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Sample records for abundant non-methane hydrocarbon

  1. Performance of commercial non-methane hydrocarbon analyzers in monitoring polar volatile organic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) from animal feeding operations (AFOs) is challenging due to the broad spectrum of compounds and the polar nature of the most abundant compounds. The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of commercial NMHC analyzers for measuring volatile ...

  2. Instrumental monitoring of non-methane hydrocarbons at a hazardous-waste incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Menzies, K.T.; Adams, J.W.

    1986-09-01

    The objective of the field program was to evaluate the reliability of non-methane hydrocarbon analyzers as a continuous indicator of DRE of a hazardous-waste incinerator. The tasks undertaken include: (1) fabrication of a sample extraction/conditioning system for transfer of combustion gas to the hydrocarbon analyzers; (2) evaluation of the reliability of two non-methane hydrocarbon analyzers under conditions of continuous operation at a hazardous-waste incinerator; and (3) determination of the correlation of non-methane hydrocarbon concentrations with combustion efficiency. During a 5-day test, two non-methane hydrocarbon analyzers (Columbia Scientific Industries Corporation Model 500-2E and HNU Systems, Inc. Model 201-250) were evaluated. During the tests, the sample conditioing/analysis system operated reasonable well.

  3. Non-methane hydrocarbon emissions from vehicle fuel caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batterman, Stuart A.; Yu, Yungdae; Jia, Chunrong; Godwin, Christopher

    Vehicles emit non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) from a number of sources, including missing, worn or improperly tightened fuel caps. Inspection and maintenance programs and the On-Board Diagnostic (OBD) system will detect some of these deficiencies, however, even properly tightened caps will emit NMHCs due to permeation, diffusion, cracks and gaps in seals, and failures of pressure-relief mechanisms. These emissions have not been previously quantified. In this study, in-use emissions from fuel caps were measured in 213 tests on vehicles of varying age and condition over several seasons, including cold and warm temperatures. Diffusion/permeation models are presented to complement the experimental work. NMHC emissions from fuel caps were detected from all vehicles, of which benzene constituted 2.5%. Emissions averaged 2.0 mg h -1 (median=0.5 mg h -1), and the distribution of emission rates was highly skewed by a small number of vehicles with much higher emissions, e.g., the 90th, 95th and maximum percentile values were 2.7, 5.0, and 62.7 mg h -1, respectively. Emission rates increased substantially if the fuel cap was loose, in hot weather, and with vehicle age and mileage. Overall, emissions from properly functioning caps are small relative to running and refueling losses, though they may be significant if the gas cap is defective or loose. Further reductions in emissions may be achieved by using new low-torque cap designs, improved elastomers, properly tightening fuel caps, and replacing old caps.

  4. Study on source apportionment of Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Compounds (NMHC) in Dagang Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Tan; Lin Tao; Bai Zhipeng

    1996-12-31

    To identify the sources of non-methane total hydrocarbon in atmosphere in the region of Dagang Oil Field, 35 samples were collected and 10 hydrocarbon compounds were analyzed with GC/FID. Then, the Chemical Mass Balance Receptor Model was set up and the source contributions and standard errors were determined with the effective variance weighted least squares estimation method. The sources of the non-methane total hydrocarbon in this region includes crude oil, gasoline, natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas and motor exhaust, whose contributions are 46.64%, 8.56%, 20.05%, 18.17% and 6.08% respectively. Upon these analyses, the major sources of regional non-methane total hydrocarbon are crude oil, natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas.

  5. Network monitoring of speciated vs. total non-methane hydrocarbon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng-Po; Liao, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Chih-Chung; Su, Yuan-Chang; Tong, Yu-Huei; Chang, Julius S.; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2014-06-01

    The total non-methane hydrocarbon (TNMHC) level in the atmosphere is defined as the level of total hydrocarbons minus the level of methane. TNMHC observations are made in selected air quality stations (AQS) of Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) across Taiwan. The AQS network is also complemented by a network of photochemical assessment monitoring stations (PAMS) to provide hourly observations of 56 speciated non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). In this study, the relationship between the AQS and PAMS TNMHC values was cross-examined for the period of 2007-2011 at four sites that conducted both types of measurements. Although the two observations differ in their methods of collection, the variations in the two datasets showed high synchronicity. However, because some of the NMHCs were missed in the summation of 56 species, the PAMS TNMHC values were consistently lower than those of the AQS TNMHC by an average of 30%.

  6. Characteristics of atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons during high PM 10 episodes and normal days in Foshan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Songjun; Tan, Jihua; Ma, Yongliang; Yang, Fumo; Yu, Yongchan; Wang, Jiewen

    2011-08-01

    Atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were firstly studied during high PM 10 episodes and normal days in December 2008 in Foshan, China. Ethyne, ethene, i-pentane, toluene, ethane and propane are six abundant hydrocarbons, accounting for round 80% of total NMHCs. Both diurnal variations and concentration ratios of morning (evening)/afternoon implied vehicular emission for most hydrocarbons. Correlation coefficients (R 2) of ethene, propene, i-butene, benzene, toluene and i-/n-butanes with ethyne were 0.60-0.88 (they were 0.64-0.88 during high PM 10 episode and 0.60-0.85 in normal days) except for ethene and i-butene in normal days, indicating these hydrocarbons are mainly related to vehicular emission. It suggests liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and natural gas (NG) leakages are responsible for propane and ethane, respectively. The measured mean benzene/toluene (B/T) ratio (wt/wt) was 0.45 ± 0.29 during total sampling periods together with R 2 analysis, again indicating vehicular emission is main contributor to ambient hydrocarbons. And the lower B/T ratio (0.29 ± 0.11) during high PM 10 episodes than that (0.75 ± 0.29) in normal days is likely caused by air transport containing low B/T value (0.23) from Guangzhou as well as solvent application containing toluene in Foshan.

  7. Measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios of non-methane hydrocarbons and halocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuiderweg, A. T.

    2012-09-01

    Within the realm of volatile organic compounds, hydrocarbons and halocarbons form a sizable proportion of carbon input to the atmosphere. Within these compound categories, the light non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC, two to seven carbon atoms) and monocarbon halocarbons have a special place as these have strong, if not exclusive, anthropogenic (human-caused) sources. With common atmospheric molar mixing ratios in the parts-per-trillion (10-12 mole/mole) to parts-per-billion (10-9 mole/mole) range, these trace gases, though decidedly minor constituants of the atmosphere, have diverse consequences due to their atmospheric presence and their removal processes. Effects range from causing ground level air pollution and resulting hazards to health, to contributing to anthropogenic climate change and the destruction of the ozone layer in the stratosphere, among many others. The existance of stable isotopes (otherwise identical atoms with varying amounts of neutrons that do not spontaneously disintegrate) in several elements relevant to atmospheric chemistry and physics is a boon to research. Their presence in molecules is detectable by mass and cause small intra- and intermolecular property changes. These changes range from the physical (e.g. boiling point variation) to the chemical (reaction rate variation) and can influence external interactions as well. The measurement of the ratio of a minor stable isotope of an element to the major one (the stable isotope ratio) can be used to establish source fingerprints, trace the interaction dynamics, and refine the understanding of the relative contribution of sources and sinks to the atmosphere as a whole. The stable minor stable isotope of carbon, 13C, has a natural abundance of approximately 1.1 %. It has a sufficient fractional mass difference from its major isotope as to cause significant effects, making it ideal for measuring the ratios and properties of hydro- and halocarbons. In order to enable a better understanding of the

  8. Observations of the release of non-methane hydrocarbons from fractured shale.

    PubMed

    Sommariva, Roberto; Blake, Robert S; Cuss, Robert J; Cordell, Rebecca L; Harrington, Jon F; White, Iain R; Monks, Paul S

    2014-01-01

    The organic content of shale has become of commercial interest as a source of hydrocarbons, owing to the development of hydraulic fracturing ("fracking"). While the main focus is on the extraction of methane, shale also contains significant amounts of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). We describe the first real-time observations of the release of NMHCs from a fractured shale. Samples from the Bowland-Hodder formation (England) were analyzed under different conditions using mass spectrometry, with the objective of understanding the dynamic process of gas release upon fracturing of the shale. A wide range of NMHCs (alkanes, cycloalkanes, aromatics, and bicyclic hydrocarbons) are released at parts per million or parts per billion level with temperature- and humidity-dependent release rates, which can be rationalized in terms of the physicochemical characteristics of different hydrocarbon classes. Our results indicate that higher energy inputs (i.e., temperatures) significantly increase the amount of NMHCs released from shale, while humidity tends to suppress it; additionally, a large fraction of the gas is released within the first hour after the shale has been fractured. These findings suggest that other hydrocarbons of commercial interest may be extracted from shale and open the possibility to optimize the "fracking" process, improving gas yields and reducing environmental impacts.

  9. Biomass burning sources of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and non-methane hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, C.S.

    1995-11-01

    Biomass burning is an important source of many key tropospheric species, including aerosols, carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub {times}}=NO+NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), methyl bromide (CH{sub 3}Br), ammonia (NH{sub 3}), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and other species. These emissions and their subsequent products act as pollutants and affect greenhouse warming of the atmosphere. One important by-product of biomass burning is tropospheric ozone, which is a pollutant that also absorbs infrared radiation. Ozone is formed when CO, CH{sub 4}, and NMHCs react in the presence of NO{sub {times}} and sunlight. Ozone concentrations in tropical regions (where the bulk of biomass burning occurs) may increase due to biomass burning. Additionally, biomass burning can increase the concentration of nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}), a key component of acid rain.

  10. A Regional Analysis of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons And Meteorology of The Rural Southeast United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-01-01

    7 C6666- %0 -C D0 0 -( D C =C DC DC D ( DC DC N 40W Ne 0r =C =10(N0O 000C 7 )C 1 n( O )e M GI’’O N nC W 00 CD000N 0 000 - 0 0 0 ’.D CDC 0( 000 \\0...82170 00 0 cl- 𔃺 0n N 0’ CDC o ( - CC Mr 0 M CD~i 0 N 0 CC 0 0 0 eW) Q- N 0 0 C - 𔃺-0 QC 0 C 0 0 - CD4( t- W It %D T W0 0 0~ W)~ r W- ) ) k t%%- r1... Zika . Continuous hourly analysis of C2-Cl 0 non-methane hydrocarbon compounds in urban air by GC-FID. Environmenal Science and Technology 28, 23 8-245

  11. Characterization of non-methane hydrocarbons in Asian summer monsoon outflow observed by the CARIBIC aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. K.; Schuck, T. J.; Slemr, F.; van Velthoven, P.; Zahn, A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.

    2010-07-01

    Between April and December 2008 the CARIBIC commercial aircraft conducted monthly measurement flights between Frankfurt, Germany and Chennai, India. These flights covered the period of the Asian summer monsoon (June-September), during which enhancements in a number of atmospheric species were observed in monsoon outflow. In addition to in situ measurements of trace gases and aerosols, whole air samples were collected during the flights, and these were subsequently analyzed for a suite of trace gases that included the non-methane hydrocarbons. Non-methane hydrocarbons are relatively short-lived compounds and the large enhancements in their mixing ratios in the upper troposphere over Southwest Asia between June and September, sometimes more than double their spring and fall means, provides qualitative evidence for the influence of convectively uplifted boundary layer air. The particularly large enhancements of the combustion tracers benzene and ethyne, along with the similarity of their ratios to carbon monoxide and emission ratios from the burning of household biofuels, indicate a strong influence of biofuel burning to NMHC emissions in this region. Conversely, the ratios of ethane and propane to carbon monoxide, along with the ratio between i-butane and n-butane, indicate a significant source of these compounds from the use of LPG and natural gas, and comparison to previous campaigns suggests that this source could be increasing. Photochemical aging patterns of NMHCs showed that the CARIBIC samples were collected in two distinctly different regions of the monsoon circulation: a southern region where air masses had been recently influenced by low level contact and a northern region, where air parcels had spent substantial time in transit in the upper troposphere before being probed. Estimates of age using ratios of individual NMHCs have ranges of 3-6 d in the south and 9-12 d in the north.

  12. Characterization of non-methane hydrocarbons in Asian summer monsoon outflow observed by the CARIBIC aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. K.; Schuck, T. J.; Slemr, F.; van Velthoven, P.; Zahn, A.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.

    2011-01-01

    Between April and December 2008 the CARIBIC commercial aircraft conducted monthly measurement flights between Frankfurt, Germany and Chennai, India. These flights covered the period of the Asian summer monsoon (June-September), during which enhancements in a number of atmospheric species were observed in the upper troposphere over southwestern Asia. In addition to in situ measurements of trace gases and aerosols, whole air samples were collected during the flights, and these were subsequently analyzed for a suite of trace gases that included a number of C2-C8 non-methane hydrocarbons. Non-methane hydrocarbons are relatively short-lived compounds and the large enhancements in their mixing ratios in the upper troposphere over southwestern Asia during the monsoon, sometimes more than double their spring and fall means, provides qualitative evidence for the influence of convectively uplifted boundary layer air. The particularly large enhancements of the combustion tracers benzene and ethyne, along with the similarity of their ratios with carbon monoxide and emission ratios from the burning of household biofuels, indicate a strong influence of biofuel burning to NMHC emissions in this region. Conversely, the ratios of ethane and propane to carbon monoxide, along with the ratio between i-butane and n-butane, indicate a significant source of these compounds from the use of fossil fuels, and comparison to previous campaigns suggests that this source could be increasing. Photochemical aging patterns of NMHCs showed that the CARIBIC samples were collected in two distinctly different regions of the monsoon circulation: a southern region where air masses had been recently influenced by low level contact and a northern region, where air parcels had spent substantial time in transit in the upper troposphere before being probed. Estimates of age using ratios of individual NMHCs have ranges of 3-6 days in the south and 9-12 days in the north.

  13. Estimates for biogenic non-methane hydrocarbons and nitric oxide emissions in the Valley of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Erik

    Biogenic non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (methylbutenol or MBO) and nitrogen oxide (NO) emissions were estimated for the Valley of Mexico developing a spatially and temporally resolved emission inventory for air quality models. The modeling domain includes all the Metropolitan Mexico City Area, the surrounding forests and agriculture fields. The estimates were based on several sources of land use and land cover data and a biogenic emission model; the biomass density and tree characteristics were obtained from reforestation program data. The biogenic emissions depend also on climatic conditions, mainly temperature and solar radiation. The temperature was obtained from a statistical revision of the last 10 yr data reported by the Mexico City Automatic Atmospheric Monitoring Network, while the solar radiation data were obtained from measurements performed in a typical oak forest in the Valley and from sources of total solar radiation data for Mexico City. The results indicated that 7% of total hydrocarbon emissions in Mexico Valley are due to vegetation and NO emissions from soil contribute with 1% to the total NO x emissions.

  14. Tropospheric OH and Cl levels deduced from non-methane hydrocarbon measurements in a marine site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsene, C.; Bougiatioti, A.; Kanakidou, M.; Bonsang, B.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2007-09-01

    In situ continuous hourly measurements of C2-C8 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCS) have been performed from March to October 2006 at two coastal locations (natural and rural) on the island of Crete, in the Eastern Mediterranean. Well defined diel variations were observed for several short lived NMHCS (including ethene, propene, n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, 2-methyl-pentane). The daytime concentration of hydroxyl (OH) radicals estimated from these experimental data varied from 1.3×106 to ~4.0×106 radical cm-3, in good agreement with box-model simulations. In addition the relative variability of various hydrocarbon pairs (at least 7) was used to derive the tropospheric levels of Cl atoms. The Cl atom concentration has been estimated to range between 0.6×104 and 4.7×104 atom cm-3, in good agreement with gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) observations in the area. Such levels of Cl atoms can be of considerable importance for the oxidation capacity of the troposphere on a regional scale.

  15. Tropospheric OH and Cl levels deduced from non-methane hydrocarbon measurements in a marine site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsene, C.; Bougiatioti, A.; Kanakidou, M.; Bonsang, B.; Mihalopoulos, N.

    2007-05-01

    In situ continuous hourly measurements of C2-C8 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCS) have been performed from March to October 2006 at two coastal locations on the island of Crete, in the Eastern Mediterranean. Well defined diurnal variations were observed for several short lived NMHCS (including ethene, propene, n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, 2-methyl-pentane). The daytime concentration of hydroxyl (OH) radicals estimated from these experimental data varied from 1.3×106 to ~4.0×106 radical cm-3, in good agreement with box-model simulations. In addition the relative variability of various hydrocarbon pairs (at least 7) was used to derive the tropospheric levels of Cl atoms. The Cl atom concentration has been estimated to range between 0.6×104 and 4.7×104 atom cm-3, in good agreement with gaseous hydrochloric acid (HCl) observations in the area. Such levels of Cl atoms can be of considerable importance for the oxidation capacity of the troposphere on a regional scale.

  16. Characterization of Light Non-Methane Hydrocarbons, Surface Water DOC, and Aerosols over the Nordic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, E. D.; Ariya, P. A.

    2006-12-01

    Whole air, size-fractionated marine aerosols, and surface ocean water DOC were sampled together during June-July 2004 on the Nordic seas, in order to explore factors leading to the formation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at the sea surface and their transfer to the atmosphere. High site-to-site variability in 19 non-methane hydrocarbon concentrations suggests highly variable, local sources for these compounds. Acetone, C5 and C6 hydrocarbons, and dimethylsulfide were identified in the seawater samples using solid-phase microextraction/GC-MS. The aerosols were analysed by SEM-EDX and contained primarily inorganic material (sea salt, marine sulfates, and carbonates) and little organic matter. However, a culturable bacterium was isolated from the large (9.9 - 18 μ m) fraction at one site, and identified as Micrococcus luteus. We will discuss the implication of these results on potential exchange processes at the ocean-atmosphere interface and the impact of bioaerosols in transferring marine organic carbon to atmospheric organic carbon.

  17. Characteristics of atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons during haze episode in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Songjun; Tan, Jihua; Duan, Jingchun; Ma, Yongliang; Yang, Fumo; He, Kebin; Hao, Jimin

    2012-12-01

    This study firstly focused on non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) during three successive days with haze episode (16-18 August 2006) in Beijing. Concentrations of alkanes, alkenes, aromatic hydrocarbons, and ethyne all peaked at traffic rush hour, implying vehicular emission; and alkanes also peaked at non-traffic rush hour in the daytime, implying additional source. Especially, alkanes and aromatics clearly showed higher levels in the nighttime than that in the daytime, implying their active photochemical reactions in the daytime. Correlation coefficients (R (2)) showed that propane, n-butane, i-butane, ethene, propene, and benzene correlated with ethyne (R (2) = 0.61-0.66), suggesting that their main source is vehicular emission; 2-methylpentane and n-hexane correlated with i-pentane (R (2) = 0.61-0.64), suggesting that gasoline evaporation is their main source; and ethylbezene, m-/p-xylene, and o-xylene correlated with toluene (R (2) = 0.60-0.79), suggesting that their main source is similar to that of toluene (e.g., solvent usage). The R (2) of ethyne, i-pentane, and toluene with total NMHCs were 0.58, 0.76, and 0.60, respectively, indicating that ambient hydrocarbons are associated with vehicular emission, gasoline evaporation, and solvent usage. The sources of other hydrocarbons (e.g., ethane) might be natural gas leakage, biogenic emission, or long-range transport of air pollutants. Measured higher mean B/T ratio (0.78 ± 0.27) was caused by the more intensive photochemical activity of toluene than benzene, still indicating the dominant emission from vehicles.

  18. Climatology and Atmospheric Chemistry of Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Emissions over the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, Detlev; Hueber, Jacques; Munoz, Mauricio; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Mazzoleni, Lynn; Owen, Robert; Val-Martin, Maria; Fialho, Paulo

    2013-04-01

    Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) spanning the C2-C7 volatility range have been monitored at the Pico Mountain Observatory, located at 2,225 m a.s.l., on Pico Island, in the Azores, Portugal, since 2004. Observations at this site, due to the topography, location, and height of the station, during most times reflect long-range transport of air from the continents bordering the North Atlantic. The multi-year data records show that NMHC mole fractions exhibit regular annual cycles with winter maxima and summer minima. Short-term variability of the data is driven by transport events typically lasting 2-5 days. During these events NMHC absolute levels show significant increases over their seasonal background. NMHC ratios were applied to estimate the degree of photochemical processing and transport time to the station. Transport events identified from the NMHC data were then analyzed for emission source region and transport pathway using HYSPLIT model outputs. The multi-year observations were applied to develop a seasonality of the pollution transport to Pico and contributing source regions. These analyses show that emissions from the North American continent are the primary cause for elevated NMHC levels observed at the station. Most identified transport events originate from urban areas; biomass burning transport from boreal North America was identified in a few selected cases during late summer. Emissions in air transported from Europe and Africa were encountered only on a few occasions.

  19. Simultaneous analysis of atmospheric halocarbons and non-methane hydrocarbons using two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chieh-Heng; Chiang, Sen-Wei; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2010-01-15

    A gas chromatographic system was constructed to simultaneously measure ambient non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and halocarbons, which play significant roles in tropospheric ozone formation and stratospheric ozone loss, respectively. A heart-cut device based on a Deans switch was connected to two capillary columns to cover the full range of NMHCs and halocarbons. Analytes more volatile than C(6) NMHCs and the halocarbon CFC-113 were separated with a PLOT column, while the remaining less volatile compounds were separated with a DB-1 column. Merge-and-split of the flows at the end of the two columns allowed the NMHCs and halocarbons to be observed simultaneously by electron capture detection (ECD) and flame ionization detection (FID). To avoid peak-overlap from the two columns while merging, programmed pressures were incorporated to control the Deans switch. In addition to the advantage of measuring two important classes of compounds in the atmosphere at the same time, this method has the additional benefit of using the homogeneity of atmospheric CFC-113 as an "intrinsic" internal reference. Thus, better data continuity, less consumption of gas standards, and real-time quality control can all be achieved.

  20. Estimation of unidentified non-methane hydrocarbons in urban air based on highly correlated compound pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Blas, Maite; Gómez, Maria Carmen; Navazo, Marino; Alonso, Lucio; Durana, Nieves; Iza, Jon

    2014-12-01

    Gas Chromatography coupled with Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID) is used worldwide for non-methane hydrocarbons' (NMHCs) monitoring. Being a non-selective detector, identification and coelution problems may hamper the reliability of data. An estimation method was developed, based on the correlation of easily measured NMHCs with those unknowns. Correlations were calculated from data obtained with a Gas Chromatograph coupled with a Mass Spectrometer Detector (GC-MSD) after gathering more than 1500 hourly mixing ratio data of 67 NMHCs. The method was developed and validated for an urban area but it may be adapted and applied to other locations. Now it is possible to estimate mixing ratios of some important ozone precursors previously not resolved with the GC-FID, such as 2,2,4-trimethylpentane and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene. As a result, a six year-long database was enlarged by 34% allowing for a more accurate calculation of the total reactivity and NMHCs' ozone forming potential.

  1. Seasonal behavior of non-methane hydrocarbons in the firn air at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmig, D.; Stephens, C. R.; Caramore, J.; Hueber, J.

    2014-03-01

    Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) were measured in the ambient air and in the snowpack interstitial firn air at ˜1 m depth continuously for nearly two years at Summit, Greenland, from fall 2008 through summer 2010. Additionally, five firn air depth profiles were conducted to a depth of 3 m spanning winter, spring, and summer seasons. Here we report measurements of ethane, ethene, ethyne, propane, propene, i-butane, n-butane, i-pentane, n-pentane, and benzene and discuss the seasonal behavior of these species in the ambient and firn air. The alkanes, ethyne, and benzene in the firn air closely reflect the ambient air concentrations during all the seasons of the year. In spring and summer seasons, ethene and propene were enhanced in the near-surface firn over that in the ambient air, indicating a photochemical production mechanism for these species within the snowpack interstitial air. Evaluation of the NMHC ratios of i-butane/n-butane, i-pentane/n-pentane, and benzene/ethyne in both ambient and firn air does not provide evidence for chlorine or bromine radical chemistry significantly affecting these gases, except in a few summer samples, where individual data points may suggest bromine oxidation influence.

  2. New off-line aircraft instrumentation for non-methane hydrocarbon measurements.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Joelle; Borbon, Agnès; Jambert, Corinne; Perros, Pascal E

    2008-11-01

    New off-line instrumentation was developed to implement measurements of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) on (French) research aircraft. NMHC are collected on multisorbent tubes by AMOVOC (Airborne Measurements Of Volatile Organic Compounds), a new automatic sampler. AMOVOC is a versatile and portable sampler targeting a wide range of NMHC at high frequency (sampling time of 10 min). Multisorbent tubes are analyzed on the ground by short-path thermal desorption coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The development and optimization of both NMHC sampling and analysis are reported here. On the one hand, the paper points out technical choices that were made according to aircraft constraints and avoiding sample loss or contamination. On the other hand, it describes analytical optimization, tube storage stability, and moisture removal. The method shows high selectivity, sensitivity (limit of detection less than 10 ppt) and precision (less than 24%). Finally, NMHC data collected on French aircraft during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis campaign are reported for the first time. The results highlight instrumentation validity and protocol efficiency for NMHC measurements in the lower and upper troposphere.

  3. Geochemical investigation of the potential for mobilizing non-methane hydrocarbons during carbon dioxide storage in deep coal beds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kolak, J.J.; Burruss, R.C.

    2006-01-01

    Coal samples of different rank (lignite to anthracite) were extracted in the laboratory with supercritical CO2 (40 ??C; 10 MPa) to evaluate the potential for mobilizing non-methane hydrocarbons during CO2 storage (sequestration) or enhanced coal bed methane recovery from deep (???1-km depth) coal beds. The total measured alkane concentrations mobilized from the coal samples ranged from 3.0 to 64 g tonne-1 of dry coal. The highest alkane concentration was measured in the lignite sample extract; the lowest was measured in the anthracite sample extract. Substantial concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also mobilized from these samples: 3.1 - 91 g tonne-1 of dry coal. The greatest amounts of PAHs were mobilized from the high-volatile bituminous coal samples. The distributions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons mobilized from the coal samples also varied with rank. In general, these variations mimicked the chemical changes that occur with increasing degrees of coalification and thermal maturation. For example, the amount of PAHs mobilized from coal samples paralleled the general trend of bitumen formation with increasing coal rank. The coal samples yielded hydrocarbons during consecutive extractions with supercritical CO2, although the amount of hydrocarbons mobilized declined with each successive extraction. These results demonstrate that the potential for supercritical CO2 to mobilize non-methane hydrocarbons from coal beds, and the effect of coal rank on this process, are important to consider when evaluating deep coal beds for CO2 storage.

  4. Non-methane hydrocarbons over the Eastern Mediterranean during summer, measured from northwest Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvage, Carina; Derstroff, Bettina; Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios; Keßel, Stephan; Thorenz, Ute; Baker, Angela; Williams, Jonathan; Lelieveld, Jos

    2015-04-01

    In summer 2014 the CYprus Photochemistry EXperiment (CYPHEX) field campaign took place at an elevated (600m) measurement site in the north western part of Cyprus close (10 km) to the coast (35,96N, 32,4E) in order to investigate the photochemistry and air mass transport of the eastern Mediterranean. Non-methane hydrocarbons were measured with a commercial GC-FID (AMA instruments GmbH, Ulm, Germany) with a final dataset consisting of two weeks of continuous, hourly measurements for 10 NMHC. NMHCs are a class of volatile organic compounds (VOC) which are emitted by both anthropogenic and natural sources. Their predominant sink in the atmosphere is photochemically driven oxidation by OH radicals. Their atmospheric lifetimes, which range from a few days for more reactive compounds such as pentanes and butanes and up to a month for less reactive ones like ethane, make it possible to deduce photochemical histories and transport regimes from NMHC observations. Furthermore, in the presence of NOx they are important precursors for tropospheric ozone. Backward trajectories show that the airmasses reaching the measurement site had been influenced periodically by emissions from western continental Europe (France, Spain) that crossed the Mediterranean Sea and from eastern continental Europe (Greece and Turkey) more recently influenced by industrial emissions. Varying patterns in NMHC data delineates these two regimes very well, with aged western European air masses being characterized by low level ethane and with toluene and benzene being higher and more variable in plumes from eastern Europe. Additionally, atypical n-butane and i-butane ratios suggest a deviation from the expected predominant oxidation by OH, possibly indicating reaction with chlorine radicals (Cl). The dataset has been evaluated with respect to NMHC sources and oxidative history using different methods of approach.

  5. Non-methane hydrocarbons source apportionment at different sites in Mexico City during 2002-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, E.; Sanchez, G.; Molina, L.

    2007-09-01

    The atmospheric concentrations of a variety of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) collected at different sites, representing urban and rural environments within Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) during 1997, 2002 and 2003 field campaigns, were compared and used as an input for the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor model to determine the source contribution of NMHC to the atmosphere. A common feature at all the locations was the dominance of alkenes (59%), aromatics (16%) and olefins (9%) in the average NMHC burden. At the urban sites the interquartile range of NMHC concentrations showed stabilization over this period with a slight increase in the concentrations of propane and butanes in the southwest site of the MCMA in 2003 due to the increased use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The receptor model CMB version 8.0 was used to apportion the NMHC sources at six locations within the MCMA, representing the heavily industrialized, commercial, residential and rural areas. For the 2003 field campaign, the contribution of vehicular emissions dominated the NMHC concentrations (19.7%±7.1% for gasoline vehicles and 35.4%±17.5% for diesel vehicles) followed by the emissions of marketing and handling of LPG (29.9%±8.0%). The NMHC concentrations showed a weekly cycle with the highest levels towards the end of the week and lowest at weekend and beginning of the week, suggesting that both emissions and accumulations process play a key role in building up NMHC levels. The toluene to benzene ratio was used to determine photochemical ageing of the air samples during the 2003 field campaign. The database was divided into periods with similar wind circulation pattern; the results suggest that ageing process within the MCMA is generally suppressed by the amount of fresh emissions.

  6. Vertical Distribution of Non-Methane Hydrocarbons During Winter Ozone Production Events in the Uintah Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, C. R.; Helmig, D.; Evans, J.; Hueber, J.; Park, J.; Boylan, P.

    2013-12-01

    Emissions of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) are primarily linked to anthropogenic fossil fuel activities, such as oil and natural gas extraction and distribution, and are important tropospheric ozone precursors. The Uintah Basin, Utah, is a region of heavy oil and natural gas development where high winter-time ozone production events have been observed during strong inversions when there is snow cover present. In the winters of 2012 and 2013, we conducted measurements of methane and NMHC during the Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study. NMHC were monitored along a vertical gradient up to 150 m using a flux tower and tethered balloon. In 2013, measurements of NMHC were also conducted from within the snowpack. In 2012, no high ozone events were observed. In contrast, during the 2013 study, several periods of high ozone occurred concurrently with strong increases in ambient NMHC. Here, we present vertical profile measurements of C2-C5 alkanes, benzene and toluene comparing 2012 and 2013. Data from 2013 show strong vertical gradients with build-up of NMHC and ozone near the surface during inversion events, with wash out of both ozone and ozone precursors during low pressure front passage from the west. The NOAA/INSTAAR global flask network provides a useful comparison for expected regional background values of NMHC, and we find up to a 570-fold enhancement in Uintah, providing evidence for the importance of local emissions sources. Investigation of NMHC ratios reveals distinctly different values in the ambient air and within the snowpack, suggesting active radical chemistry occurring in the snow. Analysis of butane and pentane isomer ratios points towards the presence of chlorine radicals, indicating that the snow may serve as a reactive chlorine reservoir that may enhance ozone production chemistry.

  7. The Stable Carbon Isotope Ratio Analysis of Atmospheric Non-Methane Hydrocarbons in Los Angeles, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotoh, A. A.; Tyler, S. C.; Meinardi, S.; Gervais, K.; Blake, D. R.

    2003-12-01

    Los Angeles type photochemical air pollution is caused by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) reacting with hydroxyl radicals and nitrous oxides in the presence of light. To create more effective control strategies in reducing such air pollution, it is essential to have both a better understanding of the complex photochemical processes of NMHCs and the sources of these compounds. From the past successful studies of other atmospheric trace gases such as methane and carbon monoxide, we expect that the stable carbon ratio (13C/12C, reported as a δ 13C value) of each of these hydrocarbons will also reflect the δ 13C value of the source material and/or provide formation on chemical loss processes that fractionate C isotopes. We have developed a NMHC preconcentrator system which enables us to measure δ 13C values using a continuous-flow gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometer (cf-GC/C/IRMS). Our system is similar to the successful design pioneered in Rudolph et al. (1997), but is custom designed by our laboratory. Stable carbon isotope measurements of any of the C2-C5 NMHCs in field and/or lab studies are scarce to date. Our system allows us to report on δ 13C measurements of ethane, ethene, ethyne, propane, propene, n-butane, i-butane, 1-butene, n-pentane, i-pentane, and methyl chloride. To see if we can learn the specific sources contributing to the emissions of a given NMHC within a region by comparing isotopic signatures of its potential sources to δ 13C measurements of it within the local air mass, urban air samples were collected in 3 different cities of Los Angeles County, California, USA, during the summer of 2003 and analyzed for the concentrations and δ 13C values of NMHCs. To our knowledge, this is the first δ 13C analysis of ambient NMHCs conducted in the United States. We report the results of the δ 13C analyses and concentration measurements for selected NMHC species from the urban air samples, and their implications for the local

  8. Geochemical investigation of the potential for mobilizing non-methane hydrocarbons during carbon dioxide storage in deep coal beds

    SciTech Connect

    Jonathan J. Kolak; Robert C. Burruss

    2006-03-15

    Coal samples of different rank (lignite to anthracite) were extracted in the laboratory with supercritical CO{sub 2} (40{sup o}C; 10 MPa) to evaluate the potential for mobilizing non-methane hydrocarbons during CO{sub 2} storage (sequestration) or enhanced coal bed methane recovery from deep ({approximately} 1-km depth) coal beds. The total measured alkane concentrations mobilized from the coal samples ranged from 3.0 to 64 g tonne{sup -1} of dry coal. The highest alkane concentration was measured in the lignite sample extract; the lowest was measured in the anthracite sample extract. Substantial concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also mobilized from these samples: 3.1-91 g tonne{sup -1} of dry coal. The greatest amounts of PAHs were mobilized from the high-volatile bituminous coal samples. The distributions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons mobilized from the coal samples also varied with rank. In general, these variations mimicked the chemical changes that occur with increasing degrees of coalification and thermal maturation. For example, the amount of PAHs mobilized from coal samples paralleled the general trend of bitumen formation with increasing coal rank. The coal samples yielded hydrocarbons during consecutive extractions with supercritical CO{sub 2}, although the amount of hydrocarbons mobilized declined with each successive extraction. These results demonstrate that the potential for supercritical CO{sub 2} to mobilize non-methane hydrocarbons from coal beds, and the effect of coal rank on this process, are important to consider when evaluating deep coal beds for CO{sub 2} storage. 36 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Wintertime Methane and Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Measurements Utah's Uintah Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    As a part of the winter 2011/2012 Uintah Basin Winter Ozone Study, ambient methane (CH4) and total non-methane hydrocarbons (TNMHC) were measured at a population center (Roosevelt) and within the oil/gas field (Horse Pool). At Horse Pool, near real-time CH4/TNMHC were monitored using a GC-FID analyzer. Samples were collected for 30 seconds once every five minutes. The TNMHC concentrations were reported in ppb-C3, or parts per billion in C3 (propane) equivalents. At Roosevelt, discrete volatile organic carbon (VOC) samples were collected for two weeks beginning on Feb. 14, 2012 using evacuated stainless steel Summa canisters. The samples were collected over four 1-hr time periods spaced throughout the day. After collection, the canisters were shipped to a commercial laboratory for GC-MS quantification. Methane samples were obtained at Roosevelt by whole vial collection and subsequently analyzed via GC-FID. Nominally, the CH4 vials were collected at the start and end of each canister collection period, as well as intermittently throughout the daily periods. Furthermore, CH4 grab samples were collected at several other locations throughout the Basin when possible. For the full wintertime study period (Jan. 19 - Mar. 15, 2012), the CH4 and TNMHC at Horse Pool averaged 3.47±1.8 ppm and 243±253 ppb-C3 (± 1σ), respectively. A very strong diurnal behavior was seen for both classes of compounds, with CH4 maximums approaching 30 ppm in the early morning hours. During the comparative February time period, CH4 concentrations at Horse Pool averaged 3.25±0.07 ppm (± 95% CI), while CH4 at Roosevelt averaged 2.52±0.08 ppm. No strong diurnal behavior was observed at Roosevelt and the maximum CH4 levels only reached 4.08 ppm. Grab samples from the other locations found similar or slightly lower CH4 concentrations, with the exception of Ouray (3.91±1.27 ppm) which was also located in the production/exploration area, but was among the lowest elevation of the sampling sites. It

  10. Spatial and seasonal variability of measured anthropogenic non-methane hydrocarbons in urban atmospheres: Implication on emission ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boynard, Anne; Borbon, Agnès; Leonardis, Thierry; Barletta, Barbara; Meinardi, Simone; Blake, Don R.; Locoge, Nadine

    2014-01-01

    Continuous measurements of a wide range of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) have been performed since 2001 in Paris megacity and three French medium-sized cities (Grenoble, Marseille, and Strasbourg). After a careful verification of the data measured, the ambient concentrations are used to analyze the spatial and seasonal variability of the anthropogenic NMHC and determine the present NMHC emission ratios relative to acetylene, a useful metric to evaluate and constraint emission inventories. We show that NMHC urban composition is consistent between all cities with no industrial influence and characteristic of the urban emission mixtures, which are mostly dominated by vehicle exhaust emissions. In winter, the urban NMHC composition generally shows an enhancement in combustion-derived products (alkenes, acetylene), C2-C3 alkanes and benzene, which presumes seasonal changes in emission ratio values. Present emission ratios of NMHC relative to acetylene are determined in Paris and Strasbourg both in summer and winter. They generally compare within a factor of two except for C7-C9 aromatics in Paris. On a seasonal basis, summertime emission ratios are three times higher than wintertime ones while they stay constant for combustion derived product (alkenes) and benzene. The unburned gasoline fraction (alkanes and C7-C9 aromatics) shows the maximum difference up to a factor of seven. These findings suggest that the emission ratios reflect seasonal changes in emissions and can be a useful metric to constraint temporally resolved emission inventories at different time of the year.

  11. Influence of oil and gas field operations on spatial and temporal distributions of atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons and their effect on ozone formation in winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. A.; Soltis, J.; McCarthy, M. C.; Murphy, S.; Montague, D. C.

    2015-03-01

    Emissions from oil and natural gas development during winter in the Upper Green River basin of Wyoming are known to drive episodic ozone (O3) production. Contrasting O3 distributions were observed in the winters of 2011 and 2012, with numerous episodes (hourly O3 ≥ 85 ppbv) in 2011 compared to none in 2012. The lack of O3 episodes in 2012 coincided with a reduction in measured ambient levels of total non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC). Measurements of speciated NMHC, and other air quality parameters, were performed to better understand emission sources and to determine which compounds are most active in promoting O3 formation. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analyses of the data were carried out to help achieve these goals. PMF analyses revealed three contributing factors that were identified with different emission source types: factor 1, combustion/traffic; factor 2, fugitive natural gas; and factor 3, fugitive condensate. Compositional signatures of the three contributing factors were identified through comparison with independently derived emission source profiles. Fugitive emissions of natural gas and of condensate were the two principal emission source types for NMHC. A water treatment and recycling facility was found to be a significant source of NMHC that are abundant in condensate, in particular toluene and m+p-xylene. Emissions from water treatment have an influence upon peak O3 mixing ratios at downwind measurement sites.

  12. Developing receptor-oriented methods for non-methane hydrocarbon characterisation in urban air. Part II: source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borbon, Agnès; Fontaine, Hervé; Locoge, Nadine; Veillerot, Marc; Galloo, J. C.

    The methods and the results of non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) source apportionment are described at urban scale on a spatial and temporal basis. Here, hourly ambient concentrations of nearly 40 C 2-C 9 NMHC are used. Methods are based on the knowledge of the wintertime NMHC vehicle-exhaust emission ratio generally determined by simple regression analysis taking acetylene, ethylene, propene and 1,3-butadiene as auto-exhaust tracers. The RSD of the estimated source contributions is lower than 20%; the developed receptor-oriented methods are flexible and easily transposable to other areas. In winter, vehicle-exhaust emissions explain 100% of the NMHC majority levels and even isoprene. From May to November, our models revealed the temperature-dependent contribution of additional sources (0.71< r<0.90). On the one hand, the evaporation of fuel and solvent affects the whole C 4-C 9 NMHC fraction, and fluctuates between 20% and 50%, even for a northern France urban area. On the other hand, both vehicle-exhaust and biogenic emissions control the highly photoreactive isoprene distribution whatever the site; the traffic is responsible for a third of its levels in summer. Finally, the particular behaviour of the C 2-C 4 compounds pointed out dominant contributions, generally other than traffic. Suspected sources are numerous: natural gas leakage for ethane and propane, wintertime fuel evaporation for butanes and butenes, non-automotive combustion for ethylene and acetylene. Ethane and propane also showed that long-range advective transport, responsible for background concentrations, could significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon levels with a high atmospheric residence time (from 20% to 50%).

  13. Examining Methane and Non-methane Hydrocarbons in an Oil and Gas Production Area using Low-cost Sensor Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, A. M.; Piedrahita, R.; Halliday, H.; Hannigan, M.; Masson, N.; Casey, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    During the 2014 FRAPPE/DISCOVER-AQ sampling campaigns a network of next-generation, low-cost air quality monitors were placed throughout the Colorado Front Range area. The network covered areas ranging from high saturation of oil and gas development to no development. We are leveraging the monitors' multiple 'off-the-shelf' sensors to collect and analyze continuous data on volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The monitors were developed at the University of Colorado Boulder and include different VOC sensor models, as well as sensors for other gas-phase pollutants (e.g., carbon dioxide and ozone). Using high-quality methane and non-methane hydrocarbon data collected by the Penn State Native Trailer research team and Armin Wisthaler's research team (University of Oslo) as a reference we can calibrate data for one of our monitors. Additionally, through the use of various quantification models we can characterize sensor responses to specific VOCs and groups of VOCs. The primary monitor was located at the Native Trailer in Platteville throughout the study. By using this monitor for secondary field normalization, we can apply our quantification methods to the remaining monitors in the network. The sensor network data provides greater spatial resolution than would be possible with fewer, more expensive instruments. In addition to discussing the quantification of low-cost sensors, we will examine how the spatial and temporal variability of hydrocarbon concentrations throughout the area relates to sources, specifically oil and gas development and its impacts on air quality. Although more research is needed, low-cost sensor arrays have the potential to support reference-quality measurements and expand our capacity in future oil and gas related research.

  14. Multi-year levels and trends of non-methane hydrocarbon concentrations observed in ambient air in France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waked, Antoine; Sauvage, Stéphane; Borbon, Agnès; Gauduin, Julie; Pallares, Cyril; Vagnot, Marie-Pierre; Léonardis, Thierry; Locoge, Nadine

    2016-09-01

    Measurements of 31 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were carried out at three urban (Paris, 2003-2014, Strasbourg, 2002-2014 and Lyon, 2007-2014) sites in France over the period of a decade. A trend analysis was applied by means of the Mann-Kendall non-parametric test to annual and seasonal mean concentrations in order to point out changes in specific emission sources and to assess the impact of emission controls and reduction strategies. The trends were compared to those from three rural sites (Peyrusse-Vieille, 2002-2013, Tardière, 2003-2013 and Donon, 1997-2007). The results obtained showed a significant yearly decrease in pollutant concentrations over the study period and for the majority of species in the range of -1 to -7% in accordance with the decrease of NMHC emissions in France (-5 to -9%). Concentrations of long-lived species such as ethane and propane which are recognized as tracers of distant sources and natural gas remained constant. Compounds associated with combustion processes such as acetylene, propene, ethylene and benzene showed a significant decline in the range of -2% to -5% yr-1. These trends are consistent with those recently described at urban and background sites in the northern mid-latitudes and with emission inventories. C7-C9 aromatics such as toluene and xylenes as well as C4-C5 alkanes such as isopentane and isobutane also showed a significant decrease in the range of -3% to -7% yr-1. The decreasing trends in terms of % yr-1 observed at these French urban sites were typically higher for acetylene, ethylene and benzene than those reported for French rural sites of the national observatory of Measurement and Evaluation in Rural areas of trans-boundary Air pollution (MERA). The study also highlighted the difficult choice of a long term sampling site representative of the general trends of pollutant concentrations.

  15. CARIBIC observations of greenhouse gases and non-methane hydrocarbons on flights between Germany and South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenninkmeijer, C. A.; Schuck, T. J.; Baker, A. K.; van Velthoven, P.

    2012-12-01

    Since May 2005 the CARIBIC project (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container, www.caribic-atmospheric.com) has made near-monthly deployments of an atmospheric observatory making measurements from aboard a Lufthansa Airbus A340-600 during routine passenger flights. Flights originate in Frankfurt, Germany and serve a large number of destinations, among them Cape Town and Johannesburg in South Africa. On these flights, which took place primarily during northern hemisphere winter 2010/2011, a near-meridional profile was obtained over Europe and Africa, in similar fashion to HIPPO flight tracks over the Pacific, be it without vertical profiles. Over Central Africa, deep convection transports boundary layer air to the free troposphere, linking observations at cruise altitude to surface emissions and allowing for the investigation of emissions and sources of atmospherically relevant species in Africa. Mixing ratios of greenhouse gases (methane, carbon dioxide, sulfur hexafluoride and nitrous oxide) and a suite of C2-C8 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) are measured from flask samples collected at cruise altitude during flight. Several tracers, for example methane, carbon monoxide, and various NMHC, exhibit enhanced mixing ratios over tropical Africa. Using tracer-tracer correlations to characterize methane emissions from Africa, we find that biomass burning made a major contribution to the methane burden, but that also biogenic sources, such as wetlands, play a significant role. We also compare these measurements to those conducted earlier over India, which were used to investigate sources and emissions of greenhouse gases during the South Asian summer monsoon.

  16. Non-methane hydrocarbons in the atmosphere of Mexico City: Results of the 2012 ozone-season campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaimes-Palomera, Mónica; Retama, Armando; Elias-Castro, Gabriel; Neria-Hernández, Angélica; Rivera-Hernández, Olivia; Velasco, Erik

    2016-05-01

    With the aim to strengthen the verification capabilities of the local air quality management, the air quality monitoring network of Mexico City has started the monitoring of selected non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs). Previous information on the NMHC characterization had been obtained through individual studies and comprehensive intensive field campaigns, in both cases restricted to sampling periods of short duration. This new initiative will address the NMHC pollution problem during longer monitoring periods and provide robust information to evaluate the effectiveness of new control measures. The article introduces the design of the monitoring network and presents results from the first campaign carried out during the first six months of 2012 covering the ozone-season (Mar-May). Using as reference data collected in 2003, results show reductions during the morning rush hour (6-9 h) in the mixing ratios of light alkanes associated with the consumption and distribution of liquefied petroleum gas and aromatic compounds related with the evaporation of fossil fuels and solvents, in contrast to olefins from vehicular traffic. The increase in mixing ratios of reactive olefins is of relevance to understand the moderate success in the ozone and fine aerosols abatement in recent years in comparison to other criteria pollutants. In the case of isoprene, the typical afternoon peak triggered by biogenic emissions was clearly observed for the first time within the city. The diurnal profiles of the monitored compounds are analyzed in terms of the energy balance throughout the day as a surrogate of the boundary layer evolution. Particular features of the diurnal profiles and correlation between individual NMHCs and carbon monoxide are used to investigate the influence of specific emission sources. The results discussed here highlight the importance of monitoring NMHCs to better understand the drivers and impacts of air pollution in large cities like Mexico City.

  17. ACTRIS non-methane hydrocarbon intercomparison experiment in Europe to support WMO GAW and EMEP observation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoerger, C. C.; Claude, A.; Plass-Duelmer, C.; Reimann, S.; Eckart, E.; Steinbrecher, R.; Aalto, J.; Arduini, J.; Bonnaire, N.; Cape, J. N.; Colomb, A.; Connolly, R.; Diskova, J.; Dumitrean, P.; Ehlers, C.; Gros, V.; Hakola, H.; Hill, M.; Hopkins, J. R.; Jäger, J.; Junek, R.; Kajos, M. K.; Klemp, D.; Leuchner, M.; Lewis, A. C.; Locoge, N.; Maione, M.; Martin, D.; Michl, K.; Nemitz, E.; O'Doherty, S.; Pérez Ballesta, P.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Sauvage, S.; Schmidbauer, N.; Spain, T. G.; Straube, E.; Vana, M.; Vollmer, M. K.; Wegener, R.; Wenger, A.

    2015-07-01

    The performance of 18 European institutions involved in long-term non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) measurements in ambient air within the framework of the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) and the European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme (EMEP) was assessed with respect to data quality objectives (DQOs) of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research InfraStructure Network) and GAW. Compared to previous intercomparison studies the DQOs define a novel approach to assess and ensure a high quality of the measurements. Having already been adopted by GAW, the ACTRIS DQOs are demanding with deviations to a reference value of less than 5 % and a repeatability of better than 2 % for NMHC mole fractions above 0.1 nmol mol-1. The participants of the intercomparison analysed two dry gas mixtures in pressurised cylinders, a 30-component NMHC mixture in nitrogen (NMHC_N2) at approximately 1 nmol mol-1 and a whole air sample (NMHC_air), following a standardised operation procedure including zero- and calibration gas measurements. Furthermore, participants had to report details on their instruments and assess their measurement uncertainties. The NMHCs were analysed either by gas chromatography-flame ionisation detection (GC-FID) or by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). For the NMHC_N2 measurements, 62 % of the reported values were within the 5 % deviation class corresponding to the ACTRIS DQOs. For NMHC_air, generally more frequent and larger deviations to the assigned values were observed, with 50 % of the reported values within the 5 % deviation class. Important contributors to the poorer performance in NMHC_air compared to NMHC_N2 were a more complex matrix and a larger span of NMHC mole fractions (0.03-2.5 nmol mol-1). The performance of the participating laboratories were affected by the different measurement procedures such as the usage of a two-step vs. a one-step calibration, breakthroughs of C2-C3 hydrocarbons in the focussing trap, blank values in zero

  18. Field studies: Test method for on-line continuous measurement of total hydrocarbons (THC) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) in stack gas

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, H.H.; Lai, C.C.; Chu, H.W.; Cheng, H.

    1999-07-01

    A new method for on-line monitoring of total hydrocarbons and non-methane hydrocarbons in stack gas simultaneously was developed in this study. Based on the principle of on-line GC/FID, the method was developed and can be considered as a new modification of the Method 25 and 25A of US EPA. Major advantages of the method included (1) capability of distinguishing methane as Method 25; (2) near-real-time results; (3) broad species coverage; (4) monitoring methane in straightforward manner; (5) low operation and maintenance costs. In the proposed method, test samples were continuously pumped from detection sources and loaded with a two-loop sampling valve. The samples were then injected into two GC columns-empty and molecular sieve columns. The empty column was used for detection of THC, and the molecular sieve column was for methane. The detector in this GC was FID. NMHC concentration was obtained by subtracting methane from THC. The tests were carried out to measure the THC and methane in waste gas in various industries, including surface coating, semiconductor manufacturing, synthetic leather industries. Recovery rates of THC in the samples were between 86% to 114% for about 100 m of transfer line of samples. For the standard gas, the recovery rate was about 101%, 6.6 % of measurement precision, and 88%--114% of accuracy. The results showed the promising and reliable measurement of the test method for THC and methane in waste gas.

  19. Characterization of ozone precursors in a regional background site of the Pearl River Delta by time series observation of non-methane hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, C.; Wang, J.; Liu, S. C.; Lai, C.; Shao, M.; Zeng, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Continuous hourly measurements of C3-C12 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were carried out in the period July 3 - 30, 2006 at a downwind site of Peal River Delta during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign. The measurements were intended to characterize the “residual composition” of ozone precursors through photochemical processing and to evaluate the photochemical relationship between oxidant (O3+NO2) and its precursors. An observation based method (OBM) of consumption concept is used to generate an ozone isopleth diagram that resembles the EKMA diagram, to examine the relationship of oxidant versus ozone precursors. A critical step in the method is to use observed concentrations of ethylbenzene and m,p-xylenes to estimate the degree of photochemical processing and amounts of photochemically consumed NOx and NMHCs by OH. The 3D OBM ozone isopleth diagram indicates that the observed oxidant level was sensitive to both of the consumed amounts of NMHCs and NOx. In addition, based on the 577 samples analyzed, toluene, benzene, isoprene, xylene and C3-C5 alkanes were found to be the most elevated species accounting for around 55% of the total measured NMHC abundance. After considering both the photochemical reactivities and mixing ratios of all the measured species, CO, isoprene, propene, xylene and toluene were calculated to have the highest ozone formation potentials (OFPs) accounting for 76.5% of total reactivity. Good correlation between NMHCs and 3-methylpentane, a proven good vehicular indicator, suggests vehicular emissions should be the major source for anthropogenic NMHCs. No correlation was found between isoprene and anthropogenic NMHCs, clearly supporting the existence of isoprene’s non-anthropogenic sources. Moreover, its diurnal pattern showed maximum mixing ratios around midday hours and minima at night, reflecting its biogenic properties which are both solar radiation and temperature dependent. Keywords: Age indicator; photochemical aging; NOx-control regime

  20. Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and their contribution to ozone formation potential in a petrochemical industrialized city, Northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chenhui; Mao, Xiaoxuan; Huang, Tao; Liang, Xiaoxue; Wang, Yanan; Shen, Yanjie; Jiang, Wanyanhan; Wang, Huiqin; Bai, Zhilin; Ma, Minquan; Yu, Zhousuo; Ma, Jianmin; Gao, Hong

    2016-03-01

    Hourly air concentrations of fifty-three non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were measured at downtown and suburb of Lanzhou, a petrochemical industrialized city, Northwest China in 2013. The measured data were used to investigate the seasonal characteristics of NMHCs air pollution and their contributions to the ozone formation in Lanzhou. Annually averaged NMHCs concentration was 38.29 ppbv in downtown Lanzhou. Among 53 NMHCs, alkanes, alkenes, and aromatics accounted for 57%, 23% and 20% of the total NMHCs air concentration, respectively. The atmospheric levels of toluene and propane with mean values of 4.62 and 4.56 ppbv were higher than other NMHCs, respectively. The ambient levels of NMHCs in downtown Lanzhou were compared with measured NMHCs data collected at a suburban site of Lanzhou, located near a large-scale petrochemical industry. Results show that the levels of alkanes, alkenes, and aromatics in downtown Lanzhou were lower by factors of 3-11 than that in west suburb of the city. O3-isopleth plots show that ozone was formed in VOCs control area in downtown Lanzhou and NOx control area at the west suburban site during the summertime. Propylene-equivalent (Prop-Equiv) concentration and the maximum incremental reactivity (MIR) in downtown Lanzhou indicate that cis-2-butene, propylene, and m/p-xylene were the first three compounds contributing to ozone formation potentials whereas in the petrochemical industrialized west suburb, ethane, propene, and trans-2-Butene played more important role in the summertime ozone formation. Principal component analysis (PCA) and multiple linear regression (MLR) were further applied to identify the dominant emission sources and examine their fractions in total NMHCs. Results suggest that vehicle emission, solvent usage, and industrial activities were major sources of NMHCs in the city, accounting for 58.34%, 22.19%, and 19.47% of the total monitored NMHCs in downtown Lanzhou, respectively. In the west suburb of the city

  1. Non Methane Hydrocarbons (NMHCs) at the centre of Athens: variability and relative contribution of traffic and wood burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panopoulou, Anastasia; Liakakou, Eleni; Psiloglou, Basil; Gros, Valerie; Bonsang, Bernard; Sauvage, Stephane; Locoge, Nadine; Lianou, Maria; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) can be found in significant concentrations in urban areas. They are emitted by biogenic and anthropogenic sources like vehicle exhaust, gasoline evaporation and solvent use. Once emitted they mainly react with hydroxyl radicals (OH) and in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx) lead to the formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone (O3), peroxy acetyl nitrate (PAN) and secondary organic aerosols. In Great Athens Area (GAA) despite the numerous air quality issues especially with exceedances in ozone and particulate matter (PM), continuous monitoring of NMHCs is absent. This work presents the first results of a ChArMEX/TRANSEMED project dealing with VOC source apportionment and emission inventory evaluation in megacities around the Mediterranean basin. A representative site in the centre of Athens is progressively equipped with high performance instruments in order to measure continuously NMHCs (time resolution of 30 min) over a long period. The main objective of this presentation is the determination of the ambient level and temporal variability of C2-C6 NMHCs, as well as the impact of the sources controlling their variability. The importance of this work is attributed to the high time resolution measurements providing a detailed light hydrocarbons profile of the area for first time in the GAA. An automatic gas chromatograph (airmoVOC C2-C6 Chromatrap GC, Chromatotec, France) equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID) has been used for the in-situ measurements of NMHCS with two to six carbon atoms (C2-C6 NMHCs) during the period from the 16 of October to end of December 2015. In addition, meteorological and auxiliary data for major gases (CO, O3, NOx) and particulates (PM and Black Carbon (BC) are also available. Atmospheric concentrations of NMHCs range from below the detection limit to a few ppbs, for example almost 14 ppb, 20 ppb and 25 ppb for ethane, propane and acetylene respectively. Between the NMHCs being monitored

  2. Simultaneous monitoring of atmospheric methane and speciated non-methane hydrocarbon concentrations using Peltier effect sub-ambient pre-concentration and gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Harrison, D; Seakins, P W; Lewis, A C

    2000-02-01

    Sub-ambient trapping, used to pre-concentrate atmospheric samples for non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) analysis by gas chromatography, can also be used to measure ambient methane concentrations. Above a sample volume of 40 ml, a dynamic equilibrium is established between ambient and trapped methane allowing for simultaneous quantitative determinations of methane and NMHC. The temperature stability of the trap is critical for quantitative methane analysis and this can be achieved by Peltier effect cooling. Simultaneous measurements of methane and NMHC reduce the equipment required for field trips and can ease the interpretation and modelling of atmospheric data. The feasibility for deployment of the system in remote locations was demonstrated by running the apparatus virtually unattended for a 5-day period. The correlations between the concentrations of methane, ethane and ethene measured during this period are discussed.

  3. Assessment of carbon monoxide (CO) adjusted non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emissions of a motor fleet - A long tunnel study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Tzu; Chen, Sheng-Po; Chang, Chih-Chung; Ou-Yang, Chang-Feng; Liao, Wei-Cheng; Su, Yuan-Chang; Wu, Yue-Chuen; Wang, Chieh-Heng; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2014-06-01

    Speciated hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and CO were simultaneously measured by evenly distributed samples along the entire length (12.9 km) of the tunnel in different traffic conditions. Four passes (two round-trips) were made at four different fleet speeds (i.e., 45, 65, 75 and 85 km h-1). Individual NMHC and CO mixing ratios were observed to be sensitive to the fleet speed, which is compounded by driving conditions and traffic volumes. We propose using ratios of NMHCs to CO to cancel out the factor of traffic volumes to determine CO-normalized NMHC emissions, such that a less biased comparison can be made between different fleet speeds in this study and even between different studies. Moreover, to obtain robust CO-normalized NMHC emissions which are sufficiently representative of the fleet speeds, only samples collected deep inside the long-tunnels between 8 and 12 km were used. Of the 61 target NMHCs, isomers of butane, pentane, ethylene, acetylene and toluene were the most abundant species regardless of the driving conditions. We observed that different driving conditions not only affected the emission strengths but also altered the compositions of the NMHCs. To simplify the data analysis, the target NMHCs were classified into four chemical groups, i.e., alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and alkynes. For the slower and more congested driving condition (fleet speed = 45 km h-1), the CO-normalized NMHC emissions were the highest, with alkanes contributing to approximately 60% of the total NMHC levels, suggesting poorer fuel utilization at slower driving conditions. In terms of the CO-normalized ozone forming potentials (OFPs), the contribution of the alkanes diminished dramatically to approximately 9-22% despite their high weight percentage, whereas the contribution of the alkenes was enhanced significantly to 50-60% from their weight percent of only approximately 26%. Our total NMHC to CO ratios of 0.06-0.20 for the four fleet speeds generally fall within the range constrained

  4. Influence of oil and gas field operations on spatial and temporal distributions of atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons and their effect on ozone formation in winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. A.; Soltis, J.; McCarthy, M. C.; Murphy, S.; Montague, D. C.

    2014-09-01

    Emissions from oil and natural gas development during winter in the Upper Green River Basin of Wyoming are known to drive episodic ozone (O3) production. Contrasting O3 distributions were observed in the winters of 2011 and 2012, with numerous episodes in 2011 compared to none in 2012. During 2011 wintertime O3 episodes at two sites near Boulder Wyoming, situated ∼5 km apart, were observed to sometimes differ. In 2012 the lack of O3 episodes coincided with a reduction in ambient levels of total non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC). Measurements of speciated NMHC, and other air quality parameters, were performed to better understand emission sources and to determine which compounds are most active in promoting O3 formation. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analyses of the data were carried out to help achieve these goals. PMF analyses revealed three contributing factors that were identified with different emission source types: factor 1, combustion/traffic; factor 2, fugitive natural gas; and factor 3, fugitive condensate. Compositional signatures of three contributing factors were identified through comparison with independently derived emission source profiles. Fugitive emissions of natural gas and of condensate were the two principal emission source types for NMHC. A water treatment and recycling facility was found to be a significant source of condensate range NMHC, in particular toluene and m+p-xylene. Emissions from water treatment have an influence upon peak O3 mixing ratios at downwind measurement sites.

