Science.gov

Sample records for abundant phenolic compounds

  1. Phenolic Molding Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Koji; Charles, Ted; de Keyser, Hendrik

    Phenolic Molding Compounds continue to exhibit well balanced properties such as heat resistance, chemical resistance, dimensional stability, and creep resistance. They are widely applied in electrical, appliance, small engine, commutator, and automotive applications. As the focus of the automotive industry is weight reduction for greater fuel efficiency, phenolic molding compounds become appealing alternatives to metals. Current market volumes and trends, formulation components and its impact on properties, and a review of common manufacturing methods are presented. Molding processes as well as unique advanced techniques such as high temperature molding, live sprue, and injection/compression technique provide additional benefits in improving the performance characterisitics of phenolic molding compounds. Of special interest are descriptions of some of the latest innovations in automotive components, such as the phenolic intake manifold and valve block for dual clutch transmissions. The chapter also characterizes the most recent developments in new materials, including long glass phenolic molding compounds and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic molding compounds exhibiting a 10-20-fold increase in Charpy impact strength when compared to short fiber filled materials. The role of fatigue testing and fatigue fracture behavior presents some insight into long-term reliability and durability of glass-filled phenolic molding compounds. A section on new technology outlines the important factors to consider in modeling phenolic parts by finite element analysis and flow simulation.

  2. Phenolic compounds in Brassica vegetables.

    PubMed

    Cartea, María Elena; Francisco, Marta; Soengas, Pilar; Velasco, Pablo

    2010-12-30

    Phenolic compounds are a large group of phytochemicals widespread in the plant kingdom. Depending on their structure they can be classified into simple phenols, phenolic acids, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. Phenolic compounds have received considerable attention for being potentially protective factors against cancer and heart diseases, in part because of their potent antioxidative properties and their ubiquity in a wide range of commonly consumed foods of plant origin. The Brassicaceae family includes a wide range of horticultural crops, some of them with economic significance and extensively used in the diet throughout the world. The phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables has been recently investigated and, nowadays, the profile of different Brassica species is well established. Here, we review the significance of phenolic compounds as a source of beneficial compounds for human health and the influence of environmental conditions and processing mechanisms on the phenolic composition of Brassica vegetables.

  3. Lipid encapsulated phenolic compounds by fluidization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds exhibit antioxidant and antimicrobial activities with applications as functional food and feed additives. Ferulic acid, a phenolic compound present in grain crops and lignocellulose biomass, was encapsulated with saturated triglycerides using a laboratory fluidizer. Stability of t...

  4. Chemicals from coal. Utilization of coal-derived phenolic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Song, C.; Schobert, H.H.

    1999-07-01

    This article provides an overview for possible utilization of coal-derived phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds are abundant in coal-derived liquids. Coal-derived phenolic compounds include phenol, cresol, catechol, methylcatechol, naphthol, and their derivatives. Liquids from coal liquefaction, pyrolysis, gasification, and carbonization are potential sources of phenolic chemicals, although certain processing and separation are needed. There are opportunities for coal-based phenolic chemicals, because there are existing industrial applications and potential new applications. Currently the petrochemical industry produces phenol in multi-step processes, and new research and development has resulted in a one-step process. Selective methylation of phenol can produce a precursor for aromatic engineering plastics. Catalytic oxidation of phenol has been commercialized recently for catechol production. There are potential new uses of phenol that could replace large-volume multi-step chemical processes that are based on benzene as the starting material. New chemical research on coal and coal-derived liquids can pave the way for their non-fuel uses for making chemicals and materials.

  5. [Efficient synthesis of multisubstituted aromatic compounds from phenol derivatives].

    PubMed

    Ikawa, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Phenols are abundant in nature and diverse phenols are readily available commercially at low cost. Thus, phenols can be used as the raw materials for the synthesis of valuable multisubstituted aromatic compounds by the direct activation of phenolic hydroxyl groups (C-O bond activation), followed by substitutions with other substituents. Although the derivatization of phenolic hydroxyl groups to sulfonates, such as triflates, nonaflates, tosylates and mesylates, followed by the transition-metal-catalyzed coupling reactions has been extensively investigated for this purpose, the direct C-O bond activation of phenols for subsequent functional group transformation has been a long-standing challenge in modern organic synthesis. In this review, I have summarized my recent studies on the formal direct C-O bond activation of phenols using nonafluorobutanesulfonyl fluoride (NfF) for the synthesis of multisubstituted aromatics. I have focused on the dual use of NfF, a less expensive commercially available reagent, including the tentative formation of highly reactive nonaflates from phenols and the use of the liberated fluoride ion as a nucleophile to promote the reactions of nonaflates. The following four topics are discussed: 1) palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions of phenols, 2) novel preparation of benzynes from 2-silylphenols, 3) synthesis of fluorinated aromatic compounds via the formation of benzynes, and 4) Hiyama coupling of (tert-butyldimethylsilyl)arenes activated by internal phenolic hydroxyl groups.

  6. Phenolic Compounds in Particles of Mainstream Waterpipe Smoke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Waterpipe tobacco smoking has in recent years become a popular international phenomenon, particularly among youth. While it has been shown to deliver significant quantities of several carcinogenic and toxic substances, phenols, an important class of chemical compounds thought to promote DNA mutation and cardiovascular diseases, however, has not been studied. Due to the relatively low temperature characteristic of waterpipe tobacco during smoking (i.e., <450 °C), it was hypothesized that phenolic compounds, which form at approximately 300 °C, will be found in abundance in waterpipe smoke. Methods: In this study, phenolic compounds in the particle phase of waterpipe mainstream smoke were quantified. Waterpipe and cigarette mainstream smoke generated using standard methods were collected on glass fiber pads and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy selected ion current profile chromatogram method for quantification. Results: We found that relative to a single cigarette, a waterpipe delivers at least 3 times greater quantities of the 7 analyzed phenols (phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol, catechol, resorcinol, and hydroquinone). Moreover, phenol derivatives such as methylcatechol, and flavorings such as vanillin, ethyl vanillin, and benzyl alcohol were found in quantities up to 1,000 times greater than the amount measured in the smoke of a single cigarette. Conclusion: The large quantities of phenols and phenol derivatives in waterpipe smoke add to the growing evidence that habitual waterpipe use may increase the risk of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:23178319

  7. Extraction of phenolic compounds from soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the composition and amount of phenolic inputs from plants is important for studies of soil organic matter formation and nutrient cycling. However, some phenolic compounds, including tannins, can sorb or complex with the soil making them difficult to extract. We extracted soils with a...

  8. Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins

    SciTech Connect

    Agblevor, F.A.

    1998-09-15

    A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

  9. Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins

    DOEpatents

    Agblevor, Foster A.

    1998-01-01

    A process for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C. at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1-3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof.

  10. Extraction and isolation of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Gonzalez-Manzano, Susana; Dueñas, Montserrat; Gonzalez-Paramas, Ana M

    2012-01-01

    Phenolic compounds constitute a major class of plant secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in the plant kingdom and show a large structural diversity. These compounds occur as aglycones or glycosides, as monomers or constituting highly polymerized structures, or as free or matrix-bound compounds. Furthermore, they are not uniformly distributed in the plant and their stability varies significantly. This greatly complicates their extraction and isolation processes, which means that a single standardized procedure cannot be recommended for all phenolics and/or plant materials; procedures have to be optimized depending on the nature of the sample and the target analytes, and also on the object of the study. In this chapter, the main techniques for sample preparation, and extraction and isolation of phenolic compounds have been reviewed-from classical solvent extraction procedures to more modern approaches, such as the use of molecularly imprinted polymers or counter-current chromatography.

  11. Toxicity of phenolic compounds to sediment bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Dean-Ross, D.; Rahimi, M.

    1995-08-01

    Biodegradation of organic compounds plays an important role in remediation of polluted environments. Several factors influence the rate and extent of biodegradation: number of degrading organisms, adequate supply of nutrients, adequate availability of a suitable electron acceptor. One important factor is the toxicity of the organic chemical itself. Very often chemicals may be susceptible to biodegradation at low concentrations, yet may be toxic to the degrading population at higher concentrations, thus inhibiting their own biodegradation. Phenolic compounds are known to exhibit toxicity to bacteria. Under batch conditions, a strain of Pseudomonas could degrade 0.1% phenol in approximately 48 hr, while taking over 130 hr to degrade 0.15% phenol. A concentration of 0.2% phenol was inhibitory to the cells, killing 50% of the inoculum within 10 d. Activated sludge bacteria maintained in pulse fed batch reactors were inhibited by concentrations of phenol in excess of 50 mg/L. Biodegradation of 4-chlorophenol by Alcaligenes sp. A 7-2 showed a similar concentration effect, being inhibited at concentrations above 160 mg/L in fed-batch culture. The present report is part of an investigation on the biodegradation of phenol in contaminated soils and sediments in northwestern Indiana. Phenol has been found in groundwater aquifers which drain into the Grand Calumet watershed, and in groundwater contaminated by a Superfund site. Data on phenol toxicity were needed in order to assess the potential for in situ biodegradation of phenol and related compounds in sediments of the Grand Calumet River. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Analysis of phenolic compounds for poultry feeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds have generated significant interest recently as feed additives that can impart bioactive characteristics such as anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, and anti-fungal properties to a feed formulation [1-2]. Such natural compounds may offer some preventive benefit to the routine administra...

  13. Three new phenolic compounds from Dalbergia odorifera.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Dong, Wen-Hua; Zuo, Wen-Jian; Wang, Hui; Zhong, Hui-Min; Mei, Wen-Li; Dai, Hao-Fu

    2014-12-01

    Three new phenolic compounds (1-3) were isolated from the heartwood of Dalbergia odorifera T. Chen. (Leguminosae). Their structures were established based on spectroscopic methods including 1D and 2D NMR (HSQC, COSY, HMBC and ROESY). Compound 2 exhibited cytotoxicity against BEL-7402 tumor cell lines.

  14. Phenolic compounds in Ross Sea water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangrando, Roberta; Barbaro, Elena; Gambaro, Andrea; Barbante, Carlo; Corami, Fabiana; Kehrwald, Natalie; Capodaglio, Gabriele

    2016-04-01

    Phenolic compounds are semi-volatile organic compounds produced during biomass burning and lignin degradation in water. In atmospheric and paleoclimatic ice cores studies, these compounds are used as biomarkers of wood combustion and supply information on the type of combusted biomass. Phenolic compounds are therefore indicators of paleoclimatic interest. Recent studies of Antarctic aerosols highlighted that phenolic compounds in Antarctica are not exclusively attributable to biomass burning but also derive from marine sources. In order to study the marine contribution to aerosols we developed an analytical method to determine the concentration of vanillic acid, vanillin, p-coumaric acid, syringic acid, isovanillic acid, homovanillic acid, syringaldehyde, acetosyringone and acetovanillone present in dissolved and particle phases in Sea Ross waters using HPLC-MS/MS. The analytical method was validated and used to quantify phenolic compounds in 28 sea water samples collected during a 2012 Ross Sea R/V cruise. The observed compounds were vanillic acid, vanillin, acetovanillone and p-coumaric acid with concentrations in the ng/L range. Higher concentrations of analytes were present in the dissolved phase than in the particle phase. Sample concentrations were greatest in the coastal, surficial and less saline Ross Sea waters near Victoria Land.

  15. Phenolic compounds in Rosaceae fruits from Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Vasco, Catalina; Riihinen, Kaisu; Ruales, Jenny; Kamal-Eldin, Afaf

    2009-02-25

    RP-HPLC-DAD was used to study the content of phenolic compounds in four Ecuadorian fruits (strawberry, Andean blackberry, plum, and capuli cherry). Compounds were identified using spectral characteristics of representative standards and reference samples. Further, LC-MS with MS/MS was used to confirm molecular assignments in previously unstudied capuli cherry. Gallic acid was detected in Andean blackberry, and galloyl esters were detected in strawberries. Both these berries contained ellagic acid derivatives as major compounds, followed by anthocyanins, cyanidin, and pelargonidin glycosides. Plums and capuli cherry showed similar profiles of phenolic compounds, with chlorogenic and neochlorogenic acids being the most important hydroxycinnamates. (-)-Epicatechin was found in high amounts in Andean blackberry, plums, and capuli cherry, while (+)-catechin was only found in capuli cherry. Proanthocyanidins were major compounds in all fruits, and all contained considerable amounts of quercetin derivatives and smaller amounts of kaempferol derivatives. LC-MS analysis of capuli cherry revealed dimeric and trimeric procyanidins, quercetin and kaempferol hexosides and pentosides, and a kaempferol-O,C-dipentoside.

  16. LC-MS analysis of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of buckwheat at different stages of malting.

    PubMed

    Terpinc, Petra; Cigić, Blaž; Polak, Tomaž; Hribar, Janez; Požrl, Tomaž

    2016-11-01

    The impact of malting on the profile of the phenolic compounds and the antioxidant properties of two buckwheat varieties was investigated. The highest relative increases in phenolic compounds were observed for isoorientin, orientin, and isovitexin, which are consequently major inducible phenolic compounds during malting. Only a minor relative increase was observed for the most abundant phenolic compound, rutin. The radical-scavenging activity of buckwheat seeds was evaluated using ABTS and DPPH assays. A considerable increase in total phenolic compounds and higher antioxidant activity were observed after 64h of germination, whereas kilning resulted in decreased total phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity. Higher antioxidant activities for extracts were found for buffered solvents than for pure methanol and water. Changes in the composition of the phenolic compounds and increased antioxidant content were confirmed by several methods, indicating that buckwheat malt can be used as a food rich in antioxidants.

  17. [Phenolic compounds in branches of Tamarix rasissima].

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Li, Wei-Qi; Zheng, Ping; Wang, Rui; Yu, Jian-Qiang; Yang, Jian-Hong; Yao, Yao

    2014-06-01

    To study the chemical constituents of the branches of Tamarix rasissima, repeated silica gel column chromatography, Sephadex LH-20 chromatography and recrystallization were applied for chemical constituents isolation and purification. Ten phenolic compounds were isolated from the n-BuOH fraction and their structures were elucidated by physical properties and spectra analysis such as UV, ESI-MS and NMR as monodecarboxyellagic acid (1), ellagic acid (2), 3, 3'-di-O-methylellagic acid (3), 3, 3'-di-O-methylellagic acid-4-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), 3, 3'-di-O-methylellagic acid-4'-O-alpha-D-arabinfuranoside (5), ferulic acid (6), isoferulic acid (7), caffeic acid (8), 4-O-acetyl-caffeic acid (9), and 4-methyl-1, 2-benzenediol (10). All compounds except for isoferulic acid were isolated firstly from this plant except for isoferulic acid, and compounds 5, 9 and 10 were obtained from Tamarix genus for the first time.

  18. Biological activity of acetylated phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Fragopoulou, Elizabeth; Nomikos, Tzortzis; Karantonis, Haralabos C; Apostolakis, Constantinos; Pliakis, Emmanuel; Samiotaki, Martina; Panayotou, George; Antonopoulou, Smaragdi

    2007-01-10

    In recent years an effort has been made to isolate and identify biologically active compounds that are included in the Mediterranean diet. The existence of naturally occurring acetylated phenolics, as well as studies with synthetic ones, provide evidence that acetyl groups could be correlated with their biological activity. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is implicated in atherosclerosis, whereas its inhibitors seem to play a protective role against cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to examine the biological activity of resveratrol and tyrosol and their acetylated derivatives as inhibitors of PAF-induced washed rabbit platelet aggregation. Acetylation of resveratrol and tyrosol was performed, and separation was achieved by HPLC. Acetylated derivatives were identified by negative mass spectrometry. The data showed that tyrosol and its monoacetylated derivatives act as PAF inhibitors, whereas diacetylated derivatives induce platelet aggregation. Resveratrol and its mono- and triacetylated derivatives exert similar inhibitory activity, whereas the diacetylated ones are more potent inhibitors. In conclusion, acetylated phenolics exert the same or even higher antithrombotic activity compared to the biological activity of the initial one.

  19. Adsorption and detection of some phenolic compounds by rice husk ash of Kenyan origin.

    PubMed

    Mbui, Damaris N; Shiundu, Paul M; Ndonye, Rachel M; Kamau, Geoffrey N

    2002-12-01

    Rice husk ash (RHA) obtained from a rice mill in Kenya has been used as an inexpensive and effective adsorbent (and reagent) for the removal (and detection) of some phenolic compounds in water. The abundantly available rice mill waste was used in dual laboratory-scale batch experiments to evaluate its potential in: (i) the removal of phenol, 1,3-dihydroxybenzene (resorcinol) and 2-chlorophenol from water; and (ii) the detection of 1,2-dihydroxybenzene (pyrocatechol) and 1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene (pyrogallol) present in an aqueous medium. The studies were conducted using synthetic water with different initial concentrations of the phenolic compounds. The effects of different operating conditions (such as contact time, concentration of the phenolic compounds, adsorbent quantity, temperature, and pH) were assessed by evaluating the phenolic compound removal efficiency as well as the extent of their color formation reactions (where applicable). RHA exhibits reasonable adsorption capacity for the phenolic compounds and follows both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. Adsorption capacities of 1.53 x 10(-4), 8.07 x 10(-5), and 1.63 x 10(-6) mol g(-1) were determined for phenol, resorcinol and 2-chlorophenol, respectively. Nearly 100% adsorption of the phenolic compounds was possible and this depended on the weight of RHA employed. For the detection experiments, pyrocatechol and pyrogallol present in water formed coloured complexes with RHA, with the rate of colour formation increasing with temperature, weight of RHA, concentration of the phenolic compounds and sonication. This study has proven that RHA is a useful agricultural waste product for the removal and detection of some phenolic compounds.

  20. Phenolic compounds extracted by acidic aqueous ethanol from berries and leaves of different berry plants.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ye; Liimatainen, Jaana; Alanne, Aino-Liisa; Lindstedt, Anni; Liu, Pengzhan; Sinkkonen, Jari; Kallio, Heikki; Yang, Baoru

    2017-04-01

    Phenolic compounds of berries and leaves of thirteen various plant species were extracted with aqueous ethanol and analyzed with UPLC-DAD-ESI-MS, HPLC-DAD, and NMR. The total content of phenolics was consistently higher in leaves than in berries (25-7856 vs. 28-711mg/100g fresh weight). Sea buckthorn leaves were richest in phenolic compounds (7856mg/100g f.w.) with ellagitannins as the dominant compound class. Sea buckthorn berries contained mostly isorhamnetin glycosides, whereas quercetin glycosides were typically abundant in most samples investigated. Anthocyanins formed the dominating group of phenolics in most dark-colored berries but phenolic acid derivatives were equally abundant in saskatoon and chokeberry berries. Caffeoylquinic acids constituted 80% of the total phenolic content (1664mg/100g f.w.) in bilberry leaves. B-type procyanidins and caffeoylquinic acids were the major phenolic compounds in hawthorn and rowanberry, respectively. Use of leaves of some species with prunasin, tyramine and β-p-arbutin, may be limited in food applications.

  1. Characterization of phenolic compounds in rooibos tea.

    PubMed

    Krafczyk, Nicole; Glomb, Marcus A

    2008-05-14

    Polyphenols present in rooibos, a popular herbal tea from Aspalathus linearis, were isolated in two steps. First, phenolic ingredients were separated by multilayer countercurrent chromatography (MLCCC). Preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was then applied to obtain pure flavonoids. The purity and identity of isolated compounds was confirmed by different NMR experiments, HPLC-diode array detector (DAD), or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. This strategy proved to be valid to isolate material in up to gram quantities and to verify known and previously not published polyphenol structures. In addition the chemistry of dihydrochalcones and related intermediates was studied. The dihydrochalcone aspalathin was oxidized to the corresponding flavanone- C-glycosides (( R)/( S)-eriodictyol-6- C-beta- D-glucopyranoside and ( R)/( S)-eriodictyol-8- C-beta- D-glucopyranoside). Flavanone-6- C-beta- D-glucopyranosides were further degraded to flavones isoorientin and orientin.

  2. The Health Benefiting Mechanisms of Virgin Olive Oil Phenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Lisa; Cicerale, Sara

    2016-12-16

    Virgin olive oil (VOO) is credited as being one of the many healthful components associated with the Mediterranean diet. Mediterranean populations experience reduced incidence of chronic inflammatory disease states and VOO is readily consumed as part of an everyday Mediterranean dietary pattern. VOO is rich in phenolic compounds and the health promoting benefits of these phenolics are now established. Recent studies have highlighted the biological properties of VOO phenolic compounds elucidating their anti-inflammatory activities. This paper will review current knowledge on the anti-inflammatory and nutrigenomic, chemoprotective and anti-atherosclerotic activities of VOO phenolics. In addition the concentration, metabolism and bioavailability of specific phenolic compounds will be discussed. The evidence presented in the review concludes that oleurepein, hydroxytyrosol and oleocanthal have potent pharmacological activities in vitro and in vivo; however, intervention studies with biologically relevant concentrations of these phenolic compounds are required.

  3. Effects of Ultrasonic Irradiation on Phenolic Compounds in Wine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuzawa, Nobuyoshi; Ohdaira, Etsuzo; Ide, Masao

    2000-05-01

    Red wine has been of interest recently because many poly-phenols, that are considered to be good for health, are contained therein. Since ultrasonic irradiation accelerates maturation, its effects on phenolic compounds in wine were investigated in this study. Effects were evaluated using the indices developed by Glories. It was found that weak ultrasonic irradiation promotes an increase in the amount of phenolic compounds in red wine.

  4. Development of a phenol-enriched olive oil with both its own phenolic compounds and complementary phenols from thyme.

    PubMed

    Rubió, Laura; Motilva, Maria-José; Macià, Alba; Ramo, Tomás; Romero, Maria-Paz

    2012-03-28

    Besides affecting the oil's sensorial characteristics, the presence of herbs and spices has an impact on the nutritional value of the flavored oils. The aim of the study was to develop a new product based on the phenol-enrichment of a virgin olive oil with both its own phenolic compounds (secoiridoid derivatives) plus additional complementary phenols from thyme (flavonoids). We studied the effect of the addition of phenolic extracts (olive cake and thyme) on phenolic composition, oxidative stability, antioxidant activity, and bitter sensory attribute of olive oils. Results showed that flavonoids from thyme appeared to have higher transference ratios (average 89.7%) from the phenolic extract to oil, whereas secoiridoids from olive presented lower transference ratios (average 35.3%). The bitter sensory attribute of the phenol-enriched oils diminished with an increase of the concentration of phenols from thyme, which might denote an improvement in the consumer acceptance.

  5. Spectroscopic analysis of phenolic compounds for food and feed formulations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds exhibit several bioactive properties including anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, and anti-fungal characteristics with potential applications as additives in functional food and feed formulations. Phenolic compounds occur in plants as secondary metabolites and may be recovered as a co-...

  6. Stimulation of Cellulases by Small Phenolic Compounds in Pretreated Stover.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Junying; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-03-27

    The effect of small phenolic compounds in pretreated stover on celluase activity is crucial but has not yet been fully elucidated. This work investigated the effects of both phenolic acid and phenolic aldehyde on cellulase activity. The model substances of small phenolic compounds identified in steam exploded corn stover were used to examine their individual effects on cellulase activity. It was found that phenolic aldehyde significantly inhibited cellulase activity at 0.05-8 g/L. However, phenolic acids might have a concentration-dependent effect on cellulase activity: significant inhibition at 0.05 g/L and slight stimulation at 2-4 g/L. Small phenolic compounds mixture might also have a concentration-dependent effect on cellulase activity: significant stimulation at 2-8 g/L and slight inhibition at 0.05-1 g/L. The small phenolic compounds in pretreated stover were proven to be able to significantly stimulate enzymatic hydrolysis of stover. On the basis of these results, it is proposed that the concentration-dependent effects of small phenolic compounds on cellulase activity should be considered while removing them after pretreatment.

  7. Inhibition of biogas production and biodegradability by substituted phenolic compounds in anaerobic sludge.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, J E; Edyvean, R G J

    2008-12-15

    Phenolic compounds are abundant in nature and organic wastes. This biomass may be utilised in biogas generation. Phenolics can inhibit the degradation of readily biodegradable organic fractions and their own biodegradation. In this work, assays were carried out under anaerobic conditions to study the inhibition of both gas production and biodegradability due to seven phenolic compounds and to study their adsorption onto sludge and autoxidation in the aqueous medium. Fifty percent inhibition was in the range of 120 to 594 mg of compound/g VSS. An initial enhancement followed by an inhibition of biogas formation was found. The inhibition by the phenolic compounds was found to be influenced by autoxidation, apolarity, type, size and number of substitutions. Biogas production is influenced by concentration rather than any pH change. The concentration of the phenolic compound was partially biomethanized and the degradation of gallic and caffeic acids by this process is reported here for the first time. The maximum total biodegradation of any phenolic compound was 63.85+/-2.73%, and remaining non-biodegradable fraction was autoxidized and adsorbed onto the sludge matrix. Inhibition of methanization and partial inhibition of background gas was found at concentrations between 800 and 1600 mg/L organic carbon.

  8. Diterpenes and phenolic compounds from Sideritis pullulans.

    PubMed

    Faiella, Laura; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Bader, Ammar; Braca, Alessandra

    2014-10-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Sideritis pullulans aerial part and root extracts allowed to isolate six ent-kaurane diterpenes, two phenylpropanoids, and one coumarin, identified as 1α,3α,7β,18-tetrahydroxy-ent-kaur-16-ene (sideripullol A) (1), 3α,11α,18-trihydroxy-ent-kaur-16-ene (sideripullol B) (2), 3α,7β,18-trihydroxy-17-nor-ent-kauran-16-one (sideritone A) (3), 3α,7β-dihydroxy-18-acetyloxy-17-nor-ent-kauran-16-one (sideritone B) (4), 3α,7β,16α,17-tetrahydroxy-18-acetyloxy-ent-kaurane (sideripullol C) (5), 7β,16α,17,18-tetrahydroxy-ent-kaurane (sideripullol D) (6), β-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethyl-O-α-l-arabinopiranosyl-(1→2)-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-6-O-t-feruloyl-β-d-glucopyranoside (sideritiside A) (7), β-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-ethyl-O-α-l-arabinopiranosyl-(1→2)-α-l-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→3)-6-O-t-feruloyl-β-d-glucopyranoside (sideritiside B) (8), and 7-demethyl-8-methoxycoumarsabin (9), respectively. Twenty known compounds, including phenolics, flavonol glycosides, iridoids, diterpenes, sesquiterpenes, lignans, coumarins, and phenylpropanoids were also isolated and characterized. All diterpenes were evaluated for their cytotoxic activity.

  9. Phenolic Compounds in the Potato and Its Byproducts: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Hazal; Riciputi, Ylenia; Capanoglu, Esra; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Verardo, Vito

    2016-05-27

    The potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a tuber that is largely used for food and is a source of different bioactive compounds such as starch, dietary fiber, amino acids, minerals, vitamins, and phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds are synthetized by the potato plant as a protection response from bacteria, fungi, viruses, and insects. Several works showed that these potato compounds exhibited health-promoting effects in humans. However, the use of the potato in the food industry submits this vegetable to different processes that can alter the phenolic content. Moreover, many of these compounds with high bioactivity are located in the potato's skin, and so are eliminated as waste. In this review the most recent articles dealing with phenolic compounds in the potato and potato byproducts, along with the effects of harvesting, post-harvest, and technological processes, have been reviewed. Briefly, the phenolic composition, main extraction, and determination methods have been described. In addition, the "alternative" food uses and healthy properties of potato phenolic compounds have been addressed.

  10. Phenolic Compounds in the Potato and Its Byproducts: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Hazal; Riciputi, Ylenia; Capanoglu, Esra; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Verardo, Vito

    2016-01-01

    The potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a tuber that is largely used for food and is a source of different bioactive compounds such as starch, dietary fiber, amino acids, minerals, vitamins, and phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds are synthetized by the potato plant as a protection response from bacteria, fungi, viruses, and insects. Several works showed that these potato compounds exhibited health-promoting effects in humans. However, the use of the potato in the food industry submits this vegetable to different processes that can alter the phenolic content. Moreover, many of these compounds with high bioactivity are located in the potato’s skin, and so are eliminated as waste. In this review the most recent articles dealing with phenolic compounds in the potato and potato byproducts, along with the effects of harvesting, post-harvest, and technological processes, have been reviewed. Briefly, the phenolic composition, main extraction, and determination methods have been described. In addition, the “alternative” food uses and healthy properties of potato phenolic compounds have been addressed. PMID:27240356

  11. Phenolic compounds in Rosaceae fruit and nut crops.

    PubMed

    Ogah, Onwuchekwa; Watkins, Carolyn S; Ubi, Benjamin Ewa; Oraguzie, Nnadozie C

    2014-10-01

    The demand for new fruit cultivars with high levels of phytochemicals, in particular phenolic compounds, has received increasing attention from biochemists, pharmaceutical companies, plant breeders, and the general public due to their health benefits. This review focuses on the economically important Rosaceae, which contains varying proportions and concentrations of these compounds. The paper discusses the common phenolics in the Rosaceae including phenolic acids, flavonols, flavanols, anthocyanins, and dihydrochalcones. The nonextractable phenolics are also presented but not discussed in detail. The metabolism and bioavailability of phenolics, as well as human and environmental factors that affect their concentration and composition, are highlighted. Furthermore, the paper presents different approaches for biofortification and posits that breeding may be the most viable and sustainable option as it improves other fruit quality traits simultaneously and increases confidence in adoption of new cultivars with enhanced consumer appeal.

  12. Isolation and identification of plant phenolic compounds in birch leaves: Air pollution stress and leaf phenolics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loponen, Jyrki Mikael

    Chromatographic (analytical and preparative HPLC), chemical (hydrolysis) and spectroscopic (UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and MS) techniques proved to be suitable tools for the structure identification of plant phenolic compounds. More than 30 individual phenolic compounds were detected and quantified. Detailed information of the structures of individual compounds was determined after isolation from birch leaves. Ten flavonoid glycosides were identified. Two of them, myricetin-3-O-α-L-(acetyl)-rhamnopyranoside and quercetin-3-O-α-L-(4/prime'-O-acetyl)- rhamnopyranoside, have been rarely found in birch leaves. Further, some characterized major phenolics with non- flavonoid structures in our study were 1-O-galloyl- β-D-(2-O-acetyl)-glucopyranose, gallic, chlorogenic, neochlorogenic, cis- and trans-forms of 3- and 5-p-coumaroylquinic acids. The presence of gallotannin group was evidenced by strong positive correlations between concentrations of these gallotannins (preliminary identified by HPLC and UV spectra) and the protein precipitation capacity of extracts. Content of gallotannins decreased with leaf growth and maturation. It is known that concentrations of phenolic compounds regularly increase in slowly growing stressed plants and therefore, it is natural that they are also sensitive to different forms of air pollution. Total content and the contents of some individual phenolics correlated negatively with the distance from the pollution source in our study area. In addition to comparing absolute concentrations of compounds in question, the within-tree correlations or within-tree variations of the relevant compounds between polluted and control areas were an alternative approach. Differences in pairwise correlations between the investigated leaf phenolic compounds indicated the competition between some gallotannins and p-coumaroylquinic acids on the polluted but not on the control site. Air pollution seems to be a stress factor for birch trees associated with

  13. Characterization and quantitation of low and high molecular weight phenolic compounds in apple seeds.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Matthias; Bayha, Sandra; Carle, Reinhold; Kammerer, Dietmar R

    2012-02-08

    The phenolic constituents of seeds of 12 different apple cultivars were fractionated by sequential extraction with aqueous acetone (30:70, v/v) and ethyl acetate after hexane extraction of the lipids. Low molecular weight phenolic compounds were individually quantitated by RP-HPLC-DAD. The contents of extractable and nonextractable procyanidins were determined by applying RP-HPLC following thiolysis and n-butanol/HCl hydrolysis, respectively. As expected, the results revealed marked differences of the ethyl acetate extracts, aqueous acetone extracts, and insoluble residues with regard to contents and mean degrees of polymerization of procyanidins. Total phenolic contents in the defatted apple seed residues ranged between 18.4 and 99.8 mg/g. Phloridzin was the most abundant phenolic compound, representing 79-92% of monomeric polyphenols. Yields of phenolic compounds significantly differed among the cultivars under study, with seeds of cider apples generally being richer in phloridzin and catechins than seeds of dessert apple cultivars. This is the first study presenting comprehensive data on the contents of phenolic compounds in apple seeds comprising extractable and nonextractable procyanidins. Furthermore, the present work points out a strategy for the sustainable and complete exploitation of apple seeds as valuable agro-industrial byproducts, in particular as a rich source of phloridzin and antioxidant flavanols.

  14. Antibacterial activity of phenolic compounds against the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Christina E; Laur, Lisa M; Tian, Li

    2010-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a pathogenic bacterium that causes diseases in many crop species, which leads to considerable economic loss. Phenolic compounds (a group of secondary metabolites) are widely distributed in plants and have shown to possess antimicrobial properties. The anti-Xylella activity of 12 phenolic compounds, representing phenolic acid, coumarin, stilbene and flavonoid, was evaluated using an in vitro agar dilution assay. Overall, these phenolic compounds were effective in inhibiting X. fastidiosa growth, as indicated by low minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). In addition, phenolic compounds with different structural features exhibited different anti-Xylella capacities. Particularly, catechol, caffeic acid and resveratrol showed strong anti-Xylella activities. Differential response to phenolic compounds was observed among X. fastidiosa strains isolated from grape and almond. Elucidation of secondary metabolite-based host resistance to X. fastidiosa will have broad implication in combating X. fastidiosa-caused plant diseases. It will facilitate future production of plants with improved disease resistance properties through genetic engineering or traditional breeding approaches and will significantly improve crop yield.

  15. Patterns of phenolic compounds in leafy galls of tobacco.

    PubMed

    Vereecke, D; Messens, E; Klarskov, K; De Bruyn, A; Van Montagu, M; Goethals, K

    1997-03-01

    The chemical composition of ethanolic and aqueous extracts from leafy galls produced after infection of Nicotiana tabacum L. plants with Rhodococcus fascians was drastically changed compared to uninfected controls. Chlorogenic acid was abundant both in uninfected and infected plants, but caffeic acid and another cinnamoyl analogue were new in leafy galls. The most pronounced product induced in leafy galls was identified as 7-O-methyl-6-O-beta-D-glucopyranosyl coumarin (7-methyl esculin). This is the first report of the presence of this coumarin derivative in tobacco. Interestingly, 7-methyl esculin did not accumulate in the presence of avirulent R. fascians strains nor was it found in leafy galls on other plant species. However, it did appear in crown galls induced by Agrobacterium tumefaciens on tobacco plants. Intriguingly, none of the phenolics known to accumulate in Solanaceae under pathogen attack were found in leafy galls. 7-Methyl esculin barely affected growth of R. fascians nor was it catabolized. Microscopical analysis showed that autofluorescent compounds were located mainly in the abundant meristematic regions of the leafy galls. We postulate that 7-methyl esculin might locally influence plant cell division.

  16. Phenolic compound in beans as protection against mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    Telles, Annie Campello; Kupski, Larine; Furlong, Eliana Badiale

    2017-01-01

    Phenolic compounds, their inhibitory activity against fungal amylase and the occurrence of aflatoxins were determined in edible beans. The free, conjugated and bounded phenolic compounds and their phenolic acid profiles were determined in ten bean varieties. A method for aflatoxin B1, B2, G1 and G2 determination and confirmation by LC-MS/MS was validated. The red and carioca beans presented the highest total phenolic content (1.8 and 1.2mg.g(-1), respectively); the fradinho and white beans the lowest (0.18 and 0.19mg.g(-1), respectively). In the free and conjugated forms, chlorogenic acid was present in 60% of the samples, while in the bounded phenolic, ferulic acid was in 90% of the samples. The phenolic extracts were able to inhibit fungal amylase, and the PCA analysis confirmed that the relation between the chlorogenic and gallic acids is important to this effect. The absence of aflatoxins in samples confirm the protector effects of these phenolic compounds.

  17. Antioxidant activities and phenolic compounds of date plum persimmon ( Diospyros lotus L.) fruits.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Cheng, Ni; Zhou, Juan; Wang, Bini; Deng, Jianjun; Cao, Wei

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, phenolic compounds are extracted from the date plum persimmon fruits using water, methanol and acetone as solvents. Antioxidant activities of the phenolic extracts are measured using four different tests, namely, DPPH, hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, chelating and reducing power assays. All the extracts show dose dependent DPPH radical scavenging activity, reducing and chelating powers and moreover, they are well correlated with the total phenolic and total flavonoid substances, suggesting direct contribution of phenolic compounds to these activities. In further, the extracts are identified and quantified by HPLC-ECD. Results show that gallic acid is the most abundant phenolic compound, with amounts ranging between 45.49and 287.47 μg/g dry sample. Myricetin is the dominant flavonoid in all extracts. Its level varied from 2.75 μg/g dry sample in acetone extract to 5.28 μg/g dry sample in water extract. On the basis of the results obtained, the date plum persimmon fruits phenolic extract is a potential source of natural antioxidants owing to its significant antioxidant activities.

  18. Gas phase plasma impact on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice.

    PubMed

    Herceg, Zoran; Kovačević, Danijela Bursać; Kljusurić, Jasenka Gajdoš; Jambrak, Anet Režek; Zorić, Zoran; Dragović-Uzelac, Verica

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of gas phase plasma on phenolic compounds in pomegranate juice. The potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy combined with partial least squares for monitoring the stability of phenolic compounds during plasma treatment was explored, too. Experiments are designed to investigate the effect of plasma operating conditions (treatment time 3, 5, 7 min; sample volume 3, 4, 5 cm(3); gas flow 0.75, 1, 1.25 dm(3) min(-1)) on phenolic compounds and compared to pasteurized and untreated pomegranate juice. Pasteurization and plasma treatment resulted in total phenolic content increasing by 29.55% and 33.03%, respectively. Principal component analysis and sensitivity analysis outputted the optimal treatment design with plasma that could match the pasteurized sample concerning the phenolic stability (5 min/4 cm(3)/0.75 dm(3) min(-1)). Obtained results demonstrate the potential of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy that can be successfully used to evaluate the quality of pomegranate juice upon plasma treatment considering the phenolic compounds.

  19. Pressurized liquid extraction of phenolic compounds from rice (Oryza sativa) grains.

    PubMed

    Setyaningsih, W; Saputro, I E; Palma, M; Barroso, C G

    2016-02-01

    An analytical pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) process has been studied for the extraction of phenolic compounds from rice grains. A fractional factorial design (2(7-2)) with a centre point was used to optimize PLE parameters such as solvent composition (EtOAc in MeOH), extraction temperature, pressure, flushing, static extraction time, solvent-purge and sample weight. Extraction temperature, solvent and static extraction time were found to have a significant effect on the response value. The optimized method was validated for selectivity, linearity, limits of detection and quantification, recovery and precision. The validated method was successfully applied for the analysis of a wide variety of rice grains. Seventeen phenolic compounds were detected in the sample and guaiacol, ellagic acid, vanillic acid and protocatechuic acid were identified as the most abundant compounds. Nonetheless, different species of rice show very varied compound diversity and levels of compounds in their grain compositions.

  20. Phenolic compounds and vitamin antioxidants of caper (Capparis spinosa).

    PubMed

    Tlili, Nizar; Khaldi, Abdelhamid; Triki, Saida; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2010-09-01

    Capparis spinosa shows strong resistance to the adverse Mediterranean conditions and it has nutritional and medicinal value. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contents of total phenolic compounds, rutin, tocopherols, carotenoids and vitamin C in leaves and flower buds of C. spinosa from different locations in Tunisia. Results showed the richness of caper with these compounds, especially phenolic compounds. Interestingly, it was also found the presence of both α- and γ-tocopherol in buds. Moreover, C. spinosa contained an appreciable level of vitamin C. The significant amounts of these antioxidants confirm the nutritional and medicinal value of caper.

  1. Potential of LC Coupled to Fluorescence Detection in Food Metabolomics: Determination of Phenolic Compounds in Virgin Olive Oil.

    PubMed

    Monasterio, Romina P; Olmo-García, Lucía; Bajoub, Aadil; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Carrasco-Pancorbo, Alegría

    2016-09-24

    A powerful chromatographic method coupled to a fluorescence detector was developed to determine the phenolic compounds present in virgin olive oil (VOO), with the aim to propose an appropriate alternative to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. An excitation wavelength of 285 nm was selected and four different emission wavelengths (316, 328, 350 and 450 nm) were simultaneously recorded, working therefore on "multi-emission" detection mode. With the use of commercially available standards and other standards obtained by semipreparative high performance liquid chromatography, it was possible to identify simple phenols, lignans, several complex phenols, and other phenolic compounds present in the matrix under study. A total of 26 phenolic compounds belonging to different chemical families were identified (23 of them were susceptible of being quantified). The proposed methodology provided detection and quantification limits within the ranges of 0.004-7.143 μg·mL(-1) and 0.013-23.810 μg·mL(-1), respectively. As far as the repeatability is concerned, the relative standard deviation values were below 0.43% for retention time, and 9.05% for peak area. The developed methodology was applied for the determination of phenolic compounds in ten VOOs, both monovarietals and blends. Secoiridoids were the most abundant fraction in all the samples, followed by simple phenolic alcohols, lignans, flavonoids, and phenolic acids (being the abundance order of the latter chemical classes logically depending on the variety and origin of the VOOs).

  2. Potential of LC Coupled to Fluorescence Detection in Food Metabolomics: Determination of Phenolic Compounds in Virgin Olive Oil

    PubMed Central

    Monasterio, Romina P.; Olmo-García, Lucía; Bajoub, Aadil; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Carrasco-Pancorbo, Alegría

    2016-01-01

    A powerful chromatographic method coupled to a fluorescence detector was developed to determine the phenolic compounds present in virgin olive oil (VOO), with the aim to propose an appropriate alternative to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. An excitation wavelength of 285 nm was selected and four different emission wavelengths (316, 328, 350 and 450 nm) were simultaneously recorded, working therefore on “multi-emission” detection mode. With the use of commercially available standards and other standards obtained by semipreparative high performance liquid chromatography, it was possible to identify simple phenols, lignans, several complex phenols, and other phenolic compounds present in the matrix under study. A total of 26 phenolic compounds belonging to different chemical families were identified (23 of them were susceptible of being quantified). The proposed methodology provided detection and quantification limits within the ranges of 0.004–7.143 μg·mL−1 and 0.013–23.810 μg·mL−1, respectively. As far as the repeatability is concerned, the relative standard deviation values were below 0.43% for retention time, and 9.05% for peak area. The developed methodology was applied for the determination of phenolic compounds in ten VOOs, both monovarietals and blends. Secoiridoids were the most abundant fraction in all the samples, followed by simple phenolic alcohols, lignans, flavonoids, and phenolic acids (being the abundance order of the latter chemical classes logically depending on the variety and origin of the VOOs). PMID:27669238

  3. Role of phenolic compounds in peptic ulcer: An overview.

    PubMed

    Sumbul, Sabiha; Ahmad, Mohd Aftab; Mohd, Asif; Mohd, Akhtar

    2011-07-01

    Peptic ulcer is the most common gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorder in clinical practice, which affects approximately 5-10% of the people during their life. The use of herbal drugs for the prevention and treatment of various diseases is constantly developing throughout the world. This is particularly true with regard to phenolic compounds that probably constitute the largest group of plants secondary metabolites. Phenolic compounds have attracted special attention due to their health-promoting characteristics. In the past ten years a large number of the studies have been carried out on the effects of phenolic compounds on human health. Many studies have been carried out that strongly support the contribution of polyphenols to the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes mellitus, and suggest a role in the prevention of peptic ulcer. Polyphenols display a number of pharmacological properties in the GIT area, acting as antisecretory, cytoprotective, and antioxidant agents. The antioxidant properties of phenolic compounds have been widely studied, but it has become clear that their mechanisms of action go beyond the modulation of oxidative stress. Various polyphenolic compounds have been reported for their anti-ulcerogenic activity with a good level of gastric protection. Besides their action as gastroprotective, these phenolic compounds can be an alternative for the treatment of gastric ulcers. Therefore, considering the important role of polyphenolic compounds in the prevention or reduction of gastric lesions induced by different ulcerogenic agents, in this review, we have summarized the literature on some potent antiulcer plants, such as, Oroxylum indicum, Zingiber officinale, Olea europaea L., Foeniculum vulgare, Alchornea glandulosa, Tephrosia purpurea, and so on, containing phenolic compounds, namely, baicalein, cinnamic acid, oleuropein, rutin, quercetin, and tephrosin, respectively, as active

  4. Role of phenolic compounds in peptic ulcer: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Sumbul, Sabiha; Ahmad, Mohd. Aftab; Mohd., Asif; Mohd., Akhtar

    2011-01-01

    Peptic ulcer is the most common gastrointestinal tract (GIT) disorder in clinical practice, which affects approximately 5-10% of the people during their life. The use of herbal drugs for the prevention and treatment of various diseases is constantly developing throughout the world. This is particularly true with regard to phenolic compounds that probably constitute the largest group of plants secondary metabolites. Phenolic compounds have attracted special attention due to their health-promoting characteristics. In the past ten years a large number of the studies have been carried out on the effects of phenolic compounds on human health. Many studies have been carried out that strongly support the contribution of polyphenols to the prevention of cardiovascular diseases, cancer, osteoporosis, neurodegenerative diseases, and diabetes mellitus, and suggest a role in the prevention of peptic ulcer. Polyphenols display a number of pharmacological properties in the GIT area, acting as antisecretory, cytoprotective, and antioxidant agents. The antioxidant properties of phenolic compounds have been widely studied, but it has become clear that their mechanisms of action go beyond the modulation of oxidative stress. Various polyphenolic compounds have been reported for their anti-ulcerogenic activity with a good level of gastric protection. Besides their action as gastroprotective, these phenolic compounds can be an alternative for the treatment of gastric ulcers. Therefore, considering the important role of polyphenolic compounds in the prevention or reduction of gastric lesions induced by different ulcerogenic agents, in this review, we have summarized the literature on some potent antiulcer plants, such as, Oroxylum indicum, Zingiber officinale, Olea europaea L., Foeniculum vulgare, Alchornea glandulosa, Tephrosia purpurea, and so on, containing phenolic compounds, namely, baicalein, cinnamic acid, oleuropein, rutin, quercetin, and tephrosin, respectively, as active

  5. Anaerobic biodegradation of phenolic compounds in digested sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, S.A.; Shelton, D.R.; Berry, D.; Tiedje, J.M.

    1983-07-01

    The authors examined the anaerobic degradation of phenol and the ortho, meta, and para isomers of chlorophenol, methoxyphenol, methylphenol (cresol),and nitrophenol in anaerobic sewage sludge diluted to 10% in a mineral salts medium. Of the 12 monosubstituted phenols studied, only p-chlorophenol and o-cresol were not significantly degraded during an 8-week incubation period. The phenol compounds degraded and the time required for complete substrate disappearance (in weeks) were: phenol (2), o-chlorophenol (3), m-chlorophenol (7), o-methoxyphenol (2), m- and p-methoxyphenol (1), m-cresol (7), p-cresol (3), and o-, m-, and p-nitrophenol (1). Complete mineralization of phenol, o-chlorophenol, m-cresol, p-cresol, o-nitrophenol, p-nitrophenol, and o-, m-, and p-methoxyphenol was observed. In general, the presence of Cl and NO/sub 2/ groups on phenols inhibited methane production. Elimination or transformation of these substituents was accompanied by increased methane production. o-Chlorophenol was metabolized to phenol, which indicated that dechlorination was the initial degradation step. The methoxyphenols were transformed to the corresponding dihydroxybenzene compounds, which were subsequently mineralized. (Refs. 14).

  6. Recent developments in the HPLC separation of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kalili, Kathithileni M; de Villiers, André

    2011-04-01

    Phenolic compounds represent a class of highly complex naturally occurring molecules that possess a range of beneficial health properties. As a result, considerable attention has been devoted to the analysis of phenolics in a variety of samples. HPLC is the workhorse method for phenolic separation. However, conventional HPLC methods provide insufficient resolving power when faced with the complexity of real-world phenolic fractions. This limitation has been traditionally circumvented by extensive sample fractionation, multiple analysis methods and/or selective detection strategies. On the other hand, there is an increasing demand for improved throughput and resolving power from the chromatographic methods used for phenolic analyses. Fortunately, during the last decade, a number of important technological advances in LC have demonstrated significant gains in terms of both speed and resolution. These include ultra high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC), high-temperature liquid chromatography (HTLC), multi-dimensional separations as well as various new stationary phase chemistries and morphologies. In recent years, these technologies have also found increasing application for phenolic analysis. This review seeks to provide an updated overview of the application of recent advances in HPLC to phenolic separation, with the emphasis on how these methodologies can contribute to improve performance in HPLC analysis of phenolics.

  7. The influence of interactions among phenolic compounds on the antiradical activity of chokeberries (Aronia melanocarpa).

    PubMed

    Jakobek, Lidija; Seruga, Marijan; Krivak, Petra

    2011-06-01

    In the present work, interactions between phenolic compounds from chokeberries and their influence on the antiradical activity was studied. Three fractions were isolated from chokeberries containing different classes of phenolic compounds. The first fraction contained a major part of phenolic acids and flavonols, the second anthocyanins, and the third insoluble phenols and proanthocyanidins. The phenolic compound content was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography, and the antiradical activity using the DPPH test. In order to evaluate the effects of interactions between phenolic compounds on the antiradical activity, the antiradical activity of individual phenolic fractions was compared with that obtained by mixing phenolic fractions. Phenolic mixtures showed the decrease in the antiradical activity in comparison with the individual phenolic fractions. These results suggest the existence of complex interactions among phenolic compounds that caused the decrease of the antiradical activity. Interactions among chokeberry phenols promoted a negative synergism.

  8. Olive phenolic compounds: metabolic and transcriptional profiling during fruit development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Olive (Olea europaea L.) fruits contain numerous secondary metabolites, primarily phenolics, terpenes and sterols, some of which are particularly interesting for their nutraceutical properties. This study will attempt to provide further insight into the profile of olive phenolic compounds during fruit development and to identify the major genetic determinants of phenolic metabolism. Results The concentration of the major phenolic compounds, such as oleuropein, demethyloleuropein, 3–4 DHPEA-EDA, ligstroside, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, verbascoside and lignans, were measured in the developing fruits of 12 olive cultivars. The content of these compounds varied significantly among the cultivars and decreased during fruit development and maturation, with some compounds showing specificity for certain cultivars. Thirty-five olive transcripts homologous to genes involved in the pathways of the main secondary metabolites were identified from the massive sequencing data of the olive fruit transcriptome or from cDNA-AFLP analysis. Their mRNA levels were determined using RT-qPCR analysis on fruits of high- and low-phenolic varieties (Coratina and Dolce d’Andria, respectively) during three different fruit developmental stages. A strong correlation was observed between phenolic compound concentrations and transcripts putatively involved in their biosynthesis, suggesting a transcriptional regulation of the corresponding pathways. OeDXS, OeGES, OeGE10H and OeADH, encoding putative 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-P synthase, geraniol synthase, geraniol 10-hydroxylase and arogenate dehydrogenase, respectively, were almost exclusively present at 45 days after flowering (DAF), suggesting that these compounds might play a key role in regulating secoiridoid accumulation during fruit development. Conclusions Metabolic and transcriptional profiling led to the identification of some major players putatively involved in biosynthesis of secondary compounds in the olive tree. Our data

  9. Characterization and quantification of phenolic compounds in four tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) farmers' varieties in northeastern Portugal homegardens.

    PubMed

    Barros, Lillian; Dueñas, Montserrat; Pinela, José; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Buelga, Celestino Santos; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2012-09-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) is one of the most widely consumed fresh and processed vegetables in the world, and contains bioactive key components. Phenolic compounds are one of those components and, according to the present study, farmers' varieties of tomato cultivated in homegardens from the northeastern Portuguese region are a source of phenolic compounds, mainly phenolic acid derivatives. Using HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS, it was concluded that a cis p-coumaric acid derivative was the most abundant compound in yellow (Amarelo) and round (Batateiro) tomato varieties, while 4-O-caffeolyquinic acid was the most abundant in long (Comprido) and heart (Coração) varieties. The most abundant flavonoid was quercetin pentosylrutinoside in the four tomato varieties. Yellow tomato presented the highest levels of phenolic compounds (54.23 μg/g fw), including phenolic acids (43.30 μg/g fw) and flavonoids (10.93 μg/g fw). The phenolic compounds profile obtained for the studied varieties is different from other tomato varieties available in different countries, which is certainly related to genetic features, cultivation conditions, and handling and storage methods associated to each sample.

  10. Biological activities of phenolic compounds present in virgin olive oil.

    PubMed

    Cicerale, Sara; Lucas, Lisa; Keast, Russell

    2010-02-02

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases and certain types of cancer. The apparent health benefits have been partially ascribed to the dietary consumption of virgin olive oil by Mediterranean populations. Much research has focused on the biologically active phenolic compounds naturally present in virgin olive oils to aid in explaining reduced mortality and morbidity experienced by people consuming a traditional Mediterranean diet. Studies (human, animal, in vivo and in vitro) have demonstrated that olive oil phenolic compounds have positive effects on certain physiological parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet and cellular function, antimicrobial activity and bone health. This paper summarizes current knowledge on the bioavailability and biological activities of olive oil phenolic compounds.

  11. Phenolic compounds in ectomycorrhizal interaction of lignin modified silver birch

    PubMed Central

    Sutela, Suvi; Niemi, Karoliina; Edesi, Jaanika; Laakso, Tapio; Saranpää, Pekka; Vuosku, Jaana; Mäkelä, Riina; Tiimonen, Heidi; Chiang, Vincent L; Koskimäki, Janne; Suorsa, Marja; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Häggman, Hely

    2009-01-01

    Background The monolignol biosynthetic pathway interconnects with the biosynthesis of other secondary phenolic metabolites, such as cinnamic acid derivatives, flavonoids and condensed tannins. The objective of this study is to evaluate whether genetic modification of the monolignol pathway in silver birch (Betula pendula Roth.) would alter the metabolism of these phenolic compounds and how such alterations, if exist, would affect the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis. Results Silver birch lines expressing quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides L.) caffeate/5-hydroxyferulate O-methyltransferase (PtCOMT) under the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) promoter showed a reduction in the relative expression of a putative silver birch COMT (BpCOMT) gene and, consequently, a decrease in the lignin syringyl/guaiacyl composition ratio. Alterations were also detected in concentrations of certain phenolic compounds. All PtCOMT silver birch lines produced normal ectomycorrhizas with the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus (Batsch: Fr.), and the formation of symbiosis enhanced the growth of the transgenic plants. Conclusion The down-regulation of BpCOMT in the 35S-PtCOMT lines caused a reduction in the syringyl/guaiacyl ratio of lignin, but no significant effect was seen in the composition or quantity of phenolic compounds that would have been caused by the expression of PtCOMT under the 35S or UbB1 promoter. Moreover, the detected alterations in the composition of lignin and secondary phenolic compounds had no effect on the interaction between silver birch and P. involutus. PMID:19788757

  12. Bacterial community structure within an activated sludge reactor added with phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Acata, Selene; Esquivel-Ríos, Ivonne; Pérez-Sandoval, Mariana Vivian; Navarro-Noya, Yendi; Rojas-Valdez, Aketzally; Thalasso, Frederic; Luna-Guido, Marco; Dendooven, Luc

    2016-12-16

    Biodegradation of phenolic compounds in bioreactors is well documented, but the changes in the bacterial populations dynamics during degradation were not that often. A glass bubble column used as reactor was inoculated with activated sludge, spiked with 2-chlorophenol, phenol and m-cresol after 28 days and maintained for an additional 56 days, while the 16S rRNA gene from metagenomic DNA was monitored. Proteobacteria (68.1%) dominated the inoculum, but the bacterial composition changed rapidly. The relative abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes decreased from 4.8 and 9.4 to <0.1 and 0.2% respectively, while that of Actinobacteria and TM7 increased from 4.8 and 2.0 to 19.2 and 16.1% respectively. Phenol application increased the relative abundance of Proteobacteria to 94.2% (mostly Brevundimonas 17.6%), while that of Bacteroidetes remained low (1.2%) until day 42. It then increased to 47.3% (mostly Leadbetterella 46.9%) at day 84. It was found that addition of phenolic compounds did not affect the relative abundance of the Alphaproteobacteria initially, but it decreased slowly while that of the Bacteroidetes increased towards the end.

  13. A review of phenolic compounds in oil-bearing plants: Distribution, identification and occurrence of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Alu'datt, Muhammad H; Rababah, Taha; Alhamad, Mohammad N; Al-Mahasneh, Majdi A; Almajwal, Ali; Gammoh, Sana; Ereifej, Khalil; Johargy, Ayman; Alli, Inteaz

    2017-03-01

    Over the last two decades, separation, identification and measurement of the total and individual content of phenolic compounds has been widely investigated. Recently, the presence of a wide range of phenolic compounds in oil-bearing plants has been shown to contribute to their therapeutic properties, including anti-cancer, anti-viral, anti-oxidant, hypoglycemic, hypo-lipidemic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Phenolics in oil-bearing plants are now recognized as important minor food components due to several organoleptic and health properties, and they are used as food or sources of food ingredients. Variations in the content of phenolics in oil-bearing plants have largely been attributed to several factors, including the cultivation, time of harvest and soil types. A number of authors have suggested that the presence phenolics in extracted proteins, carbohydrates and oils may contribute to objectionable off flavors The objective of this study was to review the distribution, identification and occurrence of free and bound phenolic compounds in oil-bearing plants.

  14. Removal of phenolic compounds from wastewaters using soybean peroxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, H.; Nicell, J.A.

    1996-11-01

    Toxic and odiferous phenolic compounds are present in wastewaters generated by a variety of industries including petroleum refining, plastics, resins, textiles, and iron and steel manufacturing among others. Due to its commercial availability in purified form, its useful presence in raw plant material, and its proven ability to remove a variety of phenolic contaminants from wastewaters over a wide range of pH and temperature, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) appears to be the peroxidase enzyme of choice in enzymatic wastewater treatment studies. Problems with HRP catalyzed phenol removal, however, include the formation of toxic soluble reaction by-products, the cost of the enzyme, and costs associated with disposal of the phenolic precipitate generated. Enzyme costs are incurred because the enzyme is inactivated during the phenol removal process by various side reactions. While recent work has shown that enzyme inactivation can be reduced using chemical additives, the problem of enzyme cost could be circumvented by using a less expensive source of enzyme. In 1991, the seed coat of the soybean was identified as a very rich source of peroxidase enzyme. Since the seed coat of the soybean is a waste product of the soybean food industry, soybean peroxidase (SBP) has the potential of being a cost effective alternative to HRP in wastewater treatment. In this study, SBP is characterized in terms of its catalytic activity, its stability, and its ability to promote removal of phenolic compounds from synthetic wastewaters. Results obtained are discussed and compared to similar investigations using HRP.

  15. Tunisian table olive phenolic compounds and their antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Ben Othman, N; Roblain, D; Thonart, P; Hamdi, M

    2008-05-01

    For the 1st time, 4 olive cultivars, the Meski, Chemlali, Besbessi, and Tounsi, from the Tunisian market were investigated to evaluate the phenolic compounds' contribution in nutritional value of table olives. From the Meski cultivar, we have chosen 4 different samples to evaluate differences within the same cultivar. Basic characteristics and total phenolic content were evaluated in flesh and kernel. The highest value of flesh phenolic content was observed in sample M4 of the Meski cultivar; however, the lowest value was observed in the Besbessi cultivar and they were 1801 and 339 mg GA/100 g dry weight, respectively. The main simple phenolic compounds identified in flesh extracts are hydroxytyrosol, tyrosol, and vanillic acid. Oleuropein was not detected in any samples. The antioxidant activity of Tunisian olive flesh varies between 212 and 462 muM TEAC/g of dry weight. Antioxidant activity of olives was related to their phenolic content but we found a low correlation between phenolic content and TEAC.

  16. Recent Advances in the Analysis of Phenolic Compounds in Unifloral Honeys.

    PubMed

    Ciulu, Marco; Spano, Nadia; Pilo, Maria I; Sanna, Gavino

    2016-04-08

    Honey is one of the most renowned natural foods. Its composition is extremely variable, depending on its botanical and geographical origins, and the abundant presence of functional compounds has contributed to the increased worldwide interest is this foodstuff. In particular, great attention has been paid by the scientific community towards classes of compounds like phenolic compounds, due to their capability to act as markers of unifloral honey origin. In this contribution the most recent progress in the assessment of new analytical procedures aimed at the definition of the qualitative and quantitative profile of phenolic compounds of honey have been highlighted. A special emphasis has been placed on the innovative aspects concerning the extraction procedures, along with the most recent strategies proposed for the analysis of phenolic compounds. Moreover, the centrality of validation procedures has been claimed and extensively discussed in order to ensure the fitness-for-purpose of the proposed analytical methods. In addition, the exploitation of the phenolic profile as a tool for the classification of the botanical and geographical origin has been described, pointing out the usefulness of chemometrics in the interpretation of data sets originating from the analysis of polyphenols. Finally, recent results in concerning the evaluation of the antioxidant properties of unifloral honeys and the development of new analytical approaches aimed at measuring this parameter have been reviewed.

  17. A novel phenolic compound from Phyllanthus emblica.

    PubMed

    She, Gaimei; Cheng, Ruiyang; Sha, Lei; Xu, Yixia; Shi, Renbin; Zhang, Lanzhen; Guo, Yajian

    2013-04-01

    A new compound, mucic acid 3-O-gallate (1), was isolated from the fruit of Phyllanthus emblica L, together with 5 known compounds (2-6). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D NMR techniques, and by comparison with literature data.

  18. Photocatalytic degradation of phenol and phenolic compounds Part I. Adsorption and FTIR study.

    PubMed

    Araña, J; Pulido Melián, E; Rodríguez López, V M; Peña Alonso, A; Doña Rodríguez, J M; González Díaz, O; Pérez Peña, J

    2007-07-31

    With the goal of predicting the photocatalytic behaviour of different phenolic compounds (catechol, resorcinol, phenol, m-cresol and o-cresol), their adsorption and interaction types with the TiO(2) Degussa P-25 surface were studied. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms were applied in the adsorption studies. The obtained results indicated that catechol adsorption is much higher than those of the other phenolics and its interaction occurs preferentially through the formation of a catecholate monodentate. Resorcinol and the cresols interact by means of hydrogen bonds through the hydroxyl group, and their adsorption is much lower than that of catechol. Finally, phenol showed an intermediate behaviour, with a Langmuir adsorption constant, K(L), much lower than that of catechol, but a similar interaction. The interaction of the selected molecules with the catalyst surface was evaluated by means of FTIR experiments, which allowed us to determine the probability of OH radical attack to the aromatic ring.

  19. Phenolic compounds and chromatographic profiles of pear skins (Pyrus spp.).

    PubMed

    Lin, Long-Ze; Harnly, James M

    2008-10-08

    A standardized profiling method based on liquid chromatography with diode array and electrospray ionization/mass spectrometric detection (LC-DAD-ESI/MS) was used to analyze the phenolic compounds in the skins of 16 pears (Pyrus spp.). Thirty-four flavonoids and 19 hydroxycinnamates were identified. The main phenolic compounds (based on peak area) in all of the pear skins were arbutin and chlorogenic acid. The remaining phenolics varied widely in area and allowed the pears to be divided into four groups. Group 1, composed of four Asian pears (Asian, Asian brown, Korean, and Korean Shinko), contained only trace quantities of the remaining phenolics. Yali pear (group 2) contained significant amounts of dicaffeoylquinic acids. Fragrant pear (group 3) contained significant quantities of quercetin glycosides and lesser quantities of isorhamnetin glycosides and the glycosides of luteolin, apigenin, and chrysoeriol. The remaining 10 pears (group 4) (Bartlett, Beurre, Bosc, Comice, D'Anjou, Forelle, Peckham, Red, Red D'Anjou, and Seckel) contained significant quantities of isorhamnetin glycosides and their malonates and lesser quantities of quercetin glycosides. Red D'Anjou, D'Anjou, and Seckel pears also contained cyanidin 3-O-glucoside. Thirty-two phenolic compounds are reported in pear skins for the first time.

  20. Antioxidant phenolic compounds of cassava (Manihot esculenta) from Hainan.

    PubMed

    Yi, Bo; Hu, Lifei; Mei, Wenli; Zhou, Kaibing; Wang, Hui; Luo, Ying; Wei, Xiaoyi; Dai, Haofu

    2011-12-07

    An activity-directed fractionation and purification process was used to isolate antioxidant components from cassava stems produced in Hainan. The ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions showed greater DPPH˙and ABTS·+ scavenging activities than other fractions. The ethyl acetate fraction was subjected to column chromatography, to yield ten phenolic compounds: Coniferaldehyde (1), isovanillin (2), 6-deoxyjacareubin (3), scopoletin (4), syringaldehyde (5), pinoresinol (6), p-coumaric acid (7), ficusol (8), balanophonin (9) and ethamivan (10), which possess significant antioxidant activities. The relative order of DPPH· scavenging capacity for these compounds was ascorbic acid (reference) > 6 > 1 > 8 > 10 > 9 > 3 > 4 > 7 > 5 > 2, and that of ABTS·+ scavenging capacity was 5 > 7 > 1 > 10 > 4 > 6 > 8 > 2 > Trolox (reference compound) > 3 > 9. The results showed that these phenolic compounds contributed to the antioxidant activity of cassava.

  1. [Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of dimeric phenol compounds].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masahiro

    2008-08-01

    We studied the antioxidant and antibacterial activities of monomeric and dimeric phenol compounds. Dimeric compounds had higher antioxidant activities than monomeric compounds. Electron spin resonance spin-trapping experiments showed that phenol compounds with an allyl substituent on their aromatic rings directly scavenged superoxide, and that only eugenol trapped hydroxyl radicals. We developed a generation system of the hydroxyl radical without using any metals by adding L-DOPA and DMPO to PBS or MiliQ water in vitro. We found that eugenol trapped hydroxyl radicals directly and is metabolized to a dimer. On the other hand, dipropofol, a dimer of propofol, has strong antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. However, it lacks solubility in water and this property is assumed to limit its efficacy. We tried to improve the solubility and found a new solubilization method of dipropofol in water with the addition of a monosaccharide or ascorbic acid.

  2. Alkaline extraction of phenolic compounds from intact sorghum kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An aqueous sodium hydroxide solution was employed to extract phenolic compounds from whole grain sorghum without decortication or grinding as determined by Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC). The alkaline extract ORAC values were more stable over 32 days compared to neutralized and freeze dri...

  3. Mechanisms of action of phenolic compounds in olive.

    PubMed

    Rafehi, Haloom; Ververis, Katherine; Karagiannis, Tom C

    2012-06-01

    Olive oil, an oil rich in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFCs) and minor constituents including phenolic compounds, is a major component of the Mediterranean diet. The potential health benefits of the Mediterranean diet were highlighted by the seminal Seven Countries Study, and more contemporary research has identified olive oil as a major element responsible for these effects. It is emerging that the phenolic compounds are the most likely candidates accounting for the cardioprotective and cancer preventative effects of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). In particular, the phenolic compound, hydroxytyrosol has been identified as one of the most potent antioxidants found in olive oil. This review will briefly consider historical aspects of olive oil research and the biological properties of phenolic compounds in olive oil will be discussed. The focus of the discussion will be related to the mechanisms of action of hydroxytyrosol. Studies have demonstrated that hydroxytyrosol induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. Further, research has shown that hydroxytyrosol can prevent cardiovascular disease by reducing the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells and preventing the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The molecular mechanisms accounting for these effects are reviewed.

  4. Three new phenolic compounds from the roots of Glycyrrhiza yunnanensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing; Ji, Shuai; Yu, Si-wang; Wang, Hui-xia; Lin, Xiong-hao; Ma, Tao-tao; Qiao, Xue; Xiang, Cheng; Ye, Min; Guo, De-an

    2013-03-01

    Three new phenolic compounds (1-3), together with 16 known compounds (4-19), were isolated from the roots of Glycyrrhiza yunnanensis Cheng f. et L. K. Dai. On the basis of 1D and 2D NMR, HR-ESI-MS, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic analysis, structures of the new compounds were elucidated as 2-(2'-methoxy-4'-hydroxy)-aryl-3-methy-6-hydroxy-benzofuran (1), (2S)-6,7-(2,2-dimethyldihydropyrano)-8-prenyl-4'-hydroxyflavanone (2), and 6-prenyl-7,3',4'-trihydroxyflavone (3). Compounds 1, 3, 5, 12, 14, 15 and 16 showed antioxidant activity by an ABTS-based assay.

  5. Bioprocessing of wheat bran improves in vitro bioaccessibility and colonic metabolism of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Anson, Nuria Mateo; Selinheimo, Emilia; Havenaar, Rob; Aura, Anna-Marja; Mattila, Ismo; Lehtinen, Pekka; Bast, Aalt; Poutanen, Kaisa; Haenen, Guido R M M

    2009-07-22

    Ferulic acid (FA) is the most abundant phenolic compound in wheat grain, mainly located in the bran. However, its bioaccessibility from the bran matrix is extremely low. Different bioprocessing techniques involving fermentation or enzymatic and fermentation treatments of wheat bran were developed aiming at improving the bioaccessibility of phenolic compounds in bran-containing breads. The bioaccessibility of ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, and sinapic acid was assessed with an in vitro model of upper gastrointestinal tract (TIM-1). Colonic metabolism of the phenolic compounds in the nonbioaccessible fraction of the breads was studied with an in vitro model of human colon (TIM-2). The most effective treatment was the combination of enzymes and fermentation that increased the bioaccessibility of FA from 1.1% to 5.5%. The major colonic metabolites were 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid and 3-phenylpropionic acid. Bran bioprocessing increases the bioaccessibility of phenolic compounds as well as the colonic end metabolite 3-phenylpropionic acid.

  6. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds of Extra Virgin Olive Oil.

