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Sample records for abundant photosynthetic organism

  1. Tocopherol functions in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hiroshi; DellaPenna, Dean

    2007-06-01

    During the past decade, the genes required for tocopherol (vitamin E) synthesis in plants and cyanobacteria have been identified. A series of mutants in which specific pathway steps are disrupted have been generated, providing new insights into tocopherol functions in photosynthetic organisms. Tocopherols are essential for controlling non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation during seed dormancy and seedling germination. Their absence results in elevated levels of malondialdehyde and phytoprostanes, and in inappropriate activation of plant defense responses. Surprisingly, tocopherol deficiency in mature leaves has limited consequences under most abiotic stresses, including high intensity light stress. The cell wall development of phloem transfer cells under cold conditions is, however, severely impaired in mature leaves of tocopherol-deficient mutants, indicating that tocopherols are required for proper adaptation of phloem loading at low temperatures.

  2. Nitric oxide in marine photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Castellano, Immacolata; Patti, Francesco Paolo; Palumbo, Anna; Buia, Maria Cristina

    2015-05-01

    Nitric oxide is a versatile and powerful signaling molecule in plants. However, most of our understanding stems from studies on terrestrial plants and very little is known about marine autotrophs. This review summarizes current knowledge about the source of nitric oxide synthesis in marine photosynthetic organisms and its role in various physiological processes under normal and stress conditions. The interactions of nitric oxide with other stress signals and cross talk among secondary messengers are also highlighted.

  3. Phosphofructokinase Activities in Photosynthetic Organisms 1

    PubMed Central

    Carnal, Nancy Wieland; Black, Clanton C.

    1983-01-01

    A pyrophosphate-dependent phosphofructokinase (PPi-PFK) activity is detectable in extracts of a wide variety of primitive and advanced plants, the Charalean algae, and in the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodospirillum rubrum. Angiosperms with extractable PPi-PFK activities 4- to 70-fold higher than the respective ATP-PFK activities tend to be succulent and to exhibit CAM. Even though PPi-PFK activity is not detected in crude extracts of some well known CAM plants, e.g. plants in the Crassulaceae, gel filtration of the extract and/or inclusion of the PPi-PFK activator, fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, in the assay reveals that a PPi-PFK activity is present in these species. Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate likewise activates PPi-PFK activities in extracts of C3 and C4 plants. C3 and C4 plant PPi-PFK activities are roughly equivalent to ATP-PFK activities in the same species. PPi-PFK activity is also detected in some bryophytes, lower vascular plants, ferns, and gymnosperms. The Charophytes, advanced algae presumed to be similar to species ancestral to vascular plants, exhibit at least 4-fold higher PPi-PFK than ATP-PFK activities. R. rubrum also exhibits a much higher PPi-PFK activity than ATP-PFK activity. These data indicate that PPi-PFK may serve as an alternate enzyme to ATP-PFK in glycolysis in a wide range of photosynthetic organisms. PMID:16662776

  4. Hydrogen photoproduction by use of photosynthetic organisms and biomimetic systems.

    PubMed

    Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Kreslavski, Vladimir D; Thavasi, Velmurugan; Zharmukhamedov, Sergei K; Klimov, Vyacheslav V; Nagata, Toshi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2009-02-01

    Hydrogen can be important clean fuel for future. Among different technologies for hydrogen production, oxygenic natural and artificial photosyntheses using direct photochemistry in synthetic complexes have a great potential to produce hydrogen, since both use clean and cheap sources: water and solar energy. Artificial photosynthesis is one way to produce hydrogen from water using sunlight by employing biomimetic complexes. However, splitting of water into protons and oxygen is energetically demanding and chemically difficult. In oxygenic photosynthetic microorganisms such as algae and cyanobacteria, water is split into electrons and protons, which during primary photosynthetic process are redirected by photosynthetic electron transport chain, and ferredoxin, to the hydrogen-producing enzymes hydrogenase or nitrogenase. By these enzymes, e- and H+ recombine and form gaseous hydrogen. Biohydrogen activity of hydrogenase can be very high but it is extremely sensitive to photosynthetic O2. In contrast, nitrogenase is insensitive to O2, but has lower activity. At the moment, the efficiency of biohydrogen production is low. However, theoretical expectations suggest that the rates of photon conversion efficiency for H2 bioproduction can be high enough (>10%). Our review examines the main pathways of H2 photoproduction by using of photosynthetic organisms and biomimetic photosynthetic systems.

  5. Quantifying Reversible Oxidation of Protein Thiols in Photosynthetic Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slade, William O.; Werth, Emily G.; McConnell, Evan W.; Alvarez, Sophie; Hicks, Leslie M.

    2015-04-01

    Photosynthetic organisms use dynamic post-translational modifications to survive and adapt, which include reversible oxidative modifications of protein thiols that regulate protein structure, function, and activity. Efforts to quantify thiol modifications on a global scale have relied upon peptide derivatization, typically using isobaric tags such as TMT, ICAT, or iTRAQ that are more expensive, less accurate, and provide less proteome coverage than label-free approaches—suggesting the need for improved experimental designs for studies requiring maximal coverage and precision. Herein, we present the coverage and precision of resin-assisted thiol enrichment coupled to label-free quantitation for the characterization of reversible oxidative modifications on protein thiols. Using C. reinhardtii and Arabidopsis as model systems for algae and plants, we quantified 3662 and 1641 unique cysteinyl peptides, respectively, with median coefficient of variation (CV) of 13% and 16%. Further, our method is extendable for the detection of protein abundance changes and stoichiometries of cysteine oxidation. Finally, we demonstrate proof-of-principle for our method, and reveal that exogenous hydrogen peroxide treatment regulates the C. reinhardtii redox proteome by increasing or decreasing the level of oxidation of 501 or 67 peptides, respectively. As protein activity and function is controlled by oxidative modifications on protein thiols, resin-assisted thiol enrichment coupled to label-free quantitation can reveal how intracellular and environmental stimuli affect plant survival and fitness through oxidative stress.

  6. Lead effects on Brassica napus photosynthetic organs.

    PubMed

    Ferreyroa, Gisele V; Lagorio, M Gabriela; Trinelli, María A; Lavado, Raúl S; Molina, Fernando V

    2017-06-01

    In this study, effects of lead on ultracellular structure and pigment contents of Brassica napus were examined. Pb(II) was added in soluble form to soil prior to sowing. Pb contents were measured in plant organs at the ontogenetic stages of flowering (FL) and physiological maturity (PM). Pigment contents were evaluated through reflectance measurements. Pb content in organs was found to decrease in the order; roots>stems>leaves. Lead content in senescent leaves at FL stage was significantly higher than harvested leaves, strongly suggesting a detoxification mechanism. Leaves and stems harvested at the PM stage showed damage at subcellular level, namely chloroplast disorganization, cell wall damage and presence of osmiophilic bodies. Chlorophyll content increased in the presence of Pb at the FL stage, compared with control; at the PM stage, chlorophyll contents decreased with low Pb concentration but showed no significant differences with control at high Pb soil concentration. The results suggest an increase in antioxidants at low Pb concentration and cell damage at higher lead concentration.

  7. Engineering photosynthetic organisms for the production of biohydrogen.

    PubMed

    Dubini, Alexandra; Ghirardi, Maria L

    2015-03-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as green algae are capable of absorbing sunlight and converting the chemical energy into hydrogen gas. This process takes advantage of the photosynthetic apparatus of these organisms which links water oxidation to H2 production. Biological H2 has therefore the potential to be an alternative fuel of the future and shows great promise for generating large scale sustainable energy. Microalgae are able to produce H2 under light anoxic or dark anoxic condition by activating 3 different pathways that utilize the hydrogenases as catalysts. In this review, we highlight the principal barriers that prevent hydrogen production in green algae and how those limitations are being addressed, through metabolic and genetic engineering.  We also discuss the major challenges and bottlenecks facing the development of future commercial algal photobiological systems for H2 production. Finally we provide suggestions for future strategies and potential new techniques to be developed towards an integrated system with optimized hydrogen production.

  8. Automated systems to monitor space radiation effect on photosynthetic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, D.; di Costa, F.; Faraloni, C.; Fasolo, F.; Pace, E.; Perosino, M.; Torzillo, G.; Touloupakis, E.; Zanini, A.; Giardi, M. T.

    We developed automated biodevices to obtain, automatically, measures about the space radiation effect on living photosynthetic organisms, which can be used as biomass and oxygen-producing system on shuttles or ISS. Vitality measurements were performed by optical devices (fluorimeters) measuring fluorescence emission. Fluorescence methodology is a well known applied technique for studying photosynthetic activity, and in particular the oxygen-evolving process of photosynthetic organisms. Different strains of unicellular green algae are properly immobilized on agar growth medium and kept under survial light. The biodevices are characterised by the sensibility and selectivity of the biological component response, together with easy use, versatility, miniature size and low cost. We performed experiments in some facilities, in order to understand separately the effect of radiation of different LET, on the biochemical activity (gamma rays at Joint Research Centre -Varese, Italy; fast neutrons at CERF -- SPS beam at CERN -Geneva, Switzerland). The exposure to different radiation beams of the automatic devices, allowed us to test them under stress condition. In one year, these instrument are expected to be sent to space, inside a spacecraft, in order to study the effect of ionising cosmic radiation during an ESA flight.

  9. Function and distribution of bilin biosynthesis enzymes in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Dammeyer, Thorben; Frankenberg-Dinkel, Nicole

    2008-10-01

    Bilins are open-chain tetrapyrrole molecules essential for light-harvesting and/or sensing in many photosynthetic organisms. While they serve as chromophores in phytochrome-mediated light-sensing in plants, they additionally function in light-harvesting in cyanobacteria, red algae and cryptomonads. Associated to phycobiliproteins a variety of bile pigments is responsible for the specific light-absorbance properties of the organisms enabling efficient photosynthesis under different light conditions. The initial step of bilin biosynthesis is the cleavage of heme by heme oxygenases (HO) to afford the first linear molecule biliverdin. This reaction is ubiquitously found also in non-photosynthetic organisms. Biliverdin is then further reduced by site specific reductases most of them belonging to the interesting family of ferredoxin-dependent bilin reductases (FDBRs)-a new family of radical oxidoreductases. In recent years much progress has been made in the field of heme oxygenases but even more in the widespread family of FDBRs, revealing novel biochemical FDBR activities, new crystal structures and new ecological aspects, including the discovery of bilin biosynthesis genes in wild marine phage populations. The aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the recent progress in this field and to highlight the new and remaining questions.

  10. High abundances of aerobic anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria in the South Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Lami, Raphaël; Cottrell, Matthew T; Ras, Joséphine; Ulloa, Osvaldo; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Claustre, Hervé; Kirchman, David L; Lebaron, Philippe

    2007-07-01

    Little is known about the abundance, distribution, and ecology of aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria, particularly in oligotrophic environments, which represent 60% of the ocean. We investigated the abundance of AAP bacteria across the South Pacific Ocean, including the center of the gyre, the most oligotrophic water body of the world ocean. AAP bacteria, Prochlorococcus, and total prokaryotic abundances, as well as bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) and divinyl-chlorophyll a concentrations, were measured at several depths in the photic zone along a gradient of oligotrophic conditions. The abundances of AAP bacteria and Prochlorococcus were high, together accounting for up to 58% of the total prokaryotic community. The abundance of AAP bacteria alone was up to 1.94 x 10(5) cells ml(-1) and as high as 24% of the overall community. These measurements were consistent with the high BChl a concentrations (up to 3.32 x 10(-3) microg liter(-1)) found at all stations. However, the BChl a content per AAP bacterial cell was low, suggesting that AAP bacteria are mostly heterotrophic organisms. Interestingly, the biovolume and therefore biomass of AAP bacteria was on average twofold higher than that of other prokaryotic cells. This study demonstrates that AAP bacteria can be abundant in various oligotrophic conditions, including the most oligotrophic regime of the world ocean, and can account for a large part of the bacterioplanktonic carbon stock.

  11. RNA function and phosphorus use by photosynthetic organisms

    PubMed Central

    Raven, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) in RNA accounts for half or more of the total non-storage P in oxygenic photolithotrophs grown in either P-replete or P-limiting growth conditions. Since many natural environments are P-limited for photosynthetic primary productivity, and peak phosphorus fertilizer production is inevitable, the paper analyses what economies in P allocation to RNA could, in principle, increase P-use efficiency of growth (rate of dry matter production per unit organism P). The possibilities of decreasing P allocation to RNA without decreasing growth rate include (1) more widespread down-regulation of RNA production in P-limited organisms, (2) optimal allocation of P to RNA, both spatially among cell compartments and organs, and temporally depending on the stage of growth, and (3) a constant rate of protein synthesis through the diel cycle. Acting on these suggestions would, however, be technically demanding. PMID:24421782

  12. Engineering photosynthetic organisms for the production of biohydrogen

    DOE PAGES

    Dubini, Alexandra; Ghirardi, Maria L.

    2014-03-27

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as green algae are capable of absorbing sunlight and converting the chemical energy into hydrogen gas. This process takes advantage of the photosynthetic apparatus of these organisms which links water oxidation to H2 production. Biological H2 has therefore the potential to be an alternative fuel of the future and shows great promise for generating large scale sustainable energy. Microalgae are able to produce H2 under light anoxic or dark anoxic condition by activating 3 different pathways that utilize the hydrogenases as catalysts. In this review, we highlight the principal barriers that prevent hydrogen production in greenmore » algae and how those limitations are being addressed, through metabolic and genetic engineering. We also discuss the major challenges and bottlenecks facing the development of future commercial algal photobiological systems for H2 production. Lastly we provide suggestions for future strategies and potential new techniques to be developed towards an integrated system with optimized hydrogen production.« less

  13. Engineering photosynthetic organisms for the production of biohydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Dubini, Alexandra; Ghirardi, Maria L.

    2014-03-27

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as green algae are capable of absorbing sunlight and converting the chemical energy into hydrogen gas. This process takes advantage of the photosynthetic apparatus of these organisms which links water oxidation to H2 production. Biological H2 has therefore the potential to be an alternative fuel of the future and shows great promise for generating large scale sustainable energy. Microalgae are able to produce H2 under light anoxic or dark anoxic condition by activating 3 different pathways that utilize the hydrogenases as catalysts. In this review, we highlight the principal barriers that prevent hydrogen production in green algae and how those limitations are being addressed, through metabolic and genetic engineering. We also discuss the major challenges and bottlenecks facing the development of future commercial algal photobiological systems for H2 production. Lastly we provide suggestions for future strategies and potential new techniques to be developed towards an integrated system with optimized hydrogen production.

  14. Distribution and abundance of organic thiols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahey, R.

    1985-01-01

    The role of glutathione (GSH) in protecting against the toxicity of oxygen and oxygen by products is well established for all eukaryotes studied except Entamoeba histolytica which lacks mitochrondria, chloroplasts, and microtubules. The GSH is not universal among prokaryotes. Entamoeba histolytica does not produce GSH or key enzymes of GSH metabolism. A general method of thiol analysis based upon fluorescent labeling with monobromobimane and HPLC separation of the resulting thiol derivatives was developed to determine the occurrence of GSH and other low molecular weight thiols in bacteria. Glutathione is the major thiol in cyanobacteria and in most bacteria closely related to the purple photosynthetic bacteria, but GSH was not found in archaebacteria, green bacteria, or GRAM positive bacteria. It suggested that glutathione metabolism was incorporated into eukaryotes at the time that mitochondria and chloroplasts were acquired by endosymbiosis. In Gram positive aerobes, coenzyme A occurs at millimolar levels and CoA disulfide reductases are identified. The CoA, rather than glutathione, may function in the oxygen detoxification processes of these organisms.

  15. Synthetic biology for production of natural and new-to-nature terpenoids in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Philipp; Pollier, Jacob; Callewaert, Nico; Goossens, Alain

    2016-07-01

    With tens of thousands of characterized members, terpenoids constitute the largest class of natural compounds that are synthesized by all living organisms. Several terpenoids play primary roles in the maintenance of cell membrane fluidity, as pigments or as phytohormones, but most of them function as specialized metabolites that are involved in plant resistance to herbivores or plant-environment interactions. Terpenoids are an essential component of human nutrition, and many are economically important pharmaceuticals, aromatics and potential next-generation biofuels. Because of the often low abundance in their natural source, as well as the demand for novel terpenoid structures with new or improved bioactivities, terpenoid biosynthesis has become a prime target for metabolic engineering and synthetic biology projects. In this review we focus on the creation of new-to-nature or tailor-made plant-derived terpenoids in photosynthetic organisms, in particular by means of combinatorial biosynthesis and the activation of silent metabolism. We reflect on the characteristics of different potential photosynthetic host organisms and recent advances in synthetic biology and discuss their utility for the (heterologous) production of (novel) terpenoids.

  16. Engineering biosynthesis of high-value compounds in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Ellis C; Kelly, Steven

    2016-10-04

    The photosynthetic, autotrophic lifestyle of plants and algae position them as ideal platform organisms for sustainable production of biomolecules. However, their use in industrial biotechnology is limited in comparison to heterotrophic organisms, such as bacteria and yeast. This usage gap is in part due to the challenges in generating genetically modified plants and algae and in part due to the difficulty in the development of synthetic biology tools for manipulating gene expression in these systems. Plant and algal metabolism, pre-installed with multiple biosynthetic modules for precursor compounds, bypasses the requirement to install these pathways in conventional production organisms, and creates new opportunities for the industrial production of complex molecules. This review provides a broad overview of the successes, challenges and future prospects for genetic engineering in plants and algae for enhanced or de novo production of biomolecules. The toolbox of technologies and strategies that have been used to engineer metabolism are discussed, and the potential use of engineered plants for industrial manufacturing of large quantities of high-value compounds is explored. This review also discusses the routes that have been taken to modify the profiles of primary metabolites for increasing the nutritional quality of foods as well as the production of specialized metabolites, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and industrial chemicals. As the universe of high-value biosynthetic pathways continues to expand, and the tools to engineer these pathways continue to develop, it is likely plants and algae will become increasingly valuable for the biomanufacturing of high-value compounds.

  17. The essential gene set of a photosynthetic organism

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, Benjamin E.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Price, Morgan N.; Diamond, Spencer; Shultzaberger, Ryan K.; Lowe, Laura C.; Curtin, Genevieve; Arkin, Adam P.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Golden, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 is a model organism used for studying photosynthesis and the circadian clock, and it is being developed for the production of fuel, industrial chemicals, and pharmaceuticals. To identify a comprehensive set of genes and intergenic regions that impacts fitness in S. elongatus, we created a pooled library of ∼250,000 transposon mutants and used sequencing to identify the insertion locations. By analyzing the distribution and survival of these mutants, we identified 718 of the organism’s 2,723 genes as essential for survival under laboratory conditions. The validity of the essential gene set is supported by its tight overlap with well-conserved genes and its enrichment for core biological processes. The differences noted between our dataset and these predictors of essentiality, however, have led to surprising biological insights. One such finding is that genes in a large portion of the TCA cycle are dispensable, suggesting that S. elongatus does not require a cyclic TCA process. Furthermore, the density of the transposon mutant library enabled individual and global statements about the essentiality of noncoding RNAs, regulatory elements, and other intergenic regions. In this way, a group I intron located in tRNALeu, which has been used extensively for phylogenetic studies, was shown here to be essential for the survival of S. elongatus. Our survey of essentiality for every locus in the S. elongatus genome serves as a powerful resource for understanding the organism’s physiology and defines the essential gene set required for the growth of a photosynthetic organism. PMID:26508635

  18. Methods and constructs for expression of foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms

    DOEpatents

    Laible, Philip D.; Hanson, Deborah K.

    2002-01-01

    A method for expressing and purifying foreign proteins in photosynthetic organisms comprising the simultaneous expression of both the heterologous protein and a means for compartmentalizing or sequestering of the protein.

  19. Photosynthetic characteristics and organization of chlorophyll in marine dinoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Prézelin, Barbara B.; Alberte, Randall S.

    1978-01-01

    The photosystem I reaction center complex, the P-700-chlorophyll a-protein, has been isolated from the photosynthetic membranes of two marine dinoflagellates, Gonyaulax polyedra and Glenodinium sp., by detergent solubilization with Triton X-100. The complexes isolated from the two species were indistinguishable, exhibiting identical absorption properties (400-700 nm) at both room (300 K) and low (77 K) temperature. The room temperature, red wavelength maximum was at 675 nm. The absorption properties, kinetics of photobleaching, sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoretic mobilities, and chlorophyll a/P-700 ratio (50 ± 10) of the P-700-chlorophyll a-protein complexes from the two species also were essentially the same and similar to those properties characterizing P-700-chlorophyll a-protein complexes of higher plants and green algae. Photosynthetic unit sizes were determined for cells grown at 1000 μW/cm2. Both dinoflagellates had unit sizes (total chlorophyll/P-700 ratios) of about 600, even though the distribution of chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and peridinin in the light-harvesting components differed in Gonyaulax and Glenodinium. The number of photosynthetic units per cell in the two species correlates directly with their photosynthetic activities. A model is presented for the distribution of chlorophyll in the photosynthetic apparatus of these dinoflagellates which accounts for the known role of the isolated pigment-protein complexes and for the known photoadaptive physiology in pigmentation and photosynthesis for these species. PMID:16592518

  20. [Effects of organic fertilizer application rate on leaf photosynthetic characteristics and grain yield of dryland maize].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Juan; Jia, Zhi-Kuan; Liang, Lian-You; Ding, Rui-Xia; Wang, Min; Li, Han

    2012-02-01

    A 4-year field experiment was conducted at the Heyang Research Station in Weibei dryland to study the effects of organic fertilizer application rate on the leaf photosynthetic characteristics and grain yield of dryland maize. Comparing with applying chemical fertilizer, applying organic fertilizer increased the leaf photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance, but decreased the leaf intercellular CO2 concentration at each growth stage of maize significantly. With the increasing application rate of organic fertilizer, the leaf photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance at each growth stage of maize had a gradual increase, while the leaf intercellular CO2 concentration had a gradual decrease. The leaf photosynthesis of maize at each growth stage was controlled by non-stomatal factors, and the application of organic fertilizer reduced the non-stomatal limitation on the photosynthesis performance significantly. The 4-year application of organic fertilizer improved soil nutrient status, and soil nutrients were no longer the main factors limiting the leaf photosynthetic rate and grain yield of maize.

  1. HSP33 in eukaryotes - an evolutionary tale of a chaperone adapted to photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Segal, Na'ama; Shapira, Michal

    2015-06-01

    HSP33 was originally identified in bacteria as a redox-sensitive chaperone that protects unfolded proteins from aggregation. Here, we describe a eukaryote ortholog of HSP33 from the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which appears to play a protective role under light-induced oxidizing conditions. The algal HSP33 exhibits chaperone activity, as shown by citrate synthase aggregation assays. Studies from the Jakob laboratory established that activation of the bacterial HSP33 upon its oxidation initiates by the release of pre-bound Zn from the well conserved Zn-binding motif Cys-X-Cys-Xn -Cys-X-X-Cys, and is followed by significant structural changes (Reichmann et al., ). Unlike the bacterial protein, the HSP33 from C. reinhardtii had lost the first cysteine residue of its center, diminishing Zn-binding activity under all conditions. As a result, the algal protein can be easily activated by minor structural changes in response to oxidation and/or excess heat. An attempt to restore the missing first cysteine did not have a major effect on Zn-binding and on the mode of activation. Replacement of all remaining cysteines abolished completely any residual Zn binding, although the chaperone activation was maintained. A phylogenetic analysis of the algal HSP33 showed that it clusters with the cyanobacterial protein, in line with its biochemical localization to the chloroplast. Indeed, expression of the algal HSP33 increases in response to light-induced oxidative stress, which is experienced routinely by photosynthetic organisms. Despite the fact that no ortholog could be found in higher eukaryotes, its abundance in all algal species examined could have a biotechnological relevance.

  2. Measuring indigenous photosynthetic organisms to detect chemical warefare agents in water

    DOEpatents

    Greenbaum, Elias; Sanders, Charlene A.

    2005-11-15

    A method of testing water to detect the presence of a chemical or biological warfare agent is disclosed. The method is carried out by establishing control data by providing control water containing indigenous organisms but substantially free of a chemical and a biological warfare agent. Then measuring photosynthetic activity of the control water with a fluorometer to obtain control data to compare with test data to detect the presence of the chemical or agent. The test data is gathered by providing test water comprising the same indigenous organisms as contained in the control water. Further, the test water is suspected of containing the chemical or agent to be tested for. Photosynthetic activity is also measured by fluorescence induction in the test water using a fluorometer.

  3. Thermoluminescence as a complementary technique for the toxicological evaluation of chemicals in photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Repetto, Guillermo; Zurita, Jorge L; Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M

    2015-01-01

    Thermoluminescence is a simple technique very useful for studying electron transfer reactions on photosystem II (standard thermoluminescence) or the level of lipid peroxidation in membranes (high temperature thermoluminescence) in photosynthetic organisms. Both techniques were used to investigate the effects produced on Chlorella vulgaris cells by six compounds: the chemical intermediates bromobenzene and diethanolamine, the antioxidant propyl gallate, the semiconductor indium nitrate, the pesticide sodium monofluoroacetate and the antimalarial drug chloroquine. Electron transfer activity of the photosystem II significantly decreased after the exposure of Chlorella cells to all the six chemicals used. Lipid peroxidation was slightly decreased by the antioxidant propyl gallate, not changed by indium nitrate and very potently stimulated by diethanolamine, chloroquine, sodium monofluoroacetate and bromobenzene. For five of the chemicals studied (not bromobenzene) there is a very good correlation between the cytotoxic effects in Chlorella cells measured by the algal growth inhibition test, and the inhibition of photosystem II activity. The results suggest that one very important effect of these chemicals in Chlorella cells is the inhibition of photosynthetic metabolism by the blocking of photosystem II functionality. In the case of sodium monofluoroacetate, diethanolamine and chloroquine this inhibition seems to be related with the induction of high level of lipid peroxidation in cells that may alter the stability of photosystem II. The results obtained by both techniques supply information that can be used as a supplement to the growth inhibition test and allows a more complete assessment of the effects of a chemical in photosynthetic organisms of aquatic ecosystems.

  4. Elevated temperature altered photosynthetic products in wheat seedlings and organic compounds and biological activity in rhizopshere soil under cadmium stress

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xia; Zhao, YongHua; Wang, WenKe; He, Yunhua

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of slightly elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring on photosynthetic products in wheat seedlings and on organic compounds and biological activity in rhizosphere soil under cadmium (Cd) stress. Elevated temperature was associated with increased soluble sugars, reducing sugars, starch, and total sugars, and with decreased amino acids in wheat seedlings under Cd stress. Elevated temperature improved total soluble sugars, free amino acids, soluble phenolic acids, and organic acids in rhizosphere soil under Cd stress. The activity of amylase, phenol oxidase, invertase, β-glucosidase, and l-asparaginase in rhizosphere soil was significantly improved by elevated temperature under Cd stress; while cellulase, neutral phosphatase, and urease activity significantly decreased. Elevated temperature significantly improved bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, and total microorganisms abundance and fluorescein diacetate activity under Cd stress. In conclusion, slightly elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring improved the carbohydrate levels in wheat seedlings and organic compounds and biological activity in rhizosphere soil under Cd stress in the short term. In addition, elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring stimulated available Cd by affecting pH, DOC, phenolic acids, and organic acids in rhizosphere soil, which resulted in the improvement of the Cd uptake by wheat seedlings. PMID:26395070

  5. Elevated temperature altered photosynthetic products in wheat seedlings and organic compounds and biological activity in rhizopshere soil under cadmium stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Xia; Zhao, Yonghua; Wang, Wenke; He, Yunhua

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of slightly elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring on photosynthetic products in wheat seedlings and on organic compounds and biological activity in rhizosphere soil under cadmium (Cd) stress. Elevated temperature was associated with increased soluble sugars, reducing sugars, starch, and total sugars, and with decreased amino acids in wheat seedlings under Cd stress. Elevated temperature improved total soluble sugars, free amino acids, soluble phenolic acids, and organic acids in rhizosphere soil under Cd stress. The activity of amylase, phenol oxidase, invertase, β-glucosidase, and L-asparaginase in rhizosphere soil was significantly improved by elevated temperature under Cd stress; while cellulase, neutral phosphatase, and urease activity significantly decreased. Elevated temperature significantly improved bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, and total microorganisms abundance and fluorescein diacetate activity under Cd stress. In conclusion, slightly elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring improved the carbohydrate levels in wheat seedlings and organic compounds and biological activity in rhizosphere soil under Cd stress in the short term. In addition, elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring stimulated available Cd by affecting pH, DOC, phenolic acids, and organic acids in rhizosphere soil, which resulted in the improvement of the Cd uptake by wheat seedlings.

  6. Elevated temperature altered photosynthetic products in wheat seedlings and organic compounds and biological activity in rhizopshere soil under cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xia; Zhao, YongHua; Wang, WenKe; He, Yunhua

    2015-09-23

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of slightly elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring on photosynthetic products in wheat seedlings and on organic compounds and biological activity in rhizosphere soil under cadmium (Cd) stress. Elevated temperature was associated with increased soluble sugars, reducing sugars, starch, and total sugars, and with decreased amino acids in wheat seedlings under Cd stress. Elevated temperature improved total soluble sugars, free amino acids, soluble phenolic acids, and organic acids in rhizosphere soil under Cd stress. The activity of amylase, phenol oxidase, invertase, β-glucosidase, and l-asparaginase in rhizosphere soil was significantly improved by elevated temperature under Cd stress; while cellulase, neutral phosphatase, and urease activity significantly decreased. Elevated temperature significantly improved bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, and total microorganisms abundance and fluorescein diacetate activity under Cd stress. In conclusion, slightly elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring improved the carbohydrate levels in wheat seedlings and organic compounds and biological activity in rhizosphere soil under Cd stress in the short term. In addition, elevated atmospheric temperature in the spring stimulated available Cd by affecting pH, DOC, phenolic acids, and organic acids in rhizosphere soil, which resulted in the improvement of the Cd uptake by wheat seedlings.

  7. The xanthophyll cycle pigments, violaxanthin and zeaxanthin, modulate molecular organization of the photosynthetic antenna complex LHCII.

    PubMed

    Janik, Ewa; Bednarska, Joanna; Zubik, Monika; Sowinski, Karol; Luchowski, Rafal; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2016-02-15

    The effect of violaxanthin and zeaxanthin, two main carotenoids of the xanthophyll cycle, on molecular organization of LHCII, the principal photosynthetic antenna complex of plants, was studied in a model system based on lipid-protein membranes, by means of analysis of 77 K chlorophyll a fluorescence and "native" electrophoresis. Violaxanthin was found to promote trimeric organization of LHCII, contrary to zeaxanthin which was found to destabilize trimeric structures. Moreover, violaxanthin was found to induce decomposition of oligomeric LHCII structures formed in the lipid phase and characterized by the fluorescence emission band at 715 nm. Both pigments promoted formation of two-component supramolecular structures of LHCII and xanthophylls. The violaxanthin-stabilized structures were composed mostly of LHCII trimers while, the zeaxanthin-stabilized supramolecular structures of LHCII showed more complex organization which depended periodically on the xanthophyll content. The effect of the xanthophyll cycle pigments on molecular organization of LHCII was analyzed based on the results of molecular modeling and discussed in terms of a physiological meaning of this mechanism. Supramolecular structures of LHCII stabilized by violaxanthin, prevent uncontrolled oligomerization of LHCII, potentially leading to excitation quenching, therefore can be considered as structures protecting the photosynthetic apparatus against energy loses at low light intensities.

  8. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: the model of choice to study mitochondria from unicellular photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Funes, Soledad; Franzén, Lars-Gunnar; González-Halphen, Diego

    2007-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a model organism to study photosynthesis, cellular division, flagellar biogenesis, and, more recently, mitochondrial function. It has distinct advantages in comparison to higher plants because it is unicellular, haploid, and amenable to tetrad analysis, and its three genomes are subject to specific transformation. It also has the possibility to grow either photoautotrophically or heterotrophically on acetate, making the assembly of the photosynthetic machinery not essential for cell viability. Methods developed allow the isolation of C. reinhardtii mitochondria free of thylakoid contaminants. We review the general procedures used for the biochemical characterization of mitochondria from this green alga.

  9. Species selection for the design of gold nanobioreactor by photosynthetic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahoumane, Si Amar; Djediat, Chakib; Yéprémian, Claude; Couté, Alain; Fiévet, Fernand; Coradin, Thibaud; Brayner, Roberta

    2012-06-01

    The design of cell-based bioreactors for inorganic particles formation requires both a better understanding of the underlying processes and the identification of most suitable organisms. With this purpose, the process of Au3+ incorporation, intracellular reduction, and Au0 nanoparticle release in the culture medium was compared for four photosynthetic microorganisms, Klebsormidium flaccidum and Cosmarium impressulum green algae, Euglena gracilis euglenoid and Anabaena flos- aquae cyanobacteria. At low gold content, the two green algae show maintained photosynthetic activity and recovered particles (ca. 10 nm in size) are similar to internal colloids, indicating a full biological control over the whole process. In similar conditions, the euglenoid exhibits a rapid loss of biological activity, due to the absence of protective extracellular polysaccharide, but could grow again after an adaptation period. This results in a larger particle size dispersity but larger reduction yield. The cyanobacteria undergo rapid cell death, due to their prokaryotic nature, leading to high gold incorporation rate but poor control over released particle size. Similar observations can be made after addition of a larger gold salt concentration when all organisms rapidly die, suggesting that part of the process is not under biological control anymore but also involves extracellular chemical reactions. Overall, fruitful information on the whole biocrystallogenesis process is gained and most suitable species for further bioreactor design can be identified, i.e., green algae with external coating.

  10. Bioinspired Organic PV Cells Using Photosynthetic Pigment Complex for Energy Harvesting Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-10

    Photosynthetic Pigment Complex for Energy Harvesting Materials Key Researcher involved in the Proposed Project: Mamoru Nango... Photosynthetic Pigment Complex for Energy Harvesting Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA48690814030 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This is the report of a research project that used the photosynthetic pigment complex of purple bacteria or green plants

  11. Efficient CO2 Fixation Pathways: Energy Plant: High Efficiency Photosynthetic Organisms

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    PETRO Project: UCLA is redesigning the carbon fixation pathways of plants to make them more efficient at capturing the energy in sunlight. Carbon fixation is the key process that plants use to convert carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere into higher energy molecules (such as sugars) using energy from the sun. UCLA is addressing the inefficiency of the process through an alternative biochemical pathway that uses 50% less energy than the pathway used by all land plants. In addition, instead of producing sugars, UCLA’s designer pathway will produce pyruvate, the precursor of choice for a wide variety of liquid fuels. Theoretically, the new biochemical pathway will allow a plant to capture 200% as much CO2 using the same amount of light. The pathways will first be tested on model photosynthetic organisms and later incorporated into other plants, thus dramatically improving the productivity of both food and fuel crops.

  12. 9th International Conference on Tetrapyrrole Photoreceptors of Photosynthetic Organisms (ICTPPO 2009): Meeting Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Lagarias, J. Clark

    2009-07-01

    Tetrapyrroles are strongly pigmented heterocyclic molecules that play key roles in the harvesting of light and in its efficient conversion into chemical energy by photosynthetic organisms, including agronomically important plant species. This grant provided financial support for the International Conference on Tetrapyrrole Photoreceptors of Photosynthetic Organisms (ICTPPO 2009), the ninth in the series of ad hoc biennial conferences focused on the structure, function and biotechnological applications of tetrapyrrole photoreceptors, held at Asilomar Conference Center, Monterey CA from July 26 to July 31, 2009. The goal of this meeting was to bring together leading experts in the field of tetrapyrrole photoreceptors and from associated fields with new investigators, to provide critical analyses of the current state of their fields, the challenges and opportunities therein and their most recent unpublished discoveries to stimulate new approaches to address key issues of agricultural and energy significance. Among the 80 participants included 40 PIs (including one Nobelist in chemistry, two members of the US National Academy of Science, and a recent inductee to the Royal Society), 8 senior scientists, 1 DOE program manager, 12 postdoctoral fellows and 20 graduate students representing 13 countries. One third of the formal lecture program was reserved for discussion, and these sessions particularly well supported the conference objectives. In the spirit of the Gordon Conference format adopted for this meeting, the conference proceedings were documented in a bound document available to all participants but were not distributed to the general public. The major output was the cross-breeding of scientists not previously associated with this meeting, both senior and junior, from the fields of photosynthesis/energy conversion, tetrapyrrole metabolism and bioinspired, tetrapyrrole-based light harvesting systems.

  13. PSII-LHCII supercomplex organizations in photosynthetic membrane by coarse-grained simulation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Pao, Chun-Wei; Smit, Berend

    2015-03-12

    Green plant photosystem II (PSII) and light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) in the stacked grana regions of thylakoid membranes can self-organize into various PSII-LHCII supercomplexes with crystalline or fluid-like supramolecular structures to adjust themselves with external stimuli such as high/low light and temperatures, rendering tunable solar light absorption spectrum and photosynthesis efficiencies. However, the mechanisms controlling the PSII-LHCII supercomplex organizations remain elusive. In this work, we constructed a coarse-grained (CG) model of the thylakoid membrane including lipid molecules and a PSII-LHCII supercomplex considering association/dissociation of moderately bound-LHCIIs. The CG interaction between CG beads were constructed based on electron microscope (EM) experimental results, and we were able to simulate the PSII-LHCII supramolecular organization of a 500 × 500 nm(2) thylakoid membrane, which is compatible with experiments. Our CGMD simulations can successfully reproduce order structures of PSII-LHCII supercomplexes under various protein packing fractions, free-LHCII:PSII ratios, and temperatures, thereby providing insights into mechanisms leading to PSII-LHCII supercomplex organizations in photosynthetic membranes.

  14. High light induced changes in organization, protein profile and function of photosynthetic machinery in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Nama, Srilatha; Madireddi, Sai Kiran; Devadasu, Elsin Raju; Subramanyam, Rajagopal

    2015-11-01

    The green alga Chlamydomonas (C.) reinhardtii is used as a model organism to understand the efficiency of photosynthesis along with the organization and protein profile of photosynthetic apparatus under various intensities of high light exposure for 1h. Chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence induction, OJIPSMT transient was decreased with increase in light intensity indicating the reduction in photochemical efficiency. Further, circular dichroism studies of isolated thylakoids from high light exposed cells showed considerable change in the pigment-pigment interactions and pigment-proteins interactions. Furthermore, the organization of supercomplexes from thylakoids is studied, in which, one of the hetero-trimer of light harvesting complex (LHC) II is affected significantly in comparison to other complexes of LHC's monomers. Also, other supercomplexes, photosystem (PS)II reaction center dimer and PSI complexes are reduced. Additionally, immunoblot analysis of thylakoid proteins revealed that PSII core proteins D1 and D2 were significantly decreased during high light treatment. Similarly, the PSI core proteins PsaC, PsaD and PsaG were drastically changed. Further, the LHC antenna proteins of PSI and PSII were differentially affected. From our results it is clear that LHCs are damaged significantly, consequently the excitation energy is not efficiently transferred to the reaction center. Thus, the photochemical energy transfer from PSII to PSI is reduced. The inference of the study deciphers the structural and functional changes driven by light may therefore provide plants/alga to regulate the light harvesting capacity in excess light conditions.

  15. Cyanide-resistant respiration in photosynthetic organs of freshwater aquatic plants.

    PubMed

    Azcón-Bieto, J; Murillo, J; Peñuelas, J

    1987-07-01

    THE RATE AND SENSITIVITY TO INHIBITORS (KCN AND SALICYLHYDROXAMIC ACID[SHAM]) OF RESPIRATORY OXYGEN UPTAKE HAS BEEN INVESTIGATED IN PHOTOSYNTHETIC ORGANS OF SEVERAL FRESHWATER AQUATIC PLANT SPECIES: six angiosperms, two bryophytes, and an alga. The oxygen uptake rates on a dry weight basis of angiosperm leaves were generally higher than those of the corresponding stems. Leaves also had a higher chlorophyll content than stems. Respiration of leaves and stems of aquatic angiosperms was generally cyanide-resistant, the percentage of resistance being higher than 50% with very few exceptions. The cyanide resistance of respiration of whole shoots of two aquatic bryophytes and an alga was lower and ranged between 25 and 50%. These results suggested that the photosynthetic tissues of aquatic plants have a considerable alternative pathway capacity. The angiosperm leaves generally showed the largest alternative path capacity. In all cases, the respiration rate of the aquatic plants studied was inhibited by SHAM alone by about 13 to 31%. These results were used for calculating the actual activities of the cytochrome and alternative pathways. These activities were generally higher in the leaves of angiosperms. The basal oxygen uptake rate of Myriophyllum spicatum leaves was not stimulated by sucrose, malate or glycine in the absence of the uncoupler carbonylcyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), but was greatly increased by CCCP, either in the presence or in the absence of substrates. These results suggest that respiration was limited by the adenylate system, and not by substrate availability. The increase in the respiratory rate by CCCP was due to a large increase in the activities of both the cytochrome and alternative pathways. The respiration rate of M. spicatum leaves in the presence of substrates was little inhibited by SHAM alone, but the SHAM-resistant rate (that is, the cytochrome path) was greatly stimulated by the further addition of CCCP. Similarly, the cyanide

  16. Cyanide-resistant respiration in photosynthetic organs of freshwater aquatic plants. [Myriophyllum spicatum

    SciTech Connect

    Azcon-Bieto, J.; Murillo, J.; Penuelas, J.

    1987-07-01

    The rate and sensitivity to inhibitors (KCN and salicylhydroxamic acid(SHAM)) of respiratory oxygen uptake has been investigated in photosynthetic organs of several freshwater aquatic plant species. The oxygen uptake rates on a dry weigh basis of angiosperm leaves were generally higher than those of the corresponding stems. Leaves also had a higher chlorophyll content than stems. Respiration of leaves and stems of aquatic angiosperms was generally cyanide-resistant. The cyanide resistance of respiration of whole shoots of two aquatic bryophytes and an alga was lower. These results suggested that the photosynthetic tissues of aquatic plants have a considerable alternative pathway capacity. The angiosperm leaves generally showed the largest alternative path capacity. In all cases, the respiration rate of the aquatic plants studied was inhibited by SHAM alone by about 13 to 31%. These results were used for calculating the actual activities of the cytochrome and alternative pathways. These activities were generally higher in the leaves of angiosperms. The basal oxygen uptake rate of Myriophyllum spicatum leaves was greatly increased by CCCP, either in the presence or in the absence of substrates. These results suggest that respiration was limited by the adenylate system, and not by substrate availability. The increase in the respiratory rate by CCCP was due to a large increase in the activities of both the cytochrome and alternative pathways. The respiration rate of M. spicatum leaves in the presence of substrates was little inhibited by SHAM alone, but the SHAM-resistant rate (that is, the cytochrome path) was greatly stimulated by the further addition of CCCP. Similarly, the cyanide-resistant rate of O/sub 2/ uptake was also increased by the uncoupler.

  17. Functions of tocopherols in the cells of plants and other photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Mokrosnop, V M

    2014-01-01

    Tocopherol synthesis has only been observed in photosynthetic organisms (plants, algae and some cyanobacteria). Tocopherol is synthesized in the inner membrane of chloroplasts and distributed between chloroplast membranes, thylakoids and plastoglobules. Physiological significance of tocopherols for human and animal is well-studied, but relatively little is known about their function in plant organisms. Among the best characterized functions oftocopherols in cells is their ability to scavenge and quench reactive oxygen species and fat-soluble by-products of oxidative stress. There are the data on the participation of different mechanisms of α-tocopherol action in protecting photosystem II (PS II) from photoinhibition both by deactivation of singlet oxygen produced by PSII and by reduction of proton permeability of thylakoid membranes, leading to acidification of lumen under high light conditions and activation of violaxanthin de-epoxidase. Additional biological activity of tocopherols, independent of its antioxidant functions have been demonstrated. Basic mechanisms for these effects are connected with the modulation of signal transduction pathways by specific tocopherols and, in some instances, by transcriptional activation of gene expression.

  18. Semipurification and ice recrystallization inhibition activity of ice-active substances associated with Antarctic photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Raymond, J A; Fritsen, C H

    2001-08-01

    Ice-active substances (IASs), i.e., macromolecular substances that modify the shape of growing ice crystals, were previously found to be associated with various terrestrial and aquatic photosynthetic organisms from Antarctica, but their chemical nature and function are unknown. In this study, we used the ice-binding properties of the IASs to semipurify IASs from a cyanobacterial mat, a eukaryotic green alga (Prasiola sp.), and a moss (Bryum sp.) and examined the ice recrystallization inhibition (RI) activities of the semipure materials. The semipure materials contain both protein and carbohydrate in which the carbohydrate accounted for 73, 52, and 37%, respectively, of the total carbohydrate + protein. The IASs had RI activity at concentrations of 1.4, 0.05, and 0.01 microg ml-1, respectively. RI activity was greatly reduced by heat treatment, suggesting that the IASs inhibit recrystallization through a specific interaction with ice. These results raise the possibility that the IASs increase freezing tolerance of their respective organisms by preventing the recrystallization of ice.

  19. Glutathionylation in the photosynthetic model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: a proteomic survey.

    PubMed

    Zaffagnini, Mirko; Bedhomme, Mariette; Groni, Hayam; Marchand, Christophe H; Puppo, Carine; Gontero, Brigitte; Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Decottignies, Paulette; Lemaire, Stéphane D

    2012-02-01

    Protein glutathionylation is a redox post-translational modification occurring under oxidative stress conditions and playing a major role in cell regulation and signaling. This modification has been mainly studied in nonphotosynthetic organisms, whereas much less is known in photosynthetic organisms despite their important exposure to oxidative stress caused by changes in environmental conditions. We report a large scale proteomic analysis using biotinylated glutathione and streptavidin affinity chromatography that allowed identification of 225 glutathionylated proteins in the eukaryotic unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Moreover, 56 sites of glutathionylation were also identified after peptide affinity purification and tandem mass spectrometry. The targets identified belong to a wide range of biological processes and pathways, among which the Calvin-Benson cycle appears to be a major target. The glutathionylation of four enzymes of this cycle, phosphoribulokinase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, ribose-5-phosphate isomerase, and phosphoglycerate kinase was confirmed by Western blot and activity measurements. The results suggest that glutathionylation could constitute a major mechanism of regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle under oxidative stress conditions.

  20. Suitability of different photosynthetic organisms for an extraterrestrial biological life support system.

    PubMed

    Lehto, Kirsi M; Lehto, Harry J; Kanervo, Eira A

    2006-01-01

    In the present era of intensive space and planetary research, efficient life support systems (LSSs) are needed to maintain suitable living conditions when humans move into space, i.e. away from the Earth's atmosphere. Thus far, such suitable conditions on various space flights and on the space stations (Mir and the International Space Station) have been maintained solely via physical and chemical means (transport of O2, H2O and food from the Earth, cleaning and recycling of air and water). However, for long-duration missions to distant destinations, such as exploratory missions to Mars, biological life support systems (BLSSs) may be needed to convert local CO2 and H2O to O2, and to food. As on earth, this conversion process would need to be based on photosynthesis. Use of higher plants and microalgae as BLSS organisms has been intensively studied. Here we review the growth requirements of these two types of photosynthetic organisms, with particular attention to their suitability for use in harsh Martian conditions, i.e. low temperatures, low atmospheric pressure, high CO2 concentration, high UV radiation and dryness.

  1. Important photosynthetic contribution from the non-foliar green organs in cotton at the late growth stage.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhang, Ya-Li; Luo, Hong-Hai; Li, Wei; Oguchi, Riichi; Fan, Da-Yong; Chow, Wah Soon; Zhang, Wang-Feng

    2012-02-01

    Non-foliar green organs are recognized as important carbon sources after leaves. However, the contribution of each organ to total yield has not been comprehensively studied in relation to the time-course of changes in surface area and photosynthetic activity of different organs at different growth stages. We studied the contribution of leaves, main stem, bracts and capsule wall in cotton by measuring their time-course of surface area development, O(2) evolution capacity and photosynthetic enzyme activity. Because of the early senescence of leaves, non-foliar organs increased their surface area up to 38.2% of total at late growth stage. Bracts and capsule wall showed less ontogenetic decrease in O(2) evolution capacity per area and photosynthetic enzyme activity than leaves at the late growth stage. The total capacity for O(2) evolution of stalks and bolls (bracts plus capsule wall) was 12.7 and 23.7% (total ca. 36.4%), respectively, as estimated by multiplying their surface area by their O(2) evolution capacity per area. We also kept the bolls (from 15 days after anthesis) or main stem (at the early full bolling stage) in darkness for comparison with non-darkened controls. Darkening the bolls and main stem reduced the boll weight by 24.1 and 9%, respectively, and the seed weight by 35.9 and 16.3%, respectively. We conclude that non-foliar organs significantly contribute to the yield at the late growth stage.

  2. Collapsing Aged Culture of the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus Produces Compound(s) Toxic to Photosynthetic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Assaf; Sendersky, Eleonora; Carmeli, Shmuel; Schwarz, Rakefet

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplankton mortality allows effective nutrient cycling, and thus plays a pivotal role in driving biogeochemical cycles. A growing body of literature demonstrates the involvement of regulated death programs in the abrupt collapse of phytoplankton populations, and particularly implicates processes that exhibit characteristics of metazoan programmed cell death. Here, we report that the cell-free, extracellular fluid (conditioned medium) of a collapsing aged culture of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus is toxic to exponentially growing cells of this cyanobacterium, as well as to a large variety of photosynthetic organisms, but not to eubacteria. The toxic effect, which is light-dependent, involves oxidative stress, as suggested by damage alleviation by antioxidants, and the very high sensitivity of a catalase-mutant to the conditioned medium. At relatively high cell densities, S. elongatus cells survived the deleterious effect of conditioned medium in a process that required de novo protein synthesis. Application of conditioned medium from a collapsing culture caused severe pigment bleaching not only in S. elongatus cells, but also resulted in bleaching of pigments in a cell free extract. The latter observation indicates that the elicited damage is a direct effect that does not require an intact cell, and therefore, is mechanistically different from the metazoan-like programmed cell death described for phytoplankton. We suggest that S. elongatus in aged cultures are triggered to produce a toxic compound, and thus, this process may be envisaged as a novel regulated death program. PMID:24959874

  3. Photoprotection conferred by changes in photosynthetic protein levels and organization during dehydration of a homoiochlorophyllous resurrection plant.

    PubMed

    Charuvi, Dana; Nevo, Reinat; Shimoni, Eyal; Naveh, Leah; Zia, Ahmad; Adam, Zach; Farrant, Jill M; Kirchhoff, Helmut; Reich, Ziv

    2015-04-01

    During desiccation, homoiochlorophyllous resurrection plants retain most of their photosynthetic apparatus, allowing them to resume photosynthetic activity quickly upon water availability. These plants rely on various mechanisms to prevent the formation of reactive oxygen species and/or protect their tissues from the damage they inflict. In this work, we addressed the issue of how homoiochlorophyllous resurrection plants deal with the problem of excessive excitation/electron pressures during dehydration using Craterostigma pumilum as a model plant. To investigate the alterations in the supramolecular organization of photosynthetic protein complexes, we examined cryoimmobilized, freeze-fractured leaf tissues using (cryo)scanning electron microscopy. These examinations revealed rearrangements of photosystem II (PSII) complexes, including a lowered density during moderate dehydration, consistent with a lower level of PSII proteins, as shown by biochemical analyses. The latter also showed a considerable decrease in the level of cytochrome f early during dehydration, suggesting that initial regulation of the inhibition of electron transport is achieved via the cytochrome b6f complex. Upon further dehydration, PSII complexes are observed to arrange into rows and semicrystalline arrays, which correlates with the significant accumulation of sucrose and the appearance of inverted hexagonal lipid phases within the membranes. As opposed to PSII and cytochrome f, the light-harvesting antenna complexes of PSII remain stable throughout the course of dehydration. Altogether, these results, along with photosynthetic activity measurements, suggest that the protection of retained photosynthetic components is achieved, at least in part, via the structural rearrangements of PSII and (likely) light-harvesting antenna complexes into a photochemically quenched state.

  4. Photoprotection Conferred by Changes in Photosynthetic Protein Levels and Organization during Dehydration of a Homoiochlorophyllous Resurrection Plant1

    PubMed Central

    Charuvi, Dana; Nevo, Reinat; Shimoni, Eyal; Naveh, Leah; Zia, Ahmad; Adam, Zach; Farrant, Jill M.; Kirchhoff, Helmut; Reich, Ziv

    2015-01-01

    During desiccation, homoiochlorophyllous resurrection plants retain most of their photosynthetic apparatus, allowing them to resume photosynthetic activity quickly upon water availability. These plants rely on various mechanisms to prevent the formation of reactive oxygen species and/or protect their tissues from the damage they inflict. In this work, we addressed the issue of how homoiochlorophyllous resurrection plants deal with the problem of excessive excitation/electron pressures during dehydration using Craterostigma pumilum as a model plant. To investigate the alterations in the supramolecular organization of photosynthetic protein complexes, we examined cryoimmobilized, freeze-fractured leaf tissues using (cryo)scanning electron microscopy. These examinations revealed rearrangements of photosystem II (PSII) complexes, including a lowered density during moderate dehydration, consistent with a lower level of PSII proteins, as shown by biochemical analyses. The latter also showed a considerable decrease in the level of cytochrome f early during dehydration, suggesting that initial regulation of the inhibition of electron transport is achieved via the cytochrome b6f complex. Upon further dehydration, PSII complexes are observed to arrange into rows and semicrystalline arrays, which correlates with the significant accumulation of sucrose and the appearance of inverted hexagonal lipid phases within the membranes. As opposed to PSII and cytochrome f, the light-harvesting antenna complexes of PSII remain stable throughout the course of dehydration. Altogether, these results, along with photosynthetic activity measurements, suggest that the protection of retained photosynthetic components is achieved, at least in part, via the structural rearrangements of PSII and (likely) light-harvesting antenna complexes into a photochemically quenched state. PMID:25713340

  5. Lycopene cyclase paralog CruP protects against reactive oxygen species in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Louis M T; Shumskaya, Maria; Tzfadia, Oren; Wu, Shi-Biao; Kennelly, Edward J; Wurtzel, Eleanore T

    2012-07-03

    In photosynthetic organisms, carotenoids serve essential roles in photosynthesis and photoprotection. A previous report designated CruP as a secondary lycopene cyclase involved in carotenoid biosynthesis [Maresca J, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:11784-11789]. However, we found that cruP KO or cruP overexpression plants do not exhibit correspondingly reduced or increased production of cyclized carotenoids, which would be expected if CruP was a lycopene cyclase. Instead, we show that CruP aids in preventing accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), thereby reducing accumulation of β-carotene-5,6-epoxide, a ROS-catalyzed autoxidation product, and inhibiting accumulation of anthocyanins, which are known chemical indicators of ROS. Plants with a nonfunctional cruP accumulate substantially higher levels of ROS and β-carotene-5,6-epoxide in green tissues. Plants overexpressing cruP show reduced levels of ROS, β-carotene-5,6-epoxide, and anthocyanins. The observed up-regulation of cruP transcripts under photoinhibitory and lipid peroxidation-inducing conditions, such as high light stress, cold stress, anoxia, and low levels of CO(2), fits with a role for CruP in mitigating the effects of ROS. Phylogenetic distribution of CruP in prokaryotes showed that the gene is only present in cyanobacteria that live in habitats characterized by large variation in temperature and inorganic carbon availability. Therefore, CruP represents a unique target for developing resilient plants and algae needed to supply food and biofuels in the face of global climate change.

