Science.gov

Sample records for abundant organic matter

  1. SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF ORGANIC MOLECULAR MARKERS IN URBAN PARTICULATE MATTER FROM PHILADELPHIA, PA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic molecular markers were measured in airborne particulate matter (PM10) from the City of Philadelphia North Broad Street air quality monitoring site to identify the seasonal abundances of key tracer compounds together with their dominant sources. Daily PM10...

  2. Organic matter degradation drives benthic cyanobacterial mat abundance on Caribbean coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Brocke, Hannah J; Polerecky, Lubos; de Beer, Dirk; Weber, Miriam; Claudet, Joachim; Nugues, Maggy M

    2015-01-01

    Benthic cyanobacterial mats (BCMs) are impacting coral reefs worldwide. However, the factors and mechanisms driving their proliferation are unclear. We conducted a multi-year survey around the Caribbean island of Curaçao, which revealed highest BCM abundance on sheltered reefs close to urbanised areas. Reefs with high BCM abundance were also characterised by high benthic cover of macroalgae and low cover of corals. Nutrient concentrations in the water-column were consistently low, but markedly increased just above substrata (both sandy and hard) covered with BCMs. This was true for sites with both high and low BCM coverage, suggesting that BCM growth is stimulated by a localised, substrate-linked release of nutrients from the microbial degradation of organic matter. This hypothesis was supported by a higher organic content in sediments on reefs with high BCM coverage, and by an in situ experiment which showed that BCMs grew within days on sediments enriched with organic matter (Spirulina). We propose that nutrient runoff from urbanised areas stimulates phototrophic blooms and enhances organic matter concentrations on the reef. This organic matter is transported by currents and settles on the seabed at sites with low hydrodynamics. Subsequently, nutrients released from the organic matter degradation fuel the growth of BCMs. Improved management of nutrients generated on land should lower organic loading of sediments and other benthos (e.g. turf and macroalgae) to reduce BCM proliferation on coral reefs.

  3. Organic Matter Degradation Drives Benthic Cyanobacterial Mat Abundance on Caribbean Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Brocke, Hannah J.; Polerecky, Lubos; de Beer, Dirk; Weber, Miriam; Claudet, Joachim; Nugues, Maggy M.

    2015-01-01

    Benthic cyanobacterial mats (BCMs) are impacting coral reefs worldwide. However, the factors and mechanisms driving their proliferation are unclear. We conducted a multi-year survey around the Caribbean island of Curaçao, which revealed highest BCM abundance on sheltered reefs close to urbanised areas. Reefs with high BCM abundance were also characterised by high benthic cover of macroalgae and low cover of corals. Nutrient concentrations in the water-column were consistently low, but markedly increased just above substrata (both sandy and hard) covered with BCMs. This was true for sites with both high and low BCM coverage, suggesting that BCM growth is stimulated by a localised, substrate-linked release of nutrients from the microbial degradation of organic matter. This hypothesis was supported by a higher organic content in sediments on reefs with high BCM coverage, and by an in situ experiment which showed that BCMs grew within days on sediments enriched with organic matter (Spirulina). We propose that nutrient runoff from urbanised areas stimulates phototrophic blooms and enhances organic matter concentrations on the reef. This organic matter is transported by currents and settles on the seabed at sites with low hydrodynamics. Subsequently, nutrients released from the organic matter degradation fuel the growth of BCMs. Improved management of nutrients generated on land should lower organic loading of sediments and other benthos (e.g. turf and macroalgae) to reduce BCM proliferation on coral reefs. PMID:25941812

  4. Occurrence and abundance of carbohydrates and amino compounds in sequentially extracted labile soil organic matter fractions.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to investigate the content of carbohydrates and amino compounds in three labile fraction of soil organic matter (SOM). Soil samples were collected from two agricultural fields in southern Italy and the light fraction (LF), the 500–53-µm particulate organic matter (POM) and the mobil...

  5. Identification, abundance and origin of atmospheric organic particulate matter in a Portuguese rural area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pio, C. A.; Alves, C. A.; Duarte, A. C.

    Respirable suspended particles high-volume samples were collected from a coastal-rural site in the centre of Portugal in August 1997 and their solvent-extractable organic compounds were subjected to characterisation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Particles were also analysed by a thermal/optical technique in order to determine their black and organic carbon content. The total lipid extract yields ranged from 20 to 63 μg m -3, containing mainly aliphatic hydrocarbons such as n-alkanes, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The higher input of vascular plant wax components was demonstrated by the distribution patterns of the n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids and n-alkanols homologous series, with C max at C 29, C 22/C 24 and C 30, respectively. The CPI values for these series were in the range 1.8-9.7, being indicative of recent biogenic input from microbial lipid residues and flora epicuticular components. Specific natural constituents (e.g. phytosterols, terpenes, etc.) were identified as molecular markers. Some oxidation products from volatile organic precursors were also present in the aerosols. In addition, all samples had a component of petroleum hydrocarbons representing urban and vehicular emissions probably transported from the nearest cities and from the motorway in the vicinity. This data set could be used to make a mass balance with organic carbon, organic extracts and elutable matter, permitting also the comparison with lipid signatures observed for other regions.

  6. Soil compaction and organic matter affect conifer seedling nonmycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance and diversity. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Amaranthus, M.P.; Page-Dumroese, D.; Harvey, A.; Cazares, E.; Bednar, L.F.

    1996-05-01

    Three levels of organic matter removal (bole only; bole and crowns; and bole, crowns, and forest floor) and three levels of mechanical soil compaction (no compaction, moderate compaction, and severe soil compaction) were studied as they influence Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) and western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) seedlings following outplanting. Moderate and severe soil compaction significantly reduced nonmycorrhizal root tip abundance on both Douglas-fir and western white pine seedlings (p less than or equal to 0.05). Ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance was significantly reduced on Douglas-fir seedlings in severely compacted areas with bole and crowns and bole, crowns, and forest floor removed. Ectomycorrhizal diversity also was significantly reduced on Douglas-fir seedlings in all severely compacted areas.

  7. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter in glacial ice: coupling natural abundance 1H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pautler, Brent G; Woods, Gwen C; Dubnick, Ashley; Simpson, André J; Sharp, Martin J; Fitzsimons, Sean J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2012-04-03

    Glaciers and ice sheets are the second largest freshwater reservoir in the global hydrologic cycle, and the onset of global climate warming has necessitated an assessment of their contributions to sea-level rise and the potential release of nutrients to nearby aquatic environments. In particular, the release of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from glacier melt could stimulate microbial activity in both glacial ecosystems and adjacent watersheds, but this would largely depend on the composition of the material released. Using fluorescence and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, we characterize DOM at its natural abundance in unaltered samples from a number of glaciers that differ in geographic location, thermal regime, and sample depth. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modeling of DOM fluorophores identifies components in the ice that are predominantly proteinaceous in character, while (1)H NMR spectroscopy reveals a mixture of small molecules that likely originate from native microbes. Spectrofluorescence also reveals a terrestrial contribution that was below the detection limits of NMR; however, (1)H nuclei from levoglucosan was identified in Arctic glacier ice samples. This study suggests that the bulk of the DOM from these glaciers is a mixture of biologically labile molecules derived from microbes.

  8. Terracidiphilus gabretensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an Abundant and Active Forest Soil Acidobacterium Important in Organic Matter Transformation

    PubMed Central

    García-Fraile, Paula; Benada, Oldrich; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the activity of bacteria in coniferous forests is highly important, due to the role of these environments as a global carbon sink. In a study of the microbial biodiversity of montane coniferous forest soil in the Bohemian Forest National Park (Czech Republic), we succeeded in isolating bacterial strain S55T, which belongs to one of the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in active bacterial populations, according to the analysis of RNA-derived 16S rRNA amplicons. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the species most closely related to strain S55T include Bryocella elongata SN10T (95.4% identity), Acidicapsa ligni WH120T (95.2% identity), and Telmatobacter bradus TPB6017T (95.0% identity), revealing that strain S55T should be classified within the phylum Acidobacteria, subdivision 1. Strain S55T is a rod-like bacterium that grows at acidic pH (3 to 6). Its phylogenetic, genotypic, phenotypic, and chemotaxonomic characteristics indicate that strain S55T corresponds to a new genus within the phylum Acidobacteria; thus, we propose the name Terracidiphilus gabretensis gen. nov., sp. nov. (strain S55T = NBRC 111238T = CECT 8791T). This strain produces extracellular enzymes implicated in the degradation of plant-derived biopolymers. Moreover, analysis of the genome sequence of strain S55T also reveals the presence of enzymatic machinery required for organic matter decomposition. Soil metatranscriptomic analyses found 132 genes from strain S55T being expressed in the forest soil, especially during winter. Our results suggest an important contribution of T. gabretensis S55T in the carbon cycle in the Picea abies coniferous forest. PMID:26546425

  9. Characterization of a flood-associated deposit on the Waipaoa River shelf using radioisotopes and terrigenous organic matter abundance and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniskern, Tara A.; Mitra, Siddhartha; Orpin, Alan R.; Harris, Courtney K.; Walsh, J. P.; Corbett, D. R.

    2014-09-01

    An ephemeral oceanic-flood deposit adjacent to a well-studied small mountainous river (SMR), the Waipaoa River in northeastern New Zealand, was characterized using multiple proxies, including radioisotopes (234Th, 7Be, and 210Pb), bulk organic carbon abundance and isotopic signature (%OC, δ13C), as well as a biomarker of terrigenous organic matter (lignin). Field sampling was conducted within two weeks after a 1-in-8 year flood that occurred between January 30 and February 6, 2010. Geochemical analyses indicated that initial deposition of fresh riverine material extended alongshore to the north and south from the river mouth. A comparison of prior- and post-flood 7Be inventories revealed that flood sediments were widely dispersed between 20 and 70 m water depth, accounting for 50-80% of the estimated flood load. Surface (0-2 cm) isotopic carbon values increased with distance from Poverty Bay, positively correlating with total 210Pb activities, potentially reflecting increasing marine influence with water depth. Abundances of sedimentary organic carbon (OC) were 0.18-0.76% dry weight, and the total nitrogen varied from 0.02 to 0.13%. Stable isotope signatures of carbon (δ13COC), nitrogen (δ15N), and lignin abundances (λ6) throughout the study area ranged from -23.6 to -27.7‰, 1.9 to 5.3‰, and 0.93 to 9.0 mg 100 mg OC-1, respectively. The spatial distribution pattern of terrigenous organic matter (OM) abundance and interclass ratios (indicative of freshness of organic matter) varied along and across-shelf. Lignin abundances were high and interclass ratios were low in the southern depocenter and inner shelf areas, suggesting that this zone had recently received vascular-plant enriched OM, minimally altered by shelf-bed mixing processes. In contrast, sediments in the northern depocenter and outer shelf also contained elevated amounts of terrigenous sedimentary OM, but this material was generally lower in lignin abundance and had higher interclass ratios

  10. Diquark abundance in stellar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.E.; de Freitas Pacheco, J.A.; de Araujo, J.C.N. )

    1992-11-15

    The clustering of quarks into pairs (diquarks) has been suggested recently to play an important role in dense matter and its astrophysical realization in neutron-star cores. We address in this work the features of diquark matter by employing an accurate equation of state valid for the effective {lambda}{phi}{sup 4} diquark theory, and find milder (although non-negligible) effects than in previous calculations. Some considerations on the very presence of a diquark-dominated region immediately above the deconfinement density are also given.

  11. Effect of petroleum products on the decomposition of soil organic matter as assessed by 13C natural abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmach, Wioleta; Szarlip, Paweł; Trembaczowski, Andrzej; Bieganowski, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Petroleum products are common contaminants in soils due to human activities. They are toxic for microorganisms and threat their functions, including decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM). The direct estimation of altered SOM decomposition - based on the CO2 emission - is impossible after oil contamination, because oil decomposition also contributes to the CO2 release. We used the natural differences in the isotopic signature (δ13C) of SOM and of oil products to partition the total CO2 for both sources and to analyze the suppression of SOM decomposition. The dynamics of 13C fractionation during the mineralization of gasoline and diesel was measured during 42 days. The 13C fractionation varied between -8.8‰ and +3.6‰ within the first 10 days, and stabilized thereafter at about -5.3‰ for gasoline and +3.2‰ for diesel. These 13C fractionations and δ13C values of CO2 emitted from the soil were used for correct partitioning of the total CO2. Contamination with gasoline reduced the CO2 efflux from SOM decomposition by a factor of 25 (from 151 to 6 mg C-CO2 kg-1 soil during 42 days). The negative effect of diesel was much lower: the CO2 efflux from SOM was decreased by less than a factor of 2. The strong effect of gasoline versus diesel reflects the lower absorption of gasoline to mineral particles and the development of a thin film on water surfaces, leading to toxicity for microorganisms. We conclude that the small differences of 13C of SOM and of organic pollutants can be used to partition CO2 fluxes and analyze pollutant effects on SOM decomposition.

  12. The use of amino acid indices for assessing organic matter quality and microbial abundance in deep-sea Antarctic sediments of IODP Expedition 318

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Stephanie A; Mills, Christopher; Mandernack, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    The Adélie Basin, located offshore of the Wilkes Land margin, experiences unusually high sedimentation rates (~ 2 cm yr− 1) for the Antarctic coast. This study sought to compare depthwise changes in organic matter (OM) quantity and quality with changes in microbial biomass with depth at this high-deposition site and an offshore continental margin site. Sediments from both sites were collected during the International Ocean Drilling (IODP) Program Expedition 318. Viable microbial biomass was estimated from concentrations of bacterial-derived phospholipid fatty acids, while OM quality was assessed using four different amino acid degradation proxies. Concentrations of total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA) measured from the continental margin suggest an oligotrophic environment, with THAA concentrations representing only 2% of total organic carbon with relative proportions of non-protein amino acids β-alanine and γ-aminobutyric acid as high as 40%. In contrast, THAA concentrations from the near-shore Adélie Basin represent 40%–60% of total organic carbon. Concentrations of β-alanine and γ-aminobutyric acid were often below the detection limit and suggest that the OM of the basin as labile. DI values in surface sediments at the Adélie and margin sites were measured to be + 0.78 and − 0.76, reflecting labile and more recalcitrant OM, respectively. Greater DI values in deeper and more anoxic portions of both cores correlated positively with increased relative concentrations of phenylalanine plus tyrosine and may represent a change of redox conditions, rather than OM quality. This suggests that DI values calculated along chemical profiles should be interpreted with caution. THAA concentrations, the percentage of organic carbon (CAA%) and total nitrogen (NAA%) represented by amino acids at both sites demonstrated a significant positive correlation with bacterial abundance estimates. These data suggest that the selective degradation of amino acids, as

  13. Dark Energy and The Dark Matter Relic Abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Rosati, Francesca

    2004-11-17

    Two mechanisms by which the quintessence scalar could enhance the relic abundance of dark matter particles are discussed. These effects can have an impact on supersymmetric candidates for dark matter.

  14. Is old organic matter simple organic matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunan, Naoise; Lerch, Thomas; Pouteau, Valérie; Mora, Philippe; Changey, Fréderique; Kätterer, Thomas; Herrmann, Anke

    2016-04-01

    Bare fallow soils that have been deprived of fresh carbon inputs for prolonged periods contain mostly old, stable organic carbon. In order to shed light on the nature of this carbon, the functional diversity profiles (MicroResp™, Biolog™ and enzyme activity spectra) of the microbial communities of long-term barefallow soils were analysed and compared with those of the microbial communities from their cultivated counterparts. The study was based on the idea that microbial communities adapt to their environment and that therefore the catabolic and enzymatic profiles would reflect the type of substrates available to the microbial communities. The catabolic profiles suggested that the microbial communities in the long-term bare-fallow soil were exposed to a less diverse range of substrates and that these substrates tended to be of simpler molecular forms. Both the catabolic and enzyme activity profiles suggested that the microbial communities from the long-term bare-fallow soils were less adapted to using polymers. These results do not fit with the traditional view of old, stable carbon being composed of complex, recalcitrant polymers. An energetics analysis of the substrate use of the microbial communities for the different soils suggested that the microbial communities from the long-term bare-fallow soils were better adapted to using readily oxidizable,although energetically less rewarding, substrates. Microbial communities appear to adapt to the deprivation of fresh organic matter by using substrates that require little investment.

  15. Environmental factors regulating soil organic matter chlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, Teresia; Montelius, Malin; Reyier, Henrik; Rietz, Karolina; Karlsson, Susanne; Lindberg, Cecilia; Andersson, Malin; Danielsson, Åsa; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Natural chlorination of organic matter is common in soils. Despite the widespread abundance of soil chlorinated soil organic matter (SOM), frequently exceeding soil chloride abundance in surface soils, and a common ability of microorganisms to produce chlorinated SOM, we lack fundamental knowledge about dominating processes and organisms responsible for the chlorination. To take one step towards resolving the terrestrial chlorine (Cl) puzzle, this study aims to analyse how environmental factors influence chlorination of SOM. Four factors were chosen for this study: soil moisture (W), nitrogen (N), chloride (Cl) and organic matter quality (C). These factors are all known to be important for soil processes. Laboratory incubations with 36Cl as a Cl tracer were performed in a two soil incubation experiments. It was found that addition of chloride and nitrogen seem to hamper the chlorination. For the C treatment, on the other hand, the results show that chlorination is enhanced by increased availability of labile organic matter (glucose and maltose). Even higher chlorination was observed when nitrogen and water were added in combination with labile organic matter. The effect that more labile organic matter strongly stimulated the chlorination rates was confirmed by the second separate experiment. These results indicate that chlorination was not primarily a way to cut refractory organic matter into digestible molecules, representing one previous hypothesis, but is related with microbial metabolism in other ways that will be further discussed in our presentation.

  16. Abundance of Asymmetric Dark Matter in Brane World Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdusattar, Haximjan; Iminniyaz, Hoernisa

    2016-09-01

    Relic abundance of asymmetric Dark Matter particles in brane world cosmological scenario is investigated in this article. Hubble expansion rate is enhanced in brane world cosmology and it affects the relic abundance of asymmetric Dark Matter particles. We analyze how the relic abundance of asymmetric Dark Matter is changed in this model. We show that in such kind of nonstandard cosmological scenario, indirect detection of asymmetric Dark Matter is possible if the cross section is small enough which let the anti-particle abundance kept in the same amount with the particle. We show the indirect detection signal constraints can be used to such model only when the cross section and the 5-dimensional Planck mass scale are in appropriate values. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11365022

  17. Detection and structural identification of dissolved organic matter in Antarctic glacial ice at natural abundance by SPR-W5-WATERGATE 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pautler, Brent G; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J; Tseng, Li-Hong; Spraul, Manfred; Dubnick, Ashley; Sharp, Martin J; Fitzsimons, Sean J

    2011-06-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems and is derived from various inputs that control its turnover. Glaciers and ice sheets are the second largest water reservoir in the global hydrologic cycle, but little is known about glacial DOM composition or contributions to biogeochemical cycling. Here we employ SPR-W5-WATERGATE (1)H NMR spectroscopy to elucidate and quantify the chemical structures of DOM constituents in Antarctic glacial ice as they exist in their natural state (average DOC of 8 mg/L) without isolation or preconcentration. This Antarctic glacial DOM is predominantly composed of a mixture of small recognizable molecules differing from DOM in marine, lacustrine, and other terrestrial environments. The major constituents detected in three distinct types of glacial ice include lactic and formic acid, free amino acids, and a mixture of simple sugars and amino sugars with concentrations that vary between ice types. The detection of free amino acid and amino sugar monomer components of peptidoglycan within the ice suggests that Antarctic glacial DOM likely originates from in situ microbial activity. As these constituents are normally considered to be biologically labile (fast cycling) in nonglacial environments, accelerated glacier melt and runoff may result in a flux of nutrients into adjacent ecosystems.

  18. Helium and neon abundances and compositions in cometary matter.

    PubMed

    Marty, Bernard; Palma, Russell L; Pepin, Robert O; Zimmermann, Laurent; Schlutter, Dennis J; Burnard, Peter G; Westphal, Andrew J; Snead, Christopher J; Bajt, Sasa; Becker, Richard H; Simones, Jacob E

    2008-01-04

    Materials trapped and preserved in comets date from the earliest history of the solar system. Particles captured by the Stardust spacecraft from comet 81P/Wild 2 are indisputable cometary matter available for laboratory study. Here we report measurements of noble gases in Stardust material. Neon isotope ratios are within the range observed in "phase Q," a ubiquitous, primitive organic carrier of noble gases in meteorites. Helium displays 3He/4He ratios twice those in phase Q and in Jupiter's atmosphere. Abundances per gram are surprisingly large, suggesting implantation by ion irradiation. The gases are probably carried in high-temperature igneous grains similar to particles found in other Stardust studies. Collectively, the evidence points to gas acquisition in a hot, high ion-flux nebular environment close to the young Sun.

  19. Helium and Neon Abundances and Compositions in Cometary Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Marty, B; Palma, R L; Pepin, R O; Zimmmermann, L; Schlutter, D J; Burnard, P G; Westphal, A J; Snead, C J; Bajt, S; Becker, R H; Simones, J E

    2007-10-15

    Materials trapped and preserved in comets date from the earliest history of the solar system. Particles captured by the Stardust spacecraft from comet Wild 2 are indisputable cometary matter available for laboratory study. Here they report measurements of noble gases in Stardust material. neon isotope ratios are within the range observed in 'phase Q', a ubiquitous, primitive organic carrier of noble gases in meteorites. Helium displays {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios twice those in phase Q and in Jupiter's atmosphere. Abundances per gram are surprisingly large, suggesting implantation by ion irradiation. The gases are carried in high temperature igneous grains similar to particles found in other Stardust studies. Collectively the evidence points to gas acquisition in a hot, high ion flux nebular environment close to the young Sun.

  20. Dark matter relic abundance and light sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yi-Lei; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we calculate the relic abundance of the dark matter particles when they can annihilate into sterile neutrinos with the mass ≲ 100 GeV in a simple model. Unlike the usual standard calculations, the sterile neutrino may fall out of the thermal equilibrium with the thermal bath before the dark matter freezes out. In such a case, if the Yukawa coupling y N between the Higgs and the sterile neutrino is small, this process gives rise to a larger ΩDM h 2 so we need a larger coupling between the dark matter and the sterile neutrino for a correct relic abundance.

  1. Extraterrestrial organic matter: a review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.

    1998-01-01

    We review the nature of the widespread organic material present in the Milky Way Galaxy and in the Solar System. Attention is given to the links between these environments and between primitive Solar System objects and the early Earth, indicating the preservation of organic material as an interstellar cloud collapsed to form the Solar System and as the Earth accreted such material from asteroids, comets and interplanetary dust particles. In the interstellar medium of the Milky Way Galaxy more than 100 molecular species, the bulk of them organic, have been securely identified, primarily through spectroscopy at the highest radio frequencies. There is considerable evidence for significantly heavier organic molecules, particularly polycyclic aromatics, although precise identification of individual species has not yet been obtained. The so-called diffuse interstellar bands are probably important in this context. The low temperature kinetics in interstellar clouds leads to very large isotopic fractionation, particularly for hydrogen, and this signature is present in organic components preserved in carbonaceous chondritic meteorites. Outer belt asteroids are the probable parent bodies of the carbonaceous chondrites, which may contain as much as 5% organic material, including a rich variety of amino acids, purines, pyrimidines, and other species of potential prebiotic interest. Richer in volatiles and hence less thermally processed are the comets, whose organic matter is abundant and poorly characterized. Cometary volatiles, observed after sublimation into the coma, include many species also present in the interstellar medium. There is evidence that most of the Earth's volatiles may have been supplied by a 'late' bombardment of comets and carbonaceous meteorites, scattered into the inner Solar System following the formation of the giant planets. How much in the way of intact organic molecules of potential prebiotic interest survived delivery to the Earth has become an

  2. Dark-matter decay and the abundance of ultracompact minihalos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yu-Peng; Yang, Gui-Lin; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2013-03-01

    Ultracompact minihalos would be formed if there are larger density perturbations (0.0003 < δρ/ρ < 0.3) in the earlier epoch. Their density profile is steeper than the standard dark-matter halos. If dark matter can annihilate or decay into standard particles, e.g., photons, these objects would be the potential astrophysical sources. In order to be consistent with observations, as those from Fermi, the abundance of ultracompact minihalos must be constrained. On the other hand, the formation of these objects has very tight relation with the primordial curvature perturbations on smaller scale, so the fraction of ultracompact minihalos is very important for modern cosmology. In previous works, the studies are focused on the dark-matter annihilation for these objects. But if dark matter is not annihilated, the dark-matter decay is another important possible case. On the other hand, the abundance of ultracompact minihalos is related to many other parameters, such as the mass of dark matter, the decay channels and the density profile of dark-matter halos. One of the important aspects of this work is that we investigate the γ-ray signals from nearby ultracompact minihalos due to dark-matter decay and another important aspect is to study in detail how the different decay channels and density profiles affect the constraints on the abundance of ultracompact minihalos.

  3. The secondary history of Sutter's Mill CM carbonaceous chondrite based on water abundance and the structure of its organic matter from two clasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, P.; Quirico, E.; Garenne, A.; Yin, Q.-Z.; Bonal, L.; Schmitt, B.; Montes-Hernandez, G.; Montagnac, G.; Chiriac, R.; Toche, F.

    2014-11-01

    Sutter's Mill is a regolith breccia composed of both heavily altered clasts and more reduced xenoliths. Here, we present a detailed investigation of fragments of SM18 and SM51. We have characterized the water content and the mineralogy by infrared (IR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the structure of the organic compounds by Raman spectroscopy, to characterize the secondary history of the clasts, including aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism. The three methods used in this study suggest that SM18 was significantly heated. The amount of water contained in phyllosilicates derived by TGA is estimated to be approximately 3.2 wt%. This value is quite low compared with other CM chondrites that typically range from 6 to 12 wt%. The infrared transmission spectra of SM18 show that the mineralogy of the sample is dominated by a mixture of phyllosilicate and olivine. SM18 shows an intense peak at 11.2 μm indicative of olivine (Fig. 1). If we compare SM18 with other CM and metamorphosed CM chondrites, it shows one of the most intense olivine signatures, and therefore a lower proportion of phyllosilicate minerals. The Raman results tend to support a short-duration heating hypothesis. In the ID/IG versus FWHM-D diagram, SM18 appears to be unusual compared to most CM samples, and close to the metamorphosed CM chondrites Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91008 and PCA 02012. In the case of SM51, infrared spectroscopy reveals that olivine is less abundant than in SM18 and the 10 μm silicate feature is more similar to that of moderately altered CM chondrites (like Murchison or Queen Alexandra Range [QUE] 97990). Raman spectroscopy does not clearly point to a heating event for SM51 in the ID/IG versus FWHM-D diagram. However, TGA analysis suggests that SM51 was slightly dehydrated as the amount of water contained in phyllosilicates is approximately 3.7 wt%, which is higher than SM18, but still lower than phyllosilicate water contents in weakly altered CM chondrites

  4. Arctic River organic matter transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Peter; Gustafsson, Orjan; Vonk, Jorien; Spencer, Robert; McClelland, Jim

    2016-04-01

    Arctic Rivers have unique hydrology and biogeochemistry. They also have a large impact on the Arctic Ocean due to the large amount of riverine inflow and small ocean volume. With respect to organic matter, their influence is magnified by the large stores of soil carbon and distinct soil hydrology. Here we present a recap of what is known of Arctic River organic matter transport. We will present a summary of what is known of the ages and sources of Arctic River dissolved and particulate organic matter. We will also discuss the current status of what is known about changes in riverine organic matter export due to global change.

  5. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Cox, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS 15N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by 15N NMR. Liquid state 15N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (1H-15N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  6. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2009-02-28

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS ¹⁵N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by ¹⁵N NMR. Liquid state ¹⁵N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (¹H–¹⁵N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  7. Factors Regulating Soil Organic Matter Chlorination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svensson, T.; Gustavsson, M.; Reyier, H.; Rietz, K.; Karlsson, S.; Göransson, C.; Andersson, M.; Öberg, G.; Bastviken, D.

    2013-12-01

    Natural chlorination of organic matter is a common process in various soils. Despite the widespread abundance of soil organic chlorine, knowledge on the processes and regulation of soil organic matter chlorination are modest. The purpose of this study is to elucidate how environmental factors may influence chlorination of organic matter in soil. Four factors were chosen for this study; water content, and nitrogen, organic carbon, and chloride concentrations. The variables are all known in different ways as important for microbes and transformation of chlorine in soil. The soil was collected from 5-15 cm depth in a coniferous forest southeast of Sweden. To test how the selected factors influenced chlorination of organic matter, we used soil laboratory incubations using 36Cl-chloride as a radioisotopic marker. A multivariate factorial design with two levels of i) soil moisture, ii) chloride amendment, iii) nitrogen amendment, and iv) glucose and maltose addition was used to simultaneously test for possible combination effects for all factors. A known radioactivity of 36chloride was added to the soil samples and incubated with four different factor treatments during an incubation period of 15 and 60 days. This presentation will discuss the results of this study including what combination of factors enhanced or hampered chlorination and thereby discuss previous observed variability of organic chlorine and chloride in soil.

  8. Gravitino dark matter and the cosmic lithium abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly, Sean; Jedamzik, Karsten; Moultaka, Gilbert

    2009-09-01

    Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model of particle physics assuming the gravitino to be the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP), and with the next-to-LSP (NLSP) decaying to the gravitino during big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN), are analyzed. Particular emphasis is laid on their potential to solve the “Li7 problem,” observations leading to an apparent 2 to 4 overproduction of Li7 with respect to standard big bang nucleosynthesis predictions, their production of cosmologically important amounts of Li6, as well as the resulting gravitino dark matter densities in these models. The study includes several improvements compared to prior studies concerning NLSP hadronic branching ratios, the evaluation of hadronic NLSP decays on BBN, BBN catalytic effects, updated nuclear reaction rates, and relies on a complete calculation of the NLSP thermal abundance, interfacing state-of-the-art computer packages. Heavy gravitinos in the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model are reanalyzed, whereas light gravitinos in gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking scenarios are studied for the first time in the context of the “lithium problems.” It is confirmed that decays of NLSP staus to heavy gravitinos, while producing all the dark matter, may at the same time resolve the Li7 problem. For NLSP decay times ≈103sec, such scenarios also lead to cosmologically important Li6 (and possibly Be9) abundances. However, as such scenarios require heavy ≳1TeV staus they are likely not testable at the LHC. It is found that decays of NLSP staus to light gravitinos may lead to significant Li6 (and Be9) abundances, whereas NLSP neutralinos decaying into light gravitinos may solve the Li7 problem. Though both scenarios are testable at the LHC they may not lead to the production of the bulk of the dark matter. A section of the paper outlines particle properties required to significantly reduce the Li7 abundance, and/or enhance the Li6 (and possibly Be9) abundances, by the

  9. Organic Matter in the Contemporary Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eglinton, T. I.; Repeta, D. J.

    2003-12-01

    This chapter summarizes selected aspects of our current understanding of the organic carbon (OC) cycle as it pertains to the modern ocean, including underlying surficial sediments. We briefly review present estimates of the size of OC reservoirs and the fluxes between them. We then proceed to highlight advances in our understanding that have occurred since the late 1980s, especially those which have altered our perspective of the ways organic matter is cycled in the oceans. We have focused on specific areas where substantial progress has been made, although in most cases our understanding remains far from complete. These are the fate of terrigenous OC inputs in the ocean, the composition of oceanic dissolved organic matter (DOM), the mechanisms of OC preservation, and new insights into microbial inputs and processes. In each case, we discuss prevailing hypotheses concerning the composition and fate of organic matter derived from the different inputs, the reactivity and relationships between different organic matter pools, and highlight current gaps in our knowledge.The advances in our understanding of organic matter cycling and composition has stemmed largely from refinements in existing methodologies and the emergence of new analytical capabilities. Molecular-level stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic measurements have shed new light on a range of biogeochemical processes. Natural abundance of radiocarbon data has also been increasingly applied as both a tracer and source indicator in studies of organic matter cycling. As for 13C, bulk 14C measurements are now complemented by measurements at the molecular level, and the combination of these different isotopic approaches has proven highly informative. The application of multinuclear solid- and liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has provided a more holistic means to examine the complex array of macromolecules that appears to comprise both dissolved and particulate forms of organic matter. New

  10. The abundance of Kaluza-Klein dark matter with coannihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Burnell, Fiona; Kribs, Graham D.

    2006-01-01

    In universal extra dimension models, the lightest Kaluza-Klein (KK) particle is generically the first KK excitation of the photon and can be stable, serving as particle dark matter. We calculate the thermal relic abundance of the KK photon for a general mass spectrum of KK excitations including full coannihilation effects with all (level-one) KK excitations. We find that including coannihilation can significantly change the relic abundance when the coannihilating particles are within about 20% of the mass of the KK photon. Matching the relic abundance with cosmological data, we find the mass range of the KK photon is much wider than previously found, up to about 2 TeV if the masses of the strongly interacting level-one KK particles are within 5% of the mass of the KK photon. We also find cases where several coannihilation channels compete (constructively and destructively) with one another. The lower bound on the KK photon mass, about 540 GeV when just right-handed KK leptons coannihilate with the KK photon, relaxes upward by several hundred GeV when coannihilation with electroweak KK gauge bosons of the same mass is included.

  11. Effects of QCD bound states on dark matter relic abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Seng Pei; Luo, Feng

    2017-02-01

    We study scenarios where there exists an exotic massive particle charged under QCD in the early Universe. We calculate the formation and dissociation rates of bound states formed by pairs of these particles, and apply the results in dark matter (DM) coannihilation scenarios, including also the Sommerfeld effect. We find that on top of the Sommerfeld enhancement, bound-state effects can further significantly increase the largest possible DM masses which can give the observed DM relic abundance, by ˜ 30-100% with respect to values obtained by considering the Sommerfeld effect only, for the color triplet or octet exotic particles we consider. In particular, it indicates that the Bino DM mass in the right-handed stop-Bino coannihilation scenario in the Minimal Supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) can reach ˜ 2.5 TeV, even though the potential between the stop and antistop prior to forming a bound state is repulsive. We also apply the bound-state effects in the calculations of relic abundance of long-lived or metastable massive colored particles, and discuss the implications on the BBN constraints and the abundance of a super-weakly interacting DM. The corrections for the bound-state effect when the exotic massive colored particles also carry electric charges, and the collider bounds are also discussed.

  12. Photodissolution of soil organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mayer, L.M.; Thornton, K.R.; Schick, L.L.; Jastrow, J.D.; Harden, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Sunlight has been shown to enhance loss of organic matter from aquatic sediments and terrestrial plant litter, so we tested for similar reactions in mineral soil horizons. Losses of up to a third of particulate organic carbon occurred after continuous exposure to full-strength sunlight for dozens of hours, with similar amounts appearing as photodissolved organic carbon. Nitrogen dissolved similarly, appearing partly as ammonium. Modified experiments with interruption of irradiation to include extended dark incubation periods increased loss of total organic carbon, implying remineralization by some combination of light and microbes. These photodissolution reactions respond strongly to water content, with reaction extent under air-dry to fully wet conditions increasing by a factor of 3-4 fold. Light limitation was explored using lamp intensity and soil depth experiments. Reaction extent varied linearly with lamp intensity. Depth experiments indicate that attenuation of reaction occurs within the top tens to hundreds of micrometers of soil depth. Our data allow only order-of-magnitude extrapolations to field conditions, but suggest that this type of reaction could induce loss of 10-20% of soil organic carbon in the top 10. cm horizon over a century. It may therefore have contributed to historical losses of soil carbon via agriculture, and should be considered in soil management on similar time scales. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  13. The abundance and environment of dark matter haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metuki, Ofer; Libeskind, Noam I.; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2016-07-01

    An open question in cosmology and the theory of structure formation is to what extent does environment affect the properties of galaxies and haloes. The present paper aims at shedding light on this problem. The paper focuses on the analysis of a dark matter only simulation and it addresses the issue of how the environment affects the abundance of haloes, which are assigned four attributes: their virial mass, an ambient density calculated with an aperture that scales with Rvir (ΔM), a fixed-aperture (ΔR) ambient density, and a cosmic web classification (i.e. voids, sheets, filaments, and knots, as defined by the V-web algorithm). ΔM is the mean density around a halo evaluated within a sphere of a radius of 5Rvir, where Rvir is the virial radius. ΔR is the density field Gaussian smoothed with R = 4 h-1 Mpc, evaluated at the centre of the halo. The main result of the paper is that the difference between haloes in different web elements stems from the difference in their mass functions, and does not depend on their adaptive-aperture ambient density. A dependence on the fixed-aperture ambient density is induced by the cross-correlation between the mass of a halo and its fixed-aperture ambient density.

  14. Dissolved Organic Matter and Emerging Contaminants in Urban Stream Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushal, S. S.; Findlay, S.; Groffman, P.; Belt, K.; Delaney, K.; Sides, A.; Walbridge, M.; Mayer, P.

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the effects of urbanization on the sources, bioavailability and forms of natural and anthropogenic organic matter found in streams located in Maryland, U.S.A. We found that the abundance, biaoavailability, and enzymatic breakdown of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) increased in streams with increasing watershed urbanization suggesting that organic nutrients may represent a growing form of nutrient loading to coastal waters associated with land use change. Organic carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in urban streams were elevated several-fold compared to forest and agricultural streams. Enzymatic activities of stream microbes in organic matter decomposition were also significantly altered across watershed land use. Chemical characterization suggested that organic matter in urban streams originated from a variety of sources including terrestrial, sewage, and in-stream transformation. In addition, a characterization of emerging organic contaminants (polyaromatic cyclic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, and polybrominated diphenyl ether flame retardents), showed that organic contaminants and dissolved organic matter increase with watershed urbanization and fluctuate substantially with changing climatic conditions. Elucidating the emerging influence of urbanization on sources, transport, and in-stream transformation of organic nutrients and contaminants will be critical in unraveling the changing role of organic matter in urban degraded and restored stream ecosystems.

  15. Effects of earthworms and plants on the soil structure, the physical stabilization of soil organic matter and the microbial abundance and diversity in soil aggregates in a long term study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangerlé, Anne; Hissler, Christophe; Lavelle, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Earthworms and plant roots, as ecosystem engineers, have large effects on biotic and abiotic properties of the soil system. They create biogenic soil macroaggregates (i.e. earthworm casts and root macroaggregates) with specific physical, chemical and microbiological properties. Research to date has mainly considered their impacts in isolation thereby ignoring potential interactions between these organisms. On the other hand, most of the existing studies focused on short to midterm time scale. We propose in this study to consider effect of earthworms and plants on aggregate dynamics at long time scale. A 24 months macrocosm experiment, under semi-controlled conditions, was conducted to assess the impacts of corn and endogeic plus anecic earthworms (Apporectodea caliginosa and Lumbricus terrestris) on soil structure, C stabilization and microbial abundance and biodiversity. Aggregate stability was assessed by wet-sieving. Macroaggregates (>2 mm) were also visually separated according to their biological origin (e.g., earthworms, roots). Total C and N contents were measured in aggregates of all size classes and origins. Natural abundances of 13C of corn, a C4 plant, were used as a supplemental marker of OM incorporation in aggregates. The genetic structure and the abundance of the bacterial and fungal communities were characterized by using respectively the B- and F-ARISA fingerprinting approach and quantitative PCR bacteria (341F/515R) and fungi (FF330/FR1). They significantly impacted the soil physical properties in comparison to the other treatments: lower bulk density in the first 10cm of the soil with 0.95 g/cm3 in absence of corn plants and 0.88 g/cm3 in presence of corn plants compared to control soil (1.21g/cm3). The presence of earthworms increased aggregate stability (mean weight diameter) by 7.6 %, while plants alone had no simple impacts on aggregation. A significant interaction revealed that earthworms increased aggregate stability in the presence of

  16. Priming of native soil organic matter by pyrogenic organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCiucies, Silene; Dharmakeerthi, Saman; Whitman, Thea; Woolf, Dominic; Lehmann, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Priming, in relation to pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM), describes the change in mineralization rate of non-pyrogenic ("native") soil organic matter (nSOM) due to the addition of PyOM. Priming may be 'positive', in that the addition of pyC increases the mineralization rate of native SOM, or 'negative', in that the mineralization rate of nSOM is decreased. Reasons for increased mineralization may include: (i) co-metabolism: microbial decomposition of labile C-additions increases microbial activity, and facilitates additional decomposition of npSOC by active enzymes; (ii) stimulation: substrate additions result in lifted pH, nutrient, oxygen, or water constraints resulting in increased microbial activity. Decreased mineralization may be a result of: (i) inhibition: the opposite of stimulation whereby constraints are aggravated by substrate addition. Substrate addition may also cause inhibition by interfering with enzymes or signaling compounds; (ii) preferential substrate utilization: labile fraction of PyOM additions are preferentially used up by microbes thus causing a decrease in nSOC decomposition; (iii) sorption: organic compounds are adsorbed onto PyOM surfaces, decreasing their rate of mineralization; (iv) stabilization: formation of organo-mineral associations forms stable SOC pools. We have conducted a suite of experiments to investigate these potential interactions. In a seven year long incubation study, PyOM additions increased total OM mineralization for the first 2.5 years, was equal to control after 6.2 years, and was 3% lower after 7.1 years. Cumulative nSOM mineralization was 23% less with the PyOM additions than without, and over 60% of the added PyOM was present in the labile soil fraction after the 7.1 year incubation. Two additional incubation studies, one with and without plants, showed greater nSOM mineralization in the short term and lower nSOM mineralization over the long term. Increased nSOC mineralization due to the presence of plants was

  17. Distribution and abundance of organic thiols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, R.

    1985-01-01

    The role of glutathione (GSH) in protecting against the toxicity of oxygen and oxygen by products is well established for all eukaryotes studied except Entamoeba histolytica which lacks mitochrondria, chloroplasts, and microtubules. The GSH is not universal among prokaryotes. Entamoeba histolytica does not produce GSH or key enzymes of GSH metabolism. A general method of thiol analysis based upon fluorescent labeling with monobromobimane and HPLC separation of the resulting thiol derivatives was developed to determine the occurrence of GSH and other low molecular weight thiols in bacteria. Glutathione is the major thiol in cyanobacteria and in most bacteria closely related to the purple photosynthetic bacteria, but GSH was not found in archaebacteria, green bacteria, or GRAM positive bacteria. It suggested that glutathione metabolism was incorporated into eukaryotes at the time that mitochondria and chloroplasts were acquired by endosymbiosis. In Gram positive aerobes, coenzyme A occurs at millimolar levels and CoA disulfide reductases are identified. The CoA, rather than glutathione, may function in the oxygen detoxification processes of these organisms.

  18. Soil organic matter contribution to the NW Mediterranean (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Buscail, R.; Blokker, J.; Kerhervé, P.; Schouten, S.; Ludwig, W.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    The BIT (Branched and Isoprenoid Tetraether) index has recently been introduced as a proxy for soil organic matter input and is based on the relative abundance of non-isoprenoidal glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) derived from organisms living in terrestrial environments versus a structurally related isoprenoid GDGT “crenarchaeol” produced by marine Crenarchaeota (Hopmans et al., 2004). In this study, detailed spatial distribution patterns of BIT index were investigated in combination with other organic parameters in the continental margin of the north western Mediterranean. Based on a transect sampling strategy from source (land) to sink (sea) via river, we analysed a variety of soils from the Têt and Rhône basins, suspended particulate matter in waters of the Têt and Rhône rivers flowing into the Gulf of Lions, and marine surface sediments from the Gulf of Lions collected before and after a flood occurred in June 2008. Our study allows us to track BIT values along the transport pathway of soil organic matter and thus to estimate soil organic matter contribution in marine sediments in the Gulf of Lions (NW Mediterranean), a river-dominated continental margin. Hopmans, E.C., Weijers, J.W.H., Schefuss, E., Herfort, L., Sinninghe Damsté, J.S., Schouten, S., 2004. A novel proxy for terrestrial organic matter in sediments based on branched and isoprenoidtetraether lipids. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 224, 107-116.

  19. Effects of Crayfish on Quality of Fine Particulate Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montemarano, J. J.; Kershner, M. W.; Leff, L. G.

    2005-05-01

    The origin and ontogeny of detritus often determines its bioavailability. Crayfish shred and consume detrital organic matter, influencing fine particulate organic matter (FPOM) availability, composition and quality. Given consumption of FPOM by many invertebrates, crayfish can indirectly affect these organisms by altering FPOM bioavailability through organic matter fragmentation, biofilm disturbance, and defecation. These effects may or may not vary among coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) from different leaf species. To assess crayfish effects on FPOM quality, crayfish were fed stream-conditioned maple or oak leaves in hanging 1-mm mesh-bottom baskets in aquaria. After 12 h, crayfish and remaining leaves were removed. FPOM fragments that fell through the mesh were vacuum filtered and analyzed for percent organic matter, C:N ratio, and bacterial abundance. The same analyses were conducted on crayfish feces collected using finger cots encasing crayfish abdomens. C:N ratios did not differ between feces and maple leaf CPOM, but were lower in FPOM produced through fragmentation and disturbance (P = 0.023). Overall, crayfish alter the ontogeny of detritus, which may, in turn, affect stream FPOM dynamics.

  20. Chemodestructive fractionation of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. I.; Rusakov, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The method of chemodestructive fractionation is suggested to assess the composition of soil organic matter. This method is based on determination of the resilience of soil organic matter components and/or different parts of organic compounds to the impact of oxidizing agents. For this purpose, a series of solutions with similar concentration of the oxidant (K2Cr2O7), but with linearly increasing oxidative capacity was prepared. Chemodestructive fractionation showed that the portion of easily oxidizable (labile) organic matter in humus horizons of different soil types depends on the conditions of soil formation. It was maximal in hydromorphic soils of the taiga zone and minimal in automorphic soils of the dry steppe zone. The portion of easily oxidizable organic matter in arable soils increased with an increase in the rate of organic fertilizers application. The long-lasting agricultural use of soils and burying of the humus horizons within the upper one-meter layer resulted in the decreasing content of easily oxidizable organic matter. It was found that the portion of easily oxidizable organic matter decreases by the mid-summer or fall in comparison with the spring or early summer period.

  1. Contribution of plant lignin to the soil organic matter formation and stabilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignin is the third most abundant plant constituent after cellulose and hemicellulose and thought to be one of the building blocks for soil organic matter formation. Lignin can be used as a predictor for long-term soil organic matter stabilization and C sequestration. Soils and humic acids from fo...

  2. Interstellar and Solar System Organic Matter Preserved in Interplanetary Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth's stratosphere derive from collisions among asteroids and by the disruption and outgassing of short-period comets. Chondritic porous (CP) IDPs are among the most primitive Solar System materials. CP-IDPs have been linked to cometary parent bodies by their mineralogy, textures, C-content, and dynamical histories. CP-IDPs are fragile, fine-grained (less than um) assemblages of anhydrous amorphous and crystalline silicates, oxides and sulfides bound together by abundant carbonaceous material. Ancient silicate, oxide, and SiC stardust grains exhibiting highly anomalous isotopic compositions are abundant in CP-IDPs, constituting 0.01 - 1 % of the mass of the particles. The organic matter in CP-IDPs is isotopically anomalous, with enrichments in D/H reaching 50x the terrestrial SMOW value and 15N/14N ratios up to 3x terrestrial standard compositions. These anomalies are indicative of low T (10-100 K) mass fractionation in cold molecular cloud or the outermost reaches of the protosolar disk. The organic matter shows distinct morphologies, including sub-um globules, bubbly textures, featureless, and with mineral inclusions. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies of organic matter in IDPs reveals diverse species including aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The organic matter with the highest isotopic anomalies appears to be richer in aliphatic compounds. These materials also bear similarities and differences with primitive, isotopically anomalous organic matter in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. The diversity of the organic chemistry, morphology, and isotopic properties in IDPs and meteorites reflects variable preservation of interstellar/primordial components and Solar System processing. One unifying feature is the presence of sub-um isotopically anomalous organic globules among all primitive materials, including IDPs, meteorites, and comet Wild-2 samples returned by the Stardust mission.

  3. Relic abundance of dark matter in universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Sato, Joe; Yamanaka, Masato; Senami, Masato

    2009-04-17

    Relic abundance of dark matter is investigated in the framework of universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos. These models are free from the serious Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton problem that the original universal extra dimension model possesses. The first KK particle of the right-handed neutrino is a candidate for dark matter in this framework. When ordinary neutrino masses are large enough such as the degenerate mass spectrum case, the dark matter relic abundance can change significantly. The scale of the extra dimension consistent with cosmological observations can be 500 GeV in the minimal setup of universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos.

  4. "Deficits Don't Matter": Abundance, Indebtedness and American Culture.

    PubMed

    Kroes, Rob

    If deficits, nor defaults, don't really matter anymore, what sign of our times is it? What has changed from the days that Franklin Delano Roosevelt risked the fragile economic recovery from the great depression by returning, in 1937, to the standard of his economic orthodoxy, a belief in fiscal rectitude and anaversion to debts and deficits? If that was a sign of a certain American character, what has happened to it? A massive shift in public culture must have occurred, affecting people's views on public probity and political rectitude. The following is an attempt to trace some of the main shifts on the way to our present quandary.

  5. A marine sink for chlorine in natural organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leri, Alessandra C.; Mayer, Lawrence M.; Thornton, Kathleen R.; Northrup, Paul A.; Dunigan, Marisa R.; Ness, Katherine J.; Gellis, Austin B.

    2015-08-01

    Chloride--the most abundant ion in sea water--affects ocean salinity, and thereby seawater density and ocean circulation. Its lack of reactivity gives it an extremely long residence time. Other halogens are known to be incorporated into marine organic matter. However, evidence of similar transformations of seawater chloride is lacking, aside from emissions of volatile organochlorine by marine algae. Here we report high organochlorine concentrations from 180 to 700 mg kg-1 in natural particulate organic matter that settled into sediment traps at depths between 800 and 3,200 m in the Arabian Sea, taken between 1994 and 1995. X-ray spectromicroscopic imaging of chlorine bonding reveals that this organochlorine exists primarily in concentrated aliphatic forms consistent with lipid chlorination, along with a more diffuse aromatic fraction. High aliphatic organochlorine in particulate material from cultured phytoplankton suggests that primary production is a source of chlorinated organic matter. We also found that particulate algal detritus can act as an organic substrate for abiotic reactions involving Fe2+, H2O2 or light that incorporate chlorine into organic matter at levels up to several grams per kilogram. We conclude that transformations of marine chloride to non-volatile organochlorine through biological and abiotic pathways represent an oceanic sink for this relatively unreactive element.

  6. Organic matter in meteorites and comets - Possible origins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Edward

    1991-01-01

    At least six extraterrestrial environments may have contributed organic compounds to meteorites and comets: solar nebula, giant-planet subnebulae, asteroid interiors containing liquid water, carbon star atmospheres, and diffuse or dark interstellar clouds. The record in meteorites is partly obscured by pervasive reheating that transformed much of the organic matter to kerogen; nonetheless, it seems that all six formation sites contributed. For comets, the large abundance of HCHO, HCN, and unsaturated hydrocarbons suggests an interstellar component of 50 percent or more, but the contributions of various interstellar processes, and of a solar-nebula component, are hard to quantify. A research program is outlined that may help reduce these uncertainties.

  7. Organic matter in meteorites and comets - Possible origins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, E.

    1991-04-01

    At least six extraterrestrial environments may have contributed organic compounds to meteorites and comets: solar nebula, giant-planet subnebulae, asteroid interiors containing liquid water, carbon star atmospheres, and diffuse or dark interstellar clouds. The record in meteorites is partly obscured by pervasive reheating that transformed much of the organic matter to kerogen; nonetheless, it seems that all six formation sites contributed. For comets, the large abundance of HCHO, HCN, and unsaturated hydrocarbons suggests an interstellar component of 50 percent or more, but the contributions of various interstellar processes, and of a solar-nebula component, are hard to quantify. A research program is outlined that may help reduce these uncertainties.

  8. Spectral mapping of soil organic matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristof, S. J.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Johannsen, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    Multispectral remote sensing data were examined for use in the mapping of soil organic matter content. Computer-implemented pattern recognition techniques were used to analyze data collected in May 1969 and May 1970 by an airborne multispectral scanner over a 40-km flightline. Two fields within the flightline were selected for intensive study. Approximately 400 surface soil samples from these fields were obtained for organic matter analysis. The analytical data were used as training sets for computer-implemented analysis of the spectral data. It was found that within the geographical limitations included in this study, multispectral data and automatic data processing techniques could be used very effectively to delineate and map surface soils areas containing different levels of soil organic matter.

  9. [Infrared spectroscopy application in soil organic matter].

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Xi, S; Jiang, Y

    1998-02-01

    As an important method to study the constitution and properties of macromolecular organic compounds, the infrared spectroscopy has been more and more widely taken in the researches of soil organic matters (SOM). Especially,the application of FTIR and the combined uses of FTIR with chromatogram etc. have made the researches of SOM get a great progress in many aspects. In this paper, the infrared spectroscopy applications were reviewed in SOM. It includes the following contents: the methods to study SOM by IR, studies on the constitution of soil humic substances (SHS), extraction of SOM and classification of SHS, decomposition, transformation and humification of organic matters, the differences of SOM in different situations, the interactions of SHS with metais, clay minerals and other organics in soil.

  10. Organic matter loading affects lodgepole pine seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaohua; Li, Qinglin; Waterhouse, M J; Armleder, H M

    2012-06-01

    Organic matter plays important roles in returning nutrients to the soil, maintaining forest productivity and creating habitats in forest ecosystems. Forest biomass is in increasing demand for energy production, and organic matter has been considered as a potential supply. Thus, an important management question is how much organic matter should be retained after forest harvesting to maintain forest productivity. To address this question, an experimental trial was established in 1996 to evaluate the responses of lodgepole pine seedling growth to organic matter loading treatments. Four organic matter loading treatments were randomly assigned to each of four homogeneous pine sites: removal of all organic matter on the forest floor, organic matter loading quantity similar to whole-tree-harvesting residuals left on site, organic matter loading quantity similar to stem-only-harvesting residuals, and organic matter loading quantity more similar to what would be found in disease- or insect-killed stands. Our 10-year data showed that height and diameter had 29 and 35 % increase, respectively, comparing the treatment with the most organic matter loading to the treatment with the least organic matter loading. The positive response of seedling growth to organic matter loading may be associated with nutrients and/or microclimate change caused by organic matter, and requires further study. The dynamic response of seedling growth to organic matter loading treatments highlights the importance of long-term studies. Implications of those results on organic matter management are discussed in the context of forest productivity sustainability.

  11. Organic Matter Loading Affects Lodgepole Pine Seedling Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaohua; Li, Qinglin; Waterhouse, M. J.; Armleder, H. M.

    2012-06-01

    Organic matter plays important roles in returning nutrients to the soil, maintaining forest productivity and creating habitats in forest ecosystems. Forest biomass is in increasing demand for energy production, and organic matter has been considered as a potential supply. Thus, an important management question is how much organic matter should be retained after forest harvesting to maintain forest productivity. To address this question, an experimental trial was established in 1996 to evaluate the responses of lodgepole pine seedling growth to organic matter loading treatments. Four organic matter loading treatments were randomly assigned to each of four homogeneous pine sites: removal of all organic matter on the forest floor, organic matter loading quantity similar to whole-tree-harvesting residuals left on site, organic matter loading quantity similar to stem-only-harvesting residuals, and organic matter loading quantity more similar to what would be found in disease- or insect-killed stands. Our 10-year data showed that height and diameter had 29 and 35 % increase, respectively, comparing the treatment with the most organic matter loading to the treatment with the least organic matter loading. The positive response of seedling growth to organic matter loading may be associated with nutrients and/or microclimate change caused by organic matter, and requires further study. The dynamic response of seedling growth to organic matter loading treatments highlights the importance of long-term studies. Implications of those results on organic matter management are discussed in the context of forest productivity sustainability.

  12. The Role of Electroweak Corrections for the Dark Matter Relic Abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Ciafaloni, Paolo; Comelli, Denis; Simone, Andrea De; Morgante, Enrico; Riotto, Antonio; Urbano, Alfredo E-mail: comelli@fe.infn.it E-mail: enrico.morgante@unige.ch E-mail: alfredo.urbano@sissa.it

    2013-10-01

    We analyze the validity of the theorems concerning the cancellation of the infrared and collinar divergences in the case of dark matter freeze-out in the early universe. In particular, we compute the electroweak logarithmic corrections of infrared origin to the annihilation cross section of a dark matter particle being the neutral component of a SU(2){sub L} multiplet. The inclusion of processes with final state W can modify significantly the cross sections computed with only virtual W exchange. Our results show that the inclusion of infrared logs is necessary for a precise computation of the dark matter relic abundance.

  13. Speciation of The Particulate Organic Matter In Three Remote Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masclet, Pierre; Marchand, Nicolas; Jaffrezo, Jean Luc; Besombes, Jean Luc

    Total particulate matter was collected as part of three programs between 1999 and 2001 (EAAS in Finland, ESOMPTE in Marseille/Fos and POVA in french alpine valleys). The speciation of the particulate organic matter (POM) was performed by Gas Chromatography or HPLC coupled with a mass spectrometer. 13 organic families were identified in the 245 samples collected. The presence of some functional groups (- COOH; - OH and - CHO) and the carbon chain length are used in order to identify the sources of the particulate pollutants and the physicochemical behaviour during the long range atmospheric transport of the aerosol. The composition of the POM differs depending on the season (the secondary fraction reaches 27 % in summer and only 6% in winter) and on the remoteness of the sources. Alkanes are always the most abundant compounds. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, esters, carboxylic acids and monoaromatic hydrocarbons are present in significant abundance. Some alkenes, aldehydes, ether oxydes, ketones and halocompounds are also found. Alcohols are more abundant in aerosols collected close to marine sites. Long carbon chain esters are mostly found in aerosols collected in high density vegetation areas and relatively high concentrations of PAH are measured in aerosols collected close to highly populated areas. These three families are good geochemical tracers, respectively of marine, biogenic and anthropic sources.

  14. Lability of Secondary Organic Particulate Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Pengfei; Li, Yong Jie; Wang, Yan; Giles, Mary K.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Bertram, Allan K.; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-10-24

    Accurate simulations of the consenctrations of atmospheric organic particulate matter (PM) are needed for predicting energy flow in the Earth’s climate system. In the past, simulations of organic PM widely assume equilibrium partitioning of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) between the PM and surrounding vapor. Herein, we test this assumption by measuring evaporation rates and associated vapor mass concentration of organic films representative of atmospheric PM. For films representing anthropogenic PM, evaporation rates and vapor mass concentrations increased above a threshold relative humidity (RH), indicating equilibrium partitioning above a transition RH but not below. In contrast for films representing biogenic PM, no threshold was observed, indicating equilibrium partitioning at all RHs. The results suggest that the mass lability of atmospheric organic PM can differ in consequential ways among Earth’s natural biomes, polluted regions, and regions of land-use change, and these differences need to be considered when simulating atmospheric organic PM.

  15. Organic matters: investigating the sources, transport, and fate of organic matter in Fanno Creek, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sobieszczyk, Steven; Keith, Mackenzie; Goldman, Jami H.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Clean Water Services, recently completed an investigation into the sources, transport, and fate of organic matter in the Fanno Creek watershed. The information provided by this investigation will help resource managers to implement strategies aimed at decreasing the excess supply of organic matter that contributes to low dissolved-oxygen levels in Fanno Creek and downstream in the Tualatin River during summer. This fact sheet summarizes the findings of the investigation.

  16. Sulfur species behavior in soil organic matter during decomposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroth, A.W.; Bostick, B.C.; Graham, M.; Kaste, J.M.; Mitchell, M.J.; Friedland, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is a primary re??servoir of terrestrial sulfur (S), but its role in the global S cycle remains poorly understood. We examine S speciation by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy to describe S species behavior during SOM decomposition. Sulfur species in SOM were best represented by organic sulfide, sulfoxide, sulfonate, and sulfate. The highest fraction of S in litter was organic sulfide, but as decomposition progressed, relative fractions of sulfonate and sulfate generally increased. Over 6-month laboratory incubations, organic sulfide was most reactive, suggesting that a fraction of this species was associated with a highly labile pool of SOM. During humification, relative concentrations of sulfoxide consistently decreased, demonstrating the importance of sulfoxide as a reactive S phase in soil. Sulfonate fractional abundance increased during humification irrespective of litter type, illustrating its relative stability in soils. The proportion of S species did not differ systematically by litter type, but organic sulfide became less abundant in conifer SOM during decomposition, while sulfate fractional abundance increased. Conversely, deciduous SOM exhibited lesser or nonexistent shifts in organic sulfide and sulfate fractions during decomposition, possibly suggesting that S reactivity in deciduous litter is coupled to rapid C mineralization and independent of S speciation. All trends were consistent in soils across study sites. We conclude that S reactivity is related to spqciation in SOM, particularly in conifer forests, and S species fractions in SOM change, during decomposition. Our data highlight the importance of intermediate valence species (sulfoxide and sulfonate) in the pedochemical cycling of organic bound S. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Isotopic analysis of cometary organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerridge, J. F.

    1991-04-01

    Carbon isotope ratios have been measured for CN in the coma of Comet Halley and for several CHON particles emitted by Halley. Of these, only the CHON-particle data may be reasonably related to organic matter in the cometary nucleus, but the true range of (C-13)/(C-12) values in those particles is quite uncertain. The D/H ratio in H2O in the Halley coma resembles that in Titan/Uranus.

  18. Peer reviewed: Characterizing aquatic dissolved organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, Jerry A.; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Whether it causes aesthetic concerns such as color, taste, and odor; leads to the binding and transport of organic and inorganic contaminants; produces undesirable disinfection byproducts; provides sources and sinks for carbon; or mediates photochemical processes, the nature and properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in water are topics of significant environmental interest. DOM is also a major reactant in and product of biogeochemical processes in which the material serves as a carbon and energy source for biota and controls levels of dissolved oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, numerous trace metals, and acidity.

  19. Isolation and chemical characterization of dissolved and colloidal organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiken, G.; Leenheer, J.

    1993-01-01

    Commonly used techniques for the concentration and isolation of organic matter from water, such as preparative chromatography, ultrafiltration and reverse osmosis, and the methods used to analyze the organic matter obtained by these methods are reviewed. The development of methods to obtain organic matter that is associated with fractions of the dissolved organic carbon other than humic substances, such as organic bases, hydrophilic organic acids and colloidal organic matter are discussed. Methods specifically used to study dissolved organic nitrogen and dissolved organic phosphorous are also discussed. -from Authors

  20. Nondestructive, in situ, cellular-scale mapping of elemental abundances including organic carbon in permineralized fossils.

    PubMed

    Boyce, C K; Hazen, R M; Knoll, A H

    2001-05-22

    The electron microprobe allows elemental abundances to be mapped at the microm scale, but until now high resolution mapping of light elements has been challenging. Modifications of electron microprobe procedure permit fine-scale mapping of carbon. When applied to permineralized fossils, this technique allows simultaneous mapping of organic material, major matrix-forming elements, and trace elements with microm-scale resolution. The resulting data make it possible to test taphonomic hypotheses for the formation of anatomically preserved silicified fossils, including the role of trace elements in the initiation of silica precipitation and in the prevention of organic degradation. The technique allows one to understand the localization of preserved organic matter before undertaking destructive chemical analyses and, because it is nondestructive, offers a potentially important tool for astrobiological investigations of samples returned from Mars or other solar system bodies.

  1. Matrix protected organic matter in a river dominated margin: A possible mechanism to sequester terrestrial organic matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, Ralph N.; Goñi, Miguel A.

    2008-06-01

    The provenance of organic matter in surface sediments from the northern Gulf of Mexico was investigated by analyzing the compositions of lipid biomarkers ( n-alkanes, fatty acids, sterols) liberated after a series of chemical treatments designed to remove different organo-mineral matrix associations (i.e. freely extractable, base-hydrolyzable, unhydrolyzable). Bulk analyses of the organic matter (carbon content, carbon:nitrogen ratios, stable and radiocarbon isotopic analyses) were also performed on the intact sediments and their non-hydrolyzable, demineralized residue. We found recognizable lipids from distinct sources, including terrestrial vascular plants, bacteria and marine algae and zooplankton, within each of the isolated fractions. Based on the lipid signatures and bulk compositions, the organic matter within the unhydrolyzable fractions appeared to be the most diagenetically altered, was the oldest in age, and had the highest abundance of terrigenous lipids. In contrast, the base-hydrolyzable fraction was the most diagentically unaltered, had the youngest ages and was most enriched in N and marine lipids. Our results indicate that fresh, autochthonous organic matter is the most important contributor to base-hydrolyzable lipids, whereas highly altered allochthonous sources appear to be predominant source of unhydrolyzable lipids in the surface sediments from the Atchafalaya River shelf. Overall, the lipid biomarker signatures of intact sediments were biased towards the autochthonous source because many of the organic compounds indicative of degraded, terrigenous sources were protected from extraction and saponification by organo-mineral matrices. It is only after these protective matrices were removed by treatment with HCl and HF that these compounds became evident.

  2. Enhancement of the natural organic matter removal from drinking water by nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Matilainen, A; Liikanen, R; Nyström, M; Lindqvist, N; Tuhkanen, T

    2004-03-01

    Finnish surface waters are abundant in natural organic matter. Natural organic matter can be removed from drinking water in a water treatment process by coagulation and filtration. The standard treatment operations are not able to remove the smallest molar mass fraction of organic matter and the intermediate molar mass matter is only partly removed. The removal of residual natural organic matter from drinking water by nanofiltration was evalueted in this study. Three different nanofiltration membranes were compared in filtering six pre-treated surface waters. The total organic carbon content of the feed waters varied from 2.0 to 4.2 mg l(-1). Other water quality parameters measured were conductivity, alkalinity, hardness, UV-absorbance, SUVA, E2/E3 value and molecular size distribution by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography. The natural organic matter removal efficiencies of the membranes were good and varied between 100% and 49%, and between 85% and 47% according to molecular size distribution and total organic carbon measurements, respectively. Removal of different molecular size fractions varied from 100% to 56%, 100% to 54% and 88% to 19%, regarding high molar mass, intermediate molar mass and low molar mass organic matter, respectively. The Desal-5 DL membrane produced the highest natural organic matter removals.

  3. Abiotic Bromination of Soil Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Leri, Alessandra C; Ravel, Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Biogeochemical transformations of plant-derived soil organic matter (SOM) involve complex abiotic and microbially mediated reactions. One such reaction is halogenation, which occurs naturally in the soil environment and has been associated with enzymatic activity of decomposer organisms. Building on a recent finding that naturally produced organobromine is ubiquitous in SOM, we hypothesized that inorganic bromide could be subject to abiotic oxidations resulting in bromination of SOM. Through lab-based degradation treatments of plant material and soil humus, we have shown that abiotic bromination of particulate organic matter occurs in the presence of a range of inorganic oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide and assorted forms of ferric iron, producing both aliphatic and aromatic forms of organobromine. Bromination of oak and pine litter is limited primarily by bromide concentration. Fresh plant material is more susceptible to bromination than decayed litter and soil humus, due to a labile pool of mainly aliphatic compounds that break down during early stages of SOM formation. As the first evidence of abiotic bromination of particulate SOM, this study identifies a mechanistic source of the natural organobromine in humic substances and the soil organic horizon. Formation of organobromine through oxidative treatments of plant material also provides insights into the relative stability of aromatic and aliphatic components of SOM.