    PubMed

    Servili, Maurizio; Sordini, Beatrice; Esposto, Sonia; Urbani, Stefania; Veneziani, Gianluca; Di Maio, Ilona; Selvaggini, Roberto; Taticchi, Agnese

    2013-12-20

    Over the last few decades, multiple biological properties, providing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and anti-cancer benefits, as well as the characteristic pungent and bitter taste, have been attributed to Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) phenols. In particular, growing efforts have been devoted to the study of the antioxidants of EVOO, due to their importance from health, biological and sensory points of view. Hydrophilic and lipophilic phenols represent the main antioxidants of EVOO, and they include a large variety of compounds. Among them, the most concentrated phenols are lignans and secoiridoids, with the latter found exclusively in the Oleaceae family, of which the drupe is the only edible fruit. In recent years, therefore, we have tackled the study of the main properties of phenols, including the relationships between their biological activity and the related chemical structure. This review, in fact, focuses on the phenolic compounds of EVOO, and, in particular, on their biological properties, sensory aspects and antioxidant capacity, with a particular emphasis on the extension of the product shelf-life.

  7. Biological Activities of Phenolic Compounds of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

    PubMed Central

    Servili, Maurizio; Sordini, Beatrice; Esposto, Sonia; Urbani, Stefania; Veneziani, Gianluca; Maio, Ilona Di; Selvaggini, Roberto; Taticchi, Agnese

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few decades, multiple biological properties, providing antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and anti-cancer benefits, as well as the characteristic pungent and bitter taste, have been attributed to Extra Virgin Olive Oil (EVOO) phenols. In particular, growing efforts have been devoted to the study of the antioxidants of EVOO, due to their importance from health, biological and sensory points of view. Hydrophilic and lipophilic phenols represent the main antioxidants of EVOO, and they include a large variety of compounds. Among them, the most concentrated phenols are lignans and secoiridoids, with the latter found exclusively in the Oleaceae family, of which the drupe is the only edible fruit. In recent years, therefore, we have tackled the study of the main properties of phenols, including the relationships between their biological activity and the related chemical structure. This review, in fact, focuses on the phenolic compounds of EVOO, and, in particular, on their biological properties, sensory aspects and antioxidant capacity, with a particular emphasis on the extension of the product shelf-life. PMID:26784660

  8. Factors influencing phenolic compounds in table olives (Olea europaea).

    PubMed

    Charoenprasert, Suthawan; Mitchell, Alyson

    2012-07-25

    The Mediterranean diet appears to be associated with a reduced risk of several chronic diseases including cancer and cardiovascular and Alzheimer's diseases. Olive products (mainly olive oil and table olives) are important components of the Mediterranean diet. Olives contain a range of phenolic compounds; these natural antioxidants may contribute to the prevention of these chronic conditions. Consequently, the consumption of table olives and olive oil continues to increase worldwide by health-conscious consumers. There are numerous factors that can affect the phenolics in table olives including the cultivar, degree of ripening, and, importantly, the methods used for curing and processing table olives. The predominant phenolic compound found in fresh olive is the bitter secoiridoid oleuropein. Table olive processing decreases levels of oleuropein with concomitant increases in the hydrolysis products hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol. Many of the health benefits reported for olives are thought to be associated with the levels of hydroxytyrosol. Herein the pre- and post-harvest factors influencing the phenolics in olives, debittering methods, and health benefits of phenolics in table olives are reviewed.

  9. Distribution, antioxidant and characterisation of phenolic compounds in soybeans, flaxseed and olives.

    PubMed

    Alu'datt, Muhammad H; Rababah, Taha; Ereifej, Khalil; Alli, Inteaz

    2013-08-15

    The distribution of free and bound phenolic compounds present in soybean, flaxseed and olive were investigated. The phenolic compounds were fractionated on the basis on their solubility characteristics in water, alcohol, dilute base and dilute acid. Reversed phase high pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and mass spectrometry (MS) were used for identification of individual components of phenolic compounds. Antioxidant activity (AA%) of free and bound phenolic compounds was measured using the linoleic acid/β-carotene assay. The water-soluble phenolic compound fractions represented 68-81%, 50-72% and 46-56% of the total phenolic compounds measured in full-fat soybean, olive and flaxseed, respectively. Methanolic extraction of free phenolic compounds without heat, solubilised 21-56%, 42-62% and 34-51% of the total phenolic compounds measured in soybean, olive and flaxseed, respectively; methanol extraction of free phenolic compounds with heat solubilised a further 24-34%, 31-37% and 36-37% of phenolic compounds from soybean, olive and flaxseed, respectively. Further dilute alkali and dilute acid solubilised the remaining 10-40%, 1-21% and 12-29% of the total phenolic compounds from soybean, olive and flaxseed, respectively. Results indicated that the full-fat meals of soybean, flaxseed and olive showed higher antioxidant activity compared to defatted meals. RP-HPLC and LC-MS/MS profil1 for soybean, flaxseed and olive indicate two classes of phenolic compounds designated as free and bound phenolic compounds.

  10. Phenolic Compounds from Olea europaea L. Possess Antioxidant Activity and Inhibit Carbohydrate Metabolizing Enzymes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dekdouk, Nadia; Malafronte, Nicola; Russo, Daniela; Faraone, Immacolata; De Tommasi, Nunziatina; Ameddah, Souad; Severino, Lorella; Milella, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic composition and biological activities of fruit extracts from Italian and Algerian Olea europaea L. cultivars were studied. Total phenolic and tannin contents were quantified in the extracts. Moreover 14 different phenolic compounds were identified, and their profiles showed remarkable quantitative differences among analysed extracts. Moreover antioxidant and enzymatic inhibition activities were studied. Three complementary assays were used to measure their antioxidant activities and consequently Relative Antioxidant Capacity Index (RACI) was used to compare and easily describe obtained results. Results showed that Chemlal, between Algerian cultivars, and Coratina, among Italian ones, had the highest RACI values. On the other hand all extracts and the most abundant phenolics were tested for their efficiency to inhibit α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Leccino, among all analysed cultivars, and luteolin, among identified phenolic compounds, were found to be the best inhibitors of α-amylase and α-glucosidase enzymes. Results demonstrated that Olea europaea fruit extracts can represent an important natural source with high antioxidant potential and significant α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory effects. PMID:26557862

  11. Extraction of phenolic compounds from a Spodosol profile: an evaluation of three extractants

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, G.F.; Boyd, S.A.; Mokma, D.L.

    1985-12-01

    The authors extracted phenolic compounds from each horizon of a Spodosol profile using three extractants: 0.1 M sodium pyrophosphate at pH 7.0 and 10.2, and 0.5 N sodium hydroxide at pH 13.4. Of 28 standard compounds evaluated seven phenolic compounds were identified: three carboxylic acids - protocatechuic, p-hydroxybenzoic, and vanillic acids; two aldehydes - vanillin and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde; and two cinnamic acids - trans p-coumaric and ferulic acids. The three most abundant compounds evaluated were protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and vanillic acid. The amounts of each phenolic compound extracted increased with increasing pH of the extractant except for protocatechuic acid. Protocatechuic acid was extracted in the highest amounts by sodium pyrophosphate pH 10. The pyrophosphate (pH .10) extracts revealed that protocatechuic acid tended to accumulate in the B horizons, suggesting that it may play a role in the translocation of metal ions during podzolization. The two cinnamic acids, trans p-coumaric and ferulic, were extracted primarily by NaOH. The identification of these cinnamic derivatives in an NaOH extraction of roots separated from the B horizon suggested that their presence may be due to degradation of plant residues by NaOH. Pyrophosphate (pH 7) extracted only small amounts of phenolic compounds. The specificity of pyrophosphate (pH 10) in removing organic complexes of a possible pedogenic nature suggest that it was the better extractant. Sodium pyrophosphate (pH 10) is recommended for use in future pedological studies of phenolic substances.

  12. New Isoprenylated Phenolic Compounds from Morus laevigata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Yu, Bang-Wei; Yu, Mei-Hua; Gao, Li-Xin; Li, Jing-Ya; Wang, He-Yao; Li, Jia; Hou, Ai-Jun

    2015-06-01

    Two new isoprenylated flavonoids, laevigasins A and B (1 and 2, resp.), and one new isoprenylated 2-arylbenzofuran, leavigasin C (3), together with eight known compounds, 4-11, were isolated from the twigs of Morus laevigata. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods. Laevigasin A (1) showed significant inhibitory effect on α-glucosidase in vitro. Notabilisin E (5), taxifolin (10), and hultenin (11) inhibited PTP1B phosphatase activity in vitro.

  13. Irreversible adsorption of phenolic compounds by activated carbons

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, T.M.; King, C.J.

    1988-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine the reasons why phenolic sorbates can be difficult to remove and recover from activated carbons. The chemical properties of the sorbate and the adsorbent surface, and the influences of changes in the adsorption and desorption conditions were investigated. Comparison of isotherms established after different contact times or at different temperatures indicated that phenolic compounds react on carbon surfaces. The reaction rate is a strong function of temperature. Regeneration of carbons by leaching with acetone recovered at least as much phenol as did regeneration with other solvents or with displacers. The physiochemical properties of adsorbents influences irreversible uptakes. Sorbates differed markedly in their tendencies to undergo irreversible adsorption. 64 refs., 47 figs., 32 tabs.

  14. High pressure extraction of phenolic compounds from citrus peels†

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casquete, R.; Castro, S. M.; Villalobos, M. C.; Serradilla, M. J.; Queirós, R. P.; Saraiva, J. A.; Córdoba, M. G.; Teixeira, P.

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect of high pressure processing on the recovery of high added value compounds from citrus peels. Overall, the total phenolic content in orange peel was significantly (P < .05) higher than that in lemon peel, except when pressure treated at 500 MPa. However, lemon peel demonstrated more antioxidant activity than orange peel. Pressure-treated samples (300 MPa, 10 min; 500 MPa, 3 min) demonstrated higher phenolic content and antioxidant activity comparatively to the control samples. For more severe treatments (500 MPa, 10 min), the phenolic content and antioxidant activity decreased in both lemon and orange peels. This paper was presented at the 8th International Conference on High Pressure Bioscience & Biotechnology (HPBB 2014), in Nantes (France), 15-18 July 2014.

  15. Aquatic pathways model to predict the fate of phenolic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Aaberg, R.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Mellinger, P.J.

    1983-04-01

    Organic materials released from energy-related activities could affect human health and the environment. To better assess possible impacts, we developed a model to predict the fate of spills or discharges of pollutants into flowing or static bodies of fresh water. A computer code, Aquatic Pathways Model (APM), was written to implement the model. The computer programs use compartmental analysis to simulate aquatic ecosystems. The APM estimates the concentrations of chemicals in fish tissue, water and sediment, and is therefore useful for assessing exposure to humans through aquatic pathways. The APM will consider any aquatic pathway for which the user has transport data. Additionally, APM will estimate transport rates from physical and chemical properties of chemicals between several key compartments. The major pathways considered are biodegradation, fish and sediment uptake, photolysis, and evaporation. The model has been implemented with parameters for distribution of phenols, an important class of compounds found in the water-soluble fractions of coal liquids. Current modeling efforts show that, in comparison with many pesticides and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the lighter phenolics (the cresols) are not persistent in the environment. The properties of heavier molecular weight phenolics (indanols, naphthols) are not well enough understood at this time to make similar judgements. For the twelve phenolics studied, biodegradation appears to be the major pathway for elimination from aquatic environments. A pond system simulation (using APM) of a spill of solvent refined coal (SRC-II) materials indicates that phenol, cresols, and other single cyclic phenolics are degraded to 16 to 25 percent of their original concentrations within 30 hours. Adsorption of these compounds into sediments and accumulation by fish was minor.

  16. Composition and health effects of phenolic compounds in hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) of different origins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baoru; Liu, Pengzhan

    2012-06-01

    Epicatechin, aglycons and glycosides of B-type oligomeric procyanidins and flavonols, phenolic acids and C-glycosyl flavones are the major groups of phenolic compounds in hawthorn (Crataegus spp). The total content of phenolic compounds is higher in the leaves and flowers than in the fruits. Procyanidins dominate in the fruits, whereas flavonol glycosides and C-glycosyl flavones are most abundant in the leaves. Genotype and developmental/ripening stage have strong impacts. Procyanidin glycosides and C-glycosyl flavones may be chemotaxonomic markers differentiating species and varieties of hawthorn. Future research shall improve the separation, identification and quantification of procyanidins with degree of polymerisation (DP) ≥ 6, procyanidin glycosides, C-glycosyl flavones and some flavonol glycosides. In vitro and animal studies have shown cardioprotective, hypolipidaemic, hypotensive, antioxidant, radical-scavenging and anti-inflammatory potentials of hawthorn extracts, suggesting different phenolic compounds as the major bioactive components. However, the varying and insufficiently defined composition of the extracts investigated, as a result of different raw materials and extraction methods, makes comparison of the studies very difficult. Clinical evidence indicates that some hawthorn extracts may increase the exercise tolerance of patients with congestive heart failure. More clinical studies are needed to establish the effects of hawthorn, especially in healthy humans.

  17. Solid lipid nanoparticles as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds: Overcoming pharmacokinetic limitations for nutraceutical applications.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Sara; Madureira, Ana Raquel; Campos, Débora; Sarmento, Bruno; Gomes, Ana Maria; Pintado, Manuela; Reis, Flávio

    2017-06-13

    Drug delivery systems, accompanied by nanoparticle technology, have recently emerged as prominent solutions to improve the pharmacokinetic properties, namely bioavailability, of therapeutic and nutraceutical agents. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) have received much attention from researchers due to their potential to protect or improve drug properties. SLNs have been reported to be an alternative system to traditional carriers, such as emulsions, liposomes, and polymeric nanoparticles. Phenolic compounds are widespread in plant-derived foodstuffs and therefore abundant in our diet. Over the last decades, phenolic compounds have received considerable attention due to several health promoting properties, mostly related to their antioxidant activity, which can have important implications for health. However, most of these compounds have been associated with poor bioavailability being poorly absorbed, rapidly metabolized and eliminated, which compromises its biological and pharmacological benefits. This paper provides a systematic review of the use of SLNs as oral delivery systems of phenolic compounds, in order to overcome pharmacokinetic limitations of these compounds and improved nutraceutical potential. In vitro studies, as well as works describing topical and oral treatments will be revisited and discussed. The classification, synthesis, and clinical application of these nanomaterials will be also considered in this review article.

  18. Extraction, Separation, and Identification of Phenolic Compounds in Virgin Olive Oil by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Tasioula-Margari, Maria; Tsabolatidou, Eleftheria

    2015-08-13

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the recovery of individual phenolic compounds extracted from virgin olive oil (VOO), from different Greek olive varieties. Sufficient recoveries (90%) of all individual phenolic compounds were obtained using methanol as an extraction solvent, acetonitrile for residue solubilization, and two washing steps with hexane. Moreover, in order to elucidate structural characteristics of phenolic compounds in VOO, high performance liquid chromatography with a diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) at 280 and 340 nm and HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) in the negative-ion mode were performed. The most abundant phenolic compounds were oleuropein derivatives with m/z 319 and 377 and ligstroside derivatives with m/z 303, 361. Lignans, such as 1-acetoxypinoresinol and pinoresinol were also present in substantial quantities in the phenolic fraction. However, pinoresinol was co-eluted with dialdehydic form of ligstroside aglycone (DAFLA) and it was not possible to be quantified separately. The phenolic extracts, obtained from different VOO samples, yielded similar HPLC profiles. Differences, however, were observed in the last part of the chromatogram, corresponding to isomers of the aldehydic form of ligstroside aglycone. Oxidized phenolic products, originating from secoiridoids, were also detected.

  19. Extraction, Separation, and Identification of Phenolic Compounds in Virgin Olive Oil by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Tasioula-Margari, Maria; Tsabolatidou, Eleftheria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the recovery of individual phenolic compounds extracted from virgin olive oil (VOO), from different Greek olive varieties. Sufficient recoveries (90%) of all individual phenolic compounds were obtained using methanol as an extraction solvent, acetonitrile for residue solubilization, and two washing steps with hexane. Moreover, in order to elucidate structural characteristics of phenolic compounds in VOO, high performance liquid chromatography with a diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) at 280 and 340 nm and HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) in the negative-ion mode were performed. The most abundant phenolic compounds were oleuropein derivatives with m/z 319 and 377 and ligstroside derivatives with m/z 303, 361. Lignans, such as 1-acetoxypinoresinol and pinoresinol were also present in substantial quantities in the phenolic fraction. However, pinoresinol was co-eluted with dialdehydic form of ligstroside aglycone (DAFLA) and it was not possible to be quantified separately. The phenolic extracts, obtained from different VOO samples, yielded similar HPLC profiles. Differences, however, were observed in the last part of the chromatogram, corresponding to isomers of the aldehydic form of ligstroside aglycone. Oxidized phenolic products, originating from secoiridoids, were also detected. PMID:26783843

  20. Analysis of nonextractable phenolic compounds in foods: the current state of the art.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Jiménez, Jara; Torres, Josep Lluís

    2011-12-28

    More than 500 phenolic compounds have been reported as present in foodstuffs, and their intake has been related to the prevention of several chronic diseases. Most of the literature on phenolic compounds focuses on those present in the supernatant of aqueous-organic extractions: extractable phenolics. Nevertheless, significant amounts of phenolic compounds remain in the solid residues after such extractions. These nonextractable phenolics are mostly proanthocyanidins, phenolic acids, and hydrolyzable tannins that are closely associated with the food matrix. Studies of this fraction of dietary phenolic compounds are scarce, and the few there are usually refer to particular types of phenolics rather than to the fraction as a whole. The present review reports the state-of-the-art methods that currently exist for analyzing nonextractable phenolic compounds in foods.

  1. Phenolic-compound-extraction systems for fruit and vegetable samples.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Salas, Patricia; Morales-Soto, Aranzazu; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2010-12-03

    This paper reviews the phenolic-compound-extraction systems used to analyse fruit and vegetable samples over the last 10 years. Phenolic compounds are naturally occurring antioxidants, usually found in fruits and vegetables. Sample preparation for analytical studies is necessary to determine the polyphenolic composition in these matrices. The most widely used extraction system is liquid-liquid extraction (LLE), which is an inexpensive method since it involves the use of organic solvents, but it requires long extraction times, giving rise to possible extract degradation. Likewise, solid-phase extraction (SPE) can be used in liquid samples. Modern techniques, which have been replacing conventional ones, include: supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE). These alternative techniques reduce considerably the use of solvents and accelerate the extraction process.

  2. Radiation induced chemical changes of phenolic compounds in strawberries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitfellner, F.; Solar, S.; Sontag, G.

    2003-06-01

    In unirradiated strawberries four phenolic acids (gallic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid), the flavonoids (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and glycosides from kaempferol and quercetin were determined by reversed phase chromatography with diode array detection. Characteristic linear dose/concentration relationships were found for 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and two unidentified compounds. One of them may be usable as marker to prove an irradiation treatment.

  3. Laccase Catalyzed Synthesis of Iodinated Phenolic Compounds with Antifungal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ihssen, Julian; Schubert, Mark; Thöny-Meyer, Linda; Richter, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Iodine is a well known antimicrobial compound. Laccase, an oxidoreductase which couples the one electron oxidation of diverse phenolic and non-phenolic substrates to the reduction of oxygen to water, is capable of oxidizing unreactive iodide to reactive iodine. We have shown previously that laccase-iodide treatment of spruce wood results in a wash-out resistant antimicrobial surface. In this study, we investigated whether phenolic compounds such as vanillin, which resembles sub-structures of softwood lignin, can be directly iodinated by reacting with laccase and iodide, resulting in compounds with antifungal activity. HPLC-MS analysis showed that vanillin was converted to iodovanillin by laccase catalysis at an excess of potassium iodide. No conversion of vanillin occurred in the absence of enzyme. The addition of redox mediators in catalytic concentrations increased the rate of iodide oxidation ten-fold and the yield of iodovanillin by 50%. Iodinated phenolic products were also detected when o-vanillin, ethyl vanillin, acetovanillone and methyl vanillate were incubated with laccase and iodide. At an increased educt concentration of 0.1 M an almost one to one molar ratio of iodide to vanillin could be used without compromising conversion rate, and the insoluble iodovanillin product could be recovered by simple centrifugation. The novel enzymatic synthesis procedure fulfills key criteria of green chemistry. Biocatalytically produced iodovanillin and iodo-ethyl vanillin had significant growth inhibitory effects on several wood degrading fungal species. For Trametes versicolor, a species causing white rot of wood, almost complete growth inhibition and a partial biocidal effect was observed on agar plates. Enzymatic tests indicated that the iodinated compounds acted as enzyme responsive, antimicrobial materials. PMID:24594755

  4. Phenolic compounds with IL-6 inhibitory activity from Aster yomena.

    PubMed

    Kim, A Ryun; Jin, Qinglong; Jin, Hong-Guang; Ko, Hae Ju; Woo, Eun-Rhan

    2014-07-01

    A new biflavonoid, named asteryomenin (1), as well as six known phenolic compounds, esculetin (2), 4-O-β-D-glucopyranoside-3-hydroxy methyl benzoate (3), caffeic acid (4), isoquercitrin (5), isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside (6), and apigenin (7) were isolated from the aerial parts of Aster yomena. The structures of compounds (1-7) were identified based on 1D and 2D NMR, including (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, HMBC and NOESY spectroscopic analyses. Compounds 2-7 were isolated from this plant for the first time. For these isolates, the inhibitory activity of IL-6 production in the TNF-α stimulated MG-63 cell was examined. Among these isolates, compounds 4 and 7 appeared to have potent inhibitory activity of IL-6 production in the TNF-α stimulated MG-63 cell, while compounds 1-3 and 5-6 showed moderate activity.

  5. Extraction of phenolic compounds from virgin olive oil by deep eutectic solvents (DESs).

    PubMed

    García, Aránzazu; Rodríguez-Juan, Elisa; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Rios, José Julian; Fernández-Bolaños, Juan

    2016-04-15

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are "green" solvents, applied in this study for the extraction of phenolic compounds from virgin olive oil (VOO). Different combinations of DES consisting of choline chloride (ChCl) in various mixing ratios with sugars, alcohols, organic acids, and urea, as well as a mixture of three sugars were used. The yields of the DES extractions were compared with those from conventional 80% (v/v) methanol/water. DES showed a good solubility of phenolic compounds with different polarities. The two most abundant secoiridoid derivatives in olive oil, oleacein and oleocanthal, extracted with ChCl/xylitol and ChCl/1,2-propanediol showed an increase of 20-33% and 67.9-68.3% with respect to conventional extraction, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first time that phenolic compounds have been extracted from VOO oil using DES. Our results suggest that DES offers an efficient, safe, sustainable, and cost effective alternative to methanol for extraction of bioactive compounds from VOO.

  6. Characterization of phenols biodegradation by compound specific stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xi; Gilevska, Tetyana; Wenzig, Felix; Hans, Richnow; Vogt, Carsten

    2015-04-01

    Biodegradation of phenol and alkylphenols has been described under both oxic and anoxic conditions. In the absence of molecular oxygen, the degradation of phenolic compounds is initiated by microorganisms through carboxylation, fumarate addition to the methyl moiety or anoxic hydroxylation of the methyl moiety. Comparatively, under aerobic condition, the initiation mechanisms are revealed to be monoxygenation or dihydroxylation for phenol and ring hydroxylation or methyl group oxidation for cresols. While several studies biochemically characterized the enzymes and reaction mechanisms in the relevant degradation pathways, isotope fractionation patterns were rarely reported possibly due to constraints in current analytical methods. In this study, the carbon isotope fractionation patterns upon the degradation of phenol and cresols by several strains were analyzed by using isotope ratio mass spectrometry connected with liquid chromatography (LC-IRMS). The corresponding enrichment factors for carbon (ƐC) have been obtained. Cresols degradation by various strains showed generally moderate carbon isotope fractionation patterns with notable differences. For p-cresol degradation, five strains were examined. The aerobic strain Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NCIMB8250 exploits ring hydroxylation by molecular oxygen as initial reaction, and a ƐC value of -1.4±0.2‰ was obtained. Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes NCIMB 9867, an aerobic strain initiating cresols degradation via oxygen-dependent side chain hydroxylation, yielded a ƐC value of -2.3±0.2‰. Under nitrate-reducing conditions, Geobacter metallireducens DSM 7210 and Azoarcus buckelii DSM 14744 attacks p-cresol at the side chain by monohydroxylation using water as oxygen source; the two strains produced ƐC values of -3.6±0.4‰ and -2±0.1‰, accordingly. The sulfate-reducing Desulfosarcina cetonica DSM 7267 activating cresols by fumarate addition to the methyl moiety yielded ƐC values of -1.9±0.2‰ for p

  7. Phenolic responses of mountain crowberry (Empetrum nigrum ssp. hermaphroditum) to global climate change are compound specific and depend on grazing by reindeer (Rangifer tarandus).

    PubMed

    Väisänen, Maria; Martz, Françoise; Kaarlejärvi, Elina; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta; Stark, Sari

    2013-12-01

    Mountain crowberry (Empetrum nigrum ssp. hermaphroditum) is a keystone species in northern ecosystems and exerts important ecosystem-level effects through high concentrations of phenolic metabolites. It has not been investigated how crowberry phenolics will respond to global climate change. In the tundra, grazing by reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) affects vegetation and soil nutrient availability, but almost nothing is known about the interactions between grazing and global climate change on plant phenolics. We performed a factorial warming and fertilization experiment in a tundra ecosystem under light grazing and heavy grazing and analyzed individual foliar phenolics and crowberry abundance. Crowberry was more abundant under light grazing than heavy grazing. Although phenolic concentrations did not differ between grazing intensities, responses of crowberry abundance and phenolic concentrations to warming varied significantly depending on grazing intensity. Under light grazing, warming increased crowberry abundance and the concentration of stilbenes, but decreased e.g., the concentrations of flavonols, condensed tannins, and batatasin-III, resulting in no change in total phenolics. Under heavy grazing, warming did not affect crowberry abundance, and induced a weak but consistent decrease among the different phenolic compound groups, resulting in a net decrease in total phenolics. Our results show that the different phenolic compound groups may show varying or even opposing responses to warming in the tundra at different levels of grazing intensity. Even when plant phenolic concentrations do not directly respond to grazing, grazers may have a key control over plant responses to changes in the abiotic environment, reflecting multiple adaptive purposes of plant phenolics and complex interactions between the biotic and the abiotic factors.

  8. Retardation of quality changes in camel meat sausages by phenolic compounds and phenolic extracts.

    PubMed

    Maqsood, Sajid; Manheem, Kusaimah; Abushelaibi, Aisha; Kadim, Isam Tawfik

    2016-11-01

    Impact of tannic acid (TA), date seed extract (DSE), catechin (CT) and green tea extract (GTE) on lipid oxidation, microbial load and textural properties of camel meat sausages during 12 days of refrigerated storage was investigated. TA and CT showed higher activities in all antioxidative assays compared to DSE and GTE. Lipid oxidation and microbial growth was higher for control sausages when compared to other samples. TA and CT at a level of 200 mg/kg were more effective in retarding lipid oxidation and lowering microbial count (P < 0.05). Sausages treated with TA and DSE were found to have higher hardness, gumminess and chewiness values compared to other treatments (P < 0.05). Addition of different phenolic compounds or extract did not influence the sensory color of sausages. Furthermore, sensory quality was also found to be superior in TA and CT treated sausages. Therefore, pure phenolic compounds (TA and CT) proved to be more effective in retaining microbial and sensorial qualities of camel meat sausages compared to phenolic extracts (GTE and DSE) over 12 days of storage at 4°C.

  9. Natural phenolic compounds from medicinal herbs and dietary plants: potential use for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wu-Yang; Cai, Yi-Zhong; Zhang, Yanbo

    2010-01-01

    Natural phenolic compounds play an important role in cancer prevention and treatment. Phenolic compounds from medicinal herbs and dietary plants include phenolic acids, flavonoids, tannins, stilbenes, curcuminoids, coumarins, lignans, quinones, and others. Various bioactivities of phenolic compounds are responsible for their chemopreventive properties (e.g., antioxidant, anticarcinogenic, or antimutagenic and anti-inflammatory effects) and also contribute to their inducing apoptosis by arresting cell cycle, regulating carcinogen metabolism and ontogenesis expression, inhibiting DNA binding and cell adhesion, migration, proliferation or differentiation, and blocking signaling pathways. This review covers the most recent literature to summarize structural categories and molecular anticancer mechanisms of phenolic compounds from medicinal herbs and dietary plants.

  10. Characterization of phenolic compounds from lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea).

    PubMed

    Ek, Sari; Kartimo, Heikki; Mattila, Sampo; Tolonen, Ari

    2006-12-27

    Phenolic compounds from the lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) were identified using LC-TOFMS, LC-MS/MS, and NMR experiments. The compounds were extracted from the plant material using methanol in an ultrasonicator and further isolated and purified using solid-phase extraction and preparative liquid chromatographic techniques. A total of 28 phenolic compounds were at least tentatively identified, including flavonols, anthocyanidins, catechins and their glycosides, and different caffeoyl and ferulic acid conjugates. This is apparently the first report of coumaroyl-hexose-hydroxyphenol, caffeoyl-hexose-hydroxyphenol, coumaroyl-hexose-hydroxyphenol, quercetin-3-O-alpha-arabinofuranoside, kaempferol-pentoside, and kaempferol-deoxyhexoside in the plant, and the flavonol acylglycosides quercetin-3-O-[4' '-(3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaroyl)]-alpha-rhamnose and kaempferol-3-O-[4' '-(3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaroyl)]-alpha-rhamnose are presented here for the first time ever. In addition, more detailed structure in comparison to earlier reports is described for some compounds previously known to exist in lingonberry.

  11. Antioxidant Activity of Phenolic Compounds from Fava Bean Sprouts.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Koharu; Hosoya, Takahiro; Kawarazaki, Kai; Izawa, Norihiko; Kumazawa, Shigenori

    2016-06-01

    Fava beans are eaten all over the world and recently, marketing for their sprouts began in Japan. Fava bean sprouts contain more polyphenols and l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) than the bean itself. Our antioxidant screening program has shown that fava bean sprouts also possess a higher antioxidant activity than other commercially available sprouts and mature beans. However, the individual constituents of fava bean sprouts are not entirely known. In the present study, we investigated the phenolic compounds of fava bean sprouts and their antioxidant activity. Air-dried fava bean sprouts were treated with 80% methanol and the extract was partitioned in water with chloroform and ethyl acetate. HPLC analysis had shown that the ethyl acetate-soluble parts contained phenolic compounds, separated by preparative HPLC to yield 5 compounds (1-5). Structural analysis using NMR and MS revealed that the compounds isolated were kaempferol glycosides. All isolated compounds had an α-rhamnose at the C-7 position with different sugars attached at the C-3 position. Compounds 1-5 had β-galactose, β-glucose, α-rhamnose, 6-acetyl-β-galactose and 6-acetyl-β-glucose, respectively, at the C-3 position. The amount of l-DOPA in fava bean sprouts was determined by the quantitative (1) H NMR technique. The l-DOPA content was 550.45 mg ± 11.34 /100 g of the raw sprouts. The antioxidant activities of compounds 2-5 and l-DOPA were evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl scavenging assay. l-DOPA showed high antioxidant activity, but the isolated kaempferol glycosides showed weak activity. Therefore, it can be suggested that l-DOPA contributed to the antioxidant activity of fava bean sprouts.

  12. Analysis of antioxidative phenolic compounds in artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingfu; Simon, James E; Aviles, Irma Fabiola; He, Kan; Zheng, Qun-Yi; Tadmor, Yaakov

    2003-01-29

    Artichoke leaf is an herbal medicine known for a long time. A systematic antioxidant activity-directed fractionation procedure was used to purify antioxidative components from the aqueous methanol extractions of artichoke heads and leaves in this study. Seven active polyphenolic compounds were purified from artichoke, and structural elucidation of each was achieved using MS and NMR. Two of these compounds, apigenin-7-rutinoside and narirutin, were found to be unique to artichoke heads, this represents the first report of these compounds in the edible portion of this plant. The contents of these antioxidants and total phenols in dried artichoke samples from leaves and immature and mature heads of three varieties, Imperial Star, Green Globe, and Violet, were then analyzed and compared by colorimetric and validated HPLC methods. Significant differences by variety and plant organ were observed.

  13. Identification and quantification of phenolic compounds in grapes by HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS on a semimicro separation scale.

    PubMed

    Nicoletti, Isabella; Bello, Cristiano; De Rossi, Antonella; Corradini, Danilo

    2008-10-08

    occurring in the whole berries of nine red and one white grape of different varieties of Vitis vinifera, comprising some autochthonous varieties of south Italy such as Aglianico, Malvasia Nera, Uva di Troia, Negroamaro, Primitivo, and Susumaniello. Large differences in the content of phenolic compounds was found in the investigated grape varieties. As expected, only glycosilated flavonols were quantified, and the total amount of these compounds was higher in the whole berries of red grapes than in the white Moscato, where the most abundant phenolic compound was quercetin 3-O-glucoside. In almost all samples, the most and least abundant anthocyanins were malvidin 3-O-glucoside and cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, respectively, with the exception of Uva di Troia where the least abundant anthocyanin was delphinidin 3-O-glucoside.

  14. Development of novel antibiofouling materials from natural phenol compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelikani, Rahul; Kim, Dong Shik

    2007-03-01

    Biofilms consist of a gelatinous matrix formed on a solid surface by microbial organisms.Biofilm is caused due to the adhesion of microbes to solid surfaces with production of extracellular polymers and the process of the biofilm formation is reffered to as biofouling.Biofouling causes serious problems in chemical, medical and pharmaceutical industries.Although there have been some antibiofouling materials developed over the years,no plausible results have been found yet.Natural polyphenolic compounds like flavanoids,cathechins have strong antioxidant and antimicrobial properties.Recently,apocynin,a phenol derivative,was polymerized to form oligomers,which can regulate intracellular pathways in cancer cells preventing cell proliferation and migration.These natural phenolic compounds have never been applied to solid surfaces to prevent biofouling.It is thought that probably because of the difficulty to crosslink them to form a stable coating.In this study,some novel polyphenolic compounds synthesized using enzymatic technique from cashew nut shell liquid,a cheap and renewable byproduct of the cashew industry are used as coating materials to prevent biofouling.The interaction of these materials with microbes preventing fouling on surfaces and the chemico-physical properties of the materials causing the antibiofouling effect will be discussed.It is critical to understand the antibiofouling mechanism of these materials for better design and application in various fields.

  15. Phenolic compounds in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) fruits: Composition in 27 cultivars and changes during ripening.

    PubMed

    Aaby, Kjersti; Mazur, Sebastian; Nes, Arnfinn; Skrede, Grete

    2012-05-01

    Phenolic compounds in fruits of 27 cultivars of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) grown in Norway were characterised and quantified by HPLC-DAD-MS(n). Total phenolic content, calculated as the sum of the individual compounds, varied 2.3-fold among cultivars, i.e., from 57 to 133mg/100g of fw. There were significant differences among cultivars in concentration of all phenolic compounds. The highest variation between cultivars was found for cinnamoyl glucose (0.6-24.9mg/100g of fw). Concentration of anthocyanins, the most abundant class of phenolic compounds in the majority of the cultivars, varied from 8.5 to 65.9mg/100g of fw. Flavan-3-ols (11-45mg/100g of fw) and ellagitannins (7.7-18.2mg/100g of fw) contributed on average 28% and 14% to total phenolic contents in the strawberry cultivars, respectively. In three cultivars harvested at three stages of ripeness, anthocyanins and cinnamic acid conjugates were the compounds most affected by ripening. The anthocyanin profile for the individual cultivars was only slightly affected by ripening and growing conditions.

  16. Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Phalaenopsis Orchid Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    Minh, Truong Ngoc; Khang, Do Tan; Tuyen, Phung Thi; Minh, Luong The; Anh, La Hoang; Quan, Nguyen Van; Ha, Pham Thi Thu; Quan, Nguyen Thanh; Toan, Nguyen Phu; Elzaawely, Abdelnaser Abdelghany; Xuan, Tran Dang

    2016-01-01

    Phalaenopsis spp. is the most commercially and economically important orchid, but their plant parts are often left unused, which has caused environmental problems. To date, reports on phytochemical analyses were most available on endangered and medicinal orchids. The present study was conducted to determine the total phenolics, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity of ethanol extracts prepared from leaves and roots of six commercial hybrid Phalaenopsis spp. Leaf extracts of “Chian Xen Queen” contained the highest total phenolics with a value of 11.52 ± 0.43 mg gallic acid equivalent per g dry weight and the highest total flavonoids (4.98 ± 0.27 mg rutin equivalent per g dry weight). The antioxidant activity of root extracts evaluated by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) free radical scavenging assay and β-carotene bleaching method was higher than those of the leaf extracts. Eleven phenolic compounds were identified, namely, protocatechuic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, syringic acid, vanillin, ferulic acid, sinapic acid, p-coumaric acid, benzoic acid, and ellagic acid. Ferulic, p-coumaric and sinapic acids were concentrated largely in the roots. The results suggested that the root extracts from hybrid Phalaenopsis spp. could be a potential source of natural antioxidants. This study also helps to reduce the amount of this orchid waste in industrial production, as its roots can be exploited for pharmaceutical purposes. PMID:27649250

  17. Glycybridins A-K, Bioactive Phenolic Compounds from Glycyrrhiza glabra.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Ji, Shuai; Song, Wei; Kuang, Yi; Lin, Yan; Tang, Shunan; Cui, Zexu; Qiao, Xue; Yu, Siwang; Ye, Min

    2017-02-24

    In an attempt to discover bioactive agents from the herbal medicine Glycyrrhiza glabra (widely known as licorice), 11 new phenolic compounds, glycybridins A-K (1-11), along with 47 known phenolics (12-58) were isolated. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive NMR and MS analyses as well as experimental and computed ECD data. According to the clinical therapeutic effects of licorice, enzyme or cell-based bioactivity screenings of 1-58 were conducted. A number of compounds significantly activate Nrf2, inhibit tyrosinase or PTP1B, inhibit LPS-induced NO production and NF-κB transcription, and inhibit the proliferation of human cancer cells (HepG2, SW480, A549, MCF7). Glycybridin D (4) showed moderate cytotoxic activities against the four cancer cell lines, with IC50 values ranging from 4.6 to 6.6 μM. Further studies indicated that 4 (10 mg/kg, ip) decreased tumor mass by 39.7% on an A549 human lung carcinoma xenograft mice model, but showed little toxicity.

  18. Effectiveness of phenolic compounds against citrus green mould.

    PubMed

    Sanzani, Simona M; Schena, Leonardo; Ippolito, Antonio

    2014-08-18

    Stored citrus fruit suffer huge losses because of the development of green mould caused by Penicillium digitatum. Usually synthetic fungicides are employed to control this disease, but their use is facing some obstacles, such public concern about possible adverse effects on human and environmental health and the development of resistant pathogen populations. In the present study quercetin, scopoletin and scoparone--phenolic compounds present in several agricultural commodities and associated with response to stresses--were firstly tested in vitro against P. digitatum and then applied in vivo on oranges cv. Navelina. Fruits were wound-treated (100 µg), pathogen-inoculated, stored and surveyed for disease incidence and severity. Although only a minor (≤13%) control effect on P. digitatum growth was recorded in vitro, the in vivo trial results were encouraging. In fact, on phenolic-treated oranges, symptoms appeared at 6 days post-inoculation (DPI), i.e., with a 2 day-delay as compared to the untreated control. Moreover, at 8 DPI, quercetin, scopoletin, and scoparone significantly reduced disease incidence and severity by 69%-40% and 85%-70%, respectively, as compared to the control. At 14 DPI, scoparone was the most active molecule. Based on the results, these compounds might represent an interesting alternative to synthetic fungicides.

  19. Characterisation of phenolic compounds in processed fibres from the juice industry.

    PubMed

    Delpino-Rius, Antoni; Eras, Jordi; Vilaró, Francisca; Cubero, Miguel Ángel; Balcells, Mercè; Canela-Garayoa, Ramon

    2015-04-01

    The content of phenolic compounds was determined in nine industrially processed fibres derived from the juice industry. Apple, peach, and pear as non-citrus fruit fibres were examined, as well as orange peel and flesh, tangerine peel and flesh, and lemon flesh as citrus fruit fibres, and carrot as vegetable fibre. The extractable phenolic profile of all fibres was obtained by UPLC-PDA-FLR-MS/MS. Forty phenolic compounds were identified and their concentrations determined. In addition, bound phenolic acids and proanthocyanidins were measured in solid residues in order to determine the phenolic compounds remaining. Also, to allow the comparison of the profiles and contents in the fresh fruit and fibres, we analysed extractable and bound phenolic compounds in lyophilized peel and pulp from fresh fruit. The profile and phenolic content of the fibres was similar to that of the fresh fruit, except for flavan-3-ols, which registered lower values.

  20. Flavonol glycosides and other phenolic compounds in buds and leaves of different varieties of black currant (Ribes nigrum L.) and changes during growing season.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengzhan; Kallio, Heikki; Yang, Baoru

    2014-10-01

    Phenolic compounds in buds and leaves of three varieties of black currant in Finland were identified by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS. Forty-three phenolic compounds of flavonol glycosides, proanthocyanidins and phenolic acids were found in variety "Mikael" whereas only thirty-five in "Mortti" and "Jaloste n:o 15". Glycosides of quercetin and kaempferol were the major phenolics. Rutin, hyperoside, isoquercitrin, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoise, kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-(6″-malonyl)-glucoside and a kaempferol-malonylhexoside were the most abundant flavonol glycosides. The contents of flavonol glycosides ranged from 1 to 7 mg/g fresh weight in leaves showing typically an increasing trend from July to August, reaching the highest values in early October in "Mikael" and the end of August in "Mortti" and "Jaloste n:o 15". This is the first systematic report of the composition and content of phenolic compounds in buds and leaves of black currant.

  1. Synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolone and macrolide antibiotics with phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Oh, Euna; Jeon, Byeonghwa

    2015-01-01

    The increasing resistance of Campylobacter to clinically important antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and macrolides, is a serious public health problem. The objective of this study is to investigate synergistic anti-Campylobacter jejuni activity of fluoroquinolones and macrolides in combination with phenolic compounds. Synergistic antimicrobial activity was measured by performing a checkerboard assay with ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in the presence of 21 phenolic compounds. Membrane permeability changes in C. jejuni by phenolic compounds were determined by measuring the level of intracellular uptake of 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN). Antibiotic accumulation assays were performed to evaluate the level of ciprofloxacin accumulation in C. jejuni. Six phenolic compounds, including p-coumaric acid, sinapic acid, caffeic acid, vanillic acid, gallic acid, and taxifolin, significantly increased the susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin in several human and poultry isolates. The synergistic antimicrobial effect was also observed in ciprofloxacin- and erythromycin-resistant C. jejuni strains. The phenolic compounds also substantially increased membrane permeability and antibiotic accumulation in C. jejuni. Interestingly, some phenolic compounds, such as gallic acid and taxifolin, significantly reduced the expression of the CmeABC multidrug efflux pump. Phenolic compounds increased the NPN accumulation in the cmeB mutant, indicating phenolic compounds may affect the membrane permeability. In this study, we successfully demonstrated that combinational treatment of C. jejuni with antibiotics and phenolic compounds synergistically inhibits C. jejuni by impacting both antimicrobial influx and efflux.

  2. Imperanene, a novel phenolic compound with platelet aggregation inhibitory activity from Imperata cylindrica.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, K; Shibuya, M; Ohizumi, Y

    1995-01-01

    Imperanene, a novel phenolic compound [1] has been isolated from Imperata cylindrica. Its structure was elucidated by spectroscopic evidence. Imperanene showed platelet aggregation inhibitory activity.

  3. Phenolic compounds from Allium schoenoprasum, Tragopogon pratensis and Rumex acetosa and their antiproliferative effects.

    PubMed

    Kucekova, Zdenka; Mlcek, Jiri; Humpolicek, Petr; Rop, Otakar; Valasek, Pavel; Saha, Petr

    2011-11-03

    Experimental studies have shown that phenolic compounds have antiproliferative and tumour arresting effects. The aim of this original study was to investigate the content of phenolic compounds (PhC) in flowers of Allium schoenoprasum (chive), Tragopogon pratensis (meadow salsify) and Rumex acetosa (common sorrel) and their effect on proliferation of HaCaT cells. Antiproliferative effects were evaluated in vitro using the following concentrations of phenolic compounds in cultivation medium: 100, 75, 50 and 25 µg/mL. Phenolic composition was also determined by HPLC. The results indicate that even low concentrations of these flowers' phenolic compounds inhibited cell proliferation significantly and the possible use of the studied herb's flowers as sources of active phenolic compounds for human nutrition.

  4. Phenolic Compounds in Apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.): Compounds Characterization and Stability during Postharvest and after Processing

    PubMed Central

    Francini, Alessandra; Sebastiani, Luca

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the information on the occurrence of phenolic compounds in apple (Malus x domestica Borkh.) fruit and juice, with special reference to their health related properties. As phytochemical molecules belonging to polyphenols are numerous, we will focus on the main apples phenolic compounds with special reference to changes induced by apple cultivar, breeding approaches, fruit postharvest and transformation into juice. PMID:26784345

  5. Ultrasound Assisted Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Peaches and Pumpkins

    PubMed Central

    Altemimi, Ammar; Watson, Dennis G.; Choudhary, Ruplal; Dasari, Mallika R.; Lightfoot, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) method was used to optimize the extraction of phenolic compounds from pumpkins and peaches. The response surface methodology (RSM) was used to study the effects of three independent variables each with three treatments. They included extraction temperatures (30, 40 and 50°C), ultrasonic power levels (30, 50 and 70%) and extraction times (10, 20 and 30 min). The optimal conditions for extractions of total phenolics from pumpkins were inferred to be a temperature of 41.45°C, a power of 44.60% and a time of 25.67 min. However, an extraction temperature of 40.99°C, power of 56.01% and time of 25.71 min was optimal for recovery of free radical scavenging activity (measured by 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) reduction). The optimal conditions for peach extracts were an extraction temperature of 41.53°C, power of 43.99% and time of 27.86 min for total phenolics. However, an extraction temperature of 41.60°C, power of 44.88% and time of 27.49 min was optimal for free radical scavenging activity (judged by from DPPH reduction). Further, the UAE processes were significantly better than solvent extractions without ultrasound. By electron microscopy it was concluded that ultrasonic processing caused damage in cells for all treated samples (pumpkin, peach). However, the FTIR spectra did not show any significant changes in chemical structures caused by either ultrasonic processing or solvent extraction. PMID:26885655

  6. Phenolic compounds from male castoreum of the North American beaver,Castor canadensis.

    PubMed

    Tang, R; Webster, F X; Müller-Schwarze, D

    1993-07-01

    North American beaver (Castor canadensis) mark their territories with castoreum, the contents of their castor sacs. In their territories, beaver respond with scent marking to experimental scent marks consisting of castoreum, or selected single components. In part, the unique odor of castoreum is due to large amounts of phenolic compounds. Purified phenolic components were analyzed by GC, GC-MS, and NMR; identifications were confirmed by comparing the spectra of synthetic phenols with those of the isolated phenols. Of the 15 phenols reported elsewhere, only five were confirmed in our analysis; the other 10 phenolic compounds are either absent or are not volatile enough to be detected by our methods. In addition, 10 phenolic compounds have been identified in this study that were not reported in the previous papers concerning the constitution of castoreum.

  7. Identification and characterization of phenolic compounds in hydromethanolic extracts of sorghum wholegrains by LC-ESI-MS(n).

    PubMed

    Kang, Jinguo; Price, William E; Ashton, John; Tapsell, Linda C; Johnson, Stuart

    2016-11-15

    Hydromethanolic extracts of brown, red, and white sorghum whole grains were analysed by LC-MS(n) in negative ESI mode within the range m/z 150-550amu. Besides the flavonoids already reported in sorghum, a number of flavonoids were also identified in the sorghum grain for the first time, including flavanones, flavonols and flavanonols, and flavan-3-ol derivatives. Various phenylpropane glycerides were also found in the sorghum grain, the majority of them are reported here for the first time, and a few of them were detected with abundant peaks in the extracts, indicating they are another important class of phenolic compounds in sorghum. In addition, phenolamides were also found in sorghum grain, which have not been reported before, and dicaffeoyl spermidine was detected in high abundance in the extracts of all three type sorghum grains. These results confirmed that sorghum is a rich source of various phenolic compounds.

  8. Sensitive determination of phenolic compounds using high-performance liquid chromatography with cerium(IV)-rhodamine 6G-phenolic compound chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qunlin; Cui, Hua; Myint, Aung; Lian, Mei; Liu, Lijuan

    2005-11-18

    A simple, selective and sensitive determination method of 20 phenolic compounds has been developed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with chemiluminescence detection. The method is based on the chemiluminescent enhancement by phenolic compound of the cerium(IV)-rhodamine 6G system in sulfuric acid medium. Twenty phenolic compounds were separated on a XDB-C(8) column with a gradient elution using a mixture of methanol and 1.0% acetic acid as a mobile phase. Under the optimized conditions, a linear working range extends 2 orders of magnitude with the relative standard deviations of intra- and inter-day precision below 4.0%, and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were in the range of 1.5-82.1 ng/ml. The chemiluminescence reaction was compatible with the mobile phase of high-performance liquid chromatography. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the assay of phenolic compounds in red wine without any pretreatment.

  9. Unravelling the total antioxidant capacity of pinotage wines: contribution of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    de Beer, Dalene; Joubert, Elizabeth; Marais, Johann; Manley, Marena

    2006-04-19

    The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and phenolic composition of 139 Pinotage wines (2002 and 2003 vintages) were determined using the 2,2'-azino-di(3-ethylbenzo-thialozine-sulfonic acid) scavenging assay and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. The contribution of individually quantified phenolic compounds to the wine TAC was calculated using their concentrations and Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) values. The TEAC values of quercetin-3-galactoside, isorhamnetin, and peonidin-3-glucoside are reported for the first time. Between 11 and 24% of the measured TAC of Pinotage wines was explained by the sum of the calculated contributions of their quantified phenolic compounds comprising monomeric phenolic compounds and procyanidin B1. Ultrafiltration was carried out to attempt separation of monomeric and polymeric phenolic compounds. Analysis of ultrafiltration permeates and retentates enabled estimation of the TAC contribution of large molecular weight (MW) unknown compounds (46%) (>50 kDa), including oligomeric and polymeric phenolic compounds and small MW unknown compounds (34%) (<50 kDa). Three mixtures, containing 12 phenolic compounds in typical concentrations expected in Pinotage wines, exhibited 16-23% synergistic antioxidant activity. This suggests that synergy between phenolic compounds does play a role in the wine TAC but that it does not explain the large discrepancy between measured and calculated TAC values.

  10. Influence of Controlled Postflowering Temperature and Daylength on Individual Phenolic Compounds in Four Black Currant Cultivars.

    PubMed

    Woznicki, Tomasz L; Aaby, Kjersti; Sønsteby, Anita; Heide, Ola M; Wold, Anne-Berit; Remberg, Siv F

    2016-02-03

    The effects of postflowering temperature and daylength on the concentration of individual phenolic compounds were studied in black currant (Ribes nigrum L.) berries under controlled phytotron conditions. The four cultivars studied varied greatly in their concentrations of individual phenolic compounds and temperature stability for accumulation. The concentrations of a wide range of identified phenolic compounds were strongly influenced by temperature over the 12-24 °C range, often with opposite temperature gradient patterns for compounds within the same subclass. Accumulation of anthocyanins and flavonols increased under natural long day conditions, which provided an increased daily light integral, while under identical light energy conditions, photoperiod had little or no effect on the concentration of phenolic compounds. Furthermore, with the exception of members of the hydroxycinnamic acid subclass, the concentration of most phenolic compounds was higher in berries ripened outdoors than in the phytotron, apparently due to screening of UV-B radiation by the glass cover.

  11. Olive Tree (Olea europeae L.) Leaves: Importance and Advances in the Analysis of Phenolic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Abaza, Leila; Taamalli, Amani; Nsir, Houda; Zarrouk, Mokhtar

    2015-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are becoming increasingly popular because of their potential role in contributing to human health. Experimental evidence obtained from human and animal studies demonstrate that phenolic compounds from Olea europaea leaves have biological activities which may be important in the reduction in risk and severity of certain chronic diseases. Therefore, an accurate profiling of phenolics is a crucial issue. In this article, we present a review work on current treatment and analytical methods used to extract, identify, and/or quantify phenolic compounds in olive leaves. PMID:26783953

  12. HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n) profiling of phenolic compounds from Lathyrus cicera L. seeds.

    PubMed

    Ferreres, F; Magalhães, S C Q; Gil-Izquierdo, A; Valentão, P; Cabrita, A R J; Fonseca, A J M; Andrade, P B

    2017-01-01

    Lathyrus cicera L. seeds are of interest for food and feed purposes. Despite the recognized antioxidant activity of the seeds, arising from the phenolic fraction, their phenolic compounds have not been studied in depth yet. Therefore, to determine the phenolics profile of these seeds, a target analysis was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to photodiode-array detection and electrospray ionization/ion trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS(n)). Thirty-seven glycosylated flavonoids were identified for the first time in the seeds of this species and, according to their MS fragmentation, clustered in flavonol-3-O-di-/tri-glycosides-7-O-rhamnosides and other flavonol-glycosides, and flavonol-3-O-(cinnamoyl)glycoside-7-O-rhamnosides, flavonol-3-O-(dihydrophaseoyl, cinnamoyl)glycoside-7-O-rhamnosides and flavonol-3-O-(malonyl)glycoside-7-O-rhamnosides. Glycosides of kaempferol were the main flavonoids found (10 non-acylated and 21 acylated), followed by those of quercetin (3) and those of isorhamnetin, apigenin and luteolin (1). The most abundant flavonols were identified as kaempferol-3-O-(2-hexosyl)hexoside-7-O-rhamnosides. The methodology used allowed to increase the knowledge on a relevant phytochemical class of seeds from L. cicera.

  13. Degradation of phenol and toxicity of phenolic compounds: a comparison of cold-tolerant Arthrobacter sp. and mesophilic Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Margesin, Rosa; Bergauer, Philipp; Gander, Silvia

    2004-06-01

    Phenol degradation efficiency of cold-tolerant Arthrobacter sp. AG31 and mesophilic Pseudomonas putida DSM6414 was compared. The cold-tolerant strain was cultivated at 10 degrees C, while the mesophile was grown at 25 degrees C. Both strains degraded 200 mg and 400 mg phenol/l within 48-72 h of cultivation, but the cold-tolerant strain produced more biomass than the mesophile. Both strains oxidized catechol by the ortho type of ring fission. Catechol 1,2 dioxygenase (C1,2D) activity was found intra- and extracellularly in the absence and in the presence of phenol. In the presence of 200 mg phenol/l, C1,2D activity of the mesophile was about 1.5- to 2-fold higher than that of the cold-tolerant strain. However, an initial phenol concentration of 400 mg/l resulted in a comparable enzyme activity of the cold-tolerant and the mesophilic strain. The two strains differed significantly in their toxicity pattern towards 12 aromatic (mostly phenolic) compounds at different growth temperatures, which was determined via growth inhibition in the presence of nutrients and toxicants. For the cold-tolerant strain, toxicity was significantly lower at 10 degrees C than at 25 degrees C. The mesophile showed a significantly lower susceptibility to high hydrocarbon concentrations when grown at 25 degrees C compared to 10 degrees C.

  14. Phenolic compounds and fatty acid composition of organic and conventional grown pecan kernels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, differences in contents of phenolic compounds and fatty acids in pecan kernels of organically versus conventionally grown pecan cultivars (‘Desirable’, ‘Cheyenne’, and ‘Wichita’) were evaluated. Although we were able to identify nine phenolic compounds (gallic acid, catechol, catechin...

  15. Oxidative stability, phenolic compounds and antioxidant potential of a virgin olive oil enriched with natural bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Adámez, Jonathan; Baltasar, M Nieves Franco; Yuste, María Concepción Ayuso; Martín-Vertedor, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate strategies for the development of a virgin olive oil (VOO) enriched with aqueous extracts of olive leaf and cake to increase the necessary dose in the diet of phenolic compounds with a natural product, as phenolic compounds are involved on the healthy properties of olive oil. Different extraction procedures were evaluated with the aim of increasing the phenol content and antioxidant potential of extracts of olive leaf and cake. As leaves extract presented a higher total phenolic content, it was characterized in order to determine its phenolic profile, and was employed to enrich VOO. Diverse procedures were used to prepare enriched VOO with the leaves extract, and finally the effects of phenol enrichment were evaluated based on the antioxidant potential and oxidative stability of the prepared phenol-enriched virgin olive oils. These enriched VOOs increased significantly the content in phenolic compounds, antioxidant potential and oxidative stability 40, 4 and 1.5 fold more, respectively, than the Control oil. Furthermore, the addition of lecithin had a positive effect both on the phenolic compounds content, and on the antioxidant potential of the oils. Besides, the use of the olive leaves extract, with and without lecithin respectively, supposes a strategy potential for reducing the harmful effects that inflicts long-term preservation of VOOs and its possible deterioration.

  16. Phenolic compounds in olive oil: antioxidant, health and organoleptic activities according to their chemical structure.

    PubMed

    Servili, M; Esposto, S; Fabiani, R; Urbani, S; Taticchi, A; Mariucci, F; Selvaggini, R; Montedoro, G F

    2009-04-01

    Hydrophilic phenols are the most abundant natural antioxidants of virgin olive oil (VOO), in which, however, tocopherols and carotenes are also present. The prevalent classes of hydrophilic phenols found in VOO are phenolic alcohols and acids, flavonoids, lignans and secoiridoids. Among these substances the last two classes include the most concentrate phenols of VOO. Secoiridoids, like aglycone derivatives of oleuropein, demethyloleuropein and ligstroside, are present in olive fruit as most abundant VOO phenolic antioxidants. Several important biological properties (antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, chemopreventive and anti-cancer) and the characteristic pungent and bitter tasty properties have been attributed to VOO phenols. Relationships between polyphenols activities and their chemical structures are discussed in this paper.

  17. Removal of phenolic compounds in water by ultrafiltration membrane treatments.

    PubMed

    Acero, Juan L; Benítez, F Javier; Leal, Ana I; Real, Francisco J

    2005-01-01

    The ultrafiltration (UF) of aqueous solutions containing mixtures of three phenolic compounds (gallic acid, acetovanillone, and esculetin) was studied in a tangential UF laboratory system. These substances were selected as model pollutants present in the tannic fraction of the cork processing wastewaters. The two membranes used were a polyethersulfone membrane (Biomax5K) and a regenerated cellulose membrane (Ultracel5K), both with a molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) of 5000 Da. Previous experiments for the characterization of the membranes led to values for the water hydraulic permeability of 70.3 and 18.1 L/h x m2 x bar for the Biomax5K and Ultracel5K membranes, respectively. During the UF experiments, the permeate flow rate remained almost constant with processing time and the evolution of the pollutants concentrations varied depending on the nature of the membranes and the substances. The influence of the main operating variables (tansmembrane pressure and feed flow rate) on the permeate flux was established, and values for the apparent and intrinsic rejection coefficients were evaluated. Cork processing wastewater UF experiments were also conducted under similar operating conditions to those applied to the ultrapure water solutions. Removals of chemical oxygen demand, aromatic and tannic contents, and color were determined in these experiments, and the elimination of the three model compounds in the wastewater was also followed, with the evaluation of their apparent rejection coefficients.

  18. Capillary electrochromatography of selected phenolic compounds of Chamomilla recutita.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Fabiana N; Tavares, Marina F M; Horváth, Csaba

    2007-06-22

    This article explores the use of capillary electrochromatography for the analysis of chamomile (Chamomilla recutita L.) extracts. After a thorough study of analytical parameters such as mobile and stationary phase composition, applied voltage, and temperature, a methodology to determine 11 bioactive phenolic compounds (coumarins: herniarin, umbelliferone; phenylpropanoids: chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid; flavones: apigenin, apigenin-7-O-glucoside, luteolin, luteolin-7-O-glucoside; flavonols: quercetin, rutin and flavanone: naringenin) in chamomile extracts was proposed. The method was performed in a Hypersil SCX/C18 column with pH 2.8 phosphate buffer at 50 mmol L(-1) containing 50% acetonitrile (pH adjusted before the addition of the organic solvent). All compounds were separated in less than 7.5 min under isocratic conditions. Figures of merit include linearity (peak area versus apigenin concentration) from 50.0-1000 microg/mL (r2=0.995), and intra-day precision of retention time and peak area better than 1.3% CV and 15%, respectively. The limits of detection and quantification for apigenin were 35.0 microg/mL and 150.0 microg/mL, respectively. This article also describes an NMR 1H study, carried out to monitor a new clean-up procedure for extracts containing propyleneglycol, whose components are poorly retained in conventional octadecyl silica cartridges.

  19. Phenolic compounds and biological activity of Kitaibelia vitifolia.

    PubMed

    Mašković, Pavle; Solujić, Slavica; Mihailović, Vladimir; Mladenović, Milan; Cvijović, Milica; Mladenović, Jelena; Aćamović-Đoković, Gordana; Kurćubić, Vladimir

    2011-12-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the antioxidant activity and efficacy of the ethanolic extract of the endemic plant species Kitaibelia vitifolia in inhibiting the growth of selected fungi and bacteria. Antimicrobial activity was tested using the broth dilution procedure for determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). MICs were determined for eight selected indicator strains. The highest susceptibility to K. vitifolia ethanolic extract among the bacteria tested was exhibited by Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and Klebsiella pneumoniae ATCC 13883 (MIC=15.62 μg/mL), followed by Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Proteus mirabilis ATCC 14153 (MIC=31.25 μg/mL), and Proteus vulgaris ATCC 13315 (MIC=62.50 μg/mL). Of the fungi, Candida albicans ATCC 10231 (MIC=15.62 μg/mL) showed the highest susceptibility, and Aspergillus niger ATCC 16404 (MIC=31.25 μg/mL) had the lowest. Results showed that K. vitifolia extract possesses antioxidant activity, with total antioxidant capacity of 75.45±0.68 μg of ascorbic acid/g and 50% inhibition concentration values of 47.45±0.55 μg/mL for 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging activity, 35.35±0.68 μg/mL for inhibitory activity against lipid peroxidation, 95.25±0.52 μg/mL for hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, and 31.50±0.35 μg/mL for metal chelating activity. Total phenolics, flavonoids, condensed tannins, and gallotannins were 85.25±0.69 mg of gallic acid (GA)/g, 45.32±0.55 mg of rutin/g, 54.25±0.75 mg of GA/g, and 41.74±0.55 mg of GA/g, respectively. The phenolic composition of K. vitifolia extract was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Rosmarinic acid was found to be the dominant phenolic compound of the extract.

  20. Factors Affecting the Extraction of Intact Ribonucleic Acid from Plant Tissues Containing Interfering Phenolic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Newbury, H. John; Possingham, John V.

    1977-01-01

    Using conventional methods it is impossible to extract RNA as uncomplexed intact molecules from the leaves of grapevines (Vitis vinifera L.) and from a number of woody perennial species that contain high levels of reactive phenolic compounds. A procedure involving the use of high concentrations of the chaotropic agent sodium perchlorate prevents the binding of phenolic compounds to RNA during extraction. Analyses of the phenolics present in plant tissues used in these experiments indicate that there is a poor correlation between the total phenolic content and the complexing of RNA. However, qualitative analyses suggest that proanthocyanidins are involved in the tanning of RNA during conventional extractions. PMID:16660134

  1. Colonic catabolism of dietary phenolic and polyphenolic compounds from Concord grape juice.

    PubMed

    Stalmach, Angelique; Edwards, Christine A; Wightman, Jolynne D; Crozier, Alan

    2013-01-01

    After acute ingestion of 350 ml of Concord grape juice, containing 528 μmol of (poly)phenolic compounds, by healthy volunteers, a wide array of phase I and II metabolites were detected in the circulation and excreted in urine. Ingestion of the juice by ileostomists resulted in 40% of compounds being recovered intact in ileal effluent. The current study investigated the fate of these undigested (poly)phenolic compounds on reaching the colon. This was achieved through incubation of the juice using an in vitro model of colonic fermentation and through quantification of catabolites produced after colonic degradation and their subsequent absorption prior to urinary excretion by healthy subjects and ileostomy volunteers. A total of 16 aromatic and phenolic compounds derived from colonic metabolism of Concord grape juice (poly)phenolic compounds were identified by GC-MS in the faecal incubation samples. Thirteen urinary phenolic acids and aromatic compounds were excreted in significantly increased amounts after intake of the juice by healthy volunteers, whereas only two of these compounds were excreted in elevated amounts by ileostomists. The production of phenolic acids and aromatic compounds by colonic catabolism contributed to the bioavailability of Concord grape (poly)phenolic compounds to a much greater extent than phase I and II metabolites originating from absorption in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Catabolic pathways are proposed, highlighting the impact of colonic microbiota and subsequent phase II metabolism prior to excretion of phenolic compounds derived from (poly)phenolic compounds in Concord grape juice, which pass from the small to the large intestine.

  2. Monitoring the phenolic compounds of Greek extra-virgin olive oils during storage.

    PubMed

    Kotsiou, Kali; Tasioula-Margari, Maria

    2016-06-01

    Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) samples, of five Greek olive varieties, were stored in dark glass bottles (headspace 0.5%) in a basement without central heating for 24 months. Quantitative variations of the phenolic compounds and their degradation products were monitored over time. The differences observed in the initial total phenolic compounds concentration (ranging between 250.77 and 925.75 mg/kg) were attributed to extraction system, olive variety, and maturity stage. Even after 24 months, the degree of reduction in total phenolic compounds did not exceed 31%. The reduction was more pronounced in dialdehydic forms of oleuropein and ligstroside aglycones (DAFOA and DAFLA), indicating a more active participation in the hydrolysis and oxidation processes of the more polar secoiridoids. The initial total phenolic content was the main factor correlated to the degradation rate of the phenolic compounds. The decrease in secoiridoid derivatives, gave rise to hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol content and to the formation of four oxidized products.

  3. Determination of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in leaves from wild Rubus L. species.

    PubMed

    Oszmiański, Jan; Wojdyło, Aneta; Nowicka, Paulina; Teleszko, Mirosława; Cebulak, Tomasz; Wolanin, Mateusz

    2015-03-18

    Twenty-six different wild blackberry leaf samples were harvested from various localities throughout southeastern Poland. Leaf samples were assessed regarding their phenolic compound profiles and contents by LC/MS QTOF, and their antioxidant activity by ABTS and FRAP. Thirty-three phenolic compounds were detected (15 flavonols, 13 hydroxycinnamic acids, three ellagic acid derivatives and two flavones). Ellagic acid derivatives were the predominant compounds in the analyzed leaves, especially sanguiin H-6, ellagitannins, lambertianin C, and casuarinin. The content of phenolic compounds was significantly correlated with the antioxidant activity of the analyzed samples. The highest level of phenolic compounds was measured for R. perrobustus, R. wimmerianus, R. pedemontanus and R. grabowskii. The study showed that wild blackberry leaves can be considered a good source of antioxidant compounds. There is clear potential for the utilization of blackberry leaves as a food additive, medicinal source or herbal tea.

  4. First Approach to the Analytical Characterization of
Barrel-Aged Grape Marc Distillates Using Phenolic Compounds and Colour Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Solana, Raquel; Salgado, José Manuel; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Summary Phenolic compounds (benzoic and cinnamic acid derivatives) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with multiple wavelength detector (HPLC- -MWD) in grape marc distillates aged in Quercus petraea, Quercus robur and Quercus alba wooden barrels. In addition to colour indices and evaluable polyphenols, all samples were described by sensorial analysis. There were significant differences in the mean concentrations of the majority of phenolic compounds among the samples. Gallic and benzoic acids were the most abundant and samples aged in Q. robur from Galicia (NW of Spain) had the highest concentration of most of the determined phenols. Grape marc distillates aged in Q. robur obtained the highest values of all sensorial attributes, whereas samples aged in Q. petraea and Q. alba obtained similar scores. Principal component analysis accounted for 88.32% of total variance, showing a good separation of aged distillates in terms of phenolic compounds and colour characteristics, according to the species and origin of the oak wood used in the ageing process. PMID:27904312

  5. Dietary Phenolic Compounds Interfere with the Fate of Hydrogen Peroxide in Human Adipose Tissue but Do Not Directly Inhibit Primary Amine Oxidase Activity.

    PubMed

    Carpéné, Christian; Hasnaoui, Mounia; Balogh, Balázs; Matyus, Peter; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Rodríguez, Víctor; Mercader, Josep; Portillo, Maria P

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol has been reported to inhibit monoamine oxidases (MAO). Many substrates or inhibitors of neuronal MAO interact also with other amine oxidases (AO) in peripheral organs, such as semicarbazide-sensitive AO (SSAO), known as primary amine oxidase, absent in neurones, but abundant in adipocytes. We asked whether phenolic compounds (resveratrol, pterostilbene, quercetin, and caffeic acid) behave as MAO and SSAO inhibitors. AO activity was determined in human adipose tissue. Computational docking and glucose uptake assays were performed in 3D models of human AO proteins and in adipocytes, respectively. Phenolic compounds fully inhibited the fluorescent detection of H2O2 generated during MAO and SSAO activation by tyramine and benzylamine. They also quenched H2O2-induced fluorescence in absence of biological material and were unable to abolish the oxidation of radiolabelled tyramine and benzylamine. Thus, phenolic compounds hampered H2O2 detection but did not block AO activity. Only resveratrol and quercetin partially impaired MAO-dependent [(14)C]-tyramine oxidation and behaved as MAO inhibitors. Phenolic compounds counteracted the H2O2-dependent benzylamine-stimulated glucose transport. This indicates that various phenolic compounds block downstream effects of H2O2 produced by biogenic or exogenous amine oxidation without directly inhibiting AO. Phenolic compounds remain of interest regarding their capacity to limit oxidative stress rather than inhibiting AO.