  6. Light Modulates the Biosynthesis and Organization of Cyanobacterial Carbon Fixation Machinery through Photosynthetic Electron Flow1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yaqi; Casella, Selene

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have evolved effective adaptive mechanisms to improve photosynthesis and CO2 fixation. The central CO2-fixing machinery is the carboxysome, which is composed of an icosahedral proteinaceous shell encapsulating the key carbon fixation enzyme, Rubisco, in the interior. Controlled biosynthesis and ordered organization of carboxysomes are vital to the CO2-fixing activity of cyanobacterial cells. However, little is known about how carboxysome biosynthesis and spatial positioning are physiologically regulated to adjust to dynamic changes in the environment. Here, we used fluorescence tagging and live-cell confocal fluorescence imaging to explore the biosynthesis and subcellular localization of β-carboxysomes within a model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, in response to light variation. We demonstrated that β-carboxysome biosynthesis is accelerated in response to increasing light intensity, thereby enhancing the carbon fixation activity of the cell. Inhibition of photosynthetic electron flow impairs the accumulation of carboxysomes, indicating a close coordination between β-carboxysome biogenesis and photosynthetic electron transport. Likewise, the spatial organization of carboxysomes in the cell correlates with the redox state of photosynthetic electron transport chain. This study provides essential knowledge for us to modulate the β-carboxysome biosynthesis and function in cyanobacteria. In translational terms, the knowledge is instrumental for design and synthetic engineering of functional carboxysomes into higher plants to improve photosynthesis performance and CO2 fixation. PMID:26956667

  7. Linear programming model to construct phylogenetic network for 16S rRNA sequences of photosynthetic organisms and influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Rinku; Adlakha, Neeru

    2014-06-01

    Phylogenetic trees give the information about the vertical relationships of ancestors and descendants but phylogenetic networks are used to visualize the horizontal relationships among the different organisms. In order to predict reticulate events there is a need to construct phylogenetic networks. Here, a Linear Programming (LP) model has been developed for the construction of phylogenetic network. The model is validated by using data sets of chloroplast of 16S rRNA sequences of photosynthetic organisms and Influenza A/H5N1 viruses. Results obtained are in agreement with those obtained by earlier researchers.

  8. Anatomy of a cluster IDP. Part 2: Noble gas abundances, trace element geochemistry, isotopic abundances, and trace organic chemistry of several fragments from L2008#5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Flynn, G. J.; Keller, L. P.; Mckay, David S.; Messenger, S.; Nier, A. O.; Schlutter, D. J.; Sutton, S. R.; Walker, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    The topics discussed include the following: noble gas content and release temperatures; trace element abundances; heating summary of cluster fragments; isotopic measurements; and trace organic chemistry.

  9. Designer organisms for photosynthetic production of ethanol from carbon dioxide and water

    DOEpatents

    Lee, James Weifu

    2011-07-05

    The present invention provides a revolutionary photosynthetic ethanol production technology based on designer transgenic plants, algae, or plant cells. The designer plants, designer algae, and designer plant cells are created such that the endogenous photosynthesis regulation mechanism is tamed, and the reducing power (NADPH) and energy (ATP) acquired from the photosynthetic water splitting and proton gradient-coupled electron transport process are used for immediate synthesis of ethanol (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH) directly from carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) and water (H.sub.2O). The ethanol production methods of the present invention completely eliminate the problem of recalcitrant lignocellulosics by bypassing the bottleneck problem of the biomass technology. The photosynthetic ethanol-production technology of the present invention is expected to have a much higher solar-to-ethanol energy-conversion efficiency than the current technology and could also help protect the Earth's environment from the dangerous accumulation of CO.sub.2 in the atmosphere.

  10. Inhibitory effect of organic carbon on CO₂ fixing by non-photosynthetic microbial community isolated from the ocean.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia-jun; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Shi-ping; Wang, Yuan-qing; Xi, Xue-fei

    2011-07-01

    The inhibitory effect of organic carbon on CO(2) fixation (CF) by the non-photosynthetic microbial community (NPMC) and its mechanism were studied. The results showed that different concentrations of glucose inhibited CF to some extent. However, when these microorganisms pre-cultured with glucose were re-cultured without organic carbon, their CF efficiency differed significantly from the control based on the glucose concentration in the pre-culture. ATP as bioenergy and NADH as reductant had no obvious inhibitory effect on CF; conversely, they improved CF efficiency to some extent, especially when both were present simultaneously. These results implied that not all organic materials inhibited CF by NPMC, and only those that acted as good carbon sources, such as glucose, inhibited CF. Moreover, some metabolites generated during the catabolism of glucose by heterotrophic metabolism of NPMC might inhibit CF, while other cumulated materials present in the cell interior, such as ATP and NADH, might improve CF.

  11. Automated Microscopy: Macro Language Controlling a Confocal Microscope and its External Illumination: Adaptation for Photosynthetic Organisms.

    PubMed

    Steinbach, Gábor; Kaňa, Radek

    2016-04-01

    Photosynthesis research employs several biophysical methods, including the detection of fluorescence. Even though fluorescence is a key method to detect photosynthetic efficiency, it has not been applied/adapted to single-cell confocal microscopy measurements to examine photosynthetic microorganisms. Experiments with photosynthetic cells may require automation to perform a large number of measurements with different parameters, especially concerning light conditions. However, commercial microscopes support custom protocols (through Time Controller offered by Olympus or Experiment Designer offered by Zeiss) that are often unable to provide special set-ups and connection to external devices (e.g., for irradiation). Our new system combining an Arduino microcontroller with the Cell⊕Finder software was developed for controlling Olympus FV1000 and FV1200 confocal microscopes and the attached hardware modules. Our software/hardware solution offers (1) a text file-based macro language to control the imaging functions of the microscope; (2) programmable control of several external hardware devices (light sources, thermal controllers, actuators) during imaging via the Arduino microcontroller; (3) the Cell⊕Finder software with ergonomic user environment, a fast selection method for the biologically important cells and precise positioning feature that reduces unwanted bleaching of the cells by the scanning laser. Cell⊕Finder can be downloaded from http://www.alga.cz/cellfinder. The system was applied to study changes in fluorescence intensity in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 cells under long-term illumination. Thus, we were able to describe the kinetics of phycobilisome decoupling. Microscopy data showed that phycobilisome decoupling appears slowly after long-term (>1 h) exposure to high light.

  12. Molecular bases and photobiological consequences of light intensity adaptation in photosynthetic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y-B.; Durnford, D.; Koblizek, M.; Falkowski, P. G.

    2003-02-10

    By applying a combination of light transitions, uncouplers, and inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport inhibitors we modulate the redox poise of many components in the plastid and examine the pattern of expression of cab1 gene. This gene encodes the major light harvesting protein that services photosystem II. While our results have confirmed our own previous finding that light intensity regulation of cab1 gene expression is signaled by the redox state of the PQ pool, we have also identified additional sensor(s) located in the PET chain.

  13. The activated sludge ecosystem contains a core community of abundant organisms.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Aaron M; Albertsen, Mads; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Per H

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the microbial ecology of a system requires that the observed population dynamics can be linked to their metabolic functions. However, functional characterization is laborious and the choice of organisms should be prioritized to those that are frequently abundant (core) or transiently abundant, which are therefore putatively make the greatest contribution to carbon turnover in the system. We analyzed the microbial communities in 13 Danish wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal in consecutive years and a single plant periodically over 6 years, using Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons of the V4 region. The plants contained a core community of 63 abundant genus-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that made up 68% of the total reads. A core community consisting of abundant OTUs was also observed within the incoming wastewater to three plants. The net growth rate for individual OTUs was quantified using mass balance, and it was found that 10% of the total reads in the activated sludge were from slow or non-growing OTUs, and that their measured abundance was primarily because of immigration with the wastewater. Transiently abundant organisms were also identified. Among them the genus Nitrotoga (class Betaproteobacteria) was the most abundant putative nitrite oxidizer in a number of activated sludge plants, which challenges previous assumptions that Nitrospira (phylum Nitrospirae) are the primary nitrite-oxidizers in activated sludge systems with nutrient removal.

  14. The activated sludge ecosystem contains a core community of abundant organisms

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Aaron M; Albertsen, Mads; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Per H

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the microbial ecology of a system requires that the observed population dynamics can be linked to their metabolic functions. However, functional characterization is laborious and the choice of organisms should be prioritized to those that are frequently abundant (core) or transiently abundant, which are therefore putatively make the greatest contribution to carbon turnover in the system. We analyzed the microbial communities in 13 Danish wastewater treatment plants with nutrient removal in consecutive years and a single plant periodically over 6 years, using Illumina sequencing of 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons of the V4 region. The plants contained a core community of 63 abundant genus-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that made up 68% of the total reads. A core community consisting of abundant OTUs was also observed within the incoming wastewater to three plants. The net growth rate for individual OTUs was quantified using mass balance, and it was found that 10% of the total reads in the activated sludge were from slow or non-growing OTUs, and that their measured abundance was primarily because of immigration with the wastewater. Transiently abundant organisms were also identified. Among them the genus Nitrotoga (class Betaproteobacteria) was the most abundant putative nitrite oxidizer in a number of activated sludge plants, which challenges previous assumptions that Nitrospira (phylum Nitrospirae) are the primary nitrite-oxidizers in activated sludge systems with nutrient removal. PMID:26262816

  15. Bird diversity and abundance in organic and conventional apple orchards in northern Japan

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have investigated the benefits of agri-environmental schemes, such as organic farming, on biodiversity conservation in annual systems, but their effectiveness in perennial systems is less well understood, particularly in bird communities in temperate regions of Asia. This study examined the effects of organic farming practices on species richness and abundance of breeding birds in apple orchards in northern Japan. Bird counts were conducted in six pairs of organic and conventional orchards during the breeding season in April and May 2015. The total species richness of birds, estimated by sample- and coverage-based rarefaction and extrapolation curves, was greater in organic orchards than in conventional orchards. Among the three dietary guilds (insectivore, granivore, and omnivore), only insectivorous species were more abundant in organic orchards than in conventional ones. This study offers the first quantitative evidence that organic farming can be beneficial for enhancing the diversity of birds, particularly of insectivores, in fruit orchards in Japan. PMID:27677408

  16. Consequences of organic farming and landscape heterogeneity for species richness and abundance of farmland birds.

    PubMed

    Smith, Henrik G; Dänhardt, Juliana; Lindström, Ake; Rundlöf, Maj

    2010-04-01

    It has been suggested that organic farming may benefit farmland biodiversity more in landscapes that have lost a significant part of its former landscape heterogeneity. We tested this hypothesis by comparing bird species richness and abundance during the breeding season in organic and conventional farms, matched to eliminate all differences not directly linked to the farming practice, situated in either homogeneous plains with only a little semi-natural habitat or in heterogeneous farmland landscapes with abundant field borders and semi-natural grasslands. The effect of farm management on species richness interacted with landscape structure, such that there was a positive relationship between organic farming and diversity only in homogeneous landscapes. This pattern was mainly dependent on the species richness of passerine birds, in particular those that were invertebrate feeders. Species richness of non-passerines was positively related to organic farming independent of the landscape context. Bird abundance was positively related to landscape heterogeneity but not to farm management. This was mainly because the abundance of passerines, particularly invertebrate feeders, was positively related to landscape heterogeneity. We suggest that invertebrate feeders particularly benefit from organic farming because of improved foraging conditions through increased invertebrate abundances in otherwise depauperate homogeneous landscapes. Although many seed-eaters also benefit from increased insect abundance, they may also utilize crop seed resources in homogeneous landscapes and conventional farms. The occurrence of an interactive effect of organic farming and landscape heterogeneity on bird diversity will have consequences for the optimal allocation of resources to restore the diversity of farmland birds.

  17. Studying the Supramolecular Organization of Photosynthetic Membranes within Freeze-fractured Leaf Tissues by Cryo-scanning Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Charuvi, Dana; Nevo, Reinat; Kaplan-Ashiri, Ifat; Shimoni, Eyal; Reich, Ziv

    2016-06-23

    Cryo-scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of freeze-fractured samples allows investigation of biological structures at near native conditions. Here, we describe a technique for studying the supramolecular organization of photosynthetic (thylakoid) membranes within leaf samples. This is achieved by high-pressure freezing of leaf tissues, freeze-fracturing, double-layer coating and finally cryo-SEM imaging. Use of the double-layer coating method allows acquiring high magnification (>100,000X) images with minimal beam damage to the frozen-hydrated samples as well as minimal charging effects. Using the described procedures we investigated the alterations in supramolecular distribution of photosystem and light-harvesting antenna protein complexes that take place during dehydration of the resurrection plant Craterostigma pumilum, in situ.

  18. Determination of photophysical parameters of chlorophyll {alpha} in photosynthetic organisms using the method of nonlinear laser fluorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gostev, T S; Fadeev, V V

    2011-05-31

    We study the possibility of solving the multiparameter inverse problem of nonlinear laser fluorimetry of molecular systems with high local concentration of fluorophores (by the example of chlorophyll {alpha} molecules in photosynthetic organisms). The algorithms are proposed that allow determination of up to four photophysical parameters of chlorophyll {alpha} from the experimental fluorescence saturation curves. The uniqueness and stability of the inverse problem solution obtained using the proposed algorithms were assessed numerically. The laser spectrometer, designed in the course of carrying out the work and aimed at nonlinear laser fluorimetry in the quasi-stationary and nonstationary excitation regimes is described. The algorithms, proposed in this paper, are tested on pure cultures of microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under different functional conditions. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  19. Determination of photophysical parameters of chlorophyll α in photosynthetic organisms using the method of nonlinear laser fluorimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gostev, T. S.; Fadeev, V. V.

    2011-05-01

    We study the possibility of solving the multiparameter inverse problem of nonlinear laser fluorimetry of molecular systems with high local concentration of fluorophores (by the example of chlorophyll α molecules in photosynthetic organisms). The algorithms are proposed that allow determination of up to four photophysical parameters of chlorophyll α from the experimental fluorescence saturation curves. The uniqueness and stability of the inverse problem solution obtained using the proposed algorithms were assessed numerically. The laser spectrometer, designed in the course of carrying out the work and aimed at nonlinear laser fluorimetry in the quasi-stationary and nonstationary excitation regimes is described. The algorithms, proposed in this paper, are tested on pure cultures of microalgae Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii under different functional conditions.

  20. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C-H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  1. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework nodes.

    PubMed

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-30

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal-organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C-H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  2. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework nodes

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-08-30

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C–H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals.

  3. SEASONAL ABUNDANCE OF ORGANIC MOLECULAR MARKERS IN URBAN PARTICULATE MATTER FROM PHILADELPHIA, PA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic molecular markers were measured in airborne particulate matter (PM10) from the City of Philadelphia North Broad Street air quality monitoring site to identify the seasonal abundances of key tracer compounds together with their dominant sources. Daily PM10...

  4. Effects of microgravityon the structural organization of Brassica rapa photosynthetic appartus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamchuk, N.; Kordyum, E.; Guikema, J.

    Leaf mesophyll cells of 13- and 15-day old Brassica rapa plants grown on board the space shuttle Columbia (STS-87) and in the ground control have been investigated using the methods of light and electron microscopy. 13-day old plants were fixed on orbit and 15-day old plants were fixed after landing. It was shown the essential differences in leaf mesophyll quantitative anatomical and ultrastructural characteristics between spaceflight and ground control variants. Both the volume of palisade parenchyma cells and a number of chloroplasts in those cells increased in spaceflight samples. Simultaneusly, a chloroplast size decreased together with increasing of a relative volume of stromal thylakoids, starch grains and plastoglobuli. It was also noted increasing of stromal thylakoid length. In the same time, both a total length of thylakoids in granae and the grana number diminished in space flight. In addition, the interthylakoid space could be expended and the thylakoid length was more variable in chloroplast granae on microgravity, that correlated with a shrinkage of thylakoids in granal stacks. The obtained data a er discussed with the questions on both the photosynthetic apparatus sensitivity to gravity and its adaptive possibility to microgravity.

  5. A device to study the effect of space radiation on photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Angelini, G; Ragni, P; Esposito, D; Giardi, P; Pompili, M L; Moscardelli, R; Giardi, M T

    2001-01-01

    This research concerns the study of the effects of ionising space radiation on the oxygen-evolving activity of algae and cyanobacteria, focusing our attention on Photosystem II (PS-II), the oxygen-evolving complex. These microorganisms as higher plants, can use light energy to split water molecules and evolve oxygen in a process that produce storable energy-rich products from atmospheric carbon dioxide. Algae and cyanobacteria which can grow in the presence of nutrients and carbonate are expected to be utilised to maintain an oxygen-atmosphere and to constitute biomass in space shuttles. Irradiation was performed in gamma 60Co-sources of different activities; fluorescence techniques in vivo and SDS-PAGE analysis in vitro were used to determine PS-II efficiency during radiation stress. We determined the radiation target on PS-II by immunoblot. We built a miniaturised growth box that preserves constant pressure and temperature to measure automatically photosynthetic activity by a fluorescence sensor, directly in space during a mission in an ASI balloon.

  6. [Regulation of alternative CO[sub 2] fixation pathways in procaryotic and eucaryotic photosynthetic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    The major goal of this project is to determine how microorganisms regulate the assimilation of CO[sup 2] via pathways alternative to the usual Calvin reductive pentose phosphate scheme. In particular, we are interest in the molecular basis for switches in CO[sub 2] metabolic paths. Several earlier studies had indicated that purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacteria assimilate significant amounts of CO[sub 2] via alternative non-Calvin routes. We have deleted the gene that encodes. RubisCo (ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) in both the Rhodobacter sphaeroids and Rhodospirillum rubrum. The R. sphaeroides RubisCO deletion strain (strain 16) could not grow under photoheterotrophic conditions with malate as electron donor and CO[sub 2] as the electron acceptor; however the R. rub RubisCO deletion strain (strain I-19) could. Over the past year we have sought to physiologically characterize strain 16PHC. We found that, 16PHC exhibited rates of whole-cell CO[sub 2] fixation which were significantly higher than strain 16. Strain 16PHC could not grow photolithoautotrophically in a CO[sub 2] atmosphere; however, CO[sub 2] fixation catalyzed by photoheterotrophically grown 16PHC was repressed by the addition of DMSO. Likewise, we found that cells initially grown in the presence of DMSO could induce the CO[sub 2] fixation system when DMSO was removed. Thus, these results suggested that both PHC and I-19 could be used to study alternative CO[sub 2] fixation reactions and their significance in R. sphaexoides and R. rubrum.

  7. Organic matter degradation drives benthic cyanobacterial mat abundance on Caribbean coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Brocke, Hannah J; Polerecky, Lubos; de Beer, Dirk; Weber, Miriam; Claudet, Joachim; Nugues, Maggy M

    2015-01-01

    Benthic cyanobacterial mats (BCMs) are impacting coral reefs worldwide. However, the factors and mechanisms driving their proliferation are unclear. We conducted a multi-year survey around the Caribbean island of Curaçao, which revealed highest BCM abundance on sheltered reefs close to urbanised areas. Reefs with high BCM abundance were also characterised by high benthic cover of macroalgae and low cover of corals. Nutrient concentrations in the water-column were consistently low, but markedly increased just above substrata (both sandy and hard) covered with BCMs. This was true for sites with both high and low BCM coverage, suggesting that BCM growth is stimulated by a localised, substrate-linked release of nutrients from the microbial degradation of organic matter. This hypothesis was supported by a higher organic content in sediments on reefs with high BCM coverage, and by an in situ experiment which showed that BCMs grew within days on sediments enriched with organic matter (Spirulina). We propose that nutrient runoff from urbanised areas stimulates phototrophic blooms and enhances organic matter concentrations on the reef. This organic matter is transported by currents and settles on the seabed at sites with low hydrodynamics. Subsequently, nutrients released from the organic matter degradation fuel the growth of BCMs. Improved management of nutrients generated on land should lower organic loading of sediments and other benthos (e.g. turf and macroalgae) to reduce BCM proliferation on coral reefs.

  8. Organic Matter Degradation Drives Benthic Cyanobacterial Mat Abundance on Caribbean Coral Reefs

    PubMed Central

    Brocke, Hannah J.; Polerecky, Lubos; de Beer, Dirk; Weber, Miriam; Claudet, Joachim; Nugues, Maggy M.

    2015-01-01

    Benthic cyanobacterial mats (BCMs) are impacting coral reefs worldwide. However, the factors and mechanisms driving their proliferation are unclear. We conducted a multi-year survey around the Caribbean island of Curaçao, which revealed highest BCM abundance on sheltered reefs close to urbanised areas. Reefs with high BCM abundance were also characterised by high benthic cover of macroalgae and low cover of corals. Nutrient concentrations in the water-column were consistently low, but markedly increased just above substrata (both sandy and hard) covered with BCMs. This was true for sites with both high and low BCM coverage, suggesting that BCM growth is stimulated by a localised, substrate-linked release of nutrients from the microbial degradation of organic matter. This hypothesis was supported by a higher organic content in sediments on reefs with high BCM coverage, and by an in situ experiment which showed that BCMs grew within days on sediments enriched with organic matter (Spirulina). We propose that nutrient runoff from urbanised areas stimulates phototrophic blooms and enhances organic matter concentrations on the reef. This organic matter is transported by currents and settles on the seabed at sites with low hydrodynamics. Subsequently, nutrients released from the organic matter degradation fuel the growth of BCMs. Improved management of nutrients generated on land should lower organic loading of sediments and other benthos (e.g. turf and macroalgae) to reduce BCM proliferation on coral reefs. PMID:25941812

  9. Organic amendments enhance microbial diversity and abundance of functional genes in Australian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldorri, Sind; McMillan, Mary; Pereg, Lily

    2016-04-01

    Food and cash crops play important roles in Australia's economy with black, grey and red clay soil, widely use for growing cotton, wheat, corn and other crops in rotation. While the majority of cotton growers use nitrogen and phosphate fertilizers only in the form of agrochemicals, a few experiment with the addition of manure or composted plant material before planting. We hypothesized that the use of such organic amendments would enhance the soil microbial function through increased microbial diversity and abundance, thus contribute to improved soil sustainability. To test the hypothesis we collected soil samples from two cotton-growing farms in close geographical proximity and with mostly similar production practices other than one grower has been using composted plants as organic amendment and the second farmer uses only agrochemicals. We applied the Biolog Ecoplate system to study the metabolic signature of microbial communities and used qPCR to estimate the abundance of functional genes in the soil. The soil treated with organic amendments clearly showed higher metabolic activity of a more diverse range of carbon sources as well as higher abundance of genes involved in the nitrogen and phosphorous cycles. Since microbes undertake a large number of soil functions, the use of organic amendments can contribute to the sustainability of agricultural soils.

  10. Toxicity of five antibiotics and their mixtures towards photosynthetic aquatic organisms: implications for environmental risk assessment.

    PubMed

    González-Pleiter, Miguel; Gonzalo, Soledad; Rodea-Palomares, Ismael; Leganés, Francisco; Rosal, Roberto; Boltes, Karina; Marco, Eduardo; Fernández-Piñas, Francisca

    2013-04-15

    The individual and combined toxicities of amoxicillin, erythromycin, levofloxacin, norfloxacin and tetracycline have been examined in two organisms representative of the aquatic environment, the cyanobacterium Anabaena CPB4337 as a target organism and the green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata as a non-target organism. The cyanobacterium was more sensitive than the green alga to the toxic effect of antibiotics. Erythromycin was highly toxic for both organisms; tetracycline was more toxic to the green algae whereas the quinolones levofloxacin and norfloxacin were more toxic to the cyanobacterium than to the green alga. Amoxicillin also displayed toxicity to the cyanobacterium but showed no toxicity to the green alga. The toxicological interactions of antibiotics in the whole range of effect levels either in binary or multicomponent mixtures were analyzed using the Combination Index (CI) method. In most cases, synergism clearly predominated both for the green alga and the cyanobacterium. The CI method was compared with the classical models of additivity Concentration Addition (CA) and Independent Action (IA) finding that CI could accurately predict deviations from additivity. Risk assessment was performed by calculating the ratio between Measured Environmental Concentration (MEC) and the Predicted No Effect Concentration (PNEC). A MEC/PNEC ratio higher than 1 was found for the binary erythromycin and tetracycline mixture in wastewater effluents, a combination which showed a strong synergism at low effect levels in both organisms. From the tested antibiotic mixtures, it can be concluded that certain specific combinations may pose a potential ecological risk for aquatic ecosystems with the present environmentally measured concentrations.

  11. Organic Nitrogen-Driven Stimulation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Hyphae Correlates with Abundance of Ammonia Oxidizers.

    PubMed

    Bukovská, Petra; Gryndler, Milan; Gryndlerová, Hana; Püschel, David; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Large fraction of mineral nutrients in natural soil environments is recycled from complex and heterogeneously distributed organic sources. These sources are explored by both roots and associated mycorrhizal fungi. However, the mechanisms behind the responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) hyphal networks to soil organic patches of different qualities remain little understood. Therefore, we conducted a multiple-choice experiment examining hyphal responses to different soil patches within the root-free zone by two AM fungal species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Claroideoglomus claroideum) associated with Medicago truncatula, a legume forming nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Hyphal colonization of the patches was assessed microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using AM taxon-specific markers, and the prokaryotic and fungal communities in the patches (pooled per organic amendment treatment) were profiled by 454-amplicon sequencing. Specific qPCR markers were then designed and used to quantify the abundance of prokaryotic taxa showing the strongest correlation with the pattern of AM hyphal proliferation in the organic patches as per the 454-sequencing. The hyphal density of both AM fungi increased due to nitrogen (N)-containing organic amendments (i.e., chitin, DNA, albumin, and clover biomass), while no responses as compared to the non-amended soil patch were recorded for cellulose, phytate, or inorganic phosphate amendments. Abundances of several prokaryotes, including Nitrosospira sp. (an ammonium oxidizer) and an unknown prokaryote with affiliation to Acanthamoeba endosymbiont, which were frequently recorded in the 454-sequencing profiles, correlated positively with the hyphal responses of R. irregularis to the soil amendments. Strong correlation between abundance of these two prokaryotes and the hyphal responses to organic soil amendments by both AM fungi was then confirmed by qPCR analyses using all individual replicate patch samples. Further

  12. Organic Nitrogen-Driven Stimulation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Hyphae Correlates with Abundance of Ammonia Oxidizers

    PubMed Central

    Bukovská, Petra; Gryndler, Milan; Gryndlerová, Hana; Püschel, David; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Large fraction of mineral nutrients in natural soil environments is recycled from complex and heterogeneously distributed organic sources. These sources are explored by both roots and associated mycorrhizal fungi. However, the mechanisms behind the responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) hyphal networks to soil organic patches of different qualities remain little understood. Therefore, we conducted a multiple-choice experiment examining hyphal responses to different soil patches within the root-free zone by two AM fungal species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Claroideoglomus claroideum) associated with Medicago truncatula, a legume forming nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Hyphal colonization of the patches was assessed microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using AM taxon-specific markers, and the prokaryotic and fungal communities in the patches (pooled per organic amendment treatment) were profiled by 454-amplicon sequencing. Specific qPCR markers were then designed and used to quantify the abundance of prokaryotic taxa showing the strongest correlation with the pattern of AM hyphal proliferation in the organic patches as per the 454-sequencing. The hyphal density of both AM fungi increased due to nitrogen (N)-containing organic amendments (i.e., chitin, DNA, albumin, and clover biomass), while no responses as compared to the non-amended soil patch were recorded for cellulose, phytate, or inorganic phosphate amendments. Abundances of several prokaryotes, including Nitrosospira sp. (an ammonium oxidizer) and an unknown prokaryote with affiliation to Acanthamoeba endosymbiont, which were frequently recorded in the 454-sequencing profiles, correlated positively with the hyphal responses of R. irregularis to the soil amendments. Strong correlation between abundance of these two prokaryotes and the hyphal responses to organic soil amendments by both AM fungi was then confirmed by qPCR analyses using all individual replicate patch samples. Further

  13. Photosynthetic approaches to chemical biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shuchi H; Atsumi, Shota

    2013-12-01

    National interest and environmental advocates encourage alternatives to petroleum-based products. Besides biofuels, many other valuable chemicals used in every-day life are petroleum derivatives or require petroleum for their production. A plausible alternative to production using petroleum for chemical production is to harvest the abundant carbon dioxide resources in the environment to produce valuable hydrocarbons. Currently, efforts are being made to utilize a natural biological system, photosynthetic microorganisms, to perform this task. Photosynthetic microorganisms are attractive to use for biochemical production because they utilize economical resources for survival: sunlight and carbon dioxide. This review examines the various compounds produced by photosynthetic microorganisms.

  14. Chemoselective single-site Earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework nodes

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Kuntal; Ji, Pengfei; Lin, Zekai; Greene, Francis X.; Urban, Ania; Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed for sustainable chemical synthesis. Here we report a simple, cheap and effective strategy of producing novel earth-abundant metal catalysts at metal–organic framework (MOF) nodes for broad-scope organic transformations. The straightforward metalation of MOF secondary building units (SBUs) with cobalt and iron salts affords highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for a range of organic reactions, including chemoselective borylation, silylation and amination of benzylic C–H bonds, as well as hydrogenation and hydroboration of alkenes and ketones. Our structural, spectroscopic and kinetic studies suggest that chemoselective organic transformations occur on site-isolated, electron-deficient and coordinatively unsaturated metal centres at the SBUs via σ-bond metathesis pathways and as a result of the steric environment around the catalytic site. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for the development of highly active and affordable base metal catalysts for the sustainable synthesis of fine chemicals. PMID:27574182

  15. Nanophase Iron Oxides as an Ultraviolet Sunscreen for Ancient Photosynthetic Microbes: A Possible Link Between Early Organisms, Banded-Iron Formations, and the Oxygenation of the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Rogoff, Dana A.

    2006-01-01

    We propose that nanophase iron oxide-bearing materials provided important niches for ancient photosynthetic microbes on the early Earth that ultimately led to the oxygenation of the Earth s atmosphere and the formation of iron oxide deposits. Atmospheric oxygen and ozone attenuate UV radiation on the Earth today providing substantial protection for photosynthetic organisms. With ultraviolet radiation fluxes likely to have been even higher on the early Earth than today, accessing solar radiation was particularly risky for early organisms. Yet, we know that photosynthesis arose then and played a critical role in subsequent evolution. Of primary importance was protection at approx.250-290 nm, where peak nucleic acid (approx.260 nm) and protein (approx.280 nm) absorptions occur. Nanophase ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide minerals absorb, and thus block, the lethal UV radiation, while transmitting light through much of the visible and near-infrared regions of interest to photosynthesis (400 to 1100 nm). Further, they were available in early environments, and are synthesized by many organisms. Based on ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide spectral properties, likely geologic processes, and the results of experiments with the photosynthetic organisms, Euglena sp. and Chlumydomonus reinhardtii, we propose a scenario where photosynthesis, and ultimately the oxygenation of the atmosphere, depended on the protection of early microbes by nanophase ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides. The results of this study are also applicable to other potentially habitable iron-bearing planetary bodies because of the evolutionary pressure to utilize solar radiation when available as an energy source.

  16. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossini, Aaron J.; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (∼100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance 1H-2H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance 2H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2 h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the 2H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of 1H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques.

  17. Constraining the Abundances of Complex Organics in the Inner Regions of Solar-type Protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taquet, Vianney; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Neri, Roberto; Kahane, Claudine; Charnley, Steven B.

    2015-05-01

    The high abundances of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) with respect to methanol, the most abundant COM, detected toward low-mass protostars, tend to be underpredicted by astrochemical models. This discrepancy might come from the large beam of the single-dish telescopes, encompassing several components of the studied protostar, commonly used to detect COMs. To address this issue, we have carried out multi-line observations of methanol and several COMs toward the two low-mass protostars NGC 1333-IRAS 2A and -IRAS 4A with the Plateau de Bure interferometer at an angular resolution of 2″, resulting in the first multi-line detection of the O-bearing species glycolaldehyde and ethanol and of the N-bearing species ethyl cyanide toward low-mass protostars other than IRAS 16293. The high number of detected transitions from COMs (more than 40 methanol transitions for instance) allowed us to accurately derive the source size of their emission and the COM column densities. The COM abundances with respect to methanol derived toward IRAS 2A and IRAS 4A are slightly, but not substantitally, lower than those derived from previous single-dish observations. The COM abundance ratios do not vary significantly with the protostellar luminosity, over five orders of magnitude, implying that low-mass hot corinos are quite chemically rich as high-mass hot cores. Astrochemical models still underpredict the abundances of key COMs, such as methyl formate or di-methyl ether, suggesting that our understanding of their formation remains incomplete.

  18. Probabilisitc Geobiological Classification Using Elemental Abundance Distributions and Lossless Image Compression in Recent and Modern Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    Last year we presented techniques for the detection of fossils during robotic missions to Mars using both structural and chemical signatures[Storrie-Lombardi and Hoover, 2004]. Analyses included lossless compression of photographic images to estimate the relative complexity of a putative fossil compared to the rock matrix [Corsetti and Storrie-Lombardi, 2003] and elemental abundance distributions to provide mineralogical classification of the rock matrix [Storrie-Lombardi and Fisk, 2004]. We presented a classification strategy employing two exploratory classification algorithms (Principal Component Analysis and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis) and non-linear stochastic neural network to produce a Bayesian estimate of classification accuracy. We now present an extension of our previous experiments exploring putative fossil forms morphologically resembling cyanobacteria discovered in the Orgueil meteorite. Elemental abundances (C6, N7, O8, Na11, Mg12, Ai13, Si14, P15, S16, Cl17, K19, Ca20, Fe26) obtained for both extant cyanobacteria and fossil trilobites produce signatures readily distinguishing them from meteorite targets. When compared to elemental abundance signatures for extant cyanobacteria Orgueil structures exhibit decreased abundances for C6, N7, Na11, All3, P15, Cl17, K19, Ca20 and increases in Mg12, S16, Fe26. Diatoms and silicified portions of cyanobacterial sheaths exhibiting high levels of silicon and correspondingly low levels of carbon cluster more closely with terrestrial fossils than with extant cyanobacteria. Compression indices verify that variations in random and redundant textural patterns between perceived forms and the background matrix contribute significantly to morphological visual identification. The results provide a quantitative probabilistic methodology for discriminating putatitive fossils from the surrounding rock matrix and &om extant organisms using both structural and chemical information. The techniques described appear applicable

  19. CONSTRAINING THE ABUNDANCES OF COMPLEX ORGANICS IN THE INNER REGIONS OF SOLAR-TYPE PROTOSTARS

    SciTech Connect

    Taquet, Vianney; Charnley, Steven B.; López-Sepulcre, Ana; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Kahane, Claudine; Neri, Roberto

    2015-05-10

    The high abundances of Complex Organic Molecules (COMs) with respect to methanol, the most abundant COM, detected toward low-mass protostars, tend to be underpredicted by astrochemical models. This discrepancy might come from the large beam of the single-dish telescopes, encompassing several components of the studied protostar, commonly used to detect COMs. To address this issue, we have carried out multi-line observations of methanol and several COMs toward the two low-mass protostars NGC 1333-IRAS 2A and -IRAS 4A with the Plateau de Bure interferometer at an angular resolution of 2″, resulting in the first multi-line detection of the O-bearing species glycolaldehyde and ethanol and of the N-bearing species ethyl cyanide toward low-mass protostars other than IRAS 16293. The high number of detected transitions from COMs (more than 40 methanol transitions for instance) allowed us to accurately derive the source size of their emission and the COM column densities. The COM abundances with respect to methanol derived toward IRAS 2A and IRAS 4A are slightly, but not substantitally, lower than those derived from previous single-dish observations. The COM abundance ratios do not vary significantly with the protostellar luminosity, over five orders of magnitude, implying that low-mass hot corinos are quite chemically rich as high-mass hot cores. Astrochemical models still underpredict the abundances of key COMs, such as methyl formate or di-methyl ether, suggesting that our understanding of their formation remains incomplete.

  20. Nondestructive, in situ, cellular-scale mapping of elemental abundances including organic carbon in permineralized fossils.

    PubMed

    Boyce, C K; Hazen, R M; Knoll, A H

    2001-05-22

    The electron microprobe allows elemental abundances to be mapped at the microm scale, but until now high resolution mapping of light elements has been challenging. Modifications of electron microprobe procedure permit fine-scale mapping of carbon. When applied to permineralized fossils, this technique allows simultaneous mapping of organic material, major matrix-forming elements, and trace elements with microm-scale resolution. The resulting data make it possible to test taphonomic hypotheses for the formation of anatomically preserved silicified fossils, including the role of trace elements in the initiation of silica precipitation and in the prevention of organic degradation. The technique allows one to understand the localization of preserved organic matter before undertaking destructive chemical analyses and, because it is nondestructive, offers a potentially important tool for astrobiological investigations of samples returned from Mars or other solar system bodies.

  1. Carotenoid Cleavage Oxygenases from Microbes and Photosynthetic Organisms: Features and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Ahrazem, Oussama; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes; Rodrigo, María J.; Avalos, Javier; Limón, María Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Apocarotenoids are carotenoid-derived compounds widespread in all major taxonomic groups, where they play important roles in different physiological processes. In addition, apocarotenoids include compounds with high economic value in food and cosmetics industries. Apocarotenoid biosynthesis starts with the action of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs), a family of non-heme iron enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of carbon–carbon double bonds in carotenoid backbones through a similar molecular mechanism, generating aldehyde or ketone groups in the cleaving ends. From the identification of the first CCD enzyme in plants, an increasing number of CCDs have been identified in many other species, including microorganisms, proving to be a ubiquitously distributed and evolutionarily conserved enzymatic family. This review focuses on CCDs from plants, algae, fungi, and bacteria, describing recent progress in their functions and regulatory mechanisms in relation to the different roles played by the apocarotenoids in these organisms. PMID:27792173

  2. Fossilized intact polar lipids of photosynthetic organisms in ancient subsurface sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauersachs, T.; Schouten, S.; Hopmans, E. C.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.

    2009-12-01

    In recent years, the idea of a rich microbial biosphere in the marine sea floor has been widely accepted. This so-called “deep biosphere” is estimated to contain ca. 50 % of Earth’s total prokaryotic biomass with the overall order of magnitude of microbial cells in the sea floor being the same as the biomass of all surface plant life (Whitman et al. 1998). Evidence for the existence of a deep biosphere comes, among others, from the analysis of intact polar lipids (IPLs). This approach presumes that IPLs almost instantaneously lose their polar head group after cell death and thus do not preserve on geological timescales. Consequently, IPLs in the subsurface should derive from in situ production and hence indicate the presence of living prokaryotic cells. For example, in various oceanic subsurface sediments archaeal IPLs have been found, suggesting that Archaea constitute a major fraction of the deep biosphere biomass (Lipp et al. 2008). In this study, we found IPLs of heterocystous cyanobacteria in a number of ancient and deeply buried sediments. Heterocystous cyanobacteria are strictly photoautotrophic organisms that are a common constituent of the phytoplankton community in many freshwater and brackish environments but are also encountered in the marine realm as endosymbionts of diatom species. Under nitrogen-depleted conditions, these organisms carry out nitrogen fixation in specialized cells, known as heterocysts. These cells contain a suite of heterocyst glycolipids (HGs) that have not been identified in any other organism and are thus unique biological markers for nitrogen-fixing heterocystous cyanobacteria. Using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionisation tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC/ESI-MS/MS), we detected HGs in Pleistocene and Pliocene Mediterranean sapropels buried up to 60 m below the seafloor. In addition, these HGs were also found in lacustrine deposits of the Oligocene Lake Enspel (35 Ma), the Eocene Lake Messel

  3. Carotenoid Cleavage Oxygenases from Microbes and Photosynthetic Organisms: Features and Functions.

    PubMed

    Ahrazem, Oussama; Gómez-Gómez, Lourdes; Rodrigo, María J; Avalos, Javier; Limón, María Carmen

    2016-10-26

    Apocarotenoids are carotenoid-derived compounds widespread in all major taxonomic groups, where they play important roles in different physiological processes. In addition, apocarotenoids include compounds with high economic value in food and cosmetics industries. Apocarotenoid biosynthesis starts with the action of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCDs), a family of non-heme iron enzymes that catalyze the oxidative cleavage of carbon-carbon double bonds in carotenoid backbones through a similar molecular mechanism, generating aldehyde or ketone groups in the cleaving ends. From the identification of the first CCD enzyme in plants, an increasing number of CCDs have been identified in many other species, including microorganisms, proving to be a ubiquitously distributed and evolutionarily conserved enzymatic family. This review focuses on CCDs from plants, algae, fungi, and bacteria, describing recent progress in their functions and regulatory mechanisms in relation to the different roles played by the apocarotenoids in these organisms.

  4. Fabrication of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Photosynthetic Pigments Extracted from Spinach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, Naoki; Kitagawa, Natsuko; Matsuda, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    We fabricated organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) containing chlorophylls in the active region, which were extracted from spinach using a chemical method. Photoluminescence (PL) cannot be observed in the thin film of the extracted chlorophylls owing to concentration quenching. To overcome the concentration quenching, a host material, poly[(m-phenylenevinylene)-alt-(2,5-dihexyloxy-p-phenylenevinylene)] (PPV) was added in the active region. This leads to the observaton of electroluminescence (EL) signals originating from chlorophyll a. We also evaluated the lifetime of the PL and EL. Consequently, the OLEDs containing carotenoids in the active region exhibit the light-emission much longer time than that without carotenoidos. This is assigned to the antioxidant activities of carotenoids. OLEDs containing a large amount of carotenoids are resistant to the oxidation damage.

  5. Self-organized photosynthetic nanoparticle for cell-free hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Iwuchukwu, Ifeyinwa J; Vaughn, Michael; Myers, Natalie; O'Neill, Hugh; Frymier, Paul; Bruce, Barry D

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable interest in making use of solar energy through photosynthesis to create alternative forms of fuel. Here, we show that photosystem I from a thermophilic bacterium and cytochrome-c(6) can, in combination with a platinum catalyst, generate a stable supply of hydrogen in vitro upon illumination. The self-organized platinization of the photosystem I nanoparticles allows electron transport from sodium ascorbate to photosystem I via cytochrome-c(6) and finally to the platinum catalyst, where hydrogen gas is formed. Our system produces hydrogen at temperatures up to 55 degrees C and is temporally stable for >85 days with no decrease in hydrogen yield when tested intermittently. The maximum yield is approximately 5.5 micromol H(2) h(-1) mg(-1) chlorophyll and is estimated to be approximately 25-fold greater than current biomass-to-fuel strategies. Future work will further improve this yield by increasing the kinetics of electron transfer, extending the spectral response and replacing the platinum catalyst with a renewable hydrogenase.

  6. Self-organized photosynthetic nanoparticle for cell-free hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwuchukwu, Ifeyinwa J.; Vaughn, Michael; Myers, Natalie; O'Neill, Hugh; Frymier, Paul; Bruce, Barry D.

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable interest in making use of solar energy through photosynthesis to create alternative forms of fuel. Here, we show that photosystem I from a thermophilic bacterium and cytochrome-c6 can, in combination with a platinum catalyst, generate a stable supply of hydrogen in vitro upon illumination. The self-organized platinization of the photosystem I nanoparticles allows electron transport from sodium ascorbate to photosystem I via cytochrome-c6 and finally to the platinum catalyst, where hydrogen gas is formed. Our system produces hydrogen at temperatures up to 55 °C and is temporally stable for >85 days with no decrease in hydrogen yield when tested intermittently. The maximum yield is ~ 5.5 µmol H2 h-1 mg-1 chlorophyll and is estimated to be ~25-fold greater than current biomass-to-fuel strategies. Future work will further improve this yield by increasing the kinetics of electron transfer, extending the spectral response and replacing the platinum catalyst with a renewable hydrogenase.

  7. Self-Organized Photosynthetic Nanoparticle for Cell-free Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Iwuchukwu, Ifeyinwa J; Vaughn, Michael D; Myers, Natalie; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Frymier, Paul Dexter; Bruce, Barry

    2009-01-01

    There is considerable interest in making use of solar energy through photosynthesis to create alternative forms of fuel. Here, we show that photosystem I from a thermophilic bacterium and cytochrome-c6 can, in combination with a platinum catalyst, generate a stable supply of hydrogen in vitro upon illumination. The self-organized platinization of the photosystem I nanoparticles allows electron transport from sodium ascorbate to photosystem I via cytochrome-c{sub 6} and finally to the platinum catalyst, where hydrogen gas is formed. Our system produces hydrogen at temperatures up to 55 C and is temporally stable for >85 days with no decrease in hydrogen yield when tested intermittently. The maximum yield is {approx} 5.5 {micro}mol H{sub 2} h{sup -1} mg{sup -1} chlorophyll and is estimated to be {approx} 25-fold greater than current biomass-to-fuel strategies. Future work will further improve this yield by increasing the kinetics of electron transfer, extending the spectral response and replacing the platinum catalyst with a renewable hydrogenase.

  8. Light represses transcription of asparagine synthetase genes in photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic organs of plants

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Fongying; Coruzzi, G. )

    1991-10-01

    Asparagine synthetase (AS) mRNA in Pisum sativum accumulates preferentially in plants grown in the dark. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrate that expression of both the AS1 and AS2 genes is negatively regulated by light at the level of transcription. A decrease in the transcriptional rate of the AS1 gene can be detected as early as 20 min after exposure to light. Time course experiments reveal that the levels of AS mRNA fluctuate dramatically during a normal light/dark cycle. This is due to a direct effect of light and not to changes associated with circadian rhythm. A novel finding is that the light-repressed expression of the AS1 gene is as dramatic nonphotosynthetic organs such as roots as it is in leaves. Experiments demonstrate that the small amount of light which passes through the soil is sufficient to repress AS1 expression in roots, indicating that light has a direct effect on AS1 gene expression in roots. The negative regulation of AS gene expression by light was shown to be a general phenomenon in plants which also occurs in nonlegumes such as Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and Nicotiana tabacum. Thus, the AS genes can serve as a model with which to dissect the molecular basis for light-regulated transcriptional repression in plants.

  9. Stoichiometry, inhibitor sensitivity, and organization of manganese associated with photosynthetic oxygen evolution.

    PubMed

    Yocum, C F; Yerkes, C T; Blankenship, R E; Sharp, R R; Babcock, G T

    1981-12-01

    Chloroplast thylakoid membranes isolated in the presence of EDTA retain high rates of O(2) evolution (>/=340 mumol.h(-1).mg chlorophyll(-1)) but contain no Mn(2+) that is detectable by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at room temperature. The total Mn(2+) content of these preparations is 4.6 per 400 chlorophylls; 0.6 Mn(2+) can be released by addition of Ca(2+), a treatment that does not affect O(2) evolution. The remaining Mn(2+) (4 per 400 chlorophylls) appears to be functionally associated with O(2) evolution activity. Inhibition by Tris, NH(2)OH, or heat will release a small fraction of Mn(2+) from these membranes ( approximately 25% with Tris, for example). Addition of Ca(2+) further enhances Mn(2+) release so that for Tris and for NH(2)OH, 2 and 3, respectively, Mn(2+) per 400 chlorophylls are extracted from the O(2)-evolving complex. Based on the microwave power-saturation properties of the EPR signal IIf, which arises from an intermediate electron carrier in the water splitting process, it appears that one of the four Mn(2+) associated with photosystem II is uniquely sensitive to Tris. A new model is proposed for the organization and inhibitor sensitivity of manganese in the O(2)-evolving complex.

  10. Stoichiometry, inhibitor sensitivity, and organization of manganese associated with photosynthetic oxygen evolution

    PubMed Central

    Yocum, C. F.; Yerkes, C. T.; Blankenship, R. E.; Sharp, R. R.; Babcock, G. T.

    1981-01-01

    Chloroplast thylakoid membranes isolated in the presence of EDTA retain high rates of O2 evolution (≥340 μmol·h-1·mg chlorophyll-1) but contain no Mn2+ that is detectable by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at room temperature. The total Mn2+ content of these preparations is 4.6 per 400 chlorophylls; 0.6 Mn2+ can be released by addition of Ca2+, a treatment that does not affect O2 evolution. The remaining Mn2+ (4 per 400 chlorophylls) appears to be functionally associated with O2 evolution activity. Inhibition by Tris, NH2OH, or heat will release a small fraction of Mn2+ from these membranes (≈25% with Tris, for example). Addition of Ca2+ further enhances Mn2+ release so that for Tris and for NH2OH, 2 and 3, respectively, Mn2+ per 400 chlorophylls are extracted from the O2-evolving complex. Based on the microwave power-saturation properties of the EPR signal IIf, which arises from an intermediate electron carrier in the water splitting process, it appears that one of the four Mn2+ associated with photosystem II is uniquely sensitive to Tris. A new model is proposed for the organization and inhibitor sensitivity of manganese in the O2-evolving complex. PMID:16593134

  11. Organic and mineral imprints in fossil photosynthetic mats of an East Antarctic lake.

    PubMed

    Lepot, K; Compère, P; Gérard, E; Namsaraev, Z; Verleyen, E; Tavernier, I; Hodgson, D A; Vyverman, W; Gilbert, B; Wilmotte, A; Javaux, E J

    2014-09-01

    spheres interpreted as coccoidal bacteria may represent fossils of intracellular calcification. These organo-mineral associations support organically driven nanocarbonate crystallization and stabilization, hence providing potential markers for microbial calcification in ancient rocks.

  12. PCoM-DB Update: A Protein Co-Migration Database for Photosynthetic Organisms.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Atsushi; Takabayashi, Saeka; Takahashi, Kaori; Watanabe, Mai; Uchida, Hiroko; Murakami, Akio; Fujita, Tomomichi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2016-12-22

    The identification of protein complexes is important for the understanding of protein structure and function and the regulation of cellular processes. We used blue-native PAGE and tandem mass spectrometry to identify protein complexes systematically, and built a web database, the protein co-migration database (PCoM-DB, http://pcomdb.lowtem.hokudai.ac.jp/proteins/top), to provide prediction tools for protein complexes. PCoM-DB provides migration profiles for any given protein of interest, and allows users to compare them with migration profiles of other proteins, showing the oligomeric states of proteins and thus identifying potential interaction partners. The initial version of PCoM-DB (launched in January 2013) included protein complex data for Synechocystis whole cells and Arabidopsis thaliana thylakoid membranes. Here we report PCoM-DB version 2.0, which includes new data sets and analytical tools. Additional data are included from whole cells of the pelagic marine picocyanobacterium Prochlorococcus marinus, the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens. The Arabidopsis protein data now include data for intact mitochondria, intact chloroplasts, chloroplast stroma and chloroplast envelopes. The new tools comprise a multiple-protein search form and a heat map viewer for protein migration profiles. Users can compare migration profiles of a protein of interest among different organelles or compare migration profiles among different proteins within the same sample. For Arabidopsis proteins, users can compare migration profiles of a protein of interest with putative homologous proteins from non-Arabidopsis organisms. The updated PCoM-DB will help researchers find novel protein complexes and estimate their evolutionary changes in the green lineage.

  13. Light/electricity conversion by a self-organized photosynthetic biofilm in a single-chamber reactor.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Koichi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2010-04-01

    Biological energy-conversion systems are attractive in terms of their self-sustaining and self-organizing nature and are expected to be applied to low-cost and environment-friendly processes. Here we show a biofilm-based light/electricity-conversion system that was self-organized from a natural microbial community. A bioreactor equipped with an air cathode and graphite-felt anode was inoculated with a green hot-spring microbial mat. When the reactor was irradiated with light, electric current was generated between the anode and cathode in accordance with the formation of green biofilm on the anode. Fluorescence microscopy of the green biofilm revealed the presence of chlorophyll-containing microbes of approximately 10 microm in size, and these cells were abundant close to the surface of the biofilm. The biofilm community was also analyzed by sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified small-subunit rRNA gene fragments, showing that sequence types affiliated with Chlorophyta, Betaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes were abundantly detected. These results suggest that green algae and heterotrophic bacteria cooperatively converted light energy into electricity.

  14. Orchid bees as bio-indicators for organic coffee farms in Costa Rica: does farm size affect their abundance?

    PubMed

    Hedström, Ingemar; Denzel, Andrew; Owens, Gareth

    2006-09-01

    The potential of Euglossini bees, especially Euglossa, as biological indicators of organic vs nonorganic coffee farms was studied in Atenas and San Isidro, Alajuela, Costa Rica using 1.8-cineole as lure. Observations were made for three days at each of four farms and complemented with data from a year of observations. Orchid bees were in greater abundance in the organic farms (t-Student test). However, lower abundances suggest that an organic farm may be negatively affected by the proximity of non-organic farms, depending on its size and distance. Orchid bees may be indicators of organic coffee farms.

  15. Use of commercial organic fertilizer increases the abundance of antibiotic resistance genes and antibiotics in soil.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue; Qiao, Min; Wang, Feng-Hua; Zhu, Yong-Guan

    2017-01-01

    The application of manure-based commercial organic fertilizers (COFs) is becoming increasingly extensive because of the expanding market for organic food. The present study examined the effects of repeated applications of chicken or swine manure-based COFs on the fate of antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in soil by conducting a soil microcosm experiment. Application of COFs significantly increased antibiotics residues, as well as the relative abundance of ARGs and the integrase gene of class 1 integrons (intΙ1) in soil. Two months after each application, antibiotics and ARGs dissipated in amended soils, but they still remained at an elevated level, compared with the control. And, the accumulation of antibiotics was found due to repeated COF applications. However, the relative abundance of ARGs in most COF-amended soils did not differ significantly between the first application and the repeated application. The results imply that 2 months are not sufficient for ARGs to approach background levels, and that animal manure must be treated more effectively prior to using it in agriculture ecosystems.

  16. T cell abundance in blood predicts acute organ toxicity in chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reichardt, Sybille D.; Rave-Fränk, Margret; Schirmer, Markus A.; Stadelmann, Christine; Canis, Martin; Wolff, Hendrik A.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) by chemoradiotherapy (CRT) often results in high-grade acute organ toxicity (HGAOT). As these adverse effects impair the patients' quality of life and the feasibility of the planned therapy, we sought to analyze immunological parameters in tumor material and blood samples obtained from 48 HNSCC patients in order to assess the potential to predict the individual acute organ toxicity. T cells in the tumor stroma were enriched in patients developing HGAOT whereas levels of soluble factors in the plasma and gene expression in whole blood did not coincide with the occurrence of acute organ toxicity. In contrast, the frequency and absolute numbers of selected leukocyte subpopulations measured in samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) directly before the beginning of CRT were significantly different in patients with HGAOT as compared to those without. When we validated several potential markers including the abundance of T cells in a small prospective study with 16 HNSCC patients, we were able to correctly predict acute organ toxicity in up to 81% of the patients. We conclude that analysis of PBMCs by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) might be a convenient strategy to identify patients at risk of developing HGAOT caused by CRT, which might allow to adapt the treatment regimen and possibly improve disease outcome. PMID:27589568

  17. Inorganic nitrogen supply and dissolved organic nitrogen abundance across the US Great Plains.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Megan L; Cleary, Matthew J; Burke, Ingrid C

    2014-01-01

    Across US Great Plains grasslands, a gradient of increasing mean annual precipitation from west to east corresponds to increasing aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and increasing N-limitation. Previous work has shown that there is no increase in net N mineralization rates across this gradient, leading to the question of where eastern prairie grasses obtain the nitrogen to support production. One as-yet unexamined source is soil organic N, despite abundant literature from other ecosystems showing that plants take up dissolved soil organic N. This study measured KCl-extractable dissolved organic N (DON) in surface soils across the grassland productivity gradient. We found that KCl-extractable DON pools increased from west to east. If available to and used by plants, this DON may help explain the high ANPP in the eastern Great Plains. These results suggest a need for future research to determine whether, in what quantities, and in what forms prairie grasses use organic N to support primary production.

  18. Predators alter community organization of coral reef cryptofauna and reduce abundance of coral mutualists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, A. C.; Leray, M.