  5. Non-methane hydrocarbons in the atmosphere of a Metropolitan City and a background site in South Korea: Sources and health risk potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunhwa; Choi, Kyungho; Yi, Seung-Muk

    2011-12-01

    Hourly concentrations of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were collected at a background monitoring site between April of 2004 and March of 2005 and at suburban and urban sites between March and December of 2006. The sources of NMHCs were identified and associated health risks through the inhalation pathway were evaluated. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) results showed that solvent sources account for the largest portion of the total NMHCs at suburban and urban areas in South Korea, and the risk assessment combined with the PMF results indicated that risk-weighted contributions of solvent sources were enhanced compared to the absolute contribution (from 52% to 68% in suburban areas and from 47% to 80% in urban areas). Carcinogenic risk due to benzene exposure exceeded the one-in-a-million (i.e., 10 -6) cancer benchmark at all three study sites, and the fractions of the population with greater than the benchmark level were 87%, 99%, and 98% in the background, suburban, and urban sites, respectively. Common benzene sources of three study sites were predicted to be Shandong in China based on the 120 h potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis. To prioritize management options for NMHC sources, risk term may give more meaningful information than amount term. This study suggests that controlling solvent sources would be better option for the mitigation of non-carcinogenic health risk from airborne NMHCs. In addition, the identification of benzene sources using PSCF can be used to assist policymakers in developing regional measures to reduce benzene.

  6. Source apportionment vs. emission inventories of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) in an urban area of the Middle East: local and global perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salameh, Thérèse; Sauvage, Stéphane; Afif, Charbel; Borbon, Agnès; Locoge, Nadine

    2016-03-01

    We applied the positive matrix factorization model to two large data sets collected during two intensive measurement campaigns (summer 2011 and winter 2012) at a sub-urban site in Beirut, Lebanon, in order to identify NMHC (non-methane hydrocarbons) sources and quantify their contribution to ambient levels. Six factors were identified in winter and five factors in summer. PMF-resolved source profiles were consistent with source profiles established by near-field measurements. The major sources were traffic-related emissions (combustion and gasoline evaporation) in winter and in summer accounting for 51 and 74 wt %, respectively, in agreement with the national emission inventory. The gasoline evaporation related to traffic source had a significant contribution regardless of the season (22 wt % in winter and 30 wt % in summer). The NMHC emissions from road transport are estimated from observations and PMF results, and compared to local and global emission inventories. The PMF analysis finds reasonable differences on emission rates, of 20-39 % higher than the national road transport inventory. However, global inventories (ACCMIP, EDGAR, MACCity) underestimate the emissions up to a factor of 10 for the transportation sector. When combining emission inventory to our results, there is strong evidence that control measures in Lebanon should be targeted on mitigating the NMHC emissions from the traffic-related sources. From a global perspective, an assessment of VOC (volatile organic compounds) anthropogenic emission inventories for the Middle East region as a whole seems necessary as these emissions could be much higher than expected at least from the road transport sector.

  7. Springtime depletion of tropospheric ozone, gaseous elemental mercury and non-methane hydrocarbons in the European Arctic, and its relation to atmospheric transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eneroth, Kristina; Holmén, Kim; Berg, Torunn; Schmidbauer, Norbert; Solberg, Sverre

    Using a trajectory climatology for the period 1992-2001 we have examined how seasonal changes in transport cause changes in the concentrations of tropospheric ozone (O 3), gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) and non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) observed at the Mt. Zeppelin station, Ny-Ålesund (78.9°N, 11.9°E). During April-June O 3 depletion events were frequently observed in connection with air transport across the Arctic Basin. The O 3 loss was most pronounced in air masses advected close to the surface. This result supports the idea that the O 3 depletion reactions take place in the lowermost part of the atmosphere in the central Arctic Basin. A strong positive correlation between springtime O 3 depletion events and the oxidation of GEM to divalent mercury was found. During air mass advection from Siberia, the Barents Sea and the Norwegian Sea the strongest correlation was observed during April-May, whereas air masses originating from the Canadian Arctic and the central Arctic areas showed the highest O 3-GEM correlation in May-June. We suggest that this 1-month lag could either be due to the position of the marginal ice zone or temperature differences between the northwestern and northeastern air masses. In connection with springtime O 3 depletion events low concentrations of some NMHCs, especially ethane and ethyne, were observed, indicating that both bromine (ethyne oxidant) and chlorine radicals (ethane oxidant) are present in the Arctic atmosphere during spring. In winter, negative correlations between O 3 and NMHCs were found in connection with air transport from Europe and Siberia, which we interpret as O 3 destruction taking place in industrially contaminated plumes.

  8. Interannual Variability and Trends of C2-C11 Non-Methane Hydrocarbons in a Subtropical Area close to the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglück, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    Speciated C2-C11 non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) have been measured online on an hourly basis at Lake Jackson/TX close to the Gulf of Mexico. Altogether 48 NMHCs, including the GAW NMHC compounds, along with NO, NO2, NOx, O3 have been collected continuously from January 2004-December 2013 under the auspices of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. Data was screened for background conditions representing marine wind sectors. The data set represents a combination of marine air masses mixed with local biogenic emissions. The data analysis addresses photochemical processing of air masses as reflected in the relationship of ln(n-butane/ethane) vs. ln(propane/ethane) and ln(i-butane/ethane) vs. ln(n-butane/ethane). In addition, key NMHC relationships for radical chemistry, e.g. i-butane vs n-butane for OH and Cl chemistry and i-pentane vs. n-pentane for NO3 chemistry, are discussed. Seasonal analysis revealed a clear trend with maximum NMHC mixing ratios in winter time and lowest mixing ratios in summer reflecting the impact of photochemical processes in summer. Propene equivalents were highest during summertime, with significant contributions from alkenes, including isoprene. The relation of propane/ethane vs ethane indicates seasonal variation with lowest values (i.e. most aged air masses) in winter. Contrary to usual GAW NMHC sampling procedures, which at least requires routine daytime samples (e.g. for canister samplings), continuous NMHC data collection allows to analyze nighttime data, which is least impacted by photochemical processes and potentially well-suited for trend analysis. Corresponding trend analysis for the Lake Jackson data suggests an overall slight decrease of selected NMHCs over the 2004-2013 period.

  9. Source apportionment of ambient non-methane hydrocarbons in Hong Kong: application of a principal component analysis/absolute principal component scores (PCA/APCS) receptor model.

    PubMed

    Guo, H; Wang, T; Louie, P K K

    2004-06-01

    Receptor-oriented source apportionment models are often used to identify sources of ambient air pollutants and to estimate source contributions to air pollutant concentrations. In this study, a PCA/APCS model was applied to the data on non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) measured from January to December 2001 at two sampling sites: Tsuen Wan (TW) and Central & Western (CW) Toxic Air Pollutants Monitoring Stations in Hong Kong. This multivariate method enables the identification of major air pollution sources along with the quantitative apportionment of each source to pollutant species. The PCA analysis identified four major pollution sources at TW site and five major sources at CW site. The extracted pollution sources included vehicular internal engine combustion with unburned fuel emissions, use of solvent particularly paints, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or natural gas leakage, and industrial, commercial and domestic sources such as solvents, decoration, fuel combustion, chemical factories and power plants. The results of APCS receptor model indicated that 39% and 48% of the total NMHCs mass concentrations measured at CW and TW were originated from vehicle emissions, respectively. 32% and 36.4% of the total NMHCs were emitted from the use of solvent and 11% and 19.4% were apportioned to the LPG or natural gas leakage, respectively. 5.2% and 9% of the total NMHCs mass concentrations were attributed to other industrial, commercial and domestic sources, respectively. It was also found that vehicle emissions and LPG or natural gas leakage were the main sources of C(3)-C(5) alkanes and C(3)-C(5) alkenes while aromatics were predominantly released from paints. Comparison of source contributions to ambient NMHCs at the two sites indicated that the contribution of LPG or natural gas at CW site was almost twice that at TW site. High correlation coefficients (R(2) > 0.8) between the measured and predicted values suggested that the PCA/APCS model was applicable for estimation

  10. Sampling, storage, and analysis of C2-C7 non-methane hydrocarbons from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Cooperative Air Sampling Network glass flasks.

    PubMed

    Pollmann, Jan; Helmig, Detlev; Hueber, Jacques; Plass-Dülmer, Christian; Tans, Pieter

    2008-04-25

    An analytical technique was developed to analyze light non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), including ethane, propane, iso-butane, n-butane, iso-pentane, n-pentane, n-hexane, isoprene, benzene and toluene from whole air samples collected in 2.5l-glass flasks used by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Earth System Research Laboratory, Global Monitoring Division (NOAA ESRL GMD, Boulder, CO, USA) Cooperative Air Sampling Network. This method relies on utilizing the remaining air in these flasks (which is at below-ambient pressure at this stage) after the completion of all routine greenhouse gas measurements from these samples. NMHC in sample aliquots extracted from the flasks were preconcentrated with a custom-made, cryogen-free inlet system and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionization detection (FID). C2-C7 NMHC, depending on their ambient air mixing ratios, could be measured with accuracy and repeatability errors of generally < or =10-20%. Larger deviations were found for ethene and propene. Hexane was systematically overestimated due to a chromatographic co-elution problem. Saturated NMHC showed less than 5% changes in their mixing ratios in glass flask samples that were stored for up to 1 year. In the same experiment ethene and propene increased at approximately 30% yr(-1). A series of blank experiments showed negligible contamination from the sampling process and from storage (<10 pptv yr(-1)) of samples in these glass flasks. Results from flask NMHC analyses were compared to in-situ NMHC measurements at the Global Atmospheric Watch station in Hohenpeissenberg, Germany. This 9-months side-by-side comparison showed good agreement between both methods. More than 94% of all data comparisons for C2-C5 alkanes, isoprene, benzene and toluene fell within the combined accuracy and precision objectives of the World Meteorological Organization Global Atmosphere Watch (WMO-GAW) for NMHC measurements.

  11. First observations of light non-methane hydrocarbons (C2-C5) over a high altitude site in the central Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarangi, Tapaswini; Naja, Manish; Lal, S.; Venkataramani, S.; Bhardwaj, Piyush; Ojha, N.; Kumar, R.; Chandola, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    This study presents observations of methane (CH4) and light non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) for the first time from a high altitude site Nainital (29.4°N, 79.5°E, 1958 m amsl) in the central Himalayas. The whole air samples collected with a frequency of 3 samples per week during April 2009-December 2011 are analyzed using a Gas Chromatograph equipped with Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID). Additionally, samples were collected from two semi-urban sites (Haldwani and Pantnagar) in the adjoining Indo Gangetic plain region. CH4 and NMHCs show a distinct seasonal cycle over this region with more frequent observations of higher levels during winter (DJF) and late autumn (SON) and lower levels during the summer-monsoon (JJA). Different NMHCs exhibit better correlations during autumn/winter as compared to the summer-monsoon season. The annual mean mixing ratios of methane, ethane, ethene, propane, propene, i-butane, n-butane, acetylene, and i-pentane at Nainital are measured to be 1.9 ± 0.1 ppmv, 1.8 ± 1.0, 0.7 ± 0.9, 0.6 ± 0.8, 0.6 ± 0.7, 0.6 ± 0.7, 0.5 ± 0.6, 1.0 ± 0.8, and 0.5 ± 0.6, respectively (all in ppbv). The seasonal cycle of CH4 at Nainital is found to be similar to other global high altitude sites (Jungfraujoch and Mauna Loa) but somewhat different than a high altitude site Mt. Abu in India. NMHCs, other than ethane and propane, are found to be higher over this central Himalayan region than other sites. Additionally, composition of NMHCs is shown to be different over the study region when compared with other sites in the IGP region. A correlation study between ln((n-butane)/(ethane)) and ln((i-butane)/(ethane)) showed that oxidation by the OH radical is the main removal mechanism of these species over the central Himalaya and dilution maintains the ratios of these species. The lowest slope of propane and acetylene with CO during summer and spring are indicating absence of fresh air mass over this region. This study fills a major gap in

  12. Anthropogenic non-methane volatile hydrocarbons at Mt. Cimone (2165 m a.s.l., Italy): Impact of sources and transport on atmospheric composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Vullo, Eleonora; Furlani, Francesco; Arduini, Jgor; Giostra, Umberto; Graziosi, Francesco; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Williams, Martin L.; Maione, Michela

    2016-09-01

    To advance our understanding of the factors that affect pollution in mountainous areas, long-term, high frequency measurements of thirteen Non Methane Volatile Organic Compounds (NMVOCs) have been carried out at the atmospheric observatory on the top of Mt. Cimone (2165 m a.s.l.), whose location is ideal for sampling both aged air masses representing the regional background and polluted air masses coming from nearby sources of anthropogenic pollution. An analysis of the NMVOC time series available at Mt. Cimone during 2010-2014 was used to examine the influence of transport processes on NMVOC atmospheric composition and to derive information on the emission sources. We performed a multifactor principal component analysis whose results allowed us to identify the source categories emitting the NMVOCs measured at Mt. Cimone as well as to assess transport ranges in winter and summer. Aged air masses, due to long-range transport and related to vehicular traffic exhaust emissions accounted for 78% of the NMVOC variability in winter and 62% in summer, whereas evaporative emissions, likely to be associated with fresh emissions from nearby sources, accounted for 12% of the NMVOC variability and 24% in winter and summer, respectively. Such results have been confirmed by a further analysis in which the NMVOC variability as a function of their atmospheric lifetimes has been evaluated. The ratios of alkane isomers potentially provides a metric to investigate seasonal changes in NMVOCs composition and in the emission fields of butanes and pentanes, suggesting that during the summer the butanes are originating mainly from the European domain and that for pentanes non-anthropogenic sources may be contributing to the measured concentrations.

  13. Gas chromatography system for the automated, unattended, and cryogen-free monitoring of C2 to C6 non-methane hydrocarbons in the remote troposphere.

    PubMed

    Tanner, David; Helmig, Detlev; Hueber, Jacques; Goldan, Paul

    2006-04-07

    An unattended, automated, on-line, cryogen-free, remotely controlled gas chromatography (GC) system was developed and has been deployed for more than 1 year for the continuous determination of C(2) to C(6) hydrocarbons at an observatory located at 2225 m elevation, on the summit caldera of an inactive volcano on the island of Pico, Azores. The GC instrument is tailored to the measurement challenges at this remote and high altitude site. All consumable gases are prepared in situ. Total power use remains below 700 W at all times. Sample collection and analysis is performed without use of cryogen. Hydrocarbons are concentrated on a one-stage trapping/injection system consisting of a Peltier-cooled multi-bed solid adsorbent trap. Analytes are detected after thermal desorption and separation on an alumina-PLOT (porous-layer open tubular) column by flame ionization detection (FID). Sample focusing, desorption, separation and detection parameters were thoroughly investigated to ensure quantitative collection and subsequent injection onto the GC system. GC operation is controlled remotely and data are downloaded daily. Sample volumes (600 and 3000 ml) are alternated for analysis of C(2) to C(3) and C(3) to C(6) hydrocarbons, respectively. Detection limits are in the low parts per trillion by volume (pptv) range, sufficient for quantification of the compounds of interest at their central North Atlantic lower free troposphere background concentrations.

  14. Concentrations and sources of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) from 2005 to 2013 in Hong Kong: A multi-year real-time data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Jiamin; Guo, Hai; Zheng, Junyu; Cheung, Kalam; Louie, Peter K. K.; Ling, Zhenhao; Wang, Dawei

    2015-02-01

    To understand the long-term variations of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) and their emission sources, real-time speciated NMHCs have been monitored in Hong Kong since 2005. Data analysis showed that the concentrations of C3-C5 and C6-C7 alkanes slightly increased from 2005 to 2013 at a rate of 0.0015 and 0.0005 μg m-3 yr-1 (p < 0.05), respectively, while aromatics decreased at a rate of 0.006 μg m-3 yr-1 (p < 0.05). Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model was applied to identify and quantify the NMHC sources. Vehicular exhaust, gasoline evaporation and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) usage, consumer product and printing, architectural paints, and biogenic emissions were identified and on average accounted for 20.2 ± 6.2%, 25.4 ± 6.3%, 32.6 ± 5.8%, 21.5 ± 4.5%, and 3.3 ± 1.5% of the ambient NMHC concentrations, respectively. From 2005 to 2013, the contributions of both traffic-related sources and solvent-related sources showed no significant changes, different from the trends in emission inventory. On O3 episode days dominated by local air masses, the increase ratio of NMHC species from non-episode to episode days was found to be a natural function of the reactivity of NMHC species, suggesting that photochemical reaction would significantly change the NMHCs composition between emission sources and the receptors. Effect of photochemical reaction loss on receptor-oriented source apportionment analysis needs to be quantified in order to identify the NMHCs emission sources on O3 episode days.

  15. Abundances of Jupiter's Trace Hydrocarbons from Voyager and Cassini

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Achterberg, R. K.; Romani, P. N.; Allen, M.; Zhang, X.; Teanby, N. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Flasar, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    The flybys of Jupiter by the Voyager spacecraft in 1979, and over two decades later by Cassini in 2000, have provided us with unique datasets from two different epochs, allowing the investigation of seasonal change in the atmosphere. In this paper we model zonal averages of thermal infrared spectra from the two instruments, Voyager 1 IRIS and Cassini CIRS, to retrieve the vertical and meridional profiles of temperature, and the abundances of the two minor hydrocarbons, acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6). The spatial variation of these gases is controlled by both chemistry and dynamics, and therefore their observed distribution gives us an insight into both processes, We find that the two gases paint quite different pictures of seasonal change. Whilst the 2-D cross-section of C2H6 abundance is slightly increased and more symmetric in 2000 (northern summer solstice) compared to 1979 (northern fall equinox), the major trend of equator to pole increase remains. For C2H2 on tile other hand, the Voyager epoch exhibits almost no latitudinal variation, whilst the Cassini era shows a marked decrease polewards in both hemispheres. At the present time, these experimental findings are in advance of interpretation, as there are no published models of 2-D Jovian seasonal chemical variation available for comparison.

  16. Large Abundances of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Adriani, A.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Moriconi, M. L.; D'Aversa, E.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 micron in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al.We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 micron. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) × 10(exp 4) particles / cubic cm. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is approx 430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 sq. nm; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  17. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E.; Moriconi, M. L.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2013-06-20

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  18. Non-methane organic composition in the Lincoln tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Lonneman, W.A.; Sella, R.L.; Meeks, S.A.

    1986-08-01

    Measurements of the non-methane organic carbon (NMOC) are reported for the Lincoln Tunnel from a 1982 study. The NMOC levels in the tunnel were a factor of approximately 4 lower than those found in a similar study performed in 1970. This decrease probably reflects reduced vehicular tailpipe emissions due to the utilization of catalyst-equipped vehicles. Acetylene concentrations in the tunnel decreased to a greater extent than many of the other major individual hydrocarbon compounds during the 1970-1982 period. This decrease was attributed to the preferential oxidation of acetylene by the catalytic converter installed on vehicles beginning with the 1975 model year. New NMOC compounds and sum of NMOC compounds to acetylene ratios are reported. These ratios are useful in the estimation of vehicular tailpipe emission contribution to NMOC levels observed in urban and industrial areas. 24 references, 6 tables.

  19. The Abundance and Physical State of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandstrom, Karin M.; Bolatto, A. D.; Draine, B.; Stanimirovic, S.; Bot, C.

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of two studies investigating the abundance and physical state of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). PAHs play important roles in the thermal balance and chemistry of the interstellar medium and their mid-IR emission bands are bright and detectable out to high redshift. Observations with ISO and Spitzer have shown that PAHs are deficient in low-metallicity galaxies. In particular, galaxies with 12 + log(O/H) < 8 show mid-IR colors and spectra consistent with low PAH abundance. The SMC provides a unique opportunity to map the PAH emission in a low-metallicity (12 + log(O/H) 8) galaxy at high spatial resolution to learn what processes set the abundance and physical state of PAHs. To study the PAH abundance, we model dust SEDs across the SMC using Spitzer Survey of the SMC (S3MC) photometry from 3.6 to 160 microns. We also use overlapping spectral mapping observations from 5 to 38 microns from the Spitzer Spectroscopic Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (S4MC) in selected regions to test the reliability of the PAH abundance as determined from SED fits using the Draine et al (2007) models. Our results show that the average PAH abundance in the SMC is low compared to the Milky Way (q_pah 0.6% vs. 4%) and variable--with high abundance (q_pah 1-2%) in molecular clouds and low abundance in the diffuse ISM. Based on these results, we suggest that PAHs are destroyed in the diffuse ISM of the SMC and/or PAHs are forming in molecular clouds. In addition, we use S4MC observations to diagnose the physical state of the PAHs from the ratios of their mid-IR bands. We find that PAHs in the SMC tend to be smaller and less ionized than in higher metallicity galaxies.

  20. Determination of motor vehicle profiles for non-methane organic compounds in the Mexico City metropolitan area

    PubMed

    Mugica; Vega; Arriaga; Ruiz

    1998-11-01

    Non-methane organic compound (NMOC) profiles for on-road motor vehicle emissions were measured in a down-town tunnel and parking garages in Mexico City during 1996. Hydrocarbon samples from the tunnel and ambient air samples (C2-C12) were collected using stainless steel canisters, and carbonyl compounds were collected using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) impregnated cartridges. Canister samples were analyzed by gas chromatography/flame ionization detection (GC/FID) to ascertain detailed hydrocarbon composition. DNPH samples were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). NMOC source profiles were quantified for evaporative emissions from refueling, cold start, and hot soak, and on-road operating conditions. The ultimate purpose will be to determine the apportionment of ambient NMOC concentrations using the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) model. The tunnel profile contained 42.3 ppbC% of alkanes, 20.6 ppbC% of unsaturated compounds, and 22.4 ppbC% of aromatics. The most abundant species were acetylene with 7.22 ppbC%, followed by ipentane with 5.69 ppbC%, and toluene with 5.42 ppbC%. These results were compared with those from studies in the United States. The cold start profile was found to be similar to the tunnel profile, although there were differences in the content of acetylene, isopentane, and oxygenates. The abundance of saturated NMOC in the hot soak profile was similar to gasoline head space profiles; it was also much larger than saturated NMOC in the roadway profile.

  1. Determination of Motor Vehicle Profiles for Non-Methane Organic Compounds in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area.

    PubMed

    Mugica, Violeta; Vega, Elizabeth; Arriaga, José Luis; Ruiz, Ma Esther

    1998-11-01

    Non-methane organic compound (NMOC) profiles for on-road motor vehicle emissions were measured in a downtown tunnel and parking garages in Mexico City during 1996. Hydrocarbon samples from the tunnel and ambient air samples (C2-C12) were collected using stainless steel canisters, and carbonyl compounds were collected using 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH) impregnated cartridges. Canister samples were analyzed by gas chromatog-raphy/flame ionization detection (GC/FID) to ascertain detailed hydrocarbon composition. DNPH samples were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). NMOC source profiles were quantified for evaporative emissions from refueling, cold start, and hot soak, and on-road operating conditions. The ultimate purpose will be to determine the apportionment of ambient NMOC concentrations using the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) model. The tunnel profile contained 42.3 ppbC% of alkanes, 20.6 ppbC% of unsaturated compounds, and 22.4 ppbC% of aromatics. The most abundant species were acetylene with 7.22 ppbC%, followed by ipentane with 5.69 ppbC%, and toluene with 5.42 ppbC%. These results were compared with those from studies in the United States. The cold start profile was found to be similar to the tunnel profile, although there were differences in the content of acetylene, isopentane, and oxygenates. The abundance of saturated NMOC in the hot soak profile was similar to gasoline head space profiles; it was also much larger than saturated NMOC in the roadway profile.

  2. Retrievals of the Abundances of Acetylene and other Hydrocarbons in Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Siteng; Shemansky, D. E.; Yung, Yuk

    2016-10-01

    Acetylene abundance in the Titan upper atmosphere has been extracted from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) stellar occultations. The data reduction process is based on simulation of the discrete spectral absorption in the far ultraviolet (FUV) region between 110 and 190 nm. Pointing drift is corrected by instrument simulation of the stellar image location on the instrument detector. Latitude and seasonal dependence of the vertical profiles has been examined. The observed spectra have been compared to atmospheric chemical model calculations (KINETICS) by predicting the occultation spectra, allowing the imposition of constraints on the model, and directly establishing the level of uncertainty in the extraction process. Hydrocarbon and nitrile vertical profiles have been extracted, with limits set on the precursors to aerosols. Aerosol continuum spectral structure is recognized in the extinction spectra, but physical chemistry modeling of aerosol precursors to date indicate higher abundances than the upper limits set by observation.

  3. Abundances of C3Hx Hydrocarbons in Titan's Stratosphere from Cassini CIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, C. A.; Jennings, D. E.; Bezard, B.; Vinatier, S.; Teanby, N. A.; Sung, K.; Ansty, T. M.; Irwin, P. G.; Gorius, N.; Cottini, V.; Coustenis, A.; Flasar, F. M.

    2014-12-01

    During the ten years since entry into Saturn orbit in 2004, the Cassini spacecraft has made more than 100 close flybys of Titan, measuring the properties of the atmosphere by both in situ and remote sensing techniques. Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) senses the infrared spectrum from 7-1000 μm (1400-10 cm-1), a region which exhibits the vibrational emissions of many different molecular species. CIRS has therefore been able to map the spatial distributions and temporal variations of hydrocarbons, nitriles and other gas species in Titan's atmosphere, yielding information about the chemistry and dynamics. Recently, Nixon et al. (2013) made the first detection of a new stratospheric gas species from Cassini using CIRS - the C3H6 molecule (propene). This filled in a long-time missing link in the chemical picture of Titan's lower atmosphere, since the C3H4 (propyne) and C3H8 (propane) molecules had been detected in 1981 by Voyager 1 IRIS. The inferred abundance of C3H6 is less than both C3H8 and C3H4, and this pattern is repeated also in the C2Hx molecules where C2H4 is less abundant than C2H2 and C2H6. Therefore a pattern emerges whereby: alkanes > alkynes > alkenes within the C2Hx and C3Hx chemical families in the lower stratosphere. We comment on how this trend compares to published photochemical model predictions, and also give updates on the search for C3Hx isomers (allene: CH2CCH2, and cyclopropane: c-C3H6) and C4Hx species using CIRS.

  4. Hydrocarbons and fuels analyses with the supersonic gas chromatography mass spectrometry--the novel concept of isomer abundance analysis.

    PubMed

    Fialkov, Alexander B; Gordin, Alexander; Amirav, Aviv

    2008-06-27

    Hydrocarbon analysis with standard GC-MS is confronted by the limited range of volatile compounds amenable for analysis and by the similarity of electron ionization mass spectra for many compounds which show weak or no molecular ions for heavy hydrocarbons. The use of GC-MS with supersonic molecular beams (Supersonic GC-MS) significantly extends the range of heavy hydrocarbons that can be analyzed, and provides trustworthy enhanced molecular ion to all hydrocarbons. In addition, unique isomer mass spectral features are obtained in the ionization of vibrationally cold hydrocarbons. The availability of molecular ions for all hydrocarbons results in the ability to obtain unique chromatographic isomer distribution patterns that can serve as a new method for fuel characterization and identification. Examples of the applicability and use of this novel isomer abundance analysis (IAA) method to diesel fuel, kerosene and oil analyses are shown. It is suggested that in similarity to the "three ions method" for identification purposes, three isomer abundance patterns can serve for fuel characterization. The applications of the Supersonic GC-MS for engine motor oil analysis and transformer oil analysis are also demonstrated and discussed, including the capability to achieve fast 1-2s sampling without separation for oil and fuel fingerprinting. The relatively fast analysis of biodiesel is described, demonstrating the provision of molecular ions to heavy triglycerides. Isomer abundance analysis with the Supersonic GC-MS could find broad range of applications including petrochemicals and fuel analysis, arson analysis, environmental oil/fuel spill analysis, fuel adulteration analysis and motor oil analysis.

  5. Discovery of abundant, accessible hydrocarbons nearly everywhere in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Zuppero, A.

    1996-05-01

    analysis of the data gathered during the Comet Halley encounter during 1987 resulted in a body of literature asserting that all comets contain substantial percentages of hydrocarbon solids. These solids appear to have a strong similarity to petrochemicals. Arguments are made that the amount of hydrocarbon material in the accessible comets of the inner Solar system can substantially exceed the known reserves of hydrocarbons on Earth. An example is given of at least one conceptually simple method to use comet material as feedstock for space transportation schemes that can move masses through the solar system comparable to the mass carried by oil supertankers. The presentation concludes we need to send prospecting and assay probes to a sampling of the accessible comets to determine the amount of hydrocarbons and the form and location of materials needed for space transportation systems.

  6. Emissions of non-methane organic compounds from a grassland site

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Yoshiko; Doskey, P.V.

    1996-03-01

    A mixture of oxygenated hydrocarbons (OxHCs), isoprene, and monoterpenes was detected in the emissions from a grassland site in the Midwestern United States. A plot dominated by crown vetch (Coronilla varia) and bluegrass (Poa spp.), exhibited a constant decrease in emissions of total non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) from 580 {mu}g m{sup -2} hr{sup -1} in June 1992 to 150 {mu}g m{sup - 2} hr{sup -1} in October 1992, except for a slight increase in August. Oxygenated hydrocarbons (methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone) and terpenes (isoprene, limonene, myrcene, {alpha}-pinene, and {beta}- pinene) composed about 90% and 10% of the identified NMOC emissions, respectively. Isoprene represented about 10% of the terpene emissions. Total NMOC emission rates based on vegetative biomass averaged 2.3 {mu}g g{sup -1} hr{sup -1}, with 10% of the identified NMOCs attributed to monoterpenes and the remainder mainly OxHCs. Over the course of the investigation, the relationship between the monoterpene emission rate and the temperature for a single plot was logarithmic and similar to the one between compound vapor pressure and temperature. However, emission rates normalized to temperature decreased throughout the summer and fall, indicating that parameterizations of emission rates from herbaceous plants must include a factor to compensate for environmental conditions such as soil moisture and nutrient deposition, which affect plant phenology and the seasonal pattern of species dominance.

  7. The Abundances of Hydrocarbon Functional Groups in the Interstellar Medium Inferred from Laboratory Spectra of Hydrogenated and Methylated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steglich, M.; Jäger, C.; Huisken, F.; Friedrich, M.; Plass, W.; Räder, H.-J.; Müllen, K.; Henning, Th.

    2013-10-01

    Infrared (IR) absorption spectra of individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) containing methyl (\\sbondCH3), methylene (\\protect{\\epsfbox{art/apjs484229un01.eps}}CH2), or diamond-like \\protect{\\epsfbox{art/apjs484229un02.eps}}CH groups and IR spectra of mixtures of methylated and hydrogenated PAHs prepared by gas-phase condensation were measured at room temperature (as grains in pellets) and at low temperature (isolated in Ne matrices). In addition, the PAH blends were subjected to an in-depth molecular structure analysis by means of high-performance liquid chromatography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Supported by calculations at the density functional theory level, the laboratory results were applied to analyze in detail the aliphatic absorption complex of the diffuse interstellar medium at 3.4 μm and to determine the abundances of hydrocarbon functional groups. Assuming that the PAHs are mainly locked in grains, aliphatic CH x groups (x = 1, 2, 3) would contribute approximately in equal quantities to the 3.4 μm feature (N CHx /N H ≈ 10-5-2 × 10-5). The abundances, however, may be two to four times lower if a major contribution to the 3.4 μm feature comes from molecules in the gas phase. Aromatic \\epsfbox{art/apjs484229un03.eps} CH groups seem to be almost absent from some lines of sight, but can be nearly as abundant as each of the aliphatic components in other directions (N_{\\epsfbox{art/apjs484229un03.eps} CH}/N H lsim 2 × 10-5 upper value for grains). Due to comparatively low binding energies, astronomical IR emission sources do not display such heavy excess hydrogenation. At best, especially in protoplanetary nebulae, \\protect{\\epsfbox{art/apjs484229un01.eps}}CH2 groups bound to aromatic molecules, i.e., excess hydrogens on the molecular periphery only, can survive the presence of a nearby star.

  8. Measurements of biogenic non-methane organic compound emissions from grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Yoshiko

    1994-12-31

    Non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) play an important role in the formation of photochemical oxidants in the troposphere. NMOCs originate from both anthropogenic and biogenic sources. Many organic compounds of biogenic origins are more reactive than those of anthropogenic origin because of the presence of internal double bonds within their molecular structure. The objective of this investigation was to examine the seasonal variation of NMOC emissions from grasslands and determine the environmental factors that control the emissions. An enclosure system was chosen as the most appropriate sampling technique for measuring emissions from herbaceous vegetation, and an analysis method using cryogenic preconcentration/high resolution gas chromatography was established. Emission rates were measured at a fixed location in a natural grassland during 1992 and 1993. Measurements were also made at various locations within the same site where the vegetation was harvested after the emission rates were determined. Emission rates of NMOCs for grasslands are not as large as those reported for forests. However the emissions of oxygenated hydrocarbons exceeded the emissions of monoterpenes and have not previously been identified as important forest-type emissions. A framework for parameterizing the NMOC emissions from grasslands based on seasonal and instantaneous variations of the emission rate measurements was developed. Temperature, hypoxia induced by water saturated soil, and frost were key environmental factors affecting both the composition and magnitude of NMOC emissions.

  9. Nutrients can enhance the abundance and expression of alkane hydroxylase CYP153 gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass planted in hydrocarbon-polluted soil.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Muhammad; Afzal, Muhammad; Amin, Imran; Iqbal, Samina; Khan, Qaiser M

    2014-01-01

    Plant-bacteria partnership is a promising strategy for the remediation of soil and water polluted with hydrocarbons. However, the limitation of major nutrients (N, P and K) in soil affects the survival and metabolic activity of plant associated bacteria. The objective of this study was to explore the effects of nutrients on survival and metabolic activity of an alkane degrading rhizo-bacterium. Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) was grown in diesel-contaminated soil and inoculated with an alkane degrading bacterium, Pantoea sp. strain BTRH79, in greenhouse experiments. Two levels of nutrients were applied and plant growth, hydrocarbon removal, and gene abundance and expression were determined after 100 days of sowing of ryegrass. Results obtained from these experiments showed that the bacterial inoculation improved plant growth and hydrocarbon degradation and these were further enhanced by nutrients application. Maximum plant biomass production and hydrocarbon mineralization was observed by the combined use of inoculum and higher level of nutrients. The presence of nutrients in soil enhanced the colonization and metabolic activity of the inoculated bacterium in the rhizosphere. The abundance and expression of CYP153 gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass was found to be directly associated with the level of applied nutrients. Enhanced hydrocarbon degradation was associated with the population of the inoculum bacterium, the abundance and expression of CYP153 gene in the rhizosphere of ryegrass. It is thus concluded that the combination between vegetation, inoculation with pollutant-degrading bacteria and nutrients amendment was an efficient approach to reduce hydrocarbon contamination.

  10. Jovian Mid-Infrared Aurora, Hydrocarbon Abundances and Temperature Prior to Juno's Arrival

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostiuk, Theodor; Livengood, Timothy A.; Hewagama, Tilak; Kolasinski, John

    2016-10-01

    We report on ground-based measurements of Jupiter's thermal infrared aurora, ethane abundances and temperature prior to Juno's arrival at Jupiter in July 2016. Measurements covering spectral and altitude regions that will complement Juno observational capabilities were made April 18-22, 2016, with the GSFC Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind And Composition (HIPWAC) on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The ultra-high spectral resolution infrared heterodyne spectroscopy (IRHS) measures fully resolved individual spectral lines whose shape provides unique information on variability of temperature and abundance. Ethane line spectra near 12-micrometer wavelength will be used to determine the intensities of auroral emission from Jupiter's polar regions and retrieve ethane abundance and temperature changes on and off the north polar "hot spot" region. Results will be compared to a 30-year study of this thermal infrared aurora with ground-based IRHS and with Voyager IRIS and Cassini CIRS measurements. Additional measurements during Juno's orbital mission phase are also planned. Analyses of the variability of the earlier measurements suggest that the thermal IR auroral emission may be low during the Juno -Jupiter encounter. Results will be useful for the Juno mission, since it does not have instrumentation in this spectral region and this work provides complementary information and diagnostic for studying Jupiter in a spectral region and altitude range not directly probed by Juno.

  11. Non-methane organic composition in the Lincoln Tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Lonneman, W.A.; Seila, R.L.; Meeks, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    Recent 1982 measurements of the nonmethane organic compound (NMOC) are reported for the Lincoln Tunnel. The NMOC levels in the tunnel were a factor of approximately 4 lower than 1970 levels. The decrease probably reflects reduced vehicular tailpipe emissions due to EPA hydrocarbon control strategy for photochemical ozone. Acetylene contribution to the total NMOC composition decreased almost by a factor of 2 from 1970 to 1982. The decrease was attributed to the preferential oxidation of acetylene by the vehicular catalytic device. New hydrocarbon component and sum of NMOC component ratios to acetylene are presented. These ratios are useful in the determination of hydrocarbon-source-emission contribution in urban and industrial areas.

  12. The Variation of Hydrocarbon Abundances with Latitude and Season in Saturn's Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moses, J. I.; Greathouse, T. K.

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a realistic, time-variable, one-dimensional, seasonal model for stratospheric photochemistry on Saturn using the Caltech/ JPL KINETICS code [1,2,3]. The model accounts for variations in ultraviolet flux due to orbital position, solar-cycle variations, and ring-shadowing effects. The results for two Saturnian years, starting at Ls = 0 in 1950 and running until the upcoming northern vernal equinox in 2009, are presented for numerous latitudes. The same two model years are run over and over again until the model convergences to make sure that high-altitude effects have had a chance to propagate down through the atmosphere. We use the SOLAR2000 model [4,5], in combination with the spectra presented in [6], to predict the ultraviolet flux at any wavelength and any point in time during the simulation. Saturn's orbital position during the simulation was taken from the ephemeris calculator at http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/horizons.html [7]. The photochemical model is derived from "Model C" of [8] and uses a hydrocarbon reaction list that has been extensively updated from that presented in [3].

  13. Effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons on microbial community structure and PAH ring hydroxylating dioxygenase gene abundance in soil.

    PubMed

    Sawulski, Przemyslaw; Clipson, Nicholas; Doyle, Evelyn

    2014-11-01

    Development of successful bioremediation strategies for environments contaminated with recalcitrant pollutants requires in-depth knowledge of the microorganisms and microbial processes involved in degradation. The response of soil microbial communities to three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenanthrene (3-ring), fluoranthene (4-ring) and benzo(a)pyrene (5-ring), was examined. Profiles of bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities were generated using molecular fingerprinting techniques (TRFLP, ARISA) and multivariate statistical tools were employed to interpret the effect of PAHs on community dynamics and composition. The extent and rate of PAH removal was directly related to the chemical structure, with the 5-ring PAH benzo(a)pyrene degraded more slowly than phenathrene or fluoranthene. Bacterial, archaeal and fungal communities were all significantly affected by PAH amendment, time and their interaction. Based on analysis of clone libraries, Actinobacteria appeared to dominate in fluoranthene amended soil, although they also represented a significant portion of the diversity in phenanthrene amended and unamended soils. In addition there appeared to be more γ-Proteobacteria and less Bacteroidetes in soil amended with either PAH compared to the control. The soil bacterial community clearly possessed the potential to degrade PAHs as evidenced by the abundance of PAH ring hydroxylating (PAH-RHDα) genes from both gram negative (GN) and gram positive (GP) bacteria in PAH-amended and control soils. Although the dioxygenase gene from GP bacteria was less abundant in soil than the gene associated with GN bacteria, significant (p < 0.001) increases in the abundance of the GP PAH-RHDα gene were observed during phenanthrene and fluoranthene degradation, whereas there was no significant difference in the abundance of the GN PAH-RHDα gene during the course of the experiment. Few studies to-date have examined the effect of pollutants on more than one microbial

  14. Inter-comparison of network measurements of non-methane organic compounds with model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sheng-Po; Su, Yuan-Chang; Chiu, Ching-Jui; Lin, Ching-Ho; Chang, Julius S.; Chang, Chih-Chung; Wang, Jia-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Ambient levels of total non-methane organic carbons (NMOCs) at air quality stations (AQSs, called AQS NMOCs) are compared with the summed concentrations of 56 NMHCs obtained from the Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Stations (called total PAMS). For mutual validation of the two networks, the total PAMS were compared with the AQS NMOCs at four sites on the island of Taiwan for the period 2007-2012. The inter-comparison of total PAMS and AQS NMOCs has been discussed previously, which reported that the total PAMS accounted for approximately 30% of the AQS NMOCs on average (Chen et al., 2014b). In this study, both the observed total PAMS and AQS NMOCs were further compared with the emissions and model simulations for mutual validation. A three-dimensional Eulerian air quality model was used to simulate total PAMS and total VOCs, which were then inter-compared with the observed total PAMS and AQS NMOCs, respectively. We found closely agreeing results between the observed and simulated total PAMS, affirming that the treatment of meteorology and VOC emissions in the model was sufficiently robust. Further, although the modeled VOC data agreed with the AQS NMOC observations for the sites in urban settings, a significant discrepancy existed for the industrial sites, particularly at the concentration spikes. Such a discrepancy was presumably attributed to high emissions of OVOCs from industrial complexes compounded by the lower sensitivity of AQS measurements for OVOCs compared with hydrocarbons. Consequently, using AQS NMOCs to represent ambient VOC levels should be limited to environments where the amounts of OVOCs are relatively small relative to total VOCs.

  15. Abundances of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 14 chinese and american coals and their relation to coal rank and weathering

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, R.; Liu, Gaisheng; Zhang, Jiahua; Chou, C.-L.; Liu, J.

    2010-01-01

    The abundances of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on the priority list of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) have been determined in 14 Chinese and American coals. The ranks of the samples range from lignite, bituminous coal, anthracite, to natural coke. Soxhlet extraction was conducted on each coal for 48 h. The extract was analyzed on a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The results show that the total PAH content ranged from 0.31 to 57.6 ??g/g of coal (on a dry basis). It varied with coal rank and is highest in the maturity range of bituminous coal rank. High-molecular-weight (HMW) PAHs are predominant in low-rank coals, but low-molecular-weight (LMW) PAHs are predominant in high-rank coals. The low-sulfur coals have a higher PAH content than high-sulfur coals. It may be explained by an increasing connection between disulfide bonds and PAHs in high-sulfur coal. In addition, it leads us to conclude that the PAH content of coals may be related to the depositional environment. ?? 2010 American Chemical Society.

  16. THE ABUNDANCE OF C{sub 3}H{sub 2} AND OTHER SMALL HYDROCARBONS IN THE DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Liszt, Harvey; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Cordiner, Martin; Gerin, Maryvonne

    2012-07-10

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium, observed in diverse environments ranging from diffuse to molecular dark clouds and strong photon-dominated regions near H II regions. Recently, two broad diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 4881 A and 5450 A were attributed to the linear version of propynylidene l-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, a species whose more stable cyclic conformer c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} has been widely observed in the diffuse interstellar medium at radio wavelengths. This attribution has already been criticized on the basis of indirect plausibility arguments because the required column densities are quite large, N(l-C{sub 3}H{sub 2})/E{sub B-V} =4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} mag{sup -1}. Here we present new measurements of N(l-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}) based on simultaneous 18-21 GHz Very Large Array absorption profiles of cyclic and linear C{sub 3}H{sub 2} taken along sight lines toward extragalactic radio-continuum background sources with foreground Galactic reddening E{sub B-V} = 0.1-1.6 mag. We find that N(l-C{sub 3}H{sub 2})/N(c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}) Almost-Equal-To 1/15-1/40 and N(l-C{sub 3}H{sub 2})/E{sub B-V} Almost-Equal-To (2 {+-} 1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} mag{sup -1}, so that the column densities of l-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} needed to explain the DIBs are some three orders of magnitude higher than what is observed. We also find N(C{sub 4}H)/E{sub B-V} <1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} mag{sup -1} and N(C{sub 4}H{sup -})/E{sub B-V} <1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} mag{sup -1} (3{sigma}). Using available data for CH and C{sub 2}H we compare the abundances of small hydrocarbons in diffuse and dark clouds as a guide to their ability to contribute as DIB carriers over a wide range of conditions in the interstellar medium.

  17. Comparison of two tunnel studies for non methane hydrocarbons in Mexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Mugica A, V.; Vega R, E.; Ruiz S, M.E.; Seila, R.

    1998-12-31

    Emissions from vehicles have long been considered a major source of pollutants involved in smog formation and ozone production. During the last few years, different control strategies have been taking place to reduce the high levels of ozone and some other atmospheric pollutants. Some of these strategies are: improvement of fuels, a program for compulsory vehicular emission test and the introduction of catalytic converters to be used in conjunction with unleaded gasoline since 1991. The comparison of the vehicular NMHC emission source profiles measured in a tunnel in Mexico City during March 1992 and May 1996 is presented. Samples were collected using stainless steel SUMMA{reg_sign} canisters and subsequent analyzed by gas chromatography with flame ionized detector. It was found that in general, the source profiles are similar, however, some differences were detected for some species. The sum of acetylene, ethylene and ethane contents, which are a typical combustion products, is lower for the 1996 source profile than for the 1992. In the same way, there is a small decrease of paraffin and olefin contents, except for hexane. Finally, significant differences were found for aromatic compounds, mainly toluene and xylenes which increased in 1996.

  18. [Atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons near plants of crude oil first treatment].

    PubMed

    Bustaffa, Elisa; De Marinis Loiotile, Annamaria; Farella, Genoveffa; Petraccone, Stefania; De Gennaro, Gianluigi; Bianchi, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    La continua espansione delle attività di perforazione ai fini dell'estrazione petrolifera in prossimità di aree abitate ha fatto sì che negli ultimi anni l'attenzione si focalizzasse sull'impatto di questo processo fortemente industrializzato sulla salute pubblica. Le comunità che vivono nei dintorni di impianti di questo tipo devono, infatti, fronteggiare diversi problemi, quali l'inquinamento atmosferico e acustico, la contaminazione del suolo e delle acque sotterranee, il traffico dei camion da e verso il sito, incidenti e malfunzionamenti all'interno dell'impianto. In questo contesto, la valutazione del rischio per la salute è ostacolata dal fatto che l'esposizione alle sostanze chimiche presenti non può essere valutata in via definitiva, poiché non sempre si è a conoscenza di tutti i composti immessi nell'ambiente né delle loro concentrazioni, per non parlare del problema delle coesposizioni ad altri inquinanti. Nonostante l'oramai conclamato e vasto interesse generato da questo argomento, ad oggi esistono pochi studi basati su popolazioni riguardanti gli effetti sulla salute delle comunità che vivono in prossimità dei siti di perforazione ed estrazione; ciò genera la necessità di condurre campagne di monitoraggio mirate e studi epidemiologici che verifichino l'eventuale esistenza e natura di pattern di malattie associati a tali attività. La presente rassegna bibliografica individua, quindi, i principali inquinanti atmosferici presenti in prossimità di un impianto di primo trattamento del greggio e cerca di fornire un quadro generale delle loro potenziali sorgenti e caratteristiche.

  19. Determination of microbial carbon sources and cycling during remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon impacted soil using natural abundance (14)C analysis of PLFA.

    PubMed

    Cowie, Benjamin R; Greenberg, Bruce M; Slater, Gregory F

    2010-04-01

    In a petroleum impacted land-farm soil in Sarnia, Ontario, compound-specific natural abundance radiocarbon analysis identified biodegradation by the soil microbial community as a major pathway for hydrocarbon removal in a novel remediation system. During remediation of contaminated soils by a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria enhanced phytoremediation system (PEPS), the measured Delta(14)C of phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) biomarkers ranged from -793 per thousand to -897 per thousand, directly demonstrating microbial uptake and utilization of petroleum hydrocarbons (Delta(14)C(PHC) = -1000 per thousand). Isotopic mass balance indicated that more than 80% of microbial PLFA carbon was derived from petroleum hydrocarbons (PHC) and a maximum of 20% was obtained from metabolism of more modern carbon sources. These PLFA from the contaminated soils were the most (14)C-depleted biomarkers ever measured for an in situ environmental system, and this study demonstrated that the microbial community in this soil was subsisting primarily on petroleum hydrocarbons. In contrast, the microbial community in a nearby uncontaminated control soil maintained a more modern Delta(14)C signature than total organic carbon (Delta(14)C(PLFA) = +36 per thousand to -147 per thousand, Delta(14)C(TOC) = -148 per thousand), indicating preferential consumption of the most modern plant-derived fraction of soil organic carbon. Measurements of delta(13)C and Delta(14)C of soil CO(2) additionally demonstrated that mineralization of PHC contributed to soil CO(2) at the contaminated site. The CO(2) in the uncontaminated control soil exhibited substantially more modern Delta(14)C values, and lower soil CO(2) concentrations than the contaminated soils, suggesting increased rates of soil respiration in the contaminated soils. In combination, these results demonstrated that biodegradation in the soil microbial community was a primary pathway of petroleum hydrocarbon removal in the PEPS system. This study

  20. Long-term Observations of Jovian Mid-Infrared Aurora, Hydrocarbon Abundances, and Temperature: Ground-based and Space-based Comparison and Preparation for Juno

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostiuk, T.; Hewagama, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Fast, K. E.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Carlson, R. C.; Schmuelling, F.

    2015-12-01

    With Juno's approach to Jupiter in 2016 nearing, we report on long term measurements of Jupiter's thermal infrared aurora covering spectral and altitude regions that will complement Juno observational capabilities. Previously acquired spectral data from ground-based observatories as well as by Voyager IRIS and Cassini CIRS during Jupiter flybys will be investigated using current methods and capabilities. The thermal (mid-) IR aurora from Jupiter's polar regions, hydrocarbon abundances, and thermal structure retrieved from the ground and from space-based investigations will be compared and used to illustrate the different capabilities and complementarity of the measurement platforms. We report on the reexamination and re-analysis of hydrocarbon emission spectra from Jupiter obtained using ground-based ultra-high spectral resolution infrared heterodyne spectroscopy (IRHS) and Fourier transform spectroscopy (FTS) from Cassini CIRS during its flyby of Jupiter in 2000-2001 and Voyager IRIS data obtained during flybys in 1979. Measurements with IRHS have been made over 30 years, primarily of ethane near 12 micrometer wavelength. These measurements yield fully resolved individual spectral lines whose shape provides unique information on variability of temperature and abundance. CIRS and IRIS data at coarser spectral resolution provide extended spatial distributions covering a broad spectral region, including abundances and auroral response of hydrocarbon constituents in the 8-13 micrometer spectral region (ethane, methane, ethylene, and acetylene). Analysis shows detailed spatial variability of the primary hydrocarbons in northern latitudes. Temporal changes of the ethane line emission over three solar cycles and comparison of retrievals from ethane data taken contemporaneously during the Cassini flyby by both techniques will be compared and results discussed. From these analyses, the expectation is that the thermal IR auroral emission may be low during the Juno tour at

  1. PTR-MS measurements of non-methane volatile organic compounds during an intensive field campaign at the summit of Mount Tai, China, in June 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, S.; Tanimoto, H.; Kato, S.; Suthawaree, J.; Kanaya, Y.; Pochanart, P.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Z.

    2010-08-01

    Owing to recent industrialization, Central East China has become a significant source of air pollutants. To examine the processes controlling the chemistry and transport of tropospheric ozone, we performed on-line measurements of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) as part of an intensive field campaign at Mount Tai, China, in June 2006 (MTX2006), using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Temporal variations of NMVOCs were recorded in mass-scan mode from m/z17 to m/z 300 during 12-30 June 2006. More than thirty kinds of NMVOCs were detected up to m/z 160, including alkenes, aromatics, alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. In combination with non-methane hydrocarbon data obtained by a gas chromatography with flame ionization detection, it was found that oxygenated VOCs were the predominant NMVOCs. Diurnal variations depending mainly on local photochemistry were observed during 24-28 June. During the night of 12 June, we observed an episode of high NMVOCs concentrations attributed to the burning of agricultural biomass. The ΔNMVOCs/ΔCO ratios derived by PTR-MS measurements for this episode (with biomass burning (BB) plume) and during 16-23 June (without BB plume) are compared to emission ratios from various types of biomass burning as reviewed by Andreae and Merlet (2001) and to ratios recently measured by PTR-MS in tropical forests (Karl et al., 2007) and at urban sites (Warneke et al., 2007).

  2. Hydrocarbon degraders establish at the costs of microbial richness, abundance and keystone taxa after crude oil contamination in permafrost environments

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sizhong; Wen, Xi; Shi, Yulan; Liebner, Susanne; Jin, Huijun; Perfumo, Amedea

    2016-01-01

    Oil spills from pipeline ruptures are a major source of terrestrial petroleum pollution in cold regions. However, our knowledge of the bacterial response to crude oil contamination in cold regions remains to be further expanded, especially in terms of community shifts and potential development of hydrocarbon degraders. In this study we investigated changes of microbial diversity, population size and keystone taxa in permafrost soils at four different sites along the China-Russia crude oil pipeline prior to and after perturbation with crude oil. We found that crude oil caused a decrease of cell numbers together with a reduction of the species richness and shifts in the dominant phylotypes, while bacterial community diversity was highly site-specific after exposure to crude oil, reflecting different environmental conditions. Keystone taxa that strongly co-occurred were found to form networks based on trophic interactions, that is co-metabolism regarding degradation of hydrocarbons (in contaminated samples) or syntrophic carbon cycling (in uncontaminated samples). With this study we demonstrate that after severe crude oil contamination a rapid establishment of endemic hydrocarbon degrading communities takes place under favorable temperature conditions. Therefore, both endemism and trophic correlations of bacterial degraders need to be considered in order to develop effective cleanup strategies. PMID:27886221

  3. Hydrocarbon degraders establish at the costs of microbial richness, abundance and keystone taxa after crude oil contamination in permafrost environments.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sizhong; Wen, Xi; Shi, Yulan; Liebner, Susanne; Jin, Huijun; Perfumo, Amedea

    2016-11-25

    Oil spills from pipeline ruptures are a major source of terrestrial petroleum pollution in cold regions. However, our knowledge of the bacterial response to crude oil contamination in cold regions remains to be further expanded, especially in terms of community shifts and potential development of hydrocarbon degraders. In this study we investigated changes of microbial diversity, population size and keystone taxa in permafrost soils at four different sites along the China-Russia crude oil pipeline prior to and after perturbation with crude oil. We found that crude oil caused a decrease of cell numbers together with a reduction of the species richness and shifts in the dominant phylotypes, while bacterial community diversity was highly site-specific after exposure to crude oil, reflecting different environmental conditions. Keystone taxa that strongly co-occurred were found to form networks based on trophic interactions, that is co-metabolism regarding degradation of hydrocarbons (in contaminated samples) or syntrophic carbon cycling (in uncontaminated samples). With this study we demonstrate that after severe crude oil contamination a rapid establishment of endemic hydrocarbon degrading communities takes place under favorable temperature conditions. Therefore, both endemism and trophic correlations of bacterial degraders need to be considered in order to develop effective cleanup strategies.

  4. Estimating the biogenic emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds from the North Western Mediterranean vegetation of Catalonia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Parra, R; Gassó, S; Baldasano, J M

    2004-08-15

    An estimation of the magnitude of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) emitted by vegetation in Catalonia (NE of the Iberian Peninsula, Spain), in addition to their superficial and temporal distribution, is presented for policy and scientific (photochemical modelling) purposes. It was developed for the year 2000, for different time resolutions (hourly, daily, monthly and annual) and using a high-resolution land-use map (1-km2 squared cells). Several meteorological surface stations provided air temperature and solar radiation data. An adjusted mathematical emission model taking account of Catalonia's conditions was built into a geographic information system (GIS) software. This estimation uses the latest information, mainly relating to: (1) emission factors; (2) better knowledge of the composition of Catalonia's forest cover; and (3) better knowledge of the particular emission behaviour of some Mediterranean vegetal species. Results depict an annual cycle with increasing values in the March-April period with the highest emissions in July-August, followed by a decrease in October-November. Annual biogenic NMVOCs emissions reach 46.9 kt, with monoterpenes the most abundant species (24.7 kt), followed by other biogenic volatile organic compounds (e.g. alcohols, aldehydes and acetone) (16.3 kt), and isoprene (5.9 kt). These compounds signify 52%, 35% and 13%, respectively, of total emission estimates. Peak hourly total emission for a winter day could be less than 10% of the corresponding value for a summer day.

  5. NATURAL EMISSIONS OF NON-METHANE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS, CARBON MONOXIDE, AND OXIDES OF NITROGEN FROM NORTH AMERICA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The magnitudes, distributions, controlling processes and uncertainties associated with North American natural emissions of oxidant precursors are reviewed. Natural emissions are repsonsible for a major portion of the compounds, including non-methane volatile organic compounds (N...

  6. Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor

    DOEpatents

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

  7. Stellar Evolutionary Effects on the Abundances of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Supernova-Condensed Dust in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galliano, Frédéric; Dwek, Eli; Chanial, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Spectral and photometric observations of nearby galaxies show a correlation between the strength of their mid-IR aromatic features, attributed to PAH molecules, and their metal abundances, leading to a deficiency of these features in low-metallicity galaxies. In this paper we suggest that the observed correlation represents a trend of PAH abundance with galactic age, reflecting the delayed injection of carbon dust into the ISM by AGB stars in the final post-AGB phase of their evolution. AGB stars are the primary sources of PAHs and carbon dust in galaxies, and recycle their ejecta back to the ISM after only a few hundred million years of evolution on the main sequence. In contrast, more massive stars that explode as Type II supernovae inject their metals and dust almost instantaneously after their formation. We first determined the PAH abundance in galaxies by constructing detailed models of UV-to-radio SEDs of galaxies that estimate the contribution of dust in PAH-free H II regions, and of PAHs and dust in photodissociation regions, to the IR emission. All model components, the galaxies' stellar content, the properties of their H II regions, and their ionizing and nonionizing radiation fields and dust abundances, are constrained by their observed multiwavelength spectra. After determining the PAH and dust abundances in 35 nearby galaxies using our SED model, we use a chemical evolution model to show that the delayed injection of carbon dust by AGB stars provides a natural explanation for the dependence of the PAH content in galaxies on metallicity. We also show that larger dust particles giving rise to the far-IR emission follow a distinct evolutionary trend closely related to the injection of dust by massive stars into the ISM.

  8. Distribution, abundance and carbon isotopic composition of gaseous hydrocarbons in Big Soda Lake, Nevada - An alkaline, meromictic lake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oremland, R. S.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    The study of the distribution and isotopic composition of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases at the Big Soda Lake, Nevada, has shown that while neither ethylene nor propylene were found in the lake, ethane, propane, isobutane and n-butane concentrations all increased with water column depth. It is concluded that methane has a biogenic origin in both the sediments and the anoxic water column, and that C2-C4 alkanes have biogenic origins in the monimolimnion water and shallow sediments. The changes observed in delta C-13/CH4/ and CH4/(C2H6 + C3H8) with depth in the water column and sedimeents are probably due to bacterial processes, which may include anaerobic methane oxidation and different rates of methanogenesis, and C2-to-C4 alkane production by microorganisms.

  9. Constraints on hydrocarbon and organic acid abundances in hydrothermal fluids at the Von Damm vent field, Mid-Cayman Rise (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, J. M.; Seewald, J.; German, C. R.; Sylva, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of organic compounds in vent fluids has been of interest since the discovery of seafloor hydrothermal systems, due to implications for the sustenance of present-day microbial populations and their potential role in the origin of life on early Earth. Possible sources of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems include microbial production, thermogenic degradation of organic material, and abiotic synthesis. Abiotic organic synthesis reactions may occur during active circulation of seawater-derived fluids through the oceanic crust or within olivine-hosted fluid inclusions containing carbon-rich magmatic volatiles. H2-rich end-member fluids at the Von Damm vent field on the Mid-Cayman Rise, where fluid temperatures reach 226°C, provide an exciting opportunity to examine the extent of abiotic carbon transformations in a highly reducing system. Our results indicate multiple sources of carbon compounds in vent fluids at Von Damm. An ultramafic-influenced hydrothermal system located on the Mount Dent oceanic core complex at 2350 m depth, Von Damm vent fluids contain H2, CH4, and C2+ hydrocarbons in high abundance relative to basalt-hosted vent fields, and in similar abundance to other ultramafic-hosted systems, such as Rainbow and Lost City. The CO2 content and isotopic composition in end-member fluids are virtually identical to bottom seawater, suggesting that seawater DIC is unchanged during hydrothermal circulation of seawater-derived fluids. Accordingly, end-member CH4 that is present in slightly greater abundance than CO2 cannot be generated from reduction of aqueous CO2 during hydrothermal circulation. We postulate that CH4 and C2+ hydrocarbons that are abundantly present in Von Damm vent fluids reflect leaching of fluids from carbon- and H2-rich fluid inclusions hosted in plutonic rocks. Geochemical modeling of carbon speciation in the Von Damm fluids suggests that the relative abundances of CH4, C2+ hydrocarbons, and CO2 are consistent with

  10. The relative abundance and seasonal distribution correspond with the sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the surface sediments of Chenab River, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Imran; Syed, Jabir Hussain; Kamal, Atif; Iqbal, Mehreen; Eqani, Syed-Ali-Mustjab-Akbar-Shah; Bong, Chui Wei; Taqi, Malik Mumtaz; Reichenauer, Thomas G; Zhang, Gan; Malik, Riffat Naseem

    2016-06-01

    Chenab River is one of the most important rivers of Punjab Province (Pakistan) that receives huge input of industrial effluents and municipal sewage from major cities in the Central Punjab, Pakistan. The current study was designed to evaluate the concentration levels and associated ecological risks of USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the surface sediments of Chenab River. Sampling was performed from eight (n = 24) sampling stations of Chenab River and its tributaries. We observed a relatively high abundance of ∑16PAHs during the summer season (i.e. 554 ng g(-1)) versus that in the winter season (i.e. 361 ng g(-1)), with an overall abundance of two-, five- and six-ring PAH congeners. Results also revealed that the nitrate and phosphate contents in the sediments were closely associated with low molecular weight (LMW) and high molecular weight (HMW) PAHs, respectively. Source apportionment results showed that the combustion of fossil fuels appears to be the key source of PAHs in the study area. The risk quotient (RQ) values indicated that seven PAH congeners (i.e. phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)pyrene, chrysene and benzo(a)anthracene) could pose serious threats to the aquatic life of the riverine ecosystem in Pakistan.