  6. Dietary Phenolic Compounds Interfere with the Fate of Hydrogen Peroxide in Human Adipose Tissue but Do Not Directly Inhibit Primary Amine Oxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Carpéné, Christian; Hasnaoui, Mounia; Balogh, Balázs; Matyus, Peter; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Rodríguez, Víctor; Mercader, Josep; Portillo, Maria P.

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol has been reported to inhibit monoamine oxidases (MAO). Many substrates or inhibitors of neuronal MAO interact also with other amine oxidases (AO) in peripheral organs, such as semicarbazide-sensitive AO (SSAO), known as primary amine oxidase, absent in neurones, but abundant in adipocytes. We asked whether phenolic compounds (resveratrol, pterostilbene, quercetin, and caffeic acid) behave as MAO and SSAO inhibitors. AO activity was determined in human adipose tissue. Computational docking and glucose uptake assays were performed in 3D models of human AO proteins and in adipocytes, respectively. Phenolic compounds fully inhibited the fluorescent detection of H2O2 generated during MAO and SSAO activation by tyramine and benzylamine. They also quenched H2O2-induced fluorescence in absence of biological material and were unable to abolish the oxidation of radiolabelled tyramine and benzylamine. Thus, phenolic compounds hampered H2O2 detection but did not block AO activity. Only resveratrol and quercetin partially impaired MAO-dependent [14C]-tyramine oxidation and behaved as MAO inhibitors. Phenolic compounds counteracted the H2O2-dependent benzylamine-stimulated glucose transport. This indicates that various phenolic compounds block downstream effects of H2O2 produced by biogenic or exogenous amine oxidation without directly inhibiting AO. Phenolic compounds remain of interest regarding their capacity to limit oxidative stress rather than inhibiting AO. PMID:26881018

  7. Effect of cadmium on phenolic compounds, antioxidant enzyme activity and oxidative stress in blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) plantlets grown in vitro.

    PubMed

    Manquián-Cerda, K; Escudey, M; Zúñiga, G; Arancibia-Miranda, N; Molina, M; Cruces, E

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd(2+)) can affect plant growth due to its mobility and toxicity. We evaluated the effects of Cd(2+) on the production of phenolic compounds and antioxidant response of Vaccinium corymbosum L. Plantlets were exposed to Cd(2+) at 50 and 100µM for 7, 14 and 21 days. Accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the antioxidant enzyme SOD was determined. The profile of phenolic compounds was evaluated using LC-MS. The antioxidant activity was measured using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and the ferric reducing antioxidant power test (FRAP). Cd(2+) increased the content of MDA, with the highest increase at 14 days. The presence of Cd(2+) resulted in changes in phenolic compounds. The main phenolic compound found in blueberry plantlets was chlorogenic acid, whose abundance increased with the addition of Cd(2+) to the medium. The changes in the composition of phenolic compounds showed a positive correlation with the antioxidant activity measured using FRAP. Our results suggest that blueberry plantlets produced phenolic compounds with reducing capacity as a selective mechanism triggered by the highest activity of Cd(2+).

  8. Two new phenolic compounds and antitumor activities of asparinin A from Asparagus officinalis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Mei; Cai, Jin-Long; Wang, Le; Wang, Wen-Xiang; Ai, Hong-Lian; Mao, Zi-Chao

    2017-02-01

    Two new phenolic acid compounds, asparoffin C (1) and asparoffin D (2), together with four known compounds, asparenyol (3), gobicusin B (4), 1-methoxy-2-hydroxy-4-[5-(4-hydroxyphenoxy)-3-penten-1-ynyl] phenol (5), and asparinin A (6), have been isolated from the stems of Asparagus officinalis. The structures were established by extensive spectroscopic methods (MS and 1D and 2D NMR). Compound 6 has obvious antitumor activities both in vitro and in vivo.

  9. Bread formulated with guava powder was enriched in phenolic and aroma compounds, and was highly acceptable by consumers.

    PubMed

    Castelo-Branco, Vanessa N; Lago, Mabel G; Minuzzo, Daniela A; Moura-Nunes, Nathália; Torres, Alexandre G; Nunes, Juliana C; Monteiro, Mariana

    2016-12-01

    Guava powder (GP) was used as source of aroma and phenolic compounds to fortify wheat bread 10% (GB10) and 20% (GB20), substituting for wheat flour. Phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity, volatile compounds profile, and sensory acceptability of control bread (CB; without GP) and guava breads (GB) were evaluated. Incorporation of GP increased roughly 2-to-3-fold the phenolic compounds contents of bread. Ten phenolic compounds were identified in GB20, and quercetin-3-O-rutinoside was the major compound, while in CB, ferulic acid was the major among the six phenolic compounds in CB. Bread making seemed to promote the release of phenolic compounds from structural components. Breads incorporated with GP presented a richer volatile profile than CB, especially due to the presence of terpenes. GB improved aroma profile of bread. GP added aroma compounds and phenolic antioxidants, and seemed to be an interesting approach to enhance bread bioactivity and acceptability.

  10. Phenolic Compounds and Their Fates In Tropical Lepidopteran Larvae: Modifications In Alkaline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Vihakas, Matti; Gómez, Isrrael; Karonen, Maarit; Tähtinen, Petri; Sääksjärvi, Ilari; Salminen, Juha-Pekka

    2015-09-01

    Lepidopteran larvae encounter a variety of phenolic compounds while consuming their host plants. Some phenolics may oxidize under alkaline conditions prevailing in the larval guts, and the oxidation products may cause oxidative stress to the larvae. In this study, we aimed to find new ways to predict how phenolic compounds may be modified in the guts of herbivorous larvae. To do so, we studied the ease of oxidation of phenolic compounds from 12 tropical tree species. The leaf extracts were incubated in vitro in alkaline conditions, and the loss of total phenolics during incubation was used to estimate the oxidizability of extracts. The phenolic profiles of the leaf extracts before and after incubation were compared, revealing that some phenolic compounds were depleted during incubation. The leaves of the 12 tree species were each fed to 12 species of lepidopteran larvae that naturally feed on these trees. The phenolic profiles of larval frass were compared to those of in vitro incubated leaf extracts. These comparisons showed that the phenolic profiles of alkali-treated samples and frass samples were similar in many cases. This suggested that certain phenolics, such as ellagitannins, proanthocyanidins, and galloylquinic acid derivatives were modified by the alkaline pH of the larval gut. In other cases, the chromatographic profiles of frass and in vitro incubated leaf extracts were not similar, and new modifications of phenolics were detected in the frass. We conclude that the actual fates of phenolics in vivo are often more complicated than can be predicted by a simple in vitro method.

  11. Competitive adsorption of furfural and phenolic compounds onto activated carbon in fixed bed column.

    PubMed

    Sulaymon, Abbas H; Ahmed, Kawther W

    2008-01-15

    For a multicomponent competitive adsorption of furfural and phenolic compounds, a mathematical model was builtto describe the mass transfer kinetics in a fixed bed column with activated carbon. The effects of competitive adsorption equilibrium constant, axial dispersion, external mass transfer, and intraparticle diffusion resistance on the breakthrough curve were studied for weakly adsorbed compound (furfural) and strongly adsorbed compounds (parachlorophenol and phenol). Experiments were carried out to remove the furfural and phenolic compound from aqueous solution. The equilibrium data and intraparticle diffusion coefficients obtained from separate experiments in a batch adsorber, by fitting the experimental data with theoretical model. The results show that the mathematical model includes external mass transfer and pore diffusion using nonlinear isotherms and provides a good description of the adsorption process for furfural and phenolic compounds in a fixed bed adsorber.

  12. European marketable grain legume seeds: Further insight into phenolic compounds profiles.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Sara C Q; Taveira, Marcos; Cabrita, Ana R J; Fonseca, António J M; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B

    2017-01-15

    Twenty-nine mature raw varieties of grain legume seeds (chickpeas, field peas, faba beans, common vetch and lupins) produced in Europe were investigated for their phenolic profile by means of high performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). To the best of our knowledge, this study reported for the first time the phenolic composition of mature raw seeds of chickpea type Desi, field pea and common vetch. Phenolic acids were predominant compounds in chickpeas, field peas and common vetch compared to flavonoids, whereas the opposite was observed for lupin seeds. Yellow lupins presented the highest levels of total phenolic compounds followed by narrow-leafed lupins (in average 960 and 679mg/kg, dry basis, respectively), whereas Kabuli chickpeas got the lowest ones (in average 47mg/kg, dry basis). Principal component analysis revealed that flavones and total levels of phenolic compounds were responsible for nearly 51% of total data variability.

  13. Phenolic Melatonin-Related Compounds: Their Role as Chemical Protectors against Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Galano, Annia; Castañeda-Arriaga, Romina; Pérez-González, Adriana; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, Russel J

    2016-10-29

    There is currently no doubt about the serious threat that oxidative stress (OS) poses to human health. Therefore, a crucial strategy to maintain a good health status is to identify molecules capable of offering protection against OS through chemical routes. Based on the known efficiency of the phenolic and melatonin (MLT) families of compounds as antioxidants, it is logical to assume that phenolic MLT-related compounds should be (at least) equally efficient. Unfortunately, they have been less investigated than phenols, MLT and its non-phenolic metabolites in this context. The evidence reviewed here strongly suggests that MLT phenolic derivatives can act as both primary and secondary antioxidants, exerting their protection through diverse chemical routes. They all seem to be better free radical scavengers than MLT and Trolox, while some of them also surpass ascorbic acid and resveratrol. However, there are still many aspects that deserve further investigations for this kind of compounds.

  14. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of kernels and shells of Mexican pecan (Carya illinoinensis).

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Laura A; Alvarez-Parrilla, Emilio; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2011-01-12

    The phenolic composition and antioxidant activity of pecan kernels and shells cultivated in three regions of the state of Chihuahua, Mexico, were analyzed. High concentrations of total extractable phenolics, flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins were found in kernels, and 5-20-fold higher concentrations were found in shells. Their concentrations were significantly affected by the growing region. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by ORAC, DPPH•, HO•, and ABTS•-- scavenging (TAC) methods. Antioxidant activity was strongly correlated with the concentrations of phenolic compounds. A strong correlation existed among the results obtained using these four methods. Five individual phenolic compounds were positively identified and quantified in kernels: ellagic, gallic, protocatechuic, and p-hydroxybenzoic acids and catechin. Only ellagic and gallic acids could be identified in shells. Seven phenolic compounds were tentatively identified in kernels by means of MS and UV spectral comparison, namely, protocatechuic aldehyde, (epi)gallocatechin, one gallic acid-glucose conjugate, three ellagic acid derivatives, and valoneic acid dilactone.

  15. Experimental and theoretical binding affinity between polyvinylpolypyrrolidone and selected phenolic compounds from food matrices.

    PubMed

    Durán-Lara, Esteban F; López-Cortés, Xaviera A; Castro, Ricardo I; Avila-Salas, Fabián; González-Nilo, Fernando D; Laurie, V Felipe; Santos, Leonardo S

    2015-02-01

    Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP) is a fining agent, widely used in winemaking and brewing, whose mode of action in removing phenolic compounds has not been fully characterised. The aim of this study was to evaluate the experimental and theoretical binding affinity of PVPP towards six phenolic compounds representing different types of phenolic species. The interaction between PVPP and phenolics was evaluated in model solutions, where hydroxyl groups, hydrophobic bonding and steric hindrance were characterised. The results of the study indicated that PVPP exhibits high affinity for quercetin and catechin, moderate affinity for epicatechin, gallic acid and lower affinity for 4-methylcatechol and caffeic acid. The affinity has a direct correlation with the hydroxylation degree of each compound. The results show that the affinity of PVPP towards phenols is related with frontier orbitals. This work demonstrates a direct correlation between the experimental affinity and the interaction energy calculations obtained through computational chemistry methods.

  16. Effect of cultivar and variety on phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of cherry wine.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zuobing; Fang, Lingling; Niu, Yunwei; Yu, Haiyan

    2015-11-01

    To compare the influence of cultivar and variety on the phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity (AA) of cherry wines, total phenolic (TP), total flavonoid (TF), total anthocyanin (TA), total tannin (TT), five individual phenolic acids, and AA were determined. An ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS) method was developed for the determination of gallic acid (GAE), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHB), chlorogenic acid (CHL), vanillic acid (VAN), and caffeic acid (CAF). A principal component analysis (PCA) and a cluster analysis (CA) were used to analyze differences related to cultivar and variety. The TP, TF, TA, TT, and AA of samples sourced from the Shandong province of China were higher than those from the Jiangsu province. The PCA and CA results showed that phenolic compounds in cherry wines were closely related to cultivar and variety and that cultivar had more influence on the phenolic compounds of cherry wines than variety.

  17. Characterization of nitrated phenolic compounds for their anti-oxidant, pro-oxidant, and nitration activities.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Yusuke; Nomoto, Maki; Oda, Momoko; Mochizuki, Keisuke; Nakano, Yuki; Ishii, Yuji; Ito, Rie; Saito, Koichi; Umemura, Takashi; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2011-09-01

    Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages worldwide. Evidence of the health benefits and the important contribution of coffee brew to the intake of anti-oxidants in the diet has increased coffee consumption. Chlorogenic acid (ChA) and caffeic acid (CaA) are the major phenolic compounds in coffee. However, phenolic compounds, which are generally effective anti-oxidants, can become pro-oxidants in the presence of Cu(2+) to induce DNA damage under certain conditions. On the other hand, sodium nitrite (NaNO(2)) is widely used as a food additive to preserve and tinge color on cured meat and fish. It is possible that phenolic compounds react with NaNO(2) under acidic conditions, such as gastric juice. In this study, we identified compounds produced by the reaction between ChA or CaA in coffee and NaNO(2) in artificial gastric juice. The identified phenolic compounds and nitrated phenolic compounds were assessed for their anti-oxidant, pro-oxidant, and nitration activities by performing an in vitro assay. The nitrated phenolic compounds seemed to show increased anti-oxidant activity and decreased pro-oxidant activity. However, one nitrated CaA compound that has a furoxan ring showed the ability to release NO(2)(-) in the neutral condition.

  18. Using phenolic compounds to reduce the allergenic properties of peanut extracts and peanut butter slurries.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since phenolic compounds may form insoluble complexes with proteins, we determined that their interaction with peanut allergens leads to a reduction in the allergenic properties of peanut extracts and peanut butter slurries. Phenolics, such as, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, and ferulic acid were e...

  19. The Regulation by Phenolic Compounds of Soil Organic Matter Dynamics under a Changing Environment

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kyungjin; Freeman, Chris; Kang, Hojeong; Choi, Sung-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Phenolics are the most abundant plant metabolites and are believed to decompose slowly in soils compared to other soil organic matter (SOM). Thus, they have often been considered as a slow carbon (C) pool in soil dynamics models. Here, however, we review changes in our concept about the turnover rate of phenolics and quantification of different types of phenolics in soils. Also, we synthesize current research on the degradation of phenolics and their regulatory effects on decomposition. Environmental changes, such as elevated CO2, warming, nitrogen (N) deposition, and drought, could influence the production and form of phenolics, leading to a change in SOM dynamics, and thus we also review the fate of phenolics under environmental disturbances. Finally, we propose the use of phenolics as a tool to control rates of SOM decomposition to stabilize organic carbon in ecosystems. Further studies to clarify the role of phenolics in SOM dynamics should include improving quantification methods, elucidating the relationship between phenolics and soil microorganisms, and determining the interactive effects of combinations of environmental changes on the phenolics production and degradation and subsequent impact on SOM processing. PMID:26495314

  20. The regulation by phenolic compounds of soil organic matter dynamics under a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyungjin; Freeman, Chris; Kang, Hojeong; Choi, Sung-Uk

    2015-01-01

    Phenolics are the most abundant plant metabolites and are believed to decompose slowly in soils compared to other soil organic matter (SOM). Thus, they have often been considered as a slow carbon (C) pool in soil dynamics models. Here, however, we review changes in our concept about the turnover rate of phenolics and quantification of different types of phenolics in soils. Also, we synthesize current research on the degradation of phenolics and their regulatory effects on decomposition. Environmental changes, such as elevated CO2, warming, nitrogen (N) deposition, and drought, could influence the production and form of phenolics, leading to a change in SOM dynamics, and thus we also review the fate of phenolics under environmental disturbances. Finally, we propose the use of phenolics as a tool to control rates of SOM decomposition to stabilize organic carbon in ecosystems. Further studies to clarify the role of phenolics in SOM dynamics should include improving quantification methods, elucidating the relationship between phenolics and soil microorganisms, and determining the interactive effects of combinations of environmental changes on the phenolics production and degradation and subsequent impact on SOM processing.

  1. Metabolism-dependent taxis towards (methyl)phenols is coupled through the most abundant of three polar localized Aer-like proteins of Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed

    Sarand, Inga; Osterberg, Sofia; Holmqvist, Sofie; Holmfeldt, Per; Skärfstad, Eleonore; Parales, Rebecca E; Shingler, Victoria

    2008-05-01

    Comparatively little is known about directed motility of environmental bacteria to common aromatic pollutants. Here, by expressing different parts of a (methyl)phenol-degradative pathway and the use of specific mutants, we show that taxis of Pseudomonas putida towards (methyl)phenols is dictated by its ability to catabolize the aromatic compound. Thus, in contrast to previously described chemoreceptor-mediated chemotaxis mechanisms towards benzoate, naphthalene and toluene, taxis in response to (methyl)phenols is mediated by metabolism-dependent behaviour. Here we show that P. putida differentially expresses three Aer-like receptors that are all polar-localized through interactions with CheA, and that inactivation of the most abundant Aer2 protein significantly decreases taxis towards phenolics. In addition, the participation of a sensory signal transduction protein composed of a PAS, a GGDEF and an EAL domain in motility towards these compounds is demonstrated. The results are discussed in the context of the versatility of metabolism-dependent coupling and the necessity for P. putida to integrate diverse metabolic signals from its native heterogeneous soil and water environments.

  2. Mentha spicata L. infusions as sources of antioxidant phenolic compounds: emerging reserve lots with special harvest requirements.

    PubMed

    Rita, Ingride; Pereira, Carla; Barros, Lillian; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-10-12

    Mentha spicata L., commonly known as spearmint, is widely used in both fresh and dry forms, for infusion preparation or in European and Indian cuisines. Recently, with the evolution of the tea market, several novel products with added value are emerging, and the standard lots have evolved to reserve lots, with special harvest requirements that confer them with enhanced organoleptic and sensorial characteristics. The apical leaves of these batches are collected in specific conditions having, then, a different chemical profile. In the present study, standard and reserve lots of M. spicata were assessed in terms of the antioxidants present in infusions prepared from the different lots. The reserve lots presented the highest concentration in all the compounds identified in relation to the standard lots, with 326 and 188 μg mL(-1) of total phenolic compounds, respectively. Both types of samples presented rosmarinic acid as the most abundant phenolic compound, at concentrations of 169 and 101 μg mL(-1) for reserve and standard lots, respectively. The antioxidant activity was higher in the reserve lots which had the highest total phenolic compounds content, with EC50 values ranging from 152 to 336 μg mL(-1). The obtained results provide scientific information that may allow the consumer to make a conscientious choice.

  3. Effect of removal of phenolic compounds on structural and thermal properties of sunflower protein isolate.

    PubMed

    Malik, M A; Sharma, H K; Saini, C S

    2016-09-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of removal of polyphenols on the structural properties of protein isolates extracted from sunflower seed and kernel. The structural and thermal changes in protein upon phenolic interaction were studied using circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry, thermal gravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Presence of phenolic compounds in proteins decreased the ordered structure content with parallel increase in unordered structure content. Denaturation temperature was higher for protein isolates with phenolic compounds while, enthalpy decreased upon phenolic interaction. In the presence of phenolic compounds, higher mass loss was observed upon heating. Crystalinity and crystal size got increased after removal of phenolic compounds. Protein isolates from kernels had higher percentage of crystalinity and crystal size as compared to seed protein isolates. Higher molecular weights were observed for protein isolates with phenolic compounds. Presence of polyphenols reduced the hydrophobicity as well the sulfhydryl content and increased the particle size of proteins.

  4. Assessment of total (free and bound) phenolic compounds in spent coffee extracts.

    PubMed

    Monente, Carmen; Ludwig, Iziar A; Irigoyen, Angel; De Peña, María-Paz; Cid, Concepción

    2015-05-06

    Spent coffee is the main byproduct of the brewing process and a potential source of bioactive compounds, mainly phenolic acids easily extracted with water. Free and bound caffeoylquinic (3-CQA, 4-CQA, 5-CQA), dicaffeoylquinic (3,4-diCQA, 3,5-diCQA, 4,5-diCQA), caffeic, ferulic, p-coumaric, sinapic, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acids were measured by HPLC, after the application of three treatments (alkaline, acid, saline) to spent coffee extracts. Around 2-fold higher content of total phenolics has been estimated in comparison to free compounds. Phenolic compounds with one or more caffeic acid molecules were approximately 54% linked to macromolecules such as melanoidins, mainly by noncovalent interactions (up to 81% of bound phenolic compounds). The rest of the quantitated phenolic acids were mainly attached to other structures by covalent bonds (62-97% of total bound compounds). Alkaline hydrolysis and saline treatment were suitable to estimate total bound and ionically bound phenolic acids, respectively, whereas acid hydrolysis is an inadequate method to quantitate coffee phenolic acids.

  5. In vitro bioavailability of phenolic compounds from five cultivars of frozen sweet cherries (Prunus avium L.).

    PubMed

    Fazzari, Marco; Fukumoto, Lana; Mazza, Giuseppe; Livrea, Maria A; Tesoriere, Luisa; Marco, Luigi Di

    2008-05-28

    The bioavailability of phenolic compounds from five cultivars of frozen sweet cherries was assessed by a digestion process involving pepsin-HCl digestion (to simulate gastric digestion) and pancreatin digestion with bile salts (to simulate small intestine conditions) and dialyzed to assess serum- and colon-available fractions. After pepsin digestion, the % recovery of total phenolics, relative to the original starting material, increased, whereas the % anthocyanins did not change. Following pancreatic digestion and dialysis, the total phenolics in the IN (serum-available) fraction was about 26-30% and the OUT (colon-available) fraction was about 77-101%. The anthocyanin content in the IN fraction was 15-21%, and in the OUT fraction, it was 52-67%. Skeena, Lapins, and Sweetheart cultivars contained higher levels of total phenolics and anthocyanins, which resulted in higher concentrations of these compounds in the IN and OUT fractions. The potential bioavailability of phenolic compounds was also assessed in Bing and Lapins cultivars at three ripening stages. Immature cherries had higher % total phenolics in the IN fraction than mature or overmature cherries. However, immature cherries had the lowest concentrations of these compounds, making the actual bioavailable amounts of these compounds lower than for mature and overmature fruit. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis of Lapins cherries at three maturity stages confirmed the results obtained using spectrophotometric methods for total phenolics and anthocyanins.

  6. Extraction, identification, fractionation and isolation of phenolic compounds in plants with hepatoprotective effects.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carla; Barros, Lillian; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-03-15

    The liver is one of the most important organs of human body, being involved in several vital functions and regulation of physiological processes. Given its pivotal role in the excretion of waste metabolites and drugs detoxification, the liver is often subjected to oxidative stress that leads to lipid peroxidation and severe cellular damage. The conventional treatments of liver diseases such as cirrhosis, fatty liver and chronic hepatitis are frequently inadequate due to side effects caused by hepatotoxic chemical drugs. To overcome this problematic paradox, medicinal plants, owing to their natural richness in phenolic compounds, have been intensively exploited concerning their extracts and fraction composition in order to find bioactive compounds that could be isolated and applied in the treatment of liver ailments. The present review aimed to collect the main results of recent studies carried out in this field and systematize the information for a better understanding of the hepatoprotective capacity of medicinal plants in in vitro and in vivo systems. Generally, the assessed plant extracts revealed good hepatoprotective properties, justifying the fractionation and further isolation of phenolic compounds from different parts of the plant. Twenty-five phenolic compounds, including flavonoids, lignan compounds, phenolic acids and other phenolic compounds, have been isolated and identified, and proved to be effective in the prevention and/or treatment of chemically induced liver damage. In this perspective, the use of medicinal plant extracts, fractions and phenolic compounds seems to be a promising strategy to avoid side effects caused by hepatotoxic chemicals.

  7. Toxicological aspects of the use of phenolic compounds in disease prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kyselova, Zuzana

    2011-01-01

    The consumption of a diet low in fat and enhanced by fruits and vegetables, especially rich in phenolic compounds, may reduce risks of many civilization diseases. The use of traditional medicines, mainly derived from plant sources, has become an attractive segment in the management of many lifestyle diseases. Concerning the application of dietary supplements (based on phenolic compounds) in common practice, the ongoing debate over possible adverse effects of certain nutrients and dosage levels is of great importance. Since dietary supplements are not classified as drugs, their potential toxicities and interactions have not been thoroughly evaluated. First, this review will introduce phenolic compounds as natural substances beneficial for human health. Second, the potential dual mode of action of flavonoids will be outlined. Third, potential deleterious impacts of phenolic compounds utilization will be discussed: pro-oxidant and estrogenic activities, cancerogenic potential, cytotoxic effects, apoptosis induction and flavonoid-drug interaction. Finally, future trends within the research field will be indicated. PMID:22319251

  8. Bioactive amines and phenolic compounds in cocoa beans are affected by fermentation.

    PubMed

    do Carmo Brito, Brenda de Nazaré; Campos Chisté, Renan; da Silva Pena, Rosinelson; Abreu Gloria, Maria Beatriz; Santos Lopes, Alessandra

    2017-08-01

    Cocoa is the target of increased scientific research as it is one of the richest source of bioactive compounds. The formation of bioactive amines and their changes in cocoa beans during seven days of traditional fermentation was investigated for the first time. In addition, total phenolic compounds, anthocyanins contents and the scavenging capacity against ABTS radical were determined to monitor the fermentation process. Only two biogenic amines (tryptamine and tyramine) and two polyamines (spermidine and spermine) were detected in cocoa beans during fermentation. Fermentation was characterized by three stages: i) high levels of tryptamine, phenolics, and scavenging capacity; ii) high contents of spermine, total biogenic amines and total polyamines; and iii) the highest spermidine levels and total acidity, but the lowest total phenolic compounds and anthocyanins contents. The scavenging capacity of cocoa beans during fermentation correlated with total phenolic compounds and anthocyanins contents.

  9. Antibacterial Potential of Northeastern Portugal Wild Plant Extracts and Respective Phenolic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Isabel C. F. R.; Barros, Lillian; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Soares, Graça; Henriques, Mariana

    2014-01-01

    The present work aims to assess the antibacterial potential of phenolic extracts, recovered from plants obtained on the North East of Portugal, and of their phenolic compounds (ellagic, caffeic, and gallic acids, quercetin, kaempferol, and rutin), against bacteria commonly found on skin infections. The disk diffusion and the susceptibility assays were used to identify the most active extracts and phenolic compounds. The effect of selected phenolic compounds on animal cells was assessed by determination of cellular metabolic activity. Gallic acid had a higher activity, against gram-positive (S. epidermidis and S. aureus) and gram-negative bacteria (K. pneumoniae) at lower concentrations, than the other compounds. The caffeic acid, also, showed good antibacterial activity against the 3 bacteria used. The gallic acid was effective against the 3 bacteria without causing harm to the animal cells. Gallic and caffeic acid showed a promising applicability as antibacterial agents for the treatment of infected wounds. PMID:24804249

  10. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of red wine made from grapes treated with different fungicides.

    PubMed

    Mulero, J; Martínez, G; Oliva, J; Cermeño, S; Cayuela, J M; Zafrilla, P; Martínez-Cachá, A; Barba, A

    2015-08-01

    The effect of treating grapes with six fungicides, applied under critical agricultural practices (CAP) on levels of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of red wines of Monastrell variety was studied. Vinifications were performed through addition of active dry yeast (ADY). Measurement of phenolic compounds was made with HPLC-DAD. Determination of antioxidant activity was through reaction of the wine sample with the DPPH radical. The wine prepared from grapes treated with quinoxyfen shows a greater increase of phenolic compounds than the control wine. In contrast, the wine obtained from grapes treated with trifloxystrobin showed lower total concentration of phenolic compounds, including stilbenes, whilst treatments with kresoxim-methyl, fluquinconazole, and famoxadone slightly reduced their content. Hence, the use of these last four fungicides could cause a decrease in possible health benefits to consumers. Antioxidant activity hardly varied in the assays with quinoxyfen, fluquinconazole and famoxadone, and decreased in the other wines.

  11. Analysis of phenolic compounds from corn, oat, and wheat bran extracts by LC-MS-PDA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds are among the most common secondary metabolites produced by plants and can exhibit a range of bioactive properties including antimicrobial, antioxidant, and antihypertensive. These natural products have applications in nutraceutical, pharmaceutical and functional food or animal fe...

  12. Enzymatic electrochemical detection coupled to multivariate calibration for the determination of phenolic compounds in environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Silvia R; Kergaravat, Silvina V; Pividori, Maria Isabel

    2013-03-15

    An approach based on the electrochemical detection of the horseradish peroxidase enzymatic reaction by means of square wave voltammetry was developed for the determination of phenolic compounds in environmental samples. First, a systematic optimization procedure of three factors involved in the enzymatic reaction was carried out using response surface methodology through a central composite design. Second, the enzymatic electrochemical detection coupled with a multivariate calibration method based in the partial least-squares technique was optimized for the determination of a mixture of five phenolic compounds, i.e. phenol, p-aminophenol, p-chlorophenol, hydroquinone and pyrocatechol. The calibration and validation sets were built and assessed. In the calibration model, the LODs for phenolic compounds oscillated from 0.6 to 1.4 × 10(-6) mol L(-1). Recoveries for prediction samples were higher than 85%. These compounds were analyzed simultaneously in spiked samples and in water samples collected close to tanneries and landfills.

  13. The Bark-Beetle-Associated Fungus, Endoconidiophora polonica, Utilizes the Phenolic Defense Compounds of Its Host as a Carbon Source.

    PubMed

    Wadke, Namita; Kandasamy, Dineshkumar; Vogel, Heiko; Lah, Ljerka; Wingfield, Brenda D; Paetz, Christian; Wright, Louwrance P; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Hammerbacher, Almuth

    2016-06-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies) is periodically attacked by the bark beetle Ips typographus and its fungal associate, Endoconidiophora polonica, whose infection is thought to be required for successful beetle attack. Norway spruce produces terpenoid resins and phenolics in response to fungal and bark beetle invasion. However, how the fungal associate copes with these chemical defenses is still unclear. In this study, we investigated changes in the phenolic content of Norway spruce bark upon E. polonica infection and the biochemical factors mediating these changes. Although genes encoding the rate-limiting enzymes in Norway spruce stilbene and flavonoid biosynthesis were actively transcribed during fungal infection, there was a significant time-dependent decline of the corresponding metabolites in fungal lesions. In vitro feeding experiments with pure phenolics revealed that E. polonica transforms both stilbenes and flavonoids to muconoid-type ring-cleavage products, which are likely the first steps in the degradation of spruce defenses to substrates that can enter the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Four genes were identified in E. polonica that encode catechol dioxygenases carrying out these reactions. These enzymes catalyze the cleavage of phenolic rings with a vicinal dihydroxyl group to muconoid products accepting a wide range of Norway spruce-produced phenolics as substrates. The expression of these genes and E. polonica utilization of the most abundant spruce phenolics as carbon sources both correlated positively with fungal virulence in several strains. Thus, the pathways for the degradation of phenolic compounds in E. polonica, initiated by catechol dioxygenase action, are important to the infection, growth, and survival of this bark beetle-vectored fungus and may play a major role in the ability of I. typographus to colonize spruce trees.

  14. Adsorption of phenolic compound by aged-refuse.

    PubMed

    Xiaoli, Chai; Youcai, Zhao

    2006-09-01

    The adsorption of phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol by aged-refuse has been studied. Adsorption isotherms have been determined for phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol and the data fits well to the Freundlich equation. The chlorinated phenols are absorbed more strongly than the phenol and the adsorption capacity has an oblivious relationship with the numbers and the position of chlorine subsistent. The experiment data suggests that both the partition function and the chemical adsorption involve in the adsorption process. Pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model were applied to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption and the results show that it fit the pseudo-second-order model. More than one step involves in the adsorption process and the overall rate of the adsorption process appears to be controlled by the chemical reaction. The thermodynamic analysis indicates that the adsorption is spontaneous and endothermic.

  15. Phenol compounds in solutions of soils of different types in the central forest state biosphere reserve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinina, M. S.; Ivanilova, S. V.

    2008-04-01

    The interannual, seasonal, and daily dynamics of the contents of phenol compounds in the soil solution of a peat-podzolic-gleyic soil in the southern taiga are considered. The concentrations of phenol compounds in the studied soil remain relatively stable. In the solutions obtained from different soil types, the main limiting factor is the degree of hydromorphism, which manifests itself via the biological factor—the intensity of the microorganisms activity and the composition and quality of the forest litters.

  16. Fractionation of Phenolic Compounds Extracted from Propolis and Their Activity in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Petelinc, Tanja; Polak, Tomaž; Demšar, Lea; Jamnik, Polona

    2013-01-01

    We have here investigated the activities of Slovenian propolis extracts in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified the phenolic compounds that appear to contribute to these activities. We correlated changes in intracellular oxidation and cellular metabolic energy in these yeasts with the individual fractions of the propolis extracts obtained following solid-phase extraction. The most effective fraction was further investigated according to its phenolic compounds. PMID:23409133

  17. Potentiation of the bioavailability of blueberry phenolic compounds by co-ingested grape phenolic compounds in mice, revealed by targeted metabolomic profiling in plasma and feces.

    PubMed

    Dudonné, Stéphanie; Dal-Pan, Alexandre; Dubé, Pascal; Varin, Thibault V; Calon, Frédéric; Desjardins, Yves

    2016-08-10

    The low bioavailability of dietary phenolic compounds, resulting from poor absorption and high rates of metabolism and excretion, is a concern as it can limit their potential beneficial effects on health. Targeted metabolomic profiling in plasma and feces of mice supplemented for 15 days with a blueberry extract, a grape extract or their combination revealed significantly increased plasma concentrations (3-5 fold) of blueberry phenolic metabolites in the presence of a co-ingested grape extract, associated with an equivalent decrease in their appearance in feces. Additionally, the repeated daily administration of the blueberry-grape combination significantly increased plasma phenolic concentrations (2-3-fold) compared to animals receiving only a single acute dose, with no such increase being observed with individual extracts. These findings highlight a positive interaction between blueberry and grape constituents, in which the grape extract enhanced the absorption of blueberry phenolic compounds. This study provides for the first time in vivo evidence of such an interaction occurring between co-ingested phenolic compounds from fruit extracts leading to their improved bioavailability.

  18. Localization and Identification of Phenolic Compounds in Theobroma cacao L. Somatic Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    ALEMANNO, L.; RAMOS, T.; GARGADENEC, A.; ANDARY, C.; FERRIERE, N.

    2003-01-01

    Cocoa breeders and growers continue to face the problem of high heterogeneity between individuals derived from one progeny. Vegetative propagation by somatic embryogenesis could be a way to increase genetic gains in the field. Somatic embryogenesis in cocoa is difficult and this species is considered as recalcitrant. This study was conducted to investigate the phenolic composition of cocoa flowers (the explants used to achieve somatic embryogenesis) and how it changes during the process, by means of histochemistry and conventional chemical techniques. In flowers, all parts contained polyphenolics but their locations were specific to the organ considered. After placing floral explants in vitro, the polyphenolic content was qualitatively modified and maintained in the calli throughout the culture process. Among the new polyphenolics, the three most abundant were isolated and characterized by 1H‐ and 13C‐NMR. They were hydroxycinnamic acid amides: N‐trans‐caffeoyl‐l‐DOPA or clovamide, N‐trans‐p‐coumaroyl‐l‐tyrosine or deoxiclovamide, and N‐trans‐caffeoyl‐l‐tyrosine. The same compounds were found also in fresh, unfermented cocoa beans. The synthesis kinetics for these compounds in calli, under different somatic embryogenesis conditions, revealed a higher concentration under non‐embryogenic conditions. Given the antioxidant nature of these compounds, they could reflect the stress status of the tissues. PMID:12933367

  19. Localization and identification of phenolic compounds in Theobroma cacao L. somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Alemanno, L; Ramos, T; Gargadenec, A; Andary, C; Ferriere, N

    2003-10-01

    Cocoa breeders and growers continue to face the problem of high heterogeneity between individuals derived from one progeny. Vegetative propagation by somatic embryogenesis could be a way to increase genetic gains in the field. Somatic embryogenesis in cocoa is difficult and this species is considered as recalcitrant. This study was conducted to investigate the phenolic composition of cocoa flowers (the explants used to achieve somatic embryogenesis) and how it changes during the process, by means of histochemistry and conventional chemical techniques. In flowers, all parts contained polyphenolics but their locations were specific to the organ considered. After placing floral explants in vitro, the polyphenolic content was qualitatively modified and maintained in the calli throughout the culture process. Among the new polyphenolics, the three most abundant were isolated and characterized by 1H- and 13C-NMR. They were hydroxycinnamic acid amides: N-trans-caffeoyl-l-DOPA or clovamide, N-trans-p-coumaroyl-l-tyrosine or deoxiclovamide, and N-trans-caffeoyl-l-tyrosine. The same compounds were found also in fresh, unfermented cocoa beans. The synthesis kinetics for these compounds in calli, under different somatic embryogenesis conditions, revealed a higher concentration under non-embryogenic conditions. Given the antioxidant nature of these compounds, they could reflect the stress status of the tissues.

  20. Analysis of phenolic compounds in six Norwegian plum cultivars (Prunus domestica L.).

    PubMed

    Slimestad, Rune; Vangdal, Eivind; Brede, Cato

    2009-12-09

    Six European plum cultivars ( Prunus domestica L.) grown in Norway have been studied with respect to phenolic composition. Neochlorogenic acid was found to be the most important phenolic acid in all cultivars. Together with other phenolic acids, this compound varied significantly in amount among the cultivars. Cyanidin 3-rutinoside was found to account for >60% of the total anthocyanin content. Minor amounts of flavonols (rutin and quercetin 3-glucoside) were detected in all cultivars. Total antioxidant capacity varied from 814 to 290 micromol of Trolox 100 g(-1) of fresh weight. Measurement of total phenolic content in terms of Prussian blue complex formation revealed a method failure of magnitude order compared to results obtained by HPLC. Comparison of the response factors of a range of phenolic compounds obtained upon analysis by the Prussian blue and Folin-Ciocalteu assays revealed that the latter method returned higher yields in terms of gallic acid (GAE).

  1. Natural Phenolic Compounds as Therapeutic and Preventive Agents for Cerebral Amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masahito; Ono, Kenjiro; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Noguchi-Shinohara, Moeko

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that diets rich in phenolic compounds may have preventive effects on the development of dementia or Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the effects of natural phenolic compounds, such as myricetin (Myr), rosmarinic acid (RA), ferulic acid (FA), curcumin (Cur) and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) on the aggregation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ), using in vitro and in vivo models of cerebral Aβ amyloidosis. The in vitro studies revealed that these phenolic compounds efficiently inhibit oligomerization as well as fibril formation of Aβ through differential binding, whilst reducing Aβ oligomer-induced synaptic and neuronal toxicity. Furthermore, a transgenic mouse model fed orally with such phenolic compounds showed significant reduction of soluble Aβ oligomers as well as of insoluble Aβ deposition in the brain. These data, together with an updated review of the literature, indicate that natural phenolic compounds have anti-amyloidogenic effects on Aβ in addition to well-known anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects, hence suggesting their potential as therapeutic and/or preventive agents for cerebral Aβ amyloidosis, including AD and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Well-designed clinical trials or preventive interventions with natural phenolic compounds are necessary to establish their efficacy as disease-modifying agents.

  2. Oxidation of phenols by horseradish peroxidase and lactoperoxidase compound II--kinetic considerations.

    PubMed

    Zahida, M S; Deva, W; Peerzada, G M; Behere, D V

    1998-12-01

    Oxidation of para substituted phenols by horseradish peroxidase compound II (HRP-II) and lactoperoxidase compound II (LPO-II) were studied using stopped flow technique. Apparent second order rate constants (kapp) of the reactions were determined. The kinetics of oxidation of phenols by HRP-II and LPO-II have been compared with the oxidation potentials of the substrates. Reorganization energies of electron-transfer of phenols to the enzymes were estimated from the variation of second order rate constants with the thermodynamic driving force.

  3. Content of different groups of phenolic compounds in microshoots of Juglans regia cultivars and studies on antioxidant activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic and other compounds were extracted from micropropagated axillary shoots (microshoots) of the walnut (Juglans regia L.) cultivars ‘Chandler’, ‘Howard’, ‘Kerman’, ‘Sunland’, and ‘Z63’. Among cultivars, microshoots showed differences in phenolic compounds, phenolic acids, flavonoids and proant...

  4. Effect of maceration duration on physicochemical characteristics, organic acid, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of red wine from Vitis vinifera L. Karaoglan.

    PubMed

    Kocabey, N; Yilmaztekin, M; Hayaloglu, A A

    2016-09-01

    Effects of different maceration times (5, 10 and 15 days) on composition, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities of red wines made from the Vitis vinifera L. Karaoglan grown in Malatya were investigated. Maceration duration changed some chemical constituents and color of Karaoglan red wines. A linear relationship was observed between antioxidant activity of wine and maceration duration. Major organic acid was tartaric acid which was at the highest concentration in wine macerated for 10 days. A total of 25 phenolic compounds was determined in wine samples. Within these phenolics; procyanidin B2, trans-caftaric acid, gallic acid, trans-caffeic acid, (+) catechin, (-) epicatechin and quercetin-3-O-glucoside were the most abundant phenolics regardless of maceration duration. In general, extended maceration duration resulted in increase in the concentration of phenolic compounds, reflecting the antioxidant activities of wine. In conclusion, the highest concentrations of total and individual phenolic compounds as well as antioxidant activities were found in wines macerated for 15 days.

  5. Beaver (Castor canadensis) responses to major phenolic and neutral compounds in castoreum.

    PubMed

    Schulte, B A; Müller-Schwarze, D; Tang, R; Webster, F X

    1994-12-01

    North American beaver (Castor canadensis) mark their territories with castoreum, a chemically complex secretion from their castor sacs. The phenolic and neutral fractions of castoreum have been shown to elicit specific behavioral responses from beavers in a field setting. Our objective was to identify compounds/mixtures that evoked responses similar to those stimulated by castoreum. We assayed recently identified phenolic compounds, some phenolics that had been determined to be biologically active in previous studies, the neutral compound borneol, and combinations of phenolic compounds, neutral compounds, and the two combined. Biological activity was measured by the elicitation and extent of specific responses and their strength (duration, frequency, and proportion of beavers responding). Generally, single compounds stimulated fewer responses than mixtures. A 26-compound mixture of phenolic and neutral compounds elicited responses in a similar proportion of trials as castoreum. However, responses to castoreum were stronger than to any synthetic sample. Further investigation of different measures of response, namely, elicitation, completeness, and strength, are deemed necessary to fully decipher the design of social odors.

  6. Methodologies for the extraction of phenolic compounds from environmental samples: new approaches.

    PubMed

    Mahugo Santana, Cristina; Sosa Ferrera, Zoraida; Esther Torres Padrón, M; Juan Santana Rodríguez, José

    2009-01-09

    Phenolic derivatives are among the most important contaminants present in the environment. These compounds are used in several industrial processes to manufacture chemicals such as pesticides, explosives, drugs and dyes. They also are used in the bleaching process of paper manufacturing. Apart from these sources, phenolic compounds have substantial applications in agriculture as herbicides, insecticides and fungicides. However, phenolic compounds are not only generated by human activity, but they are also formed naturally, e.g., during the decomposition of leaves or wood. As a result of these applications, they are found in soils and sediments and this often leads to wastewater and ground water contamination. Owing to their high toxicity and persistence in the environment, both, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the European Union have included some of them in their lists of priority pollutants. Current standard methods of phenolic compounds analysis in water samples are based on liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) while Soxhlet extraction is the most used technique for isolating phenols from solid matrices. However, these techniques require extensive cleanup procedures that are time-intensive and involve expensive and hazardous organic solvents, which are undesirable for health and disposal reasons. In the last years, the use of news methodologies such as solid-phase extraction (SPE) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME) have increased for the extraction of phenolic compounds from liquid samples. In the case of solid samples, microwave assisted extraction (MAE) is demonstrated to be an efficient technique for the extraction of these compounds. In this work we review the developed methods in the extraction and determination of phenolic derivatives in different types of environmental matrices such as water, sediments and soils. Moreover, we present the new approach in the use of micellar media coupled with SPME process for the extraction of phenolic

  7. Phenolic compounds: Strong inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic hydrolysate for 2,3-butanediol production by Enterobacter aerogenes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Ju Hun; Yang, Xiaoguang; Kim, Sung Bong; Lee, Ja Hyun; Yoo, Hah Young; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2015-12-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass are attractive feedstocks for 2,3-butanediol production due to their abundant supply and low price. During the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, various byproducts are formed and their effects on 2,3-butanediol production were not sufficiently studied compared to ethanol production. Therefore, the effects of compounds derived from lignocellulosic biomass (weak acids, furan derivatives and phenolics) on the cell growth, the 2,3-butanediol production and the enzymes activity involved in 2,3-butanediol production were evaluated using Enterobacter aerogenes ATCC 29007. The phenolic compounds showed the most toxic effects on cell growth, 2,3-butanediol production and enzyme activity, followed by furan derivatives and weak acids. The significant effects were not observed in the presence of acetic acid and formic acid. Also, feasibility of 2,3-butanediol production from lignocellulosic biomass was evaluated using Miscanthus as a feedstock. In the fermentation of Miscanthus hydrolysate, 11.00 g/L of 2,3-butanediol was obtained from 34.62 g/L of reducing sugar. However, 2,3-butanediol was not produced when the concentration of total phenolic compounds in the hydrolysate increased to more than 1.5 g/L. The present study provides useful information to develop strategies for biological production of 2,3-butanediol and to establish biorefinery for biochemicals from lignocellulosic biomass.

  8. Determination of phenolic compounds in Prunella L. by liquid chromatography-diode array detection.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Saliha; Demir, Cevdet; Malyer, Hulusi

    2011-07-15

    Four species of Prunella L. (Prunella vulgaris L., Prunella laciniata L., Prunella grandiflora L. and Prunella orientalis Bornm.) belong to the family of Lamiaceae and representing popular Western and Chinese herbal medicine were examined for the content of phenolic compounds. Phenolic acids (rosmarinic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, chlorogenic acid, protocatechuic acid), flavonoids (rutin, quercetin) in different quantitative proportions depending on extracts were determined by the rapid, selective and accurate method combining solvent/acid hydrolysis extraction and high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). Water, methanol, butanol, acetonitrile, ethyl acetate, hexane and their acidic solutions were used to examine the efficiency of different solvent systems for the extraction of phenolic compounds. Acid hydrolysis extraction was established as the most suitable extraction method for phenolic compounds.

  9. Optimisation of the extraction of phenolic compounds from apples using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Aline; Zielinski, Acácio Antonio Ferreira; Zardo, Danianni Marinho; Demiate, Ivo Mottin; Nogueira, Alessandro; Mafra, Luciana Igarashi

    2014-04-15

    The extraction of phenolic compounds from apples was optimised using response surface methodology (RSM). A Box-Behnken design was conducted to analyse the effects of solvent concentration (methanol or acetone), temperature and time on the extraction of total phenolic content, total flavonoids and antioxidant capacity (FRAP and DPPH). Analysis of the individual phenolics was performed by HPLC in optimal extraction conditions. The optimisation suggested that extraction with 84.5% methanol for 15 min, at 28 °C and extraction with 65% acetone for 20 min, at 10 °C were the best solutions for this combination of variables. RSM was shown to be an adequate approach for modelling the extraction of phenolic compounds from apples. Most of the experiments with acetone solutions extracted more bioactive compounds, and hence they had more antioxidant capacity, however, chlorogenic acid and phloridzin had higher yields (32.4% and 48.4%, respectively) in extraction with methanol.

  10. Evolution of aroma and phenolic compounds during ripening of 'superior seedless' grapes.

    PubMed

    Hellín, Pilar; Manso, Angela; Flores, Pilar; Fenoll, José

    2010-05-26

    The evolution of aroma and phenolic compounds was studied during ripening of Vitis vinifera cv. 'Superior Seedless' grapes in two consecutive years. The major free detected compounds were citral, geraniol, and benzyl alcohol whereas geraniol, citral, nerol, citronellol, dienediol I, linalol oxide I, linalol oxide II, benzyl alcohol, and 2-phenylethanol were identified in the glycosidically bound fraction. Concentrations of the main free terpene alcohols responsible for 'Superior Seedless' aroma decreased during grape development, and bound compounds became predominant at grape maturity. Calculation of odor activity values showed that geraniol was the most active odorant followed to a lesser extent by citral and nerol. With regard to phenolic compound evolution, flavan-3-ols and flavonols were maximal at veraison and decreased throughout the ripening, stilbenes content decreased from the first stage, and total phenolics increased to show a maximum in the ripe grapes. At ripening, quercetin 3-O-glucoside and catechin were the main compounds detected in 'Superior Seedless'.

  11. Determination of the major phenolic compounds in pomegranate juices by HPLC−DAD−ESI-MS.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Verardo, Vito; Toselli, Moreno; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza

    2013-06-05

    Traditionally, pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) has been consumed as fresh fruit or as pomegranate juice. In this study, the main phenolic compounds of 12 pomegranate varieties and 5 pomegranate clones were determined by HPLC−DAD−ESI-MS. Two chromatographic methods with a fused-core C18 column and a classical HPLC system were developed. Thirteen anthocyanins and fourteen other phenolic compounds were determined in the pomegranate juices. As far as we are concerned, a new flavonol-glycoside, phellatin or its isomer amurensin, has been tentatively identified for the first time in pomegranate juices. Total phenolic content ranged from 580.8 to 2551.3 mg/L of pomegranate juice. Anthocyanins varied between 20 to 82% of total phenolic content. Flavonoids were 1.6-23.6% of total phenolic compounds, while phenolic acids and ellagitannins were in the range 16.4-65.8%. The five clones reported a phenolic content comparable with that of the other pomegranate samples.

  12. Effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catal, Tunc; Fan, Yanzhen; Li, Kaichang; Bermek, Hakan; Liu, Hong

    Lignocellulosic biomass is an attractive fuel source for MFCs due to its renewable nature and ready availability. Furan derivatives and phenolic compounds could be potentially formed during the pre-treatment process of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, voltage generation from these compounds and the effects of these compounds on voltage generation from glucose in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were examined. Except for 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (5-HMF), all the other compounds tested were unable to be utilized directly for electricity production in MFCs in the absence of other electron donors. One furan derivate, 5-HMF and two phenolic compounds, trans-cinnamic acid and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid did not affect electricity generation from glucose at a concentration up to 10 mM. Four phenolic compounds, including syringaldeyhde, vanillin, trans-4-hydroxy-3-methoxy, and 4-hydroxy cinnamic acids inhibited electricity generation at concentrations above 5 mM. Other compounds, including 2-furaldehyde, benzyl alcohol and acetophenone, inhibited the electricity generation even at concentrations less than 0.2 mM. This study suggests that effective electricity generation from the hydrolysates of lignocellulosic biomass in MFCs may require the employment of the hydrolysis methods with low furan derivatives and phenolic compounds production, or the removal of some strong inhibitors prior to the MFC operation, or the improvement of bacterial tolerance against these compounds through the enrichment of new bacterial cultures or genetic modification of the bacterial strains.

  13. Assessing the Protective Activity of a Recently Discovered Phenolic Compound against Oxidative Stress Using Computational Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Villuendas-Rey, Yenny; Alvarez-Idaboy, Juan Raul; Galano, Annia

    2015-12-28

    The protection exerted by 3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxybenzyl alcohol (DHMBA), a phenolic compound recently isolated from the Pacific oyster, against oxidative stress (OS) is investigated using the density functional theory. Our results indicate that DHMBA is an outstanding peroxyl radical scavenger, being about 15 times and 4 orders of magnitude better than Trolox for that purpose in lipid and aqueous media, respectively. It was also found to react faster with HOO(•) than other known antioxidants such as resveratrol and ascorbic acid. DHMBA is also predicted to be able to sequester Cu(II) ions, consequently inhibiting the OS induced by Cu(II)-ascorbate mixtures and downgrading the (•)OH production via the Haber-Weiss reaction. However, it is proposed that DHMBA is more efficient as a primary antioxidant (free radical scavenger), than as a secondary antioxidant (metal ion chelator). In addition, it was found that DHMBA can be efficiently regenerated in aqueous solution, at physiological pH. Such regeneration is expected to contribute to increase the antioxidant protection exerted by DHMBA. These results suggest that probably synthetic routes for this compound should be pursued, because albeit its abundance in nature is rather low, its antioxidant activity is exceptional.

  14. Effect of Steam Blanching and Drying on Phenolic Compounds of Litchi Pericarp.

    PubMed

    Kessy, Honest N E; Hu, Zhuoyan; Zhao, Lei; Zhou, Molin

    2016-06-03

    The effects of different treatment methods on the stability and antioxidant capacity of the bioactive phenolic compounds of litchi pericarps were investigated. Fresh litchi pericarps were open air-dried, steam-blanched for 3 min in combination with hot air oven drying at 60 and 80 °C, and unblanched pericarps were dried in a hot air oven at 40, 60, 70 and 80 °C until equilibrium weight was reached. The total phenolic compounds, flavonoids, anthocyanins, proanthocyanidins and individual procyanidins, and antioxidant activity were analyzed. The combination of blanching and drying at 60 °C significantly (p < 0.05) improved the release of phenolic compounds, individual procyanidins, and the extracts' antioxidant capacity compared with the unblanched hot air oven-dried and open air-dried pericarps. Drying of fresh unblanched litchi pericarps in either open air or a hot air oven caused significant losses (p < 0.05) in phenolic compounds and individual procyanidins, leading to a reduction in the antioxidant activity. A similar increase, retention or reduction was reflected in flavonoids, proanthocyanidins and anthocyanins because they are sub-groups of phenolic compounds. Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryldydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging capacity of the treated pericarps were significantly correlated (r ≥ 0.927, p < 0.01) with the total phenolic compounds. Thus, the combination of steam blanching and drying treatments of fresh litchi pericarps could produce a stable and dry litchi pericarp that maintains phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity as a raw material for further recovery of the phytochemicals.

  15. Phenolic compounds and chromatographic profiles of pear skins (Pyrus spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A standardized profiling method based on liquid chromatography with diode array and electrospray ionization/mass spectrometric detection (LC-DAD-ESI/MS) was used to analyze the phenolic components of 16 pear skins (Pyrus spp., varieties and cultivars). More than 30 flavonoids and 13 hydroxycinnamat...

  16. Soluble and bound phenolic compounds in different Bolivian purple corn ( Zea mays L.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Cuevas Montilla, Elyana; Hillebrand, Silke; Antezana, Amalia; Winterhalter, Peter

    2011-07-13

    In nine Bolivian purple corn ( Zea mays L.) varieties the content of phenolic compounds as well as the anthocyanin composition has been determined. The phenotypes under investigation included four red and five blue varieties (Kulli, Ayzuma, Paru, Tuimuru, Oke, Huaca Songo, Colorado, Huillcaparu, and Checchi). In purple corn, phenolic compounds were highly concentrated in cell walls. Thus, simultaneous determination of soluble and bound-form phenolics is essential for analysis, extraction, and quantification. The present study reports the determination of soluble and insoluble-bound fraction of phenolic compounds by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-ESI-MS(n) in Bolivian purple corn varieties. Enzymatic, thermal, and alkaline hydrolyses were used to obtain the cell wall-linked phenolic compounds. Ferulic acid values ranged from 132.9 to 298.4 mg/100 g, and p-coumaric acid contents varied between 251.8 and 607.5 mg/100 g dry weight (DW), respectively, and were identified as the main nonanthocyanin phenolics. The total content of phenolic compounds ranged from 311.0 to 817.6 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/100 g DW, and the percentage contribution of bound to total phenolics varied from 62.1 to 86.6%. The total monomeric anthocyanin content ranged from 1.9 to 71.7 mg cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents/100 g DW. Anthocyanin profiles are almost the same among the different samples. Differences are observed only in the relative percentage of each anthocyanin. Cyanidin-3-glucoside and its malonated derivative were detected as major anthocyanins. Several dimalonylated monoglucosides of cyanidin, peonidin, and pelargonidin were present as minor constituents.

  17. Wide genetic variation in phenolic compound content of seed coats among black soybean cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Phommalath, Siviengkhek; Teraishi, Masayoshi; Yoshikawa, Takanori; Saito, Hiroki; Tsukiyama, Takuji; Nakazaki, Tetsuya; Tanisaka, Takatoshi; Okumoto, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Black soybeans have been used as a food source and also in traditional medicine because their seed coats contain natural phenolic compounds such as proanthocyanidin and anthocyanin. The objective of this research is to reveal the genetic variation in the phenolic compound contents (PCCs) of seed coats in 227 black soybean cultivars, most of which were Japanese landraces and cultivars. Total phenolics were extracted from seed coats using an acidic acetone reagent and the proanthocyanidin content, monomeric anthocyanin content, total flavonoids content, total phenolics content, and radical scavenging activity were measured. The cultivars showed wide genetic variation in PCCs. Each of the contents was highly correlated with one another, and was closely associated with radical scavenging activity. PCCs were also moderately associated by flowering date but not associated by seed weight. Cultivars with purple flowers had a tendency to produce higher PCCs compared with cultivars with white flowers, suggesting that the W1 locus for flower color can affect phenolic compound composition and content. Our results suggest that developing black soybean cultivars with high functional phenolic compounds activity is feasible. PMID:25914597

  18. Determination of phenolic compounds in honey using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction.

    PubMed

    Campone, Luca; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Pagano, Imma; Carabetta, Sonia; Di Sanzo, Rosa; Russo, Mariateresa; Rastrelli, Luca

    2014-03-21

    Honey is a valuable functional food rich in phenolic compounds with a broad spectrum of biological activities. Analysis of the phenolic compounds in honey is a very promising tool for the quality control, the authentication and characterization of botanical origin, and the nutraceutical research. This work describes a novel approach for the rapid analysis of five phenolic acids and 10 flavonoids in honey. Phenolic compounds were rapidly extracted and concentrated from diluted honey by dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) and then analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography with UV absorbance detection (HPLC-UV). Some important parameters, such as the nature and volume of extraction and dispersive solvents, pH and salt effect were carefully investigated and optimized to achieve the best extraction efficiency. Under the optimal conditions, an exhaustive extraction for twelve of the investigated analytes (recoveries >70%), with a precision (RSD<10%) highly acceptable for complex matrices, and detection and quantification limits at ppb levels (1.4-12 and 4.7-40ngg(-1), respectively) were attained. The proposed method, compared with the most widely used method in the analysis of phenolic compounds in honey, provided similar or higher extraction efficiency, except in the case of the most hydrophilic phenolic acids. The capability of DLLME to the extraction of other honey phytochemicals, such as abscisic acid, was also demonstrated. The main advantages of developed method are the simplicity of operation, the rapidity to achieve a very high sample throughput and low cost.

  19. Phenolic compound profiles and their corresponding antioxidant Capacity of purple pitaya (Hylocereus sp.) genotypes.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Patricia; Stintzing, Florian C; Carle, Reinhold

    2007-01-01

    Folin-Ciocalteu and TEAC (Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity) assay together with the spectrophotometric determination of betalains were applied to investigate the correlation between phenolics and their contribution to the antioxidant capacity of five different Costa Rican genotypes of purple pitaya (Hylocereus sp.) and of H. polyrhizus fruits. Maximum antioxidant capacity, total phenolic and betalain contents were observed in the genotype 'Lisa'. While non-betalainic phenolic compounds contributed only to a minor extent, betalains were responsible for the major antioxidant capacity of purple pitaya juices evaluated. The phenolic pattern of each genotype was also thoroughly investigated using liquid chromatography coupled to positive electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry. In addition to the well known betalains previously reported in Hylocereus fruits, several biosynthetic precursors were detected. Notably, decarboxylated and dehydrogenated betalains were identified as genuine compounds of the juices. Some of these compounds were previously described as artifacts upon heat exposure. Moreover, gallic acid was identified for the first time in pitaya fruits. While the phenolic profiles generally differed between genotypes, phenolic compound composition of 'Rosa' resembled that of H. polyrhizus with respect to total contents of betacyanins, betalainic precursors, phyllocactin and cyclo-Dopa malonyl-glucosides.

  20. Phenols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Manfred; Weber, Markus

    Up to the end of the nineteenth century, phenol was recovered primarily from coal tar. With the commercialization of the phenolic resins, the demand for phenol grew significantly. Currently, the cumene-to-phenol process is the predominant synthetic route for the production of phenol. It is accompanied by acetone as a co-product. Cumene is oxidized with oxygen to form cumene hydroperoxide. The peroxide is subsequently decomposed to phenol and acetone, using a strong mineral acid as catalyst. The products are purified in a series of distillation columns. The cumene-to-phenol process is described in more detail in this chapter. An overview is given about synthetic routes via direct oxidation of benzene. None of these alternative routes has been commercialized. The chapter also gives an overview of global supply and use of phenol in 2008. Finally, the main natural sources and synthetic routes for cresols, xylenols, resorcinol, and bisphenol-A are described. These components are used as comonomers for special phenolic resins.

  1. Cleanliness of common air sampling sorbents for application to phenolic compounds measurement using supercritical fluid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, J.R.; Pleil, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    The trace-level measurement of phenolic compounds in the ambient air is complicated by the acidic and polar nature of the compounds especially during recovery from the sampling medium. Recently, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has been proposed as an alternative extraction method to Soxhlet extraction or thermal desorption to achieve more efficient recoveries. For such methodology to become practical, the candidate sorbents must first be tested for stability and cleanliness under SFE conditions. This paper describes exploratory research results of background contamination tests and cleanup properties of some common air sampling sorbent media with respect to future application to phenolic compounds monitoring.

  2. Cleanliness of common air sampling sorbents for application to phenolic compounds measurement using supercritical fluid extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, J.R.; Pleil, J.D.

    1994-01-01

    The trace-level measurement of phenolic compounds in the ambient air is complicated by the acidic and polar nature of the compounds especially during recovery from the sampling medium. Recently, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) has been proposed as an alternative extraction method to Soxhlet extraction or thermal desorption to achieve more efficient recoveries. For such methodology to become practical, the candidate sorbents must first be tested for stability and cleanliness under SFE conditions. The paper describes exploratory research results of background contamination tests and cleanup properties of some common air sampling sorbent media with respect to future application to phenolic compounds monitoring.

  3. Quenching of fluorescence of phenolic compounds and modified humic acids by cadmium ions.

    PubMed

    Tchaikovskaya, O N; Nechaev, L V; Yudina, N V; Mal'tseva, E V

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of a number of phenolic compounds, being 'model fragments' of humic acids, with cadmium ions was investigated. The fluorescence quenching method was used to determine the complexation constants of these compounds with cadmium ions. It was established that bonding of phenolic compounds by cadmium ions at рН 7 is weak and reaches a maximum value of 15% for interaction with resorcinol. It was demonstrated that modification of humic acids by the mechanoactivation method increases by three times bonding of cadmium ions, which is caused by strengthening the acid properties of carboxyl and hydroxyl groups at the aromatic ring. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Identification of bioaccessible and uptaken phenolic compounds from strawberry fruits in in vitro digestion/Caco-2 absorption model.

    PubMed

    Kosińska-Cagnazzo, Agnieszka; Diering, Sascha; Prim, Denis; Andlauer, Wilfried

    2015-03-01

    Strawberry fruits are highly valued for their taste and nutritional value. However, results describing the bioaccessibility and intestinal absorption of phenolic compounds from strawberries are still scarce. In our study, a combined in vitro digestion/Caco-2 absorption model was used to mimic physiological conditions in the gastrointestinal track and identify compounds transported across intestinal epithelium. In the course of digestion, the loss of anthocyanins was noted whilst pelargonidin-3-glucoside remained the most abundant compound, amounting to nearly 12 mg per 100 g of digested strawberries. Digestion increased the amount of ellagic acid available by nearly 50%, probably due to decomposition of ellagitannins. Only trace amounts of pelargonidin-3-glucoside were found to be absorbed in the intestine model. Dihydrocoumaric acid sulphate and p-coumaric acid were identified as metabolites formed in enterocytes and released at the serosal side of the model.

  5. Analysis of phenolic compounds for poultry feed by supercritical fluid chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenolic compounds have generated interest as components in functional feed formulations due to their anti-oxidant, anti-microbial, and anti-fungal properties. These compounds may have greater significance in the future as the routine use of antibiotics is reduced and the prevalence of resistant bac...

  6. Thermal Decomposition Mechanisms of Lignin Model Compounds: From Phenol to Vanillin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Adam Michael

    Lignin is a complex, aromatic polymer abundant in cellulosic biomass (trees, switchgrass etc.). Thermochemical breakdown of lignin for liquid fuel production results in undesirable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that lead to tar and soot byproducts. The fundamental chemistry governing these processes is not well understood. We have studied the unimolecular thermal decomposition mechanisms of aromatic lignin model compounds using a miniature SiC tubular reactor. Products are detected and characterized using time-of-flight mass spectrometry with both single photon (118.2 nm; 10.487 eV) and 1 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) as well as matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. Gas exiting the heated reactor (300 K--1600 K) is subject to a free expansion after a residence time of approximately 100 micros. The expansion into vacuum rapidly cools the gas mixture and allows the detection of radicals and other highly reactive intermediates. By understanding the unimolecular fragmentation patterns of phenol (C6H5OH), anisole (C6H 5OCH3) and benzaldehyde (C6H5CHO), the more complicated thermocracking processes of the catechols (HO-C 6H4-OH), methoxyphenols (HO-C6H4-OCH 3) and hydroxybenzaldehydes (HO-C6H4-CHO) can be interpreted. These studies have resulted in a predictive model that allows the interpretation of vanillin, a complex phenolic ether containing methoxy, hydroxy and aldehyde functional groups. This model will serve as a guide for the pyrolyses of larger systems including lignin monomers such as coniferyl alcohol. The pyrolysis mechanisms of the dimethoxybenzenes (H3C-C 6H4-OCH3) and syringol, a hydroxydimethoxybenzene have also been studied. These results will aid in the understanding of the thermal fragmentation of sinapyl alcohol, the most complex lignin monomer. In addition to the model compound work, pyrolyisis of biomass has been studied via the pulsed laser ablation of poplar wood. With the REMPI scheme, aromatic lignin decomposition

  7. Evaluation of antioxidant activities of the edible and medicinal Acacia albida organs related to phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Karoune, Samira; Falleh, Hanen; Kechebar, Mohamed Seif Allah; Halis, Youcef; Mkadmini, Khaoula; Belhamra, Mohamed; Rahmoune, Chaabane; Ksouri, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    This study compared phenolic contents and antioxidant activity in different organs of Acacia albida (leaves and bark) and focuses on identification of phenolic compounds of leaves by HPLC-DAD. The analysed organs exhibited differences in total polyphenol contents (100 and 59.5 mg GAE g(-1) DW). Phenolic contents of leaves were two times higher than those in bark. Ethanolic extracts exhibited good antioxidant activities with IC50 = 26 μg mL(-1) for DPPH and EC50 = 50 μg mL(-1) for FRAP. Identification by HPLC-DAD revealed the presence of nine phenolic compounds known for their high antioxidant activity. The results suggested that this species can be used as source of natural antioxidants.

  8. Phenolic compounds and the colour of oranges subjected to a combination treatment of waxing and irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussaid, M.; Lacroix, M.; Nketsia-Tabiri, J.; Boubekri, C.

    2000-03-01

    The effects of waxing, irradiation dose and storage on phenolics and colour of irradiated oranges were investigated. Mature oranges ( Maroc late) waxed or unwaxed were treated with 0, 1 or 2 kGy radiation and stored up to 9 weeks at 20°C and 40-50% r.h. Colour of the oranges, total phenols and flavones in the peel were measured. Phenolic compounds increased with irradiation dose and storage time. Hue angle, value and chroma of the orange colour were more affected by waxing and storage time than the irradiation treatment. Changes in the phenolic compounds were linked with changes in the redness and saturation of the orange colour. Irradiation stimulated synthesis of flavones; waxing controlled changes induced by irradiation.

  9. Subcritical water extraction of antioxidant phenolic compounds from XiLan olive fruit dreg.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xue-Mei; Zhu, Ping; Zhong, Qiu-Ping; Li, Meng-Ying; Ma, Han-Ruo

    2015-08-01

    Olive fruit dreg (OFD), waste from olive softdrink processing, has caused disposal problems. Nevertheless, OFD is a good source of functional ingredients, such as phenolic compounds. This study investigated the extraction conditions of phenolic compounds from OFD by using subcritical water (SCW) extraction method, antioxidant activity of SCW extracts, and components of phenolic compounds by LC-MS. SCW extraction experiments were performed in a batch stainless steel reactor at temperatures ranging from 100 to 180 °C at residence time of 5 to 60 min, and at solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:20 to 1:60. Higher recoveries of phenolic compounds [37.52 ± 0.87 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g, dry weight (DW)] were obtained at 160 °C, solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:50, and extract time of 30 min than at 2 h extraction with methanol (1.21 ± 0.16 mg GAE/g DW), ethanol (0.24 ± 0.07 mg GAE/g DW), and acetone (0.34 ± 0.01 mg GAE/g DW). The antioxidant activities of the SCW extracts were significantly stronger than those in methanol extracts at the same concentration of total phenolic contents. LC-MS analysis results indicated that SCW extracts contained higher amounts of phenolic compounds, such as chlorogenic acid, homovanillic acid, gallic acid, hydroxytyrosol, quercetin, and syringic acid. SCW at 160 °C, 30 min, and solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:50 may be a good substitute of organic solvents, such as methanol, ethanol, and acetone to recover phenolic compounds from OFD.