    2014-03-01

    Coral reefs are the most diverse marine systems in the world, yet our understanding of the processes that maintain such extraordinary diversity remains limited and taxonomically biased toward the most conspicuous species. Cryptofauna that live deeply embedded within the interstitial spaces of coral reefs make up the majority of reef diversity, and many of these species provide important protective services to their coral hosts. However, we know very little about the processes governing the diversity and composition of these less conspicuous but functionally important species. Here, we experimentally quantify the role of predation in driving the community organization of small fishes and decapods that live embedded within Pocillopora eydouxi, a structurally complex, reef-building coral found widely across the Indo-Pacific. We use surveys to describe the natural distribution of predators, and then, factorially manipulate two focal predator species to quantify the independent and combined effects of predator density and identity on P. eydouxi-dwelling cryptofauna. Predators reduced abundance (34 %), species richness (20 %), and modified species composition. Rarefaction revealed that observed reductions in species richness were primarily driven by changes in abundance. Additionally, the two predator species uniquely affected the beta diversity and composition of the prey assemblage. Predators reduced the abundance and modified the composition of a number of mutualist fishes and decapods, whose benefit to the coral is known to be both diversity- and density-dependent. We predict that the density and identity of predators present within P. eydouxi may substantially alter coral performance in the face of an increased frequency and intensity of natural and anthropogenic stressors.

  19. Effects of multiple levels of social organization on survival and abundance.

    PubMed

    Ward, Eric J; Semmens, Brice X; Holmes, Elizabeth E; Balcomb Iii, Ken C

    2011-04-01

    Identifying how social organization shapes individual behavior, survival, and fecundity of animals that live in groups can inform conservation efforts and improve forecasts of population abundance, even when the mechanism responsible for group-level differences is unknown. We constructed a hierarchical Bayesian model to quantify the relative variability in survival rates among different levels of social organization (matrilines and pods) of an endangered population of killer whales (Orcinus orca). Individual killer whales often participate in group activities such as prey sharing and cooperative hunting. The estimated age-specific survival probabilities and survivorship curves differed considerably among pods and to a lesser extent among matrilines (within pods). Across all pods, males had lower life expectancy than females. Differences in survival between pods may be caused by a combination of factors that vary across the population's range, including reduced prey availability, contaminants in prey, and human activity. Our modeling approach could be applied to demographic rates for other species and for parameters other than survival, including reproduction, prey selection, movement, and detection probabilities.

  20. The occurrence of the psbS gene product in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and in other photosynthetic organisms and its correlation with energy quenching.

    PubMed

    Bonente, Giulia; Passarini, Francesca; Cazzaniga, Stefano; Mancone, Carmine; Buia, Maria Cristina; Tripodi, Marco; Bassi, Roberto; Caffarri, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    To avoid photodamage, photosynthetic organisms have developed mechanisms to evade or dissipate excess energy. Lumen overacidification caused by light-induced electron transport triggers quenching of excited chlorophylls and dissipation of excess energy into heat. In higher plants participation of the PsbS protein as the sensor of low lumenal pH was clearly demonstrated. Although light-dependent energy quenching is a property of all photosynthetic organisms, large differences in amplitude and kinetics can be observed thus raising the question whether a single common mechanism is in action. We performed a detailed study of PsbS expression/accumulation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and investigated its accumulation in other algae and plants. We showed that PsbS cannot be detected in Chlamydomonas under a wide range of growth conditions. Overexpression of the endogenous psbs gene showed that the corresponding protein could not be addressed to the thylakoid membranes. Survey of different unicellular green algae showed no accumulation of anti-PsbS reactive proteins differently from multicellular species. Nevertheless, some unicellular species exhibit high energy quenching activity, suggesting that a PsbS-independent mechanism is activated. By correlating growth habitat and PsbS accumulation in different species, we suggest that during the evolution the light environment has been a determinant factor for the conservation/loss of the PsbS function.

  1. Thermal alteration of organic matter in recent marine sediments. 1: Pigments. [photosynthetic pigments from Tanner Basin off Southern California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikan, R.; Aizenshtat, Z.; Baedecker, M. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1974-01-01

    Sediment from Tanner Basin, the outer continental shelf off Southern California, was analyzed for photosynthetic pigments and their derivatives, namely carotenes and chlorins. Samples of the sediment were also exposed to raised temperatures (65, 100, 150 C) for various periods of time (1 week, 1 month, 2 months). Analysis of the heat-treated sediment revealed the presence of alpha-ionene and 2,6-dimethylnapthalene, thermal degradation products of Betacarotente. Chlorins were converted to nickel porphyrins of both DPEP and etio series. Possible mechanisms of these transformations are presented.

  2. Photosynthetic Photovoltaic Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-21

    PHOTOSYNTHETIC PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS 5b. GRANT NUMBER F49620-02-1-0399 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER MARC A. BALDO 5e. TASK...building an ’antenna’ on top of a conventional solar cell. Biomimetic organic solar cells operate as follows: The antenna absorbs the light, and acts to...no longer must absorb all the light. Thus, its quantum efficiency can approach 100% potentially doubling the performance of organic solar cells. 15

  3. The abundance and organization of polypeptides associated with antigens of the Rh blood group system.

    PubMed

    Gardner, B; Anstee, D J; Mawby, W J; Tanner, M J; von dem Borne, A E

    1991-06-01

    Twelve murine monoclonal antibodies, which react with human red cells of common Rh phenotype but give weak or negative reactions with Rh null erythrocytes, were used in quantitative binding assays and competitive binding assays to investigate the abundance and organization of polypeptides involved in the expression of antigens of the Rh blood group system. Antibodies of the R6A-type (R6A, BRIC-69, BRIC-207) and the 2D10-type (MB-2D10, LA18.18, LA23.40) recognize related structures and 100,000-200,000 molecules of each antibody bind maximally to erythrocytes of common Rh phenotype. Antibodies of the BRIC-125 type (BRICs 32, 122, 125, 126, 168, 211) recognize structures that are unrelated to those recognized by R6A-type and 2D10-type antibodies and between 10,000 and 50,000 antibody molecules bind maximally to erythrocytes of the common Rh phenotype. The binding of antibodies of the R6A-type and the 2D10-type, but not of antibodies of the BRIC-125-type could be partially inhibited by human anti-D antibodies (polyclonal and monoclonal) and a murine anti-e-like antibody. These results are consistent with evidence (Moore & Green 1987; Avent et al., 1988b) that the Rh blood group antigens are associated with a complex that comprises two groups of related polypeptides of M(r) 30,000 and M(r) 35,000-100,000, respectively, and suggest that there are 1-2 x 10(5) copies of this complex per erythrocyte. The polypeptide recognized by antibodies of the BRIC-125 type is likely to be associated with this complex.

  4. Effects of organic acids on the photosynthetic and antioxidant properties and accumulations of heavy metals of Melilotus officinalis grown in Cu tailing.

    PubMed

    Han, Yulin; Wu, Xue; Gu, Jiguang; Zhao, Jiuzhou; Huang, Suzhen; Yuan, Haiyan; Fu, Jiajia

    2016-09-01

    The effect of citric acid (CA), acetic acid (Ac), and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the photosynthetic and antioxidant properties and the accumulation of some heavy metals (HMs) of Melilotus officinalis seedling growing in Cu mine tailings for 25 days were studied. Results showed that the formation of photosynthesizing cells of M. officinalis was inhibited by EDTA at 2 mmol/kg. Photosynthetic pigment contents under EDTA of 2 mmol/kg were reduced by 26, 40, and 19 %, respectively, compared to the control. The proline contents in aboveground and underground parts increased as the level of EDTA was enhanced. CA and Ac enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) in the aboveground parts and EDTA inhibited the activity of POD in the underground parts. The addition of CA promoted significantly the growth of M. officinalis, while the biomass decreased significantly under 2 mmol/kg EDTA. Cu contents in the aboveground parts treated with 0.5 and 2.0 mmol/kg EDTA reached 175.50 and 265.17 μg/g dry weight, respectively. Ac and EDTA treatments promoted Cd to translocate from root to aboveground parts. The result indicated that M. officinalis was a tolerant species of Cu tailing and can be used to remediate Cu contaminated environment, and rationally utilization of organic acids, especially EDTA, in the phytoremediation can improve the growth and metals accumulation of M. officinalis.

  5. An obligately photosynthetic bacterial anaerobe from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent.

    PubMed

    Beatty, J Thomas; Overmann, Jörg; Lince, Michael T; Manske, Ann K; Lang, Andrew S; Blankenship, Robert E; Van Dover, Cindy L; Martinson, Tracey A; Plumley, F Gerald

    2005-06-28

    The abundance of life on Earth is almost entirely due to biological photosynthesis, which depends on light energy. The source of light in natural habitats has heretofore been thought to be the sun, thus restricting photosynthesis to solar photic environments on the surface of the Earth. If photosynthesis could take place in geothermally illuminated environments, it would increase the diversity of photosynthetic habitats both on Earth and on other worlds that have been proposed to possibly harbor life. Green sulfur bacteria are anaerobes that require light for growth by the oxidation of sulfur compounds to reduce CO2 to organic carbon, and are capable of photosynthetic growth at extremely low light intensities. We describe the isolation and cultivation of a previously unknown green sulfur bacterial species from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent, where the only source of light is geothermal radiation that includes wavelengths absorbed by photosynthetic pigments of this organism.

  6. Evolving a photosynthetic organelle.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Takuro; Archibald, John M

    2012-04-24

    The evolution of plastids from cyanobacteria is believed to represent a singularity in the history of life. The enigmatic amoeba Paulinella and its 'recently' acquired photosynthetic inclusions provide a fascinating system through which to gain fresh insight into how endosymbionts become organelles.The plastids, or chloroplasts, of algae and plants evolved from cyanobacteria by endosymbiosis. This landmark event conferred on eukaryotes the benefits of photosynthesis--the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy--and in so doing had a huge impact on the course of evolution and the climate of Earth 1. From the present state of plastids, however, it is difficult to trace the evolutionary steps involved in this momentous development, because all modern-day plastids have fully integrated into their hosts. Paulinella chromatophora is a unicellular eukaryote that bears photosynthetic entities called chromatophores that are derived from cyanobacteria and has thus received much attention as a possible example of an organism in the early stages of organellogenesis. Recent studies have unlocked the genomic secrets of its chromatophore 23 and provided concrete evidence that the Paulinella chromatophore is a bona fide photosynthetic organelle 4. The question is how Paulinella can help us to understand the process by which an endosymbiont is converted into an organelle.

  7. Decrease in the abundance and viability of oceanic phytoplankton due to trace levels of complex mixtures of organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Echeveste, Pedro; Dachs, Jordi; Berrojalbiz, Naiara; Agustí, Susana

    2010-09-01

    Long range atmospheric transport and deposition is a significant introduction pathway of organic pollutants to remote oceanic regions, leading to their subsequent accumulation in marine organisms. Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) bioconcentrate in planktonic food webs and these exert a biogeochemical control on the regional and global cycling of POPs. Therefore, an important issue is to determine whether the anthropogenic chemical perturbation of the biosphere introduced by the myriad of organic pollutants present in seawater influences phytoplankton abundance and productivity. The results reported here from five sets of experiments performed in the NE Atlantic Ocean show that there is a toxic effect induced by trace levels of complex mixtures of organic pollutants on phytoplankton oceanic communities. The levels of single pollutant, such as phenanthrene and pyrene, at which lethality of phytoplankton is observed are high in comparison to field levels. Complex mixtures of organic pollutants, however, have an important toxic effect on phytoplankton abundances, viability and concentrations of Chlorophyll a at pollutant concentrations 20-40 folds those found in the open ocean. The toxicity of these complex mixtures of organic pollutants exceeds by 10(3) times the toxicity expected for a single pollutant. Therefore, our results point out the need for a systematic investigation of the influence of complex mixtures of organic hydrophobic pollutants to oceanic phytoplankton communities, a perturbation not accounted for on previous assessments of anthropogenic pressures in the marine environment.

  8. Tectonics and the photosynthetic habitable zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleep, N. H.

    2009-12-01

    The traditional habitable zone lies between an inner stellar radius where the surface of the planet becomes too hot for liquid water carbon-based life and on outer radius, where the surface freezes. It is effectively the zone where photosynthesis is feasible. The concept extends to putative life on objects with liquid methane at the surface, like Titan. As a practical matter, photosynthesis leaves detectable biosignatures in the geological record; black shale on the Earth indicates that sulfide and probably FeO based photosynthesis existed by 3.8 Ga. The hard crustal rocks and the mantle sequester numerous photosynthetic biosignatures. Photosynthesis can produce detectable free oxygen with ozone in the atmosphere of extrasolar planets. In contrast, there is no outer limit for subsurface life in large silicate objects. Pre-photosynthetic niches are dependable but meager and not very detectable at great antiquity or great distance, with global productivity less than 1e-3 of the photosynthetic ones. Photosynthetic organisms have bountiful energy that modifies their surface environment and even tectonics. For example, metamorphic rocks formed at the expense of thick black shale are highly radioactive and hence self-fluxing. Active tectonics with volcanism and metamorphism prevents volatiles from being sequestered in the subsurface as on Mars. A heat-pipe object, like a larger Io, differs from the Earth in that the volatiles return to the deep interior distributed within massive volcanic deposits rather than concentrated in the shallow oceanic crust. One the Earth, the return of water to the surface by arc volcanoes controls its mantle abundance at the transition between behaving as a trace element and behaving as a major element that affects melting. The ocean accumulates the water that the mantle and crust do not take. The Earth has the “right” amount of water that erosion/deposition and tectonics both tend to maintain near sea level surfaces. The mantle contains

  9. Engineered photosynthetic bacteria, method of manufacture of biofuels

    DOEpatents

    Laible, Philip D.; Snyder, Seth W.

    2016-09-13

    The invention provides for a novel type of biofuel; a method for cleaving anchors from photosynthetic organisms; and a method for producing biofuels using photosynthetic organisms, the method comprising identifying photosynthesis co-factors and their anchors in the organisms; modifying the organisms to increase production of the anchors; accumulating biomass of the organisms in growth media; and harvesting the anchors.

  10. Diversity, abundance, and sex-specific expression of chemosensory proteins in the reproductive organs of the locust Locusta migratoria manilensis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xian-Hong; Ban, Li-Ping; Iovinella, Immacolata; Zhao, Li-Jing; Gao, Qian; Felicioli, Antonio; Sagona, Simona; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Pelosi, Paolo; Zhang, Long; Dani, Francesca Romana

    2013-01-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are small soluble proteins often associated with chemosensory organs in insects but include members involved in other functions, such as pheromone delivery and development. Although the CSPs of the sensory organs have been extensively studied, little is known on their functions in other parts of the body. A first screening of the available databases has identified 70 sequences encoding CSPs in the oriental locust Locusta migratoria manilensis. Applying proteomic analysis, we have identified 17 of them abundantly expressed in the female reproductive organs, but only one (CSP91) in male organs. Bacterially expressed CSP91 binds fatty acids with a specificity for oleic and linoleic acid, as well as medium-length alcohols and esters. The same acids have been detected as the main gas chromatographic peaks in the dichloromethane extracts of reproductive organs of both sexes. The abundance and the number of CSPs in female reproductive organs indicates important roles for these proteins. We cannot exclude that different functions can be associated with each of the 17 CSPs, including delivery of semiochemicals, solubilization of hormones, direct control of development, or other unknown tasks.

  11. [Regulation of alternative CO{sub 2} fixation pathways in procaryotic and eucaryotic photosynthetic organisms]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The major goal of this project is to determine how microorganisms regulate the assimilation of CO{sup 2} via pathways alternative to the usual Calvin reductive pentose phosphate scheme. In particular, we are interest in the molecular basis for switches in CO{sub 2} metabolic paths. Several earlier studies had indicated that purple nonsulfur photosynthetic bacteria assimilate significant amounts of CO{sub 2} via alternative non-Calvin routes. We have deleted the gene that encodes. RubisCo (ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) in both the Rhodobacter sphaeroids and Rhodospirillum rubrum. The R. sphaeroides RubisCO deletion strain (strain 16) could not grow under photoheterotrophic conditions with malate as electron donor and CO{sub 2} as the electron acceptor; however the R. rub RubisCO deletion strain (strain I-19) could. Over the past year we have sought to physiologically characterize strain 16PHC. We found that, 16PHC exhibited rates of whole-cell CO{sub 2} fixation which were significantly higher than strain 16. Strain 16PHC could not grow photolithoautotrophically in a CO{sub 2} atmosphere; however, CO{sub 2} fixation catalyzed by photoheterotrophically grown 16PHC was repressed by the addition of DMSO. Likewise, we found that cells initially grown in the presence of DMSO could induce the CO{sub 2} fixation system when DMSO was removed. Thus, these results suggested that both PHC and I-19 could be used to study alternative CO{sub 2} fixation reactions and their significance in R. sphaexoides and R. rubrum.

  12. Photosynthetic based algal-bacterial combined treatment of mixtures of organic pollutants and CO2 mitigation in a continuous photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Essam, Tamer; ElRakaiby, Marwa; Hashem, Abdelgawad

    2013-06-01

    An algal-bacterial microcosm was synthetically constructed of Chlorella vulgaris MMl and Pseudomonas MTl. This microcosm was able to treat simulated wastewater supplemented with mixtures of phenol and pyridine up to 4.6 and 4.4 mM, respectively, in a continuous stirred tank bioreactor (CSTR) using photosynthetic oxygenation. Complete pollutant removal and detoxification and 82 % removal of introduced chemical oxygen demand (COD) were achieved at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 2.7 days. Increasing the influent load to 5.3 and 6.3 mM reduced the removal of phenol, pyridine and COD to 78, 21 and 59 %, respectively. Fertilization of the photobioreactor with 24 mM NaHCO3 restored the treatment and detoxification efficiencies. The system was able to additionally mitigate up to 72 mM NaHCO3 at the same HRT. Although the fertilization increased the system treatment efficiency, the settleability of the algal-bacterial microcosm was significantly reduced. When the photobioreactor was operated at HRT of 2.7 days in a 12/12 h of dark/light cycle, complete removal of 4.7 mM phenol was recorded but only 11 % of 5.7 mM pyridine was removed. The COD removal efficiency and CO2 mitigation were also reduced to 65 and 86 %, respectively, and the effluent retained significant toxicity where 73 % inhibition was recorded. Elongation of the illumination time to 48 h (HRT of 4 days at 12/12 h dark/light cycle) restored the treatment and detoxification efficiencies.

  13. Nanophase iron oxides as a key ultraviolet sunscreen for ancient photosynthetic microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Louris, Stephanie K.; Rogoff, Dana A.; Rothschild, Lynn J.

    2006-07-01

    We propose that nanophase iron-oxide-bearing materials provided important niches for ancient photosynthetic microbes on the Earth that ultimately led to the oxygenation of the Earth's atmosphere and the formation of iron-oxide deposits. Atmospheric oxygen and ozone attenuate ultraviolet radiation on the Earth today providing substantial protection for photosynthetic organisms. With ultraviolet radiation fluxes likely to have been even higher on the early Earth than today, accessing solar radiation was particularly risky for early organisms. Yet, we know that photosynthesis arose early and played a critical role in subsequent evolution. Of primary importance was protection below 290 nm, where peak nucleic acid (~260 nm) and protein (~280 nm) absorptions occur. Nanophase ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide minerals absorb, and thus block, the lethal ultraviolet radiation, while transmitting light through much of the visible and near-infrared regions of interest to photosynthesis (400 to 1100 nm). Furthermore, they were available in early environments, and are synthesized by many organisms. Based on experiments using nanophase ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide minerals as a sunscreen for photosynthetic microbes, we suggest that iron, an abundant element widely used in biological mechanisms, may have provided the protection that early organisms needed in order to be able to use photosynthetically active radiation while being protected from ultraviolet-induced damage. The results of this study are broadly applicable to astrobiology because of the abundance of iron in other potentially habitable bodies and the evolutionary pressure to utilize solar radiation when available as an energy source. This model could apply to a potential life form on Mars or other bodies where liquid water and ultraviolet radiation could have been present at significant levels. Based on ferric oxide/oxyhydroxide spectral properties, likely geologic processes, and the results of experiments with the

  14. Factors controlling the abundance of organic sulfur in flash pyrolyzates of Upper Cretaceous kerogens from Sergipe Basin, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carmo, A.M.; Stankiewicz, B.A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Pratt, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    The molecular and elemental composition of immature kerogens isolated from Upper Cretaceous marine carbonates from Sergipe Basin, Brazil were investigated using combined pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and organic petrographic techniques. The kerogens are predominantly composed of reddish-fluorescing amorphous organic matter (AOM) and variable amounts of yellow-fluorescing alginite and liptodetrinite. The abundance of organic sulfur in the kerogens inferred from the ratio 2-ethyl-5-methylthiophene/(1,2-dimethylbenzene + dec-1-ene) in the pyrolyzates is variable and may be related to changes in the type of primary organic input and/or to variations in rates of bacterial sulfate reduction. A concomitant increase in S/C and O/C ratios determined in situ using the electron microprobe is observed in AOM and alginites and may be related to a progressive oxidation of the organic matter during sulfurization. The S/C ratio of the AOM is systematically higher than the S C ratio of the alginites. Combined with a thiophene distribution characteristic of pyrolyzates of Type II organic matter, the higher S/C of AOM in Sergipe kerogens suggests that sulfurization and incorporation of low-molecular weight lipids derived from normal marine organic matter into the kerogen structure predominated over direct sulfurization of highly aliphatic algal biomacromolecules.The molecular and elemental composition of immature kerogens isolated from Upper Cretaceous marine carbonates from Sergipe Basin, Brazil were investigated using combined pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and organic petrographic techniques. The kerogens are predominantly composed of reddish-fluorescing amorphous organic matter (AOM) and variable amounts of yellow-fluorescing alginite and liptodetrinite. The abundance of organic sulfur in the kerogens inferred from the ratio 2-ethyl-5-methylthiophene/(1,2-dimethylbenzene+dec-1-ene) in the pyrolyzates is variable and may be related to changes in

  15. Weed seed persistence and microbial abundance in long-term organic and conventional cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed seed persistence in soil can be influenced by many factors, including crop management. This research was conducted to determine whether organic management systems with higher organic amendments and soil microbial biomass could reduce weed seed persistence compared to conventional management sy...

  16. Occurrence and abundance of carbohydrates and amino compounds in sequentially extracted labile soil organic matter fractions.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study aimed to investigate the content of carbohydrates and amino compounds in three labile fraction of soil organic matter (SOM). Soil samples were collected from two agricultural fields in southern Italy and the light fraction (LF), the 500–53-µm particulate organic matter (POM) and the mobil...

  17. Species dependence of the redox potential of the primary electron donor p700 in photosystem I of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms revealed by spectroelectrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Akimasa; Suzawa, Tomoyuki; Kato, Yuki; Watanabe, Tadashi

    2011-05-01

    The redox potential of the primary electron donor P700, E(m)(P700/P700(+)), of Photosystem I (PSI) has been determined for 10 oxygenic photosynthesis organisms, ranging from cyanobacteria, red algae, green algae to higher plants, by spectroelectrochemistry with an optically transparent thin-layer electrode (OTTLE) cell to elucidate the scattering by as much as 150 mV in reported values of E(m)(P700/P700(+)). The E(m)(P700/P700(+)) values determined within error ranges of ± 1-4 mV exhibited a significant species dependence, with a span >70 mV, from +398 to +470 mV vs. the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE). The E(m)(P700/P700(+)) value appears to change systematically in going from cyanobacteria and primitive eukaryotic red algae, then to green algae and higher plants. From an evolutionary point of view, this result suggests that the species believed to appear later in evolution of photosynthetic organisms exhibit higher values of E(m)(P700/P700(+)). Further, the species dependence of E(m)(P700/P700(+)) seems to originate in the species-dependent redox potentials of soluble metalloproteins, Cyt c(6) and plastocyanin, which re-reduce the oxidized P700 in the electron transfer chain.

  18. Accounting for non-independent detection when estimating abundance of organisms with a Bayesian approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Julien; Royle, J. Andrew; MacKenzie, Darryl I.; Edwards, Holly H.; Kery, Marc; Gardner, Beth

    2011-01-01

    Summary 1. Binomial mixture models use repeated count data to estimate abundance. They are becoming increasingly popular because they provide a simple and cost-effective way to account for imperfect detection. However, these models assume that individuals are detected independently of each other. This assumption may often be violated in the field. For instance, manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) may surface in turbid water (i.e. become available for detection during aerial surveys) in a correlated manner (i.e. in groups). However, correlated behaviour, affecting the non-independence of individual detections, may also be relevant in other systems (e.g. correlated patterns of singing in birds and amphibians). 2. We extend binomial mixture models to account for correlated behaviour and therefore to account for non-independent detection of individuals. We simulated correlated behaviour using beta-binomial random variables. Our approach can be used to simultaneously estimate abundance, detection probability and a correlation parameter. 3. Fitting binomial mixture models to data that followed a beta-binomial distribution resulted in an overestimation of abundance even for moderate levels of correlation. In contrast, the beta-binomial mixture model performed considerably better in our simulation scenarios. We also present a goodness-of-fit procedure to evaluate the fit of beta-binomial mixture models. 4. We illustrate our approach by fitting both binomial and beta-binomial mixture models to aerial survey data of manatees in Florida. We found that the binomial mixture model did not fit the data, whereas there was no evidence of lack of fit for the beta-binomial mixture model. This example helps illustrate the importance of using simulations and assessing goodness-of-fit when analysing ecological data with N-mixture models. Indeed, both the simulations and the goodness-of-fit procedure highlighted the limitations of the standard binomial mixture model for aerial

  19. Soil compaction and organic matter affect conifer seedling nonmycorrhizal and ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance and diversity. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect

    Amaranthus, M.P.; Page-Dumroese, D.; Harvey, A.; Cazares, E.; Bednar, L.F.

    1996-05-01

    Three levels of organic matter removal (bole only; bole and crowns; and bole, crowns, and forest floor) and three levels of mechanical soil compaction (no compaction, moderate compaction, and severe soil compaction) were studied as they influence Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca (Beissn.) Franco) and western white pine (Pinus monticola Dougl. ex D. Don) seedlings following outplanting. Moderate and severe soil compaction significantly reduced nonmycorrhizal root tip abundance on both Douglas-fir and western white pine seedlings (p less than or equal to 0.05). Ectomycorrhizal root tip abundance was significantly reduced on Douglas-fir seedlings in severely compacted areas with bole and crowns and bole, crowns, and forest floor removed. Ectomycorrhizal diversity also was significantly reduced on Douglas-fir seedlings in all severely compacted areas.

  20. The Photosynthetic Cycle

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Calvin, Melvin

    1955-03-21

    A cyclic sequence of transformations, including the carboxylation of RuDP (ribulose diphosphate) and its re-formation, has been deduced as the route for the creation of reduced carbon compounds in photosynthetic organisms. With the demonstration of RuDP as substrate for the carboxylation in a cell-free system, each of the reactions has now been carried out independently in vitro. Further purification of this last enzyme system has confirmed the deduction that the carboxylation of RuDP leads directly to the two molecules of PGA (phosphoglyceric acid) involving an internal dismutation and suggesting the name "carboxydismutase" for the enzyme. As a consequence of this knowledge of each of the steps in the photosynthetic CO{sub 2} reduction cycle, it is possible to define the reagent requirements to maintain it. The net requirement for the reduction of one molecule of CO{sub 2} is four equivalents of [H]and three molecules of ATP (adenine triphosphate). These must ultimately be supplied by the photochemical reaction. Some possible ways in which this may be accomplished are discussed.

  1. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries. PMID:26389924

  2. Photosynthetic Pigments in Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Kuczynska, Paulina; Jemiola-Rzeminska, Malgorzata; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-09-16

    Photosynthetic pigments are bioactive compounds of great importance for the food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical industries. They are not only responsible for capturing solar energy to carry out photosynthesis, but also play a role in photoprotective processes and display antioxidant activity, all of which contribute to effective biomass and oxygen production. Diatoms are organisms of a distinct pigment composition, substantially different from that present in plants. Apart from light-harvesting pigments such as chlorophyll a, chlorophyll c, and fucoxanthin, there is a group of photoprotective carotenoids which includes β-carotene and the xanthophylls, diatoxanthin, diadinoxanthin, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin, which are engaged in the xanthophyll cycle. Additionally, some intermediate products of biosynthetic pathways have been identified in diatoms as well as unusual pigments, e.g., marennine. Marine algae have become widely recognized as a source of unique bioactive compounds for potential industrial, pharmaceutical, and medical applications. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on diatom photosynthetic pigments complemented by some new insights regarding their physico-chemical properties, biological role, and biosynthetic pathways, as well as the regulation of pigment level in the cell, methods of purification, and significance in industries.

  3. Organic layer serves as a hotspot of microbial activity and abundance in Arctic tundra soils.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Jang, Inyoung; Chae, Namyi; Choi, Taejin; Kang, Hojeong

    2013-02-01

    Tundra ecosystem is of importance for its high accumulation of organic carbon and vulnerability to future climate change. Microorganisms play a key role in carbon dynamics of the tundra ecosystem by mineralizing organic carbon. We assessed both ecosystem process rates and community structure of Bacteria, Archaea, and Fungi in different soil layers (surface organic layer and subsurface mineral soil) in an Arctic soil ecosystem located at Spitsbergen, Svalbard during the summer of 2008 by using biochemical and molecular analyses, such as enzymatic assay, terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and pyrosequencing. Activity of hydrolytic enzymes showed difference according to soil type. For all three microbial communities, the average gene copy number did not significantly differ between soil types. However, archaeal diversities appeared to differ according to soil type, whereas bacterial and fungal diversity indices did not show any variation. Correlation analysis between biogeochemical and microbial parameters exhibited a discriminating pattern according to microbial or soil types. Analysis of the microbial community structure showed that bacterial and archaeal communities have different profiles with unique phylotypes in terms of soil types. Water content and hydrolytic enzymes were found to be related with the structure of bacterial and archaeal communities, whereas soil organic matter (SOM) and total organic carbon (TOC) were related with bacterial communities. The overall results of this study indicate that microbial enzyme activity were generally higher in the organic layer than in mineral soils and that bacterial and archaeal communities differed between the organic layer and mineral soils in the Arctic region. Compared to mineral soil, peat-covered organic layer may represent a hotspot for secondary productivity and nutrient cycling in this ecosystem.

  4. Identification, abundance and origin of atmospheric organic particulate matter in a Portuguese rural area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pio, C. A.; Alves, C. A.; Duarte, A. C.

    Respirable suspended particles high-volume samples were collected from a coastal-rural site in the centre of Portugal in August 1997 and their solvent-extractable organic compounds were subjected to characterisation by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Particles were also analysed by a thermal/optical technique in order to determine their black and organic carbon content. The total lipid extract yields ranged from 20 to 63 μg m -3, containing mainly aliphatic hydrocarbons such as n-alkanes, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The higher input of vascular plant wax components was demonstrated by the distribution patterns of the n-alkanes, n-alkanoic acids and n-alkanols homologous series, with C max at C 29, C 22/C 24 and C 30, respectively. The CPI values for these series were in the range 1.8-9.7, being indicative of recent biogenic input from microbial lipid residues and flora epicuticular components. Specific natural constituents (e.g. phytosterols, terpenes, etc.) were identified as molecular markers. Some oxidation products from volatile organic precursors were also present in the aerosols. In addition, all samples had a component of petroleum hydrocarbons representing urban and vehicular emissions probably transported from the nearest cities and from the motorway in the vicinity. This data set could be used to make a mass balance with organic carbon, organic extracts and elutable matter, permitting also the comparison with lipid signatures observed for other regions.

  5. Prochlorococcus, a Marine Photosynthetic Prokaryote of Global Significance

    PubMed Central

    Partensky, F.; Hess, W. R.; Vaulot, D.

    1999-01-01

    The minute photosynthetic prokaryote Prochlorococcus, which was discovered about 10 years ago, has proven exceptional from several standpoints. Its tiny size (0.5 to 0.7 μm in diameter) makes it the smallest known photosynthetic organism. Its ubiquity within the 40°S to 40°N latitudinal band of oceans and its occurrence at high density from the surface down to depths of 200 m make it presumably the most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth. Prochlorococcus typically divides once a day in the subsurface layer of oligotrophic areas, where it dominates the photosynthetic biomass. It also possesses a remarkable pigment complement which includes divinyl derivatives of chlorophyll a (Chl a) and Chl b, the so-called Chl a2 and Chl b2, and, in some strains, small amounts of a new type of phycoerythrin. Phylogenetically, Prochlorococcus has also proven fascinating. Recent studies suggest that it evolved from an ancestral cyanobacterium by reducing its cell and genome sizes and by recruiting a protein originally synthesized under conditions of iron depletion to build a reduced antenna system as a replacement for large phycobilisomes. Environmental constraints clearly played a predominant role in Prochlorococcus evolution. Its tiny size is an advantage for its adaptation to nutrient-deprived environments. Furthermore, genetically distinct ecotypes, with different antenna systems and ecophysiological characteristics, are present at depth and in surface waters. This vertical species variation has allowed Prochlorococcus to adapt to the natural light gradient occurring in the upper layer of oceans. The present review critically assesses the basic knowledge acquired about Prochlorococcus both in the ocean and in the laboratory. PMID:10066832

  6. Monte Carlo implementation of Schiff's approximation for estimating radiative properties of homogeneous, simple-shaped and optically soft particles: Application to photosynthetic micro-organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, Julien; Blanco, Stéphane; Cornet, Jean-François; Dauchet, Jérémi; El Hafi, Mouna; Fournier, Richard; Abboud, Mira Kaissar; Weitz, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper, Schiff's approximation is applied to the study of light scattering by large and optically-soft axisymmetric particles, with special attention to cylindrical and spheroidal photosynthetic micro-organisms. This approximation is similar to the anomalous diffraction approximation but includes a description of phase functions. Resulting formulations for the radiative properties are multidimensional integrals, the numerical resolution of which requires close attention. It is here argued that strong benefits can be expected from a statistical resolution by the Monte Carlo method. But designing such efficient Monte Carlo algorithms requires the development of non-standard algorithmic tricks using careful mathematical analysis of the integral formulations: the codes that we develop (and make available) include an original treatment of the nonlinearity in the differential scattering cross-section (squared modulus of the scattering amplitude) thanks to a double sampling procedure. This approach makes it possible to take advantage of recent methodological advances in the field of Monte Carlo methods, illustrated here by the estimation of sensitivities to parameters. Comparison with reference solutions provided by the T-Matrix method is presented whenever possible. Required geometric calculations are closely similar to those used in standard Monte Carlo codes for geometric optics by the computer-graphics community, i.e. calculation of intersections between rays and surfaces, which opens interesting perspectives for the treatment of particles with complex shapes.

  7. Photoacclimation responses of the brown macroalga Sargassum Cymosum to the combined influence of UV radiation and salinity: cytochemical and ultrastructural organization and photosynthetic performance.

    PubMed

    Polo, Luz K; Felix, Marthiellen R de L; Kreusch, Marianne; Pereira, Debora T; Costa, Giulia B; Simioni, Carmen; Ouriques, Luciane C; Chow, Fungyi; Ramlov, Fernanda; Maraschin, Marcelo; Bouzon, Zenilda L; Schmidt, Eder C

    2014-01-01

    The photoacclimation responses of the brown macroalga Sargassum cymosum were studied to determine its cytochemical and ultrastructural organization, as well as photosynthetic pigments and performance. S. cymosum was cultivated in three salinities (30, 35 and 40 psu) under four irradiation treatments: PAR-only, PAR + UVA, PAR + UVB and PAR + UVA + UVB. Plants were exposed to PAR at 70 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1), PAR + UVB at 0.35 W m(-2) and PAR +UVA at 0.70 W m(-2) for 3 h per day during 7 days in vitro. Growth rate was not significantly affected by any type of radiation or salinity. The amount of pigments in S. cymosum was significantly influenced by the interaction of salinity and radiation treatments. Compared with PAR-only, UVR treatments modified the kinetics patterns of the photosynthesis/irradiance curve. After exposure to UVR, S. cymosum increased cell wall thickness and the presence of phenolic compounds. The number of mitochondria increased, whereas the number of chloroplasts showed few changes. Although S. cymosum showed insensitivity to changes in salinity, it can be concluded that samples treated under four irradiation regimes showed structural changes, which were more evident, but not severe, under PAR + UVB treatment.

  8. Synthesis of High-Molecular-Weight Polyhydroxyalkanoates by Marine Photosynthetic Purple Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Morisaki, Kumiko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a biopolyester/bioplastic that is produced by a variety of microorganisms to store carbon and increase reducing redox potential. Photosynthetic bacteria convert carbon dioxide into organic compounds using light energy and are known to accumulate PHA. We analyzed PHAs synthesized by 3 purple sulfur bacteria and 9 purple non-sulfur bacteria strains. These 12 purple bacteria were cultured in nitrogen-limited medium containing acetate and/or sodium bicarbonate as carbon sources. PHA production in the purple sulfur bacteria was induced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Purple non-sulfur bacteria accumulated PHA even under normal growth conditions, and PHA production in 3 strains was enhanced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Gel permeation chromatography analysis revealed that 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized high-molecular-weight PHAs, which are useful for industrial applications. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that mRNA levels of phaC and PhaZ genes were low under nitrogen-limited conditions, resulting in production of high-molecular-weight PHAs. We conclude that all 12 tested strains are able to synthesize PHA to some degree, and we identify 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria that accumulate high-molecular-weight PHA molecules. Furthermore, the photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized PHA when they were cultured in seawater supplemented with acetate. The photosynthetic purple bacteria strains characterized in this study should be useful as host microorganisms for large-scale PHA production utilizing abundant marine resources and carbon dioxide. PMID:27513570

  9. Synthesis of High-Molecular-Weight Polyhydroxyalkanoates by Marine Photosynthetic Purple Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Higuchi-Takeuchi, Mieko; Morisaki, Kumiko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Numata, Keiji

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) is a biopolyester/bioplastic that is produced by a variety of microorganisms to store carbon and increase reducing redox potential. Photosynthetic bacteria convert carbon dioxide into organic compounds using light energy and are known to accumulate PHA. We analyzed PHAs synthesized by 3 purple sulfur bacteria and 9 purple non-sulfur bacteria strains. These 12 purple bacteria were cultured in nitrogen-limited medium containing acetate and/or sodium bicarbonate as carbon sources. PHA production in the purple sulfur bacteria was induced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Purple non-sulfur bacteria accumulated PHA even under normal growth conditions, and PHA production in 3 strains was enhanced by nitrogen-limited conditions. Gel permeation chromatography analysis revealed that 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized high-molecular-weight PHAs, which are useful for industrial applications. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that mRNA levels of phaC and PhaZ genes were low under nitrogen-limited conditions, resulting in production of high-molecular-weight PHAs. We conclude that all 12 tested strains are able to synthesize PHA to some degree, and we identify 5 photosynthetic purple bacteria that accumulate high-molecular-weight PHA molecules. Furthermore, the photosynthetic purple bacteria synthesized PHA when they were cultured in seawater supplemented with acetate. The photosynthetic purple bacteria strains characterized in this study should be useful as host microorganisms for large-scale PHA production utilizing abundant marine resources and carbon dioxide.

  10. Can heavy isotopes increase lifespan? Studies of relative abundance in various organisms reveal chemical perspectives on aging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Stable heavy isotopes co‐exist with their lighter counterparts in all elements commonly found in biology. These heavy isotopes represent a low natural abundance in isotopic composition but impose great retardation effects in chemical reactions because of kinetic isotopic effects (KIEs). Previous isotope analyses have recorded pervasive enrichment or depletion of heavy isotopes in various organisms, strongly supporting the capability of biological systems to distinguish different isotopes. This capability has recently been found to lead to general decline of heavy isotopes in metabolites during yeast aging. Conversely, supplementing heavy isotopes in growth medium promotes longevity. Whether this observation prevails in other organisms is not known, but it potentially bears promise in promoting human longevity. PMID:27554342

  11. Distribution of fallover in the carboxylase reaction and fallover-inducible sites among ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenases of photosynthetic organisms.

    PubMed

    Uemura, K; Tokai, H; Higuchi, T; Murayama, H; Yamamoto, H; Enomoto, Y; Fujiwara, S; Hamada, J; Yokota, A

    1998-02-01

    The biphasic reaction course, fallover, of carboxylation catalysed by ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) has been known as a characteristic of the enzyme from higher land plants. Fallover consists of hysteresis in the reaction seen during the initial several minutes and a very slow suicide inhibition by inhibitors formed from the substrate ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP). This study examined the relationship between occurrence of fallover and non-catalytic RuBP-binding sites, and the putative hysteresis-inducible sites (Lys-21 and Lys-305 of the large subunit in spinach RuBisCO) amongst RuBisCOs of a wide variety of photosynthetic organisms. Fallover could be detected by following the course of the carboxylase reaction at 1 mM RuBP and the non-catalytic binding sites by alleviation of fallover at 5 mM RuBP. RuBisCO from Euglena gracilis showed the same linear reaction course at both RuBP concentrations, indicating an association between an absence of fallover and an absence of the non-catalytic binding sites. This was supported by the results of an equilibrium binding assay for this enzyme with a transition state analogue. Green macroalgae and non-green algae contained the plant-type, fallover enzyme. RuBisCOs from Conjugatae, Closterium ehrenbergii, Gonatozygon monotaenium and Netrium digitus, showed a much smaller decrease in activity at 1 mM RuBP than the spinach enzyme and the reaction courses of these enzymes at 5 mM RuBP were almost linear. RuBisCO of a primitive type Conjugatae, Mesotaenium caldariorum, showed the same linear course at both RuBP concentrations. Sequencing of rbcL of these organisms indicated that Lys-305 was changed into arginine with Lys-21 conserved.

  12. Abundance and diversity of total and nitrifying prokaryotes as influenced by biochemical quality of organic inputs combined with mineral nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muema, Esther; Vanlauwe, Bernard; Röhl, Carolin; Cadisch, Georg; Rasche, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea (AOB, AOA) co-exist in soil, but they respond differently to distinct fertilization strategies in agricultural soils. Accordingly, effects of organic inputs and combination with mineral nitrogen (N) on AOB and AOA remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to compare soil amendment with contrasting quality of organic inputs (i.e., high quality Tithonia diversifolia (TD; C/N ratio: 13, Lignin: 8.9 %; Polyphenols: 1.7 %), intermediate quality Calliandra calothyrsus (CC; 13; 13; 9.4) and low quality Zea mays (ZM; 59; 5.4; 1.2)), and combination with mineral N on the abundance (i.e., DNA-based gene quantification) and community structure (i.e., T-RFLP analysis) of total bacterial and archaea (16S rRNA gene), as well as AOB and AOA (targeting the amoA gene) communities in a Humic Nitisol. Soils (0-15 cm depth) were sampled prior to the onset of the rainy season in March 2012 in a 10 years old field experiment established in the central highlands of Kenya in 2002. Since the start of the experiment, organic inputs were applied annually at a rate of 4 Mg C ha-1 and mineral N twice a year as calcium ammonium nitrate (5Ca(NO3)2NH4NO3) at a rate of 120 kg N ha-1 growing season-1. Quality of organic inputs posed only a significant effect on the AOB community structure between TD versus ZM and CC versus ZM. Moreover, TD significantly increased the size of AOB over ZM input, while higher abundances for total bacteria, total archaea and AOA were measured in ZM and TD over CC. This was explained by high and available N in TD, but low lignin and polyphenol contents in TD and ZM as opposed to CC. AOB responded sensitively (i.e., complete community structure separation) to mineral N, specifically when combined with low quality ZM. Hence, AOB community was specifically responsive to quality of organic inputs and combination of low organic input with mineral N over AOA and total prokaryotic communities in the studied soil. The results

  13. Abundance and Characterization of Dissolved Organic Carbon in Suburban Streams of Baltimore, Maryland, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, G.; Fazekas, M.

    2014-12-01

    The contribution of streams and rivers to the carbon cycle is significant, transporting to the oceans ~1.4 Pg C/yr, with dissolved carbon corresponding to as much as 0.7 Pg C/yr. Changes in land use have the potential effect of modifying this flux, particularly in urban areas where impervious areas are common. To investigate the effect of urbanization on riverine carbon transport, we studied four first-order streams in Towson, a suburb of Baltimore, Maryland, USA. The watersheds from the studied streams exhibit different levels of urbanization as measured by the percentage of impervious areas. Samples from these four streams were taken weekly, and several chemical constituents were measured either in the field or in the laboratory. These constituents included nitrate, dissolved organic nitrogen, pH, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total carbon, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), phosphate, the carbon isotopic compositions of DOC and DIC, and fluorescence intensity of the DOC. Results show that DOC concentrations were consistently below 5 mg C/L regardless of the level of imperviousness of the watershed. Similarly, carbon isotope ratios were consistent across the studied streams, with values centered around -26.4 per mil, thus suggesting a significant influx of soil-derived organic carbon originated from C3 plants that are common in the watersheds. Confirming this interpretation, fluorescence spectroscopy data suggest a humic-like origin for the DOC of the streams, thus pointing to the heterotrophic nature of the streams. The combined results suggest that the studied streams exhibit similar DOC concentrations, carbon isotopic values, and fluorescence spectra, despite their level of impervious surfaces in their watersheds.

  14. Abundance of organic compounds photochemically produced in the atmospheres of the Outer Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raulin, F.; Bossard, A.; Toupance, G.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1979-01-01

    Organic photochemical syntheses in the Jovian atmosphere was simulated by irradiating, at 147 nm, gaseous mixtures of methane and ammonia with varying amounts of hydrogen. Some results relevant to the photochemistry of the Jupiter atmosphere at several tens of kilometers above the clouds were obtained: (1) a favorable effect of the pressure of high amounts of H2 on the yield of hydrocarbon synthesis when NH3 is mixed with CH4; (2) a very low yield of synthesis of unsaturated hydrocarbons in such conditions; and (3) the possibility of formation of detectable amounts of HCN and CH3CN.

  15. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers are pigment-protein complexes that are responsible for the transduction of light energy into chemical energy. Considerable evidence indicates that photosynthetic organisms were present very early in the evolution of life on Earth. The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus is on the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reactions centers suggest that they may be the descendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes were isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria, Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii, by extraction of membranes with Deriphat 160C followed by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Other aspects of this investigation are briefly discussed.

  16. [Carbon isotope (13C/12C) effect of photorespiration in photosynthetic organisms. Evidence for existence, probable mechanism].

    PubMed

    Ivlev, A A

    2002-01-01

    Experimental evidence in favor of the new phenomenon predicted for photosynthesizing organisms, the fractionation of carbon isotopes in photorespiration is presented. A possible mechanism of this process is discussed. The fractionation of carbon in isotopes photorespiration occurs in the oxygenase phase of the functioning of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (rubisco), the key enzyme of photosynthesis, which is capable to act as carboxylase and oxygenase. Which function of the enzyme is active depends on CO2/O2 concentration ratio, which periodically changes in a cell. The key reaction in the mechanism of carbon isotope fractionation in photorespiration is glycine decarboxylation, which results in the splitting and removal from the cell of CO2 enriched with 12C and the accumulation of 13C photorespiratory carbon flow. The coupling of photorespiration and CO2 photoassimilation gives rise to two isotopically different carbon flows, which fill up separate carbohydrate pools, which are the sources of carbon in the following syntheses in the dark phase of photosynthesis. This enables one to identify, from the carbon isotope ratio of metabolites, their involvement in the photorespiratory and assimilatory carbon flows, to investigate the pathways of carbon metabolism, and to estimate more thoroughly the biosynthetic role of photorespiration.

  17. Effect of flagellates on free-living bacterial abundance in an organically contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kinner, N.E.; Harvey, R.W.; Kazmierkiewicz-Tabaka, M.

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the role of protists in the saturated subsurface. Porous media microcosms containing bacteria and protists, were used to determine whether flagellates from an organically contaminated aquifer could substantively affect the number of free- living bacteria (FLB). When flagellates were present, the 3-40% maximum breakthrough of fluorescent y labelled FLB injected into the microcosms was much lower than the 60-130% observed for killed controls Grazing and clearance rates (3-27 FLB flag-1 h-1 and 12-23 nI flag-1 h-1, respectively) calculated from the data were in the range reported for flagellates in other aqueous environments. The data provide evidence that flagellate bacterivory is an important control on groundwater FLB populations.

  18. Bryophytes as Climate Indicators: moss and liverwort photosynthetic limitations and carbon isotope signals in organic material and peat deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, H.; Royles, J.; Horwath, A.; Hodell, D. A.; Convey, P.; Hodgson, D.; Wingate, L.; Ogeé, J.

    2011-12-01

    Bryophytes make a significant contribution to carbon sequestration and storage in polar, boreal, temperate and tropical biomes, and yet there is limited understanding of the determinants of carbon isotope composition. Bryophytes are poikilohydric and lack stomata in the vegetative (gametophyte) stage, and lack of roots and reliance on liquid water to maintain hydration status also imposes diffusional limitations on CO2 uptake and extent of carbon isotope discrimination. Real-time gas exchange and instantaneous discrimination studies can be used to quantify responses to liquid phase limitation. Thus, wetted tissues show less negative δ13C signals due to liquid phase conductance and, as the thallus surface dries, maximum CO2 assimilation and discrimination are attained when the limitation is primarily the internal (mesophyll) conductance. Continued desiccation then leads to additional biochemical limitation in drought tolerant species, and low discrimination, although the carbon gain is low at this time. In this paper we explore the extent of carbon isotope discrimination in bulk organic material and cellulose as a function of climatic and environmental conditions, in temperate, tropical and Antarctic bryophytes. Field studies have been used to investigate seasonal variations in precipitation and water vapour inputs for cloud forest formations as a function of bryophyte biomass, diversity and isotope composition in epiphytes (particularly leafy liverworts) along an altitudinal gradient in Peru. In the Antarctic, moss banks sampled on Signy Island consisted of only two species, primarily Chorisodontium aciphyllum and some Polytrichum strictum, allowing the collection of shallow and deep cores representative of growth over the past 200 to 2000 years. The well-preserved peat has provided data on growth (14C) and stable isotopic proxies (13C, 18O) for material contemporary with recent anthropogenic climate forcing (over the past 200 years), for comparison with longer

  19. Determination of Natural 14C Abundances in Dissolved Organic Carbon in Organic-Rich Marine Sediment Porewaters by Thermal Sulfate Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L.; Komada, T.

    2010-12-01

    The abundances of natural 14C in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the marine environment hold clues regarding the processes that influence the biogeochemical cycling of this large carbon reservoir. At present, UV irradiation is the widely accepted method for oxidizing seawater DOC for determination of their 14C abundances. This technique yields precise and accurate values with low blanks, but it requires a dedicated vacuum line, and hence can be difficult to implement. As an alternative technique that can be conducted on a standard preparatory vacuum line, we modified and tested a thermal sulfate reduction method that was previously developed to determine δ13C values of marine DOC (Fry B. et al., 1996. Analysis of marine DOC using a dry combustion method. Mar. Chem., 54: 191-201.) to determine the 14C abundances of DOC in marine sediment porewaters. In this method, the sample is dried in a 100 ml round-bottom Pyrex flask in the presence of excess oxidant (K2SO4) and acid (H3PO4), and combusted at 550 deg.C. The combustion products are cryogenically processed to collect and quantify CO2 using standard procedures. Materials we have oxidized to date range from 6-24 ml in volume, and 95-1500 μgC in size. The oxidation efficiency of this method was tested by processing known amounts of reagent-grade dextrose and sucrose (as examples of labile organic matter), tannic acid and humic acid (as examples of complex natural organic matter), and porewater DOC extracted from organic-rich nearshore sediments. The carbon yields for all of these materials averaged 99±4% (n=18). The 14C abundances of standard materials IAEA C-6 and IAEA C-5 processed by this method using >1mgC aliquots were within error of certified values. The size and the isotopic value of the blank were determined by a standard dilution technique using IAEA C-6 and IAEA C-5 that ranged in size from 150 to 1500 μgC (n=4 and 2, respectively). This yielded a blank size of 6.7±0.7 μgC, and a blank isotopic

  20. Structure and organization of a 25 kbp region of the genome of the photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme containing Mg-chelatase encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Petersen, B L; Møller, M G; Stummann, B M; Henningsen, K W

    1998-01-01

    A region comprising approximately 25 kbp of the genome of the strictly anaerobic and obligate photosynthetic green sulfur bacterium Chlorobium vibrioforme has been mapped, subcloned and partly sequenced. Approximately 15 kbp have been sequenced in it's entirety and three genes with significant homology and feature similarity to the bchI, -D and -H genes and the chlI, -D and -H genes of Rhodobacter and Synechocystis strain PCC6803, respectively, which encode magnesium chelatase subunits, have been identified. Magnesium chelatase catalyzes the insertion of Mg2+ into protoporphyrin IX, and is the first enzyme unique to the (bacterio)chlorophyll specific branch of the porphyrin biosynthetic pathway. The organization of the three Mg-chelatase encoding genes is unique to Chlorobium and suggests that the magnesium chelatase of C. vibrioforme is encoded by a single operon. The analyzed 25 kbp region contains five additional open reading frames, two of which display significant homology and feature similarity to genes encoding lipoamide dehydrogenase and genes with function in purine synthesis, and another three display significant homology to open reading frames with unknown function in distantly related bacteria. Putative E. coli sigma 70-like promoter sequences, ribosome binding sequences and rho-independent transcriptional stop signals within the sequenced 15 kbp region are related to the identified genes and orfs. Southern analysis, restriction mapping and partial sequencing of the remaining ca. 10 kbp of the analyzed 25 kbp region have shown that this part includes the hemA, -C, -D and -B genes (MOBERG and AVISSAR 1994), which encode enzymes with function in the early part of the biosynthetic pathway of porphyrins.

  1. Photosynthetic complex stoichiometry dynamics in higher plants: environmental acclimation and photosynthetic flux control

    PubMed Central

    Schöttler, Mark A.; Tóth, Szilvia Z.

    2014-01-01

    The composition of the photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants is dynamically adjusted to long-term changes in environmental conditions such as growth light intensity and light quality, and to changing metabolic demands for ATP and NADPH imposed by stresses and leaf aging. By changing photosynthetic complex stoichiometry, a long-term imbalance between the photosynthetic production of ATP and NADPH and their metabolic consumption is avoided, and cytotoxic side reactions are minimized. Otherwise, an excess capacity of the light reactions, relative to the demands of primary metabolism, could result in a disturbance of cellular redox homeostasis and an increased production of reactive oxygen species, leading to the destruction of the photosynthetic apparatus and the initiation of cell death programs. In this review, changes of the abundances of the different constituents of the photosynthetic apparatus in response to environmental conditions and during leaf ontogenesis are summarized. The contributions of the different photosynthetic complexes to photosynthetic flux control and the regulation of electron transport are discussed. PMID:24860580

  2. Photosynthetic water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1981-01-01

    The photosynthetic unit of hydrogen evolution, the turnover time of photosynthetic hydrogen production, and hydrogenic photosynthesis are discussed in the section on previous work. Recent results are given on simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen, kinetic studies, microscopic marine algae-seaweeds, and oxygen profiles.

  3. Protein structure, electron transfer and evolution of prokaryotic photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blankenship, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centers from a variety of organisms have been isolated and characterized. The groups of prokaryotic photosynthetic organisms include the purple bacteria, the filamentous green bacteria, the green sulfur bacteria and the heliobacteria as anoxygenic representatives as well as the cyanobacteria and prochlorophytes as oxygenic representatives. This review focuses on structural and functional comparisons of the various groups of photosynthetic reaction centers and considers possible evolutionary scenarios to explain the diversity of existing photosynthetic organisms.

  4. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus of this project is the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms known as Heliobacteria. These organisms are the only known photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reaction centers suggest that they might be the decendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes have been isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii. The absorption and fluorescence properties of membranes and reaction centers are almost identical, suggesting that a single pigment-protein complex serves as both antenna and reaction center. Experiments in progress include sequence determination of the 48,000 Mr reaction center protein, and evolutionary comparisons with other reaction center proteins.

  5. [Regulation of alternative CO{sub 2} fixation pathways in prokaryotic and eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms]. Progress report, June 15, 1991--June 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Tabita, R.