  4. Soil organic matter composition affected by potato cropping managements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic matter is a small but important soil component. As a heterogeneous mixture of geomolecules and biomolecules, soil organic matter (SOM) can be fractionated into distinct pools with different solubility and lability. Water extractable organic matter (WEOM) fraction is the most labile and mobil...

  5. The surface area of soil organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.; Lee, J.-F.; Boyd, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    The previously reported surface area for soil organic matter (SOM) of 560-800 m2/g as determined by the ethylene glycol (EG) retention method was reexamined by the standard BET method based on nitrogen adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature. Test samples consisted of two high organic content soils, a freeze-dried soil humic acid, and an oven-dried soil humic acid. The measured BET areas for these samples were less than 1 m2/g, except for the freeze-dried humic acid. The results suggest that surface adsorption of nonionic organic compounds by SOM is practically insignificant in comparison to uptake by partition. The discrepancy between the surface areas of SOM obtained by BET and EG methods was explained in terms of the 'free surface area' and the 'apparent surface area' associated with these measurements.The previously reported surface area for soil organic matter (SOM) of 560-800 m2/g as determined by the ethylene glycol (EG) retention method was reexamined by the standard BET method based on nitrogen adsorption at liquid nitrogen temperature. Test samples consisted of two high organic content soils, a freeze-dried soil humic acid, and an oven-dried soil humic acid. The measured BET areas for these samples were less than 1 m2/g, except for the freeze-dried humic acid. The results suggest that surface adsorption of nonionic organic compounds by SOM is practically insignificant in comparison to uptake by partition. The discrepancy between the surface areas of SOM obtained by BET and EG methods was explained in terms of the 'free surface area' and the 'apparent surface area' associated with these measurements.

  6. Morphological Study of Insoluble Organic Matter Residues from Primitive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Changela, H. G.; Stroud, R. M.; Peeters, Z.; Nittler, L. R.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; DeGregorio, B. T.; Cody, G. D.

    2012-01-01

    Insoluble organic matter (IOM) constitutes a major proportion, 70-99%, of the total organic carbon found in primitive chondrites [1, 2]. One characteristic morphological component of IOM is nanoglobules [3, 4]. Some nanoglobules exhibit large N-15 and D enrichments relative to solar values, indicating that they likely originated in the ISM or the outskirts of the protoplanetary disk [3]. A recent study of samples from the Tagish Lake meteorite with varying levels of hydrothermal alteration suggest that nanoglobule abundance decreases with increasing hydrothermal alteration [5]. The aim of this study is to further document the morphologies of IOM from a range of primitive chondrites in order to determine any correlation of morphology with petrographic grade and chondrite class that could constrain the formation and/or alteration mechanisms.

  7. Diversity, abundance and activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in fine particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jing-Feng; Fan, Xiao-Yan; Pan, Kai-Ling; Li, Hong-Yu; Sun, Li-Xin

    2016-12-01

    Increasing ammonia emissions could exacerbate air pollution caused by fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Therefore, it is of great importance to investigate ammonia oxidation in PM2.5. This study investigated the diversity, abundance and activity of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and complete ammonia oxidizers (Comammox) in PM2.5 collected in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei megalopolis, China. Nitrosopumilus subcluster 5.2 was the most dominant AOA. Nitrosospira multiformis and Nitrosomonas aestuarii were the most dominant AOB. Comammox were present in the atmosphere, as revealed by the occurrence of Candidatus Nitrospira inopinata in PM2.5. The average cell numbers of AOA, AOB and Ca. N. inopinata were 2.82 × 104, 4.65 × 103 and 1.15 × 103 cell m‑3 air, respectively. The average maximum nitrification rate of PM2.5 was 0.14 μg (NH4+-N) [m3 air·h]‑1. AOA might account for most of the ammonia oxidation, followed by Comammox, while AOB were responsible for a small part of ammonia oxidation. Statistical analyses showed that Nitrososphaera subcluster 4.1 was positively correlated with organic carbon concentration, and Nitrosomonas eutropha showed positive correlation with ammonia concentration. Overall, this study expanded our knowledge concerning AOA, AOB and Comammox in PM2.5 and pointed towards an important role of AOA and Comammox in ammonia oxidation in PM2.5.

  8. Diversity, abundance and activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in fine particulate matter

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jing-Feng; Fan, Xiao-Yan; Pan, Kai-Ling; Li, Hong-Yu; Sun, Li-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Increasing ammonia emissions could exacerbate air pollution caused by fine particulate matter (PM2.5). Therefore, it is of great importance to investigate ammonia oxidation in PM2.5. This study investigated the diversity, abundance and activity of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and complete ammonia oxidizers (Comammox) in PM2.5 collected in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei megalopolis, China. Nitrosopumilus subcluster 5.2 was the most dominant AOA. Nitrosospira multiformis and Nitrosomonas aestuarii were the most dominant AOB. Comammox were present in the atmosphere, as revealed by the occurrence of Candidatus Nitrospira inopinata in PM2.5. The average cell numbers of AOA, AOB and Ca. N. inopinata were 2.82 × 104, 4.65 × 103 and 1.15 × 103 cell m−3 air, respectively. The average maximum nitrification rate of PM2.5 was 0.14 μg (NH4+-N) [m3 air·h]−1. AOA might account for most of the ammonia oxidation, followed by Comammox, while AOB were responsible for a small part of ammonia oxidation. Statistical analyses showed that Nitrososphaera subcluster 4.1 was positively correlated with organic carbon concentration, and Nitrosomonas eutropha showed positive correlation with ammonia concentration. Overall, this study expanded our knowledge concerning AOA, AOB and Comammox in PM2.5 and pointed towards an important role of AOA and Comammox in ammonia oxidation in PM2.5. PMID:27941955

  9. Factors controlling the abundance of organic sulfur in flash pyrolyzates of Upper Cretaceous kerogens from Sergipe Basin, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carmo, A.M.; Stankiewicz, B.A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Pratt, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    The molecular and elemental composition of immature kerogens isolated from Upper Cretaceous marine carbonates from Sergipe Basin, Brazil were investigated using combined pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and organic petrographic techniques. The kerogens are predominantly composed of reddish-fluorescing amorphous organic matter (AOM) and variable amounts of yellow-fluorescing alginite and liptodetrinite. The abundance of organic sulfur in the kerogens inferred from the ratio 2-ethyl-5-methylthiophene/(1,2-dimethylbenzene + dec-1-ene) in the pyrolyzates is variable and may be related to changes in the type of primary organic input and/or to variations in rates of bacterial sulfate reduction. A concomitant increase in S/C and O/C ratios determined in situ using the electron microprobe is observed in AOM and alginites and may be related to a progressive oxidation of the organic matter during sulfurization. The S/C ratio of the AOM is systematically higher than the S C ratio of the alginites. Combined with a thiophene distribution characteristic of pyrolyzates of Type II organic matter, the higher S/C of AOM in Sergipe kerogens suggests that sulfurization and incorporation of low-molecular weight lipids derived from normal marine organic matter into the kerogen structure predominated over direct sulfurization of highly aliphatic algal biomacromolecules.The molecular and elemental composition of immature kerogens isolated from Upper Cretaceous marine carbonates from Sergipe Basin, Brazil were investigated using combined pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and organic petrographic techniques. The kerogens are predominantly composed of reddish-fluorescing amorphous organic matter (AOM) and variable amounts of yellow-fluorescing alginite and liptodetrinite. The abundance of organic sulfur in the kerogens inferred from the ratio 2-ethyl-5-methylthiophene/(1,2-dimethylbenzene+dec-1-ene) in the pyrolyzates is variable and may be related to changes in

  10. Organic geochemical analysis of sedimentary organic matter associated with uranium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leventhal, J.S.; Daws, T.A.; Frye, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    Samples of sedimentary organic matter from several geologic environments and ages which are enriched in uranium (56 ppm to 12%) have been characterized. The three analytical techniqyes used to study the samples were Rock-Eval pyrolysis, pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and solid-state C-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. In samples with low uranium content, the pyrolysis-gas chromatography products contain oxygenated functional groups (as hydroxyl) and molecules with both aliphatic and aromatic carbon atoms. These samples with low uranium content give measurable Rock-Eval hydrocarbon and organic-CO2 yields, and C-13 NMR values of > 30% aliphatic carbon. In contrast, uranium-rich samples have few hydrocarbon pyrolysis products, increased Rock-Eval organic-CO2 contents and > 70% aromatic carbon contents from C-13 NMR. The increase in aromaticity and decrease in hydrocarbon pyrolysis yield are related to the amount of uranium and the age of the uranium minerals, which correspond to the degree of radiation damage. The three analytical techniques give complementary results. Increase in Rock-Eval organic-CO2 yield correlates with uranium content for samples from the Grants uranium region. Calculations show that the amount of organic-CO2 corresponds to the quantity of uranium chemically reduced by the organic matter for the Grants uranium region samples. ?? 1986.

  11. Rare earth elements and neodymium isotopes in sedimentary organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freslon, Nicolas; Bayon, Germain; Toucanne, Samuel; Bermell, Sylvain; Bollinger, Claire; Chéron, Sandrine; Etoubleau, Joel; Germain, Yoan; Khripounoff, Alexis; Ponzevera, Emmanuel; Rouget, Marie-Laure

    2014-09-01

    (inferred from the analysis of local surface seawater). A notable exception is the case of organic matter (OM) fractions leached from cold seep sediment samples, which sometimes exhibit εNd values markedly different from both terrigenous and surface seawater signatures. This suggests that a significant fraction of organic compounds in these sediments may be derived from chemosynthetic processes, recycling pore water REE characterized by a distinct isotopic composition. Overall, our results confirm that organic matter probably plays an important role in the oceanic REE budget, through direct scavenging and remineralization within the water column. Both the high REE abundances and the shape of shale-normalized patterns for leached SOM also suggest that OM degradation in sub-surface marine sediments during early diagenesis could control, to a large extent, the distribution of REE in pore waters. Benthic fluxes of organic-bound REE could hence substantially contribute to the exchange processes between particulates and seawater that take place at ocean margins. Neodymium isotopes could provide useful information for tracing the origin (terrestrial versus marine) and geographical provenance of organic matter, with potential applications in paleoceanography. In particular, future studies should further investigate the potential of Nd isotopes in organic compounds preserved in sedimentary records for reconstructing past variations of surface ocean circulation.

  12. The fate of airborne polycyclic organic matter.

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, T; Ramdahl, T; Bjørseth, A

    1983-01-01

    Biological tests have shown that a significant part of the mutagenicity of organic extracts of collected airborne particulate matter is not due to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). It is possible that part of these unknown compounds are transformation products of PAH. This survey focuses on the reaction of PAH in the atmosphere with other copollutants, such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, ozone and free radicals and their reaction products. Photochemically induced reactions of PAH are also included. The reactivity of particle-associated PAH is discussed in relation to the chemical composition and the physical properties of the carrier. Recommendations for future work are given. PMID:6825615

  13. Organic Matter in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruiskshank, Dale P.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Many solid bodies in the outer Solar System are covered with ices of various compositions, including water, carbon dioxide, methane, nitrogen, and other molecules that are solid at the low temperatures that prevail there. These ices have all been detected by remote sensing observations made with telescopes on Earth, or more recently, spacecraft in orbit (notably Galileo at Jupiter). The data also reveal other solid materials that could be minerals or complex carbon-bearing organic molecules. A study in progress using large ground-based telescopes to acquire infrared spectroscopic data, and laboratory results on the optical properties of complex organic matter, seeks to identify the non-icy materials on several satellites of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The work on the satellites of Saturn is in part preparatory to the Cassini spacecraft investigation of the Saturn system, which will begin in 2004 and extend for four years.

  14. Relic abundance of dark matter in universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Sato, Joe; Yamanaka, Masato; Senami, Masato

    2007-08-15

    Relic abundance of dark matter is investigated in the framework of universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos. These models are free from the serious Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton problem that the original universal extra dimension model has. The first KK particle of the right-handed neutrino is a candidate for dark matter in this framework, and its relic abundance is determined by three processes, (1) the decay of the KK photon into the first KK right-handed neutrino in the late universe, (2) production of the first KK right-handed neutrino from the thermal bath in the early universe, and (3) the decay of higher KK right-handed neutrinos into the first KK right-handed neutrino in the late universe. When ordinary neutrino masses are large enough such as the degenerate mass spectrum case, the last process contributes to the abundance significantly, even if the reheating temperature is low. The scale of the extra dimension consistent with cosmological observations can be 500 GeV in the minimal setup of universal extra dimension models with right-handed neutrinos.

  15. Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter in Southwestern Greenland Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osburn, C. L.; Giles, M. E.; Underwood, G. J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important property of Arctic lake ecosystems, originating from allochthonous inputs from catchments and autochthonous production by plankton in the water column. Little is known about the quality of DOM in Arctic lakes that lack substantial inputs from catchments and such lakes are abundant in southwestern Greenland. Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), the fraction that absorbs ultraviolet (UV) and visible light, is the controlling factor for the optical properties of many surface waters and as well informs on the quality of DOM. We examined the quality of CDOM in 21 lakes in southwestern Greenland, from the ice sheet to the coast, as part of a larger study examining the role of DOM in regulating microbial communities in these lakes. DOM was size fractioned and absorbance and fluorescence was measured on each size fraction, as well as on bulk DOM. The specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) at 254 nm (SUVA254), computed by normalizing absorption (a254) to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, provided an estimate of the aromatic carbon content of DOM. SUVA values were generally <2, indicating low aromatic content. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) of CDOM fluorescence was used to determine the relative abundance of allochthonous and autochthonous DOM in all size fractions. Younger lakes near the ice sheet and lakes near the coast had lower amounts of CDOM and appeared more microbial in quality. However, lakes centrally located between the ice sheet and the coast had the highest CDOM concentrations and exhibited strong humic fluorescence. Overall distinct differences in CDOM quality were observed between lake locations and among DOM size fractions.

  16. Stability of Ferrihydrite and Organic Matter in Ferrihydrite-Organic Matter Associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, K.; Totsche, K. U.

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxides can bind particularly large amounts of organic matter (OM) and seem to be an important control on OM storage in many soils. To better understand the interactions between Fe oxides and OM, we produced ferrihydrite-OM associations by adsorption and coprecipitation in laboratory experiments. Because ferrihydrites are often formed in OM-rich solutions, we assume that coprecipitation is a common process in nature. In contrast to adsorption on pre-existing ferrihydrite surfaces, coprecipitation involves adsorption, occlusion (physical entrapment of OM), formation of Fe-OM complexes, and poisoning of ferrihydrite growth. The reactivity of coprecipitates may therefore differ from ferriydrites with adsorbed OM. Incubation experiments with an inoculum extracted from a Podzol forest-floor were carried out to quantify the mineralization of the adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter. These experiments showed that the association with ferrihydrite stabilized the associated organic matter, but that differences in the degradability of adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter were small. We therefore conclude that coprecipitation does not lead to a significant formation of microbial inaccessible organic matter domains. Microbial reduction experiments were performed using Geobacter bremensis. We observed that increasing amounts of associated OM led to decreasing initial reaction rates and a decreasing degree of dissolution. Reduction of coprecipitated ferrihydrites was faster than reduction of ferrihydrites with adsorbed OM. Our data demonstrate that the association with ferrihydrite can effectively stabilize labile polysaccharides. Vice versa, these polysaccharides may protect ferrihydrite from reduction by Geobacter-like bacteria. However, a challenge for future studies will be to link formation and degradation of mineral-organic associations to natural porous systems, that is, to the complex interplay of mass transport and microbial distribution in the

  17. Dispersed and accumulated organic matter in fractures: Primary migration evidences

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, L.; Pasquali, J. )

    1993-02-01

    Concentrated organic matter accumulated in fractures (organic rich fraction) and dispersed organic matter (total rock) of the source rocks of the Querecual and San Antonio formations of the Eastern Venezuelan basin were studied. The distribution of organic matter was studied in polished sections. Sample were analyzed for total organic carbon (Ct), total bitumen and the n-alkane fraction within the bitumen. Dispersed and concentrated organic matter were analyzed separately, and the pertinent differences were established. Concentrated organic matter, probably accumulated to due migration of dispersed organic matter into fractures, or low pressure zones is deficient in n-alkanes of low molecular weight. This fact is interpreted as the result of the migration process that allows the preferential movement of light components of low polarity. It seems that the products of kerogen maturation start their transformation to materials more like crude oils from their primary migration, stage that is to say, within the source rock.

  18. Estimating the size and abundance of dark matter subhaloes with gravitational millilensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vives-Arias, H.; Jiménez-Vicente, J.; Muñoz, J. A.; Mediavilla, E.

    2017-03-01

    We use 8 gravitational lens systems with quadruply imaged quasars and their observed flux ratio anomalies obtained using data in mid-infrared, radio or spectral narrow lines as a baseline, to estimate the amount of substructure in the dark matter halo of lens galaxies. We assume that the smooth gravitational potential of the galaxies is well modeled by a Singular Isothermal Ellipsoid (SIE) plus external shear (γ) and an additional Singular Isothermal Sphere (SIS) in some cases, and that the cause of the flux ratio anomalies is dark matter subhalos described by pseudo-Jaffe density profiles. Our Bayesian estimate for the Einstein radius of the subhalos is b = 0.0003^{+0.0005}_{-0.0002} arcsec, and their abundance (as a fraction of the total surface density of the lens galaxy at the image positions) is α =Ê0.075^{+0.030}_{-0.021}.

  19. Relating dissolved organic matter fluorescence to functional properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipping, E.; Baker, A.; Thacker, S.; Gondar, D.

    2007-12-01

    The fluorescence excitation emission matrix properties of dissolved organic matter from three rivers and one lake in NW England are analysed. Sites are sampled in duplicate and for some sites seasonally to cover variations in dissolved organic matter composition, river flow, and carbon isotopic (13C, 14C) variability. Results are compared to the functional properties of the dissolved organic matter, the functional assays provide quantitative information on light absorption, fluorescence, photochemical fading, pH buffering, copper binding, benzo[a]pyrene binding, hydrophilicity and adsorption to alumina. Fluorescence characterization of the dissolved organic matter samples demonstrates that peak C fluorescence emission wavelength, the ratio of peak T to peak C fluorescence intensity, and the fluorescence : absorbance ratio best differentiate different dissolved organic matter samples. These parameters correspond to dissolved organic matter aromaticity, the ratio of labile to recalcitrant organic matter, and dissolved organic matter molecular weight. Peak C fluorescence emission wavelength, the ratio of peak T to peak C fluorescence intensity, and the fluorescence : absorbance ratio fluorescence parameters also have strong correlations with several of the functional assays, in particular the extinction coefficients, benzo(a)pyrene binding and alumina adsorption, and buffering capacity. In many cases, regression equations with a correlation coefficient >0.9 are obtained, suggesting that dissolved organic matter functional character can be predicted from DOM fluorescence properties. For one site, the relationship between dissolved organic matter source, fluorescence, function and carbon isotopic composition is discussed.

  20. Seasonal Variability of Particulate Organic Matter in a Mountain Stream in Central Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollá, Salvador; Robles, Santiago; Casado, Carmen

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to study the influence of environmental characteristics of the Mediterranean climate on seasonal variability of particulate organic matter abundance in a mountain stream. Coarse and fine fractions of both suspended and benthic particulate organic matter were determined on 14 occasions between February 1998 and November 1999 in a second-order Mediterranean stream in Central Spain (Arroyo Mediano). Temporal variability of suspended organic matter followed a seasonal pattern, attributed to litter-fall inputs, instream processing, and the hydrological regime. Suspended organic matter (SOM) and its seasonal variability fall well within the range reported for streams in temperate non-Mediterranean deciduous forest. However, we found no seasonal trend in benthic organic matter (BOM) storage, and it seems that the amount of BOM remained fairly constant throughout the year. Reach retention (evaluated as the ratio between BOM and SOM per m2) was higher in summer during reduced stream flow, mainly due to coarse particulate organic matter storage. These observations do not differ from those reported for other headwater streams in temperate forested biomes, from which we conclude that there was no evidence of a Mediterranean influence on particulate organic matter dynamics in the Mediano stream, nor probably in other headwater Mediterranean streams.

  1. The Origin of Organic Matter in the Solar System: Evidence from Interplanetary Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Jacobsen, C.; Wirick, S.

    2001-01-01

    The origin of the organic matter in interplanetary materials has not been established. A variety of mechanisms have been proposed, with two extreme cases being a Fisher-Tropsch type process operating in the gas phase of the solar nebula or a Miller-Urey type process, which requires interaction with an aqueous fluid, presumably occurring on an asteroid. In the Fisher-Tropsch case, we might expect similar organic matter in hydrated and anhydrous interplanetary materials. However, aqueous alteration is required in the case of the Miller-Urey process, and we would expect to see organic matter preferentially in interplanetary materials that exhibit evidence of aqueous activity, such as the presence of hydrated silicates. The types and abundance of organic matter in meteorites have been used as an indicator of the origin of organic matter in the Solar System. Indigenous complex organic matter, including amino acids, has been found in hydrated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, such as Murchison. Much lower amounts of complex organic matter, possibly only terrestrial contamination, have been found in anhydrous carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, such as Allende, that contain most of their carbon in elemental form. These results seem to favor production of the bulk of the organic matter in the Solar System by aqueous processing on parent bodies such as asteroids, a Miller-Urey process. However, the hydrated carbonaceous chondrite meteorites have approximately solar abundances of the moderately volatile elements, while all anhydrous carbonaceous chondrite meteorites have significantly lower contents of these moderately volatile elements. Two mechanisms, incomplete condensation or evaporation, both of which involve processing at approx. 1200 C, have been suggested to explain the lower content of the moderately volatile elements in all anhydrous meteorites. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Starting life requires more than organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, R.

    2015-10-01

    A physicochemical approach is proposed to study requirements for the origin of life in agreement with developments made in Systems Chemistry for several decades. Emphasis is made on the occurrence of environments generating abiotic chemical systems making more of themselves under far from equilibrium conditions. It follows that the presence of organic matter is only one of the components needed for the process of chemical evolution leading to life. The presence of an energy source with a potential equivalent to that of visible light is needed to render the activation step kinetically irreversible and the reproduction loop a unidirectional flux of reactants. This condition is required in order that reproduction follows an exponential law and dynamic kinetic stability governs the evolution toward the selection of improved variants. According to these views, no fundamental difference can be found between the chemical and biological stages of evolution.

  3. Highly Pristine Organic Matter in a Xenolith Clast in the Zag H Chrondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kebukawa, Y.; Ito, M.; Zolensky, M. E.; Nakato, A.; Suga, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Takeichi, Y.; Mase, K.; Chan, Q.; Fries, M.; Kobayashi, K.

    2017-01-01

    The Zag meteorite is a halite-bearing H3-6 chondrite [1]. We have been studying a dark Zag clast with abundant organic matter [2,3], which was proposed to be from Ceres [4,5]. Therefore, our systematic research of the Zag clast may provide an important linkage to the recent remote sensing observations obtained by the DAWN mission to Ceres. We prepared a new sub-sample of this clast for coordinated organic analysis by STXM-XANES and NanoSIMS, in order to understand the nature and origin of the organic matter.

  4. Composition of dissolved organic matter in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longnecker, Krista; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B.

    2011-05-01

    Groundwater constitutes a globally important source of freshwater for drinking water and other agricultural and industrial purposes, and is a prominent source of freshwater flowing into the coastal ocean. Therefore, understanding the chemical components of groundwater is relevant to both coastal and inland communities. We used electrospray ionization coupled with Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) to examine dissolved organic compounds in groundwater prior to and after passage through a sediment-filled column containing microorganisms. The data revealed that an unexpectedly high proportion of organic compounds contained nitrogen and sulfur, possibly due to transport of surface waters from septic systems and rain events. We matched 292 chemical features, based on measured mass:charge ( m/z) values, to compounds stored in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). A subset of these compounds (88) had only one structural isomer in KEGG, thus supporting tentative identification. Most identified elemental formulas were linked with metabolic pathways that produce polyketides or with secondary metabolites produced by plants. The presence of polyketides in groundwater is notable because of their anti-bacterial and anti-cancer properties. However, their relative abundance must be quantified with appropriate analyses to assess any implications for public health.

  5. Dissolved organic matter photolysis in Canadian arctic thaw ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurion, Isabelle; Mladenov, Natalie

    2013-09-01

    The abundant thaw lakes and ponds in the circumarctic receive a new pool of organic carbon as permafrost peat soils degrade, which can be exposed to significant irradiance that potentially increases as climate warms and ice cover shortens. Exposure to sunlight is known to accelerate the transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) into molecules that can be more readily used by microbes. We sampled the water from two common classes of ponds found in the ice-wedge system of continuous permafrost regions of Canada, polygonal and runnel ponds, and followed the transformation of DOM over 12 days by looking at dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration and DOM absorption and fluorescence properties. The results indicate a relatively fast decay of color (3.4 and 1.6% loss d-1 of absorption at 320 nm for the polygonal and runnel pond, respectively) and fluorescence (6.1 and 8.3% loss d-1 of total fluorescent components, respectively) at the pond surface, faster in the case of humic-like components, but insignificant losses of DOC over the observed period. This result indicates that direct DOM mineralization (photochemical production of CO2) is apparently minor in thaw ponds compared to the photochemical transformation of DOM into less chromophoric and likely more labile molecules with a greater potential for microbial mineralization. Therefore, DOM photolysis in arctic thaw ponds can be considered as a catalytic mechanism, accelerating the microbial turnover of mobilized organic matter from thawing permafrost and the production of greenhouse gases, especially in the most shallow ponds. Under a warming climate, this mechanism will intensify as summers lengthen.

  6. Relic abundance in a secluded dark matter scenario with a massive mediator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawa, Shohei; Tanabashi, Masaharu; Yamanaka, Masato

    2017-01-01

    The relic abundance of the dark matter (DM) particle d is studied in a secluded DM scenario, in which the d number decreasing process dominantly occurs not through the pair annihilation of d into the standard model particles, but via the d d →m m scattering process with a subsequently decaying mediator particle m . It is pointed out that the cosmologically observed relic abundance of DM can be accomplished even with a massive mediator having a mass mm non-negligibly heavy compared with the DM particle mass md. In the degenerated d -m case (md=mm), the DM relic abundance is realized by adjusting the d d →m m scattering amplitude large enough and by choosing an appropriate mediator particle lifetime. The DM evolution in the early universe exhibits characteristic "terrace" behavior, or two-step number density decreasing behavior, having a "fake" freeze-out at the first step. Based on these observations, a novel possibility of the DM model buildings is introduced in which the mediator particle m is unified with the DM particle d in an approximate dark symmetry multiplet. A pionic DM model is proposed to illustrate this idea in a renormalizable field theory framework.

  7. Dilaton dominance in the early universe dilutes dark matter relic abundances

    SciTech Connect

    Lahanas, A. B.

    2011-05-15

    The role of the dilaton field and its coupling to matter may result in a dilution of dark matter (DM) relic densities. This is to be contrasted with quintessence scenarios in which relic densities are augmented, due to modification of the expansion rate, since the Universe is not radiation dominated at DM decoupling. The dilaton field, besides this, affects relic densities through its coupling to dust which tends to decrease relic abundances. Thus two separate mechanisms compete with each other resulting, in general, in a decrease of the relic density. This feature may be welcomed and can help the situation if direct dark matter experiments point towards small neutralino-nucleon cross sections, implying small neutralino annihilation rates and hence large relic densities, at least in the popular supersymmetric scenarios. In the presence of a diluting mechanism, both experimental constraints can be met. The role of the dilaton for this mechanism has been studied in the context of the noncritical string theory but in this work we follow a rather general approach assuming that the dilaton dominates only at early eras long before big bang nucleosynthesis.

  8. Soil Organic Matter and Management of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, T. L.; Mitkowski, N. A.; Abawi, G. S.

    2002-01-01

    Organic matter and its replenishment has become a major component of soil health management programs. Many of the soil's physical, chemical, and biological properties are a function of organic matter content and quality. Adding organic matter to soil influences diverse and important biological activities. The diversity and number of free-living and plant-parasitic nematodes are altered by rotational crops, cover crops, green manures, and other sources of organic matter. Soil management programs should include the use of the proper organic materials to improve soil chemical, physical, and biological parameters and to suppress plant-parasitic nematodes and soilborne pathogens. It is critical to monitor the effects of organic matter additions on activities of major and minor plant-parasitic nematodes in the production system. This paper presents a general review of information in the literature on the effects of crop rotation, cover crops, and green manures on nematodes and their damage to economic crops. PMID:19265946

  9. Insights into the nature of cometary organic matter from terrestrial analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Court, Richard W.; Sephton, Mark A.

    2012-04-01

    The nature of cometary organic matter is of great interest to investigations involving the formation and distribution of organic matter relevant to the origin of life. We have used pyrolysis-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to investigate the chemical effects of the irradiation of naturally occurring bitumens, and to relate their products of pyrolysis to their parent assemblages. The information acquired has then been applied to the complex organic matter present in cometary nuclei and comae. Amalgamating the FTIR data presented here with data from published studies enables the inference of other comprehensive trends within hydrocarbon mixtures as they are progressively irradiated in a cometary environment, namely the polymerization of lower molecular weight compounds; an increased abundance of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon structures; enrichment in 13C; reduction in atomic H/C ratio; elevation of atomic O/C ratio and increase in the temperature required for thermal degradation. The dark carbonaceous surface of a cometary nucleus will display extreme levels of these features, relative to the nucleus interior, while material in the coma will reflect the degree of irradiation experienced by its source location in the nucleus. Cometary comae with high methane/water ratios indicate a nucleus enriched in methane, favouring the formation of complex organic matter via radiation-induced polymerization of simple precursors. In contrast, production of complex organic matter is hindered in a nucleus possessing a low methane/water ration, with the complex organic matter that does form possessing more oxygen-containing species, such as alcohol, carbonyl and carboxylic acid functional groups, resulting from reactions with hydroxyl radicals formed by the radiolysis of the more abundant water. These insights into the properties of complex cometary organic matter should be of particular interest to both remote observation and space missions involving in situ

  10. Sensitivity of soil organic matter in anthropogenically disturbed organic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Säurich, Annelie; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Bechtold, Michel; Don, Axel; Freibauer, Annette

    2016-04-01

    Drained peatlands are hotspots of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from agriculture. However, the variability of CO2 emissions increases with disturbance, and little is known on the soil properties causing differences between seemingly similar sites. Furthermore the driving factors for carbon cycling are well studied for both genuine peat and mineral soil, but there is a lack of information concerning soils at the boundary between organic and mineral soils. Examples for such soils are both soils naturally relatively high in soil organic matter (SOM) such as Humic Gleysols and former peat soils with a relative low SOM content due to intensive mineralization or mixing with underlying or applied mineral soil. The study aims to identify drivers for the sensitivity of soil organic matter and therefore for respiration rates of anthropogenically disturbed organic soils, especially those near the boundary to mineral soils. Furthermore, we would like to answer the question whether there are any critical thresholds of soil organic carbon (SOC) concentrations beyond which the carbon-specific respiration rates change. The German agricultural soil inventory samples all agricultural soils in Germany in an 8x8 km² grid following standardized protocols. From this data and sample base, we selected 120 different soil samples from more than 80 sites. As reference sites, three anthropogenically undisturbed peatlands were sampled as well. We chose samples from the soil inventory a) 72 g kg-1 SOC and b) representing the whole range of basic soil properties: SOC (72 to 568 g kg-1), total nitrogen (2 to 29 g kg-1), C-N-ratio (10 to 80) bulk density (0.06 to 1.41 g/cm³), pH (2.5 to 7.4), sand (0 to 95 %) and clay (2 to 70 %) content (only determined for samples with less than 190 g kg-1 SOC) as well as the botanical origin of the peat (if determinable). Additionally, iron oxides were determined for all samples. All samples were sieved (2 mm) and incubated at standardized water content and

  11. Aerobic methane production from organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigano, I.

    2010-01-01

    Methane, together with H2O, CO2 and N2O, is an important greenhouse gas in th e Earth’s atmosphere playing a key role in the radiative budget. It has be en known for decades that the production of the reduced compound CH4 is possible almost exclusively in anoxic environments per opera of one of the most importan t class of microorganisms which form the Archaea reign. Methane can be produced also from incomplete combustion of organic material. The generation of CH4 in an oxygenated environment under near-ambient conditions is a new discovery made in 2006 by Keppler et. al where surprisingly they measured emissions of this green house gas from plants incubated in chambers with air containing 20% of oxygen. A lthough the estimates on a global scale are still object of an intensive debate, the results presented in this thesis clearly show the existence of methane prod uction under oxic conditions for non living plant material. Temperature and UV l ight are key factors that drive the generation of CH4 from plant matter in a wel l oxygenated environment.

  12. The evolution of organic matter in space.

    PubMed

    Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Spaans, Marco; Holm, Nils G

    2011-02-13

    Carbon, and molecules made from it, have already been observed in the early Universe. During cosmic time, many galaxies undergo intense periods of star formation, during which heavy elements like carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, silicon and iron are produced. Also, many complex molecules, from carbon monoxide to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, are detected in these systems, like they are for our own Galaxy. Interstellar molecular clouds and circumstellar envelopes are factories of complex molecular synthesis. A surprisingly high number of molecules that are used in contemporary biochemistry on the Earth are found in the interstellar medium, planetary atmospheres and surfaces, comets, asteroids and meteorites and interplanetary dust particles. Large quantities of extra-terrestrial material were delivered via comets and asteroids to young planetary surfaces during the heavy bombardment phase. Monitoring the formation and evolution of organic matter in space is crucial in order to determine the prebiotic reservoirs available to the early Earth. It is equally important to reveal abiotic routes to prebiotic molecules in the Earth environments. Materials from both carbon sources (extra-terrestrial and endogenous) may have contributed to biochemical pathways on the Earth leading to life's origin. The research avenues discussed also guide us to extend our knowledge to other habitable worlds.

  13. Spectral Characterization of Plant-Derived Dissolved Organic Matter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from fresh or early-stage decomposing soil amendment materials may play an important role in the process of organic matter accumulation. The DOM can influence many chemical processes, due to its reactivity with both soil solution components and soil surfaces. W...

  14. The Biogeochemistry of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter in Coastal Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    97-1-0720 LONG-TERM GOAL The long-term goal of this research is to better understand the biogeochemical cycling of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in...are analyzed for particulate organic carbon and nitrogen , chlorophyll a, total suspended matter, DO13C, and fluorescence lifetime. These samples have

  15. Sources of organic matter for intertidal consumers on Ascophyllum-shores (SW Iceland): a multi-stable isotope approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarà, G.; de Pirro, M.; Romano, C.; Rumolo, P.; Sprovieri, M.; Mazzola, A.

    2007-12-01

    Stable isotopes were used to examine the origin of organic matter in Icelandic Ascophyllum-based habitats, the role of different organic matters in filling intertidal food webs and the food preferences of the most abundant suspension feeders, grazers and predators. We selected three intertidal sites on the SW coast of Iceland where we sampled in early September 2004, organic matter sources (POM, SOM and most abundant primary producers, A. nodosum and F. vesciculosus) and the most abundant macrofauna species (barnacles, mussels, gastropods, sponge and crabs). Even though the primary production ( Ascophyllum-based) was the same at the three study sites, the isotopic composition of common-among-sites organisms varied due to local differences in the origin of available POM and SOM and in food web structures.

  16. Organic Matter Sequestration in Oregon Margin Sediments: Tectonic, Climatic and Oceanographic Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coccoli, C. A.; Goni, M. A.; Alleau, Y.; Smith, L.

    2014-12-01

    A combination of box, gravity and piston cores from a site on the upper slope off the Umpqua River in the central Oregon margin were used to create a high-resolution record of organic matter burial over the past ~13,000 years. Our objective is to understand how variations in precipitation intensity and frequency, tectonic uplift rates, and topographic relief affect the magnitude and composition of organic matter deposited along this margin. To examine the possible tectonic and climatic factors influencing the land-ocean relationship of Cascadia during the late Holocene, we measured the organic carbon content, carbon-nitrogen ratio, stable isotopic compositions of organic carbon, yields of lignin-derived and lipid-derived constituents, and mineral surface area of collected sediments from box, kasten and piston cores. Decreases in several organic constituents revealed a potential preferential degradation of marine organic matter over time. Lignin phenol abundances oscillated downcore, pointing towards changes in the provenance of terrigenous organic matter transported to this site. Primary component analysis (PCA) illustrated distinct marine and terrestrial organic matter-dominated segments of the record, which will be correlated to eustatic, tectonic and climatic forcings over the late Holocene.

  17. Size matters: abundance matching, galaxy sizes, and the Tully-Fisher relation in EAGLE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Ismael; Navarro, Julio F.; Abadi, Mario G.; Sales, Laura V.; Bower, Richard G.; Crain, Robert A.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2017-02-01

    The Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) links the stellar mass of a disc galaxy, Mstr, to its rotation speed: it is well approximated by a power law, shows little scatter, and evolves weakly with redshift. The relation has been interpreted as reflecting the mass-velocity scaling (M ∝ V3) of dark matter haloes, but this interpretation has been called into question by abundance-matching (AM) models, which predict the galaxy-halo mass relation to deviate substantially from a single power law and to evolve rapidly with redshift. We study the TFR of luminous spirals and its relation to AM using the EAGLE set of Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological simulations. Matching both relations requires disc sizes to satisfy constraints given by the concentration of haloes and their response to galaxy assembly. EAGLE galaxies approximately match these constraints and show a tight mass-velocity scaling that compares favourably with the observed TFR. The TFR is degenerate to changes in galaxy formation efficiency and the mass-size relation; simulations that fail to match the galaxy stellar mass function may fit the observed TFR if galaxies follow a different mass-size relation. The small scatter in the simulated TFR results because, at fixed halo mass, galaxy mass and rotation speed correlate strongly, scattering galaxies along the main relation. EAGLE galaxies evolve with lookback time following approximately the prescriptions of AM models and the observed mass-size relation of bright spirals, leading to a weak TFR evolution consistent with observation out to z = 1. ΛCDM models that match both the abundance and size of galaxies as a function of stellar mass have no difficulty reproducing the observed TFR and its evolution.

  18. Detection of organic matter in interstellar grains.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Y J

    1997-06-01

    Star formation and the subsequent evolution of planetary systems occurs in dense molecular clouds, which are comprised, in part, of interstellar dust grains gathered from the diffuse interstellar medium (DISM). Radio observations of the interstellar medium reveal the presence of organic molecules in the gas phase and infrared observational studies provide details concerning the solid-state features in dust grains. In particular, a series of absorption bands have been observed near 3.4 microns (approximately 2940 cm-1) towards bright infrared objects which are seen through large column densities of interstellar dust. Comparisons of organic residues, produced under a variety of laboratory conditions, to the diffuse interstellar medium observations have shown that aliphatic hydrocarbon grains are responsible for the spectral absorption features observed near 3.4 microns (approximately 2940 cm-1). These hydrocarbons appear to carry the -CH2- and -CH3 functional groups in the abundance ratio CH2/CH3 approximately 2.5, and the amount of carbon tied up in this component is greater than 4% of the cosmic carbon available. On a galactic scale, the strength of the 3.4 microns band does not scale linearly with visual extinction, but instead increases more rapidly for objects near the Galactic Center. A similar trend is noted in the strength of the Si-O absorption band near 9.7 microns. The similar behavior of the C-H and Si-O stretching bands suggests that these two components may be coupled, perhaps in the form of grains with silicate cores and refractory organic mantles. The ubiquity of the hydrocarbon features seen in the near infrared near 3.4 microns throughout out Galaxy and in other galaxies demonstrates the widespread availability of such material for incorporation into the many newly forming planetary systems. The similarity of the 3.4 microns features in any organic material with aliphatic hydrocarbons underscores the need for complete astronomical observational

  19. Origin of sedimentary organic matter at the Northern Cascadia Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, M.; Naraoka, H.

    2007-12-01

    Gas hydrate in marine sediments may have important roles on global carbon cycle and climatic change. We examined origins of sedimentary organic matter and bacterial activity in deep and hydrate-bearing sediment cored in Site U1327 and U1328 at northern Cascadia Margin by IODP Exp311, using σ13C of total organic carbon (TOC), σ15N of total nitrogen (TN), σ34S of total sulfur (TS), and σ13C of biomarkers in hydrocarbon fraction. In both sites, TOC/TN ratios and σ13C of TOC values ranged from 5.5 to 18.0 and -25.7 to -21.5 ‰, respectively, suggesting that sedimentary organic matter is a mixture of terrestrial and marine sources. Long chain (n)-alkanes (C27, C29, and C30), known as biomarkers of terrestrial higher plant were most abundant components (up to ~50 μg/gCorg) through down to 300 mbsf, and their σ13C values (-34.3 to -28.7 ‰) reveal their C3 plant origin. In addition, very long-chain alkene (C37) occurred in some sediments, which suggests the blooming by coccolithophore in the past. σ34S of TS values at both sites show large variation between -30 to +20 ‰. Most of σ34S of TS values were less than present σ34S value of seawater sulfate (+20.3 ‰). This is attributable to isotope fractionation during microbial sulfate reduction. Crocetenes including one double bond occurred in deep sediments with higher σ13C values (-23 ‰) than the reported σ13C values (< ~ -100 ‰, Elvert et al, 2000), providing possibility of heterotrophic archaea using marine organic matter as a carbon source. Pentamethylicosane (PMI) was detected in relatively high concentrations at 249 mbsf at Site U1328 and its σ13C value was -46.4 ‰. This PMI could be chemoautotrophic archaea in origin such as methanogen. Diploptene was also detected in most sediments with the σ13C value of -37 to -35 ‰, probably being characteristic of chemoautotrophic bacteria.

  20. Sources of organic matter in Ria Formosa revealed by stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machás, Raquel; Santos, Rui

    1999-07-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the major sources of organic matter for macroconsumers in the Ria Formosa tidal lagoon. The C, S and N isotopic natural abundances of abundant primary producers of particulate organic matter (POM) and Mytilus galloprovincialis muscle and digestive gland were analysed. The chlorophyll a (Chl a), the suspended particulate matter (SPM) and the POM were measured along the Faro-Olhão channel. The range of variation of stable isotope values among primary producers in Ria Formosa was low suggesting difficulties in the assessment of their relative contribution to higher levels of the food web. Chl a values decreased from outer station to inner station, while SPM and POM values increased. The multiple isotope approach illustrates that POM values along the Faro-Olhão channel, may result from a mixture of upland plants, benthic plants and phytoplankton. Mussel values indicate a selective diet of benthic macrophytes and phytoplankton, with the relative proportions of each determined by the location in the channel. During winters, the upland plants may be an important source of organic matter in the inner lagoon while phytoplankton was an important source of organic matter in the outer lagoon.

  1. The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to oxalic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studenroth, Sabine; Huber, Stefan; Schöler, H. F.

    2010-05-01

    The abiotic degradation of soil organic matter to volatile organic compounds was studied intensely over the last years (Keppler et al., 2000; Huber et al., 2009). It was shown that soil organic matter is oxidised due to the presence of iron (III), hydrogen peroxide and chloride and thereby produces diverse alkyl halides, which are emitted into the atmosphere. The formation of polar halogenated compounds like chlorinated acetic acids which are relevant toxic environmental substances was also found in soils and sediments (Kilian et al., 2002). The investigation of the formation of other polar halogenated and non-halogenated compounds like diverse mono- and dicarboxylic acids is going to attain more and more importance. Due to its high acidity oxalic acid might have impacts on the environment e.g., nutrient leaching, plant diseases and negative influence on microbial growth. In this study, the abiotic formation of oxalic acid in soil is examined. For a better understanding of natural degradation processes mechanistic studies were conducted using the model compound catechol as representative for structural elements of the humic substances and its reaction with iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide. Iron is one of the most abundant elements on earth and hydrogen peroxide is produced by bacteria or through incomplete reduction of oxygen. To find suitable parameters for an optimal reaction and a qualitative and quantitative analysis method the following reaction parameters are varied: concentration of iron (III) and hydrogen peroxide, time dependence, pH-value and influence of chloride. Analysis of oxalic acid was performed employing an ion chromatograph equipped with a conductivity detector. The time dependent reaction shows a relatively fast formation of oxalic acid, the optimum yield is achieved after 60 minutes. Compared to the concentration of catechol an excess of hydrogen peroxide as well as a low concentration of iron (III) are required. In absence of chloride the

  2. Dodelson-Widrow production of sterile neutrino Dark Matter with non-trivial initial abundance

    SciTech Connect

    Merle, Alexander; Totzauer, Maximilian; Schneider, Aurel E-mail: aurel@physik.uzh.ch

    2016-04-01

    The simplest way to create sterile neutrinos in the early Universe is by their admixture to active neutrinos. However, this mechanism, connected to the Dark Matter (DM) problem by Dodelson and Widrow (DW), cannot simulatenously meet the relic abundance constraint as well as bounds from structure formation and X-rays. Nonetheless, unless a symmetry forces active-sterile mixing to vanish exactly, the DW mechanism will unavoidably affect the sterile neutrino DM population created by any other production mechanism. We present a semi-analytic approach to the DW mechanism acting on an arbitrary initial abundance of sterile neutrinos, allowing to combine DW with any other preceeding production mechanism in a physical and precise way. While previous analyses usually assumed that the spectra produced by DW and another mechanism can simply be added, we use our semi-analytic results to discuss the validity of this assumption and to quantify its accurateness, thereby also scrutinising the DW spectrum and the derived mass bounds. We then map our results to the case of sterile neutrino DM from the decay of a real SM singlet coupled to the Higgs. Finally, we will investigate aspects of structure formation beyond the usual simple free-streaming estimates in order to judge on the effects of the DW modification on the sterile neutrino DM spectra generated by scalar decay.

  3. Complexation of trace metals by adsorbed natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption behavior and solution speciation of Cu(II) and Cd(II) were studied in model systems containing colloidal alumina particles and dissolved natural organic matter. At equilibrium a significant fraction of the alumina surface was covered by adsorbed organic matter. Cu(II) was partitioned primarily between the surface-bound organic matter and dissolved Cu-organic complexes in the aqueous phase. Complexation of Cu2+ with the functional groups of adsorbed organic matter was stronger than complexation with uncovered alumina surface hydroxyls. It is shown that the complexation of Cu(II) by adsorbed organic matter can be described by an apparent stability constant approximately equal to the value found for solution phase equilibria. In contrast, Cd(II) adsorption was not significantly affected by the presence of organic matter at the surface, due to weak complex formation with the organic ligands. The results demonstrate that general models of trace element partitioning in natural waters must consider the presence of adsorbed organic matter. ?? 1984.

  4. Sources and diagenesis of organic matter in tidal flat sediments from the German Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkman, J. K.; Rohjans, D.; Rullkötter, J.; Scholz-Böttcher, B. M.; Liebezeit, G.

    2000-07-01

    The sources and diagenesis of organic matter in a sediment core from the Swinnplate backbarrier area near Spiekeroog Island in the northwest German Wadden Sea have been examined using stable carbon isotopes, 14C-ages and lipid biomarker data. Twenty-two core sections were analysed from the surface to a depth of 90 cm, representing sedimentation over the past approximately 200 years. Total organic carbon (TOC) contents were highly variable (0.1-1%), as was the grain size with some core sections containing up to 50% of clay and silt (mud fraction). These data indicate a highly variable depositional regime in which organic matter is extensively degraded both before and after incorporation into the sediments. The TOC content was strongly correlated with the abundance of the mud fraction, indicating the importance of organic matter sorption onto particles for preservation of both marine and terrestrial organic matter. Sediments near the top of the core were enriched in marine organic matter, but terrestrial organic matter predominated in most core sections. Some samples showed higher TOC contents than might be predicted from the TOC-grain size relationship. Isotope and biomarker studies showed that these contained additional terrestrial organic matter from peats, possibly eroded from areas to the west of the investigated area. The organic matter in these layers had the lightest values of δ 13C (about -26‰ compared with a more typical mixed marine-terrestrial value of -24‰). Most of the n-alkane distributions show a strong predominance of odd-carbon-number alkanes typical of the distributions found in higher plant waxes. All core sections contained abundant long-chain alcohols and triterpenoid alcohols such as α-amyrin, β-amyrin, lupeol, taraxerol, taraxerone and friedelin from higher plants. The dihydroxy triterpenoid betulin was particularly abundant confirming that eroded peats are a major source of the lipids. Further confirmation was obtained from AMS

  5. Chemodiversity of dissolved organic matter in the Amazon Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsior, Michael; Valle, Juliana; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Hertkorn, Norbert; Bastviken, David; Luek, Jenna; Harir, Mourad; Bastos, Wanderley; Enrich-Prast, Alex

    2016-07-01

    Regions in the Amazon Basin have been associated with specific biogeochemical processes, but a detailed chemical classification of the abundant and ubiquitous dissolved organic matter (DOM), beyond specific indicator compounds and bulk measurements, has not yet been established. We sampled water from different locations in the Negro, Madeira/Jamari and Tapajós River areas to characterize the molecular DOM composition and distribution. Ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) combined with excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) revealed a large proportion of ubiquitous DOM but also unique area-specific molecular signatures. Unique to the DOM of the Rio Negro area was the large abundance of high molecular weight, diverse hydrogen-deficient and highly oxidized molecular ions deviating from known lignin or tannin compositions, indicating substantial oxidative processing of these ultimately plant-derived polyphenols indicative of these black waters. In contrast, unique signatures in the Madeira/Jamari area were defined by presumably labile sulfur- and nitrogen-containing molecules in this white water river system. Waters from the Tapajós main stem did not show any substantial unique molecular signatures relative to those present in the Rio Madeira and Rio Negro, which implied a lower organic molecular complexity in this clear water tributary, even after mixing with the main stem of the Amazon River. Beside ubiquitous DOM at average H / C and O / C elemental ratios, a distinct and significant unique DOM pool prevailed in the black, white and clear water areas that were also highly correlated with EEM-PARAFAC components and define the frameworks for primary production and other aspects of aquatic life.

  6. Subcritical water extraction of organic matter from sedimentary rocks.

    PubMed

    Luong, Duy; Sephton, Mark A; Watson, Jonathan S

    2015-06-16

    Subcritical water extraction of organic matter containing sedimentary rocks at 300°C and 1500 psi produces extracts comparable to conventional solvent extraction. Subcritical water extraction of previously solvent extracted samples confirms that high molecular weight organic matter (kerogen) degradation is not occurring and that only low molecular weight organic matter (free compounds) are being accessed in analogy to solvent extraction procedures. The sedimentary rocks chosen for extraction span the classic geochemical organic matter types. A type I organic matter-containing sedimentary rock produces n-alkanes and isoprenoidal hydrocarbons at 300°C and 1500 psi that indicate an algal source for the organic matter. Extraction of a rock containing type II organic matter at the same temperature and pressure produces aliphatic hydrocarbons but also aromatic compounds reflecting the increased contributions from terrestrial organic matter in this sample. A type III organic matter-containing sample produces a range of non-polar and polar compounds including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and oxygenated aromatic compounds at 300°C and 1500 psi reflecting a dominantly terrestrial origin for the organic materials. Although extraction at 300°C and 1500 psi produces extracts that are comparable to solvent extraction, lower temperature steps display differences related to organic solubility. The type I organic matter produces no products below 300°C and 1500 psi, reflecting its dominantly aliphatic character, while type II and type III organic matter contribute some polar components to the lower temperature steps, reflecting the chemical heterogeneity of their organic inventory. The separation of polar and non-polar organic compounds by using different temperatures provides the potential for selective extraction that may obviate the need for subsequent preparative chromatography steps. Our results indicate that subcritical water extraction can act as a suitable

  7. [Contribution of plant litters to sediments organic matter in Jiulong river estuary wetland].

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhuan-Xi; Qiu, Zhao-Zheng; Wang, Zhen-Hong; Yan, Chang-Zhou

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the decomposition process of different plant litters and its controlling factors, and to quantify the different contribution rates to sediments organic matter throughout the decomposition of different plant litters. Results showed that the decomposition rates of plant litters buried at medium tidal level were 0.655 a(-1) for mangrove and 1.723 a(-1) for Spartina, which were greater than those with 0.651 a(-1) for mangrove and 1.586 a(-1) for Spartina at high tidal level. The reduction of carbon concentration in plant litters at high tidal level was lower than that at medium tidal level, while the increment of nitrogen and sulfur concentrations in plant litters at high tidal level was greater than those at medium tidal. And the isotope abundance of carbon (delta13C) in plant litters at medium tidal level reduced much more significantly than that at high tidal level. The contribution rates of plant litters carbon to sediments organic matter differed among tidal levels, plant species and decomposition duration. Specifically, the decomposition of mangrove litters contributed 5.96% to the sediment organic matter at medium tidal level, which was greater than that (3.03%) at high tidal level. Similarly, the decomposition of Spartina litters contributed 14.81% to the sediment organic matter at medium tidal level, which was also greater than that (13.97%) at high tidal level. The contribution of the decomposition of Spartina litters organic matter (average with 14.39%) was greater than that of mangrove litters (4.50%). The decomposition of plant litters requires a long process. The contribution of plant litters to sediments organic matter throughout one year decomposition was lower than that in complete decomposition, in particular, mangrove litters. Our study showed that the quantitative differences in plant litters-derived sediment organic matter would improve the proper estimation of the contribution of litters to wetland

  8. Anthropogenic N deposition increases soil organic matter accumulation without altering its biochemical composition.

    PubMed

    Zak, Donald R; Freedman, Zachary B; Upchurch, Rima A; Steffens, Markus; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2017-02-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that future rates of atmospheric N deposition have the potential to increase soil C storage by reducing the decay of plant litter and soil organic matter (SOM). Although the microbial mechanism underlying this response is not well understood, a decline in decay could alter the amount, as well as biochemical composition of SOM. Here, we used size-density fractionation and solid-state (13) C-NMR spectroscopy to explore the extent to which declines in microbial decay in a long-term (ca. 20 yrs.) N deposition experiment have altered the biochemical composition of forest floor, bulk mineral soil, as well as free and occluded particulate organic matter. Significant amounts of organic matter have accumulated in occluded particulate organic matter (~20%; oPOM); however, experimental N deposition had not altered the abundance of carboxyl, aryl, alkyl, or O/N-alkyl C in forest floor, bulk mineral soil, or any soil fraction. These observations suggest that biochemically equivalent organic matter has accumulated in oPOM at a greater rate under experimental N deposition, relative to the ambient treatment. Although we do not understand the process by which experimental N deposition has fostered the occlusion of organic matter by mineral soil particles, our results highlight the importance of interactions among the products of microbial decay and the chemical and physical properties of silt and clay particles that occlude organic matter from microbial attack. Because oPOM can reside in soils for decades to centuries, organic matter accumulating under future rates of anthropogenic N deposition could remain in soil for long periods of time. If temperate forest soils in the Northern Hemisphere respond like those in our experiment, then unabated deposition of anthropogenic N from the atmosphere has the potential to foster greater soil C storage, especially in fine-texture forest soils.

  9. The Carboniferous carbon isotope record from sedimentary organic matter: can we disentangle the carbon cycle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, S. J.; Bennett, C. E.; Leng, M. J.; Kearsey, T.; Marshall, J. E.; Millward, D.; Reeves, E. J.; Snelling, A.; Sherwin, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the δ13C composition of sedimentary organic matter from Euramerican Carboniferous successions indicates there are significant shifts in δ13C through this key time interval. Our studies have revealed that, at an individual location, the source and delivery mechanism of the sediment contribute to the type of organic matter preserved and, in turn this influences the measured δ13C values from bulk sedimentary organic matter of organic matter. In general, where marine-derived organic matter is dominant in these Carboniferous successions then δ13C values are characteristically lower compared to the higher values encountered where terrestrial plant-derived material is most abundant. The implication of these observations is that an apparent carbon isotope excursion identified from the bulk organic matter may reflect a change in transport processes, or depositional environment, rather than a perturbation in the global carbon cycle. In our most recent studies, however, we compare δ13C values from specific wood fragments and bulk sedimentary organic matter from non-marine, marine basinal, and marine shelfal successions from the earliest Mississippian through to the early Pennsylvanian. These data indicate that early Mississippian δ13C of organic matter is far less negative (around -22%0) than material of Late Mississippian age (around -26%0), however by the early Pennsylvanian, δ13C values return to -22%0. There are some δ13C data from brachiopod carbonate from this time interval and similar shifts are indicated. Our data are beginning to address whether we can identify a primary carbon cycle signal from the Carboniferous record using δ13C from a range of sedimentary environments. If we can, there are still questions around what the record is telling us about the global carbon cycle during a period when plant groups, including lycopods and seed ferns, rapidly diversified.

  10. CHARACTERIZING THE ORGANIC MATTER IN SURFACE ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The San Juan Bay Estuary (SJBE) is located on the north coast of Puerto Rico and includes the San Juan Bay, San José Lagoon, La Torrecilla Lagoon and Piñones Lagoon, as well as the Martín Peña and the Suárez Canals. The SJBE watershed has the highest density of inhabitants and major industrial activities in Puerto Rico. As a result, the SJBE is impacted by wastewater from combined-sewer overflows, faulty sewer lines, and storm water runoff; these factors combined with trash accumulation and infilling of the Martín Peña canal, contribute to decreased tidal exchange and reduced flushing in the estuary. To quantify the impact of the obstruction of the Martín Peña canal on anthropogenic nutrient distribution in the SJBE, over 200 sediment grab samples were collected throughout the estuary in 2015. The samples were analyzed for carbonate content, organic matter, grain size, bulk density, percent phosphorus, percent nitrogen (%N), and stable isotopes (δ15N and δ13C). The %N values were highest in the surface sediments from the western portion of the Martín Peña canal, where %N was >0.86%. In contrast, %N from the adjacent San José lagoon averaged <0.2%. Grain size distributions across the SJBE were consistent with low flushing in the inner portions of the SJBE. While the Martín Peña canal remains phosphorus limited, N:P ratios suggest the San Juna Bay and San José Lagoon have undergone major ecological shifts in the past two decades. Our

  11. Abiotic emissions of methane and reduced organic compounds from organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeckmann, T.; Keppler, F.; Vigano, I.; Derendorp, L.; Holzinger, R.

    2012-12-01

    Recent laboratory studies show that the important greenhouse gas methane, but also other reduced atmospheric trace gases, can be emitted by abiotic processes from organic matter, such as plants, pure organic compounds and soils. It is very difficult to distinguish abiotic from biotic emissions in field studies, but in laboratory experiments this is easier because it is possible to carefully prepare/sterilize samples, or to control external parameters. For example, the abiotic emissions always show a strong increase with temperature when temperatures are increased to 70C or higher, well above the temperature optimum for bacterial activity. UV radiation has also been clearly shown to lead to emission of methane and other reduced gases from organic matter. Interesting information on the production mechanism has been obtained from isotope studies, both at natural abundance and with isotope labeling. For example, the methoxyl groups of pectin were clearly identified to produce methane. However, analysis of the isotopic composition of methane from natural samples clearly indicates that there must be other molecular mechanisms that lead to methane production. Abiotic methane generation could be a ubiquitous process that occurs naturally at low rates from many different sources.

  12. Changes in River Organic Matter Through Time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, N.; Baker, A.; Ward, D.

    2006-12-01

    fluorescence, as an increase in pH was also observed in these samples. This work illustrates the dynamic character of river organic matter within a timescale and under conditions that are representative of the natural system.

  13. Deformation behaviors of peat with influence of organic matter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Liu, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Peat is a kind of special material rich in organic matter. Because of the high content of organic matter, it shows different deformation behaviors from conventional geotechnical materials. Peat grain has a non-negligible compressibility due to the presence of organic matter. Biogas can generate from peat and can be trapped in form of gas bubbles. Considering the natural properties of peat, a special three-phase composition of peat is described which indicates the existence of organic matter and gas bubbles in peat. A stress-strain-time model is proposed for the compression of organic matter, and the surface tension effect is considered in the compression model of gas bubbles. Finally, a mathematical model has been developed to simulate the deformation behavior of peat considering the compressibility of organic matter and entrapped gas bubbles. The deformation process is the coupling of volume variation of organic matter, gas bubbles and water drainage. The proposed model is used to simulate a series of peat laboratory oedometer tests, and the model can well capture the test results with reasonable model parameters. Effects of model parameters on deformation of peat are also analyzed.

  14. Spatial Complexity of Soil Organic Matter Forms at Nanometre Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Lehmann,J.; Solomon, D.; Kinyangi, J.; Dathe, L.; Wirick, S.; Jacobsen, C.

    2008-01-01

    Organic matter in soil has been suggested to be composed of a complex mixture of identifiable biopolymers1 rather than a chemically complex humic material2. Despite the importance of the spatial arrangement of organic matter forms in soil3, its characterization has been hampered by the lack of a method for analysis at fine scales. X-ray spectromicroscopy has enabled the identification of spatial variability of organic matter forms, but was limited to extracted soil particles4 and individual micropores within aggregates5, 6. Here, we use synchrotron-based near-edge X-ray spectromicroscopy7 of thin sections of entire and intact free microaggregates6 to demonstrate that on spatial scales below 50 nm resolution, highly variable yet identifiable organic matter forms, such as plant or microbial biopolymers, can be found in soils at distinct locations of the mineral assemblage. Organic carbon forms detected at this spatial scale had no similarity to organic carbon forms of total soil. In contrast, we find that organic carbon forms of total soil were remarkably similar between soils from several temperate and tropical forests with very distinct vegetation composition and soil mineralogy. Spatial information on soil organic matter forms at the scale provided here could help to identify processes of organic matter cycling in soil, such as carbon stability or sequestration and responses to a changing climate.

  15. Organic matter in hydrothermal metal ores and hydrothermal fluids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Spiker, E. C.; Kotra, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    Massive polymetallic sulfides are currently being deposited around active submarine hydrothermal vents associated with spreading centers. Chemoautolithotrophic bacteria are responsible for the high production of organic matter also associated with modern submarine hydrothermal activity. Thus, there is a significant potential for organic matter/metal interactions in these systems. We have studied modern and ancient hydrothermal metal ores and modern hydrothermal fluids in order to establish the amounts and origin of the organic matter associated with the metal ores. Twenty-six samples from modern and ancient hydrothermal systems were surveyed for their total organic C contents. Organic C values ranged from 0.01% to nearly 4.0% in these samples. Metal ores from modern and ancient sediment-covered hydrothermal systems had higher organic C values than those from modern and ancient hydrothermal systems lacking appreciable sedimentary cover. One massive pyrite sample from the Galapagos spreading center (3% organic C) had stable isotope values of -27.4% (??13C) and 2.1% (??15N), similar to those in benthic siphonophors from active vents and distinct from seep sea sedimentary organic matter. This result coupled with other analyses (e.g. 13C NMR, pyrolysis/GC, SEM) of this and other samples suggests that much of the organic matter may originate from chemoautolithotrophic bacteria at the vents. However, the organic matter in hydrothermal metal ores from sediment covered vents probably arises from complex sedimentary organic matter by hydrothermal pyrolysis. The dissolved organic C concentrations of hydrothermal fluids from one site (Juan de Fuca Ridge) were found to be the same as that of background seawater. This result may indicate that dissolved organic C is effectively scavenged from hydrothermal fluids by biological activity or by co-precipitation with metal ores. ?? 1990.

  16. Nitrogen Isotopic Composition of Organic Matter in a Pristine Collection IDP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Nguyen, A. N.; Walker, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Anhydrous chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) are probable cometary materials that show primitive characteristics, such as unequilibrated mineralogy, fragile structure, and abundant presolar grains and organic matter [1-3]. CP IDPs are richer in aliphatic species and N-bearing aromatic hydrocarbons than meteoritic organics and commonly exhibit highly anomalous H and N isotopic compositions [4,5]. Cometary organic matter is of interest in part because it has escaped the hydrothermal processing experienced by meteorites. However, IDPs are collected using silicon oil that must be removed with strong organic solvents such as hexane. This procedure is likely to have removed some fraction of soluble organic phases in IDPs. We recently reported the first stratospheric collection of IDPs without the use of silicone oil [6]. Here we present initial studies of the carbonaceous material in an IDP from this collection.

  17. Pyrogenic organic matter can alter microbial communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiello, Caroline; Gao, Xiaodong; Cheng, Hsiao-Ying; Silberg, Jonathan

    2016-04-01

    Soil microbes communicate with each other to manage a large range of processes that occur more efficiently when microbes are able to act simultaneously. This coordination occurs through the continuous production of signaling compounds that are easily diffused into and out of cells. As the number of microbes in a localized environment increases, the internal cellular concentration of these signaling compounds increases, and when a threshold concentration is reached, gene expression shifts, leading to altered (and coordinated) microbial behaviors. Many of these coordinated behaviors have biogeochemically important outcomes. For example, methanogenesis, denitrification, biofilm formation, and the development of plant-rhizobial symbioses are all regulated by a simple class of cell-cell signaling molecules known as acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). Pyrogenic organic matter in soils can act to disrupt microbial communication through multiple pathways. In the case of AHLs, charcoal's very high surface area can sorb these signaling compounds, preventing microbes from detecting each others' presence (Masiello et al., 2014). In addition, the lactone ring in AHLs is vulnerable to pH increases accompanying PyOM inputs, with soil pH values higher than 7-8 leading to ring opening and compound destabilization. Different microbes use different classes of signaling compounds, and not all microbial signaling compounds are pH-vulnerable. This implies that PyOM-driven pH increases may trigger differential outcomes for Gram negative bacteria vs fungi, for example. A charcoal-driven reduction in microbes' ability to detect cell-cell communication compounds may lead to a shift in the ability of microbes to participate in key steps of C and N cycling. For example, an increase in an archaeon-specific AHL has been shown to lead to a cascade of metabolic processes that eventually results in the upregulation of CH4 production (Zhang et al., 2012). Alterations in similar AHL compounds leads to

  18. Anatomy of a cluster IDP. Part 2: Noble gas abundances, trace element geochemistry, isotopic abundances, and trace organic chemistry of several fragments from L2008#5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Mckay, David S.; Messenger, S.; Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Walker, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: noble gas content and release temperatures; trace element abundances; heating summary of cluster fragments; isotopic measurements; and trace organic chemistry.

  19. Influence of land use on soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogeon, H.; Lemée, L.; Chabbi, A.; Ambles, A.