  10. Determination of phenolic compounds using spectral and color transitions of rhodium nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gatselou, Vasiliki; Christodouleas, Dionysios C; Kouloumpis, Antonios; Gournis, Dimitrios; Giokas, Dimosthenis L

    2016-08-17

    This work reports a new approach for the determination of phenolic compounds based on their interaction with citrate-capped rhodium nanoparticles. Phenolic compounds (i.e., catechins, gallates, cinnamates, and dihydroxybenzoic acids) were found to cause changes in the size and localized surface plasmon resonance of rhodium nanoparticles, and therefore, give rise to analyte-specific spectral and color transitions in the rhodium nanoparticle suspensions. Upon reaction with phenolic compounds (mainly dithydroxybenzoate derivatives, and trihydroxybenzoate derivatives), new absorbance peaks at 350 nm and 450 nm were observed. Upon reaction with trihydroxybenzoate derivatives, however, an additional absorbance peak at 580 nm was observed facilitating the speciation of phenolic compounds in the sample. Both absorbance peaks at 450 nm and 580 nm increased with increasing concentration of phenolic compounds over a linear range of 0-500 μM. Detection limits at the mid-micromolar levels were achieved, depending on the phenolic compound involved, and with satisfactory reproducibility (<7.3%). On the basis of these findings, two rhodium nanoparticles-based assays for the determination of the total phenolic content and total catechin content were developed and applied in tea samples. The obtained results correlated favorably with commonly used methods (i.e., Folin-Ciocalteu and aluminum complexation assay). Not the least, the finding that rhodium nanoparticles can react with analytes and exhibit unique localized surface plasmon resonance bands in the visible region, can open new opportunities for developing new optical and sensing analytical applications.

  11. Binding of alkyl- and alkoxy-substituted simple phenolic compounds to human serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Shibata, T

    2000-01-01

    Wood creosote, primarily a mixture of simple alkyl- and/or alkoxy-substituted phenolic compounds with closely related structures, has long been used as an oral antidiarrheal agent. The use of wood creosote as a parenteral antidiarrheal agent was investigated, and for basic pharmacokinetic data we measured the extent of equilibrium binding of its six major constituent phenolic compounds to human serum proteins using an ultrafiltration method. The percent binding of these major constituent phenolic compounds, namely phenol, guaiacol, p-cresol, o-cresol, creosol and 4-ethylguaiacol, bound to 40-mg/ml human serum albumin was 15.5+/-0.9, 28.0+/-1.5, 37.2+/-0.7, 52.3+/-5.3, 36.8+/-2.0 and 56.7+/-2.4%, respectively, while percent binding to human serum (68 mg protein/ml) was 41.3+/-0.7, 42.6+/-0.5, 64.8+/-0.4, 70.1+/-1.6, 65.7+/-0.2 and 83.1+/-0.1% (mean +/- standard deviation, n = 4), respectively, when tested individually at a concentration of 500 micromol/l. Saturation of binding was not observed for the phenolic compounds up to a concentration of 50 mmol/l. Phenolic compounds with a lipophilic substituent showed higher percent binding to proteins than those without it. We conclude that simple phenolic compounds having alkyl- and/or alkoxy-substituents bind to serum proteins to a considerable extent and that the binding is hydrophobic and nonspecific.

  12. Ternary liquid-liquid equilibria for the phenolic compounds extraction from artificial textile industrial waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardhyanti, Dewi Selvia; Prasetiawan, Haniif; Hermawan, Sari, Lelita Sakina

    2017-03-01

    Liquid waste in textile industry contains large amounts of dyes and chemicals which are capable of harming the environment and human health. It is due to liquid waste characteristics which have high BOD, COD, temperature, dissolved and suspended solid. One of chemical compound which might be harmful for environment when disposed in high concentration is phenol. Currently, Phenol compound in textile industrial waste has reached 10 ppm meanwhile maximum allowable phenol concentration is not more than 0.2 ppm. Otherwise, Phenol also has economic value as feedstock of plastic, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry. Furthermore, suitable method to separate phenol from waste water is needed. In this research, liquid - liquid extraction method was used with extraction time for 70 minutes. Waste water sample was then separated into two layers which are extract and raffinate. Thereafter, extract and raffinate were then tested by using UV-Vis Spectrophotometer to obtained liquid - liquid equilibrium data. Aim of this research is to study the effect of temperature, stirring speed and type of solvent to obtain distribution coefficient (Kd), phenol yield and correlation of Three-Suffix Margules model for the liquid - liquid extraction data equilibrium. The highest extraction yield at 80.43 % was found by using 70% methanol as solvent at extraction temperature 50 °C with stirring speed 300 rpm, coefficient distribution was found 216.334. From this research it can be concluded that Three-Suffix Margules Model is suitable to predict liquid - liquid equilibrium data for phenol system.

  13. Inhibitory Effect of Furanic and Phenolic Compounds on Exoelectrogenesis in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell Bioanode

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2016-09-09

    Furanic and phenolic compounds are 20 lignocellulose-derived compounds known to inhibit to H2- and ethanol- producing microorganisms in dark fermentation. Bioelectrochemical conversion of furanic and phenolic compounds to electricity or H2 has recently been demonstrated as a productive method to use these compounds. However, potential inhibitory effect of furanic and phenolic compounds on exoelectrogenesis in bioelectrochemical systems is not well understood. This study systematically investigated the inhibitory effect of furfural (FF), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), syringic acid (SA), vanillic acid (VA), and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) on exoelectrogenesis in the bioanode of a microbial electrolysis cell. A mixture of these five compounds at an increasing initial total concentration from 0.8 to 8.0 g/L resulted in current decrease up to 91%. The observed inhibition primarily affected exoelectrogenesis, instead of non-exoelectrogenic biotransformation pathways (e.g., fermentation) of the five compounds. Furthermore, the parent compounds at a high concentration, as opposed to their biotransformation products, were responsible for the observed inhibition. Tests with individual compounds show that all five parent compounds contributed to the observed inhibition by the mixture. The IC50 (concentration resulting in 50% current decrease) was estimated as 2.7 g/L for FF, 3.0 g/L for HMF, 1.9 g/L for SA, 2.1 g/L for VA and 2.0 g/L for HBA. Nevertheless, these compounds below their non-inhibitory concentrations jointly resulted in significant inhibition as a mixture. Catechol and phenol, which were persistent biotransformation products of the mixture, inhibited exoelectrogens at high concentrations, but to a lesser extent than the parent compounds. Recovery of exoelectrogenesis from inhibition by all compounds was observed, except for catechol, which resulted in irreversible inhibition. The reversibility of inhibition, as well as the observed difference in recovery rates

  14. An update on dietary phenolic compounds in the prevention and management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rosillo, María Angeles; Alarcón-de-la-Lastra, Catalina; Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina

    2016-07-13

    Certain nutritional components influence the cellular metabolism and interfere in the pathological inflammatory process, so that they may act as a coadjuvant in the treatment of many chronic inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Particularly, a wide range of evidence has demonstrated the beneficial roles of dietary phenolic compounds in RA because of their ability to modulate pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory pathways reducing the onset of arthritic disease progression. These natural phenolic compounds can modulate both the action and the production of inflammatory mediators either directly or indirectly by modulating the action of other molecules involved in RA pathology. Subsequently, the purpose of this article is to review the main in vitro and in vivo studies in RA, which have documented interesting insights into the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory properties of dietary phenolic compounds focusing on their molecular action mechanisms involved in RA. The observations reported above are promising and suggest that the dietary phenolic compounds may influence the course of RA, ameliorating the RA symptoms and downregulating the inflammation at the molecular level; however, most of the studies conducted to date have been preclinical. Thus, future studies should therefore focus more on understanding the efficacy of these phenolic compounds in humans and bringing them to the forefront of the treatment of chronic human diseases.

  15. Optimization of the Aqueous Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Olive Leaves.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Chloe D; Vuong, Quan V; Stathopoulos, Costas E; Roach, Paul D; Scarlett, Christopher J

    2014-10-23

    Olive leaves are an agricultural waste of the olive-oil industry representing up to 10% of the dry weight arriving at olive mills. Disposal of this waste adds additional expense to farmers. Olive leaves have been shown to have a high concentration of phenolic compounds. In an attempt to utilize this waste product for phenolic compounds, we optimized their extraction using water-a "green" extraction solvent that has not yet been investigated for this purpose. Experiments were carried out according to a Box Behnken design, and the best possible combination of temperature, extraction time and sample-to-solvent ratio for the extraction of phenolic compounds with a high antioxidant activity was obtained using RSM; the optimal conditions for the highest yield of phenolic compounds was 90 °C for 70 min at a sample-to-solvent ratio of 1:100 g/mL; however, at 1:60 g/mL, we retained 80% of the total phenolic compounds and maximized antioxidant capacity. Therefore the sample-to-solvent ratio of 1:60 was chosen as optimal and used for further validation. The validation test fell inside the confidence range indicated by the RSM output; hence, the statistical model was trusted. The proposed method is inexpensive, easily up-scaled to industry and shows potential as an additional source of income for olive growers.

  16. Effect of salinity stress on phenolic compounds and carotenoids in buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum M.) sprout.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeong-Ho; Park, Kee-Jai; Kim, Bum-Keun; Jeong, Jin-Woong; Kim, Hyun-Jin

    2012-12-01

    The effect of salinity stress on the nutritional quality of buckwheat sprouts cultivated for 1, 3, 5, and 7d was investigated by analysis of the antioxidant activity and levels of phenolic compounds and carotenoids. Treatment with various concentrations of NaCl (10, 50, 100, and 200mM) resulted in an increase in the amount of phenolic compounds and carotenoids in the sprouts compared with the control (0mM). The phenolic contents of sprouts treated with 10, 50, and 100mM after 7d of cultivation were 57%, 121%, and 153%, respectively, higher than that of the control (0mM NaCl). Moreover, the accumulation of phenolic compounds was primarily caused by an increase in the levels of 4 compounds: isoorientin, orientin, rutin, and vitexin. The carotenoid content of sprouts treated with 50 and 100mM NaCl was twice higher than that of the control. In addition, the antioxidant activity of ethanol extracts of the sprouts was increased by NaCl treatment. Although the growth rate of sprouts decreased with >50mM NaCl, these results suggest that treatment of an appropriate concentration of NaCl improves the nutritional quality of sprouts, including the level of phenolic compounds, carotenoids, and antioxidant activity.

  17. Relationship between virgin olive oil phenolic compounds and acrylamide formation in fried crisps.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Aurora; Morales, Francisco; Sacchi, Raffaele; Fogliano, Vincenzo

    2008-03-26

    In this paper the relationship between virgin olive oil (VOO) phenol compounds and the formation of acrylamide in potato crisps was investigated. The phenol compositions of 20 VOO samples were screened by LC-MS, and 4 oils, characterized by different phenol compound patterns, were selected for frying experiments. Slices of potatoes were fried at 180 degrees C for 5, 10, and 15 min, and acrylamide content was determined by LC-MS. Results demonstrated that VOO phenolic compounds are not degraded during frying, and crisp color was not significantly different among the four VOOs. Acrylamide concentration in crisps increased during frying time, but the formation was faster in the oil having the lowest concentration of phenolic compounds. Moreover, the VOO having the highest concentration of ortho-diphenolic compounds is able to efficiently inhibit acrylamide formation in crisps from mild to moderate frying conditions. It was concluded that the use of ortho-diphenolic-rich VOOs can be proposed as a reliable mitigation strategy to reduce acrylamide formation in domestic deep-frying.

  18. Antioxidative activities and phenolic compounds of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo) seeds and amaranth (Amaranthus caudatus) grain extracts.

    PubMed

    Peiretti, Pier Giorgio; Meineri, Giorgia; Gai, Francesco; Longato, Erica; Amarowicz, Ryszard

    2017-01-23

    Phenolic compounds were extracted from pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo) seed and amaranth (Amaranthus caudatus) grain into 80% (v/v) methanol. The extracts obtained were characterised by the contents of total phenolic compounds (TPC), trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and antiradical activity against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(·)) radical. The content of individual phenolic compounds was determined by HPLC-DAD method. Pumpkin seeds showed the higher content of TPC than that from amaranth. The TEAC values of both extracts were similar each other. The lower value of FRAP was observed for pumpkin seed. Phenolic compound present in amaranth grain exhibited strongest antiradical properties against DPPH radical. Several peaks were present on the HPLC chromatograms of two extracts. The UV-DAD spectra confirmed the presence of vanillic acid derivatives in the amaranth grain. The three main phenolic compound present in pumpkin seed were characterised by UV-DAD spectra with maximum at 258, 266 and 278 nm.

  19. Optimization of the Aqueous Extraction of Phenolic Compounds from Olive Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Chloe D.; Vuong, Quan V.; Stathopoulos, Costas E.; Roach, Paul D.; Scarlett, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Olive leaves are an agricultural waste of the olive-oil industry representing up to 10% of the dry weight arriving at olive mills. Disposal of this waste adds additional expense to farmers. Olive leaves have been shown to have a high concentration of phenolic compounds. In an attempt to utilize this waste product for phenolic compounds, we optimized their extraction using water—a “green” extraction solvent that has not yet been investigated for this purpose. Experiments were carried out according to a Box Behnken design, and the best possible combination of temperature, extraction time and sample-to-solvent ratio for the extraction of phenolic compounds with a high antioxidant activity was obtained using RSM; the optimal conditions for the highest yield of phenolic compounds was 90 °C for 70 min at a sample-to-solvent ratio of 1:100 g/mL; however, at 1:60 g/mL, we retained 80% of the total phenolic compounds and maximized antioxidant capacity. Therefore the sample-to-solvent ratio of 1:60 was chosen as optimal and used for further validation. The validation test fell inside the confidence range indicated by the RSM output; hence, the statistical model was trusted. The proposed method is inexpensive, easily up-scaled to industry and shows potential as an additional source of income for olive growers. PMID:26785235

  20. Extraction and concentration of phenolic compounds from water and sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, Marvin C.; Weiner, Eugene R.

    1980-01-01

    Continuous liquid-liquid extractors are used to concentrate phenols at the ??g l-1 level from water into dichloromethane; this is followed by Kuderna-Danish evaporative concentration and gas chromatography. The procedure requires 5 h for 18 l of sample water. Overall concentration factors around 1000 are obtained. Overall concentration efficiencies vary from 23.1 to 87.1%. Concentration efficiencies determined by a batch method suitable for sediments range from 18.9 to 73.8%. ?? 1980.

  1. Phenolic Compounds in Extra Virgin Olive Oil Stimulate Human Osteoblastic Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, Olga; De Luna-Bertos, Elvira; Ramos-Torrecillas, Javier; Ruiz, Concepción; Milia, Egle; Lorenzo, María Luisa; Jimenez, Brigida; Sánchez-Ortiz, Araceli; Rivas, Ana

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to clarify the effects of phenolic compounds and extracts from different extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) varieties obtained from fruits of different ripening stages on osteoblast cells (MG-63) proliferation. Cell proliferation was increased by hydroxytyrosol, luteolin, apigenin, p-coumaric, caffeic, and ferulic acids by approximately 11-16%, as compared with controls that were treated with one vehicle alone, while (+)-pinoresinol, oleuropein, sinapic, vanillic acid and derivative (vanillin) did not affect cell proliferation. All phenolic extracts stimulated MG-63 cell growth, and they induced higher cell proliferation rates than individual compounds. The most effective EVOO phenolic extracts were those obtained from the Picual variety, as they significantly increased cell proliferation by 18-22%. Conversely, Arbequina phenolic extracts increased cell proliferation by 9-13%. A decline in osteoblast proliferation was observed in oils obtained from olive fruits collected at the end of the harvest period, as their total phenolic content decreases at this late stage. Further research on the signaling pathways of olive oil phenolic compounds involved in the processes and their metabolism should be carried out to develop new interventions and adjuvant therapies using EVOO for bone health (i.e.osteoporosis) in adulthood and the elderly.

  2. Phenolic Compounds in Extra Virgin Olive Oil Stimulate Human Osteoblastic Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    García-Martínez, Olga; De Luna-Bertos, Elvira; Ramos-Torrecillas, Javier; Ruiz, Concepción; Milia, Egle; Lorenzo, María Luisa; Jimenez, Brigida; Sánchez-Ortiz, Araceli; Rivas, Ana

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to clarify the effects of phenolic compounds and extracts from different extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) varieties obtained from fruits of different ripening stages on osteoblast cells (MG-63) proliferation. Cell proliferation was increased by hydroxytyrosol, luteolin, apigenin, p-coumaric, caffeic, and ferulic acids by approximately 11–16%, as compared with controls that were treated with one vehicle alone, while (+)-pinoresinol, oleuropein, sinapic, vanillic acid and derivative (vanillin) did not affect cell proliferation. All phenolic extracts stimulated MG-63 cell growth, and they induced higher cell proliferation rates than individual compounds. The most effective EVOO phenolic extracts were those obtained from the Picual variety, as they significantly increased cell proliferation by 18–22%. Conversely, Arbequina phenolic extracts increased cell proliferation by 9–13%. A decline in osteoblast proliferation was observed in oils obtained from olive fruits collected at the end of the harvest period, as their total phenolic content decreases at this late stage. Further research on the signaling pathways of olive oil phenolic compounds involved in the processes and their metabolism should be carried out to develop new interventions and adjuvant therapies using EVOO for bone health (i.e.osteoporosis) in adulthood and the elderly. PMID:26930190

  3. Extraction, evolution, and sensory impact of phenolic compounds during red wine maceration.

    PubMed

    Casassa, L Federico; Harbertson, James F

    2014-01-01

    We review the extraction into wine and evolution of major phenolic classes of sensory relevance. We present a historical background to highlight that previously established aspects of phenolic extraction and retention into red wine are still subjects of much research. We argue that management of the maceration length is one of the most determining factors in defining the proportion and chemical fate of phenolic compounds in wine. The extraction of anthocyanins, flavonols, flavan-3-ols, and oligomeric and polymeric proanthocyanidins (PAs) is discussed in the context of their individual extraction patterns but also with regard to their interaction with other wine components. The same approach is followed to present the sensory implications of phenolic and phenolic-derived compounds in wine. Overall, we conclude that the chemical diversity of phenolic compounds in grapes is further enhanced as soon as vacuolar and pulp components are released upon crushing, adding a variety of new sensory dimensions to the already present chemical diversity. Polymeric pigments formed by the covalent reaction of anthocyanin and PAs are good candidates to explain some of the observed sensory changes in the color, taste, and mouthfeel attributes of red wines during maceration and aging.

  4. Organosilica composite for preconcentration of phenolic compounds from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, V N; Khalaf, V A; Zaitseva, G N

    2008-06-01

    A new adsorbent is proposed for the solid-phase extraction of phenol and 1-naphthol from polluted water. The adsorbent (TX-SiO(2)) is an organosilica composite made from a bifunctional immobilized layer comprising a major fraction (91%) of hydrophilic diol groups and minor fraction (9%) of the amphiphilic long-chain nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 (polyoxyethylated isooctylphenol) (TX). Under static conditions phenol was quantitatively extracted onto TX-SiO(2) in the form of a 4-nitrophenylazophenolate ion associate with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. The capacity of TX-SiO(2) for phenol is 2.4 mg g(-1) with distribution coefficients up to 3.4 x 10(4) mL g(-1); corresponding data for 1-naphthol are 1.5 mg g(-1) and 3 x 10(3) mL g(-1). The distribution coefficient does not change significantly for solution volumes of 0.025-0.5 L and adsorbent mass less than 0.03 g; 1-90 microg analyte can be easily eluted by 1-3 mL acetonitrile with an overall recovery of 98.2% and 78.3% for phenol and 1-naphthol, respectively. Linear correlation between acetonitrile solution absorbance (A(540)) and phenol concentration (C) in water was found according to the equation A(540) = (6 +/- 1) x 10(-2) + (0.9 +/- 0.1) C (micromol L(-1)) with a detection range from 1 x 10(-8) mol L(-1) (0.9 microL g(-1)) to 2 x 10(-7) mol L(-1) (19 microL g(-1)), a limit of quantification of 1 microL g(-1) (preconcentration factor 125), correlation coefficient of 0.936, and relative standard deviation of 2.5%. A solid-phase colorimetric method was developed for quantitative determination of 1-naphthol on adsorbent phase using scanner technology and RGB numerical analysis. The detection limit of 1-naphthol with this method is 6 microL g(-1) while the quantification limit is 20 microL g(-1). A test system was developed for naked eye monitoring of 1-naphthol impurities in water. The proposed test kit allows one to observe changes in the adsorbent color when 1-naphthol concentration in water is 0.08-3.2 mL g

  5. Identification and Phytotoxicity Assessment of Phenolic Compounds in Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera (Boneseed).

    PubMed

    Al Harun, Md Abdullah Yousuf; Johnson, Joshua; Uddin, Md Nazim; Robinson, Randall W

    2015-01-01

    Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera (boneseed), a weed of national significance in Australia, threatens indigenous species and crop production through allelopathy. We aimed to identify phenolic compounds produced by boneseed and to assess their phytotoxicity on native species. Phenolic compounds in water and methanol extracts, and in decomposed litter-mediated soil leachate were identified using HPLC, and phytotoxicity of identified phenolics was assessed (repeatedly) through a standard germination bioassay on native Isotoma axillaris. The impact of boneseed litter on native Xerochrysum bracteatum was evaluated using field soil in a greenhouse. Collectively, we found the highest quantity of phenolic compounds in boneseed litter followed by leaf, root and stem. Quantity varied with extraction media. The rank of phenolics concentration in boneseed was in the order of ferulic acid > phloridzin > catechin > p-coumaric acid and they inhibited germination of I. axillaris with the rank of ferulic acid > catechin > phloridzin > p-coumaric acid. Synergistic effects were more severe compared to individual phenolics. The litter-mediated soil leachate (collected after15 days) exhibited strong phytotoxicity to I. axillaris despite the level of phenolic compounds in the decomposed leachate being decreased significantly compared with their initial level. This suggests the presence of other unidentified allelochemicals that individually or synergistically contributed to the phytotoxicity. Further, the dose response phytotoxic impacts exhibited by the boneseed litter-mediated soil to native X. bracteatum in a more naturalistic greenhouse experiment might ensure the potential allelopathy of other chemical compounds in the boneseed invasion. The reduction of leaf relative water content and chlorophyll level in X. bracteatum suggest possible mechanisms underpinning plant growth inhibition caused by boneseed litter allelopathy. The presence of a substantial quantity of free

  6. Influence of microwaves treatment of rapeseed on phenolic compounds and canolol content.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Zheng, Chang; Zhou, Qi; Liu, Changsheng; Li, Wenlin; Huang, Fenghong

    2014-02-26

    Rapeseeds were treated with microwaves under 800 W for 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 min at a frequency of 2450 MHz, and oil was extracted with a press to investigate the influence on phenolic compounds, including sinapine, the main free phenolic acids, and canolol content in the rapeseeds and oil from them. The results indicated that sinapine and sinapic acid was the main phenolic compound and free phenolic acid in the rapeseed, respectively, and canolol was the main phenolic compound in the oil from rapeseed by cold press. Microwave treatment significantly influenced phenolic compounds content in the rapeseeds and oil from them. The sinapine, sinapic acid, and canolol content in rapeseed first increased and then decreased depending on the period of microwave radiation (p < 0.05). The canolol content of 7 min microwave pretreatment rapeseed increased to the maximum and was approximately six times greater than that of the unroasted rapeseed. The amount of canolol formed was significantly correlated with the content of sinapic acid and sinapine (for sinapic acid, r = -0.950, p < 0.001, for sinapine, r = -0.828, p < 0.05) and also the loss of sinapic acid and sinapine (for sinapic acid, r = 0.997, p < 0.001, for sinapine, r = 0.952, p < 0.05) during roasting. There were differences in the transfer rate of difference phenolic compounds to the oil extracted by press. Almost all of the sinapine remained in the cold-pressed cake and only 1.4-2.7% of the sinapic acid, whereas approximately 56-83% of the canolol was transferred to the oil. The transfer ratio of canolol significantly increased with microwave radiation time (p < 0.001). Microwave pretreatment of rapeseed benefited improving the oxidative stability of oil.

  7. Identification and Phytotoxicity Assessment of Phenolic Compounds in Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera (Boneseed)

    PubMed Central

    Al Harun, Md Abdullah Yousuf; Johnson, Joshua; Uddin, Md Nazim; Robinson, Randall W.

    2015-01-01

    Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera (boneseed), a weed of national significance in Australia, threatens indigenous species and crop production through allelopathy. We aimed to identify phenolic compounds produced by boneseed and to assess their phytotoxicity on native species. Phenolic compounds in water and methanol extracts, and in decomposed litter-mediated soil leachate were identified using HPLC, and phytotoxicity of identified phenolics was assessed (repeatedly) through a standard germination bioassay on native Isotoma axillaris. The impact of boneseed litter on native Xerochrysum bracteatum was evaluated using field soil in a greenhouse. Collectively, we found the highest quantity of phenolic compounds in boneseed litter followed by leaf, root and stem. Quantity varied with extraction media. The rank of phenolics concentration in boneseed was in the order of ferulic acid > phloridzin > catechin > p-coumaric acid and they inhibited germination of I. axillaris with the rank of ferulic acid > catechin > phloridzin > p-coumaric acid. Synergistic effects were more severe compared to individual phenolics. The litter-mediated soil leachate (collected after15 days) exhibited strong phytotoxicity to I. axillaris despite the level of phenolic compounds in the decomposed leachate being decreased significantly compared with their initial level. This suggests the presence of other unidentified allelochemicals that individually or synergistically contributed to the phytotoxicity. Further, the dose response phytotoxic impacts exhibited by the boneseed litter-mediated soil to native X. bracteatum in a more naturalistic greenhouse experiment might ensure the potential allelopathy of other chemical compounds in the boneseed invasion. The reduction of leaf relative water content and chlorophyll level in X. bracteatum suggest possible mechanisms underpinning plant growth inhibition caused by boneseed litter allelopathy. The presence of a substantial quantity of free

  8. Effect of toasting intensity at cooperage on phenolic compounds in acacia (Robinia pseudoacacia) heartwood.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miriam; Fernández de Simón, Brígida; Esteruelas, Enrique; Muñoz, Ángel Ma; Cadahía, Estrella; Hernández, Teresa; Estrella, Isabel; Pinto, Ernani

    2011-04-13

    The phenolic composition of heartwood from Robinia pseudoacacia, commonly known as false acacia, before and after toasting in cooperage was studied by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS/MS. A total of 41 flavonoid and nonflavonoid compounds were identified, some tentatively, and quantified. Seasoned acacia wood showed high concentrations of flavonoid and low levels of nonflavonoid compounds, the main compounds being the dihydroflavonols dihydrorobinetin, fustin, tetrahydroxy, and trihydroxymethoxy dihydroflavonol, the flavonol robinetin, the flavanones robtin and butin, and a leucorobinetinidin, none of which are found in oak wood. The low molecular weight (LMW) phenolic compounds present also differed from those found in oak, since compounds with a β-resorcylic structure, gallic related compounds, protocatechuic aldehyde, and some hydroxycinnamic compounds are included, but only a little gallic and ellagic acid. Toasting changed the chromatographic profiles of extracts spectacularly. Thus, the toasted acacia wood contributed flavonoids and condensed tannins (prorobinetin type) in inverse proportion to toasting intensity, while LMW phenolic compounds were directly proportional to toasting intensity, except for gallic and ellagic acid and related compounds. Even though toasting reduced differences between oak and acacia, particular characteristics of this wood must be taken into account when considering its use in cooperage: the presence of flavonoids and compounds with β-resorcylic structure and the absence of hydrolyzable tannins.

  9. Changes in phenolic compounds and their antioxidant capacities in jujube (Ziziphus jujuba Miller) during three edible maturity stages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the changes in total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), individual phenolic compound content, DPPH radical scavenging activity and antioxidant capacity measured by FRAP assay of four phenolic fractions (free, esterified, glycosided and insoluble-bound) fro...

  10. Aquatic Pathways Model to predict the fate of phenolic compounds. Appendixes A through D

    SciTech Connect

    Aaberg, R.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L.; Mellinger, P.L.

    1983-04-01

    Organic materials released from energy-related activities could affect human health and the environment. We have developed a model to predict the fate of spills or discharges of pollutants into flowing or static bodies of fresh water. A computer code, Aquatic Pathways Model (APM), was written to implement the model. The APM estimates the concentrations of chemicals in fish tissue, water and sediment, and is therefore useful for assessing exposure to humans through aquatic pathways. The major pathways considered are biodegradation, fish and sediment uptake, photolysis, and evaporation. The model has been implemented with parameters for the distribution of phenols, an important class of compounds found in the water-soluble fractions of coal liquids. The model was developed to estimate the fate of liquids derived from coal. Current modeling efforts show that, in comparison with many pesticides and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the lighter phenolics (the cresols) are not persistent in the environment. For the twelve phenolics studied, biodegradation appears to be the major pathway for elimination from aquatic environments. A pond system simulation of a spill of solvent-refined coal (SRC-II) materials indicates that phenol, cresols, and other single cyclic phenolics are degraded to 16 to 25 percent of their original concentrations within 30 hours. Adsorption of these compounds into sediments and accumulation by fish was minor. Results of a simulated spill of a coal liquid (SRC-II) into a pond show that APM predicted the allocation of 12 phenolic components among six compartments at 30 hours after a small spill. The simulation indicated that most of the introduced phenolic compounds were biodegraded. The phenolics remaining in the aquatic system partitioned according to their molecular weight and structure. A substantial amount was predicted to remain in the water, with less than 0.01% distributed in sediment or fish.

  11. Sorghum flour fractions: correlations among polysaccharides, phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and glycemic index.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Érica Aguiar; Marineli, Rafaela da Silva; Lenquiste, Sabrina Alves; Steel, Caroline Joy; de Menezes, Cícero Beserra; Queiroz, Valéria Aparecida Vieira; Maróstica Júnior, Mário Roberto

    2015-08-01

    Nutrients composition, phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and estimated glycemic index (EGI) were evaluated in sorghum bran (SB) and decorticated sorghum flour (DSF), obtained by a rice-polisher, as well as whole sorghum flour (WSF). Correlation between EGI and the studied parameters were determined. SB presented the highest protein, lipid, ash, β-glucan, total and insoluble dietary fiber contents; and the lowest non-resistant and total starch contents. The highest carbohydrate and resistant starch contents were in DSF and WSF, respectively. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities were concentrated in SB. The EGI values were: DSF 84.5 ± 0.41; WSF 77.2 ± 0.33; and SB 60.3 ± 0.78. Phenolic compounds, specific flavonoids and antioxidant activities, as well as total, insoluble and soluble dietary fiber and β-glucans of sorghum flour samples were all negatively correlated to EGI. RS content was not correlated to EGI.

  12. Ocean acidification increases the accumulation of toxic phenolic compounds across trophic levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Peng; Wang, Tifeng; Liu, Nana; Dupont, Sam; Beardall, John; Boyd, Philip W.; Riebesell, Ulf; Gao, Kunshan

    2015-10-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations are causing ocean acidification (OA), altering carbonate chemistry with consequences for marine organisms. Here we show that OA increases by 46-212% the production of phenolic compounds in phytoplankton grown under the elevated CO2 concentrations projected for the end of this century, compared with the ambient CO2 level. At the same time, mitochondrial respiration rate is enhanced under elevated CO2 concentrations by 130-160% in a single species or mixed phytoplankton assemblage. When fed with phytoplankton cells grown under OA, zooplankton assemblages have significantly higher phenolic compound content, by about 28-48%. The functional consequences of the increased accumulation of toxic phenolic compounds in primary and secondary producers have the potential to have profound consequences for marine ecosystem and seafood quality, with the possibility that fishery industries could be influenced as a result of progressive ocean changes.

  13. Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Total Phenolic Compounds from Inula helenium

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin; Zhao, Yong-Ming; Tian, Ya-Ting; Yan, Chun-Lin; Guo, Chun-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of phenolic compounds from Inula helenium was studied. Effects of ethanol concentration, ultrasonic time, solid-liquid ratio, and number of extractions were investigated. An orthogonal array was constructed to optimize UAE process. The optimized extraction conditions were as follows: ethanol concentration, 30%; solid-liquid ratio, 1 : 20; number of extractions, 2 times; extraction time, 30 min. Under the optimal conditions, the yield of total phenolic compounds and chlorogenic acid was 6.13 ± 0.58 and 1.32 ± 0.17 mg/g, respectively. The results showed that high amounts of phenolic compounds can be extracted from I. helenium by ultrasound-assisted extraction technology. PMID:24089600

  14. Ocean acidification increases the accumulation of toxic phenolic compounds across trophic levels.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Wang, Tifeng; Liu, Nana; Dupont, Sam; Beardall, John; Boyd, Philip W; Riebesell, Ulf; Gao, Kunshan

    2015-10-27

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations are causing ocean acidification (OA), altering carbonate chemistry with consequences for marine organisms. Here we show that OA increases by 46-212% the production of phenolic compounds in phytoplankton grown under the elevated CO2 concentrations projected for the end of this century, compared with the ambient CO2 level. At the same time, mitochondrial respiration rate is enhanced under elevated CO2 concentrations by 130-160% in a single species or mixed phytoplankton assemblage. When fed with phytoplankton cells grown under OA, zooplankton assemblages have significantly higher phenolic compound content, by about 28-48%. The functional consequences of the increased accumulation of toxic phenolic compounds in primary and secondary producers have the potential to have profound consequences for marine ecosystem and seafood quality, with the possibility that fishery industries could be influenced as a result of progressive ocean changes.

  15. Antioxidant capacities, phenolic compounds and polysaccharide contents of 49 edible macro-fungi.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ya-Jun; Deng, Gui-Fang; Xu, Xiang-Rong; Wu, Shan; Li, Sha; Xia, En-Qin; Li, Fang; Chen, Feng; Ling, Wen-Hua; Li, Hua-Bin

    2012-11-01

    Edible macro-fungi are widely consumed as food sources for their flavors and culinary features. In order to explore the potential of macro-fungi as a natural resource of bioactive compounds, the antioxidant properties and polysaccharide contents of 49 edible macro-fungi from China were evaluated systematically. A positive correlation between antioxidant capacity and total phenolic content indicated that phenolic compounds could be main contributors of antioxidant capacities of these macro-fungi. Furthermore, many bioactive compounds such as gallic, homogentisic, protocatechuic, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid were identified and quantified. The macro-fungi species Thelephora ganbajun Zang, Boletus edulis Bull., Volvariella volvacea Sing, Boletus regius Krombh, and Suillus bovinus Kuntze displayed the highest antioxidant capacities and total phenolic contents, indicating their potential as important dietary sources of natural antioxidants.

  16. Determination of some phenolic compounds in red wine by RP-HPLC: method development and validation.

    PubMed

    Burin, Vívian Maria; Arcari, Stefany Grützmann; Costa, Léa Luzia Freitas; Bordignon-Luiz, Marilde T

    2011-09-01

    A methodology employing reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of five phenolic compounds in red wine. The chromatographic separation was carried out in a C(18) column with water acidify with acetic acid (pH 2.6) (solvent A) and 20% solvent A and 80% acetonitrile (solvent B) as the mobile phase. The validation parameters included: selectivity, linearity, range, limits of detection and quantitation, precision and accuracy, using an internal standard. All calibration curves were linear (R(2) > 0.999) within the range, and good precision (RSD < 2.6%) and recovery (80-120%) was obtained for all compounds. This method was applied to quantify phenolics in red wine samples from Santa Catarina State, Brazil, and good separation peaks for phenolic compounds in these wines were observed.

  17. Decoction, infusion and hydroalcoholic extract of Origanum vulgare L.: different performances regarding bioactivity and phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Martins, Natália; Barros, Lillian; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Henriques, Mariana; Silva, Sónia; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2014-09-01

    Bioactivity of oregano methanolic extracts and essential oils is well known. Nonetheless, reports using aqueous extracts are scarce, mainly decoction or infusion preparations used for therapeutic applications. Herein, the antioxidant and antibacterial activities, and phenolic compounds of the infusion, decoction and hydroalcoholic extract of oregano were evaluated and compared. The antioxidant activity is related with phenolic compounds, mostly flavonoids, since decoction presented the highest concentration of flavonoids and total phenolic compounds, followed by infusion and hydroalcoholic extract. The samples were effective against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. It is important to address that the hydroalcoholic extract showed the highest efficacy against Escherichia coli. This study demonstrates that the decoction could be used for antioxidant purposes, while the hydroalcoholic extract could be incorporated in formulations for antimicrobial features. Moreover, the use of infusion/decoction can avoid the toxic effects showed by oregano essential oil, widely reported for its antioxidant and antimicrobial properties.

  18. A review of molecular mechanisms of the anti-leukemic effects of phenolic compounds in honey.

    PubMed

    Abubakar, Murtala B; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah; Suen, Ang Boon

    2012-11-15

    Hematologic malignancies constitute about 9% of all new cases of cancers as reported via the GLOBOCAN series by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) in 2008. So far, the conventional therapeutic and surgical approaches to cancer therapy have not been able to curtail the rising incidence of cancers, including hematological malignancies, worldwide. The last decade has witnessed great research interest in biological activities of phenolic compounds that include anticancer, anti-oxidation and anti-inflammation, among other things. A large number of anticancer agents combat cancer through cell cycle arrest, induction of apoptosis and differentiation, as well as through inhibition of cell growth and proliferation, or a combination of two or more of these mechanisms. Various phenolic compounds from different sources have been reported to be promising anticancer agents by acting through one of these mechanisms. Honey, which has a long history of human consumption both for medicinal and nutritional uses, contains a variety of phenolic compounds such as flavonoids, phenolic acids, coumarins and tannins. This paper presents a review on the molecular mechanisms of the anti-leukemic activity of various phenolic compounds on cell cycle, cell growth and proliferation and apoptosis, and it advocates that more studies should be conducted to determine the potential role of honey in both chemoprevention and chemotherapy in leukemia.

  19. Grapevine phenolic compounds in xylem sap and tissues are significantly altered during infection by Xylella fastidiosa.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Christopher M; Chen, Jianchi

    2012-09-01

    Pierce's disease of grapevine (PD), caused by the bacterial pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, remains a serious problem for grape production in California and elsewhere. This research examined induction of phenolic compounds in grapevines ('Thompson Seedless') infected with X. fastidiosa over a 6-month period. Two months postinoculation with X. fastidiosa, catechin, digalloylquinic acid, and astringin were found at greater levels in xylem sap; multiple catechins, procyanidins, and stilbenoids were found at greater levels in xylem tissues; and precursors to lignin and condensed tannins were found at greater levels in xylem cell walls. However, such large-scale inductions of phenolic compounds were not observed 4 months after inoculation. Six months after inoculation, infected plants had significantly reduced phenolic levels in xylem sap and tissues when compared with control plants, including lowered levels of lignin and condensed tannins. At 6 months, PD symptoms were severe in infected plants and most photosynthetic tissue was abscised. These results suggest that, even though grapevine hosts may initially respond to X. fastidiosa infections with increased production of phenolic compounds, ultimately, PD causes grapevines to enter a state of decline whereby diseased hosts no longer have the resources to support secondary metabolite production, including defense-associated phenolic compounds.

  20. Identification of Phenolic Compounds and Evaluation of Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Properties of Euphorbia Tirucalli L.

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Keline Medeiros; de Lima, Alessandro; Silva, Jurandy do N.; Rodrigues, Larissa L.; Amorim, Adriany G. N.; Quelemes, Patrick V.; dos Santos, Raimunda C.; Rocha, Jefferson A.; de Andrades, Éryka O.; Leite, José Roberto S. A.; Mancini-Filho, Jorge; da Trindade, Reginaldo Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive compounds extracted from natural sources can benefit human health. The aim of this work was to determine total phenolic content and antioxidant activity in extracts of Euphorbia tirucalli L. followed by identification and quantification of the phenolic compounds, as well as their antibacterial activities. Antioxidant activities were determined by DPPH and ABTS•+ assay. Identification of phenolic compounds was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and antimicrobial activities were verified by agar dilution methods and MIC values. Total phenolic content ranged from 7.73 to 30.54 mg/100 g gallic acid equivalent. Extracts from dry plants showed higher antioxidant activities than those from fresh ones. The DPPH EC50 values were approximately 12.15 μg/mL and 16.59 μg/mL, respectively. Antioxidant activity measured by the ABTS method yielded values higher than 718.99 μM trolox/g for dry plants, while by the Rancimat® system yielded protection factors exceeding 1 for all extracts, comparable to synthetic BHT. Ferulic acid was the principal phenolic compound identified and quantified through HPLC-UV in all extracts. The extracts proved effective inhibitory potential for Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus. These results showed that extracts of Euphorbia tirucalli L. have excellent antioxidant capacity and moderate antimicrobial activity. These can be attributed to the high concentration of ferulic acid. PMID:26784670

  1. Antioxidant and cyclooxygenase inhibitory phenolic compounds from Ocimum sanctum Linn.

    PubMed

    Kelm, M A; Nair, M G; Strasburg, G M; DeWitt, D L

    2000-03-01

    Anti-oxidant bioassay-directed extraction of the fresh leaves and stems of Ocimum sanctum and purification of the extract yielded the following compounds; cirsilineol [1], cirsimaritin [2], isothymusin [3], isothymonin [4], apigenin [5], rosmarinic acid [6], and appreciable quantities of eugenol. The structures of compounds 1-6 were established using spectroscopic methods. Compounds 1 and 5 were isolated previously from O. sanctum whereas compounds 2 and 3 are here identified for the first time from O. sanctum. Eugenol, a major component of the volatile oil, and compounds 1, 3, 4, and 6 demonstrated good antioxidant activity at 10-microM concentrations. Anti-inflammatory activity or cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity of these compounds were observed. Eugenol demonstrated 97% cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitory activity when assayed at 1000-microM concentrations. Compounds 1, 2, and 4-6 displayed 37, 50, 37, 65, and 58% cyclooxygenase-1 inhibitory activity, respectively, when assayed at 1000-microM concentrations. Eugenol and compounds 1, 2, 5, and 6 demonstrated cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitory activity at slightly higher levels when assayed at 1000-microM concentrations. The activities of compounds 1-6 were comparable to ibuprofen, naproxen, and aspirin at 10-, 10-, and 1000-microM concentrations, respectively. These results support traditional uses of O. sanctum and identify the compounds responsible.

  2. Molecular modeling and snake venom phospholipase A2 inhibition by phenolic compounds: Structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Iqbal; Alam, Mohammed A; Alam, Ozair; Nargotra, Amit; Taneja, Subhash Chandra; Koul, Surrinder

    2016-05-23

    In our earlier study, we have reported that a phenolic compound 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde from Janakia arayalpatra root extract was active against Viper and Cobra envenomations. Based on the structure of this natural product, libraries of synthetic structurally variant phenolic compounds were studied through molecular docking on the venom protein. To validate the activity of eight selected compounds, we have tested them in in vivo and in vitro models. The compound 21 (2-hydroxy-3-methoxy benzaldehyde), 22 (2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde) and 35 (2-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzylalcohol) were found to be active against venom-induced pathophysiological changes. The compounds 20, 15 and 35 displayed maximum anti-hemorrhagic, anti-lethal and PLA2 inhibitory activity respectively. In terms of SAR, the presence of a formyl group in conjunction with a phenolic group was seen as a significant contributor towards increasing the antivenom activity. The above observations confirmed the anti-venom activity of the phenolic compounds which needs to be further investigated for the development of new anti-snake venom leads.

  3. Altitudinal and seasonal changes of phenolic compounds in Buxus sempervirens leaves and cuticles.

    PubMed

    Bernal, M; Llorens, L; Julkunen-Tiitto, R; Badosa, J; Verdaguer, D

    2013-09-01

    The variation in the leaf content of phenolic compounds has been related to the UV-B changes of the environment in which plants grow. In this context, we aimed to investigate: a) whether the seasonal and altitudinal changes in the content of phenolic compounds of Buxus sempervirens L. leaves and cuticles could be related to the natural fluctuations in UV-B levels and b) the possible use of specific phenolic compounds as biomarkers of ambient UV-B levels. To achieve these goals we sampled, every three months during one year, leaves of B. sempervirens along an altitudinal gradient. At the lowest and the highest altitudes, we also conducted a UV-exclusion experiment to discern whether the observed changes could be attributed to the natural variation in UV-B. Results show that total phenolic content of leaves was lower in June than in the other sampling dates, which suggests a leaf ontogenic rather than a UV-B effect on the leaf content of these compounds. Regarding the elevational gradient, the overall amount of phenolic acids and neolignan of entire leaves increased with altitude while the total amount of flavonoids in leaf cuticles decreased. However, the lack of a significant effect of our UV-exclusion treatment on the content of these compounds suggests that the observed variations along the altitudinal gradient would respond to other factors rather than to UV-B. Concomitantly, we did not find any phenolic compound in leaves or cuticles of B. sempervirens that could be considered as a biomarker of ambient UV-B levels.

  4. Phenolic compounds prevent the oligomerization of α-synuclein and reduce synaptic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Ryoichi; Ono, Kenjiro; Takamura, Yusaku; Mizuguchi, Mineyuki; Ikeda, Tokuhei; Nishijo, Hisao; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-09-01

    Lewy bodies, mainly composed of α-synuclein (αS), are pathological hallmarks of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. Epidemiological studies showed that green tea consumption or habitual intake of phenolic compounds reduced Parkinson's disease risk. We previously reported that phenolic compounds inhibited αS fibrillation and destabilized preformed αS fibrils. Cumulative evidence suggests that low-order αS oligomers are neurotoxic and critical species in the pathogenesis of α-synucleinopathies. To develop disease modifying therapies for α-synucleinopathies, we examined effects of phenolic compounds (myricetin (Myr), curcumin, rosmarinic acid (RA), nordihydroguaiaretic acid, and ferulic acid) on αS oligomerization. Using methods such as photo-induced cross-linking of unmodified proteins, circular dichroism spectroscopy, the electron microscope, and the atomic force microscope, we showed that Myr and RA inhibited αS oligomerization and secondary structure conversion. The nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that Myr directly bound to the N-terminal region of αS, whereas direct binding of RA to monomeric αS was not detected. Electrophysiological assays for long-term potentiation in mouse hippocampal slices revealed that Myr and RA ameliorated αS synaptic toxicity by inhibition of αS oligomerization. These results suggest that Myr and RA prevent the αS aggregation process, reducing the neurotoxicity of αS oligomers. To develop disease modifying therapies for α-synucleinopathies, we examined effects of phenolic compounds on α-synuclein (αS) oligomerization. Phenolic compounds, especially Myricetin (Myr) and Rosmarinic acid (RA), inhibited αS oligomerization and secondary structure conversion. Myr and RA ameliorated αS synaptic toxicity on the experiment of long-term potentiation. Our results suggest that Myr and RA prevent αS aggregation process and reduce the neurotoxicity of αS oligomers. Phenolic compounds are good

  5. Rapid methods for extracting and quantifying phenolic compounds in citrus rinds.

    PubMed

    Magwaza, Lembe Samukelo; Opara, Umezuruike Linus; Cronje, Paul J R; Landahl, Sandra; Ortiz, Jose Ordaz; Terry, Leon A

    2016-01-01

    Conventional methods for extracting and quantifying phenolic compounds in citrus rinds are time consuming. Rapid methods for extracting and quantifying phenolic compounds were developed by comparing three extraction solvent combinations (80:20 v/v ethanol:H2O; 70:29.5:0.5 v/v/v methanol:H2O:HCl; and 50:50 v/v dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO):methanol) for effectiveness. Freeze-dried, rind powder was extracted in an ultrasonic water bath at 35°C for 10, 20, and 30 min. Phenolic compound quantification was done with a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) equipped with diode array detector. Extracting with methanol:H2O:HCl for 30 min resulted in the optimum yield of targeted phenolic acids. Seven phenolic acids and three flavanone glycosides (FGs) were quantified. The dominant phenolic compound was hesperidin, with concentrations ranging from 7500 to 32,000 μg/g DW. The highest yield of FGs was observed in samples extracted, using DMSO:methanol for 10 min. Compared to other extraction methods, methanol:H2O:HCl was efficient in optimum extraction of phenolic acids. The limit of detection and quantification for all analytes were small, ranging from 1.35 to 5.02 and 4.51 to 16.72 μg/g DW, respectively, demonstrating HPLC quantification method sensitivity. The extraction and quantification methods developed in this study are faster and more efficient. Where speed and effectiveness are required, these methods are recommended.

  6. The influence of beverage composition on delivery of phenolic compounds from coffee and tea.

    PubMed

    Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2010-04-26

    Epidemiological data suggest that consumption of coffee and tea is associated with a reduced risk of several chronic and degenerative diseases including cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, obesity and neurodegenerative disorders. Both coffee and tea are a rich source of phenolic compounds including chlorogenic acids in coffee; and flavan-3-ols as well as complex theaflavins and thearubigens in tea. Coffee and tea are two of the most commonly consumed beverages in the world and thus represent a significant opportunity to positively affect disease risk and outcomes globally. Central to this opportunity is a need to better understand factors that may affect the bioavailability of specific phenolic components from coffee and tea based beverages. An overview of the phenolic composition of coffee and tea is discussed in the context of how processing and composition might influence phenolic profiles and bioavailability of individual phenolic components. Specifically, the impact of beverage formulation, the extent and type of processing and the influence of digestion on stability, bioavailability and metabolism of bioactive phenolics from tea and coffee are discussed. The impact of co-formulation with ascorbic acid and other phytochemicals are discussed as strategies to improve absorption of these health promoting phytochemicals. A better understanding of how the beverage composition impacts phenolic profiles and their bioavailability is critical to development of beverage products designed to deliver specific health benefits.

  7. Biopolymer nano-particles and natural nano-carriers for nano-encapsulation of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Faridi Esfanjani, Afshin; Jafari, Seid Mahdi

    2016-10-01

    Phenolic compounds are major micronutrients in our diet,(1) and evidence for their role in the prevention of degenerative diseases such as cancer, inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases is emerging. The easily destruction against environment stresses and low bioavailability of phenolics are main limitations of their application. Therefore, nano-encapsulated phenolics as a fine delivery system can solve their restrictions. Polymeric nanoparticles and natural nano-carriers are one of the most effective and industrial techniques which can be used for protection and delivery of phenolics. In this review, preparation, application and characterization of polymeric based nano-capsules and natural nano-carriers for phenolics have been considered and discussed including polymeric nanoparticles, polymeric complex nanoparticles, cyclodextrins, nano-caseins, nanocrystals, electrospun nano-fibers, electro-sprayed nano-particles, and nano-spray dried particles. Our main goal was to cover the relevant recent studies in the past few years. Although a number of different types of polymeric and natural based nano-scale delivery systems have been developed, there are relatively poor quantitative understanding of their in vivo absorption, permeation and release. Also, performing toxicity experiments, residual solvent analysis and studying their biological fate during digestion, absorption, and excretion of polymeric nanoparticle and natural nano-carriers containing phenolics should be considered in future researches. In addition, future investigations could focus on application of phenolic nano-scale delivery systems in pharmaceuticals and functional foods.

  8. Review of various treatment methods for the abatement of phenolic compounds from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Girish, C R; Murty, V Ramachandra

    2012-04-01

    Phenol and its derivatives are considered among the most hazardous organic pollutants from industrial wastewater and they are toxic even at low concentrations. Besides the existence of phenol in natural water source it can lead to the formation of other toxic substituted compounds. So this has led to growing concern on setting up of rigid limits on the acceptable level of phenol in the environment. The various methods for the treatment of phenol from wastewater streams are briefly reviewed. The various technologies like distillation, liquid-liquid extraction with different solvents, adsorption over activated carbons and polymeric and inorganic adsorbents, membrane pervaporation and membrane-solvent extraction, have been elucidated. The advantages and disadvantages of the various methods are illustrated and their performances are compared.

  9. Effect of drying method on volatile compounds, phenolic profile and antioxidant capacity of guava powders.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Juliana C; Lago, Mabel G; Castelo-Branco, Vanessa N; Oliveira, Felipe R; Torres, Alexandre Guedes; Perrone, Daniel; Monteiro, Mariana

    2016-04-15

    We studied the chemical composition of oven and freeze dried guava powders for future use as antioxidant-rich flavour enhancers. Among thirty-one volatiles in guava powders, terpenes were predominant, even after both drying processes. In contrast, esters and aldehydes, volatiles characteristic of fresh guava fruit, appeared to have been decreased by drying. Insoluble phenolics were predominant and among the sixteen compounds identified, quercetin-3-O-rutinoside and naringenin corresponded to 56% of total phenolics. Drying processes decreased total phenolics contents by up to 44%. Oven drying promoted the release of insoluble flavonoids, generating mainly quercetin. Antioxidant capacity also decreased due to both drying processes, but guava powders still presented similar antioxidant capacity in comparison to other tropical fruit powders. Our results suggest that oven drying is a viable option for the production of a functional ingredient that would improve the phenolic content of cereal foods while adding desirable guava flavour.

  10. A Systematic Review of the Efficacy of Bioactive Compounds in Cardiovascular Disease: Phenolic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Rangel-Huerta, Oscar D.; Pastor-Villaescusa, Belen; Aguilera, Concepcion M.; Gil, Angel

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is rising and is the prime cause of death in all developed countries. Bioactive compounds (BAC) can have a role in CVD prevention and treatment. The aim of this work was to examine the scientific evidence supporting phenolic BAC efficacy in CVD prevention and treatment by a systematic review. Databases utilized were Medline, LILACS and EMBASE, and all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with prospective, parallel or crossover designs in humans in which the effects of BAC were compared with that of placebo/control were included. Vascular homeostasis, blood pressure, endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers were considered as primary outcomes. Cohort, ecological or case-control studies were not included. We selected 72 articles and verified their quality based on the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, establishing diverse quality levels of scientific evidence according to two features: the design and bias risk of a study. Moreover, a grade of recommendation was included, depending on evidence strength of antecedents. Evidence shows that certain polyphenols, such as flavonols can be helpful in decreasing CVD risk factors. However, further rigorous evidence is necessary to support the BAC effect on CVD prevention and treatment. PMID:26132993

  11. A Systematic Review of the Efficacy of Bioactive Compounds in Cardiovascular Disease: Phenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Rangel-Huerta, Oscar D; Pastor-Villaescusa, Belen; Aguilera, Concepcion M; Gil, Angel

    2015-06-29

    The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) is rising and is the prime cause of death in all developed countries. Bioactive compounds (BAC) can have a role in CVD prevention and treatment. The aim of this work was to examine the scientific evidence supporting phenolic BAC efficacy in CVD prevention and treatment by a systematic review. Databases utilized were Medline, LILACS and EMBASE, and all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with prospective, parallel or crossover designs in humans in which the effects of BAC were compared with that of placebo/control were included. Vascular homeostasis, blood pressure, endothelial function, oxidative stress and inflammatory biomarkers were considered as primary outcomes. Cohort, ecological or case-control studies were not included. We selected 72 articles and verified their quality based on the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, establishing diverse quality levels of scientific evidence according to two features: the design and bias risk of a study. Moreover, a grade of recommendation was included, depending on evidence strength of antecedents. Evidence shows that certain polyphenols, such as flavonols can be helpful in decreasing CVD risk factors. However, further rigorous evidence is necessary to support the BAC effect on CVD prevention and treatment.

  12. Phenolic compounds of Dragon's blood from Dracaena draco.

    PubMed

    González, A G; León, F; Sánchez-Pinto, L; Padrón, J I; Bermejo, J

    2000-09-01

    Three new compounds, 2,4,4'-trihydroxydihydrochalcone (1), 3-(4-hydroxybenzyl)-5,7-dimethoxychroman (2), and 7-hydroxy-3-(4-hydroxybenzyl)chromone (3), were isolated from the resin "Dragon's blood" obtained from Dracaena draco along with 18 known compounds. The structures of 1, 2, and 3 were determined using MS and NMR techniques.

  13. Chemical Characterization of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed from Atmospheric Aqueous-phase Reactions of Phenolic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L.; Smith, J.; Anastasio, C.; Zhang, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Phenolic compounds, which are released in significant amounts from biomass burning, may undergo fast aqueous-phase reactions to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. Understanding the aqueous-phase reaction mechanisms of these compounds and the composition of their reaction products is thus important for constraining SOA sources and predicting organic aerosol properties in models. In this study, we investigate the aqueous-phase reactions of three phenols (phenol, guaiacol and syringol) with two oxidants - excited triplet states (3C*) of non-phenolic aromatic carbonyls and hydroxyl radical (OH). By employing four analytical methods including high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometry, total organic carbon analysis, ion chromatography, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we thoroughly characterize the chemical compositions of the low volatility reaction products of phenols and propose formation mechanisms based on this information. Our results indicate that phenolic SOA is highly oxygenated, with O/C ratios in the range of 0.83-1.03, and that the SOA of phenol is usually more oxidized than those of guaiacol and syringol. Among the three precursors, syringol generates the largest fraction of higher molecular weight (MW) products. For the same precursor, the SOA formed via reaction with 3C* is less oxidized than that formed via reaction with OH. In addition, oxidation by 3C* enhances the formation of higher MW species, including phenolic dimers, higher oligomers and hydroxylated products, compared to reactions initiated by OH, which appear to favor the formation of organic acids. However, our results indicate that the yields of small organic acids (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate) are low for both reaction pathways, together accounting for less than 5% of total SOA mass.

  14. Phenolic Profiles and Contribution of Individual Compounds to Antioxidant Activity of Apple Powders.

    PubMed

    Raudone, Lina; Raudonis, Raimondas; Liaudanskas, Mindaugas; Viskelis, Jonas; Pukalskas, Audrius; Janulis, Valdimaras

    2016-05-01

    Apples (Malus domestica L.) are the most common source of phenolic compounds in northern European diet. Besides pectins, dietary fibers, vitamins, and oligosaccharides they contain phenolic compounds of different classes. Apple powders are convenient functional forms retaining significant amounts of phenolic antioxidants. In this study reducing and radical scavenging profiles of freeze-dried powders of "Aldas,ˮ "Auksis,ˮ "Connel Red,ˮ "Ligol,ˮ "Lodel,ˮ and "Rajkaˮ were determined and phenolic constituents were identified using ultra high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole and time-of-flight mass spectrometers. A negative ionization mode was applied and seventeen compounds: phenolic acids (coumaroylquinic, chlorogenic), flavonoids (quercetin derivatives), and procyanidin derivatives (B1, B2, and C1) were identified in all tested apple samples. Total values of Trolox equivalents varied from 7.72 ± 0.32 up to 20.02 ± 0.52 and from 11.10 ± 0.57 up to 21.42 ± 0.75 μmol/g of dry weight of apple powder in FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power) and ABTS (2,2-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) postcolumn assays, respectively. The greatest Trolox equivalent values were determined for apples of "Aldasˮ cultivar. Chlorogenic acid and procyanidin C1 were the most significant contributors to total reducing and radical scavenging activity in all apple cultivars tested, therefore they could be considered as markers of antioxidant activity.

  15. Effects of cooking methods on phenolic compounds in xoconostle (Opuntia joconostle).

    PubMed

    Cortez-García, Rosa María; Ortiz-Moreno, Alicia; Zepeda-Vallejo, Luis Gerardo; Necoechea-Mondragón, Hugo

    2015-03-01

    Xoconostle, the acidic cactus pear fruit of Opuntia joconostle of the Cactaceae family, is the source of several phytochemicals, such as betalain pigments and numerous phenolic compounds. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of four cooking procedures (i.e., boiling, grilling, steaming and microwaving) on the total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity (measured by ABTS, DPPH, reducing power, and BCBA) of xoconostle. In addition, HPLC-DAD analyses were performed to identify and quantify individual phenolic compounds. After microwaving and steaming xoconostle, the TPC remained the same that in fresh samples, whereas both grilling and boiling produced a significant, 20% reduction (p ≤ 0.05). Total flavonoids remained unchanged in boiled and grilled xoconostle, but steaming and microwaving increased the flavonoid content by 13 and 20%, respectively. Steaming and microwaving did not produce significant changes in the antioxidant activity of xoconostle, whereas boiling and grilling result in significant decreases. The phenolic acids identified in xoconostle fruits were gallic, vanillic, 4-hydroxybenzoic, syringic, ferulic and protocatechuic acids; the flavonoids identified were epicatechin, catechin, rutin, quercitrin, quercetin and kaempferol. Based on the results, steaming and microwaving are the most suitable methods for retaining the highest level of phenolic compounds and flavonoids in xoconostle.

  16. Anti-Amyloidogenic Properties of Some Phenolic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Porzoor, Afsaneh; Alford, Benjamin; Hügel, Helmut M.; Grando, Danilla; Caine, Joanne; Macreadie, Ian

    2015-01-01

    A family of 21 polyphenolic compounds consisting of those found naturally in danshen and their analogues were synthesized and subsequently screened for their anti-amyloidogenic activity against the amyloid beta peptide (Aβ42) of Alzheimer’s disease. After 24 h incubation with Aβ42, five compounds reduced thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence, indicative of their anti-amyloidogenic propensity (p < 0.001). TEM and immunoblotting analysis also showed that selected compounds were capable of hindering fibril formation even after prolonged incubations. These compounds were also capable of rescuing the yeast cells from toxic changes induced by the chemically synthesized Aβ42. In a second assay, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae AHP1 deletant strain transformed with GFP fused to Aβ42 was treated with these compounds and analyzed by flow cytometry. There was a significant reduction in the green fluorescence intensity associated with 14 compounds. We interpret this result to mean that the compounds had an anti-amyloid-aggregation propensity in the yeast and GFP-Aβ42 was removed by proteolysis. The position and not the number of hydroxyl groups on the aromatic ring was found to be the most important determinant for the anti-amyloidogenic properties. PMID:25898401

  17. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of olive leaf extracts.

    PubMed

    Kontogianni, Vassiliki G; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P

    2012-01-01

    The total phenolic content and antioxidant activities of olive leaf extracts were determined. Plant material was extracted with methanol and fractionated with solvents of increasing polarity, giving certain extracts. The qualitative changes in the composition of the extracts were determined after the storage of leaves for 22 h at 37°C, before the extraction. Total polyphenol contents in extracts were determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu procedure. They were also analysed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Their antioxidant activities were evaluated using the diphenyl picrylhydrazyl method and the β-carotene linoleate model assay. Moreover, the effects of different crude olive leaf extracts on the oxidative stability of sunflower oil at 40°C and sunflower oil-in-water emulsions (10% o/w) at 37°C, at a final concentration of crude extract 200 mg kg(-1) oil, were tested and compared with butylated hydroxyl toluene.

  18. Different phenolic compounds activate distinct human bitter taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Soares, Susana; Kohl, Susann; Thalmann, Sophie; Mateus, Nuno; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; De Freitas, Victor

    2013-02-20

    Bitterness is a major sensory attribute of several common foods and beverages rich in polyphenol compounds. These compounds are reported as very important for health as chemopreventive compounds, but they are also known to taste bitter. In this work, the activation of the human bitter taste receptors, TAS2Rs, by six polyphenol compounds was analyzed. The compounds chosen are present in a wide range of plant-derived foods and beverages, namely, red wine, beer, tea, and chocolate. Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a hydrolyzable tannin, (-)-epicatechin is a precursor of condensed tannins, procyanidin dimer B3 and trimer C2 belong to the condensed tannins, and malvidin-3-glucoside and cyanidin-3-glucoside are anthocyanins. The results show that the different compounds activate different combinations of the ~25 TAS2Rs. (-)-Epicatechin activated three receptors, TAS2R4, TAS2R5, and TAS2R39, whereas only two receptors, TAS2R5 and TAS2R39, responded to PGG. In contrast, malvidin-3-glucoside and procyanidin trimer stimulated only one receptor, TAS2R7 and TAS2R5, respectively. Notably, tannins are the first natural agonists found for TAS2R5 that display high potency only toward this receptor. The catechol and/or galloyl groups appear to be important structural determinants that mediate the interaction of these polyphenolic compounds with TAS2R5. Overall, the EC(50) values obtained for the different compounds vary 100-fold, with the lowest values for PGG and malvidin-3-glucoside compounds, suggesting that they could be significant polyphenols responsible for the bitterness of fruits, vegetables, and derived products even if they are present in very low concentrations.

  19. Improved HPLC determination of phenolic compounds in cv. golden delicious apples using a monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Chinnici, Fabio; Gaiani, Anna; Natali, Nadia; Riponi, Claudio; Galassi, Sergio

    2004-01-14

    A rapid HPLC-DAD determination of phenols in apple using an RP monolithic column is reported. Because of the hydrodynamic advantages offered by this kind of column and the use of acidified acetonitrile as eluent, assays of apple extracts can be performed in <21 min. Assays of pulp and peel extracts were carried out without the need for time-consuming sample pretreatment except filtration. Several flavanols, hydroxycinnamic acids, dihydrochalcones, and six quercetin glycosides were identified and quantified. A seventh quercetin derivative, two chalcone-related compounds, and three hydroxycinnamic derivatives were also found. Peels proved to be richer in phenols than pulps, the former being composed mainly of (-)-epicatechin, procyanidin B2, chlorogenic acid, phloridzin, hyperin, and avicularin. In pulps, where the chlorogenic acid was the principal phenolic compound, quercetin glycosides were found in very low amounts.

  20. Equilibrium studies in natural waters: Speciation of phenolic compounds in synthetic seawater at different salinities

    SciTech Connect

    Demianov, P.; De Stefano, C.; Sammartano, S.; Gianguzza, A.

    1995-05-01

    Interactions between some phenolic compounds and macro-constituents of synthetic seawater (Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Cl{sup {minus}}, and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), at 20, 35, and 45 {per_thousand} salinity, have been investigated potentiometrically by using the [H]-glass electrode. The formation constants of phenol, o- and p-cresol, o-a dn p-nitrophenol complexes with sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium ions have been determined in the ionic strength range 0 {le} I {le} 1 mol/L. A comparison between the apparent protonation constants of phenols determined in synthetic seawater, and those simulated by a suitable complex formation model, is discussed. The possibility of calculating, by simulation, the apparent protonation constants of some chlorophenolic compounds in synthetic seawater is also reported.

  1. Synthesis of New Sulfated and Glucuronated Metabolites of Dietary Phenolic Compounds Identified in Human Biological Samples.

    PubMed

    Almeida, A Filipa; Santos, Cláudia N; Ventura, M Rita

    2017-02-23

    (Poly)phenols are a large group of dietary compounds present in fruits and vegetables; their consumption is associated with health beneficial effects. After ingestion, (poly)phenols suffer extensive metabolization, and the identification of their metabolites is an emerging area, because these metabolites are considered the effective bioactive molecules in the human organism. However, a lack of commercially available standards has hampered the study of metabolite bioactivity and the exact structural confirmation in biological samples. New (poly)phenol metabolites previously identified in human samples after the intake of berry juice were chemically synthesized. Efficient chemical reactions were performed with moderate to excellent yields and selectivities. These new compounds could be used as standard chemicals for confirmation of the structure of metabolites in biological samples and will also allow mechanistic studies in cellular models.

  2. Evaluation of bioactive properties and phenolic compounds in different extracts prepared from Salvia officinalis L.

    PubMed

    Martins, Natália; Barros, Lillian; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Henriques, Mariana; Silva, Sónia; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2015-03-01

    The therapeutic benefits of medicinal plants are well known. Nevertheless, essential oils have been the main focus of antioxidant and antimicrobial studies, remaining scarce the reports with hydrophilic extracts. Thus, the antioxidant and antifungal activities of aqueous (prepared by infusion and decoction) and methanol/water (80:20, v/v) extracts of sage (Salvia officinalis L.) were evaluated and characterised in terms of phenolic compounds. Decoction and methanol/water extract gave the most pronounced antioxidant and antifungal properties, being positively related with their phenolic composition. The highest concentration of phenolic compounds was observed in the decoction, followed by methanol/water extract and infusion. Fungicidal and/or fungi static effects proved to be dependent on the extracts concentration. Overall, the incorporation of sage decoction in the daily diet or its use as a complement for antifungal therapies, could provide considerable benefits, also being an alternative to sage essential oils that can display some toxic effects.

  3. Identification of major phenolic compounds of Chinese water chestnut and their antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    You, Yanli; Duan, Xuewu; Wei, Xiaoyi; Su, Xinguo; Zhao, Mouming; Sun, Jian; Ruenroengklin, Neungnapa; Jiang, Yueming

    2007-04-25

    Chinese water chestnut (CWC) is one of the most popular foods among Asian people due to its special taste and medical function. Experiments were conducted to test the antioxidant activity and then determine the major phenolic compound components present in CWC. CWC phenolic extract strongly inhibited linoleic acid oxidation and exhibited a dose-dependent free-radical scavenging activity against alpha,alpha-diphenyl-beta-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals, superoxide anions and hydroxyl radicals, which was superior to ascorbic acid and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), two commercial used antioxidants. Furthermore, the CWC extract was found to have a relatively higher reducing power, compared with BHT. The major phenolic compounds present in CWC tissues were extracted, purified and identified by high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC) as (-)-gallocatechin gallate, (-)-epicatechin gallate and (+)-catechin gallate. This study suggests that CWC tissues exhibit great potential for antioxidant activity and may be useful for their nutritional and medicinal functions.

  4. Antioxidant and biological properties of bioactive phenolic compounds from Quercus suber L.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Ana; Fernandes, Iva; Cruz, Luís; Mateus, Nuno; Cabral, Miguel; de Freitas, Victor

    2009-12-09

    Phenolic compounds, namely, hydrolyzable tannins and low molecular weight phenolic compounds, were isolated and purified from Portuguese cork from Quercus suber L. Some of these compounds were studied to evaluate their antioxidant activity, including free-radical scavenging capacity (DPPH method) and reducing capacity (FRAP method). All compounds tested showed significant antioxidant activity, namely, antiradical and reducing properties. The antiradical capacity seemed to increase with the presence of galloyl groups. Regarding the reducing capacity, this structure-activity relationship was not so clear. These compounds were also studied to evaluate the growth inhibitory effect on the estrogen responsive human breast cancer cell line (ER+) MCF-7 and two other colon cancer cell lines (Caco-2 and HT-29). Generally, all the compounds tested exhibited, after a continuous exposure during a 48 h period, a dose-dependent growth inhibitory effect. Relative inhibitory activity was primarily related to the number of phenolic hydroxyl groups (galloyl and HHDP moieties) found in the active structures, with more groups generally conferring increased effects, except for HHDP-di-galloyl-glucose. Mongolicain B showed a greater potential to inhibit the growth of the three cell lines tested, identical to the effect observed with castalagin. Since these compounds are structurally related with each other, this activity might be based within the C-glycosidic ellagitannin moiety.