  11. Effects of different compost amendments on the abundance and composition of alkB harboring bacterial communities in a soil under industrial use contaminated with hydrocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Wallisch, Stefanie; Gril, Tjasa; Dong, Xia; Welzl, Gerd; Bruns, Christian; Heath, Ester; Engel, Marion; Suhadolc, Marjetka; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Alkane degrading microorganisms play an important role for the bioremediation of petrogenic contaminated environments. In this study, we investigated the effects of compost addition on the abundance and diversity of bacteria harboring the alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB) in an oil-contaminated soil originated from an industrial zone in Celje, Slovenia (Technosol). Soil without any amendments (control soil) and soil amended with two composts differing in their maturation stage and nutrient availability, were incubated under controlled conditions in a microcosm experiment and sampled after 0, 6, 12, and 36 weeks of incubation. As expected the addition of compost stimulated the degradation of alkanes in the investigated soil shortly after the addition. By using quantitative real-time PCR higher number of alkB genes were detected in soil samples amended with compost compared to the control soils. To get an insight into the composition of alkB harboring microbial communities, we performed next generation sequencing of amplicons of alkB gene fragment. Richness and diversity of alkB gene harboring prokaryotes was higher in soil mixed with compost compared to control soils with stronger effects of the less maturated, nutrient poor compost. The phylogenetic analysis of communities suggested that the addition of compost stimulated the abundance of alkB harboring Actinobacteria during the experiment independent from the maturation stage of the compost. AlkB harboring γ-proteobacteria like Shewanella or Hydrocarboniphaga as well as α-proteobacteria of the genus Agrobacterium responded also positively to the addition of compost to soil. The amendment of the less maturated, nutrient poor compost resulted in addition in a large increase of alkB harboring bacteria of the Cytophaga group (Microscilla) mainly at the early sampling time points. Our data indicates that compost amendments significantly change abundance and diversity pattern of alkB harboring microbes in Technosol and

  12. Effects of different compost amendments on the abundance and composition of alkB harboring bacterial communities in a soil under industrial use contaminated with hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Wallisch, Stefanie; Gril, Tjasa; Dong, Xia; Welzl, Gerd; Bruns, Christian; Heath, Ester; Engel, Marion; Suhadolc, Marjetka; Schloter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Alkane degrading microorganisms play an important role for the bioremediation of petrogenic contaminated environments. In this study, we investigated the effects of compost addition on the abundance and diversity of bacteria harboring the alkane monooxygenase gene (alkB) in an oil-contaminated soil originated from an industrial zone in Celje, Slovenia (Technosol). Soil without any amendments (control soil) and soil amended with two composts differing in their maturation stage and nutrient availability, were incubated under controlled conditions in a microcosm experiment and sampled after 0, 6, 12, and 36 weeks of incubation. As expected the addition of compost stimulated the degradation of alkanes in the investigated soil shortly after the addition. By using quantitative real-time PCR higher number of alkB genes were detected in soil samples amended with compost compared to the control soils. To get an insight into the composition of alkB harboring microbial communities, we performed next generation sequencing of amplicons of alkB gene fragment. Richness and diversity of alkB gene harboring prokaryotes was higher in soil mixed with compost compared to control soils with stronger effects of the less maturated, nutrient poor compost. The phylogenetic analysis of communities suggested that the addition of compost stimulated the abundance of alkB harboring Actinobacteria during the experiment independent from the maturation stage of the compost. AlkB harboring γ-proteobacteria like Shewanella or Hydrocarboniphaga as well as α-proteobacteria of the genus Agrobacterium responded also positively to the addition of compost to soil. The amendment of the less maturated, nutrient poor compost resulted in addition in a large increase of alkB harboring bacteria of the Cytophaga group (Microscilla) mainly at the early sampling time points. Our data indicates that compost amendments significantly change abundance and diversity pattern of alkB harboring microbes in Technosol and

  13. Distribution, abundance and carbon isotopic composition of gaseous hydrocarbons in Big Soda Lake, Nevada: An alkaline, meromictic lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.; Des Marais, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    Distribution and isotopic composition (??13C) of low molecular weight hydrocarbon gases were studied in Big Soda Lake (depth = 64 m), an alkaline, meromictic lake with permanently anoxic bottom waters. Methane increased with depth in the anoxic mixolimnion (depth = 20-35 m), reached uniform concentrations (55 ??M/l) in the monimolimnion (35-64 m) and again increased with depth in monimolimnion bottom sediments (>400 ??M/kg below 1 m sub-bottom depth). The ??13C[CH4] values in bottom sediment below 1 m sub-bottom depth (<-70 per mil) increased with vertical distance up the core (??13C[CH4] = -55 per mil at sediment surface). Monimolimnion ??13C[CH4] values (-55 to -61 per mil) were greater than most ??13C[CH4] values found in the anoxic mixolimnion (92% of samples had ??13C[CH4] values between -20 and -48 per mil). No significant concentrations of ethylene or propylene were found in the lake. However ethane, propane, isobutane and n-butane concentrations all increased with water column depth, with respective maximum concentrations of 260, 80, 23 and 22 nM/l encountered between 50-60 m depth. Concentrations of ethane, propane and butanes decreased with depth in the bottom sediments. Ratios of CH4 [C2H6 + C3H8] were high (250-620) in the anoxic mixolimnion, decreased to ~161 in the monimolimnion and increased with depth in the sediment to values as high as 1736. We concluded that methane has a biogenic origin in both the sediments and the anoxic water column and that C2-C4 alkanes have biogenic origins in the monimolimnion water and shallow sediments. The changes observed in ??13C[CH4] and CH4 (C2H6 + C3H8) with depth in the water column and sediments are probably caused by bacteria] processes. These might include anaerobic methane oxidation and different rates of methanogenesis and C2 to C4 alkane production by microorganisms. ?? 1983.

  14. Abundance and diversity of functional genes involved in the degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in Antarctic soils and sediments around Syowa Station.

    PubMed

    Muangchinda, C; Chavanich, S; Viyakarn, V; Watanabe, K; Imura, S; Vangnai, A S; Pinyakong, O

    2015-03-01

    Hydrocarbon catabolic genes were investigated in soils and sediments in nine different locations around Syowa Station, Antarctica, using conventional PCR, real-time PCR, cloning, and sequencing analysis. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase (PAH-RHD)-coding genes from both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria were observed. Clone libraries of Gram-positive RHD genes were related to (i) nidA3 of Mycobacterium sp. py146, (ii) pdoA of Terrabacter sp. HH4, (iii) nidA of Diaphorobacter sp. KOTLB, and (iv) pdoA2 of Mycobacterium sp. CH-2, with 95-99% similarity. Clone libraries of Gram-negative RHD genes were related to the following: (i) naphthalene dioxygenase of Burkholderia glathei, (ii) phnAc of Burkholderia sartisoli, and (iii) RHD alpha subunit of uncultured bacterium, with 41-46% similarity. Interestingly, the diversity of the Gram-positive RHD genes found around this area was higher than those of the Gram-negative RHD genes. Real-time PCR showed different abundance of dioxygenase genes between locations. Moreover, the PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) profile demonstrated diverse bacterial populations, according to their location. Forty dominant fragments in the DGGE profiles were excised and sequenced. All of the sequences belonged to ten bacterial phyla: Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Verrucomicrobia, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Gemmatimonadetes, Cyanobacteria, Chlorobium, and Acidobacteria. In addition, the bacterial genus Sphingomonas, which has been suggested to be one of the major PAH degraders in the environment, was observed in some locations. The results demonstrated that indigenous bacteria have the potential ability to degrade PAHs and provided information to support the conclusion that bioremediation processes can occur in the Antarctic soils and sediments studied here.

  15. Abundance and diversity of n-alkane-degrading bacteria in a forest soil co-contaminated with hydrocarbons and metals: a molecular study on alkB homologous genes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-de-Mora, Alfredo; Engel, Marion; Schloter, Michael

    2011-11-01

    Unraveling functional genes related to biodegradation of organic compounds has profoundly improved our understanding of biological remediation processes, yet the ecology of such genes is only poorly understood. We used a culture-independent approach to assess the abundance and diversity of bacteria catalyzing the degradation of n-alkanes with a chain length between C(5) and C(16) at a forest site co-contaminated with mineral oil hydrocarbons and metals for nearly 60 years. The alkB gene coding for a rubredoxin-dependent alkane monooxygenase enzyme involved in the initial activation step of aerobic aliphatic hydrocarbon metabolism was used as biomarker. Within the area of study, four different zones were evaluated: one highly contaminated, two intermediately contaminated, and a noncontaminated zone. Contaminant concentrations, hydrocarbon profiles, and soil microbial respiration and biomass were studied. Abundance of n-alkane-degrading bacteria was quantified via real-time PCR of alkB, whereas genetic diversity was examined using molecular fingerprints (T-RFLP) and clone libraries. Along the contamination plume, hydrocarbon profiles and increased respiration rates suggested on-going natural attenuation at the site. Gene copy numbers of alkB were similar in contaminated and control areas. However, T-RFLP-based fingerprints suggested lower diversity and evenness of the n-alkane-degrading bacterial community in the highly contaminated zone compared to the other areas; both diversity and evenness were negatively correlated with metal and hydrocarbon concentrations. Phylogenetic analysis of alkB denoted a shift of the hydrocarbon-degrading bacterial community from Gram-positive bacteria in the control zone (most similar to Mycobacterium and Nocardia types) to Gram-negative genotypes in the contaminated zones (Acinetobacter and alkB sequences with little similarity to those of known bacteria). Our results underscore a qualitative rather than a quantitative response of

  16. NATURAL EMISSIONS OF NON-METHANE VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS, CARBON MONOXIDE, AND OXIDES OF NITROGEN FROM NORTH AMERICA. (R825259)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The magnitudes, distributions, controlling processes and uncertainties associated with North American natural emissions of oxidant precursors are reviewed. Natural emissions are responsible for a major portion of the compounds, including non-methane volatile o...

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Methylophaga muralis Bur 1, a Haloalkaliphilic (Non-Methane-Utilizing) Methylotroph Isolated from a Soda Lake

    PubMed Central

    Trotsenko, Yuri A.; Shmareva, Maria N.; Tarlachkov, Sergey V.; Mustakhimov, Ildar I.

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of Methylophaga muralis strain Bur 1 (VKM B-3046T), a non-methane-utilizing methylotroph isolated from a soda lake, is reported here. Strain Bur 1 possesses genes for methanol and methylamine (methylamine dehydrogenase and N-methylglutamate pathway) oxidation. Genes for the biosynthesis of ectoine were also found. PMID:27811106

  18. Volatile hydrocarbon emissions from vehicles and vertical ventilations in the Hsuehshan traffic tunnel, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chia-Hsiang; Peng, Yen-Ping

    2012-07-01

    The concentrations of 56 volatile organic hydrocarbons (VOCs) were measured simultaneously in the southbound bore, the northbound bore and the exhaust air shafts of the Hsuehshan tunnel near Yilan, Taiwan during 2007 and 2008. A total of 60 integrated air samples were collected using stainless steel canisters and analyzed using GC/FID and GC/MS. The highest temperature and lowest relative humidity were observed at the exit of the tunnel owing to the accumulation in the tunnel of waste heat that was exhausted from vehicles. The five most abundant species in all samples were ethylene, acetylene, isopentane, propylene, and toluene. The exit/entrance ratios of total non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) concentration were 7.8 and 4.8 for the southbound and northbound bores, respectively. Furthermore, the most abundant species of emission rate (ER) is toluene (21.93-42.89 mg s(-1)), followed by isopentane, ethylene, propylene and 1-butene, with ER ranging from 2.50 to 9.31 mg s(-1) for the three shafts. The ozone formation potential (OFP)/total NMHC ratios in three exhaust air shafts show that the reactivities of these emissions are similar to those of vehicle emissions.

  19. Relationship between total Non-Methane Hydrocarbons (NMHC) and Speciated NMHCs by Photochemical Assessment Monitoring Station (PAMS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.; Ou Yang, C.; Chang, J.; Wang, J.

    2012-12-01

    Total NMHC observations were made in some of the EPA air quality stations (AQS) across Taiwan, along with measurements of ozone, CO, NOx, SO2 and PM10. This network is also complimented by another eight-station network, called photochemical assessment monitoring stations (PAMS), to provide hourly observations of 56 individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs). In this study, the relationship of the total NMHC and PAMS NMHC observations for the period of 2007-2011 at four sites were cross-examined. It was found that both the hourly mixing ratios and variations of the summed PAMS NMHC values were in excellent agreement with the total NMHC data, with the summed PAMS NMHC observations accounted for at least 80% of the total NMHC observations. However, when looking into the VOC emission database, the PAMS NMHC emissions only contributed 58% of the total NMHC emissions. This then leads to about 30% difference in the traditionally observed NMHCs and estimated emissions. The three-dimensional Eulerian air quality model (PAMS-AQM) was used to simulate both the total NMHC and individual PAMS NMHCs, which showed that the sum of the simulated PAMS NMHCs agreed well with the observed PAMS values. However, the modeled total VOC values were significantly higher than the observed total NMHC values, and such findings were consistent among all four stations. This and the above findings combine to suggest that the customarily labeled "total NMHC" reported by almost all air quality stations are underestimates by about 30%. This underestimate is rather uncertain for two reasons: One, both total NMHC and PAMS speciated NMHC measurements underestimate VOC levels in ambient air. Since both types of measurements use the same method of flame ionization detection, it is less sensitive to oxygen containing VOCs (OVOCs), e.g., aldehydes, esters, ketones, ether, acids, etc. than other VOCs. In contrast, the PAMS measurements only target 56 PAMS NMHCs although more directly, and OVOCs also are not covered by the measurements. So both measurements miss the same group of VOCs for different reasons. Two, due to the lumping methods used to treat numerous VOCs in all air quality models, the integral rate expressions and deposition constants of each lumping groups are only approximate. The unique characteristics of individual VOCs cannot be revealed in the relevant lumping groups. When this is added to uncertainties in emissions estimates, model results can only be considered as reasonable set of independent estimates. At this time, our findings of this approximately 30% uncertainty may be the limit of model accuracy in comparing VOC simulations with observations.

  20. Release of non-methane organic compounds during simulated landfilling of aerobically pretreated municipal solid waste.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yue, Dongbei; Liu, Jianguo; Lu, Peng; Wang, Ying; Liu, Jing; Nie, Yongfeng

    2012-06-30

    Characteristics of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) emissions during the anaerobic decomposition of untreated (APD-0) and four aerobically pretreated (APD-20, APD-39, APD-49, and APD-63) samples of municipal solid waste (MSW) were investigated in laboratory. The cumulative mass of the NMOCs of APD-20, APD-39, APD-49, and APD-63 accounted for 15%, 9%, 16%, and 15% of that of APD-0, respectively. The intensities of the NMOC emissions calculated by dividing the cumulative NMOC emissions by the quantities of organic matter removed (Q(VS)) decreased from 4.1 mg/kg Q(VS) for APD-0 to 0.8-3.4 mg/kg Q(VS) for aerobically pretreated MSW. The lipid and starch contents might have significant impact on the intensity of the NMOC emissions. Alkanes dominated the NMOCs released from the aerobically pretreated MSW, while oxygenated compounds were the chief component of the NMOCs generated from untreated MSW. Aerobic pretreatment of MSW prior to landfilling reduces the organic content of the waste and the intensity of the NMOC emissions, and increases the odor threshold, thereby reducing the environmental impact of landfills.

  1. Speciated non-methane organic compounds emissions from food cooking in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugica, V.; Vega, E.; Chow, J.; Reyes, E.; Sánchez, G.; Arriaga, J.; Egami, R.; Watson, J.

    Non-methane organic compound (NMOC) emissions from different sorts of food preparation sites, were quantified for the first time in Mexico, in order to develop emission profiles for further application in the chemical mass balance receptor model (CMB). Restaurants using charcoal grills and LP gas stoves, "tortillerı´as", food frying places and rotisseries were sampled using SUMMA ® stainless-steel canisters to analyse NMOC by high-resolution gas chromatography. The results obtained show that profiles determined from food cooking processes have similarities to those found in LP gas combustion, which is the most common fuel in Mexico used for this purpose, although there were differences in the relative composition of propane and butane in both cases. This suggests that, the rates of combustion of propane and butane are different. It has also been detected that propene, a reactive olefin is produced during the combustion process. The obtained profiles of restaurants, rotisseries and fried food show an important contribution of two carbon compounds (ethane, ethylene and acetylene) that can be attributed to the complex process of grease and meat cooking. The presence of these compounds cannot be attributed to vehicular sources since the concentrations are higher than in ambient air. These were also determined from aromatic compounds such as benzene, toluene and xylene in the combustion of vegetal charcoal. The measured concentrations indicate that NMOC emissions from cooking may become an important indoor source of NMOC under crowded conditions in closed places.

  2. Non-methane volatile organic compound flux from a subarctic mire in Northern Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäckstrand, Kristina; Crill, Patrick M.; Mastepanov, Mikhail; Christensen, Torben R.; Bastviken, David

    2008-04-01

    Biogenic NMVOCs are mainly formed by plants and microorganisms. They have strong impact on the local atmospheric chemistry when emitted to the atmosphere. The objective of this study was to determine if there are significant emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) from a subarctic mire in northern Sweden. Subarctic peatlands in discontinuous permafrost regions are undergoing substantial environmental changes due to their high sensitivity to climate warming and there is need for including NMVOCs in the overall carbon budget. Automatic and manual chamber measurements were used to estimate NMVOC fluxes from three dominating subhabitats on the mire during three growing seasons. Emission rates varied and were related to plant species distribution and seasonal net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide. The highest fluxes were observed from wetter sites dominated by Eriophorum and Sphagnum spp. Total NMVOC emissions from the mire (~17 ha) is estimated to consist of ~150 kgC during a growing season with 150 d. NMVOC fluxes can account for ~5% of total net carbon exchange (-3177 kgC) at the mire during the same period. NMVOC emissions are therefore a significant component in a local carbon budget for peatlands.

  3. Total non-methane volatile organic compounds (TNMVOC) in the atmosphere of Delhi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Padhy, Pratap; Varshney, C. K.

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC), more specifically, non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC) play a critical role in the atmospheric chemistry. NMVOC, through complex photochemical reactions, contribute to the formation of toxic oxidants, such as tropospheric ozone and PAN, which are injurious to health and highly phytotoxic. Certain NMVOC have been shown to be highly toxic, mutagenic and carcinogenic. NMVOC are receiving increasing attention in the west on account of their implication for human health and air quality. On the other hand, information on NMVOC in India and other developing countries is not available. As a result, appreciation of potential threat from NMVOC in relation to air quality and public health is sadly lacking among planners and policy makers. The paper deals with the estimation of total NMVOC at 13 sites in the urban environment of Delhi during November 1994 to June 1995. An inexpensive, labour intensive manual sample collection device was used and the air samples were analysed using GC-FID. The results show that the amount of NMVOC in the ambient environment of Delhi varied between 1.3 and 32.5 ppmv exhibiting wide temporal and seasonal variation. NMVOC levels mostly peaked at 0900 h, which coincide with the peak traffic hour. The implications of NMVOC build-up in the urban atmosphere are obvious for air quality. The results of this preliminary study make out a strong case for developing a regular monitoring programme for NMVOC in the urban environment of Delhi as well as in other major cities in the region.

  4. Non-methane volatile organic compounds in Africa: A view from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marais, Eloise Ann

    Isoprene emissions affect human health, air quality, and the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Globally anthropogenic non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOC) emissions are lower than that of isoprene, but local hotspots are hazardous to human health and air quality. In Africa the tropics are a large source of isoprene, while Nigeria appears as a large contributor to regional anthropogenic NMVOC emissions. I make extensive use of space-based formaldehyde (HCHO) observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and the chemical transport model (CTM) GEOS-Chem to estimate and examine seasonality of isoprene emissions across Africa, and identify sources and air quality consequences of anthropogenic NMVOC emissions in Nigeria. To estimate isoprene emissions I first developed a filtering scheme to remove (1) contamination from biomass burning and anthropogenic influences; and (2) displacement of HCHO from the isoprene emission source diagnosed with the GEOS-Chem CTM. Conversion to isoprene emissions is with NOx-dependent GEOS-Chem HCHO yields, obtained as the local sensitivity S of the HCHO column ΩHCHO to a perturbation Delta in isoprene emissions EISOP (S = DeltaΩHCHO/DeltaE ISOP). The error in OMI-derived isoprene emissions is 40% at low levels of NOx and 40-90% under high-NOx conditions and is reduced by spatial and temporal averaging to the extent that errors are random. Weak isoprene emission seasonality in equatorial forests is driven predominantly by temperature, while large seasonality in northern and southern savannas is driven by temperature and leaf area index. The largest contribution of African isoprene emissions to surface ozone and particulate matter, determined with GEOS-Chem, of 8 ppbv and 1.5 μg m-3, respectively, is over West Africa. The OMI HCHO data feature a large enhancement over Nigeria that is due to anthropogenic NMVOC emissions. With the OMI HCHO data, coincident satellite observations of atmospheric composition, aircraft

  5. Assessing methods to estimate emissions of non-methane organic compounds from landfills.

    PubMed

    Saquing, Jovita M; Chanton, Jeffrey P; Yazdani, Ramin; Barlaz, Morton A; Scheutz, Charlotte; Blake, Don R; Imhoff, Paul T

    2014-11-01

    The non-methane organic compound (NMOC) emission rate is used to assess compliance with landfill gas emission regulations by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). A recent USEPA Report (EPA/600/R-11/033) employed a ratio method to estimate speciated NMOC emissions (i.e., individual NMOC emissions): speciated NMOC emissions=measured methane (CH4) emission multiplied by the ratio of individual NMOCs concentration relative to CH4 concentration (C(NMOCs)/C(CH4)) in the landfill header gas. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the efficacy of the ratio method in estimating speciated NMOC flux from landfills; (2) determine for what types of landfills the ratio method may be in error and why, using recent field data to quantify the spatial variation of (C(NMOCs)/C(CH4)) in landfills; and (3) formulate alternative models for estimating NMOC emissions from landfills for cases in which the ratio method results in biased estimates. This study focuses on emissions through landfill covers measured with flux chambers and evaluates the utility of the ratio method for estimating NMOC emission through this pathway. Evaluation of the ratio method was performed using CH4 and speciated NMOC concentration and flux data from 2012/2013 field sampling of four landfills, an unpublished landfill study, and literature data from three landfills. The ratio method worked well for landfills with thin covers (<40 cm), predicting composite NMOC flux (as hexane-C) to within a factor of 10× for 13 out of 15 measurements. However, for thick covers (⩾40 cm) the ratio method overestimated NMOC emissions by ⩾10× for 8 out of 10 measurements. Alternative models were explored incorporating other chemical properties into the ratio method. A molecular weight squared (MW)(2)-modified ratio equation was shown to best address the tendency of the current ratio method to overestimate NMOC fluxes for thick covers. While these analyses were only performed using NMOC fluxes

  6. Characterizing non-methane volatile organic compounds emissions from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, Ian C.; Aneja, Viney P.; Lonneman, William A.

    2012-02-01

    Emissions of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) were determined from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation (CAFO) in North Carolina. NMVOCs were measured in air samples collected in SUMMA and fused-silica lined (FSL) canisters and were analyzed using a gas chromatography flame ionization detection (GC-FID) system. Measurements were made from both an anaerobic lagoon and barn in each of the four seasonal sampling periods during the period June 2007 through April 2008. In each sampling period, nine to eleven canister samples were taken from both the anaerobic lagoon and barn over a minimum of four different days during a period of ˜1 week. Measurements of meteorological and physiochemical parameters were also made during the sampling period. In lagoon samples, six NMVOCs were identified that had significantly larger emissions in comparison to other NMVOCs. This included three alcohols (ethanol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, and methanol), two ketones (acetone and methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)) and an aldehyde (acetaldehyde). The overall average fluxes for these NMVOCs, ranged from 0.18 μg m -2 min -1 for 2-ethyl-1-hexanol to 2.11 μg m -2 min -1 for acetone, with seasonal fluxes highest in the summer for four (acetone, acetaldehyde, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol and MEK) of the six compounds In barn samples, there were six NMVOCs that had significantly larger concentrations and emissions in comparison to other NMVOCs. These consisted of two alcohols (methanol and ethanol), an aldehyde (acetaldehyde), two ketones (acetone and 2,3-butanedione), and a phenol (4-methylphenol). Overall average barn concentration ranged from 2.87 ppb for 4-methylphenol to 16.12 ppb for ethanol. Overall average normalized barn emission rates ranged from 0.10 g day -1 AU -1 (1 AU (animal unit) = 500 kg of live animal weight) for acetaldehyde to 0.45 g day -1 AU -1 for ethanol. The NMVOCs, 4-methylphenol and 2,3-butanedione, which have low odor thresholds (odor thresholds = 1.86 ppb and 0

  7. GLOBAL SIMULATION OF TROPOSPHERIC O3-NOX-HYDROCARBON CHEMISTRY, 3. ORIGIN OF TROPOSPHERIC OZONE AND EFFECTS OF NON-METHANE HYDROCARBONS. (R824096)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  8. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  9. Characterization of non-methane volatile organic compounds at swine facilities in eastern North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blunden, Jessica; Aneja, Viney P.; Lonneman, William A.

    Samples were collected and analyzed in a field study to characterize C 2-C 12 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted at five swine facilities in Eastern North Carolina between April 2002 and February 2003. Two sites employed conventional lagoon and field spray technologies, while three sites utilized various alternative waste treatment technologies in an effort to substantially reduce gaseous compound emissions, odor, and pathogens from these swine facilities. More than 100 compounds, including various paraffins, olefins, aromatics, ethers, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, halogenated hydrocarbons, phenols, and sulfides were positively identified and quantified by Gas Chromatographic/Flame Ionization Detection (GC/FID) analysis and confirmed by Gas Chromatographic/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS). GC/MS analysis of one particularly complex sample collected assisted in providing identification and retention times for 17 sulfur-type VOCs including dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, and dimethyl trisulfide as well as many other VOCs. Highest VOC concentration levels measured at each of the facilities were near the hog barn ventilation fans. Total measured VOCs at the hog barns were typically dominated by oxygenated hydrocarbons (HCs), i.e., ethanol, methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone. These compounds, in addition to other oxygenated VOCs measured at the various sites, generally represented ˜37-73% of net total measured VOCs that were emitted from the hog barns at the various sites. Dimethyl sulfide and dimethyl disulfide, both recognized as malodorous compounds, were determined to have higher concentration levels at the barns than the background at every farm sampled with the exception of one farm during the warm sampling season.

  10. Multi-instrument comparison and compilation of non-methane organic gas emissions from biomass burning and implications for smoke-derived secondary organic aerosol precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatch, Lindsay E.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Stockwell, Chelsea E.; Veres, Patrick R.; Simpson, Isobel J.; Blake, Donald R.; Orlando, John J.; Barsanti, Kelley C.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple trace-gas instruments were deployed during the fourth Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment (FLAME-4), including the first application of proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry (PTR-TOFMS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC-TOFMS) for laboratory biomass burning (BB) measurements. Open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) was also deployed, as well as whole-air sampling (WAS) with one-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. This combination of instruments provided an unprecedented level of detection and chemical speciation. The chemical composition and emission factors (EFs) determined by these four analytical techniques were compared for four representative fuels. The results demonstrate that the instruments are highly complementary, with each covering some unique and important ranges of compositional space, thus demonstrating the need for multi-instrument approaches to adequately characterize BB smoke emissions. Emission factors for overlapping compounds generally compared within experimental uncertainty, despite some outliers, including monoterpenes. Data from all measurements were synthesized into a single EF database that includes over 500 non-methane organic gases (NMOGs) to provide a comprehensive picture of speciated, gaseous BB emissions. The identified compounds were assessed as a function of volatility; 6-11 % of the total NMOG EF was associated with intermediate-volatility organic compounds (IVOCs). These atmospherically relevant compounds historically have been unresolved in BB smoke measurements and thus are largely missing from emission inventories. Additionally, the identified compounds were screened for published secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yields. Of the total reactive carbon (defined as EF scaled by the OH rate constant and carbon number of each compound) in the BB emissions, 55-77 % was associated with compounds for

  11. Kinetics of biological methane oxidation in the presence of non-methane organic compounds in landfill bio-covers

    SciTech Connect

    Albanna, Muna; Warith, Mostafa; Fernandes, Leta

    2010-02-15

    In this experimental program, the effects of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) on the biological methane (CH{sub 4}) oxidation process were examined. The investigation was performed on compost experiments incubated with CH{sub 4} and selected NMOCs under different environmental conditions. The selected NMOCs had different concentrations and their effects were tested as single compounds and mixtures of compounds. The results from all experimental sets showed a decrease in CH{sub 4} oxidation capacity of the landfill bio-cover with the increase in NMOCs concentrations. For example, in the experiment using compost with 100% moisture content at 35 deg. C without any NMOCs the V{sub max} value was 35.0 mug CH{sub 4}h{sup -1}g{sub wetwt}{sup -1}. This value was reduced to 19.1 mug CH{sub 4}h{sup -1}g{sub wetwt}{sup -1} when mixed NMOCs were present in the batch reactors under the same environmental conditions. The experimental oxidation rates of CH{sub 4} in the presence of single and mixed NMOCs were modeled using the uncompetitive inhibition model and kinetic parameters, including the dissociation constants, were obtained. Additionally, the degradation rates of the NMOCs and co-metabolic abilities of methanotrophic bacteria were estimated.

  12. Characterization of non-methane volatile organic compounds sources in Houston during 2001 using positive matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eugene; Brown, Steven G.; Hafner, Hilary R.; Hopke, Philip K.

    Non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMOC) that were most likely to contribute to ozone formation in the Houston, Texas area were measured by Texas Commission on Environmental Quality using AutoSystem Gas Chromatograph. Hourly, integrated NMOC measured between 9 pm and 6 am at the three monitoring sites (Deer Park, Haden Rd., and Clinton Dr.) in Houston were analyzed with Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). Only NMOC data collected during the nighttime was utilized to minimize the influence of photochemistry, motor vehicles, and biogenic sources. A total of 401-883 samples and 38 to 40 NMOC species measured between July 2001 and October 2001 were analyzed. PMF identified seven sources at Deer Park (flare emissions, industrial source, petrochemical source, natural gas/propane, refinery, isoprene source, and motor vehicle), Haden Rd. (flare emissions, petrochemical source, industrial source, solvent, natural gas/propane, refinery, and motor vehicle), and Clinton Dr. (flare emissions, two industrial sources, refinery, natural gas/propane, motor vehicle, and isoprene source). Five similar source types were found among three sites although the sources were differently located. Conditional probability function analysis using surface wind data and identified source contributions aided the identifications of local point sources by providing indications of likely directions for the sources. The results agreed well with the locations of known local NMOC sources.

  13. Determination of ambient air hydrocarbons in 39 US cities

    SciTech Connect

    Seila, R.L.; Lonneman, W.A.

    1988-06-01

    Compliance with the NAAQS for ozone will require the reduction of non-methane organic carbon (NMOC). To this end, speciated hydrocarbons were determined for over 800 ambient air samples from 39 U.S. cities from 1984-1986. Samples were collected in stainless steel spheres on week days from 6 to 9 A.M. during June through September. C2 to C12 hydrocarbons were determined by capillary GC/FID with sample cryogenic preconcentration. The GC retention time identification table consisted of 314 uniquely numbered peaks, of which 97 were specifically named, 214 were identified by type (olefin, paraffin, aromatic). GC-MSD/FID analysis confirmed the identity of 40 peaks and indicated the presence of oxygenated, chlorinated, and fluorinated hydrocarbons in some samples.

  14. 40 CFR 86.1710-99 - Fleet average non-methane organic gas exhaust emission standards for light-duty vehicles and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... follows: Table R99-15—Fleet Average Non-Methane Organic Gas Standards (g/mi) for Light-Duty Vehicles and... specifications of Tables R99-15 and R99-16 are less than or equal to the standards in Tables R99-15 and R99-16 in...-Methane Organic Gas Standards (g/mi) for Light-Duty Vehicles and Light Light-Duty Trucks Sold in the...

  15. 40 CFR 86.1710-99 - Fleet average non-methane organic gas exhaust emission standards for light-duty vehicles and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... follows: Table R99-15—Fleet Average Non-Methane Organic Gas Standards (g/mi) for Light-Duty Vehicles and... specifications of Tables R99-15 and R99-16 are less than or equal to the standards in Tables R99-15 and R99-16 in...-Methane Organic Gas Standards (g/mi) for Light-Duty Vehicles and Light Light-Duty Trucks Sold in the...

  16. 40 CFR 86.1710-99 - Fleet average non-methane organic gas exhaust emission standards for light-duty vehicles and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... follows: Table R99-15—Fleet Average Non-Methane Organic Gas Standards (g/mi) for Light-Duty Vehicles and... specifications of Tables R99-15 and R99-16 are less than or equal to the standards in Tables R99-15 and R99-16 in...-Methane Organic Gas Standards (g/mi) for Light-Duty Vehicles and Light Light-Duty Trucks Sold in the...

  17. 40 CFR 86.1710-99 - Fleet average non-methane organic gas exhaust emission standards for light-duty vehicles and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... follows: Table R99-15—Fleet Average Non-Methane Organic Gas Standards (g/mi) for Light-Duty Vehicles and... specifications of Tables R99-15 and R99-16 are less than or equal to the standards in Tables R99-15 and R99-16 in...-Methane Organic Gas Standards (g/mi) for Light-Duty Vehicles and Light Light-Duty Trucks Sold in the...

  18. Composition and concentrations of semi-volatile hydrocarbons. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinska, B.; Fung, K.; Sheetz, L.

    1992-08-01

    Nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHC) in ambient air are routinely analyzed for C2 to C10 species. The Caldecott Tunnel, located in the San Francisco area, was selected as a site dominated by motor vehicle emissions. The remaining sampling sites were: Los Angeles as a typical urban site, and Oildale as a site dominated by oil production. Whole air samples, analyzed for C2 through C12 hydrocarbons, were collected using the stainless steel canisters. Semi-volatile hydrocarbons, in the range of C8 to C18, were collected using Tenax-TA solid adsorbent. The samples were analyzed using high resolution gas chromatographic separation and Fourier transform infrared/mass spectrometric detection (GC/IRD/MSD) or flame ionization detection (FID) of individual hydrocarbons. The comparison of hydrocarbon concentrations found in the Tenax and canister samples and the assessment of the levels of semivolatile hydrocarbons (C10-C18 range) relative to total non-methane hydrocarbons (C2-C10 or C2-C12), as measured by the canister method, is presented. The results showed that the percent contribution of SVHC to TNMHC ranged from approximately 1 to approximately 18% depending on the carbon number arbitrarily selected as a starting point of SVHC range.

  19. Temperature-dependent ozone chemiluminescence: A new approach for hydrocarbon monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Marley, N.; Gaffney, J.

    1996-12-31

    Ozone chemiluminescent reactions have been used for some time to detect oxides of nitrogen, ozone, and olefins in air quality studies. Current procedures use non-methane hydrocarbon analyzers based on the flame ionization detector (FID), which quantitate total non-methane hydrocarbons but do not differentiate between the wide variety of volatile organic classes and oxygenates. The other methodology that has been used, gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS), can measure a variety of individual hydrocarbon species and classes, but it is costly, time-consuming, and labor intensive and is not amenable to real-time measurements. Presented here is preliminary research aimed at the development of an alternative to FID and GC/MS: the ozone chemiluminescent detector (OCD) for measurement of a variety of hydrocarbon species and classes by use of the temperature dependence of ozone chemiluminescent reactions. Responses for various hydrocarbon classes obtained with an OCD operated at 170 C or the FID were compared. The results indicate that the OCD detector responds like a total carbon detector at this temperature, with sensitivities 10-100 times higher than those of a FID. Use of the temperature dependence of the chemiluminescent reaction and prereactors will apparently make a real-time hydrocarbon analyzer based on this approach feasible for determination of high-, moderate-, and low-reactivity hydrocarbon levels in ambient air. The OCD approach may be very useful in determining oxygenate emissions from motor vehicles, particularly alternative fuels. The OCD may also be useful in monitoring of ambient air for natural hydrocarbon emissions.

  20. Characterizing reduced sulfur compounds and non-methane volatile organic compounds emissions from a swine concentrated animal feeding operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumsey, Ian Cooper

    Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) and non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) emissions from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have become a potential environmental and human health concern. Both RSCs and NMVOCs contribute to odor. In addition, RSCs also have the potential to form fine particulate matter (PMfine) and NMVOCs the potential to form ozone. Measurements of RSCs and NMVOCs emissions were made from both an anaerobic lagoon and barn at a swine CAFO in North Carolina. Emission measurements were made over all four seasonal periods. In each seasonal period, measurements were made from both the anaerobic lagoon and barn for ˜1 week. RSC and NMVOCs samples were collected using passivated canisters. Nine to eleven canister samples were taken from both the lagoon and barn over each sampling period. The canisters were analyzed ex-situ using gas chromatography flame ionization detection (GC-FID). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) measurements were made in-situ using a pulsed fluorescence H2S/SO2 analyzer. During sampling, measurements of meteorological and physiochemical parameters were made. H2S had the largest RSC flux, with an overall average lagoon flux of 1.33 mug m-2 min-1. The two main RSCs identified by the GC-FID, dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), had overall average lagoon fluxes an order of magnitude lower, 0.12 and 0.09 mug m-2 min-1, respectively. Twelve significant NMVOCs were identified in lagoon samples (ethanol, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, methanol, acetaldehyde, decanal, heptanal, hexanal, nonanal, octanal, acetone, methyl ethyl ketone, and 4-methylphenol). The overall average fluxes for these NMVOCs, ranged from 0.08 mug m-2 min-1 (4-methylphenol) to 2.11 mug m-2 min-1 (acetone). Seasonal H2S barn concentrations ranged from 72-631 ppb. DMS and DMDS seasonal concentrations were 2-3 orders of magnitude lower. There were six significant NMVOCs identified in barn samples (methanol, ethanol, acetone 2-3 butanedione, acetaldehyde

  1. Ambient Atmospheric Hydrocarbon Content as Determined by Gas Chromatographic Techniques from Rural Tidewater Virginia in Late Spring 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, G. E.; Davis, R.; Maroulis, P.; Bandy, A. R.; Denyszyn, R.; Kindle, E. C.

    1975-01-01

    In an attempt to ascertain the naturally generated hydrocarbon contribution to the air quality of the Hampton Roads region of Tidewater Virginia, a series of 27 air samples was obtained in two rural locations during late spring of 1974. These samples were analyzed for their hydrocarbon content (carbon number range C5 to C10) using gas chromatographic techniques. The thirty different hydrocarbon species were identified and monitored in the experiment. Preliminary analysis of the data indicates an average concentration of 397 parts per billion by weight (carbon) for the total non-methane hydrocarbon loading for C5 to C10 during the experiment. This value exceeds the National Primary Air Quality Standards as set by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  2. Sources of C₂-C₄ alkenes, the most important ozone nonmethane hydrocarbon precursors in the Pearl River Delta region.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Xinming; Zhang, Zhou; Lü, Sujun; Huang, Zhonghui; Li, Longfeng

    2015-01-01

    Surface ozone is becoming an increasing concern in China's megacities such as the urban centers located in the highly industrialized and densely populated Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, where previous studies suggested that ozone production is sensitive to VOC emissions with alkenes being important precursors. However, little was known about sources of alkenes. Here we present our monitoring of ambient volatile organic compounds at four representative urban, suburban and rural sites in the PRD region during November-December 2009, which experienced frequent ozone episodes. C2-C4 alkenes, whose total mixing ratios were 11-20% of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) quantified, accounted for 38-64% of ozone formation potentials (OFPs) and 30-50% of the total hydroxyl radical (OH) reactivity by NMHCs. Ethylene was the most abundant alkene, accounting for 8-15% in total mixing ratios of NMHCs and contributed 25-46% of OFPs. Correlations between C2-C4 alkenes and typical source tracers suggested that ethylene might be largely related to vehicle exhausts and industry activities, while propene and butenes were much more LPG-related. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) confirmed that vehicle exhaust and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) were two major sources that altogether accounted for 52-62%, 58-77%, 73-83%, 68-79% and 73-84% for ethylene, propene, 1-butene, trans-2-butene and cis-2-butene, respectively. Vehicle exhausts alone contributed 32-49% ethylene and 35-41% propene. Industry activities contributed 13-23% ethylene and 7-20% propene. LPG instead contributed the most to butenes (38-65%) and substantially to propene (23-36%). Extensive tests confirmed high fractions of propene and butenes in LPG then used in Guangzhou and in LPG combustion plumes; therefore, limiting alkene contents in LPG would benefit regional ozone control.

  3. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  4. PTR-MS measurements of non-methane volatile organic compounds during an intensive field campaign at the summit of Mount Tai, China, in June 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, S.; Tanimoto, H.; Kato, S.; Suthawaree, J.; Kanaya, Y.; Pochanart, P.; Liu, Y.; Wang, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Owing to recent industrialization, Central East China has become a significant source of air pollutants. To examine the processes controlling the chemistry and transport of tropospheric ozone, we continuously measured non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) as part of an intensive field campaign at Mount Tai, China, in June 2006 (MTX2006), using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Temporal variations of NMVOCs were recorded in mass-scan mode from m/z 17 to m/z 300 during 12-30 June 2006. More than thirty kinds of NMVOCs were detected up to m/z 160, including alkenes, aromatics, alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. Oxygenated VOCs were the predominant NMVOCs. During the night of 12 June, we observed an episode of high NMVOCs concentrations attributed to the burning of agricultural biomass. The ΔNMVOCs/ΔCO ratios derived by PTR-MS measurements for this episode are compared to emission ratios from various types of biomass burning as reviewed by Andreae and Merlet (2001) and to ratios recently measured by PTR-MS in tropical forests (Karl et al., 2007) and at urban sites (Warneke et al., 2007).

  5. PTR-MS measurements of non-methane volatile organic compounds during an intensive field campaign at the summit of Mount Tai, China, in June 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inomata, Satoshi; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Kato, Shungo; Suthawaree, Jeeranut; Kanaya, Yugo; Pochanart, Pakpong; Liu, Yu; Wang, Zifa

    2010-05-01

    Owing to recent industrialization, Central East China has become a significant source of air pollutants. To examine the processes controlling the chemistry and transport of tropospheric ozone, we continuously measured non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) as part of an intensive field campaign at Mount Tai, China, in June 2006 (MTX2006), using proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). Temporal variations of NMVOCs were recorded in mass-scan mode from m/z 17 to m/z 300 during 12-30 June 2006. More than thirty kinds of NMVOCs were detected up to m/z 160, including alkenes, aromatics, alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. Oxygenated VOCs were the predominant NMVOCs. During the night of 12 June, we observed an episode of high NMVOCs concentrations attributed to the burning of agricultural biomass. The NMVOCs/CO ratios derived by PTR-MS measurements for this episode are compared to emission ratios from various types of biomass burning as reviewed by Andreae and Merlet (2001) and to ratios recently measured by PTR-MS in tropical forests (Karl et al., 2007) and at urban sites (Warneke et al., 2007).

  6. Surface distributions of O 3, CO and hydrocarbons over the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea during pre-monsoon season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, S.; Lal, S.; Venkataramani, S.; Gupta, S.; Sheel, V.

    2012-02-01

    Mixing ratios of ozone (O 3), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH 4) and few light non methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) were measured on board the ocean research vessel Sagar Kanya over the Bay of Bengal and the Arabian Sea during the spring of 2006 as a part of an Integrated Campaign for Aerosol, gases and Radiation Budget (ICARB). North-westerly winds prevailing during this period transport large amount of anthropogenic pollutants from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) to the northern part of Bay of Bengal. The south-westerly and north-westerly winds carried cleaner marine air having lower abundance of pollutants over the southern Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea. Ozone, CH 4, CO, ethane and n-butane are found to be well correlated with each other over the northern Bay of Bengal indicating their common co-located sources. The latitudinal gradients of these species are found to be significant (O 3 ˜ 5.4 ppbv deg -1, CH 4 ˜ 5.3 ppbv deg -1, CO ˜ 10 ppbv deg -1, ethane ˜ 93.2 pptv deg -1 and n-butane ˜ 59.7 pptv deg -1) over this region. Surprisingly, and in contrast to over the Bay of Bengal, the mixing ratios of these trace gases over the Arabian Sea are found comparatively higher over the southern region than over the northern region leading to negative latitudinal gradients. The short lived species with oceanic sources like ethene and propene show large variability and higher mixing ratios over southern parts of both the marine regions. These observations are compared with previous measurements made over these marine regions and the results obtained from the 3D MOZART chemistry transport model. The present study shows that the two marine regions adjacent to the Indian subcontinent are completely different from the perspective of surface level distributions of these species.

  7. The hydrocarbon composition of exhaust emitted from gasoline fuelled vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, P. F.; Quigley, S. M.

    The non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) compositions of the exhausts from 67 vehicles in 'on the road' condition and driven through an urban driving cycle on a chassis dynamometer, have been determined. The major components were ethylene (11.2% w/w of NMHC), toluene (10.2%), acetylene (8.7%), m, p-Xylenes(6.5%), benzene (5.0%), propylene (5.0%) and i-pentane(4.8%). These compounds have also been reported as significant components in the exhausts from two similar populations of American vehicles. The NMHC compositions were found to be insensitive to the mass emission rates of hydrocarbons from the vehicles, except for the combustion-derived olefins, ethylene and propylene, which were affected by engine modifications introduced to satisfy emission control requirements. A close relationship was found between petrol composition and exhaust composition but this did not correspond simply to emissions of unburnt petrol. The aromatics are enriched relative to the alkanes in exhaust when compared with their proportions in the petrol.

  8. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Lea-Smith, David J; Biller, Steven J; Davey, Matthew P; Cotton, Charles A R; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M; Turchyn, Alexandra V; Scanlan, David J; Smith, Alison G; Chisholm, Sallie W; Howe, Christopher J

    2015-11-03

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2-540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼ 308-771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities.

  9. Contribution of cyanobacterial alkane production to the ocean hydrocarbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Lea-Smith, David J.; Biller, Steven J.; Davey, Matthew P.; Cotton, Charles A. R.; Perez Sepulveda, Blanca M.; Turchyn, Alexandra V.; Scanlan, David J.; Smith, Alison G.; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are ubiquitous in the ocean, where alkanes such as pentadecane and heptadecane can be found even in waters minimally polluted with crude oil. Populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, which are responsible for the turnover of these compounds, are also found throughout marine systems, including in unpolluted waters. These observations suggest the existence of an unknown and widespread source of hydrocarbons in the oceans. Here, we report that strains of the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus, produce and accumulate hydrocarbons, predominantly C15 and C17 alkanes, between 0.022 and 0.368% of dry cell weight. Based on global population sizes and turnover rates, we estimate that these species have the capacity to produce 2–540 pg alkanes per mL per day, which translates into a global ocean yield of ∼308–771 million tons of hydrocarbons annually. We also demonstrate that both obligate and facultative marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria can consume cyanobacterial alkanes, which likely prevents these hydrocarbons from accumulating in the environment. Our findings implicate cyanobacteria and hydrocarbon degraders as key players in a notable internal hydrocarbon cycle within the upper ocean, where alkanes are continually produced and subsequently consumed within days. Furthermore we show that cyanobacterial alkane production is likely sufficient to sustain populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria, whose abundances can rapidly expand upon localized release of crude oil from natural seepage and human activities. PMID:26438854

  10. Compilation of a biogenic hydrocarbon emissions inventory for evaluating ozone-control strategies in the San Francisco Bay Area

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Moreland, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    The body of information presented is directed to planners and engineers concerned with developing ozone control strategies. A biogenic hydrocarbon emissions inventory for the San Francisco Bay Area has been prepared for use in determining the degree of hydrocarbon emissions control needed to attain the ozone standard. Remote sensing imagery was used to characterize the regional vegetation distribution, and a Delphi survey of scientists familiar with biogenic emissions was used to provide biogenic hydrocarbon emission factors. For a hypothetical 24-hour period of twelve hours of darkness and twelve hours of light, biogenic sources in the nine-county Bay Area were estimated to produce about 4.5 x 10/sup 5/ kg (500 tons) of total non-methane hydrocarbons; the uncertainty of this estimate was calculated to be +- 50%. The biogenic emissions were found to represent about 33% of the man-made and natural hydrocarbon emissions in the region. The magnitude of the biogenic emissions inventory is not the key factor from which the contribution of biogenic sources to urban ozone production can be discerned. Photochemical dispersion modeling of the total (man-made plus natural) hydrocarbon emissions inventory is recommended as a tool to help understand the contribution of biogenic sources to excessive amounts of the ozone standard in the San Francisco Bay Area.

  11. Natural hydrocarbon emission estimates based on Landsat data as an input to a regional ozone photochemical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, E. M.; Gervin, J. C.; Salop, J.

    1982-01-01

    Landsat-derived forest cover data were employed with non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) emission rates in a model to quantify summer forest ozone production for the Tidewater Region of Virginia. The areal extent of the three major forest types - coniferous, deciduous, and mixed - were determined from Landsat data on two adjacent scenes, using an unsupervised approach to spectral signature development. The forest type results from both data sets were verified in an extensive accuracy assessment and merged to provide regional statistics for total acreages, percent forest, and error rates. The Landsat statistics were incorporated into forest type emission factor equations to produce an estimated emission rate for natural hydrocarbons from forests. This estimate, along with measured rates for nitrogen oxides and NMHC from anthropogenic sources, was provided as input to computer simulations of atmospheric ozone generation for the Tidewater Region using a photochemical oxident model.

  12. Climatically driven emissions of hydrocarbons from marine sediments during deglaciation

    PubMed Central

    Hill, T. M.; Kennett, J. P.; Valentine, D. L.; Yang, Z.; Reddy, C. M.; Nelson, R. K.; Behl, R. J.; Robert, C.; Beaufort, L.

    2006-01-01

    Marine hydrocarbon seepage emits oil and gas, including methane (≈30 Tg of CH4 per year), to the ocean and atmosphere. Sediments from the California margin contain preserved tar, primarily formed through hydrocarbon weathering at the sea surface. We present a record of variation in the abundance of tar in sediments for the past 32,000 years, providing evidence for increases in hydrocarbon emissions before and during Termination IA [16,000 years ago (16 ka) to 14 ka] and again over Termination IB (11–10 ka). Our study provides direct evidence for increased hydrocarbon seepage associated with deglacial warming through tar abundance in marine sediments, independent of previous geochemical proxies. Climate-sensitive gas hydrates may modulate thermogenic hydrocarbon seepage during deglaciation. PMID:16945904

  13. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cronin, John R.; Pizzarello, Sandra

    1990-01-01

    Hydrocarbon fractions from the Murchison meteorite were prepared using benzene-methanol as the extraction solvent, fractionated on silica gel columns, and analyzed using gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry and IR and NMR techniques. Results indicate that the most abundant aliphatic hydrocarbon components of the Murchison meteorite are C15 to C30 branched-alkyl-substituted mono-, di-, and tricyclic alkanes. It is shown that the n-alkanes, methyl alkanes, and isoprenoid alkanes that are sometimes found in extracts of the Murchison meteorite are terrestrial contaminants.

  14. New observational constraints on hydrocarbon chemistry in Saturn's upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, Tommi; Moses, Julianne I.; West, Robert; Guerlet, Sandrine; Jouchoux, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Until now there have been only a few observations of hydrocarbons and photochemical haze in the region where they are produced in Saturn's upper atmosphere. We present new results on hydrocarbon abundances and atmospheric structure based on more than 40 stellar occultations observed by the Cassini/UVIS instrument that we have combined with results from Cassini/CIRS to generate full atmosphere structure models. In addition to detecting CH4, C2H2, C2H4 and C2H6, we detect benzene (C6H6) in UVIS occultations that probe different latitudes and present the first vertical abundance profiles for this species in its production region. Benzene is the simplest ring polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and a stepping stone to the formation of more complex molecules that are believed to form stratospheric haze. Our calculations show that the observed abundances of benzene can be explained by solar-driven ion chemistry that is enhanced by high-latitude auroral production at least in the northern spring hemisphere. Condensation of benzene and heavier hydrocarbons is possible in the cold polar night of the southern winter where we detect evidence for high altitude haze. We also report on substantial variability in the CH4 profiles that arise from dynamics and affects the minor hydrocarbon abundances. Our results demonstrate the importance of hydrocarbon ion chemistry and coupled models of chemistry and dynamics for future studies of Saturn's upper atmosphere.

  15. Imaging fluid/solid interactions in hydrocarbon reservoir rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Uwins, P.J.R.; Baker, J.C.; Mackinnon, I.D.R. . Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis)

    1993-08-01

    The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) has been used to image liquid hydrocarbons in sandstones and oil shales. Additionally, the fluid sensitivity of selected clay minerals in hydrocarbon reservoirs was assessed via three case studies: HCl acid sensitivity of authigenic chlorite in sandstone reservoirs, freshwater sensitivity of authigenic illite/smectite in sandstone reservoir, and bleach sensitivity of a volcanic reservoir containing abundant secondary chlorite/corrensite. The results showed the suitability of using ESEM for imaging liquid hydrocarbon films in hydrocarbon reservoirs and the importance of simulating in situ fluid-rock interactions for hydrocarbon production programs. In each case, results of the ESEM studies greatly enhanced prediction of reservoir/borehole reactions and, in some cases, contradicted conventional wisdom regarding the outcome of potential engineering solutions.

  16. Imaging fluid/solid interactions in hydrocarbon reservoir rocks.

    PubMed

    Uwins, P J; Baker, J C; Mackinnon, I D

    1993-08-01

    The environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) has been used to image liquid hydrocarbons in sandstones and oil shales. Additionally, the fluid sensitivity of selected clay minerals in hydrocarbon reservoirs was assessed via three case studies: HCl acid sensitivity of authigenic chlorite in sandstone reservoirs, freshwater sensitivity of authigenic illite/smectite in sandstone reservoirs, and bleach sensitivity of a volcanic reservoir containing abundant secondary chlorite/corrensite. The results showed the suitability of using ESEM for imaging liquid hydrocarbon films in hydrocarbon reservoirs and the importance of simulating in situ fluid-rock interactions for hydrocarbon production programmes. In each case, results of the ESEM studies greatly enhanced prediction of reservoir/borehole reactions and, in some cases, contradicted conventional wisdom regarding the outcome of potential engineering solutions.

  17. Volatile hydrocarbons inhibit methanogenic crude oil degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sherry, Angela; Grant, Russell J.; Aitken, Carolyn M.; Jones, D. Martin; Head, Ian M.; Gray, Neil D.

    2014-01-01

    Methanogenic degradation of crude oil in subsurface sediments occurs slowly, but without the need for exogenous electron acceptors, is sustained for long periods and has enormous economic and environmental consequences. Here we show that volatile hydrocarbons are inhibitory to methanogenic oil biodegradation by comparing degradation of an artificially weathered crude oil with volatile hydrocarbons removed, with the same oil that was not weathered. Volatile hydrocarbons (nC5–nC10, methylcyclohexane, benzene, toluene, and xylenes) were quantified in the headspace of microcosms. Aliphatic (n-alkanes nC12–nC34) and aromatic hydrocarbons (4-methylbiphenyl, 3-methylbiphenyl, 2-methylnaphthalene, 1-methylnaphthalene) were quantified in the total hydrocarbon fraction extracted from the microcosms. 16S rRNA genes from key microorganisms known to play an important role in methanogenic alkane degradation (Smithella and Methanomicrobiales) were quantified by quantitative PCR. Methane production from degradation of weathered oil in microcosms was rapid (1.1 ± 0.1 μmol CH4/g sediment/day) with stoichiometric yields consistent with degradation of heavier n-alkanes (nC12–nC34). For non-weathered oil, degradation rates in microcosms were significantly lower (0.4 ± 0.3 μmol CH4/g sediment/day). This indicated that volatile hydrocarbons present in the non-weathered oil inhibit, but do not completely halt, methanogenic alkane biodegradation. These findings are significant with respect to rates of biodegradation of crude oils with abundant volatile hydrocarbons in anoxic, sulphate-depleted subsurface environments, such as contaminated marine sediments which have been entrained below the sulfate-reduction zone, as well as crude oil biodegradation in petroleum reservoirs and contaminated aquifers. PMID:24765087

  18. Hydrocarbon emissions in the Bakken oil field in North Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke-Maday, I.; Petron, G.; Miller, B.; Frost, G. J.; Peischl, J.; Kort, E. A.; Smith, M. L.; Karion, A.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Montzka, S. A.; Sweeney, C.; Ryerson, T. B.; Tans, P. P.; Schnell, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    Within the past five years, the production of oil and natural gas in the United States from tight formations has increased rapidly due to advances in technology, such as horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. With the expansion of oil and natural gas extraction operations comes the need to better quantify their emissions and potential impacts on climate forcing and air quality. The Bakken formation within the Williston Basin in North Dakota has emerged as a large contributor to the recent growth in oil production and accounts for over 10% of domestic production. Close to 30% of associated gas co-produced with the oil is flared. Very little independent information is currently available to assess the oil and gas industry emissions and their impacts on regional air quality. In May 2014, an airborne field campaign was conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Earth System Research Laboratory and the University of Michigan to investigate hydrocarbon emissions from operations in the oil field. Here, we present results from the analysis for methane, several non-methane hydrocarbons and combustion tracers in 72 discrete air samples collected by the aircraft on nine different flights. Samples were obtained in the boundary layer upwind and downwind of the operations and in the free troposphere. We will show results of a multiple species analysis and compare them with field campaign data from other U.S. oil and gas fields, measurements from NOAA's Global Monitoring Division long-term observing network, and available bottom-up information on emissions from oil and gas operations.

  19. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in estuarine sediments: metal influence.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Raquel; Mucha, Ana P; Teixeira, Catarina; Bordalo, Adriano A; Almeida, C Marisa R

    2013-02-01

    In this work, the potential effect of metals, such as Cd, Cu and Pb, on the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in estuarine sediments was investigated under laboratory conditions. Sandy and muddy non-vegetated sediments were collected in the Lima River estuary (NW Portugal) and spiked with crude oil and each of the metals. Spiked sediments were left in the dark under constant shaking for 15 days, after which crude oil biodegradation was evaluated. To estimate microbial abundance, total cell counts were obtained by DAPI staining and microbial community structure was characterized by ARISA. Culturable hydrocarbon degraders were determined using a modified most probable number protocol. Total petroleum hydrocarbons concentrations were analysed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy after their extraction by sonication, and metal contents were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. The results obtained showed that microbial communities had the potential to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons, with a maximum of 32 % degradation obtained for sandy sediments. Both crude oil and metals changed the microbial community structure, being the higher effect observed for Cu. Also, among the studied metals, only Cu displayed measurable deleterious effect on the hydrocarbons degradation process, as shown by a decrease in the hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms abundance and in the hydrocarbon degradation rates. Both degradation potential and metal influence varied with sediment characteristics probably due to differences in contaminant bioavailability, a feature that should be taken into account in developing bioremediation strategies for co-contaminated estuarine sites.

  20. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  1. Oxygenated Derivatives of Hydrocarbons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For the book entitled “Insect Hydrocarbons: Biology, Biochemistry and Chemical Ecology”, this chapter presents a comprehensive review of the occurrence, structure and function of oxygenated derivatives of hydrocarbons. The book chapter focuses on the occurrence, structural identification and functi...

  2. Recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing vapors

    DOEpatents

    Mirza, Zia I.; Knell, Everett W.; Winter, Bruce L.

    1980-09-30

    Values are recovered from a hydrocarbon-containing vapor by contacting the vapor with quench liquid consisting essentially of hydrocarbons to form a condensate and a vapor residue, the condensate and quench fluid forming a combined liquid stream. The combined liquid stream is mixed with a viscosity-lowering liquid to form a mixed liquid having a viscosity lower than the viscosity of the combined liquid stream to permit easy handling of the combined liquid stream. The quench liquid is a cooled portion of the mixed liquid. Viscosity-lowering liquid is separated from a portion of the mixed liquid and cycled to form additional mixed liquid.

  3. Plant hydrocarbon recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Dzadzic, P.M.; Price, M.C.; Shih, C.J.; Weil, T.A.

    1982-01-26

    A process for production and recovery of hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing whole plants in a form suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon energy sources which process comprises: (A) pulverizing by grinding or chopping hydrocarbon-containing whole plants selected from the group consisting of euphorbiaceae, apocynaceae, asclepiadaceae, compositae, cactaceae and pinaceae families to a suitable particle size, (B) drying and preheating said particles in a reducing atmosphere under positive pressure (C) passing said particles through a thermal conversion zone containing a reducing atmosphere and with a residence time of 1 second to about 30 minutes at a temperature within the range of from about 200* C. To about 1000* C., (D) separately recovering the condensable vapors as liquids and the noncondensable gases in a condition suitable for use as chemical feedstocks or as hydrocarbon fuels.

  4. Subsea hydrocarbon sensor system

    SciTech Connect

    Marosko, R.J.; Warren, W.B.