    2009-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) is actually of great environmental interest as the amount of organic matter stored in soils represents one of the largest reservoirs of organic carbon on the global scale [1]. Indeed, soil carbon storage capacity represents 1500 to 2000 Gt for the first meter depth, which is twice the concentration of atmospheric CO2 [2]. Furthermore, human activities, such as deforestation (which represents a flux of 1.3 Gt C/year), contribute to the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration for about one percent a year [3]. Therefore, carbon dioxide sequestration in plant and carbon storage in soil and biomass could be considered as a complementary solution against climate change. The stock of carbon in soils is greatly influenced by land use (ca 70 Gt for a forest soil or a grassland against 40 Gt for an arable land). Furthermore the molecular composition of SOM should be also influenced by vegetation. In this context, four horizons taken between 0-120 cm from the same profile of a soil under grassland and forest located in the vicinity of Poitiers (INRA Lusignan, ORE Prairie) were compared. For the surface horizon, the study is improved with the results from the cultivated soil from INRA Versailles. Soil organic matter was characterized using IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and thermal analysis. Granulometric fractionation into sand (50-2000 μm), silt (2-50 μm) and clay (<2 μm) was conducted. The organic matter associated with the mineral fractions was thus characterized using thermochemolysis coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). The total lipidic fractions were extracted with CH2Cl2/MeOH using an accelerated solvent extraction (ASE). In the three soils, lipids are concentrated into the superficial horizon (0-30 cm) which indicates a low mobilisation. Lipids from the superficial horizon are more abundant for the arable soil (1010 ppm) than for the two other (400 ppm). Lipids from the forest and the grassland were

  20. Assessment of soil organic matter fluxes at the EU level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, Anne; Campling, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Soil has a complex relationship with climate change. Soil helps take carbon dioxide out of the air and as such it absorbs millions of tons each year, but with the Earth still warming micro-organisms grow faster, consume more soil organic matter and release carbon dioxide. The net result is a relative decline in soil organic carbon. With a growing population and higher bio-energy demands, more land is likely to be required for settlement, for commercial activity and for bio-energy production. Conversions from terrestrial ecosystems to urban and commercial activity will alter both the production and losses of organic matter, and have an indirect impact on potential SOM levels. Conversions between different terrestrial ecosystems have a direct impact on SOM levels. Net SOM losses are reported for several land conversions, e.g. from grassland to arable land, from wetlands to drained agricultural land, from crop rotations to monoculture, reforestation of agricultural land. In the context of looking for measures to support best practices to manage soil organic matter in Europe we propose a method to assess soil organic matter fluxes at the EU level. We adopt a parsimonious approach that is comparable to the nutrient balance approaches developed by the OECD and Eurostat. We describe the methodology and present the initial results of a European carbon balance indicator that uses existing European statistical and land use change databases. The carbon balance consists of the following components: organic matter production (I), organic matter losses (O), land use changes that effect both production and losses (E). These components are set against the (mostly legislative) boundary conditions that determine the maximum input potential (MIP) for soil organic matter. In order to budget SOM losses due to mineralisation, runs will be made with a multi-compartment SOM model that takes into account management practices, climate and different sources of organic matter.

  1. Organic matter chlorination rates in different boreal soils: the role of soil organic matter content.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Malin; Karlsson, Susanne; Oberg, Gunilla; Sandén, Per; Svensson, Teresia; Valinia, Salar; Thiry, Yves; Bastviken, David

    2012-02-07

    Transformation of chloride (Cl(-)) to organic chlorine (Cl(org)) occurs naturally in soil but it is poorly understood how and why transformation rates vary among environments. There are still few measurements of chlorination rates in soils, even though formation of Cl(org) has been known for two decades. In the present study, we compare organic matter (OM) chlorination rates, measured by (36)Cl tracer experiments, in soils from eleven different locations (coniferous forest soils, pasture soils and agricultural soils) and discuss how various environmental factors effect chlorination. Chlorination rates were highest in the forest soils and strong correlations were seen with environmental variables such as soil OM content and Cl(-) concentration. Data presented support the hypothesis that OM levels give the framework for the soil chlorine cycling and that chlorination in more organic soils over time leads to a larger Cl(org) pool and in turn to a high internal supply of Cl(-) upon dechlorination. This provides unexpected indications that pore water Cl(-) levels may be controlled by supply from dechlorination processes and can explain why soil Cl(-) locally can be more closely related to soil OM content and the amount organically bound chlorine than to Cl(-) deposition.

  2. Investigation of the organic matter in inactive nuclear tank liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Schenley, R.L.; Griest, W.H.

    1990-08-01

    Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) methodology for regulatory organics fails to account for the organic matter that is suggested by total organic carbon (TOC) analysis in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) inactive nuclear waste-tank liquids and sludges. Identification and measurement of the total organics are needed to select appropriate waste treatment technologies. An initial investigation was made of the nature of the organics in several waste-tank liquids. This report details the analysis of ORNL wastes.

  3. Fractionation and characterization of organic matter in wastewater from a swine waste-retention basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, Jerry A.; Rostad, Colleen E.

    2004-01-01

    Organic matter in wastewater sampled from a swine waste-retention basin in Iowa was fractionated into 14 fractions on the basis of size (particulate, colloid, and dissolved); volatility; polarity (hydrophobic, transphilic, hydrophilic); acid, base, neutral characteristics; and precipitate or flocculates (floc) formation upon acidification. The compound-class composition of each of these fractions was determined by infrared and 13C-NMR spectral analyses. Volatile acids were the largest fraction with acetic acid being the major component of this fraction. The second most abundant fraction was fine particulate organic matter that consisted of bacterial cells that were subfractionated into extractable lipids consisting of straight chain fatty acids, peptidoglycans components of bacterial cell walls, and protein globulin components of cellular plasma. The large lipid content of the particulate fraction indicates that non-polar contaminants, such as certain pharmaceuticals added to swine feed, likely associate with the particulate fraction through partitioning interactions. Hydrocinnamic acid is a major component of the hydrophobic acid fraction, and its presence is an indication of anaerobic degradation of lignin originally present in swine feed. This is the first study to combine particulate organic matter with dissolved organic matter fractionation into a total organic matter fractionation and characterization.

  4. Nutrient Effects on Belowground Organic Matter in a ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Belowground structure and carbon dioxide emission rates were examined in minerogenic marshes of the North Inlet estuary, a system dominated by depositional processes and typical of the southeastern USA. Three areas were sampled: a long-term nutrient enrichment experiment (Goat Island); a fringing marsh that only receives drainage from an entirely forested watershed (upper Crab Haul Creek); and three locations along a creek basin that receives drainage from a residential and golf course development situated at its headwaters (Debidue Creek). Responses to fertilization at Goat Island were an increase in soil organic matter, an increase in number of rhizomes, enlarged rhizome diameters, decreased fine root mass, and increased carbon dioxide emission rates. At the Crab Haul Creek, the greatest abundances of coarse roots and rhizomes were observed in the high marsh compared to the low marsh and creekbank. The upper and mid Debidue Creek, which may be influenced by nutrient inputs associated with land development, had significantly fewer rhizomes compared to the mouth, which was dominated by exchange with bay waters. Carbon dioxide emission rates at the fertilized Goat Island plots were similar in magnitude to the upper Debidue Creek and significantly greater than the Goat Island control plots and the Crab Haul Creek. Inputs of sediment and particulates in marshes dominated by depositional processes such as the North Inlet may buffer the system from adverse effects of

  5. Pyrolysis-combustion 14C dating of soil organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Hongfang; Hackley, Keith C.; Panno, S.V.; Coleman, D.D.; Liu, J.C.-L.; Brown, J.

    2003-01-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) dating of total soil organic matter (SOM) often yields results inconsistent with the stratigraphic sequence. The onerous chemical extractions for SOM fractions do not always produce satisfactory 14C dates. In an effort to develop an alternative method, the pyrolysis-combustion technique was investigated to partition SOM into pyrolysis volatile (Py-V) and pyrolysis residue (Py-R) fractions. The Py-V fractions obtained from a thick glacigenic loess succession in Illinois yielded 14C dates much younger but more reasonable than the counterpart Py-R fractions for the soil residence time. Carbon isotopic composition (??13C) was heavier in the Py-V fractions, suggesting a greater abundance of carbohydrate- and protein-related constituents, and ??13C was lighter in the Py-R fractions, suggesting more lignin- and lipid-related constituents. The combination of 14C dates and ??13C values indicates that the Py-V fractions are less biodegradation resistant and the Py-R fractions are more biodegradation resistant. The pyrolysis-combustion method provides a less cumbersome approach for 14C dating of SOM fractions. With further study, this method may become a useful tool for analyzing unlithified terrestrial sediments when macrofossils are absent. ?? 2003 University of Washington. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cross Sections, relic abundance, and detection rates for neutralino dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griest, Kim

    1988-01-01

    Neutralino annihilation and elastic scattering cross sections are derived which differ in important ways from previous work. These are applied to relic abundance calculations and to direct detection of neutralino dark matter from the galactic halo. Assuming the neutralino to be the lightest supersymmetric particle and that it is less massive than the Z sup 0, we find relic densities of neutralinos greater than 4 percent of critical density for almost all values of the supersymmetric parameters. We constrain the parameter space by using results from PETRA (chargino mass less than 23 GeV) and ASP, and then assuming a critical density of neutralinos, display event rates in a cryogenic detector for a variety of models. A new term implies spin independent elastic scattering even for those majorana particles and inclusion of propagator momenta increases detection rates by 10 to 300 percent for pure photinos. Z sup 0-squark interference leads to very low detection rates for some values of the parameters. The new term in the elastic cross section dominates for heavy, mostly spinless materials and mitigates the negative interference cancellations in light materials; except for the pure photino or pure higgsinos cases where it does not contribute. In general, the rates can be substantially different from the pure photino and pure higgsino special cases usually considered.

  7. Characterizing Variability In Ohio River Natural Organic Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surface water contains natural organic matter (NOM) which reacts with disinfectants creating disinfection byproducts (DBPs), some of which are USEPA regulated contaminants. Characterizing NOM can provide important insight on DBP formation and water treatment process adaptation t...

  8. Soil organic matter quantity and quality shape microbial community compositions of subtropical broadleaved forests.

    PubMed

    Ding, Junjun; Zhang, Yuguang; Wang, Mengmeng; Sun, Xin; Cong, Jing; Deng, Ye; Lu, Hui; Yuan, Tong; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Li, Diqiang; Zhou, Jizhong; Yang, Yunfeng

    2015-10-01

    As two major forest types in the subtropics, broadleaved evergreen and broadleaved deciduous forests have long interested ecologists. However, little is known about their belowground ecosystems despite their ecological importance in driving biogeochemical cycling. Here, we used Illumina MiSeq sequencing targeting 16S rRNA gene and a microarray named GeoChip targeting functional genes to analyse microbial communities in broadleaved evergreen and deciduous forest soils of Shennongjia Mountain of Central China, a region known as 'The Oriental Botanic Garden' for its extraordinarily rich biodiversity. We observed higher plant diversity and relatively richer nutrients in the broadleaved evergreen forest than the deciduous forest. In odds to our expectation that plant communities shaped soil microbial communities, we found that soil organic matter quantity and quality, but not plant community parameters, were the best predictors of microbial communities. Actinobacteria, a copiotrophic phylum, was more abundant in the broadleaved evergreen forest, while Verrucomicrobia, an oligotrophic phylum, was more abundant in the broadleaved deciduous forest. The density of the correlation network of microbial OTUs was higher in the broadleaved deciduous forest but its modularity was smaller, reflecting lower resistance to environment changes. In addition, keystone OTUs of the broadleaved deciduous forest were mainly oligotrophic. Microbial functional genes associated with recalcitrant carbon degradation were also more abundant in the broadleaved deciduous forests, resulting in low accumulation of organic matters. Collectively, these findings revealed the important role of soil organic matter in shaping microbial taxonomic and functional traits.

  9. The role of clay minerals in the preservation of organic matter in sediments of qinghai lake, NW China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yu, B.; Dong, H.; Jiang, H.; Lv, G.; Eberl, D.; Li, S.; Kim, J.

    2009-01-01

    The role of saline lake sediments in preserving organic matter has long been recognized. In order to further understand the preservation mechanisms, the role of clay minerals was studied. Three sediment cores, 25, 57, and 500 cm long, were collected from Qinghai Lake, NW China, and dissected into multiple subsamples. Multiple techniques were employed, including density fractionation, X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), total organic carbon (TOC) and carbon compound analyses, and surface area determination. The sediments were oxic near the water-sediment interface, but became anoxic at depth. The clay mineral content was as much as 36.8%, consisting mostly of illite, chlorite, and halloysite. The TEM observations revealed that organic matter occurred primarily as organic matter-clay mineral aggregates. The TOC and clay mineral abundances are greatest in the mid-density fraction, with a positive correlation between the TOC and mineral surface area. The TOC of the bulk sediments ranges from 1 to 3% with the non-hydrocarbon fraction being predominant, followed by bitumen, saturated hydrocarbon, aromatic hydrocarbons, and chloroform-soluble bitumen. The bimodal distribution of carbon compounds of the saturated hydrocarbon fraction suggests that organic matter in the sediments was derived from two sources: terrestrial plants and microorganisms/algae. Depthrelated systematic changes in the distribution patterns of the carbon compounds suggest that the oxidizing conditions and microbial abundance near the water-sediment interface promote degradation of labile organic matter, probably in adsorbed form. The reducing conditions and small microbial biomass deeper in the sediments favor preservation of organic matter, because of the less labile nature of organic matter, probably occurring within clay mineral-organic matter aggregates that are inaccessible to microorganisms. These results have important implications for our

  10. Carbon cycle: Ocean dissolved organics matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amon, Rainer M. W.

    2016-12-01

    Large quantities of organic carbon are stored in the ocean, but its biogeochemical behaviour is elusive. Size-age-composition relations now quantify the production of tiny organic molecules as a major pathway for carbon sequestration.

  11. Big-bang nucleosynthesis and the relic abundance of dark matter in a stau-neutralino coannihilation scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Jittoh, Toshifumi; Koike, Masafumi; Sato, Joe; Yamanaka, Masato; Kohri, Kazunori; Shimomura, Takashi

    2008-09-01

    A scenario of the big-bang nucleosynthesis is analyzed within the minimal supersymmetric standard model, which is consistent with a stau-neutralino coannihilation scenario to explain the relic abundance of dark matter. We find that we can account for the possible discrepancy of the abundance of {sup 7}Li between the observation and the prediction of the big-bang nucleosynthesis by taking the mass of the neutralino as 300 GeV and the mass difference between the stau and the neutralino as (100-120) MeV. We can therefore simultaneously explain the abundance of the dark matter and that of {sup 7}Li by these values of parameters. The lifetime of staus in this scenario is predicted to be O(100-1000) sec.

  12. Land-use Effect on Stream Organic Matter Composition in Two Metropolitan Areas in USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, S.; Kaushal, S.; Amon, R. M.; Brinkmeyer, R.

    2011-12-01

    displacement of waste water treatment plant in upper watershed. Organic matter compositions of suspended sediment, however, were more related to abundance of phytoplankton biomass.

  13. Composition and reactivity of ferrihydrite-organic matter associations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, Karin; Hädrich, Anke; Neidhardt, Julia; Küsel, Kirsten; Totsche, Kai

    2014-05-01

    The formation of organo-mineral associations affects many soil forming processes. On the one hand, it will influence soil organic matter composition and development, because the complex organic matter mixtures usually fractionate during their association with mineral surfaces. Whereas the associated fraction is supposed to be stabilized, the non-associated fraction remains mobile and available to degradation by microorganisms. On the other hand, the organic coating will completely change the interface properties of Fe oxides such as solubility, charge and hydrophobicity. This in turn will strongly influence their reactivity towards nutrients and pollutants, the adsorption of new organic matter, and the availability of ferric Fe towards microorganisms. To better understand such processes we produced ferrihydrite-organic matter associations by adsorption and coprecipitation in laboratory experiments. As a surrogate for dissolved soil organic matter we used the water-extractable fraction of a Podzol forest-floor layer under spruce. Sorptive fractionation of the organic matter was investigated by 13C NMR and FTIR. Relative to the original forest-floor extract, the ferrihydrite-associated OM was enriched in polysaccharides but depleted in aliphatic C and carbonyl C, especially when adsorption took place. Liquid phase incubation experiments were carried out with an inoculum extracted from the podzol forest-floor under oxic conditions at pH 4.8 to quantify the mineralization of the adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter. These experiments showed that the association with ferrihydrite stabilized the associated organic matter, but that differences in the degradability of adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter were small. We therefore conclude that coprecipitation does not lead to a significant formation of microbial inaccessible organic matter domains. Microbial reduction experiments were performed using Geobacter bremensis. We observed that increasing amounts of

  14. Organic matter and containment of uranium and fissiogenic isotopes at the Oklo natural reactors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nagy, B.; Gauthier-Lafaye, F.; Holliger, P.; Davis, D.W.; Mossman, D.J.; Leventhal, J.S.; Rigali, M.J.; Parnell, J.

    1991-01-01

    SOME of the Precambrian natural fission reactors at Oklo in Gabon contain abundant organic matter1,2, part of which was liquefied at the time of criticality and subsequently converted to a graphitic solid3,4. The liquid organic matter helps to reduce U(VI) to U(IV) from aqueous solutions, resulting in the precipitation of uraninite5. It is known that in the prevailing reactor environments, precipitated uraninite grains incorporated fission products. We report here observations which show that these uraninite crystals were held immobile within the resolidified, graphitic bitumen. Unlike water-soluble (humic) organic matter, the graphitic bituminous organics at Oklo thus enhanced radionu-clide containment. Uraninite encased in solid graphitic matter in the organic-rich reactor zones lost virtually no fissiogenic lan-thanide isotopes. The first major episode of uranium and lead migration was caused by the intrusion of a swarm of adjacent dolerite dykes about 1,100 Myr after the reactors went critical. Our results from Oklo imply that the use of organic, hydrophobic solids such as graphitic bitumen as a means of immobilizing radionuclides in pretreated nuclear waste warrants further investigation. ?? 1991 Nature Publishing Group.

  15. High dimensional reflectance analysis of soil organic matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, T. L.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Franzmeier, D. P.; Stott, D. E.; Coster, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in remote-sensing technology have led to the development of high spectral resolution imaging sensors for observation of earth surface features. This research was conducted to evaluate the effects of organic matter content and composition on narrowband soil reflectance across the visible and reflective infrared spectral ranges. Organic matter from four Indiana agricultural soils, ranging in organic C content from 0.99 to 1.72 percent, was extracted, fractionated, and purified. Six components of each soil were isolated and prepared for spectral analysis. Reflectance was measured in 210 narrow bands in the 400- to 2500-nm wavelength range. Statistical analysis of reflectance values indicated the potential of high dimensional reflectance data in specific visible, near-infrared, and middle-infrared bands to provide information about soil organic C content, but not organic matter composition. These bands also responded significantly to Fe- and Mn-oxide content.

  16. Natural organic matter properties in Swedish agricultural streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieroza, Magdalena; Kyllmar, Katarina; Bergström, Lars; Köhler, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    We have analysed natural organic matter (NOM) properties in 18 agricultural streams in Sweden covering a broad range of environmental (climate, soil type), land use and water quality (nutrient and concentrations, pH, alkalinity) characteristics. Stream water samples collected every two weeks within an ongoing Swedish Monitoring Programme for Agriculture have been analysed for total/dissolved organic carbon, absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy. A number of quantitative and qualitative spectroscopic parameters was calculated to help to distinguish between terrestrially-derived, refractory organic material and autochthonous, labile material indicative of biogeochemical transformations of terrestrial NOM and recent biological production. The study provides insights into organic matter properties and carbon budgets in agricultural streams and improves understanding of how agricultural catchments transform natural and anthropogenic fluxes of organic matter and nutrients to signals observed in receiving waters.

  17. The search for indigenous lunar organic matter.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.

    1972-01-01

    It is argued that the absence of organic compounds from returned lunar samples is to be expected even for a lunar history rich in primordial organics. The sites most likely to yield lunar organic compounds have not been investigated, and there may be an area of investigation conceivably critical to problems in prebiological chemistry and the early history of the solar system awaiting continued lunar exploration, manned or unmanned.

  18. Modeling organic matter stabilization during windrow composting of livestock effluents.

    PubMed

    Oudart, D; Paul, E; Robin, P; Paillat, J M

    2012-01-01

    Composting is a complex bioprocess, requiring a lot of empirical experiments to optimize the process. A dynamical mathematical model for the biodegradation of the organic matter during the composting process has been developed. The initial organic matter expressed by chemical oxygen demand (COD) is decomposed into rapidly and slowly degraded compartments and an inert one. The biodegradable COD is hydrolysed and consumed by microorganisms and produces metabolic water and carbon dioxide. This model links a biochemical characterization of the organic matter by Van Soest fractionating with COD. The comparison of experimental and simulation results for carbon dioxide emission, dry matter and carbon content balance showed good correlation. The initial sizes of the biodegradable COD compartments are explained by the soluble, hemicellulose-like and lignin fraction. Their sizes influence the amplitude of the carbon dioxide emission peak. The initial biomass is a sensitive variable too, influencing the time at which the emission peak occurs.

  19. Defining the quality of soil organic matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soils represent the largest terrestrial pool of carbon (C) and hold approximately two-thirds of all C held in these ecosystems. However, not all C in soils is of equal quality. Some fractions of the organic forms, i.e., soil organic carbon (SOC) have long residence times while ...

  20. Comprehensive characterization of atmospheric organic matter in Fresno, California fog water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herckes, P.; Leenheer, J.A.; Collett, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Fogwater collected during winter in Fresno (CA) was characterized by isolating several distinct fractions and characterizing them by infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. More than 80% of the organic matter in the fogwater was recovered and characterized. The most abundant isolated fractions were those comprised of volatile acids (24% of isolated carbon) and hydrophilic acids plus neutrals (28%). Volatile acids, including formic and acetic acid, have been previously identified as among the most abundant individual species in fogwater. Recovered hydrophobic acids exhibited some properties similar to aquatic fulvic acids. An insoluble particulate organic matter fraction contained a substantial amount of biological material, while hydrophilic and transphilic fractions also contained material suggestive of biotic origin. Together, these fractions illustrate the important contribution biological sources make to organic matter in atmospheric fog droplets. The fogwater also was notable for containing a large amount of organic nitrogen present in a variety of species, including amines, nitrate esters, peptides, and nitroso compounds. ?? 2007 American Chemical Society.

  1. Organic matter composition and macrofaunal diversity in sediments of the Condor Seamount (Azores, NE Atlantic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bongiorni, Lucia; Ravara, Ascensão; Parretti, Paola; Santos, Ricardo S.; Rodrigues, Clara F.; Amaro, Teresa; Cunha, Marina R.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years increasing knowledge has been accumulated on seamounts ecology; however their sedimentary environments and associated biological communities remain largely understudied. In this study we investigated quantity and biochemical composition of organic matter and macrofaunal diversity in sediments of the Condor Seamount (NE Atlantic, Azores). In order to test the effect of the seamount on organic matter distribution, sediment samples were collected in 6 areas: the summit, the northern and southern flanks and bases, and in an external far field site. Macrofauna abundance and diversity were investigated on the summit, the southern flank and in the far field site. The organic matter distribution reflected the complex hydrodynamic conditions occurring on the Condor. Concentrations of organic matter compounds were generally lower on the whole seamount than in the far field site and on the seamount summit compared to flanks and bases. A clear difference was also evident between the northern and southern slopes of the Condor, suggesting a role of the seamount in conditioning sedimentation processes and distribution of food resources for benthic consumers. Macrofauna assemblages changed significantly among the three sampling sites. High abundance and dominance, accompanied by low biodiversity, characterized the macrofauna community on the Condor summit, while low dominance and high biodiversity were observed at the flank. Our results, although limited to five samples on the seamount and two off the seamount, do not necessarily support the paradigm that seamounts are more biodiverse than the surrounding seafloor. However, the abundance (and biomass), functional diversity and taxonomical distinctiveness of the macrofaunal assemblages from the Condor Seamount suggest that seamounts habitats may play a relevant role in adding to the regional biodiversity.

  2. PHOTOCHEMICAL TRANSFORMATIONS OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN A BLACKWATER RIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined photochemical alterations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the Satilla River, a high DOC (10-40 mg/liter) blackwater river of southeast Georgia. Water samples were filtered to remove most organisms, placed in quartz tubes, and incubated under natural sunlight a...

  3. Black Carbon in Estuarine and Coastal Ocean Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2003-01-01

    Analysis of high-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (DOM) from two estuaries in the northwest Atlantic Ocean reveals that black carbon (BC) is a significant component of previously uncharacterized DOM, suggesting that river-estuary systems are important exporters of recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon to the ocean.

  4. Organic Matter Application Can Reduce Copper Toxicity in Tomato Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Copper fungicides and bactericides are often used in tomato cultivation and can cause toxic Cu levels in soils. In order to combat this, organic matter can be applied to induce chelation reactions and form a soluble complex by which much of the Cu can leach out of the soil profile or be taken up safely by plants. Organic acids such as citric,…

  5. Pedogenesis evolution of mine technosols: focus onto organic matter implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grégoire, Pascaud; Marilyne, Soubrand; Laurent, Lemee; Husseini Amelène, El-Mufleh Al; Marion, Rabiet; Emmanuel, Joussein

    2014-05-01

    Keywords: Mine technosols, pedogenesis, organic matter, environmental impact, pyr-GC-MS Technosols include soils subject to strong anthropogenic pressure and particularly to soil influenced by human transformed materials. In this context, abandoned mine sites contain a large amount of transformed waste materials often enriched with metals and/or metalloids. The natural evolution of technosols (pedogenesis) may induces the change in contaminants behaviour in term of stability of bearing phases, modification of pH oxydo-reduction conditions, organic matter turnover, change in permeability, or influence of vegetation cover. The fate of these elements in the soil can induce major environmental problems (contamination of biosphere and water resource). This will contribute to a limited potential use of these soils, which represent yet a large area around the world. The initial contamination of the parental material suggests that the pedological cover would stabilize the soil; however, the chemical reactivity must be taken in consideration particularly with respect to potential metal leachings. In this case, it is quite important to understand the development of soil in this specific context. Consequently, the global aims of this study are to understand the functioning of mine Technosols focusing onto the organic matter implication in their pedogenesis. Indeed, soil organic matter constitutes an heterogeneous fraction of organic compounds that plays an important role in the fate and the transport of metals and metalloids in soils. Three different soil profiles were collected representative to various mining context (contamination, time, climat), respectively to Pb-Ag, Sn and Au exploitations. Several pedological parameters were determined like CEC, pH, %Corg, %Ntot, C/N ratio, grain size distribution and chemical composition. The evolution of the nature of organic matter in Technosol was studied by elemental analyses and thermochemolysis was realized on the total and

  6. The post-Paleozoic chronology and mechanism of 13C depletion in primary marine organic matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, B. N.; Takigiku, R.; Hayes, J. M.; Louda, J. W.; Baker, E. W.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-isotopic compositions of geoporphyrins have been measured from marine sediments of Mesozoic and Cenozoic age in order to elucidate the timing and extent of depletion of 13C in marine primary producers. These results indicate that the difference in isotopic composition of coeval marine carbonates and marine primary photosynthate was approximately 5 to 7 permil greater during the Mesozoic and early Cenozoic than at present. In contrast to the isotopic record of marine primary producers, isotopic compositions of terrestrial organic materials have remained approximately constant for this same interval of time. This difference in the isotopic records of marine and terrestrial organic matter is considered in terms of the mechanisms controlling the isotopic fractionation associated with photosynthetic fixation of carbon. We show that the decreased isotopic fractionation between marine carbonates and organic matter from the Early to mid-Cenozoic may record variations in the abundance of atmospheric CO2.

  7. GROUNDWATER TRANSPORT OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE PRESENCE OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the transport of hydrophobic organic compounds in soil columns were investigated. Three compounds (naphthalene, phenanthrene and DDT) that spanned three orders of magnitude in water solubility were used. Instead of humic matter, mo...

  8. Removal of dissolved organic matter by anion exchange: Effect of dissolved organic matter properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyer, T.H.; Singer, P.C.; Aiken, G.R.

    2008-01-01

    Ten isolates of aquatic dissolved organic matter (DOM) were evaluated to determine the effect that chemical properties of the DOM, such as charge density, aromaticity, and molecular weight, have on DOM removal by anion exchange. The DOM isolates were characterized asterrestrial, microbial, or intermediate humic substances or transphilic acids. All anion exchange experiments were conducted using a magnetic ion exchange (MIEX) resin. The charge density of the DOM isolates, determined by direct potentiometric titration, was fundamental to quantifying the stoichiometry of the anion exchange mechanism. The results clearly show that all DOM isolates were removed by anion exchange; however, differences among the DOM isolates did influence their removal by MIEX resin. In particular, MIEX resin had the greatest affinity for DOM with high charge density and the least affinity for DOM with low charge density and low aromaticity. This work illustrates that the chemical characteristics of DOM and solution conditions must be considered when evaluating anion exchange treatment for the removal of DOM. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  9. One-pot synthesis of amino acid precursors with insoluble organic matter in planetesimals with aqueous activity.

    PubMed

    Kebukawa, Yoko; Chan, Queenie H S; Tachibana, Shogo; Kobayashi, Kensei; Zolensky, Michael E

    2017-03-01

    The exogenous delivery of organic molecules could have played an important role in the emergence of life on the early Earth. Carbonaceous chondrites are known to contain indigenous amino acids as well as various organic compounds and complex macromolecular materials, such as the so-called insoluble organic matter (IOM), but the origins of the organic matter are still subject to debate. We report that the water-soluble amino acid precursors are synthesized from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia with the presence of liquid water, simultaneously with macromolecular organic solids similar to the chondritic IOM. Amino acid products from hydrothermal experiments after acid hydrolysis include α-, β-, and γ-amino acids up to five carbons, for which relative abundances are similar to those extracted from carbonaceous chondrites. One-pot aqueous processing from simple ubiquitous molecules can thus produce a wide variety of meteoritic organic matter from amino acid precursors to macromolecular IOM in chondrite parent bodies.

  10. One-pot synthesis of amino acid precursors with insoluble organic matter in planetesimals with aqueous activity

    PubMed Central

    Kebukawa, Yoko; Chan, Queenie H. S.; Tachibana, Shogo; Kobayashi, Kensei; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2017-01-01

    The exogenous delivery of organic molecules could have played an important role in the emergence of life on the early Earth. Carbonaceous chondrites are known to contain indigenous amino acids as well as various organic compounds and complex macromolecular materials, such as the so-called insoluble organic matter (IOM), but the origins of the organic matter are still subject to debate. We report that the water-soluble amino acid precursors are synthesized from formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, and ammonia with the presence of liquid water, simultaneously with macromolecular organic solids similar to the chondritic IOM. Amino acid products from hydrothermal experiments after acid hydrolysis include α-, β-, and γ-amino acids up to five carbons, for which relative abundances are similar to those extracted from carbonaceous chondrites. One-pot aqueous processing from simple ubiquitous molecules can thus produce a wide variety of meteoritic organic matter from amino acid precursors to macromolecular IOM in chondrite parent bodies. PMID:28345041

  11. Organic content of particulate matter in turbine engine exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, D.J.; Groth, R.H.; Blasko, T.J.

    1980-03-01

    Research report:Solid particulate matter, mainly carbon, emitted during fossil fuels combustion contains a variety of organic species adsorbed onto it. Studies were conducted to identify the organic compounds generated by a gas turbine engine. Total organics were determined by gas chromatography and flame ionization. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, and nitrosamines were present in samples collected from exhaust gases. (1 diagram, 4 references, 11 tables)

  12. Structural and Isotopic Analysis of Organic Matter in Carbonaceous Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmour, I.

    2003-12-01

    The most ancient organic molecules available for study in the laboratory are those carried to Earth by infalling carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. All the classes of compounds normally considered to be of biological origin are represented in carbonaceous meteorites and, aside from some terrestrial contamination; it is safe to assume that these organic species were produced by nonbiological methods of synthesis. In effect, carbonaceous chondrites are a natural laboratory containing organic molecules that are the product of ancient chemical evolution. Understanding the sources of organic molecules in meteorites and the chemical processes that led to their formation has been the primary research goal. Circumstellar space, the solar nebulae, and asteroidal meteorite parent bodies have all been suggested as environments where organic matter may have been formed. Determination of the provenance of meteoritic organic matter requires detailed structural and isotopic information, and the fall of the Murchison CM2 chondrite in 1969 enabled the first systematic organic analyses to be performed on comparatively pristine samples of extraterrestrial organic material. Prior to that, extensive work had been undertaken on the organic matter in a range of meteorite samples galvanized, in part, by the controversial debate in the early 1960s on possible evidence for former life in the Orgueil carbonaceous chondrite (Fitch et al., 1962; Meinschein et al., 1963). It was eventually demonstrated that the suggested biogenic material was terrestrial contamination ( Fitch and Anders, 1963; Anders et al., 1964); however, the difficulties created by contamination have posed a continuing problem in the analysis and interpretation of organic material in meteorites (e.g., Watson et al., 2003); this has significant implications for the return of extraterrestrial samples by space missions. Hayes (1967) extensively reviewed data acquired prior to the availability of Murchison samples

  13. The activated sludge ecosystem contains a core community of abundant organisms.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Aaron M; Albertsen, Mads; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Per H

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the microbial ecology of a system requires that the observed population dynamics can be linked to their metabolic functions. However, functional characterization is laborious and the choice of organisms should be prioritized to those that are frequently abundant (core) or transiently abundant, which are therefore putatively make the greatest contribution to carbon turnover in the system. We analyzed the microbial communities in 13 Danish wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal in consecutive years and a single plant periodically over 6 years, using Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons of the V4 region. The plants contained a core community of 63 abundant genus-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that made up 68% of the total reads. A core community consisting of abundant OTUs was also observed within the incoming wastewater to three plants. The net growth rate for individual OTUs was quantified using mass balance, and it was found that 10% of the total reads in the activated sludge were from slow or non-growing OTUs, and that their measured abundance was primarily because of immigration with the wastewater. Transiently abundant organisms were also identified. Among them the genus Nitrotoga (class Betaproteobacteria) was the most abundant putative nitrite oxidizer in a number of activated sludge plants, which challenges previous assumptions that Nitrospira (phylum Nitrospirae) are the primary nitrite-oxidizers in activated sludge systems with nutrient removal.

  14. The activated sludge ecosystem contains a core community of abundant organisms

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Aaron M; Albertsen, Mads; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Per H

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the microbial ecology of a system requires that the observed population dynamics can be linked to their metabolic functions. However, functional characterization is laborious and the choice of organisms should be prioritized to those that are frequently abundant (core) or transiently abundant, which are therefore putatively make the greatest contribution to carbon turnover in the system. We analyzed the microbial communities in 13 Danish wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal in consecutive years and a single plant periodically over 6 years, using Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons of the V4 region. The plants contained a core community of 63 abundant genus-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that made up 68% of the total reads. A core community consisting of abundant OTUs was also observed within the incoming wastewater to three plants. The net growth rate for individual OTUs was quantified using mass balance, and it was found that 10% of the total reads in the activated sludge were from slow or non-growing OTUs, and that their measured abundance was primarily because of immigration with the wastewater. Transiently abundant organisms were also identified. Among them the genus Nitrotoga (class Betaproteobacteria) was the most abundant putative nitrite oxidizer in a number of activated sludge plants, which challenges previous assumptions that Nitrospira (phylum Nitrospirae) are the primary nitrite-oxidizers in activated sludge systems with nutrient removal. PMID:26262816

  15. Bird diversity and abundance in organic and conventional apple orchards in northern Japan

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the benefits of agri-environmental schemes, such as organic farming, on biodiversity conservation in annual systems, but their effectiveness in perennial systems is less well understood, particularly in bird communities in temperate regions of Asia. This study examined the effects of organic farming practices on species richness and abundance of breeding birds in apple orchards in northern Japan. Bird counts were conducted in six pairs of organic and conventional orchards during the breeding season in April and May 2015. The total species richness of birds, estimated by sample- and coverage-based rarefaction and extrapolation curves, was greater in organic orchards than in conventional orchards. Among the three dietary guilds (insectivore, granivore, and omnivore), only insectivorous species were more abundant in organic orchards than in conventional ones. This study offers the first quantitative evidence that organic farming can be beneficial for enhancing the diversity of birds, particularly of insectivores, in fruit orchards in Japan. PMID:27677408

  16. Microbial biomass as a significant source of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltner, Anja; Kindler, Reimo; Schweigert, Michael; Achtenhagen, Jan; Bombach, Petra; Fester, Thomas; Kästner, Matthias

    2014-05-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) plays an important role for soil fertility and in the global carbon cycle. SOM management should be based on knowledge about the chemical composition as well as the spatial distribution of SOM and its individual components in soils. Both parameters strongly depend on the direct precursors of SOM. In the past, microbial biomass has been neglected as a potential source of SOM, mainly because of its small pool size. Recent studies, however, show that a substantial portion of SOM is derived from microbial biomass residues. We therefore investigated the fate of microbial biomass residues in soils by means of incubation experiments with 13C-labelled microbial biomass. For our studies, we selected model organisms representing the three types of soil microorganisms and their characteristic cell wall structures: Escherichia coli (a Gram-negative bacterium), Bacillus subtilis (a Gram-positive bacterium) and Laccaria bicolor (an ectomycorrhizal fungus). We labelled the organisms by growing them on 13C glucose and incubated them in soil. During incubation, we followed the mineralisation of the labelled C, its incorporation into microbial biomass, and its transformation to non-living SOM. We found that 50-65% of the microbial biomass C remained in the soil during incubation. However, only a small part remained in the microbial biomass, the majority was transformed to SOM. In particular, proteins seemed to be rather stable in our experiments. In addition, we used scanning electron microscopy to identify microbial residues in soils and, for comparison, in artificial groundwater microcosms. Scanning electron micrographs showed a low number of intact cells, but mainly fragments of about 200-500 nm size. Similar fragments were found in artificial groundwater microcosms where the only possible origin was microbial biomass residues. Based on the results obtained, we provide a mechanistic model which explains how microbial biomass residues are formed and

  17. The temperature sensitivity of organic matter decay in tidal marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirwan, M. L.; Guntenspergen, G. R.; Langley, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Approximately half of marine carbon sequestration takes place in coastal wetlands, including tidal marshes, where ecosystems accumulate organic matter to build soil elevation and survive sea level rise. The long-term viability of marshes, and their carbon pools, depends in part on how the balance between productivity and decay responds to climate change. Here, we report the sensitivity of soil organic matter decay in tidal marshes to seasonal and latitudinal variations in temperature measured over a 3 year period. We find a moderate increase in decay rate at warmer temperatures (3-6% °C-1, Q10 = 1.3-1.5). Despite the profound differences between microbial metabolism in wetlands and uplands, our results indicate a strong conservation of temperature sensitivity. Moreover, simple comparisons with organic matter production suggest that elevated atmospheric CO2 and warmer temperatures will accelerate carbon accumulation in marsh soils, and enhance their ability to survive sea level rise.

  18. Organic matter in the Saturn system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagan, C.; Khare, B. N.; Lewis, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental predictions of the formation (and outgassing) of organic molecules in the outer solar system are compared with Voyager IRIS spectral data for the Titan atmosphere. The organic molecules of Titan are of interest because the species and processes within the atmosphere of that moon may have had analogs in the early earth atmosphere 4 Gyr ago. The spacecraft data confirmed the presence of alkanes, ethane, propane, ethylene, alkynes, acetylene, butadiene, methylacetylene, nitriles, hydrogen cyanide, cyanoacetylene, and cyanogen, all heavier than the dominant CH4. Experimental simulation of the effects of UV photolysis, alpha and gamma ray irradiation, electrical discharges and proton and electron bombardment of similar gas mixtures has shown the best promise for modeling the reactions producing the Titan atmosphere chemicals.

  19. Role of sedimentary organic matter in bacterial sulfate reduction: the G model tested

    SciTech Connect

    Westrich, J.T.; Berner, R.A.

    1984-03-01

    Laboratory study of the bacterial decomposition of Long Island Sound plankton in oxygenated seawater over a period of 2 years shows that the organic material undergoes decomposition via first-order kinetics and can be divided into two decomposable fractions, of considerably different reactivity, and a nonmetabolized fraction. This planktonic material, after undergoing varying degrees of oxic degradation, was added in the laboratory to anoxic sediment taken from a depth of 1 m at the NWC site of Long Island Sound and the rate of bacterial sulfate reduction in the sediment measured by the /sup 35/S radiotracer technique. The stimulated rate of sulfate reduction was in direct proportion to the amount of planktonic carbon added. This provides direct confirmation of the first-order decomposition, or G model, for marine sediments and proves that the in situ rate of sulfate reduction is organic-matter limited. Slower sulfate reduction rates resulted when oxically degraded plankton rather than fresh plankton was added, and the results confirm the presence of the same two fractions of organic matter deduced from the oxic degradation studies. Near-surface Long Island Sound sediment, which already contains abundant readily decomposable organic matter, was also subjected to anoxic decomposition by bacterial sulfate reduction. The decrease in sulfate reduction rate with time parallels decreases in the amount of organic matter, and these results also indicate the presence of two fractions of organic carbon of distinctly different reactivity. From plots of the log of reduction rate vs. time two first-order rate constants were obtained that agree well with those derived from the plankton addition experiment. Together, the two experiments confirm the use of a simple multi-first-order rate law for organic matter decomposition in marine sediments.

  20. Characterization and origin of polar dissolved organic matter from the Great Salt Lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, J.A.; Noyes, T.I.; Rostad, C.E.; Davisson, M.L.

    2004-01-01

    Polar dissolved organic matter (DOM) was isolated from a surface-water sample from the Great Salt Lake by separating it from colloidal organic matter by membrane dialysis, from less-polar DOM fractions by resin sorbents, and from inorganic salts by a combination of sodium cation exchange followed by precipitation of sodium salts by acetic acid during evaporative concentration. Polar DOM was the most abundant DOM fraction, accounting for 56% of the isolated DOM. Colloidal organic matter was 14C-age dated to be about 100% modern carbon and all of the DOM fractions were 14C-age dated to be between 94 and 95% modern carbon. Average structural models of each DOM fraction were derived that incorporated quantitative elemental and infrared, 13C-NMR, and electrospray/mass spectrometric data. The polar DOM model consisted of open-chain N-acetyl hydroxy carboxylic acids likely derived from N-acetyl heteropolysaccharides that constituted the colloidal organic matter. The less polar DOM fraction models consisted of aliphatic alicyclic ring structures substituted with carboxyl, hydroxyl, ether, ester, and methyl groups. These ring structures had characteristics similar to terpenoid precursors. All DOM fractions in the Great Salt Lake are derived from algae and bacteria that dominate DOM inputs in this lake.

  1. Organic Matter in Rivers: The Crossroads between Climate and Water Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M L

    2001-04-27

    All surface waters in the world contain dissolved organic matter and its concentration depends on climate and vegetation. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is ten times higher in wetlands and swamps than in surface water of arctic, alpine, or arid climate. Climates of high ecosystem productivity (i.e., tropics) typically have soils with low organic carbon storage, but drain high dissolved organic loads to rivers. Regions with lower productivity (e.g. grasslands) typically have high soil carbon storage while adjacent rivers have high DOC contents. Most DOC in a free-flowing river is derived from leaching vegetation and soil organic matter, whereas in dammed rivers algae may comprise a significant portion. Water chemistry and oxygen-18 abundance of river water, along with radiocarbon and carbon-13 isotope abundance measurements of DOC were used to distinguish water and water quality sources in the Missouri River watershed. Drinking water for the City of St. Louis incorporates these different sources, and its water quality depends mostly on whether runoff is derived from the upper or the lower watershed, with the lower watershed contributing water with the highest DOC. During drinking water chlorination, DOC forms carcinogenic by-products in proportion to the amount of DOC present. This has recently led the USEPA to propose federal regulation standards. Restoration of natural riparian habitat such as wetlands will likely increase DOC concentrations in river water.

  2. Do soils loose phosphorus with dissolved organic matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, K.; Brödlin, D.; Hagedorn, F.

    2014-12-01

    During ecosystem development and soil formation, primary mineral sources of phosphorus are becoming increasingly depleted. Inorganic phosphorus forms tend to be bound strongly to or within secondary minerals, thus, are hardly available to plants and are not leached from soil. What about organic forms of phosphorus? Since rarely studied, little is known on the composition, mobility, and bioavailability of dissolved organic phosphorus. There is some evidence that plant-derived compounds, such as phytate, bind strongly to minerals as well, while microbial compounds, such as nucleotides and nucleic acids, may represent more mobile fractions of soil phosphorus. In some weakly developed, shallow soils, leaching losses of phosphorus seem to be governed by mobile organic forms. Consequently, much of the phosphorus losses observed during initial stages of ecosystem development may be due to the leaching of dissolved organic matter. However, the potentially mobile microbial compounds are enzymatically hydrolysable. Forest ecosystems on developed soils already depleted in easily available inorganic phosphorus are characterized by rapid recycling of organic phosphors. That can reduce the production of soluble forms of organic phosphorus as well as increase the enzymatic hydrolysis and subsequent plant uptake of phosphorus bound within dissolved organic matter. This work aims at giving an outlook to the potential role of dissolved organic matter in the cycling of phosphorus within developing forest ecosystems, based on literature evidence and first results of ongoing research.

  3. Andic soils : mineralogical effect onto organic matter dynamics, organic matter effect onto mineral dynamics, or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Amundson, Ronald; Balesdent, Jérome; Borschneck, Daniel; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Colin, Fabrice; de Junet, Alexis; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Legros, Samuel; Levard, Clément; Masion, Armand; Meunier, Jean-Dominique; Rose, Jérôme

    2014-05-01

    From a strictly mineralogical point of view, weathering of volcanic glass produces secondary phases that are short range ordered alumino-silicates (SRO-AlSi). These are imogolite tubes (2 to 3 nm of diameter) and allophane supposedly spheres (3.5 to 5 nm). Their local structure is composed of a curved gibbsite Al layer and Si tetrahedra in the vacancies (Q0). Proto-imogolites have the same local structure but are roof-shape nanoparticles likely representing the precursors of imogolite and allophanes (Levard et al. 2010). These structures and sizes give to the SRO-AlSi large specific surfaces and high reactivities. In some natural sites, imogolites and allophanes are formed in large quantities. Aging of these phases may lead to the formation of more stable minerals (halloysite, kaolinite and gibbsite) (Torn et al 1997). In natural environments, when the weathering of volcanic glass is associated with the establishment of vegetation, the soils formed are generally andosols. These soils are particularly rich in organic matter (OM), which is explained by the high ability of SRO-AlSi mineral phases to form bonds with organic compounds. In a first order "bulk" approach, it is considered that these bonds strongly stabilize the organic compounds as their mean age can reach more than 10 kyrs in some studied sites (Basile-Doelsch et al. 2005; Torn et al. 1997). However, the structure of the mineral phases present in andosols deserves more attention. Traditionally, the presence in the SRO-AlSi andosols was shown by selective dissolution approaches by oxalate and pyrophosphate. Using spectroscopic methods, mineralogical analysis of SRO-AlSi in andosols samples showed that these mineral phases were neither imogolites nor allophanes as originally supposed, but only less organized structures remained in a state of proto-imogolites (Basile-Doelsch al. 2005 ; Levard et al., 2012). The presence of OM would have an inhibitory effect on the formation of secondary mineral phases, by

  4. Consequences of organic farming and landscape heterogeneity for species richness and abundance of farmland birds.

    PubMed

    Smith, Henrik G; Dänhardt, Juliana; Lindström, Ake; Rundlöf, Maj

    2010-04-01

    It has been suggested that organic farming may benefit farmland biodiversity more in landscapes that have lost a significant part of its former landscape heterogeneity. We tested this hypothesis by comparing bird species richness and abundance during the breeding season in organic and conventional farms, matched to eliminate all differences not directly linked to the farming practice, situated in either homogeneous plains with only a little semi-natural habitat or in heterogeneous farmland landscapes with abundant field borders and semi-natural grasslands. The effect of farm management on species richness interacted with landscape structure, such that there was a positive relationship between organic farming and diversity only in homogeneous landscapes. This pattern was mainly dependent on the species richness of passerine birds, in particular those that were invertebrate feeders. Species richness of non-passerines was positively related to organic farming independent of the landscape context. Bird abundance was positively related to landscape heterogeneity but not to farm management. This was mainly because the abundance of passerines, particularly invertebrate feeders, was positively related to landscape heterogeneity. We suggest that invertebrate feeders particularly benefit from organic farming because of improved foraging conditions through increased invertebrate abundances in otherwise depauperate homogeneous landscapes. Although many seed-eaters also benefit from increased insect abundance, they may also utilize crop seed resources in homogeneous landscapes and conventional farms. The occurrence of an interactive effect of organic farming and landscape heterogeneity on bird diversity will have consequences for the optimal allocation of resources to restore the diversity of farmland birds.

  5. New revelations on the nature of organic matter in ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grannas, Amanda M.; Hockaday, William C.; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Thompson, Lonnie G.; Mosley-Thompson, Ellen

    2006-02-01

    Analysis of organic species stored in ice cores provides a unique opportunity to obtain information about the environment of the past. Because of the trace nature of the organic components of interest, studying these species in molecular level detail within ice cores can be an analytical challenge. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization, we have characterized, at an unprecedented molecular level, the organic material in an ice core collected from Franz Josef Land (Russia). Several thousand distinct molecular species are identified and provide clues to the principal sources of the organic matter. Humic-like substances have been identified in both modern and ancient ice, despite the remote marine setting of the ice field. Species containing sulfur heteroatoms are far more abundant in the modern ice, indicating that anthropogenic sulfur emissions are also present in the high-molecular weight organic compounds preserved in ice.

  6. Caracterisation of anthropogenic contribution to the coastal fluorescent organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Nahhal, Ibrahim; Nouhi, Ayoub; Mounier, Stéphane

    2015-04-01

    It is known that most of the coastal fluorescent organic matter is of a terrestrial origin (Parlanti, 2000; Tedetti, Guigue, & Goutx, 2010). However, the contribution of the anthropogenic organic matter to this pool is not well defined and evaluated. In this work the monitoring of little bay (Toulon Bay, France) was done in the way to determine the organic fluorescent response during a winter period. The sampling campaign consisted of different days during the month of December, 2014 ( 12th, 15th, 17th, 19th) on 21 different sampling sites for the fluorescence measurements (without any filtering of the samples) and the whole month of December for the bacterial and the turbidity measurements. Excitation Emission Matrices (EEMs) of fluorescence (from 200 to 400 nm and 220 to 420 nm excitation and emission range) were treated by parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC).The parafac analysis of the EEM datasets was conducted using PROGMEEF software in Matlab langage. On the same time that the turbidity and bacterial measurement (particularly the E.Coli concentration) were determined. The results gives in a short time range, information on the the contribution of the anthropogenic inputs to the coastal fluorescent organic matter. In addition, the effect of salinity on the photochemical degradation of the anthropogenic organic matter (especially those from wastewater treatment plants) will be studied to investigate their fate in the water end member by the way of laboratory experiments. Parlanti, E. (2000). Dissolved organic matter fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool to estimate biological activity in a coastal zone submitted to anthropogenic inputs. Organic Geochemistry, 31(12), 1765-1781. doi:10.1016/S0146-6380(00)00124-8 Tedetti, M., Guigue, C., & Goutx, M. (2010). Utilization of a submersible UV fluorometer for monitoring anthropogenic inputs in the Mediterranean coastal waters. Marine Pollution Bulletin, 60(3), 350-62. doi:10.1016/j.marpolbul.2009.10.018

  7. Aggregation of organic matter by pelagic tunicates

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.; Deibel, D.

    1980-07-01

    Three genera of pelagic tunicates were fed concentrates of natural seston and an axenic diatom culture. Fresh and up to 4-day-old feces resemble flocculent organic aggregates containing populations of microorganisms, as described from highly productive parts of the ocean, and older feces resemble the nearly sterile flocculent aggregates which are ubiquitous in surface waters. Fresh feces consist of partially digested phytoplankton and other inclusions in an amorphous gelatinous matrix. After 18 to 36 h, a population of large bacteria develops in the matrix and in some of the remains of phytoplankton contained in the feces. From 48 to 96 h, protozoan populations arise which consume the bacteria and sometimes the remains of the phytoplankton in the feces. Thereafter only a sparse population of microorganisms remains, and the particles begin to fragment. Water samples taken in or below dense populations of salps and doliolids contained greater numbers of flocculent aggregates than did samples from adjacent stations.

  8. Search for Organic Matter in Leonid Meteoroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rairden, Richard L.; Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Near-ultraviolet 300-410 nm spectra of Leonid meteors were obtained in an effort to measure the strong B to X emission band of the radical CN in Leonid meteor spectra at 387 nm. CN is an expected product of ablation of nitrogen containing organic carbon in the meteoroids as well as a possible product of the aerothermochemistry induced by the kinetic energy of the meteor. A slitless spectrograph with objective grating was deployed on FISTA during the 1999 Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. Fifteen first-order UV spectra were captured near the 02:00 UT meteor storm peak on November 18. It is found that neutral iron lines dominate the spectrum, with no clear sign of the CN band. The meteor plasma contains less than one CN molecule per three Fe atoms at the observed altitude of about 100 km.

  9. Search for Organic Matter in Leonid Meteoroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rairden, Richard L.; Jenniskens, Peter; Laux, Christophe O.

    Near-ultraviolet 300-410 nm spectra of Leonid meteoroids were obtained in an effort to measure the strong B --> X emission band of the radical CN in Leonid meteor spectra at 387 nm. CN is an expected product of ablation of nitrogen containing organic carbon in the meteoroids as well as a possible product of the aerothermochemistry induced by the kinetic energy of the meteor. A slit-less spectrograph with objective grating was deployed on FISTA during the 1999 Leonid Multi-Instrument Aircraft Campaign. Fifteen first-order UV spectra were captured near the 02:00 UT meteor storm peak on November 18. It is found that neutral iron lines dominate the spectrum, with no clear sign of the CN band. The meteor plasma contains less than one CN molecule per 3 Fe atoms at the observed altitude of about 100 km.

  10. Biomass burning as the main source of organic aerosol particulate matter in Malaysia during haze episodes.

    PubMed

    Radzi bin Abas, M; Oros, Daniel R; Simoneit, B R T

    2004-05-01

    The haze episodes that occurred in Malaysia in September-October 1991, August-October 1994 and September-October 1997 have been attributed to suspended smoke particulate matter from biomass burning in southern Sumatra and Kalimantan, Indonesia. In the present study, polar organic compounds in aerosol particulate matter from Malaysia are converted to their trimethylsilyl derivatives and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in order to better assess the contribution of the biomass burning component during the haze episodes. On the basis of this analysis, levoglucosan was found to be the most abundant organic compound detected in almost all samples. The monosaccharides, alpha- and beta-mannose, the lignin breakdown products, vanillic and syringic acids and the minor steroids, cholesterol and beta-sitosterol were also present in some samples. The presence of the tracers from smoke overwhelmed the typical signatures of emissions from traffic and other anthropogenic activities in the urban areas.

  11. The Contribution of Fungal Necromass to Soil Organic Matter Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, K. M.; Blair, N. E.; Buiser, A.; Egerton-Warburton, L.

    2013-12-01

    Saprotrophic fungi have the ability to degrade the three most important biopolymers: cellulose, lignin, and chitin, and therefore are key moderators of a globally important flow of carbon. However, little is known about how that carbon is transformed and/or stored in soil organic matter (SOM). Fungi are also known to produce a variety of biopolymers, such as chitin, melanin, glucan, and mucus-like exudates, and it is likely that these compounds contribute to long-term storage of SOM. In fact, recent work with ectomycorrhizal fungi has shown that a portion of the fungal necromass survives after degradation times of a few weeks to one month (e.g. Drigo et al. 2012, Clemmenson et al. 2013). Until now, the potential contribution of other abundant fungi to recalcitrant SOM has been unknown. Soil incubations have been performed with the common saprotrophic fungus, Fusarium avencum. Approximately 80% of the fungal material was found to turnover over on a time period of days, but 15% of the original biomass was left over at the end of the two-month degradation experiment in both laboratory experiments and in situ in the Dixon Prairie of the Chicago Botanic Garden. In both experiments, degradation was performed by a natural soil microbial consortium. Residual fungal material at each point in the decomposition sequence was analyzed using FTIR and thermochemolysis-GCMS with tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide. The recalcitrant fraction contained carbohydrate and amide-linked functional groups, which is consistent with the chitin or chitosan biopolymer. The breakdown of more labile organic carbon (including proteins and ester-linked groups) appears to occur on a more rapid time scale. Additionally, lipid biomarker analyses revealed a succession of microbial degraders in the degradation process. This is the first time a study of this kind has been performed using a widely distributed saprotrophic fungus, and indicates that these fungi are potentially important in long-term C

  12. Organic Matter Loading Modifies the Microbial Community Responsible for Nitrogen Loss in Estuarine Sediments.

    PubMed

    Babbin, Andrew R; Jayakumar, Amal; Ward, Bess B

    2016-04-01

    Coastal marine sediments, as locations of substantial fixed nitrogen loss, are very important to the nitrogen budget and to the primary productivity of the oceans. Coastal sediment systems are also highly dynamic and subject to periodic natural and anthropogenic organic substrate additions. The response to organic matter by the microbial community involved in nitrogen loss processes was evaluated using mesocosms of Chesapeake Bay sediments. Over the course of a 50-day incubation, rates of anammox and denitrification were measured weekly using (15)N tracer incubations, and samples were collected for genetic analysis. Rates of both nitrogen loss processes and gene abundances associated with them corresponded loosely, probably because heterogeneities in sediments obscured a clear relationship. The rates of denitrification were stimulated more, and the fraction of nitrogen loss attributed to anammox slightly reduced, by the higher organic matter addition. Furthermore, the large organic matter pulse drove a significant and rapid shift in the denitrifier community composition as determined using a nirS microarray, indicating that the diversity of these organisms plays an essential role in responding to anthropogenic inputs. We also suggest that the proportion of nitrogen loss due to anammox in these coastal estuarine sediments may be underestimated due to temporal dynamics as well as from methodological artifacts related to conventional sediment slurry incubation approaches.

  13. Microbial Nitrogen Cycling Associated with the Early Diagenesis of Organic Matter in Subseafloor Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, R.

    2015-12-01

    The early diagenesis of organic matter is the major energy source of marine sedimentary biosphere and thus controls its population size; however, the vertical distribution of any functional groups along with the diagenesis of organic matter is remained unclear, especially for those microbes involved in nitrogen transformation which serve as a major control on the nitrogen flux between reservoirs. Here we investigated the vertical distributions of various functional groups in five sediment cores retrieved from Arctic Mid-Ocean Ridge (AMOR), with emphasis on the nitrifiers, denitrifiers and anaerobic ammonium oxidizing bacteria (anammox). We observed the clear geochemical zonation associated with organic matter diagenesis in the sediments based on the pore water profiles of oxygen, nitrate, ammonium, manganese and sulfate, with distinct geochemical transition zones at the boundaries of geochemical zones, including oxic-anoxic transition zone (OATZ) and nitrate-manganese reduction zone (NMTZ). Nitrate was produced in surface oxygenated sediments and nitrate consumption mainly took place at the NMTZ, splitted between re-oxidation of ammonium and manganese (II). Abundances of ammonia oxidizers, nitrite oxidizers, and denitrifiers, estimated through quantitative PCR targeting their respective functional genes, generally decrease with depth, but constantly elevated around the OATZ, NMTZ, and manganese-reduction zone as well. Anammox bacteria were only detected around the NMTZ where both nitrate/nitrite and ammonium are available. These depth profiles of functional groups were also confirmed by the community structure profiling by prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene tag pyrosequencing. Cell-specific rates of nitrification and denitrification, calculated from the bulk net reaction rates divided by functional group abundances, were similar to those values from oligotrophic sediments like North Pond and thus suggested that nitrifiers and denitirifiers populations were in maintenance

  14. Quenching and Sensitizing Fullerene Photoreactions by Natural Organic Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of natural organic matter (NOM) on the photoreaction kinetics of fullerenes (i.e., C60 and fullerenol) were investigated using simulated sunlight and monochromatic radiation (365 nm). NOM from several sources quenched (slowed) the photoreaction of C60 aggregates in water ...

  15. Calculation of the enthalpy of formation of coal organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    A.M. Gyul'maliev; M.Ya. Shpirt

    2008-10-15

    The enthalpy of formation for the organic matter of coals in the coal rank series was calculated from the heat of the complete combustion reaction. Three variants were considered in which the experimental heating values and the values found from the correlation equation or calculated using the Mendeleev formula were taken as the heat of the complete combustion of coals.

  16. Photoproduction of Carbon Monoxide from Natural Organic Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pioneering studies by Valentine provided early kinetic results that used carbon monoxide (CO) production to evaluate the photodecomposition of aquatic natural organic matter (NOM) . (ES&T 1993 27 409-412). Comparatively few kinetic studies have been conducted of the photodegradat...

  17. Lyophilization and Reconstitution of Reverse Osmosis Concentrated Natural Organic Matter

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disinfection by-product (DBP) research can be complicated by difficulties in shipping large water quantities and changing natural organic matter (NOM) characteristics over time. To overcome these issues, it is advantageous to have a reliable method for concentrating and preservin...

  18. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C-H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  19. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework nodes.

    PubMed

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-30

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C-H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  20. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-30

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C–H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  1. Organic and Inorganic Matter in Louisiana Coastal Waters: Vermilion, Atchafalaya, Terrebonne, Barataria, and Mississippi Regions.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) spectral absorption, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, and the particulate fraction of inorganic (PIM) and organic matter (POM) were measured in Louisiana coastal waters at Vermilion, Atchafalaya, Terrebonne, Barataria, and...

  2. CHROMOPHORIC DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER (CDOM) DERIVED FROM DECOMPOSITION OF VARIOUS VASCULAR PLANT AND ALGAL SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromophoric dissolved organic (CDOM) in aquatic environments is derived from the microbial decomposition of terrestrial and microbial organic matter. Here we present results of studies of the spectral properties and photoreactivity of the CDOM derived from several organic matter...

  3. Molecular characterization of soil organic matter: a historic overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Rumpel, Cornelia

    2014-05-01

    The characterization of individual molecular components of soil organic matter started in the early 19th century, but proceeded slowly. The major focus at this time was on the isolation and differentiation of different humic and fulvic acid fractions, which were considered to have a defined chemical composition and structure. The isolation and structural anlysis of specific individual soil organic matter components became more popular in the early 20th century. In 1936 40 different individual compounds had been isolated and a specific chemical strucutre had been attributed. These structural attributions were confirmed later for some, but not all of these individual compounds. In the 1950 much more individual compounds could be isolated and characterized, using complicated and time consuming chromatography. It became obvious that soil also contains a number of compounds of microbial origin, such as e.g., amino sugars and lipids. With the improvement of chrmoatographic separation techniques and the use of gas chromatography in combination with thin layerchromatography in the 1960 hundreds of individual compounds have been isolated and identified, most of them after chemical degradation of humic or fulvic acids. The chemical degradative techniques were amended with analytical pyrolysis in the 1970s. More and more, bulk soil organic matter was analyzed with these techniques and the advent of solid-stae 13C NMR spectroscopy around the 1980s allowed for the characterization of the composition of bulk soil organic matter. The gas chromatographic separation of organic matter can nowadays be combined with specific detectors, such that specific attributes ofindividual molecules can be analyzed, e.g. the radiocarbon content or the stable isotope composition.

  4. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter in pore water of continental shelf sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Frauke; Elvert, Marcus; Koch, Boris P.; Witt, Matthias; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2009-06-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in sediment pore water is a complex molecular mixture reflecting various sources and biogeochemical processes. In order to constrain those sources and processes, molecular variations of pore water DOM in surface sediments from the NW Iberian shelf were analyzed by ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and compared to river and marine water column DOM. Weighted average molecular element ratios of oxygen to carbon ((O/C) wa) and hydrogen to carbon ((H/C) wa) provided general information about DOM sources. DOM in local rivers was more oxygenated ((O/C) wa 0.52) and contained less hydrogen ((H/C) wa 1.15) than marine pore water DOM (mean (O/C) wa 0.50, mean (H/C) wa 1.26). The relative abundance of specific compound groups, such as highly oxygenated aromatic compounds or nitrogen-bearing compounds with low H/C ratios, correspond to a high concentration of lignin phenols (160 μg/g sediment dry weight) and a high TOC/TN ratio (13.3) in the sedimentary organic matter and were therefore assigned to terrestrial sources. The lower degree of unsaturation and a higher relative abundance of nitrogen-bearing compounds in the pore water DOM reflected microbial activity within the sediment. One sampling site on the shelf with a high sediment accumulation, and a humic-rich river sample showed a wide range of sulfur compounds in the DOM, accompanied by a higher abundance of lipid biomarkers for sulfate-reducing bacteria, probably indicating early diagenetic sulfurization of organic matter.

  5. Production of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in Arctic Ocean sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Meilian; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Nam, Seung-Il; Niessen, Frank; Hong, Wei-Li; Kang, Moo-Hee; Hur, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Little is known about the production of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) in the anoxic oceanic sediments. In this study, sediment pore waters were sampled from four different sites in the Chukchi-East Siberian Seas area to examine the bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and their optical properties. The production of FDOM, coupled with the increase of nutrients, was observed above the sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ). The presence of FDOM was concurrent with sulfate reduction and increased alkalinity (R2 > 0.96, p < 0.0001), suggesting a link to organic matter degradation. This inference was supported by the positive correlation (R2 > 0.95, p < 0.0001) between the net production of FDOM and the modeled degradation rates of particulate organic carbon sulfate reduction. The production of FDOM was more pronounced in a shallow shelf site S1 with a total net production ranging from 17.9 to 62.3 RU for different FDOM components above the SMTZ depth of ca. 4.1 mbsf, which presumably underwent more accumulation of particulate organic matter than the other three deeper sites. The sediments were generally found to be the sources of CDOM and FDOM to the overlying water column, unearthing a channel of generally bio-refractory and pre-aged DOM to the oceans.