  5. The phenolic compounds of olive oil: structure, biological activity and beneficial effects on human health.

    PubMed

    Tripoli, Elisa; Giammanco, Marco; Tabacchi, Garden; Di Majo, Danila; Giammanco, Santo; La Guardia, Maurizio

    2005-06-01

    The Mediterranean diet is rich in vegetables, cereals, fruit, fish, milk, wine and olive oil and has salutary biological functions. Epidemiological studies have shown a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases and certain kinds of cancer in the Mediterranean area. Olive oil is the main source of fat, and the Mediterranean diet's healthy effects can in particular be attributed not only to the high relationship between unsaturated and saturated fatty acids in olive oil but also to the antioxidant property of its phenolic compounds. The main phenolic compounds, hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein, which give extra-virgin olive oil its bitter, pungent taste, have powerful antioxidant activity both in vivo and in vitro. The present review focuses on recent works analysing the relationship between the structure of olive oil polyphenolic compounds and their antioxidant activity. These compounds' possible beneficial effects are due to their antioxidant activity, which is related to the development of atherosclerosis and cancer, and to anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activity.

  6. A novel antibacterial and antifungal phenolic compound from the endophytic fungus Pestalotiopsis mangiferae.

    PubMed

    Subban, Kamalraj; Subramani, Ramesh; Johnpaul, Muthumary

    2013-01-01

    A novel phenolic compound, 4-(2,4,7-trioxa-bicyclo[4.1.0]heptan-3-yl) phenol (1), was isolated from Pestalotiopsis mangiferae, an endophytic fungus associated with Mangifera indica Linn. The structure of the compound was elucidated on the basis of comprehensive spectral analysis (UV, IR, ¹H-, ¹³C- and 2D-NMR, as well as HRESI-MS). Compound (1) shows potent antibacterial and antifungal activity against Bacillus subtilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Micrococcus luteus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans. The transmission electron microscope study for the mode of inhibition of compound (1) on bacterial pathogens revealed the destruction of bacterial cells by cytoplasm agglutination with the formation of pores in cell wall membranes.

  7. Selected phenolic compounds in cultivated plants: ecologic functions, health implications, and modulation by pesticides.

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, O; Meier, M S; Schlatter, J; Frischknecht, P

    1999-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are widely distributed in the plant kingdom. Plant tissues may contain up to several grams per kilogram. External stimuli such as microbial infections, ultraviolet radiation, and chemical stressors induce their synthesis. The phenolic compounds resveratrol, flavonoids, and furanocoumarins have many ecologic functions and affect human health. Ecologic functions include defense against microbial pathogens and herbivorous animals. Phenolic compounds may have both beneficial and toxic effects on human health. Effects on low-density lipoproteins and aggregation of platelets are beneficial because they reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. Mutagenic, cancerogenic, and phototoxic effects are risk factors of human health. The synthesis of phenolic compounds in plants can be modulated by the application of herbicides and, to a lesser extent, insecticides and fungicides. The effects on ecosystem functioning and human health are complex and cannot be predicted with great certainty. The consequences of the combined natural and pesticide-induced modulating effects for ecologic functions and human health should be further evaluated. PMID:10229712

  8. Nanoliposomal carriers for improvement the bioavailability of high - valued phenolic compounds of pistachio green hull extract.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Zahra; Barzegar, Mohsen; Sahari, Mohammad Ali; Maherani, Behnoush

    2017-04-01

    In present study, nanoliposomes were prepared by thin hydration method with different concentrations of phenolic compounds (500, 750 and 1000ppm) of pure extract and lecithin (1, 2 and 3%w/w) and characterized by considering the particle size, polydispersity index (PDI), zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency (EE) and morphology. The results showed that nanoliposome (90.39-103.78nm) had negative surface charge varied from -51.5±0.9 to -40.2±0.2mV with a narrow size distribution (PDI≈0.069-0.123). Nanoliposomes composed of 1% lecithin with 1000ppm of phenolic compounds had the highest EE (52.93%). The FTIR analysis indicated the formation of hydrogen bonds between the polar zone of phospholipid and the OH groups of phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds also increased phase transition temperature (Tc) of nanoliposomes (2.01-7.24°C). Moreover, nanoliposomes had considerable stability during storage. Consequently, liposome is an efficient carrier for protection and improving PGHE biofunctional actives in foodstuffs.

  9. Reactivity of phenolic compounds towards free radicals under in vitro conditions.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Sindhu; Abraham, T Emilia; Zakaria, Zainul Akmar

    2015-09-01

    The free radical scavenging activity and reducing power of 16 phenolic compounds including four hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives namely ferulic acid, caffeic acid, sinapic acid and p-coumaric acid, benzoic acid and its derivatives namely protocatechuic acid, gallic acid and vanillic acid, benzene derivatives namely vanillin, vanillyl alcohol, veratryl alcohol, veratraldehyde, pyrogallol, guaiacol and two synthetic antioxidants, butylated hydroxy anisole (BHA) and propyl gallate were evaluated using 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH(•)), 2,2'-Azinobis-3- ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid radical (ABTS(+•)), Hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) and Superoxide radical (O2 (•-)) scavenging assays and reduction potential assay. By virtue of their hydrogen donating ability, phenolic compounds with multiple hydroxyl groups such as protocatechuic acid, pyrogallol, caffeic acid, gallic acid and propyl gallate exhibited higher free radical scavenging activity especially against DPPH(•) and O2 (•-). The hydroxylated cinnamates such as ferulic acid and caffeic acid were in general better scavengers than their benzoic acid counter parts such as vanillic acid and protocatechuic acid. All the phenolic compounds tested exhibited more than 85 % scavenging due to the high reactivity of the hydroxyl radical. Phenolic compounds with multiple hydroxyl groups also exhibited high redox potential. Exploring the radical scavenging and reducing properties of antioxidants especially those which are found naturally in plant sources are of great interest due to their protective roles in biological systems.

  10. Phenolic Compounds of Pomegranate Byproducts (Outer Skin, Mesocarp, Divider Membrane) and Their Antioxidant Activities.

    PubMed

    Ambigaipalan, Priyatharini; de Camargo, Adriano Costa; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2016-08-31

    Pomegranate peel was separated into outer leathery skin (PS), mesocarp (PM), and divider membrane (PD), and its phenolic compounds were extracted as free (F), esterified (E), and insoluble-bound (B) forms for the first time. The total phenolic content followed the order PD > PM > PS. ABTS(•+), DPPH, and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities and metal chelation were evaluated. In addition, pomegranate peel extracts showed inhibitory effects against α-glucosidase activity, lipase activity, and cupric ion-induced LDL-cholesterol oxidation as well as peroxyl and hydroxyl radical-induced DNA scission. Seventy-nine phenolic compounds were identified using HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS(n) mainly in the form of insoluble-bound. Thirty compounds were identified for the first time. Gallic acid was the major phenolic compound in pomegranate peel, whereas kaempferol 3-O-glucoside was the major flavonoid. Moreover, ellagic acid and monogalloyl-hexoside were the major hydrolyzable tannins, whereas the dominant proanthocyanidin was procyanidin dimers. Proanthocyanidins were detected for the first time.

  11. Evaluation of the effect of germination on phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities in sorghum varieties.

    PubMed

    Dicko, Mamoudou H; Gruppen, Harry; Traore, Alfred S; van Berkel, Willem J H; Voragen, Alphons G J

    2005-04-06

    The screening of 50 sorghum varieties showed that, on average, germination did not affect the content in total phenolic compounds but decreased the content of proanthocyanidins, 3-deoxyanthocyanidins, and flavan-4-ols. Independent of germination, there are intervarietal differences in antioxidant activities among sorghum varieties. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities were more positively correlated in ungerminated varieties than in germinated ones. Sorghum grains with pigmented testa layer, chestnut color glumes, and red plants had higher contents, larger diversity of phenolic compounds, and higher antioxidant activities than other sorghums. Some red sorghum varieties had higher antioxidant activities (30-80 mumol of Trolox equiv/g) than several sources of natural antioxidants from plant foods. Among varieties used for "to", "dolo", couscous, and porridge preparation, the "dolo"(local beer) varieties had the highest average content and diversity in phenolic compounds as well as the highest antioxidant activities. The biochemical markers determined are useful indicators for the selection of sorghum varieties for food and agronomic properties.

  12. Xylella fastidiosa infection of grapevines affects xylem levels of phenolic compounds and pathogenesis-related proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pierce’s disease (PD), caused by the xylem-dwelling pathogen Xylella fastidiosa (X.f.), is a serious threat to grape production. The effects of X.f. infection six months post-inoculation on defense-associated proteins and phenolic compounds found in xylem sap and tissue were evaluated. Defense-assoc...

  13. Influence of salts and phenolic compounds on olive mill wastewater detoxification using superabsorbent polymers.

    PubMed

    Davies, L C; Novais, J M; Martins-Dias, S

    2004-12-01

    For a selection of nine commercially available superabsorbent polymers, the absorption capacity was evaluated for the principal absorption-inhibition constituent of OMW, mineral salts and for phytotoxic-components, the phenolic compounds. A double exponential model was established for electrical conductivities ranging 4.2-25,000 microS cm(-1). For solutions of phenolic compounds ranging 0-0.5 g l(-1), a distribution coefficient near unit was achieved, while for OMW, the phenolic compounds were concentrated inside the gel as the distribution coefficient was 1.4. Correction of OMW pH towards neutrality was found to increase the absorption capacity by up to 35%. The phytotoxicity was assessed by the germination of Lepidium sativum. Inhibition in plant growth occurred for all OMW dilutions without superabsorbent polymers application. For 5% of OMW (COD 5 gl(-1) and 200 ppm of phenolic compounds) immobilised in PNa2 (1 gl(-1)), plant growth was promoted being observed a 120% growth germination, thus indicating that olive mill wastewater detoxification occurred.

  14. A high-performance liquid chromatographic determination of major phenolic compounds in tobacco smoke

    SciTech Connect

    Risner, C.H.; Cash, S.L. )

    1990-05-01

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method is developed that simultaneously quantifies the dihydroxy compounds hydroquinone, resorcinol, and catechol and the monohydroxy compounds phenol, m + p-cresol and o-cresol in cigarette smoke. Particulate matter samples collected on Cambridge pads and in impingers by conventional trapping techniques are simply (no derivatization required) subjected to reversed-phase gradient liquid chromatography. Samples of both mainstream and sidestream smoke can be analyzed. Selective fluorescence detection is used to monitor the mobile phase effluent, by which these phenolic compounds are detected in the nanogram range. The detector response is linear, overall precision is good, and recoveries are greater than 95 percent. The total run time, excluding extraction, is one hour. The procedure has been applied to tobacco products whose smoke contains varying amounts of these phenols. Kentucky Reference Cigarette 1R4F was found to contain substantially more of these compounds than a new cigarette that heats but does not burn tobacco (New Cigarette). The method is compared with other procedures used to determine phenolics in cigarette smoke.

  15. Temperature-dependent kinetics of grape seed phenolic compounds extraction: experiment and model.

    PubMed

    Bucić-Kojić, Ana; Sovová, Helena; Planinić, Mirela; Tomas, Srećko

    2013-02-15

    The kinetics of a batch solid-liquid extraction of total phenolic compounds (PC) from milled grape seed (Vitis vinifera L. cv. "Frankovka") using 50% ethanol at different extraction temperatures (25-80°C) was studied. The maximum yield of PC was 0.13 kg(GAE)/kg(db) after 200 min of extraction in agitated vessel at 80°C. A new model based on the assumptions of a first order kinetics mechanism for the solid-liquid extraction and a linear equilibrium at the solid-liquid interface was developed. The model involves the concept of broken and intact cells in order to describe two successive extraction periods: a very fast surface washing process followed by slow diffusion of phenolic compounds from grape seeds to the solvent. The proposed model is suited to fit experimental data and to simulate the extraction of phenolic compounds, which was confirmed by the correlation coefficient (r≥0.965), the root mean square error (RMSE≤0.003 kg(GAE)/kg(db)) and the mean relative deviation modulus (E≤2.149%). The temperature influenced both equilibrium partition coefficients of phenolic compounds and transport properties, which is manifested by a relatively high value of activation energy (23-24) kJ/mol and by values of effective diffusivity in seed particles.

  16. Phenolic acids are in vivo atheroprotective compounds appearing in serum of rats after blueberry consumption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries (BB) have recently been shown to have cardio-protective effects and prevention of atherosclerosis in rodent models. However, the bioactive compounds in BB responsible for these effects have not yet been characterized. Seven phenolic acids were identified as metabolites in serum of rats ...

  17. Method and device for the detection of phenol and related compounds. [in an electrochemical cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, J. G.; Liu, C. C. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method is described which permits the selective oxidation and potentiometric detection of phenol and related compounds in an electrochemical cell. An anode coated with a gel immobilized oxidative enzyme and a cathode are each placed in an electrolyte solution. The potential of the cell is measured by a potentiometer connected to the electrodes.

  18. Removal of phenolic compounds from aqueous phase by adsorption onto polymer supported iron nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sen, Bhupendra K; Deshmukh, Dhananjay K; Deb, Manas K; Verma, Devsharan; Pal, Jolly

    2014-11-01

    The removal of phenolic compounds, i.e., o-cresol, m-cresol, and p-cresol from aqueous solution have been evaluated employing activated carbon (AC) coated with polymer supported iron nanoparticles (FeNPs). The synthesized FeNPs were characterized by scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction analysis. High correlation coefficient values indicated that the adsorption of phenolic compounds onto AC coated with polyvinylpyrrolidon (PVP) supported FeNPs obey Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms. Higher Freundlich and Langmuir constant values for AC coated with PVP supported FeNPs indicated its greater efficiency than AC. The adsorption data are well represented by both the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms, indicating favourable adsorption of cresols by the adsorbents. Cresols were effectively removed (90 %) by adsorption process from aqueous solution using AC coated with FeNPs. The percentage removal of above phenolic compounds was studied under varying experimental conditions such as pH, temperature, adsorbent dosage, and contact time. The adsorption of phenolic compounds is quite sensitive to pH of the suspension and optimum uptake value was found at pH 7.0. Temperature also has a favorable effect on adsorption when varied from 20 to 50°C. On the contrary, beyond 30°C, a decrease in the adsorption was noticed.

  19. Degradation of phenolic compounds by the lignocellulose deconstructing thermoacidophilic bacterium Alicyclobacillus Acidocaldarius

    DOE PAGES

    Aston, John E.; Apel, William A.; Lee, Brady D.; ...

    2015-11-05

    Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius, a thermoacidophilic bacterium, has a repertoire of thermo- and acid-stable enzymes that deconstruct lignocellulosic compounds. The work presented here describes the ability of A. acidocaldarius to reduce the concentration of the phenolic compounds: phenol, ferulic acid, ρ-coumaric acid and sinapinic acid during growth conditions. The extent and rate of the removal of these compounds were significantly increased by the presence of micro-molar copper concentrations, suggesting activity by copper oxidases that have been identified in the genome of A. acidocaldarius. Substrate removal kinetics was first order for phenol, ferulic acid, ρ-coumaric acid and sinapinic acid in the presence ofmore » 50 μM copper sulfate. In addition, laccase enzyme assays of cellular protein fractions suggested significant activity on a lignin analog between the temperatures of 45 and 90 °C. As a result, this work shows the potential for A. acidocaldarius to degrade phenolic compounds, demonstrating potential relevance to biofuel production and other industrial processes.« less

  20. Degradation of phenolic compounds by the lignocellulose deconstructing thermoacidophilic bacterium Alicyclobacillus Acidocaldarius

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, John E.; Apel, William A.; Lee, Brady D.; Thompson, David N.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Newby, Deborah T.; Reed, David. W.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2015-11-05

    Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius, a thermoacidophilic bacterium, has a repertoire of thermo- and acid-stable enzymes that deconstruct lignocellulosic compounds. The work presented here describes the ability of A. acidocaldarius to reduce the concentration of the phenolic compounds: phenol, ferulic acid, ρ-coumaric acid and sinapinic acid during growth conditions. The extent and rate of the removal of these compounds were significantly increased by the presence of micro-molar copper concentrations, suggesting activity by copper oxidases that have been identified in the genome of A. acidocaldarius. Substrate removal kinetics was first order for phenol, ferulic acid, ρ-coumaric acid and sinapinic acid in the presence of 50 μM copper sulfate. In addition, laccase enzyme assays of cellular protein fractions suggested significant activity on a lignin analog between the temperatures of 45 and 90 °C. As a result, this work shows the potential for A. acidocaldarius to degrade phenolic compounds, demonstrating potential relevance to biofuel production and other industrial processes.

  1. Soluble phenolic compounds in different cultivars of red clover and alfalfa, and their implication for protection against proteolysis and ammonia production in ruminants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Red clover contains phenolic compounds with roles in inhibiting proteolysis and loss of amino acids as ammonia. Alfalfa has been found to have lower concentrations of phenolic compounds, but few alfalfa and red clover cultivars have been compared for phenolic content. Total soluble phenolic compou...

  2. Candenatenins A-F, phenolic compounds from the heartwood of Dalbergia candenatensis.

    PubMed

    Cheenpracha, Sarot; Karalai, Chatchanok; Ponglimanont, Chanita; Kanjana-Opas, Akkharawit

    2009-08-01

    Chemical investigation of the CH2Cl2 extract of the heartwood of Dalbergia candenatensis affored six new phenolic compounds, designated candenatenins A-F (1-6), as well as four known compounds, (2R,3R)-3,5-dihydroxy-7-methoxyflavanone (7), 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-8,9-methylenedioxypterocarpan (8), nutiducol (9), and sophoraflavanone A (10). The structures of the new compounds were determined by 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopic studies as well as by MS analysis. The cytotoxic activities of the isolated compounds are also reported.

  3. Antagonism between lipid-derived reactive carbonyls and phenolic compounds in the Strecker degradation of amino acids.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Rosa M; Hidalgo, Francisco J; Zamora, Rosario

    2016-03-01

    The Strecker-type degradation of phenylalanine in the presence of 2-pentanal and phenolic compounds was studied to investigate possible interactions that either promote or inhibit the formation of Strecker aldehydes in food products. Phenylacetaldehyde formation was promoted by 2-pentenal and also by o- and p-diphenols, but not by m-diphenols. This is consequence of the ability of phenolic compounds to be converted into reactive carbonyls and produce the Strecker degradation of the amino acid. When 2-pentenal and phenolic compounds were simultaneously present, an antagonism among them was observed. This antagonism is suggested to be a consequence of the ability of phenolic compounds to either react with both 2-pentenal and phenylacetaldehyde, or compete with other carbonyl compounds for the amino acids, a function that is determined by their structure. All these results suggest that carbonyl-phenol reactions may be used to modulate flavor formation produced in food products by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls.

  4. Variation in phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in apple seeds of seven cultivars

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Fan, Mingtao; Ran, Junjian; Zhang, Tingjing; Sun, Huiye; Dong, Mei; Zhang, Zhe; Zheng, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Polyphenols are the predominant ingredients in apple seeds. However, few data are available on the phenolic profile or antioxidant activity in apple seeds in previous researches. In this study, low-molecular-weight phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in seeds, peels, and flesh of seven apple cultivars grown in northwest China were measured and analyzed using HPLC and FRAP, DPPH, ABTS assays, respectively. HPLC analysis revealed phloridzin as the dominant phenolic compound in the seeds with its contents being 240.45–864.42 mg/100 gDW. Total phenolic content (TPC) measured by the Folin–Ciocalteu assay in apple seed extracts of seven cultivars ranged from 5.74 (Golden Delicious) to 17.44 (Honeycrisp) mgGAE/gDW. Apple seeds showed higher antioxidant activity than peels or flesh; antioxidant activity in seeds varied from 57.59 to 397.70 μM Trolox equivalents (TE)/g FW for FRAP, from 37.56 to 64.31 μM TE/g FW for DPPH, and from 220.52 to 708.02 μM TE/g FW for ABTS. TPC in apple seeds was significantly correlated with all three assays. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that Honeycrisp was characterized with high contents of total polyphenols and phloridzin. Our findings suggest that phenolic extracts from apple seeds have good commercial potential as a promising antioxidant for use in food or cosmetics. PMID:27081364

  5. Enzyme-Enhanced Extraction of Phenolic Compounds and Proteins from Flaxseed Meal

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Bernardo Dias; Barreto, Daniel Weingart; Coelho, Maria Alice Zarur

    2013-01-01

    Flaxseed (Linum usitatissimum) meal, the main byproduct of the flaxseed oil extraction process, is composed mainly of proteins, mucilage, and phenolic compounds. The extraction methods of phenolics either commonly employed the use of mixed solvents (dioxane/ethanol, water/acetone, water/methanol, and water/ethanol) or are done with the aid of alkaline, acid, or enzymatic hydrolysis. This work aimed at the study of optimal conditions for a clean process, using renewable solvents and enzymes, for the extraction of phenolics and proteins from flaxseed meal. After a screening of the most promising commercial preparations based on different carbohydrases and proteases, a central composite rotatable design and a mixture design were applied, achieving as optimal results a solution containing 6.6 and 152 g kg−1 meal of phenolics and proteins, respectively. The statistical approach used in the present study for the enzyme-enhanced extraction of phenolics and proteins from the major flaxseed byproduct was effective. By means of the sequential experimental design methodology, the extraction of such compounds was increased 10-fold and 14-fold, when compared to a conventional nonenzymatic extraction. PMID:25969774

  6. The effects of plant growth regulators and L-phenylalanine on phenolic compounds of sweet basil.

    PubMed

    Koca, Nülüfer; Karaman, Şengül

    2015-01-01

    The effects of methyl jasmonate (MeJA), spermine (Spm), epibrassinolide (EBL) and l-phenylalanine on sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) were studied to determine the amount of phenolic compounds and enzymatic activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL). Total phenolic and total flavonoid contents of sweet basils were determined by a spectrophotometer, and individual phenolic compounds and activity of PAL were analysed by HPLC/UV. The highest total phenolic (6.72 mg GAE/g) and total flavonoid contents (0.92 mg QE/g) obtained from 1.0 mM Spm+MeJA application. Rosmarinic acid (RA) and caffeic acid contents significantly enhanced after the applications but no such differences observed in chicoric acid content or PAL activity. RA was the main phenolic acid in all samples and its concentration varied from 1.04 to 2.70 mg/gFW. As a result the combinations of Spm+MeJA and EBL+MeJA can induce secondary metabolites effectively and those interactions play important role in the production of phytochemicals in plants.

  7. Biodegradation of dimethylphenols by bacteria with different ring-cleavage pathways of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Viggor, Signe; Heinaru, Eeva; Loponen, Jyrki; Merimaa, Merike; Tenno, Toomas; Heinaru, Ain

    2002-01-01

    The biodegradation of 3,4, 2,4, 2,3, 2,6 and 3,5-dimethylphenol in combination with phenol and p-cresol by axenic and mixed cultures of bacteria was investigated. The strains, which degrade phenol and p-cresol through different catabolic pathways, were isolated from river water continuously polluted with phenolic compounds of leachate of oil shale semicoke ash heaps. The proper research of degradation of 2,4 and 3,4-dimethylphenol in multinutrient environments was performed. The degradation of phenolic compounds from mixtures indicated a flux of substrates into different catabolic pathways. Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase activity was induced by dimethylphenols in Pseudomonas mendocina PC1, where meta cleavage pathway was functional during the degradation of p-cresol. In the case of strains PC18 and PC24 of P. fluorescens, the degradation of p-cresol occurred via the protocatechuate ortho pathway and the key enzyme of this pathway, p-cresol methylhydroxylase, was also induced by dimethylphenols. 2,4 and 3,4-dimethylphenols were converted into the dead-end products 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzoic acid and 4-hydroxy-2-methylbenzoic acid. In the degradation of 3,4-dimethylphenol, the transient accumulation of 4-hydroxy-2-methylbenzaldehyde repressed the consumption of phenol from substrate mixtures. A mixed culture of strains with different catabolic types made it possible to overcome the incompatibilities at degradation of studied substrate mixtures.

  8. Computational Studies of Free Radical-Scavenging Properties of Phenolic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Alov, Petko; Tsakovska, Ivanka; Pajeva, Ilza

    2015-01-01

    For more than half a century free radical-induced alterations at cellular and organ levels have been investigated as a probable underlying mechanism of a number of adverse health conditions. Consequently, significant research efforts have been spent for discovering more effective and potent antioxidants / free radical scavengers for treatment of these adverse conditions. Being by far the most used antioxidants among natural and synthetic compounds, mono- and polyphenols have been the focus of both experimental and computational research on mechanisms of free radical scavenging. Quantum chemical studies have provided a significant amount of data on mechanisms of reactions between phenolic compounds and free radicals outlining a number of properties with a key role for the radical scavenging activity and capacity of phenolics. The obtained quantum chemical parameters together with other molecular descriptors have been used in quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses for the design of new more effective phenolic antioxidants and for identification of the most useful natural antioxidant phenolics. This review aims at presenting the state of the art in quantum chemical and QSAR studies of phenolic antioxidants and at analysing the trends observed in the field in the last decade. PMID:25547098

  9. Accumulation of Phenolic Compounds and Expression Profiles of Phenolic Acid Biosynthesis-Related Genes in Developing Grains of White, Purple, and Red Wheat.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongyun; Li, Yaoguang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Chenyang; Qin, Haixia; Ding, Huina; Xie, Yingxin; Guo, Tiancai

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols in whole grain wheat have potential health benefits, but little is known about the expression patterns of phenolic acid biosynthesis genes and the accumulation of phenolic acid compounds in different-colored wheat grains. We found that purple wheat varieties had the highest total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity. Among phenolic acid compounds, bound ferulic acid, vanillic, and caffeic acid levels were significantly higher in purple wheat than in white and red wheat, while total soluble phenolic acid, soluble ferulic acid, and vanillic acid levels were significantly higher in purple and red wheat than in white wheat. Ferulic acid and syringic acid levels peaked at 14 days after anthesis (DAA), whereas p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid levels peaked at 7 DAA, and vanillic acid levels gradually increased during grain filling and peaked near ripeness (35 DAA). Nine phenolic acid biosynthesis pathway genes (TaPAL1, TaPAL2, TaC3H1, TaC3H2, TaC4H, Ta4CL1, Ta4CL2, TaCOMT1, and TaCOMT2) exhibited three distinct expression patterns during grain filling, which may be related to the different phenolic acids levels. White wheat had higher phenolic acid contents and relatively high gene expression at the early stage, while purple wheat had the highest phenolic acid contents and gene expression levels at later stages. These results suggest that the expression of phenolic acid biosynthesis genes may be closely related to phenolic acids accumulation.

  10. Accumulation of Phenolic Compounds and Expression Profiles of Phenolic Acid Biosynthesis-Related Genes in Developing Grains of White, Purple, and Red Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dongyun; Li, Yaoguang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Chenyang; Qin, Haixia; Ding, Huina; Xie, Yingxin; Guo, Tiancai

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols in whole grain wheat have potential health benefits, but little is known about the expression patterns of phenolic acid biosynthesis genes and the accumulation of phenolic acid compounds in different-colored wheat grains. We found that purple wheat varieties had the highest total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant activity. Among phenolic acid compounds, bound ferulic acid, vanillic, and caffeic acid levels were significantly higher in purple wheat than in white and red wheat, while total soluble phenolic acid, soluble ferulic acid, and vanillic acid levels were significantly higher in purple and red wheat than in white wheat. Ferulic acid and syringic acid levels peaked at 14 days after anthesis (DAA), whereas p-coumaric acid and caffeic acid levels peaked at 7 DAA, and vanillic acid levels gradually increased during grain filling and peaked near ripeness (35 DAA). Nine phenolic acid biosynthesis pathway genes (TaPAL1, TaPAL2, TaC3H1, TaC3H2, TaC4H, Ta4CL1, Ta4CL2, TaCOMT1, and TaCOMT2) exhibited three distinct expression patterns during grain filling, which may be related to the different phenolic acids levels. White wheat had higher phenolic acid contents and relatively high gene expression at the early stage, while purple wheat had the highest phenolic acid contents and gene expression levels at later stages. These results suggest that the expression of phenolic acid biosynthesis genes may be closely related to phenolic acids accumulation. PMID:27148345

  11. Phenol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 02 / 006 TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF Phenol ( CAS No . 108 - 95 - 2 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2002 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington D.C . DISCLAIMER Mention of trade names or commercial products does n

  12. Componential profile and amylase inhibiting activity of phenolic compounds from Calendula officinalis L. leaves.

    PubMed

    Olennikov, Daniil N; Kashchenko, Nina I

    2014-01-01

    An ethanolic extract and its ethyl acetate-soluble fraction from leaves of Calendula officinalis L. (Asteraceae) were found to show an inhibitory effect on amylase. From the crude extract fractions, one new phenolic acid glucoside, 6'-O-vanilloyl-β-D-glucopyranose, was isolated, together with twenty-four known compounds including five phenolic acid glucosides, five phenylpropanoids, five coumarins, and nine flavonoids. Their structures were elucidated based on chemical and spectral data. The main components, isoquercitrin, isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, and quercetin-3-O-(6''-acetyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside, exhibited potent inhibitory effects on amylase.

  13. Inhibitory Effect of Furanic and Phenolic Compounds on Exoelectrogenesis in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell Bioanode

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2016-09-09

    Furanic and phenolic compounds are 20 lignocellulose-derived compounds known to inhibit to H2- and ethanol- producing microorganisms in dark fermentation. Bioelectrochemical conversion of furanic and phenolic compounds to electricity or H2 has recently been demonstrated as a productive method to use these compounds. However, potential inhibitory effect of furanic and phenolic compounds on exoelectrogenesis in bioelectrochemical systems is not well understood. This study systematically investigated the inhibitory effect of furfural (FF), 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), syringic acid (SA), vanillic acid (VA), and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) on exoelectrogenesis in the bioanode of a microbial electrolysis cell. A mixture of these five compounds atmore » an increasing initial total concentration from 0.8 to 8.0 g/L resulted in current decrease up to 91%. The observed inhibition primarily affected exoelectrogenesis, instead of non-exoelectrogenic biotransformation pathways (e.g., fermentation) of the five compounds. Furthermore, the parent compounds at a high concentration, as opposed to their biotransformation products, were responsible for the observed inhibition. Tests with individual compounds show that all five parent compounds contributed to the observed inhibition by the mixture. The IC50 (concentration resulting in 50% current decrease) was estimated as 2.7 g/L for FF, 3.0 g/L for HMF, 1.9 g/L for SA, 2.1 g/L for VA and 2.0 g/L for HBA. Nevertheless, these compounds below their non-inhibitory concentrations jointly resulted in significant inhibition as a mixture. Catechol and phenol, which were persistent biotransformation products of the mixture, inhibited exoelectrogens at high concentrations, but to a lesser extent than the parent compounds. Recovery of exoelectrogenesis from inhibition by all compounds was observed, except for catechol, which resulted in irreversible inhibition. The reversibility of inhibition, as well as the observed difference in recovery

  14. New phenolic compounds from the twigs of Artocarpus heterophyllus.

    PubMed

    Di, X; Wang, S; Wang, B; Liu, Y; Yuan, H; Lou, H; Wang, X

    2013-02-01

    Two new chalcones, artocarpusins A and B (1 and 2), one new flavone, artocarpusin C (3), one new 2-arylbenzofuran derivative, artocarstilene A (4), and 15 flavonoids were isolated from the twigs of Artocarpus heterophyllus. Their structures were established on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis. Compounds 9 and 16 showed moderate inhibitory activity on the proliferation of the PC-3 and H460 cell lines.

  15. A new isorhamnetin glycoside and other phenolic compounds from Callianthemum taipaicum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong-Mei; Pu, Wen-Jun; Wang, Yong-Hong; Zhang, Yu-Juan; Wang, Shan-Shan

    2012-04-17

    A new flavonol glycoside together with five known phenolic compounds were isolated from the whole herb of Callianthemum taipaicum. The compounds were identified as isorhamnetin-3-O-α-L-arabinoside-7-O-β-D-glucoside (1), isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-glucoside (2), dibutyl phthalate (3), (+)-1-hydroxylpinoresinol-4'-β-D-glucoside (4), pinoresinol-4'-O-β-D-glucoside (5) and 2-phenylethyl-β-primeveroside (6). Compound 1 was identified as a new flavonol glycoside. The compound 6 was isolated for the first time as natural product. All compounds were isolated for the first time from the Callianthemum genus. Furthermore, the 2D-NMR data of the four known compounds 2-5 are given for the first time in this paper. All the structures were identified on the basis of detailed spectral analysis. The compounds 1 and 4 exhibited certain antifungal activity.

  16. Removal of organic pollutants by surfactant modified zeolite: comparison between ionizable phenolic compounds and non-ionizable organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jie; Meng, Wenna; Wu, Deyi; Zhang, Zhenjia; Kong, Hainan

    2012-09-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the adsorption capability and mechanism of hexadecyltrimethylammonium modified zeolite, which was synthesized from coal fly ash, for the removal of ionizable phenolic compounds (phenol, p-chlorophenol and bisphenol A, with different pK(a)) and non-ionizable organic compounds (aniline, nitrobenzene, and naphthalene, with different hydrophobicity). The obtained zeolite was identified as type Na-P1 (Na(6)Al(6)Si(10)O(32)·12H(2)O, JCPDS code 39-0219), which is classified into the gismondine group with a pore size of 3.1 Å × 4.5 Å [100] and 2.8 Å × 4.8 Å [101]. The adsorption of the two kinds of organic compounds was due to loaded surfactant bilayer because modified zeolite showed great ability for the removal of organic chemicals while little adsorption by zeolite was observed. The isotherm data of ionizable compounds fitted well to the Langmuir model but those of non-ionizable chemicals followed a linear equation. Uptake of ionizable compounds depended greatly on pH, increasing at alkaline pH conditions. In contrary, adsorption of non-ionizable chemicals was essentially the same at all pH levels studied. The adsorption of both kinds of organic compounds correlated well to k(ow) value, suggesting that more hydrophobic organic contaminants are more easily retained by modified zeolite. Based on the different adsorption behavior, the uptake of non-ionizable pollutants was thought to be a single partitioning process into the surfactant bilayer. For ionizable compounds, however, interaction of the phenol group(s) with the positively charged "head" of surfactant additionally functions.

  17. Monitoring the apple polyphenol oxidase-modulated adduct formation of phenolic and amino compounds.

    PubMed

    Reinkensmeier, Annika; Steinbrenner, Katrin; Homann, Thomas; Bußler, Sara; Rohn, Sascha; Rawel, Hashadrai M

    2016-03-01

    Minimally processed fruit products such as smoothies are increasingly coming into demand. However, they are often combined with dairy ingredients. In this combination, phenolic compounds, polyphenoloxidases, and amino compounds could interact. In this work, a model approach is presented where apple serves as a source for a high polyphenoloxidase activity for modulating the reactions. The polyphenoloxidase activity ranged from 128 to 333nakt/mL in different apple varieties. From these, 'Braeburn' was found to provide the highest enzymatic activity. The formation and stability of resulting chromogenic conjugates was investigated. The results show that such adducts are not stable and possible degradation mechanisms leading to follow-up products formed are proposed. Finally, apple extracts were used to modify proteins and their functional properties characterized. There were retaining antioxidant properties inherent to phenolic compounds after adduct formation. Consequently, such interactions may also be utilized to improve the textural quality of food products.

  18. Riboflavin Phototransformation on the Changes of Antioxidant Capacities in Phenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Song, Juhee; Seol, Nam Gyu; Kim, Mi-Ja; Lee, JaeHwan

    2016-08-01

    Eight phenolic compounds including: p-coumaric acid, vanillic acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, trolox, quercetin, curcumin, and resveratrol were treated with riboflavin (RF) photosensitization and in vitro antioxidant capacities of the mixtures were determined by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2' azino bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays. Mixtures containing p-coumaric acid and vanillic acid under RF photosensitization showed increases in ferric ion reducing ability and radical scavenging activity of DPPH, whereas mixtures of other compounds had decreases in both radical scavenging ability and ferric reducing antioxidant power. Hydroxycoumaric acid and conjugated hydroxycoumaric and coumaric acids were tentatively identified from RF photosensitized p-coumaric acid, whereas dimmers of vanillic acid were tentatively identified from RF photosensitized vanillic acid. RF photosensitization may be a useful method to enhance antioxidant properties like ferric ion reducing abilities of some selected phenolic compounds.

  19. From Olive Fruits to Olive Oil: Phenolic Compound Transfer in Six Different Olive Cultivars Grown under the Same Agronomical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Talhaoui, Nassima; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; León, Lorenzo; De la Rosa, Raúl; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Phenolic compounds are responsible of the nutritional and sensory quality of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO). The composition of phenolic compounds in EVOO is related to the initial content of phenolic compounds in the olive-fruit tissues and the activity of enzymes acting on these compounds during the industrial process to produce the oil. In this work, the phenolic composition was studied in six major cultivars grown in the same orchard under the same agronomical and environmental conditions in an effort to test the effects of cultivars on phenolic composition in fruits and oils as well as on transfer between matrices. The phenolic fractions were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. A total of 33 phenolic compounds were determined in the fruit samples and a total of 20 compounds in their corresponding oils. Qualitative and quantitative differences in phenolic composition were found among cultivars in both matrices, as well as regarding the transfer rate of phenolic compounds from fruits to oil. The results also varied according to the different phenolic groups evaluated, with secoiridoids registering the highest transfer rates from fruits to oils. Moreover, wide-ranging differences have been noticed between cultivars for the transfer rates of secoiridoids (4.36%–65.63% of total transfer rate) and for flavonoids (0.18%–0.67% of total transfer rate). ‘Picual’ was the cultivar that transferred secoiridoids to oil at the highest rate, whereas ‘Changlot Real’ was the cultivar that transferred flavonoids at the highest rates instead. Principal-component analysis confirmed a strong genetic effect on the basis of the phenolic profile both in the olive fruits and in the oils. PMID:26959010

  20. From Olive Fruits to Olive Oil: Phenolic Compound Transfer in Six Different Olive Cultivars Grown under the Same Agronomical Conditions.

    PubMed

    Talhaoui, Nassima; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; León, Lorenzo; De la Rosa, Raúl; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-03-04

    Phenolic compounds are responsible of the nutritional and sensory quality of extra-virgin olive oil (EVOO). The composition of phenolic compounds in EVOO is related to the initial content of phenolic compounds in the olive-fruit tissues and the activity of enzymes acting on these compounds during the industrial process to produce the oil. In this work, the phenolic composition was studied in six major cultivars grown in the same orchard under the same agronomical and environmental conditions in an effort to test the effects of cultivars on phenolic composition in fruits and oils as well as on transfer between matrices. The phenolic fractions were identified and quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry. A total of 33 phenolic compounds were determined in the fruit samples and a total of 20 compounds in their corresponding oils. Qualitative and quantitative differences in phenolic composition were found among cultivars in both matrices, as well as regarding the transfer rate of phenolic compounds from fruits to oil. The results also varied according to the different phenolic groups evaluated, with secoiridoids registering the highest transfer rates from fruits to oils. Moreover, wide-ranging differences have been noticed between cultivars for the transfer rates of secoiridoids (4.36%-65.63% of total transfer rate) and for flavonoids (0.18%-0.67% of total transfer rate). 'Picual' was the cultivar that transferred secoiridoids to oil at the highest rate, whereas 'Changlot Real' was the cultivar that transferred flavonoids at the highest rates instead. Principal-component analysis confirmed a strong genetic effect on the basis of the phenolic profile both in the olive fruits and in the oils.

  1. Effects of plant antimicrobial phenolic compounds on virulence of the genus Pectobacterium.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Janak Raj; Burdman, Saul; Lipsky, Alexander; Yedidia, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Pectobacterium spp. are among the most devastating necrotrophs, attacking more than 50% of angiosperm plant orders. Their virulence strategy is based mainly on the secretion of exoenzymes that degrade the cell walls of their hosts, providing nutrients to the bacteria, but conversely, exposing the bacteria to plant defense compounds. In the present study, we screened plant-derived antimicrobial compounds, mainly phenolic acids and polyphenols, for their ability to affect virulence determinants including motility, biofilm formation and extracellular enzyme activities of different Pectobacteria: Pectobacterium carotovorum, P. brasiliensis, P. atrosepticum and P. aroidearum. In addition, virulence assays were performed on three different plant hosts following exposure of the bacteria to selected phenolic compounds. These experiments showed that cinnamic, coumaric, syringic and salicylic acids and catechol can considerably reduce disease severity, ranging from 20 to 100%. The reduced disease severity was not only the result of reduced bacterial growth, but also of a direct effect of the compounds on important bacterial virulence determinants, including pectolytic and proteolytic exoenzyme activities, that were reduced by 50-100%. This is the first report revealing a direct effect of phenolic compounds on virulence factors in a wide range of Pectobacterium strains.

  2. Inhibition of cellulose enzymatic hydrolysis by laccase-derived compounds from phenols.

    PubMed

    Oliva-Taravilla, Alfredo; Tomás-Pejó, Elia; Demuez, Marie; González-Fernández, Cristina; Ballesteros, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The presence of inhibitors compounds after pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials affects the saccharification and fermentation steps in bioethanol production processes. Even though, external addition of laccases selectively removes the phenolic compounds from lignocellulosic prehydrolysates, when it is coupled to saccharification step, lower hydrolysis yields are attained. Vanillin, syringaldehyde and ferulic acid are phenolic compounds commonly found in wheat-straw prehydrolysate after steam-explosion pretreatment. These three phenolic compounds were used in this study to elucidate the inhibitory mechanisms of laccase-derived compounds after laccase treatment. Reaction products derived from laccase oxidation of vanillin and syringaldehyde showed to be the strongest inhibitors. The presence of these products causes a decrement on enzymatic hydrolysis yield of a model cellulosic substrate (Sigmacell) of 46.6 and 32.6%, respectively at 24 h. Moreover, a decrease in more than 50% of cellulase and β-glucosidase activities was observed in presence of laccase and vanillin. This effect was attributed to coupling reactions between phenoxyl radicals and enzymes. On the other hand, when the hydrolysis of Sigmacell was performed in presence of prehydrolysate from steam-exploded wheat straw a significant inhibition on enzymatic hydrolysis was observed independently of laccase treatment. This result pointed out that the other components of wheat-straw prehydrolysate are affecting the enzymatic hydrolysis to a higher extent than the possible laccase-derived products.

  3. Evolution of colour and phenolic compounds during Garnacha Tintorera grape raisining.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo-González, M; Cancho-Grande, B; Simal-Gándara, J

    2013-12-01

    The off-vine drying is one of the most important steps in the production of a high quality naturally sweet wine. However, only few studies have analyzed the changes in colour and phenolic compounds of the grapes throughout the process. In this work, UV/Vis spectrophotometry and HPLC/DAD-ESI/MS were applied to determine, respectively, the evolution of colour and phenolic compounds in the red grapes of Garnacha Tintorera during the raisining process. The total water loss in 83 days was about 62% and the sugar concentration rose from 225 to 464 g L(-1). Browning and low-medium molecular weight compounds increase during the dehydration process. In CIELab coordinates, raisining decreases a(*) (red/green) and lightness and increases b(∗) (yellow/blue), colour saturation and hue angle. In general, most of the phenolic compounds determined (anthocyanins, flavonols, esters of hydroxycinnamic acids, flavan-3-ol monomers and proanthocyanidins) increase but to a lesser extent than expected because of the water loss of the grapes during drying. The lower increase was observed for esters of hydroxicinnamic acids suggesting these compounds could undergo strong enzymatic degradation. Despite this, both the terminal and the extension subunit compositions show little changes, while the mean degree of polymerization of proanthocyanidins decreases as raisining progresses.

  4. Phenolic compounds: The inhibition effect on polyol pathway enzymes.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Hatice Esra; Beydemir, Şükrü

    2017-03-25

    The polyol pathway called as sorbitol way is a small part of glycose metabolism. The pathway is regarded as an important element in the pathogenesis of various diabetic complications in individuals with diabetes mellitus. The pathway plays a crucial role in hyperglycemia. The polyol pathway contains two enzymes as aldose reductase (AR) and sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH). In the present study, AR and SDH were purified from sheep liver by using simple chromatographic methods. AR was purified with a yield of 2.11% and approximately 162 fold and SDH was purified with a yield of 0.53% and approximately 9.07 purification fold. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) was performed to check the purity and determine the subunit molecular weights of the enzymes. Subunit molecular weights of AR and SDH were 38.82 kDa and 37.74 kDa, respectively. Optimal pH, optimal ionic strength, optimal temperature, activation energy, activation enthalpy, Q10 value and stable pH were determined as 5.5, 10 mM, 50 °C, 2.16 kcal, 1.52 kcal, 1.33 and 8.0 for AR enzyme, respectively. The kinetic parameters Km and Vmax for AR were determined as 0.45 mM and 0.55 EU/mL, respectively. These parameters were studied for only AR in the present study, because it was previously studied for SDH. IC50 values of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 3-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, salicylic acid, p-coumaric acid, ellagic acid, gallic acid, ferrulic acid and caffeic acid on AR and SDH activities were found as 120, 92.0, 49.0, 39.0, 40.0, 690, 7.00, 103, 84.0, 3.00 μM for AR enzyme and 5060, 8350, 6730, 7070, 5780, 24.0, 13.0, 26.0, 17.0, 21.0 μM for SDH enzyme, respectively. According to these results, caffeic acid was the strongest inhibitor for AR activity compared to the other phenolic acids and ellagic acid was also the strongest inhibitor for SDH activity.

  5. Determination of phenolic compounds and their antioxidant activity in fruits and cereals.

    PubMed

    Stratil, P; Klejdus, B; Kubán, V

    2007-03-15

    Three methods, FCM (with Folin-Ciocalteu reagent), PBM (Price and Butler) and AAPM (with 4-aminoantipyrine) for assessment of phenolic compounds and three commonly used methods, TEAC (Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity), DPPH (with diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl radical), and FRAP (ferric reducing antioxidant power) for evaluation of antioxidant capacity, were modified to a semimicroscale (total volume 1ml) with minimum consumption (to 100mul) of a sample and thereby applicable for fast screening. Appropriate standards and extracts of 17 kinds of fruit and six kinds of cereal were assessed for total content of phenolic compounds and total antioxidant capacity by each of these methods. The results of analyses of commonly used standards (gallic, caffeic and ferulic acids, (+)-catechin, Trolox, fenol and FeSO(4)) for these methods and identical plant extract showed different reactivity of principal reagent of the methods with individual standards and therefore with phenolic substances of extracts as well. However, the trends of the measured values of extracts could be compared, though their absolute values differ proportionally. At assessments of phenolic compounds it is important to determine content of ascorbic acid at roughly the same time and correct the obtained values according to its contribution to the increase in absorbance calculated on the basis of absorbance equations, especially for samples with a higher content. The same is true for reducing saccharides; they can significantly "elevate" values of contents of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities (by even more than 50%), especially in samples of sweeter fruits. The saccharides should therefore be removed or a correction applied reflecting their concentration.

  6. Evaluation of total phenolic compounds and insecticidal and antioxidant activities of tomato hairy root extract.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harpal; Dixit, Sameer; Verma, Praveen Chandra; Singh, Pradhyumna Kumar

    2014-03-26

    Tomatoes are one of the most consumed crops in the whole world because of their versatile importance in dietary food as well as many industrial applications. They are also a rich source of secondary metabolites, such as phenolics and flavonoids. In the present study, we described a method to produce these compounds from hairy roots of tomato (THRs). Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain A4 was used to induce hairy roots in the tomato explants. The Ri T-DNA was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the rolC gene. Biomass accumulation of hairy root lines was 1.7-3.7-fold higher compared to in vitro grown roots. Moreover, THRs efficiently produced several phenolic compounds, such as rutin, quercetin, kaempferol, gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, ferulic acid, colorogenic acid, and caffeic acid. Gallic acid [34.02 μg/g of dry weight (DW)] and rutin (20.26 μg/g of DW) were the major phenolic acid and flavonoid produced by THRs, respectively. The activities of reactive oxygen species enzymes (catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase) were quantified. The activity of catalase in THRs was 0.97 ± 0.03 mM H2O2 min(-1) g(-1), which was 1.22-fold (0.79 ± 0.09 mM H2O2 min(-1) g(-1)) and 1.59-fold (0.61 ± 0.06 mM H2O2 min(-1) g(-1)) higher than field grown and in vitro grown roots, respectively. At 100 μL/g concentration, the phenolic compound extract caused 53.34 and 40.00% mortality against Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura, respectively, after 6 days. Surviving larvae of H. armigera and S. litura on the phenolic compound extract after 6 days showed 85.43 and 86.90% growth retardation, respectively.

  7. Phenolic compound profiles and antioxidant capacity of Persea americana Mill. peels and seeds of two varieties.

    PubMed

    Kosińska, Agnieszka; Karamać, Magdalena; Estrella, Isabel; Hernández, Teresa; Bartolomé, Begoña; Dykes, Gary A

    2012-05-09

    Avocado processing by the food and cosmetic industries yields a considerable amount of phenolic-rich byproduct such as peels and seeds. Utilization of these byproducts would be favorable from an economic point of view. Methanolic (80%) extracts obtained from lyophilized ground peels and seeds of avocado (Persea americana Mill.) of the Hass and Shepard varieties were characterized for their phenolic compound profiles using the HPLC-PAD technique. The structures of the identified compounds were subsequently unambiguously confirmed by ESI-MS. Compositional analysis revealed that the extracts contained four polyphenolic classes: flavanol monomers, proanthocyanidins, hydroxycinnamic acids, and flavonol glycosides. The presence of 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid, 3-O-p-coumaroylquinic acid, and procyanidin A trimers was identified in seeds of both varieties. Intervarietal differences were apparent in the phenolic compound profiles of peels. Peels of the Shepard variety were devoid of (+)-catechin and procyanidin dimers, which were present in the peels of the Hass variety. Peels of both varieties contained 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid and quercetin derivatives. The differences in the phenolic profiles between varietals were also apparent in the different antioxidant activity of the extracts. The peel extracts had a higher total phenolic compound content and antioxidant activity when compared to the seed extracts. The highest TEAC and ORAC values were apparent in peels of the Haas variety in which they amounted to 0.16 and 0.47 mmol Trolox/g DW, respectively. No significant (p > 0.05) differences were apparent between the TEAC values of seeds of the two varieties but the ORAC values differed significantly (p < 0.05). Overall these findings indicate that both the seeds and peel of avocado can be utilized as a functional food ingredient or as an antioxidant additive.

  8. Phenol-Rich Compounds Sweet Gel: A Statistically More Effective Antibiotic than Cloxacillin Against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Dashtdar, Mehrab; Dashtdar, Mohammad Reza; Dashtdar, Babak; Khan, Gazala Afreen; Kardi, Karima

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to obtain a natural antibiotic from Phenol-rich compounds; for the dressing and the treatment of chronic wounds. Methods: The Phenol-rich compound sweet gel was prepared by blending four natural herbal extracts, Acacia catechu (L.F.), Momia (Shilajit), Castanea sativa, and Ephedra sinica stapf, with combination of a sweet gel medium, including honey, maple saps, Phoenix dactylifera L. (date), pomegranate extract and Azadirachta indica gum as a stabilizer. The combinations were screened by using a well-diffusion assay with cloxacillin as a control. Pseudomonas spp. was tested with our novel antimicrobial compound. The zones of inhibition in agar culture were measured for each individual component and for the compound, and the results were compared with those of the control group which had been treated with cloxacillin. Data were expressed as means ± standard deviations. Quantitative analyses were performed using the paired t-test. Results: The antibiotic effect of the Phenol-rich compound sweet gel was statistically shown to be more significant than that of cloxacillin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Our novel approach to fighting the antibiotic resistance of Pseudomonas proved to be successful. The Phenol-rich compound sweet gel was found to be suitable for use as an alternative medicine and bioactive dressing material, for the treatment of patients with various types of wounds, including burns, venous leg ulcers, ulcers of various etiologies, leg ulcers on the feet of diabetic, unhealed graft sampling sites, abscesses, boils, surgical wounds, necrotic process, post-operative and neonatal wound infection, and should be considered as an alternative to the usual methods of cure. PMID:27695634

  9. Characterization of phenol and cresol biodegradation by compound-specific stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xi; Gilevska, Tetyana; Wetzig, Felix; Dorer, Conrad; Richnow, Hans-Hermann; Vogt, Carsten

    2016-03-01

    Microbial degradation of phenol and cresols can occur under oxic and anoxic conditions by different degradation pathways. One recent technique to take insight into reaction mechanisms is compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). While enzymes and reaction mechanisms of several degradation pathways have been characterized in (bio)chemical studies, associated isotope fractionation patterns have been rarely reported, possibly due to constraints in current analytical methods. In this study, carbon enrichment factors and apparent kinetic isotope effects (AKIEc) of the initial steps of different aerobic and anaerobic phenol and cresols degradation pathways were analyzed by isotope ratio mass spectrometry connected with liquid chromatography (LC-IRMS). Significant isotope fractionation was detected for aerobic ring hydroxylation, anoxic side chain hydroxylation, and anoxic fumarate addition, while anoxic carboxylation reactions produced small and inconsistent fractionation. The results suggest that several microbial degradation pathways of phenol and cresols are detectable in the environment by CSIA.

  10. Determination of phenolic compounds in Yucca gloriosa bark and root by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Montoro, Paola; Skhirtladze, Alexandre; Bassarello, Carla; Perrone, Angela; Kemertelidze, Ether; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2008-08-05

    On the basis of the biological activities shown by yuccaols and gloriosaols from Yucca schidigera and Yucca gloriosa, the content of yuccaols and gloriosaols in two different parts of Y. gloriosa (roots and bark), was determined for each single compound, and compared with phenolic determination in Y. schidigera bark, concluding that Y. gloriosa bark and roots are rich sources of phenolic derivatives structurally related to resveratrol. LC/ESIMS (liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray mass spectrometry) qualitative and an LC/ESIMS/MS (liquid chromatography coupled to tandem electrospray mass spectrometry) quantitative studies of the phenolic fraction of Y. gloriosa were performed. LC/ESIMS/MS multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method previously described for yuccaols in Y. schidigera was applied and optimised for separation and determination of gloriosaols and yuccaols in Y. gloriosa. Due to the sensitivity and the repeatability of the assay, we suggest this method as suitable for industrial quality control of raw materials and final products.

  11. Phenolic compounds and fatty acids from acorns (Quercus spp.), the main dietary constituent of free-ranged Iberian pigs.

    PubMed

    Cantos, Emma; Espín, Juan Carlos; López-Bote, Clemente; de la Hoz, Lorenzo; Ordóñez, Juan A; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2003-10-08

    The aim of the present work was to identify and quantify the phenolic compounds and fatty acids in acorns from Quercus ilex, Quercus rotundifolia, and Quercus suber. The concentration of oleic acid was >63% of total fatty acids in all cases, followed by palmitic and linoleic acids at similar concentrations (12-20%). The concentrations of alpha-tocopherol in Q. rotundifolia, Q. ilex, and Q. suber were 19, 31, and 38 mg/kg of dry matter (DM), respectively, whereas the concentrations of gamma-tocopherol were 113, 66, and 74 mg/kg of DM, respectively. Thirty-two different phenolic compounds were distinguished. All of them were gallic acid derivatives, in the form of either galloyl esters of glucose, combinations of galloyl and hexahydroxydiphenoyl esters of glucose, tergallic O- or C-glucosides, or ellagic acid derivatives. Several tergallic acid C-glucosides were also present in the extracts obtained from Q. suber. Acorns from Q. ilex and Q. rotundifolia showed similar polyphenol patterns mainly with gallic acid-like spectra. Chromatograms of Q. suber showed mainly polyphenols with ellagic acid-like spectra. Valoneic acid dilactone was especially abundant in Q. suber skin. The contribution of skin to the total phenolics of the acorn was relatively small in Q. rotundifolia and Q. ilex but relatively high in Q. suber. Skin extracts from Q. suber, Q. rotundifolia, and Q. ilex showed 1.3, 1.4, and 1.0 antioxidant efficiencies, respectively (compared to that of butylhydroxyanisole). Endosperm extracts showed lower capacity to prevent lipid peroxidation than skin extracts.

  12. Phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacities of 10 common edible flowers from China.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Lina; Yang, Jiajia; Jiang, Yirong; Lu, Baiyi; Hu, Yinzhou; Zhou, Fei; Mao, Shuqin; Shen, Canxi

    2014-04-01

    The free and bound phenolic compounds in 10 common Chinese edible flowers were investigated using reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Their antioxidant capacities were evaluated using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radical-scavenging activity, oxygen radical absorption capacity (ORAC), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA). Free factions were more prominent in phenolic content and antioxidant capacity than bound fractions. Paeonia suffruticosa and Flos lonicerae showed the highest total phenolic content (TPC) 235.5 mg chlorogenic acid equivalents/g of dry weight and total flavonoid content 89.38 mg rutin equivalents/g of dry weight. The major phenolic compounds identified were gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, and rutin. P. suffruticosa had the highest antioxidant capacity in the DPPH, ABTS, and ORAC assays, which were 1028, 2065, 990 μmol Trolox equivalents/g of dry weight, respectively, whereas Rosa chinensis had the highest FRAP value (2645 μmol Fe(2+) equivalents /g of dry weight). The P. suffruticosa soluble phenolics had the highest CAA, with the median effective dose (EC50 ) 26.7 and 153 μmol quercetin equivalents/100 g of dry weight in the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and no PBS wash protocol, respectively. TPC was strongly correlated with antioxidant capacity (R = 0.8443 to 0.9978, P < 0.01), which indicated that phenolics were the major contributors to the antioxidant activity of the selected edible flowers.

  13. Bioregeneration of activated carbon and activated rice husk loaded with phenolic compounds: Kinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Ng, S L; Seng, C E; Lim, P E

    2010-01-01

    A kinetic model consisting of first-order desorption and biodegradation processes was developed to describe the bioregeneration of phenol- and p-nitrophenol-loaded powdered activated carbon (PAC) and pyrolyzed rice husk (PRH), respectively. Different dosages of PAC and PRH were loaded with phenol or p-nitrophenol by contacting with the respective phenolic compound at various concentrations. The kinetic model was used to fit the phenol or p-nitrophenol concentration data in the bulk solution during the bioregeneration process to determine the rate constants of desorption, k(d), and biodegradation, k. The results showed that the kinetic model fitted relatively well (R(2)>0.9) to the experimental data for the phenol- and p-nitrophenol-loaded PAC as well as p-nitrophenol-loaded PRH. Comparison of the values of k(d) and k shows that k is much greater than k(d). This indicates clearly that the desorption process is the rate-determining step in bioregeneration and k(d) can be used to characterize the rate of bioregeneration. The trend of the variation of the k(d) values with the dosages of PAC or PRH used suggests that higher rate of bioregeneration can be achieved under non-excess adsorbent dosage condition.

  14. Phenolic compounds in hawthorn (Crataegus grayana) fruits and leaves and changes during fruit ripening.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengzhan; Kallio, Heikki; Yang, Baoru

    2011-10-26

    Phenolics in the fruits and leaves of Crataegus grayana were identified by HPLC-UV-ESI-MS. The contents of these compounds and their changes during autumn were also analyzed. Epicatechin [1-7 mg/g dry mass (DM) in fruits and 1-10 mg/g DM in leaves), procyanidins B2 (2-4 and 1-8 mg/g DM) and C1 (2-4 and 1-8 mg/g DM), hyperoside (0.5-1 and 2-11 mg/g DM), and a quercetin-pentoside (0.3-0.5 and 2-6 mg/g DM) were the major phenolics in both fruits and leaves. C-Glycosyl flavones were present in leaves (2-5 mg/g DM), whereas only trace levels were found in fruits. Ideain and 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid were found only in fruits. An additional 11 phenolics were identified/tentatively identified. Total phenolic contents reached highest levels by the end of August in fruits and by the end of September in leaves. The compositional profiles of phenolics in fruits and leaves of C. grayana were different from those of other Crataegus species.

  15. Seasonal variations of phenolic compounds and biological properties in sage (Salvia officinalis L.).

    PubMed

    Generalić, Ivana; Skroza, Danijela; Surjak, Jana; Možina, Sonja Smole; Ljubenkov, Ivica; Katalinić, Ana; Simat, Vida; Katalinić, Višnja

    2012-02-01

    The aim was to investigate the phenolic content, antioxidant capacity, and antibacterial activity of Dalmatian sage (Salvia officinalis L.) leaves collected during different vegetation periods. Separation and quantification of the individual phenols were performed by reversed-phase (RP)-HPLC coupled with a PDA (photodiode array) detector and using an internal standard, while the contents of total phenols, flavonoids, flavones, and flavonols were determined spectrophotometrically. The antioxidant properties of the sage leaf extracts were evaluated using five different antioxidant assays (FRAP, DPPH, ABTS, Briggs-Rauscher reaction, and β-carotene bleaching). The antimicrobial activity of the extracts was tested against two Gram-positive (Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus) and two Gram-negative (Salmonella Infantis and Escherichia coli) bacterial reference strains. All extracts were extremely rich in phenolic compounds, and provided good antioxidant and antibacterial properties, but the phenophase in which the leaves were collected affected the phenolic composition of the sage extracts and consequently their biological activity. The May Extract, the richest in total flavonoids, showed the best antioxidant properties and the highest antimicrobial activity. Thus, collection of the plants during May seems the best choice for further use of them in the pharmaceutical and food industry.

  16. Assessment of the distribution of phenolic compounds and contribution to the antioxidant activity in Tunisian fig leaves, fruits, skins and pulps using mass spectrometry-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Ammar, Sonda; del Mar Contreras, María; Belguith-Hadrich, Olfa; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Bouaziz, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    The phenolic composition of leaves, fruits, skins and pulps from two F. carica cultivars, 'Temri' and 'Soltani', was studied in order to understand its contribution to the antioxidant activity. A total of 116 compounds were characterized based on the results obtained by reversed-phase ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array and mass spectrometry detection. In general, the leaves of both cultivars and the skin of 'Soltani' presented richer qualitative profiles compared to the other plant parts. Using the negative ionization mode, qualitative profiles of the same part of the studied figs were similar. In this regard, rutin was the main compound in fruits, skins and leaves, but with different relative amounts. Alternatively, an isomer of prenylhydroxygenistein was the major compound in the pulps. In the positive ionization mode, 9 anthocyanins were characterized in 'Soltani' skin, only two of them being also present in the green cultivar 'Temri'. The main anthocyanins were cyanidin 3-rutinoside and cyanidin 3,5-diglucoside, depending on the cultivar and fruit part. In this ionization mode, 15 furanocoumarins were also detected in the leaves of both the studied cultivars with methoxypsoralen and psoralen being the most relatively abundant. In addition, our findings showed a good correlation between the antioxidant activity, total phenol content, and abundance of some phenolic subfamilies such as hydroxybenzoic acids, flavonols, flavones, hydroxycoumarins and furanocoumarins with r > 0.97.

  17. Artificial neural network modelling of the antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds of bananas submitted to different drying treatments.

    PubMed

    Guiné, Raquel P F; Barroca, Maria João; Gonçalves, Fernando J; Alves, Mariana; Oliveira, Solange; Mendes, Mateus

    2015-02-01

    Bananas (cv. Musa nana and Musa cavendishii) fresh and dried by hot air at 50 and 70°C and lyophilisation were analysed for phenolic contents and antioxidant activity. All samples were subject to six extractions (three with methanol followed by three with acetone/water solution). The experimental data served to train a neural network adequate to describe the experimental observations for both output variables studied: total phenols and antioxidant activity. The results show that both bananas are similar and air drying decreased total phenols and antioxidant activity for both temperatures, whereas lyophilisation decreased the phenolic content in a lesser extent. Neural network experiments showed that antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds can be predicted accurately from the input variables: banana variety, dryness state and type and order of extract. Drying state and extract order were found to have larger impact in the values of antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds.

  18. Anti-platelet effects of different phenolic compounds from Yucca schidigera Roezl. bark.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Stochmal, Anna; Oleszek, Wieslaw

    2002-05-01

    Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) has been reported to have a variety of anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, anti-fungal and anti-platelet effects. It occurs naturally in different medicinal plants. Recently, resveratrol and other related phenolic compounds including trans-3,3',5,5'-tetrahydroxy-4'-methoxystilbene and yuccaols A and C were isolated from the bark of Yucca schidigera. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vitro the effects of these compounds on platelet aggregation induced by thrombin and ADP. Pretreatment of platelets with resveratrol or other tested phenolics (1-25 microg/ml) slightly reduced platelet aggregation stimulated by 5 microM ADP (P < 0.05) or 10 microM ADP (P < 0.005). The comparison of the inhibitory effects of tested compound in thrombin-induced platelet aggregation revealed that phenolic showed even stronger antiplatelet actions than resveratrol. These compounds also had an inhibitory effect on the thrombin-induced enzymatic platelet lipid peroxidation determined as the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances.

  19. Modeling of protein and phenolic compound removal from aqueous solutions by electrocoagulation.

    PubMed

    Robić, Goran; Miranda, Everson Alves

    2010-01-01

    Electrocoagulation is a technique basically applied in water and wastewater treatment, but which has a number of potential applications in polymer, protein, drug, and vaccine delivery. In this work, we correlate the current applied between the electrodes to the removal of phenolic compounds or protein from aqueous solutions, but the principle can also be applied to other biological compounds such as plant pigments and sugars. Simple and time-dependent models were developed based on the complex formation between these biological substances and the aluminium hydroxide gel phase. The models developed represent a good agreement with experimental data (R(2) as high as 0.992). Besides construction of the models, the effect of pH on the efficiency of removal of proteins and phenolic compounds was evaluated. It was found that this parameter has significant effect on the efficiency of the electrocoagulation and the maximal removal efficiency for bovine serum albumin and phenolic compound catechin was observed at pH 8.0.

  20. Consequences of plant phenolic compounds for productivity and health of ruminants.

    PubMed

    Waghorn, Garry C; McNabb, Warren C

    2003-05-01

    Plant phenolic compounds are diverse in structure but are characterised by hydroxylated aromatic rings (e.g. flavan-3-ols). They are categorised as secondary metabolites, and their function in plants is often poorly understood. Many plant phenolic compounds are polymerised into larger molecules such as the proanthocyanidins (PA; condensed tannins) and lignins. Only the lignins, PA, oestrogenic compounds and hydrolysable tannins will be considered here. Lignins slow the physical and microbial degradation of ingested feed, because of resilient covalent bonding with hemicellulose and cellulose, rather than any direct effects on the rumen per se. The PA are prevalent in browse and are expressed in the foliage of some legumes (e.g. Lotus spp.), but rarely in grasses. They reduce the nutritive value of poor-quality diets, but can also have substantial benefits for ruminant productivity and health when improved temperate forages are fed. Beneficial effects are dependent on the chemical and physical structure, and concentration of the PA in the diet, but they have been shown to improve live-weight gain, milk yield and protein concentration, and ovulation rate. They prevent bloat in cattle, reduce gastrointestinal nematode numbers, flystrike and CH4 production. Some phenolic compounds (e.g. coumestans) cause temporary infertility, whilst those produced by Fusarium fungi found in pasture, silage or stored grains can cause permanent infertility. The HT may be toxic because products of their metabolism can cause liver damage and other metabolic disorders.

  1. Phenolic compounds in chestnut (Castanea sativa Mill.) heartwood. Effect of toasting at cooperage.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miriam; Cadahía, Estrella; Esteruelas, Enrique; Muñoz, Angel Ma; Fernández de Simón, Brígida; Hernández, Teresa; Estrella, Isabel

    2010-09-08

    The phenolic and tannic composition of heartwood extracts from Castanea sativa Mill., before and after toasting in cooperage, were studied using HPLC-DAD and HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS, and some low molecular weight phenolic compounds and hydrolyzable tannins were found. The low molecular weight phenolic compounds were lignin constituents as the acids gallic, protocatechuic, vanillic, syringic, ferulic, and ellagic, the aldehydes protocatechuic, vanillic, syringic, coniferylic, and sinapic, and the coumarin scopoletin. Their patterns were somewhat different those of oak because oak does not contain compounds such protocatechuic acid and aldehyde and is composed of much lower amounts of gallic acid than chestnut. Vescalagin and castalagin were the main ellagitannins, and acutissimin was tentatively identified for the first time in this wood. Moreover, some gallotannins were tentatively identified, including different isomers of di, tri, tetra, and pentagalloyl glucopyranose, and di and trigalloyl-hexahydroxydiphenoyl glucopyranose, comprising 20 different compounds, as well as some ellagic derivatives such as ellagic acid deoxyhexose, ellagic acid dimer dehydrated, and valoneic acid dilactone. These ellagic derivatives as well as some galloyl and hexahydroxydiphenoyl derivatives were tentatively identified for the first time in this wood. The profile of tannins was therefore different from that of oak wood because oak only contains tannins of the ellagitannins type. Seasoned and toasted chestnut wood showed a very different balance between lignin derivatives and tannins because toasting resulted in the degradation of tannins and the formation of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignin degradation. Moreover, the different toasting levels provoked different balances between tannins and lignin constituents because the intensity of lignin and tannin degradation was in relation to the intensity of toasting.