    1993-12-31

    The goal of this project to determine how photosynthetic microorganisms regulate the assimilation of CO{sub 2} via pathways alternative to the usual Calvin-Benson-Bassham reductive pentose phosphate scheme, particularly in the molecular basis for switches in CO{sub 2} metabolic paths. We have identified proteins on one-dimensional and two-dimensional SDS gels that appear differentially expressed in R. sphaeroides strain 16PHC which may be due to a mutation or change in some locus that controls the expression of several genes and their products. Similar observations were made relative to R. rubrum I-19 and the wild-type, namely that additional protein bands were observed in extracts of I-19 compared to the wild-type when both were grown photoheterotrophically with malate as electron donor and CO{sub 2} as the obligatory electron acceptor. The results of Tn5 mutagenesis of R. sphaeroides 16PHC resulted in the isolation of several strains that effectively changed back to the 16 phenotype; i.e., no malate-dependent phototrophic growth with CO{sub 2} as electron acceptor. We have found that both wild-type R. sphaeroides and R. rubrum, and the respective RubisCO negative mutant strains, are all capable of photolithoautotrophic growth using reduced sulfur compounds as electron donors and CO{sub 2} as the sole carbon source and electron acceptor. The fact that the RubisCO negative are capable of photoautotrophic growth is an exciting development for us because it proves that alternative or nonCalvin CO{sub 2} fixation pathways are extremely important to the overall carbon metabolism of these organisms. Moreover, wild-type strains turn off the synthesis of RubisCO under these cultural conditions. Thus, there appears to be separate autotrophic CO{sub 2} fixation pathways in these organisms, and a major emphasis has been placed to identify how these bacteria can grow autotrophically and fix CO{sub 2} in the absence of RubisCO.

  6. Design principles of photosynthetic light-harvesting.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Graham R; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S; Amarnath, Kapil; Zaks, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms are capable of harvesting solar energy with near unity quantum efficiency. Even more impressively, this efficiency can be regulated in response to the demands of photosynthetic reactions and the fluctuating light-levels of natural environments. We discuss the distinctive design principles through which photosynthetic light-harvesting functions. These emergent properties of photosynthesis appear both within individual pigment-protein complexes and in how these complexes integrate to produce a functional, regulated apparatus that drives downstream photochemistry. One important property is how the strong interactions and resultant quantum coherence, produced by the dense packing of photosynthetic pigments, provide a tool to optimize for ultrafast, directed energy transfer. We also describe how excess energy is quenched to prevent photodamage under high-light conditions, which we investigate through theory and experiment. We conclude with comments on the potential of using these features to improve solar energy devices.

  7. Clade-Specific Quantitative Analysis of Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Prochlorococcus

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pinos, María-Carmen; Casado, Marta; Caballero, Gemma; Zinser, Erik R.; Dachs, Jordi; Piña, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Newly designed primers targeting rbcL (CO2 fixation), psbA (photosystem II) and rnpB (reference) genes were used in qRT-PCR assays to assess the photosynthetic capability of natural communities of Prochlorococcus, the most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth and a major contributor to primary production in oligotrophic oceans. After optimizing sample collection methodology, we analyzed a total of 62 stations from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation (including Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans) at three different depths. Sequence and quantitative analyses of the corresponding amplicons showed the presence of high-light (HL) and low-light (LL) Prochlorococcus clades in essentially all 182 samples, with a largely uniform stratification of LL and HL sequences. Synechococcus cross-amplifications were detected by the taxon-specific melting temperatures of the amplicons. Laboratory exposure of Prochlorococcus MED4 (HL) and MIT9313 (LL) strains to organic pollutants (PAHs and organochlorine compounds) showed a decrease of rbcL transcript abundances, and of the rbcL to psbA ratios for both strains. We propose this technique as a convenient assay to evaluate effects of environmental stressors, including pollution, on the oceanic Prochlorococcus photosynthetic function. PMID:26244890

  8. Clade-Specific Quantitative Analysis of Photosynthetic Gene Expression in Prochlorococcus.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Pinos, María-Carmen; Casado, Marta; Caballero, Gemma; Zinser, Erik R; Dachs, Jordi; Piña, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Newly designed primers targeting rbcL (CO2 fixation), psbA (photosystem II) and rnpB (reference) genes were used in qRT-PCR assays to assess the photosynthetic capability of natural communities of Prochlorococcus, the most abundant photosynthetic organism on Earth and a major contributor to primary production in oligotrophic oceans. After optimizing sample collection methodology, we analyzed a total of 62 stations from the Malaspina 2010 circumnavigation (including Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Oceans) at three different depths. Sequence and quantitative analyses of the corresponding amplicons showed the presence of high-light (HL) and low-light (LL) Prochlorococcus clades in essentially all 182 samples, with a largely uniform stratification of LL and HL sequences. Synechococcus cross-amplifications were detected by the taxon-specific melting temperatures of the amplicons. Laboratory exposure of Prochlorococcus MED4 (HL) and MIT9313 (LL) strains to organic pollutants (PAHs and organochlorine compounds) showed a decrease of rbcL transcript abundances, and of the rbcL to psbA ratios for both strains. We propose this technique as a convenient assay to evaluate effects of environmental stressors, including pollution, on the oceanic Prochlorococcus photosynthetic function.

  9. Chronic hypoxia and VEGF differentially modulate abundance and organization of myosin heavy chain isoforms in fetal and adult ovine arteries.

    PubMed

    Hubbell, Margaret C; Semotiuk, Andrew J; Thorpe, Richard B; Adeoye, Olayemi O; Butler, Stacy M; Williams, James M; Khorram, Omid; Pearce, William J

    2012-11-15

    Chronic hypoxia increases vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and thereby promotes angiogenesis. The present study explores the hypothesis that hypoxic increases in VEGF also remodel artery wall structure and contractility through phenotypic transformation of smooth muscle. Pregnant and nonpregnant ewes were maintained at sea level (normoxia) or 3,820 m (hypoxia) for the final 110 days of gestation. Common carotid arteries harvested from term fetal lambs and nonpregnant adults were denuded of endothelium and studied in vitro. Stretch-dependent contractile stresses were 32 and 77% of normoxic values in hypoxic fetal and adult arteries. Hypoxic hypocontractility was coupled with increased abundance of nonmuscle myosin heavy chain (NM-MHC) in fetal (+37%) and adult (+119%) arteries. Conversely, hypoxia decreased smooth muscle MHC (SM-MHC) abundance by 40% in fetal arteries but increased it 123% in adult arteries. Hypoxia decreased colocalization of NM-MHC with smooth muscle α-actin (SM-αA) in fetal arteries and decreased colocalization of SM-MHC with SM-αA in adult arteries. Organ culture with physiological concentrations (3 ng/ml) of VEGF-A(165) similarly depressed stretch-dependent stresses to 37 and 49% of control fetal and adult values. The VEGF receptor antagonist vatalanib ablated VEGF's effects in adult but not fetal arteries, suggesting age-dependent VEGF receptor signaling. VEGF replicated hypoxic decreases in colocalization of NM-MHC with SM-αA in fetal arteries and decreases in colocalization of SM-MHC with SM-αA in adult arteries. These results suggest that hypoxic increases in VEGF not only promote angiogenesis but may also help mediate hypoxic arterial remodeling through age-dependent changes in smooth muscle phenotype and contractility.

  10. Mitochondrial Genome Structure of Photosynthetic Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Yurina, N P; Odintsova, M S

    2016-02-01

    Current ideas of plant mitochondrial genome organization are presented. Data on the size and structural organization of mtDNA, gene content, and peculiarities are summarized. Special emphasis is given to characteristic features of the mitochondrial genomes of land plants and photosynthetic algae that distinguish them from the mitochondrial genomes of other eukaryotes. The data published before the end of 2014 are reviewed.

  11. Biological optimization systems for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Ryan W.; Chinnasamy, Senthil; Das, Keshav C.; de Mattos, Erico Rolim

    2012-11-06

    Biological optimization systems for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency and methods of use. Specifically, methods for enhancing photosynthetic efficiency including applying pulsed light to a photosynthetic organism, using a chlorophyll fluorescence feedback control system to determine one or more photosynthetic efficiency parameters, and adjusting one or more of the photosynthetic efficiency parameters to drive the photosynthesis by the delivery of an amount of light to optimize light absorption of the photosynthetic organism while providing enough dark time between light pulses to prevent oversaturation of the chlorophyll reaction centers are disclosed.

  12. "Candidatus Propionivibrio aalborgensis": A Novel Glycogen Accumulating Organism Abundant in Full-Scale Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Plants.

    PubMed

    Albertsen, Mads; McIlroy, Simon J; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Karst, Søren M; Nielsen, Per H

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is widely used to remove phosphorus from wastewater. The process relies on polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) that are able to take up phosphorus in excess of what is needed for growth, whereby phosphorus can be removed from the wastewater by wasting the biomass. However, glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) may reduce the EBPR efficiency as they compete for substrates with PAOs, but do not store excessive amounts of polyphosphate. PAOs and GAOs are thought to be phylogenetically unrelated, with the model PAO being the betaproteobacterial "Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis" (Accumulibacter) and the model GAO being the gammaproteobacterial "Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis". Here, we report the discovery of a GAO from the genus Propionivibrio, which is closely related to Accumulibacter. Propionivibrio sp. are targeted by the canonical fluorescence in situ hybridization probes used to target Accumulibacter (PAOmix), but do not store excessive amounts of polyphosphate in situ. A laboratory scale reactor, operated to enrich for PAOs, surprisingly contained co-dominant populations of Propionivibrio and Accumulibacter. Metagenomic sequencing of multiple time-points enabled recovery of near complete population genomes from both genera. Annotation of the Propionivibrio genome confirmed their potential for the GAO phenotype and a basic metabolic model is proposed for their metabolism in the EBPR environment. Using newly designed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes, analyses of full-scale EBPR plants revealed that Propionivibrio is a common member of the community, constituting up to 3% of the biovolume. To avoid overestimation of Accumulibacter abundance in situ, we recommend the use of the FISH probe PAO651 instead of the commonly applied PAOmix probe set.

  13. “Candidatus Propionivibrio aalborgensis”: A Novel Glycogen Accumulating Organism Abundant in Full-Scale Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Albertsen, Mads; McIlroy, Simon J.; Stokholm-Bjerregaard, Mikkel; Karst, Søren M.; Nielsen, Per H.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) is widely used to remove phosphorus from wastewater. The process relies on polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) that are able to take up phosphorus in excess of what is needed for growth, whereby phosphorus can be removed from the wastewater by wasting the biomass. However, glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs) may reduce the EBPR efficiency as they compete for substrates with PAOs, but do not store excessive amounts of polyphosphate. PAOs and GAOs are thought to be phylogenetically unrelated, with the model PAO being the betaproteobacterial “Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis” (Accumulibacter) and the model GAO being the gammaproteobacterial “Candidatus Competibacter phosphatis”. Here, we report the discovery of a GAO from the genus Propionivibrio, which is closely related to Accumulibacter. Propionivibrio sp. are targeted by the canonical fluorescence in situ hybridization probes used to target Accumulibacter (PAOmix), but do not store excessive amounts of polyphosphate in situ. A laboratory scale reactor, operated to enrich for PAOs, surprisingly contained co-dominant populations of Propionivibrio and Accumulibacter. Metagenomic sequencing of multiple time-points enabled recovery of near complete population genomes from both genera. Annotation of the Propionivibrio genome confirmed their potential for the GAO phenotype and a basic metabolic model is proposed for their metabolism in the EBPR environment. Using newly designed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes, analyses of full-scale EBPR plants revealed that Propionivibrio is a common member of the community, constituting up to 3% of the biovolume. To avoid overestimation of Accumulibacter abundance in situ, we recommend the use of the FISH probe PAO651 instead of the commonly applied PAOmix probe set. PMID:27458436

  14. Molecular characterization of dissolved organic matter in glacial ice: coupling natural abundance 1H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pautler, Brent G; Woods, Gwen C; Dubnick, Ashley; Simpson, André J; Sharp, Martin J; Fitzsimons, Sean J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2012-04-03

    Glaciers and ice sheets are the second largest freshwater reservoir in the global hydrologic cycle, and the onset of global climate warming has necessitated an assessment of their contributions to sea-level rise and the potential release of nutrients to nearby aquatic environments. In particular, the release of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from glacier melt could stimulate microbial activity in both glacial ecosystems and adjacent watersheds, but this would largely depend on the composition of the material released. Using fluorescence and (1)H NMR spectroscopy, we characterize DOM at its natural abundance in unaltered samples from a number of glaciers that differ in geographic location, thermal regime, and sample depth. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modeling of DOM fluorophores identifies components in the ice that are predominantly proteinaceous in character, while (1)H NMR spectroscopy reveals a mixture of small molecules that likely originate from native microbes. Spectrofluorescence also reveals a terrestrial contribution that was below the detection limits of NMR; however, (1)H nuclei from levoglucosan was identified in Arctic glacier ice samples. This study suggests that the bulk of the DOM from these glaciers is a mixture of biologically labile molecules derived from microbes.

  15. How Cyanobacterial Distributions Reveal Flow and Irradiance Conditions of Photosynthetic Biofilm Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prufert-Bebout, Lee; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Microbial life on Earth is enormously abundant at sediment-water interfaces. The fossil record in fact contains abundant evidence of the preservation of life on such surfaces. It is therefore critical to our interpretation of early Earth history, and potentially to history of life on other planets, to be able to recognize life forms at these interfaces. On Earth this life often occurs as organized structures of microbes and their extracellular exudates known as biofilms. When such biofilms occur in areas receiving sunlight photosynthetic biofilms are the dominant form in natural ecosystems due to selective advantage inherent in their ability to utilize solar energy. Cyanobacteria are the dominant phototrophic microbes in most modern and ancient photosynthetic biofilms, microbial mats and stromatolites. Due to their long (3.5 billion year) evolutionary history, this group has extensively diversified resulting in an enormous array of morphologies and physiological abilities. This enormous diversity and specialization results in very specific selection for a particular cyanobacterium in each available photosynthetic niche. Furthermore these organisms can alter their spatial orientation, cell morphology, pigmentation and associations with heterotrophic organisms in order to fine tune their optimization to a given micro-niche. These adaptations can be detected, and if adequate knowledge of the interaction between environmental conditions and organism response is available, the detectable organism response can be used to infer the environmental conditions causing that response. This presentation will detail two specific examples which illustrate this point, Light and water are essential to photosynthesis in cyanobacteria and these organisms have specific detectable behavioural responses to these parameters. We will present cyanobacterial responses to quantified flow and irradiance to demonstrate the interpretative power of distribution and orientation information. This

  16. Impacts of oxidation aging on secondary organic aerosol formation, particle growth rate, cloud condensation nuclei abundance, and aerosol climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, F.; Luo, G.

    2014-12-01

    Particle composition measurements indicate that organic aerosol (OA) makes up ~20-90% of submicron particulate mass and secondary OA (SOA) accounts for a large fraction (~ 72 ±21%) of these OA masses at many locations around the globe. The volatility changes of secondary organic gases (SOG) associated with oxidation aging as well as the contribution of highly oxidized low volatile SOG (LV-SOG) to the condensational growth of secondary particles have been found to be important in laboratory and field measurements but are poorly represented in global models. A novel scheme to extend the widely used two-product SOA formation model, by adding a third product arising from the oxidation aging (i.e., LV-SOG) and considering the dynamic transfer of mass from higher to lower volatile products, has been developed and implemented into a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) and a community atmosphere model (CESM-CAM5). The scheme requires only minor changes to the existing two-product SOA formation model and is computationally efficient. With the oxidation rate constrained by laboratory measurements, we show that the new scheme predicts a much higher SOA mass concentrations, improving the agreement with aerosol mass spectrometer SOA measurements. The kinetic condensation of LV-SOG on ultrafine particles, simulated by a size-resolved (sectional) advanced particle microphysics (APM) model incorporated into in GEOS-Chem and CAM5, increases the particle growth rate substantially and improves the agreement of simulated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations with observations. Based on GEOS-Chem-APM simulations, the new SOA formation scheme increases global mean low troposphere SOA mass concentration by ~130% and CCN abundance by ~ 15%, and optical depth of secondary particles and coated black carbon and primary organic carbon particles by ~10%. As a result, aerosol radiative cooling effect (direct + first indirect) is enhanced by -0.9 W/m2, with large spatial

  17. Regulation of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and Photoinhibition

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Thomas; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja Krieger

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic organisms and isolated photosystems are of interest for technical applications. In nature, photosynthetic electron transport has to work efficiently in contrasting environments such as shade and full sunlight at noon. Photosynthetic electron transport is regulated on many levels, starting with the energy transfer processes in antenna and ending with how reducing power is ultimately partitioned. This review starts by explaining how light energy can be dissipated or distributed by the various mechanisms of non-photochemical quenching, including thermal dissipation and state transitions, and how these processes influence photoinhibition of photosystem II (PSII). Furthermore, we will highlight the importance of the various alternative electron transport pathways, including the use of oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor and cyclic flow around photosystem I (PSI), the latter which seem particularly relevant to preventing photoinhibition of photosystem I. The control of excitation pressure in combination with the partitioning of reducing power influences the light-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species in PSII and in PSI, which may be a very important consideration to any artificial photosynthetic system or technical device using photosynthetic organisms. PMID:24678670

  18. Occurrence and forms of Kranz anatomy in photosynthetic organs and characterization of NAD-ME subtype C4 photosynthesis in Blepharis ciliaris (L.) B. L. Burtt (Acanthaceae).

    PubMed

    Akhani, Hossein; Ghasemkhani, Maraym; Chuong, Simon D X; Edwards, Gerald E

    2008-01-01

    Blepharis (Acanthaceae) is an Afroasiatic genus comprising 129 species which occur in arid and semi-arid habitats. This is the only genus in the family which is reported to have some C(4) species. Blepharis ciliaris (L.) B. L. Burtt. is a semi-desert species with distribution in Iran, Oman, and Pakistan. Its form of photosynthesis was investigated by studying different organs. C(4)-type carbon isotope composition, the presence of atriplicoid type Kranz anatomy, and compartmentation of starch all indicate performance of C(4) photosynthesis in cotyledons, leaves, and the lamina part of bracts. A continuous layer of distinctive bundle sheath cells (Kranz cells) encircle the vascular bundles in cotyledons and the lateral vascular bundles in leaves. In older leaves, there is extensive development of ground tissue in the midrib and the Kranz tissue becomes interrupted on the abaxial side, and then becomes completely absent in the mature leaf base. Cotyledons have 5-6 layers, and leaves 2-3 layers, of spongy chlorenchyma beneath the veins near the adaxial side of the leaf, indicating bifacial organization of chlorenchyma. As the plant matures, bracts and spines develop and contribute to carbon assimilation through an unusual arrangement of Kranz anatomy which depends on morphology and exposure to light. Stems do not contribute to carbon assimilation, as they lack chlorenchyma tissue and Kranz anatomy. Analysis of C(4) acid decarboxylases by western blot indicates B. ciliaris is an NAD-malic enzyme type C(4) species, which is consistent with the Kranz cells having chloroplasts with well-developed grana and abundant mitochondria.

  19. Terracidiphilus gabretensis gen. nov., sp. nov., an Abundant and Active Forest Soil Acidobacterium Important in Organic Matter Transformation

    PubMed Central

    García-Fraile, Paula; Benada, Oldrich; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Baldrian, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the activity of bacteria in coniferous forests is highly important, due to the role of these environments as a global carbon sink. In a study of the microbial biodiversity of montane coniferous forest soil in the Bohemian Forest National Park (Czech Republic), we succeeded in isolating bacterial strain S55T, which belongs to one of the most abundant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in active bacterial populations, according to the analysis of RNA-derived 16S rRNA amplicons. The 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that the species most closely related to strain S55T include Bryocella elongata SN10T (95.4% identity), Acidicapsa ligni WH120T (95.2% identity), and Telmatobacter bradus TPB6017T (95.0% identity), revealing that strain S55T should be classified within the phylum Acidobacteria, subdivision 1. Strain S55T is a rod-like bacterium that grows at acidic pH (3 to 6). Its phylogenetic, genotypic, phenotypic, and chemotaxonomic characteristics indicate that strain S55T corresponds to a new genus within the phylum Acidobacteria; thus, we propose the name Terracidiphilus gabretensis gen. nov., sp. nov. (strain S55T = NBRC 111238T = CECT 8791T). This strain produces extracellular enzymes implicated in the degradation of plant-derived biopolymers. Moreover, analysis of the genome sequence of strain S55T also reveals the presence of enzymatic machinery required for organic matter decomposition. Soil metatranscriptomic analyses found 132 genes from strain S55T being expressed in the forest soil, especially during winter. Our results suggest an important contribution of T. gabretensis S55T in the carbon cycle in the Picea abies coniferous forest. PMID:26546425

  20. Community Assembly and Ecology of Activated Sludge Under Photosynthetic Feast/Famine Conditions.

    PubMed

    Oyserman, Ben O; Martirano, Joseph M; Wipperfurth, Spenser; Owen, Brian R; Noguera, Daniel R; McMahon, Katherine D

    2017-02-27

    Here we demonstrate that photosynthetic oxygen production under light/dark, feast/famine cycles with no mechanical aeration and negligible oxygen diffusion is able to maintain phosphorus cycling activity associated with the enrichment of polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs). We investigate the ecology of this novel system by conducting a time series analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic biodiversity using the V3-V4 and V4 region of the 16S and 18S rRNA gene sequences, respectively. In the Eukaryotic community, the initial dominant alga observed was Desmodesmus. During operation, the algal community became a more diverse consortium of Desmodesmus, Parachlorella, Characiopodium and Bacillariophytina. In the Prokaryotic community, there was an initial enrichment of the PAO Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis (Accumulibacter) Acc-SG2, and the dominant ammonia-oxidizing organism was Nitrosomonas oligotropha, however these populations decreased in relative abundance, becoming dominated by Accumulibacter Acc-SG3 and Nitrosomonas ureae. Furthermore, functional guilds that were not abundant initially became enriched including the putative Cyanobacterial PAOs Obscuribacterales and Leptolyngbya, and the H2-oxidizing denitrifying autotroph Sulfuritalea. After a month of operation, the most abundant prokaryote belonged to an uncharacterized clade of Chlorobi classified as Chlorobiales;SJA-28 Clade III, the first reported enrichment of this lineage. This experiment represents the first investigation into the ecological interactions and community assembly during photosynthetic feast/famine conditions. Our findings suggest that photosynthesis may provide sufficient oxygen to drive polyphosphate cycling.

  1. Enhanced practical photosynthetic CO2 mitigation

    DOEpatents

    Bayless, David J.; Vis-Chiasson, Morgan L.; Kremer, Gregory G.

    2003-12-23

    This process is unique in photosynthetic carbon sequestration. An on-site biological sequestration system directly decreases the concentration of carbon-containing compounds in the emissions of fossil generation units. In this process, photosynthetic microbes are attached to a growth surface arranged in a containment chamber that is lit by solar photons. A harvesting system ensures maximum organism growth and rate of CO.sub.2 uptake. Soluble carbon and nitrogen concentrations delivered to the cyanobacteria are enhanced, further increasing growth rate and carbon utilization.

  2. The relationship of metals, bifenthrin, physical habitat metrics, grain size, total organic carbon, dissolved oxygen and conductivity to Hyalella sp. abundance in urban California streams.

    PubMed

    Hall, Lenwood W; Anderson, Ronald D

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between Hyalella sp. abundance in four urban California streams and the following parameters: (1) 8 bulk metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Hg, Ni, and Zn) and their associated sediment Threshold Effect Levels (TELs); (2) bifenthrin sediment concentrations; (3) 10 habitat metrics and total score; (4) grain size (% sand, silt and clay); (5) Total Organic Carbon (TOC); (6) dissolved oxygen; and (7) conductivity. California stream data used for this study were collected from Kirker Creek (2006 and 2007), Pleasant Grove Creek (2006, 2007 and 2008), Salinas streams (2009 and 2010) and Arcade Creek (2009 and 2010). Hyalella abundance in the four California streams generally declined when metals concentrations were elevated beyond the TELs. There was also a statistically significant negative relationship between Hyalella abundance and % silt for these 4 California streams as Hyalella were generally not present in silt areas. No statistically significant relationships were reported between Hyalella abundance and metals concentrations, bifenthrin concentrations, habitat metrics, % sand, % clay, TOC, dissolved oxygen and conductivity. The results from this study highlight the complexity of assessing which factors are responsible for determining the abundance of amphipods, such as Hyalella sp., in the natural environment.

  3. [Influences of long-term application of organic and inorganic fertilizers on the composition and abundance of nirS-type denitrifiers in black soil].

    PubMed

    Yin, Chang; Fan, Fen-Liang; Li, Zhao-Jun; Song, A-Lin; Zhu, Ping; Peng, Chang; Liang, Yong-Chao

    2012-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to explore the effects of long-term organic and inorganic fertilizations on the composition and abundance of nirS-type denitrifiers in black soil. Soil samples were collected from 4 treatments (i. e. no fertilizer treatment, CK; organic manure treatment, OM; chemical fertilizer treatment (NPK) and combination of organic and chemical fertilizers treatment (MNPK)) in Gongzhuling Long-term Fertilization Experiment Station. Composition and abundance of nirS-type denitrifiers were analyzed with terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and real-time quantitative PCR (Q-PCR), respectively. Denitrification enzyme activity (DEA) and soil properties were also measured. Application of organic fertilizers (OM and MNPK) significantly increased the DEAs of black soil, with the DEAs in OM and MNPK being 5.92 and 6.03 times higher than that in CK treatment, respectively, whereas there was no significant difference between NPK and CK. OM and MNPK treatments increased the abundances of nirS-type denitrifiers by 2.73 and 3.83 times relative to that of CK treatment, respectively. The abundance of nirS-type denitrifiers in NPK treatment was not significantly different from that of CK. The T-RFLP analysis of nirS genes showed significant differences in community composition between organic and inorganic treatments, with the emergence of a 79 bp T-RF, a significant decrease in relative abundance of the 84 bp T-RF and a loss of the 99 bp T-RF in all organic treatments. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the airS-type denitrifiers in the black soil were mainly composed of alpha, beta and gamma-Proteobacteria. The 79 bp-type denitrifiers inhabiting exclusively in organic treatments (OM and MNPK) were affiliated to Pseudomonadaceae in gamma-Proteobacteria and Burkholderiales in beta-Proteobacteria. The 84 bp-types were related to Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales. Correlation analysis indicated that pH, concentrations of total nitrogen

  4. Acyl homoserine lactone changes the abundance of proteins and the levels of organic acids associated with stationary phase in Salmonella Enteritidis.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Felipe Alves; Pimentel-Filho, Natan de Jesus; Carrijo, Lanna Clícia; Bento, Cláudia Braga Pereira; Baracat-Pereira, Maria Cristina; Pinto, Uelinton Manoel; de Oliveira, Leandro Licursi; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell-cell communication mechanism mediated by signaling molecules known as autoinducers (AIs) that lead to differential gene expression. Salmonella is unable to synthesize the AI-1 acyl homoserine lactone (AHL), but is able to recognize AHLs produced by other microorganisms through SdiA protein. Our study aimed to evaluate the influence of AI-1 on the abundance of proteins and the levels of organic acids of Salmonella Enteritidis. The presence of N-dodecyl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) did not interfere on the growth or the total amount of extracted proteins of Salmonella. However, the abundance of the proteins PheT, HtpG, PtsI, Adi, TalB, PmgI (or GpmI), Eno, and PykF enhanced while the abundance of the proteins RplB, RplE, RpsB, Tsf, OmpA, OmpC, OmpD, and GapA decreased when Salmonella Enteritidis was anaerobically cultivated in the presence of C12-HSL. Additionally, the bacterium produced less succinic, lactic, and acetic acids in the presence of C12-HSL. However, the concentration of extracellular formic acid reached 20.46 mM after 24 h and was not detected when the growth was in the absence of AI-1. Considering the cultivation period for protein extraction, their abundance, process and function, as well as the levels of organic acids, we observed in cells cultivated in presence of C12-HSL a correlation with what is described in the literature as entry into the stationary phase of growth, mainly related to nitrogen and amino acid starvation and acid stress. Further studies are needed in order to determine the specific role of the differentially abundant proteins and extracellular organic acids secreted by Salmonella in the presence of quorum sensing signaling molecules.

  5. "PP2C7s", Genes Most Highly Elaborated in Photosynthetic Organisms, Reveal the Bacterial Origin and Stepwise Evolution of PPM/PP2C Protein Phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kerk, David; Silver, Dylan; Uhrig, R Glen; Moorhead, Greg B G

    2015-01-01

    Mg+2/Mn+2-dependent type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes, mediating diverse cellular signaling processes through metal ion catalyzed dephosphorylation of target proteins. We have identified a distinct PP2C sequence class ("PP2C7s") which is nearly universally distributed in Eukaryotes, and therefore apparently ancient. PP2C7s are by far most prominent and diverse in plants and green algae. Combining phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization predictions, and a distillation of publically available gene expression data, we have traced the evolutionary trajectory of this gene family in photosynthetic eukaryotes, demonstrating two major sequence assemblages featuring a succession of increasingly derived sub-clades. These display predominant expression moving from an ancestral pattern in photosynthetic tissues toward non-photosynthetic, specialized and reproductive structures. Gene co-expression network composition strongly suggests a shifting pattern of PP2C7 gene functions, including possible regulation of starch metabolism for one homologue set in Arabidopsis and rice. Distinct plant PP2C7 sub-clades demonstrate novel amino terminal protein sequences upon motif analysis, consistent with a shifting pattern of regulation of protein function. More broadly, neither the major events in PP2C sequence evolution, nor the origin of the diversity of metal binding characteristics currently observed in different PP2C lineages, are clearly understood. Identification of the PP2C7 sequence clade has allowed us to provide a better understanding of both of these issues. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparisons using Hidden Markov Models strongly suggest that PP2Cs originated in Bacteria (Group II PP2C sequences), entered Eukaryotes through the ancestral mitochondrial endosymbiosis, elaborated in Eukaryotes, then re-entered Bacteria through an inter-domain gene transfer, ultimately producing bacterial Group I PP2C sequences. A key evolutionary

  6. "PP2C7s", Genes Most Highly Elaborated in Photosynthetic Organisms, Reveal the Bacterial Origin and Stepwise Evolution of PPM/PP2C Protein Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Kerk, David; Silver, Dylan; Uhrig, R. Glen; Moorhead, Greg B. G.

    2015-01-01

    Mg+2/Mn+2-dependent type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs) are ubiquitous in eukaryotes, mediating diverse cellular signaling processes through metal ion catalyzed dephosphorylation of target proteins. We have identified a distinct PP2C sequence class (“PP2C7s”) which is nearly universally distributed in Eukaryotes, and therefore apparently ancient. PP2C7s are by far most prominent and diverse in plants and green algae. Combining phylogenetic analysis, subcellular localization predictions, and a distillation of publically available gene expression data, we have traced the evolutionary trajectory of this gene family in photosynthetic eukaryotes, demonstrating two major sequence assemblages featuring a succession of increasingly derived sub-clades. These display predominant expression moving from an ancestral pattern in photosynthetic tissues toward non-photosynthetic, specialized and reproductive structures. Gene co-expression network composition strongly suggests a shifting pattern of PP2C7 gene functions, including possible regulation of starch metabolism for one homologue set in Arabidopsis and rice. Distinct plant PP2C7 sub-clades demonstrate novel amino terminal protein sequences upon motif analysis, consistent with a shifting pattern of regulation of protein function. More broadly, neither the major events in PP2C sequence evolution, nor the origin of the diversity of metal binding characteristics currently observed in different PP2C lineages, are clearly understood. Identification of the PP2C7 sequence clade has allowed us to provide a better understanding of both of these issues. Phylogenetic analysis and sequence comparisons using Hidden Markov Models strongly suggest that PP2Cs originated in Bacteria (Group II PP2C sequences), entered Eukaryotes through the ancestral mitochondrial endosymbiosis, elaborated in Eukaryotes, then re-entered Bacteria through an inter-domain gene transfer, ultimately producing bacterial Group I PP2C sequences. A key

  7. Characterization of a flood-associated deposit on the Waipaoa River shelf using radioisotopes and terrigenous organic matter abundance and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kniskern, Tara A.; Mitra, Siddhartha; Orpin, Alan R.; Harris, Courtney K.; Walsh, J. P.; Corbett, D. R.

    2014-09-01

    An ephemeral oceanic-flood deposit adjacent to a well-studied small mountainous river (SMR), the Waipaoa River in northeastern New Zealand, was characterized using multiple proxies, including radioisotopes (234Th, 7Be, and 210Pb), bulk organic carbon abundance and isotopic signature (%OC, δ13C), as well as a biomarker of terrigenous organic matter (lignin). Field sampling was conducted within two weeks after a 1-in-8 year flood that occurred between January 30 and February 6, 2010. Geochemical analyses indicated that initial deposition of fresh riverine material extended alongshore to the north and south from the river mouth. A comparison of prior- and post-flood 7Be inventories revealed that flood sediments were widely dispersed between 20 and 70 m water depth, accounting for 50-80% of the estimated flood load. Surface (0-2 cm) isotopic carbon values increased with distance from Poverty Bay, positively correlating with total 210Pb activities, potentially reflecting increasing marine influence with water depth. Abundances of sedimentary organic carbon (OC) were 0.18-0.76% dry weight, and the total nitrogen varied from 0.02 to 0.13%. Stable isotope signatures of carbon (δ13COC), nitrogen (δ15N), and lignin abundances (λ6) throughout the study area ranged from -23.6 to -27.7‰, 1.9 to 5.3‰, and 0.93 to 9.0 mg 100 mg OC-1, respectively. The spatial distribution pattern of terrigenous organic matter (OM) abundance and interclass ratios (indicative of freshness of organic matter) varied along and across-shelf. Lignin abundances were high and interclass ratios were low in the southern depocenter and inner shelf areas, suggesting that this zone had recently received vascular-plant enriched OM, minimally altered by shelf-bed mixing processes. In contrast, sediments in the northern depocenter and outer shelf also contained elevated amounts of terrigenous sedimentary OM, but this material was generally lower in lignin abundance and had higher interclass ratios

  8. Mapping the spectral variability in photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic vegetation, soils, and shade using AVIRIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Dar A.; Smith, Milton O.; Sabol, Donald E.; Adams, John B.; Ustin, Susan L.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of this research was to map as many spectrally distinct types of green vegetation (GV), non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV), shade, and soil (endmembers) in an Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) scene as is warranted by the spectral variability of the data. Once determined, a secondary objective was to interpret these endmembers and their abundances spatially and spectrally in an ecological context.

  9. Determination of photosynthetic parameters in two seawater-tolerant vegetables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Nianwei; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Qian; Zhao, Wenqian

    2016-03-01

    It is difficult to determine the photosynthetic parameters of non-flat leaves/green stems using photosynthetic instruments, due to the unusual morphology of both organs, especially for Suaeda salsa and Salicornia bigelovii as two seawater-tolerant vegetables. To solve the problem, we developed a simple, practical, and effective method to measure and calculate the photosynthetic parameters (such as P N, g s, E) based on unit fresh mass, instead of leaf area. The light/CO2/temperature response curves of the plants can also be measured by this method. This new method is more effective, stable, and reliable than conventional methods for plants with non-flat leaves. In addition, the relative notes on measurements and calculation of photosynthetic parameters were discussed in this paper. This method solves technical difficulties in photosynthetic parameter determination of the two seawater-tolerant vegetables and similar plants.

  10. Structure-function relationship of the plant photosynthetic pigment-protein complex LHCII studied with molecular spectroscopy techniques.

    PubMed

    Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2013-01-01

    LHCII, the largest plant photosynthetic pigment-protein complex of photosystem II, is a most abundant membrane protein in living organisms and comprises approximately half of the pool of chlorophyll molecules in the biosphere. The principal role of this pigment-protein complex is to collect sunlight quanta and transfer electronic excitations toward the reaction centers, where the primary photosynthetic electric charge separation reactions take place. The LHCII protein, as a major protein component of the photosynthetic membranes, modulates also the structural and dynamic properties of the lipid phase of the membranes. According to the recent concepts, one of the physiological roles of LHCII is also a protection of the photosynthetic apparatus against oxidative damage caused by illumination with high intensity light. Detailed examination of all those physiological functions of LHCII, in relation to the complex structure, was possible owing to the application of several molecular spectroscopy techniques. Some examples of such studies are presented in this chapter. The examples of application of steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, and resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy are presented and discussed.

  11. Systems Analysis of the Response of Photosynthesis, Metabolism, and Growth to an Increase in Irradiance in the Photosynthetic Model Organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii[C][W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mettler, Tabea; Mühlhaus, Timo; Hemme, Dorothea; Schöttler, Mark-Aurel; Rupprecht, Jens; Idoine, Adam; Veyel, Daniel; Pal, Sunil Kumar; Yaneva-Roder, Liliya; Winck, Flavia Vischi; Sommer, Frederik; Vosloh, Daniel; Seiwert, Bettina; Erban, Alexander; Burgos, Asdrubal; Arvidsson, Samuel; Schönfelder, Stephanie; Arnold, Anne; Günther, Manuela; Krause, Ursula; Lohse, Marc; Kopka, Joachim; Nikoloski, Zoran; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Willmitzer, Lothar; Bock, Ralph; Schroda, Michael; Stitt, Mark

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the systems response of metabolism and growth after an increase in irradiance in the nonsaturating range in the algal model Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In a three-step process, photosynthesis and the levels of metabolites increased immediately, growth increased after 10 to 15 min, and transcript and protein abundance responded by 40 and 120 to 240 min, respectively. In the first phase, starch and metabolites provided a transient buffer for carbon until growth increased. This uncouples photosynthesis from growth in a fluctuating light environment. In the first and second phases, rising metabolite levels and increased polysome loading drove an increase in fluxes. Most Calvin-Benson cycle (CBC) enzymes were substrate-limited in vivo, and strikingly, many were present at higher concentrations than their substrates, explaining how rising metabolite levels stimulate CBC flux. Rubisco, fructose-1,6-biosphosphatase, and seduheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase were close to substrate saturation in vivo, and flux was increased by posttranslational activation. In the third phase, changes in abundance of particular proteins, including increases in plastidial ATP synthase and some CBC enzymes, relieved potential bottlenecks and readjusted protein allocation between different processes. Despite reasonable overall agreement between changes in transcript and protein abundance (R2 = 0.24), many proteins, including those in photosynthesis, changed independently of transcript abundance. PMID:24894045

  12. Inorganic and organic fertilizers impact the abundance and proportion of antibiotic resistance and integron-integrase genes in agricultural grassland soil.

    PubMed

    Nõlvak, Hiie; Truu, Marika; Kanger, Kärt; Tampere, Mailiis; Espenberg, Mikk; Loit, Evelin; Raave, Henn; Truu, Jaak

    2016-08-15

    Soil fertilization with animal manure or its digestate may facilitate an important antibiotic resistance dissemination route from anthropogenic sources to the environment. This study examines the effect of mineral fertilizer (NH4NO3), cattle slurry and cattle slurry digestate amendment on the abundance and proportion dynamics of five antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) and two classes of integron-integrase genes (intI1 and intI2) in agricultural grassland soil. Fertilization was performed thrice throughout one vegetation period. The targeted ARGs (sul1, tetA, blaCTX-M, blaOXA2 and qnrS) encode resistance to several major antibiotic classes used in veterinary medicine such as sulfonamides, tetracycline, cephalosporins, penicillin and fluoroquinolones, respectively. The non-fertilized grassland soil contained a stable background of tetA, blaCTX-M and sul1 genes. The type of applied fertilizer significantly affected ARGs and integron-integrase genes abundances and proportions in the bacterial community (p<0.001 in both cases), explaining 67.04% of the abundance and 42.95% of the proportion variations in the grassland soil. Both cattle slurry and cattle slurry digestate proved to be considerable sources of ARGs, especially sul1, as well as integron-integrases. Sul1, intI1 and intI2 levels in grassland soil were elevated in response to each organic fertilizer's application event, but this increase was followed by a stage of decrease, suggesting that microbes possessing these genes were predominantly entrained into soil via cattle slurry or its digestate application and had somewhat limited survival potential in a soil environment. However, the abundance of these three target genes did not decrease to a background level by the end of the study period. TetA was most abundant in mineral fertilizer treated soil and blaCTX-M in cattle slurry digestate amended soil. Despite significantly different abundances, the abundance dynamics of bacteria possessing these genes were

  13. Whiting events: biogenic origin due to the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacterial picoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, J. B.; Schultze-Lam, S.; Beveridge, T. J.; Des Marais, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    An annual whiting event occurs each year in late May to early June in Fayetteville Green Lake, New York. The initiation of this event correlates with exponential growth of the Synechococcus population within the lake. Synechococcus is the dominant (by approximately 4 orders of magnitude) autotrophic organism owing to the oligotrophic condition of the lake. The delta 13C values of the dissolved inorganic C range seasonally from -9.5% in winter to -6.2% in summer due to photosynthetic activity. Calcite precipitates principally in the microenvironment surrounding Synechococcus because of a photosynthetically driven alkalization process and the availability of the cells as nucleation sites. This calcite has a heavier delta 13C value (>4%) than does the dissolved inorganic C of the lake water owing to the cells' preferential uptake of 12C. A conceptual model suggests that photosynthetic activity and cell surface chemistry, together with the substantial surface area that arises from the great abundance of micron-sized cells, allow Synechococcus to dominate the annual whiting events in Fayetteville Green Lake.

  14. Pulley reef: a deep photosynthetic coral reef on the West Florida Shelf, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Culter, J.K.; Ritchie, K.B.; Earle, S.A.; Guggenheim, D.E.; Halley, R.B.; Ciembronowicz, K.T.; Hine, A.C.; Jarrett, B.D.; Locker, S.D.; Jaap, W.C.

    2006-01-01

    Pulley Reef (24°50′N, 83°40′W) lies on a submerged late Pleistocene shoreline feature that formed during a sea-level stillstand from 13.8 to 14.5 ka (Jarrett et al. 2005). The reef is currently 60–75 m deep, exhibits 10–60% coral cover, and extends over approximately 160 km2 of the sea floor. Zooxanthellate corals are primarily Agaricia lamarcki, A. fragilis, Leptoseris cucullata, and less common Madracis formosa, M. pharensis, M. decactis, Montastraea cavernosa, Porites divaricata, Scolymia cubensis and Oculina tenella. Coralline algae are comparable in abundance to stony corals. Other macroalgae include Halimeda tuna, Dictyota divaricata, Lobophora variegata, Ventricatri ventricosa, Verdigelas pelas, and Kallymenia sp. Anadyomene menziesii is abundant. The reef provides a habitat for organisms typically observed at much shallower depths, and is the deepest known photosynthetic coral reef on the North America continental shelf (Fig. 1).

  15. Estimation of particulate organic carbon flux in relation to photosynthetic production in a shallow coastal area in the Seto Inland Sea.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hitomi; Montani, Shigeru; Tsutsumi, Hiroaki; Hamada, Ken ichiro; Ueda, Naoko

    2003-01-01

    Sediment trap experiments were carried out three times from 1999 to 2000, in the western part of the Seto Inland Sea (Suo-Sound), Japan. We investigated both the particulate flux and the composition of chemical substances in the sediment trap samples. Based on the results, we discuss the origin of particulate organic carbon (POC) collected by the sediment traps in a coastal area. Moreover, we purposed to estimate the flux of the portion of the POC that is derived from phytoplankton photosynthesis. The fluxes of POC varied between 677 and 3424 mgC m(-2) d(-1). Significant positive correlations between POC and aluminum (Al) fluxes suggested that these components show almost the same behaviour. The mean value of the Al flux was about eight times higher than that of Al burial rates on the sediment surface. Therefore, it seems that the POC flux observed with the sediment traps was considerably overestimated. Moreover, judging from the fact that Al is a typical terriginous element, it seems that most of the POC collected in the sediment traps derived from the re-suspended surface sediment or sediment transported laterally from shallow flanks such as intertidal mudflats. The fluxes of chlorophyll a (Chl a) were independent of the POC fluxes, and a relatively consistent correlation was found between Chl a abundance in the water column and the Chl a flux. Moreover, surface sediment Chl a content was approximately 100 times lower than that of suspended matter. Therefore, resuspension and terriginous contributions to Chl a collected in sediment traps are likely to be negligible. The POC content in the trap samples varied between 22.4 and 70.7 mg g(-1) dry weight. The variations of POC contents were positively correlated with the Chl a contents: POC(mg g(-1))=76.5 x Chl a(mg g(-1)) + 26.0 (r=0.95, p<0.01, n=9). This result shows that POC contents strongly corresponded with phytoplankton and their debris. It was also considered that the fraction of POC derived from

  16. Effects of natural radiation, photosynthetically active radiation and artificial ultraviolet radiation-B on the chloroplast organization and metabolism of Porphyra acanthophora var. brasiliensis (Rhodophyta, Bangiales).

    PubMed

    Bouzon, Zenilda L; Chow, Fungyi; Zitta, Carmen S; dos Santos, Rodrigo W; Ouriques, Luciane C; Felix, Marthiellen R de L; Osorio, Luz K P; Gouveia, Claudiane; Martins, Roberta de Paula; Latini, Alexandra; Ramlov, Fernanda; Maraschin, Marcelo; Schmidt, Eder C

    2012-12-01

    We undertook a study of Porphyra acanthophora var. brasiliensis to determine its responses under ambient conditions, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), and PAR+UVBR (ultraviolet radiation-B) treatment, focusing on changes in ultrastructure, and cytochemistry. Accordingly, control ambient samples were collected in the field, and two different treatments were performed in the laboratory. Plants were exposed to PAR at 60 μmol photons m-2 s-1 and PAR + UVBR at 0.35 W m-2 for 3 h per day during 21 days of in vitro cultivation. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis of the vegetative cells showed single stellate chloroplast in ambient and PAR samples, but in PAR+UVBR-exposed plants, the chloroplast showed alterations in the number and form of arms. Under PAR+UVBR treatment, the thylakoids of the chloroplasts were disrupted, and an increase in the number of plastoglobuli was observed, in addition to mitochondria, which appeared with irregular, disrupted morphology compared to ambient and PAR samples. After UVBR exposure, the formation of carpospores was also observed. Plants under ambient conditions, as well as those treated with PAR and PAR+UVBR, all showed different concentrations of enzymatic response, including glutathione peroxidase and reductase activity. In summary, the present study demonstrates that P. acanthophora var. brasiliensis shows the activation of distinct mechanisms against natural radiation, PAR and PAR+UVBR.

  17. Spatio-temporal distribution of organic and inorganic pollutants from Lake Geneva (Switzerland) reveals strong interacting effects of sewage treatment plant and eutrophication on microbial abundance.

    PubMed

    Thevenon, Florian; Graham, Neil D; Herbez, Aline; Wildi, Walter; Poté, John

    2011-07-01

    Variation with depth and time of organic matter (carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus), inorganic pollutant (mercury), as well as bacterial abundance and activity, were investigated for the first time in sediment profiles of different parts of Lake Geneva (Switzerland) over the last decades. The highest organic contents (about 32%), mercury concentration (27 mg kg(-1)), bacterial abundance (in order of 9×10(9) cell g(-1) dry sediment), and bacterial activity (1299 Relative Light Units (RLU)) were found in the highly polluted sediments contaminated by the waste water treatment plant (WWTP) discharge, which deposited during the period of cultural eutrophication. Such data, which contrast with the other sampled sites from deeper and more remote parts of the lake, prove that the organic matter and nutrients released from the municipal WWTP have considerable effects on bacterial abundance and activities in freshwater sediments. In fact, the relatively unpolluted deepwater sites and the coastal polluted site show large synchronous increases in bacterial densities linked to the anoxic conditions in the 1970s (lake eutrophication caused by external nutrient input) that subsequently increased the nutrient loading fluxes. These results show that the microbial activities response to natural or human-induced changing limnological conditions (e.g., nutrient supply, oxygen availability, redox conditions) constitutes a threat to the security of water resources, which in turn poses concerns for the world's freshwater resources in the context of global warming and the degradation of water quality (oxygen depletion in the bottom water due to reduced deep waters mixing). Moreover, the accumulation of inorganic pollutants such as high mercury (methyl-mercury) concentration may represent a significant source of toxicity for sediment dwelling organisms.

  18. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2004-10-13

    This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project for the period ending 09/30/2004. The primary effort of this quarter was focused on mass transfer of carbon dioxide into the water film to study the potential effects on the photosynthetic organisms that depend on the carbon. Testing of the carbon dioxide scrubbing capability (mass transfer capability) of flowing water film appears to be relatively high and largely unaffected by transport of the gas through the bioreactor. The implications are that the transfer of carbon dioxide into the film is nearly at maximum and that it is sufficient to sustain photosynthesis at whatever rate the organisms can sustain. This finding is key to assuming that the process is an energy (photon) limited reaction and not a nutrient limited reaction.

  19. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic green algae.

    PubMed

    Ghirardi, Maria L

    2006-08-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria, green algae and diatoms are capable of absorbing light and storing up to 10-13% of its energy into the H-H bond of hydrogen gas. This process, which takes advantage of the photosynthetic apparatus of these organisms to convert sunlight into chemical energy, could conceivably be harnessed for production of significant amounts of energy from a renewable resource, water. The harnessed energy could then be coupled to a fuel cell for electricity generation and recycling of water molecules. In this review, current biochemical understanding of this reaction in green algae, and some of the major challenges facing the development of future commercial algal photobiological systems for H2 production have been discussed.

  20. A new approach for the photosynthetic antenna-reaction center complex with a model organized around an s-triazine linker.

    PubMed

    Kuhri, Susanne; Charalambidis, Georgios; Angaridis, Panagiotis A; Lazarides, Theodore; Pagona, Georgia; Tagmatarchis, Nikos; Coutsolelos, Athanassios G; Guldi, Dirk M

    2014-02-10

    Two new artificial mimics of the photosynthetic antenna-reaction center complex have been designed and synthesized (BDP-H2 P-C60 and BDP-ZnP-C60). The resulting electron-donor/acceptor conjugates contain a porphyrin (either in its free-base form (H2P) or as Zn-metalated complex (ZnP)), a boron dipyrrin (BDP), and a fulleropyrrolidine possessing, as substituent of the pyrrolidine nitrogen, an ethylene glycol chain terminating in an amino group C60-X-NH2 (X=spacer). In both cases, the three different components were connected by s-triazine through stepwise substitution reactions of cyanuric chloride. In addition to the facile synthesis, the star-type arrangement of the three photo- and redox-active components around the central s-triazine unit permits direct interaction between one another, in contrast to reported examples in which the three components are arranged in a linear fashion. The energy- and electron-transfer properties of the resulting electron-donor/acceptor conjugates were investigated by using UV/Vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Comparison of the absorption spectra and cyclic voltammograms of BDP-H2P-C60 and BDP-ZnP-C60 with those of BDP-H2P, BDP-ZnP and BDP-C60, which were used as references, showed that the spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of the individual constituents are basically retained, although some appreciable shifts in terms of absorption indicate some interactions in the ground state. Fluorescence lifetime measurements and transient absorption experiments helped to elucidate the antenna function of BDP, which upon selective excitation undergoes a rapid and efficient energy transfer from BDP to H2P or ZnP. This is then followed by an electron transfer to C60, yielding the formation of the singlet charge-separated states, namely BDP-H2(·+) -C60(·-) and BDP-ZnP(·+)-C60(·-). As such, the sequence of energy transfer and electron transfer in the

  1. Robust and Porous β-Diketiminate-Functionalized Metal–Organic Frameworks for Earth-Abundant-Metal-Catalyzed C–H Amination and Hydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Thacker, Nathan C.; Lin, Zekai; Zhang, Teng; Gilhula, James C.; Abney, Carter W.; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-05-27

    We have designed a strategy for postsynthesis installation of the β-diketiminate (NacNac) functionality in a metal–organic framework (MOF) of UiO-topology. Metalation of the NacNac-MOF (I) with earth-abundant metal salts afforded the desired MOF-supported NacNac-M complexes (M = Fe, Cu, and Co) with coordination environments established by detailed EXAFS studies. The NacNac-Fe-MOF catalyst, I•Fe(Me), efficiently catalyzed the challenging intramolecular sp3 C–H amination of a series of alkyl azides to afford α-substituted pyrrolidines. The NacNac-Cu-MOF catalyst, I•Cu(THF), was effective in promoting the intermolecular sp3 C–H amination of cyclohexene using unprotected anilines to provide access to secondary amines in excellent selectivity. Finally, the NacNac-Co-MOF catalyst, I•Co(H), was used to catalyze alkene hydrogenation with turnover numbers (TONs) as high as 700 000. All of the NacNac-M-MOF catalysts were more effective than their analogous homogeneous catalysts and could be recycled and reused without a noticeable decrease in yield. The NacNac-MOFs thus provide a novel platform for engineering recyclable earth-abundant-element-based single-site solid catalysts for many important organic transformations.

  2. Constraints on hydrocarbon and organic acid abundances in hydrothermal fluids at the Von Damm vent field, Mid-Cayman Rise (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, J. M.; Seewald, J.; German, C. R.; Sylva, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The generation of organic compounds in vent fluids has been of interest since the discovery of seafloor hydrothermal systems, due to implications for the sustenance of present-day microbial populations and their potential role in the origin of life on early Earth. Possible sources of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems include microbial production, thermogenic degradation of organic material, and abiotic synthesis. Abiotic organic synthesis reactions may occur during active circulation of seawater-derived fluids through the oceanic crust or within olivine-hosted fluid inclusions containing carbon-rich magmatic volatiles. H2-rich end-member fluids at the Von Damm vent field on the Mid-Cayman Rise, where fluid temperatures reach 226°C, provide an exciting opportunity to examine the extent of abiotic carbon transformations in a highly reducing system. Our results indicate multiple sources of carbon compounds in vent fluids at Von Damm. An ultramafic-influenced hydrothermal system located on the Mount Dent oceanic core complex at 2350 m depth, Von Damm vent fluids contain H2, CH4, and C2+ hydrocarbons in high abundance relative to basalt-hosted vent fields, and in similar abundance to other ultramafic-hosted systems, such as Rainbow and Lost City. The CO2 content and isotopic composition in end-member fluids are virtually identical to bottom seawater, suggesting that seawater DIC is unchanged during hydrothermal circulation of seawater-derived fluids. Accordingly, end-member CH4 that is present in slightly greater abundance than CO2 cannot be generated from reduction of aqueous CO2 during hydrothermal circulation. We postulate that CH4 and C2+ hydrocarbons that are abundantly present in Von Damm vent fluids reflect leaching of fluids from carbon- and H2-rich fluid inclusions hosted in plutonic rocks. Geochemical modeling of carbon speciation in the Von Damm fluids suggests that the relative abundances of CH4, C2+ hydrocarbons, and CO2 are consistent with

  3. Anoxic carbon flux in photosynthetic microbial mats as revealed by metatranscriptomics.

    PubMed

    Burow, Luke C; Woebken, Dagmar; Marshall, Ian P G; Lindquist, Erika A; Bebout, Brad M; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Hoehler, Tori M; Tringe, Susannah G; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Weber, Peter K; Spormann, Alfred M; Singer, Steven W

    2013-04-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mats possess extraordinary phylogenetic and functional diversity that makes linking specific pathways with individual microbial populations a daunting task. Close metabolic and spatial relationships between Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi have previously been observed in diverse microbial mats. Here, we report that an expressed metabolic pathway for the anoxic catabolism of photosynthate involving Cyanobacteria and Chloroflexi in microbial mats can be reconstructed through metatranscriptomic sequencing of mats collected at Elkhorn Slough, Monterey Bay, CA, USA. In this reconstruction, Microcoleus spp., the most abundant cyanobacterial group in the mats, ferment photosynthate to organic acids, CO2 and H2 through multiple pathways, and an uncultivated lineage of the Chloroflexi take up these organic acids to store carbon as polyhydroxyalkanoates. The metabolic reconstruction is consistent with metabolite measurements and single cell microbial imaging with fluorescence in situ hybridization and NanoSIMS.