  6. Production of fluorescent dissolved organic matter in Arctic Ocean sediments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meilian; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Nam, Seung-Il; Niessen, Frank; Hong, Wei-Li; Kang, Moo-Hee; Hur, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the production of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) in the anoxic oceanic sediments. In this study, sediment pore waters were sampled from four different sites in the Chukchi-East Siberian Seas area to examine the bulk dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and their optical properties. The production of FDOM, coupled with the increase of nutrients, was observed above the sulfate-methane-transition-zone (SMTZ). The presence of FDOM was concurrent with sulfate reduction and increased alkalinity (R2 > 0.96, p < 0.0001), suggesting a link to organic matter degradation. This inference was supported by the positive correlation (R2 > 0.95, p < 0.0001) between the net production of FDOM and the modeled degradation rates of particulate organic carbon sulfate reduction. The production of FDOM was more pronounced in a shallow shelf site S1 with a total net production ranging from 17.9 to 62.3 RU for different FDOM components above the SMTZ depth of ca. 4.1 mbsf, which presumably underwent more accumulation of particulate organic matter than the other three deeper sites. The sediments were generally found to be the sources of CDOM and FDOM to the overlying water column, unearthing a channel of generally bio-refractory and pre-aged DOM to the oceans. PMID:27982085

  7. Bacterial biomarkers thermally released from dissolved organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greenwood, P.F.; Leenheer, J.A.; McIntyre, C.; Berwick, L.; Franzmann, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    Hopane biomarker products were detected using microscale sealed vessel (MSSV) pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of dissolved organic matter from natural aquatic systems colonised by bacterial populations. MSSV pyrolysis can reduce the polyhydroxylated alkyl side chain of bacteriohopanepolyols, yielding saturated hopane products which are more amenable to GC-MS detection than their functionalised precursors. This example demonstrates how the thermal conditions of MSSV pyrolysis can reduce the biologically-inherited structural functionality of naturally occurring organic matter such that additional structural fragments can be detected using GC methods. This approach complements traditional analytical pyrolysis methods by providing additional speciation information useful for establishing the structures and source inputs of recent or extant organic material. ?? 2006.

  8. Pre-biotic organic matter from comets and asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, Edward

    1989-01-01

    Only meteoritic fragments small enough to be gently decelerated by the atmosphere (10 to the -12th g to 10 to the -6th g) can deliver organic matter intact. The amount of such 'soft-landed' organic carbon can be estimated from data for the infall rate of meteoritic matter. At present rates, only about 0.0006 g/sq cm intact organic carbon would accumulate in 100 million years, but at the higher rates of about four billion yr ago, about 20 g/sq cm may have accumulated in the few hundred million years between the last cataclysmic impact and the beginning of life. It may have included some biologically important compounds that did not form by abiotic synthesis on earth.

  9. Nature of particulate organic matter in the River Indus, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ittekkot, Venugopalan; Arain, Rafee

    1986-08-01

    Suspended sediments from the Indus River collected during 1981 through 1983 were analyzed for POC and its constituent fractions including amino acids, amino sugars and sugars. Percentage of POC decreased with increasing suspended matter concentrations, which suggested dilution of organic matter by mineral matter. The concentrations of amino acids, amino sugars and sugars varied, respectively, between 180 and 2000 μg/l, 5 and 125 μg/l, and 60 and 1100 μg/l. Their contributions to POC varied between 2 and 60% for amino acids and amino sugars, and between 2 and 15% for sugars. They were high during low sediment discharge (February to June), and low during high sediment discharge (August and September). Suspended sediments associated with high sediment discharge periods were characterized by low ratios of: (i) aspartic acid:β-alanine (ii) glutamic acid:γ-aminobutyric acid (iii) amino acids:amino sugars (iv) hexoses:pentoses. These and the relative distribution pattern of the monosaccharides such as galactose, arabinose, mannose and xylose indicated that, not only dilution, but also differences in the sources and processes affect the POC transport in the Indus River. These result in transport of biodegraded organic matter during high sediment discharge periods: this appears to be common to other major rivers of the region, with depositional centers in deep sea areas. These rivers, with their high sediment loads, could contribute up to 8 to 11% of the global annual organic carbon burial in marine sediments.

  10. Soil Organic Matter Content Effects on Dermal Pesticide ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Agricultural landscapes serve as active amphibian breeding grounds despite their seemingly poor habitat value. Activity of adults and dispersal of metamorphs to and from agricultural ponds occurs in most species from spring through late summer or early fall, a time that coincides with pesticide applications on farm fields and crops. In terrestrial landscapes, dermal contact with contaminated soil and plant matter may lead to bioconcentration as well as lethal and sublethal effects in amphibians.Although the physiological structure of the amphibian dermis may facilitate pesticide uptake, soil properties may ultimately dictate bioavailability of pesticides in terrestrial habitats. The organic matter fraction of soil readily binds to pesticides, potentially decreasing the availability of pesticides adhering to biological matter. Soil partition coefficient organic carbon content and soil-specific Koc values may be important to indicating pesticide bioavailability and potential bioconcentration in amphibians. Our study was designed to evaluate dermal uptake of five pesticide active ingredients on either high or low organic matter soils. We predicted that amphibian body burdens would be a function of soil carbon content or Koc. with greater bioconcentration in individuals exposed to pesticides on sa

  11. Cumulative effects of biochar, mineral and organic fertilizers on soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, César; López-de-Sá, Esther G.; Gascó, Gabriel; Méndez, Ana; Zaccone, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the effect of three consecutive annual applications of biochar at rates of 0 and 20 t ha-1, in a factorial combination with a mineral fertilizer (NPK and nitrosulfate) and two types of organic amendment (municipal solid waste compost and sewage sludge), on soil organic matter in a field experiment under Mediterranean conditions. Biochar increased significantly soil organic C content and C/N ratio. In biochar-amended soils, soil organic C increased significantly with the addition of municipal solid waste compost and sewage sludge. To capture organic matter protection mechanisms related to aggregation and mineral interaction, the soil samples will be fractionated into free (unprotected), intra-macroaggregate, intra-microaggregate, and mineral-associated organic matter pools, and the isolated fractions will be subjected to further chemical and spectroscopic analysis.

  12. Characterization and Phenanthrene Sorption of Natural and Pyrogenic Organic Matter Fractions.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jie; Sun, Ke; Wang, Ziying; Yang, Yan; Han, Lanfang; Xing, Baoshan

    2017-03-07

    Pyrogenic humic acid (HA) is released into the environment during the large-scale application of biochar. However, the biogeochemistry of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) fractions and their sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) are poorly understood in comparison with natural organic matter (NOM) fractions. HA and humin (HM) fractions isolated from soils and the oxidized biochars were characterized. Sorption of phenanthrene (PHE) by these fractions was also examined. The characterization results demonstrate that pyrogenic HAs are different from natural HAs, with the former having lower atomic H/C ratios, more abundant aromatic C, and higher concentrations of surface carboxylic groups. Compared with the fresh biochars, the Koc of PHE on their oxidized biochars, pyrogenic HA, and HM fractions were undiminished, which is encouraging for the use of biochar in soil remediation. The PyOM fractions exhibited stronger nonlinear sorption than the NOM fractions. In addition, the PyOM fractions had higher sorption capacity than the NOM fractions due to their low polar C content and high aryl C content. The results obtained from this work will shed new light on the impact of the addition of biochar on the biogeochemistry of soil organic matter and on the fate of HOCs in biochar-amended soil.

  13. X-RAY PROPERTIES OF YOUNG EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES. II. ABUNDANCE RATIO IN THE HOT INTERSTELLAR MATTER

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Pipino, Antonio

    2012-05-20

    Using Chandra X-ray observations of young, post-merger elliptical galaxies, we present X-ray characteristics of age-related observational results by comparing them with typical old elliptical galaxies in terms of metal abundances in the hot interstellar matter (ISM). While the absolute element abundances may be uncertain because of unknown systematic errors and partly because of the smaller amount of hot gas in young ellipticals, the relative abundance ratios (e.g., the {alpha}-element to Fe ratio, and most importantly the Si/Fe ratio) can be relatively well constrained. In two young elliptical galaxies (NGC 720 and NGC 3923) we find that the Si to Fe abundance ratio is super-solar (at a 99% significance level), in contrast to typical old elliptical galaxies where the Si to Fe abundance ratio is close to solar. Also, the O/Mg ratio is close to solar in the two young elliptical galaxies, as opposed to the sub-solar O/Mg ratio reported in old elliptical galaxies. Both features appear to be less significant outside the effective radius (roughly 30'' for the galaxies under study), consistent with the observations that confine to the centermost regions the signatures of recent star formation in elliptical galaxies. Observed differences between young and old elliptical galaxies can be explained by the additional contribution from SNe II ejecta in the former. In young elliptical galaxies, the later star formation associated with recent mergers would have a dual effect, resulting both in galaxy scale winds-and therefore smaller observed amounts of hot ISM-because of the additional SN II heating, and in different metal abundances, because of the additional SN II yields.

  14. Extending the analytical window for water-soluble organic matter in sediments by aqueous Soxhlet extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Frauke; Koch, Boris P.; Witt, Matthias; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2014-09-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in marine sediments is a complex mixture of thousands of individual constituents that participate in biogeochemical reactions and serve as substrates for benthic microbes. Knowledge of the molecular composition of DOM is a prerequisite for a comprehensive understanding of the biogeochemical processes in sediments. In this study, interstitial water DOM was extracted with Rhizon samplers from a sediment core from the Black Sea and compared to the corresponding water-extractable organic matter fraction (<0.4 μm) obtained by Soxhlet extraction, which mobilizes labile particulate organic matter and DOM. After solid phase extraction (SPE) of DOM, samples were analyzed for the molecular composition by Fourier Transform Ion-Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) with electrospray ionization in negative ion mode. The average SPE extraction yield of the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in interstitial water was 63%, whereas less than 30% of the DOC in Soxhlet-extracted organic matter was recovered. Nevertheless, Soxhlet extraction yielded up to 4.35% of the total sedimentary organic carbon, which is more than 30-times the organic carbon content of the interstitial water. While interstitial water DOM consisted primarily of carbon-, hydrogen- and oxygen-bearing compounds, Soxhlet extracts yielded more complex FT-ICR mass spectra with more peaks and higher abundances of nitrogen- and sulfur-bearing compounds. The molecular composition of both sample types was affected by the geochemical conditions in the sediment; elevated concentrations of HS- promoted the early diagenetic sulfurization of organic matter. The Soxhlet extracts from shallow sediment contained specific three- and four-nitrogen-bearing molecular formulas that were also detected in bacterial cell extracts and presumably represent proteinaceous molecules. These compounds decreased with increasing sediment depth while one- and two-nitrogen-bearing molecules increased

  15. Dark matter relic abundance and big bang nucleosynthesis in Horava's gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lambiase, G.

    2011-05-15

    The cosmological consequences of Horava's gravity are reviewed in the frameworks of the PAMELA experiment (which has reported an excess of positron events that likely can be ascribed to weakly interacting massive particles dark matter) and of big bang nucleosynthesis. Constraints on parameters characterizing Horawa's cosmology are derived.

  16. Preservation of organic matter in sediments promoted by iron.

    PubMed

    Lalonde, Karine; Mucci, Alfonso; Ouellet, Alexandre; Gélinas, Yves

    2012-03-07

    The biogeochemical cycles of iron and organic carbon are strongly interlinked. In oceanic waters, organic ligands have been shown to control the concentration of dissolved iron. In soils, solid iron phases shelter and preserve organic carbon, but the role of iron in the preservation of organic matter in sediments has not been clearly established. Here we use an iron reduction method previously applied to soils to determine the amount of organic carbon associated with reactive iron phases in sediments of various mineralogies collected from a wide range of depositional environments. Our findings suggest that 21.5 ± 8.6 per cent of the organic carbon in sediments is directly bound to reactive iron phases. We further estimate that a global mass of (19-45) × 10(15) grams of organic carbon is preserved in surface marine sediments as a result of its association with iron. We propose that these associations between organic carbon and iron, which are formed primarily through co-precipitation and/or direct chelation, promote the preservation of organic carbon in sediments. Because reactive iron phases are metastable over geological timescales, we suggest that they serve as an efficient 'rusty sink' for organic carbon, acting as a key factor in the long-term storage of organic carbon and thus contributing to the global cycles of carbon, oxygen and sulphur.

  17. Sedimentary process control on carbon isotope composition of sedimentary organic matter in an ancient shallow-water shelf succession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, S. J.; Leng, M. J.; Macquaker, J. H. S.; Hawkins, K.

    2012-11-01

    Source and delivery mechanisms of organic matter are rarely considered when interpreting changing δ13C through sedimentary successions even though isotope excursions are widely used to identify and correlate global perturbations in the carbon cycle. Combining detailed sedimentology and geochemistry we demonstrate how organic carbon abundance and δ13C values from sedimentary organic matter from Carboniferous-aged mudstones are influenced by the proportion of terrestrial versus water column-derived organic matter. Silt-bearing clay-rich shelf mudstones that were deposited by erosive density flows are characterized by 1.8-2.4% organic carbon and highδ13C values (averaging -22.9 ± 0.3‰, n = 12). Typically these mudstones contain significant volumes of terrestrial plant-derived material. In contrast, clay-rich lenticular mudstones, with a marine macrofauna, are the products of the transport of mud fragments, eroded from pre-existing water-rich shelfal muds, when shorelines were distant and biological productivity in the water column was high. Higher organic carbon (2.1-5.2%) and lowerδ13C values (averaging -24.3 ± 0.5‰, n = 11) characterize these mudstones and are interpreted to reflect a greater contribution by (isotopically more negative) amorphous organic matter derived from marine algae. Differences in δ13C between terrestrial and marine organic matter allow the changing proportions from different sources to be tracked through this succession. Combining δ13C values with zirconium (measured from whole rock), here used as a proxy for detrital silt input, provides a novel approach to distinguishing mudstone provenance and ultimately using δ13C to identify oil-prone organic matter in potential source rocks. These results have important implications for using bulk organic matter to identify and characterize global C-isotope excursions.

  18. Hydrographic controls on marine organic matter fate and microbial diversity in the western Irish Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Shane; Szpak, Michal; Monteys, Xavier; Flanagan, Paul; Allen, Christopher; Kelleher, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Cycling of organic matter (OM) is the key biological process in the marine environment1 and knowledge of the sources and the reactivity of OM, in addition to factors controlling its distribution in estuarine, coastal and shelf sediments are of key importance for understanding global biogeochemical cycles2. With recent advances in cultivation-independent molecular approaches to microbial ecology, the key role of prokaryotes in global biogeochemical cycling in marine ecosystems has been emphasised3,4. However, spatial studies combining the distribution and fate of OM with microbial community abundance and diversity remain rare. Here, a combined spatial lipid biomarker and 16S rRNA tagged pyrosequencing study was conducted in surface sediments and particulate matter across hydrographically distinct zones associated with the seasonal western Irish Sea gyre. The aim was to assess the spatial variation of, and factors controlling, marine organic cycling and sedimentary microbial communities across these distinct zones. The distribution of phospholipid fatty acids, source-specific sterols, wax esters and C25 highly branched isoprenoids indicate that diatoms, dinoflagellates and green algae were the major contributors of marine organic matter, while the distribution of cholesterol, wax esters and C20 and C22 polyunsaturated fatty acids have highlighted the importance of copepod grazing for mineralizing organic matter in the water column5. This marine OM production and mineralisation was greatest in well-mixed waters compared to offshore stratified waters. Lipid analysis and 16S rRNA PCR-DGGE profiling also suggests that sedimentary bacterial abundance increases while community diversity decreases in offshore stratified waters. The major bacterial classes are the Deltaproteobacteria, Clostridia, Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobactera and Bacteroiidia. At the family/genus level most groups appear to be associated with organoheterotrophic processing of sedimentary OM, ranging

  19. Glacier inputs influence organic matter composition and prokaryotic distribution in a high Arctic fjord (Kongsfjorden, Svalbard)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, Solveig; Kerhervé, Philippe; Calleja, Maria Ll.; Many, Gaël; Morata, Nathalie

    2016-12-01

    With climate change, the strong seasonality and tight pelagic-benthic coupling in the Arctic is expected to change in the next few decades. It is currently unclear how the benthos will be affected by changes of environmental conditions such as supplies of organic matter (OM) from the water column. In the last decade, Kongsfjorden (79°N), a high Arctic fjord in Svalbard influenced by several glaciers and Atlantic water inflow, has been a site of great interest owing to its high sensitivity to climate change, evidenced by a reduction in ice cover and an increase in melting freshwater. To investigate how spatial and seasonal changes in vertical fluxes can impact the benthic compartment of Kongsfjorden, we studied the organic matter characteristics (in terms of quantity and quality) and prokaryotic distribution in sediments from 3 stations along a transect extending from the glacier into the outer fjord in 4 different seasons (spring, summer, autumn and winter) in 2012-2013. The biochemical parameters used to describe the sedimentary organic matter were organic carbon (OC), total nitrogen, bulk stable isotope ratios, pigments (chorophyll-a and phaeopigments) and biopolymeric carbon (BPC), which is the sum of the main macromolecules, i.e. lipids, proteins and carbohydrates. Prokaryotic abundance and distribution were estimated by 4‧,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining. This study identifies a well-marked quantitative gradient of biogenic compounds throughout all seasons and also highlights a discrepancy between the quantity and quality of sedimentary organic matter within the fjord. The sediments near the glacier were organic-poor (< 0.3%OC), however the high primary productivity in the water column displayed during spring was reflected in summer sediments, and exhibited higher freshness of material at the inner station compared to the outer basin (means C-chlorophyll-a/OC 5 and 1.5%, respectively). However, sediments at the glacier front were depleted in BPC

  20. Cu Binding to Iron Oxide-Organic Matter Coprecipitates in Solid and Dissolved Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadas, T. M.; Koenigsmark, F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that Cu is released from wetlands following storm events. Assymetrical field flow field fractionation (AF4) analyses as well as total and dissolved metal concentration measurements suggest iron oxide-organic matter complexes control Cu retention and release. Coprecipitation products of Fe oxide and organic matter were prepared under conditions similar to the wetland to assess Cu partitioning to and availability from solid phases that settle from solution as well as phases remaining suspended. Cu coprecipitation and sorption to organomineral precipitation solids formed at different Fe:organic carbon (OC) ratios were compared for net Cu removal and extractability. As more humic acid was present during precipitation of Fe, TEM images indicated smaller Fe oxide particles formed within an organic matrix as expected. In coprecipitation reactions, as the ratio of Fe:OC decreased, more Cu was removed from solution at pH 5.5 and below. However, in sorption reactions, there was an inhibition of Cu removal at low OC concentrations. As the pH increased from 5.5 to 7 and as solution phase OC concentration increased, more Cu remained dissolved in both coprecipitation and sorption reactions. The addition of Ca2+, glycine, histidine and citric acid or lowering the pH resulted in more extractable Cu from the coprecipitation compared with the sorption reactions. The variations in Cu extraction were likely due to a combination of a more amorphous structure in CPT products, and the relative abundance of available Fe oxide or OC binding sites. Suspended Fe oxide-organic matter coprecipitates were assessed using AF4 coupled to online TOC analysis and ICP-MS. In laboratory prepared samples, Cu was observed in a mixture of small 1-5 nm colloids of Fe oxide-organic matter precipitates, but the majority was observed in larger organic matter colloids and were not UV absorbing, suggesting more aliphatic carbon materials. In field samples, up to 60% of the dissolved Cu

  1. A marine sink for chlorine in natural organic matter [Natural chlorination of marine organic matter

    DOE PAGES

    Leri, Alessandra C.; Northrup, Paul A.; Mayer, Lawrence M.; ...

    2015-07-06

    Chloride, Cl–, is the most abundant solute in seawater, amounting to 55% of ions by weight. Cl– is more difficult to oxidize than bromide, and marine halogenating enzymes tend to be bromoperoxidases that are incapable of forming organochlorines. Consequently, most halogenated natural products identified in the marine environment are organobromines. Known exceptions include small quantities of volatile chlorocarbons emitted by marine algae and dissolved chlorinated benzoic acids.

  2. A marine sink for chlorine in natural organic matter [Natural chlorination of marine organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Leri, Alessandra C.; Northrup, Paul A.; Mayer, Lawrence M.; Thornton, Kathleen R.; Dunigan, Marisa R.; Ness, Katherine J.; Gellis, Austin B.

    2015-07-06

    Chloride, Cl, is the most abundant solute in seawater, amounting to 55% of ions by weight. Cl is more difficult to oxidize than bromide, and marine halogenating enzymes tend to be bromoperoxidases that are incapable of forming organochlorines. Consequently, most halogenated natural products identified in the marine environment are organobromines. Known exceptions include small quantities of volatile chlorocarbons emitted by marine algae and dissolved chlorinated benzoic acids.

  3. Direct evidence for microbial-derived soil organic matter formation and its ecophysiological controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenbach, Cynthia M.; Frey, Serita D.; Grandy, A. Stuart

    2016-11-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) and the carbon and nutrients therein drive fundamental submicron- to global-scale biogeochemical processes and influence carbon-climate feedbacks. Consensus is emerging that microbial materials are an important constituent of stable SOM, and new conceptual and quantitative SOM models are rapidly incorporating this view. However, direct evidence demonstrating that microbial residues account for the chemistry, stability and abundance of SOM is still lacking. Further, emerging models emphasize the stabilization of microbial-derived SOM by abiotic mechanisms, while the effects of microbial physiology on microbial residue production remain unclear. Here we provide the first direct evidence that soil microbes produce chemically diverse, stable SOM. We show that SOM accumulation is driven by distinct microbial communities more so than clay mineralogy, where microbial-derived SOM accumulation is greatest in soils with higher fungal abundances and more efficient microbial biomass production.

  4. Direct evidence for microbial-derived soil organic matter formation and its ecophysiological controls

    PubMed Central

    Kallenbach, Cynthia M.; Frey, Serita D.; Grandy, A. Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) and the carbon and nutrients therein drive fundamental submicron- to global-scale biogeochemical processes and influence carbon-climate feedbacks. Consensus is emerging that microbial materials are an important constituent of stable SOM, and new conceptual and quantitative SOM models are rapidly incorporating this view. However, direct evidence demonstrating that microbial residues account for the chemistry, stability and abundance of SOM is still lacking. Further, emerging models emphasize the stabilization of microbial-derived SOM by abiotic mechanisms, while the effects of microbial physiology on microbial residue production remain unclear. Here we provide the first direct evidence that soil microbes produce chemically diverse, stable SOM. We show that SOM accumulation is driven by distinct microbial communities more so than clay mineralogy, where microbial-derived SOM accumulation is greatest in soils with higher fungal abundances and more efficient microbial biomass production. PMID:27892466

  5. Organic amendments enhance microbial diversity and abundance of functional genes in Australian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldorri, Sind; McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily

    2016-04-01

    Food and cash crops play important roles in Australia's economy with black, grey and red clay soil, widely use for growing cotton, wheat, corn and other crops in rotation. While the majority of cotton growers use nitrogen and phosphate fertilizers only in the form of agrochemicals, a few experiment with the addition of manure or composted plant material before planting. We hypothesized that the use of such organic amendments would enhance the soil microbial function through increased microbial diversity and abundance, thus contribute to improved soil sustainability. To test the hypothesis we collected soil samples from two cotton-growing farms in close geographical proximity and with mostly similar production practices other than one grower has been using composted plants as organic amendment and the second farmer uses only agrochemicals. We applied the Biolog Ecoplate system to study the metabolic signature of microbial communities and used qPCR to estimate the abundance of functional genes in the soil. The soil treated with organic amendments clearly showed higher metabolic activity of a more diverse range of carbon sources as well as higher abundance of genes involved in the nitrogen and phosphorous cycles. Since microbes undertake a large number of soil functions, the use of organic amendments can contribute to the sustainability of agricultural soils.

  6. Organic matter determination for street dust in Delhi.

    PubMed

    Shandilya, Kaushik K; Khare, Mukesh; Gupta, A B

    2013-06-01

    The organic matter of street dust is considered as one of the causes for high human mortality rate. To understand the association, the street dust samples were collected from four different localities (industrial, residential, residential-commercial, and commercial) situated in the greater Delhi area of India. The loss-on-ignition method was used to determine the organic matter (OM) content in street dust. The OM content, potassium, calcium, sulfate, and nitrate concentrations of street dust in Delhi, India is measured to understand the spatial variation. Correlation analysis, analysis of variance, and factor analysis were performed to define the sources. The dust OM level ranges from 2.63 to 10.22 %. It is found through correlation and factor analysis that OM is primarily contributed from secondary aerosol and vehicular exhaust. The OM levels suggest that the use of a residential-commercial site for commercial purposes is polluting the street dust and creating the environmental and human health problems.

  7. Control of organic matter on the magnetic properties of surficial marine sediments. A simple kinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed Falcon, K. J.; Andrade, A.; Rey, D.; Rubio, B.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic properties of marine sediments in the Galician Rias, in NW Spain, have shown that in these shallow marine settings the magnetic mineral assemblage, and its bulk magnetic properties, is controlled by grain size, wave climate, and organic matter content. The grain size effect is explained by concentration of diamagnetic biogenic carbonates in the coarse fraction, which dilutes the concentration-dependent magnetic properties. Furthermore, this effect is enhanced by the hydrodynamic sorting of the heavy minerals, like magnetite, that become concentrated in the finer fractions. Waves on the other hand concentrate the coarser bioclasts in the shallower areas along the coastal margins of the rias, and consequently these areas show the lowest magnetic mineral concentrations. Magnetic minerals are therefore more abundant in the deeper central axis and towards the external, more oceanic, areas of the rias. Another effect of waves is periodic resuspension of fine sediments, which allows them to be reoxigenated preventing the onset of reductive diagenesis. This effect is best seen in sediment cores, where organic matter remineralization promotes dissolution of magnetic iron oxides and oxyhydroxides. Areas where resuspension is frequent and/or deeper areas where sediments stay in the water column for longer have lower degrees of reductive early diagenesis. In addition to its downcore effect, organic matter also controls the magnetic properties of surficial sediments. Our results in the Ria de Muros, at the north of our study area, have shown that a simple kinetic model is enough to quantify the effect of organic matter content on the dissolution of magnetite. We have found that a Total Organic Carbon increase of 0.35% reduces magnetite concentration of surface samples by half. These effects observed in the Ria de Muros have also been confirmed for published results in the southern Rias Baixas previously studied by our research group.

  8. Chemical characterization of high molecular weight dissolved organic matter in fresh and marine waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repeta, Daniel J.; Quan, Tracy M.; Aluwihare, Lihini I.; Accardi, AmyMarie

    2002-03-01

    The high molecular weight fraction of dissolved organic matter in a suite of lakes, rivers, seawater, and marine sediment interstitial water samples was collected by ultrafiltration and characterized by molecular level and spectroscopic techniques. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of all samples show a high degree of similarity, with major contributions from carbohydrates, bound acetate, and lipids. Molecular level analyses of neutral sugars show seven monosaccharides, rhamnose, fucose, arabinose, xylose, mannose, glucose, and galactose, to be abundant, and to occur in comparable relative amounts in each sample. Previous studies have emphasized the distinctive composition of dissolved humic substances in fresh and marine waters, and have attributed these differences to sources and transformations of organic matter unique to each environment. In contrast we find a large fraction of freshwater high molecular weight dissolved organic matter (HMWDOM; > 1kD) to be indistinguishable from marine HMWDOM in bulk and molecular-level chemical properties. Aquatic HMWDOM is similar in chemical composition to biologically derived acylated heteropolysaccharides isolated from marine algal cultures, suggesting a biological source for some fraction of persistent HMWDOM. High molecular weight DOC contributes 51 ± 26% of the total DOC, and monosaccharides 18 ± 8% of the total HMWDOC in our freshwater samples. These contributions are on average higher and more variable, but not significantly different than for surface seawater (30% and 16% respectively). Biogeochemical processes that produce, accumulate, and recycle DOM may therefore share important similarities and be broadly comparable across a range of environmental settings.

  9. Prebiotic Organic Matter from the Center of the Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfen, DeWayne; Ziurys, Lucy M.

    2016-06-01

    The origins of life on Earth must have begun with simple organic compounds. A plausible source of such prebiotic molecules was the interstellar medium (ISM). Of the over 160 molecules that have been identified in interstellar gas, about half have been discovered in one source, Sagittarius B2(N), located in the Galactic Center. This giant molecular cloud is also home to many large organic species observed in the ISM. How complex these species can become is unknown. In order to accurately establish an inventory of potentially, prebiotic organic molecules, we completed a continuous spectral-line survey of Sgr B2(N) at the confusion limit using the Arizona Radio Observatory facilities: the Kitt Peak 12 m and the Submillimeter Telescope. The survey covers the 1, 2, and 3 mm atmospheric windows in the range 68 - 280 GHz, and about 15,000 individual spectral lines have been observed. Seventy-four molecules have been identified in the data, including several potential prebiotic species, such as glycolaldehyde, acetamide, and methyl isocyanate. These molecules are relatively abundant in Sgr B2(N), with fractional abundances of f ~ 10-10 - 10-12 relative to H2. Current results of this survey will be presented, along with its implications for interstellar organic chemistry and prebiotic synthesis. A comparison with organics found in comets and meteorites will also be discussed.

  10. Variation in some chemical parameters and organic matter in soils regenerated by the addition of municipal solid waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Carlos; Hernandez, Teresa; Costa, Francisco

    1992-11-01

    The organic fraction of a municipal solid waste was added in different doses to an eroded soil formed of loam and with no vegetal cover. After three years, the changes in macronutrient content and the chemical-structural composition of its organic matter were studied. The addition of the organic fraction from a municipal solid waste had a positive effect on soil regeneration, the treated soils being covered with spontaneous vegetation from 1 yr onwards. An increase in electrical conductivity and a fall in pH were noted in the treated soils as were increases in macronutrients, particularly N and available P and the different carbon fractions. Optical density measurements of the organic matter extracted with sodium pyrophosphate showed that the treated soils contained an organic matter with less condensed compounds and with a greater tendency to evolve than the control. A pyrolysis-gas chromatography study of the organic matter extracted with pyrophosphate showed large quantities of benzene both in the treated soils and control; pyrrole was also relatively abundant, although this fragment decreased as the dose rose. Xylenes and pyridine were present in greater quantities in the control and furfural in the treated soils. Three years after addition to the soil, the organic matter had a higher proportion of fragments derived from aromatic compounds and a smaller proportion derived from hydrocarbons. Similarity indices showed that, although the added and newly formed organic matter 3 yr after addition continued to differ from that of the original soil and to be more mineralizable, the transformations it has undergone made it more similar to the original organic matter of the soil than it was at the moment of being added.

  11. Photochemical Degradation of Persistent Organic Pollutants: A Study of Ice Photochemistry Mediated by Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobby, R.; Pagano, L.; Grannas, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    It is well established that ice is a reactive medium in the environment and that active photochemistry occurs in frozen systems. Snow and ice contain a number of absorbing species including nitrate, peroxide and organic matter. Upon irradiation, they can generate a variety of reactive intermediates such as hydroxyl radical and singlet oxygen. It has been shown that dissolved organic matter is a ubiquitous component of snow and ice and plays an important role in overall light absorption properties of the sample. Additionally, the reactive intermediates produced can further react with contaminants present and alter their fate in the environment. Unfortunately, the role of dissolved organic matter in ice photochemistry has received little attention. Here we present results from laboratory-based studies aimed at elucidating the role of dissolved organic matter photochemistry on contaminant degradation in ice. Aqueous samples of our target pollutant, aldrin (20 μg/L), in liquid and frozen phases, were irradiated under Q-Panel 340 lamps to simulate the UV radiation profile of natural sunlight. Results indicated that frozen samples degraded more quickly than liquid samples and that the addition of dissolved organic matter increases the aldrin degradation rate significantly. Both terrestrial (Suwannee River, U.S.) and microbial sources (Pony Lake, Antarctica) of DOM were able to sensitize aldrin loss in ice. Scavengers of singlet oxygen, such as furfuryl alcohol and β-carotene, were also added to DOM solutions. Based on the type of organic matter present, the scavengers had different effects on the photochemical degradation of aldrin. Our results indicate that natural organic matter present in ice is an important component of ice photochemical processes.

  12. Temperature sensitivity of organic-matter decay in tidal marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirwan, Matthew L.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Langley, J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Approximately half of marine carbon sequestration takes place in coastal wetlands, including tidal marshes, where organic matter contributes to soil elevation and ecosystem persistence in the face of sea-level rise. The long-term viability of marshes and their carbon pools depends, in part, on how the balance between productivity and decay responds to climate change. Here, we report the sensitivity of labile soil organic-matter decay in tidal marshes to seasonal and latitudinal variations in temperature measured over a 3-year period. We find a moderate increase in decay rate at warmer temperatures (3-6% per °C, Q10 = 1.3-1.5). Despite the profound differences between microbial metabolism in wetlands and uplands, our results indicate a strong conservation of temperature sensitivity. Moreover, simple comparisons with organic-matter production suggest that elevated atmospheric CO2 and warmer temperatures will accelerate carbon accumulation in marsh soils, and potentially enhance their ability to survive sea-level rise.

  13. Temperature sensitivity of organic-matter decay in tidal marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirwan, M. L.; Guntenspergen, G. R.; Langley, J. A.

    2014-09-01

    Approximately half of marine carbon sequestration takes place in coastal wetlands, including tidal marshes, where organic matter contributes to soil elevation and ecosystem persistence in the face of sea-level rise. The long-term viability of marshes and their carbon pools depends, in part, on how the balance between productivity and decay responds to climate change. Here, we report the sensitivity of labile soil organic-matter decay in tidal marshes to seasonal and latitudinal variations in temperature measured over a 3-year period. We find a moderate increase in decay rate at warmer temperatures (3-6% per °C, Q10 = 1.3-1.5). Despite the profound differences between microbial metabolism in wetlands and uplands, our results indicate a strong conservation of temperature sensitivity. Moreover, simple comparisons with organic-matter production suggest that elevated atmospheric CO2 and warmer temperatures will accelerate carbon accumulation in marsh soils, and potentially enhance their ability to survive sea-level rise.

  14. Terrestrial dominance of organic matter in north temperate lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, G.; Pace, M. L.; Cole, J. J.

    2012-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are hotspots of decomposition and a source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere that is globally significant. Carbon exported from land (allochthonous) also supplements the carbon fixed by photosynthesis in aquatic ecosystems (autochthonous), contributing to the organic matter (OM) that supports aquatic consumers. Although the presence of terrestrial compounds in aquatic OM is well known, the contribution of terrestrial versus aquatic sources to the composition of OM has been quantified for only a handful of systems. Here we use stable isotopes of hydrogen and carbon to demonstrate that the terrestrial contribution to particulate organic matter (POM) is as large or larger (mean=54.6% terrestrial) than the algal contribution in 39 lakes of the northern highlands region of Wisconsin and Michigan. Further, the largest carbon pool, dissolved organic matter (DOM), is strongly dominated by allochthonous material (mean for the same set of lakes approximately 100% terrestrial). Among lakes, increases in terrestrial contribution to POM are significantly correlated with more acidic pH. Extrapolating this relationship using a survey of pH in 1692 lakes in the region reveals that, with the exception of eutrophic lakes, most of the OM in lakes is of terrestrial origin. These results are consistent with the growing evidence that terrestrial OM may support many lake food webs, and that lakes are significant conduits for returning degraded terrestrial carbon to the atmosphere.

  15. Terrestrial dominance of organic matter in north temperate lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Grace M.; Pace, Michael L.; Cole, Jonathan J.

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are hotspots of decomposition and sources of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere that are globally significant. Carbon exported from land (allochthonous) also supplements the carbon fixed by photosynthesis in aquatic ecosystems (autochthonous), contributing to the organic matter (OM) that supports aquatic consumers. Although the presence of terrestrial compounds in aquatic OM is well known, the contribution of terrestrial versus aquatic sources to the composition of OM has been quantified for only a handful of systems. Here we use stable isotopes of hydrogen and carbon to demonstrate that the terrestrial contribution (ΦTerr) to particulate organic matter (POM) is as large or larger (mean = 54.6% terrestrial) than the algal contribution in 39 lakes of the northern highlands region of Wisconsin and Michigan. Further, the largest carbon pool, dissolved organic matter (DOM), is strongly dominated by allochthonous material (mean for the same set of lakes approximately 100% terrestrial). Among lakes, increases in terrestrial contribution to POM are significantly correlated with more acidic pH. Extrapolating this relationship using a survey of pH in 1692 lakes in the region reveals that, with the exception of eutrophic lakes, most of the OM in lakes is of terrestrial origin. These results are consistent with the growing evidence that lakes are significant conduits for returning degraded terrestrial carbon to the atmosphere.

  16. Comments on D/H ratios in chondritic organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J. W.; Rigby, D.

    1981-06-01

    D/H ratios in chondritic organic matter are investigated. Demineralized organic residues obtained from previous experiments were dried in a quartz reaction vessel under vacuum for 60 minutes at 250-300 C and then combusted in oxygen for 20 minutes at 850 C. The apparatus is described and the results of the experiments such as D/H ratios in water and measurements on total carbon dioxide are given. Atomic H/C ratios calculated directly from the quantities of carbon dioxide and water recovered, are reported according to Standard Mean Ocean Water and Pee Dee Belemnite, using the customary notation.

  17. Microorganisms and typical organic matter responsible for lacustrine "black bloom".

    PubMed

    Feng, Ziyan; Fan, Chengxin; Huang, Weiyi; Ding, Shiming

    2014-02-01

    Identifying the causation of the black substance in lacustrine "black bloom" is of great significance for forecasting and preventing black bloom in many waters of the world. In this research, an array of black bloom was simulated in a laboratory to investigate how microorganisms and organic matter affect black bloom. Sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are the main biological factor, and protein is the key organic factor contributing to lacustrine black bloom. The black colour of black bloom is strongly associated with a relatively high SRB population density. Hydrogen sulphide concentration can serve as a predictor of black bloom.

  18. Plutonium Immobilization and Mobilization by Soil Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Santschi, Peter H.; Schwehr, Kathleen A.; Xu, Chen; Athon, Matthew; Ho, Yi-Fang; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Didonato, Nicole; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    2016-03-08

    The human and environmental risks associated with Pu disposal, remediation, and nuclear accidents scenarios stems mainly from the very long half-lives of several of its isotopes. The SRS, holding one-third of the nation’s Pu inventory, has a long-term stewardship commitment to investigation of Pu behavior in the groundwater and downgradient vast wetlands. Pu is believed to be essentially immobile due to its low solubility and high particle reactivity to mineral phase or natural organic matter (NOM). For example, in sediments collected from a region of SRS, close to a wetland and a groundwater plume, 239,240Pu concentrations suggest immobilization by NOM compounds, as Pu correlate with NOM contents. Micro-SXRF data indicate, however, that Pu does not correlate with Fe. However, previous studies reported Pu can be transported several kilometers in surface water systems, in the form of a colloidal organic matter carrier, through wind/water interactions. The role of NOM in both immobilizing or re-mobilizing Pu thus has been demonstrated. Our results indicate that more Pu (IV) than (V) was bound to soil colloidal organic matter (COM), amended at far-field concentrations. Contrary to expectations, the presence of NOM in the F-Area soil did not enhance Pu fixation to the organic-rich soil, when compared to the organic-poor soil or the mineral phase from the same soil source, due to the formation of COM-bound Pu. Most importantly, Pu uptake by organic-rich soil decreased with increasing pH because more NOM in the colloidal size desorbed from the particulate fraction at elevated pH, resulting in greater amounts of Pu associated with the COM fraction. This is in contrast to previous observations with low-NOM sediments or minerals, which showed increased Pu uptake with increasing pH levels. This demonstrates that despite Pu immobilization by NOM, COM can convert Pu into a more mobile form. Sediment Pu concentrations in the SRS F-Area wetland were correlated to total organic

  19. Carbon isotopic studies of organic matter in Precambrian rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oehler, D. Z.; Schopf, J. W.; Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1972-01-01

    A survey has been undertaken of the carbon composition of the total organic fraction of a suite of Precambrian sediments to detect isotopic trends possibly correlative with early evolutionary events. Early Precambrian cherts of the Fig Tree and upper and middle Onverwacht groups of South Africa were examined for this purpose. Reduced carbon in these cherts was found to be isotopically similar to photosynthetically produced organic matter of younger geological age. Reduced carbon in lower Onverwacht cherts was found to be anomalously heavy; it is suggested that this discontinuity may reflect a major event in biological evolution.

  20. The Impact of Microbial Metabolism on Marine Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujawinski, Elizabeth B.

    2011-01-01

    Microbes mediate global biogeochemical cycles through their metabolism, and all metabolic processes begin with the interaction between the microbial cell wall or membrane and the external environment. For all heterotrophs and many autotrophs, critical growth substrates and factors are present within the dilute and heterogeneous mixture of compounds that constitutes dissolved organic matter (DOM). In short, the microbe-molecule interaction is one of the fundamental reactions within the global carbon cycle. Here, I summarize recent findings from studies that examine DOM-microbe interactions from either the DOM perspective (organic geochemistry) or the microbe perspective (microbial ecology). Gaps in our knowledge are highlighted and future integrative research directions are proposed.

  1. Determination of Natural 14C Abundances in Dissolved Organic Carbon in Organic-Rich Marine Sediment Porewaters by Thermal Sulfate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L.; Komada, T.

    2010-12-01

    The abundances of natural 14C in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the marine environment hold clues regarding the processes that influence the biogeochemical cycling of this large carbon reservoir. At present, UV irradiation is the widely accepted method for oxidizing seawater DOC for determination of their 14C abundances. This technique yields precise and accurate values with low blanks, but it requires a dedicated vacuum line, and hence can be difficult to implement. As an alternative technique that can be conducted on a standard preparatory vacuum line, we modified and tested a thermal sulfate reduction method that was previously developed to determine δ13C values of marine DOC (Fry B. et al., 1996. Analysis of marine DOC using a dry combustion method. Mar. Chem., 54: 191-201.) to determine the 14C abundances of DOC in marine sediment porewaters. In this method, the sample is dried in a 100 ml round-bottom Pyrex flask in the presence of excess oxidant (K2SO4) and acid (H3PO4), and combusted at 550 deg.C. The combustion products are cryogenically processed to collect and quantify CO2 using standard procedures. Materials we have oxidized to date range from 6-24 ml in volume, and 95-1500 μgC in size. The oxidation efficiency of this method was tested by processing known amounts of reagent-grade dextrose and sucrose (as examples of labile organic matter), tannic acid and humic acid (as examples of complex natural organic matter), and porewater DOC extracted from organic-rich nearshore sediments. The carbon yields for all of these materials averaged 99±4% (n=18). The 14C abundances of standard materials IAEA C-6 and IAEA C-5 processed by this method using >1mgC aliquots were within error of certified values. The size and the isotopic value of the blank were determined by a standard dilution technique using IAEA C-6 and IAEA C-5 that ranged in size from 150 to 1500 μgC (n=4 and 2, respectively). This yielded a blank size of 6.7±0.7 μgC, and a blank isotopic

  2. SOIL NITROGEN TRANSFORMATIONS AND ROLE OF LIGHT FRACTION ORGANIC MATTER IN FOREST SOILS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Depletion of soil organic matter through cultivation may alter substrate availability for microbes, altering the dynamic balance between nitrogen (N) immobilization and mineralization. Soil light fraction (LF) organic matter is an active pool that decreases upon cultivation, and...

  3. Soil Quality of Restinga Forest: Organic Matter and Aluminum Saturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Almeida Filho, Jasse; Casagrande, José Carlos; Martins Bonilha, Rodolfo; Soares, Marcio Roberto; Silva, Luiz Gabriel; Colato, Alexandre

    2013-04-01

    The restinga vegetation (sand coastal plain vegetation) consists of a mosaic of plant communities, which are defined by the characteristics of the substrates, resulting from the type and age of the depositional processes. This mosaic complex of vegetation types comprises restinga forest in advanced (high restinga) and medium regeneration stages (low restinga), each with particular differentiating vegetation characteristics. Of all ecosystems of the Atlantic Forest, restinga is the most fragile and susceptible to anthropic disturbances. The purpose of this study was evaluating the organic matter and aluminum saturation effects on soil quality index (SQI). Two locations were studied: State Park of the Serra do Mar, Picinguaba, in the city of Ubatuba (23°20' e 23°22' S / 44°48' e 44°52' W), and State Park of Cardoso Island in the city of Cananéia (25°03'05" e 25°18'18" S / 47°53'48" e 48° 05'42" W). The soil samples were collect at a depth of 0-10 cm, where concentrate 70% of vegetation root system. Was studied an additive model to evaluate soil quality index. The shallow root system development occurs due to low calcium levels, whose disability limits their development, but also can reflect on delay, restriction or even in the failure of the development vegetation. The organic matter is kept in the soil restinga ecosystem by high acidity, which reduces the decomposition of soil organic matter, which is very poor in nutrients. The base saturation, less than 10, was low due to low amounts of Na, K, Ca and Mg, indicating low nutritional reserve into the soil, due to very high rainfall and sandy texture, resulting in high saturation values for aluminum. Considering the critical threshold to 3% organic matter and for aluminum saturation to 40%, the IQS ranged from 0.95 to 0.1 as increased aluminum saturation and decreased the soil organic matter, indicating the main limitation to the growth of plants in this type of soil, when deforested.

  4. Using Riverine Natural Organic Matter to Test the Hypothesis that Soil Organic Matter is Modified by Contact with Sodium Hydroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdue, E. Michael; Driver, Shamus; Hertkorn, Norbert; Harir, Mourad; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    It has been postulated by some scientists that soil humic acids and fulvic acids are an artifact of alkaline extractions of soil. Riverine natural organic matter (NOM) is obtained in part by dissolution and transport of organic matter from soils by meteoric waters at acidic to circumneutral pH. The NOM may be fractionated into humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA), and hydrophilic NOM by adsorption of HA and FA onto XAD-8 resin at pH < 2, followed by their desorption with NaOH at pH 13. Alternatively, riverine NOM may be concentrated using reverse osmosis (RO) and desalted by cation exchange. Several properties of Suwannee River NOM prior to its isolation, after concentration by RO, and after the XAD-8 process are compared to detect modifications that might have resulted from exposure of the sample to low and high pH.

  5. The composition and degradability of upland dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, Catherine; Worrall, Fred; Clay, Gareth

    2016-04-01

    In order to assess controls on the degradability of DOM in stream water, samples of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and particulate organic matter (POM) were collected every month for a period of 24 months from an upland, peat-covered catchment in northern England. Each month the degradability of the DOM was assessed by exposing river water to light for up to 24 hours, and the change in the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration in the water was measured. To provide context for the analysis of DOM and its degradability, samples of peat, vegetation, and litter were also taken from the same catchment and analysed. The organic matter samples were analysed by several methods including: elemental analysis (CHN and O), bomb calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, pyrolysis GC/MS, ICP-OES, stable isotope analysis (13C and 15N) and 13C solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The water samples were analysed for pH, conductivity, absorbance at 400nm, anions, cations, particulate organic carbon (POC) and DOC concentrations. River flow conditions and meteorology were also recorded at the site and included in the analysis of the composition and degradability of DOM. The results of multiple regression models showed that the rates of DOC degradation were affected by the N-alkyl, O-alkyl, aldehyde and aromatic relative intensities, gross heat, OR and C:N. Of these, the N-alkyl relative intensity had the greatest influence, and this in turn was found to be dependent on the rainfall and soil temperature in the week before sampling.

  6. Soil organic matter regulates molybdenum storage and mobility in forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marks, Jade A; Perakis, Steven; King, Elizabeth K; Pett-Ridge, Julie

    2015-01-01

    The trace element molybdenum (Mo) is essential to a suite of nitrogen (N) cycling processes in ecosystems, but there is limited information on its distribution within soils and relationship to plant and bedrock pools. We examined soil, bedrock, and plant Mo variation across 24 forests spanning wide soil pH gradients on both basaltic and sedimentary lithologies in the Oregon Coast Range. We found that the oxidizable organic fraction of surface mineral soil accounted for an average of 33 %of bulk soil Mo across all sites, followed by 1.4 % associated with reducible Fe, Al, and Mn-oxides, and 1.4 % in exchangeable ion form. Exchangeable Mo was greatest at low pH, and its positive correlation with soil carbon (C) suggests organic matter as the source of readily exchangeable Mo. Molybdenum accumulation integrated over soil profiles to 1 m depth (τMoNb) increased with soil C, indicating that soil organic matter regulates long-term Mo retention and loss from soil. Foliar Mo concentrations displayed no relationship with bulk soil Mo, and were not correlated with organic horizon Mo or soil extractable Mo, suggesting active plant regulation of Mo uptake and/or poor fidelity of extractable pools to bioavailability. We estimate from precipitation sampling that atmospheric deposition supplies, on average, over 10 times more Mo annually than does litterfall to soil. In contrast, bedrock lithology had negligible effects on foliar and soil Mo concentrations and on Mo distribution among soil fractions. We conclude that atmospheric inputs may be a significant source of Mo to forest ecosystems, and that strong Mo retention by soil organic matter limits ecosystem Mo loss via dissolution and leaching pathways.

  7. Contributions of organic matter and organic sulfur redox processes to electron flow in anoxic incubations of peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    YU, Zhiguo; Peiffer, Stefan; Göttlicher, Jörg; Knorr, Klaus-Holger

    2015-04-01

    Anaerobic decomposition of peat soils involves a number of interdependent microbial processes that ultimately generate CO2 and CH4. In many peat soils, a high ratio of CO2:CH4 was reported, which presumably results from a direct or indirect role of soil organic matter serving as an electron acceptor. Therefore, in this study we intended to test the hypothesis that organic matter (OM) suppresses methanogenesis and sustains anaerobic CO2 production, serving as i) direct electron acceptor or ii) via supporting internal sulfur cycling to maintains CO2 production through bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR). We incubated peat samples of commercial bog peat, inoculated with a small amount of fresh peat to introduce an active microbial community. Samples were amended with sulfate or sulfide and incubated under anoxic conditions for 6 weeks at 30 ° C. Upon anaerobic incubation of peat virtually devoid of inorganic electron acceptors, CO2 and CH4 were produced at a ratio of 3.2. According to the electron budget, the calculated electron accepting capacity (EAC) of OM was 2.36 μeq cm3 d-1. Addition of sulfate significantly increased CO2 production and effectively suppressed CH4 production. After subtracting the EAC provided though sulfate addition (0.97~2.81 μeq cm-3 d-1), EACs supplied by OM reached 3.88 to 4.85 μeq cm-3 d-1.The contribution of organic sulfur was further evaluated by XANES spectroscopy and using natural abundance of δ34S as a tracer. Results demonstrated that BSR involved both addition of H2S and sulfate to OM leading to a formation of reduced organic sulfur and partial changes of oxidized organic sulfur species. The original peat prior to incubation contained 70.5% reduced organic S (R-S-H, R-S-R, R-S-S-R), and 25.9% oxidized S (R-SO3, R-SO2-R, R-SO4-R), whereas the treatment with H2S or sulfate addition comprised 75.7~ 81.1% reduced organic S, and only 21.1~18.9 % oxidized S. Our results imply that that organic matter contributes to anaerobic respiration

  8. New upper limit on strange quark matter abundance in cosmic rays with the PAMELA space experiment.

    PubMed

    Adriani, O; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bruno, A; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; De Donato, C; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergè, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N

    2015-09-11

    In this work we present results of a direct search for strange quark matter (SQM) in cosmic rays with the PAMELA space spectrometer. If this state of matter exists it may be present in cosmic rays as particles, called strangelets, having a high density and an anomalously high mass-to-charge (A/Z) ratio. A direct search in space is complementary to those from ground-based spectrometers. Furthermore, it has the advantage of being potentially capable of directly identifying these particles, without any assumption on their interaction model with Earth's atmosphere and the long-term stability in terrestrial and lunar rocks. In the rigidity range from 1.0 to ∼1.0×10^{3}  GV, no such particles were found in the data collected by PAMELA between 2006 and 2009. An upper limit on the strangelet flux in cosmic rays was therefore set for particles with charge 1≤Z≤8 and mass 4≤A≤1.2×10^{5}. This limit as a function of mass and as a function of magnetic rigidity allows us to constrain models of SQM production and propagation in the Galaxy.

  9. New Upper Limit on Strange Quark Matter Abundance in Cosmic Rays with the PAMELA Space Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adriani, O.; Barbarino, G. C.; Bazilevskaya, G. A.; Bellotti, R.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bongi, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Bottai, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Carlson, P.; Casolino, M.; Castellini, G.; de Donato, C.; de Santis, C.; de Simone, N.; di Felice, V.; Formato, V.; Galper, A. M.; Karelin, A. V.; Koldashov, S. V.; Koldobskiy, S.; Krutkov, S. Y.; Kvashnin, A. N.; Leonov, A.; Malakhov, V.; Marcelli, L.; Martucci, M.; Mayorov, A. G.; Menn, W.; Mergè, M.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Monaco, A.; Mori, N.; Munini, R.; Osteria, G.; Palma, F.; Panico, B.; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Ricci, M.; Ricciarini, S. B.; Sarkar, R.; Scotti, V.; Simon, M.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G.; Voronov, S. A.; Yurkin, Y. T.; Zampa, G.; Zampa, N.; Pamela Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present results of a direct search for strange quark matter (SQM) in cosmic rays with the PAMELA space spectrometer. If this state of matter exists it may be present in cosmic rays as particles, called strangelets, having a high density and an anomalously high mass-to-charge (A /Z ) ratio. A direct search in space is complementary to those from ground-based spectrometers. Furthermore, it has the advantage of being potentially capable of directly identifying these particles, without any assumption on their interaction model with Earth's atmosphere and the long-term stability in terrestrial and lunar rocks. In the rigidity range from 1.0 to ˜1.0 ×103 GV , no such particles were found in the data collected by PAMELA between 2006 and 2009. An upper limit on the strangelet flux in cosmic rays was therefore set for particles with charge 1 ≤Z ≤8 and mass 4 ≤A ≤1.2 ×105 . This limit as a function of mass and as a function of magnetic rigidity allows us to constrain models of SQM production and propagation in the Galaxy.

  10. Organic matter and soil structure in the Everglades Agricultural Area

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Alan L.; Hanlon, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    This publication pertains to management of organic soils (Histosols) in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA). These former wetland soils are a major resource for efficient agricultural production and are important globally for their high organic matter content. Recognition of global warming has led to considerable interest in soils as a repository for carbon. Soils rich in organic matter essentially sequester or retain carbon in the profile and can contribute directly to keeping that sequestered carbon from entering the atmosphere. Identification and utilization of management practices that minimize the loss of carbon from organic soils to the atmosphere can minimize effects on global warming and increase the longevity of subsiding Histosols for agricultural use. Understanding and predicting how these muck soils will respond to current and changing land uses will help to manage soil carbon. The objectives of this document are to: a. Discuss organic soil oxidation relative to storing or releasing carbon and nitrogen b. Evaluate effects of cultivation (compare structure for sugarcane vs. uncultivated soil) Based upon the findings from the land-use comparison (sugarcane or uncultivated), organic carbon was higher with cultivation in the lower depths. There is considerable potential for minimum tillage and residue management to further enhance carbon sequestration in the sugarcane system. Carbon sequestration is improved and soil subsidence is slowed with sugarcane production, and both of these are positive outcomes. Taking action to increase or maintain carbon sequestration appears to be appropriate but may introduce some risk to farming operations. Additional management methods are needed to reduce this risk. For both the longevity of these organic soils and from a global perspective, slowing subsidence through BMP implementation makes sense. Since these BMPs also have considerable societal benefit, it remains to be seen if society will help to offset a part or all

  11. Organic matter oxidation and aragonite diagenesis in a coral reef

    SciTech Connect

    Tribble, G.W. Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu )

    1993-05-01

    A combination of field and theoretical work is used to study controls on the saturation state of aragonite inside a coral-reef framework. A closed-system ion-speciation model is used to evaluate the effect of organic-matter oxidation on the saturation state of aragonite. The aragonite saturation state initially drops below 1 but becomes oversaturated during sulfate reduction. The C:N ratio of the organic matter affects the degree of oversaturation with N-poor organic material resulting in a system more corrosive to aragonite. Precipitation of sulfide as FeS strongly affects the aragonite saturation state, and systems with much FeS formation will have a stronger tendency to become oversaturated with respect to aragonite. Both precipitation and dissolution of aragonite are predicted at different stages of the organic reaction pathway if the model system is maintained at aragonite saturation. Field data from a coral-reef framework indicate that the system maintains itself at aragonite saturation, and model-predicted changes in dissolved calcium follow those observed in the interstitial waters of the reef. Aragonite probably acts as a solid-phase buffer in regulating the pH of interstitial waters. Because interstitial water in the reef has a short residence time, the observed equilibration suggests rapid kinetics.

  12. Research Highlight: Water-extractable organic matter from sandy loam soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Labile organic matter plays important roles in soil health and nutrient cycling because of its dynamic nature. Water-extractable organic matter is part of the soil labile organic matter. In an article recently published in Agricultural & Environmental Letters, researchers report on the level and na...

  13. Organic speciation of size-segregated atmospheric particulate matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Raphael

    Particle size and composition are key factors controlling the impacts of particulate matter (PM) on human health and the environment. A comprehensive method to characterize size-segregated PM organic content was developed, and evaluated during two field campaigns. Size-segregated particles were collected using a cascade impactor (Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor) and a PM2.5 large volume sampler. A series of alkanes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were solvent extracted and quantified using a gas chromatograph coupled with a mass spectrometer (GC/MS). Large volume injections were performed using a programmable temperature vaporization (PTV) inlet to lower detection limits. The developed analysis method was evaluated during the 2001 and 2002 Intercomparison Exercise Program on Organic Contaminants in PM2.5 Air Particulate Matter led by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Ambient samples were collected in May 2002 as part of the Tampa Bay Regional Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment (BRACE) in Florida, USA and in July and August 2004 as part of the New England Air Quality Study - Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (NEAQS - ITCT) in New Hampshire, USA. Morphology of the collected particles was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Smaller particles (one micrometer or less) appeared to consist of solid cores surrounded by a liquid layer which is consistent with combustion particles and also possibly with particles formed and/or coated by secondary material like sulfate, nitrate and secondary organic aerosols. Source apportionment studies demonstrated the importance of stationary sources on the organic particulate matter observed at these two rural sites. Coal burning and biomass burning were found to be responsible for a large part of the observed PAHs during the field campaigns. Most of the measured PAHs were concentrated in particles smaller than one micrometer and linked to combustion sources

  14. Biotoxicity of nanoparticles: effect of natural organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungyun; Kim, Kitae; Shon, H. K.; Kim, Sang Don; Cho, Jaeweon

    2011-07-01

    Various natural organic matters (NOM) with different characteristics in aquatic environment may affect toxicity of leased nanoparticles, owing to interactions between NOM and nanoparticles. This study investigated the effect of NOM and physical characteristics of the effluent organic matter (EfOM) on the ecotoxicity of quantum dots (QD) using Daphnia magna. Organic matter samples were obtained from: Yeongsan River (YR-NOM), Dongbuk Lake (DL-NOM), Damyang wastewater treatment plant (EfOM), and Suwannee River NOM (SR-NOM). The QD was composed of a CdSe core, ZnS shell, and polyethylene glycol coating. The average size of the investigated QD was 4.8, 56.5, and 25.0 nm determined by transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation, respectively. The relative hydrophobicity of NOM was investigated using both specific UV absorbance at 254 nm and XAD-8/4 resins. The sorption of NOM on the QD was measured using a fluorescence quenching method. The highest hydrophobicity was exhibited by the SR-NOM, while the lowest was recorded for the DL-NOM. All tested NOMs significantly reduced the acute toxicity of D. magna when adsorbed to QD, and the order of effectiveness for each NOM was as follows: SR-NOM > EfOM > YS-NOM > DL-NOM. The sorption of NOM on the QD surface caused a decrease in the fluorescence intensity of QD at increasing NOM concentration. This suggests that the NOM coating influenced the physicochemical characteristics of QD in the internal organs of D. magna by inducing a reduced bioavailability . Results from this study revealed that NOM with relatively high hydrophobicity had a greater capability of inducing toxicity mitigation.

  15. Fundamental Physics with the Hubble Frontier Fields: Constraining Dark Matter Models with the Abundance of Extremely Faint and Distant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menci, N.; Merle, A.; Totzauer, M.; Schneider, A.; Grazian, A.; Castellano, M.; Sanchez, N. G.

    2017-02-01

    We show that the measured abundance of ultra-faint lensed galaxies at z≈ 6 in the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) provides stringent constraints on the parameter space of (i) dark matter models based on keV sterile neutrinos; (ii) “fuzzy” wavelike dark matter models, based on Bose–Einstein condensates of ultra-light particles. For the case of sterile neutrinos, we consider two production mechanisms: resonant production through mixing with active neutrinos and the decay of scalar particles. For the former model, we derive constraints for the combination of sterile neutrino mass {m}ν and mixing parameter {\\sin }2(2θ ) which provide the tightest lower bounds on the mixing angle (and hence on the lepton asymmetry) derived so far by methods independent of baryonic physics. For the latter we compute the allowed combinations of the scalar mass, its coupling to the Higgs field, and the Yukawa coupling of scalar to sterile neutrinos. We compare our results to independent existing astrophysical bounds on sterile neutrinos in the same mass range. For the case of “fuzzy” dark matter, we show that the observed number density ≈ 1/{{Mpc}}3 of high-redshift galaxies in the HFF sets a lower limit {m}\\psi ≥slant 8\\cdot {10}-22 eV (at the 3-σ confidence level) on the particle mass, a result that strongly disfavors wavelike bosonic dark matter as a viable model for structure formation. We discuss the impact on our results of uncertainties due to systematics in the selection of highly magnified, faint galaxies at high redshift.

  16. Effluent organic matter (EfOM) characterization by simultaneous measurement of proteins and humic matter.

    PubMed

    Vakondios, Nikos; Koukouraki, Elisavet E; Diamadopoulos, Evan

    2014-10-15

    This work developed a method, based on the Lowry method and Frølund modification, for the simultaneous determination of proteins and humic matter in wastewater effluent samples at low concentrations. The method was based on simultaneous spectrophotometric measurements of proteins and humic matter at 750 nm in the absence and presence of CuSO4, which is responsible for increasing the absorbance only in the presence of to proteins. Statistical analysis through ANOVA showed that the response surface of the method fit the experimental measurements at significance level lower than 0.05, indicating satisfactory fit. The quantification limits of the proposed method were 0.5-30 mg/l for proteins and 2-30 mg/l for humic matter. The presence of carbohydrates did not interfere with the analysis of proteins and humic matter at carbohydrate concentrations below 35-40 mg/l. The Lowry method overestimated the concentration of the proteins because of the presence of humic substances. A carbon balance indicated that the analytical method developed could provide a satisfactory distribution of the main organic constituents in wastewater and effluents.

  17. Thraustochytrids, a neglected component of organic matter decomposition and food webs in marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Bongiorni, Lucia

    2012-01-01

    Decomposition of organic matter in marine sediments is a critical step influencing oxygen and carbon fluxes. In addition to heterotrophic bacteria and fungi, osmoheterotrophic protists may contribute to this process, but the extent of their role as decomposers is still unknown. Among saprophytic protists, the thraustochytrids have been isolated from different habitats and substrates. Recently, they have been reported to be particularly abundant in marine sediments characterized by the presence of recalcitrant organic matter such as seagrass and mangrove detritus where they can reach biomass comparable to those of other protists and bacteria. In addition, their capacity to produce a wide spectrum of enzymes suggests a substantial role of thraustochytrids in sedimentary organic decomposition. Moreover, thraustochytrids may represent a food source for several benthic microorganisms and animals and may be involved in the upgrading of nutrient-poor organic detritus. This chapter presents an overview on studies of thraustochytrids in benthic ecosystems and discusses future prospectives and possible methods to quantify their role in benthic food webs.

  18. Modelling of organic matter dynamics during the composting process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Lashermes, G; Houot, S; Doublet, J; Steyer, J P; Zhu, Y G; Barriuso, E; Garnier, P

    2012-01-01

    Composting urban organic wastes enables the recycling of their organic fraction in agriculture. The objective of this new composting model was to gain a clearer understanding of the dynamics of organic fractions during composting and to predict the final quality of composts. Organic matter was split into different compartments according to its degradability. The nature and size of these compartments were studied using a biochemical fractionation method. The evolution of each compartment and the microbial biomass were simulated, as was the total organic carbon loss corresponding to organic carbon mineralisation into CO(2). Twelve composting experiments from different feedstocks were used to calibrate and validate our model. We obtained a unique set of estimated parameters. Good agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental results that described the evolution of different organic fractions, with the exception of some compost because of a poor simulation of the cellulosic and soluble pools. The degradation rate of the cellulosic fraction appeared to be highly variable and dependent on the origin of the feedstocks. The initial soluble fraction could contain some degradable and recalcitrant elements that are not easily accessible experimentally.

  19. Competitive Sorption and Desorption of Chlorinated Organic Solvents (DNAPLs) in Engineered Natural Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Jixin; Weber, Walter J., Jr.

    2004-03-31

    The effects of artificially accelerated geochemical condensation and maturation of natural organic matter on the sorption and desorption of trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) were studied. The sorption and desorption of TCE in the presence and absence of the competing PCE and 1,2-dichlorobenzene (DCB) were also examined. A sphagnum peat comprising geologically young organic matter was artificially ''aged'' using superheated water, thus increasing the aromaticity and the degree of condensation of its associated organic matter. The sorption of all solutes tested were increased remarkably and their respective desorptions reduced, by the aged peat. The sorption capacities and isotherm nonlinearities of the peat for both TCE and PCE were found to increase as treatment temperature increased. In the competitive sorption studies, both PCE and DCB were found to depress TCE sorption, with PCE having greater effects than DCB, presumably because the molecular structure o f the former is more similar to that of TCE.

  20. Organic Nitrogen-Driven Stimulation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Hyphae Correlates with Abundance of Ammonia Oxidizers.