  2. Seasonal distribution, source investigation and vertical profile of phenolic endocrine disrupting compounds in Dianchi Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Huang, Bin; Jin, Wei; Wang, Yu; Zhao, Shimin; Li, Farong; Hu, Ping; Pan, Xuejun

    2012-04-01

    Phenolic endocrine disrupting compounds, including nonylphenol-di-ethoxylate (NP2EO), nonylphenol-mono-ethoxylate (NP1EO), 4-nonylphenol (4-NP), bisphenol A (BPA), 4-cumylphenol (4-CP) and 4-tert-octylphenol (4-t-OP), were investigated in water, surface sediment and sediment cores in Dianchi Lake to track their seasonal distributions, pollution sources and historical trends. The concentrations of NP2EO, NP1EO, 4-NP, BPA, 4-CP and 4-t-OP were up to 295.14, 448.48, 45.28, 530.33, 8.96 and 21.37 ng L(-1) in water, and up to 297.11, 809.63, 4.58, 166.87, 3.62 and 40.69 ng g(-1) dry weight in surface sediment, respectively. Except BPA in water, concentrations of all the other phenolic compounds in both of the matrices were higher in January than in July, 2011. The concentrations decreased significantly with an increase in distance from the sampling locations which were adjacent to the urban areas (Kunming City, Chenggong City and Jinning City). The pollution of phenolic EDCs came mainly from industry, agriculture and daily life. The relationships between the concentrations of target compounds and the six water quality parameters were evaluated. There were significant positive correlations between concentrations of phenolic compounds in water and in surface sediment. For sediment cores, three clearly separated maxima occurred in segments 0-5 cm (the late 2000s), 5-10 cm (the early and mid of 2000s) and 20-25 cm (the mid of 1980s), respectively. NP2EO, NP1EO and BPA were the three dominant compounds in the lake.

  3. Oil composition and characterisation of phenolic compounds of Opuntia ficus-indica seeds.

    PubMed

    Chougui, Nadia; Tamendjari, Abderezak; Hamidj, Wahiba; Hallal, Salima; Barras, Alexandre; Richard, Tristan; Larbat, Romain

    2013-08-15

    The seed composition of four varieties of Opuntia ficus-indica growing in Algeria was investigated. Seeds ground into a fine powder were first, subjected to oil extraction and fatty acids analysis. The phenolic compounds were then extracted from the defatted powder of seeds in order to be quantified and characterised by liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS(n)) and to nuclear magnetic resonance (LC-NMR) approaches. In addition, an evaluation of the antioxidant activity of the phenolic extracts was investigated. Gas chromatography analysis of the seed oil showed high percentages of linoleic acid in the four varieties ranging from 58% to 63%. The phenolic profile of the Opuntia ficus-indica seeds displayed a high complexity, with more than 20 compounds detected at 330 nm after the LC separation. Among them, three isomers of feruloyl-sucrose were firmly identified and another was strongly supposed to be a sinapoyl-diglycoside. High correlations were found between phenolic content in the defatted seed extracts and their antioxidant activity. The data indicate that the defatted cactus seed wastes still contain various components that constitute a source for natural foods.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of wood creosote: glucuronic acid and sulfate conjugation of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Matsushima, N; Shibata, T

    1995-09-01

    Wood creosote, principally a mixture of non-, alkyl- and/or alkoxy-substituted phenolic compounds, was orally administered to adult male volunteers to determine its metabolites and pharmacokinetic parameters. After a 133-mg single dose, its major constituents (i.e. phenol 15 mg, guaiacol 32 mg, p-cresol 18 mg and creosol 24 mg) were found in peripheral venous blood and urine, mostly as glucuronic acid and, except for creosol, as sulfate conjugates. Low concentrations of unconjugated phenols were also detected. The metabolites in the serum started to increase 15 min after the dose, and they reached their maximum concentrations 30 min after administration. The maximum concentrations of glucuronides were 0.18 +/- 0.07, 0.91 +/- 0.38, 0.33 +/- 0.18 and 0.47 +/- 0.23 mg/l; those of sulfates were 0.16 +/- 0.06, 0.22 +/- 0.09, 0.17 +/- 0.07 and < 0.04 mg/l for phenol, guaiacol, p-cresol and creosol, respectively. The 24-hour urinary recoveries of the sum of each compound and its metabolites were 75 +/- 35, 45 +/- 36, 103 +/- 51 and 74 +/- 36%, in the above order. The presence of guaiacol glucuronide in blood and urine was directly verified by its isolation and structure analyses.

  5. Major Phenolic Compounds, Antioxidant Capacity and Antidiabetic Potential of Rice Bean (Vigna umbellata L.) in China

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yang; Cheng, Xu-Zhen; Wang, Li-Xia; Wang, Su-Hua; Ren, Guixing

    2012-01-01

    Interest in edible beans as nutraceuticals is increasing. In the present study, the individual phenolic acids, the total phenolic content (TPC), the total flavonoid content (TFC), and the antioxidant and antidiabetic potential of 13 varieties of rice beans from China were investigated. Eight phenolic compounds (catechin, epicatechin, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, vitexin, isovitexin, sinapic acid, quercetin) were analyzed on an ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) mass spectrometry (MS) system. The rice bean varieties had significant differences in total phenolic compounds (ranging from 123.09 ± 10.35 to 843.75 ± 30.15 μg/g), in TPC (ranging from 3.27 ± 0.04 to 6.43 ± 0.25 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g), in TFC (ranging from 55.95 ± 11.16 to 320.39 ± 31.77 mg catechin (CE)/g), in antioxidant activity (ranging from 39.87 ± 1.37 to 46.40 ± 2.18 μM·TE/g), in α-glucosidase inhibition activity (ranging from 44.32 ± 2.12 to 68.71 ± 2.19) and in advanced glycation end products formation inhibition activity (ranging from 34.11 ± 0.59 to 75.75 ± 0.33). This study is the first report on phytochemistry and biological activities in rice beans. PMID:22489119

  6. Comparative study of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in different species of cherries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yun; Liu, Xinyan; Zhong, Fei; Tian, Rongrong; Zhang, Kaichun; Zhang, Xiaoming; Li, Tianhong

    2011-05-01

    A new spectrometric method ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric with high precision and rapid analysis was developed to separate 17 phenolic compounds. Different species of cherries, including 10 sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) cultivars, a tart cherry (P. cerasus L.) rootstock (CAB), and a hybrid rootstock 'Colt' (P. avium × P. pseudocerasus), were analyzed for phenolics contents by this method. The results showed that significant differences were observed among the phenolic compound contents in different cherry species. In 10 sweet cherry cultivars, the contents of neochlorogenic acid and cyanidin-3O-rutinoside were much higher in red-colored fruits (for example, 64.60 and 44.50 mg/100 g fresh weight in Burlat, respectively) than those in bicolored ones. Principal component analysis revealed that cyanidin-3O-rutinoside was an effective index for grouping the cultivars with similar species and fruit colors. Moreover, there were strong positive correlations between phenolics content and antioxidant activity, which was higher in red-colored cherries.

  7. Antioxidant Properties of Phenolic Compounds in Renewable Parts of Crataegus pinnatifida inferred from Seasonal Variations.

    PubMed

    Luo, Meng; Yang, Xuan; Hu, Jiao-Yang; Jiao, Jiao; Mu, Fan-Song; Song, Zhuo-Yue; Gai, Qing-Yan; Qiao, Qi; Ruan, Xin; Fu, Yu-Jie

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the effect of seasonal variations on Crataegus pinnatifida, changes in antioxidant activity and active components in C. pinnatifida leaves, roots, twigs, and fruits from May to October were investigated. Through correlation analysis of climatic factors and 7 phenolic compounds yield, the phenolic compounds content was positively correlated with temperatures and daytime. The correlation coefficient of temperatures and daytime were 0.912 and 0.829, respectively. 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging, 2,2'-azino-bis 3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) radical scavenging and reducing power tests were employed to evaluate the antioxidant activity of the C. pinnatifida. C. pinnatifida leaves exhibited significant advantages in terms of higher phenolic contents and excellent antioxidant activities. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that 2 main PC characterize the C. pinnatifida phenolic composition (82.1% of all variance). C. pinnatifida leaves in September possessed remarkable antioxidant activity. The results elucidate that C. pinnatifida leaves, as renewable parts, are suitable for application as antioxidant ingredients.

  8. In vitro antitrypanosomal activity of some phenolic compounds from propolis and lactones from Fijian Kawa (Piper methysticum).

    PubMed

    Otoguro, Kazuhiko; Iwatsuki, Masato; Ishiyama, Aki; Namatame, Miyuki; Nishihara-Tsukashima, Aki; Kiyohara, Hiroaki; Hashimoto, Toshihiro; Asakawa, Yoshinori; Omura, Satoshi; Yamada, Haruki

    2012-07-01

    During our search to discover new antitrypanosomal compounds, eight known plant compounds (three phenolic compounds and five kawa lactones) were evaluated for in vitro activity against Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Among them, we found two phenolic compounds and three kawa lactones possessing an α-pyrone influenced antitrypanosomal property. In particular, β-phenethyl caffeate, farnesyl caffeate and dihydrokawain exhibited high or moderate selective and potent antitrypanosomal activity in vitro. We detail here the antitrypanosomal activity and cytotoxicities of the compounds, in comparison with two commonly used antitrypanosomal drugs (eflornithine and suramin). Our findings represent the first report of the promising trypanocidal activity of these compounds.

  9. Fast pyrolysis of palm kernel shells: influence of operation parameters on the bio-oil yield and the yield of phenol and phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon-Jin; Jung, Su-Hwa; Kim, Joo-Sik

    2010-12-01

    Palm kernel shells were pyrolyzed in a pyrolysis plant equipped with a fluidized-bed reactor and a char-separation system. The influence of reaction temperature, feed size and feed rate on the product spectrum was also investigated. In addition, the effect of reaction temperature on the yields of phenol and phenolic compounds in the bio-oil was examined. The maximum bio-oil yield was 48.7 wt.% of the product at 490 degrees C. The maximum yield of phenol plus phenolic compounds amounted to about 70 area percentage at 475 degrees C. The yield of pyrolytic lignin after its isolation from the bio-oil was approximately 46 wt.% based on the water and ash free oil. The pyrolytic lignin was mainly composed of phenol, phenolic compounds and oligomers of coniferyl, sinapyl and p-coumaryl alcohols. From the result of a GPC analysis, the number average molecular weight and the weight average molecular weight were 325 and 463 g/mol, respectively.

  10. HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS analysis of phenolic compounds during ripening in exocarp and mesocarp of tomato fruit.

    PubMed

    Carrillo-López, Armando; Yahia, Elhadi

    2013-12-01

    Identification of phenolic compounds was done by means of liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) using the electrospray ionization interface (ESI). Quantification of phenolic compounds was carried out by using HPLC with diode array detector (DAD) in exocarp and mesocarp of tomato fruit at 6 different ripeness stages (mature-green, breakers, turning, pink, light-red, and red). Several phenolic compounds were identified including chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and rutin and some combined phenolic acids were tentatively identified, mainly glycosides, such as caffeoyl hexose I, caffeoyl hexose II, caffeoylquinic acid isomer, dicaffeoylquinic acid, p-coumaroyl hexose I, p-coumaroyl hexose II, feruloyl hexose I, feruloyl hexose II, siringyl hexose, and caffeoyl deoxyhexose hexose. Fruit exocarp had higher quantities of total soluble phenolics (TSP) compared to mesocarp. During ripening, TSP increased in both exocarp and mesocarp, mainly in exocarp. While rutin increased, chlorogenic acid decreased in both tissues: exocarp and mesocarp.

  11. Influence of olive oil phenolic compounds on headspace aroma release by interaction with whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Alessandro; Caporaso, Nicola; De Luca, Lucia; Paduano, Antonello; Sacchi, Raffaele

    2015-04-22

    The release of volatile compounds in an oil-in-water model system obtained from olive oil-whey protein (WP) pairing was investigated by considering the effect of phenolic compounds. Human saliva was used to simulate mouth conditions by retronasal aroma simulator (RAS) analysis. Twelve aroma compounds were quantified in the dynamic headspace by SPME-GC/MS. The results showed significant influences of saliva on the aroma release of virgin olive oil (VOO) volatiles also in the presence of WP. The interaction between WP and saliva leads to lower headspace release of ethyl esters and hexanal. Salivary components caused lower decrease of the release of acetates and alcohols. A lower release of volatile compounds was found in the RAS essay in comparison to that in orthonasal simulation of only refined olive oil (without addition of saliva or WP), with the exception of hexanal and 1-penten-3-one, where a significantly higher release was found. Our results suggest that the extent of retronasal odor (green, pungent) of these two volatile compounds is higher than orthonasal odor. An extra VOO was used to verify the release in model systems, indicating that WP affected aroma release more than model systems, while saliva seems to exert an opposite trend. A significant increase in aroma release was found when phenolic compounds were added to the system, probably due to the contrasting effects of binding of volatile compounds caused by WP, for the polyphenol-protein interaction phenomenon. Our study could be applied to the formulation of new functional foods to enhance flavor release and modulate the presence and concentrations of phenolics and whey proteins in food emulsions/dispersions.

  12. Content of phenolic compounds and free polyamines in black chokeberry (Aronia melanocarpa) after application of polyamine biosynthesis regulators.

    PubMed

    Hudec, Jozef; Bakos, Dusan; Mravec, Dusan; Kobida, L'ubomír; Burdová, Maria; Turianica, Ivan; Hlusek, Jaroslav

    2006-05-17

    The total contents of anthocyanins, flavonoids, and phenolics in 60 samples of black chokeberries (Aronia melanocarpa), after treating with catabolites of polyamine biosynthesis (KPAb) and ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor, were analyzed spectrophotometrically, and quercetin and free polyamine contents were analyzed by RP-HPLC with UV detection. The average total contents of the individual substances and phenolic subgroups in control berries were as follows (mg x kg(-1)): anthocyanines, 6408; flavonoids, 664; phenolics, 37,600; quercetin, 349. KPAb decreased total contents of anthocyanines and phenolics only slightly but significantly increased the content of flavonoids. This caused an important change in the abundance of flavonoids in the pigment complex. The absolute content of quercetin was increased, but its ratio to flavonoids content was decreased. Ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor had a markedly different effect as it significantly increased total content of anthocyanins and total phenolics, inhibited the total content of free polyamines, and stimulated the processes of saccharides transformation to phenolic pigments.

  13. Specific poly-phenolic compounds in cell culture of Vitis vinifera L. cv. Gamay Fréaux.

    PubMed

    Mewis, Inga; Smetanska, Iryna M; Müller, Carsten T; Ulrichs, Christian

    2011-05-01

    Cell cultures established from plants represent an attractive alternative to whole plants for effective production of bioactive secondary metabolites. Cell culture from Vitis vinifera L. cv. Gamay Fréaux accumulated high amounts of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and anthocyanins. Two new compounds were identified: 3-O-glucosylresveratrol, a stilbene derivative, abundant in cell suspension culture, and a hydroxyphenol, 4-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-phenol, abundant in callus culture. The major anthocyanin monoglucosides present in cell suspension culture were cyanidin 3-O-glucoside and peonidin 3-O-glucoside, and the major cinnamoyl derivatives were cyanidin 3-O-p-coumaryl glucoside and peonidin 3-O-p-coumaryl glucoside. Three minor anthocyanin compounds were found in V. vinifera cell culture: delphinidin 3-O-glucoside, petunidin 3-O-glucoside, and delphinidin 3-O-pcoumaryl glucoside. Anthocyanin levels of cell suspension cultures increased significantly--about eight fold--after 4-day cultivation in new medium. Salicylic acid at a concentration of 50 μM did not enhance anthocyanin accumulation in cell suspension culture, and similar levels of jasmonic acid significantly reduced the anthocyanin content.

  14. Altered Transport and Metabolism of Phenolic Compounds in Obesity and Diabetes: Implications for Functional Food Development and Assessment.

    PubMed

    Redan, Benjamin W; Buhman, Kimberly K; Novotny, Janet A; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2016-11-01

    Interest in the application of phenolic compounds from the diet or supplements for the prevention of chronic diseases has grown substantially, but the efficacy of such approaches in humans is largely dependent on the bioavailability and metabolism of these compounds. Although food and dietary factors have been the focus of intense investigation, the impact of disease states such as obesity or diabetes on their absorption, metabolism, and eventual efficacy is important to consider. These factors must be understood in order to develop effective strategies that leverage bioactive phenolic compounds for the prevention of chronic disease. The goal of this review is to discuss the inducible metabolic systems that may be influenced by disease states and how these effects impact the bioavailability and metabolism of dietary phenolic compounds. Because current studies generally report that obesity and/or diabetes alter the absorption and excretion of these compounds, this review includes a description of the absorption, conjugation, and excretion pathways for phenolic compounds and how they are potentially altered in disease states. A possible mechanism that will be discussed related to the modulation of phenolic bioavailability and metabolism may be linked to increased inflammatory status from increased amounts of adipose tissue or elevated plasma glucose concentrations. Although more studies are needed, the translation of benefits derived from dietary phenolic compounds to individuals with obesity or diabetes may require the consideration of dosing strategies or be accompanied by adjunct therapies to improve the bioavailability of these compounds.

  15. Phenolic compounds from the leaf extract of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) and their antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xianfeng; Zhang, Hongxun; Lo, Raymond

    2004-12-01

    A preliminary antimicrobial disk assay of chloroform, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol extracts of artichoke (Cynara scolymus L.) leaf extracts showed that the n-butanol fraction exhibited the most significant antimicrobial activities against seven bacteria species, four yeasts, and four molds. Eight phenolic compounds were isolated from the n-butanol soluble fraction of artichoke leaf extracts. On the basis of high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, tandem mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, the structures of the isolated compounds were determined as the four caffeoylquinic acid derivatives, chlorogenic acid (1), cynarin (2), 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3), and 4,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (4), and the four flavonoids, luteolin-7-rutinoside (5), cynaroside (6), apigenin-7-rutinoside (7), and apigenin-7-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (8), respectively. The isolated compounds were examined for their antimicrobial activities on the above microorganisms, indicating that all eight phenolic compounds showed activity against most of the tested organisms. Among them, chlorogenic acid, cynarin, luteolin-7-rutinoside, and cynaroside exhibited a relatively higher activity than other compounds; in addition, they were more effective against fungi than bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of these compounds were between 50 and 200 microg/mL.

  16. Phenolic Compounds of Potato Peel Extracts: Their Antioxidant Activity and Protection against Human Enteric Viruses.

    PubMed

    Silva-BeltrÁn, Norma Patricia; Chaidez-Quiroz, Cristóbal; López-Cuevas, Osvaldo; Ruiz-Cruz, Saul; López-Mata, Marco A; Del-Toro-SÁnchez, Carmen Lizette; Marquez-Rios, Enrique; Ornelas-Paz, José de Jesús

    2017-02-28

    Potato peels (PP) contain several bioactive compounds. These compounds are known to provide human health benefits, including antioxidant and antimicrobial properties. In addition, these compounds could have effects on human enteric viruses that have not yet been reported. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the phenolic composition, antioxidant properties in the acidified ethanol extract (AEE) and water extract of PP, and the antiviral effects on the inhibition of Av-05 and MS2 bacteriophages, which were used as human enteric viral surrogates. The AEE showed the highest phenolic content and antioxidant activity. Chlorogenic and caffeic acids were the major phenolic acids. In vitro analysis indicated that PP had a strong antioxidant activity. A 3 h incubation with AEE at a concentration of 5 mg/ml was needed to reduce the PFU/ml (plaque-forming unit per unit volume) of Av-05 and MS2 by 2.8 and 3.9 log₁₀, respectively, in a dose-dependent manner. Our data suggest that PP has potential to be a source of natural antioxidants against enteric viruses.

  17. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Ruoshui; Guo, Mond; Lin, Kuan-ting; Hebert, Vincent R.; Zhang, Jinwen; Wolcott, Michael P.; Quintero, Melissa; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer as well as its complex side chain structures, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) inclduing 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPCs yields obtained were 18% and 22% based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47%. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  18. Evaluation of phenolic compounds in maté ( Ilex paraguariensis) processed by gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furgeri, C.; Nunes, T. C. F.; Fanaro, G. B.; Souza, M. F. F.; Bastos, D. H. M.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2009-07-01

    The radiation food processing has been demonstrating great effectiveness in the attack of pathogenic agents, while little compromising nutritional value and sensorial properties of foods. The maté ( Ilex paraguariensis), widely consumed product in South America, generally in the form of infusions with hot or cold water, calls of chimarrão or tererê, it is cited in literature as one of the best sources phenolic compounds. The antioxidants action of these constituent has been related to the protection of the organism against the free radicals, generated in alive, currently responsible for the sprouting of some degenerative illness as cancer, arteriosclerosis, rheumatic arthritis and cardiovascular clutters among others. The objective of that work was to evaluate the action of the processing for gamma radiation in phenolic compounds of tererê beverage in the doses of 0, 3, 5, 7 and 10 kGy. The observed results do not demonstrate significant alterations in phenolic compounds of tererê beverage processed by gamma radiation.

  19. Synthesis of Hydroxide-TiO2 Compounds with Photocatalytic Activity for Degradation of Phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras-Ruiz, J. C.; Martínez-Gallegos, S.; Ordoñez, E.; González-Juárez, J. C.; García-Rivas, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of phenol using titanium dioxide (TiO2), either alone or in combination with other materials, has been tested. Mg/Al hydrotalcites prepared by two methods using inorganic (HC) or organic (HS) chemical reagents, along with mixed oxides produced by calcination of these products (HCC and HSC), were mixed with titanium isopropoxide to obtain hydroxide-TiO2 compounds (HCC-TiO2 and HSC-TiO2) and their photocatalytic activity tested in solutions of 10 mg/L phenol at 120 min under illumination at λ UV = 254 nm with power of 4 W or 8 W. The obtained materials were characterized by various techniques, revealing that TiO2 was incorporated into the mixed oxides of the calcined hydrotalcite to form the above-mentioned compounds. The photocatalytic test results indicate that the activity of HCC-TiO2 can be attributed to increased phenol adsorption by hydrotalcite for transfer to the active photocatalytic phase of the impregnated TiO2 particles, while the better results obtained for HSC-TiO2 are due to greater catalyst impregnation on the surface of the calcined hydrotalcite, reducing the screening phenomenon and achieving HSC-TiO2 degradation of up to 21.0% at 8 W. Reuse of both compounds indicated tight combination of HCC or HSC with TiO2, since in four successive separation cycles there was little reduction of activity, being associated primarily with material loss during recovery.

  20. Inhibitory effects of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on dark hydrogen fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Richen; Cheng, Jun; Ding, Lingkan; Song, Wenlu; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-11-01

    The inhibitory effects of furan derivatives [i.e. furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF)] and phenolic compounds (i.e. vanillin and syringaldehyde) on dark hydrogen fermentation from glucose were comparatively evaluated. Phenolic compounds exhibited stronger inhibition on hydrogen production and glucose consumption than furan derivatives under the same 15mM concentration. Furan derivatives were completely degraded after 72h fermentation, while over 55% of phenolic compounds remained unconverted after 108h fermentation. The inhibition coefficients of vanillin (14.05) and syringaldehyde (11.21) were higher than those of 5-HMF (4.35) and furfural (0.64). Vanillin exhibited the maximum decrease of hydrogen yield (17%). The consumed reducing power by inhibitors reduction from R-CHO to RCH2OH was a possible reason contributed to the decreased hydrogen yield. Vanillin exhibited the maximum delay of peak times of hydrogen production rate and glucose consumption. Soluble metabolites and carbon conversion efficiency decreased with inhibitors addition, which were consistent with hydrogen production.

  1. [The content of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity ready to eat desserts for infants].

    PubMed

    Filipiak-Florkiewicz, Agnieszka; Dereń, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the content of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in ready-to-eat desserts for babies. The experimental material consisted of six kinds of fruit desserts taken from the market in 2008, in which the content of dry matter phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity levels on the basis of free radical quenching ability ABTS were determined. The largest share of dry matter was found in apricot mousse with apples and bananas (16.9%). The largest amounts of phenolic compounds were found in the cream with apple and wild rose (186.3 mg/100 g) and apple with forest fruits (170.7 mg/100 g). The highest antioxidant activity among the desserts was determined in cream with apple and wild rose (14.2 micromol Trolox/g) and apple mousse with peaches (12.8 micromol Trolox/g). The antioxidant capacity of the remaining examined purée was slightly lower and ranged from 11.4-11.7 micromol Trolox/g.

  2. Optimization of microwave assisted extraction (MAE) and soxhlet extraction of phenolic compound from licorice root.

    PubMed

    Karami, Zohreh; Emam-Djomeh, Zahra; Mirzaee, Habib Allah; Khomeiri, Morteza; Mahoonak, Alireza Sadeghi; Aydani, Emad

    2015-06-01

    In present study, response surface methodology was used to optimize extraction condition of phenolic compounds from licorice root by microwave application. Investigated factors were solvent (ethanol 80 %, methanol 80 % and water), liquid/solid ratio (10:1-25:1) and time (2-6 min). Experiments were designed according to the central composite rotatable design. The results showed that extraction conditions had significant effect on the extraction yield of phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacities. Optimal condition in microwave assisted method were ethanol 80 % as solvent, extraction time of 5-6 min and liquid/solid ratio of 12.7/1. Results were compared with those obtained by soxhlet extraction. In soxhlet extraction, Optimum conditions were extraction time of 6 h for ethanol 80 % as solvent. Value of phenolic compounds and extraction yield of licorice root in microwave assisted (MAE), and soxhlet were 47.47 mg/g and 16.38 %, 41.709 mg/g and 14.49 %, respectively. These results implied that MAE was more efficient extracting method than soxhlet.

  3. Combined effect of starter culture and temperature on phenolic compounds during fermentation of Taggiasca black olives.

    PubMed

    Pistarino, Erika; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Casazza, Alessandro A; Paini, Marco; Cosulich, Maria E; Perego, Patrizia

    2013-06-01

    The influence of two operative parameters on the fermentation process of table olives from Taggiasca cultivar were investigated. Laboratory scale fermentations were performed using Lactobacillus plantarum as the only starter and in combination with Saccharomyces cerevisiae at three different temperatures (23, 30 and 37°C). Control tests used for each trial were fermented only by indigenous microflora. pH and phenolic compounds were monitored in the brine and olive flesh during the fermentation. Higher temperatures (37°C) enhanced notably the release of phenolic compounds in the brine. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of brines evidenced the complete hydrolysis of oleuropein after 100 days of fermentation at 37°C for all treatments. The antioxidant power of the extracts was linearly correlated to their polyphenol contents. The results confirmed the efficiency of treatments compared with the control tests for debittering process of table black olives. Phenolic compounds in the brines can be then extracted and used in food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries.

  4. Antioxidant capacities of phenolic compounds and tocopherols from Tunisian pomegranate (Punica granatum) fruits.

    PubMed

    Elfalleh, Walid; Tlili, Nizar; Nasri, Nizar; Yahia, Yassine; Hannachi, Hédia; Chaira, Nizar; Ying, Ma; Ferchichi, Ali

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to determine the phenolic, tocopherol contents, and antioxidant capacities from fruits (juices, peels, and seed oils) of 6 Tunisian pomegranate ecotypes. Total anthocyanins were determined by a differential pH method. Hydrolyzable tannins were determined with potassium iodate. The tocopherol (α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol, and δ-tocopherol) contents were, respectively, 165.77, 107.38, and 27.29 mg/100 g from dry seed. Four phenolic compounds were identified and quantified in pomegranate peel and pulp using the high-performance liquid chromatography/ultraviolet method: 2 hydroxybenzoic acids (gallic and ellagic acids) and 2 hydroxycinnamic acids (caffeic and p-coumaric acids). Juice, peel, and seed oil antioxidants were confirmed by ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) methods. The highest values were recorded in peels with 25.63 mmol trolox equivalent/100 g and 22.08 mmol TE/100 g for FRAP and ORAC assay, respectively. Results showed that the antioxidant potency of pomegranate extracts was correlated with their phenolic compound content. In particular, the highest correlation was reported in peels. High correlations were also found between peel hydroxybenzoic acids and FRAP ORAC antioxidant capacities. Identified tocopherols seem to contribute in major part to the antioxidant activity of seed oil. The results implied that bioactive compounds from the peel might be potential resources for the development of antioxidant function dietary food.

  5. Antioxidant capacity and phenolic compounds of Lonicerae macranthoides by HPLC-DAD-QTOF-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin; Chen, Lin; Shi, Shuyun; Cai, Ping; Liang, Xuejuan; Zhang, Shuihan

    2016-05-30

    Lonicerae macranthoides with strong antioxidant activity is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine and folk tea/beverage. However, detailed information about its antioxidant activity and bioactive compounds is limited. Then at first, we comparatively evaluated total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC) and antioxidant activities of water extract, petroleum ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions of L. macranthoides. Ethyl acetate fraction exhibited the highest level of TPC (207.38 mg GAE/g DW), TFC (53.06 mg RE/g DW) and the best DPPH scavenge activity and reducing power. n-Butanol fraction showed the best ABTS(+) and O2(-) scavenging activities. Interestingly, water extract, ethyl acetate and n-butanol fractions showed stronger antioxidant activities than positive control, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). After that, thirty-one antioxidant phenolic compounds, including twenty-two phenolic acids and nine flavonoids, were screened by DPPH-HPLC experiment and then identified using HPLC-DAD-QTOF-MS/MS. It is noted that twenty-one compounds (1, 3-4, 6-17, 19, 23, 26, 28-29, and 31), as far as was known, were discovered from L. macranthoide for the first time, and eleven of them (3-4, 10-17, and 23) were reported in Lonicera species for the first time. Results indicated that L. macranthoides could serve as promising source of rich antioxidants in foods, beverages and medicines for health promotion.

  6. Neural cell activation by phenolic compounds from the Siberian larch (Larix sibirica).

    PubMed

    Loers, Gabriele; Yashunsky, Dmitry V; Nifantiev, Nikolay E; Schachner, Melitta

    2014-07-25

    Small organic phenolic compounds from natural sources have attracted increasing attention due to their potential to ameliorate the serious consequences of acute and chronic traumata of the mammalian nervous system. In this contribution, it is reported that phenols from the knot zones of Siberian larch (Larix sibirica) wood, namely, the antioxidant flavonoid (+)-dihydroquercetin (1) and the lignans (-)-secoisolariciresinol (2) and (+)-isolariciresinol (3), affect migration and outgrowth of neurites/processes from cultured neurons and glial cells of embryonic and early postnatal mice. Compounds 1-3, which were available in preparative amounts, enhanced neurite outgrowth from cerebellar granule neurons, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and motoneurons, as well as process formation of Schwann cells in a dose-dependent manner in the low nanomolar range. Migration of cultured astrocytes was inhibited by 1-3, and migration of neurons out of cerebellar explants was enhanced by 1. These observations provide evidence for the neuroactive features of these phenolic compounds in enhancing the beneficial properties of neurons and reducing the inhibitory properties of activated astrocytes in an in vitro setting and encourage the further investigation of these effects in vivo, in animal models of acute and chronic neurological diseases.

  7. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Ruoshui; Guo, Mond; Lin, Kuan-ting; Hebert, Vincent R.; Zhang, Jinwen; Wolcott, Michael P.; Quintero, Melissa; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  8. Phenylalanine and LED lights enhance phenolic compound production in Tartary buckwheat sprouts.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jeong-Min; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Kim, Yeon-Bok; Park, Sang Un; Kim, Sun-Ju

    2015-06-15

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of different l-phenylalanine (l-Phe) concentrations and various light-emitting diodes (LEDs) on the accumulation of phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, vitexin, rutin, quercetin, cyanidin 3-O-glucoside, and cyanidin 3-O-rutinoside) in Tartary buckwheat sprouts. We found that 5mM was the optimum l-Phe concentration for the synthesis of total and individual phenolic compounds. The highest rutin (53.09 mg/g DW) and chlorogenic acid (5.62 mg/g DW) content was observed with Red+Blue and white lights. Comprehensive differences in total and individual anthocyanin content were observed between different lights; however, the total anthocyanin content (9.12 mg/g DW) was 1.5-fold higher in blue light. The expression levels of regulatory genes, such as FtDFR and FtANS, were 7.1-fold higher with l-Phe treatment. Gene expression results showed that the phenolic compounds in Tartary buckwheat sprouts increased with the use of l-Phe and LED lights.

  9. Effects of different organic farming methods on the concentration of phenolic compounds in sea buckthorn leaves.

    PubMed

    Heinäaho, Merja; Pusenius, Jyrki; Julkunen-Tiitto, Riitta

    2006-10-04

    The effects of different cultivation methods on the amount of phenolic compounds in leaves of 1-year-old seedlings of two Finnish sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. ssp. rhamnoides) cultivars 'Terhi' and 'Tytti' were studied in a field experiment established at coastal area in Merikarvia, western Finland. The cultivation methods included different fertilizers (suitable for organic cultivation), mulches (organic and plastic), and land contours (flat vs low hill surface). Two experiments were conducted. The first allowed the estimation of the effects of cultivar, fertilizer, surface contour, and all their interactions, while the other allowed the estimation of the effects of mulches, land contours, and their interactions for the cultivar 'Tytti'. Eleven different hydrolyzable tannins, pentagalloylglucose, and 14 other phenolic compounds were detected by chemical analysis with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The amount of phenolic compounds varied between different land contours and mulches. The concentrations of gallic acid, pentagalloylglucose, quercetin-3-rhamnoside, monocoumaroyl astragalin A, total hydrolyzable tannins, and condensed tannins were significantly higher on the flat surface than on the low hill surface. The plastic mulch decreased the concentration of gallic acid, hydrolyzable tannins, and condensed tannins compared to the other mulches used. These results suggest ways to cultivate sea buckthorn to produce large amounts of valuable chemicals, especially tannins in the leaves.

  10. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ruoshui; Guo, Mond; Lin, Kuan-Ting; Hebert, Vincent R; Zhang, Jinwen; Wolcott, Michael P; Quintero, Melissa; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-25

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  11. Synthesis of Hydroxide-TiO2 Compounds with Photocatalytic Activity for Degradation of Phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras-Ruiz, J. C.; Martínez-Gallegos, S.; Ordoñez, E.; González-Juárez, J. C.; García-Rivas, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    Photocatalytic degradation of phenol using titanium dioxide (TiO2), either alone or in combination with other materials, has been tested. Mg/Al hydrotalcites prepared by two methods using inorganic (HC) or organic (HS) chemical reagents, along with mixed oxides produced by calcination of these products (HCC and HSC), were mixed with titanium isopropoxide to obtain hydroxide-TiO2 compounds (HCC-TiO2 and HSC-TiO2) and their photocatalytic activity tested in solutions of 10 mg/L phenol at 120 min under illumination at λ UV = 254 nm with power of 4 W or 8 W. The obtained materials were characterized by various techniques, revealing that TiO2 was incorporated into the mixed oxides of the calcined hydrotalcite to form the above-mentioned compounds. The photocatalytic test results indicate that the activity of HCC-TiO2 can be attributed to increased phenol adsorption by hydrotalcite for transfer to the active photocatalytic phase of the impregnated TiO2 particles, while the better results obtained for HSC-TiO2 are due to greater catalyst impregnation on the surface of the calcined hydrotalcite, reducing the screening phenomenon and achieving HSC-TiO2 degradation of up to 21.0% at 8 W. Reuse of both compounds indicated tight combination of HCC or HSC with TiO2, since in four successive separation cycles there was little reduction of activity, being associated primarily with material loss during recovery.

  12. Effect of steam explosion treatment on barley bran phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Lingxiao; Huang, Luolian; Zhang, Ying

    2012-07-25

    A steam explosion pretreatment process followed by methanol extraction has been applied for releasing and extracting phenolic compounds, as well as other effective components, from barley bran. The steam explosion treatment was performed at different temperatures ranging from 210 to 250 °C, with a residence time of 30 s. The effect of residence time was also studied in the range 10 s to 120 s at 220 °C. The extracts were evaluated for their total soluble phenolic content (TSPC) including total free phenolic acids (TFPC) and total soluble conjugates (TSC), identified phenolic acids, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), water-soluble carbohydrates (WSC) and total methanol extracts (TME). High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with a photodiode array detector (PDA) was used in this study for the analysis of p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid in barley bran before and after steam explosion. Our results indicate that TSPC and TAC increased with residence time. They also increased dramatically with temperature up to 220 °C. After steam explosion at 220 °C for 120 s, the TSPC reached 1686.4 gallic acid equivalents mg/100 g dry weight, which was about 9-fold higher than that of the untreated sample. The TSPC and TAC obtained were highly positively correlated (r = 0.918-0.993), which meant that the increase of TAC for the steam explosion pretreated barley bran extracts was due, at least in part, to the increase of TSPC in the methanol soluble fraction. Also, under optimum conditions, the WSC in aqueous solution was 5 times as much as that of the untreated sample, which demonstrated that steam explosion also hydrolyzes carbohydrates into water-soluble sugars. It can be concluded that a proper and reasonable steam explosion pretreatment could be applied to release the bound phenolic compounds and enhance the antioxidant capacity of barley bran extracts.

  13. Contents of vitamins, mineral elements, and some phenolic compounds in cultivated mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Mattila, P; Könkö, K; Eurola, M; Pihlava, J M; Astola, J; Vahteristo, L; Hietaniemi, V; Kumpulainen, J; Valtonen, M; Piironen, V

    2001-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the contents of mineral elements (Ca, K, Mg, Na, P, Cu, Fe, Mn, Cd, Pb, and Se), vitamins (B(1), B(2), B(12), C, D, folates, and niacin), and certain phenolic compounds (flavonoids, lignans, and phenolic acids) in the cultivated mushrooms Agaricus bisporus/white, Agaricus bisporus/brown, Lentinus edodes, and Pleurotus ostreatus. Selenium, toxic heavy metals (Cd, Pb), and other mineral elements were analyzed by ETAAS, ICP-MS, and ICP methods, respectively; vitamins were detected by microbiological methods (folates, niacin, and vitamin B(12)) or HPLC methods (other vitamins), and phenolic compounds were analyzed by HPLC (flavonoids) or GC--MS methods (lignans and phenolic acids). Cultivated mushrooms were found to be good sources of vitamin B(2), niacin, and folates, with contents varying in the ranges 1.8--5.1, 31--65, and 0.30--0.64 mg/100 g dry weight (dw), respectively. Compared with vegetables, mushrooms proved to be a good source of many mineral elements, e.g., the contents of K, P, Zn, and Cu varied in the ranges 26.7--47.3 g/kg, 8.7--13.9 g/kg, 47--92 mg/kg, and 5.2--35 mg/kg dw, respectively. A. bisporus/brown contained large amounts of Se (3.2 mg/kg dw) and the levels of Cd were quite high in L. edodes (1.2 mg/kg dw). No flavonoids or lignans were found in the mushrooms analyzed. In addition, the phenolic acid contents were very low.

  14. Analysis of hydrolyzable tannins and other phenolic compounds in emblic leafflower (Phyllanthus emblica L.) fruits by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baoru; Kortesniemi, Maaria; Liu, Pengzhan; Karonen, Maarit; Salminen, Juha-Pekka

    2012-09-05

    Phenolic compounds were extracted from dried emblic leafflower (Phyllanthus emblica L.) fruits with methanol and separated by Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. The raw extracts and fractions were analyzed with HPLC coupled with diode array UV spectroscopy, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and tandem mass spectrometry. Mucic acid gallate, mucic acid lactone gallate, monogalloylglucose, gallic acid, digalloylglucose, putranjivain A, galloyl-HHDP-glucose, elaeocarpusin, and chebulagic acid were suggested to be the most abundant compounds in the crude methanol extracts of the fruits. In addition, 144 peaks were detected, of which 67 were tentatively identified mostly as ellagitannins, flavonoids, and simple gallic acid derivatives in the fractions. The results indicated the presence of neochebulagic acid, isomers of neochebuloyl galloylglucose, chebuloyl neochebuloyl galloylglucose, ellagic acid glycosides, quercetin glycosides, and eriodictyol coumaroyl glycosides in the fruits. The study provides a systematic report of the retention data and characteristics of UV, MS, and MS/MS spectra of the phenolic compounds in the fruits of emblic leafflower. The fruits of two varieties (Ping Dan No 1 and Fruity) from Guangxi Province differed from those of wild Tian Chuan emblic leafflower from Fujian Province in the content and profile of phenolic compounds.

  15. Evaluation of the protective effect of chemical additives in the oxidation of phenolic compounds catalysed by peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Torres, Juliana Arriel; Chagas, Pricila Maria Batista; Silva, Maria Cristina; Dos Santos, Custódio Donizete; Corrêa, Angelita Duarte

    2016-01-01

    The use of oxidoredutive enzymes in removing organic pollutants has been the subject of much research. The oxidation of phenolic compounds in the presence of chemical additives has been the focus of this study. In this investigation, the influence of the additives polyethylene glycol and Triton X-100 was evaluated in the phenol oxidation, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid and total phenolic compounds present in coffee processing wastewater (CPW) at different pH values, performed by turnip peroxidase and peroxidase extracted from soybean seed hulls. The influence of these additives was observed only in the oxidation of phenol and caffeic acid. In the oxidation of other studied phenolic compounds, the percentage of oxidation remained unchanged in the presence of these chemical additives. In the oxidation of CPW in the presence of additives, no change in the oxidation of phenolic compounds was observed. Although several studies show the importance of evaluating the influence of additives on the behaviour of enzymes, this study found a positive response from the economic point of view for the treatment of real wastewater, since the addition of these substances showed no influence on the oxidation of phenolic compounds, which makes the process less costly.

  16. RP-HPLC/MS/MS Analysis of the Phenolic Compounds, Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of Salvia L. Species

    PubMed Central

    Tohma, Hatice; Köksal, Ekrem; Kılıç, Ömer; Alan, Yusuf; Yılmaz, Mustafa Abdullah; Gülçin, İlhami; Bursal, Ercan; Alwasel, Saleh H.

    2016-01-01

    The identification and quantification of the phenolic contents of methanolic extracts of three Salvia L. species namely S. brachyantha (Bordz.) Pobed, S. aethiopis L., and S. microstegia Boiss. and Bal. were evaluated using reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography, UV adsorption, and mass spectrometry (RP-HPLC/MS). In order to determine the antioxidant capacity of these species, cupric ions (Cu2+) reducing assay (CUPRAC) and ferric ions (Fe3+) reducing assay (FRAP) were performed to screen the reducing capacity and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay was employed for evaluation of the radical scavenging activity for both solvents. In further investigation, the antimicrobial activities of Salvia species were tested using the disc diffusion method against three Gram-positive and four Gram-negative microbial species, as well as three fungi species. The results showed that there is a total of 18 detectable phenols, the most abundant of which was kaempferol in S. microstegia and rosmarinic acids in S. brachyantha and S aethiopis. The other major phenols were found to be apigenin, luteolin, p-coumaric acid, and chlorogenic acid. All species tested showed moderate and lower antioxidant activity than standard antioxidants such as butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), and ascorbic acid. The ethanolic extracts of Salvia species revealed a wide range of antimicrobial activity. S. brachyantha and S. microstegia showed the highest antimicrobial activities against B. subtilis, whereas S. aethiopis was more effective on Y. lipolytica. None of the extracts showed anti-fungal activity against S. cerevisiae. Thus these species could be valuable due to their bioactive compounds. PMID:27775656

  17. The Bark-Beetle-Associated Fungus, Endoconidiophora polonica, Utilizes the Phenolic Defense Compounds of Its Host as a Carbon Source1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wadke, Namita; Kandasamy, Dineshkumar; Vogel, Heiko; Wingfield, Brenda D.; Paetz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies) is periodically attacked by the bark beetle Ips typographus and its fungal associate, Endoconidiophora polonica, whose infection is thought to be required for successful beetle attack. Norway spruce produces terpenoid resins and phenolics in response to fungal and bark beetle invasion. However, how the fungal associate copes with these chemical defenses is still unclear. In this study, we investigated changes in the phenolic content of Norway spruce bark upon E. polonica infection and the biochemical factors mediating these changes. Although genes encoding the rate-limiting enzymes in Norway spruce stilbene and flavonoid biosynthesis were actively transcribed during fungal infection, there was a significant time-dependent decline of the corresponding metabolites in fungal lesions. In vitro feeding experiments with pure phenolics revealed that E. polonica transforms both stilbenes and flavonoids to muconoid-type ring-cleavage products, which are likely the first steps in the degradation of spruce defenses to substrates that can enter the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Four genes were identified in E. polonica that encode catechol dioxygenases carrying out these reactions. These enzymes catalyze the cleavage of phenolic rings with a vicinal dihydroxyl group to muconoid products accepting a wide range of Norway spruce-produced phenolics as substrates. The expression of these genes and E. polonica utilization of the most abundant spruce phenolics as carbon sources both correlated positively with fungal virulence in several strains. Thus, the pathways for the degradation of phenolic compounds in E. polonica, initiated by catechol dioxygenase action, are important to the infection, growth, and survival of this bark beetle-vectored fungus and may play a major role in the ability of I. typographus to colonize spruce trees. PMID:27208235

  18. Enhanced Production of Phenolic Compounds from Pumpkin Leaves by Subcritical Water Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jeong-Yeon; Ko, Mi-Ok; Kim, Dong-Shin; Lim, Sang-Bin

    2016-06-01

    Enhanced production of individual phenolic compounds by subcritical water hydrolysis (SWH) of pumpkin leaves was investigated at various temperatures ranging from 100 to 220°C at 20 min and at various reaction times ranging from 10 to 50 min at 160°C. Caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and gentisic acid were the major phenolic compounds in the hydrolysate of pumpkin leaves. All phenolic compounds except gentisic acid showed the highest yield at 160°C, but gentisic acid showed the highest yield at 180°C. The cumulative amount of individual phenolic compounds gradually increased by 48.1, 52.2, and 78.4 μg/g dry matter at 100°C, 120°C, and 140°C, respectively, and then greatly increased by 1,477.1 μg/g dry matter at 160°C. The yields of caffeic acid and ferulic acid showed peaks at 20 min, while those of cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and procatechuic acid showed peaks at 30 min. Antioxidant activities such as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and ferric reducing antioxidant power values gradually increased with hydrolysis temperature and ranged from 6.77 to 12.42 mg ascorbic acid equivalents/g dry matter and from 4.25 to 8.92 mmol Fe(2+)/100 g dry matter, respectively. Color L* and b* values gradually decreased as hydrolysis temperature increased from 100°C to 140°C. At high temperatures (160°C to 220°C), L* and b* values decreased suddenly. The a* value peaked at 160°C and then decreased as temperature increased from 160°C to 220°C. These results suggest that SWH of pumpkin leaves was strongly influenced by hydrolysis temperature and may enhanced the production of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities.

  19. Production of anthraquinones, phenolic compounds and biological activities from hairy root cultures of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb.

    PubMed

    Thiruvengadam, Muthu; Praveen, Nagella; Kim, Eun-Hye; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Chung, Ill-Min

    2014-05-01

    Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. is a highly important medicinal plant producing anthraquinones (emodin and physcion) and phenolic compounds which has pharmaceutical use. In vitro seedling explants such as roots, internodals, nodals and leaves were inoculated with A. rhizogenes strain KCTC 2703. Transformed roots were induced from internodals and leaf explants. Six transgenic clones of hairy roots were established and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) using rolC specific primers. Hairy roots cultured using MS liquid medium supplemented with 30 g/l sucrose showed highest accumulation of biomass (99.05 g/l FW [fresh weight] and 10.95 g/l DW [dry weight]) and highest production of anthraquinones content (emodin 211.32 μg/g DW and physcion 353.23 μg/g DW) were observed at 20 days. Nearly 9.5-fold increment of biomass was evident in suspension cultures at 20 days of culture and hairy root biomass produced in suspension cultures possessed 3.7- and 3.5-fold higher content of emodin and physcion, respectively, when compared with the untransformed control roots. MS basal liquid medium was superior for the growth of hairy roots and production of anthraquinones compared with other culture media evaluated (SH, B5 and N6), with MS-basal liquid medium supplemented with 30 g/l sucrose was optimal for secondary metabolite production. A total of 23 polyphenolic compounds were identified and quantified from P. multiflorum untransformed and hairy roots, which includes hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamic acids, flavonols and other groups of phenolic compounds. The ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) analysis of the phenolic compounds profile revealed that pyrogallol, hesperidin, naringenin and formononetin were higher in hairy roots compared to untransformed roots. The total phenolics, flavonoids content, antioxidant and antimicrobial activity was high in hairy roots compared to untransformed roots. This is the first

  20. Enhanced Production of Phenolic Compounds from Pumpkin Leaves by Subcritical Water Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jeong-Yeon; Ko, Mi-Ok; Kim, Dong-Shin; Lim, Sang-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced production of individual phenolic compounds by subcritical water hydrolysis (SWH) of pumpkin leaves was investigated at various temperatures ranging from 100 to 220°C at 20 min and at various reaction times ranging from 10 to 50 min at 160°C. Caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, and gentisic acid were the major phenolic compounds in the hydrolysate of pumpkin leaves. All phenolic compounds except gentisic acid showed the highest yield at 160°C, but gentisic acid showed the highest yield at 180°C. The cumulative amount of individual phenolic compounds gradually increased by 48.1, 52.2, and 78.4 μg/g dry matter at 100°C, 120°C, and 140°C, respectively, and then greatly increased by 1,477.1 μg/g dry matter at 160°C. The yields of caffeic acid and ferulic acid showed peaks at 20 min, while those of cinnamic acid, p-coumaric acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and procatechuic acid showed peaks at 30 min. Antioxidant activities such as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and ferric reducing antioxidant power values gradually increased with hydrolysis temperature and ranged from 6.77 to 12.42 mg ascorbic acid equivalents/g dry matter and from 4.25 to 8.92 mmol Fe2+/100 g dry matter, respectively. Color L* and b* values gradually decreased as hydrolysis temperature increased from 100°C to 140°C. At high temperatures (160°C to 220°C), L* and b* values decreased suddenly. The a* value peaked at 160°C and then decreased as temperature increased from 160°C to 220°C. These results suggest that SWH of pumpkin leaves was strongly influenced by hydrolysis temperature and may enhanced the production of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities. PMID:27390730

  1. Dynamic changes in phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity in oats (Avena nuda L.) during steeping and germination.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jian Guo; Tian, Cheng Rui; Hu, Qing Ping; Luo, Ji Yang; Wang, Xiang Dong; Tian, Xiang Dong

    2009-11-11

    Samples from naked oat were steeped and germinated under controlled conditions in an incubator. Changes of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity were investigated in oats during steeping and germination. Results revealed that phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of oats varied with the difference in steeping and germination stages. Compared with raw grains, short-term steeping treatment did not show significant effects (p > 0.05) on phenolic content. Germination can significantly result in the decrease in bound phenolic and the increase in free and total phenolics. Main phenolic acids and avenanthramides were isolated and quantified by HPLC analysis. During steeping, phenolic acids decreased (p < 0.05); avenanthramide N-(3',4'-dihydroxy)-(E)-cinnamoyl-5-hydroxyanthranilic acid first decreased and then increased (p < 0.05), while avenanthramides N-(4'-hydroxy)-(E)-cinnamoyl-5-hydroxyanthranilic acid and N-(4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxy)-(E)-cinnamoyl-5-hydroxyanthranilic acid did not change significantly (p > 0.05). During germination, gallic and caffeic acids first increased (p < 0.05) and then decreased, whereas p-coumaric and ferulic acids and avenanthramides increased (p < 0.05). Nevertheless, avenanthramides did not change significantly (p > 0.05) during the last stage of germination. Oat extracts exhibited increasing high antioxidant activity with the steeping and germination going on, which may explain that antioxidant activity correlated (p < 0.01) significantly with the content of phenolic compounds.

  2. Breads enriched with guava flour as a tool for studying the incorporation of phenolic compounds in bread melanoidins.

    PubMed

    Alves, Genilton; Perrone, Daniel

    2015-10-15

    In the present study we aimed at studying, for the first time, the incorporation of phenolic compounds into bread melanoidins. Fermentation significantly affected the phenolics profile of bread doughs. Melanoidins contents continuously increased from 24.1 mg/g to 71.9 mg/g during baking, but their molecular weight decreased at the beginning of the process and increased thereafter. Enrichment of white wheat bread with guava flour increased the incorporation of phenolic compounds up to 2.4-fold. Most phenolic compounds showed higher incorporation than release rates during baking, leading to increases from 3.3- to 13.3-fold in total melanoidin-bound phenolics. Incorporation patterns suggested that phenolic hydroxyls, but not glycosidic bonds of melanoidin-bound phenolics are cleaved during thermal processing. Antioxidant capacity of bread melanoidins increased due to enrichment with guava flour and increasing baking periods and was partially attributed to bound phenolics. Moreover, FRAP assay was more sensitive to measure this parameter than TEAC assay.

  3. Identification of new odorous compounds in Swedish water: mixed haloanisoles and phenolic precursors.

    PubMed

    Corbi, E; Benanou, D; Cantet, J; Tabet, J C

    2007-01-01

    Mixed chlorobromoanisoles have recently been recognized as new potential odorous compounds in tap water. The odour threshold concentrations (OTCs) of these compounds are close to the sub ng/L (ppt) and associated descriptors are "earthy, musty, rubber". During a "swampy, musty" episode in water of the Norrtälje district (Sweden), 2,4,6-mixed chlorobromoanisoles and their phenolic precursors were identified. These compounds were synthesised in order to quantify them in different types of waters, Samplings were performed during two different seasons. Results show that whatever the season, mixed haloanisoles and their precursors were present. Chlorination, biofilm activity and residence time in the distribution system seem to be critical factors for the appearance of such compounds.

  4. HPLC-DAD-q-TOF-MS as a powerful platform for the determination of phenolic and other polar compounds in the edible part of mango and its by-products (peel, seed, and seed husk).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; López-Cobo, Ana; Verardo, Vito; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Free and bound phenolic and other polar compounds in mango edible fraction and its by-products (peel, seed, and seed husk) have been determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-qTOF-MS. This analytical technique has demonstrated to be a valuable platform for the identification and quantification of these compounds in mango. In fact, UV-Vis and mass spectra data allowed the determination of 91 free compounds and 13 bound (cell wall linked) compounds taking into account the four fractions of mango. To our knowledge, this is the first time that mango seed husk has been studied regarding its phenolic compounds. The method proposed showed LODs between 0.006 and 0.85 μg/mL and accuracy ranged from 94.8 and 100.7%. Mango peel presented the highest concentration of free polar compounds followed by seed, pulp, and seed husk. It is also important to highlight that bound phenolic compounds had never been determined in mango pulp, seed, and seed husk before. Furthermore, ellagic acid was the most abundant bound compound in the four mango fractions analyzed. These results show that mango pulp and its by-products are a good source of phenolic and other polar compounds. In particular, mango seed contains a high total concentration of ellagic acid (650 mg/100 g dry weight).

  5. Antioxidant and nitrite-scavenging capacities of phenolic compounds from sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) tops.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jian; He, Xue-Mei; Zhao, Mou-Ming; Li, Li; Li, Chang-Bao; Dong, Yi

    2014-08-26

    Sugarcane tops were extracted with 50% ethanol and fractionated by petroleum ether, ethyl acetate (EtOAc), and n-butyl alcohol successively. Eight phenolic compounds in EtOAc extracts were purified through silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 column chromatographies, and then identified by nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization mass spectra. The results showed that eight phenolic compounds from EtOAc extracts were identified as caffeic acid, cis-p-hydroxycinnamic acid, quercetin, apigenin, albanin A, australone A, moracin M, and 5'-geranyl-5,7,2',4'-tetrahydroxyflavone. The antioxidant and nitrite-scavenging capacities of different solvent extracts correlated positively with their total phenolic (TP) contents. Amongst various extracts, EtOAc extracts possessed the highest TP content and presented the strongest oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), 1,1'-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging capacity, 2,2'-azobis-3-ethylbenthiaazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical-scavenging capacity, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and nitrite-scavenging capacity. Thus, sugarcane tops could be promoted as a source of natural antioxidant.

  6. Characterization, phenolic compounds and functional properties of Cucumis melo L. peels.

    PubMed

    Mallek-Ayadi, Sana; Bahloul, Neila; Kechaou, Nabil

    2017-04-15

    The aim of this work is to investigate the phytochemical composition and functional properties of the melon peels, considered as a by-product. Melon peels (maazoun cultivar) are rich in nutritional ingredients such as carbohydrates (69.77%) and ash (3.67%). They contain significant amounts of total dietary fibers (41.69%) and antioxidants as polyphenols and flavonoids (332mg/100g extract and 95.46mg/100g extract, respectively). The identification and the quantification of the phenolic compounds of melon peels were performed by high performance liquid chromatography apparatus. The obtained results indicate that hydroxybenzoic acids and flavones constitute their main phenolic classes. 3-Hydroxybenzoic acid is the major phenolic compound in the melon peels by 33.45mg/100g, followed by apigenin-7-glycoside (29.34mg/100g). Determination of the functional properties (water and oil retention capacities) and color shows that melon peels have properties that may be useful in industrial applications.

  7. Undesirable Enzymatic Browning in Crustaceans: Causative Effects and Its Inhibition by Phenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Nirmal, Nilesh Prakash; Benjakul, Soottawat; Ahmad, Mehraj; Arfat, Yasir Ali; Panichayupakaranant, Pharkphoom

    2015-01-01

    Undesirable enzymatic browning mediated by polyphenol oxidase (E.C. 1.14.18.1) on the surface of seafood from crustaceans have been a great concern to food processors, causing quality losses of seafood products. Seafoods especially from crustaceans are worldwide consumed due to their delicacy and nutritional value. However, black spot formation (melanosis) is the major problem occurring in crustaceans during postmortem handling and refrigerated storage induce deleterious changes in organoleptic properties and, therefore, decreases commercial value. Polyphenoloxidase (PPO), the copper-containing metalloprotein involved in oxidation of phenol to quinone is the major biochemical reaction of melanosis formation. This enzymatic mechanism causes unappealing blackening in postharvest crustaceans. To alleviate the melanosis formation in crustaceans, use of phenolic compounds from plant extract can serve as antimelanotics and appears to be a good alternative to the conventional sulfites which are associated with health-related disorders. In this review, we focuses on the unique features about the structure, distribution, and properties of PPO as well as mechanism of melanosis formation and provide a comprehensive deeper insight on the factors affecting melanosis formation and its inhibition by various antimelanotics including newly discovered plant phenolic compounds.

  8. Characterization and quantitation of phenolic compounds in new apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) varieties.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, David; Egea, José; Gil, María I; Tomás-Barberán, Francisco A

    2005-11-30

    Thirty-seven apricot varieties, including four new releases (Rojo Pasión, Murciana, Selene, and Dorada) obtained from different crosses between apricot varieties and three traditional Spanish cultivars (Currot, Mauricio, and Búlida), were separated according to flesh color into four groups: white, yellow, light orange, and orange (mean hue angles in flesh were 88.1, 85.0, 77.6, and 72.4, respectively). Four phenolic compound groups, procyanidins, hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, flavonols, and anthocyanins, were identified by HPLC-MS/MS and individually quantified using HPLC-DAD. Chlorogenic and neochlorogenic acids, procyanidins B1, B2, and B4, and some procyanidin trimers, quercetin 3-rutinoside, kaempferol 3-rhamnosyl-hexoside and quercetin 3-acetyl-hexoside, cyanidin 3-rutinoside, and 3-glucoside, were detected and quantified in the skin and flesh of the different cultivars. The total phenolics content, quantified as the addition of the individual compounds quantified by HPLC, ranged between 32.6 and 160.0 mg 100 g(-1) of edible tissue. No correlation between the flesh color and the phenolic content of the different cultivars was observed.

  9. Subcritical water extraction of flavoring and phenolic compounds from cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum).

    PubMed

    Khuwijitjaru, Pramote; Sayputikasikorn, Nucha; Samuhasaneetoo, Suched; Penroj, Parinda; Siriwongwilaichat, Prasong; Adachi, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    Cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) powder was treated with subcritical water at 150 and 200°C in a semi-continuous system at a constant flow rate (3 mL/min) and pressure (6 MPa). Major flavoring compounds, i.e., cinnamaldehyde, cinnamic acid, cinnamyl alcohol and coumarin, were extracted at lower recoveries than the extraction using methanol, suggesting that degradation of these components might occur during the subcritical water treatment. Caffeic, ferulic, p-coumaric, protocatechuic and vanillic acids were identified from the subcritical water treatment. Extraction using subcritical water was more effective to obtain these acids than methanol (50% v/v) in both number of components and recovery, especially at 200°C. Subcritical water treatment at 200°C also resulted in a higher total phenolic content and DPPH radical scavenging activity than the methanol extraction. The DPPH radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content linearly correlated but the results suggested that the extraction at 200°C might result in other products that possessed a free radical scavenging activity other than the phenolic compounds.

  10. Methanogenic degradation kinetics of phenolic compounds in aquifer-derived microcosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Godsy, E.M.; Goerlitz, D.F.; Grbic-Galic, D.

    1992-01-01

    In this segment of a larger multidisciplinary study of the movement and fate of creosote derived compounds in a sand-and-gravel aquifer, we present evidence that the methanogenic degradation of the major biodegradable phenolic compounds and concomitant microbial growth in batch microcosms derived from contaminated aquifer material can be described using Monod kinetics. Substrate depletion and bacterial growth curves were fitted to the Monod equations using nonlinear regression analysis. The method of Marquardt was used for the determination of parameter values that best fit the experimental data by minimizing the residual sum of squares. The Monod kinetic constants (??max, Ks, Y, and kd) that describe phenol, 2-, 3-, and 4-methylphenol degradation and concomitant microbial growth were determined under conditions that were substantially different from those previously reported for microcosms cultured from sewage sludge. The Ks values obtained in this study are approximately two orders of magnitude lower than values obtained for the anaerobic degradation of phenol in digesting sewage sludge, indicating that the aquifer microorganisms have developed enzyme systems that are adapted to low nutrient conditions. The values for kd are much less than ??max, and can be neglected in the microcosms. The extremely low Y values, approximately 3 orders of magnitude lower than for the sewage sludge derived cultures, and the very low numbers of microorganisms in the aquifer derived microcosms suggest that these organisms use some unique strategies to survive in the subsurface environment. ?? 1992 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  11. Synergistic interactions between phenolic compounds identified in grape pomace extract with antibiotics of different classes against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sanhueza, Loreto; Melo, Ricardo; Montero, Ruth; Maisey, Kevin; Mendoza, Leonora

    2017-01-01

    Synergy could be an effective strategy to potentiate and recover antibiotics nowadays useless in clinical treatments against multi-resistant bacteria. In this study, synergic interactions between antibiotics and grape pomace extract that contains high concentration of phenolic compounds were evaluated by the checkerboard method in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. To define which component of the extract is responsible for the synergic effect, phenolic compounds were identified by RP-HPLC and their relative abundance was determined. Combinations of extract with pure compounds identified there in were also evaluated. Results showed that the grape pomace extract combined with representatives of different classes of antibiotics as β-lactam, quinolone, fluoroquinolone, tetracycline and amphenicol act in synergy in all S. aureus and E. coli strains tested with FICI values varying from 0.031 to 0.155. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was reduced 4 to 75 times. The most abundant phenolic compounds identified in the extract were quercetin, gallic acid, protocatechuic acid and luteolin with relative abundance of 26.3, 24.4, 16.7 and 11.4%, respectively. All combinations of the extract with the components also showed synergy with FICI values varying from 0.031 to 0.5 and MIC reductions of 4 to 125 times with both bacteria strains. The relative abundance of phenolic compounds has no correlation with the obtained synergic effect, suggesting that the mechanism by which the synergic effect occurs is by a multi-objective action. It was also shown that combinations of grape pomace extract with antibiotics are not toxic for the HeLa cell line at concentrations in which the synergistic effect was observed (47 μg/mL of extract and 0.6–375 μg/mL antibiotics). Therefore, these combinations are good candidates for testing in animal models in order to enhance the effect of antibiotics of different classes and thus restore the currently unused

  12. Synergistic interactions between phenolic compounds identified in grape pomace extract with antibiotics of different classes against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Sanhueza, Loreto; Melo, Ricardo; Montero, Ruth; Maisey, Kevin; Mendoza, Leonora; Wilkens, Marcela

    2017-01-01

    Synergy could be an effective strategy to potentiate and recover antibiotics nowadays useless in clinical treatments against multi-resistant bacteria. In this study, synergic interactions between antibiotics and grape pomace extract that contains high concentration of phenolic compounds were evaluated by the checkerboard method in clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. To define which component of the extract is responsible for the synergic effect, phenolic compounds were identified by RP-HPLC and their relative abundance was determined. Combinations of extract with pure compounds identified there in were also evaluated. Results showed that the grape pomace extract combined with representatives of different classes of antibiotics as β-lactam, quinolone, fluoroquinolone, tetracycline and amphenicol act in synergy in all S. aureus and E. coli strains tested with FICI values varying from 0.031 to 0.155. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was reduced 4 to 75 times. The most abundant phenolic compounds identified in the extract were quercetin, gallic acid, protocatechuic acid and luteolin with relative abundance of 26.3, 24.4, 16.7 and 11.4%, respectively. All combinations of the extract with the components also showed synergy with FICI values varying from 0.031 to 0.5 and MIC reductions of 4 to 125 times with both bacteria strains. The relative abundance of phenolic compounds has no correlation with the obtained synergic effect, suggesting that the mechanism by which the synergic effect occurs is by a multi-objective action. It was also shown that combinations of grape pomace extract with antibiotics are not toxic for the HeLa cell line at concentrations in which the synergistic effect was observed (47 μg/mL of extract and 0.6-375 μg/mL antibiotics). Therefore, these combinations are good candidates for testing in animal models in order to enhance the effect of antibiotics of different classes and thus restore the currently unused

  13. Kinetic and isotherm studies of adsorption and biosorption processes in the removal of phenolic compounds from aqueous solutions: comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The phenolic compounds are known by their carcinogenicity and high toxicity as well as creating unpleasant taste and odor in water resources. The present study develops a cost-effective technology for the treatment of water contaminated with phenolic compounds, including Phenol (Ph), 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). So, two sorbents, rice bran ash (RBA) and biomass of brown algae, Cystoseiraindica, were used and results were compared with the commercially granular activated carbon (GAC). The phenolic compounds were determined using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) under batch equilibrium conditions. The effects of contact time, pH, initial adsorbate concentration, and adsorbent dosages on the removal efficiency were studied. The adsorption data were simulated by isotherm and kinetic models. Results indicated that RBA and GAC had the lowest efficiency for the removal of 2-CP, while the order of removal efficiency for C. indica biomass was as follows: 2-CP > 4-CP > phenol. The efficiency of GAC was higher than those of other adsorbents for all of the phenolic compounds. Furthermore, the adsorption capacity of RBA was found to be higher than that of C. indica biomass. The optimal initial pH for the removal of phenol, 2-CP and 4-CP was determined to be 5, 7, and 7 for RBA, GAC, and algal biomass, respectively. Kinetic studies suggested that the pseudo-second order best fitted the kinetic data. PMID:24355013

  14. Composition of phenolic compounds and glycoalkaloids alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine during commercial potato processing.

    PubMed

    Mäder, Jens; Rawel, Harshadrai; Kroh, Lothar W

    2009-07-22

    The influence of a commercial production process for dehydrated potato flakes on the content of free phenolic compounds, total phenolics, and glycoalkaloids in potatoes during the subsequent processing steps was determined. Processing byproducts, such as potato peel (steam peeling), mashed potato residues, and side streams (blanching and cooking waters), have also been investigated. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed to separate and quantify caffeic acid, gallic acid, ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, p-hydoxybenzoic acid, protocatechuic acid, vanillic acid, catechin, and three isomers of caffeoylquinic acid: chlorogenic, neochlorogenic and cryptochlorogenic acid. Determination of the glycoalkaloids alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine was performed by using a high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) method. The deliverables reveal that processing potatoes to potato flakes remarkably diminishes the content of the analyzed compounds, mainly due to peeling and leaching. The influence of thermal exposure is less significant. About 43% of the initial phenolic acids and 10% of the glycoalkaloids remain after processing. The results of the total phenolic content assay by Folin-Ciocalteu reagent are proportional to the content of phenolic compounds determined by HPLC. Steam peeling has a higher influence on glycoalkaloid losses compared to that on phenolics. The highest amounts of phenolic compounds and glycoalkaloids were found in peeling byproduct. During processing, the amount of chlorogenic acid decreased, whereas the concentration of neochlorogenic acid increased due to isomerization. The impact of the results on potato processing technology is discussed.

  15. Antioxidant compounds, antioxidant activity and phenolic content in peel from three tropical fruits from Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Moo-Huchin, Víctor M; Moo-Huchin, Mariela I; Estrada-León, Raciel J; Cuevas-Glory, Luis; Estrada-Mota, Iván A; Ortiz-Vázquez, Elizabeth; Betancur-Ancona, David; Sauri-Duch, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant compounds, antioxidant activity and content of individual phenolic compounds of freeze-dried peel from three tropical fruits grown in Yucatan, México: purple star apple (Chrysophyllum cainito L.), yellow cashew and red cashew (Anacardium occidentale). The freeze-dried peels were good source of antioxidant compounds. ABTS and DPPH values in the peel from each fruit were 3050.95-3322.31 μM Trolox/100g dry weight (DW) or 890.19-970.01 mg of vitamin C/100 g DW, and 1579.04-1680.90 μM Trolox/100 g DW or 340.18-362.18 mg of vitamin C/100 g DW, respectively. Six phenolic compounds were identified in the peel from the tropical fruits studied: ferulic, caffeic, sinapic, gallic, ellagic and myricetin. This study demonstrated that freeze-dried peels from purple star apple, yellow cashew and red cashew, could serve as potential sources of antioxidants for use in food and pharmaceutical industries.

  16. Emerging role of phenolic compounds as natural food additives in fish and fish products.

    PubMed

    Maqsood, Sajid; Benjakul, Soottawat; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2013-01-01

    Chemical and microbiological deteriorations are principal causes of quality loss of fish and fish products during handling, processing, and storage. Development of rancid odor and unpleasant flavor, changes of color and texture as well as lowering nutritional value in fish can be prevented by appropriate use of additives. Due to the potential health hazards of synthetic additives, natural products, especially antioxidants and antimicrobial agents, have been intensively examined as safe alternatives to synthetic compounds. Polyphenols (PP) are the natural antioxidants prevalent in fruits, vegetables, beverages (tea, wine, juices), plants, seaweeds, and some herbs and show antioxidative and antimicrobial activities in different fish and fish products. The use of phenolic compounds also appears to be a good alternative for sulphiting agent for retarding melanosis in crustaceans. Phenolic compounds have also been successfully employed as the processing aid for texture modification of fish mince and surimi. Thus, plant polyphenolic compounds can serve as potential additives for preventing quality deterioration or to retain the quality of fish and fish products.