    1981-08-04

    A hydrocarbon detection system is provided for use in a subsea hydrocarbon production installation which includes production tree assemblies, an electro-hydraulic control module located on the sea floor and remote from the production trees, cable assemblies interconnecting the control module with the production trees through magnetic coupling devices. A pair of inductive elements are electrically coupled by the surrounding sea water. Displacement of the conductive sea water by escaping hydrocarbons affects the coupling between the inductive elements to produce a hydrocarbon-presence-responsive output signal. The inductive elements are resonated within a selected frequency range by capacitors coupled with a primary inductor coil by auxiliary windings on a common core element. An excitation signal sweeps over the selected frequency range at a rate effective to produce a peak detected signal at the resonant frequency. The peak output signal is then monitored to form a control signal functionally related to the presence or absence of hydrocarbons in the sea water.

  5. Abundances in Przybylski's star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, C. R.; Ryabchikova, T.; Kupka, F.; Bord, D. J.; Mathys, G.; Bidelman, W. P.

    2000-09-01

    We have derived abundances for 54 elements in the extreme roAp star HD101065. ESO spectra with a resolution of about 80000, and S/N of 200 or more were employed. The adopted model has Teff=6600K, and log(g)=4.2. Because of the increased line opacity and consequent low gas pressure, convection plays no significant role in the temperature structure. Lighter elemental abundances through the iron group scatter about standard abundance distribution (SAD) (solar) values. Iron and nickel are about one order of magnitude deficient while cobalt is enhanced by 1.5dex. Heavier elements, including the lanthanides, generally follow the solar pattern but enhanced by 3 to 4dex. Odd-Z elements are generally less abundant than their even-Z neighbours. With a few exceptions (e.g. Yb), the abundance pattern among the heavy elements is remarkably coherent, and resembles a displaced solar distribution.

  6. Identifying Hydrocarbon Source Region Emission Signatures for Oil and Gas Facilities and Beyond Using Ambient Concentration Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, B.; Lary, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) has fourteen stations in the Barnett Shale that take ambient concentration measurements of forty-six non-methane hydrocarbons. We gathered all measurements for the period of October 16-31, 2013, and applied Lagrangian trajectories to each air parcel that was measured, to achieve a domain filling of the Barnett region. Regular grids of concentration values for each VOC at each hour were constructed, then implemented into an unsupervised machine learning classification. This self-organizing map assigned classification numbers to each grid cell in each hourly grid, where a class number essentially corresponded with a signature of representative concentration values for all forty-six hydrocarbons. Two hundred was determined to be an appropriate number of classes for this classification. Similarly, we applied a self-organizing map to the wind speed and resultant direction measurements recorded at each station. This classification grouped together the hours in our time frame into six distinct wind regimes. Concentration class numbers were analyzed for different wind regimes, and for the whole time period. A grouping of classes with numbers in the middle-to-upper forties was discovered near and downwind of oil and gas facilities. The validity and accuracy of this method was confirmed by performing a site-by-site comparison against an independent study which analyzed the VOC concentrations at three TCEQ stations. This opened the door to expand the dataset to include other ground-based measurements of both non-methane VOC and methane concentrations, to further trace back emission sources.

  7. Plasma Processing Of Hydrocarbon

    SciTech Connect

    Grandy, Jon D; Peter C. Kong; Brent A. Detering; Larry D. Zuck

    2007-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed several patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon processing. The INL patents include nonthermal and thermal plasma technologies for direct natural gas to liquid conversion, upgrading low value heavy oil to synthetic light crude, and to convert refinery bottom heavy streams directly to transportation fuel products. Proof of concepts has been demonstrated with bench scale plasma processes and systems to convert heavy and light hydrocarbons to higher market value products. This paper provides an overview of three selected INL patented plasma technologies for hydrocarbon conversion or upgrade.

  8. Process for preparing hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Breuker, J.H.; De H.H.; Kwant, P.B.

    1980-01-15

    A process for preparing light distillate fractions and medicinal oil from heavy hydrocarbon oils comprises two-stage hydrocracking, fractionation distillation and catalytic hydrotreatment of at least part of the fractionation residue.

  9. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  10. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Funk, Edward W.; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Chang, Y. Alice

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture over a polymeric membrane which comprises a polymer capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds at temperature ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psi. The membranes which possess pore sizes ranging from about 10 to about 500 Angstroms are cast from a solvent solution and recovered.

  11. Interstellar Dust Models Consistent with Extinction, Emission, and Abundance Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubko, Viktor; Dwek, Eli; Arendt, Richard G.

    2004-01-01

    We present new interstellar dust models which have been derived by simultaneously fitting the far ultraviolet to near infrared extinction, the diffuse infrared emission, and, unlike previous models, the elemental abundances in dust for the diffuse interstellar medium. We found that dust models consisting of a mixture of spherical graphite and silicate grains, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, in addition to porous composite particles containing silicate, organic refractory, and water ice, provide an improved .t to the UV-to-infrared extinction and infrared emission measurements, while consuming the amounts of elements well within the uncertainties of adopted interstellar abundances, including B star abundances. These models are a signi.cant improvement over the recent Li & Draine (2001, ApJ, 554, 778) model which requires an excessive amount of silicon to be locked up in dust: 48 ppm (atoms per million of H atoms), considerably more than the solar abundance of 34 ppm or the B star abundance of 19 ppm.

  12. Net Ecosystem Fluxes of Hydrocarbons from a Ponderosa Pine Forest in Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Turnipseed, A. A.; Ortega, J. V.; Smith, J. N.; Guenther, A. B.; Shen, S.; Martinez, L.; Koss, A.; Warneke, C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Deventer, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Light (C2-C4) alkenes, light alkanes and isoprene (C5H8) are non-methane hydrocarbons that play important roles in the photochemical production of tropospheric ozone and in the formation of secondary organic aerosols. Natural terrestrial fluxes of the light hydrocarbons are poorly characterized, with global emission estimates based on limited field measurements. In 2014, net fluxes of these compounds were measured at the Manitou Experimental Forest Observatory, a semi-arid ponderosa pine forest in the Colorado Rocky Mountains and site of the prior BEACHON campaigns. Three field intensives were conducted between June 17 and August 10, 2014. Net ecosystem flux measurements utilized a relaxed eddy accumulation system coupled to an automated gas chromatograph. Summertime average emissions of ethene and propene were up to 90% larger than those observed from a temperate deciduous forest. Ethene and propene fluxes were also correlated to each other, similar to the deciduous forest study. Emissions of isoprene were small, as expected for a coniferous forest, and these fluxes were not correlated with either ethene or propene. Unexpected emissions of light alkanes were also observed, and these showed a distinct diurnal cycle. Understory flux measurements allowed for the partitioning of fluxes between the surface and the canopy. Full results from the three field intensives will be compared with environmental variables in order to parameterize the fluxes for use in modeling emissions.

  13. Noble gas and hydrocarbon tracers in multiphase unconventional hydrocarbon systems: Toward integrated advanced reservoir simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, T.; Moortgat, J.; Poreda, R. J.; Muehlenbachs, K.; Whyte, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional energy resources has increased dramatically in the last decade, total unconventional oil and gas recovery from black shales is still less than 25% and 9% of the totals in place, respectively. Further, the majority of increased hydrocarbon production results from increasing the lengths of laterals, the number of hydraulic fracturing stages, and the volume of consumptive water usage. These strategies all reduce the economic efficiency of hydrocarbon extraction. The poor recovery statistics result from an insufficient understanding of some of the key physical processes in complex, organic-rich, low porosity formations (e.g., phase behavior, fluid-rock interactions, and flow mechanisms at nano-scale confinement and the role of natural fractures and faults as conduits for flow). Noble gases and other hydrocarbon tracers are capably of recording subsurface fluid-rock interactions on a variety of geological scales (micro-, meso-, to macro-scale) and provide analogs for the movement of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. As such geochemical data enrich the input for the numerical modeling of multi-phase (e.g., oil, gas, and brine) fluid flow in highly heterogeneous, low permeability formations Herein we will present a combination of noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe abundances and isotope ratios) and molecular and isotopic hydrocarbon data from a geographically and geologically diverse set of unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs in North America. Specifically, we will include data from the Marcellus, Utica, Barnett, Eagle Ford, formations and the Illinois basin. Our presentation will include geochemical and geological interpretation and our perspective on the first steps toward building an advanced reservoir simulator for tracer transport in multicomponent multiphase compositional flow (presented separately, in Moortgat et al., 2015).

  14. Anaerobic degradation of propane and butane by sulfate-reducing bacteria enriched from marine hydrocarbon cold seeps

    PubMed Central

    Jaekel, Ulrike; Musat, Niculina; Adam, Birgit; Kuypers, Marcel; Grundmann, Olav; Musat, Florin

    2013-01-01

    The short-chain, non-methane hydrocarbons propane and butane can contribute significantly to the carbon and sulfur cycles in marine environments affected by oil or natural gas seepage. In the present study, we enriched and identified novel propane and butane-degrading sulfate reducers from marine oil and gas cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico and Hydrate Ridge. The enrichment cultures obtained were able to degrade simultaneously propane and butane, but not other gaseous alkanes. They were cold-adapted, showing highest sulfate-reduction rates between 16 and 20 °C. Analysis of 16S rRNA gene libraries, followed by whole-cell hybridizations with sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes showed that each enrichment culture was dominated by a unique phylotype affiliated with the Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cluster within the Deltaproteobacteria. These phylotypes formed a distinct phylogenetic cluster of propane and butane degraders, including sequences from environments associated with hydrocarbon seeps. Incubations with 13C-labeled substrates, hybridizations with sequence-specific probes and nanoSIMS analyses showed that cells of the dominant phylotypes were the first to become enriched in 13C, demonstrating that they were directly involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Furthermore, using the nanoSIMS data, carbon assimilation rates were calculated for the dominant cells in each enrichment culture. PMID:23254512

  15. Hydrocarbon provinces and productive trends in Libya and adjacent areas

    SciTech Connect

    Missallati, A.A. Ltd., Tripoli )

    1988-08-01

    According to the age of major reservoirs, hydrocarbon occurrences in Libya and adjacent areas can be grouped into six major systems which, according to their geographic locations, can be classified into two major hydrocarbon provinces: (1) Sirte-Pelagian basins province, with major reservoirs ranging from middle-late Mesozoic to early Tertiary, and (2) Murzog-Ghadames basins province, with major reservoirs ranging from early Paleozoic to early Mesozoic. In the Sirte-Pelagian basins province, hydrocarbons have been trapped in structural highs or in stratigraphic wedge-out against structural highs and in carbonate buildups. Here, hydrocarbon generation is characterized by the combined effect of abundant structural relief and reservoir development in the same hydrocarbon systems of the same age, providing an excellent example of hydrocarbon traps in sedimentary basins that have undergone extensive tensional fracturing in a shallow marine environment. In the Murzog-Ghadames basins province, hydrocarbons have been trapped mainly in structural highs controlled by paleostructural trends as basement arches which acted as focal points for oil migration and accumulation.

  16. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro; Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei; Yokoya, Takayoshi; Kambe, Takashi; Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L. T.; Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya

    2015-07-01

    'Aromatic hydrocarbon' implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (Kxpicene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (Tc's) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting Kxpicene phase with a Tc as high as 14 K, so we now know that Kxpicene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides Kxpicene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rbxpicene and Caxpicene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for Kxpicene and Rbxpicene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of Tc that is clearly observed in some phases of aromatic hydrocarbon superconductors, suggesting behavior not explained by the standard BCS picture of superconductivity. In this article, we describe the present status of this research field, and discuss its future prospects.

  17. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  18. Hydrocarbon fuel detergent

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, G.R.; Lyons, W.R.

    1990-01-23

    This patent describes a hydrocarbon fuel composition comprising: a hydrocarbon fuel; and a detergent amount of a detergent comprising an alkenylsuccinimide prepared by reacting an alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride with a mixture of amines, wherein at least 90 weight percent of the alkenyl substituent is derived from an olefin having a carbon chain of from 10 to 30 carbons or mixtures thereof, and wherein the alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride is reacted with the mixture of amines at a mole ratio of 0.8 to 1.5 moles of the amines per mole of the alkenylsuccinic acid or anhydride.

  19. Determining the Metabolic Footprints of Hydrocarbon Degradation Using Multivariate Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Renee. J.; Jeffries, Thomas C.; Adetutu, Eric M.; Fairweather, Peter G.; Mitchell, James G.

    2013-01-01

    The functional dynamics of microbial communities are largely responsible for the clean-up of hydrocarbons in the environment. However, knowledge of the distinguishing functional genes, known as the metabolic footprint, present in hydrocarbon-impacted sites is still scarcely understood. Here, we conducted several multivariate analyses to characterise the metabolic footprints present in a variety of hydrocarbon-impacted and non-impacted sediments. Non-metric multi-dimensional scaling (NMDS) and canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) showed a clear distinction between the two groups. A high relative abundance of genes associated with cofactors, virulence, phages and fatty acids were present in the non-impacted sediments, accounting for 45.7 % of the overall dissimilarity. In the hydrocarbon-impacted sites, a high relative abundance of genes associated with iron acquisition and metabolism, dormancy and sporulation, motility, metabolism of aromatic compounds and cell signalling were observed, accounting for 22.3 % of the overall dissimilarity. These results suggest a major shift in functionality has occurred with pathways essential to the degradation of hydrocarbons becoming overrepresented at the expense of other, less essential metabolisms. PMID:24282619

  20. Ammonia abundances in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.; Engel, L.

    The emission band strengths of the NH2 bands of Comets Halley, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Borrelly were measured to determine the NH2 column densities for the comets. Production rates obtained using the Haser and vectorial models are in agreement within the observational errors, suggesting that a simple two-step decay model may be used to approximate the NH2 distribution in a comet's coma. Ammonia-to-water abundance ratios from 0.01 to 0.4 percent were found for the four comets. The ratio in Comet Halley is found to be Q(NH3)/Q(H2O) = 0.002 + or - 0.001. No significant difference in the ammonia abundance was found before or after perihelion in Comet Halley.

  1. Zeroing in on hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Roest, I.P.B. van der; Brasser, D.J.S.; Wagebaert, A.P.J.; Stam, P.H.

    1997-05-01

    The increasing costs of remediating contaminated sites has stimulated research for cost-reducing techniques in soil investigation and cleanup techniques. MAP Environmental Research has developed a technology using ground penetrating radar in combination with in house developed software to locate and define the extent of hydrocarbon contamination. This article discusses the new technology. 2 figs.

  2. Hydrocarbon options emerge

    SciTech Connect

    Fairley, P.

    1995-11-01

    Europe stole the scene at last week`s International Chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and Halon Alternatives Conference in Washington as attendees learned more about an accelerating shift to low-cost hydrocarbon refrigerants by European equipment manufacturers. Udo Wenning, representing German refrigerator market leader Bosch-Siemens, told the conference that hydrocarbons-isobutane as refrigerant and cyclopentane to blow the insulating foam-are now used in 90% of German production. Wenning says that in all performance parameters, hydrocarbons match the hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) and hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) replacements favored in the U.S. and Japan and that, unlike HCFCs and HFCs they have low global warming potential. Their Achille`s heel is flammability, Wenning says. American equipment manufacturers aiming to sell a new generation of equipment designed for the new HFC refrigerants sought to amplify concern over flammability at the conference. {open_quotes}In a society as litigious as ours, we do not see a future for flammable refrigerants,{close_quotes} says a representative of air conditioner manufacturer Carrier. Hydrocarbon supporters such as Greenpeace say the risks are mananageable.

  3. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Holly; Milanovich, Fred P.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Miller, Fred S.

    1988-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  4. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Holly; Milanovich, Fred P.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Miller, Fred S.

    1987-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  5. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.; Milanovich, F.P.; Hirschfeld, T.B.; Miller, F.S.

    1987-05-19

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons. 6 figs.

  6. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Miller, H.; Milanovich, F.P.; Hirschfeld, T.B.; Miller, F.S.

    1988-09-13

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons. 5 figs.

  7. Polycyclic hydrocarbons and cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gelboin, H.V.P; Ts'o, P.O.P.

    1981-01-01

    This book is Volume 3 of a three-volume series. It discusses polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the marine environment, various PAH dihydrodiols, certain enzyme reactions, carcinogenesis modifications, and tumor promotion. PAH epidemiology for quantifying cigarette smoking and air pollution risks is also covered. (JMT)

  8. Apparatus and methods for hydrocarbon extraction

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2016-04-26

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  9. Hydrocarbonization research: completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, E.L.; Cochran, H.D. Jr.; Westmoreland, P.R.; Brown, C.H. Jr.; Oswald, G.E.; Barker, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbonization is a relatively simple process used for producing oil, substitute natural gas, and char by heating coal under a hydrogen-rich atmosphere. This report describes studies that were performed in a bench-scale hydrocarbonization system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period 1975 to 1978. The results of mock-up studies, coal metering valve and flowmeter development, and supporting work in an atmospheric hydrocarbonization system are also described. Oil, gas, and char yields were determined by hydrocarbonization of coal in a 0.1-m-diam fluidized-bed reactor operated at a pressure of 2170 kPa and at temperatures ranging from 694 to 854 K. The nominal coal feed rate was 4.5 kg/h. Wyodak subbituminous coal was used for most of the experiments. A maximum oil yield of approx. 21% based on moisture- and ash-free (maf) coal was achieved in the temperature range of 810 to 840 K. Recirculating fluidized-bed, uniformly fluidized-bed, and rapid hydropyrolysis reactors were used. A series of operability tests was made with Illinois No. 6 coal to determine whether caking coal could be processed in the recirculating fluidized-bed reactor. These tests were generally unsuccessful because of agglomeration and caking problems; however, these problems were eliminated by the use of chemically pretreated coal. Hydrocarbonization experiments were carried out with Illinois No. 6 coal that had been pretreated with CaO-NaOH, Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, and CaO-Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/. Oil yields of 14, 24, and 21%, respectively, were obtained from the runs with treated coal. Gas and char yield data and the composition of the oil, gas, and char products are presented.

  10. Mantle hydrocarbons: Abiotic or biotic?

    SciTech Connect

    Sugisaki, Ryuichi; Mimura, Koichi

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) and peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro and granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from field contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here {open_quotes}mantle hydrocarbons.{close_quotes} The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) {delta}{sup 13}C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about {minus}27{per_thousand}). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were inorganically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH{sub 4} at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C{sub 4}H{sub 10}. 76 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Mantle hydrocarbons: abiotic or biotic?

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, R; Mimura, K

    1994-06-01

    Analyses of 227 rocks from fifty localities throughout the world showed that mantle derived rocks such as tectonized peridotites in ophiolite sequences (tectonites) arid peridotite xenoliths in alkali basalts contain heavier hydrocarbons (n-alkanes), whereas igneous rocks produced by magmas such as gabbro arid granite lack them. The occurrence of hydrocarbons indicates that they were not derived either from laboratory contamination or from held contamination; these compounds found in the mantle-derived rocks are called here "mantle hydrocarbons." The existence of hydrocarbons correlates with petrogenesis. For example, peridotite cumulates produced by magmatic differentiation lack hydrocarbons whereas peridotite xenoliths derived from the mantle contain them. Gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric records of the mantle hydrocarbons resemble those of aliphatics in meteorites and in petroleum. Features of the hydrocarbons are that (a) the mantle hydrocarbons reside mainly along grain boundaries and in fluid inclusions of minerals; (b) heavier isoprenoids such as pristane and phytane are present; and (c) delta 13C of the mantle hydrocarbons is uniform (about -27%). Possible origins for the mantle hydrocarbons are as follows. (1) They were in organically synthesized by Fischer-Tropsch type reaction in the mantle. (2) They were delivered by meteorites and comets to the early Earth. (3) They were recycled by subduction. The mantle hydrocarbons in the cases of (1) and (2) are abiogenic and those in (3) are mainly biogenic. It appears that hydrocarbons may survive high pressures and temperatures in the mantle, but they are decomposed into lighter hydrocarbon gases such as CH4 at lower pressures when magmas intrude into the crust; consequently, peridotite cumulates do not contain heavier hydrocarbons but possess hydrocarbon gases up to C4H10.

  12. Bioremediation of marine sediments contaminated by hydrocarbons: experimental analysis and kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Beolchini, Francesca; Rocchetti, Laura; Regoli, Francesco; Dell'Anno, Antonio

    2010-10-15

    This work deals with bioremediation experiments on harbor sediments contaminated by aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), investigating the effects of a continuous supply of inorganic nutrients and sand amendments on the kinetics of microbial growth and hydrocarbon degradation. Inorganic nutrients stimulated microbial growth and enhanced the biodegradation of low and high molecular weight hydrocarbons, whereas sand amendment increased only the removal of high molecular weight compounds. The simultaneous addition of inorganic nutrients and sand provided the highest biodegradation (>70% for aliphatic hydrocarbons and 40% for PAHs). A semi-empirical kinetic model was successfully fitted to experimental temporal changes of hydrocarbon residual concentrations and microbial abundances. The estimated values for parameters allowed to calculate a doubling time of 2.9 d and a yield coefficient biomass/hydrocarbons 0.39 g C biomass g-1C hydrocarbons, for the treatment with the highest hydrocarbon biodegradation yield. A comparison between the organic carbon demand and temporal profiles of hydrocarbons residual concentration allowed also to calculate the relative contribution of contaminants to carbon supply, in the range 5-32%. This suggests that C availability in the sediments, influencing prokaryotic metabolism, may have cascade effects on biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons. Even if these findings do not represent a general rule and site-specific studies are needed, the approach used here can be a relevant support tool when designing bioremediation strategies on site.

  13. Organic geochemistry of the Vindhyan sediments: Implications for hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayal, A. M.; Mani, Devleena; Madhavi, T.; Kavitha, S.; Kalpana, M. S.; Patil, D. J.; Sharma, Mukund

    2014-09-01

    The organic geochemical methods of hydrocarbon prospecting involve the characterization of sedimentary organic matter in terms of its abundance, source and thermal maturity, which are essential prerequisites for a hydrocarbon source rock. In the present study, evaluation of organic matter in the outcrop shale samples from the Semri and Kaimur Groups of Vindhyan basin was carried out using Rock Eval pyrolysis. Also, the adsorbed low molecular weight hydrocarbons, methane, ethane, propane and butane, were investigated in the near surface soils to infer the generation of hydrocarbons in the Vindhyan basin. The Total Organic Carbon (TOC) content in shales ranges between 0.04% and 1.43%. The S1 (thermally liberated free hydrocarbons) values range between 0.01-0.09 mgHC/gRock (milligram hydrocarbon per gram of rock sample), whereas the S2 (hydrocarbons from cracking of kerogen) show the values between 0.01 and 0.14 mgHC/gRock. Based on the Tmax (temperature at highest yield of S2) and the hydrogen index (HI) correlations, the organic matter is characterized by Type III kerogen. The adsorbed soil gas, CH4 (C1), C2H6 (C2), C3H8 (C3) and nC4H10, (nC4), concentrations measured in the soil samples from the eastern part of Vindhyan basin (Son Valley) vary from 0 to 186 ppb, 0 to 4 ppb, 0 to 5 ppb, and 0 to 1 ppb, respectively. The stable carbon isotope values for the desorbed methane (δ13C1) and ethane (δ13C2) range between -45.7‰ to -25.2‰ and -35.3‰ to -20.19‰ (VPDB), respectively suggesting a thermogenic source for these hydrocarbons. High concentrations of thermogenic hydrocarbons are characteristic of areas around Sagar, Narsinghpur, Katni and Satna in the Son Valley. The light hydrocarbon concentrations (C1-C4) in near surface soils of the western Vindhyan basin around Chambal Valley have been reported to vary between 1-2547 ppb, 1-558 ppb, 1-181 ppb, 1-37 ppb and 1-32 ppb, respectively with high concentrations around Baran-Jhalawar-Bhanpur-Garot regions (Kumar

  14. Microbial degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Varjani, Sunita J

    2017-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants are recalcitrant compounds and are classified as priority pollutants. Cleaning up of these pollutants from environment is a real world problem. Bioremediation has become a major method employed in restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon polluted environments that makes use of natural microbial biodegradation activity. Petroleum hydrocarbons utilizing microorganisms are ubiquitously distributed in environment. They naturally biodegrade pollutants and thereby remove them from the environment. Removal of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants from environment by applying oleophilic microorganisms (individual isolate/consortium of microorganisms) is ecofriendly and economic. Microbial biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants employs the enzyme catalytic activities of microorganisms to enhance the rate of pollutants degradation. This article provides an overview about bioremediation for petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants. It also includes explanation about hydrocarbon metabolism in microorganisms with a special focus on new insights obtained during past couple of years.

  15. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  16. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Alice; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture through a polymeric membrane. The membrane which is utilized to effect the separation comprises a polymer which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds and which has been modified by being subjected to the action of a sulfonating agent. Sulfonating agents which may be employed will include fuming sulfuric acid, chlorosulfonic acid, sulfur trioxide, etc., the surface or bulk modified polymer will contain a degree of sulfonation ranging from about 15 to about 50%. The separation process is effected at temperatures ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psig.

  17. Hydrocarbon bioremediation -- An overview

    SciTech Connect

    Reisinger, H.J.

    1995-12-31

    Bioremediation is the process that transforms xenobiotics introduced into the environment to a less toxic or innocuous form, or mineralizes them to inorganic species. The processes can be carried out through either aerobic or anaerobic pathways by indigenous heterotrophs or by specially engineered organisms. For some xenobiotics, the process can also be carried out by cometabolic processes, which use another compound as the carbon and energy source. This technique can be applied either in situ or ex situ. An overview is presented of real-world applications of a variety of hydrocarbon bioremediation approaches, including biopiling, bioventing, bioslurping, landfarming, electrobioreclamation, and biovertical circulation wells. Problems in translating laboratory and field-scale pilot test data to full-scale operating systems are discussed. Such issues include biodegradation enhancement, nutrient and electron acceptor delivery, alternative electron acceptors, and integration of biological, chemical, and physical approaches to hydrocarbon remediation.

  18. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  19. THERMOCHEMISTRY OF HYDROCARBON RADICALS

    SciTech Connect

    Kent M. Ervin, Principal Investigator

    2004-08-17

    Gas phase negative ion chemistry methods are employed to determine enthalpies of formation of hydrocarbon radicals that are important in combustion processes and to investigate the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions. Using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry, we measure collisional threshold energies of endoergic proton transfer and hydrogen atom transfer reactions of hydrocarbon molecules with negative reagent ions. The measured reaction threshold energies for proton transfer yield the relative gas phase acidities. In an alternative methodology, competitive collision-induced dissociation of proton-bound ion-molecule complexes provides accurate gas phase acidities relative to a reference acid. Combined with the electron affinity of the R {center_dot} radical, the gas phase acidity yields the RH bond dissociation energy of the corresponding neutral molecule, or equivalently the enthalpy of formation of the R{center_dot} organic radical, using equation: D(R-H) = {Delta}{sub acid}H(RH) + EA(R) - IE(H). The threshold energy for hydrogen abstraction from a hydrocarbon molecule yields its hydrogen atom affinity relative to the reagent anion, providing the RH bond dissociation energy directly. Electronic structure calculations are used to evaluate the possibility of potential energy barriers or dynamical constrictions along the reaction path, and as input for RRKM and phase space theory calculations. In newer experiments, we have measured the product velocity distributions to obtain additional information on the energetics and dynamics of the reactions.

  20. Radical scavengers from heavy hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kubo, Junichi

    1996-10-01

    The hydrogen-donating properties of some hydrocarbons form the basis for processes such as coal liquefaction and heavy oil upgrading. However, these hydrocarbons have seldom been used for other purposes, because their potential applications have not been well recognized. Research has indicated that these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons can be used in important reactions as radical scavengers and have properties particular to those of pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms. Over years of study researchers have found that pure hydrocarbons with radical-scavenging effects nearly as high as those in conventional hindered phenolic antioxidants can be produced from petroleum, and these hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons exhibit such effects even in oxidative atmospheres (i.e., they function as antioxidants). He has also shown that these mixtures have some properties particular to pure hydrocarbons without functional groups containing heteroatoms, and they`ve seen that a mechanism based on the steric effects appears when these hydrocarbons are used in heavy oil hydroprocessing. Hydrogen-donating hydrocarbons should be a viable resource in many applications. In this article, he presents radical-scavenging abilities, characteristics as pure hydrocarbons, and applications on the basis of the studies.

  1. A refined method for the calculation of the Non-Methane Volatile Organic Compound emission estimate from Domestic Solvent Usage in Ireland from 1992 to 2014 - A case study for Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, Stephen; O'Regan, Bernadette

    2016-08-01

    This study describes a new methodology to calculate Non-Methane Volatile Organic Compounds from Domestic Solvent Use including Fungicides over the period 1992-2014. Improved emissions data compiled at a much more refined level can help policy-makers develop more effective policy's to address environmental issues. However, a number of problems were found when member states attempt to use national statistics for Domestic Solvent Use including Fungicides. For instance, EMEP/EEA (2013) provides no guidance regarding which activity data should be used, resulting in emission estimates being potentially inconsistent and un-comparable. Also, previous methods and emission factors described in the EMEP/EEA (2013) guidebook do not exactly match data collected by state agencies. This makes using national statistics difficult. In addition, EMEP/EEA (2013) use broader categories than necessary (e.g. Cosmetics Aerosol/Non Aerosol) to estimate emissions while activity data is available at a more refined level scale (e.g. Personal Cleaning Products, Hair Products, Cosmetics, Deodorants and Perfumes). This can make identifying the drivers of emissions unclear. This study builds upon Tzanidakis et al. (2012) whereby it provides a method for collecting activity data from state statistics, developed country specific emission factors based on a survey of 177 Irish products and importantly, used a new method to account for the volatility of organic compounds found in commonly available domestic solvent containing products. This is the first study to account for volatility based on the characteristics of organic compounds and therefore is considered a more accurate method of accounting for emissions from this emission source. The results of this study can also be used to provide a simple method for other member parties to account for the volatility of organic compounds using sectorial adjustment factors described here. For comparison purposes, emission estimates were calculated using the

  2. Oxygen abundance and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van't Veer, C.; Cayrel, R.

    The triplet IR lines of O I near 777 nm are computed with the Kurucz's code, modified to accept several convection models. The program has been run with the MLT algorithm, with l/H = 1.25 and 0.5, and with the Canuto-Mazzitelli and Canuto-Goldman-Mazzitelli approaches, on a metal-poor turnoff-star model atmosphere with Teff=6200 K, log g = 4.3, [Fe/H]= -1.5. The results show that the differences in equivalent widths for the 4 cases do not exceed 2 per cent (0.3 mA). The convection treatment is therefore not an issue for the oxygen abundance derived from the permitted lines.

  3. Hydrocarbon source apportionment in Mexico City using the chemical mass balance receptor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vega, Elizabeth; Mugica, Violeta; Carmona, Rocío.; Valencia, Edgar

    A field study was conducted in Mexico City during May-November 1997 to determine non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) species emitted from different sources: application of slow curing asphalt pavement, liquefied petroleum gas (vapour phase), dry cleaning, graphic arts, landfill, emissions of motor vehicle exhaust inside a tunnel, hot soak, whole gasoline, painting operations and degreasing. Forty-five ambient air samples of NMHC were simultaneously collected from 6:00 to 9:00 a.m. at three different sites, Xalostoc, Pedregal and La Merced, denominated receptors, during the spring and fall of 1996. In both cases samples were collected in stainless-steel canisters and analysed by gas chromatography with flame ionisation detection system. Based on these measurements the chemical mass receptor model (CMB) was applied to estimate the contribution of the different NMHC source to ambient pollution. The average results for the two sampling periods showed that the major sources of NMHC for the three sites were: motor vehicle exhaust with an average contribution of 54.9, 57.4 and 63.8% for Xalostoc, Pedregal and La Merced, respectively, followed by handling and distribution of liquefied petroleum gas with 28.5% in Xalostoc, 20.0% in Pedregal and 24.0% in La Merced.

  4. Isotopic and molecular analyses of hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids of the Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, R. V.; Epstein, S.; Cronin, John R.; Pizzarello, Sandra; Yuen, George U.

    1992-01-01

    The monocarboxylic acids and hydrocarbons of the Murchison meteorite (CM2) were isolated for isotropic analysis. The nonvolatile hydrocarbons were analyzed as crude methanol and benzene-methanol extracts and also after separation by silica gel chromatography into predominantly aliphatic, aromatic, and polar hydrocarbon fractions. The volatile hydrocarbons were obtained after progressive decomposition of the meteorite matrix by freeze-thaw, hot water, and acid treatment. Molecular analyses of the aromatic hydrocarbons showed them to comprise a complex suite of compounds in which pyrene, fluoranthene, phenanthrene, and acenaphthene were the most abundant components, a result similar to earlier analyses. The polar hydrocarbons also comprise a very complex mixture in which aromatic ketones, nitrogen, and sulfur heterocycles were identified. The monocarboxylic acids, aliphatic, aromatic, and polar hydrocarbons, and the indigenous volatile hydrocarbons were found to be D-rich. The deuterium enrichment observed in these compounds is suggestive. In two separate analyses, the delta-D values of the nonvolatile hydrocarbons were observed to increase in the following order: aliphatic-aromatic-polar. This finding is consistent with an early solar system or parent body conversion of aromatic to aliphatic compounds as well as the suggestion of pyrolytic formation of aromatic from aliphatic compounds.

  5. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of EUVE spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. Findings are that: (1) ASCA and EUVE spectra are both dominated by a region at 6 x 10(exp 6) K. (2) The high energy cut-off of the ASCA spectrum is consistent with emission from the highest ionization stages of EUVE, namely Fe XXIV. (3) EUVE requires a continuous emission measure distribution with more than two temperatures. (4) The ASCA spectra are of such high statistical significance that systematic uncertainties dominate, including atomic physics issues and calibration issues. (5) While the ASCA spectral fits achieve lower Chi(exp 2 with two-temperature fits, the EUVE-derived emission measure distribution models are also consistent with the spectra. (6) The Fe/H ratio obtained from the ASCA fit is within 20 % of the Fe/H abundance obtained from the summed spectra of Capella over 5 EUVE pointings, as well as the 1996 EUVE data. This result confirms our claims that quasi-continua composed of weak emission lines in the short wavelength spectrometer of EUVE are not major contributors to the measured Capella continuum. Other abundance ratios are also determined from the ASCA data, using models derived with EUVE. Si, Si, and Mg appear to be close to solar photospheric values, while the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined

  6. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  7. Speciation of Total Organic Gas and Particulate Matter Emissions from Onroad Vehicles in the Next Version of MOVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Calculation of organic gas measures used in MOVES (total hydrocarbons, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, non-methane organic gases, and total organic gases). Incorporation of speciation within MOVES to produce total organic gas and particulate matte...

  8. Hydrocarbon Fuels Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    P.A.A 󈧄r𔃺 Masters, "High Density Propellants for Single Stage to Orbit Vehicles," Technical Memorandum, No. NASA/TM X -73503, Lewis Research Center...by interpolation. Optimum Hydrocarbon IP vs. LOX Sea-Level Expansion (14.7 psi, Pc’- 1000 psi) Z X .(299.6 sec) ---- 330 see. 310 see. 0...alkenes all lie along a vertical hne reflective of their common C.H2n molecular. formula. The positions of specific molecules are denoted by an X along with

  9. Spatial Variations of Dust Abundances Across the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, Déborah; Reach, William T.; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Chad W.; Gordon, Karl; Hora, Joseph L.; Indebetouw, Remy; Kawamura, Akiko; Meade, Marilyn; Meixner, Margaret; Sewilo, Marta; Vijh, Uma P.; Volk, Kevin

    2009-07-01

    Using the data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) legacy survey, we have studied the variations of the dust composition and abundance across the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Such variations are expected, as the explosive events which have lead to the formation of the many H I shells observed should have affected the dust properties. Using a model and comparing with a reference spectral energy distribution from our Galaxy, we deduce the relative abundance variations of small dust grains across the LMC. We examined the infrared color ratios as well as the relative abundances of very small grains (VSGs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) relative to the big grain abundance. Results show that each dust component could have different origins or evolution in the interstellar medium (ISM). The VSG abundance traces the star formation activity and could result from shattering of larger grains, whereas the PAH abundance increases around molecular clouds as well as in the stellar bar, where they could have been injected into the ISM during mass loss from old stars.

  10. SPATIAL VARIATIONS OF DUST ABUNDANCES ACROSS THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect

    Paradis, Deborah; Reach, William T.; Bernard, Jean-Philippe; Block, Miwa; Engelbracht, Chad W.; Gordon, Karl; Hora, Joseph L.; Indebetouw, Remy; Kawamura, Akiko; Meade, Marilyn; Meixner, Margaret; Sewilo, Marta; Vijh, Uma P.; Volk, Kevin

    2009-07-15

    Using the data obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) legacy survey, we have studied the variations of the dust composition and abundance across the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Such variations are expected, as the explosive events which have lead to the formation of the many H I shells observed should have affected the dust properties. Using a model and comparing with a reference spectral energy distribution from our Galaxy, we deduce the relative abundance variations of small dust grains across the LMC. We examined the infrared color ratios as well as the relative abundances of very small grains (VSGs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) relative to the big grain abundance. Results show that each dust component could have different origins or evolution in the interstellar medium (ISM). The VSG abundance traces the star formation activity and could result from shattering of larger grains, whereas the PAH abundance increases around molecular clouds as well as in the stellar bar, where they could have been injected into the ISM during mass loss from old stars.

  11. Plasma-assisted cataluminescence sensor array for gaseous hydrocarbons discrimination.

    PubMed

    Na, Na; Liu, Haiyan; Han, Jiaying; Han, Feifei; Liu, Hualin; Ouyang, Jin

    2012-06-05

    Combining plasma activation and cross-reactivity of sensor array, we have developed a plasma-assisted cataluminescence (PA-CTL) sensor array for fast sensing and discrimination of gaseous hydrocarbons, which can be potentially used for fast diagnosis of lung cancer. Based on dielectric barrier discharge, a low-temperature plasma is generated to activate gaseous hydrocarbons with low cataluminescence (CTL) activities. Extremely increased CTL responses have been obtained, which resulted in a plasma assistance factor of infinity (∞) for some hydrocarbons. On a 4 × 3 PA-CTL sensor array made from alkaline-earth nanomaterials, gaseous hydrocarbons showed robust and unique CTL responses to generate characteristic patterns for fast discrimination. Because of the difference in the component of hydrocarbons in breath, exhaled breath samples from donors with and without lung cancer were tested, and good discrimination has been achieved by this technique. In addition, the feasibility of multidimentional detection based on temperature was confirmed. It had good reproducibility and gave a linear range of 65-6500 ng/mL or 77-7700 ppmv (R > 0.98) for CH(4) with a detection limit of 33 ng/mL (38 ppmv) on MgO. The PA-CTL sensor array is simple, low-cost, thermally stable, nontoxic, and has an abundance of alkaline-earth nanomaterials to act as sensing elements. This has expanded the applications of CTL-based senor arrays and will show great potential in clinical fast diagnosis.

  12. THE STRUCTURE, ORIGIN, AND EVOLUTION OF INTERSTELLAR HYDROCARBON GRAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Chiar, J. E.; Ricca, A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Adamson, A. J. E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca@1.nasa.gov E-mail: aadamson@gemini.edu

    2013-06-10

    Many materials have been considered for the carrier of the hydrocarbon absorption bands observed in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). In order to refine the model for ISM hydrocarbon grains, we analyze the observed aromatic (3.28, 6.2 {mu}m) and aliphatic (3.4 {mu}m) hydrocarbon absorption features in the diffuse ISM along the line of sight toward the Galactic center Quintuplet Cluster. Observationally, sp {sup 2} bonds can be measured in astronomical spectra using the 6.2 {mu}m CC aromatic stretch feature, whereas the 3.4 {mu}m aliphatic feature can be used to quantify the fraction of sp {sup 3} bonds. The fractional abundance of these components allows us to place the Galactic diffuse ISM hydrocarbons on a ternary phase diagram. We conclude that the Galactic hydrocarbon dust has, on average, a low H/C ratio and sp {sup 3} content and is highly aromatic. We have placed the results of our analysis within the context of the evolution of carbon dust in the ISM. We argue that interstellar carbon dust consists of a large core of aromatic carbon surrounded by a thin mantle of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H), a structure that is a natural consequence of the processing of stardust grains in the ISM.

  13. Hydrocarbons emissions from Cerro Prieto Geothermal Power Plant, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Karina; Navarro-González, Rafael; de la Rosa, José; Peralta, Oscar; Castro, Telma; Imaz, Mireya

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important environmental issues related to the use of geothermal fluids to generate electricity is the emission of non-condensable gases to the atmosphere. Mexico has one of the largest geothermal plants in the world. The facility is located at Cerro Prieto, Baja California, roughly 30 km south of Mexicali and the international boundary between Mexico and United States. The Cerro Prieto power plant has 13 units grouped on four individual powerhouses. Gas samples from 9 units of the four powerhouses were collected during 4 campaigns conducted in May-July, 2010, February, 2012, December, 2012, and May, 2013. Gas samples from the stacks were collected in 1000 ml Pyrex round flasks with Teflon stopcocks, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Methane was the most abundant aliphatic hydrocarbon, with a concentration that ranged from less than 1% up to 3.5% of the total gas mixture. Normal alkanes represented the second most abundant species, and displayed a decreasing abundance with increasing carbon number in the homologous series. Isoalkanes were also present as isobutane and isopentane. Cycloalkanes occurring as cyclopentane and cyclohexane, were detected only at trace level. Unsaturated hydrocarbons (alkenes and alkynes) were not detected. Benzene was detected at levels ranging from less than 1% up to 3.4% of the total gas mixture. Other aromatic hydrocarbons detected were toluene, and xylenes, and were present at lower concentrations (

  14. Hydrocarbons preserved in a ~2.7 Ga outcrop sample from the Fortescue Group, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, Y; Flannery, D T; Walter, M R; George, S C

    2015-03-01

    The hydrocarbons preserved in an Archean rock were extracted, and their composition and distribution in consecutive slices from the outside to the inside of the rock were examined. The 2.7 Ga rock was collected from the Fortescue Group in the Pilbara region, Western Australia. The bitumen I (solvent-extracted rock) and bitumen II (solvent-extracted hydrochloric acid-treated rock) fractions have different hydrocarbon compositions. Bitumen I contains only trace amounts of aliphatic hydrocarbons and virtually no aromatic hydrocarbons. In contrast, bitumen II contains abundant aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. The difference seems to reflect the weathering history and preservational environment of the investigated rock. Aliphatic hydrocarbons in bitumen I are considered to be mainly from later hydrocarbon inputs, after initial deposition and burial, and are therefore not indigenous. The lack of aromatic hydrocarbons in bitumen I suggests a severe weathering environment since uplift and exposure of the rock at the Earth's surface in the Cenozoic. On the other hand, the high abundance of aromatic hydrocarbons in bitumen II suggests that bitumen II hydrocarbons have been physically isolated from removal by their encapsulation within carbonate minerals. The richness of aromatic hydrocarbons and the relative scarcity of aliphatic hydrocarbons may reflect the original compositions of organic materials biosynthesised in ancient organisms in the Archean era, or the high thermal maturity of the rock. Cyanobacterial biomarkers were observed in the surficial slices of the rock, which may indicate that endolithic cyanobacteria inhabited the surface outcrop. The distribution of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons implies a high thermal maturity, which is consistent with the lack of any specific biomarkers, such as hopanes and steranes, and the prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphic grade.

  15. Compilation of a source profile database for hydrocarbon and OVOC emissions in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Ziwei; Shao, Min; Lu, Sihua

    2016-10-01

    Source profiles are essential for quantifying the role of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in air pollution. This study compiled a database of VOC source profiles in China, with 75 species drawn from five major categories: transportation, solvent use, biomass burning, fossil fuel burning, and industrial processes. Source profiles were updated for diesel vehicles, biomass burning, and residential coal burning by measuring both hydrocarbons and oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs), while other source profiles were derived from the available literature. The OVOCs contributed 53.8% of total VOCs in the profiles of heavy - duty diesel vehicle exhaust and 12.4%-46.3% in biomass and residential coal burning, which indicated the importance of primary OVOCs emissions from combustion-related sources. Taking the national emission inventory from 2008 as an example, we established an approach for assigning source profiles to develop a speciation-specific VOC and OVOC emission inventory. The results showed that aromatics contributed 30% of the total 26 Tg VOCs, followed by alkanes (24%), alkenes (19%) and OVOCs (12%). Aromatics (7.9 Tg) were much higher than in previous results (1.1 Tg and 3.4 Tg), while OVOCs (3.1 Tg) were comparable with the 3.3 Tg and 4.3 Tg reported in studies using profiles from the US. The current emission inventories were built based on emission factors from non-methane hydrocarbon measurements, and therefore the proportions from OVOC emissions was neglected, leading to up to 30% underestimation of total VOC emissions. As a result, there is a need to deploy appropriate emission factors and source profiles that include OVOC measurements to reduce the uncertainty of estimated emissions and chemical reactivity potential.

  16. Hydrocarbon gas standards at the pmol/mol level to support ambient atmospheric measurements.

    PubMed

    Rhoderick, George C; Duewer, David L; Ning, Li; DeSirant, Kathryn

    2010-02-01

    Studies of climate change increasingly recognize the diverse influences exerted by hydrocarbons in the atmosphere, including roles in particulates and ozone formation. Measurements of key non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) suggest atmospheric concentrations ranging from low pmol/mol to nmol/mol, depending on location and compound. To accurately establish concentration trends and to relate measurement records from many laboratories and researchers, it is essential to have good calibration standards. Several of the world's National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) are developing primary and secondary reference gas standards at the nmol/mol level. While the U.S. NMI, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), has developed pmol/mol standards for halocarbons and some volatile organics, the feasibility of preparing well-characterized, stable standards for NMHCs at the pmol/mol level is not yet established. NIST recently developed a suite of primary standards by gravimetric dilution that contains 18 NMHCs covering the concentration range of 60 pmol/mol to 230 pmol/mol. Taking into account the small but chemically significant contribution of NMHCs in the high-purity diluent nitrogen used in their preparation, the relative concentrations and short-term stability (2 to 3 months) of these NMHCs in the primary standards have been confirmed by chromatographic analysis. The gravimetric values assigned from the methods used to prepare the materials and the analytical concentrations determined from chromatographic analysis generally agree to within +/-2 pmol/mol. However, anomalous results for several of the compounds reflect the difficulties inherent in avoiding contamination and making accurate measurements at these very low levels.

  17. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of ASCA spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous EUVE data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated, resulting in a paper in process by Liedahl and Brickhouse. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. While solar abundance ratios are generally consistent with the ASCA data, the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined from these data. Detailed discussion has been provided to NASA in the most recent annual report (1997). Two poster presentations have been made regarding modeling requirements. A substantial paper is in the final revision form, following review by six co-authors. The results of this work have wide implications, since the newly calculated emission lines almost certainly contribute to other problems in fitting not only other stellar spectra, but also composite supernova remnants, galaxies, and cooling flow clusters of galaxies. Furthermore, Liedahl and Brickhouse have identified other species for which lines of a similar nature (high principal quantum number) will contribute significant flux. For moderate resolution X-ray spectra, lines left out of the models in relatively isolated bands, will be attributed to continuum flux by spectral fitting engines, causing errors in line-to-continuum ratios. Thus addressing the general theoretical problem is of crucial importance.

  18. Dynamic autoinoculation and the microbial ecology of a deep water hydrocarbon irruption.

    PubMed

    Valentine, David L; Mezić, Igor; Maćešić, Senka; Črnjarić-Žic, Nelida; Ivić, Stefan; Hogan, Patrick J; Fonoberov, Vladimir A; Loire, Sophie

    2012-12-11

    The irruption of gas and oil into the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon event fed a deep sea bacterial bloom that consumed hydrocarbons in the affected waters, formed a regional oxygen anomaly, and altered the microbiology of the region. In this work, we develop a coupled physical-metabolic model to assess the impact of mixing processes on these deep ocean bacterial communities and their capacity for hydrocarbon and oxygen use. We find that observed biodegradation patterns are well-described by exponential growth of bacteria from seed populations present at low abundance and that current oscillation and mixing processes played a critical role in distributing hydrocarbons and associated bacterial blooms within the northeast Gulf of Mexico. Mixing processes also accelerated hydrocarbon degradation through an autoinoculation effect, where water masses, in which the hydrocarbon irruption had caused blooms, later returned to the spill site with hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria persisting at elevated abundance. Interestingly, although the initial irruption of hydrocarbons fed successive blooms of different bacterial types, subsequent irruptions promoted consistency in the structure of the bacterial community. These results highlight an impact of mixing and circulation processes on biodegradation activity of bacteria during the Deepwater Horizon event and suggest an important role for mixing processes in the microbial ecology of deep ocean environments.

  19. Insect Adhesion Secretions: Similarities and Dissimilarities in Hydrocarbon Profiles of Tarsi and Corresponding Tibiae.

    PubMed

    Gerhardt, Heike; Betz, Oliver; Albert, Klaus; Lämmerhofer, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Spatially controlled in vivo sampling by contact solid phase microextraction with a non-coated silica fiber combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was utilized for hydrocarbon profiling in tarsal adhesion secretions of four insect species (Nicrophorus vespilloides, Nicrophorus nepalensis, Sagra femorata, and Gromphadorhina portentosa) by using distinct adhesion systems, viz. hairy or smooth tarsi. For comparison, corresponding samples from tibiae, representing the general cuticular hydrocarbon profile, were analyzed to enable the statistical inference of active molecular adhesion principles in tarsal secretions possibly contributed by specific hydrocarbons. n-Alkanes, monomethyl and dimethyl alkanes, alkenes, alkadienes, and one aldehyde were detected. Multivariate statistical analysis (principal component and orthogonal partial least square discriminant analyses) gave insights into distinctive molecular features among the various insect species and between tarsus and tibia samples. In general, corresponding hydrocarbon profiles in tarsus and tibia samples largely resembled each other, both qualitatively and in relative abundances as well. However, several specific hydrocarbons showed significantly different relative abundances between corresponding tarsus and tibia samples, thus indicating that such differences of specific hydrocarbons in the complex mixtures might constitute a delicate mechanism for fine-tuning the reversible attachment performances in tarsal adhesive fluids that are composed of substances originating from the same pool as cuticular hydrocarbons. Caused by melting point depression, the multicomponent tarsal adhesion secretion, made up of straight chain alkanes, methyl alkanes, and alkenes will have a semi-solid, grease-like consistency, which might provide the basis for a good reversible attachment performance.

  20. The microbial nitrogen cycling potential is impacted by polyaromatic hydrocarbon pollution of marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Scott, Nicole M; Hess, Matthias; Bouskill, Nick J; Mason, Olivia U; Jansson, Janet K; Gilbert, Jack A

    2014-01-01

    During hydrocarbon exposure, the composition and functional dynamics of marine microbial communities are altered, favoring bacteria that can utilize this rich carbon source. Initial exposure of high levels of hydrocarbons in aerobic surface sediments can enrich growth of heterotrophic microorganisms having hydrocarbon degradation capacity. As a result, there can be a localized reduction in oxygen potential within the surface layer of marine sediments causing anaerobic zones. We hypothesized that increasing exposure to elevated hydrocarbon concentrations would positively correlate with an increase in denitrification processes and the net accumulation of dinitrogen. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the relative abundance of genes associated with nitrogen metabolism and nitrogen cycling identified in 6 metagenomes from sediments contaminated by polyaromatic hydrocarbons from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, and 3 metagenomes from sediments associated with natural oil seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel. An additional 8 metagenomes from uncontaminated sediments from the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed for comparison. We predicted relative changes in metabolite turnover as a function of the differential microbial gene abundances, which showed predicted accumulation of metabolites associated with denitrification processes, including anammox, in the contaminated samples compared to uncontaminated sediments, with the magnitude of this change being positively correlated to the hydrocarbon concentration and exposure duration. These data highlight the potential impact of hydrocarbon inputs on N cycling processes in marine sediments and provide information relevant for system scale models of nitrogen metabolism in affected ecosystems.

  1. Volatile Hydrocarbon Pheromones from Beetles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter reviews literature about hydrocarbons from beetles that serve as long-range pheromones. The most thoroughly studied beetles that use volatile hydrocarbon pheromones belong to the family Nitidulidae in the genera Carpophilus and Colopterus. Published pheromone research deals with behav...

  2. Enhanced liquid hydrocarbon recovery process

    SciTech Connect

    Sydansk, R.D.

    1992-07-14

    This patent describes a process for recovering liquid hydrocarbons. It comprises: injecting into a fractured subterranean formation a polymer enhanced foam comprising a polymer selected from a synthetic polymer or a biopolymer, a surfactant, an aqueous solvent and a gas, recovering liquid hydrocarbons from the formation.

  3. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  4. Measuring Solar Abundances with Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussack, K.; Gough, D.

    2009-12-01

    The revision of the photospheric abundances proferred by Asplund et al. (2005) has rendered opacity theory inconsistent with the seismologically determined opacity through the Sun. This highlights the need for a direct seismological measurement of solar abundances. Here we describe the technique used to measure abundances with seismology, examine our ability to detect differences between solar models using this technique, and discuss its application in the Sun.

  5. Hydrocarbon potential of lower Magdalena basin

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, E.; Valderrama, R. )

    1989-03-01

    The Lower Magdalena basin complex of Colombia has an areal extent of more than 87,000 km{sup 2}. The geologic setting of the different subbasins of the Lower Magdalena presents attractive play concepts for the generation, entrapment, and production of hydrocarbons. The sedimentary sequence within the basin attains a thickness in excess of 12,200 m, with the preponderance of this section being of Tertiary age. This major thickness of section contains good source and reservoir rocks and seals and an abundance of structural and stratigraphic traps, which make the basin attractive for new interpretation and evaluation. The Plato, San Jorge, and Sinu subbasins lie within the Lower Magdalena complex. Each of these presents different geological conditions, thereby offering a variety of play concepts for hydrocarbon exploration. Previous exploration in the Lower Magdalena has resulted in the discovery of 10 small to moderate-size fields, which have produced nearly 200 million bbl of oil. The density of exploration drilling within the basin is one well/435 km{sup 2}, thereby allowing the opportunity for more discoveries to be realized. The existence of a thick Tertiary section with excellent source beds and a tectonic history that allows for both structural and stratigraphic traps presents an excellent opportunity for the application of modern exploration techniques to reevaluate the potential of a basin that has not been thoroughly evaluated due to complex exploration problems.

  6. Formation History of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seok, J. Y.; Hirashita, H.; Asano, R.

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are one of the major dust components in the interstellar medium (ISM). We present our model calculations for the PAH abundance in the ISM on a galaxy-evolution timescale. We consider shattering of carbonaceous dust grains as the formation mechanism of PAHs while the PAH abundance is reduced by coagulation onto dust grains, destruction by supernova shocks, and injection into star formation. We implement these processes in an one-zone chemical evolution model to obtain the evolution of the PAH abundance in a galaxy. We find that PAH formation becomes accelerated at a certain metallicity at which shattering becomes efficient. For PAH destruction, while supernova shock is a primary mechanism in the metal-poor environment, coagulation is dominant in the metal-rich environment. We compare the calculated PAH abundances with the observed abundances in galaxies with a wide metallicity range. Our models reproduce both the low PAH abundance in low metallicity galaxies and the metallicity-dependence of the PAH abundance in high-metallicity galaxies. We conclude that the observational trend can be explained by shattering of carbonaceous grains being the source of PAHs in the ISM.

  7. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Absil, R.P.L.; Bowes, E.; Green, G.J.; Marler, D.O.; Shihabi, D.S.; Socha, R.F.

    1992-02-04

    This patent describes an improvement in a catalytic cracking process in which a hydrocarbon feed is cracked in a cracking zone in the absence of added hydrogen and in the presence of a circulating inventory of solid acidic cracking a catalyst which acquires a deposit of coke that contains chemically bound nitrogen while the cracking catalyst is in the cracking zone, the coke catalyst being circulated to t regeneration zone to convert the coke catalyst to a regenerated catalyst with the formation of a flue gas comprising nitrogen oxides: the improvement comprises incorporating into the circulating catalyst inventory an amount of additive particles comprising a synthetic porous crystalline material containing copper metal or cations, to reduce the content of nitrogen oxides in the flue gas.

  8. Carbon neutral hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Zeman, Frank S; Keith, David W

    2008-11-13

    Reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector may be the most difficult aspect of climate change mitigation. We suggest that carbon neutral hydrocarbons (CNHCs) offer an alternative pathway for deep emission cuts that complement the use of decarbonized energy carriers. Such fuels are synthesized from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon neutral hydrogen. The result is a liquid fuel compatible with the existing transportation infrastructure and therefore capable of a gradual deployment with minimum supply disruption. Capturing the atmospheric CO2 can be accomplished using biomass or industrial methods referred to as air capture. The viability of biomass fuels is strongly dependent on the environmental impacts of biomass production. Strong constraints on land use may favour the use of air capture. We conclude that CNHCs may be a viable alternative to hydrogen or conventional biofuels and warrant a comparable level of research effort and support.

  9. Process for recovering hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon-bearing formation

    SciTech Connect

    Alston, R.B.; Braden, W.B.; Flournoy, K.H.

    1980-03-11

    A method is described for transporting heavy crude oil through a pipeline which involves introducing into a pipeline or well-bore with the viscous hydrocarbons an aqueous solution containing (1) a sulfonate surfactant, (2) a rosin soap or a naphthenic acid soap and, optionally (3) coupling agent whereby there is spontaneously formed a low viscosity, salt tolerant, oil-in-water emulsion. Also disclosed is a method of recovery of hydrocarbons from a hydrocarbon bearing formation employing an aqueous solution containing (1) a sulfonate surfactant, (2) a rosin soap or a naphthenic acid soap and, optionally (3) a coupling agent.

  10. 40 CFR 88.103-94 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    .... ALVW—Adjusted Loaded Vehicle Weight CO—Carbon Monoxide HCHO—Formaldehyde HC—Hydrocarbon HDV—Heavy-Duty Vehicle LDT—Light-Duty Truck LDV—Light-Duty Vehicle NMHC—Non-Methane Hydrocarbon NMHCE—Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Equivalent NMOG—Non-Methane Organic Gas NOx—Nitrogen Oxides PM—Particulate Matter...

  11. 40 CFR 88.103-94 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... ALVW—Adjusted Loaded Vehicle Weight CO—Carbon Monoxide HCHO—Formaldehyde HC—Hydrocarbon HDV—Heavy-Duty Vehicle LDT—Light-Duty Truck LDV—Light-Duty Vehicle NMHC—Non-Methane Hydrocarbon NMHCE—Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Equivalent NMOG—Non-Methane Organic Gas NOx—Nitrogen Oxides PM—Particulate Matter...

  12. 40 CFR 88.103-94 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... ALVW—Adjusted Loaded Vehicle Weight CO—Carbon Monoxide HCHO—Formaldehyde HC—Hydrocarbon HDV—Heavy-Duty Vehicle LDT—Light-Duty Truck LDV—Light-Duty Vehicle NMHC—Non-Methane Hydrocarbon NMHCE—Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Equivalent NMOG—Non-Methane Organic Gas NOx—Nitrogen Oxides PM—Particulate Matter...

  13. 40 CFR 88.102-94 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... standard. Non-methane Hydrocarbon Equivalent means the sum of the carbon mass emissions of non-oxygenated non-methane hydrocarbons plus the carbon mass emissions of alcohols, aldehydes, or other organic..., expressed as gasoline-fueled vehicle non-methane hydrocarbons. In the case of exhaust emissions,...

  14. 40 CFR 88.103-94 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... ALVW—Adjusted Loaded Vehicle Weight CO—Carbon Monoxide HCHO—Formaldehyde HC—Hydrocarbon HDV—Heavy-Duty Vehicle LDT—Light-Duty Truck LDV—Light-Duty Vehicle NMHC—Non-Methane Hydrocarbon NMHCE—Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Equivalent NMOG—Non-Methane Organic Gas NOx—Nitrogen Oxides PM—Particulate Matter...

  15. 40 CFR 88.103-94 - Abbreviations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... ALVW—Adjusted Loaded Vehicle Weight CO—Carbon Monoxide HCHO—Formaldehyde HC—Hydrocarbon HDV—Heavy-Duty Vehicle LDT—Light-Duty Truck LDV—Light-Duty Vehicle NMHC—Non-Methane Hydrocarbon NMHCE—Non-Methane Hydrocarbon Equivalent NMOG—Non-Methane Organic Gas NOx—Nitrogen Oxides PM—Particulate Matter...

  16. The Evolution of Hydrocarbons in Saturn's Northern Storm Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjoraker, Gordon; Hesman, B. E.; Achterberg, R. K.; Romani, P. N.

    2012-01-01

    The massive storm at 40N on Saturn that began in December 2010 has produced significant and lasting effects in the northern hemisphere on temperature and species abundances (Fletcher et aL 2011). The northern storm region was observed on several occasions between March 2011 and April 2012 by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) at a spectral resolution (0.5/cm) which permits the study of trace species in Saturn's stratosphere. During this time period, stratospheric temperatures in regions referred to as "beacons" (warm regions at specific longitudes at the latitude of the storm) became significantly warmer than pre-storm values of 140K, peaking near 220K, and subsequently cooling. These warm temperatures led to greatly enhanced infrared emission due to C4H2, C3H4, C2H2, and C2H6 in the stratosphere as well as the first detection of C2H4 on Saturn in the thermal infrared (Hesman et al. 2012). Using CH4 as a thermometer of Saturn's stratosphere in the beacon regions, we can derive the mixing ratios of each of these molecules. The most common hydrocarbons (C2H2 and C2H6) serve as dynamical tracers on Saturn and their abundances may constrain vertical motion in the stratosphere. All of these hydrocarbons are products of methane photolysis. Since many of the photochemical reactions that produce heavier hydrocarbons such as C4H2 and C3H4 are temperature sensitive, the beacon region provides a natural laboratory for studying these reactions on Saturn. We will discuss the time evolution of the abundances of each of these hydrocarbons from their pre-storm values, through the period of maximum heating , and during the period of cooling that is taking place in Saturn's stratosphere.