    PubMed

    Bukovská, Petra; Gryndler, Milan; Gryndlerová, Hana; Püschel, David; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Large fraction of mineral nutrients in natural soil environments is recycled from complex and heterogeneously distributed organic sources. These sources are explored by both roots and associated mycorrhizal fungi. However, the mechanisms behind the responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) hyphal networks to soil organic patches of different qualities remain little understood. Therefore, we conducted a multiple-choice experiment examining hyphal responses to different soil patches within the root-free zone by two AM fungal species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Claroideoglomus claroideum) associated with Medicago truncatula, a legume forming nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Hyphal colonization of the patches was assessed microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using AM taxon-specific markers, and the prokaryotic and fungal communities in the patches (pooled per organic amendment treatment) were profiled by 454-amplicon sequencing. Specific qPCR markers were then designed and used to quantify the abundance of prokaryotic taxa showing the strongest correlation with the pattern of AM hyphal proliferation in the organic patches as per the 454-sequencing. The hyphal density of both AM fungi increased due to nitrogen (N)-containing organic amendments (i.e., chitin, DNA, albumin, and clover biomass), while no responses as compared to the non-amended soil patch were recorded for cellulose, phytate, or inorganic phosphate amendments. Abundances of several prokaryotes, including Nitrosospira sp. (an ammonium oxidizer) and an unknown prokaryote with affiliation to Acanthamoeba endosymbiont, which were frequently recorded in the 454-sequencing profiles, correlated positively with the hyphal responses of R. irregularis to the soil amendments. Strong correlation between abundance of these two prokaryotes and the hyphal responses to organic soil amendments by both AM fungi was then confirmed by qPCR analyses using all individual replicate patch samples. Further

  1. Organic Nitrogen-Driven Stimulation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Hyphae Correlates with Abundance of Ammonia Oxidizers

    PubMed Central

    Bukovská, Petra; Gryndler, Milan; Gryndlerová, Hana; Püschel, David; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Large fraction of mineral nutrients in natural soil environments is recycled from complex and heterogeneously distributed organic sources. These sources are explored by both roots and associated mycorrhizal fungi. However, the mechanisms behind the responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) hyphal networks to soil organic patches of different qualities remain little understood. Therefore, we conducted a multiple-choice experiment examining hyphal responses to different soil patches within the root-free zone by two AM fungal species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Claroideoglomus claroideum) associated with Medicago truncatula, a legume forming nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Hyphal colonization of the patches was assessed microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using AM taxon-specific markers, and the prokaryotic and fungal communities in the patches (pooled per organic amendment treatment) were profiled by 454-amplicon sequencing. Specific qPCR markers were then designed and used to quantify the abundance of prokaryotic taxa showing the strongest correlation with the pattern of AM hyphal proliferation in the organic patches as per the 454-sequencing. The hyphal density of both AM fungi increased due to nitrogen (N)-containing organic amendments (i.e., chitin, DNA, albumin, and clover biomass), while no responses as compared to the non-amended soil patch were recorded for cellulose, phytate, or inorganic phosphate amendments. Abundances of several prokaryotes, including Nitrosospira sp. (an ammonium oxidizer) and an unknown prokaryote with affiliation to Acanthamoeba endosymbiont, which were frequently recorded in the 454-sequencing profiles, correlated positively with the hyphal responses of R. irregularis to the soil amendments. Strong correlation between abundance of these two prokaryotes and the hyphal responses to organic soil amendments by both AM fungi was then confirmed by qPCR analyses using all individual replicate patch samples. Further

  2. Pyrolysis and mass spectrometry studies of meteoritic organic matter.

    PubMed

    Sephton, M A

    2012-01-01

    Meteorites are fragments of extraterrestrial materials that fall to the Earth's surface. The carbon-rich meteorites are derived from ancient asteroids that have remained relatively unprocessed since the formation of the Solar System 4.56 billion years ago. They contain a variety of extraterrestrial organic molecules that are a record of chemical evolution in the early Solar System and subsequent aqueous and thermal processes on their parent bodies. The major organic component (>70%) is a macromolecular material that resists straightforward solvent extraction. In response to its intractable nature, the most common means of investigating this exotic material involves a combination of thermal decomposition (pyrolysis) and mass spectrometry. Recently the approach has also been used to explore controversial claims of organic matter in meteorites from Mars. This review summarizes the pyrolysis data obtained from meteorites and outlines key interpretations.

  3. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework nodes

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C–H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals. PMID:27574182

  4. The nature of Cu bonding to natural organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manceau, Alain; Matynia, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    Copper biogeochemistry is largely controlled by its bonding to natural organic matter (NOM) for reasons not well understood. Using XANES and EXAFS spectroscopy, along with supporting thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and structural and steric considerations, we show evidence at pH 4.5 and 5.5 for a five-membered Cu(malate) 2-like ring chelate at 100-300 ppm Cu concentration, and a six-membered Cu(malonate)) 1-2-like ring chelate at higher concentration. A "structure fingerprint" is defined for the 5.0-7.0 Å -1 EXAFS region which is indicative of the ring size and number (i.e., mono- vs. bis-chelate), and the distance and bonding of axial oxygens (O ax) perpendicular to the chelate plane formed by the four equatorial oxygens (O eq) at 1.94 Å. The stronger malate-type chelate is a C 4 dicarboxylate, and the weaker malonate-type chelate a C 3 dicarboxylate. The malate-type chelate owes its superior binding strength to an -OH for -H substitution on the α carbon, thus offering additional binding possibilities. The two new model structures are consistent with the majority of carboxyl groups being clustered and α-OH substitutions common in NOM, as shown by recent infrared and NMR studies. The high affinity of NOM for Cu(II) is explained by the abundance and geometrical fit of the two types of structures to the size of the equatorial plane of Cu(II). The weaker binding abilities of functionalized aromatic rings also is explained, as malate-type and malonate-type structures are present only on aliphatic chains. For example, salicylate is a monocarboxylate which forms an unfavorable six-membered chelate, because the OH substitution is in the β position. Similarly, phthalate is a dicarboxylate forming a highly strained seven-membered chelate. Five-membered Cu(II) chelates can be anchored by a thiol α-SH substituent instead of an alcohol α-OH, as in thio-carboxylic acids. This type of chelate is seldom present in NOM, but forms rapidly when Cu(II) is photoreduced

  5. [Transformation of soil organic matter in microarthropod community from the Northern Taiga of West Siberia].

    PubMed

    Mordkovich, V G; Berezina, O G; Liubechanskiĭ, I I; Andrievskiĭ, V S; Marchenko, I I

    2006-01-01

    Recolonization of defaunated soil by springtails as well as by gamasid and oribatid mites and the changes in organic matter content of soil were studied in the northern taiga. After a one-year exposure in gauze bags (1.7 mm mesh), the abundance of microarthropods was higher but the number of species was lower compared to the surrounding soil. Large surface and litter forms did not colonize the samples, while the number of small and/or soil forms was higher. Soil samples inaccessible for microarthropods (0.15 mm mesh) were depleted of organic carbon compared to both surrounding soil and recolonized samples. The content of humic and fulvic acids was higher in the samples inaccessible to microarthropods. Humification processes prevailed in soils in the absence of microarthropods.

  6. Soft X-Ray Photoionizing Organic Matter from Comet Wild 2: Evidence for the Production of Organic Matter by Impact Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Wirick, S.; Flynn, G. J.; Jacobsen, C.; Na

    2011-01-01

    The Stardust mission collected both mineral and organic matter from Comet Wild 2 [1,2,3,4]. The organic matter discovered in Comet Wild 2 ranges from aromatic hydrocarbons to simple aliphatic chains and is as diverse and complex as organic matter found in carbonaceous chondrites and interplanetary dust particles.[3,5,6,7,8,9]. Compared to insoluble organic matter from carbonaceous chondrites the organic matter in Comet Wild 2 more closely resembles organic matter found in the IDPS both hydrous and anhydrous. Common processes for the formation of organic matter in space include: Fischer-Tropsch, included with this aqueous large body and moderate heating alterations; UV irradiation of ices; and; plasma formation and collisions. The Fischer-Tropsch could only occur on large bodies processes, and the production of organic matter by UV radiation is limited by the penetration depth of UV photons, on the order of a few microns or less for most organic matter, so once organic matter coats the ices it is formed from, the organic production process would stop. Also, the organic matter formed by UV irradiation would, by the nature of the process, be in-sensitive to photodissocation from UV light. The energy of soft X-rays, 280-300 eV occur within the range of extreme ultraviolet photons. During the preliminary examination period we found a particle that nearly completely photoionized when exposed to photons in the energy range 280-310eV. This particle experienced a long exposure time to the soft x-ray beam which caused almost complete mass loss so little chemical information was obtain. During the analysis of our second allocation we have discovered another particle that photoionized at these energies but the exposure time was limited and more chemical information was obtained.

  7. Mercury dilution by autochthonous organic matter in a fertilized mangrove wetland.

    PubMed

    Machado, Wilson; Sanders, Christian J; Santos, Isaac R; Sanders, Luciana M; Silva-Filho, Emmanoel V; Luiz-Silva, Wanilson

    2016-06-01

    A dated sediment core from a highly-fertilized mangrove wetland located in Cubatão (SE Brazil) presented a negative correlation between mercury (Hg) and organic carbon contents. This is an unusual result for a metal with well-known affinity to organic matter. A dilution of Hg concentrations by autochthonous organic matter explained this observation, as revealed by carbon stable isotopes signatures (δ(13)C). Mercury dilution by the predominant mangrove-derived organic matter counterbalanced the positive influences of algal-derived organic matter and clay contents on Hg levels, suggesting that deleterious effects of Hg may be attenuated. Considering the current paradigm on the positive effect of organic matter on Hg concentrations in coastal sediments and the expected increase in mangrove organic matter burial due to natural and anthropogenic stimulations of primary production, predictions on the influences of organic matter on Hg accumulation in mangrove wetlands deserve caution.

  8. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Aaron J.; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (∼100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance 1H-2H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance 2H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2 h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the 2H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of 1H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques.

  9. Organic Matter as an Indicator of Soil Degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero Diaz, Asuncion; Damian Ruiz Sinoga, Jose

    2010-05-01

    Numerous and expensive physical-chemical tests are often carried out to determine the level of soil degration. This study was to find one property, as Organic Matter, which is usually analyzed for determine the soil degradation status. To do this 19 areas in the south and southeast of the Iberian Peninsula (provinces of Málaga, Granada, Almería y Murcia) were selected and a wide sampling process was carried out. Sampling points were spread over a wide pluviometric gradient (from 1100 mm/yr to 232 mm/yr) covering the range from Mediterranean wet to dry. 554 soil surface samples were taken from soil (0-10 cm) and the following properties were analyzed: Texture, Organic Matter (OM), Electric Conductivity (EC), Aggregate Stability (AE) y Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC). These properties were intercorrelated and also with rainfall and the K factor of soil erosion, calculated for each sampling point. Los results obtained by applying the Pearson correlation coefficient to the database shows how as rainfall increases so does OM content (0,97) and la CEC (0,89), but K factor (-0,80) reacts inversely. The content of OM in the soil is related to its biological activity and this in turn is the result of available wáter within the system and, consequently, rainfall. This is specially important in fragile and complex ecogeomorphological systems as is the case of the Mediterranean, where greater or lesser rainfall is similarly reflected in the levels of increase or decrease of soil organic matter. This affirmation is reinforced by linking the organic matter of the soil with other indicative properties such as CEC and erosion, as has been shown by various authors (Imeson y Vis, 1984; De Ploey & Poesen, 1985; Le Bissonnais, 1996; Boix-Fayos et al., 2001; Cammeraat y Imeson, 1998; Cerdá, 1998). As has been stated, there is a direct relationship between rainfall, organic matter content, cation exchange capacity, structural stability, and the resistence to soil erosion factor

  10. Constraining the Abundances of Complex Organics in the Inner Regions of Solar-type Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Vianney; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Neri, Roberto; Kahane, Claudine; Charnley, Steven B.

    2015-05-01

    The high abundances of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) with respect to methanol, the most abundant COM, detected toward low-mass protostars, tend to be underpredicted by astrochemical models. This discrepancy might come from the large beam of the single-dish telescopes, encompassing several components of the studied protostar, commonly used to detect COMs. To address this issue, we have carried out multi-line observations of methanol and several COMs toward the two low-mass protostars NGC 1333-IRAS 2A and -IRAS 4A with the Plateau de Bure interferometer at an angular resolution of 2″, resulting in the first multi-line detection of the O-bearing species glycolaldehyde and ethanol and of the N-bearing species ethyl cyanide toward low-mass protostars other than IRAS 16293. The high number of detected transitions from COMs (more than 40 methanol transitions for instance) allowed us to accurately derive the source size of their emission and the COM column densities. The COM abundances with respect to methanol derived toward IRAS 2A and IRAS 4A are slightly, but not substantitally, lower than those derived from previous single-dish observations. The COM abundance ratios do not vary significantly with the protostellar luminosity, over five orders of magnitude, implying that low-mass hot corinos are quite chemically rich as high-mass hot cores. Astrochemical models still underpredict the abundances of key COMs, such as methyl formate or di-methyl ether, suggesting that our understanding of their formation remains incomplete.

  11. Probabilisitc Geobiological Classification Using Elemental Abundance Distributions and Lossless Image Compression in Recent and Modern Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    Last year we presented techniques for the detection of fossils during robotic missions to Mars using both structural and chemical signatures[Storrie-Lombardi and Hoover, 2004]. Analyses included lossless compression of photographic images to estimate the relative complexity of a putative fossil compared to the rock matrix [Corsetti and Storrie-Lombardi, 2003] and elemental abundance distributions to provide mineralogical classification of the rock matrix [Storrie-Lombardi and Fisk, 2004]. We presented a classification strategy employing two exploratory classification algorithms (Principal Component Analysis and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis) and non-linear stochastic neural network to produce a Bayesian estimate of classification accuracy. We now present an extension of our previous experiments exploring putative fossil forms morphologically resembling cyanobacteria discovered in the Orgueil meteorite. Elemental abundances (C6, N7, O8, Na11, Mg12, Ai13, Si14, P15, S16, Cl17, K19, Ca20, Fe26) obtained for both extant cyanobacteria and fossil trilobites produce signatures readily distinguishing them from meteorite targets. When compared to elemental abundance signatures for extant cyanobacteria Orgueil structures exhibit decreased abundances for C6, N7, Na11, All3, P15, Cl17, K19, Ca20 and increases in Mg12, S16, Fe26. Diatoms and silicified portions of cyanobacterial sheaths exhibiting high levels of silicon and correspondingly low levels of carbon cluster more closely with terrestrial fossils than with extant cyanobacteria. Compression indices verify that variations in random and redundant textural patterns between perceived forms and the background matrix contribute significantly to morphological visual identification. The results provide a quantitative probabilistic methodology for discriminating putatitive fossils from the surrounding rock matrix and &om extant organisms using both structural and chemical information. The techniques described appear applicable

  12. CONSTRAINING THE ABUNDANCES OF COMPLEX ORGANICS IN THE INNER REGIONS OF SOLAR-TYPE PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Taquet, Vianney; Charnley, Steven B.; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Kahane, Claudine; Neri, Roberto

    2015-05-10

    The high abundances of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) with respect to methanol, the most abundant COM, detected toward low-mass protostars, tend to be underpredicted by astrochemical models. This discrepancy might come from the large beam of the single-dish telescopes, encompassing several components of the studied protostar, commonly used to detect COMs. To address this issue, we have carried out multi-line observations of methanol and several COMs toward the two low-mass protostars NGC 1333-IRAS 2A and -IRAS 4A with the Plateau de Bure interferometer at an angular resolution of 2″, resulting in the first multi-line detection of the O-bearing species glycolaldehyde and ethanol and of the N-bearing species ethyl cyanide toward low-mass protostars other than IRAS 16293. The high number of detected transitions from COMs (more than 40 methanol transitions for instance) allowed us to accurately derive the source size of their emission and the COM column densities. The COM abundances with respect to methanol derived toward IRAS 2A and IRAS 4A are slightly, but not substantitally, lower than those derived from previous single-dish observations. The COM abundance ratios do not vary significantly with the protostellar luminosity, over five orders of magnitude, implying that low-mass hot corinos are quite chemically rich as high-mass hot cores. Astrochemical models still underpredict the abundances of key COMs, such as methyl formate or di-methyl ether, suggesting that our understanding of their formation remains incomplete.

  13. Complexation of lead by organic matter in Luanda Bay, Angola.

    PubMed

    Leitão, Anabela; Santos, Ana Maria; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2015-10-01

    Speciation is defined as the distribution of an element among different chemical species. Although the relation between speciation and bioavailability is complex, the metal present as free hydrated ion, or as weak complexes able to dissociate, is usually more bioavailable than the metal incorporated in strong complexes or adsorbed on colloidal or particulate matter. Among the analytical techniques currently available, anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) has been one of the most used in the identification and quantification of several heavy metal species in aquatic systems. This work concerns the speciation study of lead, in original (natural, non-filtered) and filtered water samples and in suspensions of particulate matter and sediments from Luanda Bay (Angola). Complexes of lead with organics were identified and quantified by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry technique. Each sample was progressively titrated with a Pb(II) standard solution until complete saturation of the organic ligands. After each addition of Pb(II), the intensity, potential and peak width of the voltammetric signal were measured. The results obtained in this work show that more than 95 % of the lead in the aquatic environment is bound in inert organic complexes, considering all samples from different sampling sites. In sediment samples, the lead is totally (100 %) complexed with ligands adsorbed on the particles surface. Two kinds of dominant lead complexes, very strong (logK >11) and strong to moderately strong (8< logK <11), were found, revealing the lead affinity for the stronger ligands.

  14. Lead Sequestration and Species Redistribution During Soil Organic Matter Decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Schroth,A.; Bostick, B.; Kaste, J.; Friedland, A.

    2008-01-01

    The turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) maintains a dynamic chemical environment in the forest floor that can impact metal speciation on relatively short timescales. Here we measure the speciation of Pb in controlled and natural organic (O) soil horizons to quantify changes in metal partitioning during SOM decomposition in different forest litters. We provide a link between the sequestration of pollutant Pb in O-horizons, estimated by forest floor Pb inventories, and speciation using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. When Pb was introduced to fresh forest Oi samples, it adsorbed primarily to SOM surfaces, but as decomposition progressed over two years in controlled experiments, up to 60% of the Pb was redistributed to pedogenic birnessite and ferrihydrite surfaces. In addition, a significant fraction of pollutant Pb in natural soil profiles was associated with similar mineral phases ({approx}20-35%) and SOM ({approx}65-80%). Conifer forests have at least 2-fold higher Pb burdens in the forest floor relative to deciduous forests due to more efficient atmospheric scavenging and slower organic matter turnover. We demonstrate that pedogenic minerals play an important role in surface soil Pb sequestration, particularly in deciduous forests, and should be considered in any assessment of pollutant Pb mobility.

  15. Lead sequestration and species redistribution during soil organic matter decomposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroth, A.W.; Bostick, B.C.; Kaste, J.M.; Friedland, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    The turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) maintains a dynamic chemical environment in the forest floor that can impact metal speciation on relatively short timescales. Here we measure the speciation of Pb in controlled and natural organic (O) soil horizons to quantify changes in metal partitioning during SOM decomposition in different forest litters. We provide a link between the sequestration of pollutant Pb in O-horizons, estimated by forest floor Pb inventories, and speciation using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. When Pb was introduced to fresh forest Oi samples, it adsorbed primarily to SOM surfaces, but as decomposition progressed over two years in controlled experiments, up to 60% of the Pb was redistributed to pedogenic birnessite and ferrihydrite surfaces. In addition, a significant fraction of pollutant Pb in natural soil profiles was associated with similar mineral phases (???20-35%) and SOM (???65-80%). Conifer forests have at least 2-fold higher Pb burdens in the forest floor relative to deciduous forests due to more efficient atmospheric scavenging and slower organic matter turnover. We demonstrate that pedogenic minerals play an important role in surface soil Pb sequestration, particularly in deciduous forests, and should be considered in any assessment of pollutant Pb mobility. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  16. Lead Sequestration And Species Redistribution During Soil Organic Matter Decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Schroth, A.W.; Bostick, B.C.; Kaste, J.M.; Friedland, A.J.

    2009-05-27

    The turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) maintains a dynamic chemical environment in the forest floor that can impact metal speciation on relatively short timescales. Here we measure the speciation of Pb in controlled and natural organic (O) soil horizons to quantify changes in metal partitioning during SOM decomposition in different forest litters. We provide a link between the sequestration of pollutant Pb in O-horizons, estimated by forest floor Pb inventories, and speciation using synchrotron-based X-rayfluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. When Pb was introduced to fresh forest O{sub i} samples, it adsorbed primarily to SOM surfaces, but as decomposition progressed over two years in controlled experiments, up to 60% of the Pb was redistributed to pedogenic birnessite and ferrihydrite surfaces. In addition, a significant fraction of pollutant Pb in natural soil profiles was associated with similar mineral phases ({approx}20--35%) and SOM ({approx}65--80%). Conifer forests have at least 2-fold higher Pb burdens in the forest floor relative to deciduous forests due to more efficient atmospheric scavenging and slower organic matter turnover. We demonstrate that pedogenic minerals play an important role in surface soil Pb sequestration, particularly in deciduous forests, and should be considered in any assessment of pollutant Pb mobility.

  17. Organic matter interactions with natural manganese oxide and synthetic birnessite.

    PubMed

    Allard, Sébastien; Gutierrez, Leonardo; Fontaine, Claude; Croué, Jean-Philippe; Gallard, Hervé

    2017-04-01

    Redox reactions of inorganic and organic contaminants on manganese oxides have been widely studied. However, these reactions are strongly affected by the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) at the surface of the manganese oxide. Interestingly, the mechanism behind NOM adsorption onto manganese oxides remains unclear. Therefore, in this study, the adsorption kinetics and equilibrium of different NOM isolates to synthetic manganese oxide (birnessite) and natural manganese oxide (Mn sand) were investigated. Natural manganese oxide is composed of both amorphous and well-crystallised Mn phases (i.e., lithiophorite, birnessite, and cryptomelane). NOM adsorption on both manganese oxides increased with decreasing pH (from pH7 to 5), in agreement with surface complexation and ligand exchange mechanisms. The presence of calcium enhanced the rate of NOM adsorption by decreasing the electrostatic repulsion between NOM and Mn sand. Also, the adsorption was limited by the diffusion of NOM macromolecules through the Mn sand pores. At equilibrium, a preferential adsorption of high molecular weight molecules enriched in aromatic moieties was observed for both the synthetic and natural manganese oxide. Hydrophobic interactions may explain the adsorption of organic matter on manganese oxides. The formation of low molecular weight UV absorbing molecules was detected with the synthetic birnessite, suggesting oxidation and reduction processes occurring during NOM adsorption. This study provides a deep insight for both environmental and engineered systems to better understand the impact of NOM adsorption on the biogeochemical cycle of manganese.

  18. Unraveling the chemical space of terrestrial and meteoritic organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe; Harir, Mourad; Hertkorn, Norbert; Kanawati, Basem; Ruf, Alexander; Quirico, Eric; Bonal, Lydie; Beck, Pierre; Gabelica, Zelimir

    2015-04-01

    In terrestrial environments natural organic matter (NOM) occurs in soils, freshwater and marine environments, in the atmosphere and represents an exceedingly complex mixture of organic compounds that collectively exhibits a nearly continuous range of properties (size-reactivity continuum). In these materials, the "classical" biogeosignatures of the (biogenic and geogenic) precursor molecules, like lipids, lignins, proteins and natural products have been attenuated, often beyond recognition, during a succession of biotic and abiotic (e.g. photo- and redox chemistry) reactions. Because of this loss of biochemical signature, these materials can be designated non-repetitive complex systems. The access to extra-terrestrial organic matter is given i.e. in the analysis of meteoritic materials. Numerous descriptions of organic molecules present in organic chondrites have improved our understanding of the early interstellar chemistry that operated at or just before the birth of our solar system. However, many molecular analyses are so far targeted toward selected classes of compounds with a particular emphasis on biologically active components in the context of prebiotic chemistry. Here we demonstrate that a non-targeted ultrahigh-resolution molecular analysis of the solvent-accessible organic fraction of meteorite extracted under mild conditions allows one to extend its indigenous chemical diversity to tens of thousands of different molecular compositions and likely millions of diverse structures. The description of the molecular complexity provides hints on heteroatoms chronological assembly, shock and thermal events and revealed recently new classes of thousands of novel organic, organometallic compounds uniquely found in extra-terrestrial materials and never described in terrestrial systems. This high polymolecularity suggests that the extraterrestrial chemodiversity is high compared to terrestrial relevant biological and biogeochemical-driven chemical space. (ultra

  19. Missing links in the root-soil organic matter continuum

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Sarah L.; Iversen, Colleen M

    2009-01-01

    The soil environment remains one of the most complex and poorly understood research frontiers in ecology. Soil organic matter (SOM), which spans a continuum from fresh detritus to highly processed, mineral-associated organic matter, is the foundation of sustainable terrestrial ecosystems. Heterogeneous SOM pools are fueled by inputs from living and dead plants, driven by the activity of micro- and mesofauna, and are shaped by a multitude of abiotic factors. The specialization required to measure unseen processes that occur on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales has led to the partitioning of soil ecology research across several disciplines. In the organized oral session 'Missing links in the root-soil organic matter continuum' at the annual Ecological Society of America meeting in Albuquerque, NM, USA, we joined the call for greater communication and collaboration among ecologists who work at the root-soil interface (e.g. Coleman, 2008). Our goal was to bridge the gap between scientific disciplines and to synthesize disconnected pieces of knowledge from root-centric and soil-centric studies into an integrated understanding of belowground ecosystem processes. We focused this report around three compelling themes that arose from the session: (1) the influence of the rhizosphere on SOM cycling, (2) the role of soil heterotrophs in driving the transformation of root detritus to SOM, and (3) the controlling influence of the soil environment on SOM dynamics. We conclude with a discussion of new approaches for gathering data to bridge gaps in the root-SOM continuum and to inform the next generation of ecosystem models. Although leaf litter has often been considered to be the main source of organic inputs to soil, Ann Russell synthesized a convincing body of work demonstrating that roots, rather than surface residues, control the accumulation of SOM in a variety of ecosystems. Living roots, which are chemically diverse and highly dynamic, also influence a wide

  20. Method and apparatus for retorting a substance containing organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Schulman, B.

    1980-07-01

    A description is given of an apparatus for converting a substance containing organic matter into hydrocarbon vapors and solids residue comprising: (A) a fluidized bed housing having an upstream end and a downstream end; (B) a substantially cylindrical retort, extending through and stationary relative to said fluidized bed housing and having an upstream end and a downstream end, each end being outside of said housing, the longitudinal axis of said retort being substantially parallel to a horizontal plane; (C) feeding means for feeding the substance containing organic matter into said retort, said feeding means communicating with the upstream portion of said retort; (D) means located within said retort for moving the substance containing organic matter from the upstream portion of said retort to the downstream portion thereof; (E) solids residue removing means for removing solids residue from said retort, said solids residue removing means communicating with the downstream portion of said retort; (F) solids residue introducing means for introducing said solids residue removed from said retort into said fluidized bed housing to employ said solids residue as particles of a fluidized bed, one end of said introducing means communicating with said solids residue removing means and the other end therof communicating with the upper upstream portion of said fluidized bed housing; (G) solids residue extracting means for extracting solids residue from said fluidized bed housing and communicating with the lower downstream portion fluidized bed housing; (H) fluidizing menas for maintaining within said fluidized bed housing a fluidized bed of heated particles of solids residue with which to heat said retort; (I) heating means for heating the particles; (J) hydrocarbon vapors removing means.

  1. Priming of soil organic matter decomposition in cryoturbated Arctic soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, A.; Wild, B.; Schnecker, J.; Rusalimova, O.

    2012-12-01

    The Arctic is subjected to particularly high rates of warming, with profound consequences for the carbon cycle: on the one hand plant productivity and C storage in plant biomass have been shown to increase strongly in many parts of the Arctic, on the other hand, increasing rates of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition have been reported. One of the possibilities that could reconcile these observations is, that increased plant growth may lead to increased root exudation rates, which are known to stimulate microbial turnover of organic matter under certain circumstances, in a process termed "priming" of SOM. Two mechanisms have been brought forward that may be responsible for priming: first, easily assimilable material exuded by plant roots may help microbes to overcome their energy limitation and second, this input of labile carbon could lead to a nitrogen limitation of the microbial community and lead to nitrogen mining, i.e. decomposition of N-rich SOM. We here report on an incubation study with arctic soil investigating potential priming of SOM decomposition in organic topsoil horizons, cryoturbated organic matter and subsoil mineral horizons of tundra soil from the Taymyr peninsula in Siberia. We used arctic soils, that are characterized by cryoturbation (mixing of soil layers due to freezing and thawing), for this study. Turbated cryosols store more than 580 Gt C globally, a significant proportion of which is stored in the cryoturbated organic matter. We hypothesized that an increased availability of labile compounds would increase SOM decomposition rates, and that this effect would be strongest in horizons with a low natural availability of labile C, i.e. in the mineral subsoil. We amended soils with 13C labelled glucose, cellulose, amino acids or proteins, and measured the mineralization of SOM C as well as microbial community composition and potential activities of extracellular enzymes. Our results demonstrate that topsoil organic, cryoturbated and

  2. Aquatic Organic Matter Fluorescence - from phenomenon to application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Darren

    2014-05-01

    The use of fluorescence to quantify and characterise aquatic organic matter in river, ocean, ground water and drinking and waste waters has come along way since its discovery as a phenomenon in the early 20th century. For example, there are over 100 papers published each year in international peer reviewed journals, an order of magnitude increase since a decade ago (see Figure taken from ISI database from 1989 to 2007 for publications in the fields of river water and waste water). Since then it has been extensively used as a research tool since the 1990's by scientists and is currently used for a wide variety of applications within a number of sectors. Universities, organisations and companies that research into aquatic organic matter have either recently readily use appropriate fluorescence based techniques and instrumentation. In industry and government, the technology is being taken up by environmental regulators and water and wastewater companies. This keynote presentation will give an overview of aquatic organic matter fluorescence from its conception as a phenomenon through to its current use in a variety of emerging applications within the sectors concerned with understanding, managing and monitoring the aquatic environment. About the Speaker Darren Reynolds pioneered the use of fluorescence spectroscopy for the analysis of wastewaters in the 1990's. He currently leads a research group within the Centre for Research in Biosciences and sits on the Scientific Advisory Board for the Institute of Bio-Sensing Technology at the University of the West of England, Bristol. He is a multidisciplinary scientist concerned with the development of technology platforms for applications in the fields of environment/agri-food and health. His current research interests include the development of optical technologies and techniques for environmental and biological sensing and bio-prospecting applications. He is currently involved in the development and use of synthetic biology

  3. Persistence of soil organic matter as an ecosystem property.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Michael W I; Torn, Margaret S; Abiven, Samuel; Dittmar, Thorsten; Guggenberger, Georg; Janssens, Ivan A; Kleber, Markus; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Lehmann, Johannes; Manning, David A C; Nannipieri, Paolo; Rasse, Daniel P; Weiner, Steve; Trumbore, Susan E

    2011-10-05

    Globally, soil organic matter (SOM) contains more than three times as much carbon as either the atmosphere or terrestrial vegetation. Yet it remains largely unknown why some SOM persists for millennia whereas other SOM decomposes readily--and this limits our ability to predict how soils will respond to climate change. Recent analytical and experimental advances have demonstrated that molecular structure alone does not control SOM stability: in fact, environmental and biological controls predominate. Here we propose ways to include this understanding in a new generation of experiments and soil carbon models, thereby improving predictions of the SOM response to global warming.

  4. Persistence of soil organic matter as an ecosystem property

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, M.W.; Torn, M. S.; Abiven, S.; Dittmar, T.; Guggenberger, G.; Janssens, I.A.; Kleber, M.; Kögel-Knabner, I.; Lehmann, J.; Manning, D.A.C.; Nannipieri, P.; Rasse, D.P.; Weiner, S.; Trumbore, S.E.

    2011-08-15

    Globally, soil organic matter (SOM) contains more than three times as much carbon as either the atmosphere or terrestrial vegetation. Yet it remains largely unknown why some SOM persists for millennia whereas other SOM decomposes readily—and this limits our ability to predict how soils will respond to climate change. Recent analytical and experimental advances have demonstrated that molecular structure alone does not control SOM stability: in fact, environmental and biological controls predominate. Here we propose ways to include this understanding in a new generation of experiments and soil carbon models, thereby improving predictions of the SOM response to global warming.

  5. Characterization of Biologically Produced Colored Dissolved Organic Matter in Seawater

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-29

    Seritti, A. Environ. Tech. 1993, 14, 94.1-948. (19) Lombardi, A.T.; Jardim, W.F. Water Research. 1999, 33, 512-520. (20) Parlanti, E .; Morin , B.; Vacher...REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved Public reporting burden for this collection of I•mo,,ation , e dlat ed to average hour per response. ind•uding... e -mail: drepeta(atwhoi.edu Grant# N00014-98-1-0579 & N00014-03-1-0387 Chromophoric, or colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), influences the

  6. Conservative or reactive? Mechanistic chemical perspectives on organic matter stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Boris

    2016-04-01

    Carbon fixation by terrestrial and marine primary production has a fundamental seasonal effect on the atmospheric carbon content and it profoundly contributes to long-term carbon storage in form of organic matter (OM) in soils, water, and sediments. The efficacy of this sequestration process strongly depends on the degree of OM persistence. Therefore, one of the key issues in dissolved and particulate OM research is to assess the stability of reservoirs and to quantify their contribution to global carbon fluxes. Incubation experiments are helpful to assess OM stability during the first, early diagenetic turnover induced by sunlight or microbes. However, net carbon fluxes within the global carbon cycle also act on much longer time scales, which are not amenable in experiments. It is therefore critical to improve our mechanistic understanding to be able to assess potential future changes in the organic matter cycle. This session contribution highlights some achievements and open questions in the field. An improved mechanistic understanding of OM turnover particularly depends on the molecular characterization of biogeochemical processes and their kinetics: (i) in soils and sediments, aggregation/disaggregation of OM is primarily controlled by its molecular composition. Hence, the chemical composition determines the transfer of organic carbon from the large particulate to the small dissolved organic matter reservoir - an important substrate for microbial metabolism. (ii) In estuaries, dissolved organic carbon gradients usually suggest conservative behavior, whereas molecular-level studies reveal a substantial chemical modification of terrestrial DOM along the land-ocean interface. (iii) In the ocean, previous studies have shown that the recalcitrance of OM depends on bulk concentration and energy yield. However, ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry in combination with radiocarbon analyses also emphasized that stability is tightly connected to molecular composition

  7. Do organic matter matter? Contribution of organic matter on scavenging and fractionation of natural radionuclides in the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) site of Bermuda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, C.; Santschi, P. H.; Conte, M. H.; Schumann, D.; Ayranov, M.

    2012-12-01

    Natural particle-reactive radionuclides, 234Th, 233Pa, 210Po, 210Pb and 7Be, have been used for estimating particulate organic carbon (POC) export flux in the ocean for decades. However, by simply relying on empirically determined isotope ratios to POC and other parameters, sometimes results from field studies are puzzling and become controversial (e.g., one is summarized in Li, 2005). The picture becomes clearer when it was noticed that a missing fraction, e.g., natural organic matter, could be the cause. For example, a series of field and lab studies demonstrated that biopolymers excreted by marine micro-organisms are likely carrier molecules for a number of these isotopes (e.g., Guo et al., 2002; Quigley et al., 2002; Santschi et al., 2003; Roberts et al., 2009; Hung et al., 2010; Xu et al., 2011; Hung et al., 2012; Yang et al., 2012). To examine the effect of organic composition of the particle on the scavenging and fractionation of selected natural radionuclides (e.g., Th, Pa, Pb, Po, Be), organic composition (e.g., protein, polysaccharides, uronic acid, siderophore and amino acid contents, and etc.) and particle-water partition coefficients (Kd) were determined for sediment trap material collected in the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) site of Bermuda (500, 1500 and 3200 m). Results showed that different organic components contribute differently to the fractionation of different radionuclides from the three depths. We conclude that natural organic matter control on the particle-water partition coefficients cannot be ignored.

  8. Effect of organic fertilizers derived dissolved organic matter on pesticide sorption and leaching.

    PubMed

    Li, Kun; Xing, Baoshan; Torello, William A

    2005-03-01

    Incorporation of organic fertilizers/amendments has been, and continues to be, a popular strategy for golf course turfgrass management. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from these organic materials may, however, facilitate organic chemical movement through soils. A batch equilibrium technique was used to evaluate the effects of organic fertilizer-derived DOM on sorption of three organic chemicals (2,4-D, naphthalene and chlorpyrifos) in USGA (United States Golf Association) sand, a mixed soil (70% USGA sand and 30% native soil) and a silt loam soil (Typic Fragiochrept). DOM was extracted from two commercial organic fertilizers. Column leaching experiments were also performed using USGA sand. Sorption experiments showed that sorption capacity was significantly reduced with increasing DOM concentration in solution for all three chemicals. Column experimental results were consistent with batch equilibrium data. These results suggest that organic fertilizer-derived DOM might lead to enhanced transport of applied chemicals in turf soils.

  9. Soil organic matter in the Moscow State University botanical garden on the Vorob'evy Hills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozanova, M. S.; Prokof'eva, T. V.; Lysak, L. V.; Rakhleeva, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Humification conditions and humus status parameters in arboretum soils of the Moscow State University botanical garden on the Vorob'evy Hills have been studied. Although microbiological activity is reduced, the warm and mild climate in the city, the eutrophication of soils (due to atmospheric fallouts and dissolution of construction waste inclusions), the retention of plant waste on the soil surface, and the presence of abundant primary destructors (mesofauna) have resulted in the formation of organic matter with specific characteristics. During the 60 years that have elapsed since the arboretum establishment, soils with a high content (up to 10-14%) of humate humus (CHA/CFA > 1) characterized by a higher degree of humification than in the control soils under herbaceous vegetation have been developed in the area. Large reserves of organic carbon have been noted not only in the upper 30-cm-thick soil layer, but also in the 1-m-thick layer due to organic matter of buried and technogenic horizons.

  10. Riverine Dissolved Organic Matter Degradation Modeled Through Microbial Incubations of Vascular Plant Leachates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harfmann, J.; Hernes, P.; Chuang, C. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) contains as much carbon as is in the atmosphere, provides the main link between terrestrial and marine carbon reservoirs, and fuels the microbial food web. The fate and removal of DOM is a result of several complex conditions and processes, including photodegradation, sorption/desorption, dominant vascular plant sources, and microbial abundance. In order to better constrain factors affecting microbial degradation, laboratory incubations were performed using Sacramento River water for microbial inoculums and vascular plant leachates. Four vascular plant sources were chosen based on their dominance in the Sacramento River Valley: gymnosperm needles from Pinus sabiniana (foothill pine), angiosperm dicot leaves from Quercus douglassi (blue oak), angiosperm monocot mixed annual grasses, and angiosperm monocot mixed Schoenoplectus acutus (tule) and Typha spp. (cattails). Three concentrations of microbial inoculum were used for each plant material, ranging from 0.2% to 10%. Degradation was monitored as a function of time using dissolved organic carbon (DOC), UV-Vis absorbance, and fluorescent dissolved organic matter (fDOM), and was compared across vascular plant type and inoculum concentration.

  11. Influence of dissolved organic carbon content on modelling natural organic matter acid-base properties.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Cédric; Mounier, Stéphane; Benaïm, Jean Yves

    2004-10-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) behaviour towards proton is an important parameter to understand NOM fate in the environment. Moreover, it is necessary to determine NOM acid-base properties before investigating trace metals complexation by natural organic matter. This work focuses on the possibility to determine these acid-base properties by accurate and simple titrations, even at low organic matter concentrations. So, the experiments were conducted on concentrated and diluted solutions of extracted humic and fulvic acid from Laurentian River, on concentrated and diluted model solutions of well-known simple molecules (acetic and phenolic acids), and on natural samples from the Seine river (France) which are not pre-concentrated. Titration experiments were modelled by a 6 acidic-sites discrete model, except for the model solutions. The modelling software used, called PROSECE (Programme d'Optimisation et de SpEciation Chimique dans l'Environnement), has been developed in our laboratory, is based on the mass balance equilibrium resolution. The results obtained on extracted organic matter and model solutions point out a threshold value for a confident determination of the studied organic matter acid-base properties. They also show an aberrant decreasing carboxylic/phenolic ratio with increasing sample dilution. This shift is neither due to any conformational effect, since it is also observed on model solutions, nor to ionic strength variations which is controlled during all experiments. On the other hand, it could be the result of an electrode troubleshooting occurring at basic pH values, which effect is amplified at low total concentration of acidic sites. So, in our conditions, the limit for a correct modelling of NOM acid-base properties is defined as 0.04 meq of total analysed acidic sites concentration. As for the analysed natural samples, due to their high acidic sites content, it is possible to model their behaviour despite the low organic carbon concentration.

  12. Nature and transformation of dissolved organic matter in treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Barber, L B; Leenheer, J A; Noyes, T I; Stiles, E A

    2001-12-15

    This investigation into the occurrence, character, and transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in treatment wetlands in the western United States shows that (i) the nature of DOM in the source water has a major influence on transformations that occur during treatment, (ii) the climate factors have a secondary effect on transformations, (iii) the wetlands receiving treated wastewater can produce a net increase in DOM, and (iv) the hierarchical analytical approach used in this study can measure the subtle DOM transformations that occur. As wastewater treatment plant effluent passes through treatment wetlands, the DOM undergoes transformation to become more aromatic and oxygenated. Autochthonous sources are contributed to the DOM, the nature of which is governed by the developmental stage of the wetland system as well as vegetation patterns. Concentrations of specific wastewater-derived organic contaminants such as linear alkylbenzene sulfonate, caffeine, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid were significantly attenuated by wetland treatment and were not contributed by internal loading.

  13. Nature and transformation of dissolved organic matter in treatment wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, L.B.; Leenheer, J.A.; Noyes, T.I.; Stiles, E.A.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation into the occurrence, character, and transformation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in treatment wetlands in the western United States shows that (i) the nature of DOM in the source water has a major influence on transformations that occur during treatment, (ii) the climate factors have a secondary effect on transformations, (iii) the wetlands receiving treated wastewater can produce a net increase in DOM, and (iv) the hierarchical analytical approach used in this study can measure the subtle DOM transformations that occur. As wastewater treatment plant effluent passes through treatment wetlands, the DOM undergoes transformation to become more aromatic and oxygenated. Autochthonous sources are contributed to the DOM, the nature of which is governed by the developmental stage of the wetland system as well as vegetation patterns. Concentrations of specific wastewaterderived organic contaminants such as linear alkylbenzene sulfonate, caffeine, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid were significantly attenuated by wetland treatment and were not contributed by internal loading.

  14. Carbon isotope fractionation of sapropelic organic matter during early diagenesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spiker, E. C.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1984-01-01

    Study of an algal, sapropelic sediment from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda shows that the mass balance of carbon and stable carbon isotopes in the major organic constituents is accounted for by a relatively straightforward model of selective preservation during diagenesis. The loss of 13C-enriched carbohydrates is the principal factor controlling the intermolecular mass balance of 13C in the sapropel. Results indicate that labile components are decomposed leaving as a residual concentrate in the sediment an insoluble humic substance that may be an original biochemical component of algae and associated bacteria. An overall decrease of up to about 4??? in the ?? 13C values of the organic matter is observed as a result of early diagenesis. ?? 1984.

  15. Literature review of organic matter transport from marshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    A conceptual model for estimating a transport coefficient for the movement of nonliving organic matter from wetlands to the adjacent embayments was developed in a manner that makes it compatible with the Earth Resources Laboratory's Productive Capacity Model. The model, which envisages detritus movement from wetland pixels to the nearest land-water boundary followed by movement within the water column from tidal creeks to the adjacent embayment, can be transposed to deal with only the interaction between tidal water and the marsh or to estimate the transport from embayments to the adjacent coastal waters. The outwelling hypothesis postulated wetlands as supporting coastal fisheries either by exporting nutrients, such as inorganic nitrogen, which stimulated the plankton-based grazing food chain in the water column, or through the export of dissolved and particulate organic carbon which provided a benthic, detritus-based food web which provides the food source for the grazing food chain in a more indirect fashion.

  16. Black Carbon - Soil Organic Matter abiotic and biotic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotrufo, Francesca; Boot, Claudia; Denef, Karolien; Foster, Erika; Haddix, Michelle; Jiang, Xinyu; Soong, Jennifer; Stewart, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    Wildfires, prescribed burns and the use of char as a soil amendment all add large quantities of black carbon to soils, with profound, yet poorly understood, effects on soil biology and chemical-physical structure. We will present results emerging from our black carbon program, which addresses questions concerning: 1) black carbon-soil organic matter interactions, 2) char decomposition and 3) impacts on microbial community structure and activities. Our understanding derives from a complementary set of post-fire black carbon field surveys and laboratory and field experiments with grass and wood char amendments, in which we used molecular (i.e., BPCA, PLFA) and isotopic (i.e., 13C and 15N labelled char) tracers. Overall, emerging results demonstrate that char additions to soil are prone to fast erosion, but a fraction remains that increases water retention and creates a better environment for the microbial community, particularly favoring gram negative bacteria. However, microbial decomposition of black carbon only slowly consumes a small fraction of it, thus char still significantly contributes to soil carbon sequestration. This is especially true in soils with little organic matter, where black carbon additions may even induce negative priming.

  17. Terrestrial and marine perspectives on modeling organic matter degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Burd, Adrian B; Frey, Serita; Cabre, Anna; Ito, Takamitsu; Levine, Naomi M; Lønborg, Christian; Long, Matthew; Mauritz, Marguerite; Thomas, R Quinn; Stephens, Brandon M; Vanwalleghem, Tom; Zeng, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Organic matter (OM) plays a major role in both terrestrial and oceanic biogeochemical cycles. The amount of carbon stored in these systems is far greater than that of carbon dioxide (CO2 ) in the atmosphere, and annual fluxes of CO2 from these pools to the atmosphere exceed those from fossil fuel combustion. Understanding the processes that determine the fate of detrital material is important for predicting the effects that climate change will have on feedbacks to the global carbon cycle. However, Earth System Models (ESMs) typically utilize very simple formulations of processes affecting the mineralization and storage of detrital OM. Recent changes in our view of the nature of this material and the factors controlling its transformation have yet to find their way into models. In this review, we highlight the current understanding of the role and cycling of detrital OM in terrestrial and marine systems and examine how this pool of material is represented in ESMs. We include a discussion of the different mineralization pathways available as organic matter moves from soils, through inland waters to coastal systems and ultimately into open ocean environments. We argue that there is strong commonality between aspects of OM transformation in both terrestrial and marine systems and that our respective scientific communities would benefit from closer collaboration.

  18. Wastewater disinfection and organic matter removal using ferrate (VI) oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bandala, Erick R; Miranda, Jocelyn; Beltran, Margarita; Vaca, Mabel; López, Raymundo; Torres, Luis G

    2009-09-01

    The use of iron in a +6 valence state, (Fe (VI), as FeO4(-2)) was tested as a novel alternative for wastewater disinfection and decontamination. The removal of organic matter (OM) and index microorganisms present in an effluent of a wastewater plant was determined using FeO4(-2) without any pH adjustment. It was observed that concentrations of FeO4(-2) ranging between 5 and 14 mg l(-1) inactivated up to 4-log of the index microorganisms (initial concentration c.a. 10(6) CFU/100 ml) and achieved OM removal up to almost 50%. The performance of FeO4(-2) was compared with OM oxidation and disinfection using hypochlorite. It was observed that hypochlorite was less effective in OM oxidation and coliform inactivation than ferrate. Results of this work suggest that FeO4(-2) could be an interesting oxidant able to deactivate pathogenic microorganisms in water with high OM content and readily oxidize organic matter without jeopardizing its efficiency on microorganism inactivation.

  19. Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Transformations of Cysteine with Dissolved Organic Matter.

    PubMed

    Chu, Chiheng; Erickson, Paul R; Lundeen, Rachel A; Stamatelatos, Dimitrios; Alaimo, Peter J; Latch, Douglas E; McNeill, Kristopher

    2016-06-21

    Cysteine (Cys) plays numerous key roles in the biogeochemistry of natural waters. Despite its importance, a full assessment of Cys abiotic transformation kinetics, products and pathways under environmental conditions has not been conducted. This study is a mechanistic evaluation of the photochemical and nonphotochemical (dark) transformations of Cys in solutions containing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM). The results show that Cys underwent abiotic transformations under both dark and irradiated conditions. Under dark conditions, the transformation rates of Cys were moderate and were highly pH- and temperature-dependent. Under UVA or natural sunlight irradiations, Cys transformation rates were enhanced by up to two orders of magnitude compared to rates under dark conditions. Product analysis indicated cystine and cysteine sulfinic acid were the major photooxidation products. In addition, this study provides an assessment of the contributions of singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide, and triplet dissolved organic matter to the CDOM-sensitized photochemical oxidation of Cys. The results suggest that another unknown pathway was dominant in the CDOM-sensitized photodegradation of Cys, which will require further study to identify.

  20. Organic matter protection as affected by the mineral soil matrix: allophanic vs. non-allophanic volcanic ash soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nierop, K. G. J.; Kaal, J.; Jansen, B.; Naafs, D. F. W.

    2009-04-01

    Volcanic ash soils (Andosols) contain the largest amounts of organic carbon of all mineral soil types. Chemical (complexes of organic matter with allophane, Al/Fe) and physical (aggregation) mechanisms are protecting the carbon from decomposition. While allophanic Andosols are dominated by short range order minerals such as allophane, imogolite and ferrihydrite, organic matter-Al/Fe complexes dominate non-allophanic Andosols. Consequently, chemical interactions between the mineral soil matrix and organic matter differ between these two soil types. This difference could potentially lead to different organic matter compositions. In this study, the organic matter of Ah horizons of an allophanic Andosol with a non-allophanic Andosol from Madeira Island is compared using analytical pyrolysis. Both volcanic soil types showed a relative decrease of lignin-derived pyrolysis products with depth, but this decrease was more pronounced in the allophanic Andosol. Polysaccharides were more abundant in the allophanic Ah horizon, particularly at lower depth, and this was also the case for the non-plant-derived N-containing polysaccharide chitin. Most likely, these biopolymers are adsorbed onto short range order minerals such as allophane and therefore were better protected in the allophanic Andosol. In addition, the higher chitin contents combined with the more pronounced lignin degradation suggests a higher fungal activity. Aliphatic pyrolysis products (n-alkenes/n-alkanes, fatty acids) were relatively more enriched in the non-allophanic Andosol. Lower microbial activity caused by the more acidic pH and higher levels of (toxic) aluminium are the most plausible reasons for the accumulation of these compounds in the non-allophanic Andosol. Although the allophanic and non-allophanic Andosol resembled each other in containing biopolymer groups of the same orders of magnitudes, in particular the contents of chitin and aliphatic compounds were distinctly affected by the differences in

  1. Land Application of Wastes: An Educational Program. Organic Matter - Module 17, Objectives, and Script.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarkson, W. W.; And Others

    This module sketches out the impact of sewage organic matter on soils. For convenience, that organic matter is separated into the readily decomposable compounds and the more resistant material (volatile suspended solids, refractory organics, and sludges). The fates of those organics are reviewed along with loading rates and recommended soil…

  2. Orchid bees as bio-indicators for organic coffee farms in Costa Rica: does farm size affect their abundance?

    PubMed

    Hedström, Ingemar; Denzel, Andrew; Owens, Gareth

    2006-09-01

    The potential of Euglossini bees, especially Euglossa, as biological indicators of organic vs nonorganic coffee farms was studied in Atenas and San Isidro, Alajuela, Costa Rica using 1.8-cineole as lure. Observations were made for three days at each of four farms and complemented with data from a year of observations. Orchid bees were in greater abundance in the organic farms (t-Student test). However, lower abundances suggest that an organic farm may be negatively affected by the proximity of non-organic farms, depending on its size and distance. Orchid bees may be indicators of organic coffee farms.

  3. Effects of dissolved organic matter from a eutrophic lake on the freely dissolved concentrations of emerging organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yi-Hua; Huang, Qing-Hui; Vähätalo, Anssi V; Li, Fei-Peng; Chen, Ling

    2014-08-01

    The authors studied the effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the bioavailability of bisphenol A (BPA) and chloramphenicol by measuring the freely dissolved concentrations of the contaminants in solutions containing DOM that had been isolated from a mesocosm in a eutrophic lake. The abundance and aromaticity of the chromophoric DOM increased over the 25-d mesocosm experiment. The BPA freely dissolved concentration was 72.3% lower and the chloramphenicol freely dissolved concentration was 56.2% lower using DOM collected on day 25 than using DOM collected on day 1 of the mesocosm experiment. The freely dissolved concentrations negatively correlated with the ultraviolent absorption coefficient at 254 nm and positively correlated with the spectral slope of chromophoric DOM, suggesting that the bioavailability of these emerging organic contaminants depends on the characteristics of the DOM present. The DOM-water partition coefficients (log KOC ) for the emerging organic contaminants positively correlated with the aromaticity of the DOM, measured as humic acid-like fluorescent components C1 (excitation/emission=250[313]/412 nm) and C2 (excitation/emission=268[379]/456 nm). The authors conclude that the bioavailability of emerging organic contaminants in eutrophic lakes can be affected by changes in the DOM.

  4. Mesopelagic N2 Fixation Related to Organic Matter Composition in the Solomon and Bismarck Seas (Southwest Pacific).

    PubMed

    Benavides, Mar; Moisander, Pia H; Berthelot, Hugo; Dittmar, Thorsten; Grosso, Olivier; Bonnet, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Dinitrogen (N2) fixation was investigated together with organic matter composition in the mesopelagic zone of the Bismarck (Transect 1) and Solomon (Transect 2) Seas (Southwest Pacific). Transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) and the presence of compounds sharing molecular formulae with saturated fatty acids and sugars, as well as dissolved organic matter (DOM) compounds containing nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) were higher on Transect 1 than on Transect 2, while oxygen concentrations showed an opposite pattern. N2 fixation rates (up to ~1 nmol N L-1 d-1) were higher in Transect 1 than in Transect 2, and correlated positively with TEP, suggesting a dependence of diazotroph activity on organic matter. The scores of the multivariate ordination of DOM molecular formulae and their relative abundance correlated negatively with bacterial abundances and positively with N2 fixation rates, suggesting an active bacterial exploitation of DOM and its use to sustain diazotrophic activity. Sequences of the nifH gene clustered with Alpha-, Beta-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria, and included representatives from Clusters I, III and IV. A third of the clone library included sequences close to the potentially anaerobic Cluster III, suggesting that N2 fixation was partially supported by presumably particle-attached diazotrophs. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primer-probe sets were designed for three phylotypes and showed low abundances, with a phylotype within Cluster III at up to 103 nifH gene copies L-1. These results provide new insights into the ecology of non-cyanobacterial diazotrophs and suggest that organic matter sustains their activity in the mesopelagic ocean.

  5. Ocean metabolism and dissolved organic matter: How do small dissolved molecules persist in the ocean?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, Ronald

    2010-05-01

    The ocean reservoir of dissolved organic matter (DOM) is among the largest global reservoirs (~700 Pg C) of reactive organic carbon. Marine primary production (~50 Pg C/yr) by photosynthetic microalgae and cyanobacteria is the major source of organic matter to the ocean and the principal substrate supporting marine food webs. The direct release of DOM from phytoplankton and other organisms as well as a variety of other processes, such as predation and viral lysis, contribute to the ocean DOM reservoir. Continental runoff and atmospheric deposition are relatively minor sources of DOM to the ocean, but some components of this material appear to be resistant to decomposition and to have a long residence time in the ocean. Concentrations of DOM are highest in surface waters and decrease with depth, a pattern that reflects the sources and diagenesis of DOM in the upper ocean. Most (70-80%) marine DOM exists as small molecules of low molecular weight (<1 kDalton). Surprisingly, high-molecular-weight (>1 kDalton) DOM is relatively enriched in major biochemicals, such as combined neutral sugars and amino acids, and is more bioavailable than low-molecular-weight DOM. The observed relationships among the size, composition, and reactivity of DOM have led to the size-reactivity continuum model, which postulates that diagenetic processes lead to the production of smaller molecules that are structurally altered and resistant to microbial degradation. The radiocarbon content of these small dissolved molecules also indicates these are the most highly aged components of DOM. Chemical signatures of bacteria are abundant in DOM and increase during diagenesis, indicating bacteria are an important source of slowly cycling biochemicals. Recent analyses of DOM isolates by ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry have revealed an incredibly diverse mixture of molecules. Carboxyl-rich alicyclic molecules are abundant in DOM, and they appear to be derived from diagenetically

  6. Use of commercial organic fertilizer increases the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotics in soil.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue; Qiao, Min; Wang, Feng-Hua; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2017-01-01

    The application of manure-based commercial organic fertilizers (COFs) is becoming increasingly extensive because of the expanding market for organic food. The present study examined the effects of repeated applications of chicken or swine manure-based COFs on the fate of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in soil by conducting a soil microcosm experiment. Application of COFs significantly increased antibiotics residues, as well as the relative abundance of ARGs and the integrase gene of class 1 integrons (intΙ1) in soil. Two months after each application, antibiotics and ARGs dissipated in amended soils, but they still remained at an elevated level, compared with the control. And, the accumulation of antibiotics was found due to repeated COF applications. However, the relative abundance of ARGs in most COF-amended soils did not differ significantly between the first application and the repeated application. The results imply that 2 months are not sufficient for ARGs to approach background levels, and that animal manure must be treated more effectively prior to using it in agriculture ecosystems.

  7. Impact of Native and Invasive Earthworm Activity on Forest Soil Organic Matter Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Top, Sara; Filley, Timothy

    2010-05-01

    Many northern North American forests are experiencing the introduction of exotic European lumbricid species earthworms with documented losses in litter layers, expansion of A-horizons, loss of the organic horizon, changes in fine root density, and shifts in microbial populations as a result. Some of these forests were previously devoid of these ecosystem engineers. We compare the soil isotope and molecular chemistry from two free air CO2 enrichment (FACE) forest experiments (aspen FACE at Rhinelander, Wisconsin and sweet gum FACE at Oak Ridge National Lab, Tennessee) that lie within the zones of earthworm invasion. These sites exhibit differences in amounts of exotic and native species as well as endogeic (predominantly mineral soil dwelling) and epigeic (litter and organic matter horizon dwelling) types. We investigated the impact of earthworm activity by tracking the relative abundance and stable carbon isotope compositions of lignin and substituted fatty acids extracted from isolated earthworms and their fecal pellets and from host soils. Additionally, 15N-labeled additions to the soil provide additional methods for tracking earthworm impacts. Indications of root vs leaf input to earthworm casts and fecal matter were derived from differences in the chemical composition of cutin, suberin, and lignin. The isotopically depleted CO2 used in FACE and the resulting isotopically depleted plant organic matter afford an excellent opportunity to assess biopolymer-specific turnover dynamics. We find that endogeic species are proportionately more responsible for fine root cycling while some epigeic species are responsible for microaggregation of foliar cutin. CSIA of fecal pellet lignin and SFA indicate how these biopolymer pools can be derived from variable sources, roots, background soil, foliar tissue within one earthworm. Additionally, CSIA indicates the distinct roles that different earthworm types have in "aging" surface soil biopolymer pools through encapsulation and

  8. DETOXIFICATION OF OUTFALL WATER USING NATURAL ORGANIC MATTER

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, N.; Looney, B.; Millings, M.; Nichols, R.; Noonkester, J.; Payne, B.

    2010-07-13

    To protect stream organisms in an ephemeral stream at the Savannah River Site, a proposed National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit reduced the copper limit from 25 {micro}g/l to 6 {micro}g/l at Outfall H-12. Efforts to reduce copper in the wastewater and stormwater draining to this outfall did not succeed in bringing copper levels below this limit. Numerous treatment methods were considered, including traditional methods such as ion exchange and natural treatment alternatives such as constructed wetlands and peat beds, all of which act to remove copper. However, the very low target metal concentration and highly variable outfall conditions presented a significant challenge for these treatment technologies. In addition, costs and energy use for most of these alternatives were high and secondary wastes would be generated. The Savannah River National Laboratory developed an entirely new 'detoxification' approach to treat the outfall water. This simple, lower-cost detoxification system amends outfall water with natural organic matter to bind up to 25 {micro}g/l copper rather than remove it, thereby mitigating its toxicity and protecting the sensitive species in the ecosystem. The amendments are OMRI (Organic Materials Review Institute) certified commercial products that are naturally rich in humic acids and are commonly used in organic farming.

  9. Characterization of dissolved organic matter for prediction of trihalomethane formation potential in surface and sub-surface waters.

    PubMed

    Awad, John; van Leeuwen, John; Chow, Christopher; Drikas, Mary; Smernik, Ronald J; Chittleborough, David J; Bestland, Erick

    2016-05-05

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in surface waters used for drinking purposes can vary markedly in character dependent on their sources within catchments. The character of DOM further influences the formation of disinfection by products when precursor DOM present in drinking water reacts with chlorine during disinfection. Here we report the development of models that describe the formation potential of trihalomethanes (THMFP) dependent on the character of DOM in waters from discrete catchments with specific land-use and soil textures. DOM was characterized based on UV absorbance at 254 nm, apparent molecular weight and relative abundances of protein-like and humic-like compounds. DOM character and Br concentration (up to 0.5 mg/L) were used as variables in models (R(2)>0.93) of THMFP, which ranged from 19 to 649 μg/L. Chloroform concentration (12-594 μg/L) and relative abundance (27-99%) were first modeled (R(2)>0.85) and from these, the abundances of bromodichloromethane and chlorodibromomethane estimated using power and exponential functions, respectively (R(2)>0.98). From these, the abundance of bromoform is calculated. The proposed model may be used in risk assessment of catchment factors on formation of trihalomethanes in drinking water, in context of treatment efficiency for removal of organic matter.

  10. Organic layer serves as a hotspot of microbial activity and abundance in Arctic tundra soils.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Jang, Inyoung; Chae, Namyi; Choi, Taejin; Kang, Hojeong

    2013-02-01

    Tundra ecosystem is of importance for its high accumulation of organic carbon and vulnerability to future climate change. Microorganisms play a key role in carbon dynamics of the tundra ecosystem by mineralizing organic carbon. We assessed both ecosystem process rates and community structure of Bacteria, Archaea, and Fungi in different soil layers (surface organic layer and subsurface mineral soil) in an Arctic soil ecosystem located at Spitsbergen, Svalbard during the summer of 2008 by using biochemical and molecular analyses, such as enzymatic assay, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and pyrosequencing. Activity of hydrolytic enzymes showed difference according to soil type. For all three microbial communities, the average gene copy number did not significantly differ between soil types. However, archaeal diversities appeared to differ according to soil type, whereas bacterial and fungal diversity indices did not show any variation. Correlation analysis between biogeochemical and microbial parameters exhibited a discriminating pattern according to microbial or soil types. Analysis of the microbial community structure showed that bacterial and archaeal communities have different profiles with unique phylotypes in terms of soil types. Water content and hydrolytic enzymes were found to be related with the structure of bacterial and archaeal communities, whereas soil organic matter (SOM) and total organic carbon (TOC) were related with bacterial communities. The overall results of this study indicate that microbial enzyme activity were generally higher in the organic layer than in mineral soils and that bacterial and archaeal communities differed between the organic layer and mineral soils in the Arctic region. Compared to mineral soil, peat-covered organic layer may represent a hotspot for secondary productivity and nutrient cycling in this ecosystem.

  11. Measuring Organic Matter with COSIMA on Board Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briois, C.; Baklouti, D.; Bardyn, A.; Cottin, H.; Engrand, C.; Fischer, H.; Fray, N.; Godard, M.; Hilchenbach, M.; von Hoerner, H.; Höfner, H.; Hornung, K.; Kissel, J.; Langevin, Y.; Le Roy, L.; Lehto, H.; Lehto, K.; Orthous-Daunay, F. R.; Revillet, C.; Rynö, J.; Schulz, R.; Silen, J. V.; Siljeström, S.; Thirkell, L.

    2014-12-01

    Comets are believed to contain the most pristine material of our Solar System materials and therefore to be a key to understand the origin of the Solar System, and the origin of life. Remote sensing observations have led to the detection of more than twenty simple organic molecules (Bockelée-Morvan et al., 2004; Mumma and Charnley, 2011). Experiments on-board in-situ exploration missions Giotto and Vega and the recent Stardust sample return missions have shown that a significant fraction of the cometary grains consists of organic matter. Spectra showed that both the gaseous (Mitchell et al., 1992) and the solid phase (grains) (Kissel and Krueger, 1987) contained organic molecules with higher masses than those of the molecules detected by remote sensing techniques in the gaseous phase. Some of the grains analyzed in the atmosphere of comet 1P/Halley seem to be essentially made of a mixture of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen (CHON grains, Fomenkova, 1999). Rosetta is an unparalleled opportunity to make a real breakthrough into the nature of cometary matter, both in the gas and in the solid phase. The dust mass spectrometer COSIMA on Rosetta will analyze organic and inorganic phases in the dust. The organic phases may be refractory, but some organics may evaporate with time from the dust and lead to an extended source in the coma. Over the last years, we have prepared the cometary rendezvous by the analysis of various samples with the reference model of COSIMA. We will report on this calibration data set and on the first results of the in-situ analysis of cometary grains as captured, imaged and analyzed by COSIMA. References : Bockelée-Morvan, D., et al. 2004. (Eds.), Comets II. the University of Arizona Press, Tucson, USA, pp. 391-423 ; Fomenkova, M.N., 1999. Space Science Reviews 90, 109-114 ; Kissel, J., Krueger, F.R., 1987. Nature 326, 755-760 ; Mitchell, et al. 1992. Icarus 98, 125-133 ; Mumma, M.J., Charnley, S.B., 2011. Annual Review of Astronomy and

  12. Organic matter loss from cultivated peat soils in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglund, Örjan; Berglund, Kerstin

    2015-04-01

    The degradation of drained peat soils in agricultural use is an underestimated source of loss of organic matter. Oxidation (biological degradation) of agricultural peat soils causes a loss of organic matter (OM) of 11 - 22 t ha-1 y-1 causing a CO2 emission of 20 - 40 t ha-1 y-1. Together with the associated N2O emissions from mineralized N this totals in the EU to about 98.5 Mton CO2 eq per year. Peat soils are very prone to climate change and it is expected that at the end of this century these values are doubled. The degradation products pollute surface waters. Wind erosion of peat soils in arable agriculture can cause losses of 3 - 30 t ha-1 y-1 peat also causing air pollution (fine organic particles). Subsidence rates are 1 - 2 cm per year which leads to deteriorating drainage effect and make peat soils below sea or inland water levels prone to flooding. Flooding agricultural peat soils is in many cases not possible without high costs, high GHG emissions and severe water pollution. Moreover sometimes cultural and historic landscapes are lost and meadow birds areas are lost. In areas where the possibility to regulate the water table is limited the mitigation options are either to increase biomass production that can be used as bioenergy to substitute some fossil fuel, try to slow down the break-down of the peat by different amendments that inhibit microbial activity, or permanent flooding. The negative effects of wind erosion can be mitigated by reducing wind speed or different ways to protect the soil by crops or fiber sheets. In a newly started project in Sweden a typical peat soil with and without amendment of foundry sand is cropped with reed canary grass, tall fescue and timothy to investigate the yield and greenhouse gas emissions from the different crops and how the sand effect the trafficability and GHG emissions.