  17. Microchip electrophoresis with amperometric detection for a novel determination of phenolic compounds in olive oil.

    PubMed

    Godoy-Caballero, María del Pilar; Acedo-Valenzuela, María Isabel; Galeano-Díaz, Teresa; Costa-García, Agustín; Fernández-Abedul, María Teresa

    2012-11-07

    The relevance of the development of microchip electrophoresis applications in the field of food analysis is considered in this work. A novel method to determine important phenolic compounds in extra virgin olive oil samples using a miniaturized chemical analysis system is presented in this paper. Three interesting phenolic compounds in olive oil and fruit (tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein glucoside) were studied by end-channel amperometric detection using a 100 μm gold wire as working electrode in glass microchip electrophoresis. The electrochemical behavior of these compounds was studied and the medium to carry out their detection was selected (0.1 M aqueous sulfuric acid). The best conditions for the separation were achieved in sodium tetraborate (10% methanol, pH 9.50) with different concentrations for the sample and the running buffer in order to allow the sample stacking phenomenon. The injection was carried out using 600 V for 3 s and the separation voltage was set at 1000 V. The quality of the method was evaluated through its analytical figures of merit and by its performance on real extra virgin olive oil samples. Determination of these compounds was carried out using the standard addition calibration method with good recoveries.

  18. Two polydimethylsiloxane rod extraction methods for the sensitive determination of phenolic compounds in water samples.

    PubMed

    Valls-Cantenys, Carme; Iglesias, Mònica; Salvadó, Victòria

    2014-12-01

    Simple, precise, and low-cost methods for the simultaneous determination of phenolic endocrine disrupting compounds such as bisphenol A, trichlorophenol, pentachlorophenol, 4-nonylphenol, and 4-octylphenol in water samples were developed. The Direct, in situ derivatization methods are based on polydimethylsiloxane rod extraction followed by liquid desorption and chromatographic analysis by liquid chromatography and diode array detection. Several parameters affecting the extraction and desorption of the phenolic compounds and their acetylated derivates were studied, as well as the chromatographic and detection conditions. For the direct method, determination coefficients (r(2) ) > 0.990 and LODs in the 0.6-2 μg/L range were obtained for all compounds except bisphenol A (9.5 μg/L). With the derivatization-based method, based on in situ acetylation, lower limits of detection (0.3-0.9 μg/L) were obtained for all the compounds with r(2) > 0.988 and RSDs in the 2-9% range. The developed methods were applied to the analysis of spiked water samples obtaining recoveries of between 60.2 and 131.7% for the direct method, and of between 76.6 and 108.2% for the derivatization-based method. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using these two methods for determining bisphenol A, trichlorophenol, pentachlorophenol, 4-nonylphenol, and 4-octylphenol in water.

  19. Immobilized soybean hull peroxidase for the oxidation of phenolic compounds in coffee processing wastewater.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Pricila Maria Batista; Torres, Juliana Arriel; Silva, Maria Cristina; Corrêa, Angelita Duarte

    2015-11-01

    Chitosan beads were prepared, using glutaraldehyde as a crosslinking agent for the immobilization of soybean hull peroxidase (SBP). The activity of free and immobilized SBP was studied. The optimum pH was 6.0 for both the free and immobilized enzyme; however, enzyme activity became more dependent on the temperature after immobilization. This study evaluated the potential use of immobilized and free enzyme in the oxidation of caffeic acid, of synthetic phenolic solution (SPS) and of total phenolic compounds in coffee processing wastewater (CPW). Some factors, such as reaction time, amount of H2O2 and caffeic acid were evaluated, in order to determine the optimum conditions for enzyme performance. Both enzymes showed a potential in the removal of caffeic acid, SPS and CPW, and immobilized SBP had the highest oxidation performance. The immobilized enzyme showed a potential of 50% in the oxidation of caffeic acid after 4 consecutive cycles.

  20. Evolution of phenolic compounds and metal content of wine during alcoholic fermentation and storage.

    PubMed

    Bimpilas, Andreas; Tsimogiannis, Dimitrios; Balta-Brouma, Kalliopi; Lymperopoulou, Theopisti; Oreopoulou, Vassiliki

    2015-07-01

    Changes in the principal phenolic compounds and metal content during the vinification process and storage under modified atmosphere (50% N2, 50% CO2) of Merlot and Syrah wines, from grapes cultivated in Greece, have been investigated. Comparing the variation of metals at maceration process, with the variation of monomeric anthocyanins and flavonols, an inverse relationship was noticed, that can be attributed to complexing reactions of polyphenols with particular trace elements. Cu decreased rapidly, whereas a similar behavior that could be expected for Fe and Mn was not confirmed. Differences in the profile of anthocyanins and flavonols in the fresh Merlot and Syrah wines are reported. During 1 year of storage monomeric anthocyanins declined almost tenfold, probably due to polymerization reactions and copigmentation. Also, a decrease in flavonol glycosides and increase in the respective aglycones was observed, attributed to enzymatic hydrolysis. The concentration of total phenols and all metals remained practically constant.

  1. Cancer cell cytotoxicity of extracts and small phenolic compounds from Chaga [Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat].

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Yuki; Nishida, Hiroshi; Matsugo, Seiichi; Konishi, Tetsuya

    2009-06-01

    Previously, we studied the antioxidant potential of Chaga mushroom [Inonotus obliquus (persoon) Pilat] extracts and isolated several small (poly)phenolic compounds as the major antioxidant components in the 80% methanol (MeOH) extract. In the present study, these isolated phenolic ingredients together with several other types of Chaga extracts were examined for cytotoxic effects against normal (IMR90) and cancer (A549, PA-1, U937, and HL-60) cell lines. Results revealed decoctions from both the fruiting body (FB) and sclerotium (ST) parts of Chaga, especially the ST part, showed considerable cytotoxicity toward tumor cells, but the cytotoxicity appeared to be stronger against normal cells than cancer cells. The 80% MeOH ST extract also showed the same trend. On the other hand, the 80% MeOH extract of FB showed significant cytotoxicity towards tumor cell lines without affecting normal cells, for example, the 50% lethal dose was 49.4 +/- 2.9 microg/mL for PA-1 cells versus 123.6 +/- 13.8 microg/mL for normal cells. The phenolic components isolated from the 80% MeOH extracts had markedly greater cancer cell toxicity than the extracts themselves. In particular, two out of seven compounds showed strong cytotoxicity towards several tumor cell lines without giving rise to significant cell toxicity toward normal cells. For example, the 50% lethal dose for 3,4-dihydroxybenzalacetone was 12.2 micromol/L in PA-1 cells but was 272.8 micromol/L in IMR90 cells. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis further revealed these phenolic ingredients have high potentiality for apoptosis induction in PA-1 cells.

  2. Determination of free and bound phenolic compounds in soy isoflavone concentrate using a PFP fused core column.

    PubMed

    Verardo, Vito; Riciputi, Ylenia; Garrido-Frenich, Antonia; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza

    2015-10-15

    In the last years, the consumption of soy-based foods has increased due to the health benefits related to soy bioactives like phenolic compounds. Thus, in the present study, a new chromatographic method using reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detection (RP-HPLC/DAD) was developed using a fused core pentafluorophenyl (PFP) column. The established method allowed the determination of twenty-one free phenolic compounds and eleven bound phenolics in a soy isoflavone concentrate. The method was validated in terms of precision and recovery. Intra and inter-day precision were less than 5% (% RSD) and the recovery was between 97.4% and 103.6%. Limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged between 0.093 and 0.443 μg/mL. Because of that, PFP stationary phase can be easily applied for routine determination of phenolic compounds in soy based foods.

  3. Towards green analysis of virgin olive oil phenolic compounds: Extraction by a natural deep eutectic solvent and direct spectrophotometric detection.

    PubMed

    Paradiso, Vito Michele; Clemente, Antonia; Summo, Carmine; Pasqualone, Antonella; Caponio, Francesco

    2016-12-01

    The determination of phenolic compounds in extra virgin olive oils (EVOO) by means of rapid, low-cost, environment-free methods would be a desirable achievement. A natural deep eutectic solvent (DES) based on glucose and lactic acid was considered as extraction solvent for phenolic compounds in EVOO. DESs are green solvents characterized by high availability, biodegradability, safety, and low cost. The spectrophotometric characteristics of DES extracts of 65 EVOO samples were related to the total phenolic content of the oils, assessed by methanol-water extraction coupled to the Folin-Ciocalteu assay. A regression model (ncalibration=45, nvalidation=20), including the absorbance at two wavelengths (257, 324nm), was obtained, with an adjusted R(2)=0.762. Therefore the DES could provide a promising and viable approach for a green screening method of phenolic compounds in EVOO, by means of simple spectrophotometric measurements of extracts, even for on-field analysis (for example in olive mills).

  4. Variation of anthocyanins and other major phenolic compounds throughout the ripening of four Portuguese blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sara; Costa, Eduardo M; Coelho, Marta C; Morais, Rui M; Pintado, Manuela E

    2017-01-01

    Blueberries are widely recognised as one of the richest sources of bioactive compounds, among which are anthocyanins, though the ripeness of berries has been reported as affecting the phytochemical composition of fruits. Therefore, the present work aimed to evaluate the variation of anthocyanins, and other major phenolics, throughout five ripening stages in four blueberry cultivars. The results showed that the antioxidant capacity and anthocyanin content increased during ripening, reaching the highest values when the blueberries are collected from bunches comprised of 75% ripe blueberries. Antagonistically, the amount of phenolic acid decreases, while the quercetin-3-glucoside levels remain stable. Furthermore, Goldtraube blueberries appear to possess, systematically, higher amounts of phenolic compounds than the other cultivars studied. Thus, when seeking the highest yield of anthocyanins, the preferred harvest should occur in bunches that contain ca 75% of ripe blueberries and, considering the cultivars assayed, the Goldtraube cultivar appears to be the richest in phenolic compounds.

  5. Biotransformation of Furanic and Phenolic Compounds with Hydrogen Gas Production in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2015-11-17

    Furanic and phenolic compounds are problematic byproducts resulting from the breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass during biofuel production. The capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to produce hydrogen gas (H2) using a mixture of two furanic (furfural, FF; 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, HMF) and three phenolic (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA) compounds as the substrate in the bioanode was assessed. The rate and extent of biotransformation of the five compounds and efficiency of H2 production, as well as the structure of the anode microbial community, were investigated. The five compounds were completely transformed within 7-day batch runs and their biotransformation rate increased with increasing initial concentration. At an initial concentration of 1200 mg/L (8.7 mM) of the mixture of the five compounds, their biotransformation rate ranged from 0.85 to 2.34 mM/d. The anode Coulombic efficiency was 44-69%, which is comparable to that of wastewater-fed MECs. The H2 yield varied from 0.26 to 0.42 g H2-COD/g COD removed in the anode, and the bioanode volume-normalized H2 production rate was 0.07-0.1 L/L-d. The biotransformation of the five compounds took place via fermentation followed by exoelectrogenesis. The major identified fermentation products that did not transform further were catechol and phenol. Acetate was the direct substrate for exoelectrogenesis. Current and H2 production were inhibited at an initial substrate concentration of 1200 mg/L, resulting in acetate accumulation at a much higher level than that measured in other batch runs conducted with a lower initial concentration of the five compounds. The anode microbial community consisted of exoelectrogens, putative degraders of the five compounds, and syntrophic partners of exoelectrogens. The MEC H2 production demonstrated in this study is an alternative to the currently used process of reforming natural gas to supply H2 needed to upgrade bio-oils to stable

  6. Partition behavior of virgin olive oil phenolic compounds in oil-brine mixtures during thermal processing for fish canning.

    PubMed

    Sacchi, Raffaele; Paduano, Antonello; Fiore, Francesca; Della Medaglia, Dorotea; Ambrosino, Maria Luisa; Medina, Isabel

    2002-05-08

    The chemical modifications and partitioning toward the brine phase (5% salt) of major phenol compounds of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) were studied in a model system formed by sealed cans filled with oil-brine mixtures (5:1, v/v) simulating canned-in-oil food systems. Filled cans were processed in an industrial plant using two sterilization conditions commonly used during fish canning. The partitioning of phenolic compounds toward brine induced by thermal processing was studied by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of the phenol fraction extracted from oils and brine. Hydroxytyrosol (1), tyrosol (2), and the complex phenolic compounds containing 1 and 2 (i.e., the dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl oleuropein aglycon 3, the dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl ligstroside aglycon 4, and the oleuropein aglycon 6) decreased in the oily phase after sterilization with a marked partitioning toward the brine phase. The increase of the total amount of 1 and 2 after processing, as well as the presence of elenolic acid 7 released in brine, revealed the hydrolysis of the ester bond of hydrolyzable phenolic compounds 3, 4, and 6 during thermal processing. Both phenomena (partitioning toward the water phase and hydrolysis) contribute to explain the loss of phenolic compounds exhibited by EVOO used as filling medium in canned foods, as well as the protection of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in canned-in-EVOO fish products.

  7. Nutritional Composition and Antioxidant Capacity in Edible Flowers: Characterisation of Phenolic Compounds by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MSn

    PubMed Central

    Navarro-González, Inmaculada; González-Barrio, Rocío; García-Valverde, Verónica; Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Periago, María Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Edible flowers are commonly used in human nutrition and their consumption has increased in recent years. The aim of this study was to ascertain the nutritional composition and the content and profile of phenolic compounds of three edible flowers, monks cress (Tropaeolum majus), marigold (Tagetes erecta) and paracress (Spilanthes oleracea), and to determine the relationship between the presence of phenolic compounds and the antioxidant capacity. Proximate composition, total dietary fibre (TDF) and minerals were analysed according to official methods: total phenolic compounds (TPC) were determined with Folin-Ciocalteu’s reagent, whereas antioxidant capacity was evaluated using Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC) and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assays. In addition, phenolic compounds were characterised by HPLC-DAD-MSn. In relation to the nutritional value, the edible flowers had a composition similar to that of other plant foods, with a high water and TDF content, low protein content and very low proportion of total fat—showing significant differences among samples. The levels of TPC compounds and the antioxidant capacity were significantly higher in T. erecta, followed by S. oleracea and T. majus. Thirty-nine different phenolic compounds were tentatively identified, with flavonols being the major compounds detected in all samples, followed by anthocyanins and hydroxycynnamic acid derivatives. In T. erecta small proportions of gallotannin and ellagic acid were also identified. PMID:25561232

  8. Nutritional composition and antioxidant capacity in edible flowers: characterisation of phenolic compounds by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MSn.

    PubMed

    Navarro-González, Inmaculada; González-Barrio, Rocío; García-Valverde, Verónica; Bautista-Ortín, Ana Belén; Periago, María Jesús

    2014-12-31

    Edible flowers are commonly used in human nutrition and their consumption has increased in recent years. The aim of this study was to ascertain the nutritional composition and the content and profile of phenolic compounds of three edible flowers, monks cress (Tropaeolum majus), marigold (Tagetes erecta) and paracress (Spilanthes oleracea), and to determine the relationship between the presence of phenolic compounds and the antioxidant capacity. Proximate composition, total dietary fibre (TDF) and minerals were analysed according to official methods: total phenolic compounds (TPC) were determined with Folin-Ciocalteu's reagent, whereas antioxidant capacity was evaluated using Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC) and Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) assays. In addition, phenolic compounds were characterised by HPLC-DAD-MSn. In relation to the nutritional value, the edible flowers had a composition similar to that of other plant foods, with a high water and TDF content, low protein content and very low proportion of total fat-showing significant differences among samples. The levels of TPC compounds and the antioxidant capacity were significantly higher in T. erecta, followed by S. oleracea and T. majus. Thirty-nine different phenolic compounds were tentatively identified, with flavonols being the major compounds detected in all samples, followed by anthocyanins and hydroxycynnamic acid derivatives. In T. erecta small proportions of gallotannin and ellagic acid were also identified.

  9. An Overview of Plant Phenolic Compounds and Their Importance in Human Nutrition and Management of Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Derong; Xiao, Mengshi; Zhao, Jingjing; Li, Zhuohao; Xing, Baoshan; Li, Xindan; Kong, Maozhu; Li, Liangyu; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Yaowen; Chen, Hong; Qin, Wen; Wu, Hejun; Chen, Saiyan

    2016-10-15

    In this paper, the biosynthesis process of phenolic compounds in plants is summarized, which include the shikimate, pentose phosphate and phenylpropanoid pathways. Plant phenolic compounds can act as antioxidants, structural polymers (lignin), attractants (flavonoids and carotenoids), UV screens (flavonoids), signal compounds (salicylic acid, flavonoids) and defense response chemicals (tannins, phytoalexins). From a human physiological standpoint, phenolic compounds are vital in defense responses, such as anti-aging, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and anti-proliferative activities. Therefore, it is beneficial to eat such plant foods that have a high antioxidant compound content, which will cut down the incidence of certain chronic diseases, for instance diabetes, cancers and cardiovascular diseases, through the management of oxidative stress. Furthermore, berries and other fruits with low-amylase and high-glucosidase inhibitory activities could be thought of as candidate food items in the control of the early stages of hyperglycemia associated with type 2 diabetes.

  10. Evaluation of leishmanicidal and trypanocidal activities of phenolic compounds from Calea uniflora Less.

    PubMed

    Lima, Tamires C; Souza, Rafaela J; Santos, Alan D C; Moraes, Milene H; Biondo, Nicole E; Barison, Andersson; Steindel, Mário; Biavatti, Maique W

    2016-01-01

    The phytochemical study of Calea uniflora led to the isolation of nine phenolic compounds identified as noreugenin (1), ethyl caffeate (2), a mixture of butein (3) + orobol (4), α-hydroxy-butein (5), caffeic acid (6), butein 4'-O-glucopyranosyl (7), quercetin 3-O-glucopyranosyl (8) and 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (9). The chemical identity of the isolates was established on the basis of NMR and physical data. The chemical shifts of 5 and 7 have been reassigned and all the isolates were tested against Leishmania amazonensis and Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes. None of the metabolites showed promising leishmanicidal activity. However, 2 and the mixture of 3 and 4 demonstrated interesting trypanocidal effect with IC50 values of 18.27 and 26.53 μM, respectively. Besides, these compounds did not present cytotoxic effect towards THP-1 cells, and compound 2 was 3.5-fold more selective than the mixture of 3+4.

  11. Phenolic compounds containing/neutral fractions extract and products derived therefrom from fractionated fast-pyrolysis oils

    DOEpatents

    Chum, Helena L.; Black, Stuart K.; Diebold, James P.; Kreibich, Roland E.

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing phenol-formaldehyde novolak resins and molding compositions in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenol/neutral fractions extract obtained from fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils. The fractionation consists of a neutralization stage which can be carried out with aqueous solutions of bases or appropriate bases in the dry state, followed by solvent extraction with an organic solvent having at least a moderate solubility parameter and good hydrogen bonding capacity. Phenolic compounds-containing/neutral fractions extracts obtained by fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils from a lignocellulosic material, is such that the oil is initially in the pH range of 2-4, being neutralized with an aqueous bicarbonate base, and extracted into a solvent having a solubility parameter of approximately 8.4-9.11 [cal/cm.sup.3 ].sup.1/2 with polar components in the 1.8-3.0 range and hydrogen bonding components in the 2-4.8 range and the recovery of the product extract from the solvent with no further purification being needed for use in adhesives and molding compounds. The product extract is characterized as being a mixture of very different compounds having a wide variety of chemical functionalities, including phenolic, carbonyl, aldehyde, methoxyl, vinyl and hydroxyl. The use of the product extract on phenol-formaldehyde thermosetting resins is shown to have advantages over the conventional phenol-formaldehyde resins.

  12. Modulation of Strawberry/Cranberry Phenolic Compounds Glucuronidation by Co-Supplementation with Onion: Characterization of Phenolic Metabolites in Rat Plasma Using an Optimized μSPE-UHPLC-MS/MS Method.

    PubMed

    Dudonné, Stéphanie; Dubé, Pascal; Pilon, Geneviève; Marette, André; Jacques, Hélène; Weisnagel, John; Desjardins, Yves

    2014-03-26

    Plant phenolic compounds are suggested to exert pharmacological activities in regards to obesity and type-2 diabetes, but their mode of action is poorly understood due to a lack of information about their bioavailability. This work aimed to study the bioavailability of GlucoPhenol phenolic compounds, a strawberry-cranberry extracts blend, by characterizing plasma phenolic profile in obese rats. A comparison was performed by co-supplementation with an onion extract. Using an optimized μSPE-UHPLC-MS/MS method, 21 phenolic metabolites were characterized, mostly conjugated metabolites and microbial degradation products of the native phenolic compounds. Their kinetic profiles revealed either an intestinal or hepatic formation. Among identified metabolites, isorhamnetin glucuronide sulfate was found in greater amount in plasma. Three glucuronidated conjugates of strawberry-cranberry phenolic compounds, p-hydroxybenzoic acid glucuronide, catechins glucuronide, and methyl catechins glucuronide were found in higher quantities when GlucoPhenol was ingested together with onion extract (+252%, +279%, and +118% respectively), suggesting a possible induction of glucuronidation processes by quercetin. This work allowed the characterization of actual phenolic metabolites generated in vivo following a phenolic intake, the analysis of their kinetics and suggested a possible synergistic activity of phenolic compounds for improving bioavailability.

  13. Biotransformation of furanic and phenolic compounds with hydrogen gas production in a microbial electrolysis cell

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2015-10-27

    In this study, furanic and phenolic compounds are problematic byproducts resulting from the decomposition of lignocellulosic biomass during biofuel production. This study assessed the capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to produce hydrogen gas (H2) using a mixture of two furanic (furfural, FF; 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, HMF) and three phenolic (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA) compounds as the sole carbon and energy source in the bioanode. The rate and extent of biotransformation of the five compounds, efficiency of H2 production, as well as the anode microbial community structure were investigated. The five compounds were completelymore » transformed within 7-day batch runs and their biotransformation rate increased with increasing initial concentration. At an initial concentration of 1,200 mg/L (8.7 mM) of the mixture of the five compounds, their biotransformation rate ranged from 0.85 to 2.34 mM/d. The anode coulombic efficiency was 44-69%, which is comparable to wastewater-fed MECs. The H2 yield varied from 0.26 to 0.42 g H2-COD/g COD removed in the anode, and the bioanode volume-normalized H2 production rate was 0.07-0.1 L/L-d. The major identified fermentation products that did not transform further were catechol and phenol. Acetate was the direct substrate for exoelectrogenesis. Current and H2 production were inhibited at an initial substrate concentration of 1,200 mg/L, resulting in acetate accumulation at a much higher level than that measured in other batch runs conducted with a lower initial concentration of the five compounds. The anode microbial community consisted of exoelectrogens, putative degraders of the five compounds, and syntrophic partners of exoelectrogens. The H2 production route demonstrated in this study has proven to be an alternative to the currently used process of reforming natural gas to supply H2 needed to upgrade bio-oils to stable hydrocarbon fuels.« less

  14. Biotransformation of furanic and phenolic compounds with hydrogen gas production in a microbial electrolysis cell

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros G.

    2015-10-27

    In this study, furanic and phenolic compounds are problematic byproducts resulting from the decomposition of lignocellulosic biomass during biofuel production. This study assessed the capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) to produce hydrogen gas (H2) using a mixture of two furanic (furfural, FF; 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, HMF) and three phenolic (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA) compounds as the sole carbon and energy source in the bioanode. The rate and extent of biotransformation of the five compounds, efficiency of H2 production, as well as the anode microbial community structure were investigated. The five compounds were completely transformed within 7-day batch runs and their biotransformation rate increased with increasing initial concentration. At an initial concentration of 1,200 mg/L (8.7 mM) of the mixture of the five compounds, their biotransformation rate ranged from 0.85 to 2.34 mM/d. The anode coulombic efficiency was 44-69%, which is comparable to wastewater-fed MECs. The H2 yield varied from 0.26 to 0.42 g H2-COD/g COD removed in the anode, and the bioanode volume-normalized H2 production rate was 0.07-0.1 L/L-d. The major identified fermentation products that did not transform further were catechol and phenol. Acetate was the direct substrate for exoelectrogenesis. Current and H2 production were inhibited at an initial substrate concentration of 1,200 mg/L, resulting in acetate accumulation at a much higher level than that measured in other batch runs conducted with a lower initial concentration of the five compounds. The anode microbial community consisted of exoelectrogens, putative degraders of the five compounds, and syntrophic partners of exoelectrogens. The H2 production route demonstrated in this study has proven to be an alternative to the currently used process of reforming natural gas to supply H2 needed to

  15. Effect of the storage time and temperature on phenolic compounds of sorghum grain and flour.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Kênia Grasielle de; Queiroz, Valéria Aparecida Vieira; Carlos, Lanamar de Almeida; Cardoso, Leandro de Morais; Pinheiro-Sant'Ana, Helena Maria; Anunciação, Pamella Cristine; Menezes, Cícero Beserra de; Silva, Ernani Clarete da; Barros, Frederico

    2017-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of storage temperature (4, 25 and 40°C) and time on the color and contents of 3-deoxyanthocyanins, total anthocyanins, total phenols and tannins of sorghum stored for 180days. Two genotypes SC319 (grain and flour) and TX430 (bran and flour) were analyzed. The SC319 flour showed luteolinidin and apigeninidin contents higher than the grain and the TX430 bran had the levels of all compounds higher than the flour. The storage temperature did not affect most of the analyzed variables. The content of most of the compounds reduced during the first 60days when they became stable. At day 180, the retention of the compounds in the genotypes SC319 and TX430 ranged from 56.1-77.9% and 67.3-80.1% (3-deoxyanthocyanins), 88.4-93.8% and 84.6-96.8% (total anthocyanins) and 86.7-86.8 and 89.4-100% (phenols) respectively. The retention of tannins ranged from 56.6 to 85.3%. The color of samples remained stable for 120days.

  16. Analysis of phenolic compounds in Matricaria chamomilla and its extracts by UPLC-UV.

    PubMed

    Haghi, G; Hatami, A; Safaei, A; Mehran, M

    2014-01-01

    Chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) is a widely used medicinal plant possessing several pharmacological effects due to presence of active compounds. This study describes a method of using ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with photodiode array (PDA) detector for the separation of phenolic compounds in M. chamomilla and its crude extracts. Separation was conducted on C18 column (150 mm × 2 mm, 1.8 μm) using a gradient elution with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and 4% aqueous acetic acid at 25°C. The method proposed was validated for determination of free and total apigenin and apigenin 7-glucoside contents as bioactive compounds in the extracts by testing sensitivity, linearity, precision and recovery. In general, UPLC produced significant improvements in method sensitivity, speed and resolution. Extraction was performed with methanol, 70% aqueous ethanol and water solvents. Total phenolic and total flavonoid contents ranged from 1.77 to 50.75 gram (g) of gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/100 g and 0.82 to 36.75 g quercetin equivalent (QE)/100 g in dry material, respectively. There was a considerable difference from 40 to 740 mg/100 g for apigenin and 210 to 1110 mg/100 g for apigenin 7-glucoside in dry material.

  17. [Inhibitory effects of Lantana camera and its contained phenolic compounds in Eichhornia crassipes growth].

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhen; Zhang, Maoxin; Ling, Bing; Xu, Di; Ye, Jingzhong

    2006-09-01

    This paper studied the effects of Lantana camera fresh leaves aqueous extract and its contained phenolic compounds on the growth and physiologic-biochemical indexes of Eichhornia crassipes. The results showed that this extract had obvious inhibitory effects on the growth and development of E. crassipes. When the concentration was higher than 30 g FW x L(-1), it could kill E. crassipes after 6 days treatment. A total of seven phenolic compounds in the abstract were identified by HPLC, which were salicylic acid, gentisic acid, beta-resorcylic acid , coumarin, ferulic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and 6-methyl coumarin, with the concentrations being, 50.95, 13.46, 5.28, 3.36, 2.92, 2.19 and 0.34 mg x L(-1), respectively. The mixture of the seven compounds had the strongest inhibitory effect, followed by salicylic acid, 6-methyl coumarin, coumarin, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid, while the effects of beta-resorcylic acid and gentisic acid were not significant.

  18. Microbial trench-based optofluidic system for reagentless determination of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Sanahuja, David; Giménez-Gómez, Pablo; Vigués, Núria; Ackermann, Tobias Nils; Guerrero-Navarro, Alfons Eduard; Pujol-Vila, Ferran; Sacristán, Jordi; Santamaria, Nidia; Sánchez-Contreras, María; Díaz-González, María; Mas, Jordi; Muñoz-Berbel, Xavier

    2015-04-07

    Phenolic compounds are one of the main contaminants of soil and water due to their toxicity and persistence in the natural environment. Their presence is commonly determined with bulky and expensive instrumentation (e.g. chromatography systems), requiring sample collection and transport to the laboratory. Sample transport delays data acquisition, postponing potential actions to prevent environmental catastrophes. This article presents a portable, miniaturized, robust and low-cost microbial trench-based optofluidic system for reagentless determination of phenols in water. The optofluidic system is composed of a poly(methyl methacrylate) structure, incorporating polymeric optical elements and miniaturized discrete auxiliary components for optical transduction. An electronic circuit, adapted from a lock-in amplifier, is used for system control and interfering ambient light subtraction. In the trench, genetically modified bacteria are stably entrapped in an alginate hydrogel for quantitative determination of model phenol catechol. Alginate is also acting as a diffusion barrier for compounds present in the sample. Additionally, the superior refractive index of the gel (compared to water) confines the light in the lower level of the chip. Hence, the optical readout of the device is only altered by changes in the trench. Catechol molecules (colorless) in the sample diffuse through the alginate matrix and reach bacteria, which degrade them to a colored compound. The absorbance increase at 450 nm reports the presence of catechol simply, quickly (~10 min) and quantitatively without addition of chemical reagents. This miniaturized, portable and robust optofluidic system opens the possibility for quick and reliable determination of environmental contamination in situ, thus mitigating the effects of accidental spills.

  19. [Phenolic compounds in leaves insertions of Mentha × villosa Huds. cv. Snežná].

    PubMed

    Tekeľová, Daniela; Bittner Fialová, Silvia; Tóth, Jaroslav; Czigle, Szilvia

    2016-01-01

    Lamiaceae plants mostly accumulate active ingredients in their leaves. The subfamily Nepetoideae, including the genus Mentha L., is characterized by the presence of essential oil and antioxidant phenolics, chiefly hydroxycinnamic acids with predominance of rosmarinic acid, and flavonoids. Mentha × piperita and M. spicata are the most broadly used mints in both medicine and industry, while M. x villosa is less known in our country. Herbal drugs in the form of leaves are usually analysed unpartitioned, while single leaves insertions have only been studied occasionally. Therefore, the aim of this work was the quantification of the active compounds content in the leaves pairs of Mentha × villosa Huds. cv. Snežná, using pharmacopoeial methods: total hydroxycinnamic derivatives expressed as rosmarinic acid (THD) and luteolin-type flavonoids. THD content ranged from 6.7% to 9.4% in the leaves pairs water extracts, and from 6.6% to 14.0% in methanol extracts. Flavonoids contents, expressed as luteolin-7-O-glucoside, ranged from 4.0% to 8.8% in water extracts, and from 4.0% to 10.5% in methanol extracts. Antioxidant activity (DPPH) expressed as SC50 ranged from 10.2 to 16.9 μg.ml-1 (drug dry weight) in water extracts, and from 10.7 to 21.6 μg.ml-1 in methanol extracts. The highest content of phenolic compounds as well as the highest antioxidant activity were found to be in the top sheet, while the lowest content of phenolic compounds and lowest antioxidant activity were detected in the leaves of the middle stem part.Key words: Mentha × villosa Huds cv. Snežná hydroxycinnamic derivatives rosmarinic acid luteolin-7-O-glucoside DPPH.

  20. The role of gamma irradiation on the extraction of phenolic compounds in onion (Allium cepa L.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Eun In; Lee, Eun Mi; Kim, Young Soo; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2012-08-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the content of total phenolic compounds, especially quercetin (Q), in onion (Allium cepa L.) skin was investigated. Onion skin extracts contained two predominant flavonoid compounds, Q and quercetin-4'-glucoside (Q4'G). After 10 kGy gamma irradiation, the yield of Q in the extracts increased significantly from 36.8 to 153.9 μg/ml of the extract, and the Q4'G content decreased slightly from 165.0 to 134.1 μg/ml. In addition, the total phenolic compound content also increased after irradiation at 10 kGy, from 228.0 μg/g of fresh weight to 346.6 μg/g; negligible changes (237.1-256.7 μg/g) occurred at doses of up to 5 kGy. As we expected, radical-scavenging activity was enhanced remarkably (by 88.8%) in the 10 kGy irradiated sample. A dose-dependent increase in the peak intensity of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra was observed in all irradiated samples, with a maximum increase at 10 kGy. The intensity relative to that of the control was 0.15, and it increased to 1.10 in 10 kGy irradiated samples. The optimum gamma irradiation dose, which is sufficient to break the chemical or physical bonds and release soluble phenols of low molecular weight in onion skin, is about 10 kGy.

  1. Flow injection chemiluminescence analysis of phenolic compounds using the NCS-luminol system.

    PubMed

    Haghighi, Behzad; Dadashvand, Reza

    2006-03-01

    A flow injection system coupled with two simple and sensitive chemiluminescence (CL) methods is described for the determination of some phenolic compounds. The methods are based on the inhibition effects of the investigated phenols on the CL signal intensities of N-chlorosuccinimide-KI-luminol (NCS-KI-luminol) and NCS-luminol systems. The influences of the chemical and hydrodynamic parameters on the decrease in CL signal intensities of NCS-KI-luminol and NCS-luminol systems for hydroquinone, catechol, and resorcinol, serving as the model compounds of analyte, were studied in the flow injection mode of analysis. Under the selected conditions, the proposed CL systems were used for the determination of some phenolic compound and analytical characteristics of the systems including calibration equation, correlation coefficient, linear dynamic range, limit of detection, and sample throughput. The limits of detection for hydroquinone, catechol, and resorcinol were 0.002, 0.01, and 0.3 microM using the NCS-KI-luminol system; for the NCS-luminol system these were 0.01, 0.17, and 1.6 microM, respectively. The relative standard deviation for 10 repeated measurements of 0.04, 0.06, and 1 microM of hydroquinone, catechol, and resorcinol were 1.9, 1.4, and 2.0%, respectively, with the NCS-KI-luminol system; for 0.2, 0.5, and 4 microM of hydroquinone, catechol, and resorcinol these were 2.6, 2.2, and 3.7%, respectively, using the NCS-luminol system. The method was applied to the determination of catechol in known environmental water samples with a relative error of less than 6%. A possible reaction mechanism of the proposed CL system is discussed briefly.

  2. Phenolic Compounds from Halimodendron halodendron (Pall.) Voss and Their Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jihua; Lou, Jingfeng; Luo, Chao; Zhou, Ligang; Wang, Mingan; Wang, Lan

    2012-01-01

    Halimodendron halodendron has been used as forage in northwestern China for a long time. Its young leaves and flowers are edible and favored by indigenous people. In this study, eleven phenolic compounds were bioassay-guided and isolated from the aerial parts of H. halodendron for the first time. They were identified by means of physicochemical and spectrometric analysis as quercetin (1), 3,5,7,8,4′-pentahydroxy-3′-methoxy flavone (2), 3-O-methylquercetin (3), 3,3′-di-O-methylquercetin (4), 3,3′-di-O-methylquercetin-7-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (5), isorhamentin-3-O-β-d-rutinoside (6), 8-O-methylretusin (7), 8-O-methylretusin-7-O-β-d-glucopyranoside (8), salicylic acid (9), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (ferulic acid) (10), and 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy cinnamic acid (11). They were sorted as flavonols (1–6), soflavones (7 and 8), and phenolic acids (9–11). Among the compounds, flanools 1–4 revealed a strong antibacterial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of 50–150 μg/mL, and median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 26.8–125.1 μg/mL. The two isoflavones (7 and 8) showed moderate inhibitory activity on the test bacteria. Three phenolic acids (9, 10 and 11) showed strong antibacterial activity with IC50 values of 28.1–149.7 μg/mL. Antifungal activities of the compounds were similar to their antibacterial activities. All these phenolic compounds showed significant antimicrobial activity with a broad spectrum as well as antioxidant activity based on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging and β-carotene-linoleic acid bleaching assays. In general, the flavonol aglycones with relatively low polarity exhibited stronger activities than the glycosides. The results suggest the potential of this plant as a source of functional food ingredients and provide support data for its utilization as forage as well. PMID:23109858

  3. Colour Evaluation, Bioactive Compound Content, Phenolic Acid Profiles and in Vitro Biological Activity of Passerina del Frusinate White Wines: Influence of Pre-Fermentative Skin Contact Times.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Katya; Fiordiponti, Luciano

    2016-07-22

    Passerina del Frusinate is an autochthonous wine grape variety, which grows in the Lazio region that is currently being evaluated by local wine producers. In this study, colour properties (CIELab coordinates), bioactive compounds (total polyphenols and flavan-3-ols), HPLC-DAD phenolic acid profiles and in vitro biological activity of monovarietal Passerina del Frusinate white wines and the effect of different maceration times (0, 18 and 24 h) were evaluated based on these parameters. Results highlighted statistically significant differences for almost all analysed parameters due to a strong influence of the pre-fermentative skin contact time. The flavan content of macerated wines was six times higher than that of the control, while total polyphenols were 1.5 times higher. According to their phytochemical content, macerated wines showed the highest antiradical capacity tested by means of DPPH(•) and ABTS(+•) assays. Besides, prolonged maceration resulted in a reduction of CIELab coordinates as well as of the content of phenolic substances and antiradical capacity. Among the phenolic acids analysed, the most abundant were vanillic acid and caffeic acid; the latter proved to be the most susceptible to degradation as a result of prolonged maceration. Passerina del Frusinate appears as a phenol-rich white wine with a strong antioxidant potential similar to that of red wines.

  4. Metabolic and Microbial Modulation of the Large Intestine Ecosystem by Non-Absorbed Diet Phenolic Compounds: A Review.

    PubMed

    Mosele, Juana I; Macià, Alba; Motilva, Maria-José

    2015-09-18

    Phenolic compounds represent a diverse group of phytochemicals whose intake is associated with a wide spectrum of health benefits. As consequence of their low bioavailability, most of them reach the large intestine where, mediated by the action of local microbiota, a series of related microbial metabolites are accumulated. In the present review, gut microbial transformations of non-absorbed phenolic compounds are summarized. Several studies have reached a general consensus that unbalanced diets are associated with undesirable changes in gut metabolism that could be detrimental to intestinal health. In terms of explaining the possible effects of non-absorbed phenolic compounds, we have also gathered information regarded their influence on the local metabolism. For this purpose, a number of issues are discussed. Firstly, we consider the possible implications of phenolic compounds in the metabolism of colonic products, such as short chain fatty acids (SCFA), sterols (cholesterol and bile acids), and microbial products of non-absorbed proteins. Due to their being recognized as affective antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents, the ability of phenolic compounds to counteract or suppress pro-oxidant and/or pro-inflammatory responses, triggered by bowel diseases, is also presented. The modulation of gut microbiota through dietetic maneuvers including phenolic compounds is also commented on. Although the available data seems to assume positive effects in terms of gut health protection, it is still insufficient for solid conclusions to be extracted, basically due to the lack of human trials to confirm the results obtained by the in vitro and animal studies. We consider that more emphasis should be focused on the study of phenolic compounds, particularly in their microbial metabolites, and their power to influence different aspects of gut health.

  5. Protein Folding and Aggregation into Amyloid: The Interference by Natural Phenolic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Massimo; Rigacci, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation is a hallmark of several degenerative diseases affecting the brain or peripheral tissues, whose intermediates (oligomers, protofibrils) and final mature fibrils display different toxicity. Consequently, compounds counteracting amyloid aggregation have been investigated for their ability (i) to stabilize toxic amyloid precursors; (ii) to prevent the growth of toxic oligomers or speed that of fibrils; (iii) to inhibit fibril growth and deposition; (iv) to disassemble preformed fibrils; and (v) to favor amyloid clearance. Natural phenols, a wide panel of plant molecules, are one of the most actively investigated categories of potential amyloid inhibitors. They are considered responsible for the beneficial effects of several traditional diets being present in green tea, extra virgin olive oil, red wine, spices, berries and aromatic herbs. Accordingly, it has been proposed that some natural phenols could be exploited to prevent and to treat amyloid diseases, and recent studies have provided significant information on their ability to inhibit peptide/protein aggregation in various ways and to stimulate cell defenses, leading to identify shared or specific mechanisms. In the first part of this review, we will overview the significance and mechanisms of amyloid aggregation and aggregate toxicity; then, we will summarize the recent achievements on protection against amyloid diseases by many natural phenols. PMID:23765219

  6. Equilibrium isotherms, kinetics and thermodynamics studies of phenolic compounds adsorption on palm-tree fruit stones.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muthanna J; Theydan, Samar K

    2012-10-01

    Adsorption capacity of an agricultural waste, palm-tree fruit stones (date stones), for phenolic compounds such as phenol (Ph) and p-nitro phenol (PNPh) at different temperatures was investigated. The characteristics of such waste biomass were determined and found to have a surface area and iodine number of 495.71 m2/g and 475.88 mg/g, respectively. The effects of pH (2-12), adsorbent dose (0.6-0.8 g/L) and contact time (0-150 min) on the adsorptive removal process were studied. Maximum removal percentages of 89.95% and 92.11% were achieved for Ph and PNPh, respectively. Experimental equilibrium data for adsorption of both components were analyzed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Tempkin isotherm models. The results show that the best fit was achieved with the Langmuir isotherm equation with maximum adsorption capacities of 132.37 and 161.44 mg/g for Ph and PNPh, respectively. The kinetic data were fitted to pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion models, and was found to follow closely the pseudo-second order model for both components. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, namely ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS showed that adsorption of Ph and PNPh was spontaneous and endothermic under examined conditions.

  7. Laccase immobilization on the electrode surface to design a biosensor for the detection of phenolic compound such as catechol.

    PubMed

    Nazari, Maryam; Kashanian, Soheila; Rafipour, Ronak

    2015-06-15

    Biosensors based on the coupling of a biological entity with a suitable transducer offer an effective route to detect phenolic compounds. Phenol and phenolic compounds are among the most toxic environmental pollutants. Laccases are multi-copper oxidases that can oxide phenol and phenolic compounds. A method is described for construction of an electrochemical biosensor to detect phenolic compounds based on covalent immobilization of laccase (Lac) onto polyaniline (PANI) electrodeposited onto a glassy carbon (GC) electrode via glutaraldehyde coupling. The modified electrode was characterized by voltammetry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. The results indicated that laccase was immobilized onto modified GC electrode by the covalent interaction between laccase and terminal functional groups of the glutaraldehyde. The laccase immobilized modified electrode showed a direct electron transfer reaction between laccase and the electrode. Linear range, sensitivity, and detection limit for this biosensor were 3.2 × 10(-6) to 19.6 × 10(-6)M, 706.7 mAL mol(-1), 2.07 × 10(-6)M, respectively.

  8. Analysis of phenolic compounds in commercial dried grape pomace by high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Lopez, Lina M; DeWitt, Christina A M

    2014-09-01

    By-products obtained from winemaking processes still contain large amounts of phenolic compounds, especially phenolic acids, flavanols, flavonols, stilbenes, and flavonoids. Enzymatic hydrolysis was used for determination and characterization of phenolic acids, flavanols, flavonols, and stilbenes. Characterization of the flavonoids was achieved using acid hydrolysis with 0.1% hydrochloric acid. In addition, organic solvents as 50% methanol, 70% methanol, 50% acetone, 0.01% pectinase, and 100% petroleum ether were also evaluated. Reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with diode array detector was used to identify phenolic compounds. Internal standard quantification was implemented using a five points of the UV-visible absorption data collected at the wavelength of maximum absorbance. A total of 16 phenolic compounds were determined. The content differed from 1.19 to 1124 mg kg(-1). Outcomes from HPLC study showed that gallic acid, (+) catechin hydrate, and (-) epicatechin gallate were the major phenolic compounds presented in the sample. Malvidin and pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside were the major anthocyanins monoglucosides.

  9. Exploratory Characterization of Phenolic Compounds with Demonstrated Anti-Diabetic Activity in Guava Leaves at Different Oxidation States

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-de-Cerio, Elixabet; Verardo, Vito; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Psidium guajava L. is widely used like food and in folk medicine all around the world. Many studies have demonstrated that guava leaves have anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic activities, among others, and that these activities belong mainly to phenolic compounds, although it is known that phenolic composition in guava tree varies throughout seasonal changes. Andalusia is one of the regions in Europe where guava is grown, thus, the aim of this work was to study the phenolic compounds present in Andalusian guava leaves at different oxidation states (low, medium, and high). The phenolic compounds in guava leaves were determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-QTOF-MS. The results obtained by chromatographic analysis reported that guava leaves with low degree of oxidation had a higher content of flavonols, gallic, and ellagic derivatives compared to the other two guava leaf samples. Contrary, high oxidation state guava leaves reported the highest content of cyanidin-glucoside that was 2.6 and 15 times higher than guava leaves with medium and low oxidation state, respectively. The QTOF platform permitted the determination of several phenolic compounds with anti-diabetic properties and provided new information about guava leaf phenolic composition that could be useful for nutraceutical production. PMID:27187352

  10. Laccase immobilization on the electrode surface to design a biosensor for the detection of phenolic compound such as catechol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazari, Maryam; Kashanian, Soheila; Rafipour, Ronak

    2015-06-01

    Biosensors based on the coupling of a biological entity with a suitable transducer offer an effective route to detect phenolic compounds. Phenol and phenolic compounds are among the most toxic environmental pollutants. Laccases are multi-copper oxidases that can oxide phenol and phenolic compounds. A method is described for construction of an electrochemical biosensor to detect phenolic compounds based on covalent immobilization of laccase (Lac) onto polyaniline (PANI) electrodeposited onto a glassy carbon (GC) electrode via glutaraldehyde coupling. The modified electrode was characterized by voltammetry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques. The results indicated that laccase was immobilized onto modified GC electrode by the covalent interaction between laccase and terminal functional groups of the glutaraldehyde. The laccase immobilized modified electrode showed a direct electron transfer reaction between laccase and the electrode. Linear range, sensitivity, and detection limit for this biosensor were 3.2 × 10-6 to 19.6 × 10-6 M, 706.7 mA L mol-1, 2.07 × 10-6 M, respectively.

  11. Exploratory Characterization of Phenolic Compounds with Demonstrated Anti-Diabetic Activity in Guava Leaves at Different Oxidation States.

    PubMed

    Díaz-de-Cerio, Elixabet; Verardo, Vito; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Segura-Carretero, Antonio

    2016-05-11

    Psidium guajava L. is widely used like food and in folk medicine all around the world. Many studies have demonstrated that guava leaves have anti-hyperglycemic and anti-hyperlipidemic activities, among others, and that these activities belong mainly to phenolic compounds, although it is known that phenolic composition in guava tree varies throughout seasonal changes. Andalusia is one of the regions in Europe where guava is grown, thus, the aim of this work was to study the phenolic compounds present in Andalusian guava leaves at different oxidation states (low, medium, and high). The phenolic compounds in guava leaves were determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-QTOF-MS. The results obtained by chromatographic analysis reported that guava leaves with low degree of oxidation had a higher content of flavonols, gallic, and ellagic derivatives compared to the other two guava leaf samples. Contrary, high oxidation state guava leaves reported the highest content of cyanidin-glucoside that was 2.6 and 15 times higher than guava leaves with medium and low oxidation state, respectively. The QTOF platform permitted the determination of several phenolic compounds with anti-diabetic properties and provided new information about guava leaf phenolic composition that could be useful for nutraceutical production.

  12. Influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and arginine deiminase system in a wine lactic acid bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Alberto, María R.; de Nadra, María C. Manca; Arena, Mario E.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of seven phenolic compounds, normally present in wine, on the growth and arginine deiminase system (ADI) of Lactobacillus hilgardii X1B, a wine lactic acid bacterium, was established. This system provides energy for bacterial growth and produces citrulline that reacts with ethanol forming the carcinogen ethyl carbamate (EC), found in some wines. The influence of phenolic compounds on bacterial growth was compound dependent. Growth and final pH values increased in presence of arginine. Arginine consumption decreased in presence of protocatechuic and gallic acids (31 and 17%, respectively) and increased in presence of quercetin, rutin, catechin and the caffeic and vanillic phenolic acids (between 10 and 13%, respectively). ADI enzyme activities varied in presence of phenolic compounds. Rutin, quercetin and caffeic and vanillic acids stimulated the enzyme arginine deiminase about 37–40%. Amounts of 200 mg/L gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme between 53 and 100%, respectively. Ornithine transcarbamylase activity was not modified at all concentrations of phenolic compounds. As gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme that produces citrulline, precursor of EC, these results are important considering the formation of toxic compounds. PMID:24031815

  13. Influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and arginine deiminase system in a wine lactic acid bacterium.

    PubMed

    Alberto, María R; de Nadra, María C Manca; Arena, Mario E

    2012-01-01

    The influence of seven phenolic compounds, normally present in wine, on the growth and arginine deiminase system (ADI) of Lactobacillus hilgardii X1B, a wine lactic acid bacterium, was established. This system provides energy for bacterial growth and produces citrulline that reacts with ethanol forming the carcinogen ethyl carbamate (EC), found in some wines. The influence of phenolic compounds on bacterial growth was compound dependent. Growth and final pH values increased in presence of arginine. Arginine consumption decreased in presence of protocatechuic and gallic acids (31 and 17%, respectively) and increased in presence of quercetin, rutin, catechin and the caffeic and vanillic phenolic acids (between 10 and 13%, respectively). ADI enzyme activities varied in presence of phenolic compounds. Rutin, quercetin and caffeic and vanillic acids stimulated the enzyme arginine deiminase about 37-40%. Amounts of 200 mg/L gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme between 53 and 100%, respectively. Ornithine transcarbamylase activity was not modified at all concentrations of phenolic compounds. As gallic and protocatechuic acids inhibited the arginine deiminase enzyme that produces citrulline, precursor of EC, these results are important considering the formation of toxic compounds.

  14. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC) of phenolic compounds from the shoots of Rubus idaeus 'Glen Ample' cultivar variety.

    PubMed

    Kula, Marta; Głód, Daniel; Krauze-Baranowska, Mirosława

    2016-03-20

    In this study the application of two-dimensional LC (2D LC) for qualitative analysis of polyphenols and simple phenols in the shoots of Rubus idaeus 'Glen Ample' variety is presented. In the preliminary analysis, the methanol extract of the shoots was analyzed by one-dimensional LC. One-dimensional LC separation profiles of phenolics from R. idaeus 'Glen Ample' shoots were dependent on column type, mobile phase composition and gradient program used. Two-dimensional LC system was built from connecting an octadecyl C-18 silica column in the first dimension and pentafluorophenyl column in the second dimension, coupled with DAD and MS (ESI, APCI, DUIS ionization) detectors. A total of 34 phenolic compounds belonging to the groups of phenolic acids, ellagitannins, flavan-3-ols, flavonols and ellagic acid conjugates were identified in the shoots of R. idaeus 'Glen Ample'. The established 2D LC method offers an effective tool for analysis of phenolics present in Rubus species.

  15. Assessment of priority phenolic compounds in sediments from an extremely polluted coastal wetland (Lake Maryut, Egypt).

    PubMed

    Khairy, Mohammed A

    2013-01-01

    Although high concentrations of trace organic pollutants were recorded along the Egyptian Mediterranean Coast and its corresponding coastal wetlands, no published data are available for the levels of phenolic compounds. Thus, this work aimed to investigate the levels of phenolic compounds in sediments of a heavily polluted coastal wetland (Lake Maryut, Egypt). For that purpose, a method was optimized for the extraction and detection of chlorophenols, methylphenols, and nitrophenols in sediments using GC-MS. Sediments were extracted with 0.1 M NaOH/methanol by sonication. Cleanup of sediment extracts using liquid-liquid extraction and SPE was found important to remove most of the interfering co-extracts. The proposed analytical methodology was validated by analysis of matrix spikes. Detection limits were 0.063-0.694 μg/kg dw for sediments. Good recoveries (70-110%) and precision values (RSD < 20%) were obtained from the fortification experiments at the parts per billion level in sediments. The method was applied to investigate the level of contamination with phenols in 19 sediment samples from Lake Maryut. Results revealed that higher concentrations were observed in the main basin (MB) of Lake Maryut affected by the discharge of effluents from a primary wastewater treatment plant, direct discharge of industrial effluents, domestic wastes, and agricultural effluents from Qalaa Drain (QD). Chlorophenols (CPs) were the major group detected in the lake sediments followed by methylphenols (MPs) and nitrophenols (NPs). CPs were dominated by 2-, 4-, and 3-chlorophenols. Concentrations of CPs were higher at the north and northwestern parts of the MB indicating the influence of industrial effluents discharged into the lake. On the other hand, higher concentrations of NPs were observed at the south and southwestern parts of the MB, which is subjected to the discharge of agricultural and domestic effluents via QD. Results of the risk assessment revealed that phenol, cresols

  16. Use of advanced techniques for the extraction of phenolic compounds from Tunisian olive leaves: phenolic composition and cytotoxicity against human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Taamalli, Amani; Arráez-Román, David; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Ruiz-Torres, Verónica; Pérez-Sánchez, Almudena; Herrero, Miguel; Ibañez, Elena; Micol, Vicente; Zarrouk, Mokhtar; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2012-06-01

    A comparison among different advanced extraction techniques such as microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), together with traditional solid-liquid extraction, was performed to test their efficiency towards the extraction of phenolic compounds from leaves of six Tunisian olive varieties. Extractions were carried out at the best selected conditions for each technique; the obtained extracts were chemically characterized using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled to electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS) and electrospray ion trap tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-IT-MS(2)). As expected, higher extraction yields were obtained for PLE while phenolic profiles were mainly influenced by the solvent used as optimum in the different extraction methods. A larger number of phenolic compounds, mostly of a polar character, were found in the extracts obtained by using MAE. Best extraction yields do not correlate with highest cytotoxic activity against breast cancer cells, indicating that cytotoxicity is highly dependent on the presence of certain compounds in the extracts, although not exclusively on a single compound. Therefore, a multifactorial behavior is proposed for the anticancer activity of olive leaf compounds.

  17. Antibacterial, Antiradical Potential and Phenolic Compounds of Thirty-One Polish Mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Los, Renata; Malm, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background Among many sources of natural bioactive substances, mushrooms constitute a huge and almost unexplored group. Fungal compounds have been repeatedly reported to exert biological effects which have prompted their use in pharmaceutical and cosmetic industry. Therefore, the aim of this study was analysis of chemical composition and biological activity of 31 wild growing mushroom species (including saprophytic and parasitic) from Poland. Methods Qualitative and quantitative LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of fourteen phenolic acids in the mushrooms analysed was performed. Moreover, total phenolic content was determined by the modified Folin-Ciocalteau method. Antioxidative activity of ethanolic extracts towards DPPH• free radical was examined. Antibacterial activity against Gram-positive (S. epidermidis, S. aureus, B. subtilis, M. luteus) and Gram-negative (E. coli, K. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa, P. mirabilis) microbial strains was analyzed. Results As a result, the first such broad report on polyphenolic composition, antiradical and antimicrobial potential of wild growing Polish mushrooms was developed. Mushroom extracts were found to contain both benzoic (protocatechuic, 4-OH-benzoic, vanillic, syringic) and cinnamic acid derivatives (caffeic, p-coumaric, ferulic). Total phenolic content in mushrooms ranged between 2.79 and 53.13 mg gallic acid equivalent /g of dried extract in Trichaptum fuscoviolaceum and Fomes fomentarius, respectively. Fungi showed much differentiated antiradical activity, from highly active F. fomentarius to poorly effective Russula fragilis (IC50 1.39 to 120.54 mg per mg DPPH•, respectively). A quite considerable relationship between phenolic content and antiradical activity has been demonstrated. Mushrooms varied widely in antimicrobial potential (MIC from 0.156 to 5 mg/ml). Generally, a slightly higher activity against Gram-positive than Gram-negative strains was observed. This is the first study concerning the chemical composition and

  18. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of selected medicinal plants containing phenolic and flavonoid compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Ravipati, Anjaneya S; Koyyalamudi, Sundar Rao; Jeong, Sang Chul; Reddy, Narsimha; Smith, Paul T; Bartlett, John; Shanmugam, Kirubakaran; Münch, Gerald; Wu, Ming Jie

    2011-12-14

    The antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cytotoxic activities of water and ethanol extracts of 14 Chinese medicinal plants were investigated and also their total phenolics and flavonoid contents measured. The antioxidant activity was evaluated in a biological assay using Saccharomyces cerevisiae , whereas the radical scavenging activity was measured using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. Total phenolics and flavonoid contents were estimated by Folin-Ciocalteu and aluminum chloride methods, respectively. The anti-inflammatory activities of the plant extracts were determined by measuring the inhibition of production of nitric oxide (NO) and TNF-α in LPS and IFN-γ activated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Their cytotoxic activities against macrophages were determined by Alamar Blue assay. Four plants, namely, Scutellaria baicalensis , Taxillus chinensis , Rheum officinale , and Sophora japonica , showed significant antioxidant activity in both yeast model and also free radical scavenging methods. The ethanol extract of S. japonica showed highest levels of phenolics and flavonoids (91.33 GAE mg/g and 151.86 QE mg/g, respectively). A positive linear correlation between antioxidant activity and the total phenolics and flavonoid contents indicates that these compounds are likely to be the main antioxidants contributing to the observed activities. Five plant extracts (S. baicalensis, T. chinensis, S. japonica, Mahonia fortunei , and Sophora flavescens ) exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity by in vitro inhibition of the production of NO and TNF-α with low IC(50) values. These findings suggest that some of the medicinal herbs studied in this paper are good sources of antioxidants.

  19. Artichoke and milk thistle pills and syrups as sources of phenolic compounds with antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carla; Barros, Lillian; José Alves, Maria; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-07-13

    Dietary supplements based on hepatoprotective plants have been increasingly used in the prevention of liver injuries. In the present work, the aim was to study the phenolic profile and possibly relate it to the in vitro antimicrobial activity of two different formulations (pills and syrups) of artichoke and milk thistle, the antioxidant and anti-hepatocellular carcinoma activities of which were previously reported by our research group. The phenolic profiles were obtained by HPLC-DAD-ESI/MS, and the antimicrobial activity evaluation was performed with the clinical isolates of multiresistant bacteria (Escherichia coli, extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa). Artichoke syrup revealed the presence of vanillic acid and luteolin-7-O-glucoside while the pills possessed higher concentrations of 4-O-caffeoylquinic, 5-O-caffeoylquinic and 1,3-O-dicaffeoylquinic acids, this latest being able to inhibit the growth of MRSA. Regarding milk thistle formulations, the syrup presented isorhamnetin-O-deoxyhexoside-O-dihexoside, isorhamnetin-O-deoxyhexoside-O-hexoside and isorhamnetin-3-O-rutinoside as the major phenolic constituents whereas the pills were richer in taxifolin, silymarin derivatives and hydroxylated silibinin; the syrup revealed antimicrobial activity against all the studied bacteria with the exception of Proteus mirabilis whereas the pills revealed activity against ESBL producing Escherichia coli. Overall, all of the studied formulations revealed to be a good source of phenolic compounds, among which milk thistle syrup presented the highest variety and concentration of flavonoids, which is possibly related to its strongest antimicrobial activity.

  20. A new parameter to simultaneously assess antioxidant activity for multiple phenolic compounds present in food products.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Xue, Xuejia; Li, Huan; Tay-Chan, Su Chin; Ong, Seng Poon; Tian, Edmund Feng

    2017-08-15

    In this work, we established a new methodology to simultaneously assess the relative reaction rates of multiple antioxidant compounds in one experimental set-up. This new methodology hypothesizes that the competition among antioxidant compounds towards limiting amount of free radical (in this article, DPPH) would reflect their relative reaction rates. In contrast with the conventional detection of DPPH decrease at 515nm on a spectrophotometer, depletion of antioxidant compounds treated by a series of DPPH concentrations was monitored instead using liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight (LC-QTOF). A new parameter, namely relative antioxidant activity (RAA), has been proposed to rank these antioxidants according to their reaction rate constants. We have investigated the applicability of RAA using pre-mixed standard phenolic compounds, and also extended this application to two food products, i.e. red wine and green tea. It has been found that RAA correlates well with the reported k values. This new parameter, RAA, provides a new perspective in evaluating antioxidant compounds present in food and herbal matrices. It not only realistically reflects the antioxidant activity of compounds when co-existing with competitive constituents; and it could also quicken up the discovery process in the search for potent yet rare antioxidants from many herbs of food/medicinal origins.

  1. Effect of meteorological parameters and regions on accumulation pattern of phenolic compounds in different mulberry cultivars grown in China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiufang; Zhang, Xiaoxu; Jin, Qing; Gu, Liwei; Liu, Xuanjun; Li, Jingming; Ni, Yuanying

    2017-05-01

    The compositions of phenolic compounds in 10 cultivars of two mulberry species (Morus atropurpurea Roxb. and Morus alba Linn.) grown in four regions of China were analysed using HPLC-TOF-MS. Results showed that a total of 27 phenolic compounds were identified in these mulberry cultivars. The Taiwan cultivar from the Jiangsu region showed the highest concentration of hydroxycinnamic acids, quercetin derivatives, and anthocyanins. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that six mulberry cultivars grown in the region of Jiangsu, Ningxia, and Guangdong were differentiated regarding their species feature and regional characteristics. Cyanidin rhamnosylglucoside, 4-caffeoylquinic acid, dihydroquercetin, and quercetin were further screened out to be the key compounds for the differentiation of these cultivars. The correlation between the regional climate feature (including rainfall, humidity, and temperature) and the accumulation of phenolic compounds in these mulberry cultivars was established.

  2. Phenolic compounds and saponins in quinoa samples (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) grown under different saline and nonsaline irrigation regimens.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Iafelice, Giovanna; Lavini, Antonella; Pulvento, Cataldo; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Marconi, Emanuele

    2012-05-09

    Quinoa is a pseudocereal from South America that has received increased interest around the world because it is a good source of different nutrients and rich in antioxidant compounds. Thus, this study has focused on the effects of different agronomic variables, such as irrigation and salinity, on the phenolic and saponin profiles of quinoa. It was observed that irrigation with 25% of full water restitution, with and without the addition of salt, was associated with increases in free phenolic compounds of 23.16 and 26.27%, respectively. In contrast, bound phenolic compounds were not affected by environmental stresses. Saponins decreased if samples were exposed to drought and saline regimens. In situations of severe water deficit, the saponins content decreased 45%, and 50% when a salt stress was added. The results suggest that irrigation and salinity may regulate the production of bioactive compounds in quinoa, influencing its nutritional and industrial values.

  3. Altered transport and metabolism of phenolic compounds in obesity and diabetes: implications for functional food development and assessment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in application of phenolic compounds from diet or supplements for prevention of chronic diseases has grown significantly, but efficacy of such approaches in humans is largely dependent on the bioavailability and metabolism of these compounds. While food and dietary factors have been the foc...

  4. Protective effect of phenolic compounds on carbonyl-amine reactions produced by lipid-derived reactive carbonyls.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Francisco J; Delgado, Rosa M; Zamora, Rosario

    2017-08-15

    The degradation of phenylalanine initiated by 2-pentenal, 2,4-heptadienal, 4-oxo-2-pentenal, 4,5-epoxy-2-heptenal, or 4,5-epoxy-2-decenal in the presence of phenolic compounds was studied to determine the structure-activity relationship of phenolic compounds on the protection of amino compounds against modifications produced by lipid-derived carbonyls. The obtained results showed that flavan-3-ols were the most efficient phenolic compounds followed by single m-diphenols. The effectiveness of these compounds was found to be related to their ability to trap rapidly the carbonyl compound, avoiding in this way the reaction of the carbonyl compound with the amino acid. The ability of flavan-3-ols for this reaction is suggested to be related to the high electronic density existing in some of the aromatic carbons of their ring A. This is the first report showing that carbonyl-phenol reactions involving lipid-derived reactive carbonyls can be produced more rapidly than carbonyl-amine reactions, therefore providing a satisfactory protection of amino compounds.

  5. Influence of technological processes on phenolic compounds, organic acids, furanic derivatives, and antioxidant activity of whole-lemon powder.

    PubMed

    García-Salas, Patricia; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana María; Arráez-Román, David; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Guerra-Hernández, Eduardo; García-Villanova, Belén; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2013-11-15

    The healthy properties of citrus fruits have been attributed to ascorbic acid and phenolic compounds, mainly to flavonoids. Flavonoids are important phytonutrients because they have a wide range of biological effects that provide health-related properties. In this context, this study seeks to characterise the phenolic compounds in lemon and their stability in different drying processes (freeze-drying and vacuum-drying) and storage conditions (-18 and 50°C for 1 and 3months). A powerful high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to DAD and electrospray-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-TOF-MS) method has been applied for the separation, identification, and quantification of 19 phenolic compounds and 4 organic acids. To our knowledge, two hydroxycinnamic acids have been identified for the first time in lemon. Folin-Ciocalteu was applied to determine total phenolic compounds and TEAC, FRAP, and ORAC were applied to determine the antioxidant capacity of lemon. Total phenolic content significantly differed in the samples analysed, vacuum-dried lemon showing the highest phenolic content, followed by freeze-dried lemon and, finally, vacuum-dried lemon stored at 50°C for 1 and 3months. The content in furanic compounds was determined to evaluate the heat damage in lemon and it was showed an increase with the thermal treatment because of the triggering of Maillard reaction. As exception of ORAC, antioxidant-capacity assays were not correlated to phenolic content by HPLC due to the formation of antioxidant compounds during Maillard reaction.

  6. Optimization of antioxidant phenolic compounds extraction from quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) seeds.

    PubMed

    Carciochi, Ramiro Ariel; Manrique, Guillermo Daniel; Dimitrov, Krasimir

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to optimize the extraction conditions of phenolic and flavonoids compounds from quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) seeds using ultrasound assistance technology. A randomized central composite face-centered design was used to evaluate the effect of extraction temperature, ethanol concentration in the solvent, and ultrasound power on the total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC) and antioxidant activity by response surface analysis. Predicted model equations were obtained to describe the experimental data regarding TPC, TFC and antioxidant activity, with significant variation in the linear, quadratic, and interaction effects of the independent variables. Regression analysis showed that more than 88 % of the variability was explained by the models. The best extraction conditions obtained by simultaneous maximization of the responses were: extraction temperature of 60 °C, 80 % ethanol as solvent and non-application of ultrasounds. Under the optimal conditions, the corresponding predicted response values were 103.6 mg GAE/100 g dry weight (dw), 25.0 mg quercetin equiv./100 g dw and 28.6 % DPPH radical scavenging, for TPC, TFC and antioxidant activity, respectively. The experimental values agreed with those predicted within a 95 % confidence level, indicating the suitability of the employed model. HPLC analysis of the obtained extracts confirmed the highest phenolic compound yield in the extract obtained under optimal extraction conditions. Considering the characteristics of the antioxidant-rich extracts obtained, they could be consider for potential application in the food industry, as nutraceutical and functional foods ingredient or well as replacement of synthetic antioxidants.

  7. Study of the steam distillation of phenolic compounds using ultraviolet spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Norwitz, G.; Nataro, N.; Keliher, P.N.

    1986-03-01

    The steam distillation of 42 phenolic compounds was studied by use of a semimicro steam distillation apparatus and ultraviolet spectrometry. In the distillation, the following gave recoveries greater than 95%: phenol, 2-nitrophenol, 2-methoxyphenol, 2-bromophenol, 2-chlorophenol, 2,3- and 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,5- and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4-dibromophenol, 2-, 3-, and 4-methylphenol, 4-chloro-2-methylphenol, 2,4-, 2,5-, 2,6-, 3,4-, and 3,5-dimethylphenol, 4-tert-butylphenol, 4-tert-amylpheno,, thymol, and carvacrol. The percent recovery for the other phenolic compounds was as follows: 3-nitrophenol, 3.7%; 4-nitrophenol, 1.8; 3-methoxyphenol, 31.1; 4-methoxyphenol, 23.2; 3-bromophenol, 79.6; 4-bromophenol, 67.8; 3-chlorophenol, 93.5; 4-chlorophenol, 91.6; 3,4-dichlorophenol, 64.1; 2,4-dinitrophenol, 21.2; 2,4,6-trinitrophenol, 0.0; 2-aminophenol, 0.1; 3-aminophenol, 0.2; 4-aminophenol, 0.1; pyrocatechol, 1.6; resorcinol, 04.; hydroquinone, 0.0; pyrogallol, 0.7; and phloroglucinol, 0.1. By the examination of the spectra of the undistilled, distilled, and residual solutions, it is concluded that the aminophenols undergo some decomposition and the hydroquinone is almost completely destroyed during the distillation. The important role that hydrogen bonding (intermolecular and intramolecular) plays in the recovery in the steam distillation is examined. 9 references, 2 tables.