  17. High Abundance of Ions in Cosmic Ices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gudipati, Murthy S.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Water-rich, mixed molecular ices and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are common throughout interstellar molecular clouds and the Solar System. Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation and particle bombardment of these abiotic ices produces complex organic species, including important biogenic molecules such as amino acids and functionalized PAHs which may have played a role in the origin of life. This ability of such water-rich, oxygen dominated ices to promote production of complex organic species is surprising and points to an important, unusual, but previously overlooked mechanism at play within the ice. Here we report the nature of this mechanism using electronic spectroscopy. VUV-irradiation of PAH/H2O ices leads to an unprecedented and efficient (greater than 70 %) conversion of the neutral PAHs to their cation form (PAH+). Further, these H2O/PAH+ ices are stabile at temperatures below 50 K, a temperature domain common throughout interstellar clouds and the Solar System. Between 50 and 125 K they react to form the complex organics. In view of this, we conclude that charged PAHs and other molecular ions should be common and abundant in many cosmic ices. The chemical, spectroscopic and physical properties of these ion-rich ices can be of fundamental importance for objects as diverse as comets, planets, and molecular clouds and may account for several poorly understood phenomena associated with each of these object classes.

  18. Hydrocarbon biodegradation by Arctic sea-ice and sub-ice microbial communities during microcosm experiments, Northwest Passage (Nunavut, Canada).

    PubMed

    Garneau, Marie-Ève; Michel, Christine; Meisterhans, Guillaume; Fortin, Nathalie; King, Thomas L; Greer, Charles W; Lee, Kenneth

    2016-10-01

    The increasing accessibility to navigation and offshore oil exploration brings risks of hydrocarbon releases in Arctic waters. Bioremediation of hydrocarbons is a promising mitigation strategy but challenges remain, particularly due to low microbial metabolic rates in cold, ice-covered seas. Hydrocarbon degradation potential of ice-associated microbes collected from the Northwest Passage was investigated. Microcosm incubations were run for 15 days at -1.7°C with and without oil to determine the effects of hydrocarbon exposure on microbial abundance, diversity and activity, and to estimate component-specific hydrocarbon loss. Diversity was assessed with automated ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis and Ion Torrent 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacterial activity was measured by (3)H-leucine uptake rates. After incubation, sub-ice and sea-ice communities degraded 94% and 48% of the initial hydrocarbons, respectively. Hydrocarbon exposure changed the composition of sea-ice and sub-ice communities; in sea-ice microcosms, Bacteroidetes (mainly Polaribacter) dominated whereas in sub-ice microcosms, the contribution of Epsilonproteobacteria increased, and that of Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes decreased. Sequencing data revealed a decline in diversity and increases in Colwellia and Moritella in oil-treated microcosms. Low concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in sub-ice seawater may explain higher hydrocarbon degradation when compared to sea ice, where DOM was abundant and composed of labile exopolysaccharides.

  19. LIQUID HYDROCARBON FUEL CELL DEVELOPMENT.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A compound anode consists of a reforming catalyst bed in direct contact with a palladium-silver fuel cell anode. The objective of this study was to...prove the feasibility of operating a compound anode fuel cell on a liquid hydrocarbon and to define the important parameters that influence cell...performance. Both reformer and fuel cell tests were conducted with various liquid hydrocarbon fuels. Included in this report is a description of the

  20. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  1. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the fungi.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weete, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review of studies of aliphatic hydrocarbons which have been recently detected in the spores of phytopathogenic fungi, and are found to be structurally very similar to the alkanes of higher plants. It appears that the hydrocarbon components of the few mycelial and yeast forms reported resemble the distribution found in bacteria. The occurence and distribution of these compounds in the fungi is discussed. Suggested functional roles of fungal spore alkanes are presented.

  2. Hydrocarbons of aquatic and terrestrial origin in mountain streams of the Marmot Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Telang, S.A.; Hodgson, G.W.; Baker, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    The abundance of n-alkanes in stream waters of the Marmot Creek drainage basin was studied to develop an understanding of the source of hydrocarbons in a pristine mountain stream. The n-alkanes varied in concentration from 0.02 ..mu..g/liter to 0.06 ..mu..g/liter and exhibited a bimodal distribution with one grouping in the range of C/sub 15/-C/sub 23/ and the other between C/sub 25/-C/sub 32/. Carbon preference indices (1.2 and 4.0, respectively) suggested that the first group was largely produced by nonphotosynthetic aquatic organisms and second was from soil and terrestrial vegetation. The contributions from stream and soil were roughly equal. Hydrocarbons in pristine mountain streams thus appeared to be derived both from autochthonous and allochthonous sources. Isoprenoid hydrocarbons were present in lesser abundance than alkane hydrocarbons. Abundance of the isoprenoids relative to n-alkanes indicated that little, if any, degradation of n-alkanes occurs in the stream waters. Aromatic hydrocarbons were not present above detection limits of 1 ng/liter.

  3. Hydrocarbon potential of Morocco

    SciTech Connect

    Achnin, H.; Nairn, A.E.M.

    1988-08-01

    Morocco lies at the junction of the African and Eurasian plates and carries a record of their movements since the end of the Precambrian. Four structural regions with basins and troughs can be identified: Saharan (Tarfaya-Ayoun and Tindouf basins); Anti-Atlas (Souss and Ouarzazate troughs and Boudnib basin); the Essaouria, Doukkala, Tadla, Missour, High Plateau, and Guercif basins; and Meseta and Rif (Rharb and Pre-Rif basins). The targets in the Tindouf basin are Paleozoic, Cambrian, Ordovician (clastics), Devonian (limestones), and Carboniferous reservoirs sourced primarily by Silurian shales. In the remaining basins, excluding the Rharb, the reservoirs are Triassic detritals, limestones at the base of the Lias and Dogger, Malm detritals, and sandy horizons in the Cretaceous. In addition to the Silurian, potential source rocks include the Carboniferous and Permo-Carboniferous shales and clays; Jurassic shales, marls, and carbonates; and Cretaceous clays. In the Rharb basin, the objectives are sand lenses within the Miocene marls. The maturation level of the organic matter generally corresponds to oil and gas. The traps are stratigraphic (lenses and reefs) and structural (horsts and folds). The seals in the pre-Jurassic rocks are shales and evaporites; in the younger rocks, shales and marl. Hydrocarbon accumulations have been found in Paleozoic, Triassic, Liassic, Malm, and Miocene rocks.

  4. Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    SciTech Connect

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr.

    1992-09-30

    Task 8 is responsible for assessing the hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain vincinity. Our main focus is source rock stratigraphy in the NTS area in southern Nevada. (In addition, Trexler continues to work on a parallel study of source rock stratigraphy in the oil-producing region of east central Nevada, but this work is not funded by Task 8.) As a supplement to the stratigraphic studies, we are studying the geometry and kinematics of deformation at NTS, particularly as these pertain to reconstructing Paleozoic stratigraphy and to predicting the nature of the Late Paleozoic rocks under Yucca Mountain. Our stratigraphic studies continue to support the interpretation that rocks mapped as the {open_quotes}Eleana Formation{close_quotes} are in fact parts of two different Mississippian units. We have made significant progress in determining the basin histories of both units. These place important constraints on regional paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions. In addition to continued work on the Eleana, we plan to look at the overlying Tippipah Limestone. Preliminary TOC and maturation data indicate that this may be another potential source rock.

  5. Illite and hydrocarbon exploration

    PubMed Central

    Pevear, David R.

    1999-01-01

    Illite is a general term for the dioctahedral mica-like clay mineral common in sedimentary rocks, especially shales. Illite is of interest to the petroleum industry because it can provide a K-Ar isotope date that constrains the timing of basin heating events. It is critical to establish that hydrocarbon formation and migration occurred after the formation of the trap (anticline, etc.) that is to hold the oil. Illite also may precipitate in the pores of sandstone reservoirs, impeding fluid flow. Illite in shales is a mixture of detrital mica and its weathering products with diagenetic illite formed by reaction with pore fluids during burial. K-Ar ages are apparent ages of mixtures of detrital and diagenetic end members, and what we need are the ages of the end members themselves. This paper describes a methodology, based on mineralogy and crystallography, for interpreting the K-Ar ages from illites in sedimentary rocks and for estimating the ages of the end members. PMID:10097055

  6. The application of forest classification from Landsat data as a basis for natural hydrocarbon emission estimation and photochemical oxidant model simulations in southeastern Virginia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salop, J.; Wakelyn, N. T.; Levy, G. F.; Middleton, W. M.; Gervin, J. C.

    1983-01-01

    The possible contribution by natural hydrocarbon emissions to the total ozone budget recorded in the Tidewater region of southeastern Virginia during the height of the summer period was examined. Natural sources investigated were limited to the primary HC emitters and most prevalent natural vegetation, the forests. Three types and their areal coverage were determined for Region VI of the Virginia State Air Pollution Control Board using remotely sensed data from Landsat, a NASA experimental earth resources satellite. Emission factors appropriate to the specific types (coniferous 0.24 x 10 to the 13th, mixed 0.63 x 10 to the 13th, deciduous 1.92 x 10 to the 13th, microgram/h), derived from contemporary procedures, were applied to produce an overall regional emission rate of 2.79 x 10 to the 13th microgram/h for natural non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC). This rate was used with estimates of the anthropogenic NO(x) and NMHC loading, as input into a photochemical box model. Additional HC loading on the order of that estimated to be produced by the natural forest communities was required in order to reach certain measured summer peak ozone levels as the computer simulation was unable to account for the measured episodic levels on the basis of the anthropogenic inventory alone.

  7. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-01-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  8. Ammonia abundances in four comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S. C.; Engel, L.

    1991-02-01

    NH2 emission band strengths were measured in four comets and the NH2 column densities were determined in order to measure the ammonia content of the comets. The mean ammonia/water abundance ratio derived for the four comets is found to be 0.13 + or - 0.06 percent, with no significant variation among the comets. The uniformity of this abundance attests to a remarkable degree of chemical homogeneity over large scales in the comet-forming region of the primordial solar nebula, and contrasts with the CO abundance variations found previously in comets. The N2 and NH3 abundances indicate a condensation temperature in the range 20-160 K, consistent with virtually all comet formation hypotheses.

  9. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-05-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  10. The bacterial community structure of hydrocarbon-polluted marine environments as the basis for the definition of an ecological index of hydrocarbon exposure.

    PubMed

    Lozada, Mariana; Marcos, Magalí S; Commendatore, Marta G; Gil, Mónica N; Dionisi, Hebe M

    2014-09-17

    The aim of this study was to design a molecular biological tool, using information provided by amplicon pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, that could be suitable for environmental assessment and bioremediation in marine ecosystems. We selected 63 bacterial genera that were previously linked to hydrocarbon biodegradation, representing a minimum sample of the bacterial guild associated with this process. We defined an ecological indicator (ecological index of hydrocarbon exposure, EIHE) using the relative abundance values of these genera obtained by pyrotag analysis. This index reflects the proportion of the bacterial community that is potentially capable of biodegrading hydrocarbons. When the bacterial community structures of intertidal sediments from two sites with different pollution histories were analyzed, 16 of the selected genera (25%) were significantly overrepresented with respect to the pristine site, in at least one of the samples from the polluted site. Although the relative abundances of individual genera associated with hydrocarbon biodegradation were generally low in samples from the polluted site, EIHE values were 4 times higher than those in the pristine sample, with at least 5% of the bacterial community in the sediments being represented by the selected genera. EIHE values were also calculated in other oil-exposed marine sediments as well as in seawater using public datasets from experimental systems and field studies. In all cases, the EIHE was significantly higher in oiled than in unpolluted samples, suggesting that this tool could be used as an estimator of the hydrocarbon-degrading potential of microbial communities.

  11. The Bacterial Community Structure of Hydrocarbon-Polluted Marine Environments as the Basis for the Definition of an Ecological Index of Hydrocarbon Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Mariana; Marcos, Magalí S.; Commendatore, Marta G.; Gil, Mónica N.; Dionisi, Hebe M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design a molecular biological tool, using information provided by amplicon pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes, that could be suitable for environmental assessment and bioremediation in marine ecosystems. We selected 63 bacterial genera that were previously linked to hydrocarbon biodegradation, representing a minimum sample of the bacterial guild associated with this process. We defined an ecological indicator (ecological index of hydrocarbon exposure, EIHE) using the relative abundance values of these genera obtained by pyrotag analysis. This index reflects the proportion of the bacterial community that is potentially capable of biodegrading hydrocarbons. When the bacterial community structures of intertidal sediments from two sites with different pollution histories were analyzed, 16 of the selected genera (25%) were significantly overrepresented with respect to the pristine site, in at least one of the samples from the polluted site. Although the relative abundances of individual genera associated with hydrocarbon biodegradation were generally low in samples from the polluted site, EIHE values were 4 times higher than those in the pristine sample, with at least 5% of the bacterial community in the sediments being represented by the selected genera. EIHE values were also calculated in other oil-exposed marine sediments as well as in seawater using public datasets from experimental systems and field studies. In all cases, the EIHE was significantly higher in oiled than in unpolluted samples, suggesting that this tool could be used as an estimator of the hydrocarbon-degrading potential of microbial communities. PMID:24964812

  12. Chlorine Abundances in Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Z. G.; Pilachowski, C. A.; Hinkle, K.

    2016-12-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and 1 M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H35Cl at 3.69851 μm. The high-resolution L-band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4 m telescope. The average [35Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with -0.72 < [Fe/H] < 0.20 is [35Cl/Fe] = (-0.10 ± 0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [35Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16 ± 0.15) dex. The [35Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of ˜0.35 dex above model predictions, suggesting that chemical evolution models are underproducing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and H ii regions. In one star where both H35Cl and H37Cl could be measured, a 35Cl/37Cl isotope ratio of 2.2 ± 0.4 was found, consistent with values found in the Galactic ISM and predicted chemical evolution models.

  13. High bacterial biodiversity increases degradation performance of hydrocarbons during bioremediation of contaminated harbor marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Dell'Anno, Antonio; Beolchini, Francesca; Rocchetti, Laura; Luna, Gian Marco; Danovaro, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    We investigated changes of bacterial abundance and biodiversity during bioremediation experiments carried out on oxic and anoxic marine harbor sediments contaminated with hydrocarbons. Oxic sediments, supplied with inorganic nutrients, were incubated in aerobic conditions at 20 °C and 35 °C for 30 days, whereas anoxic sediments, amended with organic substrates, were incubated in anaerobic conditions at the same temperatures for 60 days. Results reported here indicate that temperature exerted the main effect on bacterial abundance, diversity and assemblage composition. At higher temperature bacterial diversity and evenness increased significantly in aerobic conditions, whilst decreased in anaerobic conditions. In both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, biodegradation efficiencies of hydrocarbons were significantly and positively related with bacterial richness and evenness. Overall results presented here suggest that bioremediation strategies, which can sustain high levels of bacterial diversity rather than the selection of specific taxa, may significantly increase the efficiency of hydrocarbon degradation in contaminated marine sediments.

  14. Diesel-related hydrocarbons can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmore, R. E.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lidster, R. T.; Lee, J. D.; Evans, M. J.; Rickard, A. R.; Lewis, A. C.; Hamilton, J. F.

    2015-03-01

    Hydrocarbons are key precursors to two priority air pollutants, ozone and particulate matter. Those with two to seven carbons have historically been straightforward to observe and have been successfully reduced in many developed cities through air quality policy interventions. Longer chain hydrocarbons released from diesel vehicles are not considered explicitly as part of air quality strategies and there are few direct measurements of their gaseous abundance in the atmosphere. This study describes the chemically comprehensive and continuous measurements of organic compounds in a developed megacity (London), which demonstrate that on a seasonal median basis, diesel-related hydrocarbons represent only 20-30% of the total hydrocarbon mixing ratio but comprise more than 50% of the atmospheric hydrocarbon mass and are a dominant local source of secondary organic aerosols. This study shows for the first time that, 60% of the winter primary hydrocarbon hydroxyl radical reactivity is from diesel-related hydrocarbons and using the maximum incremental reactivity scale, we predict that they contribute up to 50% of the ozone production potential in London. Comparing real-world urban composition with regulatory emissions inventories in the UK and US highlights a previously unaccounted for but, very significant under-reporting of diesel related hydrocarbons; an underestimation of a factor ~ 4 for C9 species rising to a factor of over 70 for C12 during winter. These observations show that hydrocarbons from diesel vehicles can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in cities with high diesel fleet fractions. Future control of urban particulate matter and ozone in such locations requires a shift in policy focus onto gas phase hydrocarbons released from diesels as this vehicle type continues to displace gasoline world-wide.

  15. Diesel-related hydrocarbons can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunmore, R. E.; Hopkins, J. R.; Lidster, R. T.; Lee, J. D.; Evans, M. J.; Rickard, A. R.; Lewis, A. C.; Hamilton, J. F.

    2015-09-01

    Hydrocarbons are key precursors to two priority air pollutants, ozone and particulate matter. Those with two to seven carbons have historically been straightforward to observe and have been successfully reduced in many developed cities through air quality policy interventions. Longer chain hydrocarbons released from diesel vehicles are not considered explicitly as part of air quality strategies and there are few direct measurements of their gaseous abundance in the atmosphere. This study describes the chemically comprehensive and continuous measurements of organic compounds in a developed megacity (London), which demonstrate that on a seasonal median basis, diesel-related hydrocarbons represent only 20-30 % of the total hydrocarbon mixing ratio but comprise more than 50 % of the atmospheric hydrocarbon mass and are a dominant local source of secondary organic aerosols. This study shows for the first time that 60 % of the winter primary hydrocarbon hydroxyl radical reactivity is from diesel-related hydrocarbons and using the maximum incremental reactivity scale, we predict that they contribute up to 50 % of the ozone production potential in London. Comparing real-world urban composition with regulatory emissions inventories in the UK and US highlights a previously unaccounted for, but very significant, under-reporting of diesel-related hydrocarbons; an underestimation of a factor ~4 for C9 species rising to a factor of over 70 for C12 during winter. These observations show that hydrocarbons from diesel vehicles can dominate gas phase reactive carbon in cities with high diesel fleet fractions. Future control of urban particulate matter and ozone in such locations requires a shift in policy focus onto gas phase hydrocarbons released from diesels as this vehicle type continues to displace gasoline world-wide.

  16. Sexual dimorphism in cuticular hydrocarbons of the Australian field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus (Orthoptera: Gryllidae).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Melissa L; Simmons, Leigh W

    2008-06-01

    Sexual dimorphism is presumed to reflect adaptive divergence in response to selection favouring different optimal character states in the two sexes. Here, we analyse patterns of sexual dimorphism in the cuticular hydrocarbons of the Australian field cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus using gas chromatography. Ten of the 25 peaks found in our chromatographs, differed in their relative abundance between the sexes. The presence of sexual dimorphism in T. oceanicus is discussed in reference to a review of sexual dimorphism in cuticular hydrocarbons of other insects. We found that this trait has been examined in 103 species across seven different orders. Seventy-six of these species (73%) displayed sex specificity of cuticular hydrocarbons, the presence/absence of which does not appear to be directly linked to phylogeny. The occurrence of sexual dimorphism in cuticular hydrocarbons of some but not other species, and the extent of variation within genera, suggest that this divergence has been driven primarily by sexual selection.

  17. Fingerprinting hydrocarbons in the biological resources of the Exxon Valdez spill area

    SciTech Connect

    Bence, A.E.; Burns, W.A.

    1995-12-31

    A procedure has been developed that discriminates Exxon Valdez crude from other sources of hydrocarbons found in Prince Williams Sound and the Gulf of Alaska. The procedure uses polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) distributions, measured by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), to fingerprint sample extracts. The relative abundances of alkylated phenanthrenes, dibenzothiophenes, and chrysenes are used to differentiate Exxon Valdez crude and its weathering products from other hydrocarbons. Saturate fraction distributions are used to confirm the PAH identification whenever possible. The procedure has been applied to the more than 1,500 PAH analyses of tissues reported by the Oil Spill Health Task Force, formed after the spill to assess subsistence food safety, and nearly 4,700 PAH analyses of biological samples in PWSOIL, the government`s damage-assessment chemistry database. These two datasets constitute the largest collection of hydrocarbon analyses of biological samples form the spill-impact zone. 70 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  19. Methanotrophic gastropods from a bathyal hydrocarbon seep, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.C.; Aharon, P.; Gupta, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Two gastropods, Neritina sp. and Truncatella sp., collected live from a Gulf of Mexico active gas seep with the submersible Johnson Sea Link in September 1991, apparently incorporate methane-derived carbon in their soft tissues. Flesh of an individual Neritina sp. had a delta C-13 of [minus]50.92 per mil PDB, and that of two coexisting individuals of Truncatella sp. had values of [minus]45.11 and [minus]49.27 per mil. These isotope values are comparable to those reported for the methanotrophic mytilid bivalve Bathymodiolus sp. from other hydrocarbon seeps on the Gulf of Mexico, and are lighter than published isotopic values of chemosynthetic organisms with sulfur-oxidizing symbionts. The anomalously light carbon-isotopic values of Neritina sp. and Truncatella sp. may steam from one of three causes: (1) these gastropods host symbiotic methanotrophic bacteria, (2) their chief food is methane-oxidizing bacteria present at the seep, or (3) they incorporate some carbon from the periostracum of mussels on which they may graze. The presence of abundant juveniles of Bathymodiolus, reported to settle preferentially in areas of active seepage and high methane release, indicates that methane was abundant and supported a community with multiple trophic levels. Generally, studies of hydrocarbon-seep communities have focused on larger community members, especially bivalves and tube worms. The presence of living Neritina and Truncatella at the authors sampling site, however, draws attention to the fact that these gastropods are integral and significant parts of hydrocarbon-seep communities. Both gastropod species are members of genera that characteristically inhabit shallow marine, intertidal, and semiterrestrial environments. The presence of these genera in bathyal hydrocarbon seeps indicates that they have very broad environmental ranges, thus limiting their utility in paleoecologic reconstructions.

  20. Hydrocarbons on Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion: Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; MoreauDalleOre, Cristina; Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Clark, Roger Nelson

    2012-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the hydrocarbon spectral bands measured on three of Saturn's satellites, Phoebe, Iaperus, and Hyperion. These bands, measured with the Cassini Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on close fly-by's of these satellites, are the C-H stretching modes of aromatic hydrocarbons at approximately 3.28 micrometers (approximately 3050 per centimeter), and the are four blended bands of aliphatic -CH2- and -CH3 in the range approximately 3.36-3.52 micrometers (approximately 2980- 2840 per centimeter) bably indicating the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), is unusually strong in comparison to the aliphatic bands, resulting in a unique signarure among Solar System bodies measured so far, and as such offers a means of comparison among the three satellites. The ratio of the C-H bands in aromatic molecules to those in aliphatic molecules in the surface materials of Phoebe, NAro:NAliph approximately 24; for Hyperion the value is approximately 12, while laperus shows an intermediate value. In view of the trend of the evolution (dehydrogenation by heat and radiation) of aliphatic complexes toward more compact molecules and eventually to aromatics, the relative abundances of aliphatic -CH2- and -CH3- is an indication of the lengths of the molecular chain structures, hence the degree of modification of the original material. We derive CH2:CH3 approximately 2.2 in the spectrum of low-albedo material on laperus; this value is the same within measurement errors to the ratio in the diffuse interstellar medium. The similarity in the spectral signatures of the three satellites, plus the apparent weak trend of aromatic/aliphatic abundance from Phoebe to Hyperion, is consistent with, and effectively confirms that the source of the hydrocarbon-bearing material is Phoebe, and that the appearance of that material on the other two satellites arises from the deposition of the inward-spiraling dust that populates the Phoebe ring.

  1. Carbon and Hydrogen Stable Isotope Fractionation Associated with the Aerobic and Anaerobic Degradation of Saturated and Alkylated Aromatic Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Musat, Florin; Vogt, Carsten; Richnow, Hans H

    2016-01-01

    Saturated hydrocarbons (alkanes) and alkylated aromatic hydrocarbons are abundant environmental compounds. Hydrocarbons are primarily removed from the environment by biodegradation, a process usually associated with moderate carbon and significant hydrogen isotope fractionation allowing monitoring of biodegradation processes in the environment. Here, we review the carbon and hydrogen stable isotope fractionation associated with the cleavage of C-H bonds at alkyl chains of hydrocarbons. Propane, n-butane and ethylbenzene were used as model components for alkyl moieties of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons with emphasis on the cleavage of the C-H bond without the involvement of molecular oxygen. The carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation factors were further used to explore the diagnostic potential for characterizing the mode of bond cleavage under oxic and anoxic conditions. x039B; factors, calculated to correlate carbon and hydrogen fractionation, allowed to distinguish between aerobic and anaerobic biodegradation processes in the environment.

  2. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  3. Robust Abundance Estimation in Animal Abundance Surveys with Imperfect Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of animal abundance are central to the conservation and management of living natural resources. However, detection uncertainty complicates the sampling process of many species. One sampling method employed to deal with this problem is depletion (or removal) surveys in whi...

  4. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Yang; Dali; Devlin, David; Barbero, Robert S.; Carrera, Martin E.; Colling, Craig W.

    2010-08-10

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  5. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dali; Devlin, David; Barbero, Robert S; Carrera, Martin E; Colling, Craig W

    2011-11-29

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  6. Saturated hydrocarbons in bovine liver

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Bartholomew; Modzeleski, Vincent E.; Scott, Ward M.

    1969-01-01

    A homologous series of n-alkanes (C14–C33) and two isoprenoid hydrocarbons, 2,6,10,14-tetramethylhexadecane (phytane) and 2,6,10,14-tetramethylpentadecane (pristane) have been identified in bovine liver. Another branched but non-isoprenoid alkane and three isomers of molecular formula C20H40 were partially identified. Phytane and the C18–C22 and C29–C33 n-alkanes were found to be the major components in liver, suggesting that at least the main hydrocarbon components were derived from various plants in the diet. The hydrocarbons were separated and identified by a series of steps involving solvent extraction, saponification, elution chromatography on alumina and silica gel columns, molecular sieving and by infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy, followed by combined capillary gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. PMID:5820649

  7. The solar abundance of beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    The solar abundance of beryllium is deduced from high-resolution Kitt Peak observations of the 3130.43- and 3131.08-A lines of Be II interpreted by the method of spectrum synthesis. The results are in good agreement with those previously obtained by Grevesse (1968) and by Hauge and Engvold (1968) and indicate that in the photospheric layers, beryllium is depleted below the chondritic value by a factor of about two. It is found that the beryllium abundance is equal to logN(Be)/N(H) + 12 = 1.08 plus or minus 0.05.

  8. Hydrocarbon source apportionment for the 1996 Paso del Norte Ozone Study.

    PubMed

    Fujita, E M

    2001-08-10

    The 1996 Paso del Norte (PdN) ozone study was conducted to improve current understanding of the significant meteorological and air quality processes that lead to high concentrations of ozone in El Paso, Texas (USA) and Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua (Mexico). Two-hour canister samples were collected five times daily at 05.00-07.00 h, 07.00-09.00 h, 09.00-11.00 h, 11.00-13.00 h, and 15.00-17.00 h MST during intensive study periods at one urban and one rural site on each side of the border. An automated gas chromatograph was operated at one site in central El Paso. Source profiles (the fractional chemical composition of emissions) from motor vehicles, gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas, and commercial natural gas were combined with source profiles from other studies for input to the Chemical Mass Balance (CMB) receptor model to apportion the measured non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) to sources. On-road vehicle emissions accounted for one-half to two-thirds of the NMHC in Ciudad Juárez and El Paso with the highest contributions occurring during the morning and afternoon commute periods. Emissions from diesel exhaust contributed approximately 2-3% of NMHC in Ciudad Juárez and less than 2% in El Paso. The average sum of liquid gasoline and gasoline vapor increased during the day in Ciudad Juárez from 2% at 06.00 h to approximately 12% at 16.00 h. Diurnal and day-of-the-week patterns in the liquid gasoline contributions are essentially identical to the corresponding patterns for motor vehicle exhaust, which suggest that a large fraction of the liquid gasoline contribution may be associated with tailpipe emissions rather than evaporative emissions from motor vehicles or industrial sources. Including the sum of the two sources put the upper limit for tailpipe contributions at 60-70% of NMHC.

  9. Changes in fatty acid and hydrocarbon composition of zooplankton assemblages related to environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Changes in zooplankton fatty acid and hydrocarbon patterns are described in relation to changes in environmental conditions and species composition. The regulation of zooplankton abundance by sea nettle-ctenophore interaction was examined in a small Rhode Island coastal pond. Sea nettles were nettles were able to eliminate ctenophores from the pond and subsequently zooplankton abundance increased. During one increase in zooplankton abundance, it was found that polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased while monounsaturated fatty acids increased. It was concluded that this shift in biochemical pattern was due to food limitation. In addition, zooplankton fatty acids were used in multivariate discriminant analysis to classify whether zooplankton were from coastal or estuarine environments. Zooplankton from coastal environments were characterized by higher monounsaturate fatty acids. Zooplankton hydrocarbon composition was affected by species composition and by pollution inputs. The presence of Calanus finmarchicus was detected by increased levels of pristane.

  10. Method for producing viscous hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Poston, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    A method for recovering viscous hydrocarbons and synthetic fuels from a subterranean formation by drilling a well bore through the formation and completing the well by cementing a casing means in the upper part of the pay zone. The well is completed as an open hole completion and a superheated thermal vapor stream comprised of steam and combustion gases is injected into the lower part of the pay zone. The combustion gases migrate to the top of the pay zone and form a gas cap which provides formation pressure to produce the viscous hydrocarbons and synthetic fuels.

  11. Biological enhancement of hydrocarbon extraction

    DOEpatents

    Brigmon, Robin L.; Berry, Christopher J.

    2009-01-06

    A method of microbial enhanced oil recovery for recovering oil from an oil-bearing rock formation is provided. The methodology uses a consortium of bacteria including a mixture of surfactant producing bacteria and non-surfactant enzyme producing bacteria which may release hydrocarbons from bitumen containing sands. The described bioprocess can work with existing petroleum recovery protocols. The consortium microorganisms are also useful for treatment of above oil sands, ground waste tailings, subsurface oil recovery, and similar materials to enhance remediation and/or recovery of additional hydrocarbons from the materials.

  12. Hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbon-soluble magnesium dialkoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Kamienski, C.W.

    1988-05-31

    This patent describes a process for the preparation of hydrocarbon or chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent solutions of magnesium dialkoxides, which comprises reacting a suspension of magnesium metal or magnesium amide, or a solution of a dialkyimagnesium compound, in a volatile hydrocarbon or chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent with an alcohol selected from the group of (a) aliphatic, cycloaliphatic and acyclic C/sub 5/-C/sub 18/ beta- and gamma-alkyl-substituted secondary and tertiary monohydric alcohols; or (b) mixtures of the (a) alcohols with C/sub 3/-C/sub 18/ aliphatic or cycloaliphatic beta- and gamma-alkyl-unsubstituted secondary or tertiary alcohols; or (c) mixtures of the (a) alcohols with C/sub 1/-C/sub 18/ aliphatic primary unsubstituted and 2-alkyl-substituted alcohols; the mole ratios of the (a) to the (b), and the (a) to the (c), alcohols being 1 of the (a) alcohols to 0.1 to 2 of the (b) and/or the (c) alcohols.

  13. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaars, K.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Venter, A. D.; Josipovic, M.; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, V.; Aaltonen, H.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, A.; Hellén, H.; Laakso, L.; Hakola, H.

    2014-07-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol, which affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements of aromatic hydrocarbons were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa), which is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters), the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters), the Johannesburg-Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (> 10 million people), the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and pyrometallurgical industries), the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry) and also a region of anticyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for 1 year. Samples were collected twice a week for 2 h during daytime and 2 h during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the monthly median (mean) total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 (0.011) and 3.1 (3.2) ppb. Benzene levels did not exceed the local air quality standard limit, i.e. annual mean of 1.6 ppb. Toluene was the most abundant compound, with an annual median (mean) concentration of 0.63 (0.89) ppb. No statistically significant differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found, and no distinct seasonal patterns were

  14. Isolation and characterization of ancient hydrocarbon biomarkers from crystalline minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summons, R. E.; Carrasquillo, A.; Hallmann, C.; Sherman, L. S.; Waldbauer, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrocarbon biomarker analysis is conventionally conducted on bitumen (soluble fossilized organic matter) extracted from sedimentary rocks using organic solvents. Biomarkers can also be generated by pyrolysis of kerogen (insoluble organic matter) in the same rocks. These approaches have met with much success where the organic matter has not seen significant levels of thermal metamorphism but more limited success when applied to thermally mature Archean rocks. Biomarkers have also been isolated from fluid inclusions of crystalline minerals and this approach has found wide application in petroleum exploration because of the capability of minerals that form crystals in reservoir rocks to trap organics from different episodes of fluid migration. Lastly, biogenic crystalline minerals are well known to trap organics including amino acids, fatty acids or hydrocarbons from those organisms that laid down the minerals. In fact, recent observations suggest that hydrocarbon biomarkers can be abundantly preserved in crystalline minerals where they may be protected over long periods of time and also distinguished from more recent generations of organics from endolithic organisms (modern) or anthropogenic (fossil hydrocarbon) contaminants. Here we report analyses of biomarker lipids trapped in fluid inclusions or otherwise having a "tight association" with the minerals in sedimentary rocks from Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic successions in Australia and Southern Africa. In particular, cores recovered from the Agouron Griqualand Drilling Project contain over 2500m of well-preserved late Archean Transvaal Supergroup sediments, dating from ca. 2.67 to 2.46Ga. Bitumen extracts of samples from these strata were obtained using clean drilling, sampling and handling protocols and without overprinting with contaminant hydrocarbons. Dissolution of the mineral matrix of extracted sediments, followed by another solvent extraction, yielded a second bitumen that comprised hydrocarbons that

  15. Identification of natural, anthropogenic and petroleum hydrocarbons in aquatic sediments.

    PubMed

    Volkman, J K; Holdsworth, D G; Neill, G P; Bavor, H J

    1992-03-01

    Complex distributions of hydrocarbons occur in most aquatic sediments. Total concentrations can range from a few parts per million in non-polluted intertidal and oceanic areas to parts per thousand in heavily contaminated estuarine, lake and near-shore environments. Iatroscan TLC-FID provides a quick assessment of the total hydrocarbon load, but capillary GC, HPLC and GC-MS are essential for obtaining detailed composition data from which information on possible sources can be derived. Alkenes from microalgae, such as n-C21:6, n-C17:1 and unusual C25 and C30 isoprenoid alkenes, are often the most abundant single components in sedimentary hydrocarbon distributions. Some hydrocarbons are also produced from diagenetic transformation of functionalised lipids present in the sediment. Long-chain alkanes typical of plant waxes can be important constituents, even in marine sediments far from the coast. These distributions display a strong predominance of odd chain lengths, whereas n-alkane distributions in oils usually show little or no predominance of either odd or even chain lengths. However, the presence of this type of distribution in a sediment may not indicate petroleum contamination since biological sources for similar distributions are now recognised. Petroleum-derived residues are common in coastal and estuarine areas, particularly those near urban or industrial centers. This contamination is readily seen in capillary gas chromatograms of the alkanes as an unresolved complex mixture (UCM). The source of the oil can often be deduced from characteristic distributions of biomarker steranes, rearranged steranes, hopanes and methyl hopanes determined by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Methyl hopanes are major polycyclic alkanes in oils from carbonate source rocks, such as those from the Middle East, but are uncommon in Australian oils. GC-MS fingerprinting techniques show that lubricating oils are a major source of hydrocarbon pollution in many estuaries

  16. THE PHOTOTOXICITY OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) continues to be interested in developing methods for the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) in the environment. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) are common contaminants in our environment. Being major product...

  17. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  18. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001). The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959) and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965) open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992), and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993). However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001). The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004) is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004) emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004) also suggest that our attention

  19. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T.J.; Podosek, F.A.; Johnson, M.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of 244Pu fission Xe, U, Th, and light REE (LREE) abundances, along with modal petrographic determinations of phosphate abundances, were carried out on equilibrated ordinary chondrites in order to define better the solar system Pu abundance and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. Our data permit comparison of the directly measured Pu/ U ratio with that determined indirectly as (Pu/Nd) ?? (Nd/U) assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. Except for Guaren??a, and perhaps H chondrites in general, Pu concentrations are similar to that determined previously for St. Se??verin, although less precise because of higher trapped Xe contents. Trapped 130Xe 136Xe ratios appear to vary from meteorite to meteorite, but, relative to AVCC, all are similar in the sense of having less of the interstellar heavy Xe found in carbonaceous chondrite acid residues. The Pu/U and Pu/Nd ratios are consistent with previous data for St. Se??verin, but both tend to be slightly higher than those inferred from previous data on Angra dos Reis. Although significant variations exist, the distribution of our Th/U ratios, along with other precise isotope dilution data for ordinary chondrites, is rather symmetric about the CI chondrite value; however, actinide/(LREE) ratios are systematically lower than the CI value. Variations in actinide or LREE absolute and relative abundances are interpreted as reflecting differences in the proportions and/or compositions of more primitive components (chondrules and CAI materials?) incorporated into different regions of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The observed variations of Th/U, Nd/U, or Ce/U suggest that measurements of Pu/U on any single equilibrated ordinary chondrite specimen, such as St. Se??verin, should statistically be within ??20-30% of the average solar system value, although it is also clear that anomalous samples exist. ?? 1990.

  20. Dominant petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria in the Archipelago Sea in South-West Finland (Baltic Sea) belong to different taxonomic groups than hydrocarbon degraders in the oceans.

    PubMed

    Reunamo, Anna; Riemann, Lasse; Leskinen, Piia; Jørgensen, Kirsten S

    2013-07-15

    The natural petroleum hydrocarbon degrading capacity of the Archipelago Sea water in S-W Finland was studied in a microcosm experiment. Pristine and previously oil exposed sites were examined. Bacterial community fingerprinting was performed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and samples from selected microcosms were sequenced. The abundance of PAH degradation genes was measured by quantitative PCR. Bacterial communities in diesel exposed microcosms diverged from control microcosms during the experiment. Gram positive PAH degradation genes dominated at both sites in situ, whereas gram negative PAH degrading genes became enriched in diesel microcosms. The dominant bacterial groups after a 14 days of diesel exposure were different depending on the sampling site, belonging to the class Actinobacteria (32%) at a pristine site and Betaproteobacteria (52%) at a previously oil exposed site. The hydrocarbon degrading bacteria in the Baltic Sea differ from those in the oceans, where most hydrocarbon degraders belong to Gammaproteobacteria.

  1. Measurement of Hydrocarbon Transport in Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hydrocarbon uptake by bacteria has not been extensively studied, and strong evidence for active transport of hydrocarbons is lacking. The volatile nature of hydrocarbons, their hydrophobicity, and their relatively low aqueous solubilities can complicate transport assays. Here we present a detailed...

  2. 33 CFR 157.166 - Hydrocarbon emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrocarbon emissions. 157.166... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.166 Hydrocarbon emissions. If the... ballasted in that port the hydrocarbon vapors in each tank are contained by a means under § 157.132....

  3. 33 CFR 157.166 - Hydrocarbon emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrocarbon emissions. 157.166... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.166 Hydrocarbon emissions. If the... ballasted in that port the hydrocarbon vapors in each tank are contained by a means under § 157.132....

  4. 33 CFR 157.166 - Hydrocarbon emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon emissions. 157.166... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.166 Hydrocarbon emissions. If the... ballasted in that port the hydrocarbon vapors in each tank are contained by a means under § 157.132....

  5. 33 CFR 157.166 - Hydrocarbon emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrocarbon emissions. 157.166... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.166 Hydrocarbon emissions. If the... ballasted in that port the hydrocarbon vapors in each tank are contained by a means under § 157.132....

  6. 33 CFR 157.166 - Hydrocarbon emissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrocarbon emissions. 157.166... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.166 Hydrocarbon emissions. If the... ballasted in that port the hydrocarbon vapors in each tank are contained by a means under § 157.132....

  7. Hydrophobic encapsulation of hydrocarbon gases.

    PubMed

    Leontiev, Alexander V; Saleh, Anas W; Rudkevich, Dmitry M

    2007-04-26

    [reaction: see text] Encapsulation data for hydrophobic hydrocarbon gases within a water-soluble hemicarcerand in aqueous solution are reported. It is concluded that hydrophobic interactions serve as the primary driving force for the encapsulation, which can be used for the design of gas-separating polymers with intrinsic inner cavities.

  8. Steam Hydrocarbon Cracking and Reforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golombok, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The interactive methods of steam hydrocarbon reforming and cracking of the oil and chemical industries are scrutinized, with special focus on their resemblance and variations. The two methods are illustrations of equilibrium-controlled and kinetically-controlled processes, the analysis of which involves theories, which overlap and balance each…

  9. Hydrocarbon fingerprinting for application in forensic geology: Review with case studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, L.G.; Schmidt, G.W.

    1994-11-01

    Forensic geology, the application of the science to the law, has required detailed classification, identification, and fingerprinting of hydrocarbons. Currently, the best overall tool for this is a chromatogram derived from capillary column gas chromatography (GC). Just as hardness and cleavage identify rock minerals and x-ray angles help identify clay minerals, retention time on a chromatogram can help identify key hydrocarbons, such as normal paraffins. N-paraffin ranges can be used to classify hydrocarbon mixtures such as gasoline, diesel fuel, or crude oil. Refined and crude petroleum may be distinguished on a chromatogram by the range of n-paraffins in a mixture, the shape of the n-paraffin envelope, the presence of absence of olefins, and the presence and relative abundance of certain hydrocarbon additives. Crude oils tend to have a wide range of n-paraffins whose envelope is asymmetric and includes a tail of heavier hydrocarbons. Refined products have a more limited n-paraffin range. With some notable exceptions, such as gasoline, the envelope of most refined products is bell shaped. Olefins are an artifact of the refining process and are not present in crudes. Methylcyclohexane is relatively abundant in gasolines. Isooctane and aromatics are more abundant in premium gasolines than in condensates and crudes. Fuel additives such as tetraethyl lead, methyl tertiary butyl ether, ethyl tertiary butyl alcohol, and ethanol do not exist in crudes. This paper uses case histories to illustrate fingerprinting techniques. Case one matches the fingerprint of a plume to a specific source. Case two eliminates casing-head condensate as the source of a plume and tags processed natural-gas liquids as the probable source. Case three illustrates how other organic compounds may be mistakenly identified as hydrocarbon contamination, and case four differentiates refined products.

  10. Concerning the petroleum hydrocarbons migration in the permafrost zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, I. V.; Panova, E.; Grinko, A.; Dudarev, O.; Semiletov, I. P.

    2015-12-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms controlling methane emissions in the Laptev Sea it is extremely important to know the distribution patterns of subsea permafrost in the coastal zone. One possible solution to this problem is to analyze the hydrocarbon fluids in the bottom sediments. The object of our study was the core sample from Ivashkinskaya lagoon (Lena Delta, Sakha Republic). Pyrolytic studies were performed for this core sample (ROCK- EVAL 6 TURBO). According to the pyrolysis results there were 5 samples from the upper section in the range 0.36-5.58m selected for the further studies. The common feature of these samples is high content level of the pelitic component. They contain more than 1.0% of TOC and are composed of volatile organic compounds. Extracts obtained from the core sample were analyzed by GC-MS («Hewlett Packard» 6890/5973). Analyzed extracts demonstrated different classes of organic compounds in their composition with saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons and acids dominating. Here are the histograms of n-alkanes in function of the carbon atoms number in the molecule (Figure). Considering our work experience with the Black Sea sediments we suggest that the samples with a high degree of even n-alkanes are confined to zones of petroleum hydrocarbons migration coming from the deep oil deposits. Figure. Typical n-alkanes distribution in the extracts (horizontal axis - the number of carbon atoms in the molecule, vertical axis - relative abundance)

  11. Hydrocarbon photochemistry in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladstone, G. R.; Allen, M.; Yung, Y. L.

    1996-01-01

    The hydrocarbon photochemistry in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter is investigated using a one-dimensional, photochemical-diffusive, and diurnally averaged model. The important chemical cycles and pathways among the major species are outlined and a standard model for the North Equatorial Belt region is examined in detail. It is found that several traditionally dominant chemical pathways among the C and C2 species are replaced in importance by cycles involving C-C4 species. The pressure and altitude profiles of mixing ratios for several observable hydrocarbon species are compared with available ultraviolet- and infrared-derived abundances. The results of sensitivity studies on the standard model with respect to variations in eddy diffusion profile, solar flux, atomic hydrogen influx, latitude, temperature, and important chemical reaction rates are presented. Measured and calculated airglow emissions of He at 584 angstroms and H at 1216 angstroms are also used to provide some constraints on the range of model parameters. The relevance of the model results to the upcoming Galileo mission is briefly discussed. The model is subject to considerable improvement; there is a great need for laboratory measurements of basic reaction rates and photodissociation quantum yields, even for such simple species as methylacetylene and allene. Until such laboratory measurements exist there will be considerable uncertainty in the understanding of the C3 and higher hydrocarbons in the atmospheres of the jovian planets.

  12. Prebiotic hydrocarbon synthesis in impacting reduced astrophysical icy mixtures

    DOE PAGES

    Koziol, Lucas; Goldman, Nir

    2015-04-21

    We present results of prebiotic organic synthesis in shock-compressed reducing mixtures of simple ices from quantum molecular dynamics simulations extended to close to chemical equilibrium timescales. Given the relative abundance of carbon in reduced forms in astrophysical ices as well as the tendency of these mixtures to form complex hydrocarbons under the presence of external stimuli, it is possible that cometary impacts on a planetary surface could have yielded a larger array of prebiotic organic compounds than previously investigated. We find that the high pressures and temperatures due to shock compression yield a large assortment of carbon- and nitrogen-bonded extendedmore » structures that are highly reactive with short molecular lifetimes. Expansion and cooling causes these materials to break apart and form a wide variety of stable, potentially life-building compounds, including long-chain linear and branched hydrocarbons, large heterocyclic compounds, and a variety of different amines and exotic amino acids. Lastly, our results help provide a bottom-up understanding of hydrocarbon impact synthesis on the early Earth and its role in producing life-building molecules from simple starting materials.« less

  13. Prebiotic hydrocarbon synthesis in impacting reduced astrophysical icy mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Koziol, Lucas; Goldman, Nir

    2015-04-21

    We present results of prebiotic organic synthesis in shock-compressed reducing mixtures of simple ices from quantum molecular dynamics simulations extended to close to chemical equilibrium timescales. Given the relative abundance of carbon in reduced forms in astrophysical ices as well as the tendency of these mixtures to form complex hydrocarbons under the presence of external stimuli, it is possible that cometary impacts on a planetary surface could have yielded a larger array of prebiotic organic compounds than previously investigated. We find that the high pressures and temperatures due to shock compression yield a large assortment of carbon- and nitrogen-bonded extended structures that are highly reactive with short molecular lifetimes. Expansion and cooling causes these materials to break apart and form a wide variety of stable, potentially life-building compounds, including long-chain linear and branched hydrocarbons, large heterocyclic compounds, and a variety of different amines and exotic amino acids. Lastly, our results help provide a bottom-up understanding of hydrocarbon impact synthesis on the early Earth and its role in producing life-building molecules from simple starting materials.

  14. PREBIOTIC HYDROCARBON SYNTHESIS IN IMPACTING REDUCED ASTROPHYSICAL ICY MIXTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Koziol, Lucas; Goldman, Nir E-mail: ngoldman@llnl.gov

    2015-04-20

    We present results of prebiotic organic synthesis in shock-compressed reducing mixtures of simple ices from quantum molecular dynamics simulations extended to close to chemical equilibrium timescales. Given the relative abundance of carbon in reduced forms in astrophysical ices as well as the tendency of these mixtures to form complex hydrocarbons under the presence of external stimuli, it is possible that cometary impacts on a planetary surface could have yielded a larger array of prebiotic organic compounds than previously investigated. We find that the high pressures and temperatures due to shock compression yield a large assortment of carbon- and nitrogen-bonded extended structures that are highly reactive with short molecular lifetimes. Expansion and cooling causes these materials to break apart and form a wide variety of stable, potentially life-building compounds, including long-chain linear and branched hydrocarbons, large heterocyclic compounds, and a variety of different amines and exotic amino acids. Our results help provide a bottom-up understanding of hydrocarbon impact synthesis on the early Earth and its role in producing life-building molecules from simple starting materials.

  15. Prebiotic Hydrocarbon Synthesis in Impacting Reduced Astrophysical Icy Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziol, Lucas; Goldman, Nir

    2015-04-01

    We present results of prebiotic organic synthesis in shock-compressed reducing mixtures of simple ices from quantum molecular dynamics simulations extended to close to chemical equilibrium timescales. Given the relative abundance of carbon in reduced forms in astrophysical ices as well as the tendency of these mixtures to form complex hydrocarbons under the presence of external stimuli, it is possible that cometary impacts on a planetary surface could have yielded a larger array of prebiotic organic compounds than previously investigated. We find that the high pressures and temperatures due to shock compression yield a large assortment of carbon- and nitrogen-bonded extended structures that are highly reactive with short molecular lifetimes. Expansion and cooling causes these materials to break apart and form a wide variety of stable, potentially life-building compounds, including long-chain linear and branched hydrocarbons, large heterocyclic compounds, and a variety of different amines and exotic amino acids. Our results help provide a bottom-up understanding of hydrocarbon impact synthesis on the early Earth and its role in producing life-building molecules from simple starting materials.

  16. Prebiotic hydrocarbon synthesis in impacting reduced astrophysical icy mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Nir; Koziol, Lucas

    2015-06-01

    We present results of prebiotic organic synthesis in shock compressed reducing mixtures of simple ices from quantum molecular dynamics simulations extended to close to chemical equilibrium time-scales. Given the relative abundance of carbon in reduced forms in astrophysical ices as well as the tendency of these mixtures to form complex hydrocarbons under the presence of external stimuli, it is possible that cometary impact on a planetary surface could have yielded a larger array of prebiotic organic compounds than previously investigated. We find that the high pressures and temperatures due to shock compression yield a large assortment of carbon and nitrogen bonded extended structures that are highly reactive with short molecular lifetimes. Expansion and cooling causes these materials to break apart and form a wide variety of stable, potentially life-building compounds, including long-chain linear and branched hydrocarbons, large heterocyclic compounds, and a variety of different amines and exotic amino acids. Our results help provide a bottom-up understanding for hydrocarbon impact synthesis on early Earth and its role in producing life building molecules from simple starting materials. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. HPLC/APCI Mass Spectrometry of Saturated and Unsaturated Hydrocarbons by Using Hydrocarbon Solvents as the APCI Reagent and HPLC Mobile Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jinshan; Owen, Benjamin C.; Borton, David J.; Jin, Zhicheng; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I.

    2012-05-01

    Saturated and unsaturated, linear, branched, and cyclic hydrocarbons, as well as polyaromatic and heteroaromatic hydrocarbons, were successfully ionized by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) using small hydrocarbons as reagents in a linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) mass spectrometer. Pentane was proved to be the best reagent among the hydrocarbon reagents studied. This ionization method generated different types of abundant ions (i.e., [M + H]+, M+•, [M - H]+ and [M - 2H]+ •), with little or no fragmentation. The radical cations can be differentiated from the even-electron ions by using dimethyl disulfide, thus facilitating molecular weight (MW) determination. While some steroids and lignin monomer model compounds, such as androsterone and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde, also formed abundant M+• and [M + H]+ ions, this was not true for all of them. Analysis of two known mixtures as well as a base oil sample demonstrated that each component of the known mixtures could be observed and that a correct MW distribution was obtained for the base oil. The feasibility of using this ionization method on the chromatographic time scale was demonstrated by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with hexane as the mobile phase (and APCI reagent) to separate an artificial mixture prior to mass spectrometric analysis.

  18. HPLC/APCI mass spectrometry of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons by using hydrocarbon solvents as the APCI reagent and HPLC mobile phase.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jinshan; Owen, Benjamin C; Borton, David J; Jin, Zhicheng; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2012-05-01

    Saturated and unsaturated, linear, branched, and cyclic hydrocarbons, as well as polyaromatic and heteroaromatic hydrocarbons, were successfully ionized by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) using small hydrocarbons as reagents in a linear quadrupole ion trap (LQIT) mass spectrometer. Pentane was proved to be the best reagent among the hydrocarbon reagents studied. This ionization method generated different types of abundant ions (i.e., [M + H](+), M(+•), [M - H](+) and [M - 2H](+ •)), with little or no fragmentation. The radical cations can be differentiated from the even-electron ions by using dimethyl disulfide, thus facilitating molecular weight (MW) determination. While some steroids and lignin monomer model compounds, such as androsterone and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde, also formed abundant M(+•) and [M + H](+) ions, this was not true for all of them. Analysis of two known mixtures as well as a base oil sample demonstrated that each component of the known mixtures could be observed and that a correct MW distribution was obtained for the base oil. The feasibility of using this ionization method on the chromatographic time scale was demonstrated by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with hexane as the mobile phase (and APCI reagent) to separate an artificial mixture prior to mass spectrometric analysis.

  19. Element abundances at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, David M.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Abundances of Si(+), S(+), Cr(+), Mn(+), Fe(_), and Zn(+) are considered for two absorption-line systems in the spectrum of the QSO PKS 0528 - 250. Zinc and sulfur are underabundant, relative to H, by a factor of 10 compared to their solar and Galactic interstellar abundances. The silicon-, chromium-, iron-, and nickel-to-hydrogen ratios are less than the solar values and comparable to the local interstellar ratios. A straightforward interpretation is that nucleosynthesis in these high-redshift systems has led to only about one-tenth as much heavy production as in the gas clouds around the sun, and that the amount of the observed underabundances attributable to grain depletion is small. The dust-to-gas ratio in these clouds is less than 8 percent of the Galactic value.

  20. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1994-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution software X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred since the last report, submitted two months early, in April 1994, to facilitate evaluation of the first year's progress for contract renewal. Hence this report covers the period 15 April 1994 - 15 December 1994. A list of publications resulting from this research is included.

  1. The CALIFA survey: Oxygen abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Aff001

    We present here the last results we obtained on the spatial resolved analysis of the ionized gas of disk-dominated galaxies based on CALIFA data. CALIFA is an ongoing IFS survey of galaxies in the Local Univese (0.005 < z < 0.03) that has already obtained spectroscopic information up to ~2.5r e with a spatial resolution better than ~1 kpc for a total number of an statiscal sample of galaxies of different morphological types, covering the CM-diagram up to Mr<-18 mag. With nearly 2000 spectra obtained for each galaxy, CALIFA offer one of the best IFU data to study the starformation histories and chemical enrichment of galaxies. In this article we focus on the main results based on the analysis of the oxygen abundances based on the study of ionized gas in H ii regions and individual spaxels, and their relations with the global properties of galaxies. In summary we have found that: (1) the -Z relation does not present a secondary relation with the star-formation rate, when the abundance is measured at the effective radius; (2) the oxygen abundance present a strong correlation with the stellar surface density (Σ-Z relation); (3) the oxygen abundance profiles present three well defined regimes, (a) an overall negative radial gradient, between 0.5-2 r e , with a characteristic slope of α O/H ~-0.1 dex/r e , (b) an universal flatenning beyond >2r e and (c) an inner drop at <0.5r e which presence depends on the mass. All these results indicates that disk-galaxies present an overall inside-out growth, although with clear deviations from this simple scenario.

  2. The solar abundance of thulium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of one relatively unblended line of the solar spectrum, namely, the 3131.258-A line of Tm II, which yields a thulium abundance of 0.80 plus or minus 0.10 with the Corliss and Bozman (1962) f-value. The uncertainty of this figure is discussed in conjunction with the contradictory findings of some other investigators. The need for further detailed study of the lanthanides by the method of spectrum synthesis is pointed out.

  3. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  4. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-01-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review. PMID:24031900

  5. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments.

    PubMed

    Martins, Luiz Fernando; Peixoto, Raquel Silva

    2012-07-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review.

  6. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  7. Elemental Abundances from Very Low Abundance HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Terlevich, Roberto J.; Terlevich, Elena

    1992-12-01

    In 1987 we initiated a program to mitigate the deficiency of known low metallicity galaxies. Following our discoveries of very low abundance H II regions in nearby dwarf galaxies (Skillman et al. 1988, 1989a,b), we used the IDS on the INT to to collect spectra of dwarf galaxies in the Second Byurakan Survey (SBS) of UV excess galaxies. Our survey of over 40 SBS galaxies was completed in January 1990 and we have identified roughly one dozen very low metallicity H II galaxies. Now, with a significant sample of these galaxies, several observational programs are possible; foremost of these is the measurement of the primordial helium abundance (eg., Pagel et al. 1992). We report here on observations from March 1991 and 1992 using the ISIS spectrograph on the WHT to obtain very high quality spectra of 8 of these newly discovered metal-poor galaxies. The ISIS double spectrograph allows simultaneous observations of the blue (3600 - 5100 Angstroms) and red (6300 - 6800 Angstroms). Thus, He, N, O, Ne and S abundances can be derived with relatively small observational uncertainties. We compare our new observations with those in the literature. Our preliminary analysis indicates a slightly larger scatter in He/H at low O/H than had been seen previously. The small scatter may have been due simply to the paucity of observations at low metallicity. References: Pagel, B.E.J., Simonson, E.A., Terlevich, R.J., & Edmunds, M.G. 1992, MNRAS, 255, 325 Skillman, E.D., Kennicutt, R.C., & Hodge, P.W. 1989a, ApJ, 347, 875 Skillman, E.D., Melnick, J., Terlevich, R., & Moles, M. 1988, A&A, 196, 31 Skillman, E.D., Terlevich, R., & Melnick, J. 1989b, MNRAS, 240, 563

  8. The Abundance of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar absorption lines of F I at 951 and 954 Angstroms to derive the abundance of fluorine toward the star HD 164816. The nucleosynthetic source(s) of fluorine are still a matter of debate - the present day abundance of fluorine can potentially constrain models for pulsationally driven dredge-up in asymptotic giant branch stars. An accurate measure for the depletion behavior of fluorine will determine whether it may be detectable in QSO absorption line systems - an unambiguous detection of fluorine at suitably high redshifts would provide the best evidence to date for the neutrino process in massive stars. Furthermore, due to its extreme reactivity, measurement of the gas-phase interstellar fluorine abundance is important for models of grain chemistry. Despite the importance of measuring the interstellar fluorine abundance, at the time of our proposal only one previous detection has been made due to the low relative abundance of fluorine, the lack of lines outside the far-UV, and the blending of the available F I transitions with lines of Hz. The star HD 164816 is associated with the Lagoon nebula (M8), and at a distance of approximately 1.5 kpc probes both distant and local gas. Beginning April 8th, 2004 FUSE FP-Split observations of the star HD 164816 were obtained for this program. This data became available in the FUSE data archive May 21, 2004, and these observations were then downloaded and we began our analysis. Our analysis procedure has involved (1) fitting stellar models to the FUSE spectra, (2) using the multiple lines of Hz and N I at other wavelengths in the FUSE bandpass to derive column densities for the lines of H2 and N I which are blended with the F I features at 951 and 954 angstroms (3) the measurement of the column densities of F I and the species O I and C1 I which are important species for the dis-entangling of dust and nucleosynthetic effects. As discussed in

  9. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Jaars, K.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Venter, A. D.; Josipovic, M.; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, Ville; Aaltonen, H.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, Alex B.; Hellen, H.; Laakso, L.; Hakola, H.

    2014-07-11

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol that affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa) that is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters), the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters), the Johannesburg-Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (>10 million people), the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and industries), the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry) and also a region of anti-cyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for one year. Samples were collected twice a week for two hours during daytime and two hours 1 during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass 2 selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the 3 monthly median total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 to 3.1 ppb. 4 Benzene levels did not exceed local air quality standards. Toluene was the most abundant 5 species, with an annual median concentration of 0.63 ppb. No statistically significant 6 differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found and no distinct seasonal patterns were observed. Air mass back trajectory analysis proved that the lack of seasonal cycles could be

  10. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaars, K.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Venter, A. D.; Josipovic, M.; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, V.; Aaltonen, H.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, A.; Hellén, H.; Laakso, L.; Hakola, H.