  13. SNC Meteorites, Organic Matter and a New Look at Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmflash, David M.; Clemett, Simon J.; McKay, David S.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, evidence has begun to grow supporting the possibility that the Viking GC-MS would not have detected certain carboxylate salts that could have been present as metastable oxidation products of high molecular weight organic species. Additionally, despite the instrument's high sensitivity, the possibility had remained that very low levels of organic matter, below the instrument's detection limit, could have been present. In fact, a recent study indicates that the degradation products of several million microorganisms per gram of soil on Mars would not have been detected by the Viking GC-MS. Since the strength of the GC-MS findings was considered enough to dismiss the biology packet, particularly the LR results, any subsequent evidence suggesting that organic molecules may in fact be present on the Martian surface necessitates a re-evaluation of the Viking LR data. In addition to an advanced mass spectrometer to look for isotopic signatures of biogenic processes, future lander missions will include the ability to detect methane produced by methanogenic bacteria, as well as techniques based on biotechnology. Meanwhile, the identification of Mars samples already present on Earth in the form of the SNC meteorites has provided us with the ability to study samples of the Martian upper crust a decade or more in advance of any planned sample return missions. While contamination issues are of serious concern, the presence of indigenous organic matter in the form of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons has been detected in the Martian meteorites ALH84001 and Nakhla, while there is circumstantial evidence for carbonaceous material in Chassigny. The radiochronological ages of these meteorites are 4.5 Ga, 1.3 Ga, and 165 Ma respectively representing a span of time in Earth history from the earliest single-celled organisms to the present day. Given this perspective on organic material, a biological interpretation to the Viking LR results can no longer be ruled out. In the LR

  14. Quality of fresh organic matter affects priming of soil organic matter and substrate utilization patterns of microbes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Boutton, Thomas W.; Xu, Wenhua; Hu, Guoqing; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2015-01-01

    Changes in biogeochemical cycles and the climate system due to human activities are expected to change the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs to soils. How changing quality of fresh organic matter (FOM) might influence the priming effect (PE) on soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization is still under debate. Here we determined the PE induced by two 13C-labeled FOMs with contrasting nutritional quality (leaf vs. stalk of Zea mays L.). Soils from two different forest types yielded consistent results: soils amended with leaf tissue switched faster from negative PE to positive PE due to greater microbial growth compared to soils amended with stalks. However, after 16 d of incubation, soils amended with stalks had a higher PE than those amended with leaf. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) results suggested that microbial demand for carbon and other nutrients was one of the major determinants of the PE observed. Therefore, consideration of both microbial demands for nutrients and FOM supply simultaneously is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of PE. Our study provided evidence that changes in FOM quality could affect microbial utilization of substrate and PE on SOM mineralization, which may exacerbate global warming problems under future climate change. PMID:25960162

  15. Quality of fresh organic matter affects priming of soil organic matter and substrate utilization patterns of microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Boutton, Thomas W.; Xu, Wenhua; Hu, Guoqing; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2015-05-01

    Changes in biogeochemical cycles and the climate system due to human activities are expected to change the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs to soils. How changing quality of fresh organic matter (FOM) might influence the priming effect (PE) on soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization is still under debate. Here we determined the PE induced by two 13C-labeled FOMs with contrasting nutritional quality (leaf vs. stalk of Zea mays L.). Soils from two different forest types yielded consistent results: soils amended with leaf tissue switched faster from negative PE to positive PE due to greater microbial growth compared to soils amended with stalks. However, after 16 d of incubation, soils amended with stalks had a higher PE than those amended with leaf. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) results suggested that microbial demand for carbon and other nutrients was one of the major determinants of the PE observed. Therefore, consideration of both microbial demands for nutrients and FOM supply simultaneously is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of PE. Our study provided evidence that changes in FOM quality could affect microbial utilization of substrate and PE on SOM mineralization, which may exacerbate global warming problems under future climate change.

  16. Quality of fresh organic matter affects priming of soil organic matter and substrate utilization patterns of microbes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Boutton, Thomas W; Xu, Wenhua; Hu, Guoqing; Jiang, Ping; Bai, Edith

    2015-05-11

    Changes in biogeochemical cycles and the climate system due to human activities are expected to change the quantity and quality of plant litter inputs to soils. How changing quality of fresh organic matter (FOM) might influence the priming effect (PE) on soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization is still under debate. Here we determined the PE induced by two (13)C-labeled FOMs with contrasting nutritional quality (leaf vs. stalk of Zea mays L.). Soils from two different forest types yielded consistent results: soils amended with leaf tissue switched faster from negative PE to positive PE due to greater microbial growth compared to soils amended with stalks. However, after 16 d of incubation, soils amended with stalks had a higher PE than those amended with leaf. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) results suggested that microbial demand for carbon and other nutrients was one of the major determinants of the PE observed. Therefore, consideration of both microbial demands for nutrients and FOM supply simultaneously is essential to understand the underlying mechanisms of PE. Our study provided evidence that changes in FOM quality could affect microbial utilization of substrate and PE on SOM mineralization, which may exacerbate global warming problems under future climate change.

  17. Organic matter in sediment layers of an acidic mining lake as assessed by lipid analysis. Part II: Neutral lipids.

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, Juergen; Koschorreck, Matthias; Górecki, Tadeusz

    2017-02-01

    Natural neutralization of acidic mining lakes is often limited by organic matter. The knowledge of the sources and degradability of organic matter is crucial for understanding alkalinity generation in these lakes. Sediments collected at different depths (surface sediment layer from 0 to 1 cm and deep sediment layer from 4 to 5cm) from an acidic mining lake were studied in order to characterize sedimentary organic matter based on neutral signature markers. Samples were exhaustively extracted, subjected to pre-chromatographic derivatizations and analyzed by GC/MS. Herein, molecular distributions of diagnostic alkanes/alkenes, terpenes/terpenoids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic alcohols and ketones, sterols, and hopanes/hopanoids were addressed. Characterization of the contribution of natural vs. anthropogenic sources to the sedimentary organic matter in these extreme environments was then possible based on these distributions. With the exception of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, combined concentrations across all marker classes proved higher in the surface sediment layer as compared to those in the deep sediment layer. Alkane and aliphatic alcohol distributions pointed to predominantly allochthonous over autochthonous contribution to sedimentary organic matter. Sterol patterns were dominated by phytosterols of terrestrial plants including stigmasterol and β-sitosterol. Hopanoid markers with the ββ-biohopanoid "biological" configuration were more abundant in the surface sediment layer, which pointed to higher bacterial activity. The pattern of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons pointed to prevailing anthropogenic input. Pyrolytic makers were likely to due to atmospheric deposition from a nearby former coal combustion facility. The combined analysis of the array of biomarkers provided new insights into the sources and transformations of organic matter in lake sediments.

  18. Significance of Isotopically Labile Organic Hydrogen in Thermal Maturation of Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Arndt Schimmelmann; Maria Mastalerz

    2010-03-30

    Isotopically labile organic hydrogen in fossil fuels occupies chemical positions that participate in isotopic exchange and in chemical reactions during thermal maturation from kerogen to bitumen, oil and gas. Carbon-bound organic hydrogen is isotopically far less exchangeable than hydrogen bound to nitrogen, oxygen, or sulfur. We explore why organic hydrogen isotope ratios express a relationship with organic nitrogen isotope ratios in kerogen at low to moderate maturity. We develop and apply new techniques to utilize organic D/H ratios in organic matter fractions and on a molecular level as tools for exploration for fossil fuels and for paleoenvironmental research. The scope of our samples includes naturally and artificially matured substrates, such as coal, shale, oil and gas.

  19. Storage and turnover of organic matter in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Torn, M.S.; Swanston, C.W.; Castanha, C.; Trumbore, S.E.

    2008-07-15

    Historically, attention on soil organic matter (SOM) has focused on the central role that it plays in ecosystem fertility and soil properties, but in the past two decades the role of soil organic carbon in moderating atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations has emerged as a critical research area. This chapter will focus on the storage and turnover of natural organic matter in soil (SOM), in the context of the global carbon cycle. Organic matter in soils is the largest carbon reservoir in rapid exchange with atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and is thus important as a potential source and sink of greenhouse gases over time scales of human concern (Fischlin and Gyalistras 1997). SOM is also an important human resource under active management in agricultural and range lands worldwide. Questions driving present research on the soil C cycle include: Are soils now acting as a net source or sink of carbon to the atmosphere? What role will soils play as a natural modulator or amplifier of climatic warming? How is C stabilized and sequestered, and what are effective management techniques to foster these processes? Answering these questions will require a mechanistic understanding of how and where C is stored in soils. The quantity and composition of organic matter in soil reflect the long-term balance between plant carbon inputs and microbial decomposition, as well as other loss processes such as fire, erosion, and leaching. The processes driving soil carbon storage and turnover are complex and involve influences at molecular to global scales. Moreover, the relative importance of these processes varies according to the temporal and spatial scales being considered; a process that is important at the regional scale may not be critical at the pedon scale. At the regional scale, SOM cycling is influenced by factors such as climate and parent material, which affect plant productivity and soil development. More locally, factors such as plant tissue quality and soil mineralogy affect

  20. Strong pathways for incorporation of terrestrially derived organic matter into benthic communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, Rebecca J.; Wing, Stephen R.

    2009-05-01

    In Fiordland, New Zealand, large volumes of organic matter are deposited into the marine environment from pristine forested catchments. Analyses of δ15N, δ13C and δ34S were employed to determine whether these inputs were contributing to marine food webs via assimilation by common macroinvertebrates inhabiting the inner reaches of the fjords. Terrestrially derived organic matter (TOM) had values of δ15N, δ13C and δ34S that were distinct from other carbon source pools, providing sufficient power to quantify the contribution of TOM to the benthic food web. Isotopic values among macroinvertebrates varied significantly, with consistently low values of δ15N, δ13C and δ34S for the abundant deposit feeders Echinocardium cordatum (Echinodermata) and Pectinaria australis (Annelida), indicating assimilation of TOM. High concentrations of bacterial fatty acid biomarkers in E. cordatum, and values of δ13C of these biomarkers similar to TOM (-27 to -30‰) confirmed that TOM is indirectly assimilated by these sea urchins via heterotrophic bacteria. TOM was also found to enter the infaunal food web via chemoautotrophic bacteria that live symbiotically within Solemya parkinsonii (Bivalvia). Echinocardium cordatum, Pectinaria australis and S. parkinsonii comprised up to 33.5% of the biomass of the macroinfaunal community, and thus represent strong pathways for movement of organic matter from the forested catchments into the benthic food web. This demonstration of connectivity among adjacent marine and terrestrial habitats has important implications for coastal land management, and highlights the importance of intact coastal forests to marine ecosystem function.

  1. Size fractionated characterization of freshwater organic matter fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A.; Lead, J.; Elliott, S.; Demomi, A.; Liu, R.; Seredynska-Sobecka, B.; Hudson, N. J.

    2006-12-01

    We employ a range of optical (fluorescence, absorbance) techniques to freshwater organic matter, focusing on samples from urban catchments and using both traditional (filtration, cross flow ultrafiltration) and novel (split cell thin flow (SPLITT)) fractionation techniques to investigate the fluorescence characteristics of both dissolved and colloidal organic matter and to probe different fractions of the size range. We find: (1) As with previous studies, urban freshwaters have high tryptophan-like fluorescence in comparison to humic-like fluorescence. (2) After conventional filtration, our samples demonstrate that humic-like fluorescence is predominantly within the <25 nm fraction and pH dependent, suggesting that it is predominantly `dissolved'. Tryptophan-like fluorescence is associated with either dissolved, colloidal and particulate fractions, and is less pH dependent, depending on the sample, suggesting a variety of sources that are known to include microbial and biological cells and their exudates and the products of decomposition and feeding. (3) When the thermal quenching of fluorescence is investigated at different filter fractions, humic-like fluorescence quenching does not vary with filter fraction, whereas tryptophan-like fluorescence quenching exhibits a size dependency. This confirms at least two sources of tryptophan-like fluorescence that have different sizes and different thermal quenching properties. (4) SPLITT also shows that tryptophan-like fluorescence intensity is found mainly in the particulate material and is not pH dependent, while humic-like fluorescence intensities are dependent on pH but not on size. However, humic-like fluorescence intensity normalised to absorbance, related to fluorescence efficiency and molar mass, varies with size in the SPLITT samples. (5) Cross flow ultrafiltration confirms that, compared with tryptophan standards, freshwater tryptophan-like fluorescence is not dissolved and `free'. However, it is related to the

  2. Root Mediation of Soil Organic Matter Feedbacks to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendall, E.; Carrillo, Y.; Nie, M.; Osanai, Y.; Nelson, L. C.; Sanderman, J.; Baldock, J.; Hovenden, M.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of plant roots in carbon cycling and especially soil organic matter (SOM) formation and decomposition has been recently recognized. Up to eighty percent of net primary production may be allocated to roots in ecosystems such as grasslands, where they contribute substantially to SOM formation. On the other hand, root induced priming of SOM decomposition has been implicated in the loss of soil C stocks. Thus, the accurate prediction of climate change impacts on C sequestration in soils largely depends upon improved understanding of root-mediated SOM formation and loss in the rhizosphere. This presentation represents an initial attempt to synthesize belowground observations from free-air CO2 enrichment and warming experiments in two grassland ecosystems. We found that the chemical composition of root carbon is similar to particulate organic matter (POM), but not to mineral associated organic matter (MOM), suggesting less microbial modification during formation of POM than MOM. While root biomass and production rates increased under elevated CO2, POM and MOM fractions did not increase proportionally. We also observed increased root decomposition with elevated CO2, which was likely due to increased soil water and substrate availability, since root C quality (determined by NMR) and decomposition (in laboratory incubations) were unaltered. Further, C quality and decomposition rates of roots differed between C3 and C4 functional types. Changes in root morphology with elevated CO2 have altered root functioning. Increased root surface area and length per unit mass allow increased exploration for nutrients, and potentially enhanced root exudation, rhizodeposition, and priming of SOM decomposition. Controlled chamber experiments demonstrated that uptake of N from SOM was linearly correlated with specific root length. Taken together, these results indicate that root morphology, chemistry and function all play roles in affecting soil C storage and loss, and that

  3. T cell abundance in blood predicts acute organ toxicity in chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reichardt, Sybille D.; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Schirmer, Markus A.; Stadelmann, Christine; Canis, Martin; Wolff, Hendrik A.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) by chemoradiotherapy (CRT) often results in high-grade acute organ toxicity (HGAOT). As these adverse effects impair the patients' quality of life and the feasibility of the planned therapy, we sought to analyze immunological parameters in tumor material and blood samples obtained from 48 HNSCC patients in order to assess the potential to predict the individual acute organ toxicity. T cells in the tumor stroma were enriched in patients developing HGAOT whereas levels of soluble factors in the plasma and gene expression in whole blood did not coincide with the occurrence of acute organ toxicity. In contrast, the frequency and absolute numbers of selected leukocyte subpopulations measured in samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) directly before the beginning of CRT were significantly different in patients with HGAOT as compared to those without. When we validated several potential markers including the abundance of T cells in a small prospective study with 16 HNSCC patients, we were able to correctly predict acute organ toxicity in up to 81% of the patients. We conclude that analysis of PBMCs by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) might be a convenient strategy to identify patients at risk of developing HGAOT caused by CRT, which might allow to adapt the treatment regimen and possibly improve disease outcome. PMID:27589568

  4. Inorganic nitrogen supply and dissolved organic nitrogen abundance across the US Great Plains.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Megan L; Cleary, Matthew J; Burke, Ingrid C

    2014-01-01

    Across US Great Plains grasslands, a gradient of increasing mean annual precipitation from west to east corresponds to increasing aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and increasing N-limitation. Previous work has shown that there is no increase in net N mineralization rates across this gradient, leading to the question of where eastern prairie grasses obtain the nitrogen to support production. One as-yet unexamined source is soil organic N, despite abundant literature from other ecosystems showing that plants take up dissolved soil organic N. This study measured KCl-extractable dissolved organic N (DON) in surface soils across the grassland productivity gradient. We found that KCl-extractable DON pools increased from west to east. If available to and used by plants, this DON may help explain the high ANPP in the eastern Great Plains. These results suggest a need for future research to determine whether, in what quantities, and in what forms prairie grasses use organic N to support primary production.

  5. Molecular characterization of effluent organic matter identified by ultrahigh resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gonsior, Michael; Zwartjes, Matthew; Cooper, William J; Song, Weihua; Ishida, Kenneth P; Tseng, Linda Y; Jeung, Matthew K; Rosso, Diego; Hertkorn, Norbert; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2011-04-01

    Effluent dissolved organic matter (EfOM) collected from the secondary-treated wastewater of the Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD) located in Fountain Valley, California, USA was compared to natural organic matter collected from the Suwannee River (SRNOM), Florida using ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). Furthermore, the two different treatment processes at OCSD, activated sludge and trickling filter, were separately investigated. The blend of these two effluents was further evaluated after it had passed through the microfiltration process of the Advanced Water Purification Facility (AWPF) at Orange County Water District (OCWD). EfOM contained 872 different m/z peaks that were unambiguously assigned to exact molecular formulae containing a single sulfur atom and carbon, hydrogen and oxygen atoms (CHOS formulae). In contrast, the SRNOM sample only contained 152 CHOS formulae. The trend in CHO molecular compositions was opposite with 2500 CHO formulae assigned for SRNOM but only about 1000 for EfOM. The CHOS-derived mass peaks with highest abundances in EfOM could be attributed to surfactants such as linear alkyl benzene sulfonates (LAS), their co-products dialkyl tetralin sulfonates (DATS) and their biodegraded metabolites such as sulfophenyl carboxylic acids (SPC). The differences between the treatments were found minor with greater differences between sampling dates than treatment methods used.

  6. Saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima) invasion alters organic matter dynamics in a desert stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kennedy, T.A.; Hobbie, S.E.

    2004-01-01

    1. We investigated the impacts of saltcedar invasion on organic matter dynamics in a spring-fed stream (Jackrabbit Spring) in the Mojave Desert of southern Nevada, U.S.A., by experimentally manipulating saltcedar abundance. 2. Saltcedar heavily shaded Jackrabbit Spring and shifted the dominant organic matter inputs from autochthonous production that was available throughout the year to allochthonous saltcedar leaf litter that was strongly pulsed in the autumn. Specifically, reaches dominated by saltcedar had allochthonous litter inputs of 299 g ash free dry mass (AFDM) m-2 year-1, macrophyte production of 15 g AFDM m-2 year-1 and algal production of 400 g AFDM m-2 year-1, while reaches dominated by native riparian vegetation or where saltcedar had been experimentally removed had allochthonous litter inputs of 7-34 g AFDM m -2 year-1, macrophyte production of 118-425 g AFDM m -2 year-1 and algal production of 640-900 g AFDM m -2 year-1. 3. A leaf litter breakdown study indicated that saltcedar also altered decomposition in Jackrabbit Spring, mainly through its influence on litter quality rather than by altering the environment for decomposition. Decomposition rates for saltcedar were lower than for ash (Fraxinus velutina), the dominant native allochthonous litter type, but faster than for bulrush (Scirpus americanus), the dominant macrophyte in this system.

  7. Spatio-temporal distribution of organic and inorganic pollutants from Lake Geneva (Switzerland) reveals strong interacting effects of sewage treatment plant and eutrophication on microbial abundance.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Florian; Graham, Neil D; Herbez, Aline; Wildi, Walter; Poté, John

    2011-07-01

    Variation with depth and time of organic matter (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus), inorganic pollutant (mercury), as well as bacterial abundance and activity, were investigated for the first time in sediment profiles of different parts of Lake Geneva (Switzerland) over the last decades. The highest organic contents (about 32%), mercury concentration (27 mg kg(-1)), bacterial abundance (in order of 9×10(9) cell g(-1) dry sediment), and bacterial activity (1299 Relative Light Units (RLU)) were found in the highly polluted sediments contaminated by the waste water treatment plant (WWTP) discharge, which deposited during the period of cultural eutrophication. Such data, which contrast with the other sampled sites from deeper and more remote parts of the lake, prove that the organic matter and nutrients released from the municipal WWTP have considerable effects on bacterial abundance and activities in freshwater sediments. In fact, the relatively unpolluted deepwater sites and the coastal polluted site show large synchronous increases in bacterial densities linked to the anoxic conditions in the 1970s (lake eutrophication caused by external nutrient input) that subsequently increased the nutrient loading fluxes. These results show that the microbial activities response to natural or human-induced changing limnological conditions (e.g., nutrient supply, oxygen availability, redox conditions) constitutes a threat to the security of water resources, which in turn poses concerns for the world's freshwater resources in the context of global warming and the degradation of water quality (oxygen depletion in the bottom water due to reduced deep waters mixing). Moreover, the accumulation of inorganic pollutants such as high mercury (methyl-mercury) concentration may represent a significant source of toxicity for sediment dwelling organisms.

  8. Microbial response to the effect of quantity and quality soil organic matter alteration after laboratory heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bárcenas-Moreno, G.; Escalante, E.; Pérez-Bejarano, A.; Zavala, L. M.; Jordán, A.

    2012-04-01

    Fire-induced soil changes influence indirectly on soil microbial response, mainly due to pH increases and organic matter alterations. Partial carbon combustion can originate both, an increase in microbial activity due to dissolved organic carbon increases (Bárcenas-Moreno and Bååth, 2099, Bárcenas-Moreno et al., 2011), as well as limitation of microbial growth, either due to diminution of some fractions of organic matter (Fernández et al., 1997) or due to the formation of toxic compounds (Widden and Parkinson, 1975; Diaz-Raviña et al., 1996). The magnitude or direction of these changes is conditioned mainly by fire intensity and plant species, so forest with different vegetation could promote different quantity and quality alterations of soil organic matter after fire which leads to different soil microbial response. The objective of this work was to differentiate between the effect of reduction of carbon content and the presence of substances with inhibitory effect on soil microorganisms, inoculating microorganisms from an unaltered forest area on heated soil extract-based culture media. Soil collected from two different vegetation forest, pine (P) and oak (O) forests, with similar soil characteristics was sieved and heated at 450 °C in a muffle furnace. Heated and unheated soil was used to prepare culture media resulting in different treatments: pine unheated (PUH), pine heated at 450 °C (P450), Oak unheated (OUH) and oak heated at 450 °C (O450). To isolate inhibition of microbial proliferation and nutrient limitation, different nutritive supplements were added to the media, obtaining two levels of nutrient status for each media described above: no nutrients added (-) and nutrients added (+). Colony forming units (CFU) were enumerated as estimation of viable and cultivable microbial abundance and soil parameters characterization was also realized. Significant differences were found between CFU isolated using heated and unheated soil extract-based media

  9. How Reliable is the Bulk δ13C value of Soil Organic Matter in Paleovegetational Reconstruction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, P.; Rakshit, S.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon isotope ratios of soil/paleosol organic matter (δ13CSOM) have been used to reconstruct abundance of C3-C4 plants survived in the landscape as the δ13C value of C3 (-27‰) and C4 (-12.5 ‰) plants are distinctly different. In an attempt to reconstruct the abundance of C3 and C4 plants, δ13CSOM have been measured from three soil profiles developed on flood plain of the Gangetic plain, Mohanpur, West Bengal, India. Satellite images reveal that the investigated sediments have been deposited in an oxbow lake setting of the river Ganges. The total organic carbon content of the profile ranges from 0.9% to 0.1%. The δ13CSOM values mostly range from -19.2‰ to -22‰ except a rapid positive excursions of ~5‰ at 1.5 m depth showing enriched value (-14.2‰) in all the three profiles. Based on mass balance calculation using the δ13C values of C3 and C4 plants, the δ13CSOM in the Gangetic plain indicate presence of both C3 and C4 plants in the floodplain. However, characterization of alkanes separated from lipids extracted from the same soil organic matter reveals dominant preferences in short carbon chain (C14, C16, C18, C20) with a little preferences for higher chain (C29, C31, C33). Interestingly, n-alkanes at 1.5 m depth shows very high concentration in short chain n-alkanes. Since the lower chain n-alkane represents aquatic productivity or intense bacterial decomposition and higher chain indicates the contribution from C3-C4 plants, the data from the investigated sedimentary profile shows contribution mostly from aquatic vegetation with a little contribution from terrestrial plants. This implies that before using bulk δ13CSOM value for reconstruction of C3-C4 plants from soil/paleosol, characterization (molecular level) of soil organic matter is required

  10. Molecular insights into the microbial formation of marine dissolved organic matter: recalcitrant or labile?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, B. P.; Kattner, G.; Witt, M.; Passow, U.

    2014-02-01

    The degradation of marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is an important control variable in the global carbon cycle and dependent on the DOM composition. For our understanding of the kinetics of organic matter cycling in the ocean, it is therefore crucial to achieve a mechanistic and molecular understanding of its transformation processes. A long-term microbial experiment was performed to follow the production of non-labile DOM by marine bacteria. Two different glucose concentrations and dissolved algal exudates were used as substrates. We monitored the bacterial abundance, concentrations of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), nutrients, amino acids, and transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) for two years. Ultrahigh resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) allowed the molecular characterization of extracted DOM after 70 days and after ∼2 years of incubation. Although glucose was quickly degraded, a DOC background was generated in glucose incubations. Only 20% of the organic carbon from algal exudate was degraded within the 2 years of incubation. TEP, which are released by micro-organisms, were produced during glucose degradation but decreased within less than three weeks back to half of the maximum concentration and were below detection in all treatments after 2 years. The molecular analysis demonstrated that DOM generated during glucose degradation differed appreciably from DOM produced during the degradation of the algal exudates. Our results led to several conclusions: (i) Higher substrate levels result in a higher level of non-labile DOC which is an important prerequisite for carbon sequestration in the ocean; (ii) TEP are generated by bacteria but are also degraded rapidly, thus limiting their potential contribution to carbon sequestration; (iii) The molecular signatures of DOM derived from algal exudates or glucose after 70 days of incubation differed strongly from refractory DOM. After 2 years

  11. Soil organic matter dynamics under different land-use in grasslands in Inner Mongolia (northern China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Wu, W.; Xu, X.; Xu, Y.

    2014-04-01

    We examined bulk soil properties and molecular biomarker distributions in surface soils from Inner Mongolia grasslands in order to understand the responses of soil organic matter to different land-use. The total of sixteen soils were collected from severely degraded grassland by overgrazing (DG), native grassland without apparent anthropogenic disturbance (NG), groundwater-sustaining grassland (GG) and restored grassland from previous potato cropland (RG). Compared to NG, soil organic carbon content was lower by 50% in DG, but higher by six-fold in GG and one-fold in RG. The δ13C values of soil organic carbon were -24.2 ± 0.6‰ in DG, -24.9 ± 0.6‰ in NG, -25.1 ± 0.1‰ in RG and -26.2 ± 0.6‰ in GG, reflecting different degradation degrees of soil organic matter or different water use efficiencies. The soils in DG contained the lowest abundance of aliphatic lipids (n-alkanes, n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids, ω-hydroxylalkanoic acids and α-hydroxylalkanoic acids) and lignin-phenols, suggesting selective removal of these biochemically recalcitrant biomarkers with grassland degradation by microbial respiration or wind erosion. Compared to NG, the soils in GG and RG increased ω-hydroxylalkanoic acids by 60-70%, a biomarker for suberin from roots, and increased α-hydroxylalkanoic acids by 10-20%, a biomarker for both cutin and suberin. Our results demonstrate that the groundwater supply and cultivation-restoration practices in Inner Mongolia grasslands not only enhance soil organic carbon sequestration, but also change the proportions of shoot vs. root-derived carbon in soils. This finding has important implications for global carbon cycle since root derived aliphatic carbon has a longer residence time than the aboveground tissue-derived carbon in soils.

  12. Soil organic matter dynamics under different land use in grasslands in Inner Mongolia (northern China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.; Wu, W.; Xu, X.; Xu, Y.

    2014-09-01

    We examined bulk soil properties and molecular biomarker distributions in surface soils from Inner Mongolian grasslands in order to understand the responses of soil organic matter to different land use. A total of 16 soils were collected from severely degraded grassland by overgrazing (DG), native grassland without apparent anthropogenic disturbance (NG), groundwater-sustaining grassland (GG) and restored grassland from previous potato cropland (RG). Compared to NG, soil organic carbon content was lower by 50% in DG, but higher by six-fold in GG and one-fold in RG. The δ13C values of soil organic carbon were -24.2 ± 0.6‰ in DG, -24.9 ± 0.6‰ in NG, -25.1 ± 0.1‰ in RG and -26.2 ± 0.6‰ in GG, reflecting different degradation degrees of soil organic matter or different water use efficiencies. The soils in DG contained the lowest abundance of aliphatic lipids (n-alkanes, n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids, ω-hydroxylalkanoic acids and α-hydroxyalkanoic acids) and lignin-phenols, suggesting selective removal of these biochemically recalcitrant biomarkers with grassland degradation by microbial respiration or wind erosion. Compared to NG, the soils in GG and RG increased ω-hydroxylalkanoic acids by 60-70%, a biomarker for suberin from roots, and increased α-hydroxylalkanoic acids by 10-20%, a biomarker for both cutin and suberin. Our results demonstrate that the groundwater supply and cultivation-restoration practices in Inner Mongolian grasslands not only enhance soil organic carbon sequestration, but also change the proportions of shoot- versus root-derived carbon in soils. This finding has important implications for the global carbon cycle since root-derived aliphatic carbon has a longer residence time than the aboveground tissue-derived carbon in soils.

  13. Pacific carbon cycling constrained by organic matter size, age and composition relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Brett D.; Beaupré, Steven R.; Guilderson, Thomas P.; McCarthy, Matthew D.; Druffel, Ellen R. M.

    2016-12-01

    Marine organic matter is one of Earth’s largest actively cycling reservoirs of organic carbon and nitrogen. The processes controlling organic matter production and removal are important for carbon and nitrogen biogeochemical cycles, which regulate climate. However, the many possible cycling mechanisms have hindered our ability to quantify marine organic matter transformation, degradation and turnover rates. Here we analyse existing and new measurements of the carbon:nitrogen ratio and radiocarbon age of organic matter spanning sizes from large particulate organic matter to small dissolved organic molecules. We find that organic matter size is negatively correlated with radiocarbon age and carbon:nitrogen ratios in coastal, surface and deep waters of the Pacific Ocean. Our measurements suggest that organic matter is increasingly chemically degraded as it decreases in size, and that small particles and molecules persist in the ocean longer than their larger counterparts. Based on these correlations, we estimate the production rates of small, biologically recalcitrant dissolved organic matter molecules at 0.11-0.14 Gt of carbon and about 0.005 Gt of nitrogen per year in the deep ocean. Our results suggest that the preferential remineralization of large over small particles and molecules is a key process governing organic matter cycling and deep ocean carbon storage.

  14. Sources, Ages, and Alteration of Organic Matter in Estuaries.

    PubMed

    Canuel, Elizabeth A; Hardison, Amber K

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the processes influencing the sources and fate of organic matter (OM) in estuaries is important for quantifying the contributions of carbon from land and rivers to the global carbon budget of the coastal ocean. Estuaries are sites of high OM production and processing, and understanding biogeochemical processes within these regions is key to quantifying organic carbon (Corg) budgets at the land-ocean margin. These regions provide vital ecological services, including nutrient filtration and protection from floods and storm surge, and provide habitat and nursery areas for numerous commercially important species. Human activities have modified estuarine systems over time, resulting in changes in the production, respiration, burial, and export of Corg. Corg in estuaries is derived from aquatic, terrigenous, and anthropogenic sources, with each source exhibiting a spectrum of ages and lability. The complex source and age characteristics of Corg in estuaries complicate our ability to trace OM along the river-estuary-coastal ocean continuum. This review focuses on the application of organic biomarkers and compound-specific isotope analyses to estuarine environments and on how these tools have enhanced our ability to discern natural sources of OM, trace their incorporation into food webs, and enhance understanding of the fate of Corg within estuaries and their adjacent waters.

  15. Sources, Ages, and Alteration of Organic Matter in Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Hardison, Amber K.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the processes influencing the sources and fate of organic matter (OM) in estuaries is important for quantifying the contributions of carbon from land and rivers to the global carbon budget of the coastal ocean. Estuaries are sites of high OM production and processing, and understanding biogeochemical processes within these regions is key to quantifying organic carbon (Corg) budgets at the land-ocean margin. These regions provide vital ecological services, including nutrient filtration and protection from floods and storm surge, and provide habitat and nursery areas for numerous commercially important species. Human activities have modified estuarine systems over time, resulting in changes in the production, respiration, burial, and export of Corg. Corg in estuaries is derived from aquatic, terrigenous, and anthropogenic sources, with each source exhibiting a spectrum of ages and lability. The complex source and age characteristics of Corg in estuaries complicate our ability to trace OM along the river-estuary-coastal ocean continuum. This review focuses on the application of organic biomarkers and compound-specific isotope analyses to estuarine environments and on how these tools have enhanced our ability to discern natural sources of OM, trace their incorporation into food webs, and enhance understanding of the fate of Corg within estuaries and their adjacent waters.

  16. Organic matter recycling in a shallow coastal zone (NW Mediterranean): The influence of local and global climatic forcing and organic matter lability on hydrolytic enzyme activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misic, Cristina; Harriague, Anabella Covazzi

    2008-12-01

    Seawater and sediment were collected on a monthly basis from a shallow (10.5 m depth) coastal site in the Ligurian Sea (NW Mediterranean) from November 1993 to December 1994 to determine the main environmental forces that influenced the biogeochemical processes and to study the relationships between the availability and lability of the organic matter (OM) and hydrolytic enzymatic activity. The current direction throughout the sampling year was influenced by the climatic conditions, which showed significant correlations with north atlantic oscillation (NAO) index values. The current generally flowed northwards in spring. This could cause significantly lower transparency values than in the summer, when an eastward current probably reduced the allochthonous input of material from the main local watercourse and contributed to turning the conditions from mesotrophic to oligotrophic. Spring and summer were separated by transitional periods more than by the canonical autumn and winter seasons. These transitions were characterised by a reduction in salinity values and by resuspension caused by water column mixing and a current flowing towards the southwest. The significant inverse correlations of the chlorophyll- a and protein concentrations, bacterial abundance and proteolysis of the bottom seawater and transparency showed the direct influence of resuspension on the organic matter dynamics. Moreover, OM trophic quality influenced the bacterial parameters and the enzymatic activities. The glycolytic β glucosidase and chitinase activities and their bacterial cell-specific hydrolytic rates were higher when substrates such as hydrolysable proteins were available, while they decreased when refractory compounds were abundant. The low leucine aminopeptidase: β glucosidase ratio values observed in the water column were presumably related to the potential ease with which microbes obtained protein-derived materials and energy, the protein hydrolysable fraction being estimated at

  17. New monoaromatic steroids in organic matter of the apocatagenesis zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashirtsev, V. A.; Fomin, A. N.; Shevchenko, N. P.; Dolzhenko, K. V.

    2016-08-01

    According to the materials of geochemical study in the core of the ultradeep hole SV-27 of aromatic fractions of bitumoids of the Vilyui syneclise (East Siberia) by the method of chromatography-mass spectrometry, starting from the depth of >5000 m, four diastereomers of previously unknown hydrocarbons, which become predominant in the fraction at a depth of ˜6500 m, were distinguished. Similar hydrocarbons were found in organic matter of Upper Paleozoic rocks of the Kharaulakh anticlinorium in the Verkhoyansk folded area. According to the intense molecular ion m/z 366 and the character of the basic fragmental ions (m/z 238, 309, and 323), the major structure of the compounds studied was determined as 17-desmethyl-23-methylmonoaromatic steroid C27. The absence of such steroids in oil of the Vilyui syneclise shows that deep micro-oils did not participate in the formation of oil fringes of gas condensate deposits of the region.

  18. Dissolved organic matter uptake by Trichodesmium in the Southwest Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benavides, Mar; Berthelot, Hugo; Duhamel, Solange; Raimbault, Patrick; Bonnet, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    The globally distributed diazotroph Trichodesmium contributes importantly to nitrogen inputs in the oligotrophic oceans. Sites of dissolved organic matter (DOM) accumulation could promote the mixotrophic nutrition of Trichodesmium when inorganic nutrients are scarce. Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) analyses of individual trichomes sampled in the South Pacific Ocean, showed significant 13C-enrichments after incubation with either 13C-labeled carbohydrates or amino acids. These results suggest that DOM could be directly taken up by Trichodesmium or primarily consumed by heterotrophic epibiont bacteria that ultimately transfer reduced DOM compounds to their host trichomes. Although the addition of carbohydrates or amino acids did not significantly affect bulk N2 fixation rates, N2 fixation was enhanced by amino acids in individual colonies of Trichodesmium. We discuss the ecological advantages of DOM use by Trichodesmium as an alternative to autotrophic nutrition in oligotrophic open ocean waters.

  19. Dissolved organic matter uptake by Trichodesmium in the Southwest Pacific

    PubMed Central

    Benavides, Mar; Berthelot, Hugo; Duhamel, Solange; Raimbault, Patrick; Bonnet, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    The globally distributed diazotroph Trichodesmium contributes importantly to nitrogen inputs in the oligotrophic oceans. Sites of dissolved organic matter (DOM) accumulation could promote the mixotrophic nutrition of Trichodesmium when inorganic nutrients are scarce. Nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) analyses of individual trichomes sampled in the South Pacific Ocean, showed significant 13C-enrichments after incubation with either 13C-labeled carbohydrates or amino acids. These results suggest that DOM could be directly taken up by Trichodesmium or primarily consumed by heterotrophic epibiont bacteria that ultimately transfer reduced DOM compounds to their host trichomes. Although the addition of carbohydrates or amino acids did not significantly affect bulk N2 fixation rates, N2 fixation was enhanced by amino acids in individual colonies of Trichodesmium. We discuss the ecological advantages of DOM use by Trichodesmium as an alternative to autotrophic nutrition in oligotrophic open ocean waters. PMID:28117432

  20. Modeling of natural organic matter transport processes in groundwater.

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, T C; Mas-Pla, J; McCarthy, J F; Williams, T M

    1995-01-01

    A forced-gradient tracer test was conducted at the Georgetown site to study the transport of natural organic matter (NOM) in groundwater. In particular, the goal of this experiment was to investigate the interactions between NOM and the aquifer matrix. A detailed three-dimensional characterization of the hydrologic conductivity heterogeneity of the site was obtained using slug tests. The transport of a conservative tracer (chloride) was successfully reproduced using these conductivity data. Despite the good simulation of the flow field, NOM breakthrough curves could not be reproduced using a two-site sorption model with spatially constant parameters. Preliminary results suggest that different mechanisms for the adsorption/desorption processes, as well as their spatial variability, may significantly affect the transport and fate of NOM. PMID:7621798

  1. Systematic approaches to comprehensive analyses of natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leenheer, Jerry A.

    2009-01-01

    The more that is learned of the chemistry of aquatic natural organic matter (NOM) the greater is the scientific appreciation of the vast complexity of this subject. This complexity is due not only to a multiplicity of precursor molecules in any environment but to their associations with each other and with other components of local environments such as clays, mineral acids and dissolved metals. In addition, this complex system is subject to constant change owing to environmental variables and microbial action. Thus, there is a good argument that no two NOM samples are exactly the same even from the same source at nearly the same time. When ubiquity of occurrence, reaction with water treatment chemicals, and subsequent human exposure are added to the list of NOM issues, one can understand the appeal that this subject holds for a wide variety of environmental scientists.

  2. Grown organic matter as a fuel raw material resource

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roller, W. L.; Keener, H. M.; Kline, R. D.; Mederski, H. J.; Curry, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    An extensive search was made on biomass production from the standpoint of climatic zones, water, nutrients, costs and energy requirements for many species. No exotic species were uncovered that gave hope for a bonanza of biomass production under culture, location, and management markedly different from those of existing agricultural concepts. A simulation analysis of biomass production was carried out for six species using conventional production methods, including their production costs and energy requirements. These estimates were compared with data on food, fiber, and feed production. The alternative possibility of using residues from food, feed, or lumber was evaluated. It was concluded that great doubt must be cast on the feasibility of producing grown organic matter for fuel, in competition with food, feed, or fiber. The feasibility of collecting residues may be nearer, but the competition for the residues for return to the soil or cellulosic production is formidable.

  3. [Dissolved organic matter (DOM) dynamics in karst aquifer systems].

    PubMed

    Yao, Xin; Zou, Sheng-Zhang; Xia, Ri-Yuan; Xu, Dan-Dan; Yao, Min

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) and nutrients have a unique way of producing, decomposing and storing in southwest karst water systems. To understand the biogeochemical cycle of DOM in karst aquifer systems, we investigated the behavioral changes of DOM fluorescence components in Zhaidi karst river system. Two humic-like components (C1 and C2), and one autochthonous tyrosine-like component (C4) were identified using the parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model. Compared with the traditional physical and chemical indicators, spatial heterogeneity of DOM was more obvious, which can reflect the subtle changes in groundwater system. Traditional indicators mainly reflect the regional characteristics of karst river system, while DOM fluorescence components reflect the attribute gaps of sampling types.

  4. Distribution of some organic components in two forest soils profiles with evidence of soil organic matter leaching.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez-Romero, Marta; Papa, Stefania; Lozano-García, Beatriz; Parras-Alcántara, Luis; Coppola, Elio

    2015-04-01

    Soil stores organic carbon more often than we can find in living vegetation and atmosphere together. This reservoir is not inert, but it is constantly in a dynamic phase of inputs and losses. Soil organic carbon mainly depends on land cover, environment conditions and soil properties. After soil deposition, the organic residues of different origin and nature, the Soil Organic Matter (SOM) can be seen involved in two different processes during the pedogenesis: mineralization and humification. The transport process along profile happens under certain conditions such as deposition of high organic residues amount on the top soil, high porosity of the soil caused by sand or skeleton particles, that determine a water strong infiltrating capacity, also, extreme temperatures can slow or stop the mineralization and/or humification process in one intermediate step of the degradation process releasing organic metabolites with high or medium solubility and high loads of water percolating in relation to intense rainfall. The transport process along soil profile can take many forms that can end in the formation of Bh horizons (h means accumulation of SOM in depth). The forest cover nature influence to the quantity and quality of the organic materials deposited with marked differences between coniferous and deciduous especially in relation to resistance to degradation. Two soils in the Campania region, located in Lago Laceno (Avellino - Italy) with different forest cover (Pinus sp. and Fagus sp.) and that meets the requirements of the place and pedological formation suitable for the formation and accumulation of SOM in depth (Bh horizon) were studied. The different soil C fractions were determinated and were assessed (Ciavatta C. et al. 1990; Dell'Abate M.T. et al. 2002) for each soil profile the Total Extractable Lipids (TEL). Furthermore, the lignin were considered as a major component of soil organic matter (SOM), influencing its pool-size and its turnover, due to the high

  5. Organic-matter retention and macroinvertebrate utilization of seasonally inundated bryophytes in a mid-order Piedmont River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, James; Pattillo, Meryom; Freeman, Mary C.

    2016-01-01

    There is increased understanding of the role of bryophytes in supporting invertebrate biomass and for their influence on nutrient cycling and carbon balance in aquatic systems, but the structural and functional role of bryophytes growing in seasonally inundated habitats is substantially less studied. We conducted a study on the Middle Oconee River, near Athens, GA, to assess invertebrate abundance and organic-matter retention in seasonally inundated patches of the liverwort Porella pinnata, a species that tends to be submerged only when water levels in rivers are substantially above base flow. Aquatic invertebrate utilization of these seasonally inundated habitats has rarely been investigated. Macroinvertebrate biomass, insect density, and organic-matter content were significantly greater in patches of P. pinnata than on adjacent bare rock. Bryophyte biomass explained additional variation in organic matter, insect biomass, and density. The most abundant insects in P. pinnata patches were Dipterans and Plecopterans. Our results suggest an important structural role of seasonally inundated bryophyte habitats in riverine ecosystems.

  6. Effects of warming on stream biofilm organic matter use capabilities.

    PubMed

    Ylla, Irene; Canhoto, Cristina; Romaní, Anna M

    2014-07-01

    The understanding of ecosystem responses to changing environmental conditions is becoming increasingly relevant in the context of global warming. Microbial biofilm communities in streams play a key role in organic matter cycling which might be modulated by shifts in flowing water temperature. In this study, we performed an experiment at the Candal stream (Portugal) longitudinally divided into two reaches: a control half and an experimental half where water temperature was 3 °C above that of the basal stream water. Biofilm colonization was monitored during 42 days in the two stream halves. Changes in biofilm function (extracellular enzyme activities and carbon substrate utilization profiles) as well as chlorophyll a and prokaryote densities were analyzed. The biofilm in the experimental half showed a higher capacity to decompose cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and peptidic compounds. Total leucine-aminopeptidase, cellobiohydrolase and β-xylosidase showed a respective 93, 66, and 61% increase in activity over the control; much higher than would be predicted by only the direct temperature physical effect. In contrast, phosphatase and lipase activity showed the lowest sensitivity to temperature. The biofilms from the experimental half also showed a distinct functional fingerprint and higher carbon usage diversity and richness, especially due to a wider use of polymers and carbohydrates. The changes in the biofilm functional capabilities might be indirectly affected by the higher prokaryote and chlorophyll density measured in the biofilm of the experimental half. The present study provides evidence that a realistic stream temperature increase by 3 °C changes the biofilm metabolism to a greater decomposition of polymeric complex compounds and peptides but lower decomposition of lipids. This might affect stream organic matter cycling and the transfer of carbon to higher trophic levels.

  7. Ocean warming-acidification synergism undermines dissolved organic matter assembly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chi-Shuo; Anaya, Jesse M; Chen, Eric Y-T; Farr, Erik; Chin, Wei-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the influence of synergisms on natural processes is a critical step toward determining the full-extent of anthropogenic stressors. As carbon emissions continue unabated, two major stressors--warming and acidification--threaten marine systems on several scales. Here, we report that a moderate temperature increase (from 30°C to 32°C) is sufficient to slow--even hinder--the ability of dissolved organic matter, a major carbon pool, to self-assemble to form marine microgels, which contribute to the particulate organic matter pool. Moreover, acidification lowers the temperature threshold at which we observe our results. These findings carry implications for the marine carbon cycle, as self-assembled marine microgels generate an estimated global seawater budget of ~1016 g C. We used laser scattering spectroscopy to test the influence of temperature and pH on spontaneous marine gel assembly. The results of independent experiments revealed that at a particular point, both pH and temperature block microgel formation (32°C, pH 8.2), and disperse existing gels (35°C). We then tested the hypothesis that temperature and pH have a synergistic influence on marine gel dispersion. We found that the dispersion temperature decreases concurrently with pH: from 32°C at pH 8.2, to 28°C at pH 7.5. If our laboratory observations can be extrapolated to complex marine environments, our results suggest that a warming-acidification synergism can decrease carbon and nutrient fluxes, disturbing marine trophic and trace element cycles, at rates faster than projected.

  8. Photochemical formation of hydroxyl radical from effluent organic matter.

    PubMed

    Dong, Mei Mei; Rosario-Ortiz, Fernando L

    2012-04-03

    The photochemical formation of hydroxyl radical (HO•) from effluent organic matter (EfOM) was evaluated using three bulk wastewater samples collected at different treatment facilities under simulated sunlight. For the samples studied, the formation rates of HO•(R(HO•)) were obtained from the formation rate of phenol following the hydroxylation of benzene. The values of R(HO•) ranged from 2.3 to 3.8 × 10(-10) M s(-1) for the samples studied. The formation rate of HO• from nitrate photolysis (R(NO3)(HO•)) was determined to be 3.0 × 10(-7) M(HO)• M(NO3)(-1) s(-1). The HO• production rate from EfOM (R(EfOM)(HO•)) ranged from 0.76 to 1.3 × 10(-10) M s(-1). For the wastewater samples studied, R(EfOM)(HO•) varied from 1.5 to 2.4 × 10(-7) M(HO)• M(C)(-1) (s-1) on molarcarbon basis, which was close to HO• production from nitrate photolysis. The apparent quantum yield for the formation of HO• from nitrate (Φ(NO3-HO•)(a)) was determined as 0.010 ± 0.001 for the wavelength range 290-400 nm in ultrapure water. The apparent quantum yield for HO• formation in EfOM (Φ(EfOM-HO•)(a)) ranged from 6.1 to 9.8 × 10(-5), compared to 2.99 to 4.56 × 10(-5) for organic matter (OM) isolates. The results indicate that wastewater effluents could produce significant concentrations of HO•, as shown by potential higher nitrate levels and relatively higher quantum yields of HO• formation from EfOM.

  9. Ocean Warming–Acidification Synergism Undermines Dissolved Organic Matter Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chi-Shuo; Anaya, Jesse M.; Chen, Eric Y-T; Farr, Erik; Chin, Wei-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the influence of synergisms on natural processes is a critical step toward determining the full-extent of anthropogenic stressors. As carbon emissions continue unabated, two major stressors—warming and acidification—threaten marine systems on several scales. Here, we report that a moderate temperature increase (from 30°C to 32°C) is sufficient to slow— even hinder—the ability of dissolved organic matter, a major carbon pool, to self-assemble to form marine microgels, which contribute to the particulate organic matter pool. Moreover, acidification lowers the temperature threshold at which we observe our results. These findings carry implications for the marine carbon cycle, as self-assembled marine microgels generate an estimated global seawater budget of ~1016 g C. We used laser scattering spectroscopy to test the influence of temperature and pH on spontaneous marine gel assembly. The results of independent experiments revealed that at a particular point, both pH and temperature block microgel formation (32°C, pH 8.2), and disperse existing gels (35°C). We then tested the hypothesis that temperature and pH have a synergistic influence on marine gel dispersion. We found that the dispersion temperature decreases concurrently with pH: from 32°C at pH 8.2, to 28°C at pH 7.5. If our laboratory observations can be extrapolated to complex marine environments, our results suggest that a warming–acidification synergism can decrease carbon and nutrient fluxes, disturbing marine trophic and trace element cycles, at rates faster than projected. PMID:25714090

  10. Priming-induced Changes in Permafrost Soil Organic Matter Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegoraro, E.; Schuur, E.; Bracho, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Warming of tundra ecosystems due to climate change is predicted to thaw permafrost and increase plant biomass and litter input to soil. Additional input of easily decomposable carbon can alter microbial activity by providing a much needed energy source, thereby accelerating soil organic matter decomposition. This phenomenon, known as the priming effect, can increase CO2 flux from soil to the atmosphere. However, the extent to which this mechanism can decrease soil carbon stocks in the Arctic is unknown. This project assessed priming effects on permafrost soil collected from a moist acidic tundra site in Healy, Alaska. We hypothesized that priming would increase microbial activity by providing microbes with a fresh source of carbon, thereby increasing decomposition of old and slowly decomposing carbon. Soil from surface and deep layers were amended with multiple pulses of uniformly 13C labeled glucose and cellulose, and samples were incubated at 15° C to quantify whether labile substrate addition increased carbon mineralization. We quantified the proportion of old carbon mineralization by measuring 14CO2. Data shows that substrate addition resulted in higher respiration rates in amended soils; however, priming was only observed in deep layers, where 30% more soil-derived carbon was respired compared to control samples. This suggests that microbes in deep layers are limited in energy, and the addition of labile carbon increases native soil organic matter decomposition, especially in soil with greater fractions of slowly decomposing carbon. Priming in permafrost could exacerbate the effects of climate change by increasing mineralization rates of carbon accumulated over the long-term in deep layers. Therefore, quantifying priming effect in permafrost soils is imperative to understanding the dynamics of carbon turnover in a warmer world.

  11. Predators alter community organization of coral reef cryptofauna and reduce abundance of coral mutualists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, A. C.; Leray, M.

    2014-03-01

    Coral reefs are the most diverse marine systems in the world, yet our understanding of the processes that maintain such extraordinary diversity remains limited and taxonomically biased toward the most conspicuous species. Cryptofauna that live deeply embedded within the interstitial spaces of coral reefs make up the majority of reef diversity, and many of these species provide important protective services to their coral hosts. However, we know very little about the processes governing the diversity and composition of these less conspicuous but functionally important species. Here, we experimentally quantify the role of predation in driving the community organization of small fishes and decapods that live embedded within Pocillopora eydouxi, a structurally complex, reef-building coral found widely across the Indo-Pacific. We use surveys to describe the natural distribution of predators, and then, factorially manipulate two focal predator species to quantify the independent and combined effects of predator density and identity on P. eydouxi-dwelling cryptofauna. Predators reduced abundance (34 %), species richness (20 %), and modified species composition. Rarefaction revealed that observed reductions in species richness were primarily driven by changes in abundance. Additionally, the two predator species uniquely affected the beta diversity and composition of the prey assemblage. Predators reduced the abundance and modified the composition of a number of mutualist fishes and decapods, whose benefit to the coral is known to be both diversity- and density-dependent. We predict that the density and identity of predators present within P. eydouxi may substantially alter coral performance in the face of an increased frequency and intensity of natural and anthropogenic stressors.

  12. Lack of enhanced preservation of organic matter in sediments under the oxygen minimum on the Oman Margin

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, T.F. ); Shimmield, G.B.; Price, N.B. )

    1992-01-01

    The impingement of oxygen minima on continental margins is widely thought to promote the accumulation of sedimentary facies enriched in well-preserved organic matter. It is shown here, however, that such a relationship does not clearly apply to the productive Oman Margin in the Arabian Sea, which hosts one of the most severe oxygen minima in the oceans. Measurements made on the 0-1 cm depth interval from fourteen box cores collected from the outer shelf-upper continental slope area off Oman show that (1) deposited organic matter is overwhelmingly of marine origin, (2) there is no significant correlation between the abundance of sedimentary organic carbon (C{sub org}) and the bottom-water O{sub 2} concentration, (3) there is no relation between the sedimentary C{sub org}:N ratio and bottom-water O{sub 2}, and (4) there is no correlation between the hydrogen index (HI) of the organic matter and bottom water oxygen. There are, however, significant correlations between the C{sub org}:N ratio and the I:C{sub org}, Cr:Al, and Zr:Al ratios, as well as between the C{sub org}:N ratio and the hydrogen index. Overall, these data suggest that the bottom water oxygen concentration has little effect in governing either the distribution of the degree of preservation of organic matter on this margin. Thus, the generally high but spatially variable C{sub org} content of the sediments on the Oman Margin may not reflect the occurrence of an oxygen minimum but instead be the result of a high settling flux of organic matter, supported by monsoon-driven upwelling, and post-depositional redistribution of the organic material by hydrodynamic influences.

  13. Carbon Characteristics and Biogeochemical Processes of Uranium Accumulating Organic Matter Rich Sediments in the Upper Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boye, K.; Noel, V.; Tfaily, M. M.; Dam, W. L.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S. E.

    2015-12-01

    Uranium plume persistence in groundwater aquifers is a problem on several former ore processing sites on floodplains in the upper Colorado River Basin. Earlier observations by our group and others at the Old Rifle Site, CO, have noted that U concentrations are highest in organic rich, fine-grained, and, therefore, diffusion limited sediment material. Due to the constantly evolving depositional environments of floodplains, surficial organic matter may become buried at various stages of decomposition, through sudden events such as overbank flooding and through the slower progression of river meandering. This creates a discontinuous subsurface distribution of organic-rich sediments, which are hotspots for microbial activity and thereby central to the subsurface cycling of contaminants (e.g. U) and biologically relevant elements (e.g. C, N, P, Fe). However, the organic matter itself is poorly characterized. Consequently, little is known about its relevance in driving biogeochemical processes that control U fate and transport in the subsurface. In an investigation of soil/sediment cores from five former uranium ore processing sites on floodplains distributed across the Upper Colorado River Basin we confirmed consistent co-enrichment of U with organic-rich layers in all profiles. However, using C K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) coupled with Fourier-Transformed Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance Mass-Spectroscopy (FT-ICR-MS) on bulk sediments and density-separated organic matter fractions, we did not detect any chemical difference in the organic rich sediments compared to the surrounding coarser-grained aquifer material within the same profile, even though there were differences in organic matter composition between the 5 sites. This suggests that U retention and reduction to U(IV) is independent of C chemical composition on the bulk scale. Instead it appears to be the abundance of organic matter in combination with a limited O2 supply in the fine-grained material that

  14. Ecophysiology of uncultivated marine euryarchaea is linked to particulate organic matter

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, William D; Smith, Jason M; Wilcox, Heather M; Swalwell, Jarred E; Carini, Paul; Worden, Alexandra Z; Santoro, Alyson E

    2015-01-01

    Particles in aquatic environments host distinct communities of microbes, yet the evolution of particle-specialized taxa and the extent to which specialized microbial metabolism is associated with particles is largely unexplored. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that a widely distributed and uncultivated microbial group—the marine group II euryarchaea (MGII)—interacts with living and detrital particulate organic matter (POM) in the euphotic zone of the central California Current System. Using fluorescent in situ hybridization, we verified the association of euryarchaea with POM. We further quantified the abundance and distribution of MGII 16 S ribosomal RNA genes in size-fractionated seawater samples and compared MGII functional capacity in metagenomes from the same fractions. The abundance of MGII in free-living and >3 μm fractions decreased with increasing distance from the coast, whereas MGII abundance in the 0.8–3 μm fraction remained constant. At several offshore sites, MGII abundance was highest in particle fractions, indicating that particle-attached MGII can outnumber free-living MGII under oligotrophic conditions. Compared with free-living MGII, the genome content of MGII in particle-associated fractions exhibits an increased capacity for surface adhesion, transcriptional regulation and catabolism of high molecular weight substrates. Moreover, MGII populations in POM fractions are phylogenetically distinct from and more diverse than free-living MGII. Eukaryotic phytoplankton additions stimulated MGII growth in bottle incubations, providing the first MGII net growth rate measurements. These ranged from 0.47 to 0.54 d−1. However, MGII were not recovered in whole-genome amplifications of flow-sorted picoeukaryotic phytoplankton and heterotrophic nanoflagellates, suggesting that MGII in particle fractions are not physically attached to living POM. Collectively, our results support a linkage between MGII ecophysiology and POM, implying that

  15. Mechanistic simulation of the vertical soil organic matter profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braakhekke, M.; Beer, C.; Reichstein, M.; Hoosbeek, M.; Kruijt, B.; Kabat, P.

    2013-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) constitutes a large global pool of carbon that may play a considerable role for future climate. The vertical distribution of SOM in the profile may be important due to depth-dependence of physical, chemical, and biological conditions, and links to physical processes such as heat and moisture transport. The aim of this thesis is to develop a dynamic and mechanistic representation of the vertical SOM profile that can be applied for large scale simulations as a part of global ecosystem and earth system models. A model structure called SOMPROF was developed that dynamically simulates the SOM profile based on above and below ground litter input, decomposition, bioturbation, and liquid phase transport. Furthermore, three organic surface horizons are explicitly represented. Since the organic matter transport processes have been poorly quantified in the past and are difficult to observe directly, the model was calibrated with a Bayesian approach for two contrasting temperate forest sites in Europe. Different types of data were included in the parameter estimation, including: organic carbon stocks and concentrations, respiration rates, and excess lead-210 activity. The calibrations yielded good fits to the observations, and showed that the two sites differ considerably with respect to the relevance of the different processes. These differences agree well with expectations based on local conditions. However, the results also demonstrate the difficulties arising from convolution of the processes. Several parameters are poorly constrained and for one of the sites, several distinct regions in parameter space exist that yield acceptable fit. In a subsequent study it was found that radiocarbon observations can offer much additional constraint on several parameters, most importantly on the turnover rate of the slowest SOM fraction. Additionally, for one site, a prognostic simulation until 2100 was performed using the resulting a posteriori parameter

  16. Response of Dissolved Organic Matter to Warming and Nitrogen Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. H.; Nguyen, H.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved Organic Matter (DOM) is a ubiquitous mixture of soluble organic components. Since DOM is produced from the terrestrial leachate of various soil types, soil may influence the chemistry and biology of freshwater through the input of leachate and run-off. The increased temperature by climate change could dramatically change the DOM characteristics of soils through enhanced decomposition rate and losses of carbon from soil organic matter. In addition, the increase in the N-deposition affects DOM leaching from soils by changing the carbon cycling and decomposition rate of soil decay. In this study, we conducted growth chamber experiments using two types of soil (wetland and forest) under the conditions of temperature increase and N-deposition in order to investigate how warming and nitrogen addition influence the characteristics of the DOM leaching from different soil types. This leachate controls the quantity and quality of DOM in surface water systems. After 10 months of incubation, the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations decreased for almost samples in the range of 7.6 to 87.3% (ANOVA, p<0.05). The specific UV absorption (SUVA) values also decreased for almost samples after the first 3 months and then increased gradually afterward in range of 3.3 to 108.4%. Both time and the interaction between time and the temperature had the statistically significant effects on the SUVA values (MANOVA, p<0.05). Humification index (HIX) showed the significant increase trends during the duration of incubation and temperature for almost the samples (ANOVA, p<0.05). Higher decreases in the DOC values and increases in HIX were observed at higher temperatures, whereas the opposite trend was observed for samples with N-addition. The PARAFAC results showed that three fluorescence components: terrestrial humic (C1), microbial humic-like (C2), and protein-like (C3), constituted the fluorescence matrices of soil samples. During the experiment, labile DOM from the soils was

  17. Relating hygroscopicity and composition of organic aerosol particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Duplissy, J.; DeCarlo, P. F.; Dommen, J.; Alfarra, M. R.; Metzger, A.; Barmpadimos, I.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Weingartner, E.; Tritscher, T.; Gysel, M.; Aiken, A. C.; Jimenez, J. L.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Worsnop, D. R.; Collins, D. R.; Tomlinson, J.; Baltensperger, U.

    2011-01-01

    A hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA) was used to measure the water uptake (hygroscopicity) of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed during the chemical and photochemical oxidation of several organic precursors in a smog chamber. Electron ionization mass spectra of the non-refractory submicron aerosol were simultaneously determined with an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), and correlations between the two different signals were investigated. SOA hygroscopicity was found to strongly correlate with the relative abundance of the ion signal m/z 44 expressed as a fraction of total organic signal (f44). m/z 44 is due mostly to the ion fragment CO2+ for all types of SOA systems studied, and has been previously shown to strongly correlate with organic O/C for ambient and chamber OA. The analysis was also performed on ambient OA from two field experiments at the remote site Jungfraujoch, and the megacity Mexico City, where similar results were found. A simple empirical linear relation between the hygroscopicity of OA at subsaturated RH, as given by the hygroscopic growth factor (GF) or "κorg" parameter, and f44 was determined and is given by κorg = 2.2 × f44 - 0.13. This approximation can be further verified and refined as the database for AMS and HTDMA measurements is constantly being expanded around the world. Finally, the use of this approximation could introduce an important simplification in the parameterization of hygroscopicity of OA in atmospheric models, since f44 is correlated with the photochemical age of an air mass.

  18. Impacts of heterogeneous organic matter on phenanthrene sorption--Equilibrium and kinetic studies with aquifer material

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karapanagioti, Hrissi K.; Kleineidam, Sybille; Sabatini, David A.; Grathwohl, Peter; Ligouis, Bertrand

    2000-01-01

    Sediment organic matter heterogeneity in sediments is shown to impact the sorption behavior of contaminants. We investigated the sorptive properties as well as the composition of organic matter in different subsamples (mainly grain size fractions) of the Canadian River Alluvium (CRA). Organic petrography was used as a new tool to describe and characterize the organic matter in the subsamples. The samples studied contained many different types of organic matter including bituminous coal particles. Differences in sorption behavior were explained based on these various types of organic matter. Subsamples containing predominately coaly, particulate organic matter showed the highest Koc, the highest nonlinearity of sorption isotherms and the slowest sorption kinetics. Soil subsamples with organic matter present as organic coatings around the quartz grains evidenced the lowest Koc, the most linear sorption isotherms and the fastest sorption kinetics, which was not limited by slow intraparticle diffusion. Due to the high sorption capacity of the coaly particles even when it is present as only a small fraction of the composite organic content (<3%) causes Koc values which are much higher than expected for soil organic matter (e.g. Koc − Kow relationships). The results show that the identification and quantification of the coaly particles within a sediment or soil sample is a prerequisite in order to understand or predict sorption behavior of organic pollutants.

  19. The origin of chondritic macromolecular organic matter: a carbon and nitrogen isotope study.

    PubMed

    Alexander, C M; Russell, S S; Arden, J W; Ash, R D; Grady, M M; Pillinger, C T

    1998-07-01

    The N and C abundances and isotopic compositions of acid-insoluble carbonaceous material in thirteen primitive chondrites (five unequilibrated ordinary chondrites, three CM chondrites, three enstatite chondrites, a CI chondrite and a CR chondrite) have been measured by stepped combustion. While the range of C isotopic compositions observed is only delta 13C = 30%, the N isotopes range from delta 15N approximately -40 to 260%. After correction for metamorphism, presolar nanodiamonds appear to have made up a fairly constant 3-4 wt% of the insoluble C in all the chondrites studied. The apparently similar initial presolar nanodiamond to organic C ratios, and the correlations of elemental and isotopic compositions with metamorphic indicators in the ordinary and enstatite chondrites, suggest that the chondrites all accreted similar organic material. This original material probably most closely resembles that now found in Renazzo and Semarkona. These two meteorites have almost M-shaped N isotope release profiles that can be explained most simply by the super-position of two components, one with a composition between delta 15N = -20 and -40% and a narrow combustion interval, the other having a broader release profile and a composition of delta 15N approximately 260%. Although isotopically more subdued, the CI and the three CM chondrites all appear to show vestiges of this M-shaped profile. How and where the components in the acid-insoluble organics formed remains poorly constrained. The small variation in nanodiamond to organic C ratio between the chondrite groups limits the local synthesis of organic matter in the various chondrite formation regions to at most 30%. The most 15N-rich material probably formed in the interstellar medium, and the fraction of organic N in Renazzo in this material ranges from 40 to 70%. The isotopically light component may have formed in the solar system, but the limited range in nanodiamond to total organic C ratios in the chondrite groups is

  20. Complete and Partial Photo-oxidation of Dissolved Organic Matter Draining Permafrost Soils.

    PubMed

    Ward, Collin P; Cory, Rose M

    2016-04-05

    Photochemical degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) to carbon dioxide (CO2) and partially oxidized compounds is an important component of the carbon cycle in the Arctic. Thawing permafrost soils will change the chemical composition of DOM exported to arctic surface waters, but the molecular controls on DOM photodegradation remain poorly understood, making it difficult to predict how inputs of thawing permafrost DOM may alter its photodegradation. To address this knowledge gap, we quantified the susceptibility of DOM draining the shallow organic mat and the deeper permafrost layer of arctic soils to complete and partial photo-oxidation and investigated changes in the chemical composition of each DOM source following sunlight exposure. Permafrost and organic mat DOM had similar lability to photomineralization despite substantial differences in initial chemical composition. Concurrent losses of carboxyl moieties and shifts in chemical composition during photodegradation indicated that photodecarboxylation could account for 40-90% of DOM photomineralized to CO2. Permafrost DOM had a higher susceptibility to partial photo-oxidation compared to organic mat DOM, potentially due to a lower abundance of phenolic moieties with antioxidant properties. These results suggest that photodegradation will likely continue to be an important control on DOM fate in arctic freshwaters as the climate warms and permafrost soils thaw.

  1. Geochemical drivers of organic matter decomposition in Arctic tundra soils

    SciTech Connect

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Yang, Ziming; Graham, David E.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Gu, Baohua; Liang, Liyuan; Bargar, John; Janot, Noemie; Regier, Tom Z.