  8. Separation and characterization of phenolic compounds from dry-blanched peanut skins by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Kosińska-Cagnazzo, Agnieszka; Kerr, William L; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Swanson, Ruthann B; Pegg, Ronald B

    2014-08-22

    A large variety of phenolic compounds, including phenolic acids (hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamic acids, and their esters), stilbenes (trans-resveratrol and trans-piceatannol), flavan-3-ols (e.g., (-)-epicatechin, (+)-catechin, and their polymers {the proanthocyanidins, PACs}), other flavonoids (e.g., isoflavones, flavanols, and flavones, etc.) and biflavonoids (e.g., morelloflavone), were identified in dry-blanched peanut skins (PS) by this study. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS(n)) was applied to separate and identify the phenolic constituents. Reversed-phase HPLC was employed to separate free phenolic compounds as well as PAC monomers, dimers, and trimers. PACs with a degree of polymerization (DP) of >4 were chromatographed via hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC). Tentative identification of the separated phenolics was based solely on molecular ions and MS(n) fragmentation patterns acquired by ESI-MS in the negative-ion mode. The connection sequence of PAC oligomers (DP <5) could be deduced mainly through characteristic quinone methide (QM) cleavage ions. When the DP reached 6, only a proportion of the flavan-3-ols could be ascertained in the PACs because of the extremely complicated fragmentation patterns involved. The identification of free phenolic acids, stilbenes, and flavonoids was achieved by authentic commercial standards and also by published literature data. Quantification was performed based on peak areas of the UV (free phenolic compounds) or fluorescence (PACs) signals from the HPLC chromatograms and calibration curves of commercial standards. Overall, PS contain significantly more PACs compared to free phenolic compounds.

  9. Structural characterization of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity of the phenolic-rich fraction from defatted adlay (Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) seed meal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Chen, Chao; Su, Anxiang; Zhang, Yiyi; Yuan, Jian; Ju, Xingrong

    2016-04-01

    The current study aims to investigate the antioxidant activities of various extracts from defatted adlay seed meal (DASM) based on the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay, peroxyl radical scavenging capacity (PSC) assay and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay. Of all the fractions, the n-butanol fraction exhibited the highest antioxidant activity, followed by crude acetone extract and aqueous fractions. Of the three sub-fractions obtained by Sephadex LH-20 chromatography, sub-fraction 3 possessed the highest antioxidant activity and total phenolic content. There was a strong positive correlation between the total phenolic content and the antioxidant activity. Based on HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS analysis, the most abundant phenolic acid in sub-fraction 3 of DASM was ferulic acid at 67.28 mg/g, whereas the predominant flavonoid was rutin at 41.11 mg/g. Of the major individual compounds in sub-fraction 3, p-coumaric acid exhibited the highest ORAC values, and quercetin exhibited the highest PSC values and CAA values.

  10. Analysis of interaction of phenolic compounds with the cholecystokinin signaling pathway to explain effects on reducing food intake.

    PubMed

    Al Shukor, Nadin; Raes, Katleen; Van Camp, John; Smagghe, Guy

    2014-03-01

    Previous animal experiments demonstrated that phenolic compounds can reduce weight and food intake, but the exact mechanism(s) behind these effects remain unknown. For regulation of food intake, the cholecystokinin (CCK) hormone signaling pathway plays an important role as it induces satiety by binding on its specific receptor (CCK1R), hereby reducing food intake. In this study, we investigated the possible interactions of eight phenolic compounds of different classes (tannic acid, gallic acid, benzoic acid, hydroxybenzoic acid, protocatechuic acid, quercetin, kaempferol and resveratrol) with the CCK1R signaling pathway. As major results, the tested phenolic compounds could not activate the CCK1R in a specific cell-based bioassay. In contrast, we observed an anti-CCK1R activity. This antagonistic action might be explained by blocking of the functioning of the CCK1R receptor, although the exact mechanism of interaction remains unknown. For tannic acid, we also measured a sequestration activity of the CCK hormone in vitro. In conclusion, the reported activity of phenolic compounds against food intake and weight is not based on an activation of the CCK1R. Taking into account the complex regulation of food intake, further work is necessary to unravel other essential mechanisms involved to explain the reported effects of phenolic compounds against food intake.

  11. Enhanced accumulation of phytosterols and phenolic compounds in cyclodextrin-elicited cell suspension culture of Daucus carota.

    PubMed

    Miras-Moreno, Begoña; Almagro, Lorena; Pedreño, M A; Sabater-Jara, Ana Belén

    2016-09-01

    In this work, suspension-cultured cells of Daucus carota were used to evaluate the effect of β-cyclodextrins on the production of isoprenoid and phenolic compounds. The results showed that the phytosterols and phenolic compounds were accumulated in the extracellular medium (15100μgL(-1) and 477.46μgL(-1), respectively) in the presence of cyclodextrins. Unlike the phytosterol and phenolic compound content, β-carotene (1138.03μgL(-1)), lutein (25949.54μgL(-1)) and α-tocopherol (8063.82μgL(-1)) chlorophyll a (1625.13μgL(-1)) and b (9.958 (9958.33μgL(-1)) were mainly accumulated inside the cells. Therefore, cyclodextrins were able to induce the cytosolic mevalonate pathway, increasing the biosynthesis of phytosterols and phenolic compounds, and accumulate them outside the cells. However, in the absence of these cyclic oligosaccharidic elicitors, carrot cells mainly accumulated carotenoids through the methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway. Therefore, the use of cyclodextrins would allow the extracellular accumulation of both phytosterols and phenolic compounds by diverting the carbon flux towards the cytosolic mevalonate/phenylpropanoid pathway.

  12. Separation and determination of organic acids and phenolic compounds in fruit juices and drinks by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Shui, Guanghou; Leong, Lai Peng

    2002-11-15

    A high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) separation method with photo-diode array detection has been developed for the simultaneous determination of organic acids and phenolic compounds in juices and drinks. The chromatographic analysis of organic acids and phenolic compounds was carried out after their elution with sulphuric acid solution (pH 2.5) and methanol from C18 stationary phase. The mobile phase employed was sulphuric acid solution working at a flow-rate of 0.35 ml min(-1) for the whole run, while methanol was linearly increased to 0.45 ml min(-1) from 15 to 75 min followed by a 5-min isocratic elution. Ten organic acid acids were eluted in 30 min and 21 phenolic compounds, which include phenolic acids and flavonoids, were eluted in the following 50 min. Target compounds were detected at 215 nm. The repeatability (n=3) and between day precision of peak area (n=3) were all within 5.0% RSD. The within-day repeatability (n=3) and between-day precision (n=10) of retention times were within 0.3 and 1.6% relative standard deviation (RSD), respectively. The accuracy of the method was confirmed with an average recovery ranging between 85 and 106%. The method was successfully used to measure a variety of organic acids and phenolic compounds in juices and beverages. This method could also be used to evaluate the authenticity, spoilage or micronutrient contents of juices.

  13. Isolation of antithrombotic phenolic compounds from the leaves of Crataegus pinnatifida.

    PubMed

    Song, Shao-Jiang; Li, Ling-Zhi; Gao, Pin-Yi; Yuan, Yan-Qiang; Wang, Ru-Ping; Liu, Ke-Chun; Peng, Ying

    2012-12-01

    Four novel phenolic compounds (1-4) were isolated from the leaves of Crataegus pinnatifida, along with three known ones (5-7). Their structures were elucidated as: methyl 4-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3-[(2E,6E)-8-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadienyl] benzoate (1), biphenyl-5-ol-3-O-β-D-glucoside (2), 3,4'-dimethoxy-biphenyl-5-ol-4-O-β-D-glucoside (3), (E)-6-(benzoyloxy)-1-hydroxyhex-3-en-2-O-β-D-glucoside (4), shanyenoside A (5), eriodectyol (6), and 2″-O-rhamnosyl vitexin (7), using a combination of mass spectroscopy, 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, and chemical analysis. The antithrombotic activity of the isolated compounds was investigated on the transgenic zebra fish system. Among them, eriodectyol (6) potently inhibited the production of thrombus.

  14. Influence of TiO2 Nanoparticles on Growth and Phenolic Compounds Production in Photosynthetic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Comotto, Mattia; Casazza, Alessandro Alberto; Aliakbarian, Bahar; Caratto, Valentina; Ferretti, Maurizio; Perego, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    The influence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (pure anatase and 15% N doped anatase) on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris, Haematococcus pluvialis, and Arthrospira platensis was investigated. Results showed that pure anatase can lead to a significant growth inhibition of C. vulgaris and A. platensis (17.0 and 74.1%, resp.), while for H. pluvialis the nanoparticles do not cause a significant inhibition. Since in these stress conditions photosynthetic microorganisms can produce antioxidant compounds in order to prevent cell damages, we evaluated the polyphenols content either inside the cells or released in the medium. Although results did not show a significant difference in C. vulgaris, the phenolic concentrations of two other microorganisms were statistically affected by the presence of titanium dioxide. In particular, 15% N doped anatase resulted in a higher production of extracellular antioxidant compounds, reaching the concentration of 65.2 and 68.0 mg gDB−1 for H. pluvialis and A. platensis, respectively. PMID:25610914

  15. Permeability profile estimation of flavonoids and other phenolic compounds by biopartitioning micellar capillary chromatography.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Andréa; Escuder-Gilabert, Laura; Lopes, Norberto P; Gobbo-Neto, Leonardo; Villanueva-Camañas, Rosa María; Sagrado, Salvador; Medina-Hernández, María José

    2007-10-17

    This paper points out the usefulness of biopartitioning micellar chromatography (BMC) using capillary columns as a high-throughput primary screening tool providing key information about the oral absorption, skin permeability, and brain-blood distribution coefficients of 15 polyphenols (6 flavones, 2 flavonols, a flavanone, 2 flavan-3-ols, 3 phenolic acids, and a phloroglucinol) in a simple and economical way. For the compounds studied, except vicenin-2, rutin, chlorogenic acid, p-hydroxycinnamic acid, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, maximal oral absorption (>90%) can be expected, if there are not solubility problems or metabolic processes. On the other hand, the most retained compounds in BMC, that is, 5-hydroxyflavone, flavone, and flavanone, show the highest brain-blood distribution coefficients and skin permeability coefficients.

  16. Phenolic compounds recovered from agro-food by-products using membrane technologies: An overview.

    PubMed

    Castro-Muñoz, Roberto; Yáñez-Fernández, Jorge; Fíla, Vlastimil

    2016-12-15

    Typically, the various agro-food by-products of the food industry are treated by standard membrane processes, such as microfiltration, ultrafiltration and nanofiltration, in order to prepare them for final disposal. Recently, however, new membrane technologies have been developed. The recovery, separation and fractionation of high-added-value compounds, such as phenolic compounds from food processing waste, are major current research challenges. The goal of this paper is to provide a critical review of the main agro-food by-products treated by membrane technologies for the recovery of nutraceuticals. State-of-the-art of developments in the field are described. Particular attention is paid to experimental results reported for the recovery of polyphenols and their derivatives of different molecular weight. The literature data are analyzed and discussed in relation to separation processes, molecule properties, membrane characteristics and other interesting phenomena that occur during their recovery.

  17. Antioxidant properties and quantitative UPLC-MS analysis of phenolic compounds from extracts of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) seeds and bitter melon (Momordica charantia) fruit.

    PubMed

    Kenny, O; Smyth, T J; Hewage, C M; Brunton, N P

    2013-12-15

    Freeze-dried fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum) seeds and bitter melon (Momordica charantia) fruit were extracted sequentially using non-polar to polar solvents, with further separation carried out on polar extracts by molecular weight cut off dialysis. The fenugreek ethyl acetate crude extract (FGE3) demonstrated the highest antioxidant activity, in terms of Trolox Equivalents (TE), for both the DPPH (35.338±0.908 mg TE/g) and FRAP (77.352±0.627 mg TE/g) assays. This extract also contained the highest phenolic content, in terms of Gallic Acid Equivalents (GAE) (106.316±0.377 mg GAE/g). Despite having considerably lower antioxidant activity than fenugreek, the highest antioxidant activities for bitter fruit were observed in the hexane (BME1) and methanol hydrophilic<3.5 kDa dialysed (BME4<3.5 kDa) extracts, while the highest phenolic content was found in the methanol hydrophilic>3.5 kDa (BME4>3.5 kDa) dialysed extract. UPLC-MS was used to quantify 18 phenolic compounds from fenugreek and 13 from bitter melon in active crude extracts. The flavonoids apigenin-7-O-glycoside (1955.55 ng/mg) and luteolin-7-O-glycoside (725.50 ng/mg) were the most abundant compounds in FGE3, while bitter melon extracts contained only small amounts of mainly phenolic acids. A further 5 fenugreek and 1 bitter melon compounds were identified in trace amounts from the same extracts, respectively.

  18. A fast and innovative microextraction technique, μSPEed, followed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of phenolic compounds in teas.

    PubMed

    Porto-Figueira, Priscilla; Figueira, José A; Pereira, Jorge A M; Câmara, José S

    2015-12-11

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of a promising solid phase microextraction technique, μSPEed, in the analysis of selected phenolic compounds from teas by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (μSPEed/UHPLC-PDA). The innovative μSPEed configuration uses 3-μm sorbent particles tightly packed in a disposable needle equipped with a pressure-driven valve to withdraw samples in a single direction. The system was operated by the electronic pipette eVol® and different parameters influencing the extraction efficiency, as the nature of sorbent, pH, loading and elution conditions, and solvents were optimized. The best extracting conditions were obtained by loading twice 100μL of tea samples through the PS/DVB-RP sorbent and eluting with 50μL of acidified MeOH 95%. The following chromatographic separation was carried out in an Acquity C18 BEH capillary column using a gradient of 0.1% FA and acetonitrile. The optimized μSPEed/UHPLC-PDA methodology is selective and specific and was properly validated for 8 phenolic compounds widely reported in different teas. Overall, an excellent analytical performance was obtained in the 0.2-20μg/L linear dynamic range (LDR), with very low limits of detection (LODs) and quantification (LOQs), ranging between 3.5-16.8ng/mL and 10.6-50.6ng/mL, respectively, high recoveries (89.3-103.3%), good precision (RSD<5%) and negligible matrix effect. The methodology was used to assess the target polyphenols concentration in several tea samples. Rutin and quercetin-3-glucoside were the most abundant phenolics in all tea samples analysed and, with exception of naringenin and cinnamic acid, which are present in high amounts in the investigated citric teas, remain phenolic compounds are present in trace levels.

  19. Fresh broad (Vicia faba) tissue homogenate-based biosensor for determination of phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Hakki Mevlut; Sagiroglu, Ayten

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a novel fresh broad (Vicia faba) tissue homogenate-based biosensor for determination of phenolic compounds was developed. The biosensor was constructed by immobilizing tissue homogenate of fresh broad (Vicia faba) on to glassy carbon electrode. For the stability of the biosensor, general immobilization techniques were used to secure the fresh broad tissue homogenate in gelatin-glutaraldehyde cross-linking matrix. In the optimization and characterization studies, the amount of fresh broad tissue homogenate and gelatin, glutaraldehyde percentage, optimum pH, optimum temperature and optimum buffer concentration, thermal stability, interference effects, linear range, storage stability, repeatability and sample applications (Wine, beer, fruit juices) were also investigated. Besides, the detection ranges of thirteen phenolic compounds were obtained with the help of the calibration graphs. A typical calibration curve for the sensor revealed a linear range of 5-60 μM catechol. In reproducibility studies, variation coefficient (CV) and standard deviation (SD) were calculated as 1.59%, 0.64×10(-3) μM, respectively.

  20. Optimisation and validation of the microwave-assisted extraction of phenolic compounds from rice grains.

    PubMed

    Setyaningsih, W; Saputro, I E; Palma, M; Barroso, C G

    2015-02-15

    A new microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) method has been investigated for the extraction of phenolic compounds from rice grains. The experimental conditions studied included temperature (125-175°C), microwave power (500-1000W), time (5-15min), solvent (10-90% EtOAc in MeOH) and solvent-to-sample ratio (10:1 to 20:1). The extraction variables were optimised by the response surface methodology. Extraction temperature and solvent were found to have a highly significant effect on the response value (p<0.0005) and the extraction time also had a significant effect (p<0.05). The optimised MAE conditions were as follows: extraction temperature 185°C, microwave power 1000W, extraction time 20min, solvent 100% MeOH, and solvent-to-sample ratio 10:1. The developed method had a high precision (in terms of CV: 5.3% for repeatability and 5.5% for intermediate precision). Finally, the new method was applied to real samples in order to investigate the presence of phenolic compounds in a wide variety of rice grains.

  1. Differential expression of flavonoid biosynthesis genes and accumulation of phenolic compounds in common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Park, Nam Il; Xu, Hui; Woo, Sun-Hee; Park, Cheol Ho; Park, Sang Un

    2010-12-08

    Common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is a short-season grain crop that is a source of rutin and other phenolic compounds. In this study, we isolated the cDNAs of 11 F. esculentum enzymes in the flavonoid biosynthesis pathway, namely, phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL), cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) 1 and 2, chalcone synthase (CHS), chalcone isomerase (CHI), flavone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H), flavonol synthase (FLS) 1 and 2, and anthocyanidin synthase (ANS). Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed that these genes were most highly expressed in the stems and roots. However, high performance liquid chromatography analysis indicated that their flavonoid products, such as rutin and catechin, accumulated in the flowers and leaves. These results suggested that flavonoids may be transported within F. esculentum. In addition, light and dark growth conditions affected the expression levels of the biosynthesis genes and accumulation of phenolic compounds in F. esculentum sprouts.

  2. Monitoring of phenolic compounds and surfactants in water of Ganga Canal, Haridwar (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Richa; Singh, Prashant; Mohan, Manindra; Singh, Rakesh; Aswal, Ravinder Singh

    2013-12-01

    The Ganga Canal emerging out from Ganga River has great ritual importance among pilgrims and tourists at Haridwar, Uttarakhand, India. The Canal is being polluted due to mass bathing, washing, disposal of sewage, industrial waste and these human activities are deteriorating its water quality. To determine the impact of these activities, Ganga Canal water quality at five sites between Haridwar and Roorkee namely Pantdweep, Har Ki Pauri, Singhdwar, Piran Kaliyar and Old Bridge, Roorkee has been analyzed for organic pollutants phenolic compounds and surfactants, which have rarely been assessed and reported so far. The results of analysis show that phenolic compounds are not present in water samples of selected five sites during bi-monthly monitoring from January 2012 to November 2012. The Har Ki Pauri, Singhdwar, Piran Kaliyar and Old Bridge, Roorkee sites have been detected with surfactant concentrations (1.18, 1.63, 3.2 and 2.5 mg/l) more than permissible limit (1.00 mg/l). Also at most of the sites, surfactants' concentration crossed the desirable limit of BIS during the period of analysis. This distribution of surfactants in water has potential risk for skin diseases and cancer and requires regular monitoring with appropriate measures.

  3. Determination of seven phenolic compounds in Rhizoma Sparganii by RP-HPLC.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinsheng; Wu, Qi-nan; Wu, Yanfang; Wu, Chengying; Yue, Wei; Liang, Qiaoli

    2013-04-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the simultaneous quantification of seven phenolic compounds from Rhizoma Sparganii. The samples were separated on a Waters SunFire C18 column with a temperature of 30°C. Gradient elution was applied, using 0.8% acetic acid (solvent A) and methanol (solvent B) with a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, and detection wavelength was 280 nm. The validation of the method included linearity, precision, repeatability, stability and recovery. The calibration curves showed good linear regression (R(2) > 0.9996) within the test range. The developed method indicated good precision and accuracy, with the overall intra-day and inter-day variation at less than 3%. The range of recoveries for the seven analytes was 95.34-100.06% with relative standard deviation < 3.08 %. The established method was successfully applied for the determination of seven phenolic compounds in 12 batches of Rhizoma Sparganii. The study may be useful in the quality evaluation of Rhizoma Sparganii, and can provide technical support for pharmacological and clinical research of related drugs.

  4. Selectivity and potential interference from phenolic compounds in chemiluminescence methods for the determination of synephrine.

    PubMed

    Francis, Paul S; Brown, Allyson J; Bellomarino, Sara A; Taylor, Amelia M; Slezak, Teo; Barnett, Neil W

    2009-01-01

    Three recently reported chemiluminescence methods (based on reactions with alkaline luminol and hexacyanoferrate(III); acidic cerium(IV) and rhodamine B; and acidic permanganate with polyphosphates) for the determination of synephrine were re-evaluated in terms of their selectivity towards this analyte in comparison to other phenolic compounds. A fourth reagent system, acidic soluble manganese(IV) and formaldehyde, was also examined. Each set of reagents was sensitive towards synephrine (limits of detection were 3 x 10(-9), 5 x 10(-8), 1 x 10(-8) and 1 x 10(-8) mol/L, respectively) but also responded with numerous other phenolic compounds, including some that are present in citrus fruit extracts, dietary supplements and/or biological fluids. It is therefore recommended that the determination of synephrine in these matrices should incorporate physical separation of sample components (e.g. chromatography or electrophoresis). In more general terms, this study illustrates that accurate percentage recoveries for an analyte in spiked samples (without validation against another analytical method) are insufficient to confirm the analytical utility of new flow-injection analysis (FIA) procedures.

  5. Walnut (Juglans regia L.) leaves: phenolic compounds, antibacterial activity and antioxidant potential of different cultivars.

    PubMed

    Pereira, José Alberto; Oliveira, Ivo; Sousa, Anabela; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Ferreira, Isabel C F R; Ferreres, Federico; Bento, Albino; Seabra, Rosa; Estevinho, Letícia

    2007-11-01

    Different cultivars of walnut (Juglans regia L.) leaves (Cv. Lara, Franquette, Mayette, Marbot, Mellanaise and Parisienne) grown in Portugal, were investigated in what concerns phenolic compounds and antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. Phenolics analysis was performed by reversed-phase HPLC/DAD and 10 compounds were identified and quantified: 3- and 5-caffeoylquinic acids, 3- and 4-p-coumaroylquinic acids, p-coumaric acid, quercetin 3-galactoside, quercetin 3-pentoside derivative, quercetin 3-arabinoside, quercetin 3-xyloside and quercetin 3-rhamnoside. The antimicrobial capacity was screened against Gram positive (Bacillus cereus, B. subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram negative bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae) and fungi (Candida albicans, Cryptococcus neoformans). Walnut leaves selectively inhibited the growth of Gram positive bacteria, being B. cereus the most susceptible one (MIC 0.1mg/mL). Gram negative bacteria and fungi were resistant to the extracts at 100mg/mL. Lara walnut leaves were also submitted to antibacterial assays using 18 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus sp. Antioxidant activity was accessed by the reducing power assay, the scavenging effect on DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radicals and beta-carotene linoleate model system. In a general way, all of the studied walnut leaves cultivars presented high antioxidant activity (EC(50) values lower than 1mg/mL), being Cv. Lara the most effective one.

  6. Effective adsorption of phenolic compound from aqueous solutions on activated semi coke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaoming; Dai, Yuan; Zhang, Yu; Fu, Feng

    2017-03-01

    Activated Semi coke was prepared by KOH activation and employed as adsorbent to study adsorption function of phenolic compound from aqueous solutions. The adsorption result showed that the adsorption capacity of the activated semi coke for phenolic compound increased with contact time and adsorbent dosage, and slightly affected by temperature. The surface structure property of the activated semi coke was characterized by N2 adsorption, indicating that the activated semi coke was essentially macroporous, and the BET surface area was 347.39 m2 g-1. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the surface of the activated semi coke had a high developed pore. The adsorption kinetics were investigated according to pseudofirst order, pseudosecond order and intraparticle diffusion, and the kinetics data were fitted by pseudosecond order model, and intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling step. Adsorption isotherm was studied by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, Redlich-Peterson, Sips and Toth models. The result indicated that adsorption isotherm data could fit well with Langmuir, Redlich-Peterson, Sips and Toth models.

  7. Food phenolics and lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Curiel, José Antonio; Landete, José María; de las Rivas, Blanca; López de Felipe, Félix; Gómez-Cordovés, Carmen; Mancheño, José Miguel; Muñoz, Rosario

    2009-06-30

    Phenolic compounds are important constituents of food products of plant origin. These compounds are directly related to sensory characteristics of foods such as flavour, astringency, and colour. In addition, the presence of phenolic compounds on the diet is beneficial to health due to their chemopreventive activities against carcinogenesis and mutagenesis, mainly due to their antioxidant activities. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are autochthonous microbiota of raw vegetables. To get desirable properties on fermented plant-derived food products, LAB has to be adapted to the characteristics of the plant raw materials where phenolic compounds are abundant. Lactobacillus plantarum is the commercial starter most frequently used in the fermentation of food products of plant origin. However, scarce information is still available on the influence of phenolic compounds on the growth and viability of L. plantarum and other LAB species. Moreover, metabolic pathways of biosynthesis or degradation of phenolic compounds in LAB have not been completely described. Results obtained in L. plantarum showed that L. plantarum was able to degrade some food phenolic compounds giving compounds influencing food aroma as well as compounds presenting increased antioxidant activity. Recently, several L. plantarum proteins involved in the metabolism of phenolic compounds have been genetically and biochemically characterized. The aim of this review is to give a complete and updated overview of the current knowledge among LAB and food phenolics interaction, which could facilitate the possible application of selected bacteria or their enzymes in the elaboration of food products with improved characteristics.

  8. Weakening of salmonella with selected microbial metabolites of berry-derived phenolic compounds and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Alakomi, Hanna-Leena; Puupponen-Pimiä, Riitta; Aura, Anna-Marja; Helander, Ilkka M; Nohynek, Liisa; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Saarela, Maria

    2007-05-16

    Gram-negative bacteria are important food spoilage and pathogenic bacteria. Their unique outer membrane (OM) provides them with a hydrophilic surface structure, which makes them inherently resistant to many antimicrobial agents, thus hindering their control. However, with permeabilizers, compounds that disintegrate and weaken the OM, Gram-negative cells can be sensitized to several external agents. Although antimicrobial activity of plant-derived phenolic compounds has been widely reported, their mechanisms of action have not yet been well demonstrated. The aim of our study was to elucidate the role of selected colonic microbial metabolites of berry-derived phenolic compounds in the weakening of the Gram-negative OM. The effect of the agents on the OM permeability of Salmonella was studied utilizing a fluorescence probe uptake assay, sensitization to hydrophobic antibiotics, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) release. Our results show that 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propionic acid (3,4-diHPP), 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid, 3-phenylpropionic acid, and 3-(3-hydroxyphenyl)propionic acid efficiently destabilized the OM of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium and S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis as indicated by an increase in the uptake of the fluorescent probe 1-N-phenylnaphthylamine (NPN). The OM-destabilizing activity of the compounds was partially abolished by MgCl2 addition, indicating that part of their activity is based on removal of OM-stabilizing divalent cations. Furthermore, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, and 3,4-diHPP increased the susceptibility of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strains for novobiocin. In addition, organic acids present in berries, such as malic acid, sorbic acid, and benzoic acid, were shown to be efficient permeabilizers of Salmonella as shown by an increase in the NPN uptake assay and by LPS release.

  9. Instability of, and generation of hydrogen peroxide by, phenolic compounds in cell culture media.

    PubMed

    Long, Lee Hua; Hoi, Aina; Halliwell, Barry

    2010-09-01

    Many papers in the literature have described complex effects of flavonoids and other polyphenols on cells in culture. In this paper we show that hydroxytyrosol, delphinidin chloride and rosmarinic acid are unstable in three commonly-used cell culture media (Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM), RPMI 1640 (RPMI) and Minimal Essential Medium Eagle (MEM)) and undergo rapid oxidation to generate H2O2. This may have confounded some previous studies on the cellular effects of these compounds. By contrast, apigenin, curcumin, hesperetin, naringenin, resveratrol and tyrosol did not generate significant H2O2 levels in these media. Nevertheless, curcumin and, to a lesser extent, resveratrol (but not tyrosol) were also unstable in DMEM, so the absence of detectable H2O2 production by a compound in cell culture media should not be equated to stability of that compound. Compound instability and generation of H2O2 must be taken into account in interpreting effects of phenolic compounds on cells in culture.

  10. Phenolic compounds in cherry ( Prunus avium ) heartwood with a view to their use in cooperage.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miriam; Cadahía, Estrella; Esteruelas, Enrique; Muñoz, Angel Ma; Fernández De Simón, Brígida; Hernández, Teresa; Estrella, Isabel

    2010-04-28

    The phenolic and tannic composition of heartwood extracts from Prunus avium , commonly known as cherry tree, before and after toasting in cooperage were studied using HPLC-DAD and HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS. Nonflavonoid (16 compounds) and flavonoid (27 compounds) polyphenols were identified, 12 of them in only a tentative way. The nonflavonoids found were lignin constituents, and their pattern is different compared to oak, since they include compounds such as protocatechuic acid and aldehyde, p-coumaric acid, methyl vanillate, methyl syringate, and benzoic acid, but not ellagic acid, and only a small quantity of gallic acid. In seasoned wood we found a great variety of flavonoid compounds which have not been found in oak wood for cooperage, mainly, in addition to the flavan-3-ols (+)-catechin, a B-type procyanidin dimer, and a B-type procyanidin trimer, the flavanones naringenin, isosakuranetin, and eriodictyol and the flavanonols aromadendrin and taxifolin. Seasoned and toasted cherry wood showed different ratios of flavonoid to nonflavonoid compounds, since toasting results in the degradation of flavonoids, and the formation of nonflavonoids from lignin degradation. On the other hand, the absence of hydrolyzable tannins in cherry wood, which are very important in oak wood, is another particular characteristic of this wood that should be taken into account when considering its use in cooperage.

  11. Evaluation of antioxidant potential, enzyme inhibition activity and phenolic profile of Lathyrus cicera and Lathyrus digitatus: Potential sources of bioactive compounds for the food industry.

    PubMed

    Llorent-Martínez, E J; Ortega-Barrales, P; Zengin, G; Mocan, A; Simirgiotis, M J; Ceylan, R; Uysal, S; Aktumsek, A

    2017-03-02

    The genus Lathyrus has great importance in terms of food and agricultural areas. In this study, the in vitro antioxidant activity (phosphomolybdenum, DPPH, ABTS, FRAP, CUPRAC and metal chelating) and enzyme inhibitory activity evaluation (acetyl cholinesterase, butyryl cholinesterase, α-amylase and α-glucosidase) of L. cicera and L. digitatus were investigated, as well as their phytochemical profiles. The screening of the main phytochemical compounds in aerial parts of L. cicera and L. digitatus was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection (HPLC-ESI-MS(n)), observing that flavonoids represent the highest percentage of identified compounds, with abundance of tri- and tetra-glycosilated flavonoids, including acylated ones, especially in L. cicera. Generally, L. digitatus exhibited stronger antioxidant and enzyme inhibitory activities in correlation with its higher level of phenolics. The high number of phenolic compounds and the results of the antioxidant and enzyme assays suggest that these plants may be further used as sources of bioactive compounds, and for the preparation of new nutraceuticals.

  12. [Pollution status of phenolic compounds in the soil and sediment from a chemical industrial park along the Yangtze River].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiexia; Wei, Enze; Xian, Qiming

    2014-08-01

    A determination method of 12 phenolic compounds in soil and sediment samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis coupled with accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) for clean-up was developed. The method detection limits (MDLs) varied from 0. 410 μg/kg to 13. 1 μg/kg (dry weight), and the average recoveries ranged from 70. 7% to 122% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1. 2% to 16%. Based on this method, the levels of 12 phenolic compounds were investigated in 17 soil surrounding a chemical industrial park along the Yangtze River and seven sediment samples collected in the river. It was found that 11 of the 12 phenolic compounds were detected in all of the 24 samples, and only hydroquinone was below the MDL. The contents of the total 12 phenolic compounds were 10. 16-30. 66 mg/kg in the soil and 18. 00-29. 83 mg/kg in the sediment, with the average contents of 18. 26 and 22. 51 mg/kg respectively. It showed that 4-nitro- phenol, 4-chloro-3-methylphenol, 2-chlorohydroquinone, 2-methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol and 2,4,6- trichlorophenol were five major phenolic contaminants in the soil and sediment in this study. The pollution levels of the 12 phenolic compounds were low in the soil of the chemical industrial park as well as in the sediment of the Yangtze River, which implied a comparatively low risk for the environment.

  13. Tissue-Specific, Development-Dependent Phenolic Compounds Accumulation Profile and Gene Expression Pattern in Tea Plant [Camellia sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiwei; Zhao, Lei; Meng, Fei; Wang, Yunsheng; Tan, Huarong; Yang, Hua; Wei, Chaoling; Wan, Xiaochun; Gao, Liping; Xia, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Phenolic compounds in tea plant [Camellia sinensis (L.)] play a crucial role in dominating tea flavor and possess a number of key pharmacological benefits on human health. The present research aimed to study the profile of tissue-specific, development-dependent accumulation pattern of phenolic compounds in tea plant. A total of 50 phenolic compounds were identified qualitatively using liquid chromatography in tandem mass spectrometry technology. Of which 29 phenolic compounds were quantified based on their fragmentation behaviors. Most of the phenolic compounds were higher in the younger leaves than that in the stem and root, whereas the total amount of proanthocyanidins were unexpectedly higher in the root. The expression patterns of 63 structural and regulator genes involved in the shikimic acid, phenylpropanoid, and flavonoid pathways were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and cluster analysis. Based on the similarity of their expression patterns, the genes were classified into two main groups: C1 and C2; and the genes in group C1 had high relative expression level in the root or low in the bud and leaves. The expression patterns of genes in C2-2-1 and C2-2-2-1 groups were probably responsible for the development-dependent accumulation of phenolic compounds in the leaves. Enzymatic analysis suggested that the accumulation of catechins was influenced simultaneously by catabolism and anabolism. Further research is recommended to know the expression patterns of various genes and the reason for the variation in contents of different compounds in different growth stages and also in different organs. PMID:23646127

  14. Distribution of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidative Activities in Parts of Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batata L.) plants and in home processed roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We measured six phenolic compounds by HPLC, the total phenolic content by Folin-Ciocalteu, and antioxidative activities by three methods in the sweet potato plant and in home processed roots. Total phenolic content was highest in the leaves. Eight root varieties were partitioned and analyzed for p...

  15. Identification of phenolic compounds by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in seventeen species of wild mushrooms in Central Mexico and determination of their antioxidant activity and bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Yahia, Elhadi M; Gutiérrez-Orozco, Fabiola; Moreno-Pérez, Marco A

    2017-07-01

    Wild mushrooms are important for the diet of some communities in Mexico. However, limited information exists on their chemical composition, contribution to the diet, and health effects. We characterized seventeen wild mushroom species growing in the state of Queretaro in Central Mexico. Most species analyzed were edible, but also included nonedible, medicinal, poisonous and toxic specimens. Whole mushrooms (caps and stipes) were characterized for water content, color, and total content of phenolic compounds, flavonoids and anthocyanins. In vitro antioxidant capacity was measured by FRAP and DPPH assays. Phenolic compounds were identified and quantified by HPLC-mass spectrometry. All species analyzed were found to possess antioxidant activity in vitro and a wide range of phenolic and organic compounds were identified. Our results add to the limited information available on the composition and potential nutritional and health value of wild mushrooms. Further analyses of their bioactivities are warranted.

  16. Reaction of bromine and chlorine with phenolic compounds and natural organic matter extracts--Electrophilic aromatic substitution and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Criquet, Justine; Rodriguez, Eva M; Allard, Sebastien; Wellauer, Sven; Salhi, Elisabeth; Joll, Cynthia A; von Gunten, Urs

    2015-11-15

    Phenolic compounds are known structural moieties of natural organic matter (NOM), and their reactivity is a key parameter for understanding the reactivity of NOM and the disinfection by-product formation during oxidative water treatment. In this study, species-specific and/or apparent second order rate constants and mechanisms for the reactions of bromine and chlorine have been determined for various phenolic compounds (phenol, resorcinol, catechol, hydroquinone, phloroglucinol, bisphenol A, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, gallic acid, hesperetin and tannic acid) and flavone. The reactivity of bromine with phenolic compounds is very high, with apparent second order rate constants at pH 7 in the range of 10(4) to 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The highest value was recorded for the reaction between HOBr and the fully deprotonated resorcinol (k = 2.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). The reactivity of phenolic compounds is enhanced by the activating character of the phenolic substituents, e.g. further hydroxyl groups. With the data set from this study, the ratio between the species-specific rate constants for the reactions of chlorine versus bromine with phenolic compounds was confirmed to be about 3000. Phenolic compounds react with bromine or chlorine either by oxidation (electron transfer, ET) or electrophilic aromatic substitution (EAS) processes. The dominant process mainly depends on the relative position of the hydroxyl substituents and the possibility of quinone formation. While phenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and bisphenol A undergo EAS, hydroquinone, catechol, gallic acid and tannic acid, with hydroxyl substituents in ortho or para positions, react with bromine by ET leading to quantitative formation of the corresponding quinones. Some compounds (e.g. phloroglucinol) show both partial oxidation and partial electrophilic aromatic substitution and the ratio observed for the pathways depends on the pH. For the reaction of six NOM extracts with bromine, electrophilic aromatic substitution

  17. The effect of pro-ecological procedures and insect foraging on the total content of phenol compounds in winter wheat.

    PubMed

    Lamparski, Robert; Balcerek, Maciej; Modnicki, Daniel; Kotwica, Karol; Wawrzyniak, Maria

    2015-06-01

    In laboratory conditions, the effect of pro-ecological procedures (application of effective microorganisms and Asahi SL biostimulator) and foraging by insects [cereal leaf beetle (Oulema melanopa L.) and bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi (L.)] on the total content of phenolic compounds in winter wheat, was studied. Correlations between the total content of phenolic compounds (determined by the Folin-Ciocalteau colorimetric method) expressed as the amount of pyrogallol in wheat plants: undamaged, damaged by O. melanopa, damaged by R. padi, the length of feeding scar left by cereal leaf beetle and the number of pricks made by actively feeding insects of bird cherry-oat aphid were analysed. The wheat was treated by EM inoculant and a biostimulator. The mode of application of the preparations used had a significant effect on level the total phenolic compounds in the undamaged wheat and the wheat exposed to foraging by the above-mentioned insects. The plants not exposed to insects foraging contained greater amounts of phenolic compounds than those exposed to the insects. The correlation between the total content of phenols in the wheat damaged by the insects in the 'no-choice' conditions, proved insignificant.

  18. In vitro bioaccessibility, transepithelial transport and antioxidant activity of Urtica dioica L. phenolic compounds in nettle based food products.

    PubMed

    Bonetti, Gianpiero; Tedeschi, Paola; Meca, Giuseppe; Bertelli, Davide; Mañes, Jordi; Brandolini, Vincenzo; Maietti, Annalisa

    2016-10-12

    Nettle (Urtica dioica L.) is a well-known plant with a wide historical background use of stems, roots and leaves. Nettle leaves are an excellent source of phenolic compounds, principally 3-caffeoylquinic acid (3-CQA), caffeoylmalic acid (CMA) and rutin. The aim of this work was to evaluate the bioaccessibility (BAC), the bioavailability (BAV) and the antioxidant activity of nettle phenolic compounds present in foods and supplements. The BAC of nettle phenolics was evaluated with an in vitro dynamic digestion of real food matrices: the type of food matrix and chemical characteristic affected the kinetics of release and solubilization, with the highest BAC after duodenal digestion. A study of duodenal trans epithelial transport evidenced low bioavailability of native forms of 3-CQA, CMA and rutin. Simulation of colonic metabolism confirmed that phenolic compounds are fermented by gut microflora, confirming the need for further investigations on the impact of phenolic compounds at the large intestine level. Photochemiluminescence assay of the simulated digestion fluids demonstrated that ingestion of Urtica based foods contributes to create an antioxidant environment against superoxide anion radicals in the entire gastrointestinal tract (GIT).

  19. Influence of growing season on phenolic compounds and antioxidant properties of grape berries from vines grown in subtropical climate.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changmou; Zhang, Yali; Zhu, Lei; Huang, Yu; Lu, Jiang

    2011-02-23

    The influence of growing season (winter vs summer) on the synthesis and accumulation of phenolic compounds and antioxidant properties was studied in five grape cultivars for three consecutive years. Four phenolic compound parameters (total phenols, flavonoids, flavan-3-ols, and anthocyanins) and three antioxidant property parameters [2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging, 2,2-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazolinesulfonic acid) radical scavenging, and ferric reducing antioxidant power] were investigated. Results showed that both phenolic compounds and antioxidant properties in the seed and skin of winter berries were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those of summer berries for all of the cultivars investigated. The anthocyanin profiles of berry skins appeared to be extremely consistent in different years for the same crop, whereas they varied greatly between the two crops within the same year (winter vs summer). Winter berries contained richer glucosides of delphinidin, cyanidin, peonidin, and malvidin than summer berries. These seasonal variations of phenolic compounds and antioxidant properties on grape berries were largely contributed by climatic factors such as temperature, solar radiation, rainfall, and hydrothermic coefficient between different growing seasons.

  20. Enhanced transformation of malachite green by laccase of Ganoderma lucidum in the presence of natural phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Murugesan, Kumarasamy; Yang, In-Hee; Kim, Young-Mo; Jeon, Jong-Rok; Chang, Yoon-Seok

    2009-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the efficacy of phenolic extract of wheat bran and lignin-related phenolic compounds as natural redox mediators on laccase-mediated transformation of malachite green (MG) using purified laccase from the white-rot fungus Ganoderma lucidum. G. lucidum laccase was able to decolorize 40.7% MG dye (at 25 mg l(-1)) after 24 h of incubation. Whereas, the addition of phenolic extract of wheat bran enhanced the decolorization significantly (p<0.001) by two- to threefold than that of purified laccase alone. Among various natural phenolic compounds, acetovanillone, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid, syringaldehyde, and vanillin were the most efficient mediators, as effective as the synthetic mediator 1-hydroxybenzotriazole. Characterization of MG transformation products by HPLC, UV-Vis, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-electrospray ionization analysis revealed that N-demethylation was the key mechanism of decolorization of MG by laccase. Growth inhibition test based on mycelial growth inhibition of white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium revealed that treatment with laccase plus natural mediators effectively reduced the growth inhibitory levels of MG than that of untreated one. Among all the tested compounds, syringaldehyde showed the highest enhanced decolorization, as a consequence reduced growth inhibition was observed in syringaldehyde-treated samples. The results of the present study revealed that the natural phenolic compounds could alternatively be used as potential redox mediators for effective laccase-mediated decolorization of MG.

  1. Antiproliferative activity of New Zealand propolis and phenolic compounds vs human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Owen; Mitchell, Kevin; Bloor, Stephen; Davis, Paul; Suddes, Amanda

    2015-10-01

    New Zealand propolis is a "European" type propolis obtained by honey bees mainly from exudates of poplar. European type propolis is known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties and this activity has been attributed to some of the main constituents such as chrysin and CAPE (caffeic acid phenethyl ester). As part of our studies on how New Zealand propolis might benefit gastro-intestinal health, we carried out in vitro bioactivity-guided fractionation of "Bio30™" propolis using both anti-inflammatory (TNF-α, COX-1, COX-2) and anti-colon cancer (DLD-1 colon cancer cell viability) assays; and determined the phenolic compounds responsible for the activity. The New Zealand wax-free Bio30™ propolis tincture solids had very high levels of the dihydroflavonoids pinocembrin and pinobanksin-3-O-acetate, and high levels of the dimethylallyl, benzyl and 3-methyl-3-butenyl caffeates relative to CAPE. The DLD-1 assays identified strong anti-proliferative activity associated with these components as well as chrysin, galangin and CAPE and a number of lesser known or lower concentration compounds including benzyl ferulate, benzyl isoferulate, pinostrobin, 5-phenylpenta-2,4-dienoic acid and tectochrysin. The phenolic compounds pinocembrin, pinobanksin-3-O-acetate, tectochrysin, dimethylallyl caffeate, 3-methyl-3-butenyl caffeate, benzyl ferulate and benzyl isoferulate also showed good broad spectrum activity in anti-proliferative assays against three other gastro-intestinal cancer cell lines; HCT-116 colon carcinoma, KYSE-30 oesophageal squamous cancer, and NCI-N87 gastric carcinoma. Activity is also observed in anti-inflammatory assays although it appears to be limited to one of the first cytokines in the inflammatory cascade, TNF-α.

  2. Phenolic mediators enhance the manganese peroxidase catalyzed oxidation of recalcitrant lignin model compounds and synthetic lignin.

    PubMed

    Nousiainen, Paula; Kontro, Jussi; Manner, Helmiina; Hatakka, Annele; Sipilä, Jussi

    2014-11-01

    Fungal oxidative enzymes, such as peroxidases and laccases, are the key catalysts in lignin biodegradation in vivo, and consequently provide an important source for industrial ligninolytic biocatalysts. Recently, it has been shown that some syringyl-type phenolics have potential as industrial co-oxidants or mediators, in laccase-catalyzed modification of lignocellulosic material. We have now studied the effect of such mediators with ligninolytic peroxidases on oxidation of the most recalcitrant lignin model compounds. We found that they are able to enhance the manganese peroxidase (MnP) catalyzed oxidation reactions of small non-phenolic compounds, veratryl alcohol and veratrylglycerol β-guaiacyl ether (adlerol), which are not usually oxidized by manganese peroxidases alone. In these experiments we compared two peroxidases from white-rot fungi, MnP from Phlebia sp. Nf b19 and versatile peroxidase (VP) from Bjerkandera adusta under two oxidation conditions: (i) the Mn(III) initiated mediated oxidation by syringyl compounds and (ii) the system involving MnP-dependent lipid peroxidation, both with production of (hydrogen) peroxides in situ to maintain the peroxidase catalytic cycle. It was found that both peroxidases produced α-carbonyl oxidation product of veratryl alcohol in clearly higher yields in reactions mediated by phenoxy radicals than in lipid-peroxyl radical system. The oxidation of adlerol, on the other hand, was more efficient in lipid-peroxidation-system. VP was more efficient than MnP in the oxidation of veratryl alcohol and showed its lignin peroxidase type activity in the reaction conditions indicated by some cleavage of Cα-Cβ-bond of adlerol. Finally, the mediator assisted oxidation conditions were applied in the oxidation of synthetic lignin (DHP) and the structural analysis of the oxidized polymers showed clear modifications in the polymer outcome, e.g. the oxidation resulted in reduced amount of aliphatic hydroxyls indicated by (31)P NMR.

  3. High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling of phenolic compounds for evaluation of olive oil bitterness and pungency.

    PubMed

    Dierkes, Georg; Krieger, Sonja; Dück, Roman; Bongartz, Annette; Schmitz, Oliver J; Hayen, Heiko

    2012-08-08

    Bitterness and pungency are important parameters for olive oil quality. Therefore, two instrumental methods for evaluation of these taste attributes were developed. The first one is based on the photometric measurement of total phenolic compounds content, whereas the second one is based on the semiquantitative evaluation of hydrophilic compounds by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). Evaluation of total phenolic compounds content was performed by a modified method for the determination of the K(225) value using a more specific detection based on the pH value dependency of absorbance coefficients of phenols at λ = 274 nm. The latter method was not suitable for correct prediction, because no significant correlation between bitterness/pungency and total phenolic compounds content could be found. For the second method, areas of 25 peaks detected in 54 olive oil samples by a HPLC-MS profiling method were correlated with the bitterness and pungency by partial least-squares regression. Six compounds (oleuropein aglycon, ligstroside aglycon, decarboxymethyl oleuropein aglycon, decarboxymethyl ligstroside aglycon, elenolic acid, and elenolic acid methyl ester) show high correlations to bitterness and pungency. The computed model using these six compounds was able to predict bitterness and pungency of olive oil in the error margin of the sensory evaluation (±0.5) for most of the samples.

  4. The Extent of Fermentative Transformation of Phenolic Compounds in the Bioanode Controls Exoelectrogenic Activity in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell

    DOE PAGES

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Collins, Maya; Borole, Abhijeet P.; ...

    2016-11-27

    Phenolic compounds in hydrolysate/pyrolysate and wastewater streams produced during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production present a significant challenge in downstream processes. Bioelectrochemical systems are increasingly recognized as an alternative technology to handle biomass-derived streams and to promote water reuse in biofuel production. Thus, a thorough understanding of the fate of phenolic compounds in bioanodes is urgently needed. The present study investigated the biotransformation of three structurally similar phenolic compounds (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA), and their individual contribution to exoelectrogenesis in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) bioanode. Fermentation of SA resulted in themore » highest exoelectrogenic activity among the three compounds tested, with 50% of the electron equivalents converted to current, compared to 12 and 9% for VA and HBA, respectively. The biotransformation of SA, VA and HBA was initiated by demethylation and decarboxylation reactions common to all three compounds, resulting in their corresponding hydroxylated analogs. SA was transformed to pyrogallol (1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene), whose aromatic ring was then cleaved via a phloroglucinol pathway, resulting in acetate production, which was then used in exoelectrogenesis. In contrast, more than 80% of VA and HBA was converted to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) and phenol (hydroxybenzene) as their respective dead-end products. The persistence of catechol and phenol is explained by the fact that the phloroglucinol pathway does not apply to di- or mono-hydroxylated benzenes. Previously reported, alternative ring-cleaving pathways were either absent in the bioanode microbial community or unfavorable due to high energy-demand reactions. With the exception of acetate oxidation, all biotransformation steps in the bioanode occurred via fermentation, independently of exoelectrogenesis. Therefore, the observed

  5. The extent of fermentative transformation of phenolic compounds in the bioanode controls exoelectrogenic activity in a microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Collins, Maya A; Borole, Abhijeet P; Pavlostathis, Spyros G

    2017-02-01

    Phenolic compounds in hydrolysate/pyrolysate and wastewater streams produced during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production present a significant challenge in downstream processes. Bioelectrochemical systems are increasingly recognized as an alternative technology to handle biomass-derived streams and to promote water reuse in biofuel production. Thus, a thorough understanding of the fate of phenolic compounds in bioanodes is urgently needed. The present study investigated the biotransformation of three structurally similar phenolic compounds (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA), and their individual contribution to exoelectrogenesis in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) bioanode. Fermentation of SA resulted in the highest exoelectrogenic activity among the three compounds tested, with 50% of the electron equivalents converted to current, compared to 12 and 9% for VA and HBA, respectively. The biotransformation of SA, VA and HBA was initiated by demethylation and decarboxylation reactions common to all three compounds, resulting in their corresponding hydroxylated analogs. SA was transformed to pyrogallol (1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene), whose aromatic ring was then cleaved via a phloroglucinol pathway, resulting in acetate production, which was then used in exoelectrogenesis. In contrast, more than 80% of VA and HBA was converted to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) and phenol (hydroxybenzene) as their respective dead-end products. The persistence of catechol and phenol is explained by the fact that the phloroglucinol pathway does not apply to di- or mono-hydroxylated benzenes. Previously reported, alternative ring-cleaving pathways were either absent in the bioanode microbial community or unfavorable due to high energy-demand reactions. With the exception of acetate oxidation, all biotransformation steps in the bioanode occurred via fermentation, independently of exoelectrogenesis. Therefore, the observed

  6. Mapping the genetic and tissular diversity of 64 phenolic compounds in Citrus species using a UPLC–MS approach

    PubMed Central

    Durand-Hulak, Marie; Dugrand, Audray; Duval, Thibault; Bidel, Luc P. R.; Jay-Allemand, Christian; Froelicher, Yann; Bourgaud, Frédéric; Fanciullino, Anne-Laure

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Phenolic compounds contribute to food quality and have potential health benefits. Consequently, they are an important target of selection for Citrus species. Numerous studies on this subject have revealed new molecules, potential biosynthetic pathways and linkage between species. Although polyphenol profiles are correlated with gene expression, which is responsive to developmental and environmental cues, these factors are not monitored in most studies. A better understanding of the biosynthetic pathway and its regulation requires more information about environmental conditions, tissue specificity and connections between competing sub-pathways. This study proposes a rapid method, from sampling to analysis, that allows the quantitation of multiclass phenolic compounds across contrasting tissues and cultivars. Methods Leaves and fruits of 11 cultivated citrus of commercial interest were collected from adult trees grown in an experimental orchard. Sixty-four phenolic compounds were simultaneously quantified by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Key Results Combining data from vegetative tissues with data from fruit tissues improved cultivar classification based on polyphenols. The analysis of metabolite distribution highlighted the massive accumulation of specific phenolic compounds in leaves and the external part of the fruit pericarp, which reflects their involvement in plant defence. The overview of the biosynthetic pathway obtained confirmed some regulatory steps, for example those catalysed by rhamnosyltransferases. The results suggest that three other steps are responsible for the different metabolite profiles in ‘Clementine’ and ‘Star Ruby’ grapefruit. Conclusions The method described provides a high-throughput method to study the distribution of phenolic compounds across contrasting tissues and cultivars in Citrus, and offers the opportunity to investigate their regulation and physiological

  7. The Extent of Fermentative Transformation of Phenolic Compounds in the Bioanode Controls Exoelectrogenic Activity in a Microbial Electrolysis Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xiaofei; Collins, Maya; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Pavlostathis, Spyros

    2016-11-27

    Phenolic compounds in hydrolysate/pyrolysate and wastewater streams produced during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass for biofuel production present a significant challenge in downstream processes. Bioelectrochemical systems are increasingly recognized as an alternative technology to handle biomass-derived streams and to promote water reuse in biofuel production. Thus, a thorough understanding of the fate of phenolic compounds in bioanodes is urgently needed. The present study investigated the biotransformation of three structurally similar phenolic compounds (syringic acid, SA; vanillic acid, VA; 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, HBA), and their individual contribution to exoelectrogenesis in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) bioanode. Fermentation of SA resulted in the highest exoelectrogenic activity among the three compounds tested, with 50% of the electron equivalents converted to current, compared to 12 and 9% for VA and HBA, respectively. The biotransformation of SA, VA and HBA was initiated by demethylation and decarboxylation reactions common to all three compounds, resulting in their corresponding hydroxylated analogs. SA was transformed to pyrogallol (1,2,3-trihydroxybenzene), whose aromatic ring was then cleaved via a phloroglucinol pathway, resulting in acetate production, which was then used in exoelectrogenesis. In contrast, more than 80% of VA and HBA was converted to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene) and phenol (hydroxybenzene) as their respective dead-end products. The persistence of catechol and phenol is explained by the fact that the phloroglucinol pathway does not apply to di- or mono-hydroxylated benzenes. Previously reported, alternative ring-cleaving pathways were either absent in the bioanode microbial community or unfavorable due to high energy-demand reactions. With the exception of acetate oxidation, all biotransformation steps in the bioanode occurred via fermentation, independently of exoelectrogenesis. Therefore, the observed

  8. Separation and characterization of phenolic compounds in fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) using liquid chromatography-negative electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Parejo, Irene; Jauregui, Olga; Sánchez-Rabaneda, Ferran; Viladomat, Francesc; Bastida, Jaume; Codina, Carles

    2004-06-16

    Liquid chromatography (LC) diode array detection (DAD) coupled to negative electrospray ionization (ESI) tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was used for the rapid and sensitive identification of water-soluble phenolic compounds in fennel waste. The plant material was first extracted and then chromatographed on Sephadex LH-20 to afford seven fractions, each of them being subjected to LC-MS analysis. Identification of the compounds was carried out by interpretation of UV, MS, and MS/MS spectra. Forty-two phenolic substances were identified, 27 of which had not previously been reported in fennel, including hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, flavonoid glycosides, and flavonoid aglycons.

  9. Soluble, semivolatile phenol and nitrogen compounds in milk-processing wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, V; Cruickshank, A; Wild, K; Heaven, M W; McGee, R; Watkins, M; Nash, D

    2009-07-01

    Potable water is an essential and major input in processing our food supplies, and the continued growth in food manufacturing is placing increased pressure on this limited resource. Recycling and reuse of factory wastewater can lessen potable water use but requires a detailed understanding of wastewater properties. This study uses solid-phase extraction techniques with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis to investigate trace-level semivolatile organic species in various waste and reference waters associated with the Burra Foods milk-processing plant located in Southeastern Australia. Our focus was on contaminants containing phenolic and heterocyclic nitrogen functional groups, which, because of their toxicity and persistence, may limit options for water recycling and reuse. Effluent from the wastewater treatment plant of the factory showed both the highest soluble carbon burden (47 mg/kg) and concentrations of target compounds. The target species found in these effluents included methyl phenol (13 mg/kg), hydroxy indole (9.8 mg/kg), synthetic tolyltriazoles (5.1 mg/kg) and alkyl phenol ethoxylates (0.2 mg/kg). Given the environmental stability of the tolyltriazoles, they may act as chemical markers where these effluents are used for purposes such as irrigation. Milk evaporator condensate waters, in contrast to the effluent, contained very few target species, with only low levels of pyrrolidine and piperidine derivatives such as ethylglutarimide (450 mug/L) detected. Although there were fewer target microcontaminants overall in the potable and creek reference waters, these samples had characteristic profiles. The potable water analysis revealed hydroxy cineole (2.1 microg/L) and the creek analysis revealed dichlorohydroxyacetophenone (0.3 microg/L), which were not detected in other waters. The compounds found in the wastewaters are likely to have been derived from milk or synthetic chemicals used in factory operations. The presence of nitrogen compounds in

  10. Biodegradability of some nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds and co-degradation with phenol by denitrifiers in anoxic sludge reactor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zixing; Xu, Xiaochen; Yang, Fenglin; Tan, Zhongxia; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phenol and nitrogenous heterocyclic compounds (NHCs) are typical organic pollutants in coal gasification wastewater which are difficult to deal with. Unlike phenol, the stable molecular structure of NHCs make them nearly impossible to degrade under aerobic or anaerobic condition. In this paper, biodegradation of phenol and NHCs as carbon sources for denitrification was studied in a laboratory-scale anoxic reactor. Denitrifiers could degrade 490 mg/L phenol and 321.5 mg/L NO3(-)-N within 12 hours with removal efficiencies of 99.8% and 99.6%, respectively. The inhibition of pyridine on the microbes could be reduced by adding phenol into influent and the experimental results showed that pyridine could be degraded as the sole carbon source with the maximum organic loading rate of 4.38 mg/(g MLSS·h) (MLSS: mixed liquor suspended solids). When phenol was included as a growth substrate, the degradation performance of quinoline and pyrrole was improved due to co-degradation, and removal rate of NHCs increased according with increment of phenol in influent.

  11. Bionanoconjugates of tyrosinase and peptide-derivatised gold nanoparticles for biosensing of phenolic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, J.; Vorobieva, E.; Gralheira, D.; Osório, I.; Soares, L.; Vale, N.; Pereira, E.; Gomes, P.; Franco, R.

    2011-03-01

    Bionanoconjugates of the enzyme tyrosinase (TYR) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalised with a peptide (CALNN) were produced in solution and characterised. The formation of stable TYR-AuNP:CALNN bionanoconjugates (BNCs) was supported by a decrease of the surface charge of the BNCs as determined by ζ-potential and an increase in hydrodynamic diameter as determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). UV/Vis studies of pH-induced aggregation revealed distinct protonation patterns for the BNCs when compared with AuNP:CALNN alone, further substantiating BNC formation. Activity studies of the BNCs for the reduction of di-phenols in solution indicated that TYR not only remains active after conjugation, but interestingly its activity in the BNCs is higher than for the free enzyme. In conclusion, AuNP:CALNN can provide a suitable platform for the immobilisation of TYR, leading to BNCs with increased enzyme activity and a wider pH working range, with promising uses in electrochemical biosensors for the detection of mono- and di-phenolic compounds.

  12. Degradation of Phenolic Compounds and Ring Cleavage of Catechol by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    PubMed Central

    Leatham, Gary F.; Crawford, R. L.; Kirk, T. Kent

    1983-01-01

    POL-88, a mutant of the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium, was selected for diminished phenol-oxidizing enzyme activity. A wide variety of phenolic compounds were degraded by ligninolytic cultures of this mutant. With several o-diphenolic substrates, degradation intermediates were produced that had UV spectra consistent with muconic acids. Extensive spectrophotometric and polarographic assays failed to detect classical ring-cleaving dioxygenases in cell homogenates or in extracts from ligninolytic cultures. Even so, a sensitive carrier-trapping assay showed that intact cultures degraded [U-14C]catechol to [14C]muconic acid, establishing the presence of a system capable of 1,2-intradiol fission. Significant accumulation of [14C]muconic acid into carrier occurred only when evolution of 14CO2 from [14C]catechol was inhibited by treating cultures with excess nutrient nitrogen (e.g., l-glutamic acid) or with cycloheximide. l-Glutamic acid is known from past work to repress the ligninolytic system in P. chrysosporium and to mimic the effect of cycloheximide. The results here indicate, therefore, that the enzyme system responsible for degrading ring-cleavage products to CO2 turns over faster than does the system responsible for ring cleavage. PMID:16346340

  13. Application of glass-nonmetals of waste printed circuit boards to produce phenolic moulding compound.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jie; Rao, Qunli; Xu, Zhenming

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using glass-nonmetals, a byproduct of recycling waste printed circuit boards (PCBs), to replace wood flour in production of phenolic moulding compound (PMC). Glass-nonmetals were attained by two-step crushing and corona electrostatic separating processes. Glass-nonmetals with particle size shorter than 0.07 mm were in the form of single fibers and resin powder, with the biggest portion (up to 34.6 wt%). Properties of PMC with glass-nonmetals (PMCGN) were compared with reference PMC and the national standard of PMC (PF2C3). When the adding content of glass-nonmetals was 40 wt%, PMCGN exhibited flexural strength of 82 MPa, notched impact strength of 2.4 kJ/m(2), heat deflection temperature of 175 degrees C, and dielectric strength of 4.8 MV/m, all of which met the national standard. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed strong interfacial bonding between glass fibers and the phenolic resin. All the results showed that the use of glass-nonmetals as filler in PMC represented a promising method for resolving the environmental pollutions and reducing the cost of PMC, thus attaining both environmental and economic benefits.

  14. Bioavailability of tyrosol, an antioxidant phenolic compound present in wine and olive oil, in humans.

    PubMed

    Covas, M I; Miró-Casas, E; Fitó, M; Farré-Albadalejo, M; Gimeno, E; Marrugat, J; De La Torre, R

    2003-01-01

    Tyrosol is a phenolic compound present in two of the traditional components of the Mediterranean diet: wine and virgin olive oil. The presence of tyrosol has been described in red and white wines. Tyrosol is also present in vermouth and beer. Tyrosol has been shown to be able to exert antioxidant activity in in vitro studies. Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) appears to occur predominantly in arterial intima in microdomains sequestered from antioxidants of plasma. The antioxidant content of the LDL particle is critical for its protection. Thus, phenolics, which are able to bind LDL, could be effective in preventing lipid peroxidation and atherosclerotic processes. The ability of tyrosol to bind human LDL has been reported. We have demonstrated the bioavailability of tyrosol in humans from virgin olive oil in its natural form. Urinary tyrosol increased, reaching a peak at 0-4 h after virgin olive oil administration. Men and women showed a different pattern of urinary excretion of tyrosol. Moreover, tyrosol is absorbed in a dose-dependent manner after sustained and moderate doses of virgin olive oil. In summary, our results suggest that tyrosol from wine or virgin olive oil could exert beneficial effects on human health in vivo if its biological properties are confirmed in in vivo studies.

  15. Optimisation of ultrasonic-assisted extraction of phenolic compounds, antioxidants, and anthocyanins from sugar beet molasses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingshun; Zhao, Yi; Yu, Shujuan

    2015-04-01

    Response surface methodology was used to optimise experimental conditions for ultrasonic-assisted extraction (UAE) of functional components from sugar beet molasses. The central composite design (CCD) was used for the optimisation of extraction parameters in terms of total phenolic contents, antioxidant activities and anthocyanins. Result suggested the optimal conditions obtained by RSM for UAE from sugar beet molasses were as follows: HCl concentration 1.55-1.72 mol/L, ethanol concentration 57-63% (v/v), extraction temperature 41-48 °C, and extraction time 66-73 min. In the optimal conditions, the experimental total phenolic contents were 17.36 mg GAE/100mL, antioxidant activity was 16.66 mg TE/g, and total anthocyanins were 31.81 mg/100g of the sugar beet molasses extract, which were well matched the predicted values. Teen compounds, i.e. gallic acid, vanillin, hydroxybenzoic acid, syringic acid, cyanidin-3-O-rutinoside, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside, catechin, delphinidin-3-O-rutinoside, delphinidin-3-O-glucuronide and ferulic acid were determined by HPLC-DAD-MS/MS in sugar beet molasses.

  16. Optimisation of ultrasound assisted extraction of phenolic compounds from Sparganii rhizoma with response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinsheng; Wu, Yanfang; Chen, Guangyun; Yue, Wei; Liang, Qiaoli; Wu, Qinan

    2013-05-01

    The present study reports on the extraction of phenolic compounds from sparganii rhizome. Box-Behnken Design (BBD), a widely used form of response surface methodology (RSM), was used to investigate the effect of process variables on the ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE). Three independent variables including ethanol concentration (%), extraction time (min) and solvent-to-material ratio (mL/g) were studied. The results showed that the optimal UAE condition was obtained with an ethanol concentration of 75.3%, an extraction time of 40min and a solvent-to-material ratio of 19.21mL/g for total phenols, and an ethanol concentration of 80%, an extraction time of 33.54min and solvent-to-material ratio of 22.72mL/g for combination of ρ-hydroxybenzaldehyde, ρ-coumaric acid, vanillic acid, ferulic acid, rutin and kaempferol. The experimental values under optimal conditions were in good consistent with the predicted values, which suggested UAE is more efficient process as compared to solvent extraction.

  17. Phenolic compounds containing/neutral fractions extract and products derived therefrom from fractionated fast-pyrolysis oils

    DOEpatents

    Chum, H.L.; Black, S.K.; Diebold, J.P.; Kreibich, R.E.

    1993-06-29

    A process is described for preparing phenol-formaldehyde novolak resins and molding compositions in which portions of the phenol normally contained in said resins are replaced by a phenol/neutral fractions extract obtained from fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils. The fractionation consists of a neutralization stage which can be carried out with aqueous solutions of bases or appropriate bases in the dry state, followed by solvent extraction with an organic solvent having at least a moderate solubility parameter and good hydrogen bonding capacity. Phenolic compounds-containing/neutral fractions extracts obtained by fractionating fast-pyrolysis oils from a lignocellulosic material, is such that the oil is initially in the pH range of 2-4, being neutralized with an aqueous bicarbonate base, and extracted into a solvent having a solubility parameter of approximately 8.4-9.11 [cal/cm[sup 3

  18. Yuccalides A-C, three new phenolic compounds with spiro-structures from the roots of Yucca gloriosa.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ken-Ichi; Abe, Naohito; Oyama, Masayoshi; Inoue, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Three new phenolic compounds, yuccalides A-C (1-3), were isolated from the roots of Yucca gloriosa L., along with four known compounds (4-7). The structures of the new compounds were established by extensive NMR spectroscopic analyses. Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA levels induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mouse macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells were effectively suppressed by compounds 2, 4, and 6, all of which had the (2R*, 3R*)-configuration. IL-1β and IL-6 mRNA levels induced by LPS were significantly attenuated by compounds 4, 5, and 6, but not by 2.

  19. Absorption Profile of (Poly)Phenolic Compounds after Consumption of Three Food Supplements Containing 36 Different Fruits, Vegetables, and Berries.

    PubMed

    Bresciani, Letizia; Martini, Daniela; Mena, Pedro; Tassotti, Michele; Calani, Luca; Brigati, Giacomo; Brighenti, Furio; Holasek, Sandra; Malliga, Daniela-Eugenia; Lamprecht, Manfred; Del Rio, Daniele

    2017-02-26

    The market of plant-based nutraceuticals and food supplements is continuously growing due to the increased consumer demand. The introduction of new products with relevant nutritional characteristics represents a new way of providing bioactive compounds and (poly)phenols to consumers, becoming a strategy to ideally guarantee the health benefits attributed to plant foodstuffs and allowing the increase of daily bioactive compound intake. A paramount step in the study of nutraceuticals is the evaluation of the bioavailability and metabolism of their putatively active components. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the absorption profile of the (poly)phenolic compounds contained in three different plant-based food supplements, made of 36 different plant matrices, which were consumed by 20 subjects in an open one-arm study design. Blood samples were collected at baseline and 1, 2, 5, and 10 h after capsule intake. Twenty quantifiable metabolites deriving from different (poly)phenolic compounds were identified. Results showed that the consumption of the three capsules allowed the effective absorption of several (poly)phenolic compounds and metabolites appearing at different times in plasma, thereby indicating different absorption profiles. The capsules thus ensured potential health-promoting molecules to be potentially available to target tissues and organs.

  20. The Performance of Four Different Mineral Liners on the Transportation of Chlorinated Phenolic Compounds to Groundwater in Landfills.

    PubMed

    Adar, Elanur; Bilgili, Mehmet Sinan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of four different mineral liners (clay, bentonite, kaoline, and zeolite) which could be utilized to prevent the transport of phenolic compounds to groundwater through alternative liner systems. Four laboratory-scale HDPE reactors with 80 cm height and 40 cm inner diameter were operated for a period of 180 days. Results indicated that the transport of mono- or dichlorophenols is significantly prevented by the liner systems used, while the transport of highly chlorinated phenolic compounds cannot be prevented by the landfill liner system effectively. Highly chlorinated phenolic compounds in groundwater can be found in higher concentrations than the leachate, as a result of the degradation and transformation of these compounds. Thus, the analysis of highly chlorinated phenolic compounds such as 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,6-TCP, 3,4,5-TCP, and PCP is of great significance for the studies to be conducted on the contamination of groundwater around landfills.

  1. The Performance of Four Different Mineral Liners on the Transportation of Chlorinated Phenolic Compounds to Groundwater in Landfills

    PubMed Central

    Adar, Elanur; Bilgili, Mehmet Sinan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficiency of four different mineral liners (clay, bentonite, kaoline, and zeolite) which could be utilized to prevent the transport of phenolic compounds to groundwater through alternative liner systems. Four laboratory-scale HDPE reactors with 80 cm height and 40 cm inner diameter were operated for a period of 180 days. Results indicated that the transport of mono- or dichlorophenols is significantly prevented by the liner systems used, while the transport of highly chlorinated phenolic compounds cannot be prevented by the landfill liner system effectively. Highly chlorinated phenolic compounds in groundwater can be found in higher concentrations than the leachate, as a result of the degradation and transformation of these compounds. Thus, the analysis of highly chlorinated phenolic compounds such as 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,6-TCP, 3,4,5-TCP, and PCP is of great significance for the studies to be conducted on the contamination of groundwater around landfills. PMID:26759828

  2. Absorption Profile of (Poly)Phenolic Compounds after Consumption of Three Food Supplements Containing 36 Different Fruits, Vegetables, and Berries