    2014-02-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol that affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa) that is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters), the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters), the Johannesburg-Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (>10 million people), the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and pyrometallurgical industries), the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry) and also a region of anti-cyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for one year. Samples were collected twice a week for two hours during daytime and two hours during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the monthly median total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 to 3.1 ppb. Benzene levels did not exceed local air quality standards. Toluene was the most abundant species, with an annual median concentration of 0.63 ppb. No statistically significant differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found and no distinct seasonal patterns were observed. Air mass back trajectory analysis proved that the lack of seasonal cycles could be

  11. Noble gas partitioning behavior in the Sleipner Vest hydrocarbon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P. H.; Lawson, M.; Warr, O.; Mabry, J.; Byrne, D. J.; Meurer, W. P.; Ballentine, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Noble gases are chemically inert and variably soluble in crustal fluids. They are primarily introduced into hydrocarbon reservoirs through exchange with formation waters, and can be used to assess migration pathways, mechanisms and reservoir storage. Of particular interest is the role groundwater plays in hydrocarbon transport, which is reflected in hydrocarbon-water volume ratios. We present compositional, stable isotope and noble gas isotope and abundance data from the Sleipner Vest field, in the Norwegian North Sea. Sleipner gases are generated from primary cracking of kerogen and the thermal cracking of oil, sourced from type II marine source, with relatively homogeneous maturities and a range in vitrinite reflectance (1.2-1.7%). Gases are hosted in the lower shoreface sandstones of the Jurassic Hugin formation, which is sealed by the Jurassic Upper Draupne and Heather formations. Gases are composed of N2 (0.6-0.9%), CO2 (5.4-15.3%) and hydrocarbons (69-80%). Helium isotopes (3He/4He) are radiogenic and range from 0.065 to 0.116 RA, showing a small mantle contribution, consistent with Ne isotopes (20Ne/22Ne from 9.70-9.91; 21Ne/22Ne from 0.0290-0.0344) and Ar isotopes (40Ar/36Ar from 315-489). 20Ne/36Ar, 84Kr/36Ar and 132Xe/36Ar values are systematically higher relative to air saturated water ratios. These data are discussed within the framework of several conceptual models: i) Total gas-stripping model, which defines the minimum volume of water to have interacted with the hydrocarbon phase; ii) Equilibrium model, assuming simple equilibration between groundwater and hydrocarbon phase at reservoir P,T and salinity; and iii) Open and closed system gas-stripping models. Using Ne-Ar, we estimate gas-water ratios for the Sleipner system of 0.02-0.09, which compare with geologic gas-water estimates of ~0.24, and suggest more groundwater interaction than a static system estimate. Kr and Xe show evidence for an additional source or process involving oil or sediments.

  12. The long-term evolution of hydrocarbons in Jupiter's stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melin, Henrik; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Giles, Rohini Sara; Sinclair, James; Orton, Glenn S.; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph

    2016-10-01

    We present the global distribution of hydrocarbons in Jupiter's stratosphere using ground-based mid-infrared R~15,000 TEXES observations from the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), obtained between 2013 and 2016. Ethane and acetylene are the primary products of methane photolysis in Jupiter's stratosphere, and their spatial distribution can be used to trace atmospheric circulation and the lifetimes of chemical constituents. Zonal mean distributions of these species have been previously studied from the Voyager and Cassini spacecraft (Nixon et al., 2010, doi: 10.1016/j.pss.2010.05.008), but the TEXES dataset now provides the opportunity to track the evolution of the hydrocarbons from Earth (Fletcher et al., 2016, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2016.06.008 ). Global spectral maps of methane, ethane and acetylene emission are used to characterize the temporal evolution of large scale features in Jupiter's stratosphere (0.5-20 mbar?), including: equator to pole contrasts driven by large-scale stratospheric overturning; mid-latitude bands of elevated hydrocarbon emission; small-scale wave phenomena driven by meteorological activity in the underlying troposphere; and the tropical changes in emission related to Jupiter's Quasi-Quadrennial Oscillation. The NEMESIS spectral inversion tool (Irwin et al., 2008, doi: 10.1016/j.jqsrt.2007.11.006) is used to derive stratospheric temperatures and hydrocarbon abundances from spatially-resolved spectra at 744, 819, and 1247 cm-1. We use these to investigate the changes in the vertical temperature and ethane and acetylene distributions over time, with the aim of providing the global and temporal context for Juno's exploration of the jovian atmosphere in 2016/17.

  13. Hydrocarbon Rocket Technology Impact Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuber, Eric; Prasadh, Nishant; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the Apollo program ended, the development of launch propulsion systems in the US has fallen drastically, with only two new booster engine developments, the SSME and the RS-68, occurring in the past few decades.1 In recent years, however, there has been an increased interest in pursuing more effective launch propulsion technologies in the U.S., exemplified by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist s inclusion of Launch Propulsion Systems as the first technological area in the Space Technology Roadmaps2. One area of particular interest to both government agencies and commercial entities has been the development of hydrocarbon engines; NASA and the Air Force Research Lab3 have expressed interest in the use of hydrocarbon fuels for their respective SLS Booster and Reusable Booster System concepts, and two major commercially-developed launch vehicles SpaceX s Falcon 9 and Orbital Sciences Antares feature engines that use RP-1 kerosene fuel. Compared to engines powered by liquid hydrogen, hydrocarbon-fueled engines have a greater propellant density (usually resulting in a lighter overall engine), produce greater propulsive force, possess easier fuel handling and loading, and for reusable vehicle concepts can provide a shorter turnaround time between launches. These benefits suggest that a hydrocarbon-fueled launch vehicle would allow for a cheap and frequent means of access to space.1 However, the time and money required for the development of a new engine still presents a major challenge. Long and costly design, development, testing and evaluation (DDT&E) programs underscore the importance of identifying critical technologies and prioritizing investment efforts. Trade studies must be performed on engine concepts examining the affordability, operability, and reliability of each concept, and quantifying the impacts of proposed technologies. These studies can be performed through use of the Technology Impact Forecasting (TIF) method. The Technology Impact

  14. Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels

    DOEpatents

    Song, Chunshan [State College, PA; Ma, Xiaoliang [State College, PA; Sprague, Michael J [Calgary, CA; Subramani, Velu [State College, PA

    2012-04-17

    The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

  15. Catalytic method for synthesizing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Sansone, M.J.; Slegeir, W.A.R.

    A method for synthesizing hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen by contacting said gases with a slurry of a catalyst composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants.

  16. Catalytic method for synthesizing hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Sansone, Michael J.; Slegeir, William A. R.

    1984-01-01

    A method for synthesizing hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen by contacting said gases with a slurry of a catalyst composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants.

  17. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-09

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  18. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-01

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  19. The solar abundance of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevesse, N.

    2009-07-01

    With Martin Asplund (Max Planck Institute of Astrophysics, Garching) and Jacques Sauval (Observatoire Royal de Belgique, Brussels) I recently published detailed reviews on the solar chemical composition ({Asplund et al. 2005}, {Grevesse et al. 2007}). A new one, with Pat Scott (Stockholm University) as additional co-author, will appear in Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics ({Asplund et al. 2009}). Here we briefly analyze recent works on the solar abundance of Oxygen and recommend a value of 8.70 in the usual astronomical scale.

  20. Abnormal pressure in hydrocarbon environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Spencer, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Abnormal pressures, pressures above or below hydrostatic pressures, occur on all continents in a wide range of geological conditions. According to a survey of published literature on abnormal pressures, compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation are the two most commonly cited causes of abnormally high pressure in petroleum provinces. In young (Tertiary) deltaic sequences, compaction disequilibrium is the dominant cause of abnormal pressure. In older (pre-Tertiary) lithified rocks, hydrocarbon generation, aquathermal expansion, and tectonics are most often cited as the causes of abnormal pressure. The association of abnormal pressures with hydrocarbon accumulations is statistically significant. Within abnormally pressured reservoirs, empirical evidence indicates that the bulk of economically recoverable oil and gas occurs in reservoirs with pressure gradients less than 0.75 psi/ft (17.4 kPa/m) and there is very little production potential from reservoirs that exceed 0.85 psi/ft (19.6 kPa/m). Abnormally pressured rocks are also commonly associated with unconventional gas accumulations where the pressuring phase is gas of either a thermal or microbial origin. In underpressured, thermally mature rocks, the affected reservoirs have most often experienced a significant cooling history and probably evolved from an originally overpressured system.

  1. Influence of Coronal Abundance Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurman, Joseph (Technical Monitor); DeLuca, Edward

    2005-01-01

    During the final year of this program we concentrated on understanding the how to constrain the models with the best available observations. Work on developing accurate temperature and density diagnostics fkom TRACE and CDS together with constrained fits of non-potential force free fields will be extremely useful in the guiding the next generation of coronal models. The program has produced three fully operation numerical codes that model multi-species of ions in coronal loops: Static models and constant flow models. The time dependent numerical models have not been completed. We have extended the steady flow investigations to study the effect these flows have on coronal structure as observed with TRACE. Coronal observations derive from heavy-ion emission; thus, we focus on the extent to which flow may modify coronal abundances by examining the heavy-ion abundance stratification within long-lived loops. We discuss the magnitudes of the physical effects modeled and compare simulated results with TRACE observations. These results can have a profound effect on the interpretation of TRACE observations.

  2. Abundances in Hot Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Klaus; Rauch, Thomas; Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2009-05-01

    The hydrogen-deficiency in extremely hot post-AGB stars of spectral class PG1159 is probably caused by a (very) late helium-shell flash or a AGB final thermal pulse that consumes the hydrogen envelope, exposing the usually-hidden intershell region. Thus, the photospheric element abundances of these stars allow us to draw conclusions about details of nuclear burning and mixing processes in the precursor AGB stars. We compare predicted element abundances to those determined by quantitative spectral analyses performed with advanced non-LTE model atmospheres. A good qualitative and quantitative agreement is found for many species (He, C, N, O, Ne, F, Si, Ar) but discrepancies for others (P, S, Fe) point at shortcomings in stellar evolution models for AGB stars. Almost all of the chemical trace elements in these hot stars can only be identified in the UV spectral range. The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope played a crucial role for this research.

  3. Comparing hydrogen and hydrocarbon booster fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, James A.

    1988-01-01

    The present evaluation of the consequences of hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels as the basis of launch vehicle booster rocket-stage performance notes that hydrocarbon fuels lead to lower vehicle dry mass, for low-velocity requirements, while hydrogen fuel furnishes lower dry mass. Vehicles employing both types of fuel attempt to take advantage of the low intercept and slope of hydrocarbon fuel at low velocity, and subsequently, of the slope of the hydrogen curves at higher velocities.

  4. HYDROCARBON AND SULFUR SENSORS FOR SOFC SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Azad; Chris Holt; Todd Lesousky; Scott Swartz

    2003-11-01

    The following report summarizes work conducted during the Phase I program Hydrocarbon and Sulfur Sensors for SOFC Systems under contract No. DE-FC26-02NT41576. For the SOFC application, sensors are required to monitor hydrocarbons and sulfur in order to increase the operation life of SOFC components. This report discusses the development of two such sensors, one based on thick film approach for sulfur monitoring and the second galvanic based for hydrocarbon monitoring.

  5. Solar-system abundances of the elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, E.; Ebihara, M.

    1982-01-01

    Elemental analyses of the Ogueil Cl meteorite and all previous Cl chondrite analyses were employed to develop a new solar system abundance table, including the standard deviation and number of analyses for each element. The table also comprises the abundances of radioactive and radiogenic nuclides at the present and 4.55 AE ago, as well as abundances by weight in a typical Cl chondrite. The new abundances were within 20% of those determined by Cameron (1982), except for 14 cases in the range 20-50%, and 5 over 50%. The solar abundances were compared with the Cl abundances, showing a total of only 7 disagreements. No significant discrepancies were detected in the major cosmochemical groups, and a smooth trend was found in the abundances of odd-A nuclides. The new set is interpreted as accurate to 10%, with the Cl chondrites matching the primordial solar system abundances to at most 10% deviation.

  6. Geochemical evidence for combustion of hydrocarbons during the K-T impact event

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, Claire M.; Finch, Paul; Collinson, Margaret E.; Scott, Andrew C.; Grassineau, Nathalie V.

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed that extensive wildfires occurred after the Cretaceous–Tertiary (K-T) impact event. An abundance of soot and pyrosynthetic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (pPAHs) in marine K-T boundary impact rocks (BIRs) have been considered support for this hypothesis. However, nonmarine K-T BIRs, from across North America, contain only rare occurrences of charcoal yet abundant noncharred plant remains. pPAHs and soot can be formed from a variety of sources, including partial combustion of vegetation and hydrocarbons whereby modern pPAH signatures are traceable to their source. We present results from multiple nonmarine K-T boundary sites from North America and reveal that the K-T BIRs have a pPAH signature consistent with the combustion of hydrocarbons and not living plant biomass, providing further evidence against K-T wildfires and compelling evidence that a significant volume of hydrocarbons was combusted during the K-T impact event. PMID:19251660

  7. Hematite Abundance Map at Echo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows the hematite abundance map for a portion of the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop near where the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity landed. It was acquired by the rover's miniature thermal emission spectrometer instrument from a spot called 'Echo.' Portions of the inner crater wall in this region appear rich in hematite (red). The sharp boundary from hematite-rich to hematite-poor (yellow and green) surfaces corresponds to a change in the surface texture and color. The hematite-rich surfaces have ripple-like forms suggesting wind transported hematite to these surfaces. The bounce marks produced during landing at the base of the slope on the left are low in hematite (blue). The hematite grains that originally covered the surface were pushed below the surface by the lander, exposing a soil that has less hematite.

  8. 40 CFR 91.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 91....316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer as described... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  9. 40 CFR 91.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 91....316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer as described... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  10. 40 CFR 89.319 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 89... Equipment Provisions § 89.319 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall... and at least annually thereafter, adjust the FID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon...

  11. 40 CFR 91.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 91....316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer as described... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  12. 40 CFR 89.319 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 89... Equipment Provisions § 89.319 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall... and at least annually thereafter, adjust the FID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon...

  13. 40 CFR 89.319 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 89... Equipment Provisions § 89.319 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall... and at least annually thereafter, adjust the FID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon...

  14. 40 CFR 86.121-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.121-90 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The hydrocarbon... FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzers shall be adjusted for optimum hydrocarbon response....

  15. 40 CFR 86.121-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.121-90 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The hydrocarbon... FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzers shall be adjusted for optimum hydrocarbon response....

  16. 40 CFR 91.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 91....316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer as described... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  17. 40 CFR 90.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 90... Equipment Provisions § 90.316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  18. 40 CFR 86.121-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.121-90 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The hydrocarbon... FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzers shall be adjusted for optimum hydrocarbon response....

  19. 40 CFR 90.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 90... Equipment Provisions § 90.316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  20. 40 CFR 86.121-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.121-90 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The hydrocarbon... FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzers shall be adjusted for optimum hydrocarbon response....

  1. 40 CFR 89.319 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 89... Equipment Provisions § 89.319 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall... and at least annually thereafter, adjust the FID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon...

  2. 40 CFR 90.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 90... Equipment Provisions § 90.316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  3. 40 CFR 89.319 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 89... Equipment Provisions § 89.319 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall... and at least annually thereafter, adjust the FID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon...

  4. 40 CFR 86.121-90 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Complete Heavy-Duty Vehicles; Test Procedures § 86.121-90 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The hydrocarbon... FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzers shall be adjusted for optimum hydrocarbon response....

  5. 40 CFR 91.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 91....316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer as described... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  6. 40 CFR 90.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 90... Equipment Provisions § 90.316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  7. 40 CFR 90.316 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 90... Equipment Provisions § 90.316 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. (a) Calibrate the FID and HFID hydrocarbon... thereafter, adjust the FID and HFID hydrocarbon analyzer for optimum hydrocarbon response as specified...

  8. Hydrocarbon exposure, pancreatitis, and bile acids.

    PubMed Central

    Hotz, P; Pilliod, J; Bourgeois, R; Boillat, M A

    1990-01-01

    The data on hydrocarbon induced pancreatitis are conflicting. This question was therefore studied in a non-selected population exposed to hydrocarbons and in "formerly" exposed workers. Neither the past clinical history nor the pancreatic tests provided any evidence for a causal relation between exposure and pancreatitis. No signs of hydrocarbon induced liver damage were seen either. As a healthy worker effect cannot be totally excluded, however, a case-control study in a group of patients suffering from non-alcohol induced pancreatitis could give useful indications for finally excluding the possibility of pancreatitis being induced by hydrocarbons. PMID:2271391

  9. Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection

    DOEpatents

    Brusasco, Raymond M.; Penetrante, Bernardino M.; Vogtlin, George E.; Merritt, Bernard T.

    2001-01-01

    Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

  10. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons using cycloparaffinic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Chang, Y. Alice; Gatsis, John G.; Funk, Edward W.

    1988-01-01

    Heavy crude oils which contain metal contaminants such as nickel, vanadium and iron may be separated from light hydrocarbon oils by passing a solution of the crude oil dissolved in a cycloparaffinic hydrocarbon solvent containing from about 5 to about 8 carbon atoms by passing through a polymeric membrane which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds. The light hydrocarbon oils which possess relatively low molecular weights will be recovered as the permeate while the heavy oils which possess relatively high molecular weights as well as the metal contaminants will be recovered as the retentate.

  11. New technique for calibrating hydrocarbon gas flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Puster, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for measuring calibration correction factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters is described. It is based on the Nernst theorem for matching the partial pressure of oxygen in the combustion products of the test hydrocarbon, burned in oxygen-enriched air, with that in normal air. It is applied to a widely used type of commercial thermal mass flowmeter for a number of hydrocarbons. The calibration correction factors measured using this technique are in good agreement with the values obtained by other independent procedures. The technique is successfully applied to the measurement of differences as low as one percent of the effective hydrocarbon content of the natural gas test samples.

  12. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons using cycloparaffinic solvents

    DOEpatents

    Kulkarni, S.S.; Chang, Y.A.; Gatsis, J.G.; Funk, E.W.

    1988-06-14

    Heavy crude oils which contain metal contaminants such as nickel, vanadium and iron may be separated from light hydrocarbon oils by passing a solution of the crude oil dissolved in a cycloparaffinic hydrocarbon solvent containing from about 5 to about 8 carbon atoms by passing through a polymeric membrane which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds. The light hydrocarbon oils which possess relatively low molecular weights will be recovered as the permeate while the heavy oils which possess relatively high molecular weights as well as the metal contaminants will be recovered as the retentate.

  13. Spreading coefficients of aliphatic hydrocarbons on water

    SciTech Connect

    Takii, Taichi; Mori, Y.H. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the equilibrium spreading coefficients of some aliphatic hydrocarbons (C[sub 6]C[sub 10]) on water. The thickness of a discrete lens of each hydrocarbon sample floating on a stagnant water pool was measured interferometrically and used to calculate the spreading coefficient of the hydrocarbon with the aid of Langmuir's capillarity theory. The dependences of the spreading coefficient, thus observed, on temperature (0--50 C) and on the number of carbon atoms in the hydrocarbon molecule are in qualitative agreement with the predictions based on the Lifshitz theory of van der Waals forces.

  14. VUV Photoionisation of hydrocarbon radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcaraz, C.; Noller, Bastian; Hemberger, Patrick; Fischer, Ingo; Gans, Bérenger; Boyé-Peronne, Séverine; Douin, Stéphane; Gauyacq, Dolorès; Soldi-Lose, Héloïse; Garcia, Gustavo

    2008-09-01

    Hydrocarbon radicals CxHy are constituents of various planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as a result of the methane photochemistry induced by the solar radiation. They contribute to the neutral chemistry, but are also important for the ionosphere through their photoionisation leading to their cations CxHy +. These cations are also produced by ion-molecule reactions starting from the reaction of the primary ions CH4 + and CH3 + which are created in the non-dissociative and dissociative photoionisation of CH4. This work aims at caracterizing the VUV photoionisation of small hydrocarbon radicals as a function of photon energy. The objective is to provide laboratory data for modelers on the spectroscopy, the thermochemistry, and the reactivity of the radicals and their cations. The hydrocarbon radicals are much less caracterized than stable molecules since they have to be produced in situ in the laboratory experiment. We have adapted at Orsay [1-3] a pyrolysis source (Figure 1) well suited to produce cold beams of hydrocarbon radicals to our experimental setups. Available now at Orsay, we have two new sources of VUV radiation, complementary in terms of tunability and resolution, that can be used for these studies. The first one is the DESIRS beamline [4] at the new french synchrotron, SOLEIL. The second one is the VUV laser developped at the Centre Laser de l'Université Paris-Sud (CLUPS) [5]. At SOLEIL, a photoelectron-photoion coincidence spectrometer is used to monitor the photoionisation on a large photon energy range. At the CLUPS, a pulsedfield ionisation (PFI-ZEKE) spectrometer allows studies at higher resolution on selected photon energies. The first results obtained with these new setups will be presented. References [1] Fischer, I., Schussler, T., Deyerl, H.J., Elhanine, M. & Alcaraz, C., Photoionization and dissociative photoionization of the allyl radical, C3H5. Int. J. Mass Spectrom., 261 (2-3), 227-233 (2007) [2] Schüßler, T., Roth, W., Gerber

  15. Hydrocarbon release investigations in Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Fels, J.B.

    1996-09-01

    Hydrocarbon releases are among the most common environmental problems in Missouri, as well as across the country. Old, unprotected underground storage tanks and buried piping from the tanks to pumps are notorious sources of petroleum contamination at LUST (leaking underground storage tank) sites. Missouri has an estimated 5000 LUST sites across the state with the majority being simple spills into clay-rich soils or into a shallow perched water system. However, in the southern half of the state, where residual soils and karst bedrock are not conducive to trapping such releases, significant groundwater supplies are at risk. This article discusses the process used to identify the source of contamination.

  16. Hydrocarbon bioremediation 2(2)

    SciTech Connect

    Hinchee, R.E.; Alleman, B.C.; Hoeppel, R.E.; Miller, R.N.

    1993-12-31

    Hydrocarbon contamination of soil and groundwater, although less visible, is even more widespread than oil spills and is the background for a number of studies presented in this book, in addition to those devoted to shoreline spills. Chapters address a wide variety of theory and practice and cover important subjects such as biofiltration, natural attenuation, surfactants, and the use of in situ bioventing compared to soil venting. This book represents the collective experience of practitioners and researchers in North America, Europe, Africa, and Asia.

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon processing by cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micelotta, E. R.; Jones, A. P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Cosmic rays are present in almost all phases of the ISM. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and cosmic rays represent an abundant and ubiquitous component of the interstellar medium. However, the interaction between them has never before been fully investigated. Aims: To study the effects of cosmic ray ion (H, He, CNO and Fe-Co-Ni) and electron bombardment of PAHs in galactic and extragalactic environments. Methods: We calculate the nuclear and electronic interactions for collisions between PAHs and cosmic ray ions and electrons with energies between 5 MeV/nucleon and 10 GeV, above the threshold for carbon atom loss, in normal galaxies, starburst galaxies and cooling flow galaxy clusters. Results: The timescale for PAH destruction by cosmic ray ions depends on the electronic excitation energy E0 and on the amount of energy available for dissociation. Small PAHs are destroyed faster, with He and the CNO group being the more effective projectiles. For electron collisions, the lifetime is independent of the PAH size and varies with the threshold energy T0. Conclusions: Cosmic rays process the PAHs in diffuse clouds, where the destruction due to interstellar shocks is less efficient. In the hot gas filling galactic halos, outflows of starburst galaxies and intra-cluster medium, PAH destruction is dominated by collisions with thermal ions and electrons, but this mechanism is ineffective if the molecules are in denser cloudlets and isolated from the hot gas. Cosmic rays can access the denser clouds and together with X-rays will set the lifetime of those protected PAHs. This limits the use of PAHs as a "dye" for tracing the presence of cold entrained material.

  18. Comparative Genomics of the Ubiquitous, Hydrocarbon-degrading Genus Marinobacter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, E.; Webb, E.; Edwards, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    using fimbriae and pili. Formation of biofilm with biosurfactant characteristics has been observed in Marinobacter cultures and environmental strains in relation to hydrocarbon degradation. Genomic potential exists for the synthesis of biofilm-related carbon and energy storage compounds, e.g. alginate and isoprenoid wax esters, and quorum sensing encoded by the regulatory luxR gene and N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (AHL) signals. Halotolerance is predicted to be achieved through biosynthesis and/or import of compatible solutes, including glycine betaine, choline, ectoine, sucrose, periplasmic glucans as well as membrane channel activity regulating intracellular sodium, potassium and chloride concentration balance. Gene abundances concur with those observed in sequenced halophilic Halomonas genomes. Defense mechanisms are plentiful and include arsenate, organic solvent, copper, and mercuric resistance, compounds, which frequently occur in oil refinery wastewater. The Marinobacter genomes reflect dynamic environments and diverse interactions with viruses and other bacteria with similar metabolic strategies, as reflected by the large number of integrases and transposases. This study has provided comprehensive genomic insights into the metabolic versatility and predicted environmental impact potential of one of the most ubiquitous bacterial genera.

  19. Petroleum hydrocarbons in the surface water of two estuaries in the Southeastern united states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidleman, T. F.; Castleberry, A. A.; Foreman, W. T.; Zaranski, M. T.; Wall, D. W.

    1990-01-01

    Surface water samples from Charleston Harbor, SC and Winyah Bay, SC were analysed for total hydrocarbons by gas chromatography (GC) and for petroleum residues (expressed as crude oil equivalents) by fluorescence spectrometry. Cleanup by column chromatography and saponification was necessary to reduce the background from extraneous fluorescing materials. Oil concentrations determined by FS ranged from 0·5-25 μg l -1 in Charleston Harbor and <0·23-9·6 μg l -1 in Winyah Bay. Hydrocarbons determined by GC were significantly correlated ( P < 0·01) with crude oil equivalents determined by FS, but the data showed considerable scatter as indicated by r2 = 0·45. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were determined by gas chromatography—mass spectrometry for one set of Winyah Bay samples. The sum of nonalkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons having ≥ 3 rings ranged from 7-64 ng l -1 at different stations. Perylene, possibly originating from sediment dredging, was one of the more abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  20. Effects of nutrient and temperature on degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated sub-Antarctic soil.

    PubMed

    Coulon, Frédéric; Pelletier, Emilien; Gourhant, Lénaick; Delille, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    Mesocosm studies using sub-Antarctic soil artificially contaminated with diesel or crude oil were conducted in Kerguelen Archipelago (49 degrees 21' S, 70 degrees 13' E) in an attempt to evaluate the potential of a bioremediation approach in high latitude environments. All mesocosms were sampled on a regular basis over six months period. Soils responded positively to temperature increase from 4 degrees C to 20 degrees C, and to the addition of a commercial oleophilic fertilizer containing N and P. Both factors increased the hydrocarbon-degrading microbial abundance and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) degradation. In general, alkanes were faster degraded than polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). After 180 days, total alkane losses of both oils reached 77-95% whereas total PAHs never exceeded 80% with optimal conditions at 10 degrees C and fertilizer added. Detailed analysis of naphthalenes, dibenzothiophenes, phenanthrenes, and pyrenes showed a clear decrease of their degradation rate as a function of the size of the PAH molecules. During the experiment there was only a slight decrease in the toxicity, whereas the concentration of TPH decreased significantly during the same time. The most significant reduction in toxicity occurred at 4 degrees C. Therefore, bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated sub-Antarctic soil appears to be feasible, and various engineering strategies, such as heating or amending the soil can accelerate hydrocarbon degradation. However, the residual toxicity of contaminated soil remained drastically high before the desired cleanup is complete and it can represent a limiting factor in the bioremediation of sub-Antarctic soil.

  1. Nonmethane hydrocarbons in Southern Ocean boundary layer air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Alastair C.; Carpenter, Lucy J.; Pilling, Michael J.

    2001-03-01

    Measurements at the remote marine boundary layer station of Cape Grim, Northwest Tasmania, allow study of the unperturbed background atmosphere. Here we present a continuous data series of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), measured in situ and with high sensitivity during the Second Southern Ocean Photochemistry Experiment (SOAPEX 2) during austral summer 1999. Air masses arriving at Cape Grim originate from the Australian continent, Tasmania, and Southern Ocean and Antarctic regions. In Southern Ocean marine boundary layer (MBL) air, C2 and C3 alkanes show a highly uniform abundance (ethane 142±11.9 parts per trillion by volume (pptv), propane 8.9±1.7 pptv) at around 4 times lower concentrations than encountered in unpolluted Northern Hemisphere MBL air. The presence of shorter-lived NMHCs in marine air indicates sources of both C4-C6 alkanes and several alkenes in the Southern Ocean. The alkane isomer distributions and abundances are in broad agreement with literature sea-air flux rates. In dynamically stable maritime air, midday maxima in ethene, propene, and isoprene concentrations of a few pptv indicate photochemically driven sources very near to the sea surface. Despite their high reactivity, the impact of these oceanic alkenes on local OH concentrations in remote MBL air is not significant. However, the abundance of isoprene in marine air may significantly elevate formaldehyde above that generated by methane oxidation.

  2. Surface abundances of ON stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Palacios, A.; Howarth, I.; Georgy, C.; Walborn, N. R.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient or when mass transfer in binary systems occurs, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. Aims: ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determined the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measured the projected rotational velocities. We compared the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. Results: We show that ON stars are usually rich in helium. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cannot account for the extreme enrichment observed among ON main sequence stars. Some ON stars are members of binary systems, but others are single stars as indicated by stable radial velocities. Mass transfer is therefore not a simple explanation for the observed chemical properties. Conclusions: We conclude that ON stars show extreme chemical enrichment at their surface, consistent with nucleosynthesis through the CNO cycle. Its origin is not clear at present. Based on observations obtained 1) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope; 2) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii; 3) at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 086.D-0997; 4) the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La

  3. 40 CFR 52.1877 - Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... oxidants (hydrocarbons). 52.1877 Section 52.1877 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....1877 Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons). (a) The requirements of Subpart G of this... national standard for photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) in the Metropolitan Cincinnati...

  4. 40 CFR 52.1877 - Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... oxidants (hydrocarbons). 52.1877 Section 52.1877 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....1877 Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons). (a) The requirements of Subpart G of this... national standard for photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) in the Metropolitan Cincinnati...

  5. 40 CFR 52.1877 - Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... oxidants (hydrocarbons). 52.1877 Section 52.1877 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....1877 Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons). (a) The requirements of Subpart G of this... national standard for photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) in the Metropolitan Cincinnati...

  6. 40 CFR 52.1877 - Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... oxidants (hydrocarbons). 52.1877 Section 52.1877 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....1877 Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons). (a) The requirements of Subpart G of this... national standard for photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) in the Metropolitan Cincinnati...

  7. 40 CFR 52.1877 - Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... oxidants (hydrocarbons). 52.1877 Section 52.1877 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....1877 Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons). (a) The requirements of Subpart G of this... national standard for photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) in the Metropolitan Cincinnati...

  8. Carbonyl compounds, hydrocarbons and priority pollutants in the southwestern USA. II. The El Paso - Ciudad Juarez transborder airshed

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.S.; Popp, C.J.; Dixon, R.W.

    1996-12-31

    The combined airshed of El Paso, Texas (USA) and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico) presents a unique situation where autonomous governmental rules and regulations, economic situations, and cultural differences impact the common air quality of two different countries. Effective mitigation can only be achieved upon sufficient understanding of current atmospheric photochemistry. Atmospheric concentrations and seasonal and diurnal behavior of routinely monitored criteria pollutants and a wide range of reactive organic compounds have been quantified at separate sampling locations in each of the two cities during field studies in January and July of 1995. During the measurement campaigns, no exceedances of US ambient air quality standards were observed for any criteria pollutants. Similar concentrations were observed at both sites for both periods, with the exception of NO{sub x} compounds, which occurred at more elevated levels (>200 ppb) in Juarez during winter late evening periods. As expected summer O{sub 3} values were greater than winter values ({approx}33 ppb and {approx}14 ppb, respectively). Analysis of ambient non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) showed biogenic species, such as isoprene, {alpha}-pinene, {beta}-pinene, likely play a relatively minor role in local photochemistry, being detected infrequently and at low mixing ratios ({approx}0.2 ppb). NMHCs were dominated by species typically of anthropogenic origin. Concentrations of all carbonyls were higher in the summer than in the winter, in some cases by a factor of 10 or more. Acetone, an anthropogenic marker, was similar in concentration to formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Carbonyl concentrations were considerably higher in Juarez in summer than in El Paso, while concentrations were similar in the winter. The wintertime similarities are likely due to the presence of temperature inversions and a more constant air masses over both cities. PAN and PPN levels were similar to those reported for other urban areas.

  9. Aromatic hydrocarbons as ozone precursors before and after outbreak of the 2008 financial crisis in the Pearl River Delta region, south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Xinming; Blake, Donald R.; Li, Longfeng; Zhang, Zhou; Wang, Shaoyi; Guo, Hai; Lee, Frank S. C.; Gao, Bo; Chan, Loyin; Wu, Dui; Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2012-08-01

    In the second half of 2008 China's highly industrialized Pearl River Delta (PRD) region was hard-hit by the financial crisis (FC). This study reports volatile organic compounds measured in the PRD during November-December in both 2007 before the FC and 2008 after the FC. While total mixing ratios of non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) on average were only about 7% lower from 40.2 ppbv in 2007 to 37.5 ppbv in 2008, their ozone formation potentials (OFPs) dropped about 30%, resulting from about 55% plummet of aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs) against a greater than 20% increase of total alkanes/alkenes. The elevated alkanes and alkenes in 2008 could be explained by greater emissions from vehicle exhausts and LPG combustion due to rapid increase of vehicle numbers and LPG consumption; the drop of AHs could be explained by reduced emissions from industries using AH-containing solvents due to the influence of the FC, as indicated by much lower ratios of toluene to benzene and of xylenes/trichloroethylene/tetrachloroethylene to carbon monoxide (CO) in 2008. Source apportionment by positive matrix factorization (PMF) also revealed much less contribution of industry solvents to total anthropogenic NMHCs and particularly to toluene and xylenes in 2008 than in 2007. Based on PMF reconstructed source contributions, calculated OFPs by industrial emissions were responsible for 40.8% in 2007 in contrast to 18.4% in 2008. Further investigation into local industry output statistics suggested that the plummet of AHs in 2008 should be attributed to small enterprises, which contributed largely to ambient AHs due to their huge numbers and non-existent emission treatment, but were much more influenced by the FC.

  10. Hydrocarbon degradation by antarctic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Cavanagh, J.A.E.; Nichols, P.D.; McMeekin, T.A.; Franzmann, P.D.

    1996-12-31

    Bacterial cultures obtained from sediment samples collected during a trial oil spill experiment conducted at Airport beach, Eastern Antarctica were selectively enriched for n-alkane-degrading and phenanthrenedegrading bacteria. Samples were collected from a control site and sites treated with different hydrocarbon mixtures - Special Antarctic blend (SAB), BP-Visco and orange roughy oils. One set of replicate sites was also treated with water from Organic Lake which had previously been shown to contain hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria. No viable bacteria were obtained from samples collected from sites treated with orange roughy oil. Extensive degradation of n-alkanes by enrichment cultures obtained from sites treated with SAB and BP-Visco occurred at both 25{degrees}C and 10{degrees}C. Extensive degradation of phenanthrene also occurred in enrichment cultures from these sites grown at 25{degrees}C. Concurrent increases of polar lipid in these cultures were also observed. The presence of 1,4-naphthaquinone and 1-naphthol during the growth of the cultures on phenanthrene is unusual and warrants further investigation of the mechanism of phenanthrene-degradation by these Antarctic bacteria.

  11. Heavy hydrocarbon main injector technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, S. C.; Arbit, H. A.

    1988-01-01

    One of the key components of the Advanced Launch System (ALS) is a large liquid rocket, booster engine. To keep the overall vehicle size and cost down, this engine will probably use liquid oxygen (LOX) and a heavy hydrocarbon, such as RP-1, as propellants and operate at relatively high chamber pressures to increase overall performance. A technology program (Heavy Hydrocarbon Main Injector Technology) is being studied. The main objective of this effort is to develop a logic plan and supporting experimental data base to reduce the risk of developing a large scale (approximately 750,000 lb thrust), high performance main injector system. The overall approach and program plan, from initial analyses to large scale, two dimensional combustor design and test, and the current status of the program are discussed. Progress includes performance and stability analyses, cold flow tests of injector model, design and fabrication of subscale injectors and calorimeter combustors for performance, heat transfer, and dynamic stability tests, and preparation of hot fire test plans. Related, current, high pressure, LOX/RP-1 injector technology efforts are also briefly discussed.

  12. Biological sources for phenylalkane hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, L.; Winans, R.E.; Langworthy, T.A.; Langworthy, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    Linear alkylbenzenes (phenylalkanes) represent an important class of molecular compounds used widely in today`s society as building blocks for detergent manufacture, indeed, the almost universal widespread use and acceptance of detergents has been reflected by the fact that detergent chemical components can be found in and around almost every location around the globe where human settlements exist. This being the case, detergent chemical components represent a well recognized indicator of pollution in the lakes, rivers, and coastal water systems of the world. The identification of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in ancient sedimentary organic matter has been the subject of much controversy and concern, owing to the ubiquitous presence of phenylalkanes in today`s society. The finding of these components in the trace analytical analyses of petroleum sediments and crude oils has always implied {open_quotes}detergent contamination{close_quotes}. New evidence, however, suggests that the finding of phenylalkanes in ancient geological materials may actually represent an input from ancient algae and/or bacteria which contributed to the organic biomass from which the sediment or crude oil was derived. Moreover, the finding also of phenylalkane hydrocarbons in the lipids extracts of thermophilic bacteria still living today has revealed the first evidence of a natural system producing these compounds.

  13. Observing chemical abundances in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delsemme, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    The atomic resonance lines of the major elements were observed in the atmospheres of a few comets, by using vacuum ultraviolet spectrographs on board rockets or orbiting observatories. Dust-to-gas ratios were also deduced for two comets through a Finson-Probstein's analysis of their dust-tail isophotes. The geometric albedo of the dust for the phase angle alpha of the observations is not accurately known but, the dust-to-gas ratio is not overly sensitive to the actual value of this albedo. Infrared observations of the dust head of some comets show that the bulk of cometary dust must be silicates, although a minor component (5-10 percent) of carbon compounds is rather likely, because of poor dielectric properties of the grains. This interpretation is confirmed by the fact that interplanetary dust probably of cometary origin, that was collected in the stratosphere by NASA-U2 Spacecraft, is chondritic in nature. Metal abundances in the head of a sungrazing comet support the chondritic hypothesis.

  14. Spatial Variations of Chemical Abundances in Titan's Atmosphere as Revealed by ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, Alexander E.; Nixon, Conor; Chanover, Nancy J.; Molter, Edward; Serigano, Joseph; Cordiner, Martin; Charnley, Steven B.; Teanby, Nicholas A.; Irwin, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Complex organic molecules in Titan's atmosphere - formed through the dissociation of N2 and CH4 - exhibit latitudinal variations in abundance as observed by Cassini. Chemical species including hydrocarbons - such as CH3CCH - and nitriles - HCN, HC3N, CH3CN, and C2H5CN - may show spatial abundance variations as a result of atmospheric circulation, photochemical production and subsequent destruction throughout Titan's seasonal cycle. Recent calibration images of Titan taken by the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) with beam sizes of ~0.3'' allow for measurements of rotational transition lines of these species in spatially resolved regions of Titan's disk. We present abundance profiles obtained from public ALMA data taken in 2014, as Titan transitioned into northern summer. Abundance profiles in Titan's lower/middle atmosphere were retrieved by modeling high resolution ALMA spectra using the Non-linear Optimal Estimator for MultivariatE Spectral analySIS (NEMESIS) radiative transfer code. These retrievals were performed using spatial temperature profiles obtained by modeling strong CO lines from datasets taken in similar times with comparable resolution. We compare the abundance variations of chemical species to measurements made using Cassini data. Comparisons of chemical species with strong abundance enhancements over the poles will inform our knowledge of chemical lifetimes in Titan's atmosphere, and allow us to observe the important changes in production and circulation of numerous organic molecules which are attributed to Titan's seasons.

  15. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    DOEpatents

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  16. Microbial degradation of hydrocarbons in the environment.

    PubMed Central

    Leahy, J G; Colwell, R R

    1990-01-01

    The ecology of hydrocarbon degradation by microbial populations in the natural environment is reviewed, emphasizing the physical, chemical, and biological factors that contribute to the biodegradation of petroleum and individual hydrocarbons. Rates of biodegradation depend greatly on the composition, state, and concentration of the oil or hydrocarbons, with dispersion and emulsification enhancing rates in aquatic systems and absorption by soil particulates being the key feature of terrestrial ecosystems. Temperature and oxygen and nutrient concentrations are important variables in both types of environments. Salinity and pressure may also affect biodegradation rates in some aquatic environments, and moisture and pH may limit biodegradation in soils. Hydrocarbons are degraded primarily by bacteria and fungi. Adaptation by prior exposure of microbial communities to hydrocarbons increases hydrocarbon degradation rates. Adaptation is brought about by selective enrichment of hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms and amplification of the pool of hydrocarbon-catabolizing genes. The latter phenomenon can now be monitored through the use of DNA probes. Increases in plasmid frequency may also be associated with genetic adaptation. Seeding to accelerate rates of biodegradation has been shown to be effective in some cases, particularly when used under controlled conditions, such as in fermentors or chemostats. PMID:2215423

  17. Versatility of hydrocarbon production in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Xie, Min; Wang, Weihua; Zhang, Weiwen; Chen, Lei; Lu, Xuefeng

    2017-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microorganisms using solar energy, H2O, and CO2 as the primary inputs. Compared to plants and eukaryotic microalgae, cyanobacteria are easier to be genetically engineered and possess higher growth rate. Extensive genomic information and well-established genetic platform make cyanobacteria good candidates to build efficient biosynthetic pathways for biofuels and chemicals by genetic engineering. Hydrocarbons are a family of compounds consisting entirely of hydrogen and carbon. Structural diversity of the hydrocarbon family is enabled by variation in chain length, degree of saturation, and rearrangements of the carbon skeleton. The diversified hydrocarbons can be used as valuable chemicals in the field of food, fuels, pharmaceuticals, nutrition, and cosmetics. Hydrocarbon biosynthesis is ubiquitous in bacteria, yeasts, fungi, plants, and insects. A wide variety of pathways for the hydrocarbon biosynthesis have been identified in recent years. Cyanobacteria may be superior chassis for hydrocabon production in a photosynthetic manner. A diversity of hydrocarbons including ethylene, alkanes, alkenes, and terpenes can be produced by cyanobacteria. Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology strategies can be employed to improve hydrocarbon production in cyanobacteria. This review mainly summarizes versatility and perspectives of hydrocarbon production in cyanobacteria.

  18. Part A: Hydrocarbon Suspension in Slush Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindt, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    Methods of preparing suspensions of a hydrocarbon in slush hydrogen for nuclear fuel element corrosion inhibition in rocket engines were investigated. Suspensions were prepared using approximately 5000 ppm by mass of methane, ethane, or cyclopropane in slush hydrogen. The suspensions were stable in the slush, but the hydrocarbons settled out of the liquid melt.

  19. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, E.

    1995-05-23

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon. 5 Figs.

  20. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1995-01-01

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon.

  1. An Easy Synthesis of Two Cage Hydrocarbons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dong, Dao Cong

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simple, three-step synthesis of two cage molecules, birdcage hydrocarbon (VIII) and its homologue, the homobirdcage hydrocarbon IX. Indicates that all products are easily purified and formed in high yields in this activity suitable for advanced undergraduate laboratory courses. (Author/JN)

  2. Distribution of aliphatic hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and organochlorinated pollutants in deep-sea sediments of the Southern Cretan margin, Eastern Mediterranean Sea: a baseline assessment.

    PubMed

    Mandalakis, Manolis; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N; Tselepides, Anastasios; Lampadariou, Nikolaos

    2014-07-01

    Deep sediments from the southern Cretan margin were analyzed to establish baseline levels for various types of organic pollutants before the anticipated intensification of anthropogenic activities. The total concentration of aliphatic hydrocarbons (ΣAH:326-3758ngg(-1), dry weight) was similar to those reported for deep sediments of the western Mediterranean Sea, while considerably lower levels were measured for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ΣPAH:9-60ngg(-1)). Source-diagnostic ratios suggested that the aliphatic hydrocarbons in sediments were mainly of terrestrial biogenic origin, while polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons stemmed from the deposition of long-range transported combustion aerosols. Among the organochlorinated compounds analyzed, β-hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH:222-7052pgg(-1)), 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)ethane (p,p'-DDT:37-2236pgg(-1)) and polychlorinated biphenyls (ΣPCB:38-1182pgg(-1)) showed the highest abundance in sediments. The presence of HCHs and PCBs was attributed to historical inputs that have undergone extensive weathering, whereas an ongoing fresh input was suggested for p,p'-DDT. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that the levels of the various pollutants in sediments were controlled by different factors, but with organic carbon content playing a prominent role in most cases.

  3. Detection and quantification of hydrocarbons in sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wynn, Jeff; Williamson, Mike; Frank, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    A new technology developed by the US Geological Survey now allows for fast, direct detection of hydrocarbon plumes both in rivers and drifting in the deep ocean. Recent experiments show that the method can also detect and quantify hydrocarbons buried in river sediments and estuaries. This approach uses a variant of induced polarization, a surface-sensitive physical property of certain polarizable materials immersed in an electrolyte that can accept and adsorb charge under an inducing voltage. Known polarizable materials include most sulfides, ilmenite (FeTiO3), metallic objects such as buried wrecks and pipelines, and now hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon-in-water response to induced polarization is in fact nearly two orders of magnitude greater than the IP response of any of the hard minerals. The oil:water detection limit for hydrocarbons so far is down to 0.0002% in the laboratory.

  4. Hydrocarbon potential evaluation of the source rocks from the Abu Gabra Formation in the Sufyan Sag, Muglad Basin, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jinqi; Liu, Luofu; An, Fuli; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Ying; Wu, Kangjun; Zhao, Yuanyuan

    2016-06-01

    The Sufyan Sag is one of the low-exploration areas in the Muglad Basin (Sudan), and hydrocarbon potential evaluation of source rocks is the basis for its further exploration. The Abu Gabra Formation consisting of three members (AG3, AG2 and AG1 from bottom to top) was thought to be the main source rock formation, but detailed studies on its petroleum geology and geochemical characteristics are still insufficient. Through systematic analysis on distribution, organic matter abundance, organic matter type, organic matter maturity and characteristics of hydrocarbon generation and expulsion of the source rocks from the Abu Gabra Formation, the main source rock members were determined and the petroleum resource extent was estimated in the study area. The results show that dark mudstones are the thickest in the AG2 member while the thinnest in the AG1 member, and the thickness of the AG3 dark mudstone is not small either. The AG3 member have developed good-excellent source rock mainly with Type I kerogen. In the Southern Sub-sag, the AG3 source rock began to generate hydrocarbons in the middle period of Bentiu. In the early period of Darfur, it reached the hydrocarbon generation and expulsion peak. It is in late mature stage currently. The AG2 member developed good-excellent source rock mainly with Types II1 and I kerogen, and has lower organic matter abundance than the AG3 member. In the Southern Sub-sag, the AG2 source rock began to generate hydrocarbons in the late period of Bentiu. In the late period of Darfur, it reached the peak of hydrocarbon generation and its expulsion. It is in middle mature stage currently. The AG1 member developed fair-good source rock mainly with Types II and III kerogen. Throughout the geological evolution history, the AG1 source rock has no effective hydrocarbon generation or expulsion processes. Combined with basin modeling results, we have concluded that the AG3 and AG2 members are the main source rock layers and the Southern Sub-sag is

  5. Hydrocarbonates in precipitation of Moscow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Igor; Eremina, Iren; Aloyan, Artash; Arutunan, Vardan; Chubarova, Natalia; Yermakov, Alexandr

    2016-04-01

    According to monitoring of the atmospheric precipitation of Moscow a number of episodes is revealed, the content of hydrocarbonates in which repeatedly surpasses equilibrium level. Facts of their registration are linked to complex structure of precipitation which is caused by a different chemical composition of condensation nucleus. As a result on the underlying surface two groups of drops with acidity of the different nature are transferred. The acidity of the first, "metal" group of droplets, is determined by a carbonate equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 and with dissolved carbonates of alkali and alkaline earth metals. The acidity of the second, "ammonium" group droplets, is characterized by the balance between an ammonia absorbed from the air and atmospheric acids. Regulation of acidity of the deposits measured in a course of monitoring, occurs for this reason not only in the air, but also in the condensate receiver. A mixing "metal" and "ammonium" groups precipitation accompanied by only a partial transfer of hydrocarbonates in the dissolved CO2. The process is braked as a result of a practical stop of exit of CO2 into the atmosphere because of a mass transfer deceleration. In turn it leads to excess of equilibrium level of hydrocarbonates in the receiver. Estimates show that the acidity of "ammonia" component of precipitation should be much higher than the reported monitoring data. In other words, real acidity of rain drops can essentially exceed that is measured by standard procedures of monitoring of deposits, that it is necessary to take into consideration at calculations of so-called critical levels of acid loading on people and environment. In other words, the actual acidity of raindrops could greatly exceed that is measured by the standard procedures for monitoring rainfall, which should be taken into account when calculating the so-called critical levels of acid loads on people and the environment. It follows that the true level of hazard of acid rain

  6. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Infrared Astrophysics with Spitzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2004-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, thanks to significant, parallel advancements in observational, experimental, and theoretical techniques, tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of the role that carbon-rich plays in the interstellar medium (ISM). Twenty years ago, the possible existence of an abundant population of large, carbon-rich molecules in the ISM was unthinkable. Today, the unmistakable spectroscopic signatures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) - shockingly large molecules by the standards of traditional interstellar chemistry -are recognized throughout the Universe. In this presentation, we will examine the current state of the interstellar PAH model and explore how this data, in conjunction with the unparalleled observational data provided by the Spitzer Space Telescope, can be used to draw ever-deeper insights into the physical and chemical natures of a wide range of astrophysical environments.

  7. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in roasted coffee.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Angelica; Adisa, Afolabi; Woodham, Cara; Saleh, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are suspected to be carcinogenic and mutagenic. This study describes the presence of PAHs in light, medium and dark roasted coffee including instant and decaffeinated brands. Total PAHs concentration was related to the degree of roasting with light roasted coffee showing the least and dark roasted coffee showing the highest level. Both instant and decaffeinated coffee brand showed lower levels of PAHs. Naphthalene, acenaphthylene, pyrene and chrysene were the most abundant individual isomers. The concentrations ranged from 0 to 561 ng g(-1) for naphthalene, 0 to 512 ng g(-1) for acenaphthylene, 60 to 459 ng g(-1) for pyrene and 56 to 371 ng g(-1) for chrysene. Thus, roasting conditions should be controlled to avoid the formation of PAHs due to their suspected carcinogenic and mutagenic properties.

  8. Determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in roasted coffee

    PubMed Central

    JIMENEZ, ANGELICA; ADISA, AFOLABI; WOODHAM, CARA; SALEH, MAHMOUD

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are suspected to be carcinogenic and mutagenic. This study describes the presence of PAHs in light, medium and dark roasted coffee including instant and decaffeinated brands. Total PAHs concentration was related to the degree of roasting with light roasted coffee showing the least and dark roasted coffee showing the highest level. Both instant and decaffeinated coffee brand showed lower levels of PAHs. Naphthalene, acenaphthylene, pyrene and chrysene were the most abundant individual isomers. The concentrations ranged from 0 to 561 ng g−1 for naphthalene, 0 to 512 ng g−1 for acenaphthylene, 60 to 459 ng g−1 for pyrene and 56 to 371 ng g−1 for chrysene. Thus, roasting conditions should be controlled to avoid the formation of PAHs due to their suspected carcinogenic and mutagenic properties. PMID:25190557

  9. Synthesis of heavy hydrocarbons at the core-mantle boundary

    PubMed Central

    Belonoshko, Anatoly B.; Lukinov, Timofiy; Rosengren, Anders; Bryk, Taras; Litasov, Konstantin D.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of complex organic molecules with C-C bonds is possible under conditions of reduced activity of oxygen. We have found performing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the C-O-H-Fe system that such conditions exist at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). H2O and CO2 delivered to the CMB by subducting slabs provide a source for hydrogen and carbon. The mixture of H2O and CO2 subjected to high pressure (130 GPa) and temperature (4000 to 4500 K) does not lead to synthesis of complex hydrocarbons. However, when Fe is added to the system, C-C bonds emerge. It means that oil might be a more abundant mineral than previously thought. PMID:26675747

  10. Synthesis of heavy hydrocarbons at the core-mantle boundary.

    PubMed

    Belonoshko, Anatoly B; Lukinov, Timofiy; Rosengren, Anders; Bryk, Taras; Litasov, Konstantin D

    2015-12-17

    The synthesis of complex organic molecules with C-C bonds is possible under conditions of reduced activity of oxygen. We have found performing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of the C-O-H-Fe system that such conditions exist at the core-mantle boundary (CMB). H2O and CO2 delivered to the CMB by subducting slabs provide a source for hydrogen and carbon. The mixture of H2O and CO2 subjected to high pressure (130 GPa) and temperature (4000 to 4500 K) does not lead to synthesis of complex hydrocarbons. However, when Fe is added to the system, C-C bonds emerge. It means that oil might be a more abundant mineral than previously thought.

  11. Tri- and tetraterpenoid hydrocarbons in the Messel oil shale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, B. J.; Maxwell, J. R.; Philp, R. P.; Eglinton, G.; Albrecht, P.; Ensminger, A.; Arpino, P.; Ourisson, G.

    1974-01-01

    The high-molecular-weight constituents of the branched and cyclic hydrocarbon fraction of the Messel oil shale (Eocene) have been examined by high-resolution gas chromatography and combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The following compounds are present: perhydrolycopene, together with one or more unsaturated analogs with the same skeleton; a series of 4-methylsteranes in higher abundance than their 4-desmethyl analogs; two series of pentacyclic triterpanes, one series based on the hopane structure, and the other based on the 17 alpha-H hopane structure; and an intact triterpene hop-17(21)-ene. Only two additional triterpanes were detected in minor concentrations - namely, 30-normoretane and a C31 triterpane based on the hopane/lupane-type skeleton. The presence of these compounds suggests a significant microbial contribution to the forming sediment.

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Warshawsky, D

    1999-01-01

    A symposium on "Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Carcinogenesis" was presented at the third International Congress of Pathophysiology held in Lathi, Finland, 28 June-3 July 1998. The congress was also sponsored by the International Union of Biological Sciences and the International Society of Free Radical Research. Institutional support for the symposium included the Electric Power Research Institute, National Center for Toxicological Research, and EPA/National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory and the Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response. The symposium focused on the sources, carcinogenicity, genotoxicity, and risk assessment of individual and mixtures of PAHs that are found in solid wastes, Superfund sites, and other hazardous waste sites. Based on the occurrence of PAHs at numerous Superfund sites and the significant data gaps on the toxic potential of certain PAHs, the information developed during this symposium would be of value in assessing health risks of these chemicals at Superfund and other hazardous waste sites. PMID:10090712

  13. Carbon fibers from aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Mochida, Isao; Yoon, S.H.; Korai, Yozo; Kanno, Koichi; Sakai, Yukio; Komatsu, Makoto

    1995-02-01

    Carbon filter is widely used as a lightweight and high-strength material for composite structures. Its uses are expected to expand in the next century. Currently the best precursor for making these fibers is polyacrylonitrile (PAN). This is a relatively expensive feedstock. Carbon fibers also have been made starting with so-called mesophase pitch fractions derived from low-cost hydrocarbons such as petroleum residuum. But these fibers suffer from low mechanical strength. In the past few years, significant advances have been made in understanding the mechanism of formation of mesophase pitch, which may lead to improved performance for carbon fibers and other specialty carbons. This article introduces such advances, based principally on the authors` recent results.

  14. Soviet Arctic yields big hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-10

    Despite the huge hydrocarbon resources lying in Arctic areas of the USSR, the Soviets are expected to postpone offshore development there until the 1990s, focusing primarily on more accessible onshore Arctic reserves. They have already shown impressive ability to develop Arctic gas fields - such as the Urengoi and Yamburg fields - drilling through thick permafrost into pay zones with abnormally high pressures. The key to continued gains in Arctic production lies in the development of high-capacity, large-diameter pipe that would greatly reduce the number of pipelines required to carry the gas to western markets. The USSR recently reported successful tests on a 56-in. laminar pipe designed for operating pressures of 1500-1800 psi instead of the conventional 1100 psi.

  15. Effect of physical sediments reworking on hydrocarbon degradation and bacterial community structure in marine coastal sediments.

    PubMed

    Duran, Robert; Bonin, Patricia; Jezequel, Ronan; Dubosc, Karine; Gassie, Claire; Terrisse, Fanny; Abella, Justine; Cagnon, Christine; Militon, Cecile; Michotey, Valérie; Gilbert, Franck; Cuny, Philippe; Cravo-Laureau, Cristiana

    2015-10-01

    The present study aimed to examine whether the physical reworking of sediments by harrowing would be suitable for favouring the hydrocarbon degradation in coastal marine sediments. Mudflat sediments were maintained in mesocosms under conditions as closer as possible to those prevailing in natural environments with tidal cycles. Sediments were contaminated with Ural blend crude oil, and in half of them, harrowing treatment was applied in order to mimic physical reworking of surface sediments. Hydrocarbon distribution within the sediment and its removal was followed during 286 days. The harrowing treatment allowed hydrocarbon compounds to penetrate the first 6 cm of the sediments, and biodegradation indexes (such as n-C18/phytane) indicated that biodegradation started 90 days before that observed in untreated control mesocosms. However, the harrowing treatment had a severe impact on benthic organisms reducing drastically the macrofaunal abundance and diversity. In the harrowing-treated mesocosms, the bacterial abundance, determined by 16S rRNA gene Q-PCR, was slightly increased; and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analyses of 16S rRNA genes showed distinct and specific bacterial community structure. Co-occurrence network and canonical correspondence analyses (CCA) based on T-RFLP data indicated the main correlations between bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs) as well as the associations between OTUs and hydrocarbon compound contents further supported by clustered correlation (ClusCor) analysis. The analyses highlighted the OTUs constituting the network structural bases involved in hydrocarbon degradation. Negative correlations indicated the possible shifts in bacterial communities that occurred during the ecological succession.

  16. Review on the origin of oil and hydrocarbon gases within our solar system: biogenic or abiogenic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Prasanta K.; Mossman, David J.; Ehrman, James M.

    2010-09-01

    The petroleum hydrocarbons (oil like components and gas) and kerogen macromolecule are abundant within the extraterrestrial atmospheric particles, as reservoir of lakes and oceans or in hydrate forms, and within various carbonaceous chondrites (from asteroid belts, comets, and planets/moons), and as solid residue within the planets or moons within and outside our Solar System. Some of the important occurrences of petroleum hydrocarbons are: (a) the cup-like craters and large lakes, in the atmosphere within two moons of Saturn (Hyperion and Titan), and possibly also in Saturn's rings; (b) solid organic complexes with aromatic and aliphatic units within Iapetus and many bodies in the outer Solar System; (c) abundance of water, methane, gas hydrates within Mars; (d) remnant of nannofossils, kerogen-like geopolymers, and oil-like components within most of the CM, C1, and C2 carbonaceous chondrites. These discoveries clearly rekindled the very old debate over the biogenic or abiogenic origin on the genesis of these hydrocarbons. Several theories are prevalent for the abiogenic origin of petroleum: formation of gas by mantle decompression and thermal tsunami; various deep polymerization processes in the upper mantle gases through inorganic processes; gases evolved from a hot deep biosphere in the mantle, migration through deep-seated faults, and eventual polymerization of gases to heavier hydrocarbons. Most prevalent ideas of the origin of petroleum pool within various stratigraphic intervals in the terrestrial environment are overwhelmingly connected to the thermal degradation of macromolecular kerogen of biological entities. The current publication illustrated both these views on the genesis of petroleum hydrocarbons within carbonaceous chondrites that could be derived from other planets or moons within our Solar System and the asteroid belts and beyond.

  17. Primordial abundance of 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sripada, V. S. Murty

    Primordial abundance of the isotope (40) Ar is still not known accurately. Recent results from Genesis could also not provide (40) Ar/ (36) Ar value of solar wind, due mainly to the overwhelming (40) Ar blank. A major part of (40) Ar is contributed by the radioactive decay of (40) K (half life = 1.25 Ga), even in the nebula, as the nebula grew old. Any attempt to determine this quantity needs a sample that satisfies the following criteria: A primitive mineral/phase that formed very early in the nebula, that can trap a large amount of noble gas (Ar); and a phase that acquires minimum amount (or total absence) of in situ produced components (cosmogenic and radiogenic) of Ar. Carbon phases in the ureilite meteorites and Phase Q from chondrites best fit this criteria. The minimum (40) Ar/ (36) Ar value so far observed in Phase Q is 0.2. Also, the relatively lower value of 1.035±±0.002 for trapped (129) Xe/ (132) Xe in ureilites, as compared to 1.042±±0.002 in Phase Q suggests that trapping of gases in ureilites might have predated that of Phase Q. If this interpretation is valid, ureilites are a better host of most primitive nebular Ar. Earlier attempts on ureilite studies in 1970s have yielded the lowest (40) Ar/ (36) Ar ratio in the meteorite Dayalpur, the major uncertainty for this value mostly coming from blank correction for (40) Ar/ (36) Ar. Recent developments in low blank extraction systems and more sensitive multi-collector noble gas mass spectrometers, as compared to 1970s have prompted us to make a fresh attempt in measuring this important quantity. We have analysed a number of ureilite acid residues by stepwise temperature extraction, using both pyrolysis and combustion techniques, for Ar to ascertain the trapped (40) Ar/ (36) Ar ratio in the solar nebula. These acid residues are mostly made of C rich phases, with only trace amounts of K (radiogenic parent of (40) Ar) and target elements for the production of cosmogenic Ar component. They mostly contain

  18. A modified microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons assay to account for the presence of hydrocarbon droplets.