    2015-12-07

    Climate change is warming tundra ecosystems in the Arctic, resulting in the decomposition of previously-frozen soil organic matter (SOM) and release of carbon (C) to the atmosphere; however, the processes that control SOM decomposition and C emissions remain highly uncertain. In this study, we evaluate geochemical factors that influence anaerobic production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) in the active layers of four ice-wedge polygons. Surface and soil pore waters were collected during the annual thaw season over a two-year period in an area containing waterlogged, low-centered polygons and well-drained, high-centered polygons. We report spatial and seasonal patterns of dissolved gases in relation to the geochemical properties of Fe and organic C as determined using spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. Iron was present as Fe(II) in soil solution near the permafrost boundary but enriched as Fe(III) in the middle of the active layer, similar to dissolved aromatic-C and organic acids. Dissolved CH4 increased relative to dissolved CO2 with depth and varied with soil moisture in the middle of the active layer in patterns that were positively correlated with the proportion of dissolved Fe(III) in transitional and low-centered polygon soils but negatively correlated in the drier flat- and high-centered polygons. These results suggest that microbial-mediated Fe oxidation and reduction influence respiration/fermentation of SOM and production of substrates (e.g., low-molecular-weight organic acids) for methanogenesis. As a result, we infer that geochemical differences induced by water saturation dictate microbial products of SOM decomposition, and Fe geochemistry is an important factor regulating methanogenesis in anoxic tundra soils.

  2. Geochemical drivers of organic matter decomposition in Arctic tundra soils

    DOE PAGES

    Herndon, Elizabeth M.; Yang, Ziming; Graham, David E.; ...

    2015-12-07

    Climate change is warming tundra ecosystems in the Arctic, resulting in the decomposition of previously-frozen soil organic matter (SOM) and release of carbon (C) to the atmosphere; however, the processes that control SOM decomposition and C emissions remain highly uncertain. In this study, we evaluate geochemical factors that influence anaerobic production of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) in the active layers of four ice-wedge polygons. Surface and soil pore waters were collected during the annual thaw season over a two-year period in an area containing waterlogged, low-centered polygons and well-drained, high-centered polygons. We report spatial and seasonal patterns ofmore » dissolved gases in relation to the geochemical properties of Fe and organic C as determined using spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. Iron was present as Fe(II) in soil solution near the permafrost boundary but enriched as Fe(III) in the middle of the active layer, similar to dissolved aromatic-C and organic acids. Dissolved CH4 increased relative to dissolved CO2 with depth and varied with soil moisture in the middle of the active layer in patterns that were positively correlated with the proportion of dissolved Fe(III) in transitional and low-centered polygon soils but negatively correlated in the drier flat- and high-centered polygons. These results suggest that microbial-mediated Fe oxidation and reduction influence respiration/fermentation of SOM and production of substrates (e.g., low-molecular-weight organic acids) for methanogenesis. As a result, we infer that geochemical differences induced by water saturation dictate microbial products of SOM decomposition, and Fe geochemistry is an important factor regulating methanogenesis in anoxic tundra soils.« less

  3. Opposing effects of different soil organic matter fractions on crop yields.

    PubMed

    Wood, Stephen A; Sokol, Noah; Bell, Colin W; Bradford, Mark A; Naeem, Shahid; Wallenstein, Matthew D; Palm, Cheryl A

    2016-10-01

    Soil organic matter is critical to sustainable agriculture because it provides nutrients to crops as it decomposes and increases nutrient- and water-holding capacity when built up. Fast- and slow-cycling fractions of soil organic matter can have different impacts on crop production because fast-cycling fractions rapidly release nutrients for short-term plant growth and slow-cycling fractions bind nutrients that mineralize slowly and build up water-holding capacity. We explored the controls on these fractions in a tropical agroecosystem and their relationship to crop yields. We performed physical fractionation of soil organic matter from 48 farms and plots in western Kenya. We found that fast-cycling, particulate organic matter was positively related to crop yields, but did not have a strong effect, while slower-cycling, mineral-associated organic matter was negatively related to yields. Our finding that slower-cycling organic matter was negatively related to yield points to a need to revise the view that stabilization of organic matter positively impacts food security. Our results support a new paradigm that different soil organic matter fractions are controlled by different mechanisms, potentially leading to different relationships with management outcomes, like crop yield. Effectively managing soils for sustainable agriculture requires quantifying the effects of specific organic matter fractions on these outcomes.

  4. Partition of nonpolar organic pollutants from water to soil and sediment organic matters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chiou, C.T.

    1995-01-01

    The partition coefficients (Koc) of carbon tetrachloride and 1,2-dichlorobenzene between normal soil/sediment organic matter and water have been determined for a large set of soils, bed sediments, and suspended solids from the United States and the People's Republic of China. The Koc values for both solutes are quite invariant either for the soils or for the bed sediments; the values on bed sediments are about twice those on soils. The similarity of Koc values between normal soils and between normal bed sediments suggests that natural organic matters in soils (or sediments) of different geographic origins exhibit comparable polarities and possibly comparable compositions. The results also suggest that the process that converts eroded soils into bed sediments brings about a change in the organic matter property. The difference between soil and sediment Koc values provides a basis for identifying the source of suspended solids in river waters. The very high Koc values observed for some special soils and sediments are diagnostic of severe anthropogenic contamination.

  5. Global effects of agriculture on fluvial dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graeber, Daniel; Boëchat, Iola G.; Encina-Montoya, Francisco; Esse, Carlos; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Goyenola, Guillermo; Gücker, Björn; Heinz, Marlen; Kronvang, Brian; Meerhoff, Mariana; Nimptsch, Jorge; Pusch, Martin T.; Silva, Ricky C. S.; von Schiller, Daniel; Zwirnmann, Elke

    2015-11-01

    Agricultural land covers approximately 40% of Earth’s land surface and affects hydromorphological, biogeochemical and ecological characteristics of fluvial networks. In the northern temperate region, agriculture also strongly affects the amount and molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM), which constitutes the main vector of carbon transport from soils to fluvial networks and to the sea, and is involved in a large variety of biogeochemical processes. Here, we provide first evidence about the wider occurrence of agricultural impacts on the concentration and composition of fluvial DOM across climate zones of the northern and southern hemispheres. Both extensive and intensive farming altered fluvial DOM towards a more microbial and less plant-derived composition. Moreover, intensive farming significantly increased dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations. The DOM composition change and DON concentration increase differed among climate zones and could be related to the intensity of current and historical nitrogen fertilizer use. As a result of agriculture intensification, increased DON concentrations and a more microbial-like DOM composition likely will enhance the reactivity of catchment DOM emissions, thereby fuelling the biogeochemical processing in fluvial networks, and resulting in higher ecosystem productivity and CO2 outgassing.

  6. Role of dissolved organic matter in ice photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Grannas, Amanda M; Pagano, Lisa P; Pierce, Brittany C; Bobby, Rachel; Fede, Alexis

    2014-09-16

    In this study, we provide evidence that dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays an important role in indirect photolysis processes in ice, producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and leading to the efficient photodegradation of a probe hydrophobic organic pollutant, aldrin. Rates of DOM-mediated aldrin loss are between 2 and 56 times faster in ice than in liquid water (depending on DOM source and concentration), likely due to a freeze-concentration effect that occurs when the water freezes, providing a mechanism to concentrate reactive components into smaller, liquid-like regions within or on the ice. Rates of DOM-mediated aldrin loss are also temperature dependent, with higher rates of loss as temperature decreases. This also illustrates the importance of the freeze-concentration effect in altering reaction kinetics for processes occurring in environmental ices. All DOM source types studied were able to mediate aldrin loss, including commercially available fulvic and humic acids and an authentic Arctic snow DOM sample isolated by solid phase extraction, indicating the ubiquity of DOM in indirect photochemistry in environmental ices.

  7. Effects of agricultural practices on organic matter degradation in ditches

    PubMed Central

    Hunting, Ellard R.; Vonk, J. Arie; Musters, C.J.M.; Kraak, Michiel H.S.; Vijver, Martina G.

    2016-01-01

    Agricultural practices can result in differences in organic matter (OM) and agricultural chemical inputs in adjacent ditches, but its indirect effects on OM composition and its inherent consequences for ecosystem functioning remain uncertain. This study determined the effect of agricultural practices (dairy farm grasslands and hyacinth bulb fields) on OM degradation by microorganisms and invertebrates with a consumption and food preference experiment in the field and in the laboratory using natural OM collected from the field. Freshly cut grass and hyacinths were also offered to control for OM composition and large- and small mesh-sizes were used to distinguish microbial decomposition and invertebrate consumption. Results show that OM decomposition by microorganisms and consumption by invertebrates was similar throughout the study area, but that OM collected from ditches adjacent grasslands and freshly cut grass and hyacinths were preferred over OM collected from ditches adjacent to a hyacinth bulb field. In the case of OM collected from ditches adjacent hyacinth bulb fields, both microbial decomposition and invertebrate consumption were strongly retarded, likely resulting from sorption and accumulation of pesticides. This outcome illustrates that differences in agricultural practices can, in addition to direct detrimental effects on aquatic organisms, indirectly alter the functioning of adjacent aquatic ecosystems. PMID:26892243

  8. Contaminant-mediated photobleaching of wetland chromophoric dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Maureen C; Weavers, Linda K; Chin, Yu-Ping

    2014-09-20

    Photolytic transformation of organic contaminants in wetlands can be mediated by chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), which in turn can lose its reactivity from photobleaching. We collected water from a small agricultural wetland (Ohio), Kawai Nui Marsh (Hawaii), the Everglades (Florida), and Okefenokee Swamp (Georgia) to assess the effect of photobleaching on the photofate of two herbicides, acetochlor and isoproturon. Analyte-spiked water samples were irradiated using a solar simulator and monitored for changes in CDOM light absorbance and dissolved oxygen. Photobleaching did not significantly impact the indirect photolysis rates of either herbicide over 24 hours of irradiation. Surprisingly, the opposite effect was observed with isoproturon, which accelerated DOM photobleaching. This phenomenon was more pronounced in higher-CDOM waters, and we believe that the redox pathway between triplet-state CDOM and isoproturon may be responsible for our observations. By contrast, acetochlor indirect photolysis was dependent on reaction with the hydroxyl radical and did not accelerate photobleaching of wetland water as much as isoproturon. Finally, herbicide indirect photolysis rate constants did not correlate strongly to any one chemical or optical property of the sampled waters.

  9. Mineral surface-organic matter interactions: basics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdrè, G.; Moro, D.; Ulian, G.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to control the binding of biological and organic molecules to a crystal surface is central in several fields; for example, in biotechnology, catalysis, molecular microarrays, biosensors preparation and environmental sciences. The nano-morphology and nanostructure at the surface may have physico-chemical properties that are very different from those of the underlying mineral substrate. Recent developments in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) have widened the spectrum of possible investigations that can be performed at the nanometric level on the surface of minerals. They range from the study of physical properties such as surface potential, electric field topological determination, Brønsted-Lowry site distributions, to chemical and spectroscopic analysis in air, in liquid or in gaseous environments. After an introduction to SPM modes of operation and new SPM-based technological developments, we will present recent examples of applications in the study of interactions between organic matter and mineral surface and report on the advances in knowledge that have been made by the use of scanning probe microscopy.

  10. Global effects of agriculture on fluvial dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Graeber, Daniel; Boëchat, Iola G; Encina-Montoya, Francisco; Esse, Carlos; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Goyenola, Guillermo; Gücker, Björn; Heinz, Marlen; Kronvang, Brian; Meerhoff, Mariana; Nimptsch, Jorge; Pusch, Martin T; Silva, Ricky C S; von Schiller, Daniel; Zwirnmann, Elke

    2015-11-06

    Agricultural land covers approximately 40% of Earth's land surface and affects hydromorphological, biogeochemical and ecological characteristics of fluvial networks. In the northern temperate region, agriculture also strongly affects the amount and molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM), which constitutes the main vector of carbon transport from soils to fluvial networks and to the sea, and is involved in a large variety of biogeochemical processes. Here, we provide first evidence about the wider occurrence of agricultural impacts on the concentration and composition of fluvial DOM across climate zones of the northern and southern hemispheres. Both extensive and intensive farming altered fluvial DOM towards a more microbial and less plant-derived composition. Moreover, intensive farming significantly increased dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations. The DOM composition change and DON concentration increase differed among climate zones and could be related to the intensity of current and historical nitrogen fertilizer use. As a result of agriculture intensification, increased DON concentrations and a more microbial-like DOM composition likely will enhance the reactivity of catchment DOM emissions, thereby fuelling the biogeochemical processing in fluvial networks, and resulting in higher ecosystem productivity and CO2 outgassing.

  11. Global effects of agriculture on fluvial dissolved organic matter

    PubMed Central

    Graeber, Daniel; Boëchat, Iola G.; Encina-Montoya, Francisco; Esse, Carlos; Gelbrecht, Jörg; Goyenola, Guillermo; Gücker, Björn; Heinz, Marlen; Kronvang, Brian; Meerhoff, Mariana; Nimptsch, Jorge; Pusch, Martin T.; Silva, Ricky C. S.; von Schiller, Daniel; Zwirnmann, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural land covers approximately 40% of Earth’s land surface and affects hydromorphological, biogeochemical and ecological characteristics of fluvial networks. In the northern temperate region, agriculture also strongly affects the amount and molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM), which constitutes the main vector of carbon transport from soils to fluvial networks and to the sea, and is involved in a large variety of biogeochemical processes. Here, we provide first evidence about the wider occurrence of agricultural impacts on the concentration and composition of fluvial DOM across climate zones of the northern and southern hemispheres. Both extensive and intensive farming altered fluvial DOM towards a more microbial and less plant-derived composition. Moreover, intensive farming significantly increased dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) concentrations. The DOM composition change and DON concentration increase differed among climate zones and could be related to the intensity of current and historical nitrogen fertilizer use. As a result of agriculture intensification, increased DON concentrations and a more microbial-like DOM composition likely will enhance the reactivity of catchment DOM emissions, thereby fuelling the biogeochemical processing in fluvial networks, and resulting in higher ecosystem productivity and CO2 outgassing. PMID:26541809

  12. Effects of agricultural practices on organic matter degradation in ditches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunting, Ellard R.; Vonk, J. Arie; Musters, C. J. M.; Kraak, Michiel H. S.; Vijver, Martina G.

    2016-02-01

    Agricultural practices can result in differences in organic matter (OM) and agricultural chemical inputs in adjacent ditches, but its indirect effects on OM composition and its inherent consequences for ecosystem functioning remain uncertain. This study determined the effect of agricultural practices (dairy farm grasslands and hyacinth bulb fields) on OM degradation by microorganisms and invertebrates with a consumption and food preference experiment in the field and in the laboratory using natural OM collected from the field. Freshly cut grass and hyacinths were also offered to control for OM composition and large- and small mesh-sizes were used to distinguish microbial decomposition and invertebrate consumption. Results show that OM decomposition by microorganisms and consumption by invertebrates was similar throughout the study area, but that OM collected from ditches adjacent grasslands and freshly cut grass and hyacinths were preferred over OM collected from ditches adjacent to a hyacinth bulb field. In the case of OM collected from ditches adjacent hyacinth bulb fields, both microbial decomposition and invertebrate consumption were strongly retarded, likely resulting from sorption and accumulation of pesticides. This outcome illustrates that differences in agricultural practices can, in addition to direct detrimental effects on aquatic organisms, indirectly alter the functioning of adjacent aquatic ecosystems.

  13. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter export from U.S. rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, Robert G. M.; Aiken, George R.; Dornblaser, Mark M.; Butler, Kenna D.; Holmes, R. Max; Fiske, Greg; Mann, Paul J.; Stubbins, Aron

    2013-01-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluxes and yields from 15 major U.S. rivers draining an assortment of terrestrial biomes are presented. A robust relationship between CDOM and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) loads is established (e.g., a350 versus DOC; r2 = 0.96, p < 0.001). Calculated CDOM yields are also correlated to watershed percent wetland (e.g. a350; r2 = 0.81, p < 0.001) providing a method for the estimation of CDOM export from ungauged watersheds. A large variation in CDOM yields was found across the rivers. The two rivers in the north-eastern U.S. (Androscoggin and Penobscot), the Edisto draining into the South Atlantic Bight, and some rivers draining into the Gulf of Mexico (Atchafalaya and Mobile) exhibit the highest CDOM yields, linked to extensive wetlands in these watersheds. If the Edisto CDOM yield is representative of other rivers draining into the South Atlantic Bight, this would result in a CDOM load equivalent to that of the Mississippi from a region of approximately 10% of the Mississippi watershed, indicating the importance of certain regions with respect to the role of terrigenous CDOM in ocean color budgets.

  14. [Effects of dissolved organic matter on phenanthrene adsorption by soil].

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Ling, Wan-ting; Gao, Yan-zheng; Li, Qiu-ling; Dai, Jing-yu

    2007-02-01

    This paper studied the effects of exotic and native dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the phenanthrene adsorption by three soils differed in soil organic carbon content (foc). The exotic DOM came from decayed rice straw, while the native DOM was extracted from the test soils. In all cases, the adsorption of phenanthrene by treated soils could be well described with linear-type model, and there was a positive correlation between adsorption coefficient (Kd) and foc Compared with the control, the Kd value of test soils after native DOM removed was increased by 7. 08% -21. 4% , and the increment (deltaKd) was positively correlated with fo,, indicating that the presence of soil native DOM impeded the phenanthrene adsorption by soil. The effects of exotic DOM on phenanthrene adsorption had a close relation with its added concentration in soil-water system. Within the range of 0-106 mg DOC x L(-1) , the K, value increased first, and then decreased with the increase of added exotic DOM concentration. Lower concentrations of added exotic DOM promoted the phenanthrene adsorption by soil, while higher concentrations ( I> or =52 mg DOC x L(-1)) of it obviously impeded this adsorption. These effects of exotic and native DOM on soil phenanthrene adsorption were considered to be related to the association of phenanthrene with DOM in solution, and the ' cumulative adsorption effect' between soil solid and aqueous phases.

  15. Natural Organic Matter and the Event Horizon of Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertkorn, N.; Frommberger, M.; Witt, M.; Koch, B. P.; Schmitt-Kopplin, P.; Perdue, E. M.

    2009-05-01

    Soils, sediments, freshwaters and marine waters contain natural organic matter (NOM) - an exceedingly complex mixture of organic compounds that collectively exhibit a nearly continuous range of properties (size- reactivity continuum). NOM is composed mainly of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen, with minor contributions from heteroatoms such as sulphur and phosphorus. Suwannee River fulvic acid (SuwFA) is a fraction of NOM that is relatively depleted in heteroatoms. Ultrahigh resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron (FTICR) mass spectra of SuwFA reveal several thousand molecular formulae, corresponding in turn to several hundred thousand distinct chemical environments of carbon even without accountancy of isomers. The mass difference m among adjoining C,H,O-molecules between and within clusters of nominal mass is inversely related to molecular dissimilarity: any decrease of m imposes an ever growing mandatory difference in molecular composition. Molecular formulae that are expected for likely biochemical precursor molecules are notably absent from these spectra, indicating that SuwFA is the product of diagenetic reactions that have altered the major components of biomass beyond the point of recognition. The degree of complexity of SuwFA can be brought into sharp focus through comparison with the theoretical limits of chemical complexity, as constrained and quantized by the fundamentals of chemical binding. The theoretical C,H,O-compositional space denotes the isomer-filtered complement of the entire, very vast space of molecular structures composed solely of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. The molecular formulae within SuwFA occupy a sizable proportion of the theoretical C,H,O-compositional space. A one-hundred percent coverage of the theoretically feasible C,H,O-compositional space by SuwFA molecules is attained throughout a sizable range of mass, H/C and O/C elemental ratios. The substantial differences between (and complementarity of) the SuwFA molecular formulae that

  16. Organic matter in the ancient Alpine Tethyan Ocean Continental Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateeva, Tsvetomila; Wolff, George; Kusznir, Nick; Wheeler, John; Manataschal, Gianreto

    2016-04-01

    Studies of hydrothermal vents in modern ocean settings suggest that methane produced by serpentinization can support methanotrophic bio-systems. Are such bio-systems locally restricted to hydrothermal vents or are more pervasive, being linked with the geology of serpentinized mantle in the subsurface? Answering this question has implications for our understanding of the global importance of hidden sub-surface bio-systems, the fate of methane and the carbon cycle. The ocean-continent transition (OCT) of magma-poor rifted continental margins, exhumed within mountain belts by continent collision, provides an opportunity to investigate this question. Initial data from the Totalp unit in the Eastern Swiss Alps, representing exhumed OCT of the Alpine Tethyan rifted continental margin, shows the presence of various hydrocarbons (Mateeva et al., in prep.). Samples from other Tethyan OCT locations, consisting of the Tasna nappe and Platta unit of the Eastern Swiss Alps and Chenaillet in the Western Alps, have also been analysed to investigate the presence or absence of methanotrophic biosystems within serpentinized exhumed mantle and associated ophicalcite and syn-rift sediments. Samples from these remnant Tethyan OCT locations are characterized by low and varied organic carbon concentrations that reflect the large lithological diversity of this area. The samples contain hydrocarbons in the form of n-alkanes mostly in the range C20 - C32, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and various biomarkers (e.g. steranes, hopanes). A typical sample from the hydrothermal system in Platta shows the lithological characteristics of a black smoker, but with no indication of a more developed biosystem. Preliminary results from the examined Tethyan OCT locations (Tasna, Platta, Chenaillet) show evidence for the preservation of marine organic matter in the serpentinized mantle and overlying sediments, although there is no unequivocal indication that the organic matter is generated from

  17. Little effects on soil organic matter chemistry of density fractions after seven years of forest soil warming

    PubMed Central

    Schnecker, Jörg; Borken, Werner; Schindlbacher, Andreas; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Rising temperatures enhance microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and thereby increase the soil CO2 efflux. Elevated decomposition rates might differently affect distinct SOM pools, depending on their stability and accessibility. Soil fractions derived from density fractionation have been suggested to represent SOM pools with different turnover times and stability against microbial decomposition. To investigate the effect of soil warming on functionally different soil organic matter pools, we here investigated the chemical and isotopic composition of bulk soil and three density fractions (free particulate organic matter, fPOM; occluded particulate organic matter, oPOM; and mineral associated organic matter, MaOM) of a C-rich soil from a long-term warming experiment in a spruce forest in the Austrian Alps. At the time of sampling, the soil in this experiment had been warmed during the snow-free period for seven consecutive years. During that time no thermal adaptation of the microbial community could be identified and CO2 release from the soil continued to be elevated by the warming treatment. Our results, which included organic carbon content, total nitrogen content, δ13C, Δ14C, δ15N and the chemical composition, identified by pyrolysis-GC/MS, showed no significant differences in bulk soil between warming treatment and control. Surprisingly, the differences in the three density fractions were mostly small and the direction of warming induced change was variable with fraction and soil depth. Warming led to reduced N content in topsoil oPOM and subsoil fPOM and to reduced relative abundance of N-bearing compounds in subsoil MaOM. Further, warming increased the δ13C of MaOM at both sampling depths, reduced the relative abundance of carbohydrates while it increased the relative abundance of lignins in subsoil oPOM. As the size of the functionally different SOM pools did not significantly change, we assume that the few and small modifications in SOM

  18. Little effects on soil organic matter chemistry of density fractions after seven years of forest soil warming.

    PubMed

    Schnecker, Jörg; Borken, Werner; Schindlbacher, Andreas; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Rising temperatures enhance microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and thereby increase the soil CO2 efflux. Elevated decomposition rates might differently affect distinct SOM pools, depending on their stability and accessibility. Soil fractions derived from density fractionation have been suggested to represent SOM pools with different turnover times and stability against microbial decomposition. To investigate the effect of soil warming on functionally different soil organic matter pools, we here investigated the chemical and isotopic composition of bulk soil and three density fractions (free particulate organic matter, fPOM; occluded particulate organic matter, oPOM; and mineral associated organic matter, MaOM) of a C-rich soil from a long-term warming experiment in a spruce forest in the Austrian Alps. At the time of sampling, the soil in this experiment had been warmed during the snow-free period for seven consecutive years. During that time no thermal adaptation of the microbial community could be identified and CO2 release from the soil continued to be elevated by the warming treatment. Our results, which included organic carbon content, total nitrogen content, δ(13)C, Δ(14)C, δ(15)N and the chemical composition, identified by pyrolysis-GC/MS, showed no significant differences in bulk soil between warming treatment and control. Surprisingly, the differences in the three density fractions were mostly small and the direction of warming induced change was variable with fraction and soil depth. Warming led to reduced N content in topsoil oPOM and subsoil fPOM and to reduced relative abundance of N-bearing compounds in subsoil MaOM. Further, warming increased the δ(13)C of MaOM at both sampling depths, reduced the relative abundance of carbohydrates while it increased the relative abundance of lignins in subsoil oPOM. As the size of the functionally different SOM pools did not significantly change, we assume that the few and small modifications

  19. Dynamics of soil organic matter pools after agricultural abandonment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novara, Agata; Gristina, Luciano; Rühl Rühl, Juliane; La Mantia, Tommaso; Badalucco, Luigi; Kuzyakov, Yakov; Laudicina, Vito Armando

    2014-05-01

    Changes of land use from croplands to natural vegetation usually increase Carbon (C) stocks in soil. However, the contribution of old and new C to various pools still is not clearly analyzed. We measured the δ13C signature of soil organic carbon (SOC) pools after vegetation change from vineyard (C3) to grassland (C4) under Mediterranean climate to assess the changes of old and new C in total SOC, microbial biomass (MB), dissolved organic C (DOC), and CO2 efflux from soil. Development of the perennial grass Hyparrhenia hirta (C4) on vineyard abandoned for 15 or 35 years ago increased C stocks for 13% and 16%, respectively (in the upper 15 cm). This increase was linked to the incorporation of new C in SOC and with exchange of 25% of old C by new C after 35 years. The maximal incorporation of new C was observed in MB, thus reflecting the maximal turnover and availability of this pool. The DOC was produced mainly from old C of soil organic matter (SOM), showing that under Mediterranean climate DOC will be mainly produced not from fresh litter but from old SOM sources. Decomposition of SOM during a 51 days laboratory incubation was higher in cultivated vineyard than H. hirta soils. Based on changes in δ13C values of SOM, MB, DOC and CO2 in C3 soil and in soils after 15 and 35 years of C4 plant colonization, we separated 13C fractionation in soil from changes of isotopic composition by preferential utilization of substrates with different availability. The utilization pattern in this soil under Mediterranean climate was different from that in temperate ecosystems.

  20. Key soil functional properties affected by soil organic matter - evidence from published literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Brian

    2015-07-01

    The effect of varying the amount of soil organic matter on a range of individual soil properties was investigated using a literature search of published information largely from Australia, but also included relevant information from overseas. Based on published pedotransfer functions, soil organic matter was shown to increase plant available water by 2 to 3 mm per 10 cm for each 1% increase in soil organic carbon, with the largest increases being associated with sandy soils. Aggregate stability increased with increasing soil organic carbon, with aggregate stability decreasing rapidly when soil organic carbon fell below 1.2 to 1.5 5%. Soil compactibility, friability and soil erodibility were favourably improved by increasing the levels of soil organic carbon. Nutrient cycling was a major function of soil organic matter. Substantial amounts of N, P and S become available to plants when the soil organic matter is mineralised. Soil organic matter also provides a food source for the microorganisms involved in the nutrient cycling of N, P, S and K. In soils with lower clay contents, and less active clays such as kaolinites, soil organic matter can supply a significant amount of the cation exchange capacity and buffering capacity against acidification. Soil organic matter can have a cation exchange capacity of 172 to 297 cmol(+)/kg. As the cation exchange capacity of soil organic matter varies with pH, the effectiveness of soil organic matter to contribute to cation exchange capacity below pH 5.5 is often minimal. Overall soil organic matter has the potential to affect a range of functional soil properties.

  1. Evolution of organic matter in Orgueil, Murchison and Renazzo during parent body aqueous alteration: In situ investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Guillou, Corentin; Bernard, Sylvain; Brearley, Adrian J.; Remusat, Laurent

    2014-04-01

    Chondrites accreted the oldest solid materials in the solar system including dust processed in the protoplanetary disk and diverse organic compounds. After accretion, asteroidal alteration may have impacted organic particles in various ways. To constrain these processes, we conducted a comprehensive study of organics disseminated within the matrices of the three carbonaceous chondrite falls, Renazzo (CR2), Murchison (CM2) and Orgueil (CI). By combining synchrotron-based STXM and TEM analyses on FIB sections of samples previously characterized by NanoSIMS, we investigated the influence of aqueous alteration on the morphology, isotopic signature, molecular structure, spatial distribution, and mineralogical environment of the organic matter within the matrices. Two different populations of materials are distinguishable: sub-micrometric individual grains, likely dominated by insoluble compounds and diffuse organic matter, finely interspersed within phyllosilicates and/or (amorphous) nanocarbonates at the nanometer scale. We suggest that this latter component, which is depleted in aromatics and enriched in carboxylic functional groups, may be dominated by soluble compounds. Organic matter in Renazzo (CR) mainly consists of chemically-homogeneous individual grains surrounded by amorphous and nanocrystalline phyllosilicates. Evidence of connectivity between organic grains and fractures indicates that redistribution has occurred: some areas containing diffuse organic matter can be observed. This diffuse organic component is more abundant in Murchison (CM) and Orgueil (CI). This is interpreted as resulting from fluid transport at the micrometer scale and encapsulation within recrystallized alteration phases. In contrast to Renazzo, organic grains in Murchison and Orgueil display strong chemical heterogeneities, likely related to chemical evolution during aqueous alteration. The observations suggest that the altering fluid was a brine with elevated concentrations of both

  2. The flux of organic matter through a peatland ecosystem - evidence from thermogravimetric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worrall, Fred; Moody, Catherine; Clay, Gareth

    2016-04-01

    Carbon budgets of peatlands are now common and studies have considered nitrogen, oxygen and energy budgets, but no study has considered the whole composition of the organic matter as it transfers through and into a peatland. Organic matter samples were taken from each organic matter reservoir found in and each fluvial flux from a peatland and analysed the samples by thermogravimetric analysis. The samples analysed were: aboveground, belowground, heather, mosses and sedges, litter layer, a peat core, and monthly samples of particulate and dissolved organic matter. All organic matter samples were taken from a 100% peat catchment within Moor House National Nature Reserve in the North Pennines, UK, and collected samples were compared to standards of lignin, cellulose, humic acid and plant protein. Results showed that the thermogravimetric trace of the sampled organic matter were distinctive with the DOM traces being marked out by very low thermal stability relative other organic matter types. The peat profile shows a significant trend with depth from vegetation- to lignin-like composition. When all traces are weighted according to the observed dry matter and carbon budgets for the catchment then it is possible to judge what has been lost in the transition through and into the ecosystem. By plotting this "lost" trace it possible to assess its composition which is either 97% cellulose and 3% humic acid or 92% and 8% lignin. This has important implications for what controls the organic matter balance of peatlands and it suggests that the oxidation state (OR) of peatland is less than 1.

  3. Effects of multiple levels of social organization on survival and abundance.

    PubMed

    Ward, Eric J; Semmens, Brice X; Holmes, Elizabeth E; Balcomb Iii, Ken C

    2011-04-01

    Identifying how social organization shapes individual behavior, survival, and fecundity of animals that live in groups can inform conservation efforts and improve forecasts of population abundance, even when the mechanism responsible for group-level differences is unknown. We constructed a hierarchical Bayesian model to quantify the relative variability in survival rates among different levels of social organization (matrilines and pods) of an endangered population of killer whales (Orcinus orca). Individual killer whales often participate in group activities such as prey sharing and cooperative hunting. The estimated age-specific survival probabilities and survivorship curves differed considerably among pods and to a lesser extent among matrilines (within pods). Across all pods, males had lower life expectancy than females. Differences in survival between pods may be caused by a combination of factors that vary across the population's range, including reduced prey availability, contaminants in prey, and human activity. Our modeling approach could be applied to demographic rates for other species and for parameters other than survival, including reproduction, prey selection, movement, and detection probabilities.

  4. Chemical composition of dissolved organic matter draining permafrost soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Collin P.; Cory, Rose M.

    2015-10-01

    Northern circumpolar permafrost soils contain roughly twice the amount of carbon stored in the atmosphere today, but the majority of this soil organic carbon is perennially frozen. Climate warming in the arctic is thawing permafrost soils and mobilizing previously frozen dissolved organic matter (DOM) from deeper soil layers to nearby surface waters. Previous studies have reported that ancient DOM draining deeper layers of permafrost soils was more susceptible to degradation by aquatic bacteria compared to modern DOM draining the shallow active layer of permafrost soils, and have suggested that DOM chemical composition may be an important control for the lability of DOM to bacterial degradation. However, the compositional features that distinguish DOM drained from different depths in permafrost soils are poorly characterized. Thus, the objective of this study was to characterize the chemical composition of DOM drained from different depths in permafrost soils, and relate these compositional differences to its susceptibility to biological degradation. DOM was leached from the shallow organic mat and the deeper permafrost layer of soils within the Imnavait Creek watershed on the North Slope of Alaska. DOM draining both soil layers was characterized in triplicate by coupling ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry, 13C solid-state NMR, and optical spectroscopy methods with multi-variate statistical analyses. Reproducibility of replicate mass spectra was high, and compositional differences resulting from interfering species or isolation effects were significantly smaller than differences between DOM drained from each soil layer. All analyses indicated that DOM leached from the shallower organic mat contained higher molecular weight, more oxidized, and more unsaturated aromatic species compared to DOM leached from the deeper permafrost layer. Bacterial production rates and bacterial efficiencies were significantly higher for permafrost compared to organic mat DOM

  5. Vehicular emissions of organic particulate matter in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, B. S.; Andrade, M. F.; Herckes, P.; Dusek, U.; Röckmann, T.; Holzinger, R.

    2015-12-01

    Vehicular emissions have a strong impact on air pollution in big cities. Many factors affect these emissions: type of vehicle, type of fuel, cruising velocity, and brake use. This study focused on emissions of organic compounds by Light (LDV) and Heavy (HDV) duty vehicle exhaust. The study was performed in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil, where vehicles run on different fuels: gasoline with 25 % ethanol (called gasohol), hydrated ethanol, and diesel (with 5 % of biodiesel). The vehicular emissions are an important source of pollutants and the principal contribution to fine particulate matter (smaller than 2.5 μm, PM2.5) in Sao Paulo. The experiments were performed in two tunnels: Janio Quadros (TJQ) where 99 % of the vehicles are LDV, and Rodoanel Mario Covas (TRA) where up to 30 % of the fleet was HDV. The PM2.5 samples were collected on quartz filters in May and July 2011 at TJQ and TRA, respectively, using two samplers operating in parallel. The samples were analyzed by Thermal-Desorption Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass-Spectrometry (TD-PTR-MS), and by Thermal-Optical Transmittance (TOT). The organic aerosol (OA) desorbed at TD-PTR-MS represented around 30 % of the OA estimated by the TOT method, mainly due to the different desorption temperatures, with a maximum of 870 and 350 °C for TOT and TD-PTR-MS, respectively. Average emission factors (EF) organic aerosol (OA) and organic carbon (OC) were calculated for HDV and LDV fleet. We found that HDV emitted more OA and OC than LDV, and that OC emissions represented 36 and 43 % of total PM2.5 emissions from LDV and HDV, respectively. More than 700 ions were identified by TD-PTR-MS and the EF profiles obtained from HDV and LDV exhibited distinct features. Nitrogen-containing compounds measured in the desorbed material up to 350 °C contributed around 20 % to the EF values for both types of vehicles, possibly associated with incomplete fuel burning. Additionally, 70 % of the organic compounds measured from the aerosol

  6. Macroinvertebrate Communities and Benthic Organic Matter in Sand Habitats of 15 Northern Michigan Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamuro, A. M.; Miesbauer, J. M.; Lamberti, G. A.

    2005-05-01

    Relationships between benthic organic matter (BOM) and macroinvertebrates have been well studied in streams with coarse substrates, but such relationships have been little studied in sand habitats, despite the abundance of sand in many streams. These relationships were investigated in sand habitats of 15 streams in three watersheds of the Ottawa National Forest, Michigan. Sand habitats in the 15 streams varied widely in mean total BOM quantity (112 to 1814 g AFDM·m-2) and size composition [very fine BOM (VFBOM, 0.45-250 μm), 0-58%; fine BOM (FBOM, 250 μm-1 mm), 11-27%; coarse BOM (CBOM, >1 mm), 27-81%] but differences were still detected among watersheds (VFBOM, ANOVA, F2,11 = 8.69, p = 0.005; CBOM, F2,11 = 11.15, p = 0.002). Sand-dwelling invertebrates were dominated by gathering-collectors, primarily Chironomidae (relative abundance = 73.6±15.4%; mean±SE; n = 15). Invertebrate biomass and mean body size differed among watersheds (biomass, F2,12 = 3.89, p = 0.050; body size, F2,12 = 6.12, p = 0.015). However, at this broad spatial scale, BOM quantity and quality had little effect on invertebrate community metrics in sand habitats. BOM content of sand habitats likely represents one factor, among many components of this dynamic habitat, which shapes overall macroinvertebrate communities.

  7. Stabilization of ancient organic matter in deep buried paleosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.; Chaopricha, N. T.; Mueller, C.; Diefendorf, A. F.; Plante, A. F.; Grandy, S.; Mason, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Buried soils representing ancient surface horizons can contain large organic carbon reservoirs that may interact with the atmosphere if exposed by erosion, road construction, or strip mining. Paleosols in long-term depositional sites provide a unique opportunity for studying the importance of different mechanisms on the persistence of organic matter (OM) over millennial time-scales. We report on the chemistry and bioavailability of OM stored in the Brady soil, a deeply buried (7 m) paleosol in loess deposits of southwestern Nebraska, USA. The Brady Soil developed 9,000-13,500 years ago during a time of warming and drying. The Brady soil represents a dark brown horizon enriched in C relative to loess immediately above and below. Spanning much of the central Great Plains, this buried soil contains large C stocks due to the thickness of its A horizon (0.5 to 1 m) and wide geographic extent. Our research provides a unique perspective on long-term OM stabilization in deep soils using multiple analytical approaches. Soils were collected from the Brady soil A horizon (at 7 m depth) and modern surface A horizons (0-15 cm) at two sites for comparison. Soils were separated by density fractionation using 1.85 g ml-1 sodium polytungstate into: free particulate organic matter (fPOM) and aggregate-occluded (oPOM) of two size classes (large: >20 μm, and small: < 20 μm). The remaining dense fraction was separated into sand, silt, and clay size fractions. The distribution and age of C among density and particle-size fractions differed between surface and Brady soils. We isolated the source of the characteristic dark coloring of the Brady soil to the oPOM-small fraction, which also contained 20% of the total organic C pool in the Brady soil. The oPOM-small fraction and the bulk soil in the middle of the Brady A horizon had 14C ages of 10,500-12,400 cal yr BP, within the time that the soil was actively forming at the land surface. Surface soils showed modern ages. Lipid analyses of

  8. Photosensitized degradation of amoxicillin in natural organic matter isolate solutions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haomin; Cooper, William J; Jung, Jinyoung; Song, Weihua

    2011-01-01

    Amoxicillin is a widely used antibiotic and has been detected in natural waters. Its environmental fate is in part determined by hydrolysis, and, direct and indirect photolysis. The hydrolysis rate in distilled water and water to which five different isolated of dissolved organic matter (DOM) was added, were evaluated. In the five different DOM solutions hydrolysis accounted for 5-18% loss of amoxicillin. Direct and indirect photolysis rates were determined using a solar simulator and it appeared that indirect photolysis was the dominant loss mechanism. Direct photolysis, in a solar simulator, accounted for 6-21% loss of amoxicillin in the simulated natural waters. The steady-state concentrations of singlet oxygen, (1)ΔO(2) (∼10(-13) M) and hydroxyl radical, •OH (∼10(-17) M) were obtained in aqueous solutions of five different dissolved organic matter samples using a solar simulator. The bimolecular reaction rate constant of (1)ΔO(2) with amoxicillin was measured in the different solutions, k(ΔO(2)) = 1.44 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1). The sunlight mediated amoxicillin loss rate with (1)ΔO(2) (∼10(-9) s(-1)), and with •OH (∼10(-7) s(-1)), were also determined for the different samples of DOM. While (1)ΔO(2) only accounted for 0.03-0.08% of the total loss rate, the hydroxyl radical contributed 10-22%. It appears that the direct reaction of singlet and triplet excited state DOM ((3)DOM(∗)) with amoxicillin accounts for 48-74% of the loss of amoxicillin. Furthermore, the pseudo first-order photodegradation rate showed a positive correlation with the sorption of amoxicillin to DOM, which further supported the assumption that excited state DOM∗ plays a key role in the photochemical transformation of amoxicillin in natural waters. This is the first study to report the relative contribution of all five processes to the fate of amoxicillin in aqueous solution.

  9. Do aggregate stability and soil organic matter content increase following organic inputs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtinen, Taru; Gísladóttir, Guðrún; van Leeuwen, Jeroen P.; Bloem, Jaap; Steffens, Markus; Vala Ragnarsdóttir, Kristin

    2014-05-01

    Agriculture is facing several challenges such as loss of soil organic matter (SOM); thus, sustainable farming management practices are needed. Organic farming is growing as an alternative to conventional farming; in Iceland approximately 1% and in Austria 16% of utilized agricultural area is under organic farming practice. We analyzed the effect of different farming practices (organic, and conventional) on soil physicochemical and microbiological properties in grassland soils in Iceland and cropland soils in Austria. Organic farms differed from conventional farms by absence of chemical fertilizers and pesticide use. At these farms, we investigated soil physicochemical (e.g. soil texture, pH, CAL-extractable P and K) and microbiological properties (fungal and bacterial biomass and activity). The effects of farming practices on soil macroaggregate stability and SOM quantity, quality and distribution between different fractions were studied following a density fractionation. In Iceland, we sampled six grassland sites on Brown (BA) and Histic (HA) Andosols; two sites on extensively managed grasslands, two sites under organic and two sites under conventional farming practice. In Austria, we sampled four cropland sites on Haplic Chernozems; two sites under organic and two sites under conventional farming practice. We found significantly higher macroaggregate stability in the organic compared to the conventional grasslands in Iceland. In contrast, slightly higher macroaggregation in conventional compared to the organic farming practice was found in croplands in Austria, although the difference was not significant. Macroaggregates were positively correlated with fungal biomass in Iceland, and with Feo and fungal activity in Austria. In Austria, SOM content and nutrient status (except for lower CAL-extractable P at one site) were similar between organic and conventional farms. Our results show that the organic inputs may have enhanced macroaggregation in organic farming

  10. Electron Shuttling Capacity of Solid-Phase Organic Matter in Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, A.; Zhao, Q.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Soil organic matter, as an electron shuttle, plays an important role in regulating the biogeochemical cycles of metals, especially the redox reactions for iron. Microorganisms can reduce soil organic matter under anaerobic conditions, and biotically-reduced soil organic matter can abiotically donate electrons to ferric oxides. Such soil organic matter-mediated electron transport can facilitate the interactions between microorganisms and insoluble terminal electron acceptors, i.e. iron minerals. Most previous studies have been focused on the electron shuttling processes through dissolved soil organic matter, and scant information is available for solid-phase soil organic matter. In this study, we aim to quantify the electron accepting capacity for solid-phase organic matter in soils collected from four different forests in the United States, including Truckee (CA), Little Valley (NV), Howland (ME) and Hart (MI). We used Shewanella oneidensisMR-1 to biotically reduce soil slurries, and then quantified the electrons transferred to solid-phase and solution-phase organic matter by reacting them with Fe(III)-nitrilotriacetic acid (Fe(III)-NTA). The generation of Fe(II) was measured by a ferrozine assay to calculate the electron accepting capacity of soil organic matter. Our preliminary results showed that the Truckee soil organic matter can accept 0.51±0.07 mM e-/mol carbon. We will measure the electron accepting capacity for four different soils and correlate them to the physicochemical properties of soils. Potential results will provide information about the electron accepting capacity of solid-phase soil organic matter and its governing factors, with broad implication on the coupled biogeochemical cycles of carbon and iron.

  11. [Retrieval of forest topsoil organic matter's spatial pattern based on LiDAR data].

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Liu, Zhao-Gang; Yue, Shu-Feng; Li, Feng-Ri; Dong, Ling-Bo; Bi, Meng

    2012-09-01

    Forest soil is one of the main carbon pools in terrestrial ecosystem. Its organic matter content can provide basic information for estimating soil carbon storage, and also, is an important index for evaluating the function of soil carbon sink. Based on the LiDAR data and the topsoil organic matter contents in 55 permanent plots at Liangshui National Nature Reserve, Heilongjiang Province of Northeast China in August 2009, and by using partial least squares (PLS) method, this paper retrieved the forest topsoil organic matter's spatial pattern in the Reserve, extracted and screened the variables related to the distribution of the topsoil organic matter (e. g. , intensity, counts, elevation, slope, and aspect), and analyzed and defined the correlations between the screened variables and topsoil organic matter content, with the prediction model of forest soil organic matter content established and validated. In the Reserve, the forest topsoil organic matter content was significantly and positively correlated with three variables (intensity, r = 0.765; counts, r = 0.423; and elevation r = 0.475; all P<0.001). The model prediction on the topsoil organic matter content was reliable (precision = 83.3%, R2 = 0.725, RMSE = 1.955 ). In the areas of forest edge and of low canopy stands, the topsoil organic matter content was less than 100 g x kg(-1). The majority of the study area had a topsoil organic matter content of 100-150 g x kg(-1), while a few areas had the topsoil organic matter content as high as 150-318.4 g x kg(-1).

  12. Effects of Natural Organic Matter on Stability, Transport and Deposition of Engineered Nano-particles in Porous Media

    EPA Science Inventory

    The interaction of nano-particles and organic substances, like natural organic matter, could have significant influence on the fate, transport and bioavailability of toxic substances. Natural organic matter (NOM) is a mixture of chemically complex polyelectrolytes with varying m...

  13. Adsorption of natural dissolved organic matter at the oxide/water interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, James A.

    1982-01-01

    Natural organic matter is readily adsorbed by alumina and kaolinite in the pH range of natural waters. Adsorption occurs by complex formation between surface hydroxyls and the acidic functional groups of the organic matter. Oxides with relatively acidic surface hydroxyls, e.g. silica, do not react strongly with the organic matter. Under conditions typical for natural waters, almost complete surface coverage by adsorbed organic matter may be expected for alumina, hydrous iron oxides and the edge sites of aluminosilicates. Potentiometric titration and electrophoresis indicate that most of the acidic functional groups of the adsorbed organic matter are neutralized by protons from solution. The organic coating is expected to have a great influence on subsequent adsorption of inorganic cations and anions.

  14. Bismuth solubility through binding by various organic compounds and naturally occurring soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Murata, Tomoyoshi

    2010-01-01

    The present study was performed to examine the effects of soluble organic matter and pH on the solubility of Bi in relation to inference with the behavior of metallic Bi dispersed in soil and water environments using EDTA, citric acid, tartaric acid, L-cysteine, soil humic acids (HA), and dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from the soil organic horizon. The solubility of Bi by citric acid, tartaric acid, L-cysteine, HA, and DOM showed pH dependence, while that by EDTA did not. Bi solubility by HA seemed to be related to the distribution of pKa (acid dissociation constant) values of acidic functional groups in their molecules. That is, HA extracted at pH 3.2 solubilized Bi preferentially in the acidic range, while HA extracted at pH 8.4 showed preferential solubilization at neutral and alkaline pH. This was related to the dissociation characteristics of functional groups, their binding capacity with Bi, and precipitation of Bi carbonate or hydroxides. In addition to the dissociation characteristics of functional groups, the unique structural configuration of the HA could also contribute to Bi-HA complex formation. The solubility of Bi by naturally occurring DOM derived from the soil organic horizon (Oi) and its pH dependence were different from those associated with HA and varied among tree species.

  15. Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Loss of Refractory Marine Dissolved Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kieber, D. J.; Keene, W. C.; Frossard, A. A.; Long, M. S.; Russell, L. M.; Maben, J. R.; Kinsey, J. D.; Tyssebotn, I. M.; Quinn, P.; Bates, T. S.

    2013-12-01

    Marine aerosol produced in the oceans from bursting bubbles and breaking waves is number dominated by submicron aerosol that are highly enriched in marine organic matter relative to seawater. Recent studies suggest that these organic-rich, submicron aerosol have a major impact on tropospheric chemistry and climate. It has been assumed this marine-derived aerosol organic matter is of recent origin stemming from biological activity in the photic zone. However, we deployed a marine aerosol generator on a recent cruise in the Sargasso Sea with seawater collected from 2500 m and showed that the aerosol generated from this seawater was enriched with organic matter to the same level as observed in surface Sargasso seawater, implying that the marine organic matter flux from the oceans into atmospheric aerosol is partly due to marine organic matter not of recent origin. We propose that marine aerosol production and subsequent physical and photochemical atmospheric evolution is the main process whereby old, refractory organic matter is removed from the oceans, thereby closing the carbon budget in the oceans and solving a long-standing conundrum regarding the removal mechanism for this organic matter in the sea. The implications of this study for couplings in the ocean-atmosphere cycling of organic matter will be discussed.

  16. Response of Benthic Foraminifera to Organic Matter Quantity and Quality and Bioavailable Concentrations of Metals in Aveiro Lagoon (Portugal)

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Maria Virgínia Alves; Silva, Frederico; Laut, Lazaro L. M.; Frontalini, Fabrizio; Clemente, Iara M. M. M.; Miranda, Paulo; Figueira, Rubens; Sousa, Silvia H. M.; Dias, João M. Alveirinho

    2015-01-01

    This work analyses the distribution of living benthic foraminiferal assemblages of surface sediments in different intertidal areas of Ria de Aveiro (Portugal), a polihaline and anthropized coastal lagoon. The relationships among foraminiferal assemblages in association with environmental parameters (temperature, salinity, Eh and pH), grain size, the quantity and quality of organic matter (enrichment in carbohydrates, proteins and lipids), pollution caused by metals, and mineralogical data are studied in an attempt to identify indicators of adaptability to environmental stress. In particular, concentrations of selected metals in the surficial sediment are investigated to assess environmental pollution levels that are further synthetically parameterised by the Pollution Load Index (PLI). The PLI variations allowed the identification of five main polluted areas. Concentrations of metals were also analysed in three extracted phases to evaluate their possible mobility, bioavailability and toxicity in the surficial sediment. Polluted sediment in the form of both organic matter and metals can be found in the most confined zones. Whereas enrichment in organic matter and related biopolymers causes an increase in foraminifera density, pollution by metals leads to a decline in foraminiferal abundance and diversity in those zones. The first situation may be justified by the existence of opportunistic species (with high reproduction rate) that can live in low oxic conditions. The second is explained by the sensitivity of some species to pressure caused by metals. The quality of the organic matter found in these places and the option of a different food source should also explain the tolerance of several species to pollution caused by metals, despite their low reproductive rate in the most polluted areas. In this study, species that are sensitive and tolerant to organic matter and metal enrichment are identified, as is the differential sensitivity/tolerance of some species to

  17. Response of benthic foraminifera to organic matter quantity and quality and bioavailable concentrations of metals in Aveiro Lagoon (Portugal).

    PubMed

    Martins, Maria Virgínia Alves; Silva, Frederico; Laut, Lazaro L M; Frontalini, Fabrizio; Clemente, Iara M M M; Miranda, Paulo; Figueira, Rubens; Sousa, Silvia H M; Dias, João M Alveirinho

    2015-01-01

    This work analyses the distribution of living benthic foraminiferal assemblages of surface sediments in different intertidal areas of Ria de Aveiro (Portugal), a polihaline and anthropized coastal lagoon. The relationships among foraminiferal assemblages in association with environmental parameters (temperature, salinity, Eh and pH), grain size, the quantity and quality of organic matter (enrichment in carbohydrates, proteins and lipids), pollution caused by metals, and mineralogical data are studied in an attempt to identify indicators of adaptability to environmental stress. In particular, concentrations of selected metals in the surficial sediment are investigated to assess environmental pollution levels that are further synthetically parameterised by the Pollution Load Index (PLI). The PLI variations allowed the identification of five main polluted areas. Concentrations of metals were also analysed in three extracted phases to evaluate their possible mobility, bioavailability and toxicity in the surficial sediment. Polluted sediment in the form of both organic matter and metals can be found in the most confined zones. Whereas enrichment in organic matter and related biopolymers causes an increase in foraminifera density, pollution by metals leads to a decline in foraminiferal abundance and diversity in those zones. The first situation may be justified by the existence of opportunistic species (with high reproduction rate) that can live in low oxic conditions. The second is explained by the sensitivity of some species to pressure caused by metals. The quality of the organic matter found in these places and the option of a different food source should also explain the tolerance of several species to pollution caused by metals, despite their low reproductive rate in the most polluted areas. In this study, species that are sensitive and tolerant to organic matter and metal enrichment are identified, as is the differential sensitivity/tolerance of some species to

  18. Geochemical imprint of depositional conditions on organic matter in laminated-Bioturbated interbeds from fine-grained marine sequences

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, L.M.; Claypool, G.E.; King, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Laminated organic-rich shales are interbedded at a scale of centimeters to a few meters with bioturbated organic-poor mudstones or limestones in some fine-grained marine sequences. We have analyzed the organic matter in pairs of laminated/bioturbated interbeds from Cretaceous and Devonian rocks deposited in epicontinental and oceanic settings for the purpose of studying the influence of depositional and early diagenetic environment on the organic geochemical properties of marine shales. Results of these analyses indicate that for rocks that are still in a diagenetic stage of thermal alteration, the relative abundance of biomarker compounds and specific biomarker indices can be useful indicators of depositional and early diagenetic conditions. Pristane/phytane ratios are generally highest for laminated rocks from epicontinental basins and appear to reflect the input of isoprenoid precursors more than oxygenated versus anoxic depositional conditions. The thermally immature laminated rocks are characterized by relatively high contents of 17??(H), 21??(H)-hopanes, hopenes, sterenes and diasterenes, and by strong predominance of the 22R over 22S homohopane isomers. Thermally immature bioturbated samples are characterized by absence of the ??,??-hopanes, by low contents of both saturated and unsaturated polycyclic hydrocarbons, and by slight or no predominance of the 22R over 22S homohopane isomers. There are less obvious compositional differences between the saturated hydrocarbons in the laminated and bioturbated units from the thermally mature sequences. For both the thermally mature and immature laminated samples, the degree of isomerization at the 22C position for hopanes and at the 20C position for steranes is generally consistent with the degree of thermal maturity interpreted from other properties of the organic matter. The bioturbated samples, however, exhibit inconsistent and anomalously high degrees of isomerization for the homohopanes, resulting either from

  19. The effects of organic matter-mineral interactions and organic matter chemistry on diuron sorption across a diverse range of soils.

    PubMed

    Smernik, Ronald J; Kookana, Rai S

    2015-01-01

    Sorption of non-ionic organic compounds to soil is usually expressed as the carbon-normalized partition coefficient (KOC), because it is assumed that the main factor that influences the amount sorbed is the organic carbon content of the soil. However, KOC can vary by a factor of at least ten across a range of soils. We investigated two potential causes of variation in diuron KOC - organic matter-mineral interactions and organic matter chemistry - for a diverse set of 34 soils from Sri Lanka, representing a wide range of soil types. Treatment with hydrofluoric acid (HF-treatment) was used to concentrate soil organic matter. HF-treatment increased KOC for the majority of soils (average factor 2.4). We attribute this increase to the blocking of organic matter sorption sites in the whole soils by minerals. There was no significant correlation between KOC for the whole soils and KOC for the HF-treated soils, indicating that the importance of organic matter-mineral interactions varied greatly amongst these soils. There was as much variation in KOC across the HF-treated soils as there was across the whole soils, indicating that the nature of soil organic matter is also an important contributor to KOC variability. Organic matter chemistry, determined by solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was correlated with KOC for the HF-treated soils. In particular, KOC increased with the aromatic C content (R=0.64, p=1×10(-6)), and decreased with O-alkyl C (R=-0.32, p=0.03) and alkyl C (R=-0.41, p=0.004) content.

  20. Sources and reactivities of marine-derived organic matter in coastal sediments as determined by alkaline CuO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goñi, Miguel A.; Hedges, John I.

    1995-07-01

    Alkaline CuO oxidation of ubiquitous biochemicals such as proteins, polysaccharides, and lipids, yields specific products, including fatty acids, diacids, and carboxylated phenols. Oxidation of a variety of marine organisms, including macrophytes, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and bacteria, yields these CuO products in characteristic patterns that can often differentiate these biological sources. Sediments from Skan Bay (Unalaska Island, Alaska) display organic carbon and total nitrogen profiles which are consistent with three kinetically distinct pools of organic matter. The CuO fingerprints of these sediments distinguish these three pools at the molecular level, indicating a highly labile, fatty acid-rich surface organic layer of likely bacterial origin, intermediately reactive kelp debris and a background of phytoplankton remains that predominates at depth. The CuO method, which has been previously applied only to characterize cutin and lignin constituents of vascular land plants, also provides information on other types of abundant biochemicals, including those indicative of marine sources.

  1. Macroinvertebrate and organic matter export from headwater tributaries of a Central Appalachian stream

    EPA Science Inventory

    Headwater streams export organisms and other materials to their receiving streams and macroinvertebrate drift can shape colonization dynamics in downstream reaches while providing food for downstream consumers. Spring-time macroinvertebrate drift and organic matter export was me...

  2. Sources and Distribution of Organic Matter in Sediments of the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both riverine and marine sources of organic matter (OM) contribute to sediment organic pools, and either source can contribute significantly to sediment accumulation, burial, and remineralization rates on river dominated continental shelf systems. For the Louisiana continental sh...

  3. Sustaining effect of soil warming on organic matter decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Ruixing; Ouyang, Zhu; Dorodnikov, Maxim; Wilson, Glenn; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Global warming affects various parts of carbon (C) cycle including acceleration of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition with strong feedback to atmospheric CO2 concentration. Despite many soil warming studies showed changes of microbial community structure, only very few were focused on sustainability of soil warming on microbial activity associated with SOM decomposition. Two alternative hypotheses: 1) acclimation because of substrate exhaustion and 2) sustaining increase of microbial activity with accelerated decomposition of recalcitrant SOM pools were never proven under long term field conditions. This is especially important in the nowadays introduced no-till crop systems leading to redistribution of organic C at the soil surface, which is much susceptible to warming effects than the rest of the profile. We incubated soil samples from a four-year warming experiment with tillage (T) and no-tillage (NT) practices under three temperatures: 15, 21, and 27 °C, and related the evolved total CO2 efflux to changes of organic C pools. Warmed soils released significantly more CO2 than the control treatment (no warming) at each incubation temperature, and the largest differences were observed under 15 °C (26% increase). The difference in CO2 efflux from NT to T increase with temperature showing high vulnerability of C stored in NT to soil warming. The Q10 value reflecting the sensitivity of SOM decomposition to warming was lower for warmed than non-warmed soil indicating better acclimation of microbes or lower C availability during long term warming. The activity of three extracellular enzymes: β-glucosidase, chitinase, sulphatase, reflecting the response of C, N and S cycles to warming, were significantly higher under warming and especially under NT compared to two other respective treatments. The CO2 released during 2 months of incubation consisted of 85% from recalcitrant SOM and the remaining 15% from microbial biomass and extractable organic C based on the

  4. Influence of soil organic matter composition on the partition of organic compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rutherford, D.W.; Chiou, C.T.; Klle, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    The sorption at room temperature of benzene and carbon tetrachloride from water on three high-organic-content soils (muck, peat, and extracted peat) and on cellulose was determined in order to evaluate the effect of sorbent polarity on the solute partition coefficients. The isotherms are highly linear for both solutes on all the organic matter samples, which is consistent with a partition model. For both solutes, the extracted peat shows the greatest sorption capacity while the cellulose shows the lowest capacity; the difference correlates with the polar-to-nonpolar group ratio [(O + N)/C] of the sorbent samples. The relative increase of solute partition coefficient (Kom) with a decrease of sample polar content is similar for both solutes, and the limiting sorption capacity on a given organic matter sample is comparable between the solutes. This observation suggests that one can estimate the polarity effect of a sample of soil organic matter (SOM) on Kom of various nonpolar solutes by determining the partition coefficient of single nonpolar solute when compositional analysis of the SOM is not available. The observed dependence of Kom on sample polarity is used to account for the variation of Kom values of individual compounds on different soils that results from change in the polar group content of SOM. On the assumption that the carbon content of SOM in "ordinary soils" is 53-63%, the calculated variation of Kom is a factor of ???3. This value is in agreement with the limit of variation of most Kom data with soils of relatively high SOM contents.

  5. Isotopic composition of pyrite: Relationship to organic matter type and iron availability in some North American cretaceous shales

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gautier, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    The S isotope composition of pyrite in Cretaceous shales from the Western Interior of North America is related to organic C abundance, kerogen type and Fe availability. Both calcareous and noncalcareous rocks show a correlation between S and C, but noncalcareous rocks are relatively enriched in S with a higher S C ratio. This higher ratio probably shows that pyrite formation was Fe limited in the calcareous rocks. Organic-carbon-rich noncalcareous shales accumulated slowly beneath anoxic bottom waters. The anoxic bottom waters allowed hydrogen-rich organic matter to be preserved. Such shales have a narrow range of 34S-depleted sulfide and have Fe S ratios like stoichiometric pyrite, suggesting that pyrite formation in organic-rich shales was also limited by Fe availability. Conversely, organic-poor shales commonly accumulated at comparatively high rates, contain hydrogen-poor and refractory organic matter, and have a wide range of pyrite-S isotopic compositions. These organic-poor shales contain post-sulfidic authigenic minerals such as siderite and have excess reactive Fe rather than pyrite stoichiometry. Evidently Fe played a large role in early diagenesis and determined the course of post-sulfidic diagenesis. Fe availability was, however, mainly controlled by provenance, by the rates of sediment accumulation, and by the oxygen content of the depositional environment. ?? 1987.

  6. Natural organic matter fouling behaviors on superwetting nanofiltration membranes.

    PubMed

    Shan, Linglong; Fan, Hongwei; Guo, Hongxia; Ji, Shulan; Zhang, Guojun

    2016-04-15

    Nanofiltration has been widely recognized as a promising technology for the removal of micro-molecular organic components from natural water. Natural organic matter (NOM), a very important precursor of disinfection by-products, is currently considered as the major cause of membrane fouling. It is necessary to develop a membrane with both high NOM rejection and anti-NOM fouling properties. In this study, both superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic nanofiltration membranes for NOM removal have been fabricated. The fouling behavior of NOM on superwetting nanofiltration membranes has been extensively investigated by using humic acid (HA) as the model foulant. The extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek approach and nanoindentor scratch tests suggested that the superhydrophilic membrane had the strongest repulsion force to HA due to the highest positive total interaction energy (ΔG(TOT)) value and the lowest critical load. Excitation emission matrix analyses of natural water also indicated that the superhydrophilic membrane showed resistance to fouling by hydrophobic substances and therefore high removal thereof. Conversely, the superhydrophobic membrane showed resistance to fouling by hydrophilic substances and therefore high removal capacity. Long-term operation suggested that the superhydrophilic membrane had high stability due to its anti-NOM fouling capacity. Based on the different anti-fouling properties of the studied superwetting membranes, a combination of superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic membranes was examined to further improve the removal of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic pollutants. With a combination of superhydrophilic and superhydrophobic membranes, the NOM rejection (RUV254) and DOC removal rates (RDOC) could be increased to 83.6% and 73.3%, respectively.

  7. Dissolved organic matter reduces algal accumulation of methylmercury

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luengen, Allison C.; Fisher, Nicholas S.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) significantly decreased accumulation of methylmercury (MeHg) by the diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana in laboratory experiments. Live diatom cells accumulated two to four times more MeHg than dead cells, indicating that accumulation may be partially an energy-requiring process. Methylmercury enrichment in diatoms relative to ambient water was measured by a volume concentration factor (VCF). Without added DOM, the maximum VCF was 32 x 104, and the average VCF (from 10 to 72 h) over all experiments was 12.6 x 104. At very low (1.5 mg/L) added DOM, VCFs dropped by approximately half. At very high (20 mg/L) added DOM, VCFs dropped 10-fold. Presumably, MeHg was bound to a variety of reduced sulfur sites on the DOM, making it unavailable for uptake. Diatoms accumulated significantly more MeHg when exposed to transphilic DOM extracts than hydrophobic ones. However, algal lysate, a labile type of DOM created by resuspending a marine diatom in freshwater, behaved similarly to a refractory DOM isolate from San Francisco Bay. Addition of 67 μM L-cysteine resulted in the largest drop in VCFs, to 0.28 x 104. Although the DOM composition influenced the availability of MeHg to some extent, total DOM concentration was the most important factor in determining algal bioaccumulation of MeHg.

  8. The chemical ecology of soil organic matter molecular constituents.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Myrna J; Simpson, André J

    2012-06-01

    Soil organic matter (OM) contains vast stores of carbon, and directly supports microbial, plant, and animal life by retaining essential nutrients and water in the soil. Soil OM plays important roles in biological, chemical, and physical processes within the soil, and arguably plays a major role in maintaining long-term ecological stability in a changing world. Despite its importance, there is a great deal still unknown about soil OM chemical ecology. The development of sophisticated analytical methods have reshaped our understanding of soil OM composition, which is now believed to be comprised of plant and microbial products at various stages of decomposition. The methods also have recently been applied to study environmental change in various settings and have provided unique insight with respect to soil OM chemical ecology. The goal of this review is to highlight the methods used to characterize soil OM structure, source, and degradation that have enabled precise observations of OM and associated ecological shifts. Although the chemistry of soil OM is important in its overall fate in ecosystems, the studies conducted to date suggest that ecological function is not defined by soil OM chemistry alone. The long-standing questions regarding soil OM stability and recalcitrance will likely be answered when several molecular methods are used in tandem to closely examine structure, source, age, degradation stage, and interactions of specific OM components in soil.

  9. Sorption of endosulphan sulphate in soil organic matter.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Raja; Atwater, James W; Hall, Ken J; Parkinson, Paula

    2011-12-01

    Sorption of endosulphan sulphate in soil organic matter was investigated using Standard Elliot soil humic acid (HA) and soil fulvic acid (FA) at two ionic strengths (0.001 and 0.01). It was observed that divalent calcium ion and ionic strength affect the sorption of endosulphan sulphate in HA. All the experiments were carried out at pH 6.7 +/- 0.1. In the presence and absence of calcium (ionic strength 0.001), the solubility enhancement method was used to estimate the sorption coefficients of endosulphan sulphate in HA. For FA, the solubility enhancement method was used to estimate the sorption coefficients at an ionic strength of 0.001 (in the presence of calcium) and 0.01. The presence of calcium was found to significantly enhance (alpha = 0.01) the solubility of endosulphan sulphate in HA. Sorption coefficients at pH 6.7, obtained using the solubility enhancement method, were found to be 10-21 L/g in HA and 6 L/g in FA (in the presence of calcium). Increase in ionic strength from 0.001 to 0.01 decreased the sorption of endosulphan sulphate in HA. The effect of ionic strength and calcium on the sorption of endosulphan sulphate was most satisfactorily explained on the basis of the Donnan volume.