  4. How Cyanobacterial Distributions Reveal Flow and Irradiance Conditions of Photosynthetic Biofilm Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prufert-Bebout, Lee

    2001-01-01

    Microbial life on Earth is enormously abundant at sediment-water interfaces. The fossil record in fact contains abundant evidence of the preservation of life on such surfaces. It is therefore critical to our interpretation of early Earth history, and potentially to history of life on other planets, to be able to recognize life forms at these interfaces. On Earth this life often occurs as organized structures of microbes and their extracellular exudates known as biofilms. When such biofilms occur in areas receiving sunlight photosynthetic biofilms are the dominant form in natural ecosystems due to selective advantage inherent in their ability to utilize solar energy. Cyanobacteria are the dominant phototrophic microbes in most modern and ancient photosynthetic biofilms, microbial mats and stromatolites. Due to their long (3.5 billion year) evolutionary history, this group has extensively diversified resulting in an enormous array of morphologies and physiological abilities. This enormous diversity and specialization results in very specific selection for a particular cyanobacterium in each available photosynthetic niche. Furthermore these organisms can alter their spatial orientation, cell morphology, pigmentation and associations with heterotrophic organisms in order to fine tune their optimization to a given micro-niche. These adaptations can be detected, and if adequate knowledge of the interaction between environmental conditions and organism response is available, the detectable organism response can be used to infer the environmental conditions causing that response. This presentation will detail two specific examples which illustrate this point. Light and water are essential to photosynthesis in cyanobacteria and these organisms have specific detectable behavioral responses to these parameters. We will present cyanobacterial responses to quantified flow and irradiance to demonstrate the interpretative power of distribution and orientation information. This

  5. Effect of petroleum products on the decomposition of soil organic matter as assessed by 13C natural abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelmach, Wioleta; Szarlip, Paweł; Trembaczowski, Andrzej; Bieganowski, Andrzej

    2016-04-01

    Petroleum products are common contaminants in soils due to human activities. They are toxic for microorganisms and threat their functions, including decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM). The direct estimation of altered SOM decomposition - based on the CO2 emission - is impossible after oil contamination, because oil decomposition also contributes to the CO2 release. We used the natural differences in the isotopic signature (δ13C) of SOM and of oil products to partition the total CO2 for both sources and to analyze the suppression of SOM decomposition. The dynamics of 13C fractionation during the mineralization of gasoline and diesel was measured during 42 days. The 13C fractionation varied between -8.8‰ and +3.6‰ within the first 10 days, and stabilized thereafter at about -5.3‰ for gasoline and +3.2‰ for diesel. These 13C fractionations and δ13C values of CO2 emitted from the soil were used for correct partitioning of the total CO2. Contamination with gasoline reduced the CO2 efflux from SOM decomposition by a factor of 25 (from 151 to 6 mg C-CO2 kg-1 soil during 42 days). The negative effect of diesel was much lower: the CO2 efflux from SOM was decreased by less than a factor of 2. The strong effect of gasoline versus diesel reflects the lower absorption of gasoline to mineral particles and the development of a thin film on water surfaces, leading to toxicity for microorganisms. We conclude that the small differences of 13C of SOM and of organic pollutants can be used to partition CO2 fluxes and analyze pollutant effects on SOM decomposition.

  6. Natural abundance 13C and 14C analysis of water-soluble organic carbon in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Kirillova, Elena N; Sheesley, Rebecca J; Andersson, August; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2010-10-01

    Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) constitutes a large fraction of climate-forcing organic aerosols in the atmosphere, yet the sources of WSOC are poorly constrained. A method was developed to measure the stable carbon isotope (δ(13)C) and radiocarbon (Δ(14)C) composition of WSOC for apportionment between fossil fuel and different biogenic sources. Synthetic WSOC test substances and ambient aerosols were employed to investigate the effect of both modern and fossil carbon contamination and any method-induced isotope fractionation. The method includes extraction of aerosols collected on quartz filters followed by purification and preparation for off-line δ(13)C and Δ(14)C determination. The preparative freeze-drying step for isotope analysis yielded recoveries of only ∼70% for ambient aerosols and WSOC probes. However, the δ(13)C of the WSOC isolates were in agreement with the δ(13)C of the unprocessed starting material, even for the volatile oxalic acid probe (6.59 ± 0.37‰ vs 6.33 ± 0.31‰; 2 sd). A (14)C-fossil phthalic acid WSOC probe returned a fraction modern biomass of <0.008 whereas a (14)C-modern sucrose standard yielded a fraction modern of >0.999, indicating the Δ(14)C-WSOC method to be free of both fossil and contemporary carbon contamination. Application of the δ(13)C/Δ(14)C-WSOC method to source apportion climate-affecting aerosols was illustrated be constraining that WSOC in ambient Stockholm aerosols were 88% of contemporary biogenic C3 plant origin.

  7. CO2 reduction and organic compounds production by photosynthetic bacteria with surface displayed carbonic anhydrase and inducible expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju-Yong; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2017-01-01

    In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) is a zinc-containing metalloenzyme that catalyzes the reversible hydration of CO2 to HCO3(-) while phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; 4.1.1.31), an enzyme involved in the carbon metabolism that catalyzed the fixation of CO2 to PEP, is a key factor for biological fixation of CO2 and enhances the production of organic compounds. In this study, the recombinant R. sphaeroides with highly-expressed CA was developed based on a surface displayed system of CA (pJY-OmpCA) on the outer membrane of R. sphaeroides using outer membrane protein (Omp) in R. sphaeroides, Finally, two more different recombinant R. sphaeroides were developed, which transformed with a two-vector system harboring cytosolic expressed CA (pJY-OmpCA-CA)or PEPC (pJY-OMPCA-PEPC) in R. sphaeroides with surface displayed CA on the outer membrane. In case of recombinant R. sphaeroides with the pJY-OmpCA-PEPC, it has shown the highest CO2 reduction efficiency and the production of several organic compounds (carotenoids, polyhydroxybutyrate, malic acid, succinic acid). It means that the surface displayed CA on the R. sphaeroides would accelerate the CO2-bicabonate conversion on the bacterial outer membrane. Moreover, inducible over-expression of PEPC with surface-displayed CA was successfully used to facilitate a rapider CO2 reduction and quicker production of organic compounds.

  8. Abundance and sources of hydrophilic and hydrophobic water-soluble organic carbon at an urban site in Korea in summer.

    PubMed

    Park, Seung Shik; Kim, Ja-Hyun; Jeong, Jae-Uk

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the characteristics of total water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and isolated WSOC fractions were examined to gain a better understanding of the pathway of organic aerosol production. 24 h PM(2.5) samples were collected during the summer (July 28-August 28, 2009) at an urban site in Korea. A glass column filled with XAD7HP resin was used to separate the filtered extracts into hydrophilic (WSOC(HPI)) and hydrophobic (WSOC(HPO)) fractions. The origins of air mass pathways arriving at the sampling site were mostly classified into three types, those originating over the East Sea of Korea that passed over the eastern inland urban and industrial regions (type I); those from the marine (western/southwestern/southern marine) and passed over the national industrial complex regions (type II); and those from northeastern China that passed through North Korea and metropolitan areas of South Korea (type III). Measurements showed an increase in the average WSOC fraction of total OC from the type II to III air mass (53 to 64%) periods. Also, higher SO(4)(2-)/SO(x) (=SO(2) + SO(4)(2-)) was observed in the type III air mass (0.70) than those in the types I (0.49) and II (0.43). According to the average values of WSOC/OC and SO(4)(2-)/SO(x), measurements suggest that the aerosols collected during the type III air mass period were more aged or photo-chemically processed than those during the types I and II air mass periods. The relationship between the SO(4)(2-)/SO(x) and WSOC/OC (R(2) = 0.64) suggests that a significant fraction of the observed WSOC at the site could be formed by an oxidation process similar to SO(4)(2-) aerosols, probably the oxidation process using OH radicals, or in-cloud processing. The photochemical production of WSOC(HPO) was also observed to significantly contribute to the total OC.

  9. Probing the dynamics of photosynthetic membranes with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching.

    PubMed

    Mullineaux, Conrad W; Sarcina, Mary

    2002-06-01

    In the past few years, there has been remarkable progress in knowledge of the structures and organization of the protein complexes of photosynthetic membranes. However, static structures do not tell the whole story. Photosynthetic membranes, like other biological membranes, are dynamic systems. Recent technological advances are making it increasingly easy to probe the dynamics of photosynthetic membranes using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Here we explain the potential and the limitations of the technique.

  10. The use of amino acid indices for assessing organic matter quality and microbial abundance in deep-sea Antarctic sediments of IODP Expedition 318

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, Stephanie A; Mills, Christopher; Mandernack, Kevin W

    2016-01-01

    The Adélie Basin, located offshore of the Wilkes Land margin, experiences unusually high sedimentation rates (~ 2 cm yr− 1) for the Antarctic coast. This study sought to compare depthwise changes in organic matter (OM) quantity and quality with changes in microbial biomass with depth at this high-deposition site and an offshore continental margin site. Sediments from both sites were collected during the International Ocean Drilling (IODP) Program Expedition 318. Viable microbial biomass was estimated from concentrations of bacterial-derived phospholipid fatty acids, while OM quality was assessed using four different amino acid degradation proxies. Concentrations of total hydrolysable amino acids (THAA) measured from the continental margin suggest an oligotrophic environment, with THAA concentrations representing only 2% of total organic carbon with relative proportions of non-protein amino acids β-alanine and γ-aminobutyric acid as high as 40%. In contrast, THAA concentrations from the near-shore Adélie Basin represent 40%–60% of total organic carbon. Concentrations of β-alanine and γ-aminobutyric acid were often below the detection limit and suggest that the OM of the basin as labile. DI values in surface sediments at the Adélie and margin sites were measured to be + 0.78 and − 0.76, reflecting labile and more recalcitrant OM, respectively. Greater DI values in deeper and more anoxic portions of both cores correlated positively with increased relative concentrations of phenylalanine plus tyrosine and may represent a change of redox conditions, rather than OM quality. This suggests that DI values calculated along chemical profiles should be interpreted with caution. THAA concentrations, the percentage of organic carbon (CAA%) and total nitrogen (NAA%) represented by amino acids at both sites demonstrated a significant positive correlation with bacterial abundance estimates. These data suggest that the selective degradation of amino acids, as

  11. Evolution of photosynthetic prokaryotes: a maximum-likelihood mapping approach.

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Jason; Zhaxybayeva, Olga; Gogarten, J Peter; Blankenship, Robert E

    2003-01-01

    Reconstructing the early evolution of photosynthesis has been guided in part by the geological record, but the complexity and great antiquity of these early events require molecular genetic techniques as the primary tools of inference. Recent genome sequencing efforts have made whole genome data available from representatives of each of the five phyla of bacteria with photosynthetic members, allowing extensive phylogenetic comparisons of these organisms. Here, we have undertaken whole genome comparisons using maximum likelihood to compare 527 unique sets of orthologous genes from all five photosynthetic phyla. Substantiating recent whole genome analyses of other prokaryotes, our results indicate that horizontal gene transfer (HGT) has played a significant part in the evolution of these organisms, resulting in genomes with mosaic evolutionary histories. A small plurality phylogenetic signal was observed, which may be a core of remnant genes not subject to HGT, or may result from a propensity for gene exchange between two or more of the photosynthetic organisms compared. PMID:12594930

  12. Model-measurement comparison of functional group abundance in α-pinene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Giulia; Bernhard, Fabian A.; Henderson, Barron H.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed by α-pinene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene photooxidation under different NOx regimes is simulated using the Master Chemical Mechanism v3.2 (MCM) coupled with an absorptive gas-particle partitioning module. Vapor pressures for individual compounds are estimated with the SIMPOL.1 group contribution model for determining apportionment of reaction products to each phase. We apply chemoinformatic tools to harvest functional group (FG) composition from the simulations and estimate their contributions to the overall oxygen to carbon ratio. Furthermore, we compare FG abundances in simulated SOA to measurements of FGs reported in previous chamber studies using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. These simulations qualitatively capture the dynamics of FG composition of SOA formed from both α-pinene and 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene in low-NOx conditions, especially in the first hours after start of photooxidation. Higher discrepancies are found after several hours of simulation; the nature of these discrepancies indicates sources of uncertainty or types of reactions in the condensed or gas phase missing from current model implementation. Higher discrepancies are found in the case of α-pinene photooxidation under different NOx concentration regimes, which are reasoned through the domination by a few polyfunctional compounds that disproportionately impact the simulated FG abundance in the aerosol phase. This manuscript illustrates the usefulness of FG analysis to complement existing methods for model-measurement evaluation.

  13. Mineral vs. Organic Amendments: Microbial Community Structure, Activity and Abundance of Agriculturally Relevant Microbes Are Driven by Long-Term Fertilization Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Francioli, Davide; Schulz, Elke; Lentendu, Guillaume; Wubet, Tesfaye; Buscot, François; Reitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Soil management is fundamental to all agricultural systems and fertilization practices have contributed substantially to the impressive increases in food production. Despite the pivotal role of soil microorganisms in agro-ecosystems, we still have a limited understanding of the complex response of the soil microbiota to organic and mineral fertilization in the very long-term. Here, we report the effects of different fertilization regimes (mineral, organic and combined mineral and organic fertilization), carried out for more than a century, on the structure and activity of the soil microbiome. Organic matter content, nutrient concentrations, and microbial biomass carbon were significantly increased by mineral, and even more strongly by organic fertilization. Pyrosequencing revealed significant differences between the structures of bacterial and fungal soil communities associated to each fertilization regime. Organic fertilization increased bacterial diversity, and stimulated microbial groups (Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, and Zygomycota) that are known to prefer nutrient-rich environments, and that are involved in the degradation of complex organic compounds. In contrast, soils not receiving manure harbored distinct microbial communities enriched in oligotrophic organisms adapted to nutrient-limited environments, as Acidobacteria. The fertilization regime also affected the relative abundances of plant beneficial and detrimental microbial taxa, which may influence productivity and stability of the agroecosystem. As expected, the activity of microbial exoenzymes involved in carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorous mineralization were enhanced by both types of fertilization. However, in contrast to comparable studies, the highest chitinase and phosphatase activities were observed in the solely mineral fertilized soil. Interestingly, these two enzymes showed also a particular high biomass-specific activities and a strong negative relation with soil pH. As many soil parameters

  14. Electrochemical and optical studies of model photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The objective of this research is to obtain a better understanding of the relationship between the structural organization of photosynthetic pigments and their spectroscopic and electrochemical properties. Defined model systems were studied first. These included the least ordered (solutions) through the most highly ordered (Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers and self-assembled monolayers) systems containing BChl, BPheo, and UQ. Molecules other than the photosynthetic pigments and quinones were also examined, including chromophores (i.e. surface active cyanine dyes and phtahlocyanines) an redox active compounds (methyl viologen (MV) and surfactant ferrocenes), in order to develop the techniques needed to study the photosynthetic components. Because the chlorophylls are photosensitive and labile, it was easier first to develop procedures using stable species. Three different techniques were used to characterize these model systems. These included electrochemical techniques for determining the standard oxidation and reduction potentials of the photosynthetic components as well as methods for determining the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants for BChl and BPheo at metal electrodes (Pt and Au). Resonance Raman (RR) and surface enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy were used to determine the spectra of the photosynthetic pigments and model compounds. SERRS was also used to study several types of photosynthetic preparations.

  15. Energy transfer in real and artificial photosynthetic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hindman, J.C.; Hunt, J.E.; Katz, J.J.

    1995-02-01

    Fluorescence emission from the photosynthetic organisms Tribonema aequale, Anacystis nidulau, and Chlorelia vulgais and from some chlorophyll model systems have been recorded as a function of excitation wavelength and temperature. Considerable similarity was observed in the effects of excitation wavelength and temperature on the fluorescence from intact photosynthetic organisms and the model systems. The parallelism in behavior suggest that self-assembly processes may occur in both the in vivo and in vitro systems that give rise to chlorophyll species at low temperature that may differ significantly from those present at ambient temperatures.

  16. Counting viruses and bacteria in photosynthetic microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Cátia; Staal, Marc; Middelboe, Mathias; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2015-03-01

    Viral abundances in benthic environments are the highest found in aquatic systems. Photosynthetic microbial mats represent benthic environments with high microbial activity and possibly high viral densities, yet viral abundances have not been examined in such systems. Existing extraction procedures typically used in benthic viral ecology were applied to the complex matrix of microbial mats but were found to inefficiently extract viruses. Here, we present a method for extraction and quantification of viruses from photosynthetic microbial mats using epifluorescence microscopy (EFM) and flow cytometry (FCM). A combination of EDTA addition, probe sonication, and enzyme treatment applied to a glutaraldehyde-fixed sample resulted in a substantially higher viral (5- to 33-fold) extraction efficiency and reduced background noise compared to previously published methods. Using this method, it was found that in general, intertidal photosynthetic microbial mats harbor very high viral abundances (2.8 × 10(10) ± 0.3 × 10(10) g(-1)) compared with benthic habitats (10(7) to 10(9) g(-1)). This procedure also showed 4.5- and 4-fold-increased efficacies of extraction of viruses and bacteria, respectively, from intertidal sediments, allowing a single method to be used for the microbial mat and underlying sediment.

  17. Diurnal variations in pathways of photosynthetic carbon fixation in a freshwater cyanobacterium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labiosa, R. G.; Arrigo, K. R.; Grossman, A.; Reddy, T. E.; Shrager, J.

    2003-04-01

    . Some increase more rapidly following daybreak than others and decrease at different rates after night fall. Early results from microarrays containing the full genome of the organism show that almost all genes display higher transcript abundances during the day (including photosynthetic genes), with a few notable exceptions, and a few others display higher transcript abundance at night than during the day.

  18. Abundance of Soil-Borne Entomopathogenic Fungi in Organic and Conventional Fields in the Midwestern USA with an Emphasis on the Effect of Herbicides and Fungicides on Fungal Persistence.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Eric H; Jaronski, Stefan T; Hodgson, Erin W; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) are widespread in agricultural fields and help suppress crop pests. These natural enemies may be hindered by certain agronomic practices associated with conventional agriculture including the use of pesticides. We tested whether the abundance of EPF differed between organic and conventional fields, and whether specific cropping practices and soil properties were correlated with their abundance. In one year of the survey, soil from organic fields and accompanying margins had significantly more EPF than conventional fields and accompanying margins. Regression analysis revealed that the percentage of silt and the application of organic fertilizer were positively correlated with EPF abundance; but nitrogen concentration, tillage, conventional fields, and margins of conventional fields were negatively correlated with EPF abundance. A greenhouse experiment in which fungicides and herbicides were applied to the soil surface showed no significant effect on EPF. Though organic fields were perceived to be more suitable environments for EPF, abiotic factors and cropping practices such as tillage may have greater impacts on the abundance of EPF. Also, fungicides and herbicides may not be as toxic to soil-borne EPF as originally thought.

  19. Abundance of Soil-Borne Entomopathogenic Fungi in Organic and Conventional Fields in the Midwestern USA with an Emphasis on the Effect of Herbicides and Fungicides on Fungal Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Eric H.; Jaronski, Stefan T.; Hodgson, Erin W.; Gassmann, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi (EPF) are widespread in agricultural fields and help suppress crop pests. These natural enemies may be hindered by certain agronomic practices associated with conventional agriculture including the use of pesticides. We tested whether the abundance of EPF differed between organic and conventional fields, and whether specific cropping practices and soil properties were correlated with their abundance. In one year of the survey, soil from organic fields and accompanying margins had significantly more EPF than conventional fields and accompanying margins. Regression analysis revealed that the percentage of silt and the application of organic fertilizer were positively correlated with EPF abundance; but nitrogen concentration, tillage, conventional fields, and margins of conventional fields were negatively correlated with EPF abundance. A greenhouse experiment in which fungicides and herbicides were applied to the soil surface showed no significant effect on EPF. Though organic fields were perceived to be more suitable environments for EPF, abiotic factors and cropping practices such as tillage may have greater impacts on the abundance of EPF. Also, fungicides and herbicides may not be as toxic to soil-borne EPF as originally thought. PMID:26191815

  20. Abundance of volatile and organic species in intermediate temperature fluids from the Von Damm and Piccard deep sea hydrothermal fields, Mid-Cayman Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermott, J. M.; Seewald, J.; Reeves, E. P.; German, C. R.; Sylva, S. P.; Klein, F.

    2012-12-01

    vent fluids, and imply the presence of a CO2 sink. Von Damm fluid CO2/CH4 ratios are relatively constant at 1.0 to 1.5 (mol/mol) in the higher temperature fluids, and are low compared with CO2/CH4 ratios of 200 to 250 (mol/mol) in the higher temperature Piccard fluids. All vent fluids at Von Damm are enriched in CH4 and longer-chain n-alkanes. Von Damm fluid H2 and H2S abundances are consistent with those at Rainbow and other ultramafic-influenced systems. At the Von Damm vent field, H2 shows non-conservative behavior in intermediate fluids at temperatures ≤114 °C. Such behavior is consistent with previous studies, which attributed non-conservative H2 behavior in ~30 °C vent fluids to microbial consumption (e.g. Von Damm and Lilley, 2004). Similar activity may be occurring at Von Damm. At Piccard, H2 shows non-conservative mixing behavior at temperatures ≤149 °C. H2 depletion at Piccard occurs at higher temperatures than at Von Damm, in excess of the currently known limit for life at 122 °C (Takei et al., 2008), suggesting that abiotic as well as microbial processes may be affecting H2 abundance. Methylated organic compounds, including methanethiol and methanol, were also observed in vent fluids at Piccard and Von Damm, and further organic compound analyses are ongoing.

  1. H2 Metabolism in Photosynthetic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Amotz, Ami; Erbes, David L.; Riederer-Henderson, Mary Ann; Peavey, Dwight G.; Gibbs, Martin

    1975-01-01

    Dark H2 metabolism was studied in marine and fresh water red algae, the green alga, Chlamydomonas, and mosses. A time variable and temperature-sensitive anaerobic incubation was required prior to H2 evolution. H2 evolution was sensitive to disalicylidenepropanediamine. An immediate H2 uptake was observed in these algae. Immediate dark H2 uptake but no evolution was observed in the mosses. A cell-free hydrogenase preparation was obtained from anaerobically adapted Chlamydomonas reinhardii by means of sonic oscillation. The hydrogenase was not sedimented at 100,000g. It catalyzed the reduction of methylene blue, p-benzoquinone, NAD, NADP, but not spinach ferredoxin. H2 evolution was noted with dithionite and with reduced methyl viologen as donors but not with reduced spinach ferredoxin. Similarly, hydrogenase activities were not affected by disalicylidenepropanediamine. The pH optima for H2 evolution and for H2 uptake were 7.2 and 7.5 to 9.5, respectively. Extracts prepared from the anaerobically adapted red alga, Chondrus crispus, and the moss, Leptobryum pyriforme, consumed but did not evolve H2. Uptake was slightly stimulated by methylene blue. It is proposed that red algae and mosses appear to metabolize H2 by a different pathway than Chlamydomonas. PMID:16659260

  2. Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are abundant in Solanaceae and have a family-specific impact on gene structure and genome organization.

    PubMed

    Seibt, Kathrin M; Wenke, Torsten; Muders, Katja; Truberg, Bernd; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) are highly abundant non-autonomous retrotransposons that are widespread in plants. They are short in size, non-coding, show high sequence diversity, and are therefore mostly not or not correctly annotated in plant genome sequences. Hence, comparative studies on genomic SINE populations are rare. To explore the structural organization and impact of SINEs, we comparatively investigated the genome sequences of the Solanaceae species potato (Solanum tuberosum), tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), wild tomato (Solanum pennellii), and two pepper cultivars (Capsicum annuum). Based on 8.5 Gbp sequence data, we annotated 82 983 SINE copies belonging to 10 families and subfamilies on a base pair level. Solanaceae SINEs are dispersed over all chromosomes with enrichments in distal regions. Depending on the genome assemblies and gene predictions, 30% of all SINE copies are associated with genes, particularly frequent in introns and untranslated regions (UTRs). The close association with genes is family specific. More than 10% of all genes annotated in the Solanaceae species investigated contain at least one SINE insertion, and we found genes harbouring up to 16 SINE copies. We demonstrate the involvement of SINEs in gene and genome evolution including the donation of splice sites, start and stop codons and exons to genes, enlargement of introns and UTRs, generation of tandem-like duplications and transduction of adjacent sequence regions.

  3. Design Principles for High H2 Storage Using Chelation of Abundant Transition Metals in Covalent Organic Frameworks for 0-700 bar at 298 K.

    PubMed

    Pramudya, Yohanes; Mendoza-Cortes, Jose L

    2016-11-23

    Physisorption is an effective route to meet hydrogen gas (H2) storage and delivery requirements for transportation because it is fast and fully reversible under mild conditions. However, most current candidates have too small binding enthalpies to H2 which leads to volumetric capacity less than 10 g/L compared to that of the system target of 40 g/L at 298 K. Accurate quantum mechanical (QM) methods were used to determine the H2 binding enthalpy of 5 linkers which were chelated with 11 different transition metals (Tm), including abundant first-row Tm (Sc through Cu), totaling 60 molecular compounds with more than 4 configurations related to the different number of H2 that interact with the molecular compound. It was found that first-row Tm gave similar and sometimes superior van der Waals interactions with H2 than precious Tm. Based on these linkers, 30 new covalent organic frameworks (COFs) were constructed. The H2 uptakes of these new COFs were determined using quantum mechanics (QM)-based force fields and grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations. For the first time, the range for the adsorption pressure was explored for 0-700 bar and 298 K. It was determined that Co-, Ni-, and Fe-based COFs can give high H2 uptake and delivery when compared to bulk H2 on this unexplored range of pressure.

  4. Non-photosynthetic pigments as potential biosignatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwieterman, E. W.; Cockell, C. S.; Meadows, V. S.

    2014-03-01

    Photosynthetic organisms on Earth produce potentially detectable surface reflectance biosignatures due in part to the spectral location and strength of pigment absorption. However, life on Earth uses pigments for a multitude of purposes other than photosynthesis, including coping with extreme environments. Macroscopic environments exist on Earth where the surface reflectance is significantly altered by a nonphotosynthetic pigment, such as the case of hypersaline lakes and ponds (Oren et al. 1992). Here we explore the nature and potential detectability of non-photosynthetic pigments in disk-averaged planetary observations using a combination of laboratory measurements and archival reflectance spectra, along with simulated broadband photometry and spectra. The in vivo visible reflectance spectra of a cross section of pigmented microorganisms are presented to illustrate the spectral diversity of biologically produced pigments. Synthetic broadband colors are generated to show a significant spread in color space. A 1D radiative transfer model (Meadows & Crisp 1996; Crisp 1997) is used to approximate the spectra of scenarios where pigmented organisms are widespread on planets with Earth-like atmospheres. Broadband colors are revisited to show that colors due to surface reflectivity are not robust to the addition of scattering and absorption effects from the atmosphere. We consider a èbest case' plausible scenario for the detection of nonphotosynthetic pigments by using the Virtual Planetary Laboratory's 3D spectral Earth model (Robinson et al. 2011) to explore the detectability of the surface biosignature produced by pigmented halophiles that are widespread on an Earth-analog planet.

  5. Photovoltaic concepts inspired by coherence effects in photosynthetic systems.

    PubMed

    Brédas, Jean-Luc; Sargent, Edward H; Scholes, Gregory D

    2016-12-20

    The past decade has seen rapid advances in our understanding of how coherent and vibronic phenomena in biological photosynthetic systems aid in the efficient transport of energy from light-harvesting antennas to photosynthetic reaction centres. Such coherence effects suggest strategies to increase transport lengths even in the presence of structural disorder. Here we explore how these principles could be exploited in making improved solar cells. We investigate in depth the case of organic materials, systems in which energy and charge transport stand to be improved by overcoming challenges that arise from the effects of static and dynamic disorder - structural and energetic - and from inherently strong electron-vibration couplings. We discuss how solar-cell device architectures can evolve to use coherence-exploiting materials, and we speculate as to the prospects for a coherent energy conversion system. We conclude with a survey of the impacts of coherence and bioinspiration on diverse solar-energy harvesting solutions, including artificial photosynthetic systems.

  6. Cyanobacteria as photosynthetic biocatalysts: a systems biology perspective.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, Steinn; Nogales, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing need to replace oil-based products and to address global climate change concerns has triggered considerable interest in photosynthetic microorganisms. Cyanobacteria, in particular, have great potential as biocatalysts for fuels and fine-chemicals. During the last few years the biotechnological applications of cyanobacteria have experienced an unprecedented increase and the use of these photosynthetic organisms for chemical production is becoming a tangible reality. However, the field is still immature and many concerns about the economic feasibility of the biotechnological potential of cyanobacteria remain. In this review we describe recent successes in biofuel and fine-chemical production using cyanobacteria. We discuss the role of the photosynthetic metabolism and highlight the need for systems-level metabolic optimization in order to achieve the true potential of cyanobacterial biocatalysts.

  7. Photovoltaic concepts inspired by coherence effects in photosynthetic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brédas, Jean-Luc; Sargent, Edward H.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    The past decade has seen rapid advances in our understanding of how coherent and vibronic phenomena in biological photosynthetic systems aid in the efficient transport of energy from light-harvesting antennas to photosynthetic reaction centres. Such coherence effects suggest strategies to increase transport lengths even in the presence of structural disorder. Here we explore how these principles could be exploited in making improved solar cells. We investigate in depth the case of organic materials, systems in which energy and charge transport stand to be improved by overcoming challenges that arise from the effects of static and dynamic disorder -- structural and energetic -- and from inherently strong electron-vibration couplings. We discuss how solar-cell device architectures can evolve to use coherence-exploiting materials, and we speculate as to the prospects for a coherent energy conversion system. We conclude with a survey of the impacts of coherence and bioinspiration on diverse solar-energy harvesting solutions, including artificial photosynthetic systems.

  8. Superradiance Transition and Nonphotochemical Quenching in Photosynthetic Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Gennady Petrovich; Nesterov, Alexander; Lopez, Gustavo; Sayre, Richard Thomas

    2015-04-23

    Photosynthetic organisms have evolved protective strategies to allow them to survive in cases of intense sunlight fluctuation with the development of nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). This process allows light harvesting complexes to transfer the excess sunlight energy to non-damaging quenching channels. This report compares the NPQ process with the superradiance transition (ST). We demonstrated that the maximum of the NPQ efficiency is caused by the ST to the sink associated with the CTS. However, experimental verifications are required in order to determine whether or not the NPQ regime is associated with the ST transition for real photosynthetic complexes. Indeed, it can happen that, in the photosynthetic apparatus, the NPQ regime occurs in the “non-optimal” region of parameters, and it could be independent of the ST.

  9. Microbial abundance and community in subsurface flow constructed wetland microcosms: role of plant presence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Xie, Huijun; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Cui; Liang, Shuang; Hu, Zhen; Yang, Zhongchen; Zhao, Congcong

    2016-03-01

    In this research, the role of plants in improving microorganism growth conditions in subsurface flow constructed wetland (CW) microcosms was determined. In particular, microbial abundance and community were investigated during summer and winter in Phragmites australis-planted CW microcosms (PA) and unplanted CW microcosms (control, CT). Results revealed that the removal efficiencies of pollutants and microbial community structure varied in winter with variable microbial abundance. During summer, PA comprised more dominant phyla (e.g., Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes), whereas CT contained more Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic bacteria. During winter, the abundance of Proteobacteria was >40 % in PA but dramatically decreased in CT. Moreover, Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic bacterial dominance in CT decreased. In both seasons, bacteria were more abundant in root surfaces than in sand. Plant presence positively affected microbial abundance and community. The potential removal ability of CT, in which Cyanobacteria and photosynthetic bacteria were abundant during summer, was more significantly affected by temperature reduction than that of PA with plant presence.

  10. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-05-29

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion.

  11. Functional Implications of Photosystem II Crystal Formation in Photosynthetic Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Tietz, Stefanie; Puthiyaveetil, Sujith; Enlow, Heather M.; Yarbrough, Robert; Wood, Magnus; Semchonok, Dmitry A.; Lowry, Troy; Li, Zhirong; Jahns, Peter; Boekema, Egbert J.; Lenhert, Steven; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Kirchhoff, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The structural organization of proteins in biological membranes can affect their function. Photosynthetic thylakoid membranes in chloroplasts have the remarkable ability to change their supramolecular organization between disordered and semicrystalline states. Although the change to the semicrystalline state is known to be triggered by abiotic factors, the functional significance of this protein organization has not yet been understood. Taking advantage of an Arabidopsis thaliana fatty acid desaturase mutant (fad5) that constitutively forms semicrystalline arrays, we systematically test the functional implications of protein crystals in photosynthetic membranes. Here, we show that the change into an ordered state facilitates molecular diffusion of photosynthetic components in crowded thylakoid membranes. The increased mobility of small lipophilic molecules like plastoquinone and xanthophylls has implications for diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotective energy-dependent quenching. The mobility of the large photosystem II supercomplexes, however, is impaired, leading to retarded repair of damaged proteins. Our results demonstrate that supramolecular changes into more ordered states have differing impacts on photosynthesis that favor either diffusion-dependent electron transport and photoprotection or protein repair processes, thus fine-tuning the photosynthetic energy conversion. PMID:25897076

  12. Chlorophylls d and f and Their Role in Primary Photosynthetic Processes of Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Allakhverdiev, S I; Kreslavski, V D; Zharmukhamedov, S K; Voloshin, R A; Korol'kova, D V; Tomo, T; Shen, J-R

    2016-03-01

    The finding of unique Chl d- and Chl f-containing cyanobacteria in the last decade was a discovery in the area of biology of oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. Chl b, Chl c, and Chl f are considered to be accessory pigments found in antennae systems of photosynthetic organisms. They absorb energy and transfer it to the photosynthetic reaction center (RC), but do not participate in electron transport by the photosynthetic electron transport chain. However, Chl d as well as Chl a can operate not only in the light-harvesting complex, but also in the photosynthetic RC. The long-wavelength (Qy) Chl d and Chl f absorption band is shifted to longer wavelength (to 750 nm) compared to Chl a, which suggests the possibility for oxygenic photosynthesis in this spectral range. Such expansion of the photosynthetically active light range is important for the survival of cyanobacteria when the intensity of light not exceeding 700 nm is attenuated due to absorption by Chl a and other pigments. At the same time, energy storage efficiency in photosystem 2 for cyanobacteria containing Chl d and Chl f is not lower than that of cyanobacteria containing Chl a. Despite great interest in these unique chlorophylls, many questions related to functioning of such pigments in primary photosynthetic processes are still not elucidated. This review describes the latest advances in the field of Chl d and Chl f research and their role in primary photosynthetic processes of cyanobacteria.

  13. In situ associations between marine photosynthetic picoeukaryotes and potential parasites - a role for fungi?

    PubMed

    Lepère, Cécile; Ostrowski, Martin; Hartmann, Manuela; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Scanlan, David J

    2016-08-01

    Photosynthetic picoeukaryotes (PPEs) are important components of the marine picophytoplankton community playing a critical role in CO2 fixation but also as bacterivores, particularly in the oligotrophic gyres. Despite an increased interest in these organisms and an improved understanding of the genetic diversity of this group, we still know little of the environmental factors controlling the abundance of these organisms. Here, we investigated the quantitative importance of eukaryotic parasites in the free-living fraction as well as in associations with PPEs along a transect in the South Atlantic. Using tyramide signal amplification-fluorescence in situ hybridization (TSA-FISH), we provide quantitative evidence of the occurrence of free-living fungi in open ocean marine systems, while the Perkinsozoa and Syndiniales parasites were not abundant in these waters. Using flow cytometric cell sorting of different PPE populations followed by a dual-labelled TSA-FISH approach, we also demonstrate fungal associations, potentially parasitic, occurring with both pico-Prymnesiophyceae and pico-Chrysophyceae. These data highlight the necessity for further work investigating the specific role of marine fungi as parasites of phytoplankton to improve understanding of carbon flow in marine ecosystems.

  14. Environmental control of photosynthetic enhancement.

    PubMed

    Punnett, T

    1971-01-22

    The transition from granular to homogeneous chloroplasts in vivo in Egeria densa caused by environmental conditions was paralleled by a decrease in photosynthetic enhancement from 30 percent to nearly zero. The drop in enhancement can be explained either by a change in the partitioning of light energy between the two photosystems or a change to a single photosystem.

  15. Spectral measurements of photosynthetic efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The photosynthetic efficiency of plants was examined for plants in two very different canopies, a USDA cornfield having an instrumented flux tower in Beltsville, MD, USA and a coniferous forest in British Columbia, Canada, included in the tower network of the Canadian Carbon Program. Basic field st...

  16. Abundance of volatile organic compounds in white ash phloem and emerald ash borer larval frass does not attract Tetrastichus planipennisi in a Y-tube olfactometer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yigen; Ulyshen, Michael D; Poland, Therese M

    2016-10-01

    Many natural enemies employ plant- and/or herbivore-derived signals for host/prey location. The larval parasitoid Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is 1 of 3 biocontrol agents currently being released in an effort to control the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coloeptera: Burprestidae) in North America. To enhance its efficiency, allelochemicals that attract it need to be assessed. In this study, ash phloem volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of black, green, and white ash, and EAB larval frass were compared. Foraging behavior of T. planipennisi females in response to VOCs of white ash or frass from EAB larvae feeding on white ash phloem was tested using a Y-tube olfactometer. Results indicated that the 3 ash species had similar VOC profiles. EAB larval frass generally contained greater levels of VOCs than phloem. Factor analysis indicated that the 11 VOCs could be broadly divided into 2 groups, with α-bisabolol, β-caryophyllene, (E)-2-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexenal, limonene, methyl benzoate, methyl indole-3-acetic acid, methyl jasmonate, methyl salicylate as the first group and the rest (i.e., methyl linoleate and methyl linolenate) as a second. Abundance of VOCs in white ash phloem tissue and frass, nevertheless, did not attract T. planipennisi females. The concealed feeding of EAB larvae might explain the selection for detectable and reliable virbrational signals, instead of undetectable and relatively unreliable VOC cues from phloem and frass, in short-range foraging by T. planipennisi. Alternatively, it is possible that T. planipennisi is not amenable to the Y-tube olfactometer assay employed.

  17. Photosynthetic carbon reduction by seagrasses exposed to ultraviolet A radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The seagrasses Halophila engelmannii, Halodule wrightii, and Syringodium filiforme were examined for their intrinsic sensitivity to ultraviolet-A-UV-A and ultraviolet-B-UV-B radiation. The effect of UV-A on photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was also determined. Ultraviolet-A and ultraviolet-B were studied with emphasis on the greater respective environmental consequence in terms of seagrass distribution and abundance. Results indicate that an intrinsic sensitivity to UV-A alone is apparent only in Halophila, while net photosynthesis in Halodule and Syringodium seems unaffected by the level of UV-A provided. The sensitivity of Halophila to UV-A in the absense of (PAR) indicates that the photosynthetic reaction does not need to be in operation for damage to occur. Other significant results are reported.

  18. Photosynthetic Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Laureanti, Joseph A; Jones, Anne K

    2017-01-10

    This chapter presents the current state of research on bioelectrochemical systems that include phototrophic organisms. First, we describe what is known of how phototrophs transfer electrons from internal metabolism to external substrates. This includes efforts to understand both the source of electrons and transfer pathways within cells. Second, we consider technological progress toward producing bio-photovoltaic devices with phototrophs. Efforts to improve these devices by changing the species included, the electrode surfaces, and chemical mediators are described. Finally, we consider future directions for this research field.

  19. Zones of photosynthetic potential on Mars and the early Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockell, Charles S.; Raven, John A.

    2004-06-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is more damaging on the surface of Mars than on Earth because of the lack of an ozone shield. We investigated micro-habitats in which UV radiation could be reduced to levels similar to those found on the surface of present-day Earth, but where light in the photosynthetically active region (400-700 nm) would be above the minimum required for photosynthesis. We used a simple radiative transfer model to study four micro-habitats in which such a theoretical Martian Earth-like Photosynthetic Zone (MEPZ) might exist. A favorable radiation environment was found in martian soils containing iron, encrustations of halite, polar snows and crystalline rocks shocked by asteroid or comet impacts, all of which are known habitats for phototrophs on Earth. Although liquid water and nutrients are also required for life, micro-environments with favorable radiation environments for phototrophic life exist in a diversity of materials on Mars. This finding suggests that the lack of an ozone shield is not in itself a limit to the biogeographically widespread colonization of land by photosynthetic organisms, even if there are no other UV-absorbers in the atmosphere apart from carbon dioxide. When applied to the Archean Earth, these data suggest that even with the worst-case assumptions about the UV radiation environment, early land masses could have been colonized by primitive photosynthetic organisms. Such zones could similarly exist on anoxic extra-solar planets lacking ozone shields.

  20. Effects of ultraviolet radiation (UVA+UVB) on young gametophytes of Gelidium floridanum: growth rate, photosynthetic pigments, carotenoids, photosynthetic performance, and ultrastructure.

    PubMed

    Simioni, Carmen; Schmidt, Eder C; Felix, Marthiellen R de L; Polo, Luz Karime; Rover, Ticiane; Kreusch, Marianne; Pereira, Debora T; Chow, Fungyi; Ramlov, Fernanda; Maraschin, Marcelo; Bouzon, Zenilda L

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of radiation (PAR+UVA+UVB) on the development and growth rates (GRs) of young gametophytes of Gelidium floridanum. In addition, photosynthetic pigments were quantified, carotenoids identified, and photosynthetic performance assessed. Over a period of 3 days, young gametophytes were cultivated under laboratory conditions and exposed to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) at 80 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1) and PAR+UVA (0.70 W m(-2))+UVB (0.35 W m(-2)) for 3 h per day. The samples were processed for light and electron microscopy to analyze the ultrastructure features, as well as carry out metabolic studies of GRs, quantify the content of photosynthetic pigments, identify carotenoids and assess photosynthetic performance. PAR+UVA+UVB promoted increase in cell wall thickness, accumulation of floridean starch grains in the cytoplasm and disruption of chloroplast internal organization. Algae exposed to PAR+UVA+UVB also showed a reduction in GR of 97%. Photosynthetic pigments, in particular, phycoerythrin and allophycocyanin contents, decreased significantly from UV radiation exposure. This result agrees with the decrease in photosynthetic performance observed after exposure to ultraviolet radiation, as measured by a decrease in the electron transport rate (ETR), where values of ETRmax declined approximately 44.71%. It can be concluded that radiation is a factor that affects the young gametophytes of G. floridanum at this stage of development.

  1. Phytochromes in photosynthetically competent plants

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.H.

    1990-07-01

    Plants utilize light as a source of information in photomorphogenesis and of free energy in photosynthesis, two processes that are interrelated in that the former serves to increase the efficiency with which plants can perform the latter. Only one pigment involved in photomorphogenesis has been identified unequivocally, namely phytochrome. The thrust of this proposal is to investigate this pigment and its mode(s) of action in photosynthetically competent plants. Our long term objective is to characterize phytochrome and its functions in photosynthetically competent plants from molecular, biochemical and cellular perspectives. It is anticipated that others will continue to contribute indirectly to these efforts at the physiological level. The ultimate goal will be to develop this information from a comparative perspective in order to learn whether the different phytochromes have significantly different physicochemical properties, whether they fulfill independent functions and if so what these different functions are, and how each of the different phytochromes acts at primary molecular and cellular levels.

  2. Mimicking photosynthetic solar energy transduction.

    PubMed

    Gust, D; Moore, T A; Moore, A L

    2001-01-01

    Increased understanding of photosynthetic energy conversion and advances in chemical synthesis and instrumentation have made it possible to create artificial nanoscale devices and semibiological hybrids that carry out many of the functions of the natural process. Artificial light-harvesting antennas can be synthesized and linked to artificial reaction centers that convert excitation energy to chemical potential in the form of long-lived charge separation. Artificial reaction centers can form the basis for molecular-level optoelectronic devices. In addition, they may be incorporated into the lipid bilayer membranes of artificial vesicles, where they function as components of light-driven proton pumps that generate transmembrane proton motive force. The proton gradient may be used to synthesize adenosine triphosphate via an ATP synthase enzyme. The overall energy transduction process in the liposomal system mimics the solar energy conversion system of a photosynthetic bacterium. The results of this research illustrate the advantages of designing functional nanoscale devices based on biological paradigms.

  3. The secondary history of Sutter's Mill CM carbonaceous chondrite based on water abundance and the structure of its organic matter from two clasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, P.; Quirico, E.; Garenne, A.; Yin, Q.-Z.; Bonal, L.; Schmitt, B.; Montes-Hernandez, G.; Montagnac, G.; Chiriac, R.; Toche, F.

    2014-11-01

    Sutter's Mill is a regolith breccia composed of both heavily altered clasts and more reduced xenoliths. Here, we present a detailed investigation of fragments of SM18 and SM51. We have characterized the water content and the mineralogy by infrared (IR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and the structure of the organic compounds by Raman spectroscopy, to characterize the secondary history of the clasts, including aqueous alteration and thermal metamorphism. The three methods used in this study suggest that SM18 was significantly heated. The amount of water contained in phyllosilicates derived by TGA is estimated to be approximately 3.2 wt%. This value is quite low compared with other CM chondrites that typically range from 6 to 12 wt%. The infrared transmission spectra of SM18 show that the mineralogy of the sample is dominated by a mixture of phyllosilicate and olivine. SM18 shows an intense peak at 11.2 μm indicative of olivine (Fig. 1). If we compare SM18 with other CM and metamorphosed CM chondrites, it shows one of the most intense olivine signatures, and therefore a lower proportion of phyllosilicate minerals. The Raman results tend to support a short-duration heating hypothesis. In the ID/IG versus FWHM-D diagram, SM18 appears to be unusual compared to most CM samples, and close to the metamorphosed CM chondrites Pecora Escarpment (PCA) 91008 and PCA 02012. In the case of SM51, infrared spectroscopy reveals that olivine is less abundant than in SM18 and the 10 μm silicate feature is more similar to that of moderately altered CM chondrites (like Murchison or Queen Alexandra Range [QUE] 97990). Raman spectroscopy does not clearly point to a heating event for SM51 in the ID/IG versus FWHM-D diagram. However, TGA analysis suggests that SM51 was slightly dehydrated as the amount of water contained in phyllosilicates is approximately 3.7 wt%, which is higher than SM18, but still lower than phyllosilicate water contents in weakly altered CM chondrites

  4. Photosynthetic Machineries in Nano-Systems

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, László; Magyar, Melinda; Szabó, Tibor; Hajdu, Kata; Giotta, Livia; Dorogi, Márta; Milano, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic reaction centres are membrane-spanning proteins, found in several classes of autotroph organisms, where a photoinduced charge separation and stabilization takes place with a quantum efficiency close to unity. The protein remains stable and fully functional also when extracted and purified in detergents thereby biotechnological applications are possible, for example, assembling it in nano-structures or in optoelectronic systems. Several types of bionanocomposite materials have been assembled by using reaction centres and different carrier matrices for different purposes in the field of light energy conversion (e.g., photovoltaics) or biosensing (e.g., for specific detection of pesticides). In this review we will summarize the current status of knowledge, the kinds of applications available and the difficulties to be overcome in the different applications. We will also show possible research directions for the close future in this specific field. PMID:24678673

  5. Seasonal Changes of Bioluminescence in Photosynthetic and Heterotrophic Dinoflagellates at San Clemente Island

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    the northern Sargasso Sea : seasonal and vertical distribution. Mar. Biol. 104: 153- 164 Seasonal Changes of Bioluminescence in Photosynthetic and...bioluminescence in the northern Sargasso Sea . Mar. Biol. 113: 329-339 Bityukov, E.P., Rybasov, V.P., Shaida, V.G. (1967). Annual variations of the...geographically. Dinoflagellates are most abundant in coastal waters and inland seas and are less abundant in the open ocean (Colebrook and Robinson, 1965

  6. Application of photosynthetic N(2)-fixing cyanobacteria to the CELSS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fry, Ian V.; Hrabeta, Jana; Dsouza, Joe; Packer, Lester

    1987-01-01

    The feasibility of using photosynthetic microalgae (cyanobacteria) as a subsystem component for the closed ecological life support system program, with particular emphasis on the manipulation of the biomass (protein/carbohydrate) was addressed. Using factors which retard growth rates, but not photosynthetic electron flux, the partitioning of photosynthetically derived reductant may be dictated towards CO2 fixation (carbohydrate formation) and away from N2 fixation (protein formation). Cold shock treatment of fairly dense cultures markedly increases the glycogen content from 1 to 35 percent (dry weight), and presents a useful technique to change the protein/carbohydrate ratio of these organisms to a more nutritionally acceptable form.

  7. Development and pattern of mRNA relative abundance of bovine embryos cultured in the isolated mouse oviduct in organ culture.

    PubMed

    Rizos, D; Pintado, B; de la Fuente, J; Lonergan, P; Gutiérrez-Adán, A

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the development of bovine zygotes in isolated mouse oviducts (IMO) and the quality of the blastocysts produced. In vitro produced bovine zygotes were transferred into the ampullae of the IMO and cultured in SOF or KSOM. Control embryos were cultured in droplets of the same media. Following 6 days of culture, blastocysts were processed for nuclei counts or mRNA abundance. Culture in the IMO did not affect the proportion of zygotes developing to the blastocyst stage compared to the respective control droplets (SOF: 17.7 +/- 3.2% vs. 18.8 +/- 2.7%; KSOM: 20.7 +/- 2.6% vs. 22.2 +/- 2.8%). Culture in the IMO in KSOM resulted in an increased number of inner cell mass (ICM) nuclei; however, total nuclei number or incidence of apoptosis was unaffected. Culture in the IMO in SOF resulted in an increase (P < 0.05) in abundance of transcripts in blastocysts for Oct-4 and SOX, and reduced abundance of Glut-1, Na/K, Cx43, and survivin compared to blastocysts derived from culture in SOF alone. In contrast, culture in the IMO in KSOM resulted in increased abundance of transcripts for Glut-1, Cx43, Oct-4, and survivin and reduced expression of Na/K and SOX compared to KSOM alone. Transcripts for G6PDH, IFN-tau, and E-Cad were unaffected. These data confirm that the IMO is capable of supporting development of bovine embryos. Depending on the basal medium used, the pattern of transcript abundance in embryos derived from the IMO is similar to that of in vivo derived embryos.

  8. Short-term acclimation of the photosynthetic electron transfer chain to changing light: a mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Ebenhöh, Oliver; Fucile, Geoffrey; Finazzi, Giovanni; Rochaix, Jean-David; Goldschmidt-Clermont, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthetic eukaryotes house two photosystems with distinct light absorption spectra. Natural fluctuations in light quality and quantity can lead to unbalanced or excess excitation, compromising photosynthetic efficiency and causing photodamage. Consequently, these organisms have acquired several distinct adaptive mechanisms, collectively referred to as non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of chlorophyll fluorescence, which modulates the organization and function of the photosynthetic apparatus. The ability to monitor NPQ processes fluorometrically has led to substantial progress in elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms. However, the relative contribution of distinct NPQ mechanisms to variable light conditions in different photosynthetic eukaryotes remains unclear. Here, we present a mathematical model of the dynamic regulation of eukaryotic photosynthesis using ordinary differential equations. We demonstrate that, for Chlamydomonas, our model recapitulates the basic fluorescence features of short-term light acclimation known as state transitions and discuss how the model can be iteratively refined by comparison with physiological experiments to further our understanding of light acclimation in different species. PMID:24591710

  9. Regulation of leaf photosynthetic rate correlating with leaf carbohydrate status and activation state of Rubisco under a variety of photosynthetic source/sink balances.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Minobu

    2008-09-01

    There is evidence suggesting that in plants changes in the photosynthetic source/sink balance are an important factor that regulates leaf photosynthetic rate through affects on the leaf carbohydrate status. However, to resolve the regulatory mechanism of leaf photosynthetic rate associated with photosynthetic source/sink balance, information, particularly on mutual relationships of experimental data that are linked with a variety of photosynthetic source/sink balances, seems to be still limited. Thus, a variety of manipulations altering the plant source/sink ratio were carried out with soybean plants, and the mutual relationships of various characteristics such as leaf photosynthetic rate, carbohydrate content and the source/sink ratio were analyzed in manipulated and non-manipulated control plants. The manipulations were removal of one-half or all pods, removal of one-third or two-third leaves, and shading of one-third or one-half leaves with soybean plants grown for 8 weeks under 10 h light (24 degrees C) and 14 h darkness (17 degrees C). It was shown that there were significant negative correlations between source/sink ratio (dry weight ratio of attached leaves to other all organs) and leaf photosynthetic rate; source/sink ratio and activation ratio (percentage of initial activity to total activity) of Rubisco in leaf extract; leaf carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and photosynthetic rate; carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and activation ratio of Rubisco; amount of protein-bound ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) in leaf extract and leaf photosynthetic rate; and the amount of protein-bound RuBP and activation ratio of Rubisco. In addition, there were significant positive correlations between source/sink ratio and leaf carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content; source/sink ratio and the amount of protein-bound RuBP; carbohydrate (sucrose or starch) content and amount of protein-bound RuBP and the activation ratio of Rubisco and leaf photosynthetic rate

  10. [Photosynthetic and water physiological characteristics of weedy rice in northern China].

    PubMed

    Gao, Qi; Ma, Dian-Rong; Kong, De-Xiu; Wang, Wen-Jia; Tong, Hui; Zhao, Ming-Hui; Xu, Zheng-Jin; Chen, Wen-Fu

    2013-11-01

    Weedy rice is an important germplasm source of rice, which has the characteristics of cold-, drought-, and barren tolerance. Taking 88 accessions of weedy rice and 4 varieties of cultivated rice in northern China as test materials, this paper studied the photosynthetic characteristics (photosynthetic rate, transpiration rate, and stomatal conductance), water physiological characteristics, and their interrelationships of weedy rice in northern China. There existed greater differences in the photosynthetic and water physiological characteristics among the weedy rice accessions, possessing abundant diversity. The photosynthetic rate of the accessions was from 12.47 micromol CO2 x m(-2) x s(-1) to 28.67 micromol CO2 X m(-2) x s(-1), and the instantaneous water use efficiency was from 1.39 mg x g(-1) to 3.40 mg x g(-1). Among the photosynthetic parameters, intercellular CO2 concentration had the smallest variable coefficient, while stomatal conductance had the largest one. The photosynthetic rate had significant conic relationships with transpiration rate and stomatal conductance, and had a linear relationship with intercellular CO2 concentration. The significant conic relationships also existed between the instantaneous water use efficiency and the transpiration rate and stomatal conductance. The excellent features of weedy rice could be used to improve the cultivated rice varieties.

  11. Still Acting Green: Continued Expression of Photosynthetic Genes in the Heterotrophic Dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida (Peridiniales, Alveolata)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gwang Hoon; Jeong, Hae Jin; Yoo, Yeong Du; Kim, Sunju; Han, Ji Hee; Han, Jong Won; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C.

    2013-01-01

    The loss of photosynthetic function should lead to the cessation of expression and finally loss of photosynthetic genes in the new heterotroph. Dinoflagellates are known to have lost their photosynthetic ability several times. Dinoflagellates have also acquired photosynthesis from other organisms, either on a long-term basis or as “kleptoplastids” multiple times. The fate of photosynthetic gene expression in heterotrophs can be informative into evolution of gene expression patterns after functional loss, and the dinoflagellates ability to acquire new photosynthetic function through additional endosymbiosis. To explore this we analyzed a large-scale EST database consisting of 151,091 unique sequences (29,170 contigs, 120,921 singletons) obtained from 454 pyrosequencing of the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida. About 597 contigs from P. piscicida showed significant homology (E-value photosynthetic function. Most of the genes involved in the Calvin-Benson cycle were found, genes of the light-dependent reaction were also identified. Also genes of associated pathways including the chorismate pathway and genes involved in starch metabolism were discovered. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analysis suggest that these plastid-associated genes originated from several different photosynthetic ancestors. The Calvin-Benson cycle genes are mostly associated with genes derived from the secondary plastids of peridinin-containing dinoflagellates, while the light-harvesting genes are derived from diatoms, or diatoms that are tertiary plastids in other dinoflagellates. The continued expression of many genes involved in photosynthetic pathways indicates that the loss of transcriptional regulation may occur well after plastid loss and could explain the organism's ability to “capture” new plastids (i.e. different secondary endosymbiosis or tertiary symbioses) to renew photosynthetic function. PMID:23874554

  12. Still acting green: continued expression of photosynthetic genes in the heterotrophic Dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida (Peridiniales, Alveolata).