    PubMed

    Zoueki, Caroline Warne; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2010-04-15

    The microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) assay has been used widely to characterize microbial cell hydrophobicity and/or the extent of cell adhesion to hydrophobic liquids. The classical MATH assay involves spectrophotometric absorbance measurements of the initial and final cell concentrations in an aqueous cell suspension that has been contacted with a hydrocarbon liquid. In this study, microscopic examination of the aqueous cell suspension after contact with hexadecane or a hexadecane/toluene mixture revealed the presence of hydrocarbon droplets. The hydrocarbon droplets contributed to the absorbance values during spectrophotometric measurements and caused erroneous estimates of cell concentrations and extents of microbial adhesion. A modified MATH assay that avoids such artefacts is proposed here. In this modified assay, microscopic examination of the aqueous suspension and direct cell counts provides cell concentrations that are free of interference from hydrocarbon droplets. The presence of hydrocarbon droplets was noted in MATH assays performed with three bacterial strains, and two different hydrocarbons, at ionic strengths of 0.2 mM and 20 mM and pH 6. In these experiments, the formation of quasi-stable hydrocarbon droplets cannot be attributed to the presence of biosurfactants, or stabilization by biocolloids. The presence of surface potential at the hydrocarbon-water interface that was characterized by electrophoretic mobility of up to -1 and -2 microm cm/Vs, likely caused the formation of the quasi-stable hydrocarbon droplets that provided erroneous results using the classical MATH assay.

  19. Mineral-catalyzed dehydrogenation of C6 cyclic hydrocarbons: results from experimental studies under hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, S.; Tassi, F.; Gould, I.; Shock, E.; Lorance, E. D.; Bockisch, C.; Fecteau, K.

    2015-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are ubiquitously present in volcanic and hydrothermal gases. Their relative abundances have been demonstrated to be sensitive to physical and chemical parameters, suggesting VOCs as potential tools for evaluating deep reservoir conditions. Nevertheless, reaction pathways for VOC production at hydrothermal conditions are still poorly understood. Reversible catalytic reforming may be responsible for the high abundance of benzene observed in hydrothermal gases relative to saturated hydrocarbons. The dehydrogenation of n-hexane to benzene could proceed with C6 cyclic hydrocarbons as intermediates, as suggested by the relative enrichment in cyclic hydrocarbons observed in gases originating at T <150 °C. In this study, laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the production of benzene from cyclic hydrocarbons at 300°C and 85 bar. At these conditions in pure water, negligible benzene is produced from cyclohexane after 10 days. The presence of a mineral phase, especially sphalerite, favored the formation of both benzene and cyclohexene. The efficiency of dehydroaromatization reaction increased at increasing mineral/cyclohexane ratio, pointing to a surface catalyzed reaction. The catalytic action of sphalerite on the C-H bonds was confirmed by the large abundance of deuterated cyclohexane resulted in D2O experiments. The same experiment carried out using cyclohexene in pure water mainly produced methyl-cyclopentenes (via isomerization) and cyclohexanol (via oxygenation). In presence of sphalerite, the production of significant amounts of benzene confirmed the critical role of this mineral for the aromatization of cyclic compounds under hydrothermal conditions. Contrarily, products from cyclohexene solution phase oxidation using Cu(II) mainly consisted of oxygenated VOCs.

  20. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L.; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Borer, Elizabeth T.; Seabloom, Eric W.; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W. Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E.; Brown, Cynthia S.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Pyke, David A.; Farrell, Kelly A.; Bakker, John D.; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Adler, Peter B.; Collins, Scott L.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Crawley, Michael J.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Melbourne, Brett A.; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F.; Stevens, Carly J.; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D.; Klein, Julia A.; Fay, Phillip A.; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Buckley, Yvonne M.

    2011-01-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  1. Abundance of introduced species at home predicts abundance away in herbaceous communities.

    PubMed

    Firn, Jennifer; Moore, Joslin L; MacDougall, Andrew S; Borer, Elizabeth T; Seabloom, Eric W; HilleRisLambers, Janneke; Harpole, W Stanley; Cleland, Elsa E; Brown, Cynthia S; Knops, Johannes M H; Prober, Suzanne M; Pyke, David A; Farrell, Kelly A; Bakker, John D; O'Halloran, Lydia R; Adler, Peter B; Collins, Scott L; D'Antonio, Carla M; Crawley, Michael J; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M; La Pierre, Kimberly J; Melbourne, Brett A; Hautier, Yann; Morgan, John W; Leakey, Andrew D B; Kay, Adam; McCulley, Rebecca; Davies, Kendi F; Stevens, Carly J; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Holl, Karen D; Klein, Julia A; Fay, Philip A; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin P; Buckley, Yvonne M

    2011-03-01

    Many ecosystems worldwide are dominated by introduced plant species, leading to loss of biodiversity and ecosystem function. A common but rarely tested assumption is that these plants are more abundant in introduced vs. native communities, because ecological or evolutionary-based shifts in populations underlie invasion success. Here, data for 26 herbaceous species at 39 sites, within eight countries, revealed that species abundances were similar at native (home) and introduced (away) sites - grass species were generally abundant home and away, while forbs were low in abundance, but more abundant at home. Sites with six or more of these species had similar community abundance hierarchies, suggesting that suites of introduced species are assembling similarly on different continents. Overall, we found that substantial changes to populations are not necessarily a pre-condition for invasion success and that increases in species abundance are unusual. Instead, abundance at home predicts abundance away, a potentially useful additional criterion for biosecurity programmes.

  2. Abundance and size of Gulf shrimp in Louisiana's coastal estuaries following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

    PubMed

    van der Ham, Joris L; de Mutsert, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill impacted Louisiana's coastal estuaries physically, chemically, and biologically. To better understand the ecological consequences of this oil spill on Louisiana estuaries, we compared the abundance and size of two Gulf shrimp species (Farfantepeneus aztecus and Litopeneus setiferus) in heavily affected and relatively unaffected estuaries, before and after the oil spill. Two datasets were used to conduct this study: data on shrimp abundance and size before the spill were available from Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries (LDWF). Data on shrimp abundance and size from after the spill were independently collected by the authors and by LDWF. Using a Before-After-Control-Impact with Paired sampling (BACIP) design with monthly samples of two selected basins, we found brown shrimp to become more abundant and the mean size of white shrimp to become smaller. Using a BACIP with data on successive shrimp year-classes of multiple basins, we found both species to become more abundant in basins that were affected by the spill, while mean shrimp size either not change after the spill, or increased in both affected and unaffected basins. We conclude that following the oil spill abundances of both species increased within affected estuaries, whereas mean size may have been unaffected. We propose two factors that may have caused these results: 1) exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may have reduced the growth rate of shrimp, resulting in a delayed movement of shrimp to offshore habitats, and an increase of within-estuary shrimp abundance, and 2) fishing closures established immediately after the spill, may have resulted in decreased fishing effort and an increase in shrimp abundance. This study accentuates the complexities in determining ecological effects of oil spills, and the need of studies on the organismal level to reveal cause-and-effect relationships of such events.

  3. Predictable weathering of puparial hydrocarbons of necrophagous flies for determining the postmortem interval: a field experiment using Chrysomya rufifacies.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guang-Hui; Jia, Zheng-Jun; Yu, Xiao-Jun; Wu, Ku-Sheng; Chen, Lu-Shi; Lv, Jun-Yao; Eric Benbow, M

    2017-01-05

    Preadult development of necrophagous flies is commonly recognized as an accurate method for estimating the minimum postmortem interval (PMImin). However, once the PMImin exceeds the duration of preadult development, the method is less accurate. Recently, fly puparial hydrocarbons were found to significantly change with weathering time in the field, indicating their potential use for PMImin estimates. However, additional studies are required to demonstrate how the weathering varies among species. In this study, the puparia of Chrysomya rufifacies were placed in the field to experience natural weathering to characterize hydrocarbon composition change over time. We found that weathering of the puparial hydrocarbons was regular and highly predictable in the field. For most of the hydrocarbons, the abundance decreased significantly and could be modeled using a modified exponent function. In addition, the weathering rate was significantly correlated with the hydrocarbon classes. The weathering rate of 2-methyl alkanes was significantly lower than that of alkenes and internal methyl alkanes, and alkenes were higher than the other two classes. For mono-methyl alkanes, the rate was significantly and positively associated with carbon chain length and branch position. These results indicate that puparial hydrocarbon weathering is highly predictable and can be used for estimating long-term PMImin.

  4. Low-temperature formation of hydrocarbon gases in San Francisco Bay sediment (California, U.S.A.)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vogel, T.M.; Oremland, R.S.; Kvenvolden, K.A.

    1982-01-01

    To understand the processes responsible for the presence of low-molecular-weight hydrocarbons (C1-C4) in anoxic environments, we studied sediments collected from an anaerobic estuarine mudflat. In these sediments methane (C1) was several orders of magnitude more abundant than all other C2-C4 hydrocarbons; the C1 (C2 + C3) ratio was ??? 13,000. Mean ethane/ethene and propane/propene ratios were 0.4 and 0.7, respectively. Production of C1-C4 hydrocarbons was monitored during prolonged incubation (7 months) of sediments at 27?? and 4??C. Samples stored at 27??C generated significant quantities of C1-C4 hydrocarbon gases. Incubation at 4??C inhibited production of these gases. Several bactericides were tested with respect to their ability to inhibit formation of gaseous hydrocarbons. Sodium azide, chloroform, and 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid effectively inhibited methane formation, but not ethene formation in dilute continuously-shaken sediment slurries. Zephiran chloride only caused partial inhibition of methanogenesis (46%) and ethene generation (34%) in these slurries. In experiments with more concentrated unshaken sediment slurries, however, zephiran chloride and sodium azide did not block formation of methane, ethane, or propane. Only storage at -10??C prevented production of these gases. These results indicate that C1-C4 hydrocarbons can be formed by low-temperature reactions, possibly mediated by microorganisms. ?? 1982.

  5. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2015-06-09

    A system and method for reactively refining hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20 degrees and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure, using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. A reaction portion of the system and method delivers lightweight, volatile hydrocarbons to an associated contacting unit which operates in mixed subcritical/supercritical or supercritical modes. Using thermal diffusion, multiphase contact, or a momentum generating pressure gradient, the contacting unit separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques.

  6. Emulsification of hydrocarbons by subsurface bacteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Francy, D.S.; Thomas, J.M.; Raymond, R.L.; Ward, C.H.

    1991-01-01

    Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been the dominant factor which selected for and encouraged growth of emulsifiers; exposure to hydrocarbon was also important. Biostimulated microorganisms were better emulsifiers of aviation fuel (the contaminant hydrocarbon) than of heavier hydrocarbon to which they were not previously exposed. By measuring surface tension changes of culture broths, 11 out of 41 emulsifiers tested were identified as possible biosurfactant producers and two isolates produced large surface tension reductions indicating the high probability of biosurfactant production.Biosurfactants have potential for use in enhancement of in situ biorestoration by increasing the bioavailability of contaminants. Microorganisms isolated from biostimulated, contaminated and uncontaminated zones at the site of an aviation fuel spill and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms isolated from sites contaminated with unleaded gasoline were examined for their abilities to emulsify petroleum hydrocarbons. Emulsifying ability was quantified by a method involving agitation and visual inspection. Biostimulated-zone microbes and hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms were the best emulsifiers as compared to contaminated and uncontaminated zone microbes. Biostimulation (nutrient and oxygen addition) may have been

  7. Plasma Assisted Combustion Mechanism for Small Hydrocarbons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Andrey Starikovskiy Nickolay Aleksandrov PRINCETON University Plasma Assisted Combustion  Mechanism for Small  Hydrocarbons Report Documentation Page...COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Plasma Assisted Combustion Mechanism for Small Hydrocarbons 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Kinetics of ignition of saturated  hydrocarbons  by nonequilibrium plasma: C2H6‐ to C5H12‐containing mixtures. Combustion and Flame 156  (2009) 221–233

  8. Cuticular hydrocarbons of the ectoparasitic wasp Cephalonomia hyalinipennis (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae) and its alternative host, the stored product pest Caulophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    PubMed

    Howard, Ralph W; Pérez-Lachaud, Gabriela

    2002-06-01

    Cuticular hydrocarbons of an ectoparasitic wasp attacking two beetle hosts have been identified and examined for the influence of age, gender, mating status, and host on hydrocarbon composition. The 37 wasp hydrocarbons identified consisted of a series of n-alkanes (C16 to C33), 3-, 5-, 9-, 10-, 11-, and 12-methyl alkanes and a series of Z-7 and Z-9 monoenes (C23:1 to C27:1). One C25:2 diene was found. No effects of hydrocarbon composition as a function of age, gender, or mating status were found for the wasps. Wasps reared on Hypothenemus hampei, however, had 12/37 significant abundance differences to those reared on Caulophilus oryzae, although all but one of these differences were for components in less than 2% relative abundance. The C25:2 diene from wasps reared on H. hampei was present in about 10% whereas from wasps reared on C. oryzae it was present in about 2%. The hydrocarbons of one host for this wasp, the coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Scolytidae), have been previously reported [Howard and Infante, Ann. Entomol. Soc. Am. 89:700-709 (1996)]. The hydrocarbons of the alternative host, C. oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) consists of n-alkanes (C17 to C31), 3-, 4-, 5-, 7-, 9-, 11-, 12-, 13-, 14-, and 15-methyl alkanes, and a series of dimethyl alkanes of the series 3, 17-; 5, 11-; 5, 17-; 7, 11-; 7, 13-; 13, 17-; and 15, 19-. No unsaturated hydrocarbons were found. No significant differences in hydrocarbon composition were found between male and female C. oryzae. Hydrocarbon patterns of four species of Cephalonomia are compared and shown to be species-specific. The data are discussed in terms of ecological and physiological parameters.

  9. Anaerobic Microbial Degradation of Hydrocarbons: From Enzymatic Reactions to the Environment.

    PubMed

    Rabus, Ralf; Boll, Matthias; Heider, Johann; Meckenstock, Rainer U; Buckel, Wolfgang; Einsle, Oliver; Ermler, Ulrich; Golding, Bernard T; Gunsalus, Robert P; Kroneck, Peter M H; Krüger, Martin; Lueders, Tillmann; Martins, Berta M; Musat, Florin; Richnow, Hans H; Schink, Bernhard; Seifert, Jana; Szaleniec, Maciej; Treude, Tina; Ullmann, G Matthias; Vogt, Carsten; von Bergen, Martin; Wilkes, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are abundant in anoxic environments and pose biochemical challenges to their anaerobic degradation by microorganisms. Within the framework of the Priority Program 1319, investigations funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft on the anaerobic microbial degradation of hydrocarbons ranged from isolation and enrichment of hitherto unknown hydrocarbon-degrading anaerobic microorganisms, discovery of novel reactions, detailed studies of enzyme mechanisms and structures to process-oriented in situ studies. Selected highlights from this program are collected in this synopsis, with more detailed information provided by theme-focused reviews of the special topic issue on 'Anaerobic biodegradation of hydrocarbons' [this issue, pp. 1-244]. The interdisciplinary character of the program, involving microbiologists, biochemists, organic chemists and environmental scientists, is best exemplified by the studies on alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases. Here, research topics ranged from in-depth mechanistic studies of archetypical toluene-activating benzylsuccinate synthase, substrate-specific phylogenetic clustering of alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases (toluene plus xylenes, p-cymene, p-cresol, 2-methylnaphthalene, n-alkanes), stereochemical and co-metabolic insights into n-alkane-activating (methylalkyl)succinate synthases to the discovery of bacterial groups previously unknown to possess alkyl-/arylalkylsuccinate synthases by means of functional gene markers and in situ field studies enabled by state-of-the-art stable isotope probing and fractionation approaches. Other topics are Mo-cofactor-dependent dehydrogenases performing O2-independent hydroxylation of hydrocarbons and alkyl side chains (ethylbenzene, p-cymene, cholesterol, n-hexadecane), degradation of p-alkylated benzoates and toluenes, glycyl radical-bearing 4-hydroxyphenylacetate decarboxylase, novel types of carboxylation reactions (for acetophenone, acetone, and potentially also benzene and

  10. Aqueous geochemistry of low molecular weight hydrocarbons at elevated temperatures and pressures: constraints from mineral buffered laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seewald, Jeffrey S.

    2001-05-01

    Organic matter, water, and minerals coexist at elevated temperatures and pressures in sedimentary basins and participate in a wide range of geochemical processes that includes the generation of oil and natural gas. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted at 300 to 350°C and 350 bars to examine chemical interactions involving low molecular weight aqueous hydrocarbons with water and Fe-bearing minerals under hydrothermal conditions. Mineral buffers composed of hematite-magnetite-pyrite, hematite-magnetite, and pyrite-pyrrhotite-magnetite were added to each experiment to fix the redox state of the fluid and the activity of reduced sulfur species. During each experiment the chemical system was externally modified by addition of ethene, ethane, propene, 1-butene, or n-heptane, and variations in the abundance of aqueous organic species were monitored as a function of time and temperature. Results of the experiments indicate that decomposition of aqueous n-alkanes proceeds through a series of oxidation and hydration reactions that sequentially produce alkenes, alcohols, ketones, and organic acids as reaction intermediaries. Organic acids subsequently undergo decarboxylation and/or oxidation reactions to form carbon dioxide and shorter chain saturated hydrocarbons. This alteration assemblage is compositionally distinct from that produced by thermal cracking under anhydrous conditions, indicating that the presence of water and minerals provide alternative reaction pathways for the decomposition of hydrocarbons. The rate of hydrocarbon oxidation decreases substantially under reducing conditions and in the absence of catalytically active aqueous sulfur species. These results represent compelling evidence that the stability of aqueous hydrocarbons at elevated temperatures in natural environments is not a simple function of time and temperature alone. Under the appropriate geochemical conditions, stepwise oxidation represents a mechanism for the decomposition of low

  11. Distribution of trace metals, aliphatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in sediment cores from the Sicily Channel and the gulf of Tunis (south-western Mediterranean Sea).

    PubMed

    Mzoughi, Nadia; Chouba, Lassaad

    2011-01-01

    Under the framework of the IAEA's Technical Co-operation project RAF7/004, international research cruises were carried out in 2004 to assess the distribution of radionuclides and micropollutants in the south-western Mediterranean Sea. Sediments samples had variable concentrations of total aliphatic hydrocarbons and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons ranging from 0.2 to 1.8 microg g(-1) and 26.9 to 364.4 ng g(-1), respectively, in the Sicily Channel and from 0.7 to 2.8 microg g(-1) and 14.7 to 618.1 ng g(-1), respectively, in the open sea of the Gulf of Tunis. Hydrocarbon concentrations changed with depth and were relatively high at 3 cm and 10 cm depths. The use of 'fingerprint' ratios of certain isomeric pairs of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and the proportion of 2-3 ring and 4-5 ring PAH concentrations showed that the main origins are characteristic of petroleum sources. The ranges of trace metal concentrations, expressed in microgg(-1), in the Sicily Channel and in the Gulf of Tunis, respectively, were: Hg 0.009-0.2 and 0.02-0.1; Pb 9.9-26.1 and 21.2-32.5; Cd 0.06-0.1 and 0.07-0.33; Fe 23.7-28.1 and 29.9-36.2p; Zn 83-99.5 and 83-104; Mn 309.2-752.5 and 651-814; Cu 17.1-18.5 and 33.5-51.3. Sediment metal abundances were in the order: Mn > Zn > Fe > Cu > Pb > Cd > Hg. The results showed significant differences (p < 0.001) for trace metal and hydrocarbon mean concentrations between the two cores. These concentrations are generally similar to the background levels from the Mediterranean Sea and could be affected by physico-chemical conditions and sedimentation rate as well as biodegradation.

  12. 40 CFR 86.1321-94 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Procedures § 86.1321-94 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the... into service and at least annually thereafter, the FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  13. 40 CFR 86.317-79 - Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications....317-79 Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications. (a) Hydrocarbon measurements are to be made with a heated... measures hydrocarbon emissions on a dry basis is permitted for gasoline-fueled testing; Provided,...

  14. 40 CFR 92.119 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 92... Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the following initial and... into service and at least annually thereafter, the HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  15. 40 CFR 86.317-79 - Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications....317-79 Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications. (a) Hydrocarbon measurements are to be made with a heated... measures hydrocarbon emissions on a dry basis is permitted for gasoline-fueled testing; Provided,...

  16. 40 CFR 92.119 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 92... Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the following initial and... into service and at least annually thereafter, the HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  17. 40 CFR 86.317-79 - Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications....317-79 Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications. (a) Hydrocarbon measurements are to be made with a heated... measures hydrocarbon emissions on a dry basis is permitted for gasoline-fueled testing; Provided,...

  18. 40 CFR 92.119 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 92... Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the following initial and... into service and at least annually thereafter, the HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  19. 40 CFR 86.1321-94 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Procedures § 86.1321-94 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the... into service and at least annually thereafter, the FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  20. 40 CFR 86.1321-94 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Procedures § 86.1321-94 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the... into service and at least annually thereafter, the FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  1. 40 CFR 86.1321-94 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Procedures § 86.1321-94 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the... into service and at least annually thereafter, the FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  2. 40 CFR 92.119 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 92... Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the following initial and... into service and at least annually thereafter, the HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  3. 40 CFR 86.317-79 - Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications....317-79 Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications. (a) Hydrocarbon measurements are to be made with a heated... measures hydrocarbon emissions on a dry basis is permitted for gasoline-fueled testing; Provided,...

  4. Selective photooxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolites by oxygen

    DOEpatents

    Frei, Heinz; Blatter, Fritz; Sun, Hai

    1998-01-01

    A selective photooxidation process for the conversion of hydrocarbon molecules to partially oxygenated derivatives, which comprises the steps of adsorbing a hydrocarbon and oxygen onto a dehydrated zeolite support matrix to form a hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair, and subsequently exposing the hydrocarbon-oxygen contact pair to visible light, thereby forming a partially oxygenated derivative.

  5. 21 CFR 172.884 - Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. 172.884... § 172.884 Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons may be safely... liquid hydrocarbons derived from petroleum or synthesized from petroleum gases. The additive is...

  6. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes

    PubMed Central

    Knouft, Jason H.; Anthony, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa. PMID:27429769

  7. Climate and local abundance in freshwater fishes.

    PubMed

    Knouft, Jason H; Anthony, Melissa M

    2016-06-01

    Identifying factors regulating variation in numbers of individuals among populations across a species' distribution is a fundamental goal in ecology. A common prediction, often referred to as the abundant-centre hypothesis, suggests that abundance is highest near the centre of a species' range. However, because of the primary focus on the geographical position of a population, this framework provides little insight into the environmental factors regulating local abundance. While range-wide variation in population abundance associated with environmental conditions has been investigated in terrestrial species, the relationship between climate and local abundance in freshwater taxa across species' distributions is not well understood. We used GIS-based temperature and precipitation data to determine the relationships between climatic conditions and range-wide variation in local abundance for 19 species of North American freshwater fishes. Climate predicted a portion of the variation in local abundance among populations for 18 species. In addition, the relationship between climatic conditions and local abundance varied among species, which is expected as lineages partition the environment across geographical space. The influence of local habitat quality on species persistence is well documented; however, our results also indicate the importance of climate in regulating population sizes across a species geographical range, even in aquatic taxa.

  8. Abundances of the elements - Meteoritic and solar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Edward; Grevesse, Nicolas

    1989-01-01

    New abundance tables have been compiled for C1 chondrites and the solar photosphere and corona, based on a critical review of the literature to mid-1988. The meteorite data are generally accurate to + or - 5-10 percent. Significant discrepancies between the sun and meteorites occur only for Fe, Mn, Ge, Pb, and W; other well-determined elements agree to + or - 9 percent on the average. There is no evidence for group fractionations in C1 chondrites of cosmochemically similar elements (refractories, siderophiles, volatiles, etc.), but a selective fractionation of Fe cannot be ruled out. Abundances of odd-A nuclides between A = 65 and 209 show a generally smooth trend, with elemental abundances conforming to the slope defined by isotopic abundances. Significant irregularities occur in the Nd-Sm-Eu region, however, suggesting that the abundance curve is dependably smooth only down to about 20 percent level.

  9. Influence of Coronal Abundance Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeffrey D. (Technical Monitor); Kashyap, Vinay

    2005-01-01

    The PI of this project was Jeff Scargle of NASA/Ames. Co-I's were Alma Connors of Eureka Scientific/Wellesley, and myself. Part of the work was subcontracted to Eureka Scientific via SAO, with Vinay Kashyap as PI. This project was originally assigned grant number NCC2-1206, and was later changed to NCC2-1350 for administrative reasons. The goal of the project was to obtain, derive, and develop statistical and data analysis tools that would be of use in the analyses of high-resolution, high-sensitivity data that are becoming available with new instruments. This is envisioned as a cross-disciplinary effort with a number of "collaborators" including some at SA0 (Aneta Siemiginowska, Peter Freeman) and at the Harvard Statistics department (David van Dyk, Rostislav Protassov, Xiao-li Meng, Epaminondas Sourlas, et al). We have developed a new tool to reliably measure the metallicities of thermal plasma. It is unfeasible to obtain high-resolution grating spectra for most stars, and one must make the best possible determination based on lower-resolution, CCD-type spectra. It has been noticed that most analyses of such spectra have resulted in measured metallicities that were significantly lower than when compared with analyses of high- resolution grating data where available (see, e.g., Brickhouse et al., 2000, ApJ 530,387). Such results have led to the proposal of the existence of so-called Metal Abundance Deficient, or "MAD" stars (e.g., Drake, J.J., 1996, Cool Stars 9, ASP Conf.Ser. 109, 203). We however find that much of these analyses may be systematically underestimating the metallicities, and using a newly developed method to correctly treat the low-counts regime at the high-energy tail of the stellar spectra (van Dyk et al. 2001, ApJ 548,224), have found that the metallicities of these stars are generally comparable to their photospheric values. The results were reported at the AAS (Sourlas, Yu, van Dyk, Kashyap, and Drake, 2000, BAAS 196, v32, #54.02), and at the

  10. Geochemical methods of prospecting for hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Duchscherer, W. Jr.

    1980-12-01

    Because the commonly used reflection-seismograph exploration technique misses many marginal low-relief structural prospects and regardless of its electronic computer sophistication, overlooks almost all stratigraphic traps, the hydrocarbon exploration industry should take a look at geochemical prospecting methods, which detect geochemical anomalies in the near-surface soils by measuring the thermal dissociation of the soil carbonates that are found overlying hydrocarbon accumulations. To promote understanding of such prospecting techniques, Geochemical Surveys reviews the methods used, the soil-alteration patterns, the lateral and vertical migration of hydrocarbon gases, the halo phenomenon (a ring or annual anomaly), the geochemical modification of sediments, and the data-interpretation and exploration procedures involved in a carbonate ..delta.. C analysis, which measures the residual, stable, cumulative effect of hydrocarbon migration.

  11. Maximum hydrocarbon window determination in South Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, W.G. )

    1993-03-29

    This is the third and final part of a three part article about the distribution of hydrocarbons in the Tertiary sands of South Louisiana. Based on many individual plots, it was found that hydrocarbon distribution will vary according to the depth of abnormal pressure and lithology. The relation of maximum hydrocarbon distribution to formation fracture strength or depth opens the door to the use of a maximum hydrocarbon window (MHW) technique. This MHW technique can be used as a decision making tool on how deep to drill a well, particularly how deep to drill a well below the top of abnormal pressure. The paper describes the benefits of the MHW technique and its future potential for exploration and development operations.

  12. Liquid hydrocarbons probable under Ross Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, A. K.; Davey, F.J.; Hinz, K.

    1988-01-01

    Thick glacial strata, which have no source-rock potential, cover the Ross Sea. If these strata persist to great depths, then hydrocarbon-generation prospects will be poor. Deeply buried strata within Ross Sea rift-grabens, if like other Gondwana rift-deposits, could have good potential for hydrocarbon generation. Current hydrocarbon assessments of the Ross Sea and adjacent areas must be considered highly speculative because the deeply buried rift(?) strata have not been sampled in situ. The assessment of the Ross Sea relies on geophysical/geologic data, two-stage rift models, and data from formerly nearby Gondwana rift-basins. We conclude that conditions favorable for hydrocarbon generation and entrapment are likely throughout the Ross Sea, and especially in the Victoria Land basin, if adequate source beds exist. -Authors

  13. Biodegradation of polycyclic hydrocarbons by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability of the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) that are present in anthracene oil (a distillation product obtained from coal tar) was demonstrated. Analysis by capillary gas chromatography and high-performance li...

  14. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Energies from the PMO Method.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Charles F.

    1979-01-01

    Details a procedure for accurately calculating the quantum mechanical energies of hydrocarbons using the perturbational molecular orbital (PMO) method, which does not require the use of a computer. (BT)

  15. An Acid Hydrocarbon: A Chemical Paradox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Jeffrey T.

    2004-01-01

    The chemical paradox of cyclopentadiene, a hydrocarbon, producing bubbles like a Bronsted acid is observed. The explanation that it is the comparative thermodynamic constancy of the fragrant cyclopentadienyl anion, which produces the powerful effect, resolves the paradox.

  16. Hydrocarbon and nonhydrocarbon derivatives of cyclopropane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slabey, Vernon A; Wise, Paul H; Gibbons, Louis C

    1953-01-01

    The methods used to prepare and purify 19 hydrocarbon derivatives of cyclopropane are discussed. Of these hydrocarbons, 13 were synthesized for the first time. In addition to the hydrocarbons, six cyclopropylcarbinols, five alkyl cyclopropyl ketones, three cyclopropyl chlorides, and one cyclopropanedicarboxylate were prepared as synthesis intermediates. The melting points, boiling points, refractive indices, densities, and, in some instances, heats of combustion of both the hydrocarbon and nonhydrocarbon derivatives of cyclopropane were determined. These data and the infrared spectrum of each of the 34 cyclopropane compounds are presented in this report. The infrared absorption bands characteristic of the cyclopropyl ring are discussed, and some observations are made on the contribution of the cyclopropyl ring to the molecular refractions of cyclopropane compounds.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE HYDROCARBON JET FUELS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    AIRCRAFT ENGINE OILS, *AVIATION FUELS, *HYDROCARBONS, *JET ENGINE FUELS, *LUBRICANTS, *POLYCYCLIC COMPOUNDS, ALKYL RADICALS, BENZENE, CATALYSIS...CHEMICAL REACTIONS , COMBUSTION, CUMENES, DECOMPOSITION, ETHYLENES, FORMALDEHYDE, FRAGMENTATION, HIGH TEMPERATURE, HYDROGENATION, NAPHTHALENES, PHYSICAL

  18. Infrared Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Bakes, E. L. O.

    2000-01-01

    We have computed the synthetic infrared spectra of some polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons containing up to 54 carbon atoms. The species studied include ovalene, circumcoronene, dicoronylene, and hexabenzocoronene. We report spectra for anions, neutrals, cations, and multiply charged cations.

  19. Antifoulant additive for light end hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Dickakian, G.B.

    1990-06-05

    This patent describes a method of treating a highly paraffinic hydrocarbon liquid containing not more than 5 wt% aromatics and from 10 to 10,000 ppm high molecular weight asphaltenes to prevent asphaltene fouling of equipment at temperatures below 400{degrees} F. It comprises: adding to the hydrocarbon liquid not less than 10 ppm and not more than 200 ppm of an oil soluble overbased magnesium alkyl aromatic sulfonate to inhibit asphaltene fouling.

  20. Process for Photochemical Chlorination of Hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Beanblossom, W S

    1951-08-28

    A process for chlorination of a major portion of the hydrogen atoms of paraffinic hydrocarbons of five or more carbon atoms may be replaced by subjecting the hydrocarbon to the action of chlorine under active light. The initial chlorination is begun at 25 to 30 deg C with the chlorine diluted with HCl. The later stages may be carried out with undiluted chlorine and the temperature gradually raised to about 129 deg C.

  1. Formation of hydrocarbons by bacteria and algae

    SciTech Connect

    Tornabene, T.G.

    1980-12-01

    A literature review has been performed summarizing studies on hydrocarbon synthesis by microorganisms. Certain algal and bacterial species produce hydrocarbons in large quantities, 70 to 80% of dry cell mass, when in a controlled environment. The nutritional requirements of these organisms are simple: CO/sub 2/ and mineral salts. The studies were initiated to determine whether or not microorganisms played a role in petroleum formation. 90 references. (DMC)

  2. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  3. Microbial communities along biogeochemical gradients in a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Karolin; Kleinsteuber, Sabine; Schleinitz, Kathleen M; Fetzer, Ingo; Spott, Oliver; Stange, Florian; Lohse, Ute; Franz, Janett; Neumann, Franziska; Gerling, Sarah; Schmidt, Christian; Hasselwander, Eyk; Harms, Hauke; Wendeberg, Annelie

    2013-09-01

    Micro-organisms are known to degrade a wide range of toxic substances. How the environment shapes microbial communities in polluted ecosystems and thus influences degradation capabilities is not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigated microbial communities in a highly complex environment: the capillary fringe and subjacent sediments in a hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. Sixty sediment sections were analysed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) fingerprinting, cloning and sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes, complemented by chemical analyses of petroleum hydrocarbons, methane, oxygen and alternative terminal electron acceptors. Multivariate statistics revealed concentrations of contaminants and the position of the water table as significant factors shaping the microbial community composition. Micro-organisms with highest T-RFLP abundances were related to sulphate reducers belonging to the genus Desulfosporosinus, fermenting bacteria of the genera Sedimentibacter and Smithella, and aerobic hydrocarbon degraders of the genus Acidovorax. Furthermore, the acetoclastic methanogens Methanosaeta, and hydrogenotrophic methanogens Methanocella and Methanoregula were detected. Whereas sulphate and sulphate reducers prevail at the contamination source, the detection of methane, fermenting bacteria and methanogenic archaea further downstream points towards syntrophic hydrocarbon degradation.

  4. Carbon isotope geochemistry of hydrocarbons in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Baja California Norte, Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Des Marais, D.J.; Stallard, M.L.; Nehring, N.L.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrocarbon abundances and stable-isotopic compositions were measured in wells M5, M26, M35 and M102, which represent a range of depths (1270-2000 m) and temperatures (275-330??C) in the field. In order to simulate the production of the geothermal hydrocarbons, gases were collected from the pyrolysis of lignite in the laboratory. This lignite was obtained from a well which sampled rock strata which are identical to those occurring in the field, but which have experienced much lower subsurface temperatures. In both the well and the laboratory observations, high-temperature environments favored higher relative concentrations of methane, ethane and benzene and generally higher ??13C-values in the individual hydrocarbons. The best correlation between the laboratory and well data is obtained when laboratory-produced gases from experiments conducted at lower (400??C) and higher (600??C) temperatures are mixed. This improved correlation suggests that the wells are sampling hydrocarbons produced from a spectrum of depths and temperatures in the sediments. ?? 1988.

  5. Carbon isotope geochemistry of hydrocarbons in the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Baja California Norte, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Des Marais, D. J.; Stallard, M. L.; Nehring, N. L.; Truesdell, A. H.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrocarbon abundances and stable-isotopic compositions were measured in wells M5, M26, M35 and M102, which represent a range of depths (1270-2000 m) and temperatures (275-330 degrees C) in the field. In order to simulate the production of the geothermal hydrocarbons, gases were collected from the pyrolysis of lignite in the laboratory. This lignite was obtained from a well which sampled rock strata which are identical to those occurring in the field, but which have experienced much lower subsurface temperatures. In both the well and the laboratory observations, high-temperature environments favored higher relative concentrations of methane, ethane and benzene and generally higher delta 13C-values in the individual hydrocarbons. The best correlation between the laboratory and well data is obtained when laboratory-produced gases from experiments conducted at lower (400 degrees C) and higher (600 degrees C) temperatures are mixed. This improved correlation suggests that the wells are sampling hydrocarbons produced from a spectrum of depths and temperatures in the sediments.

  6. Amino acids and hydrocarbons approximately 3,800-Myr old in the Isua rocks, southwestern Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagy, B.; Engel, M. H.; Zumberge, J. E.; Ogino, H.; Chang, S. Y.

    1981-01-01

    Results of an analysis of amino acids and hydrocarbons found in the Isua banded iron formation, which contains the oldest known rocks on earth, are discussed. Similarities are pointed out between the relative amino acid abundances of the Isua rocks and those of lichens found on their surfaces, and a lack of substantial racemization indicated by the low D/L ratios in the 3800-million year old rock samples is noted. Experimental results showing the possibility of amino acid diffusion from lichens into the rocks are presented. Comparisons of the Isua rock amino acid D/L ratios with those reported for samples from other regions indicates that none of the Isua amino acids are older than a few tens of thousands to a few hundred thousand years. Analyses of the saturated hydrocarbons of the Isua samples reveals no odd carbon number preference, which may indicate antiquity, however laboratory experiments have shown that amino acids and aromatic and saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons could not have survived the metamorphic history of the Isua rocks. The evidence presented thus suggests that the amino acids and hydrocarbons found are not of the age of the sediments.

  7. Characteristics of hydrocarbons in sediment core samples from the northern Okinawa Trough.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Chen, Shuai; Zeng, Zhigang; Pu, Xiaoqiang; Hou, Qinghua

    2017-02-15

    Sediment core samples from the northern Okinawa Trough (OT) were analyzed to determine abundances and distributions of hydrocarbons by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The results show that the n-alkanes in this sediment core conform to a bimodal distribution, and exhibit an odd-to-even predominance of high molecular weights compared to an even-to-odd predominance in low molecular weight n-alkanes with maxima at C16 and C18. The concentrations of bitumen, alkanes and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were higher in samples S10-07 than all others. Three maturity parameters as well as the ratios between parent phenanthrenes (Ps) and methylphenanthrenes (MPs) in samples S10-07 and S10-17 were higher. The distribution and composition of hydrocarbons in sample S10-07 suggest that one, or several, undetected hydrothermal fields may be present in the region of this sediment core. Results also suggest that volcanism may be the main reason for the observed distribution and composition of hydrocarbons in S10-17 sample.

  8. Nonmethane Hydrocarbons in Ambient Air of Hazy and Normal Days in Foshan, South China

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Songjun; Yang, Fumo; Tan, Jihua; Duan, Jingchun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A first study of nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) on hazy and normal days was performed in Foshan for providing deep insight into the local deteriorating air quality. Ethane, propane, i-pentane, ethene, propene, ethyne, benzene, and toluene were eight most abundant compounds, accounting for 71%–85% of total NMHCs. Most hydrocarbons showed much higher levels on hazy days than normal days together with hydrocarbon/ethyne ratios and diurnal variations, indicating hazy days are more dominated by vehicular emission. Correlation coefficients (R2) of ethane, propane, ethane, propene, benzene, and total NMHCs with ethyne were 0.62–0.83, indicating these compounds are mainly related to vehicular emission. R2 analysis indicated that solvent usage is responsible for toluene and other aromatic hydrocarbons (e.g., ethylbezene). Benzene/toluene (B/T) ratio was 0.44±0.23 during whole sampling periods, again indicating vehicular emission is the dominant source. Lower B/T ratio (0.30±0.14) on hazy days than that (0.58±0.21) on normal days suggested that solvent usage emitted toluene. PMID:22493559

  9. Microbial biodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Peng, Ri-He; Xiong, Ai-Sheng; Xue, Yong; Fu, Xiao-Yan; Gao, Feng; Zhao, Wei; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2008-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widespread in various ecosystems and are pollutants of great concern due to their potential toxicity, mutagenicity and carcinogenicity. Because of their hydrophobic nature, most PAHs bind to particulates in soil and sediments, rendering them less available for biological uptake. Microbial degradation represents the major mechanism responsible for the ecological recovery of PAH-contaminated sites. The goal of this review is to provide an outline of the current knowledge of microbial PAH catabolism. In the past decade, the genetic regulation of the pathway involved in naphthalene degradation by different gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria was studied in great detail. Based on both genomic and proteomic data, a deeper understanding of some high-molecular-weight PAH degradation pathways in bacteria was provided. The ability of nonligninolytic and ligninolytic fungi to transform or metabolize PAH pollutants has received considerable attention, and the biochemical principles underlying the degradation of PAHs were examined. In addition, this review summarizes the information known about the biochemical processes that determine the fate of the individual components of PAH mixtures in polluted ecosystems. A deeper understanding of the microorganism-mediated mechanisms of catalysis of PAHs will facilitate the development of new methods to enhance the bioremediation of PAH-contaminated sites.

  10. The origin of light hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mango, Frank D.

    2000-04-01

    The light hydrocarbons (LHs) are probably intermediates in the catalytic decomposition of oil to gas: Oil→LHs→Gas Two lines of evidence support this possibility. First, the reaction was duplicated experimentally under moderate conditions. Second, natural LHs exhibit the characteristics of catalytic products, in particular a proportionality between isomers: (xyi)/(xiy)=α (where x and xi are isomers; y and yi are isomers that are structurally similar to x and xi; and α is a constant). All oils exhibit this relationship with coefficients of correlation reaching 0.99. Isomer ratios change systematically with concentrations, some approaching thermodynamic equilibrium, others not. The correlations reported are the strongest yet disclosed for the LHs. Isomers are related in triads (e.g., n-hexane ↔ 2-methylpentane ↔ 3-methylpentane), consistent with cyclopropane precursors. The LHs obtained experimentally are indistinguishable from natural LHs in (xyi)/(xiy). These relationships are not explained by physical fractionations, equilibrium control, or noncatalytic modes of origin. A catalytic origin, on the other hand, has precedence, economy and experimental support.

  11. Gaseous hydrocarbon-air detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Stamps, D.W. ); Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. )

    1991-04-01

    Detonation cell width measurements were made on mixtures of air and methane, ethane, dimethyl-ether, nitroethane, ethylene, acetylene, propane, 1,2-epoxypropane, n-hexane, 1-nitrohexane, mixed primary hexylnitrate, n-octane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, cyclooctane, 1-octene, cis-cyclooctene, 1,7-octadiene, 1-octyne, n-decane, 1,2-epoxydecane, pentyl-ether, and JP4. Cell width measurements were carried out at 25 and 100 {degrees} C for some of these fuel-air mixtures. For the stoichiometric alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes, there is a very slight decrease in the detonation cell width with increasing initial temperature from 25 {degrees} C to 100 {degrees} C, although the differences are within the experimentally uncertainties in cell width measurements. Also within the uncertainty limits of the measurements, there is no variation in detonation cell width with increase fuel molecular weight for n-alkanes from ethane to n-decane. Molecular structure is found to affect detonability for C{sub 8} hydrocarbons, where the saturated ring structure is more sensitive than the straight-chain alkane, which is more sensitive than the branched-chain alkane. Unsaturated alkenes and alkynes are more sensitive to detonation than saturated alkanes.

  12. Gaseous hydrocarbon-air detonations

    SciTech Connect

    Tieszen, S.R.; Stamps, D.W.; Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Detonation cell width measurements are made on mixtures of air and methane, ethane, dimethyl-ether, nitroethane, ethylene, acetylene, propane, 1,2-epoxypropane, n-hexane, 1-nitrohexane, mixed primary hexylnitrate, n-octane, 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, cyclooctane, 1-octene, cis-cyclooctene, 1-7-octadiene, 1-octyne, n-decane, 1,2-epoxydecane, pentyl-ether, and JP4. There is a slight decrease in detonation cell width that is within the uncertainty of the data for stoichiometric alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes with increasing temperature between 25 and 100/degree/C. Also there appears to be no effect of molecular weight from ethane to decane, on detonation cell width for stoichiometric alkanes. Molecular structure is found to affect detonability for C/sub 8/ hydrocarbons, where the saturated ring structure is more sensitive than the straight-chain alkane. Unsaturated alkenes and alkynes are more sensitive to detonation than saturated alkanes. However, the degree of sensitization decreases with increasing molecular weight. Addition of functional groups such as nitro, nitrate, epoxy, and ethers are found to significantly reduce the detonation cell width from the parent n-alkane. Nitrated n-alkanes can be more sensitive than hydrogen-air mixtures. The increase in sensitivity of epoxy groups appears to be related to the oxygen to carbon ratio of the molecule. Good results are obtained between the data and predictions from a ZND model with detailed chemical kinetics. 46 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Birds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, P.H.

    2006-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are present throughout the global environment and are produced naturally and by activities of humans. Effects of PAH on birds have been determined by studies employing egg injection, egg immersion, egg shell application, single and multiple oral doses, subcutaneous injection, and chemical analysis of field-collected eggs and tissue. The four-to six-ring aromatic compounds are the most toxic to embryos, young birds, and adult birds. For embryos, effects include death, developmental abnormalities, and a variety of cellular and biochemical responses. For adult and young birds, effects include reduced egg production and hatching, increased clutch or brood abandonment, reduced growth, increased organweights, and a variety of biochemical responses. Trophic level accumulation is unlikely. Environmental exposure to PAH in areas of high human population or habitats affected by recent petroleum spills might be sufficient to adversely affect reproduction. Evidence of long-term effects of elevated concentrations of environmental PAH on bird populations is very limited and the mechanisms of effect are unclear.

  14. Hydrocarbon Biodegradation in Hypersaline Environments

    PubMed Central

    Ward, David M.; Brock, T. D.

    1978-01-01

    When mineral oil, hexadecane, and glutamate were added to natural samples of varying salinity (3.3 to 28.4%) from salt evaporation ponds and Great Salt Lake, Utah, rates of metabolism of these compounds decreased as salinity increased. Rate limitations did not appear to relate to low oxygen levels or to the availability of organic nutrients. Some oxidation of l-[U-14C]glutamic acid occurred even at extreme salinities, whereas oxidation of [1-14C]hexadecane was too low to be detected. Gas chromatographic examination of hexane-soluble components of tar samples from natural seeps at Rozel Point in Great Salt Lake demonstrated no evidence of biological oxidation of isoprenoid alkanes subject to degradation in normal environments. Some hexane-soluble components of the same tar were altered by incubation in a low-salinity enrichment culture inoculated with garden soil. Attempts to enrich for microorganisms in saline waters able to use mineral oil as a sole source of carbon and energy were successful below, but not above, about 20% salinity. This study strongly suggests a general reduction of metabolic rate at extreme salinities and raises doubt about the biodegradation of hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments. PMID:16345276

  15. PROTONATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS REVISITED

    SciTech Connect

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr; Allamandola, Louis J. E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov

    2011-02-01

    We reconsider the contribution that singly protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; HPAH{sup +}s) might make to the Class A component of the 6.2 {mu}m interstellar emission feature in light of the recent experimental measurements of protonated naphthalene and coronene. Our calculations on the small HPAH{sup +}s have a band near 6.2 {mu}m, as found in experiment. While the larger HPAH{sup +}s still have emission near 6.2 {mu}m, the much larger intensity of the band near 6.3 {mu}m overwhelms the weaker band at 6.2 {mu}m, so that the 6.2 {mu}m band is barely visible. Since the large PAHs are more representative of those in the interstellar medium, our work suggests that large HPAH{sup +}s cannot be major contributors to the observed emission at 6.2 {mu}m (i.e., Class A species). Saturating large PAH cations with hydrogen atoms retains the 6.2 {mu}m Class A band position, but the rest of the spectrum is inconsistent with observed spectra.

  16. The kinetics of hydrocarbon cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Groten, W.A.; Wojciechowski, B.W. )

    1993-03-01

    A general kinetic model which describes the catalytic cracking of pure hydrocarbons is presented. The model includes a monomolecular cracking path based on the Langmuir adsorption isotherm as well as a bimolecular path, following Rideal kinetics, which accounts for the possibility of a chain cracking mechanism being involved. Catalyst decay is accounted for using the time-on-stream-decay function. Fitting of experimental data from n-nonane cracking on USHY at 673 K, combined with Monte Carlo simulations indicates that, in that case, the total catalytic activity could include between 0 and 90% of activity due to chain processes. This large margin of error stems from the combined effects of a large decay rate, forcing the experimenter to use average conversion data, and of experimental error. Fitting of the model to previously published cracking data for 2-methylpentane on USHY showed that the model lacks a suitable parameter to account for thermal reactions which were not accounted for in the original data set. This observation supports the impression that the model is sensitive to departures from the postulated mechanism. The above kinetic model has also been fitted to the results of n-nonane cracking at three temperatures as well as to previously published data for various other linear paraffins. 32 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Hydrocarbon associations in evaporite basins

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.

    1988-02-01

    Evaporite deposition today is not representative of the diversity or scale of evaporites of the past. Ancient evaporites were deposited in two main settings: platform wide or basin wide. Platform evaporites were composed of relatively thin stratiform units (usually <5-10 m thick) deposited on either ramps or behind rimmed shelves. Basinal evaporites were deposited as thick bedded units 10s to 100s of m thick, and laid down in 4 main tectonic settings - rift, collision, transform, and intracratonic. Basins could be further subdivided into three main depositional settings: deep basin-shallow water, deep basin-deep water, and shallow basin-shallow water. Thick basinal salts were remobilized into salt structures in all tectonic settings except intracratonic. Salt flow was due to inherent instability and differential loading in tectonically active settings. Hydrocarbon accumulations associated with these various platforms and basins followed a predictable, but not mutually exclusive, pattern related to the classification of evaporite settings presented in this paper. Reservoirs in platform and ramp settings tended to be of two types - depositional and diagenetic - with most of the diagenesis following patterns predicted by the porosity and plumbing established at or soon after evaporite emplacement.

  18. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons with SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berné, O.; Joblin, C.; Mulas, G.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Goicoechea, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    Thanks to high sensitivity, high angular resolution and broad spectral coverage, SPICA will offer a unique opportunity to better characterize the nature of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains (VSGs), to better use them as probes of astrophysical environments. The angular resolution will enable to probe the chemical frontiers in the evolution process from VSGs to neutral PAHs, to ionized PAHs and to "Grand-PAHs" in photodissotiation regions and HII regions, as a function of G0 /n (UV radiation field / density). High sensitivity will favor the detection of the far-IR skeletal emission bands of PAHs, which provide specific fingerprints and could lead to the identification of individual PAHs. This overall characterization will allow to use PAH and VSG populations as tracers of physical conditions in spatially resolved protoplanetary disks and nearby galaxies (using mid-IR instruments), and in high redshift galaxies (using the far-IR instrument), thanks to the broad spectral coverage SPICA provides. Based on our previous experience with ISO and Spitzer we discuss how these goals can be reached.

  19. The origin of light hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Mango, F.D.

    2000-04-01

    The light hydrocarbons (LHs) are probably intermediates in the catalytic decomposition of oil to gas. Two lines of evidence support this possibility. First, the reaction was duplicated experimentally under moderate conditions. Second, natural LHs exhibit the characteristics of catalytic products, in particular a proportionality between isomers: (xy{sub i})/(x{sub i}y) = {alpha} (where x and x{sub i} are isomers; y and y{sub i} are isomers that are structurally similar to x and x{sub i}; and {alpha} is a constant). All oils exhibit this relationship with coefficients of correlation reaching 0.99. Isomer ratios change systematically with concentrations, some approaching thermodynamic equilibrium, others not. The correlations reported are the strongest yet disclosed for the LHs. Isomers are related in triads (e.g., n-hexane {leftrightarrow} 2-methylpentane {leftrightarrow} 3-methylpentane), consistent with cyclopropane precursors. The LHs obtained experimentally are indistinguishable from natural LHs in (xy{sub i})/(x{sub i}y). These relationships are not explained by physical fractionations, equilibrium control, or noncatalytic modes of origin. A catalytic origin, on the other hand, has precedence, economy and experimental support.

  20. Total hydrocarbon analyzer evaluation study

    SciTech Connect

    Shamat, N. ); Crumpler, E. ); Roddan, A. )

    1991-10-01

    Measuring and controlling organic emissions from incineration processes has become a major environmental concern in recent years. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently proposed a regulation for sewage sludge incinerators under section 405(d) of the Clean Water Act that will require all sludge incinerators to monitor total hydrocarbon emissions (THCs) on a continuous basis. Such a requirement would be part of National Pollutant Discharge Elimination (NPDES) permits and site-specific THC limits would be established for facilities based on a risk assessment of organic emissions. Before EPA can finalize the proposed requirement, THC monitoring must be successfully conducted in a plant environment and the system required by any final regulation must be kept in operation so that facilities can comply with their permits. The Metropolitan Waste Control Commission (MWCC) in St. Paul, Minn., and Rosemount Analytical Division in La Habre, Calif., entered into a joint agreement with EPA to demonstrate a hot' THC monitoring system to detect THCs in stack gases. The objectives of the study are to determine the feasibility of THC monitoring of sludge incinerator emissions; evaluate the long term reliability, cost of operation, and consistency of a continuous THC monitoring system in an incinerator environment; and determine the correlation of THC stack concentration to incinerator and scrubber operating conditions, carbon monoxide concentration, and specific VOC emissions.

  1. Methanol conversion to higher hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Tabak, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    Several indirect options exist for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from coal, natural gas, or biomass. All involve an initial conversion step to synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}). Presently, there are two commercial technologies for converting syngas to liquids: Fischer-Tropsch, which yields a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons with molecular weights determined by Schulz-Flory kinetics, and methanol synthesis. Mobil`s diversity of technology for methanol conversion gives the methanol synthesis route flexibility for production of either gasoline, distillate or chemicals. Mobil`s ZSM-5 catalyst is the key in several processes for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from methanol: MTO for light olefins, MTG for gasoline, MOGD for distillates. The MTG process has been commercialized in New Zealand since 1985, producing one-third of the country`s gasoline supply, while MTO and MOGD have been developed and demonstrated at greater than 100 BPD scale. This paper will discuss recent work in understanding methanol conversion chemistry and the various options for its use.

  2. Microbial activity and soil organic matter decay in roadside soils polluted with petroleum hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhailova, Larysa; Fischer, Thomas; Iurchenko, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    positively correlated with the carbohydrate fraction and negatively correlated with the aliphatic fraction of the soil C, while carbohydrate-C and alkyl-C increased and decreased with distance from the road, respectively. It is proposed that petroleum hydrocarbons supress soil biological activity at concentrations above 1500 mg kg-1, and that soil organic matter priming primarily affects the carbohydrate fraction of soil organic matter. It can be concluded that the abundance of solid carbohydrates (O-alkyl C) is of paramount importance for the hydrocarbon mineralization under natural conditions, compared to more recalcitrant SOM fractions (mainly aromatic and alkyl C). References Mykhailova, L., Fischer, T., Iurchenko, V. (2013) Distribution and fractional composition of petroleum hydrocarbons in roadside soils. Applied and Environmental Soil Science, vol. 2013, Article ID 938703, 6 pages, DOI 10.1155/2013/938703 Mykhailova, L., Fischer, T., Iurchenko, V. (2014) Deposition of petroleum hydrocarbons with sediment trapped in snow in roadside areas. Journal of Environmental Engineering and Landscape Management 22(3):237-244, DOI 10.3846/16486897.2014.889698 Nelson P.N. and Baldock J.A. (2005) Estimating the molecular composition of a diverse range of natural organic materials from solid-state 13C NMR and elemental analyses, 2005, Biogeochemistry (2005) 72: 1-34, DOI 10.1007/s10533-004-0076-3 Zyakun, A., Nii-Annang, S., Franke, G., Fischer, T., Buegger, F., Dilly, O. (2011) Microbial Actvity and 13C/12C Ratio as Evidence of N-Hexadecane and N-Hexadecanoic Acid Biodegradation in Agricultural and Forest Soils. Geomicrobiology Journal 28:632-647, DOI 10.1080/01490451.2010.489922

  3. Aircraft hydrocarbon emissions at Oakland International Airport.

    PubMed

    Herndon, Scott C; Wood, Ezra C; Northway, Megan J; Miake-Lye, Richard; Thornhill, Lee; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Anderson, Bruce E; Dowlin, Renee; Dodds, Willard; Knighton, W Berk

    2009-03-15

    To help airports improve emission inventory data, speciated hydrocarbon emission indices have been measured from in-use commercial, airfreight, and general aviation aircraft at Oakland International Airport. The compounds reported here include formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, ethene, propene, and benzene. At idle, the magnitude of hydrocarbon emission indices was variable and reflected differences in engine technology, actual throttle setting, and ambient temperature. Scaling the measured emission indices to the simultaneously measured formaldehyde (HCHO) emission index eliminated most of the observed variability. This result supports a uniform hydrocarbon emissions profile across engine types when the engine is operating near idle, which can greatly simplify how speciated hydrocarbons are handled in emission inventories. The magnitude of the measured hydrocarbon emission index observed in these measurements (ambient temperature range 12-22 degrees C) is a factor of 1.5-2.2 times larger than the certification benchmarks. Using estimates of operational fuel flow rates at idle, this analysis suggests that current emission inventories at the temperatures encountered at this airport underestimate hydrocarbon emissions from the idle phase of operation by 16-45%.

  4. Fatal intoxication with hydrocarbons in deltamethrin preparation.

    PubMed

    Magdalan, Jan; Zawadzki, Marcin; Merwid-Lad, Anna

    2009-12-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are very widely used in agriculture and household due to high effectiveness and low toxicity to humans. We have described a case of a fatal oral intoxication with decis, the insecticide containing pyrethroid (deltamethrin) in a hydrocarbon base. Pyrethroids, including deltamethrin, undergo rapid biotransformation by liver enzymes, which limit their systemic toxicity. Thus, we assume that in the presented case, fatal outcome of poisoning with decis was rather connected with toxic effects of hydrocarbon base (solvent naphtha) than with deltamethrin action. In the described case, detection of aromatic hydrocarbons in blood and lung tissue and their metabolites in urine confirms that these substances were absorbed from gastrointestinal tract to the systemic circulation. Predominant among the clinical outcomes in our patient was profound depression of CNS with apnea, which could be connected with narcotic action of organic solvents. The cardiac arrest was in mechanism of asystolia with prior non-responsive to catecholamines bradycardia and vascular collapse. We connect it with hydrocarbon-induced cardiotoxicity. It is worth remembering that many pyrethroid-containing insecticides are formulated in a hydrocarbon base. Intoxication with such preparations should always be considered not only as poisoning with pyrethroid alone but also as intoxication with hydrocarbons.

  5. SPATIALLY RESOLVED l-C{sub 3}H{sup +} EMISSION IN THE HORSEHEAD PHOTODISSOCIATION REGION: FURTHER EVIDENCE FOR A TOP-DOWN HYDROCARBON CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Guzmán, V. V.; Öberg, K. I.; Pety, J.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Gerin, M.; Roueff, E.; Gratier, P.

    2015-02-20

    Small hydrocarbons, such as C{sub 2}H, C{sub 3}H, and C{sub 3}H{sub 2} are more abundant in photo-dissociation regions (PDRs) than expected based on gas-phase chemical models. To explore the hydrocarbon chemistry further, we observed a key intermediate species, the hydrocarbon ion l-C{sub 3}H{sup +}, in the Horsehead PDR with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer at high-angular resolution (6″). We compare with previous observations of C{sub 2}H and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} at similar angular resolution and new gas-phase chemical model predictions to constrain the dominant formation mechanisms of small hydrocarbons in low-UV flux PDRs. We find that at the peak of the HCO emission (PDR position), the measured l-C{sub 3}H{sup +}, C{sub 2}H, and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} abundances are consistent with current gas-phase model predictions. However, in the first PDR layers, at the 7.7 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon band emission peak, which are more exposed to the radiation field and where the density is lower, the C{sub 2}H and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} abundances are underestimated by an order of magnitude. At this position, the l-C{sub 3}H{sup +} abundance is also underpredicted by the model but only by a factor of a few. In addition, contrary to the model predictions, l-C{sub 3}H{sup +} peaks further out in the PDR than the other hydrocarbons, C{sub 2}H and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}. This cannot be explained by an excitation effect. Current gas-phase photochemical models thus cannot explain the observed abundances of hydrocarbons, in particular, in the first PDR layers. Our observations are consistent with a top-down hydrocarbon chemistry, in which large polyatomic molecules or small carbonaceous grains are photo-destroyed into smaller hydrocarbon molecules/precursors.

  6. Spatially Resolved L-C3H+ Emission in the Horsehead Photodissociation Region: Further Evidence for a Top-Down Hydrocarbon Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, V. V.; Pety, J.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Gerin, M.; Roueff, E.; Gratier, P.; Öberg, K. I.

    2015-02-01

    Small hydrocarbons, such as C2H, C3H, and C3H2 are more abundant in photo-dissociation regions (PDRs) than expected based on gas-phase chemical models. To explore the hydrocarbon chemistry further, we observed a key intermediate species, the hydrocarbon ion l-C3H+, in the Horsehead PDR with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer at high-angular resolution (6″). We compare with previous observations of C2H and c-C3H2 at similar angular resolution and new gas-phase chemical model predictions to constrain the dominant formation mechanisms of small hydrocarbons in low-UV flux PDRs. We find that at the peak of the HCO emission (PDR position), the measured l-C3H+, C2H, and c-C3H2 abundances are consistent with current gas-phase model predictions. However, in the first PDR layers, at the 7.7 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon band emission peak, which are more exposed to the radiation field and where the density is lower, the C2H and c-C3H2 abundances are underestimated by an order of magnitude. At this position, the l-C3H+ abundance is also underpredicted by the model but only by a factor of a few. In addition, contrary to the model predictions, l-C3H+ peaks further out in the PDR than the other hydrocarbons, C2H and c-C3H2. This cannot be explained by an excitation effect. Current gas-phase photochemical models thus cannot explain the observed abundances of hydrocarbons, in particular, in the first PDR layers. Our observations are consistent with a top-down hydrocarbon chemistry, in which large polyatomic molecules or small carbonaceous grains are photo-destroyed into smaller hydrocarbon molecules/precursors. Based on observations obtained with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer and 30 m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  7. Modeling void abundance in modified gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voivodic, Rodrigo; Lima, Marcos; Llinares, Claudio; Mota, David F.

    2017-01-01

    We use a spherical model and an extended excursion set formalism with drifting diffusive barriers to predict the abundance of cosmic voids in the context of general relativity as well as f (R ) and symmetron models of modified gravity. We detect spherical voids from a suite of N-body simulations of these gravity theories and compare the measured void abundance to theory predictions. We find that our model correctly describes the abundance of both dark matter and galaxy voids, providing a better fit than previous proposals in the literature based on static barriers. We use the simulation abundance results to fit for the abundance model free parameters as a function of modified gravity parameters, and show that counts of dark matter voids can provide interesting constraints on modified gravity. For galaxy voids, more closely related to optical observations, we find that constraining modified gravity from void abundance alone may be significantly more challenging. In the context of current and upcoming galaxy surveys, the combination of void and halo statistics including their abundances, profiles and correlations should be effective in distinguishing modified gravity models that display different screening mechanisms.