  10. Chemotaxis toward phytoplankton drives organic matter partitioning among marine bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Smriga, Steven; Fernandez, Vicente I.; Mitchell, James G.; Stocker, Roman

    2016-01-01

    The microenvironment surrounding individual phytoplankton cells is often rich in dissolved organic matter (DOM), which can attract bacteria by chemotaxis. These “phycospheres” may be prominent sources of resource heterogeneity in the ocean, affecting the growth of bacterial populations and the fate of DOM. However, these effects remain poorly quantified due to a lack of quantitative ecological frameworks. Here, we used video microscopy to dissect with unprecedented resolution the chemotactic accumulation of marine bacteria around individual Chaetoceros affinis diatoms undergoing lysis. The observed spatiotemporal distribution of bacteria was used in a resource utilization model to map the conditions under which competition between different bacterial groups favors chemotaxis. The model predicts that chemotactic, copiotrophic populations outcompete nonmotile, oligotrophic populations during diatom blooms and bloom collapse conditions, resulting in an increase in the ratio of motile to nonmotile cells and in the succession of populations. Partitioning of DOM between the two populations is strongly dependent on the overall concentration of bacteria and the diffusivity of different DOM substances, and within each population, the growth benefit from phycospheres is experienced by only a small fraction of cells. By informing a DOM utilization model with highly resolved behavioral data, the hybrid approach used here represents a new path toward the elusive goal of predicting the consequences of microscale interactions in the ocean. PMID:26802122

  11. Breakage, regrowth, and fractal nature of natural organic matter flocs.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Peter; Jefferson, Bruce; Parsons, Simon A

    2005-04-01

    The growth, breakage, regrowth, and fractal nature of flocs was investigated by use of a laser diffraction particle sizing device. A range of coagulants were investigated for the coagulation of natural organic matter (NOM) and compared to other coagulated systems. The results showed NOM floc structural characteristics varied in steady-state size depending upon which coagulant was used. When compared to other systems, the order of floc size was Fe precipitate > Fe-NOM > latex (in NaCl solution). Floc regrowth after exposure to high shear was limited for all of the flocs under investigation other than for latex in an inert electrolyte. This highlighted differences in the internal bonding structure of flocs, with the results suggesting that physical bonds have a capacity to re-form after breakage. Fractal dimension analysis by small-angle laser light scattering (SALLS) had limited applicability to large flocs that dominated all of the systems under investigation, but the degree of compaction increased as flocs were broken in high shear. This provided a possible mechanistic reason for the irreversible breakage seen.

  12. The Organic Matter Biogeochemistry of the Congo River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, R. G.; Hernes, P.; Wabakanghanzi, J.; Bienvenu, D. J.; Six, J.

    2015-12-01

    Organic matter (OM) represents a fundamental link between terrestrial and aquatic carbon cycles and plays an essential role in aquatic ecosystem biogeochemistry. The Congo River, which drains pristine tropical forest and savannah is the second largest exporter of terrestrial carbon to the ocean, and represents a historically understudied basin. Our ongoing projects in the Congo Basin aim to provide pertinent information on transport and emissions of carbon by rivers that need to be incorporated into carbon budgets of terrestrial ecosystems. To date the Congo Basin has seen only limited perturbation but the carbon locked away in the Congo, as in other tropical rainforests is increasingly vulnerable to release into the aquatic system and the atmosphere. However, riverine carbon transport (both of OM to the oceans and release of CO2 to the atmosphere) as a driver of global carbon cycling is still largely overlooked. Here we present data from a multi-season field campaign to quantify the transport fluxes, mineralization fluxes, and chemical character of Congo River OM, and to elucidate how these properties relate to each other and vary seasonally driven by hydrology within the Congo Basin. Existing data demonstrates that although tropical rivers do not experience the seasonal climatic extremes of temperate or northern high-latitude rivers, they all demonstrate similar effects due to changing hydrologic inputs with respect to OM dynamics. Specifically flushing periods appear to warrant further study as maximal export of reactive freshly leached plant material occurs during this time period.

  13. Chemotaxis toward phytoplankton drives organic matter partitioning among marine bacteria.

    PubMed

    Smriga, Steven; Fernandez, Vicente I; Mitchell, James G; Stocker, Roman

    2016-02-09

    The microenvironment surrounding individual phytoplankton cells is often rich in dissolved organic matter (DOM), which can attract bacteria by chemotaxis. These "phycospheres" may be prominent sources of resource heterogeneity in the ocean, affecting the growth of bacterial populations and the fate of DOM. However, these effects remain poorly quantified due to a lack of quantitative ecological frameworks. Here, we used video microscopy to dissect with unprecedented resolution the chemotactic accumulation of marine bacteria around individual Chaetoceros affinis diatoms undergoing lysis. The observed spatiotemporal distribution of bacteria was used in a resource utilization model to map the conditions under which competition between different bacterial groups favors chemotaxis. The model predicts that chemotactic, copiotrophic populations outcompete nonmotile, oligotrophic populations during diatom blooms and bloom collapse conditions, resulting in an increase in the ratio of motile to nonmotile cells and in the succession of populations. Partitioning of DOM between the two populations is strongly dependent on the overall concentration of bacteria and the diffusivity of different DOM substances, and within each population, the growth benefit from phycospheres is experienced by only a small fraction of cells. By informing a DOM utilization model with highly resolved behavioral data, the hybrid approach used here represents a new path toward the elusive goal of predicting the consequences of microscale interactions in the ocean.

  14. Mercury reduction and complexation by natural organic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Baohua; Bian, Yongrong; Miller, Carrie L; Dong, Wenming; Jiang, Xin; Liang, Liyuan

    2011-01-01

    Mercuric Hg(II) species form complexes with natural dissolved organic matter (DOM) such as humic acid (HA), and this binding is known to affect the chemical and biological transformation and cycling of mercury in aquatic environments. Dissolved elemental mercury, Hg(0), is also widely observed in sediments and water. However, reactions between Hg(0) and DOM have rarely been studied in anoxic environments. Here, under anoxic dark conditions we show strong interactions between reduced HA and Hg(0) through thiol-ligand induced oxidative complexation with an estimated binding capacity of about 3.5 umol Hg(0)/g HA and a partitioning coefficient greater than 10^6 mL/g. We further demonstrate that Hg(II) can be effectively reduced to Hg(0) in the presence of as little as 0.2 mg/L reduced HA, whereas production of purgeable Hg(0) is inhibited by complexation as HA concentration increases. This dual role played by DOM in the reduction and complexation of mercury is likely widespread in anoxic sediments and water and can be expected to significantly influence the mercury species transformations and biological uptake that leads to the formation of toxic methylmercury.

  15. Modeling monochloramine loss in the presence of natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Duirk, Stephen E; Gombert, Bertrand; Croué, Jean-Philippe; Valentine, Richard L

    2005-09-01

    A comprehensive model describing monochloramine loss in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) is presented. The model incorporates simultaneous monochloramine autodecomposition and reaction pathways resulting in NOM oxidation. These competing pathways were resolved numerically using an iterative process evaluating hypothesized reactions describing NOM oxidation by monochloramine under various experimental conditions. The reaction of monochloramine with NOM was described as biphasic using four NOM specific reaction parameters. NOM pathway 1 involves a direct reaction of monochloramine with NOM (k(doc1) = 1.05 x 10(4)-3.45 x 10(4) M(-1) h(-1)). NOM pathway 2 is slower in terms of monochloramine loss and attributable to free chlorine (HOCl) derived from monochloramine hydrolysis (k(doc2) = 5.72 x 10(5)-6.98 x 10(5) M(-1) h(-1)), which accounted for the majority of monochloramine loss. Also, the free chlorine reactive site fraction in the NOM structure was found to correlate to specific ultraviolet absorbance at 280 nm (SUVA280). Modeling monochloramine loss allowed for insight into disinfectant reaction pathways involving NOM oxidation. This knowledge is of value in assessing monochloramine stability in distribution systems and reaction pathways leading to disinfection by-product (DBP) formation.

  16. Spectral Induced Polarization Signature of Soil Organic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Nimrod; Furman, Alex

    2015-04-01

    Although often composing a non-negligible fraction of soil cation exchange capacity (CEC), the impact of soil organic matter (OM) on the electrical properties of soil has not been thoroughly investigated. In this research the impact of soil OM on the spectral induced polarization (SIP) signature of soil was investigated. Electrical and chemical measurements for two experiments using the same soil, one with calcium as the dominant cation and the other with sodium, with different concentration of OM were performed. Our results show that despite the high CEC of OM, a decrease in polarization and an increase in relaxation time with increasing concentration of OM is observed. For the soil with calcium as the dominant cation, the decreases in polarization and the increase in relaxation time were stronger. We explain these non-trivial results by accounting for the interactions between the OM and the soil minerals. We suggest that the formation of organo-mineral complexes reduce ionic mobility, explaining both the decrease in polarization and the increase in relaxation time. These results demonstrate the important role of OM on SIP response of soil, and call for a further research in order to establish a new polarization model that will include the impact of OM on soil polarization.

  17. On the spectral induced polarization signature of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, N.; Furman, A.

    2015-01-01

    Although often composing a non-negligible fraction of soil cation exchange capacity (CEC), the impact of soil organic matter (OM) on the electrical properties of soil has not been thoroughly investigated. In this research the impact of soil OM on the spectral induced polarization (SIP) signature of soil was investigated. Electrical and chemical measurements for two experiments using the same soil, one with calcium as the dominant cation and the other with sodium, with different concentration of OM were performed. Our results show that despite the high CEC of OM, a decrease in polarization and an increase in relaxation time with increasing concentration of OM is observed. For the soil with calcium as the dominant cation, the decreases in polarization and the increase in relaxation time were stronger. We explain these non-trivial results by accounting for the interactions between the OM and the soil minerals. We suggest that the formation of organo-mineral complexes reduce ionic mobility, explaining both the decrease in polarization and the increase in relaxation time. These results demonstrate the important role of OM on SIP response of soil, and call for a further research in order to establish a new polarization model that will include the impact of OM on soil polarization.

  18. Temperature responses of individual soil organic matter components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaojuan; Simpson, Myrna J.

    2008-09-01

    Temperature responses of soil organic matter (SOM) remain unclear partly due to its chemical and compositional heterogeneity. In this study, the decomposition of SOM from two grassland soils was investigated in a 1-year laboratory incubation at six different temperatures. SOM was separated into solvent extractable compounds, suberin- and cutin-derived compounds, and lignin-derived monomers by solvent extraction, base hydrolysis, and CuO oxidation, respectively. These SOM components have distinct chemical structures and stabilities and their decomposition patterns over the course of the experiment were fitted with a two-pool exponential decay model. The stability of SOM components was also assessed using geochemical parameters and kinetic parameters derived from model fitting. Compared with the solvent extractable compounds, a low percentage of lignin monomers partitioned into the labile SOM pool. Suberin- and cutin-derived compounds were poorly fitted by the decay model, and their recalcitrance was shown by the geochemical degradation parameter (ω - C16/∑C16), which was observed to stabilize during the incubation. The temperature sensitivity of decomposition, expressed as Q10, was derived from the relationship between temperature and SOM decay rates. SOM components exhibited varying temperature responses and the decomposition of lignin monomers exhibited higher Q10 values than the decomposition of solvent extractable compounds. Our study shows that Q10 values derived from soil respiration measurements may not be reliable indicators of temperature responses of individual SOM components.

  19. Variation in assimilable organic carbon formation during chlorination of Microcystis aeruginosa extracellular organic matter solutions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xingbin; Yuan, Ting; Ni, Huishan; Li, Yanpeng; Hu, Yang

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the chlorination of Microcystis aeruginosa extracellular organic matter (EOM) solutions under different conditions, to determine how the metabolites produced by these organisms affect water safety and the formation of assimilable organic carbon (AOC). The effects of chlorine dosages, coagulant dosage, reaction time and temperature on the formation of AOC were investigated during the disinfection of M.aeruginosa metabolite solutions. The concentration of AOC followed a decreasing and then increasing pattern with increasing temperature and reaction time. The concentration of AOC decreased and then increased with increasing chlorination dosage, followed by a slight decrease at the highest level of chlorination. However, the concentration of AOC decreased continuously with increasing coagulant dosage. The formation of AOC can be suppressed under appropriate conditions. In this study, chlorination at 4mg/L, combined with a coagulant dose of 40mg/L at 20°C over a reaction time of 12hr, produced the minimum AOC.

  20. Investigating organic matter in Fanno Creek, Oregon, Part 2 of 3: sources, sinks, and transport of organic matter with fine sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keith, Mackenzie K.; Sobieszczyk, Steven; Goldman, Jami H.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2014-01-01

    Organic matter (OM) is abundant in Fanno Creek, Oregon, USA, and has been tied to a variety of water-quality concerns, including periods of low dissolved oxygen downstream in the Tualatin River, Oregon. The key sources of OM in Fanno Creek and other Tualatin River tributaries have not been fully identified, although isotopic analyses from previous studies indicated a predominantly terrestrial source. This study investigates the role of fine sediment erosion and deposition (mechanisms and spatial patterns) in relation to OM transport. Geomorphic mapping within the Fanno Creek floodplain shows that a large portion (approximately 70%) of the banks are eroding or subject to erosion, likely as a result of the imbalance caused by anthropogenic alteration. Field measurements of long- and short-term bank erosion average 4.2 cm/year and average measurements of deposition for the watershed are 4.8 cm/year. The balance between average annual erosion and deposition indicates an export of 3,250 metric tons (tonnes, t) of fine sediment to the Tualatin River—about twice the average annual export of 1,880 t of sediment at a location 2.4 km from the creek’s mouth calculated from suspended sediment load regressions from continuous turbidity data and suspended sediment samples. Carbon content from field samples of bank material, combined with fine sediment export rates, indicates that about 29–67 t of carbon, or about 49–116 t of OM, from bank sediment may be exported to the Tualatin River from Fanno Creek annually, an estimate that is a lower bound because it does not account for the mass wasting of organic-rich O and A soil horizons that enter the stream.

  1. Investigating organic matter in Fanno Creek, Oregon, Part 2 of 3: Sources, sinks, and transport of organic matter with fine sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keith, Mackenzie K.; Sobieszczyk, Steven; Goldman, Jami H.; Rounds, Stewart A.

    2014-11-01

    Organic matter (OM) is abundant in Fanno Creek, Oregon, USA, and has been tied to a variety of water-quality concerns, including periods of low dissolved oxygen downstream in the Tualatin River, Oregon. The key sources of OM in Fanno Creek and other Tualatin River tributaries have not been fully identified, although isotopic analyses from previous studies indicated a predominantly terrestrial source. This study investigates the role of fine sediment erosion and deposition (mechanisms and spatial patterns) in relation to OM transport. Geomorphic mapping within the Fanno Creek floodplain shows that a large portion (approximately 70%) of the banks are eroding or subject to erosion, likely as a result of the imbalance caused by anthropogenic alteration. Field measurements of long- and short-term bank erosion average 4.2 cm/year and average measurements of deposition for the watershed are 4.8 cm/year. The balance between average annual erosion and deposition indicates an export of 3,250 metric tons (tonnes, t) of fine sediment to the Tualatin River-about twice the average annual export of 1,880 t of sediment at a location 2.4 km from the creek's mouth calculated from suspended sediment load regressions from continuous turbidity data and suspended sediment samples. Carbon content from field samples of bank material, combined with fine sediment export rates, indicates that about 29-67 t of carbon, or about 49-116 t of OM, from bank sediment may be exported to the Tualatin River from Fanno Creek annually, an estimate that is a lower bound because it does not account for the mass wasting of organic-rich O and A soil horizons that enter the stream.

  2. FACTORS INFLUENCING PHOTOREACTIONS OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER IN A COASTAL RIVER OF THE SOUTHEASTERN UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photoreactions of dissolved organic matter can affect the oxidizing capacity, nutrient dynamics, trace gas exchange, and color of surface waters. This study focuses on factors that affect the photoreactions of the colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Satilla River, a co...

  3. Anthropogenic aerosols as a source of ancient dissolved organic matter in glaciers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stubbins, Aron; Hood, Eran; Raymond, Peter A.; Aiken, George R.; Sleighter, Rachel L.; Hernes, Peter J.; Butman, David; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Striegl, Rob; Schuster, Paul F.; Abdulla, Hussain A.N.; Vermilyea, Andrew W.; Scott, Durelle T.; Spencer, Robert G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Glacier-derived dissolved organic matter represents a quantitatively significant source of ancient, yet highly bioavailable carbon to downstream ecosystems. This finding runs counter to logical perceptions of age–reactivity relationships, in which the least reactive material withstands degradation the longest and is therefore the oldest. The remnants of ancient peatlands and forests overrun by glaciers have been invoked as the source of this organic matter. Here, we examine the radiocarbon age and chemical composition of dissolved organic matter in snow, glacier surface water, ice and glacier outflow samples from Alaska to determine the origin of the organic matter. Low levels of compounds derived from vascular plants indicate that the organic matter does not originate from forests or peatlands. Instead, we show that the organic matter on the surface of the glaciers is radiocarbon depleted, consistent with an anthropogenic aerosol source. Fluorescence spectrophotometry measurements reveal the presence of protein-like compounds of microbial or aerosol origin. In addition, ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry measurements document the presence of combustion products found in anthropogenic aerosols. Based on the presence of these compounds, we suggest that aerosols derived from fossil fuel burning are a source of pre-aged organic matter to glacier surfaces. Furthermore, we show that the molecular signature of the organic matter is conserved in snow, glacier water and outflow, suggesting that the anthropogenic carbon is exported relatively unchanged in glacier outflows.

  4. Elemental composition and functional groups in soil labile organic matter fractions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Labile organic matter fractions are major components involved in nutrient cycle in soil. In this chapter, we examine three labile organic matter fraction: light fraction (LF), humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (HA) in Alabama cotton soils (ultisol) amended with chemical fertilizer (NH4NO3) and poult...

  5. Advances in understanding the molecular structure of soil organic matter: Implications for interactions in the environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    We take a historic approach to explore how concepts of the chemical and physical nature of soil organic matter have evolved over time. We emphasize conceptual and analytical achievements in organic matter research over the last two decades and demonstrate how these developments h...

  6. Characterization of Plant-derived Dissolved Organic Matter by Multiple Spectroscopic Techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) derived from fresh or early-stage decomposing soil amendment materials may play an important role in the process of organic matter accumulation. In this study, eight DOM samples from alfalfa, corn, crimson clover, hairy vetch, lupin, soybean, wheat and dairy manure wer...

  7. Effects of Agronomic and Conservation Management Practices On Organic Matter and Associated Properties in Claypan Soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic matter plays several important roles in the biogeochemistry of soil and impacts the sustainability and profitability of agroecosystems. Retention and transformation of soil organic matter (SOM) are affected by agronomic and conservation management practices. The primary objective of this stu...

  8. Composition of whole and water extractable organic matter of cattle manure affected by management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Organic matter (OM) is a major component of animal manure. In this chapter, we present two case studies on the multiple spectral features of whole and water extractable organic matter (WEOM) of cattle (beef and dairy) manure affected by differing management practices. Using wet chemistry and Fourie...

  9. Bacteriohopanepolyol distribution in Yenisei River and Kara Sea suspended particulate matter and sediments traces terrigenous organic matter input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Jonge, Cindy; Talbot, Helen M.; Bischoff, Juliane; Stadnitskaia, Alina; Cherkashov, Georgy; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2016-02-01

    Bacteriohopanepolyols (BHPs) are ubiquitous bacterial membrane lipids, encountered in soils, river and marine suspended particulate matter (SPM) and sediments. Their abundance and distribution provides a direct means to identify bacterial inputs and can be used to trace soil-derived bacterial organic matter (OM) and in some cases the presence of bacterial groups and their activities in aquatic systems. We have studied the BHP distribution in the SPM of a major Siberian River (Yenisei River) that crosses a large latitudinal gradient, draining a large part of Mongolia and Siberian Russia. The Yenisei River is the main river to flow into the Kara Sea, a shelf sea of the Arctic Ocean. We show that the BHP distribution and concentration of SPM and surface sediments of the Yenisei Outflow in the Kara Sea allow to trace soil-marker BHPs and evaluate the performance of the R‧soil index, a proxy developed to trace bacterial soil-derived OM. Soil-marker BHPs are present in the Yenisei River, and their concentration decreases from the Yenisei River Outflow into the offshore marine sediments. The R‧soil correlates well with an independent proxy for bacterial OM, the BIT-index (r2 = 0.82) and has a moderate correlation with the δ13Corg values, a bulk OM proxy for terrigenous input (r2 = 0.44). Consequently, the R‧soil index performs well in the Kara Sea, strengthening its application for tracing bacterial OM in the Arctic Ocean, both in modern and downcore sediments. Furthermore, a suite of BHPs that are characteristic for methanotrophic bacteria, i.e. 35-aminobacteriohopane-30,31,32,33,34-pentol (aminopentol) and 35-aminobacteriohopane-31,32,33,34-tetrol (aminotetrol), is encountered in the Yenisei Outflow sediments. These components are partly sourced from terrigenous sources, but are likely also produced in-situ in the marine sediments. The distribution of the pentafunctionalized cyclitol ether BHP in the marine systems is noteworthy, and indicates that it can

  10. "Death in soil" or what can we learn from groundwater for the genesis of soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaestner, M.; Miltner, A.; Bombach, P.; Schmidt-Brücken, B.

    2009-04-01

    Soil microorganisms do not only catalyze the transformation of plant residues to soil organic matter, but also serve as considerable carbon source for the formation of refractory soil organic matter by providing cell fragments as structural interfacial surfaces in soil systems. After incubation of 13C-labeled Gram negative bacteria in soil for 224 days, we could show that 44% of the bulk carbon remained in soil. 30 - 35 % of the remaining bulk C from Gram negative microbial biomass was stabilized in non-living soil organic matter (SOM). Surprisingly, the added labeled biomass proteins remained in soil almost completely which clearly indicates the stabilization of proteins in cell aggregations being more resistant to biodegradation than free proteins and amino acids. Scanning electron micrographs of the soil showed very rarely intact cells but highly abundant patchy organic cover material of 20 to 50 nm2 size on the mineral surfaces. A possible mechanism for this stabilization and the observed material could be found by analyses of microbial communities and biofilms developing on Biosep? beads within in situ microcosms exposed to contaminated aquifers. Scanning electron micrographs of the developing biofilms on the beads showed the formation of such patchy material found in the soil by fragmentation of empty bacterial cell envelopes (cell walls) and all stages of decay. The fragmentation of these cell walls provided a mechanistic explanation for the observed stabilisation, the genesis of SOM derived from dead bacterial cells, and the enzyme activity always found associated to SOM.

  11. Decomposition of soil organic matter from boreal black spruce forest: Environmental and chemical controls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wickland, K.P.; Neff, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Black spruce forests are a dominant covertype in the boreal forest region, and they inhabit landscapes that span a wide range of hydrologic and thermal conditions. These forests often have large stores of soil organic carbon. Recent increases in temperature at northern latitudes may be stimulating decomposition rates of this soil carbon. It is unclear, however, how changes in environmental conditions influence decomposition in these systems, and if substrate controls of decomposition vary with hydrologic and thermal regime. We addressed these issues by investigating the effects of temperature, moisture, and organic matter chemical characteristics on decomposition of fibric soil horizons from three black spruce forest sites. The sites varied in drainage and permafrost, and included a "Well Drained" site where permafrost was absent, and "Moderately well Drained" and "Poorly Drained" sites where permafrost was present at about 0.5 m depth. Samples collected from each site were incubated at five different moisture contents (2, 25, 50, 75, and 100% saturation) and two different temperatures (10??C and 20??C) in a full factorial design for two months. Organic matter chemistry was analyzed using pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry prior to incubation, and after incubation on soils held at 20??C, 50% saturation. Mean cumulative mineralization, normalized to initial carbon content, ranged from 0.2% to 4.7%, and was dependent on temperature, moisture, and site. The effect of temperature on mineralization was significantly influenced by moisture content, as mineralization was greatest at 20??C and 50-75% saturation. While the relative effects of temperature and moisture were similar for all soils, mineralization rates were significantly greater for samples from the "Well Drained" site compared to the other sites. Variations in the relative abundances of polysaccharide-derivatives and compounds of undetermined source (such as toluene, phenol, 4-methyl phenol, and

  12. Soil organic matter on citrus plantation in Eastern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdà, Artemi; Pereira, Paulo; Novara, Agata; Prosdocimi, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    Citrus plantations in Eastern Spain are the main crop and Valencia region is the largest world exporter. The traditional plantation are located on flood irrigated areas and the new plantation are located on slopes were drip irrigation is the source of the wetting. It has been demonstrate that the citrus plantations contribute to high erosion rates on slopes (Cerdà et al., 2009b) as it is usual on agriculture land (Cerdà et al., 2009a), but when organic farming is present the soil erosion is much lower (Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2008; Cerdà et al., 2009; Cerdà and Jurgensen, 2011). This is a worldwide phenomenon (Wu et al., 2007; Wu et al., 2011; Xu et al., 2010; Xu et al., 2012a; Xu et al., 2012b), which are a key factor of the high erosion rates in rural areas (García Orenes et al., 2009: García Orenes et al., 20010; García Orenes et al., 2012; Haregewyn et al., 2013; Zhao et al., 2013). The key factor of the contrasted response of soils to the rain in citrus is the organic matter cover. This is why the Soil Erosion and Degradation Research Team developed a survey to determine the soil erosion rates on citrus orchards under different managements. A hundred of samples were collected in a citrus plantation on slope under conventional management (Chemical management), one on organic farming, one on traditional flood irrigated organic farming and one on traditional chemical flooding farm. The organic farming soils were treated with 10000 Kg ha-1 of manure yearly. The results show that the mean soil organic matter content was 1.24 %, 3.54%, 5,43% and 2.1% respectively, which show a clear impact of organic farming in the recovery of the soil organic matter. meanwhile the on the slopes and the flood-irrigated soils are Acknowledgements The research projects GL2008-02879/BTE, LEDDRA 243857 and PREVENTING AND REMEDIATING DEGRADATION OF SOILS IN EUROPE THROUGH LAND CARE (RECARE)FP7- ENV-2013- supported this research. References Cerdà, A., Flanagan, D.C., le Bissonnais

  13. The role of planktonic Flavobacteria in processing algal organic matter in coastal East Antarctica revealed using metagenomics and metaproteomics.

    PubMed

    Williams, Timothy J; Wilkins, David; Long, Emilie; Evans, Flavia; DeMaere, Mathew Z; Raftery, Mark J; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2013-05-01

    Heterotrophic marine bacteria play key roles in remineralizing organic matter generated from primary production. However, far more is known about which groups are dominant than about the cellular processes they perform in order to become dominant. In the Southern Ocean, eukaryotic phytoplankton are the dominant primary producers. In this study we used metagenomics and metaproteomics to determine how the dominant bacterial and archaeal plankton processed bloom material. We examined the microbial community composition in 14 metagenomes and found that the relative abundance of Flavobacteria (dominated by Polaribacter) was positively correlated with chlorophyll a fluorescence, and the relative abundance of SAR11 was inversely correlated with both fluorescence and Flavobacteria abundance. By performing metaproteomics on the sample with the highest relative abundance of Flavobacteria (Newcomb Bay, East Antarctica) we defined how Flavobacteria attach to and degrade diverse complex organic material, how they make labile compounds available to Alphaproteobacteria (especially SAR11) and Gammaproteobacteria, and how these heterotrophic Proteobacteria target and utilize these nutrients. The presence of methylotrophic proteins for archaea and bacteria also indicated the importance of metabolic specialists. Overall, the study provides functional data for the microbial mechanisms of nutrient cycling at the surface of the coastal Southern Ocean.

  14. Impact of biodegradation of organic matters on ammonia oxidation in compost.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yang; De Guardia, Amaury; Ziebal, Christine; De Macedo, Flávia Junqueira; Dabert, Patrick

    2013-05-01

    Nitrification plays an important role in nitrogen turnover in composting process. It has been believed that nitrification occurs mainly during the maturation phase due to the elevated temperature during the active phase of composting. In this work, the intense biodegradation of organic matters is demonstrated to be another negative impact on the ammonia oxidation, the first step of nitrification. We investigated the ammonia oxidation in compost following organic matters addition at intermediate temperature. Different indicators of ammonia oxidation were studied, respectively. The accumulation of nitrite and nitrate was 10(2)-10(3) lower in composts with organic matters addition. The nitrous oxide emissions were absent or 40-fold inferior in these composts. The nitrogen mass balance indicated a less amount of oxidized ammonia after the addition. The ammonia-oxidizing bacteria declined following the organic matters addition. In contrast, the ammonia-oxidizing archaea were supported by the organic matters. Possible mechanisms of this impact were also discussed.

  15. Where is DNA preserved in soil organic matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccone, Claudio; Beneduce, Luciano; Plaza, César

    2015-04-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) consists of long chains of alternating sugar and phosphate residues twisted in the form of a helix. Upon decomposition of plant and animal debris, this nucleic acid is released into the soil, where its fate is still not completely understood. In fact, although DNA is one of the organic compounds from living cells that is apparently broken down rapidly in soils, it is also potentially capable of being incorporated in (or interact with) the precursors of humic molecules. In order to track DNA occurrence in soil organic matter (SOM) fractions, an experiment was set up as a randomized complete block design with two factors, namely biochar addition and organic amendment. In particular, biochar (BC), applied at a rate of 20 t/ha, was combined with municipal solid waste compost (BC+MC) at a rate equivalent to 75 kg/ha of potentially available N, and with sewage sludge (BC+SS) at a rate equivalent to 75 kg/ha of potentially available N. Using a physical fractionation method, free SOM located between aggregates (unprotected C pool; FR), SOM occluded within macroaggregates (C pool weakly protected by physical mechanisms; MA), SOM occluded within microaggregates (C pool strongly protected by physical mechanisms; MI), and SOM associated with the mineral fractions (chemically-protected C pool; MIN) were separated from soil samples. DNA was then isolated from each fraction of the two series, as well as from the unamended soil (C) and from the bulk soils (WS), using Powersoil DNA isolation kit (MoBio, CA, USA) with a modified protocol. Data clearly show that the DNA survived the SOM fractionation, thus suggesting that physical fractionation methods create less artifacts compared to the chemical ones. Moreover, in both BC+MC and BC+SS series, most of the isolated DNA was present in the FR fraction, followed by the MA and the MI fractions. No DNA was recovered from the MIN fraction. This finding supports the idea that most of the DNA occurring in the SOM

  16. Heat impact caused molecular level changes in solid and dissolved soil organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Diana; Steffen, Bernhard; Eckhardt, Kai-Uwe; Leinweber, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The ubiquitous abundance of pyrolysed, highly aromatic organic matter, called "Black Carbon" (BC), in all environmental compartments became increasingly important in different fields of research beyond intensive investigated atmospheric aerosol due to climatic relevance. Its predominant high resistance to abiotic and biotic degradation resulted in turnover times from less than a century to several millennia. This recalcitrance led to the enrichment of BC in soils, accounting for 1-6% (European forest soils) to 60% (Chernozems) of total soil organic matter (SOM). Hence, soil BC acts an important sink in the global carbon cycle. In contrast, consequences for the nitrogen cycle up to date are rather inconsistently discussed. Soil related dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a major controlling factor in soil formation, an important pathway of organic matter transport and one of the largest active carbon reservoirs on earth, if considering oceans and other bodies of water. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of artificially simulated wildfire by thermal treatment on the molecular composition of water extractable soil organic matter (DOM). Soils from two outdoor lysimeters with different management history were investigated. Soil samples, non-heated and heated up to 350°C were analyzed for elemental composition (carbon, nitrogen and sulfur) and for bulk molecular composition by Pyrolysis-Field Ionization Mass Spectrometry (Py-FIMS) and synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) at the C- and N K-edges. DOM-samples obtained by hot water extraction, desalting and concentration by solid phase extraction were subsequently analyzed by flow injection analysis in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FTICR-MS), equipped with an ESI source and a 7 T supra-conducting magnet (LTQ-FT Ultra, ThermoFisher Scientific). This technique is the key technique for the analysis of complex samples due to its outstanding mass

  17. Perchlorate-induced combustion of organic matter with variable molecular weights: Implications for Mars missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sephton, Mark A.; Lewis, James M. T.; Watson, Jonathan S.; Montgomery, Wren; Garnier, Carole

    2014-11-01

    Instruments on the Viking landers and Curiosity rover analyzed samples of Mars and detected carbon dioxide and organic compounds of uncertain origin. Mineral-assisted reactions are leading to uncertainty, particularly those involving perchlorate minerals which thermally decompose to produce chlorine and oxygen which can then react with organic matter to generate organochlorine compounds and carbon dioxide. Although generally considered a problem for interpretation, the release profiles of generated gases can indicate the type of organic matter present. We have performed a set of experiments with perchlorate and organic matter of variable molecular weights. Results indicate that organic susceptibility to thermal degradation and mineral-assisted reactions is related to molecular weight. Low molecular weight organic matter reacts at lower temperatures than its high molecular weight counterparts. The natural occurrence and association of organic matter with differing molecular weights helps to discriminate between contamination (usually low molecular weight organic matter only) and indigenous carbon (commonly low and high molecular weight organic matter together). Our results can be used to provide insights into data returning from Mars.

  18. Dissolved organic matter in anoxic pore waters from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Hatcher, P.G.; Spiker, E. C.; Szeverenyi, N.M.; Maciel, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter and dissolved inorganic chemical species in anoxic pore water from Mangrove Lake, Bermuda sediments were studied to evaluate the role of pore water in the early diagenesis of organic matter. Dissolved sulphate, titration alkalinity, phosphate, and ammonia concentration versus depth profiles were typical of many nearshore clastic sediments and indicated sulphate reduction in the upper 100 cm of sediment. The dissolved organic matter in the pore water was made up predominantly of large molecules, was concentrated from large quantities of pore water by using ultrafiltration and was extensively tudied by using elemental and stable carbon isotope analysis and high-resolution, solid state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. The results indicate that this material has a predominantly polysaccharide-like structure and in addition contains a large amount of oxygen-containing functional groups (e.g., carboxyl groups). The 13C nulcear magnetic resonance spectra of the high-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter resemble those of the organic matter in the surface sediments of Mangrove Lake. We propose that this high-molecular-weight organic matter in pore waters represents the partially degraded, labile organic components of the sedimentary organic matter and that pore waters serve as a conduit for removal of these labile organic components from the sediments. The more refractory components are, thus, selectively preserved in the sediments as humic substances (primarily humin). ?? 1986.

  19. Estimating toxic damage to soil ecosystems from soil organic matter profiles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beyer, W.N.

    2001-01-01

    Concentrations of particulate and total organic matter were measured in upper soil profiles at 26 sites as a potential means to identify toxic damage to soil ecosystems. Because soil organic matter plays a role in cycling nutrients, aerating soil, retaining water, and maintaining tilth, a significant reduction in organic matter content in a soil profile is not just evidence of a change in ecosystem function, but of damage to that soil ecosystem. Reference sites were selected for comparison to contaminated sites, and additional sites were selected to illustrate how variables other than environmental contaminants might affect the Soil organic matter profile. The survey was undertaken on the supposition that environmental contaminants and other stressors reduce the activity of earthworms and other macrofauna, inhibiting the incorporation of organic matter into the soil profile. The profiles of the unstressed soils showed a continuous decrease in organic matter content from the uppermost mineral soil layer (0-2.5 cm) down to 15 cm. Stressed soils showed an abrupt decrease in soil organic matter content below a depth of 2.5 cm. The 2.5-5.0 cm layer of stressed soils--such as found in a pine barren, an orchard, sites contaminated with zinc, and a site with compacted soil--had less than 4% total organic matter and less than 1% particulate organic matter. However, damaged soil ecosystems were best identified by comparison of their profiles to the profiles of closely matched reference soils, rather than by comparison to these absolute values. The presence or absence of earthworms offered a partial explanation of observed differences in soil organic matter profiles.

  20. Dynamics of dissolved organic matter in fjord ecosystems: Contributions of terrestrial dissolved organic matter in the deep layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Youhei; McCallister, S. Leigh; Koch, Boris P.; Gonsior, Michael; Jaffé, Rudolf

    2015-06-01

    Annually, rivers and inland water systems deliver a significant amount of terrestrial organic matter (OM) to the adjacent coastal ocean in both particulate and dissolved forms; however, the metabolic and biogeochemical transformations of OM during its seaward transport remains one of the least understood components of the global carbon cycle. This transfer of terrestrial carbon to marine ecosystems is crucial in maintaining trophic dynamics in coastal areas and critical in global carbon cycling. Although coastal regions have been proposed as important sinks for exported terrestrial materials, most of the global carbon cycling data, have not included fjords in their budgets. Here we present distributional patterns on the quantity and quality of dissolved OM in Fiordland National Park, New Zealand. Specifically, we describe carbon dynamics under diverse environmental settings based on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) depth profiles, oxygen concentrations, optical properties (fluorescence) and stable carbon isotopes. We illustrate a distinct change in the character of DOC in deep waters compared to surface and mid-depth waters. Our results suggest that, both, microbial reworking of terrestrially derived plant detritus and subsequent desorption of DOC from its particulate counterpart (as verified in a desorption experiment) are the main sources of the humic-like enriched DOC in the deep basins of the studied fjords. While it has been suggested that short transit times and protection of OM by mineral sorption may ultimately result in significant terrestrial carbon burial and preservation in fjords, our data suggests the existence of an additional source of terrestrial OM in the form of DOC generated in deep, fjord water.

  1. 14C as a tracer of labile organic matter in Antarctic benthic food webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purinton, Brett L.; DeMaster, David J.; Thomas, Carrie J.; Smith, Craig R.

    2008-11-01

    14C measurements were made on surface plankton, particle-trap material, surface sediment, benthic invertebrate gut contents, and body tissue samples to assess the effectiveness of this radioisotope as a tracer of labile organic carbon in Antarctic benthic food webs. Samples were collected on five cruises to the West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) shelf between November 1999 and March 2001 as part of the Food for Benthos on the ANtarctic Continental-Shelf (FOODBANCS) Project. The 14C contents of the body tissues from a variety of deposit feeders (-126±13 per mil) were substantially enriched relative to the surface sediment (-234±13 per mil) and statistically similar to the organic matter collected in plankton tows (-135±10 per mil), indicating that recently produced marine plankton are the primary source of nutrition for these deposit feeders on the West Antarctic shelf. Selective ingestion was the primary feeding strategy used by echiuran worms and certain holothurians (i.e. Peniagone vignoni) for incorporating labile organic carbon into their tissues as demonstrated by the large differences (105±13 per mil) between surface sediment and gut content 14C activities. In contrast, digestive and/or assimilatory selection was the predominant strategy used by an irregular urchin ( Amphipneustes lorioli) and several other holothurians ( Protelpidia murrayi, Bathyplotes fuscivinculum and the head-down conveyor belt feeder, Molpadia musculus), as demonstrated by large differences (42±7 per mil) between the 14C activities of their foregut or whole-gut organic contents and their body tissues. Despite large fluctuations in carbon export from the euphotic zone, benthic feeding strategies remained essentially constant over the 15-month sampling period. No seasonal variation was evident in either the 14C abundance of the deposit-feeder body tissues, or in the 14C abundance of their gut contents. The mean 14C abundance in the body tissues of the two sub-surface deposit feeders ( A

  2. Organic Matter Transformation in the Peat Column at Marcell Experimental Forest: Humification and Vertical Stratification

    SciTech Connect

    Tfaily, Malak; Cooper, Bill; Kostka,; Chanton, Patrick R; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Hanson, Paul J; Iversen, Colleen M; Chanton, Jeff P

    2014-01-01

    A large-scale ecosystem manipulation (Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climatic and Environmental Change, SPRUCE) is being constructed in the Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota, USA, to determine the effects of climatic forcing on ecosystem processes in northern peatlands. Prior to the initiation of the manipulation, we characterized the solid-phase peat to a depth of 2 meters using a variety of techniques, including peat C:N ratios, 13C and 15N isotopic composition, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT IR), and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR). FT IR determined peat humification-levels increased rapidly between and 75 cm, indicating a highly reactive zone. We observed a rapid drop in the abundance of O-alkyl-C, carboxyl-C, and other oxygenated functionalities within this zone and a concomitant increase in the abundance of alkyl- and nitrogen-containing compounds. Below 75-cm, minimal change was observed except that aromatic functionalities accumulated with depth. Incubation studies revealed the highest methane production rates and greatest CH4:CO2 ratios within this and 75 cm zone. Hydrology and surface vegetation played a role in belowground carbon cycling. Radiocarbon signatures of microbial respiration products in deeper porewaters resembled the signatures of dissolved organic carbon rather than solid phase peat, indicating that more recently photosynthesized organic matter fueled the bulk of subsurface microbial respiration. Oxygen-containing functionalities, especially O-alkyl-C, appear to serve as an excellent proxy for soil decomposition rate, and in addition should be a sensitive indicator of the response of the solid phase peat to the climatic manipulation.

  3. Transport of organic contaminants in subsoil horizons and effects of dissolved organic matter related to organic waste recycling practices.

    PubMed

    Chabauty, Florian; Pot, Valérie; Bourdat-Deschamps, Marjolaine; Bernet, Nathalie; Labat, Christophe; Benoit, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Compost amendment on agricultural soil is a current practice to compensate the loss of organic matter. As a consequence, dissolved organic carbon concentration in soil leachates can be increased and potentially modify the transport of other solutes. This study aims to characterize the processes controlling the mobility of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in deep soil layers and their potential impacts on the leaching of organic contaminants (pesticides and pharmaceutical compounds) potentially present in cultivated soils receiving organic waste composts. We sampled undisturbed soil cores in the illuviated horizon (60-90 cm depth) of an Albeluvisol. Percolation experiments were made in presence and absence of DOM with two different pesticides, isoproturon and epoxiconazole, and two pharmaceutical compounds, ibuprofen and sulfamethoxazole. Two types of DOM were extracted from two different soil surface horizons: one sampled in a plot receiving a co-compost of green wastes and sewage sludge applied once every 2 years since 1998 and one sampled in an unamended plot. Results show that DOM behaved as a highly reactive solute, which was continuously generated within the soil columns during flow and increased after flow interruption. DOM significantly increased the mobility of bromide and all pollutants, but the effects differed according the hydrophobic and the ionic character of the molecules. However, no clear effects of the origin of DOM on the mobility of the different contaminants were observed.

  4. Jellyfish Lake, Palau: early diagenesis of organic matter in sediments of an anoxic marine lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orem, W.H.; Burnett, W.C.; Landing, W.M.; Lyons, W.B.; Showers, W.

    1991-01-01

    The major postdepositional change in the sedimentary organic matter is carbohydrate biodegradation. Lignin and aliphatic substances are preserved in the sediments. Dissolved organic matter in pore waters is primarily composed of carbohydrates, reflecting the degradation of sedimentary carbohydrates. Rate constants for organic carbon degradation and sulfate reduction in sediments of the lake are about 10?? lower than in other anoxic sediments. This may reflect the vascular plant source and partly degraded nature of the organic matter reaching the sediments of the lake. -from Authors

  5. Characterization of organic matter in lake sediments from Minnesota and Yellowstone National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, Walter E.

    2006-01-01

    Samples of sediment from lakes in Minnesota and Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were analyzed for organic carbon (OC), hydrogen richness by Rock-Eval pyrolysis, and stable carbon- and nitrogen-isotope composition of bulk organic matter. Values of delta 13C of lake plankton tend to be around -28 to -32 parts per thousand (0/00). Organic matter with values of delta 13C in the high negative 20s overlap with those of organic matter derived from C3 higher terrestrial plants but are at least 10 0/00 more depleted in 13C than organic matter derived from C4 terrestrial plants. If the organic matter is produced mainly by photosynthetic plankton and is not oxidized in the water column, there may be a negative correlation between H-richness (Rock-Eval pyrolysis H-index) and delta 13C, with more H-rich, algal organic matter having lower values of delta 13C. However, if aquatic organic matter is oxidized in the water column, or if the organic matter is a mixture of terrestrial and aquatic organic matter, then there may be no correlation between H-richness and carbon-isotopic composition. Values of delta 13C lower than about -28 0/00 probably indicate a contribution of bacterial biomass produced in the hypolimnion by chemoautotrophy or methanotrophy. In highly eutrophic lakes in which large amounts of 13C-depleted organic matter is continually removed from the epilimnion by photosynthesis throughout the growing season, the entire carbon reservoir in the epilimnion may become severely 13C-enriched so that 13C-enriched photosynthetic organic matter may overprint 13C-depleted chemosynthetic bacterial organic matter produced in the hypolimnon. Most processes involved with the nitrogen cycle in lakes, such as production of ammonia and nitrate, tend to produce 15N-enriched values of delta 15N. Most Minnesota lake sediments are 15N-enriched. However, some of the more OC-rich sediments have delta 15N values close to zero (delta 15N of air), suggesting that organic matter production is

  6. Contribution of species-specific chemical signatures to soil organic matter in Kohala, HI.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, C. E.; Amatangelo, K.; Neff, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) inherits much of its chemical structure from the dominant vegetation, including phenolic (lignin-derived), aromatic, and aliphatic (cutin and wax-derived) compounds. The Hawaiian fern species Dicranopteris decomposes more slowly than the angiosperm, Cheirodendron due to high concentrations of recalcitrant C compounds. These aliphatic fern leaf waxes are well-preserved and may comprise a large portion of the recalcitrant organic matter in these soils. Our objective was to determine the chemical signature of fern and angiosperm vegetation types and trace the preservation or loss of those compounds into the soil. We collected live tissue, litter, roots, and soil (<53 μm) from five dominant vegetation types including two angiosperms Cheirodendron and Metrosideros, two basal ferns Dicranopteris and Cibotium and a polypod fern Diplazium in Kohala, HI. We characterized them via TMAH-pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We found distinct chemical differences between angiosperm and fern vegetation; angiosperm contained more G- and S-derived lignin structures and the fern species contained greater relative abundances of P-derived lignin and tannin-derivatives. There was a general decrease of lignin-derived phenolic compounds from live to litter to soils and an increase in more recalcitrant, aromatic and aliphatic C. Recalcitrant fern-derived cutin and leaf waxes (alkene and alkanes structures) were evident in the soils, but clear species differences were not observed. Although ferns contain distinct lipid and wax-derived compounds, soils developed under fern do not appear to accumulate these compounds in SOM.

  7. Long- and short-term temperature responses of microbially-mediated boreal soil organic matter transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, K.; Buckeridge, K. M.; Edwards, K. A.; Ziegler, S. E.; Billings, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Microorganisms use exoenzymes to decay soil organic matter into assimilable substrates, some of which are transformed into CO2. Microbial CO2 efflux contributes up to 60% of soil respiration, a feature that can change with temperature due to altered exoenzyme activities (short-term) and microbial communities producing different exoenzymes (longer-term). Often, however, microbial temperature responses are masked by factors that also change with temperature in soil, making accurate projections of microbial CO2 efflux with warming challenging. Using soils along a natural climate gradient similar in most respects except for temperature regime (Newfoundland Labrador Boreal Ecosystem Latitudinal Transect), we investigated short-vs. long-term temperature responses of microbially-mediated organic matter transformations. While incubating soils at 5, 15, and 25°C for 84 days, we measured exoenzyme activities, CO2 efflux rates and biomass, and extracted DNA at multiple times. We hypothesized that short-term, temperature-induced increases in exoenzyme activities and CO2 losses would be smaller in soils from warmer regions, because microbes presumably adapted to warmer regions should use assimilable substrates more efficiently and thus produce exoenzymes at a lower rate. While incubation temperature generally induced greater exoenzyme activities (p<0.001), exoenzymes' temperature responses depended on enzymes and regions (p<0.001). Rate of CO2 efflux was affected by incubation temperature (P<0.001), but not by region. Microbial biomass and DNA sequencing will reveal how microbial community abundance and composition change with short-vs. longer-term temperature change. Though short-term microbial responses to temperature suggest higher CO2 efflux and thus lower efficiency of resource use with warming, longer-term adaptations of microbial communities to warmer climates remain unknown; this work helps fill that knowledge gap.

  8. Ultraviolet irradiation effects incorporation of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen into aquatic natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    One of the concerns regarding the safety and efficacy of ultraviolet radiation for treatment of drinking water and wastewater is the fate of nitrate, particularly its photolysis to nitrite. In this study, 15N NMR was used to establish for the first time that UV irradiation effects the incorporation of nitrate and nitrite nitrogen into aquatic natural organic matter (NOM). Irradiation of 15N-labeled nitrate in aqueous solution with an unfiltered medium pressure mercury lamp resulted in the incorporation of nitrogen into Suwannee River NOM (SRNOM) via nitrosation and other reactions over a range of pH from approximately 3.2 to 8.0, both in the presence and absence of bicarbonate, confirming photonitrosation of the NOM. The major forms of the incorporated label include nitrosophenol, oxime/nitro, pyridine, nitrile, and amide nitrogens. Natural organic matter also catalyzed the reduction of nitrate to ammonia on irradiation. The nitrosophenol and oxime/nitro nitrogens were found to be susceptible to photodegradation on further irradiation when nitrate was removed from the system. At pH 7.5, unfiltered irradiation resulted in the incorporation of 15N-labeled nitrite into SRNOM in the form of amide, nitrile, and pyridine nitrogen. In the presence of bicarbonate at pH 7.4, Pyrex filtered (cutoff below 290–300 nm) irradiation also effected incorporation of nitrite into SRNOM as amide nitrogen. We speculate that nitrosation of NOM from the UV irradiation of nitrate also leads to production of nitrogen gas and nitrous oxide, a process that may be termed photo-chemodenitrification. Irradiation of SRNOM alone resulted in transformation or loss of naturally abundant heterocyclic nitrogens.

  9. Experimental evidence of dust-induced shaping of surface dissolved organic matter in the oligotrophic ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido-Villena, Elvira; Djaoudi, Kahina; Barani, Aude; Charrière, Bruno; Delmont, Anne; Hélias-Nunige, Sandra; Marc, Tedetti; Wambeke France, Van

    2016-04-01

    Recent research has shown that dust deposition may impact the functioning of the microbial loop. On one hand, it enhances bacterial mineralization of dissolved organic matter (DOM), and so may limit the carbon export. On the other hand, the interaction between heterotrophic bacteria and DOM in the surface ocean can increase the residence time of DOM, promoting its export and sequestration in the deep ocean. The main goal of this study was to experimentally assess whether the bacterial response to dust deposition is prone to have an effect on the residence time of the DOM pool by modifying its bioavailability. The bacterial degradation of DOM was followed on dust-amended and control treatments during long-term incubations. Dissolved organic carbon concentration decreased by 9 μmol L-1 over the course of the experiment in both control and dust-enriched conditions, with no significant differences between treatments. However, significant differences in DOM optical properties appeared at the latest stage of the incubations suggesting an accumulation of DOM of high molecular weight in the dust-amended treatment. At the end of the incubations, the remaining water was filtered and re-used as a new culture medium for a bacterial natural assemblage. Bacterial abundance and production was lower in the treatment previously submitted to dust enrichment, suggesting a decrease in DOM lability after a dust deposition event. These preliminary results point to a new link between dust and ocean carbon cycle through the modification of the residence time of the DOM pool.

  10. Distinct Optical Chemistry of Dissolved Organic Matter in Urban Pond Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    McEnroe, Nicola A.; Williams, Clayton J.; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A.; Porcal, Petr; Frost, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Urbanization has the potential to dramatically alter the biogeochemistry of receiving freshwater ecosystems. We examined the optical chemistry of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in forty-five urban ponds across southern Ontario, Canada to examine whether optical characteristics in these relatively new ecosystems are distinct from other freshwater systems. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations ranged from 2 to 16 mg C L-1 across the ponds with an average value of 5.3 mg C L-1. Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modelling showed urban pond DOM to be characterized by microbial-like and, less importantly, by terrestrial derived humic-like components. The relatively transparent, non-humic DOM in urban ponds was more similar to that found in open water, lake ecosystems than to rivers or wetlands. After irradiation equivalent to 1.7 days of natural solar radiation, DOC concentrations, on average, decreased by 38% and UV absorbance decreased by 25%. Irradiation decreased the relative abundances of terrestrial humic-like components and increased protein-like aspects of the DOM pool. These findings suggest that high internal production and/or prolonged exposure to sunlight exerts a distinct and significant influence on the chemistry of urban pond DOM, which likely reduces its chemical similarity with upstream sources. These properties of urban pond DOM may alter its biogeochemical role in these relatively novel aquatic ecosystems. PMID:24348908

  11. The Regulation by Phenolic Compounds of Soil Organic Matter Dynamics under a Changing Environment

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyungjin; Freeman, Chris; Kang, Hojeong; Choi, Sung-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Phenolics are the most abundant plant metabolites and are believed to decompose slowly in soils compared to other soil organic matter (SOM). Thus, they have often been considered as a slow carbon (C) pool in soil dynamics models. Here, however, we review changes in our concept about the turnover rate of phenolics and quantification of different types of phenolics in soils. Also, we synthesize current research on the degradation of phenolics and their regulatory effects on decomposition. Environmental changes, such as elevated CO2, warming, nitrogen (N) deposition, and drought, could influence the production and form of phenolics, leading to a change in SOM dynamics, and thus we also review the fate of phenolics under environmental disturbances. Finally, we propose the use of phenolics as a tool to control rates of SOM decomposition to stabilize organic carbon in ecosystems. Further studies to clarify the role of phenolics in SOM dynamics should include improving quantification methods, elucidating the relationship between phenolics and soil microorganisms, and determining the interactive effects of combinations of environmental changes on the phenolics production and degradation and subsequent impact on SOM processing. PMID:26495314

  12. Spatial Dependence of Reduced Sulfur in Everglades Dissolved Organic Matter Controlled by Sulfate Enrichment.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Brett A; Ryan, Joseph N; Nagy, Kathryn L; Stubbins, Aron; Dittmar, Thorsten; Orem, William H; Krabbenhoft, David P; Aiken, George R

    2017-03-01

    Sulfate inputs to the Florida Everglades stimulate sulfidic conditions in freshwater wetland sediments that affect ecological and biogeochemical processes. An unexplored implication of sulfate enrichment is alteration of the content and speciation of sulfur in dissolved organic matter (DOM), which influences the reactivity of DOM with trace metals. Here, we describe the vertical and lateral spatial dependence of sulfur chemistry in the hydrophobic organic acid (HPOA) fraction of DOM from unimpacted and sulfate-impacted Everglades wetlands using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry. Spatial variation in DOM sulfur content and speciation reflects the degree of sulfate enrichment and resulting sulfide concentrations in sediment pore waters. Sulfur is incorporated into DOM predominantly as highly reduced species in sulfidic pore waters. Sulfur-enriched DOM in sediment pore waters exchanges with overlying surface waters and the sulfur likely undergoes oxidative transformations in the water column. Across all wetland sites and depths, the total sulfur content of DOM correlated with the relative abundance of highly reduced sulfur functionality. The results identify sulfate input as a primary determinant on DOM sulfur chemistry to be considered in the context of wetland restoration and sulfur and trace metal cycling.

  13. The regulation by phenolic compounds of soil organic matter dynamics under a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyungjin; Freeman, Chris; Kang, Hojeong; Choi, Sung-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Phenolics are the most abundant plant metabolites and are believed to decompose slowly in soils compared to other soil organic matter (SOM). Thus, they have often been considered as a slow carbon (C) pool in soil dynamics models. Here, however, we review changes in our concept about the turnover rate of phenolics and quantification of different types of phenolics in soils. Also, we synthesize current research on the degradation of phenolics and their regulatory effects on decomposition. Environmental changes, such as elevated CO2, warming, nitrogen (N) deposition, and drought, could influence the production and form of phenolics, leading to a change in SOM dynamics, and thus we also review the fate of phenolics under environmental disturbances. Finally, we propose the use of phenolics as a tool to control rates of SOM decomposition to stabilize organic carbon in ecosystems. Further studies to clarify the role of phenolics in SOM dynamics should include improving quantification methods, elucidating the relationship between phenolics and soil microorganisms, and determining the interactive effects of combinations of environmental changes on the phenolics production and degradation and subsequent impact on SOM processing.

  14. Distinct optical chemistry of dissolved organic matter in urban pond ecosystems.

    PubMed

    McEnroe, Nicola A; Williams, Clayton J; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A; Porcal, Petr; Frost, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    Urbanization has the potential to dramatically alter the biogeochemistry of receiving freshwater ecosystems. We examined the optical chemistry of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in forty-five urban ponds across southern Ontario, Canada to examine whether optical characteristics in these relatively new ecosystems are distinct from other freshwater systems. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations ranged from 2 to 16 mg C L(-1) across the ponds with an average value of 5.3 mg C L(-1). Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modelling showed urban pond DOM to be characterized by microbial-like and, less importantly, by terrestrial derived humic-like components. The relatively transparent, non-humic DOM in urban ponds was more similar to that found in open water, lake ecosystems than to rivers or wetlands. After irradiation equivalent to 1.7 days of natural solar radiation, DOC concentrations, on average, decreased by 38% and UV absorbance decreased by 25%. Irradiation decreased the relative abundances of terrestrial humic-like components and increased protein-like aspects of the DOM pool. These findings suggest that high internal production and/or prolonged exposure to sunlight exerts a distinct and significant influence on the chemistry of urban pond DOM, which likely reduces its chemical similarity with upstream sources. These properties of urban pond DOM may alter its biogeochemical role in these relatively novel aquatic ecosystems.

  15. Concurrent photolytic degradation of aqueous methylmercury and dissolved organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleck, Jacob A.; Gill, Gary W.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Kraus, Tamara E.C.; Downing, Bryan D.; Alpers, Charles N.

    2014-01-01

    Monomethyl mercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxin that threatens ecosystem viability and human health. In aquatic systems, the photolytic degradation of MeHg (photodemethylation) is an important component of the MeHg cycle. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is also affected by exposure to solar radiation (light exposure) leading to changes in DOM composition that can affect its role in overall mercury (Hg) cycling. This study investigated changes in MeHg concentration, DOM concentration, and the optical signature of DOM caused by light exposure in a controlled field-based experiment using water samples collected from wetlands and rice fields. Filtered water from all sites showed a marked loss in MeHg concentration after light exposure. The rate of photodemethylation was 7.5 × 10-3 m2 mol-1 (s.d. 3.5 × 10-3) across all sites despite marked differences in DOM concentration and composition. Light exposure also caused changes in the optical signature of the DOM despite there being no change in DOM concentration, indicating specific structures within the DOM were affected by light exposure at different rates. MeHg concentrations were related to optical signatures of labile DOM whereas the percent loss of MeHg was related to optical signatures of less labile, humic DOM. Relationships between the loss of MeHg and specific areas of the DOM optical signature indicated that aromatic and quinoid structures within the DOM were the likely contributors to MeHg degradation, perhaps within the sphere of the Hg-DOM bond. Because MeHg photodegradation rates are relatively constant across freshwater habitats with natural Hg–DOM ratios, physical characteristics such as shading and hydrologic residence time largely determine the relative importance of photolytic processes on the MeHg budget in these mixed vegetated and open-water systems.

  16. [Spectral Characteristic of Dissolved Organic Matter in Xiaohe River, Hebei].

    PubMed

    Yu, Min-da; Zhang, Hui; He, Xiao-song; Tan, Wen-bing; Zhang, Yuan; Ma, Li-na; Xi, Bei-dou; Dang, Qiu-ling; Gao, Ru-tai

    2015-09-01

    The spectral characteristic of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in Xiaohe River, Hebei, was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, and basic chemical water quality indicators. The data was then statistical analyzed using principal component analysis and correlation analysis method. The result based on 3D excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy showed that DOM in Xiaohe River contained both protein-like and humus-like components. DOM and N-containing compounds were obviously correlated with COD, especially between NH4+ -N and humic-like component, indicating that COD of water in Xiaohe River can be reduced by removing NH4+ -N and DOM, which could be good indicators for monitoring water quality in the future. The relative content of protein-like component reduces gradually along the downstream, while that of humic-like component showed an increasing trend. DOM in samples S1 and S2 was mainly consisted of humic-like components with larger molecular weight and higher aromaticity, while that in samples S3 and S6 was mainly consisted of protein-like components with smaller molecular weight, lower aromaticity, which are easier to be degraded. Therefore, in order to enhance the remove of refractory humic-like substances, sewage treatment plants of S1 and S2 or improved membrane treatment equipment with better removal effect of macromolecules should be provide. On the other hand, the anaerobic and aerobic biological treatment processes should be optimized in S3 and S6, so as to better remove these degradable protein-like substances.

  17. Biogeochemical Processes That Produce Dissolved Organic Matter From Wheat Straw

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, Robert L.; Rutherford, David W.; Leenheer, Jerry A.; Kennedy, Kay R.; Cox, Larry G.; Koci, Donald R.

    2003-01-01

    The chemical reactions that lead to the formation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in natural waters are poorly understood. Studies on the formation of DOM generally are complicated because almost all DOM isolates have been derived from mixtures of plant species composed of a wide variety of different types of precursor compounds for DOM formation. This report describes a study of DOM derived mainly from bales of wheat straw that had been left in a field for several years. During this period of time, black water from the decomposing wheat straw accumulated in pools in the field. The nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectra of the black water DOM indicate that it is composed almost entirely of lignin and carbohydrate polymeric units. Analysis by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography with multi-angle laser-light scattering detection indicates that the number average molecular weight of the DOM is 124,000 daltons. The results presented in this report indicate that the black water DOM is composed of hemicellulose chains cross-linked to lignin oligomers. These types of structures have been shown to exist in the hemicellulose matrix of plant cell walls. The cross-linked lignin-hemicellulose complexes apparently were released from partially degraded wheat-straw cell walls with little alteration. In solution in the black water, these lignin-hemicellulose polymers fold into compact globular particles in which the nonpolar parts of the polymer form the interiors of the particles and the polar groups are on the exterior surfaces of the particles. The tightly folded, compact conformation of these particles probably renders them relatively resistant to microbial degradation. This should be especially the case for the aromatic lignin structures that will be buried in the interiors of the particles.

  18. Nanoscale Structure of Organic Matter Could Explain Litter Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papa, G.; Adani, F.

    2014-12-01

    According to the literature biochemical catalyses are limited in their actions because of the complex macroscopic and, above all, microscopic structures of cell wall that limit mass transportation (i.e. 3D structure). Our study on energy crop showed that plant digestibility increased by modifying the 3D cell wall microstructure. Results obtained were ascribed to the enlargement, such as effectively measured, of the pore spaces between cellulose fibrils. Therefore we postulated that 3 D structure of plant residues drives degradability in soil determining its recalcitrance in short time. Here we focused on the drivers of short-term decomposition of organic matter (plant residues) in soils evaluating the architecture of plant tissues, captured via measurements of the microporosiy of the cell walls. Decomposition rates of a wide variety of biomass types were studied conducting experiments in both aerobic and anaerobic environments. Different analytical approaches were applied in order to characterize biomass at both chemical and physical level. Combined statistical approaches were used to examine the relationships between carbon mineralization and chemical/physical characteristics. The results revealed that degradation was significantly and negatively correlated with the micro-porosity surface (MiS) (surface of pores of 0.3-1.5 nm of diameter). The multiple regressions performed by using partial least square model enabled describing biomass biodegradability under either aerobic and anaerobic condition by using micro-porosity and aromatic-C content (assumed to be representative of lignin) as independent variables (R2 =0.97, R2cv =0.95 for aerobic condition; R2 =0.99, R2cv =0.98 for anaerobic condition, respectively). These results corroborate the hypothesis that plant tissues are physically protected from enzymatic attack by a microporous "sheath" that limit penetration into cell wall, and demonstrate the key role played by aromatic carbon, because of its chemical

  19. Dissolved organic matter enhances microbial mercury methylation under sulfidic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graham, Andrew M.; Aiken, George R.; Gilmour, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is generally thought to lower metal bioavailability in aquatic systems due to the formation of metal–DOM complexes that reduce free metal ion concentrations. However, this model may not be pertinent for metal nanoparticles, which are now understood to be ubiquitous, sometimes dominant, metal species in the environment. The influence of DOM on Hg bioavailability to microorganisms was examined under conditions (0.5–5.0 nM Hg and 2–10 μM sulfide) that favor the formation of β-HgS(s) (metacinnabar) nanoparticles. We used the methylation of stable-isotope enriched 201HgCl2 by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 in short-term washed cell assays as a sensitive, environmentally significant proxy for Hg uptake. Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) and Williams Lake hydrophobic acid (WLHPoA) substantially enhanced (2- to 38-fold) the bioavailability of Hg to ND132 over a wide range of Hg/DOM ratios (9.4 pmol/mg DOM to 9.4 nmol/mg DOM), including environmentally relevant ratios. Methylmercury (MeHg) production by ND132 increased linearly with either SRHA or WLHPoA concentration, but SRHA, a terrestrially derived DOM, was far more effective at enhancing Hg-methylation than WLHPoA, an aquatic DOM dominated by autochthonous sources. No DOM-dependent enhancement in Hg methylation was observed in Hg–DOM–sulfide solutions amended with sufficient l-cysteine to prevent β-HgS(s) formation. We hypothesize that small HgS particles, stabilized against aggregation by DOM, are bioavailable to Hg-methylating bacteria. Our laboratory experiments provide a mechanism for the positive correlations between DOC and MeHg production observed in many aquatic sediments and wetland soils.

  20. Concurrent photolytic degradation of aqueous methylmercury and dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Jacob A; Gill, Gary; Bergamaschi, Brian A; Kraus, Tamara E C; Downing, Bryan D; Alpers, Charles N

    2014-06-15

    Monomethyl mercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxin that threatens ecosystem viability and human health. In aquatic systems, the photolytic degradation of MeHg (photodemethylation) is an important component of the MeHg cycle. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is also affected by exposure to solar radiation (light exposure) leading to changes in DOM composition that can affect its role in overall mercury (Hg) cycling. This study investigated changes in MeHg concentration, DOM concentration, and the optical signature of DOM caused by light exposure in a controlled field-based experiment using water samples collected from wetlands and rice fields. Filtered water from all sites showed a marked loss in MeHg concentration after light exposure. The rate of photodemethylation was 7.5×10(-3)m(2)mol(-1) (s.d. 3.5×10(-3)) across all sites despite marked differences in DOM concentration and composition. Light exposure also caused changes in the optical signature of the DOM despite there being no change in DOM concentration, indicating specific structures within the DOM were affected by light exposure at different rates. MeHg concentrations were related to optical signatures of labile DOM whereas the percent loss of MeHg was related to optical signatures of less labile, humic DOM. Relationships between the loss of MeHg and specific areas of the DOM optical signature indicated that aromatic and quinoid structures within the DOM were the likely contributors to MeHg degradation, perhaps within the sphere of the Hg-DOM bond. Because MeHg photodegradation rates are relatively constant across freshwater habitats with natural Hg-DOM ratios, physical characteristics such as shading and hydrologic residence time largely determine the relative importance of photolytic processes on the MeHg budget in these mixed vegetated and open-water systems.