    PubMed

    Kim, Gwang Hoon; Jeong, Hae Jin; Yoo, Yeong Du; Kim, Sunju; Han, Ji Hee; Han, Jong Won; Zuccarello, Giuseppe C

    2013-01-01

    The loss of photosynthetic function should lead to the cessation of expression and finally loss of photosynthetic genes in the new heterotroph. Dinoflagellates are known to have lost their photosynthetic ability several times. Dinoflagellates have also acquired photosynthesis from other organisms, either on a long-term basis or as "kleptoplastids" multiple times. The fate of photosynthetic gene expression in heterotrophs can be informative into evolution of gene expression patterns after functional loss, and the dinoflagellates ability to acquire new photosynthetic function through additional endosymbiosis. To explore this we analyzed a large-scale EST database consisting of 151,091 unique sequences (29,170 contigs, 120,921 singletons) obtained from 454 pyrosequencing of the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Pfiesteria piscicida. About 597 contigs from P. piscicida showed significant homology (E-value photosynthetic function. Most of the genes involved in the Calvin-Benson cycle were found, genes of the light-dependent reaction were also identified. Also genes of associated pathways including the chorismate pathway and genes involved in starch metabolism were discovered. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analysis suggest that these plastid-associated genes originated from several different photosynthetic ancestors. The Calvin-Benson cycle genes are mostly associated with genes derived from the secondary plastids of peridinin-containing dinoflagellates, while the light-harvesting genes are derived from diatoms, or diatoms that are tertiary plastids in other dinoflagellates. The continued expression of many genes involved in photosynthetic pathways indicates that the loss of transcriptional regulation may occur well after plastid loss and could explain the organism's ability to "capture" new plastids (i.e. different secondary endosymbiosis or tertiary symbioses) to renew photosynthetic function.

  13. Photosynthetic strategies in leaves and stems of Egeria densa.

    PubMed

    Rascio, N; Mariani, P; Tommasini, E; Bodner, M; Larcher, W

    1991-10-01

    Photosynthetic mechanisms have been compared in leaves and, separately, in stems of Egeria densa Planch. In order to correlate the structural and functional characteristics of the two organs (1) the ultrastructural features of leaves and stems have been studied and (2) their photosynthetic activity has been evaluated by measuring in vivo both oxygen evolution and the kinetics of chlorophyll fluorescence. The results confirm the aquatic behaviour of the leaf which is able to utilize inorganic C supplied both as CO2 and HCO 3 (-) . In this respect, the different wall organization found in the two cell layers of the leaf is particularly interesting, since it could be related to the known polar mechanism of inorganic-C uptake. The stem, by contrast, behaves rather as an aerial organ, needing very high CO2 concentrations in the aquatic environment in order to carry out photosynthesis. In the stem, the aerenchyma plays a role in supplying the green cells with gaseous respiratory CO2, thus facilitating the photosynthetic activity of the submerged stems.

  14. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2004-01-30

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2003 through 1/1/2004. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we have seen very encouraging results from the model scale tests in terms of organism growth rates and we have begun the final tests necessary to meet our project goals. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities--(A) The solar collector is working well and has survived the winter weather. (B) The improved high-flow CRF-2 test system has been used successfully to run several long-term growth tests with periodic harvesting events. The high flow harvesting system performed well. The mass measurement results after a 4-week test show 275% growth over the initial mass loading. This figure would have been higher had there been no leakage and handling losses. Carbon dating of biomass from this test is planned for carbon uptake estimation. The next test will include direct measurement of carbon uptake in addition to organism mass measurements. (C) Qualitative organism growth testing has begun in the pilot scale bioreactor. Some issues with uniformity of organism loading, fluid leakage and evaporation have surfaced and are currently being addressed, and quantitative testing will begin as soon as these problems are resolved. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces--(A) Montana State University (Subcontracted to do organism studies) submitted their final (3-year) project report. An abstract of the report in included in this quarterly report.

  15. Hydrogen production in photosynthetic microbial mats in the Elkhorn Slough estuary, Monterey Bay

    PubMed Central

    Burow, Luke C; Woebken, Dagmar; Bebout, Brad M; McMurdie, Paul J; Singer, Steven W; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Spormann, Alfred M; Weber, Peter K; Hoehler, Tori M

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) release from photosynthetic microbial mats has contributed to the chemical evolution of Earth and could potentially be a source of renewable H2 in the future. However, the taxonomy of H2-producing microorganisms (hydrogenogens) in these mats has not been previously determined. With combined biogeochemical and molecular studies of microbial mats collected from Elkhorn Slough, Monterey Bay, California, we characterized the mechanisms of H2 production and identified a dominant hydrogenogen. Net production of H2 was observed within the upper photosynthetic layer (0–2 mm) of the mats under dark and anoxic conditions. Pyrosequencing of rRNA gene libraries generated from this layer demonstrated the presence of 64 phyla, with Bacteriodetes, Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria dominating the sequences. Sequencing of rRNA transcripts obtained from this layer demonstrated that Cyanobacteria dominated rRNA transcript pyrotag libraries. An OTU affiliated to Microcoleus spp. was the most abundant OTU in both rRNA gene and transcript libraries. Depriving mats of sunlight resulted in an order of magnitude decrease in subsequent nighttime H2 production, suggesting that newly fixed carbon is critical to H2 production. Suppression of nitrogen (N2)-fixation in the mats did not suppress H2 production, which indicates that co-metabolic production of H2 during N2-fixation is not an important contributor to H2 production. Concomitant production of organic acids is consistent with fermentation of recently produced photosynthate as the dominant mode of H2 production. Analysis of rRNA % transcript:% gene ratios and H2-evolving bidirectional [NiFe] hydrogenase % transcript:% gene ratios indicated that Microcoelus spp. are dominant hydrogenogens in the Elkhorn Slough mats. PMID:22011721

  16. Tissue distribution and thyroid hormone effects on mRNA abundance for membrane transporters Mct8, Mct10, and organic anion-transporting polypeptides (Oatps) in a teleost fish

    PubMed Central

    Muzzio, Amanda M.; Noyes, Pamela D.; Stapleton, Heather M.; Lema, Sean C.

    2014-01-01

    Many of the actions of thyroid hormones (THs) occur via TH binding to intracellular receptors. Although it was long thought that THs diffused passively across plasma membranes, it is now recognized that cellular entry is mediated by a variety of membrane transporter proteins. In this study, we identified cDNAs encoding the TH transporters monocarboxylate transferase 8 (mct8) and 10 (mct10) as well as eight distinct organic anion-transporting polypeptide (oatp) proteins from fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Analysis of the tissue distribution of transporter mRNAs revealed that mct8 and mct10 transcripts were both abundant in liver, but also present at lower levels in brain, gonad and other tissues. Transcripts encoding oatp1c1 were highly abundant in brain, liver and gonad, and exhibited significant sex differences in the liver and gonad. Treatment of adult male minnows with 3,5,3′-triiodothyronine (T3) or the goitrogen methimazole altered gene transcript abundance for several transporters. Fish given exogenous T3 had reduced mct8 and oapt1c1 mRNA levels in the liver compared to methimazole-treated fish. In the brain, transcripts for mct8, mct10, oatp2b1, and oatp3a1 were each reduced in abundance in fish with elevated T3. As a whole, these results provide evidence that TH status influences the transcriptional dynamics of mct8, mct10 and several Oatp genes including oatp1c1 in teleost fish. PMID:24113777

  17. Tissue distribution and thyroid hormone effects on mRNA abundance for membrane transporters Mct8, Mct10, and organic anion-transporting polypeptides (Oatps) in a teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Muzzio, Amanda M; Noyes, Pamela D; Stapleton, Heather M; Lema, Sean C

    2014-01-01

    Many of the actions of thyroid hormones (THs) occur via TH binding to intracellular receptors. Although it was long thought that THs diffused passively across plasma membranes, it is now recognized that cellular entry is mediated by a variety of membrane transporter proteins. In this study, we identified cDNAs encoding the TH transporters monocarboxylate transferases 8 (mct8) and 10 (mct10) as well as eight distinct organic anion-transporting polypeptide (oatp) proteins from fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Analysis of the tissue distribution of transporter mRNAs revealed that mct8 and mct10 transcripts were both abundant in liver, but also present at lower levels in brain, gonad and other tissues. Transcripts encoding oatp1c1 were highly abundant in brain, liver and gonad, and exhibited significant sex differences in the liver and gonad. Treatment of adult male minnows with 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3) or the goitrogen methimazole altered gene transcript abundance for several transporters. Fish given exogenous T3 had reduced mct8 and oapt1c1 mRNA levels in the liver compared to methimazole-treated fish. In the brain, transcripts for mct8, mct10, oatp2b1, and oatp3a1 were each reduced in abundance in fish with elevated T3. As a whole, these results provide evidence that TH status influences the transcriptional dynamics of mct8, mct10 and several Oatp genes including oatp1c1 in teleost fish.

  18. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2001-04-16

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/03/2001 through 4/02/2001. Many of the activities and accomplishments are continuations of work initiated and reported in last quarter's status report. Major activities and accomplishments for this quarter include: Three sites in Yellowstone National Park have been identified that may contain suitable organisms for use in a bioreactor; Full-scale culturing of one thermophilic organism from Yellowstone has progressed to the point that there is a sufficient quantity to test this organism in the model-scale bioreactor; The effects of the additive monoethanolamine on the growth of one thermophilic organism from Yellowstone has been tested; Testing of growth surface adhesion and properties is continuing; Construction of a larger model-scale bioreactor to improve and expand testing capabilities is completed and the facility is undergoing proof tests; Model-scale bioreactor tests examining the effects of CO{sub 2} concentration levels and lighting levels on organism growth rates are continuing; Alternative fiber optic based deep-penetration light delivery systems for use in the pilot-scale bioreactor have been designed, constructed and tested; An existing slug flow reactor system has been modified for use in this project, and a proof-of-concept test plan has been developed for the slug flow reactor; Research and testing of water-jet harvesting techniques is continuing, and a harvesting system has been designed for use in the model-scale bioreactor; and The investigation of comparative digital image analysis as a means for determining the ''density'' of algae on a growth surface is continuing Plans for next quarter's work and an update on the project's web page are included in the conclusions.

  19. Effect of experimental crude oil contamination on abundance, mortality and resettlement of representative mud flat organisms in the mesohaline area of the elbe estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Bernem, K. H.

    After repeated experimental contamination with small doses of the crude oils Arabian light, Kuwait crude and Iranian light on a silty mud flat in the Elbe estuary, neither an increased mortality nor emigration was found in Macoma balthica or Nereis diversicolor. Oligochaetes increased in abundance. The entire population of Corophium volutator tried to leave the contaminated sediment. Most specimens came into contact with the oil coating of the sediment and were killed. Twelve weeks after the beginning of the contaminations the original community structure had reestablished. Different effects between the 3 crude oils tested were not significant.

  20. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2001-01-16

    This is the first quarterly report of the project Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation. The official project start date, 10/02/2000, was delayed until 10/31/2000 due to an intellectual property dispute that was resolved. However, the delay forced a subsequent delay in subcontracting with Montana State University, which then delayed obtaining a sampling permit from Yellowstone National Park. However, even with these delays, the project moved forward with some success. Accomplishments for this quarter include: Culturing of thermophilic organisms from Yellowstone; Testing of mesophilic organisms in extreme CO{sub 2} conditions; Construction of a second test bed for additional testing; Purchase of a total carbon analyzer dedicated to the project; Construction of a lighting container for Oak Ridge National Laboratory optical fiber testing; Modified lighting of existing test box to provide more uniform distribution; Testing of growth surface adhesion and properties; Experimentation on water-jet harvesting techniques; and Literature review underway regarding uses of biomass after harvesting. Plans for next quarter's work and an update on the project's web page are included in the conclusions.

  1. Hydrogen Production by the Photosynthetic Bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum

    PubMed Central

    Zürrer, Hans; Bachofen, Reinhard

    1979-01-01

    Continuous photosynthetic production of hydrogen by Rhodospirillum rubrum in batch cultures was observed up to 80 days with the hydrogen donor, pure lactate or lactic acid-containing wastes, supplied periodically. Hydrogen was produced at an average rate of 6 ml/h per g (dry weight) of cells with whey as a hydrogen donor. In continuous cultures with glutamate as a growth-limiting nitrogen source and lactate as a hydrogen donor, hydrogen was evolved at a rate of 20 ml/h per g (dry weight). The composition of the gas evolved remained practically constant (70 to 75% H2, 25 to 30% CO2). Photosynthetic bacteria processing specific organic wastes could be an advantage in large-scale production of hydrogen together with food protein of high value, compared to other biological systems. Images PMID:16345375

  2. Influence of thermal light correlations on photosynthetic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mendoza, Adriana; Manrique, Pedro; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Johnson, Neil F.; Rodríguez, Ferney J.; Quiroga, Luis

    2014-03-01

    The thermal light from the sun is characterized by both classical and quantum mechanical correlations. These correlations have left a fingerprint on the natural harvesting structures developed through five billion years of evolutionary pressure, specially in photosynthetic organisms. In this work, based upon previous extensive studies of spatio-temporal correlations of light fields, we hypothesize that structures involving photosensitive pigments like those present in purple bacteria vesicles emerge as an evolutionary response to the different properties of incident light. By using burstiness and memory as measures that quantify higher moments of the photon arrival statistics, we generate photon-time traces. They are used to simulate absorption on detectors spatially extended over regions comparable to these light fields coherence length. Finally, we provide some insights into the connection between these photo-statistical features with the photosynthetic membrane architecture and the lights' spatial correlation. Facultad de Ciencias Uniandes.

  3. Ion antiport accelerates photosynthetic acclimation in fluctuating light environments

    PubMed Central

    Armbruster, Ute; Carrillo, L. Ruby; Venema, Kees; Pavlovic, Lazar; Schmidtmann, Elisabeth; Kornfeld, Ari; Jahns, Peter; Berry, Joseph A.; Kramer, David M.; Jonikas, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    Many photosynthetic organisms globally, including crops, forests and algae, must grow in environments where the availability of light energy fluctuates dramatically. How photosynthesis maintains high efficiency despite such fluctuations in its energy source remains poorly understood. Here we show that Arabidopsis thaliana K+ efflux antiporter (KEA3) is critical for high photosynthetic efficiency under fluctuating light. On a shift from dark to low light, or high to low light, kea3 mutants show prolonged dissipation of absorbed light energy as heat. KEA3 localizes to the thylakoid membrane, and allows proton efflux from the thylakoid lumen by proton/potassium antiport. KEA3’s activity accelerates the downregulation of pH-dependent energy dissipation after transitions to low light, leading to faster recovery of high photosystem II quantum efficiency and increased CO2 assimilation. Our results reveal a mechanism that increases the efficiency of photosynthesis under fluctuating light. PMID:25451040

  4. Light energy to bioelectricity: photosynthetic microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, Miriam; He, Zhen; Angenent, Largus T

    2010-06-01

    Here, we reviewed five different approaches that integrate photosynthesis with microbial fuel cells (MFCs)-photoMFCs. Until now, no conclusive report has been published that identifies direct electron transfer (DET) between a photosynthetic biocatalyst and the anode of a MFC. Therefore, most recent research has been performed to generate sufficient electric current from sunlight with either electrocatalysts or heterotrophic bacteria on the anode to convert photosynthetic products indirectly. The most promising photoMFCs to date are electrocatalytic bioelectrochemical systems (BESs) that convert hydrogen from photosynthesis and sediment-based BESs that can convert excreted organics from cyanobacteria or plants. In addition, illumination on the cathode may provide either oxygen for an electrocatalytic reduction reaction or a promising anoxygenic biocathode.

  5. An Investigation into the Physico-chemical Factors Affecting the Abundance and Diversity of Aquatic Insects in Organically Manured Aquadams and Their Utilization by Oreochromis mossambicus (Perciformes: Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Rapatsa, M M; Moyo, N A G

    2015-08-01

    The interaction between the fish Oreochromis mossambicus (Percifomes: Cichlidae) and aquatic insects after application of chicken, cow, and pig manure was studied in 7,000-liter plastic aquadams. Principal component analysis showed that most of the variation in water quality after application of manure was accounted for by potassium, nitrogen, dissolved oxygen, phosphate, and alkalinity. Canonical correspondence analysis showed that Gyrinidae, Elminidae, Hydrophilidae, Hydraenidae, and Athericidae were associated with high nutrient levels (nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium) characteristic of the chicken manure. However, the most abundant aquatic insects Gerridae, Notonectidae, and Culicidae were close to the centre of the ordination and not defined by any nutrient gradient. The Shannon-Wiener diversity was highest in the aquadams treated with chicken manure. The most frequently occurring aquatic insects in the diet of O. mossambicus were culicid mosquitoes in all the treatments. However, in the laboratory, Chironomidae were the most preferred because they lacked refuge. Notonectidae and Gerridae were not recorded in the diet of O. mossambicus despite their abundance. This may be because of their anti-predation strategies. Laboratory experiments showed that Notonectidae, Gyrinidae, and Gerridae fed on Chironomidae and Culicidae. This implies that aquatic predatory insects competed for food with O. mossambicus.

  6. Hydrogen Biogeochemistry in Anaerobic and Photosynthetic Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The simple biochemistry of molecular hydrogen is central to a large number of microbial processes, affecting the interaction of organisms with each other and with the environment. In anoxic sediments, a great majority of microbial redox processes involve hydrogen as a reactant, product or potential by-product. Accordingly, the energetics (thermodynamics) of each of these processes is affected by variations in local H2 concentrations. It has long been established that this effect is important in governing microbe-microbe interactions and there are multiple demonstrations that "interspecies hydrogen transfer" can alter the products of, inhibit/stimulate, or even reverse microbial metabolic reactions. In anoxic sediments, H2 concentrations themselves are thought to be controlled by the thermodynamics of the predominant H2-consuming microbial process. In sediments from Cape Lookout Bight, this relationship quantitatively describes the co-variation of H2 concentrations with temperature (for methanogens and sulfate reducers) and with sulfate concentration (for sulfate reducers). The quantitative aspect is import= for two reasons: 1) it permits the modeling of H2-sensitive biogeochemistry, such as anaerobic methane oxidation or pathways of organic matter remineralization, as a function of environmental controls; 2) for such a relationship to be observed requires that intracellular biochemistry and bioenergetics are being directly expressed in a component of the extracellular medium. H2 could therefore be utilized a non-invasive probe of cellular energetic function in intact microbial ecosystems. Based on the latter principle we have measured down-core profiles of H2 and other relevant physico-chemical parameters in order to calculate the metabolic energy yields (DG) that support microbial metabolism in Cape Lookout Bight sediments. Methanogens in this system apparently function with energy yields significantly smaller than the minimum requirements suggested by pure

  7. Elevated atmospheric CO2 affected photosynthetic products in wheat seedlings and biological activity in rhizosphere soil under cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xia; Liu, Tuo; Zhao, Yonghua; He, Yunhua; Yang, Mingyan

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of elevated CO2 (700 ± 23 μmol mol(-1)) on photosynthetic products in wheat seedlings and on organic compounds and biological activity in rhizosphere soil under cadmium (Cd) stress. Elevated CO2 was associated with decreased quantities of reducing sugars, starch, and soluble amino acids, and with increased quantities of soluble sugars, total sugars, and soluble proteins in wheat seedlings under Cd stress. The contents of total soluble sugars, total free amino acids, total soluble phenolic acids, and total organic acids in the rhizosphere soil under Cd stress were improved by elevated CO2. Compared to Cd stress alone, the activity of amylase, phenol oxidase, urease, L-asparaginase, β-glucosidase, neutral phosphatase, and fluorescein diacetate increased under elevated CO2 in combination with Cd stress; only cellulase activity decreased. Bacterial abundance in rhizosphere soil was stimulated by elevated CO2 at low Cd concentrations (1.31-5.31 mg Cd kg(-1) dry soil). Actinomycetes, total microbial abundance, and fungi decreased under the combined conditions at 5.31-10.31 mg Cd kg(-1) dry soil. In conclusion, increased production of soluble sugars, total sugars, and proteins in wheat seedlings under elevated CO2 + Cd stress led to greater quantities of organic compounds in the rhizosphere soil relative to seedlings grown under Cd stress only. Elevated CO2 concentrations could moderate the effects of heavy metal pollution on enzyme activity and microorganism abundance in rhizosphere soils, thus improving soil fertility and the microecological rhizosphere environment of wheat under Cd stress.

  8. Changes in partitioning of carbon amongst photosynthetic pico- and nano-plankton groups in the Sargasso Sea in response to changes in the North Atlantic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, John R.; Aucan, Jerome P.; Goldberg, Stacey R.; Lomas, Michael W.

    2013-09-01

    Picophytoplankton carbon biomass at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site from June 2004 to December 2010 was estimated from the direct calibration of cellular carbon content and forward light scatter (via flow cytometry). Seasonality and interannual dynamics of Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and small eukaryotic algae (<12 μm diameter) abundance, cellular carbon content (QC; particulate organic carbon; POC cell-1), and group-specific carbon biomass are reported. QC of individual taxa varied with depth and season by as much as an order of magnitude, roughly comparable to variability in abundance. During the time-series there were obvious shifts in the taxonomic distribution of photosynthetic carbon biomass; these interannual shifts in biomass were due to simultaneous changes in both QC and cell abundance. The observed pattern was not apparent from numerical abundance alone, highlighting the importance of QC measurements in place of using fixed conversion factors to better understand biological carbon dynamics. Changes in the phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) from positive to negative modes correlated with shifts in biomass between picocyanobacteria and small eukaryotic algae, respectively. Thus, shifts in algal community structure are inferred to be associated with changes in light intensity and implied nutrient supply via mixing (i.e., patterns in upper ocean stability). These observed changes in phytoplankton biomass partitioning were correlated with the important ocean carbon cycle parameters of export flux, mesopelagic transfer efficiency, and elemental stoichiometry. Importantly, interannual relationships between these parameters and algal biomass were detected only when QC was considered as variable.

  9. Multiantenna artificial photosynthetic reaction center complex.

    PubMed

    Terazono, Yuichi; Kodis, Gerdenis; Liddell, Paul A; Garg, Vikas; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Gust, Devens

    2009-05-21

    In order to ensure efficient utilization of the solar spectrum, photosynthetic organisms use a variety of antenna chromophores to absorb light and transfer excitation to a reaction center, where photoinduced charge separation occurs. Reported here is a synthetic molecular heptad that features two bis(phenylethynyl)anthracene and two borondipyrromethene antennas linked to a hexaphenylbenzene core that also bears two zinc porphyrins. A fullerene electron acceptor self-assembles to both porhyrins via dative bonds. Excitation energy is transferred very efficiently from all four antennas to the porphyrins. Singlet-singlet energy transfer occurs both directly and by a stepwise funnel-like pathway wherein excitation moves down a thermodynamic gradient. The porphyrin excited states donate an electron to the fullerene with a time constant of 3 ps to generate a charge-separated state with a lifetime of 230 ps. The overall quantum yield is close to unity. In the absence of the fullerene, the porphyrin excited singlet state donates an electron to a borondipyrromethene on a slower time scale. This molecule demonstrates that by incorporating antennas, it is possible for a molecular system to harvest efficiently light throughout the visible from ultraviolet wavelengths out to approximately 650 nm.

  10. [Effects of light quality on photosynthetic pigment contents and photosynthetic characteristics of peanut seedling leaves].

    PubMed

    Yan, Meng-Meng; Wang, Ming-Lun; Wang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Yue-Fu; Zhao, Chang-Xing

    2014-02-01

    This study explored the effects of different light quality on photosynthetic pigment contents and photosynthetic characteristics of peanut (Qinhua 6) seedling leaves. The results showed that, compared with natural light, blue light (445-470 nm) could significantly improve the specific leaf area (SLA), chlorophyll a/b value and carotenoid content of peanut seedlings. Meanwhile, the net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, and transpiration rate were higher, the intercellular CO2 content was lower, and the photosynthetic efficiency was improved significantly under blue light. Red light (610-660 nm) could improve the chlorophyll content significantly, and reduce SLA, chlorophyll a/b value and carotenoid content, with a lower photosynthetic efficiency than natural light. Green light (515-520 nm) and yellow light (590-595 nm) were not conducive to photosynthetic pigment accumulation of leaves, and significantly inhibited leaf photosynthesis of peanut seedlings.

  11. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Photosynthetic Systems.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Toru; Chen, Wei Jia; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S

    2017-01-25

    Photosynthesis begins when a network of pigment-protein complexes captures solar energy and transports it to the reaction center, where charge separation occurs. When necessary (under low light conditions), photosynthetic organisms perform this energy transport and charge separation with near unity quantum efficiency. Remarkably, this high efficiency is maintained under physiological conditions, which include thermal fluctuations of the pigment-protein complexes and changing local environments. These conditions introduce multiple types of heterogeneity in the pigment-protein complexes, including structural heterogeneity, energetic heterogeneity, and functional heterogeneity. Understanding how photosynthetic light-harvesting functions in the face of these fluctuations requires understanding this heterogeneity, which, in turn, requires characterization of individual pigment-protein complexes. Single-molecule spectroscopy has the power to probe individual complexes. In this review, we present an overview of the common techniques for single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy applied to photosynthetic systems and describe selected experiments on these systems. We discuss how these experiments provide a new understanding of the impact of heterogeneity on light harvesting and thus how these systems are optimized to capture sunlight under physiological conditions.

  12. Photosynthetic microbial fuel cells with positive light response.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yongjin; Pisciotta, John; Billmyre, R Blake; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2009-12-01

    The current study introduces an aerobic single-chamber photosynthetic microbial fuel cell (PMFC). Evaluation of PMFC performance using naturally growing fresh-water photosynthetic biofilm revealed a weak positive light response, that is, an increase in cell voltage upon illumination. When the PMFC anodes were coated with electrically conductive polymers, the rate of voltage increased and the amplitude of the light response improved significantly. The rapid immediate positive response to light was consistent with a mechanism postulating that the photosynthetic electron-transfer chain is the source of the electrons harvested on the anode surface. This mechanism is fundamentally different from the one exploited in previously designed anaerobic microbial fuel cells (MFCs), sediment MFCs, or anaerobic PMFCs, where the electrons are derived from the respiratory electron-transfer chain. The power densities produced in PMFCs were substantially lower than those that are currently reported for conventional MFC (0.95 mW/m(2) for polyaniline-coated and 1.3 mW/m(2) for polypyrrole-coated anodes). However, the PMFC did not depend on an organic substrate as an energy source and was powered only by light energy. Its operation was CO(2)-neutral and did not require buffers or exogenous electron transfer shuttles.

  13. Photosynthetic pigments as biomarkers oof phytoplankton populations and processes involved in the transformation of particulate organic matter at the Biotrans site (47°N, 20°W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, R.; Claustre, H.

    1991-03-01

    Particulate samples were collected throughout the water column (0-4200 m)in June/July 1988 at the Biotrans site and their carotenoids and chlorophylls analysed by HPLC. These photosynthetic pigments were used as biomarkers to characterize the autotropiic pupolations, their utilization by heterotrophs snd sedimentation of particles out the euphotic zone. In the upper 50 m the pico- and nanophytoplankton accounted for 85% of the chlorophyll a biomass. The major pigment of the nanophytoplankton fraction was 19'-hexanolloxyfucoxanthin (prymnesiophytes), whereas the main pigment in the microphytoplankton was peridinin (dinoflagellates). The peaks in the distributions of phaeophorbide a and nanophytoplankton pigments (19'- hexanoyloxyfucoxanthin, 19'-butanoyloxyfucoxanthin, chlorophyll b,lutein and/or zeaxanthin) coincided between 75 and 100 m, which pointed to an active grazing of nanophytoplankton by zooplankton. These pigments were detected in particles >20 μm from the Double Longhurst Hardy Plankton Recorder down to 1000 m, probably as a consequence of their incorporation into sedimenting faecal material. In contrast, the vertical distributions of phaeophorbide a and peridinin (microphytoplankton pigment) did not coincide, and this carotenoid was not detected below 400 m in particles > 20μm. A vertical profile (0-4200 m) shows,at 2300 m, the presence of nanophytoplanktonic material similar in its pigment pattern and compositionto that of surface populations, suggesting fast sedimentation of Prymnesiophyte floc.

  14. Early photosynthetic microorganisms and environmental evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubic, S.

    1980-01-01

    Microfossils which are preserved as shrivelled kerogenous residues provide little information about cellular organization and almost none about the metabolic properties of the organisms. The distinction between prokaryotic vs eukaryotic, and phototrophic vs chemo- and organotrophic fossil microorganisms rests entirely on morphological comparisons with recent counterparts. The residual nature of the microbial fossil record promotes the conclusion that it must be biased toward (a) most abundant organisms, (b) those most resistant to degradation, and (c) those inhabiting environments with high preservation potential e.g., stromatolites. These criteria support the cyanophyte identity of most Precambrian microbial fossils on the following grounds: (1) as primary producers they dominate prokaryotic communities in modern extreme environments, e.g., intertidal zone; (2) several morphological counterparts of modern cyanophytes and microbial fossils have been established based on structure, cell division patterns and degradation sequences. The impact of anaerobic and oxygenic microbial photosynthesis on the evolution of Precambrian environments is discussed.

  15. [(3) H]-L685,458 binding sites are abundant in multiple peripheral organs in rats: implications for safety assessment of putative γ-secretase targeting drugs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhi-Ying; Li, Jian-Ming; Xiao, Ling; Mou, Lin; Cai, Yan; Huang, He; Luo, Xue-Gang; Yan, Xiao-Xin

    2014-12-01

    γ-Secretase is a multimeric enzyme complex that carries out proteolytic processing to a variety of cellular proteins. It is currently explored as a therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cancer. Mechanism-based toxicity needs to be thoroughly evaluated for γ-secretase inhibitory and/or modulatory drugs. This study comparatively assessed putative γ-secretase catalytic sites in rat peripheral tissues relative to brain and explored an effort of its pharmacological inhibition on hair regeneration. Using [(3) H]-labelled L685,458, a potent γ-secretase inhibitor, as probe, we found more abundant presence of γ-secretase binding sites in the liver, gastrointestinal tract, hair follicle, pituitary gland, ovary and testis, as compared to the brain. Local application of L658,458 delayed vibrissal regrowth following whisker removal. These results suggest that γ-secretase may execute important biological functions in many peripheral systems, as in the brain. The development of γ-secretase inhibitors/modulators for AD and cancer therapy should include close monitoring of toxicological panels for hepatic, gastrointestinal, endocrinal and reproductive functions.

  16. Stoichiometry and kinetics of mercury uptake by photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kis, Mariann; Sipka, Gábor; Maróti, Péter

    2017-03-04

    Mercury adsorption on the cell surface and intracellular uptake by bacteria represent the key first step in the production and accumulation of highly toxic mercury in living organisms. In this work, the biophysical characteristics of mercury bioaccumulation are studied in intact cells of photosynthetic bacteria by use of analytical (dithizone) assay and physiological photosynthetic markers (pigment content, fluorescence induction, and membrane potential) to determine the amount of mercury ions bound to the cell surface and taken up by the cell. It is shown that the Hg(II) uptake mechanism (1) has two kinetically distinguishable components, (2) includes co-opted influx through heavy metal transporters since the slow component is inhibited by Ca(2+) channel blockers, (3) shows complex pH dependence demonstrating the competition of ligand binding of Hg(II) ions with H(+) ions (low pH) and high tendency of complex formation of Hg(II) with hydroxyl ions (high pH), and (4) is not a passive but an energy-dependent process as evidenced by light activation and inhibition by protonophore. Photosynthetic bacteria can accumulate Hg(II) in amounts much (about 10(5)) greater than their own masses by well-defined strong and weak binding sites with equilibrium binding constants in the range of 1 (μM)(-1) and 1 (mM)(-1), respectively. The strong binding sites are attributed to sulfhydryl groups as the uptake is blocked by use of sulfhydryl modifying agents and their number is much (two orders of magnitude) smaller than the number of weak binding sites. Biofilms developed by some bacteria (e.g., Rvx. gelatinosus) increase the mercury binding capacity further by a factor of about five. Photosynthetic bacteria in the light act as a sponge of Hg(II) and can be potentially used for biomonitoring and bioremediation of mercury-contaminated aqueous cultures.

  17. The Regulation of Photosynthetic Structure and Function during Nitrogen Deprivation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Juergens, Matthew T.; Deshpande, Rahul R.; Lucker, Ben F.; Park, Jeong-Jin; Wang, Hongxia; Gargouri, Mahmoud; Holguin, F. Omar; Disbrow, Bradley; Schaub, Tanner; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Kramer, David M.; Gang, David R.; Hicks, Leslie M.; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of carbon storage compounds by many unicellular algae after nutrient deprivation occurs despite declines in their photosynthetic apparatus. To understand the regulation and roles of photosynthesis during this potentially bioenergetically valuable process, we analyzed photosynthetic structure and function after nitrogen deprivation in the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolite, and lipid profiling and microscopic time course data were combined with multiple measures of photosynthetic function. Levels of transcripts and proteins of photosystems I and II and most antenna genes fell with differing trajectories; thylakoid membrane lipid levels decreased, while their proportions remained similar and thylakoid membrane organization appeared to be preserved. Cellular chlorophyll (Chl) content decreased more than 2-fold within 24 h, and we conclude from transcript protein and 13C labeling rates that Chl synthesis was down-regulated both pre- and posttranslationally and that Chl levels fell because of a rapid cessation in synthesis and dilution by cellular growth rather than because of degradation. Photosynthetically driven oxygen production and the efficiency of photosystem II as well as P700+ reduction and electrochromic shift kinetics all decreased over the time course, without evidence of substantial energy overflow. The results also indicate that linear electron flow fell approximately 15% more than cyclic flow over the first 24 h. Comparing Calvin-Benson cycle transcript and enzyme levels with changes in photosynthetic 13CO2 incorporation rates also pointed to a coordinated multilevel down-regulation of photosynthetic fluxes during starch synthesis before the induction of high triacylglycerol accumulation rates. PMID:25489023

  18. CD56(bright)perforin(low) noncytotoxic human NK cells are abundant in both healthy and neoplastic solid tissues and recirculate to secondary lymphoid organs via afferent lymph.

    PubMed

    Carrega, Paolo; Bonaccorsi, Irene; Di Carlo, Emma; Morandi, Barbara; Paul, Petra; Rizzello, Valeria; Cipollone, Giuseppe; Navarra, Giuseppe; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Ferlazzo, Guido

    2014-04-15

    As limited information is available regarding the distribution and trafficking of NK cells among solid organs, we have analyzed a wide array of tissues derived from different human compartments. NK cells were widely distributed in most solid tissues, although their amount varied significantly depending on the tissue/organ analyzed. Interestingly, the distribution appeared to be subset specific, as some tissues were preferentially populated by CD56(bright)perforin(low) NK cells, with others by the CD56(dim)perforin(high) cytotoxic counterpart. Nevertheless, most tissues were highly enriched in CD56(bright)perforin(low) cells, and the distribution of NK subsets appeared in accordance with tissue gene expression of chemotactic factors, for which receptors are differently represented in the two subsets. Remarkably, chemokine expression pattern of tissues was modified after neoplastic transformation. As a result, although the total amount of NK cells infiltrating the tissues did not significantly change upon malignant transformation, the relative proportion of NK subsets infiltrating the tissues was different, with a trend toward a tumor-infiltrating NK population enriched in noncytotoxic cells. Besides solid tissues, CD56(bright)perforin(low) NK cells were also detected in seroma fluids, which represents an accrual of human afferent lymph, indicating that they may leave peripheral solid tissues and recirculate to secondary lymphoid organs via lymphatic vessels. Our results provide a comprehensive mapping of NK cells in human tissues, demonstrating that discrete NK subsets populate and recirculate through most human tissues and that organ-specific chemokine expression patterns might affect their distribution. In this context, chemokine switch upon neoplastic transformation might represent a novel mechanism of tumor immune escape.

  19. Hybrid system of semiconductor and photosynthetic protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Younghye; Shin, Seon Ae; Lee, Jaehun; Yang, Ki Dong; Nam, Ki Tae

    2014-08-01

    Photosynthetic protein has the potential to be a new attractive material for solar energy absorption and conversion. The development of semiconductor/photosynthetic protein hybrids is an example of recent progress toward efficient, clean and nanostructured photoelectric systems. In the review, two biohybrid systems interacting through different communicating methods are addressed: (1) a photosynthetic protein immobilized semiconductor electrode operating via electron transfer and (2) a hybrid of semiconductor quantum dots and photosynthetic protein operating via energy transfer. The proper selection of materials and functional and structural modification of the components and optimal conjugation between them are the main issues discussed in the review. In conclusion, we propose the direction of future biohybrid systems for solar energy conversion systems, optical biosensors and photoelectric devices.

  20. Hybrid system of semiconductor and photosynthetic protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younghye; Shin, Seon Ae; Lee, Jaehun; Yang, Ki Dong; Nam, Ki Tae

    2014-08-29

    Photosynthetic protein has the potential to be a new attractive material for solar energy absorption and conversion. The development of semiconductor/photosynthetic protein hybrids is an example of recent progress toward efficient, clean and nanostructured photoelectric systems. In the review, two biohybrid systems interacting through different communicating methods are addressed: (1) a photosynthetic protein immobilized semiconductor electrode operating via electron transfer and (2) a hybrid of semiconductor quantum dots and photosynthetic protein operating via energy transfer. The proper selection of materials and functional and structural modification of the components and optimal conjugation between them are the main issues discussed in the review. In conclusion, we propose the direction of future biohybrid systems for solar energy conversion systems, optical biosensors and photoelectric devices.

  1. Characterization of relative abundance of lactic acid bacteria species in French organic sourdough by cultural, qPCR and MiSeq high-throughput sequencing methods.

    PubMed

    Michel, Elisa; Monfort, Clarisse; Deffrasnes, Marion; Guezenec, Stéphane; Lhomme, Emilie; Barret, Matthieu; Sicard, Delphine; Dousset, Xavier; Onno, Bernard

    2016-12-19

    In order to contribute to the description of sourdough LAB composition, MiSeq sequencing and qPCR methods were performed in association with cultural methods. A panel of 16 French organic bakers and farmer-bakers were selected for this work. The lactic acid bacteria (LAB) diversity of their organic sourdoughs was investigated quantitatively and qualitatively combining (i) Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis-specific qPCR, (ii) global sequencing with MiSeq Illumina technology and (iii) molecular isolates identification. In addition, LAB and yeast enumeration, pH, Total Titratable Acidity, organic acids and bread specific volume were analyzed. Microbial and physico-chemical data were statistically treated by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Ascendant Classification (HAC). Total yeast counts were 6 log10 to 7.6 log10CFU/g while LAB counts varied from 7.2 log10 to 9.6 log10CFU/g. Values obtained by L. sanfranciscensis-specific qPCR were estimated between 7.2 and 10.3 log10CFU/g, except for one sample at 4.4 log10CFU/g. HAC and PCA clustered the sixteen sourdoughs into three classes described by their variables but without links to bakers' practices. L. sanfranciscensis was the dominant species in 13 of the 16 sourdoughs analyzed by Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), by the culture dependent method this species was dominant only in only 10 samples. Based on isolates identification, LAB diversity was higher for 7 sourdoughs with the recovery of L. curvatus, L. brevis, L. heilongjiangensis, L. xiangfangensis, L. koreensis, L. pontis, Weissella sp. and Pediococcus pentosaceus, as the most representative species. L. koreensis, L. heilongjiangensis and L. xiangfangensis were identified in traditional Asian food and here for the first time as dominant in organic sourdough. This study highlighted that L. sanfranciscensis was not the major species in 6/16 sourdough samples and that a relatively high LAB diversity can be observed in French organic sourdough.

  2. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Cox, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS 15N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by 15N NMR. Liquid state 15N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (1H-15N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  3. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2009-02-28

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS ¹⁵N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by ¹⁵N NMR. Liquid state ¹⁵N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (¹H–¹⁵N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  4. Scytonemin and Photosynthetic Pigment Proxies for Late Pleistocene/Holocene Environmental Change in the Eastern Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, J. M.; Van Mooy, B. A. S.

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentary pigments are biomarkers of photosynthetic organisms, most commonly derived from aquatic bacteria and algae but also with potential terrigenous sources. We detected a diverse pigment assemblage with variable down-core distributions in Great Salt Lake (GSL) sediments deposited since ca. 280 ka (GLAD1-GSL00, core 4). The most abundant pigments included derivatives of chlorophyll a, most likely from algae or cyanobacteria, bacteriochlorophyll c from green sulfur bacteria, okenone from purple sulfur bacteria, and scytonemin from UV-exposed cyanobacteria. Scytonemin is a biomarker for colonial cyanobacteria exposed to UV-radiation. In GSL it has potential sources from bioherms on the shoreline or microbiotic soil crusts from the adjacent Great Basin Desert. Scytonemin concentration was highest in the Upper Salt and Sapropel (USS) unit, deposited between 11.5-10 ka in shallow water (ca. 10 m), following deep pluvial Lake Bonneville (30-18 cal ka), the Provo lake level (ca. 18-15 cal ka), and the Gilbert transgression (11.6 cal ka). Scytonemin concentration was very low in sediments deposited during the deep lake phases, even though bioherms were prominent shoreline features. The USS was deposited under hypersaline waters and contained remarkably low concentrations of photosynthetic pigment derivatives that would be expected in organic-matter-rich sediments deposited under productive surface waters or anoxic bottom waters. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic data point toward a desert soil crust source for scytonemin in the USS, similar to what we previously observed in the Holocene Black Sea sapropel. We propose that increased aridity supported the widespread occurrence and erosion of microbiotic soil crusts during deposition of the USS. This is consistent with interpretations of Great Salt Lake hydrology, pointing toward a broader regional aridity event. Holocene sediments above the USS also contain scytonemin at relatively high concentration, consistent with

  5. Microscale spatial distributions of microbes and viruses in intertidal photosynthetic microbial mats.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Cátia; Piel, Tim; Staal, Marc; Stuut, Jan-Berend W; Middelboe, Mathias; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2015-01-01

    Intertidal photosynthetic microbial mats from the Wadden Sea island Schiermonnikoog were examined for microscale (millimetre) spatial distributions of viruses, prokaryotes and oxygenic photoautotrophs (filamentous cyanobacteria and benthic diatoms) at different times of the year. Abundances of viruses and prokaryotes were among the highest found in benthic systems (0.05-5.43 × 10(10) viruses g(-1) and 0.05-2.14 × 10(10) prokaryotes g(-1)). The spatial distribution of viruses, prokaryotes and oxygenic photoautotrophs were highly heterogeneous at mm scales. The vertical distributions of both prokaryotic and viral abundances were related to the depth of the oxygenic photoautotrophic layer, implying that the photosynthetic mat fuelled the microbial processes in the underlying layer. Our data suggest that viruses could make an important component in these productive environments potentially affecting the biodiversity and nutrient cycling within the mat.

  6. Anaerobic energy metabolism in unicellular photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Atteia, Ariane; van Lis, Robert; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Martin, William F

    2013-02-01

    Anaerobic metabolic pathways allow unicellular organisms to tolerate or colonize anoxic environments. Over the past ten years, genome sequencing projects have brought a new light on the extent of anaerobic metabolism in eukaryotes. A surprising development has been that free-living unicellular algae capable of photoautotrophic lifestyle are, in terms of their enzymatic repertoire, among the best equipped eukaryotes known when it comes to anaerobic energy metabolism. Some of these algae are marine organisms, common in the oceans, others are more typically soil inhabitants. All these species are important from the ecological (O(2)/CO(2) budget), biotechnological, and evolutionary perspectives. In the unicellular algae surveyed here, mixed-acid type fermentations are widespread while anaerobic respiration, which is more typical of eukaryotic heterotrophs, appears to be rare. The presence of a core anaerobic metabolism among the algae provides insights into its evolutionary origin, which traces to the eukaryote common ancestor. The predicted fermentative enzymes often exhibit an amino acid extension at the N-terminus, suggesting that these proteins might be compartmentalized in the cell, likely in the chloroplast or the mitochondrion. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Chlorella NC64 have the most extended set of fermentative enzymes reported so far. Among the eukaryotes with secondary plastids, the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana has the most pronounced anaerobic capabilities as yet. From the standpoints of genomic, transcriptomic, and biochemical studies, anaerobic energy metabolism in C. reinhardtii remains the best characterized among photosynthetic protists. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The evolutionary aspects of bioenergetic systems.

  7. Effects of earthworms and plants on the soil structure, the physical stabilization of soil organic matter and the microbial abundance and diversity in soil aggregates in a long term study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangerlé, Anne; Hissler, Christophe; Lavelle, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Earthworms and plant roots, as ecosystem engineers, have large effects on biotic and abiotic properties of the soil system. They create biogenic soil macroaggregates (i.e. earthworm casts and root macroaggregates) with specific physical, chemical and microbiological properties. Research to date has mainly considered their impacts in isolation thereby ignoring potential interactions between these organisms. On the other hand, most of the existing studies focused on short to midterm time scale. We propose in this study to consider effect of earthworms and plants on aggregate dynamics at long time scale. A 24 months macrocosm experiment, under semi-controlled conditions, was conducted to assess the impacts of corn and endogeic plus anecic earthworms (Apporectodea caliginosa and Lumbricus terrestris) on soil structure, C stabilization and microbial abundance and biodiversity. Aggregate stability was assessed by wet-sieving. Macroaggregates (>2 mm) were also visually separated according to their biological origin (e.g., earthworms, roots). Total C and N contents were measured in aggregates of all size classes and origins. Natural abundances of 13C of corn, a C4 plant, were used as a supplemental marker of OM incorporation in aggregates. The genetic structure and the abundance of the bacterial and fungal communities were characterized by using respectively the B- and F-ARISA fingerprinting approach and quantitative PCR bacteria (341F/515R) and fungi (FF330/FR1). They significantly impacted the soil physical properties in comparison to the other treatments: lower bulk density in the first 10cm of the soil with 0.95 g/cm3 in absence of corn plants and 0.88 g/cm3 in presence of corn plants compared to control soil (1.21g/cm3). The presence of earthworms increased aggregate stability (mean weight diameter) by 7.6 %, while plants alone had no simple impacts on aggregation. A significant interaction revealed that earthworms increased aggregate stability in the presence of

  8. Sources of organic carbon for Rimicaris hybisae: Tracing individual fatty acids at two hydrothermal vent fields in the Mid-Cayman rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Kathrin; Bennett, Sarah A.; Van Dover, Cindy L.; Coleman, Max

    2015-06-01

    Hydrothermal vents harbor ecosystems mostly decoupled from organic carbon synthesized with the energy of sunlight (photosynthetic carbon source) but fueled instead by oxidation of reduced compounds to generate a chemosynthetic carbon source. Our study aimed to disentangle photosynthetic and chemosynthetic organic carbon sources for the shrimp species Rimicaris hybisae, a primary consumer presumed to obtain its organic carbon mainly from ectosymbiotic chemoautotrophic bacteria living on its gill cover membrane. To provide ectosymbionts with ideal conditions for chemosynthesis, these shrimp live in dense clusters around vent chimneys; they are, however, also found sparsely distributed adjacent to diffuse vent flows, where they might depend on alternative food sources. Densely and sparsely distributed shrimp were sampled and dissected into abdominal tissue and gill cover membrane, covered with ectosymbiotic bacteria, at two hydrothermal vent fields in the Mid-Cayman rise that differ in vent chemistry. Fatty acids (FA) were extracted from shrimp tissues and their carbon isotopic compositions assessed. The FA data indicate that adult R. hybisae predominantly rely on bacteria for their organic carbon needs. Their FA composition is dominated by common bacterial FA of the n7 family (~41%). Bacterial FA of the n4 FA family are also abundant and found to constitute good biomarkers for gill ectosymbionts. Sparsely distributed shrimp contain fractions of n4 FA in gill cover membranes ~4% lower than densely packed ones (~18%) and much higher fractions of photosynthetic FA in abdominal tissues, ~4% more (compared with 1.6%), suggesting replacement of ectosymbionts along with exoskeletons (molt), while they take up alternative diets of partly photosynthetic organic carbon. Abdominal tissues also contain photosynthetic FA from a second source taken up presumably during an early dispersal phase and still present to c. 3% in adult shrimp. The contribution of photosynthetic carbon to

  9. Arbuscule frequency in grapevine roots is more responsive to reduction in photosynthetic capacity than to increased levels of shoot phosphorus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated whether altering photosynthetic capacity or shoot P plays bigger role in regulating arbuscule abundance in fine roots of grapevine. Pinot noir grapevines were grown in an unsterilized vineyard soil and colonized by indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in two experiments where p...

  10. Binning of shallowly sampled metagenomic sequence fragments reveals that low abundance bacteria play important roles in sulfur cycling and degradation of complex organic polymers in an acid mine drainage community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, G. J.; Andersson, A.; Banfield, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    Our understanding of environmental microbiology has been greatly enhanced by community genome sequencing of DNA recovered directly the environment. Community genomics provides insights into the diversity, community structure, metabolic function, and evolution of natural populations of uncultivated microbes, thereby revealing dynamics of how microorganisms interact with each other and their environment. Recent studies have demonstrated the potential for reconstructing near-complete genomes from natural environments while highlighting the challenges of analyzing community genomic sequence, especially from diverse environments. A major challenge of shotgun community genome sequencing is identification of DNA fragments from minor community members for which only low coverage of genomic sequence is present. We analyzed community genome sequence retrieved from biofilms in an acid mine drainage (AMD) system in the Richmond Mine at Iron Mountain, CA, with an emphasis on identification and assembly of DNA fragments from low-abundance community members. The Richmond mine hosts an extensive, relatively low diversity subterranean chemolithoautotrophic community that is sustained entirely by oxidative dissolution of pyrite. The activity of these microorganisms greatly accelerates the generation of AMD. Previous and ongoing work in our laboratory has focused on reconstrucing genomes of dominant community members, including several bacteria and archaea. We binned contigs from several samples (including one new sample and two that had been previously analyzed) by tetranucleotide frequency with clustering by Self-Organizing Maps (SOM). The binning, evaluated by comparison with information from the manually curated assembly of the dominant organisms, was found to be very effective: fragments were correctly assigned with 95% accuracy. Improperly assigned fragments often contained sequences that are either evolutionarily constrained (e.g. 16S rRNA genes) or mobile elements that are

  11. Inorganic nitrogen assimilation by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, B C; Gest, H

    1976-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas capsulata lacks glutamate dehydrogenase and normally uses the glutamine synthetase/glutamate synthase sequence of reactions for assimilation of N2 and ammonia. The glutamine synthetase in cell-free extracts of the organism is completely sedimented by centrifugation at 140,000 X g for 2 h, is inhibited by L-alanine but not by adenosine 5'-monophosphate, and exhibits two apparent Km values for ammonia (ca. 13 muM and 1 mM). PMID:10281

  12. Evidence for only minor contributions from bacteria to sedimentary organic carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartgers, W. A.; Sinninghe Damste, J. S.; Requejo, A. G.; Allan, J.; Hayes, J. M.; de Leeuw, J. W.

    1994-01-01

    Because their molecular signatures are often prominent in extracts of sediments, bacteria are thought to be important contributors to petroleum source beds. It has been shown recently, however, that abundances of biomarkers do not always reflect relative contributions to sedimentary organic carbon (Corg). The contribution of photosynthetic green sulphur bacteria to sediments can be assessed effectively because the diagenetic products of distinctive carotenoids from these organisms occur widely and their biomass is isotopically labelled, being enriched in 13C. We show here that, although sediments and oils from the Western Canada and Williston basins contain prominent biomarkers of photosynthetic bacteria, the absence of 13C enrichment in the total Corg requires that the bacterial contribution is in fact minimal. Although the importance of bacterial reworking of sedimentary debris cannot be doubted, we argue that our findings, when considered in conjunction with those from other settings, suggest that bacterial biomass may commonly represent only a minor component of total Corg in carbonaceous rocks.

  13. Detection and structural identification of dissolved organic matter in Antarctic glacial ice at natural abundance by SPR-W5-WATERGATE 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pautler, Brent G; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J; Tseng, Li-Hong; Spraul, Manfred; Dubnick, Ashley; Sharp, Martin J; Fitzsimons, Sean J

    2011-06-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is ubiquitous in aquatic ecosystems and is derived from various inputs that control its turnover. Glaciers and ice sheets are the second largest water reservoir in the global hydrologic cycle, but little is known about glacial DOM composition or contributions to biogeochemical cycling. Here we employ SPR-W5-WATERGATE (1)H NMR spectroscopy to elucidate and quantify the chemical structures of DOM constituents in Antarctic glacial ice as they exist in their natural state (average DOC of 8 mg/L) without isolation or preconcentration. This Antarctic glacial DOM is predominantly composed of a mixture of small recognizable molecules differing from DOM in marine, lacustrine, and other terrestrial environments. The major constituents detected in three distinct types of glacial ice include lactic and formic acid, free amino acids, and a mixture of simple sugars and amino sugars with concentrations that vary between ice types. The detection of free amino acid and amino sugar monomer components of peptidoglycan within the ice suggests that Antarctic glacial DOM likely originates from in situ microbial activity. As these constituents are normally considered to be biologically labile (fast cycling) in nonglacial environments, accelerated glacier melt and runoff may result in a flux of nutrients into adjacent ecosystems.

  14. PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Niederman, Robert A.; Blankenship, Robert E.; Frank, Harry A.

    2015-02-07

    These funds were used for partial support of the PS2013 Satellite Workshop on Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Systems, that was held on 8-11 August, 2013, at Washington University, St. Louis, MO. This conference, held in conjunction with the 16th International Congress on Photosynthesis/St. Louis, continued a long tradition of light-harvesting satellite conferences that have been held prior to the previous six international photosynthesis congresses. In this Workshop, the basis was explored for the current interest in replacing fossil fuels with energy sources derived form direct solar radiation, coupled with light-driven electron transport in natural photosynthetic systems and how they offer a valuable blueprint for conversion of sunlight to useful energy forms. This was accomplished through sessions on the initial light-harvesting events in the biological conversion of solar energy to chemically stored energy forms, and how these natural photosynthetic processes serve as a guide to the development of robust bio-hybrid and artificial systems for solar energy conversion into both electricity or chemical fuels. Organized similar to a Gordon Research Conference, a lively, informal and collegial setting was established, highlighting the exchange of exciting new data and unpublished results from ongoing studies. A significant amount of time was set aside for open discussion and interactive poster sessions, with a special session devoted to oral presentations by talented students and postdoctoral fellows judged to have the best posters. This area of research has seen exceptionally rapid progress in recent years, with the availability of a number of antenna protein structures at atomic resolution, elucidation of the molecular surface architecture of native photosynthetic membranes by atomic force microscopy and the maturing of ultrafast spectroscopic and molecular biological techniques for the investigation and manipulation of photosynthetic systems. The conferees

  15. Abundances in Przybylski's star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, C. R.; Ryabchikova, T.; Kupka, F.; Bord, D. J.; Mathys, G.; Bidelman, W. P.