  8. Oxygen abundance maps of CALIFA galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinchenko, I. A.; Pilyugin, L. S.; Grebel, E. K.; Sánchez, S. F.; Vílchez, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    We construct maps of the oxygen abundance distribution across the discs of 88 galaxies using Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area survey (CALIFA) Data Release 2 (DR2) spectra. The position of the centre of a galaxy (coordinates on the plate) was also taken from the CALIFA DR2. The galaxy inclination, the position angle of the major axis, and the optical radius were determined from the analysis of the surface brightnesses in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) g and r bands of the photometric maps of SDSS Data Release 9. We explore the global azimuthal abundance asymmetry in the discs of the CALIFA galaxies and the presence of a break in the radial oxygen abundance distribution. We found that there is no significant global azimuthal asymmetry for our sample of galaxies, i.e. the asymmetry is small, usually lower than 0.05 dex. The scatter in oxygen abundances around the abundance gradient has a comparable value, ≲0.05 dex. A significant (possibly dominant) fraction of the asymmetry can be attributed to the uncertainties in the geometrical parameters of these galaxies. There is evidence for a flattening of the radial abundance gradient in the central part of 18 galaxies. We also estimated the geometric parameters (coordinates of the centre, the galaxy inclination and the position angle of the major axis) of our galaxies from the analysis of the abundance map. The photometry-map-based and the abundance-map-based geometrical parameters are relatively close to each other for the majority of the galaxies but the discrepancy is large for a few galaxies with a flat radial abundance gradient.

  9. A Model-Based Analysis of Chemical and Temporal Patterns of Cuticular Hydrocarbons in Male Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Clement; Azanchi, Reza; Smith, Ben; Chu, Adrienne; Levine, Joel

    2007-01-01

    Drosophila Cuticular Hydrocarbons (CH) influence courtship behaviour, mating, aggregation, oviposition, and resistance to desiccation. We measured levels of 24 different CH compounds of individual male D. melanogaster hourly under a variety of environmental (LD/DD) conditions. Using a model-based analysis of CH variation, we developed an improved normalization method for CH data, and show that CH compounds have reproducible cyclic within-day temporal patterns of expression which differ between LD and DD conditions. Multivariate clustering of expression patterns identified 5 clusters of co-expressed compounds with common chemical characteristics. Turnover rate estimates suggest CH production may be a significant metabolic cost. Male cuticular hydrocarbon expression is a dynamic trait influenced by light and time of day; since abundant hydrocarbons affect male sexual behavior, males may present different pheromonal profiles at different times and under different conditions. PMID:17896002

  10. Abundance fluctuations in the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jura, M.

    1982-01-01

    The determination of abundances within the interstellar medium is reviewed. It appears that interstellar abundances within 1 kpc of the Sun are uniform to within a factor of two or three, but it is not yet possible to determine whether there are real fluctuations at this level except for deuterium for which the factor of two variations appear to be real. Establishing the level of local fluctuations in the abundances is of considerable importance for understanding the history of nucleosynthesis in the solar neighborhood, the evolution of the interstellar medium and the formation of stars.

  11. Interstellar Abundances Toward X Per, Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2012-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to measure elemental abundances in the local ISM. We examine absorption features of O, Mg, and Si along this line of sight using spectra from the Chandra Observatory's LETG/ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments. In general, we find that the abundances and their ratios are similar to those of young F and G stars and the most recent solar values. We compare our results with abundances required by dust grain models.

  12. Interstellar Abundances Toward X Per, Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valencic, Lynne A.; Smith, Randall K.

    2014-01-01

    The nearby X-ray binary X Per (HD 24534) provides a useful beacon with which to measure elemental abundances in the local ISM. We examine absorption features of 0, Mg, and Si along this line of sight using spectra from the Chandra Observatory's LETG/ ACIS-S and XMM-Newton's RGS instruments. In general, we find that the abundances and their ratios are similar to those of young F and G stars and the most recent solar values. We compare our results with abundances required by dust grain models.

  13. Formation of Hydrocarbons in the Outflows from Red Giants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberge, Wayne; Kress, Monika; Tielens, Alexander G.

    1995-01-01

    The formation of hydrocarbons in the oxygen-rich outflows from red giants was studied. The existence of organic molecules in such outflows has been known for several years; however, their surprisingly high abundances has been a mystery since all of the carbon had been thought to be irretrievably locked up in CO, the most strongly bound molecule. CO is the first molecule to form from the atoms present in the star's extended atmosphere, and as strong stellar winds drive a cooling outflow, dust grains condense out. In oxygen-rich outflows, the dust is thought to be composed mainly of silicates and other metal oxides. Perhaps the noble metals can condense out in metallic form, in particular the relatively abundant transition metals iron and nickel. We proposed that perhaps the carbon reservoir held as CO can be accessed through a catalytic process involving the chemisorption of CO and H2 onto grains rich in metallic iron. CO and H2 are the two most abundant molecules in circumstellar outflows, and they both are known to dissociate on transition metal surfaces at elevated temperatures, freeing carbon to form organic molecules such as methane. We believe methane is a precursor molecule to the organics observed in oxygen-rich red giants. We have developed a nonequilibrium numerical model of a surface chemical (catalytic) process. Based on this model, we believe that methane can be formed under the conditions present in circumstellar outflows. Although the methane formation rates are exceptionally low under these conditions, over dynamical timescales, a significant amount of CO can be converted to methane and driven further out in the envelope, explaining the presence of organics there.

  14. An evaluation of petrogenic hydrocarbons in northern Gulf of Alaska continental shelf sediments - The role of coastal oil seep inputs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Short, J.W.; Kolak, J.J.; Payne, J.R.; Van Kooten, G. K.

    2007-01-01

    We compared hydrocarbons in water, suspended particulate matter (SPM), and riparian sediment collected from coastal watersheds along the Yakataga foreland with corresponding hydrocarbons in Gulf of Alaska benthic sediments. This comparison allows an evaluation of hydrocarbon contributions to marine sediments from natural oil seeps, coal and organic matter (e.g., kerogen) associated with eroding siliciclastic rocks. The samples from oil seeps show extensive loss of low-molecular weight n-alkanes (hydrocarbon fingerprints on the SPM and riparian sediment samples collected upstream from the oil seeps. After entering the fluvial systems, hydrocarbons from seep oils are rapidly diluted, and associate with the SPM phase as oil-mineral-aggregates (OMA). Johnston Creek, the watershed containing the most prolific seep, conveys detectable seep-derived hydrocarbons to the Gulf of Alaska, but overall seep inputs are largely attenuated by the (non-seep) petrogenic hydrocarbon content of the high SPM loads. In contrast to the geochemical signature of seep oil, Gulf of Alaska benthic sediments are characterized by abundant alkylated naphthalene homologues, relatively smooth n-alkane envelopes (n-C9 through n-C34, but with elevated levels of n-C27, n-C29, and n-C31), and small UCMs. Further, hydrocarbons in benthic sediments are highly intercorrelated. Taken together, these characteristics indicate that seep oil is a negligible petrogenic hydrocarbon source to the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf. Coaly material separated from the benthic sediment samples using a dense liquid (???2.00 g cm-3) also accounted for a minor portion of the total PAH (1-6%) and total n-alkanes (0.4-2%) in the benthic samples. Most of the hydrocarbon burden in the sediments is found in the denser sediment fraction and likely derives from organic matter contributed by denudation of siliciclastic formations in

  15. Chemical Aspects of Astrophysically Observed Extraterrestrial Methanol, Hydrocarbon Derivatives, and Ions.

    PubMed

    Olah, George A; Mathew, Thomas; Prakash, G K Surya; Rasul, Golam

    2016-02-10

    Astrophysically observed extraterrestrial molecular matter contains, besides hydrogen and water, methane and methanol as the most abundant species. Feasible pathways and chemical aspects of their formation as well as of derived hydrocarbon homologues and their ions (carbocations and carbanions) are discussed on the basis of observed similarities with our studied terrestrial chemistry. The preferred pathway for converting extraterrestrial methane according to Ali et al. is based on CH5(+) and Olah's related nonclassical carbonium ion chemistry. On the basis of the observed higher reactivity of methanol compared with methane in various chemical reactions, a feasible new pathway is proposed for the conversion of extraterrestrial methanol to hydrocarbons, their derivatives, and carbocations together with a possible connection with methonium ion-based chemistry.

  16. Cuticular Hydrocarbon Content that Affects Male Mate Preference of Drosophila melanogaster from West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aya; Fujiwara-Tsujii, Nao; Yamaoka, Ryohei; Itoh, Masanobu; Ozaki, Mamiko; Takano-Shimizu, Toshiyuki

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in mating signals and preferences can be a potential source of incipient speciation. Variable crossability between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans among different strains suggested the abundance of such variations. A particular focus on one combination of D. melanogaster strains, TW1(G23) and Mel6(G59), that showed different crossabilities to D. simulans, revealed that the mating between females from the former and males from the latter occurs at low frequency. The cuticular hydrocarbon transfer experiment indicated that cuticular hydrocarbons of TW1 females have an inhibitory effect on courtship by Mel6 males. A candidate component, a C25 diene, was inferred from the gas chromatography analyses. The intensity of male refusal of TW1 females was variable among different strains of D. melanogaster, which suggested the presence of variation in sensitivity to different chemicals on the cuticle. Such variation could be a potential factor for the establishment of premating isolation under some conditions. PMID:22536539

  17. A Complete Understanding of Hydrocarbon Chemistry in Titan's Atmosphere: from C-1 to C-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Zhang, Xi; Yung, Yuk L.

    2014-11-01

    Propene (C3H6) has been missing from detection in Titan’s stratosphere for nearly 30 years until recently it is unveiled by the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) onboard Cassini spacecraft (Nixon et al., 2013). A one-dimensional photochemical model of Titan with an updated eddy diffusion profile (Li. et al., 2014) is used to study its vertical profile. We find that the stratospheric mixing ratio of propene peaks at 100 km with a value of 3×10^(-9), which is in good agreement with the Cassini observation. Another important species that is missing from the hydrocarbon family in Titan’s stratosphere is allene (CH2CCH2), which is an isomer of propyne. Based on the photochemical model, we provide the evidence that its abundance is on the margin of detection limit. We suggest further effort in detecting allene, which will complete the family of C-3 hydrocarbons.

  18. Hydrocarbon associations in evaporite basins

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, J.

    1988-01-01

    Evaporite deposition today is not representative of the diversity of scale of evaporites of the past. Ancient evaporites were deposited in two main settings: platform wide or basin wide. Platform evaporites were composed of relatively thin stratiform units (usually <5-10 m thick) deposited on either ramps or behind rimmed shelves. Basinal evaporites were deposited as thick bedded units 10s to 100s of m thick, and laid down in 4 main tectonic settings--rift, collision, transform, and intracratonic. Basins could be further subdivided into three main depositional settings: deep basin-shallow water, deep basin-deep water, and shallow basin-shallow water. Thick basinal salts were remobilized into salt structures in all tectonic settings except intracratonic. Salt flow was due to inherent instability and differential loading in tectonically active settings. Hydrocarbon accumulations associated with these various platforms and basins followed a predictable, but not mutually exclusive, pattern related to the classification of evaporite settings presented in this paper. Reservoirs in platform and ramp settings tended to be of two types--depositional and diagenetic--with most of the diagenesis following patterns predicted by the porosity and plumbing established at or soon after evaporite emplacement. Ramp reservoirs were almost always found in Zone Y, while shelf reservoirs were most common in the grainstone shoals associated with rim or island-crest facies, or their dolomitized equivalents. Reservoirs associated with basinal evaporites were also depositional or diagenetic. Depositional reservoirs were almost all related to topography present during deposition of the carbonates in the basin, often immediately preceding or just beginning evaporitic conditions in the basin.

  19. Determination of the aromatic hydrocarbon to total hydrocarbon ratio of mineral oil in commercial lubricants.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Yoko; Suzuki, Kumi; Ogimoto, Mami

    2016-01-01

    A method was developed to determine the aromatic hydrocarbon to total hydrocarbon ratio of mineral oil in commercial lubricants; a survey was also conducted of commercial lubricants. Hydrocarbons in lubricants were separated from the matrix components of lubricants using a silica gel solid phase extraction (SPE) column. Normal-phase liquid chromatography (NPLC) coupled with an evaporative light-scattering detector (ELSD) was used to determine the aromatic hydrocarbon to total hydrocarbon ratio. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled with a diode array detector (DAD) and a refractive index detector (RID) was used to estimate carbon numbers and the presence of aromatic hydrocarbons, which supplemented the results obtained by NPLC/ELSD. Aromatic hydrocarbons were not detected in 12 lubricants specified for use for incidental food contact, but were detected in 13 out of 22 lubricants non-specified for incidental food contact at a ratio up to 18%. They were also detected in 10 out of 12 lubricants collected at food factories at a ratio up to 13%. The centre carbon numbers of hydrocarbons in commercial lubricants were estimated to be between C16 and C50.

  20. Abundances of Elements in Stellar Coronae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Jeremy

    1998-01-01

    Interest in stellar coronal abundances was piqued several years ago by the launch of satellites that were able to study the compositions of coronae on stars other than the sun. Motivated by the possibility that other stellar coronae might share the First Ionization Potential (FIP) Effect solar abundance anomaly, we have in recent years been attempting to determine coronal element abundances in other stars. I will review these results, together with similar results reported in the literature, from a critical perspective of understanding the true uncertainties involved in the measurements. The importance of element abundances for coronal physics will be highlighted, and it will be shown that the differences in the chemical compositions of active stars allow us to draw new conclusions regarding the nature of stellar coronae and coronal heating.

  1. The lithium abundance in extreme halo stars

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, L.M.; Thorburn, J.A. )

    1991-07-01

    New observations are reported of atmospheric Li abundances for six extremely metal-poor dwarfs with Fe-H ratios not higher than {minus}2.59 and T(e) not lower than 5950 K. The spectra were obtained in 1990 at Kitt Peak National Observatory, using the echelle spectrograph with the UV Fast camera. The resulting Li abundances for these stars range between N(Li) values of 1.99 and 2.24, where N(Li) = 12 + log (Li/H). These results agree with the abundances reported previously for five other metal-poor dwarfs with the Fe/H ratios not above {minus}2.60. The invariance of Li abundance in these 11 stars indicates a primordial origin for most of the Li observed in these Galactic stars. 23 refs.

  2. Coronae of Stars with Supersolar Elemental Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peretz, Uria; Behar, Ehud; Drake, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Coronal elemental abundances are known to deviate from the photospheric values of their parent star, with the degree of deviation depending on the first ionization potential (FIP). This study focuses on the coronal composition of stars with supersolar photospheric abundances. We present the coronal abundances of six such stars: 11 LMi, iota Hor, HR 7291, tau Boo, and alpha Cen A and B. These stars all have high-statistics X-ray spectra, three of which are presented for the first time. The abundances we measured were obtained using the line-resolved spectra of the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) in conjunction with the higher throughput EPIC-pn camera spectra onboard the XMM-Newton observatory. A collisionally ionized plasma model with two or three temperature components is found to represent the spectra well. All elements are found to be consistently depleted in the coronae compared to their respective photospheres. For 11 LMi and tau Boo no FIP effect is present, while iota Hor, HR 7291, and alpha Cen A and B show a clear FIP trend. These conclusions hold whether the comparison is made with solar abundances or the individual stellar abundances. Unlike the solar corona, where low-FIP elements are enriched, in these stars the FIP effect is consistently due to a depletion of high-FIP elements with respect to actual photospheric abundances. A comparison with solar (instead of stellar) abundances yields the same fractionation trend as on the Sun. In both cases, a similar FIP bias is inferred, but different fractionation mechanisms need to be invoked.

  3. Hydrocarbons in soils: Origin, composition, and behavior (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennadiev, A. N.; Pikovskii, Yu. I.; Tsibart, A. S.; Smirnova, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    It has been shown that a large body of evidence on the sources, transformation, and migration of hydrocarbons in soils has been acquired by different researchers. Available data about the origin and behavior of hydrocarbon gases, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkanes, and other compounds have been considered successively. A wide range of natural and anthropogenic factors affecting the transformation and migration of hydrocarbons in soils have been analyzed. The indicative value of these compounds has been explained. At the same time, many problems related to hydrocarbons in soils are still insufficiently understood. Sparse and fragmentary data are available in the literature on the interaction of different hydrocarbon groups in the soil. Few data refer to the features of hydrocarbons in background zonal soils; there are almost no interzonal comparisons. The behavior of hydrocarbons in soils of different landscape-geographical positions is characterized in isolated publications. The hydrocarbon status of soils as an integral complex of interrelated hydrocarbons is almost not analyzed. Hydrocarbons of a single class (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon gases, n-alkanes, etc.) are usually characterized in each publication.

  4. Modeling abundance effects in distance sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Dawson, D.K.; Bates, S.

    2004-01-01

    Distance-sampling methods are commonly used in studies of animal populations to estimate population density. A common objective of such studies is to evaluate the relationship between abundance or density and covariates that describe animal habitat or other environmental influences. However, little attention has been focused on methods of modeling abundance covariate effects in conventional distance-sampling models. In this paper we propose a distance-sampling model that accommodates covariate effects on abundance. The model is based on specification of the distance-sampling likelihood at the level of the sample unit in terms of local abundance (for each sampling unit). This model is augmented with a Poisson regression model for local abundance that is parameterized in terms of available covariates. Maximum-likelihood estimation of detection and density parameters is based on the integrated likelihood, wherein local abundance is removed from the likelihood by integration. We provide an example using avian point-transect data of Ovenbirds (Seiurus aurocapillus) collected using a distance-sampling protocol and two measures of habitat structure (understory cover and basal area of overstory trees). The model yields a sensible description (positive effect of understory cover, negative effect on basal area) of the relationship between habitat and Ovenbird density that can be used to evaluate the effects of habitat management on Ovenbird populations.

  5. TEA: A Code Calculating Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Harrington, Joseph; Bowman, M. Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present an open-source Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances (TEA) code that calculates the abundances of gaseous molecular species. The code is based on the methodology of White et al. and Eriksson. It applies Gibbs free-energy minimization using an iterative, Lagrangian optimization scheme. Given elemental abundances, TEA calculates molecular abundances for a particular temperature and pressure or a list of temperature-pressure pairs. We tested the code against the method of Burrows & Sharp, the free thermochemical equilibrium code Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA), and the example given by Burrows & Sharp. Using their thermodynamic data, TEA reproduces their final abundances, but with higher precision. We also applied the TEA abundance calculations to models of several hot-Jupiter exoplanets, producing expected results. TEA is written in Python in a modular format. There is a start guide, a user manual, and a code document in addition to this theory paper. TEA is available under a reproducible-research, open-source license via https://github.com/dzesmin/TEA.

  6. Report on carbon and nitrogen abundance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the proposal was to determine the nitrogen to carbon abundance ratios from transition layer lines in stars with different T(sub eff) and luminosities. The equations which give the surface emission line fluxes and the measured ratio of the NV to CIV emission line fluxes are presented and explained. The abundance results are compared with those of photospheric abundance studies for stars in common with the photospheric investigations. The results show that the analyses are at least as accurate as the photospheric determinations. These studies can be extended to F and early G stars for which photospheric abundance determinations for giants are hard to do because molecular bands become too weak. The abundance determination in the context of stellar evolution is addressed. The N/C abundance ratio increases steeply at the point of evolution for which the convection zone reaches deepest. Looking at the evolution of the rotation velocities v sin i, a steep decrease in v sin i is related to the increasing depth of the convection zone. It is concluded that the decrease in v sin i for T(sub eff) less than or approximately = 5800 K is most probably due to the rearrangement of the angular momentum in the stars due to deep convective mixing. It appears that the convection zone is rotating with nearly depth independent angular momentum. Other research results and ongoing projects are discussed.

  7. Solar Models with New Low Metal Abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wuming

    2016-04-01

    In the past decade, the photospheric abundances of the Sun had been revised several times by many observers. The standard solar models constructed with the new low-metal abundances disagree with helioseismic results and detected neutrino fluxes. The solar model problem has puzzled some stellar physicists for more than 10 years. Rotation, enhanced diffusion, convection overshoot, and magnetic fields are used to reconcile the new abundances with helioseismology. The too low helium subsurface abundance in enhanced diffusion models can be improved by the mixing caused by rotation and magnetic fields. The problem of the depth of the convective zone in rotating models can be resolved by convection overshoot. Consequently, the Asplund-Grevesse-Sauval rotation model including overshooting (AGSR) reproduces the seismically inferred sound-speed and density profiles and the convection zone depth as well as the Grevesse & Sauval model computed before. But this model fails to reproduce the surface helium abundance, which is 0.2393 (2.6σ away from the seismic value), and neutrino fluxes. The magnetic model called AGSM keeps the agreement of the AGSR and improves the prediction of the surface helium abundance. The observed separation ratios r02 and r13 are reasonably reproduced by AGSM. Moreover, neutrino fluxes calculated by this model are not far from the detected neutrino fluxes and the predictions of previous works.

  8. Stimulated anoxic biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons using Fe(III) ligands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lovley, D.R.; Woodward, J.C.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1994-01-01

    Contamination of ground waters with water-soluble aromatic hydrocarbons, common components of petroleum pollution, often produces anoxic conditions under which microbial degradation of the aromatics is slow. Oxygen is often added to contaminated ground water to stimulate biodegradation, but this can be technically difficult and expensive. Insoluble Fe(III) oxides, which are generally abundant in shallow aquifers, are alternative potential oxidants, but are difficult for microorganisms to access. Here we report that adding organic ligands that bind to Fe(III) dramatically increases its bioavailability, and that in the presence of these ligands, rates of degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anoxic aquifer sediments are comparable to those in oxic sediments. We find that even benzene, which is notoriously refractory in the absence of oxygen, can be rapidly degraded. Our results suggest that increasing the bioavailability of Fe(III) by adding suitable ligands provides a potential alternative to oxygen addition for the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated aquifers.Contamination of ground waters with water-soluble aromatic hydrocarbons, common components of petroleum pollution, often produces anoxic conditions under which microbial degradation of the aromatics is slow. Oxygen is often added to contaminated ground water to stimulate biodegradation, but this can be technically difficult and expensive. Insoluble Fe(III) oxides, which are generally abundant in shallow aquifers, are alternative potential oxidants, but are difficult for microorganisms to access. Here we report that adding organic ligands that bind to Fe(III) dramatically increases its bioavailability, and that in the presence of these ligands, rates of degradation of aromatic hydrocarbons in anoxic aquifer sediments are comparable to those in oxic sediments. We find that even benzene, which is notoriously refractory in the absence of oxygen, can be rapidly degraded. Our results suggest that increasing

  9. The amino acid and hydrocarbon contents of the Paris meteorite: Insights into the most primitive CM chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Zita; Modica, Paola; Zanda, Brigitte; D'Hendecourt, Louis Le Sergeant

    2015-05-01

    The Paris meteorite is one of the most primitive carbonaceous chondrites. It is reported to be the least aqueously altered CM chondrite, and to have experienced only weak thermal metamorphism. We have analyzed for the first time the amino acid and hydrocarbon contents of this pristine meteorite by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). When plotting the relative amino acids abundances of several CM chondrites according to the increasing hydrothermal scale (petrologic subtypes), from the CM2.7/2.8 Paris to the CM2.0 MET 01070, Paris has the lowest relative abundance of β-alanine/glycine (0.15), which fits with the relative abundances of β-alanine/glycine increasing with increasing aqueous alteration for CM chondrites. These results confirm the influence of aqueous alteration on the amino acid abundances and distribution. The amino acid analysis shows that the isovaline detected in this meteorite is racemic (D/L = 0.99 ± 0.08; L-enantiomer excess = 0.35 ± 0.5%; corrected D/L = 1.03; corrected L-enantiomer excess = -1.4 ± 2.6%). The identified hydrocarbons show that Paris has n-alkanes ranging from C16 to C25 and 3- to 5-ring nonalkylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The lack of alkylated PAHs in Paris seems to be also related to this low degree of aqueous alteration on its parent body. The extraterrestrial hydrocarbon content, suggested by the absence of any biomarker, may well have a presolar origin. The chemistry of the Paris meteorite may thus be closely related to the early stages of the solar nebula with a contribution from interstellar (molecular cloud) precursors.

  10. Foaming of mixtures of pure hydrocarbons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. V.; Woods, W. W.

    1950-01-01

    Mixtures of pure liquid hydrocarbons are capable of foaming. Nine hydrocarbons were mixed in pairs, in all possible combinations, and four proportions of each combination. These mixtures were sealed in glass tubes, and the foaming was tested by shaking. Mixtures of aliphatic with other aliphatic hydrocarbons, or of alkyl benzenes with other alkyl benzenes, did not foam. Mixtures of aliphatic hydrocarbons with alkyl benzenes did foam. The proportions of the mixtures greatly affected the foaming, the maximum foaming of 12 of 20 pairs being at the composition 20 percent aliphatic hydrocarbon, 80 percent alkyl benzene. Six seconds was the maximum foam lifetime of any of these mixtures. Aeroshell 120 lubricating oil was fractionated into 52 fractions and a residue by extraction with acetone in a fractionating extractor. The index of refraction, foam lifetime, color, and viscosity of these fractions were measured. Low viscosity and high index fractions were extracted first. The viscosity of the fractions extracted rose and the index decreased as fractionation proceeded. Foam lifetimes and color were lowest in the middle fractions. Significance is attached to the observation that none of the foam lifetimes of the fractions or residue is as high as the foam lifetime of the original Aeroshell, indicating that the foaming is not due to a particular foaming constituent, but rather to the entire mixture.

  11. Serum laminin, hydrocarbon exposure, and glomerular damage.

    PubMed Central

    Hotz, P; Thielemans, N; Bernard, A; Gutzwiller, F; Lauwerys, R

    1993-01-01

    It has been postulated that occupational exposure to hydrocarbons may damage the kidney and lead to glomerulonephritis and chronic renal failure. As laminin is a ubiquitous basement membrane component that seems to play a central part in the structure and function of basement membranes and as the normal renal filtration process is highly dependent on an intact glomerular basement membrane, the serum laminin concentration was examined in a population of workers exposed to hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon exposure was assessed by exposure surrogates (exposure duration and exposure score). An interaction between occupational exposure to hydrocarbons and hypertension increased the laminin concentration whereas the laminin concentration decreased in workers exposed for a long time probably because of a selection effect. In a subgroup of printers exposed to toluene whose hippuric acid excretion had been recorded for several years this interaction was confirmed when the hippuric acid excretion was substituted for the other exposure indices. In the exposed group, the age-related decline in creatinine clearance was accelerated. These results seem to confirm that occupational exposure to hydrocarbons is a non-specific factor that may promote a deterioration of renal function. PMID:8280641

  12. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (‘syngas’) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  13. Method for collecting and analyzing hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Ouellette, G.P.; Larter, S.R.; Fox, J.R.

    1988-12-20

    This patent describes a method for separating and collecting hydrocarbons which include methane from a gas obtained from the vicinity of an earth formation and obtaining information from such a gas which is useful in predicting the hydrocarbon potential of such an earth formation, the method comprising the steps of: obtaining a sample of a gas from the vicinity of an earth formation, the sample including methane; removing any water, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide from the sample and passing the sample through a cryogenic trap to separate and collect any interfering gases and hydrocarbons having at least two carbon atoms from the sample into the cryogenic trap. The removing and passing steps produce a first gas which contains the methane from the sample but which is free of water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, interfering gases, and hydrocarbons having at least two carbon atoms; converting the methane in the first gas to form a condensed carbon dioxide sample; carrying out the removing, passing, and converting steps under a continuous subatmospheric pressure in such a manner as to prevent condensation of any oxygen in the cryogenic trap and to prevent any atmospheric carbon dioxide from entering into the sample, the first gas, the cryogenic trap, and the condensed carbon dioxide sample; determining the stable carbon isotope ratio of the condensed carbon dioxide sample which can be then be used to predict the hydrocarbon potential of the earth formation.

  14. Nonmethane hydrocarbons in the rural southeast United States national parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Daiwen; Aneja, Viney P.; Zika, Rod G.; Farmer, Charles; Ray, John D.

    2001-02-01

    Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were made at three rural sites in the southeast U.S. national parks: Mammoth Cave National Park, Kentucky; Cove Mountain, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee; and Big Meadows, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia. In 1995 the three locations were sampling sites for the Southern Oxidants Study (SOS) Nashville Intensive, and the measurements of VOCs for Shenandoah were also made under contract with the National Park Service. Starting in 1996, the National Park Service added the other two parks to the monitoring contract. Hydrocarbon measurements made during June through September for the years 1995, 1996, and 1997 were analyzed in this study. Source classification techniques based on correlation coefficient, chemical reactivity, and ratioing were developed and applied to these data. The results show that anthropogenic VOCs from automobile exhaust appeared to be dominant at Mammoth Cave National Park, and at Cove Mountain, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, but other sources were also important at Big Meadows, Shenandoah National Park. Correlation and ratio analysis based on chemical reactivity provides a basis for source-receptor relationship. The most abundant ambient VOCs varied both in concentration and order depending on park and year, but the following VOCs appeared on the top 10 list for all three sites: isoprene (6.3 to 18.4 ppbv), propane (2.1 to 12.9 ppbv), isopentane (1.3 to 5.7 ppbv), and toluene (1.0 to 7.2 ppbv). Isoprene is naturally emitted by vegetation, and the others are produced mainly by fossil fuel combustion and industrial processes. Propylene-equivalent concentrations were calculated to account for differences in reaction rates between the hydroxyl radical and individual hydrocarbons, and to thereby estimate their relative contributions to ozone formation.

  15. Plasma conversion of methane into higher hydrocarbons at surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sackinger, W.M.; Kamath, V.A.

    1995-12-31

    Natural gas is widely abundant, is easily withdrawn from reservoirs, is commonly produced as an associated gas along with crude oil production, and is found in many geologic settings as a resource separate from oil. A much larger fraction of the natural gas may be produced from a gas reservoir, as compared with a crude oil reservoir. However, natural gas is normally transported by pipeline, and the energy throughput of such a pipeline is perhaps only 20% to 30% of the throughput of an oil pipeline of the same size and cost. Gas is difficult to transport in moderate quantities at low cost, as it must either have a special pipeline or must be liquified into LNG, shipped in cryogenic LNG tankers, and regasified chemical stability of methane has made it difficult to convert it directly into conventional hydrocarbon fuel mixtures, and has also impeded its use as a feedstock for petrochemical production. Experiments are described in which a methane plasma is created, and the resulting methyl and hydrogen ions have been accelerated within a microchannel array so that they interact with neutral methane molecules on the inside surfaces of the microchannels. No catalysts are used, and the device operates at room temperature. Impact energies of the ions are in the range of 15 ev to greater than 100 ev, and the energy delivered in the interaction at the surfaces has caused the production of larger hydrocarbon molecules, such as C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, along with C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, C{sub 5}, C{sub 6}, C{sub 7}, and C{sub 8} molecules. Conversion effectiveness is greater at higher pressure, due to the increased ionic activity. The costs of production of the plasma conversion devices are projected to be quite low, and the technology appears to be commercially and economically feasible.

  16. Infrared Spectroscopy of Ammonia - Hydrocarbon Ices Relevant to Jupiter's Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, P. A.; Kalogerakis, K. S.

    2005-12-01

    Observational evidence and thermochemical models indicate an abundance of ammonia ice clouds in Jupiter's atmosphere. However, spectrally identifiable ammonia ice clouds are found covering less than 1% of Jupiter's atmosphere, notably in turbulent areas.1,2 This discrepancy highlights an important gap in our understanding of ammonia and its spectral signatures in Jupiter's atmosphere. Current literature suggests two possible explanations: coating by a hydrocarbon haze and/or photochemical processing ("tanning").2,3 We are performing laboratory experiments that investigate the above hypotheses. Thin films of ammonia ices are deposited in a cryogenic apparatus, coated with hydrocarbons, and characterized by infrared spectroscopy. The ice films can be irradiated by ultraviolet light. These spectroscopic measurements aim to identify the photophysical and chemical processes that control the optical properties of the ice mixtures and quantify their dependence on the identity of the coating, the temperature, and the ice composition. Our current results indicate a consistent suppression of the ammonia absorption feature at 3 μm with coverage by thin layers of hexane, cyclohexane, and benzene. Furthermore, strongest suppression is observed in the case of benzene, followed in magnitude by hexane and cyclohexane. Funding from the NSF Planetary Astronomy Program under grant AST-0206270 is gratefully acknowledged. The participation of Patricia A. Engel was made possible by the NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program under grant PHY-0353745. 1. S. K. Atreya, A.-S. Wong, K. H. Baines, M. H. Wong, T. C. Owen, Planet. Space Science 53, 498 (2005). 2. K. H. Baines, R. W. Carlson, and L. W. Kamp, Icarus 159, 74 (2002). 3. A.-S. Wong, Y. L. Yung, and A. J. Friedson, Geophys. Res. Lett. 30, 1447 (2003).

  17. Hydrocarbon habitats of the Middle and Upper Magdalena Valleys, Colombia

    SciTech Connect

    Schamel, S. )

    1990-05-01

    The Magdalena River flows northward across the Colombian Andes, traversing a series of en echelon, sediment-filled structural depressions. Until the late Miocene, these basins were parts of much more extensive basins: an extensional back-arc basin during the Triassic-Jurassic; a pericratonic trough during the Cretaceous and early Tertiary; the inner margin of a broad east-facing foreland trough during the middle Tertiary; and, more recently, an array of intermontane of successor basins. Exploration activity since 1918 has resulted in the discovery of more than 2.6 billion bbl of oil and 2.7 tcf gas - more than one-half of the total oil and about one-third of the total gas reserves of the country. The abundant hydrocarbon resources of the Magdalena basins are based on the presence of a thick organic-rich limestone and shale succession (La Luna or Villeta) deposited in an extensive periocratonic trough along the northwestern margin of the Guyana shield during the Cretaceous. In the south, nearer the paleogeographic margin of the trough, shallow marine sands (Caballos and Monserrate) bounding the Cretaceous marine megacycle are the prime reservoirs. To the north, nearer the axis of the trough, Cretaceous sand reservoirs are absent and production is almost exclusively from middle Tertiary molasse deposits. A wide variety of structural and stratigraphic traps developed during or prior to peak of maturation of the Cretaceous source beds. Recent discoveries of giant oil accumulations, such as the San Francisco field, were made in large hanging-wall anticlines previously considered breached and unproductive. From the standpoint of hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation, the Magdalena basins are not yet mature. The potential for additional major discoveries is excellent and with improved production techniques, current estimates of remaining ultimately recoverable reserves will be revised upward.

  18. Limnological structure of Titan's hydrocarbon lakes and its astrobiological implication.

    PubMed

    Tokano, Tetsuya

    2009-03-01

    Cassini radar recently detected several putative liquid hydrocarbon lakes in the polar region of Saturn's moon Titan. Such lakes may contain organic sediments deposited from the atmosphere that would promote prebiotic-type chemistry driven by cosmic rays, the result of which could be the production of more complex molecules such as nitrogen-bearing organic polymer or azides. The physical properties of the lake and their temporal evolution under Titan's present climatic setting were investigated by means of a one-dimensional lake thermal stratification model. Lakes can undergo various evolutions, depending on the initial composition and depth of the lake and hydrocarbon abundance in the near-surface atmosphere. Pure methane ponds, which may occasionally form when heavy methane hailstones reach the surface, would be transitory in that they would evaporate, freeze up, and eventually dry up. On the other hand, lakes filled with a mixture of methane, ethane, and nitrogen would be more stable; and freezing or drying would not necessarily occur in most cases. Such lakes undergo a seasonal cycle of thermal stratification in spring and early summer and convective overturning in other seasons. The summer thermal stratification near the lake surface could be destabilized by bottom heating as a result of an enhanced geothermal heat flux, e.g., in the vicinity of cryovolcanoes. Most likely the composition of the lake and atmosphere would come to equilibrium by way of a small amount of evaporation, but the lake-atmosphere system could be repeatedly brought out of equilibrium by irregular precipitation. The viability of prebiotic-like chemistry in the lake may depend on many lake parameters, such as temperature, liquid or frozen state, and convective mixing. Moreover, convective mixing may drive suspension of solid acetylene and other sediments on the lake bottom and redistribution of dissolved gases, which might be relevant for putative life-forms that consume hydrogen and solid

  19. Sources, distribution, and water column processes of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the northwestern Black Sea water

    SciTech Connect

    Maldonado, C.; Bayona, J.M.; Bodineau, L.

    1999-08-15

    Aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons have been determined in suspended particulate matter collected at subsurficial seawater and three vertical profiles in a transect from the continental shelf, slope, and deep basin of the western Black Sea. The dissolved phase was collected at subsurficial and in the redoxcline. The highest concentrations of hydrocarbons were detected in the Danube, Dnieper, and Dniester River Estuaries and other point sources of pollution located offshore Romania and Bulgaria where oil production and refining is carried out. Concentrations of hydrocarbons decreased with increasing distance from the coast, but relatively high concentrations were found at the open stations where the particulate organic carbon (POC) is higher. Fossil PAHs are predominant in the coastal stations, and the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) of aliphatic hydrocarbons is predominantly of a fossil common origin according to the hopane and sterane distribution. The fossil to pyrolytic PAH ratio decreases with source distance attributable to a deposition of pyrolytic PAHs. The spatial distribution of PAHs found in the dissolved phase is evenly distributed. The unresolved complex mixture/alkane ratio is higher in the dissolved phase and can be attributable to a faster degradation of labile n-alkanes in this phase. Vertical profiles of hydrocarbons in suspended particles show two submaxima located in the biomass maximum abundance and at the redoxcline where there is an enrichment referred to POC due to phytoplankton or bacteria uptake, respectively.

  20. Relative importance of hydrocarbon pollutants, salinity and tidal height in colonization of oyster reefs.

    PubMed

    Hulathduwa, Yasoma D; Brown, Kenneth M

    2006-10-01

    The relative effects of hydrocarbon pollutants, salinity and tidal height on the invertebrates and fish that inhabit oyster reefs were studied along the Louisiana Gulf of Mexico coastline. Dried oyster shell (cultch) was first exposed to crude oil in the laboratory. In a series of experiments, plastic trays filled with control and oil-exposed cultch were then deployed at two locations differing in salinity, in two seasons and at two tidal levels. In experiments on hydrocarbon, salinity, and seasonal effects, trays were colonized for one month. To examine the effects of colonization time, half of the trays were retrieved after two and the rest after five weeks. Salinity dramatically affected oyster reef assemblages, with species richness and total abundance halved at the estuarine site. Hydrocarbon effects were less prominent, whether cultch was dosed with light or heavy crude oil. The sub-tidal site had higher colonization rates, but colonization interval did not affect colonization, and seasonal differences occurred only at the higher-diversity, sub-tidal site. To determine effects of cleaners, Corexit 9580 was applied alone and with oil on cultch, and trays were colonized for one month. At high concentrations, the cleaner ameliorated hydrocarbon effects. In general, hydrocarbon effects were less prominent than salinity and aerial exposure in explaining colonization of oyster reef assemblages. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of oyster shells after one month immersion revealed considerable losses of oil, especially with higher flow at the inter-tidal site. Sediment on shell also diluted oil. We argue that oyster reef assemblages should recover from small-scale spills, unless they occur during periods of reproduction and dispersal.

  1. ASSESSMENT OF HYDROCARBON SEEPAGE DETECTION METHODS ON THE FORT PECK RESERVATION, NORTHEAST MONTANA

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence M. Monson

    2003-06-30

    Surface exploration techniques have been employed in separate study areas on the Fort Peck Reservation in northeastern Montana. Anomalies associated with hydrocarbon seepage are documented in all three areas and a variety of surface exploration techniques can be compared. In a small area with established production, Head Gas and Thermal Desorption methods best match production; other methods also map depletion. In a moderate-size area that has prospects defined by 3D seismic data, Head Gas along with Microbial, Iodine, and Eh soil anomalies are all associated with the best hydrocarbon prospect. In a large area that contains many curvilinear patterns observed on Landsat images, that could represent micro-seepage chimneys, results are inconclusive. Reconnaissance mapping using Magnetic Susceptibility has identified a potential prospect; subsequent Soil Gas and Head Gas surveys suggest hydrocarbon potential. In the final year of this project the principle contractor, the Fort Peck Tribes, completed a second survey in the Wicape 3D Seismic Prospect Area (also known as Area 6 in Phase I of the project) and sampled several Landsat image features contained in the Smoke Creek Aeromag Anomaly Area (also known as Area 1 in Phase II of the project). Methods determined to be most useful in Phases I and II, were employed in this final Phase III of the study. The Southwest Wicape seismic anomaly was only partially confirmed. The abundant curvilinears proposed to be possible hydrocarbon micro-seepage chimneys in the Smoke Creek Area were not conclusively verified as such. Insufficient sampling of background data precludes affirmative identification of these mostly topographic Landsat features as gas induced soil and vegetation anomalies. However relatively higher light gas concentrations were found associated with some of the curvilinears. Based on the findings of this work the Assiniboine & Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation intend to utilize surface hydrocarbon

  2. Improving Catalyst Efficiency in Bio-Based Hydrocarbon Fuels; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-01

    This article investigates upgrading biomass pyrolysis vapors to form hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals using catalysts with different concentrations of acid sites. It shows that greater separation of acid sites makes catalysts more efficient at producing hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals. The conversion of biomass into liquid transportation fuels has attracted significant attention because of depleting fossil fuel reserves and environmental concerns resulting from the use of fossil fuels. Biomass is a renewable resource, which is abundant worldwide and can potentially be exploited to produce transportation fuels that are less damaging to the environment. This renewable resource consists of cellulose (40–50%), hemicellulose (25–35%), and lignin (16–33%) biopolymers in addition to smaller quantities of inorganic materials such as silica and alkali and alkaline earth metals (calcium and potassium). Fast pyrolysis is an attractive thermochemical technology for converting biomass into precursors for hydrocarbon fuels because it produces up to 75 wt% bio-oil,1 which can be upgraded to feedstocks and/or blendstocks for further refining to finished fuels. Bio-oil that has not been upgraded has limited applications because of the presence of oxygen-containing functional groups, derived from cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, which gives rise to high acidity, high viscosity, low heating value, immiscibility with hydrocarbons and aging during storage. Ex situ catalytic vapor phase upgrading is a promising approach for improving the properties of bio-oil. The goal of this process is to reject oxygen and produce a bio-oil with improved properties for subsequent downstream conversion to hydrocarbons.

  3. Hydrocarbon ices in extra-red TNOs and Centaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalle Ore, C. M.; Barucci, M.; Emery, J. P.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Merlin, F.; Perna, D.

    2012-12-01

    We present an analysis of the reddest trans-neptunian objects (TNOs) and Centaurs - those belonging to the RR taxon. The RR class contains more than ¼ of the population of TNOs for which photometric colors are available, including a variety of dynamically different objects. The available data cover the spectral range from 0.3 to 2.2 μm. Previous work investigated possible relations between spectral characteristics and other physical and dynamical parameters. The distribution of ices on TNOs has been analyzed as a function of the object absolute magnitude, taxonomy and dynamical class. In a sample of 76 objects for which visible and near-IR spectroscopic measurements are available, CH3OH ice was detected only on three objects belonging to the RR taxonomic class (5145 Pholus, 55638 2002 VE95 and 90377 Sedna). These three objects are among the reddest, they belong to different dynamical classes, and they have different dimensions. However, all three have similar compositions with Sedna showing a more significant heterogeneity in the kind of hydrocarbon ices found on its surface than the others. To further investigate the presence of hydrocarbon ices, and in particular CH3OH, as part of the composition of the RR taxon we used Spitzer IRAC data available for a subgroup of nine objects. Both methanol and methane have a strong absorption at 3.6 μm, the first of the Spitzer IRAC channels, and a much higher albedo at the following channel at 4.5 μm. This albedo pattern is characteristic of some hydrocarbon ices and is very different from H2O ice that shows instead very low albedos at both channels. Our technique makes use of a large database of models including H2O, CH3OH, CH4, and N 2 ices combined with tholins, amorphous carbon, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, serpentine and olivine in different combinations of relative abundances and grain sizes. We automatically extract the models that match the observations at all color wavelengths therefore obtaining for each

  4. The elemental abundances in interplanetary dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Peter; Bohsung, Jörg; Maetz, Mischa; Jessberger, Elmar K.

    1996-11-01

    We compiled a table of all major, minor, and trace-element abundances in 89 interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) that includes data obtained with proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE), synchroton x-ray fluorescence (SXRF), and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). For the first time, the reliability of the trace-element abundances in IDPs is tested by various crosschecks. We also report on the results of cluster analyses that we performed on IDP compositions. Because of the incompleteness of the data set, we included only the elements Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, and Zn, normalized to Fe and CI chondrite abundances, that are determined in 73 IDPs. The data arrange themselves in four rather poorly defined groups that we discuss in relation to CI chondrites following the assumption that on the average CI abundances are most probable. The largest group (chondritic), with 44 members, has close to CI abundances for many refractory and moderately refractory elements (Na, Al, Si, P, K, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Co, Ge, Sr). It is slightly depleted in Fe and more in Ca and S, while the volatile elements (Cl, Cu, Zn, Ga, Se, Rb) are enriched by =1.7 × CI and Br by 21 × CI. The low-Zn group, with 12 members, is very similar to the chondritic group except for its Zn-depletion, stronger Ca-depletion and Fe-enrichment. The low-Ni group, with 11 members, has Ni/Fe = 0.03 × CI and almost CI-like Ca, but its extraterrestrial origin is not established. The last group (6 members) contains non-systematic particles of unknown origin. We found that Fe is inhomogeneously distributed on a micron scale. Furthermore, the abundances of elements that are measured near their limits of detection are easily overestimated. These biases involved, the incomplete data set and possible contaminating processes prevent us from obtaining information on the specific origin(s) of IDPs from elemental abundances.

  5. Clonal growth and plant species abundance

    PubMed Central

    Herben, Tomáš; Nováková, Zuzana; Klimešová, Jitka

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Both regional and local plant abundances are driven by species' dispersal capacities and their abilities to exploit new habitats and persist there. These processes are affected by clonal growth, which is difficult to evaluate and compare across large numbers of species. This study assessed the influence of clonal reproduction on local and regional abundances of a large set of species and compared the predictive power of morphologically defined traits of clonal growth with data on actual clonal growth from a botanical garden. The role of clonal growth was compared with the effects of seed reproduction, habitat requirements and growth, proxied both by LHS (leaf–height–seed) traits and by actual performance in the botanical garden. Methods Morphological parameters of clonal growth, actual clonal reproduction in the garden and LHS traits (leaf-specific area – height – seed mass) were used as predictors of species abundance, both regional (number of species records in the Czech Republic) and local (mean species cover in vegetation records) for 836 perennial herbaceous species. Species differences in habitat requirements were accounted for by classifying the dataset by habitat type and also by using Ellenberg indicator values as covariates. Key Results After habitat differences were accounted for, clonal growth parameters explained an important part of variation in species abundance, both at regional and at local levels. At both levels, both greater vegetative growth in cultivation and greater lateral expansion trait values were correlated with higher abundance. Seed reproduction had weaker effects, being positive at the regional level and negative at the local level. Conclusions Morphologically defined traits are predictive of species abundance, and it is concluded that simultaneous investigation of several such traits can help develop hypotheses on specific processes (e.g. avoidance of self-competition, support of offspring) potentially

  6. Spatial Distribution and Variations of Dust Abundances in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, Déborah; Reach, W. T.; Bernard, J.; Block, M.; Engelbracht, C. W.; Gordon, K.; Hora, J. L.; Indebetouw, R.; Kawamura, A.; Meade, M.; Meixner, M.; Sewilo, M.; Vijh, U. P.; Volk, K.

    2009-05-01

    The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is the nearest galaxy external to the Milky Way, located at a distance of about 55 kpc. As opposed to the situation in the Galaxy, where studies of the infrared emission from dust in the interstellar medium (ISM) suffer from significant confusion along the line of sight, the favorable viewing angle for the LMC offers a direct view to the processes taking place in the diffuse ISM. The LMC has a lower metallicity than that of our Galaxy, estimated to 1/2-1/3 of the solar metallicity. Using the data obtained with the Spitzer Space telescope as part of the Surveying the Agents of a Galaxy's Evolution (SAGE) Legacy survey, we have studied the variations of the dust composition and abundance across the LMC. We traced maps of the relative abundance of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH) and Very Small Grains (VSG), compared to Big Grains (BG). PAH are more abundant in the old stellar bar and close to molecular clouds, whereas the main source of VSG is located around 30-Doradus (brightest region of the LMC) and at the center of the bar. Morever the VSG relative abundance follows the distribution of the HII regions quite well, contrary to the PAH distribution. PAH and VSG could have a different origin or might have been subjected to different processing in the ISM. VSG abundance could trace the active star formation sites and PAH abundance could represent quiescent environments. We think that VSG could result from BG destruction in grain-grain collisions, due to turbulent motions. PAH could come from VSG shattering in some regions and could also be injected into the ISM during the AGB mass loss.

  7. Mechanisms of Hydrocarbon Based Polymer Etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Barton; Ventzek, Peter; Matsukuma, Masaaki; Suzuki, Ayuta; Koshiishi, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Dry etch of hydrocarbon based polymers is important for semiconductor device manufacturing. The etch mechanisms for oxygen rich plasma etch of hydrocarbon based polymers has been studied but the mechanism for lean chemistries has received little attention. We report on an experimental and analytic study of the mechanism for etching of a hydrocarbon based polymer using an Ar/O2 chemistry in a single frequency 13.56 MHz test bed. The experimental study employs an analysis of transients from sequential oxidation and Ar sputtering steps using OES and surface analytics to constrain conceptual models for the etch mechanism. The conceptual model is consistent with observations from MD studies and surface analysis performed by Vegh et al. and Oehrlein et al. and other similar studies. Parameters of the model are fit using published data and the experimentally observed time scales.

  8. Profiling refined hydrocarbon fuels using polar components

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rostad, C.E.; Hostettler, F.D.

    2007-01-01

    Identification of a fuel released into the environment can be difficult due to biodegradation or weathering. Negative electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry was used to screen for unique polar components in a wide variety of commercial hydrocarbon products and mixtures. These fuels produced unique and relatively simple spectra. When applied to hydrocarbon samples from a large, long-term fuel spill in a relatively cool climate in which the alkane, isoprenoid, and alkylcyclohexane portions had begun to biodegrade or weather, the polar components in these samples had changed little over time. This technique provided rapid fuel identification on hydrocarbons released into the environment, without sample preparation, fractionation, or chromatography. Copyright ?? Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  9. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2014-11-25

    This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

  10. Transpiration cooled throat for hydrocarbon rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Lee R.; Burkhardt, Wendel M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective for the Transpiration Cooled Throat for Hydrocarbon Rocket Engines Program was to characterize the use of hydrocarbon fuels as transpiration coolants for rocket nozzle throats. The hydrocarbon fuels investigated in this program were RP-1 and methane. To adequately characterize the above transpiration coolants, a program was planned which would (1) predict engine system performance and life enhancements due to transpiration cooling of the throat region using analytical models, anchored with available data; (2) a versatile transpiration cooled subscale rocket thrust chamber was designed and fabricated; (3) the subscale thrust chamber was tested over a limited range of conditions, e.g., coolant type, chamber pressure, transpiration cooled length, and coolant flow rate; and (4) detailed data analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between the key performance and life enhancement variables.

  11. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-11-26

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution.

  12. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOEpatents

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom.

  13. Photochemical Modeling of CH3 Abundances in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Anthony Y. T.; Yung, Yuk L.; Moses, Julianne

    2000-01-01

    Recent measurements of methyl radicals (CH3) in the upper atmospheres of Saturn and Neptune by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) provide new constraints to photochemical models of hydrocarbon chemistry in the outer solar system. The derived column abundances of CH3 on Saturn above 10 mbar and Neptune above the 0.2 mbar pressure level are (2.5 - 6.0) x 10(exp 13) / sq cm and (0.7 - 2.8) x 10(exp 13) / sq cm, respectively. We use the updated Caltech/Jet Propulsion Laboratory photochemical model, which incorporates hydrocarbon photochemistry, vertical molecular and bulk atmospheric eddy diffusion, and realistic radiative transfer modeling, to study the CH3 abundances in the upper atmosphere of the giant planets and Titan. We identify the key reactions that control the concentrations of CH3 in the model, such as the three-body recombination reaction, CH3 + CH3 + M yields C2H6 + M. We evaluate and extrapolate the three-body rate constant of this reaction to the low-temperature limit (1.8 x 10(exp -16) T(sup -3.75) e(sup -300/T), T < 300 K) and compare methyl radical abundances in five atmospheres: Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Titan. The sensitivity of our models to the rate coefficients for the reactions H + CH3 + M yields CH4 + M, H + C2H3 yields C2H2 + H2, (sup 1)CH2 + H2 yields CH3 + H, and H + C2H5 yields 2CH3, the branching ratios of CH4 photolysis, vertical mixing in the five atmospheres, and Lyman alpha photon enhancement at the orbit of Neptune have all been tested. The results of our model CH3 abundances for both Saturn (5.1 x 10(exp 13) / sq cm) and Neptune (2.2 x 10(exp 13) / sq cm) show good agreement with ISO Short Wavelength Spectrometer measurements. Using the same chemical reaction set, our calculations also successfully generate vertical profiles of stable hydrocarbons consistent with Voyager and ground-based measurements in these outer solar system atmospheres. Predictions of CH3 column concentrations (for p <= 0.2 mbar) in the atmospheres

  14. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Fallgren, Paul

    2009-03-30

    Bioremediation has been widely applied in the restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated. Parameters that may affect the rate and efficiency of biodegradation include temperature, moisture, salinity, nutrient availability, microbial species, and type and concentration of contaminants. Other factors can also affect the success of the bioremediation treatment of contaminants, such as climatic conditions, soil type, soil permeability, contaminant distribution and concentration, and drainage. Western Research Institute in conjunction with TechLink Environmental, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory studies to evaluate major parameters that contribute to the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated drill cuttings using land farming and to develop a biotreatment cell to expedite biodegradation of hydrocarbons. Physical characteristics such as soil texture, hydraulic conductivity, and water retention were determined for the petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil. Soil texture was determined to be loamy sand to sand, and high hydraulic conductivity and low water retention was observed. Temperature appeared to have the greatest influence on biodegradation rates where high temperatures (>50 C) favored biodegradation. High nitrogen content in the form of ammonium enhanced biodegradation as well did the presence of water near field water holding capacity. Urea was not a good source of nitrogen and has detrimental effects for bioremediation for this site soil. Artificial sea water had little effect on biodegradation rates, but biodegradation rates decreased after increasing the concentrations of salts. Biotreatment cell (biocell) tests demonstrated hydrocarbon biodegradation can be enhanced substantially when utilizing a leachate recirculation design where a 72% reduction of hydrocarbon concentration was observed with a 72-h period at a treatment temperature of 50 C. Overall, this study demonstrates the investigation of the effects of

  15. Characteristics of wintertime polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon assemblage in aerosol of the Southern Adriatic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jovanović, V. Ž.; Pfendt, P. A.; Filipović, A. J.

    2007-09-01

    Features of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) assemblage in aerosol samples collected from the atmosphere of Herceg Novi during the winter months of two successive years were studied. The results showed almost the same concentration profiles of identified PAHs for samples from the two periods analyzed, generally suggesting a similar origin. Diagnostic ratios indicated combustion of wood and coal, emissions from petrol and diesel engines, and dust resuspension as sources that predominantly contributed to the atmospheric PAH concentrations. Statistical analysis, principal component analysis (PCA) in particular, allowed us to identify the impact of meteorological parameters on PAH abundance.

  16. Abundances in Eight M31 Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Kerry G.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Corradi, Romano; Galera-Rosillo, R.; Balick, Bruce; Henry, Richard B. C.

    2014-06-01

    As part of a continuing project using planetary nebulae (PNe) to study the chemical evolution and formation history of M31 (see accompanying poster by Balick et al.), we obtained spectra of eight PNe in the fall of 2013 with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the GTC. All of these PNe are located outside M31’s inner disk and bulge. Spectral coverage extended from 3700-7800Å with a resolution of ~6 Å. Especially important in abundance determinations is the detection of the weak, temperature-sensitive auroral line of [O III], at 4363Å, which is often contaminated by Hg I 4358Å from streetlights; the remoteness of the GTC eliminated this difficulty. We reduced and measured the spectra using IRAF, and derived nebular diagnostics and abundances with ELSA, our in-house five-level-atom program. Here we report the chemical abundances determined from these spectra. The bottom line is that the oxygen abundances in these PNe are all within a factor of 2-3 of the solar value, (as are all the other M31 PNe our team has previously measured) despite the significant range of galactocentric distance. Future work will use these abundances to constrain models of the central star to estimate progenitor masses and ages. In particular we will use the results to investigate the hypothesis that these PNe might represent a population related to the encounter between M31 and M33 ~3 Gy ago. We gratefully acknowledge support from Williams College.

  17. Why is Trichodesmium abundant in the Kuroshio?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, T.; Takeda, S.; Itoh, S.; Kodama, T.; Liu, X.; Hashihama, F.; Furuya, K.

    2015-12-01

    The genus Trichodesmium is recognized as an abundant and major diazotroph in the Kuroshio, but the reason for this remains unclear. The present study investigated the abundance of Trichodesmium spp. and nitrogen fixation together with concentrations of dissolved iron and phosphate in the Kuroshio and its marginal seas. We performed the observations near the Miyako Islands, which form part of the Ryukyu Islands, situated along the Kuroshio, since our satellite analysis suggested that material transport could occur from the islands to the Kuroshio. Trichodesmium spp. bloomed (> 20 000 filaments L-1) near the Miyako Islands, abundance was high in the Kuroshio and the Kuroshio bifurcation region of the East China Sea, but was low in the Philippine Sea. The abundance of Trichodesmium spp. was significantly correlated with the total nitrogen fixation activity. The surface concentrations of dissolved iron (0.19-0.89 nM) and phosphate (< 3-36 nM) were similar for all of the study areas, indicating that the nutrient distribution could not explain the spatial differences in Trichodesmium spp. abundance and nitrogen fixation. Numerical particle-tracking experiments simulated the transportation of water around the Ryukyu Islands to the Kuroshio. Our results indicate that Trichodesmium growing around the Ryukyu Islands could be advected into the Kuroshio.

  18. REVIEW: Can habitat selection predict abundance?

    PubMed

    Boyce, Mark S; Johnson, Chris J; Merrill, Evelyn H; Nielsen, Scott E; Solberg, Erling J; van Moorter, Bram

    2016-01-01

    Habitats have substantial influence on the distribution and abundance of animals. Animals' selective movement yields their habitat use. Animals generally are more abundant in habitats that are selected most strongly. Models of habitat selection can be used to distribute animals on the landscape or their distribution can be modelled based on data of habitat use, occupancy, intensity of use or counts of animals. When the population is at carrying capacity or in an ideal-free distribution, habitat selection and related metrics of habitat use can be used to estimate abundance. If the population is not at equilibrium, models have the flexibility to incorporate density into models of habitat selection; but abundance might be influenced by factors influencing fitness that are not directly related to habitat thereby compromising the use of habitat-based models for predicting population size. Scale and domain of the sampling frame, both in time and space, are crucial considerations limiting application of these models. Ultimately, identifying reliable models for predicting abundance from habitat data requires an understanding of the mechanisms underlying population regulation and limitation.

  19. Hierarchical models of animal abundance and occurrence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Royle, J. Andrew; Dorazio, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    Much of animal ecology is devoted to studies of abundance and occurrence of species, based on surveys of spatially referenced sample units. These surveys frequently yield sparse counts that are contaminated by imperfect detection, making direct inference about abundance or occurrence based on observational data infeasible. This article describes a flexible hierarchical modeling framework for estimation and inference about animal abundance and occurrence from survey data that are subject to imperfect detection. Within this framework, we specify models of abundance and detectability of animals at the level of the local populations defined by the sample units. Information at the level of the local population is aggregated by specifying models that describe variation in abundance and detection among sites. We describe likelihood-based and Bayesian methods for estimation and inference under the resulting hierarchical model. We provide two examples of the application of hierarchical models to animal survey data, the first based on removal counts of stream fish and the second based on avian quadrat counts. For both examples, we provide a Bayesian analysis of the models using the software WinBUGS.

  20. Abundance of sea kraits correlates with precipitation.

    PubMed

    Lillywhite, Harvey B; Tu, Ming-Chung

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that sea kraits (Laticauda spp.)--amphibious sea snakes--dehydrate without a source of fresh water, drink only fresh water or very dilute brackish water, and have a spatial distribution of abundance that correlates with freshwater sites in Taiwan. The spatial distribution correlates with sites where there is a source of fresh water in addition to local precipitation. Here we report six years of longitudinal data on the abundance of sea kraits related to precipitation at sites where these snakes are normally abundant in the coastal waters of Lanyu (Orchid Island), Taiwan. The number of observed sea kraits varies from year-to-year and correlates positively with previous 6-mo cumulative rainfall, which serves as an inverse index of drought. Grouped data for snake counts indicate that mean abundance in wet years is nearly 3-fold greater than in dry years, and this difference is significant. These data corroborate previous findings and suggest that freshwater dependence influences the abundance or activity of sea kraits on both spatial and temporal scales. The increasing evidence for freshwater dependence in these and other marine species have important implications for the possible impact of climate change on sea snake distributions.