    2000-09-01

    We have derived abundances for 54 elements in the extreme roAp star HD101065. ESO spectra with a resolution of about 80000, and S/N of 200 or more were employed. The adopted model has Teff=6600K, and log(g)=4.2. Because of the increased line opacity and consequent low gas pressure, convection plays no significant role in the temperature structure. Lighter elemental abundances through the iron group scatter about standard abundance distribution (SAD) (solar) values. Iron and nickel are about one order of magnitude deficient while cobalt is enhanced by 1.5dex. Heavier elements, including the lanthanides, generally follow the solar pattern but enhanced by 3 to 4dex. Odd-Z elements are generally less abundant than their even-Z neighbours. With a few exceptions (e.g. Yb), the abundance pattern among the heavy elements is remarkably coherent, and resembles a displaced solar distribution.

  16. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-10-15

    This report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2001 through 10/01/2002. This report marks the end of year 2 of a three-year project as well as the milestone date for completion of Phase I activities. This report includes our current status and defines the steps being taken to ensure that we meet the project goals by the end of year 3. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below our current efforts are focused on evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, preparing to conduct long-term tests in the bench-scale bioreactor test systems, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the third quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Test results continue to indicate that thermophilic cyanobacteria have significant advantages as agents for practical photosynthetic CO{sub 2} mitigation before mesophilic forms. (2) Additional thermal features with developed cyanobacterial mats, which might be calcium resistant, were found in YNP. (3) Back to back tests show that there is no detectable difference in the growth of isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) in standard and Ca-modified BG-11 medium. The doubling time for both cases was about 12 hours. (4) The cultivation of cyanobacteria in Ca-BG medium should proceed in the pH range between 7 and 7.4, but this suggestion requires additional experiments. (5) Cyanobacteria can be grown in media where sodium is present at trace levels. (6) Ca{sup 2+} enriched medium can be used as a sink for CO{sub 2} under alkaline conditions. (7) Cyanobacteria are able to generate cones of filaments on travertine surfaces. [Travertine is a mixture of CaCO{sub 3} and CaSO{sub 4}]. We hypothesize that SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} stimulates the generation of such cones, because they are not almost generated on CaCO3 surface. On the other hand, we know that plant gas contains elevated

  17. Leaf-level photosynthetic capacity in lowland Amazonian and high-elevation Andean tropical moist forests of Peru.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Nur H A; Ishida, F Yoko; Weerasinghe, Lasantha K; Guerrieri, Rossella; O'Sullivan, Odhran S; Bloomfield, Keith J; Asner, Gregory P; Martin, Roberta E; Lloyd, Jon; Malhi, Yadvinder; Phillips, Oliver L; Meir, Patrick; Salinas, Norma; Cosio, Eric G; Domingues, Tomas F; Quesada, Carlos A; Sinca, Felipe; Escudero Vega, Alberto; Zuloaga Ccorimanya, Paola P; Del Aguila-Pasquel, Jhon; Quispe Huaypar, Katherine; Cuba Torres, Israel; Butrón Loayza, Rosalbina; Pelaez Tapia, Yulina; Huaman Ovalle, Judit; Long, Benedict M; Evans, John R; Atkin, Owen K

    2016-07-08

    We examined whether variations in photosynthetic capacity are linked to variations in the environment and/or associated leaf traits for tropical moist forests (TMFs) in the Andes/western Amazon regions of Peru. We compared photosynthetic capacity (maximal rate of carboxylation of Rubisco (Vcmax ), and the maximum rate of electron transport (Jmax )), leaf mass, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) per unit leaf area (Ma , Na and Pa , respectively), and chlorophyll from 210 species at 18 field sites along a 3300-m elevation gradient. Western blots were used to quantify the abundance of the CO2 -fixing enzyme Rubisco. Area- and N-based rates of photosynthetic capacity at 25°C were higher in upland than lowland TMFs, underpinned by greater investment of N in photosynthesis in high-elevation trees. Soil [P] and leaf Pa were key explanatory factors for models of area-based Vcmax and Jmax but did not account for variations in photosynthetic N-use efficiency. At any given Na and Pa , the fraction of N allocated to photosynthesis was higher in upland than lowland species. For a small subset of lowland TMF trees examined, a substantial fraction of Rubisco was inactive. These results highlight the importance of soil- and leaf-P in defining the photosynthetic capacity of TMFs, with variations in N allocation and Rubisco activation state further influencing photosynthetic rates and N-use efficiency of these critically important forests.

  18. Prioritization of copper for the use in photosynthetic electron transport in developing leaves of hybrid poplar

    PubMed Central

    Shahbaz, Muhammad; Ravet, Karl; Peers, Graham; Pilon, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Plastocyanin (PC) is an essential and abundant copper (Cu) protein required for photosynthesis in higher plants. Severe copper deprivation has the potential to cause a defect in photosynthetic electron transport due to a lack in PC. The Cu-microRNAs, which are up-regulated under Cu deficiency, down-regulate the expression of target Cu proteins other than PC, cytochrome-c oxidase and the ethylene receptors. It has been proposed that this mechanism saves Cu for PC maturation. We aimed to test how hybrid poplar, a species that has capacity to rapidly expand its photosynthetically active tissue, responds to variations in Cu availability over time. Measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence after Cu depletion revealed a drastic effect on photosynthesis in hybrid poplar. The decrease in photosynthetic capacity was correlated with a reduction in PC protein levels. Compared to older leaves, PC decreased more strongly in developing leaves, which also lost more photosynthetic electron transport capacity. The effect of Cu depletion on older and more developed leaves was minor and these leaves maintained much of their photosynthetic capacity. Interestingly, upon resupply of Cu to the medium a very rapid recovery of Cu levels was seen in the younger leaves with a concomitant rise in the expression and activity of PC. In contrast, the expression of those Cu proteins, which are targets of microRNAs was under the same circumstances delayed. At the same time, Cu resupply had only minor effects on the older leaves. The data suggest a model where rapid recovery of photosynthetic capacity in younger leaves is made possible by a preferred allocation of Cu to PC in younger leaves, which is supported by Cu-microRNA expression. PMID:26089828

  19. Short-Term Effects of Tillage Practices on Soil Organic Carbon Turnover Assessed by δ13C Abundance in Particle-Size Fractions of Black Soils from Northeast China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoping; Chen, Xuewen

    2014-01-01

    The combination of isotope trace technique and SOC fractionation allows a better understanding of SOC dynamics. A five-year tillage experiment consisting of no-tillage (NT) and mouldboard plough (MP) was used to study the changes in particle-size SOC fractions and corresponding δ13C natural abundance to assess SOC turnover in the 0–20 cm layer of black soils under tillage practices. Compared to the initial level, total SOC tended to be stratified but showed a slight increase in the entire plough layer under short-term NT. MP had no significant impacts on SOC at any depth. Because of significant increases in coarse particulate organic carbon (POC) and decreases in fine POC, total POC did not remarkably decrease under NT and MP. A distinct increase in silt plus clay OC occurred in NT plots, but not in MP plots. However, the δ13C abundances of both coarse and fine POC increased, while those of silt plus clay OC remained almost the same under NT. The C derived from C3 plants was mainly associated with fine particles and much less with coarse particles. These results suggested that short-term NT and MP preferentially enhanced the turnover of POC, which was considerably faster than that of silt plus clay OC. PMID:25162052

  20. Short-term effects of tillage practices on soil organic carbon turnover assessed by δ13C abundance in particle-size fractions of black soils from northeast China.

    PubMed

    Liang, Aizhen; Chen, Shenglong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Chen, Xuewen

    2014-01-01

    The combination of isotope trace technique and SOC fractionation allows a better understanding of SOC dynamics. A five-year tillage experiment consisting of no-tillage (NT) and mouldboard plough (MP) was used to study the changes in particle-size SOC fractions and corresponding δ (13)C natural abundance to assess SOC turnover in the 0-20 cm layer of black soils under tillage practices. Compared to the initial level, total SOC tended to be stratified but showed a slight increase in the entire plough layer under short-term NT. MP had no significant impacts on SOC at any depth. Because of significant increases in coarse particulate organic carbon (POC) and decreases in fine POC, total POC did not remarkably decrease under NT and MP. A distinct increase in silt plus clay OC occurred in NT plots, but not in MP plots. However, the δ (13)C abundances of both coarse and fine POC increased, while those of silt plus clay OC remained almost the same under NT. The C derived from C3 plants was mainly associated with fine particles and much less with coarse particles. These results suggested that short-term NT and MP preferentially enhanced the turnover of POC, which was considerably faster than that of silt plus clay OC.

  1. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-01-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/3/2001 through 1/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Our research team has made significant progress towards completion of our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts remain focused on fulfilling these research objectives in accordance with the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2001 include: (1) New procedures and protocols have been developed to increase the chances of successful implementation in the bioreactor of organisms that perform well in the lab. The new procedures include pre-screening of organisms for adhesion characteristics and a focus on identifying the organisms with maximum growth rate potential. (2) Preliminary results show an increase in adhesion to glass and a decrease in overall growth rates when using growth media prepared with tap water rather than distilled water. (3) Several of the organisms collected from Yellowstone National Park using the new procedures are currently being cultured in preparation for bioreactor tests. (4) One important result from a test of growth surface temperature distribution as a function of gas stream and drip-fluid temperatures showed a high dependence of membrane temperature on fluid temperature, with gas stream temperature having minimal effect. This result indicates that bioreactor growth surface temperatures can be controlled using fluid delivery temperature. The possible implications for implementation of the bioreactor concept are encouraging, since it may be possible to use the bioreactor with very high gas stream temperatures by controlling the temperature

  2. High Efficiency Light Harvesting by Carotenoids in the LH2 Complex from Photosynthetic Bacteria: Unique Adaptation to Growth under Low-Light Conditions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Rhodopin, rhodopinal, and their glucoside derivatives are carotenoids that accumulate in different amounts in the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodoblastus (Rbl.) acidophilus strain 7050, depending on the intensity of the light under which the organism is grown. The different growth conditions also have a profound effect on the spectra of the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) pigments that assemble in the major LH2 light-harvesting pigment–protein complex. Under high-light conditions the well-characterized B800-850 LH2 complex is formed and accumulates rhodopin and rhodopin glucoside as the primary carotenoids. Under low-light conditions, a variant LH2, denoted B800-820, is formed, and rhodopinal and rhodopinal glucoside are the most abundant carotenoids. The present investigation compares and contrasts the spectral properties and dynamics of the excited states of rhodopin and rhodopinal in solution. In addition, the systematic differences in pigment composition and structure of the chromophores in the LH2 complexes provide an opportunity to explore the effect of these factors on the rate and efficiency of carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer. It is found that the enzymatic conversion of rhodopin to rhodopinal by Rbl. acidophilus 7050 grown under low-light conditions results in nearly 100% carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer efficiency in the LH2 complex. This comparative analysis provides insight into how photosynthetic systems are able to adapt and survive under challenging environmental conditions. PMID:25171303

  3. High efficiency light harvesting by carotenoids in the LH2 complex from photosynthetic bacteria: unique adaptation to growth under low-light conditions.

    PubMed

    Magdaong, Nikki M; LaFountain, Amy M; Greco, Jordan A; Gardiner, Alastair T; Carey, Anne-Marie; Cogdell, Richard J; Gibson, George N; Birge, Robert R; Frank, Harry A

    2014-09-25

    Rhodopin, rhodopinal, and their glucoside derivatives are carotenoids that accumulate in different amounts in the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodoblastus (Rbl.) acidophilus strain 7050, depending on the intensity of the light under which the organism is grown. The different growth conditions also have a profound effect on the spectra of the bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) pigments that assemble in the major LH2 light-harvesting pigment-protein complex. Under high-light conditions the well-characterized B800-850 LH2 complex is formed and accumulates rhodopin and rhodopin glucoside as the primary carotenoids. Under low-light conditions, a variant LH2, denoted B800-820, is formed, and rhodopinal and rhodopinal glucoside are the most abundant carotenoids. The present investigation compares and contrasts the spectral properties and dynamics of the excited states of rhodopin and rhodopinal in solution. In addition, the systematic differences in pigment composition and structure of the chromophores in the LH2 complexes provide an opportunity to explore the effect of these factors on the rate and efficiency of carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer. It is found that the enzymatic conversion of rhodopin to rhodopinal by Rbl. acidophilus 7050 grown under low-light conditions results in nearly 100% carotenoid-to-BChl energy transfer efficiency in the LH2 complex. This comparative analysis provides insight into how photosynthetic systems are able to adapt and survive under challenging environmental conditions.

  4. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2003-10-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 7/2/2003 through 10/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we are preparing for the final tests necessary to meet our project goals. Specific results and accomplishments for the third quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (A) The solar collector used in the light delivery system showed signs of degradation and hence had to be replaced by ORNL. A set of light readings were taken after the new solar collector was installed. The readings showed an acceptable light profile. (B) The CRF-2 test system has undergone major improvements to produce the high flow rates needed for harvesting (as determined by previous experiments). The main changes to the system are new stainless steel header/frame units with increased flow capacity and a modified pipe end sealing method to improve flow uniformity, and installation and plumbing for a new high flow harvesting pump. The improvements have been completed and the system is ready for testing. (C) The pilot scale bioreactor is ready for testing pending some information from the CRF-2 tests. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (A) The shape of the Chlorogloeopsis sp. cells (cyanobacteria) was found to be affected by environmental pH, which may be useful in culture quality control. Besides, the further investigation of this phenomenon suggested that the rate of cell adhesion to glass surface decreases upon medium alkalinization. Thus, harvesting effectiveness may be improved by increasing medium pH up to 9 before harvesting of cyanobacteria from a substratum.

  5. Short communication: Relationship of activity and rumination to abundance of pest flies among organically certified cows fed 3 levels of concentrate.

    PubMed

    Sjostrom, L S; Heins, B J; Endres, M I; Moon, R D; Paulson, J C

    2016-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate activity, rumination time, and their association with 3 kinds of pasture flies for organic dairy cows (n=57) fed 3 grain supplementation strategies during the grazing season from May to September 2013. Cows were assigned to 1 of 3 replicate supplementation groups: (1) no corn-grain supplementation (100% pasture, PAS, n=19); (2) low corn-grain (2.72kg/cow per day, LG, n=19); and (3) high corn-grain (5.44kg/cow per day, HG, n=19). Cows calved during 2 seasons (fall and spring) at the University of Minnesota West Central Research and Outreach Center, Morris, from October to December 2012 and March to May 2013. Supplement (corn-grain and minerals) was fed in a total mixed ration of corn silage and alfalfa silage, and at least 30% of diet dry matter intake for LG and HG cows consisted of pasture. Activity and rumination time (daily and 2-h blocks of time) were monitored electronically using HR-LD tags (SCR Engineers Ltd., Netanya, Israel) for 125d. Activity (cow body movement and head movement) was reported in activity units from SCR DataFlow II software, and rumination times were reported in minutes per day. PROC HPMIXED in SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) was used for statistical analysis, and independent variables were season of calving (fall or spring), month of grazing (June to September), supplementation group, and interactions of month of grazing and supplementation group. Replicate was a random effect with repeated measures. Daily activity was higher for PAS cows (1,138 activity units) than for HG cows (1,001 activity units), and LG cows (1,019 activity units). Daily activity was highest in July (1,258 activity units) and lowest in September (819 activity units). Rumination was not different for PAS (397min/d), LG (384min/d), or HG (370min/d) cows. Daily rumination was greater in September (402min/d) than in July (361min/d). Daily activity increased rapidly between 0600-0800h and 1600-1800h. From 1800 to 2000h

  6. A mechanistic model for the light response of photosynthetic electron transport rate based on light harvesting properties of photosynthetic pigment molecules.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zi-Piao; Robakowski, Piotr; Suggett, David J

    2013-03-01

    Models describing the light response of photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) are routinely used to determine how light absorption influences energy, reducing power and yields of primary productivity; however, no single model is currently able to provide insight into the fundamental processes that implicitly govern the variability of light absorption. Here we present development and application of a new mechanistic model of ETR for photosystem II based on the light harvesting (absorption and transfer to the core 'reaction centres') characteristics of photosynthetic pigment molecules. Within this model a series of equations are used to describe novel biophysical and biochemical characteristics of photosynthetic pigment molecules and in turn light harvesting; specifically, the eigen-absorption cross-section and the minimum average lifetime of photosynthetic pigment molecules in the excited state, which describe the ability of light absorption of photosynthetic pigment molecules and retention time of excitons in the excited state but are difficult to be measured directly. We applied this model to a series of previously collected fluorescence data and demonstrated that our model described well the light response curves of ETR, regardless of whether dynamic down-regulation of PSII occurs, for a range of photosynthetic organisms (Abies alba, Picea abies, Pinus mugo and Emiliania huxleyi). Inherent estimated parameters (e.g. maximum ETR and the saturation irradiance) by our model are in very close agreement with the measured data. Overall, our mechanistic model potentially provides novel insights into the regulation of ETR by light harvesting properties as well as dynamical down-regulation of PSII.

  7. Photosynthetic recovery and acclimation to excess light intensity in the rehydrated lichen soil crusts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Lei, Yaping; Lan, Shubin; Hu, Chunxiang

    2017-01-01

    As an important successional stage and main type of biological soil crusts (BSCs) in Shapotou region of China (southeastern edge of Tengger Desert), lichen soil crusts (LSCs) often suffer from many stresses, such as desiccation and excess light intensity. In this study, the chlorophyll fluorescence and CO2 exchange in the rehydrated LSCs were detected under a series of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) gradients to study the photosynthetic acclimation of LSCs. The results showed that although desiccation leaded to the loss of photosynthetic activity in LSCs, the fluorescence parameters including Fo, Fv and Fv/Fm of LSCs could be well recovered after rehydration. After the recovery of photosynthetic activity, the effective photosynthetic efficiency ΦPSII detected by Imaging PAM had declined to nearly 0 within both the lichen thallus upper and lower layers when the PAR increased to 200 μE m-2 s-1, however the net photosynthesis detected by the CO2 gas analyzer in the LSCs still appeared when the PAR increased to 1000 μE m-2 s-1. Our results indicate that LSCs acclimating to high PAR, on the one hand is ascribed to the special structure in crust lichens, making the incident light into the lichen thallus be weakened; on the other hand the massive accumulation of photosynthetic pigments in LSCs also provides a protective barrier for the photosynthetic organisms against radiation damage. Furthermore, the excessive light energy absorbed by crust lichens is also possibly dissipated by the increasing non-photochemical quenching, therefore to some extent providing some protection for LSCs.

  8. Initial characterization of the photosynthetic apparatus of "Candidatus Chlorothrix halophila," a filamentous, anoxygenic photoautotroph.

    PubMed

    van de Meene, Allison M L; Le Olson, Tien; Collins, Aaron M; Blankenship, Robert E

    2007-06-01

    "Candidatus Chlorothrix halophila" is a recently described halophilic, filamentous, anoxygenic photoautotroph (J. A. Klappenbach and B. K. Pierson, Arch. Microbiol. 181:17-25, 2004) that was enriched from the hypersaline microbial mats at Guerrero Negro, Mexico. Analysis of the photosynthetic apparatus by negative staining, spectroscopy, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the photosynthetic apparatus in this organism has similarities to the photosynthetic apparatus in both the Chloroflexi and Chlorobi phyla of green photosynthetic bacteria. The chlorosomes were found to be ellipsoidal and of various sizes, characteristics that are comparable to characteristics of chlorosomes in other species of green photosynthetic bacteria. The absorption spectrum of whole cells was dominated by the chlorosome bacteriochlorophyll c (BChl c) peak at 759 nm, with fluorescence emission at 760 nm. A second fluorescence emission band was observed at 870 nm and was tentatively attributed to a membrane-bound antenna complex. Fluorescence emission spectra obtained at 77 K revealed another complex that fluoresced at 820 nm, which probably resulted from the chlorosome baseplate complex. All of these results suggest that BChl c is present in the chlorosomes of "Ca. Chlorothrix halophila," that BChl a is present in the baseplate, and that there is a membrane-bound antenna complex. Analysis of the proteins in the chlorosomes revealed an approximately 6-kDa band, which was found to be related to the BChl c binding protein CsmA found in other green bacteria. Overall, the absorbance and fluorescence spectra of "Ca. Chlorothrix halophila" revealed an interesting mixture of photosynthetic characteristics that seemed to have properties similar to properties of both phyla of green bacteria when they were compared to the photosynthetic characteristics of Chlorobium tepidum and Chloroflexus aurantiacus.

  9. Photosynthetic recovery and acclimation to excess light intensity in the rehydrated lichen soil crusts

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li; Lei, Yaping; Lan, Shubin; Hu, Chunxiang

    2017-01-01

    As an important successional stage and main type of biological soil crusts (BSCs) in Shapotou region of China (southeastern edge of Tengger Desert), lichen soil crusts (LSCs) often suffer from many stresses, such as desiccation and excess light intensity. In this study, the chlorophyll fluorescence and CO2 exchange in the rehydrated LSCs were detected under a series of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) gradients to study the photosynthetic acclimation of LSCs. The results showed that although desiccation leaded to the loss of photosynthetic activity in LSCs, the fluorescence parameters including Fo, Fv and Fv/Fm of LSCs could be well recovered after rehydration. After the recovery of photosynthetic activity, the effective photosynthetic efficiency ΦPSII detected by Imaging PAM had declined to nearly 0 within both the lichen thallus upper and lower layers when the PAR increased to 200 μE m-2 s-1, however the net photosynthesis detected by the CO2 gas analyzer in the LSCs still appeared when the PAR increased to 1000 μE m-2 s-1. Our results indicate that LSCs acclimating to high PAR, on the one hand is ascribed to the special structure in crust lichens, making the incident light into the lichen thallus be weakened; on the other hand the massive accumulation of photosynthetic pigments in LSCs also provides a protective barrier for the photosynthetic organisms against radiation damage. Furthermore, the excessive light energy absorbed by crust lichens is also possibly dissipated by the increasing non-photochemical quenching, therefore to some extent providing some protection for LSCs. PMID:28257469

  10. Balancing photosynthetic electron flow is critical for cyanobacterial acclimation to nitrogen limitation.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Eitan; Bar-Eyal, Leeat; Sharon, Shir; Keren, Nir

    2013-03-01

    Nitrogen limitation forces photosynthetic organisms to reallocate available nitrogen to essential functions. At the same time, it increases the probability of photo-damage by limiting the rate of energy-demanding metabolic processes, downstream of the photosynthetic apparatus. Non-diazotrophic cyanobacteria cope with this situation by decreasing the size of their phycobilisome antenna and by modifying their photosynthetic apparatus. These changes can serve two purposes: to provide extra amino-acids and to decrease excitation pressure. We examined the effects of nitrogen limitation on the form and function of the photosynthetic apparatus. Our aim was to study which of the two demands serve as the driving force for the remodeling of the photosynthetic apparatus, under different growth conditions. We found that a drastic reduction in light intensity allowed cells to maintain a more functional photosynthetic apparatus: the phycobilisome antenna was bigger, the activity of both photosystems was higher and the levels of photosystem (PS) proteins were higher. Pre-acclimating cells to Mn limitation, under which the activity of both PSI and PSII is diminished, results in a very similar response. The rate of PSII photoinhibition, in nitrogen limited cells, was found to be directly related to the activity of the photosynthetic apparatus. These data indicate that, under our experimental conditions, photo-damage avoidance was the more prominent determinant during the acclimation process. The combinations of limiting factors tested here is by no means artificial. Similar scenarios can take place under environmental conditions and should be taken into account when estimating nutrient limitations in nature.

  11. BOREAS TE-10 Photosynthetic Response Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Papagno, Andrea (Editor); Middleton, Elizabeth; Sullivan, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-10 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets in support of its efforts to characterize and interpret information on the gas exchange, reflectance, transmittance, chlorophyll content, carbon content, hydrogen content, nitrogen content, and photosynthetic response of boreal vegetation. This data set contains measurements of quantitative parameters and leaf photosynthetic response to increases in light conducted in the SSA during the growing seasons of 1994 and 1996 using an oxygen electrode system. Leaf photosynthetic responses were not collected in 1996. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  12. Synergistic Two-Photon Absorption Enhancement in Photosynthetic Light Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuo-Mei; Chen, Yu-Wei; Gao, Ting-Fong

    2012-06-01

    The grand scale fixation of solar energies into chemical substances by photosynthetic reactions of light-harvesting organisms provides Earth's other life forms a thriving environment. Scientific explorations in the past decades have unraveled the fundamental photophysical and photochemical processes in photosynthesis. Higher plants, green algae, and light-harvesting bacteria utilize organized pigment-protein complexes to harvest solar power efficiently and the resultant electronic excitations are funneled into a reaction center, where the first charge separation process takes place. Here we show experimental evidences that green algae (Chlorella vulgaris) in vivo display a synergistic two-photon absorption enhancement in their photosynthetic light harvesting. Their absorption coefficients at various wavelengths display dramatic dependence on the photon flux. This newly found phenomenon is attributed to a coherence-electronic-energy-transfer-mediated (CEETRAM) photon absorption process of light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of green algae. Under the ambient light level, algae and higher plants can utilize this quantum mechanical mechanism to create two entangled electronic excitations adjacently in their light-harvesting networks. Concerted multiple electron transfer reactions in the reaction centers and oxygen evolving complexes can be implemented efficiently by the coherent motion of two entangled excitons from antennae to the charge separation reaction sites. To fabricate nanostructured, synthetic light-harvesting apparatus, the paramount role of the CEETRAM photon absorption mechanism should be seriously considered in the strategic guidelines.

  13. Insights from Placing Photosynthetic Light Harvesting into Context.

    PubMed

    Demmig-Adams, Barbara; Stewart, Jared J; Burch, Tyson A; Adams, William W

    2014-08-21

    Solar-energy conversion through natural photosynthesis forms the base of virtually all food chains on Earth and provides fiber, materials, and fuels, as well as inspiration for the design of biomimetic energy-conversion systems. We summarize well-known as well as recently discovered feedback loops between natural light-harvesting systems and whole-organism function in natural settings. We propose that the low effective quantum yield of natural light-harvesting systems in high light is caused by downstream limitations rather than unavoidable intrinsic vulnerabilities. We evaluate potential avenues, and their costs and benefits, for increasing the maximal rate and photon yield of photosynthesis in high light in plants and photosynthetic microbes. By summarizing mechanisms observable only in complex systems (whole plants, algae, or, in some cases, intact leaves), we aim to stimulate future research efforts on reciprocal feedback loops between light harvesting and downstream processes in whole organisms and to provide additional arguments for the significance of research on photosynthetic light harvesting.

  14. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-04-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/3/2001 through 4/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives, and we are currently on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, the milestone date from the original project timeline. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, we are continuing to evaluate candidate organisms and growth surfaces, and we are expanding the test facilities in preparation for scaled up system-level testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) has been selected for further investigations because of its favorable growth properties. (2) Research on optimal conditions for the growth of cyanobacterial isolates from YNP should be carried out using distilled water which has more stable chemical parameters, although tap water use may be permissible during full scale operations (at the cost of longer organism doubling times). (3) Tr. 9.4 WF is able to generate a biofilm on an Omnisil surface. Over the long term Omnisil does not inhibit the growth of TR 9.4 isolate, though it does elongate the lag phase of growth of this isolate. (4) Initial survivability tests for the TR 9.4 organism on Omnisil screens in the CRF2 modelscale bioreactor are underway. We have experienced problems keeping the organisms alive for more than three days, but we are currently investigating several possible causes for this unexpected result. (5) Accelerated materials testing have shown that Omnisil fabric has acceptable strength properties for use in a practical bioreactor system. Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (1) Several CO{sub 2} scrubbing experiments have been completed in the translating slug flow test system, however the error introduced by the

  15. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2001-10-15

    This report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/03/2000 through 10/02/2001. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. This is the fourth quarterly report for this project, so it also serves as a year-1 project review. We have made significant progress on our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts are focused on fulfilling these research objectives ''on time'' relative to the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Our results to date concerning the individual factors which have the most significant effect on CO{sub 2} uptake are inconclusive, but we have gathered useful information about the effects of lighting, temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration on one particular organism (Nostoc) and significant progress has been made in identifying other organisms that are more suitable for use in the bioreactor due to their better tolerance for the high temperatures likely to be encountered in the flue gas stream. Our current tests are focused on one such thermophilic organism (Cyanidium), and an enlarged bioreactor system (CRF-2) has been prepared for testing this organism. Tests on the enhanced mass transfer CO{sub 2} absorption technique are underway and useful information is currently being collected concerning pressure drop. The solar collectors for the deep-penetration hybrid solar lighting system have been designed and a single solar collector tracking unit is being prepared for installation in the pilot scale bioreactor system currently under construction. Much progress has been made in designing the fiber optic light delivery system, but final selection of the ''optimum'' delivery system design depends on many factors, most significantly the

  16. Comparison of abundances, compositions and sources of elements, inorganic ions and organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols from Xi'an and New Delhi, two megacities in China and India.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianjun; Wang, Gehui; Aggarwal, Shankar G; Huang, Yao; Ren, Yanqin; Zhou, Bianhong; Singh, Khem; Gupta, Prabhat K; Cao, Junji; Zhang, Rong

    2014-04-01

    Wintertime TSP samples collected in the two megacities of Xi'an, China and New Delhi, India were analyzed for elements, inorganic ions, carbonaceous species and organic compounds to investigate the differences in chemical compositions and sources of organic aerosols. The current work is the first time comparing the composition of urban organic aerosols from China and India and discussing their sources in a single study. Our results showed that the concentrations of Ca, Fe, Ti, inorganic ions, EC, PAHs and hopanes in Xi'an are 1.3-2.9 times of those in New Delhi, which is ascribed to the higher emissions of dust and coal burning in Xi'an. In contrast, Cl(-), levoglucosan, n-alkanes, fatty alcohols, fatty acids, phthalates and bisphenol A are 0.4-3.0 times higher in New Delhi than in Xi'an, which is attributed to strong emissions from biomass burning and solid waste incineration. PAHs are carcinogenic while phthalates and bisphenol A are endocrine disrupting. Thus, the significant difference in chemical compositions of the above TSP samples may suggest that residents in Xi'an and New Delhi are exposed to environmental hazards that pose different health risks. Lower mass ratios of octadecenoic acid/octadecanoic acid (C18:1/C18:0) and benzo(a)pyrene/benzo(e)pyrene (BaP/BeP) demonstrate that aerosol particles in New Delhi are photochemically more aged. Mass closure reconstructions of the wintertime TSP indicate that crustal material is the most abundant component of ambient particles in Xi'an and New Delhi, accounting for 52% and 48% of the particle masses, respectively, followed by organic matter (24% and 23% in Xi'an and New Delhi, respectively) and secondary inorganic ions (sulfate, nitrate plus ammonium, 16% and 12% in Xi'an and New Delhi, respectively).

  17. Comparison of aerobic and photosynthetic Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Callister, Stephen J.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Zeng, Xiaohua; Roh, Jung Hyeob; Dominguez, Migual; Tavano, Christine; Monroe, Matthew E.; Kaplan, Samuel; Donohue, Timothy; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-07-05

    Proteomes from aerobic and photosynthetic grown Rhodobacter sphaeroides 2.4.1 cell cultures were characterized using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in conjunction with an accurate mass and elution time (AMT) tag approach. Roughly 8000 high quality peptides were detected that represented 1,445 gene products and 34% of the predicted proteins. The identified proteins corresponded primarily to open reading frames (ORFs) contained within the two chromosomal elements of this bacterium, but a significant number were also observed from ORFs associated with 5 naturally occurring plasmids. Data mining of peptides revealed a number of proteins uniquely detected within the photosynthetic cell culture. Proteins observed in both aerobic respiratory and photosynthetic grown cultures were analyzed semi-quantitatively by comparing their estimated abundances to provide insights into bioenergetic models for aerobic respiration and photosynthesis. Additional emphasis was placed on gene products annotated as hypothetical to gain information as to their potential roles within these two growth conditions. Where possible, transcriptome data for R. sphaeroides obtained under the same culture conditions were compared with these results. This comparative study demonstrated the applicability of the AMT tag approach for high-throughput proteomic analyses of pathways associated with the photosynthetic lifestyle.

  18. Temporal progression of photosynthetic-strategy in phytoplankton in the Ross Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan-Keogh, Thomas J.; DeLizo, Liza M.; Smith, Walker O.; Sedwick, Peter N.; McGillicuddy, Dennis J.; Moore, C. Mark; Bibby, Thomas S.

    2017-02-01

    The bioavailability of iron influences the distribution, biomass and productivity of phytoplankton in the Ross Sea, one of the most productive regions in the Southern Ocean. We mapped the spatial and temporal extent and severity of iron-limitation of the native phytoplankton assemblage using long- (> 24 h) and short-term (24 h) iron-addition experiments along with physiological and molecular characterisations during a cruise to the Ross Sea in December-February 2012. Phytoplankton increased their photosynthetic efficiency in response to iron addition, suggesting proximal iron limitation throughout most of the Ross Sea during summer. Molecular and physiological data further indicate that as nitrate is removed from the surface ocean the phytoplankton community transitions to one displaying an iron-efficient photosynthetic strategy characterised by an increase in the size of photosystem II (PSII) photochemical cross section (σPSII) and a decrease in the chlorophyll-normalised PSII abundance. These results suggest that phytoplankton with the ability to reduce their photosynthetic iron requirements are selected as the growing season progresses, which may drive the well-documented progression from Phaeocystis antarctica- assemblages to diatom-dominated phytoplankton. Such a shift in the assemblage-level photosynthetic strategy potentially mediates further drawdown of nitrate following the development of iron deficient conditions in the Ross Sea.

  19. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  20. Microfluidic high-throughput selection of microalgal strains with superior photosynthetic productivity using competitive phototaxis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaoon Young Hwan; Kwak, Ho Seok; Sung, Young Joon; Choi, Hong Il; Hong, Min Eui; Lim, Hyun Seok; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Lee, Sang Yup; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae possess great potential as a source of sustainable energy, but the intrinsic inefficiency of photosynthesis is a major challenge to realize this potential. Photosynthetic organisms evolved phototaxis to find optimal light condition for photosynthesis. Here we report a microfluidic screening using competitive phototaxis of the model alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, for rapid isolation of strains with improved photosynthetic efficiencies. We demonstrated strong relationship between phototaxis and photosynthetic efficiency by quantitative analysis of phototactic response at the single-cell level using a microfluidic system. Based on this positive relationship, we enriched the strains with improved photosynthetic efficiency by isolating cells showing fast phototactic responses from a mixture of 10,000 mutants, thereby greatly improving selection efficiency over 8 fold. Among 147 strains isolated after screening, 94.6% showed improved photoautotrophic growth over the parental strain. Two mutants showed much improved performances with up to 1.9- and 8.1-fold increases in photoautotrophic cell growth and lipid production, respectively, a substantial improvement over previous approaches. We identified candidate genes that might be responsible for fast phototactic response and improved photosynthesis, which can be useful target for further strain engineering. Our approach provides a powerful screening tool for rapid improvement of microalgal strains to enhance photosynthetic productivity. PMID:26852806

  1. Engineering of cyanobacteria for the photosynthetic production of limonene from CO2.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, Hiroshi; Okuda, Yukiko; Ito, Michiho; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2014-09-20

    Isoprenoids, major secondary metabolites in many organisms, are utilized in various applications. We constructed a model photosynthetic production system for limonene, a volatile isoprenoid, using a unicellular cyanobacterium that expresses the plant limonene synthase. This system produces limonene photosynthetically at a nearly constant rate and that can be efficiently recovered using a gas-stripping method. This production does not affect the growth of the cyanobacteria and is markedly enhanced by overexpression of three enzymes in the intrinsic pathway to provide the precursor of limonene, geranyl pyrophosphate. The photosynthetic production of limonene in our system is more or less sustained from the linear to stationary phase of cyanobacterial growth for up to 1 month.

  2. Photosynthetic potential of planets in 3 : 2 spin-orbit resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, S. P.; Mead, A. J.; Forgan, D. H.; Raven, J. A.; Cockell, C. S.

    2014-10-01

    Photosynthetic life requires sufficient photosynthetically active radiation to metabolize. On Earth, plant behaviour, physiology and metabolism are sculpted around the night-day cycle by an endogenous biological circadian clock. The evolution of life was influenced by the Earth-Sun orbital dynamic, which generates the photo-environment incident on the planetary surface. In this work, the unusual photo-environment of an Earth-like planet (ELP) in 3 : 2 spin-orbit resonance is explored. Photo-environments on the ELP are longitudinally differentiated, in addition to differentiations related to latitude and depth (for aquatic organisms) which are familiar on Earth. The light environment on such a planet could be compatible with Earth's photosynthetic life although the threat of atmospheric freeze-out and prolonged periods of darkness would present significant challenges. We emphasize the relationship between the evolution of life on a planetary body with its orbital dynamics.

  3. Contributions of photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic cell types to leaf respiration in Vicia faba L. and their responses to growth temperature.

    PubMed

    Long, Benedict M; Bahar, Nur H A; Atkin, Owen K

    2015-11-01

    In intact leaves, mitochondrial populations are highly heterogeneous among contrasting cell types; how such contrasting populations respond to sustained changes in the environment remains, however, unclear. Here, we examined respiratory rates, mitochondrial protein composition and response to growth temperature in photosynthetic (mesophyll) and non-photosynthetic (epidermal) cells from fully expanded leaves of warm-developed (WD) and cold-developed (CD) broad bean (Vicia faba L.). Rates of respiration were significantly higher in mesophyll cell protoplasts (MCPs) than epidermal cell protoplasts (ECPs), with both protoplast types exhibiting capacity for cytochrome and alternative oxidase activity. Compared with ECPs, MCPs contained greater relative quantities of porin, suggesting higher mitochondrial surface area in mesophyll cells. Nevertheless, the relative quantities of respiratory proteins (normalized to porin) were similar in MCPs and ECPs, suggesting that ECPs have lower numbers of mitochondria yet similar protein complement to MCP mitochondria (albeit with lower abundance serine hydroxymethyltransferase). Several mitochondrial proteins (both non-photorespiratory and photorespiratory) exhibited an increased abundance in response to cold in both protoplast types. Based on estimates of individual protoplast respiration rates, combined with leaf cell abundance data, epidermal cells make a small but significant (2%) contribution to overall leaf respiration which increases twofold in the cold. Taken together, our data highlight the heterogeneous nature of mitochondrial populations in leaves, both among contrasting cell types and in how those populations respond to growth temperature.

  4. Origin and evolution of photosynthetic reaction centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, John M.; Pierson, Beverly K.

    1987-09-01

    The prototype reaction center may have used protoporphyrin-IX associated with small peptides to transfer electrons or protons across the primitive cell membrane. The precursor of all contemporary reaction centers contained chlorophylla molecules as both primary electron donor and initial electron acceptor and an Fe-S center as secondary acceptor (RC-1 type). The biosynthetic pathway for chlorophylla evolved along with the evolution of a better organized reaction center associated with cytochromes and quinones in a primitive cyclic electron transport system. This reaction center probably functioned initially in photoassimilation, but was easily adapted to CO2 fixation using H2 and H2S as reductants. During this phase bacteriochlorophyllg may have evolved from chlorophylla in response to competition for light, and thereby initiated the gram-positive line of eubacteria. A second reaction center (RC-2) evolved from RC-1 between 3.5 and 2.5 Ga ago in response to the competition for reductants for CO2 fixation. The new organism containing RC-2 in series with RC-1 would have been able to use poor reducing agents such as the abundant aqueous ferrous ion in place of H2 and H2S. This new organism is proposed to be the common ancestor of all phototrophic eubacteria except those related to the gram-positive bacteria. All organisms containing bacteriochlorophylla lost either RC-1 or RC-2, while those organisms containing chlorophylla (ancestors of cyanobacteria) added a water-splitting enzyme to RC-2 between 3.0 and 2.5 Ga ago in order to use H2O in place of hydrated ferrous ion as electron donor for autotrophic photosynthesis.

  5. Photosynthetic responses to the environment. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, H.Y.; Smith, C.M.

    1993-11-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of Photosynthetic Responses to the Environment, a meeting held August 24--27, 1992. The volume contains 10 full papers and 15 mini papers. Separate entries were prepared for the database for each of these presentations.

  6. Coral bleaching independent of photosynthetic activity.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Seneca, François O; DeNofrio, Jan C; Krediet, Cory J; Palumbi, Stephen R; Pringle, John R; Grossman, Arthur R

    2013-09-23

    The global decline of reef-building corals is due in part to the loss of algal symbionts, or "bleaching," during the increasingly frequent periods of high seawater temperatures. During bleaching, endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium spp.) either are lost from the animal tissue or lose their photosynthetic pigments, resulting in host mortality if the Symbiodinium populations fail to recover. The >1,000 studies of the causes of heat-induced bleaching have focused overwhelmingly on the consequences of damage to algal photosynthetic processes, and the prevailing model for bleaching invokes a light-dependent generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by heat-damaged chloroplasts as the primary trigger. However, the precise mechanisms of bleaching remain unknown, and there is evidence for involvement of multiple cellular processes. In this study, we asked the simple question of whether bleaching can be triggered by heat in the dark, in the absence of photosynthetically derived ROS. We used both the sea anemone model system Aiptasia and several species of reef-building corals to demonstrate that symbiont loss can occur rapidly during heat stress in complete darkness. Furthermore, we observed damage to the photosynthetic apparatus under these conditions in both Aiptasia endosymbionts and cultured Symbiodinium. These results do not directly contradict the view that light-stimulated ROS production is important in bleaching, but they do show that there must be another pathway leading to bleaching. Elucidation of this pathway should help to clarify bleaching mechanisms under the more usual conditions of heat stress in the light.

  7. Longitudinal photosynthetic gradient in crust lichens' thalli.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Zhang, Gaoke; Lan, Shubin; Zhang, Delu; Hu, Chunxiang

    2014-05-01

    In order to evaluate the self-shading protection for inner photobionts, the photosynthetic activities of three crust lichens were detected using Microscope-Imaging-PAM. The false color images showed that longitudinal photosynthetic gradient was found in both the green algal lichen Placidium sp. and the cyanolichen Peltula sp. In longitudinal direction, all the four chlorophyll fluorescence parameters Fv/Fm, Yield, qP, and rETR gradually decreased with depth in the thalli of both of these two lichens. In Placidium sp., qN values decreased with depth, whereas an opposite trend was found in Peltula sp. However, no such photosynthetic heterogeneity was found in the thalli of Collema sp. in longitudinal direction. Microscope observation showed that photobiont cells are compactly arranged in Placidium sp. and Peltula sp. while loosely distributed in Collema sp. It was considered that the longitudinal photosynthetic heterogeneity was ascribed to the result of gradual decrease of incidence caused by the compact arrangement of photobiont cells in the thalli. The results indicate a good protection from the self-shading for the inner photobionts against high radiation in crust lichens.

  8. Photon echo studies of photosynthetic light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Read, Elizabeth L; Lee, Hohjai; Fleming, Graham R

    2009-01-01

    The broad linewidths in absorption spectra of photosynthetic complexes obscure information related to their structure and function. Photon echo techniques represent a powerful class of time-resolved electronic spectroscopy that allow researchers to probe the interactions normally hidden under broad linewidths with sufficient time resolution to follow the fastest energy transfer events in light harvesting. Here, we outline the technical approach and applications of two types of photon echo experiments: the photon echo peak shift and two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform photon echo spectroscopy. We review several extensions of these techniques to photosynthetic complexes. Photon echo peak shift spectroscopy can be used to determine the strength of coupling between a pigment and its surrounding environment including neighboring pigments and to quantify timescales of energy transfer. Two-dimensional spectroscopy yields a frequency-resolved map of absorption and emission processes, allowing coupling interactions and energy transfer pathways to be viewed directly. Furthermore, 2D spectroscopy reveals structural information such as the relative orientations of coupled transitions. Both classes of experiments can be used to probe the quantum mechanical nature of photosynthetic light-harvesting: peak shift experiments allow quantification of correlated energetic fluctuations between pigments, while 2D techniques measure quantum beating directly, both of which indicate the extent of quantum coherence over multiple pigment sites in the protein complex. The mechanistic and structural information obtained by these techniques reveals valuable insights into the design principles of photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes, and a multitude of variations on the methods outlined here.

  9. [Effects of water and nitrogen management modes on the leaf photosynthetic characters and yield formation of cotton with under-mulch drip irrigation].

    PubMed

    Luo, Hong-Hai; Zhang, Hong-Zhi; Tao, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Ya-Li; Zhang, Wang-feng

    2013-02-01

    Taking different genotype cotton varieties as test materials, a soil column culture experiment was conducted to study the effects of water and nitrogen management modes on the photosynthetic characters and yield formation of cotton with under-mulch drip irrigation in Xinjiang, Northwest China. Under the management mode W4N2, i.e., pre-sowing irrigation + limited drip irrigation before full-flowering + abundant drip irrigation after full-flowering in combining with basal 20% N + topdressing 80% N, the chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), stomatal conductance (gs) , actual photochemical efficiency of photosystem II (Psi PSII), and photochemical quenching coefficient (qp) at full-flowering stage all decreased significantly, the non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) increased, and the aboveground dry matter accumulation was inhibited, as compared with those under common drip irrigation. From full-flowering stage to boll-opening stage, the chlorophyll content, gs, Pn, Psi PSII, and qp increased with increasing water and nitrogen supply, and the aboveground dry matter accumulation was enhanced by compensation, which benefited the translocation and distribution of photosynthates to seed cotton. Under the fertilization mode of basal 20% N + topdressing 80% N, the seed cotton yield of Xinluzaol3 was the highest in treatment pre-sowing irrigation + common drip irrigation (W3), but that of Xinluzao43 was the highest in treatment pre-sowing irrigation + limited drip irrigation before full-flowering + abundant drip irrigation after full-flowering (W4). It was concluded that under the condition of pre-sowing irrigation, to appropriately decrease the water and nitrogen supply before full-flowering stage and increase the water and nitrogen supply at middle and late growth stages could extend the active photosynthesis duration and promote the photosynthates allocation to reproductive organ, which would fully exploit the yield-increasing potential of cotton with under

  10. Comparative analysis of plastid genomes of non-photosynthetic Ericaceae and their photosynthetic relatives

    PubMed Central

    Logacheva, Maria D.; Schelkunov, Mikhail I.; Shtratnikova, Victoria Y.; Matveeva, Maria V.; Penin, Aleksey A.

    2016-01-01

    Although plastid genomes of flowering plants are typically highly conserved regarding their size, gene content and order, there are some exceptions. Ericaceae, a large and diverse family of flowering plants, warrants special attention within the context of plastid genome evolution because it includes both non-photosynthetic and photosynthetic species with rearranged plastomes and putative losses of “essential” genes. We characterized plastid genomes of three species of Ericaceae, non-photosynthetic Monotropa uniflora and Hypopitys monotropa and photosynthetic Pyrola rotundifolia, using high-throughput sequencing. As expected for non-photosynthetic plants, M. uniflora and H. monotropa have small plastid genomes (46 kb and 35 kb, respectively) lacking genes related to photosynthesis, whereas P. rotundifolia has a larger genome (169 kb) with a gene set similar to other photosynthetic plants. The examined genomes contain an unusually high number of repeats and translocations. Comparative analysis of the expanded set of Ericaceae plastomes suggests that the genes clpP and accD that are present in the plastid genomes of almost all plants have not been lost in this family (as was previously thought) but rather persist in these genomes in unusual forms. Also we found a new gene in P. rotundifolia that emerged as a result of duplication of rps4 gene. PMID:27452401

  11. Coupling a high-temperature catalytic oxidation total organic carbon analyzer to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer to measure natural-abundance delta13C-dissolved organic carbon in marine and freshwater samples.

    PubMed

    Panetta, Robert J; Ibrahim, Mina; Gélinas, Yves

    2008-07-01

    The stable isotope composition of dissolved organic carbon (delta(13)C-DOC) provides powerful information toward understanding carbon sources and cycling, but analytical limitations have precluded its routine measurement in natural samples. Recent interfacing of wet oxidation-based dissolved organic carbon analyzers and isotope ratio mass spectrometers has simplified the measurement of delta(13)C-DOC in freshwaters, but the analysis of salty estuarine/marine samples still proves difficult. Here we describe the coupling of the more widespread high-temperature catalytic oxidation-based total organic carbon analyzer to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (HTC-IRMS) through cryogenic trapping of analyte gases exiting the HTC analyzer for routine analysis of delta(13)C-DOC in aquatic and marine samples. Targeted elimination of major sources of background CO2 originating from the HTC analyzer allows for the routine measurement of samples over the natural range of DOC concentrations (from 40 microM to over 2000 microM), and salinities (<0.1-36 g/kg). Because consensus reference natural samples for delta(13)C-DOC do not exist, method validation was carried out with water-soluble stable isotope standards as well as previously measured natural samples (IAEA sucrose, Suwannee River Fulvic Acids, Deep Sargasso Sea consensus reference material, and St. Lawrence River water) and result in excellent delta(13)C-DOC accuracy (+/-0.2 per thousand) and precision (+/-0.3 per thousand).

  12. Initial water deficit effects on Lupinus albus photosynthetic performance, carbon metabolism, and hormonal balance: metabolic reorganization prior to early stress responses.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, Carla; António, Carla; Ortuño, Maria Fernanda; Dobrev, Petre I; Hartung, Wolfram; Thomas-Oates, Jane; Ricardo, Cândido Pinto; Vanková, Radomira; Chaves, M Manuela; Wilson, Julie C

    2011-10-01

    The early (2-4 d) effects of slowly imposed soil water deficit on Lupinus albus photosynthetic performance, carbon metabolism, and hormonal balance in different organs (leaf blade, stem stele, stem cortex, and root) were evaluated on 23-d-old plants (growth chamber assay). Our work shows that several metabolic adjustments occurred prior to alteration of the plant water status, implying that water deficit is perceived before the change in plant water status. The slow, progressive decline in soil water content started to be visible 3 d after withholding water (3 DAW). The earliest plant changes were associated with organ-specific metabolic responses (particularly in the leaves) and with leaf conductance and only later with plant water status and photosynthetic rate (4 DAW) or photosynthetic capacity (according to the Farquhar model; 6 DAW). Principal component analysis (PCA) of the physiological parameters, the carbohydrate and the hormone levels and their relative values, as well as leaf water-soluble metabolites full scan data (LC-MS/MS), showed separation of the different sampling dates. At 6 DAW classically described stress responses are observed, with plant water status, ABA level, and root hormonal balance contributing to the separation of these samples. Discrimination of earlier stress stages (3 and 4 DAW) is only achieved when the relative levels of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), cytokinins (Cks), and carbon metabolism (glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and starch levels) are taken into account. Our working hypothesis is that, in addition to single responses (e.g. ABA increase), the combined alterations in hormone and carbohydrate levels play an important role in the stress response mechanism. Response to more advanced stress appears to be associated with a combination of cumulative changes, occurring in several plant organs. The carbohydrate and hormonal balance in the leaf (IAA to bioactive-Cks; soluble sugars to IAA and starch to IAA; relative abundances of the

  13. Photosynthetic circadian rhythmicity patterns of Symbiodium, the coral endosymbiotic algae

    PubMed Central

    Sorek, Michal; Yacobi, Yosef Z.; Roopin, Modi; Berman-Frank, Ilana; Levy, Oren

    2013-01-01

    Biological clocks are self-sustained endogenous timers that enable organisms (from cyanobacteria to humans) to anticipate daily environmental rhythms, and adjust their physiology and behaviour accordingly. Symbiotic corals play a central role in the creation of biologically rich ecosystems based on mutualistic symbioses between the invertebrate coral and dinoflagellate protists from the genus Symbiodinium. In this study, we experimentally establish that Symbiodinium photosynthesis, both as a free-living unicellular algae and as part of the symbiotic association with the coral Stylophora pistillata, is ‘wired’ to the circadian clock mechanism with a ‘free-run’ cycle close to 24 h. Associated photosynthetic pigments also showed rhythmicity under light/dark conditions and under constant light conditions, while the expression of the oxygen-evolving enhancer 1 gene (within photosystem II) coincided with photosynthetically evolved oxygen in Symbiodinium cultures. Thus, circadian regulation of the Symbiodinium photosynthesis is, however, complicated as being linked to the coral/host that have probably profound physiochemical influence on the intracellular environment. The temporal patterns of photosynthesis demonstrated here highlight the physiological complexity and interdependence of the algae circadian clock associated in this symbiosis and the plasticity of algae regulatory mechanisms downstream of the circadian clock. PMID:23554392

  14. Using AVIRIS images to measure temporal trends in abundance of photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic canopy components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ustin, Susan L.; Smith, Milton O.; Roberts, Dar; Gamon, John A.; Field, Christopher B.

    1992-01-01

    The Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, Stanford, California is a good example of hardwood rangeland ecosystems in California. Structurally, it is composed of a mosaic of serpentine grasslands, oak savannah, coastal chaparral, and mixed evergreen woodland, representing a broad cross-section of physiognomic classes. The Mediterranean climate produces an extended seasonal drought lasting throughout most of the growing season and has significant impact on the expression of divergent phenological patterns related to contrasting ecological strategies of these taxa. The region is well understood biologically due to the rich history of ecological research at the site. Thus, community characteristics, physiological characteristics, phenology, and temporal dynamics are reasonably well understood for many of the dominant species. Because of its proximity to NASA Ames Research Center, it has been subject to a large number of aircraft data acquisitions over many years. A more complete examination of this database would provide an opportunity to test current remote sensing hypotheses for measurement and detection of ecological attributes, particularly those involving canopy chemistry and physiology. Better definition of ecological rules might permit development of remotely sensed surrogate variables for biological properties that cannot be directly measured or measured with sufficient accuracy.

  15. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2002-07-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2001 through 7/01/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives, and we are currently on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, the milestone date from the original project timeline. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, our efforts are focused on improving the design of the bioreactor test system, evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Our collection of cyanobacteria, isolated in YNP was increased to 15 unialgal cultures. (2) Illumination rate about 50 {micro}E/m{sup 2}/sec is not saturated for the growth of 1.2 s.c. (2) isolate. The decrease of illumination rate led to the decrease of doubling time of this isolate. (3) The positive effect of Ca{sup 2+} on the growth of isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) without Omnisil was revealed, though Ca{sup 2+} addition was indifferent for the growth of this isolate at the presence of Omnisil. (4) Calcium addition had a positive effect on the generation of cyanobacterial biofilm on Omnisil surface. (5) The survivability problems with the Tr9.4 organism on Omnisil screens in the CRF2 model-scale bioreactor have been solved. The problems were related to the method used to populate the growth surfaces. When pre-populated screens were placed in the bioreactor the microalgae died within 72 hours, but when the microalgae were cultured while in place in the bioreactor using a continuous-population method they grew well inside of the CRF2 test system and survived for the full 7-day test duration. CRF2 tests will continue as soon as the new combined drip system/harvesting system header pipe

  16. Mechanism and analyses for extracting photosynthetic electrons using exogenous quinones - what makes a good extraction pathway?

    PubMed

    Longatte, G; Rappaport, F; Wollman, F-A; Guille-Collignon, M; Lemaître, F

    2016-08-04

    Plants or algae take many benefits from oxygenic photosynthesis by converting solar energy into chemical energy through the synthesis of carbohydrates from carbon dioxide and water. However, the overall yield of this process is rather low (about 4% of the total energy available from sunlight is converted into chemical energy). This is the principal reason why recently many studies have been devoted to extraction of photosynthetic electrons in order to produce a sustainable electric current. Practically, the electron transfer occurs between the photosynthetic organism and an electrode and can be assisted by an exogenous mediator, mainly a quinone. In this regard, we recently reported on a method involving fluorescence measurements to estimate the ability of different quinones to extract photosynthetic electrons from a mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. In the present work, we used the same kind of methodology to establish a zone diagram for predicting the most suitable experimental conditions to extract photoelectrons from intact algae (quinone concentration and light intensity) as a function of the purpose of the study. This will provide further insights into the extraction mechanism of photosynthetic electrons using exogenous quinones. Indeed fluorescence measurements allowed us to model the capacity of photosynthetic algae to donate electrons to an exogenous quinone by considering a numerical parameter called "open center ratio" which is related to the Photosystem II acceptor redox state. Then, using it as a proxy for investigating the extraction of photosynthetic electrons by means of an exogenous quinone, 2,6-DCBQ, we suggested an extraction mechanism that was globally found consistent with the experimentally extracted parameters.

  17. RuBisCO in Non-Photosynthetic Alga Euglena longa: Divergent Features, Transcriptomic Analysis and Regulation of Complex Formation

    PubMed Central

    Záhonová, Kristína; Füssy, Zoltán; Oborník, Miroslav; Eliáš, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Euglena longa, a close relative of the photosynthetic model alga Euglena gracilis, possesses an enigmatic non-photosynthetic plastid. Its genome has retained a gene for the large subunit of the enzyme RuBisCO (rbcL). Here we provide new data illuminating the putative role of RuBisCO in E. longa. We demonstrated that the E. longa RBCL protein sequence is extremely divergent compared to its homologs from the photosynthetic relatives, suggesting a possible functional shift upon the loss of photosynthesis. Similarly to E. gracilis, E. longa harbors a nuclear gene encoding the small subunit of RuBisCO (RBCS) as a precursor polyprotein comprising multiple RBCS repeats, but one of them is highly divergent. Both RBCL and the RBCS proteins are synthesized in E. longa, but their abundance is very low compared to E. gracilis. No RBCS monomers could be detected in E. longa, suggesting that processing of the precursor polyprotein is inefficient in this species. The abundance of RBCS is regulated post-transcriptionally. Indeed, blocking the cytoplasmic translation by cycloheximide has no immediate effect on the RBCS stability in photosynthetically grown E. gracilis, but in E. longa, the protein is rapidly degraded. Altogether, our results revealed signatures of evolutionary degradation (becoming defunct) of RuBisCO in E. longa and suggest that its biological role in this species may be rather unorthodox, if any. PMID:27391690

  18. The sulfolipid sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol is not required for photosynthetic electron transport in Rhodobacter sphaeroides but enhances growth under phosphate limitation

    SciTech Connect

    Benning, C.; Somerville, C.R. ); Beatty, J.T. ); Prince, R.C. )

    1993-02-15

    All photosynthetic organisms, with the exception of several species of photosynthetic bacteria, are thought to contain the sulfolipid 6-sulfo-[alpha]-D-quinovosyldiacylglycerol. The association of this lipid with photosynthetic membranes has led to the assumption that it plays some role in photosynthesis. Stable null mutants of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides completely lacking sulfolipid were obtained by disruption of the sqdB gene. The ratios of the various components of the photosynthetic electron transport chain, as well as the electron transfer rates during cyclic electron transport, were not altered in the mutants, when grown under optimal conditions. Growth rates of wild type and mutants were identical under a variety of growth conditions, with the exception of phosphate limitation, which resulted in reduced growth of the mutants. Phosphate limitation of the wild type a used a significant reduction in the amount of all phospholipids and an increased amount of sulfolipid. By contrast, the sulfolipid-deficient mutant had reduced levels of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine but maintained a normal level of phosphatidylglycerol. In addition, two unidentified lipids lacking phosphorus accumulated in the membranes of both wild-type and mutant strains under phosphate limitation. We conclude that sulfolipid plays no significant unique role in photoheterotrophic growth or photosynthetic electron transport in R. sphaeroides but may function as a surrogate for phospholipids, particularly phosphatidylglycerol, under phosphate-limiting conditions. 34 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Electrochemical and optical studies of model photosynthetic systems. Final progress report, July 1, 1984--August 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-15

    The objective of this research is to obtain a better understanding of the relationship between the structural organization of photosynthetic pigments and their spectroscopic and electrochemical properties. Defined model systems were studied first. These included the least ordered (solutions) through the most highly ordered (Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) monolayers and self-assembled monolayers) systems containing BChl, BPheo, and UQ. Molecules other than the photosynthetic pigments and quinones were also examined, including chromophores (i.e. surface active cyanine dyes and phtahlocyanines) an redox active compounds (methyl viologen (MV) and surfactant ferrocenes), in order to develop the techniques needed to study the photosynthetic components. Because the chlorophylls are photosensitive and labile, it was easier first to develop procedures using stable species. Three different techniques were used to characterize these model systems. These included electrochemical techniques for determining the standard oxidation and reduction potentials of the photosynthetic components as well as methods for determining the heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants for BChl and BPheo at metal electrodes (Pt and Au). Resonance Raman (RR) and surface enhanced resonance Raman (SERR) spectroscopy were used to determine the spectra of the photosynthetic pigments and model compounds. SERRS was also used to study several types of photosynthetic preparations.

  20. Photosynthetic Rates of Citronella and Lemongrass 1

    PubMed Central

    Herath, H. M. Walter; Ormrod, Douglas P.

    1979-01-01

    Ten selections of citronella (Cymbopogon nardus [L.] Rendle) were grown at 32/27, 27/21, or 15/10 C day/night temperatures, and plants from three populations of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus [D.C.] Stapf from Japan or Sri Lanka and Cymbopogon flexuosus [D.C.] Stapf from India) were grown at 8- or 15-hour photoperiods. Net photosynthetic rates of mature leaves were measured in a controlled environment at 25 C and 260 microeinsteins per meter2 per second. Rates declined with increasing leaf age, and from the tip to the base of the leaf blade. Rates for citronella leaves grown at 15/10 C were extremely low for all selections. Highest rates of net photosynthesis were recorded for four selections grown at 27/21 C and for two selections grown at 32/27 C. Lemongrass grown at 8-hour photoperiod had higher photosynthetic rates than that grown at 15-hour photoperiod. PMID:16660737

  1. BOREAS TE-9 NSA Photosynthetic Response Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G.; Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Dang, Qinglai; Margolis, Hank; Coyea, Marie

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmospheric Study (BOREAS) TE-9 (Terrestrial Ecology) team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves. This data set describes: (1) the response of leaf and shoot-level photosynthesis to ambient and intercellular CO2 concentration, temperature, and incident photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) for black spruce, jack pine, and aspen during the three intensive field campaigns (IFCs) in 1994 in the Northern Study Area (NSA); (2) the response of stomatal conductance to vapor pressure difference throughout the growing season of 1994; and (3) a range of shoot water potentials (controlled in the laboratory) for black spruce and jack pine. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  2. Photosynthetic rates of citronella and lemongrass.

    PubMed

    Herath, H M; Ormrod, D P

    1979-02-01

    Ten selections of citronella (Cymbopogon nardus [L.] Rendle) were grown at 32/27, 27/21, or 15/10 C day/night temperatures, and plants from three populations of lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus [D.C.] Stapf from Japan or Sri Lanka and Cymbopogon flexuosus [D.C.] Stapf from India) were grown at 8- or 15-hour photoperiods. Net photosynthetic rates of mature leaves were measured in a controlled environment at 25 C and 260 microeinsteins per meter(2) per second. Rates declined with increasing leaf age, and from the tip to the base of the leaf blade. Rates for citronella leaves grown at 15/10 C were extremely low for all selections. Highest rates of net photosynthesis were recorded for four selections grown at 27/21 C and for two selections grown at 32/27 C. Lemongrass grown at 8-hour photoperiod had higher photosynthetic rates than that grown at 15-hour photoperiod.

  3. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2005-01-13

    This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project during the ending 12/31/2004. Specific results and accomplishments for the program include review of pilot scale testing and design of a new bioreactor. Testing confirmed that algae can be grown in a sustainable fashion in the pilot bioreactor, even with intermittent availability of sunlight. The pilot-scale tests indicated that algal growth rate followed photon delivery during productivity testing.

  4. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2003-04-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/2/2003 through 4/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we are progressing with long-term model scale bioreactor tests and are completing final preparations for pilot scale bioreactor testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2003 are included.

  5. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2003-07-22

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2003 through 7/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we have completed some long-term model scale bioreactor tests and are prepared to begin pilot scale bioreactor testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (a) Qualitative long-term survivability tests for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been successfully completed and results demonstrate a growth rate that appears to be acceptable. (b) Quantitative tests of long-term growth productivity for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been completed and initial results are promising. Initial results show that the mass of organisms doubled (from 54.9 grams to 109.8 grams) in about 5 weeks. Full results will be available as soon as all membranes and filters are completely dried. The growth rate should increase significantly with the initiation of weekly harvesting during the long term tests. (c) The phase 1 construction of the pilot scale bioreactor has been completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. We are now in the phase of system improvement as we wait for CRF-2 results in order to be able to finalize the design and construction of the pilot scale system. (d) A mass transfer experimental setup was constructed in order to measure the mass transfer rate from the gas to the liquid film flowing over a membrane and to study the hydrodynamics of the liquid film flowing over a membrane in the bioreactor. Results were reported for mass transfer coefficient, film thickness, and fluid velocity over an Omnisil membrane with a ''drilled hole'' header pipe design. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (a) A selectivity approach was used to obtain a cyanobacterial culture with elevated resistance to acid pH. Microlonies of ''3.2.2 S.C.1 Positive'' migrated

  6. Endospore abundance, microbial growth and necromass turnover in deep sub-seafloor sediment.

    PubMed

    Lomstein, Bente Aa; Langerhuus, Alice T; D'Hondt, Steven; Jørgensen, Bo B; Spivack, Arthur J

    2012-03-18

    Two decades of scientific ocean drilling have demonstrated widespread microbial life in deep sub-seafloor sediment, and surprisingly high microbial-cell numbers. Despite the ubiquity of life in the deep biosphere, the large community sizes and the low energy fluxes in this vast buried ecosystem are not yet understood. It is not known whether organisms of the deep biosphere are specifically adapted to extremely low energy fluxes or whether most of the observed cells are in a dormant, spore-like state. Here we apply a new approach--the D:L-amino-acid model--to quantify the distributions and turnover times of living microbial biomass, endospores and microbial necromass, as well as to determine their role in the sub-seafloor carbon budget. The approach combines sensitive analyses of unique bacterial markers (muramic acid and D-amino acids) and the bacterial endospore marker, dipicolinic acid, with racemization dynamics of stereo-isomeric amino acids. Endospores are as abundant as vegetative cells and microbial activity is extremely low, leading to microbial biomass turnover times of hundreds to thousands of years. We infer from model calculations that biomass production is sustained by organic carbon deposited from the surface photosynthetic world millions of years ago and that microbial necromass is recycled over timescales of hundreds of thousands of years.

  7. Photosynthetic system in Blastochloris viridis revisited.

    PubMed

    Konorty, Marina; Brumfeld, Vlad; Vermeglio, Andre; Kahana, Nava; Medalia, Ohad; Minsky, Abraham

    2009-06-09

    The bacterium Blastochloris viridis carries one of the simplest photosynthetic systems, which includes a single light-harvesting complex that surrounds the reaction center, membrane soluble quinones, and a soluble periplasmic protein cytochrome c(2) that shuttle between the reaction center and the bc(1) complex and act as electron carriers, as well as the ATP synthase. The close arrangement of the photosynthetic membranes in Bl. viridis, along with the extremely tight arrangement of the photosystems within these membranes, raises a fundamental question about the diffusion of the electron carriers. To address this issue, we analyzed the structure and response of the Bl. viridis photosynthetic system to various light conditions, by using a combination of electron microscopy, whole-cell cryotomography, and spectroscopic methods. We demonstrate that in response to high light intensities, the ratio of both cytochrome c(2) and bc(1) complexes to the reaction centers is increased. The shorter membrane stacks, along with the notion that the bc(1) complex is located at the highly curved edges of these stacks, result in a smaller average distance between the reaction centers and the bc(1) complexes, leading to shorter pathways of cytochrome c(2) between the two complexes. Under anaerobic conditions, the slow diffusion rate is further mitigated by keeping most of the quinone pool reduced, resulting in a concentration gradient of quinols that allows for a constant supply of theses electron carriers to the bc(1) complex.

  8. Photosynthetic carbon metabolism in Enteromorpha compressa (Chlorophyta)

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.; Shragge, B.

    1987-12-01

    The intertidal macroalga Enteromorpha compressa showed the ability to use HCO/sub 3//sup -/, as an exogenous inorganic carbon (Ci) source for photosynthesis. However, although the natural sea water concentration of this carbon form was saturating, additional CO/sub 2/ above ambient Ci levels doubled net photosynthetic rates. Therefore, the productivity of this alga, when submerged, is likely to be limited by Ci. When plants were exposed to air, photosynthetic rates saturated at air-levels of CO/sub 2/ during mild desiccation. Based on carbon fixing enzyme activities and Ci pulse-chase incorporation patterns, it was found that Enteromorpha is a C/sub 3/ plant. However, this alga did not show O/sub 2/ inhibited photosynthetic rates at natural sea water Ci conditions. It is suggested that such a C/sub 4/-like gas exchange response is due to the HCO/sub 3//sup -/ utilization system concentrating CO/sub 2/ intracellularly, thus alleviating apparent photorespiration.

  9. Photosynthetic microorganisms in cold environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kviderova, Jana; Hajek, Josef; Elster, Josef; Bartak, Milos; Vaczi, Peter; Nedbalova, Linda

    The polar regions are considered as a model of extraterrestrial ecosystems. Depending on the average temperature, temperature variation and water availability, these conditions could be used as a model of Mars or Europa (e.g. (Elster and Benson, 2004). Two cases are presented: 1) Stable temperature and water availability The environment of cryosestic communities, i.e. organisms living in snow, is characterized by very stable temperature; the diurnal variations do not exceed 1 -2 ° C (Kváderová, 2010) and a are not usually exposed to freeze/thaw. Water is not usually limiting since the water content could reach up to 54 % (Nedbalová et al., 2008). The windblown sediments are important a source of nutrient and could provide protection against the excess of radiation. The nutrient concentrations in the snow are low are depleted rapidly when massive algal blooms forms. Such environment could be found near Mars polar caps or in Europa ice cover. The snow algae are the most important primary producers in snow. Their adaptation strategy is dependent on the developmental stages; the motile stages avoid the harsh conditions (e.g. high light) and sessile stages acclimatize to actual conditions. The main genera Chlamydomonas and Chloromonas (both Chlorophyta) are psychrophilic. Their growth optimum temperature is lower than 15 ° C and their growth is inhibited at temperatures above 20 ° C. 2) Unstable temperature and water availability The deglaciated surfaces, inhabited by lichen communities, are typical by variation in temper-ature and moisture. The temperature could range several tens ° C within a short time and the water availability is usually very limited. Due to temperature variation, the lichens are subjected to many freeze/thaw cycles. Such environments could be found in Martian deserts. The lichens are symbotic organisms composed of a mycobiont (heterotrophic fungi) and photo-bionts (algae and/or cyanobacteria). Majority of lichens are dehydrated in the field

  10. BIOGEOCHEMICAL STUDIES OF PHOTOSYNTHETIC MICROBIAL MATS AND THEIR BIOTA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DesMarais, David; Discipulo, M.; Turk, K.; Londry, K. L.

    2005-01-01

    Photosynthetic microbial mats offer an opportunity to define holistic functionality at the millimeter scale. At the same time. their biogeochemistry contributes to environmental processes on a planetary scale. These mats are possibly direct descendents of the most ancient biological communities; communities in which oxygenic photosynthesis might have been invented. Mats provide one of the best natural systems to study how microbial populations associate to control dynamic biogeochemical gradients. These are self- sustaining, complete ecosystems in which light energy absorbed over a dial (24 hour) cycle drives the synthesis of spatially-organized, diverse biomass. Tightly-coupled microorganisms in the mat have specialized metabolisms that catalyze transformations of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and a host of other elements.

  11. New thioredoxin targets in the unicellular photosynthetic eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Guillon, Blanche; Le Maréchal, Pierre; Keryer, Eliane; Miginiac-Maslow, Myroslawa; Decottignies, Paulette

    2004-01-01

    Proteomics were used to identify the proteins from the eukaryotic unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that can be reduced by thioredoxin. These proteins were retained specifically on a thioredoxin affinity column made of a monocysteinic thioredoxin mutant able to form mixed disulfides with its targets. Of a total of 55 identified targets, 29 had been found previously in higher plants or Synechocystis, but 26 were new targets. Biochemical tests were performed on three of them, showing a thioredoxin-dependent activation of isocitrate lyase and isopropylmalate dehydrogenase and a thioredoxin-dependent deactivation of catalase that is redox insensitive in Arabidopsis. In addition, we identified a Ran protein, a previously uncharacterized nuclear target in a photosynthetic organism. The metabolic and evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:15123830

  12. New thioredoxin targets in the unicellular photosynthetic eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, Stéphane D; Guillon, Blanche; Le Maréchal, Pierre; Keryer, Eliane; Miginiac-Maslow, Myroslawa; Decottignies, Paulette

    2004-05-11

    Proteomics were used to identify the proteins from the eukaryotic unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that can be reduced by thioredoxin. These proteins were retained specifically on a thioredoxin affinity column made of a monocysteinic thioredoxin mutant able to form mixed disulfides with its targets. Of a total of 55 identified targets, 29 had been found previously in higher plants or Synechocystis, but 26 were new targets. Biochemical tests were performed on three of them, showing a thioredoxin-dependent activation of isocitrate lyase and isopropylmalate dehydrogenase and a thioredoxin-dependent deactivation of catalase that is redox insensitive in Arabidopsis. In addition, we identified a Ran protein, a previously uncharacterized nuclear target in a photosynthetic organism. The metabolic and evolutionary implications of these findings are discussed.

  13. Ammonia abundances in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.; Engel, L.

    The emission band strengths of the NH2 bands of Comets Halley, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Borrelly were measured to determine the NH2 column densities for the comets. Production rates obtained using the Haser and vectorial models are in agreement within the observational errors, suggesting that a simple two-step decay model may be used to approximate the NH2 distribution in a comet's coma. Ammonia-to-water abundance ratios from 0.01 to 0.4 percent were found for the four comets. The ratio in Comet Halley is found to be Q(NH3)/Q(H2O) = 0.002 + or - 0.001. No significant difference in the ammonia abundance was found before or after perihelion in Comet Halley.

  14. Complete fluorescent fingerprints of extremophilic and photosynthetic microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartnell, Lewis R.; Storrie-Lombardi, Michael C.; Ward, John M.

    2010-10-01

    The work reported here represents a study into the total fluorescence exhibited by a broad selection of model, extremophilic and photosynthetic bacterial strains, over a great range of excitation and emission wavelengths from ultraviolet (UV) through visible to near infrared. The aim is to identify distinctive fluorescent features that may serve as detectable biosignatures of remnant microbial life on the Martian surface. A lab-bench fluorescence spectrometer was used to generate an excitation-emission matrix (EEM) for the unpigmented Escherichia coli, radiation-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans, Antarctic Dry Valley isolates Brevundimonas sp. MV.7 and Rhodococcus sp. MV.10, and the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Detailed EEMs, representing the fluorescence signature of each organism, are presented, and the most significant features suitable for biosignature surveys are identified, including small-molecule cellular metabolites, light-harvesting photosynthetic pigments and extracellular UV-screening compounds. E. coli exhibits the most intense emission from tryptophan, presumably due to the absence of UV-screening pigments that would shield the organism from short-wavelength light-exciting intracellular fluorescence. The efficacy of commonly available laser diodes for exciting cellular fluorescence is treated, along with the most appropriate filter wavelengths for imaging systems. The best combination of available laser diodes and PanCam filters aboard the ExoMars probe is proposed. The possibility of detecting fluorescence excited by solar UV radiation in freshly exposed surface samples by imaging when both sunlit and shadowed, perhaps by the body of the rover itself, is discussed. We also study how these biological fluorophore molecules may be degraded, and thus the potential biosignatures erased, by the high flux of far-ultraviolet light on Mars.

  15. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2003-01-15

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2001 through 1/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below our current efforts are focused on evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, preparing to conduct long-term tests in the bench-scale bioreactor test systems, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2003 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Additional thermal features with developed cyanobacterial mats, which might be calcium resistant, were found in the West Thumb area of YNP. New samples were isolated and are being cultured in glass tubes. (2) We checked the motile ability of 8.2.1 Synechococcus s.c. (10) and 3.2.2 Synechococcus s.c. 6. It was found that unicellular isolates 8.2.1 Synechococcus s.c. (10) and 3.2.2 Synechococcus s.c. 1 are phototaxic. Isolate 3.2.2 Synechococcus s.c. 1 currently consists of two populations: one population appears to be positive phototaxic, and second population appears negative phototaxis to the same level of light. This means that the character of screen illumination should be uniform and reasonable for cyanobacterial cells. (3) The aeration of growth media with 5% CO{sub 2} in air stimulates cyanobacterial growth 10-20 times over that with air alone. It is possible the rate of the stimulation of cyanobacterial growth in CRF will be higher because cyanobacteria will be grown as a biofilm. We plan to increase the concentration to 15% CO{sub 2} in air. (4) We are continuing the organizing of our collection of the thermophilic cyanobacteria isolated from Yellowstone National Park. During this reporting period we transferred about 160 samples and discarded about 80 samples with weak growth in standard media as BG-11, D or DH. As result of this work we currently have 13 unialgal cultures of thermophilic

  16. Organics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  17. Organizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  18. An Energy Balance Model to Predict Chemical Partitioning in a Photosynthetic Microbial Mat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoehler, Tori M.; Albert, Daniel B.; DesMarais, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Studies of biosignature formation in photosynthetic microbial mat communities offer potentially useful insights with regards to both solar and extrasolar astrobiology. Biosignature formation in such systems results from the chemical transformation of photosynthetically fixed carbon by accessory microorganisms. This fixed carbon represents a source not only of reducing power, but also energy, to these organisms, so that chemical and energy budgets should be coupled. We tested this hypothesis by applying an energy balance model to predict the fate of photosynthetic productivity under dark, anoxic conditions. Fermentation of photosynthetically fixed carbon is taken to be the only source of energy available to cyanobacteria in the absence of light and oxygen, and nitrogen fixation is the principal energy demand. The alternate fate for fixed carbon is to build cyanobacterial biomass with Redfield C:N ratio. The model predicts that, under completely nitrogen-limited conditions, growth is optimized when 78% of fixed carbon stores are directed into fermentative energy generation, with the remainder allocated to growth. These predictions were compared to measurements made on microbial mats that are known to be both nitrogen-limited and populated by actively nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. In these mats, under dark, anoxic conditions, 82% of fixed carbon stores were diverted into fermentation. The close agreement between these independent approaches suggests that energy balance models may provide a quantitative means of predicting chemical partitioning within such systems - an important step towards understanding how biological productivity is ultimately partitioned into biosignature compounds.

  19. Photosynthetic fuel for heterologous enzymes: the role of electron carrier proteins.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Silas Busck; Vavitsas, Konstantinos; Nielsen, Agnieszka Zygadlo; Jensen, Poul Erik

    2017-03-11

    Plants, cyanobacteria, and algae generate a surplus of redox power through photosynthesis, which makes them attractive for biotechnological exploitations. While central metabolism consumes most of the energy, pathways introduced through metabolic engineering can also tap into this source of reducing power. Recent work on the metabolic engineering of photosynthetic organisms has shown that the electron carriers such as ferredoxin and flavodoxin can be used to couple heterologous enzymes to photosynthetic reducing power. Because these proteins have a plethora of interaction partners and rely on electrostatically steered complex formation, they form productive electron transfer complexes with non-native enzymes. A handful of examples demonstrate channeling of photosynthetic electrons to drive the activity of heterologous enzymes, and these focus mainly on hydrogenases and cytochrome P450s. However, competition from native pathways and inefficient electron transfer rates present major obstacles, which limit the productivity of heterologous reactions coupled to photosynthesis. We discuss specific approaches to address these bottlenecks and ensure high productivity of such enzymes in a photosynthetic context.

  20. Voltage-Gated Na+ Channel Isoforms and Their mRNA Expression Levels and Protein Abundance in Three Electric Organs and the Skeletal Muscle of the Electric Eel Electrophorus electricus

    PubMed Central

    Hiong, Kum C.; Boo, Mel V.; Wong, Wai P.; Chew, Shit F.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to obtain the coding cDNA sequences of voltage-gated Na+ channel (scn) α-subunit (scna) and β-subunit (scnb) isoforms from, and to quantify their transcript levels in, the main electric organ (EO), Hunter’s EO, Sach’s EO and the skeletal muscle (SM) of the electric eel, Electrophorus electricus, which can generate both high and low voltage electric organ discharges (EODs). The full coding sequences of two scna (scn4aa and scn4ab) and three scnb (scn1b, scn2b and scn4b) were identified for the first time (except scn4aa) in E. electricus. In adult fish, the scn4aa transcript level was the highest in the main EO and the lowest in the Sach’s EO, indicating that it might play an important role in generating high voltage EODs. For scn4ab/Scn4ab, the transcript and protein levels were unexpectedly high in the EOs, with expression levels in the main EO and the Hunter’s EO comparable to those of scn4aa. As the key domains affecting the properties of the channel were mostly conserved between Scn4aa and Scn4ab, Scn4ab might play a role in electrogenesis. Concerning scnb, the transcript level of scn4b was much higher than those of scn1b and scn2b in the EOs and the SM. While the transcript level of scn4b was the highest in the main EO, protein abundance of Scn4b was the highest in the SM. Taken together, it is unlikely that Scna could function independently to generate EODs in the EOs as previously suggested. It is probable that different combinations of Scn4aa/Scn4ab and various Scnb isoforms in the three EOs account for the differences in EODs produced in E. electricus. In general, the transcript levels of various scn isoforms in the EOs and the SM were much higher in adult than in juvenile, and the three EOs of the juvenile fish could be functionally indistinct. PMID:27907137

  1. Phylogenomic analysis of the Chlamydomonas genome unmasks proteins potentially involved in photosynthetic function and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Karpowicz, Steven J.; Heinnickel, Mark; Dewez, David; Hamel, Blaise; Dent, Rachel; Niyogi, Krishna K.; Johnson, Xenie; Alric, Jean; Wollman, Francis-André; Li, Huiying; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a unicellular green alga, has been exploited as a reference organism for identifying proteins and activities associated with the photosynthetic apparatus and the functioning of chloroplasts. Recently, the full genome sequence of Chlamydomonas was generated and a set of gene models, representing all genes on the genome, was developed. Using these gene models, and gene models developed for the genomes of other organisms, a phylogenomic, comparative analysis was performed to identify proteins encoded on the Chlamydomonas genome which were likely involved in chloroplast functions (or specifically associated with the green algal lineage); this set of proteins has been designated the GreenCut. Further analyses of those GreenCut proteins with uncharacterized functions and the generation of mutant strains aberrant for these proteins are beginning to unmask new layers of functionality/regulation that are integrated into the workings of the photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:20490922

  2. The HY5-PIF Regulatory Module Coordinates Light and Temperature Control of Photosynthetic Gene Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Ortiz, Gabriela; Johansson, Henrik; Lee, Keun Pyo; Bou-Torrent, Jordi; Stewart, Kelly; Steel, Gavin; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Halliday, Karen J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to interpret daily and seasonal alterations in light and temperature signals is essential for plant survival. This is particularly important during seedling establishment when the phytochrome photoreceptors activate photosynthetic pigment production for photoautotrophic growth. Phytochromes accomplish this partly through the suppression of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORS (PIFs), negative regulators of chlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis. While the bZIP transcription factor LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), a potent PIF antagonist, promotes photosynthetic pigment accumulation in response to light. Here we demonstrate that by directly targeting a common promoter cis-element (G-box), HY5 and PIFs form a dynamic activation-suppression transcriptional module responsive to light and temperature cues. This antagonistic regulatory module provides a simple, direct mechanism through which environmental change can redirect transcriptional control of genes required for photosynthesis and photoprotection. In the regulation of photopigment biosynthesis genes, HY5 and PIFs do not operate alone, but with the circadian clock. However, sudden changes in light or temperature conditions can trigger changes in HY5 and PIFs abundance that adjust the expression of common target genes to optimise photosynthetic performance and growth. PMID:24922306

  3. Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

    2006-01-15

    This final report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project during the period from 10/1/2001 through 01/02/2006. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, our efforts during this project were focused on the selection of candidate organisms and growth surfaces and initiating long-term tests in the bench-scale and pilot-scale bioreactor test systems. Specific results and accomplishments for the program include: (1) CRF-2 test system: (a) Sampling test results have shown that the initial mass of algae loaded into the Carbon Recycling Facility Version 2 (CRF-2) system can be estimated with about 3% uncertainty using a statistical sampling procedure. (b) The pressure shim header pipe insert design was shown to have better flow for harvesting than the drilled-hole design. (c) The CRF-2 test system has undergone major improvements to produce the high flow rates needed for harvesting (as determined by previous experiments). The main changes to the system are new stainless steel header/frame units, with increased flow capacity and a modified pipe-end-sealing method to improve flow uniformity, and installation and plumbing for a new high flow harvesting pump. Qualitative system tests showed that the harvesting system performed wonderfully, cleaning the growth surfaces within a matter of seconds. (d) Qualitative tests have shown that organisms can be repopulated on a harvested section of a bioreactor screen, demonstrating that continuous bioreactor operation is feasible, with continuous cycles of harvesting and repopulating screens. (e) Final preparations are underway for quantitative, long-term tests in the CRF-2 with weekly harvesting. (2) Pilot-scale test system: (a) The construction of the pilot-scale bioreactor was completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. Over the course of the project, the solar collector used in the light delivery system showed some degradation, but

  4. Microbial solar cells: applying photosynthetic and electrochemically active organisms.

    PubMed

    Strik, David P B T B; Timmers, Ruud A; Helder, Marjolein; Steinbusch, Kirsten J J; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees J N

    2011-01-01

    Microbial solar cells (MSCs) are recently developed technologies that utilize solar energy to produce electricity or chemicals. MSCs use photoautotrophic microorganisms or higher plants to harvest solar energy, and use electrochemically active microorganisms in the bioelectrochemical system to generate electrical current. Here, we review the principles and performance of various MSCs in an effort to identify the most promising systems, as well as the bottlenecks and potential solutions, for "real-life" MSC applications. We present an outlook on future applications based on the intrinsic advantages of MSCs, specifically highlighting how these living energy systems can facilitate the development of an electricity-producing green roof.

  5. Harnessing Solar Energy Using Photosynthetic and Organic Pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimons, Toby Ryan

    Fossil fuels are a finite energy resource that must be supplemented or replaced by more stable forms of electrical energy. Solar technology research strives to supplement and provide eventual replacement for fossil fuel technology. This experiment focused on the use of natural pigments as photo-sensitizers in the current generation of solar cells called dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Pigments from purified chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, chlorophyll a/b, crude spinach (Spinacia oleracea) extract, phycocyanin, and chlorophyllin were used to construct DSSCs and evaluated, along with a control containing no pigment, for solar energy conversion. The anode of the solar cells consisted of titanium dioxide (TiO2) plates soaked in pigment solutions for twenty-four hours. The plates were assembled, along with an electrolyte sandwiched between cells, and a platinum-coated counter plate that functioned as the cathode. A gasket seal was placed between the plates and held together with rubber bands. The DSSCs were each tested for a maximum power (Pmax) point and a resistor was selected that corresponded to the resistance at that point. The cells were randomly placed into a power block assembly located in an environmental chamber with lighting that provided an average of 27,590 lumens at the surface of DSSCs. With appropriate resistors in place, the cells were subjected to twelve-hour days and twelve-hour nights for ten days, and measurements were recorded every ten minutes. Data were collected to obtain values for voltage in millivolts (mV), current in microamps (microA), and power in microwatts (microW), as well as beginning and ending efficiencies in converting light to usable energy. Voltages were substantially higher during the day than at night for all pigments, except for the control, indicating that the pigments functioned as DSSCs. Hence, only daytime values were used for data analysis. Voltage during the ten-day experiment ranged from 3.99 to 274 mV; current ranged from 0.0180 to 41.9 microA, and power ranged from 0.00 to 11.3 microW. Chlorophyllin had the highest peak and least voltage (274 and 161 mV), highest peak and least current (41.9 and 21.8 microA), and highest peak and least power (11.3 and 4.84 microW). The ranking of the pigments for peak voltage was: Chlorophyllin = Crude Extract ≥ Chlorophyll a = Chlorophyll a/b ≥ Phycocyanin = Chlorophyll b > Control. The ranking for least voltage was: Chlorophyllin > Phycocyanin ≥ Chlorophyll a/b ≥ Crude Extract ≥ Chlorophyll b ≥ Chlorophyll a ≥ Control. Ranking for peak and least values were similar for current and power. Solar energy conversion (efficiency in converting light energy to usable energy in watts per square meter) for all treatments ranged from 0.000595 to 0.0217% at the beginning of the experiment, and was highest in cells constructed with chlorophyllin. Based on rankings from peak and ending voltage values, as well as other measurements, it was concluded that DSSCs constructed with chlorophyllin performed the best and lasted the longest as photo-sensitizers, compared to other pigments used in this investigation. The DSSCs constructed with crude extract performed almost as well as those constructed with chlorophyllin at the beginning of the experiment, but degradation of this naturally-made pigment may have prevented these cells from sustaining solar energy conversion for more than a few days. Other pigments demonstrated conversion values higher than those of control DSSCs which contained no pigments. The results from this project provide evidence that DSSCs can produce useable energy. More research is needed to enhance and prolong the efficiency of DSSCs in solar energy conversion.

  6. Hydrogen Production Using Hydrogenase-Containing Oxygenic Photosynthetic Organisms

    DOEpatents

    Melis, A.; Zhang, L.; Benemann, J. R.; Forestier, M.; Ghirardi, M.; Seibert, M.

    2006-01-24

    A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  7. Hydrogen production using hydrogenase-containing oxygenic photosynthetic organisms

    DOEpatents

    Melis, Anastasios; Zhang, Liping; Benemann, John R.; Forestier, Marc; Ghirardi, Maria; Seibert, Michael

    2006-01-24

    A reversible physiological process provides for the temporal separation of oxygen evolution and hydrogen production in a microorganism, which includes the steps of growing a culture of the microorganism in medium under illuminated conditions to accumulate an endogenous substrate, depleting from the medium a nutrient selected from the group consisting of sulfur, iron, and/or manganese, sealing the culture from atmospheric oxygen, incubating the culture in light whereby a rate of light-induced oxygen production is equal to or less than a rate of respiration, and collecting an evolved gas. The process is particularly useful to accomplish a sustained photobiological hydrogen gas production in cultures of microorganisms, such as Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  8. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  9. Hybrid artificial photosynthetic systems comprising semiconductors as light harvesters and biomimetic complexes as molecular cocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Wen, Fuyu; Li, Can

    2013-11-19

    Solar fuel production through artificial photosynthesis may be a key to generating abundant and clean energy, thus addressing the high energy needs of the world's expanding population. As the crucial components of photosynthesis, the artificial photosynthetic system should be composed of a light harvester (e.g., semiconductor or molecular dye), a reduction cocatalyst (e.g., hydrogenase mimic, noble metal), and an oxidation cocatalyst (e.g., photosystem II mimic for oxygen evolution from water oxidation). Solar fuel production catalyzed by an artificial photosynthetic system starts from the absorption of sunlight by the light harvester, where charge separation takes place, followed by a charge transfer to the reduction and oxidation cocatalysts, where redox reaction processes occur. One of the most challenging problems is to develop an artificial photosynthetic solar fuel production system that is both highly efficient and stable. The assembly of cocatalysts on the semiconductor (light harvester) not only can facilitate the charge separation, but also can lower the activation energy or overpotential for the reactions. An efficient light harvester loaded with suitable reduction and oxidation cocatalysts is the key for high efficiency of artificial photosynthetic systems. In this Account, we describe our strategy of hybrid photocatalysts using semiconductors as light harvesters with biomimetic complexes as molecular cocatalysts to construct efficient and stable artificial photosynthetic systems. We chose semiconductor nanoparticles as light harvesters because of their broad spectral absorption and relatively robust properties compared with a natural photosynthesis system. Using biomimetic complexes as cocatalysts can significantly facilitate charge separation via fast charge transfer from the semiconductor to the molecular cocatalysts and also catalyze the chemical reactions of solar fuel production. The hybrid photocatalysts supply us with a platform to study the

  10. Application of photosynthetic N2-fixing cyanobacteria to the CELSS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packer, L.; Fry, I.; Belkin, S.

    1986-01-01

    Commercially available air lift fermentors were used to simultaneously monitor biomass production, N2-fixation, photosynthesis, respiration, and sensitivity to oxidative damage during growth under various nutritional and light regimes, to establish a data base for the integration of these organisms into a Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. Certain cyanobacterial species have the unique ability to reduce atmospheric N2 to organic nitrogen. These organisms combine the ease of cultivation characteristics of prokaryotes with the fully developed photosynthetic apparatus of higher plants. This, along with their ability to adapt to changes in their environment by modulation of certain biochemical pathways, make them attractive candidates for incorporation into the CELSS program.

  11. Beneficial Roles of Melatonin on Redox Regulation of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and Synthesis of D1 Protein in Tomato Seedlings under Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaoting; Zhao, Hailiang; Cao, Kai; Hu, Lipan; Du, Tianhao; Baluška, František; Zou, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin is important in the protection of plants suffering various forms of abiotic stress. The molecular mechanisms underlying the melatonin-mediated protection of their photosynthetic machinery are not completely resolved. This study investigates the effects of exogenous melatonin applications on salt-induced damage to the light reaction components of the photosynthetic machinery of tomato seedlings. The results showed that melatonin pretreatments can help maintain growth and net photosynthetic rate (PN) under salt stress conditions. Pretreatment with melatonin increased the effective quantum yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII), the photochemical quenching coefficient (qP) and the proportion of PSII centers that are “open” (qL) under saline conditions. In this way, damage to the photosynthetic electron transport chain (PET) in photosystem II (PSII) was mitigated. In addition, melatonin pretreatment facilitated the repair of PSII by maintaining the availability of D1 protein that was otherwise reduced by salinity. The ROS levels and the gene expressions of the chloroplast TRXs and PRXs were also investigated. Salt stress resulted in increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which were mitigated by melatonin. In tomato leaves under salt stress, the expressions of PRXs and TRXf declined but the expressions of TRXm1/4 and TRXm2 increased. Melatonin pretreatment promoted the expression of TRXf and the abundances of TRXf and TRXm gene products but had no effects on the expressions of PRXs. In summary, melatonin improves the photosynthetic activities of tomato seedlings under salt stress. The mechanism could be that: (1) Melatonin controls ROS levels and prevents damaging elevations of ROS caused by salt stress. (2) Melatonin facilitates the recovery of PET and D1 protein synthesis, thus enhancing the tolerance of photosynthetic activities to salinity. (3) Melatonin induces the expression of TRXf and regulates the abundance of TRXf and TRXm gene products

  12. Beneficial Roles of Melatonin on Redox Regulation of Photosynthetic Electron Transport and Synthesis of D1 Protein in Tomato Seedlings under Salt Stress.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoting; Zhao, Hailiang; Cao, Kai; Hu, Lipan; Du, Tianhao; Baluška, František; Zou, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin is important in the protection of plants suffering various forms of abiotic stress. The molecular mechanisms underlying the melatonin-mediated protection of their photosynthetic machinery are not completely resolved. This study investigates the effects of exogenous melatonin applications on salt-induced damage to the light reaction components of the photosynthetic machinery of tomato seedlings. The results showed that melatonin pretreatments can help maintain growth and net photosynthetic rate (PN) under salt stress conditions. Pretreatment with melatonin increased the effective quantum yield of photosystem II (ΦPSII), the photochemical quenching coefficient (qP) and the proportion of PSII centers that are "open" (qL) under saline conditions. In this way, damage to the photosynthetic electron transport chain (PET) in photosystem II (PSII) was mitigated. In addition, melatonin pretreatment facilitated the repair of PSII by maintaining the availability of D1 protein that was otherwise reduced by salinity. The ROS levels and the gene expressions of the chloroplast TRXs and PRXs were also investigated. Salt stress resulted in increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which were mitigated by melatonin. In tomato leaves under salt stress, the expressions of PRXs and TRXf declined but the expressions of TRXm1/4 and TRXm2 increased. Melatonin pretreatment promoted the expression of TRXf and the abundances of TRXf and TRXm gene products but had no effects on the expressions of PRXs. In summary, melatonin improves the photosynthetic activities of tomato seedlings under salt stress. The mechanism could be that: (1) Melatonin controls ROS levels and prevents damaging elevations of ROS caused by salt stress. (2) Melatonin facilitates the recovery of PET and D1 protein synthesis, thus enhancing the tolerance of photosynthetic activities to salinity. (3) Melatonin induces the expression of TRXf and regulates the abundance of TRXf and TRXm gene products, which

  13. Temperature response of Antarctic cryptoendolithic photosynthetic microorganisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ocampo-Friedmann, R.; Meyer, M. A.; Chen, M.; Friedmann, E. I.

    1988-01-01

    Growth responses to temperatures between 12.5 [degrees] C and 25 degrees C were determined for five photosynthetic microorganisms isolated from the Ross Desert cryptoendolithic community. Among eukaryotic algae, two strains of Trebouxia sp. have an upper temperature limit of 20 degrees C, and two strains of Hemichloris antarctica of 25 degrees C. The cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis sp., in contrast, grows at temperatures above 25 degrees C. These and earlier studies suggest that the eukaryotic algae of the Antarctic cryptoendolithic community have an upper temperature limit near 25 degrees C.

  14. Culturing photosynthetic bacteria through surface plasmon resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Bajin, Lauren; Sinton, David

    2012-12-17

    In this work, cultivation of photosynthetic microbes in surface plasmon enhanced evanescent fields is demonstrated. Proliferation of Synechococcus elongatus was obtained on gold surfaces excited with surface plasmons. Excitation over three days resulted in 10 {mu}m thick biofilms with maximum cell volume density of 20% vol/vol (2% more total accumulation than control experiments with direct light). Collectively, these results indicate the ability to (1) excite surface-bound cells using plasmonic light fields, and (2) subsequently grow thick biofilms by coupling light from the surface. Plasmonic light delivery presents opportunities for high-density optofluidic photobioreactors for microalgal analysis and solar fuel production.

  15. Culturing photosynthetic bacteria through surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Bajin, Lauren; Sinton, David

    2012-12-01

    In this work, cultivation of photosynthetic microbes in surface plasmon enhanced evanescent fields is demonstrated. Proliferation of Synechococcus elongatus was obtained on gold surfaces excited with surface plasmons. Excitation over three days resulted in 10 μm thick biofilms with maximum cell volume density of 20% vol/vol (2% more total accumulation than control experiments with direct light). Collectively, these results indicate the ability to (1) excite surface-bound cells using plasmonic light fields, and (2) subsequently grow thick biofilms by coupling light from the surface. Plasmonic light delivery presents opportunities for high-density optofluidic photobioreactors for microalgal analysis and solar fuel production.

  16. Simulation of photosynthetic production using neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmet, Tibor; Kmetova, Maria

    2013-10-01

    This paper deals with neural network based optimal control synthesis for solving optimal control problems with control and state constraints and discrete time delay. The optimal control problem is transcribed into nonlinear programming problem which is implemented with adaptive critic neural network. This approach is applicable to a wide class of nonlinear systems. The proposed simulation methods is illustrated by the optimal control problem of photosynthetic production described by discrete time delay differential equations. Results show that adaptive critic based systematic approach holds promise for obtaining the optimal control with control and state constraints.

  17. Climate Control of Photosynthetic Parameters across Biomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, S.; Yi, C.

    2011-12-01

    Meteorological tower networks measure net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2, which is a balance between ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross primary production (GPP). For understanding the mechanistic response of CO2 exchange to climate factors at process-level, it's necessary to separate NEE into its two components. A light-response analysis model (Ruimy, et al., 1995) has proved to be an efficient tool for this purpose. Principal light-response parameters-apparent quantum yield (α), photosynthetic capacity (Fmax) and ecosystem respiration (Reco) are important for modeling of CO2 exchange from regional scale to global domains using remote sensing. A major challenge lies in understanding how those parameters vary across biomes under different climatic conditions. So far, few large-sample studies have been conducted on this purpose. In our study, we partition seasonal NEE into photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration of 247 unique fluxnet sites, which represents over 900 site-years. Our results indicate that: (1) apparent quantum yield (α) of deciduous broadleaf forests and mixed forests is sensitive to seasonal temperature; (2) photosynthetic capacity (Fmax) of deciduous forests and evergreen broadleaf forests is controlled by Bowen Ratio; and (3) Ecosystem respiration of evergreen needle forests and mixed forests is controlled by temperature, while evergreen broadleaf forests controlled by Bowen Ratio. Our results also demonstrate that some relationships between photosynthetic parameters and climate controls are latitude dependent. Ecosystem respiration of croplands and deciduous broadleaf forests in high latitudes shows better temperature correlations than that in low latitudes; apparent quantum yield (α) of evergreen needle forests only display temperature control in latitudes above 40N. On biome-scale average, the magnitudes of photosynthetic capacity are categorized into two groups: (1) with high value (from 31.96 to 37.13 umol m-2s-1) of croplands

  18. Microspectroscopy of the photosynthetic compartment of algae.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Valtere; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Passarelli, Vincenzo; Barsanti, Laura; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2006-01-01

    We performed microspectroscopic evaluation of the pigment composition of the photosynthetic compartments of algae belonging to different taxonomic divisions and higher plants. The feasibility of microspectroscopy for discriminating among species and/or phylogenetic groups was tested on laboratory cultures. Gaussian bands decompositions and a fitting algorithm, together with fourth-derivative transformation of absorbance spectra, provided a reliable discrimination among chlorophylls a, b and c, phycobiliproteins and carotenoids. Comparative analysis of absorption spectra highlighted the evolutionary grouping of the algae into three main lineages in accordance with the most recent endosymbiotic theories.

  19. Mosaic origin of the heme biosynthesis pathway in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Oborník, Miroslav; Green, Beverley R

    2005-12-01

    Heme biosynthesis represents one of the most essential metabolic pathways in living organisms, providing the precursors for cytochrome prosthetic groups, photosynthetic pigments, and vitamin B(12). Using genomic data, we have compared the heme pathway in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana and the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae to those of green algae and higher plants, as well as to those of heterotrophic eukaryotes (fungi, apicomplexans, and animals). Phylogenetic analyses showed the mosaic character of this pathway in photosynthetic eukaryotes. Although most of the algal and plant enzymes showed the expected plastid (cyanobacterial) origin, at least one of them (porphobilinogen deaminase) appears to have a mitochondrial (alpha-proteobacterial) origin. Another enzyme, glutamyl-tRNA synthase, obviously originated in the eukaryotic nucleus. Because all the plastid-targeted sequences consistently form a well-supported cluster, this suggests that genes were either transferred from the primary endosymbiont (cyanobacteria) to the primary host nucleus shortly after the primary endosymbiotic event or replaced with genes from other sources at an equally early time, i.e., before the formation of three primary plastid lineages. The one striking exception to this pattern is ferrochelatase, the enzyme catalyzing the first committed step to heme and bilin pigments. In this case, two red algal sequences do not cluster either with the other plastid sequences or with cyanobacterial sequences and appear to have a proteobacterial origin like that of the apicomplexan parasites Plasmodium and Toxoplasma. Although the heterokonts also acquired their plastid via secondary endosymbiosis from a red alga, the diatom has a typical plastid-cyanobacterial ferrochelatase. We have not found any remnants of the plastidlike heme pathway in the nonphotosynthetic heterokonts Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora sojae.

  20. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Study of a Photosynthetic Microbial Mat and Comparison with Archean Cherts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourbin, M.; Derenne, S.; Gourier, D.; Rouzaud, J.-N.; Gautret, P.; Westall, F.

    2012-12-01

    Organic radicals in artificially carbonized biomass dominated by oxygenic and non-oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, Microcoleus chthonoplastes-like and Chloroflexus-like bacteria respectively, were studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The two bacteria species were sampled in mats from a hypersaline lake. They underwent accelerated ageing by cumulative thermal treatments to induce progressive carbonization of the biological material, mimicking the natural maturation of carbonaceous material of Archean age. For thermal treatments at temperatures higher than 620 °C, a drastic increase in the EPR linewidth is observed in the carbonaceous matter from oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria and not anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. This selective EPR linewidth broadening reflects the presence of a catalytic element inducing formation of radical aggregates, without affecting the molecular structure or the microstructure of the organic matter, as shown by Raman spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. For comparison, we carried out an EPR study of organic radicals in silicified carbonaceous rocks (cherts) from various localities, of different ages (0.42 to 3.5 Gyr) and having undergone various degrees of metamorphism, i.e. various degrees of natural carbonization. EPR linewidth dispersion for the most primitive samples was quite significant, pointing to a selective dipolar broadening similar to that observed for carbonized bacteria. This surprising result merits further evaluation in the light of its potential use as a marker of past bacterial metabolisms, in particular oxygenic photosynthesis, in Archean cherts.

  1. Electron paramagnetic resonance study of a photosynthetic microbial mat and comparison with Archean cherts.

    PubMed

    Bourbin, M; Derenne, S; Gourier, D; Rouzaud, J-N; Gautret, P; Westall, F

    2012-12-01

    Organic radicals in artificially carbonized biomass dominated by oxygenic and non-oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria, Microcoleus chthonoplastes-like and Chloroflexus-like bacteria respectively, were studied by Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The two bacteria species were sampled in mats from a hypersaline lake. They underwent accelerated ageing by cumulative thermal treatments to induce progressive carbonization of the biological material, mimicking the natural maturation of carbonaceous material of Archean age. For thermal treatments at temperatures higher than 620 °C, a drastic increase in the EPR linewidth is observed in the carbonaceous matter from oxygenic photosynthetic bacteria and not anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria. This selective EPR linewidth broadening reflects the presence of a catalytic element inducing formation of radical aggregates, without affecting the molecular structure or the microstructure of the organic matter, as shown by Raman spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy. For comparison, we carried out an EPR study of organic radicals in silicified carbonaceous rocks (cherts) from various localities, of different ages (0.42 to 3.5 Gyr) and having undergone various degrees of metamorphism, i.e. various degrees of natural carbonization. EPR linewidth dispersion for the most primitive samples was quite significant, pointing to a selective dipolar broadening similar to that observed for carbonized bacteria. This surprising result merits further evaluation in the light of its potential use as a marker of past bacterial metabolisms, in particular oxygenic photosynthesis, in Archean cherts.

  2. Predicted correspondence between species abundances and dendrograms of niche similarities

    PubMed Central

    Sugihara, George; Bersier, Louis-Félix; Southwood, T. Richard E.; Pimm, Stuart L.; May, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    We examine a hypothesized relationship between two descriptions of community structure: the niche-overlap dendrogram that describes the ecological similarities of species and the pattern of relative abundances. Specifically, we examine the way in which this relationship follows from the niche hierarchy model, whose fundamental assumption is a direct connection between abundances and underlying hierarchical community organization. We test three important, although correlated, predictions of the niche hierarchy model and show that they are upheld in a set of 11 communities (encompassing fishes, amphibians, lizards, and birds) where both abundances and dendrograms were reported. First, species that are highly nested in the dendrogram are on average less abundant than species from branches less subdivided. Second, and more significantly, more equitable community abundances are associated with more evenly branched dendrogram structures, whereas less equitable abundances are associated with less even dendrograms. This relationship shows that abundance patterns can give insight into less visible aspects of community organization. Third, one can recover the distribution of proportional abundances seen in assemblages containing two species by treating each branch point in the dendrogram as a two-species case. This reconstruction cannot be achieved if abundances and the dendrogram are unrelated and suggests a method for hierarchically decomposing systems. To our knowledge, this is the first test of a species abundance model based on nontrivial predictions as to the origins and causes of abundance patterns, and not simply on the goodness-of-fit of distributions. PMID:12702773

  3. Oxygen abundance and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van't Veer, C.; Cayrel, R.

    The triplet IR lines of O I near 777 nm are computed with the Kurucz's code, modified to accept several convection models. The program has been run with the MLT algorithm, with l/H = 1.25 and 0.5, and with the Canuto-Mazzitelli and Canuto-Goldman-Mazzitelli approaches, on a metal-poor turnoff-star model atmosphere with Teff=6200 K, log g = 4.3, [Fe/H]= -1.5. The results show that the differences in equivalent widths for the 4 cases do not exceed 2 per cent (0.3 mA). The convection treatment is therefore not an issue for the oxygen abundance derived from the permitted lines.

  4. Toward understanding as photosynthetic biosignatures: light harvesting and energy transfer calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Y.; Umemura, M.; Shoji, M.; Shiraishi, K.; Kayanuma, M.; Yabana, K.

    2014-03-01

    Among several proposed biosignatures, red edge is a direct evidence of photosynthetic life if it is detected (Kiang et al 2007). Red edge is a sharp change in reflectance spectra of vegetation in NIR region (about 700-750 nm). The sign of red edge is observed by Earthshine or remote sensing (Wolstencroft & Raven 2002, Woolf et al 2002). But, why around 700-750 nm? The photosynthetic organisms on Earth have evolved to optimize the sunlight condition. However, if we consider about photosynthetic organism on extrasolar planets, they should have developed to utilize the spectra of its principal star. Thus, it is not strange even if it shows different vegetation spectra. In this study, we focused on the light absorption mechanism of photosynthetic organisms on Earth and investigated the fundamental properties of the light harvesting mechanisms, which is the first stage for the light absorption. Light harvesting complexes contain photosynthetic pigments like chlorophylls. Effective light absorption and the energy transfer are accomplished by the electronic excitations of collective photosynthetic pigments. In order to investigate this mechanism, we constructed an energy transfer model by using a dipole-dipole approximation for the interactions between electronic excitations. Transition moments and transition energies of each pigment are calculated at the time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) level (Marques & Gross 2004). Quantum dynamics simulation for the excitation energy transfer was calculated by the Liouvelle's equation. We adopted the model to purple bacteria, which has been studied experimentally and known to absorb lower energy. It is meaningful to focus on the mechanism of this bacteria, since in the future mission, M planets will become a important target. We calculated the oscillator strengths in one light harvesting complex and confirmed the validity by comparing to the experimental data. This complex is made of an inner and an outer ring. The

  5. Adaptive radiation of photosynthetic physiology in the Hawaiian lobeliads: dynamic photosynthetic responses.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Rebecca A; Givnish, Thomas J

    2008-03-01

    Hawaiian lobeliads have radiated into habitats from open alpine bogs to densely shaded rainforest interiors, and show corresponding adaptations in steady-state photosynthetic light responses and associated leaf traits. Shaded environments are not uniformly dark, however, but punctuated by sunflecks that carry most of the photosynthetically active light that strikes plants. We asked whether lobeliads have diversified in their dynamic photosynthetic light responses and how dynamic responses influence daily leaf carbon gain. We quantified gas exchange and dynamic light regimes under field conditions for ten species representing each major Hawaiian sublineage. Species in shadier habitats experienced shorter and less numerous sunflecks: average sunfleck length varied from 1.4 +/- 1.7 min for Cyanea floribunda in shaded forest understories to 31.2 +/- 2.1 min for Trematolobelia kauaiensis on open ridges. As expected, the rate of photosynthetic induction increased significantly toward shadier sites, with assimilation after 60 s rising from ca. 30% of fully induced rates in species from open environments to 60% in those from densely shaded habitats. Uninduced light use efficiency-actual photosynthesis versus that expected under steady-state conditions-increased from 10 to 70% across the same gradient. In silico transplants-modeling daily carbon gain using one species' photosynthetic light response in its own and other species' dynamic light regimes-demonstrated the potential adaptive nature of species differences: understory Cyanea pilosa in its light regimes outperformed gap-dwelling Clermontia parviflora, while Clermontia in its light regimes outperformed Cyanea. The apparent crossover in daily photosynthesis occurred at about the same photon flux density where dominance shifts from Cyanea to Clermontia in the field. Our results further support our hypothesis that the lobeliads have diversified physiologically across light environments in Hawaiian ecosystems and that

  6. [Effect of different substrates on photosynthetic characteristics of Iris pseudacorus L. and the capacity of purify wastewater].

    PubMed

    Xu, De-Fu; Li, Ying-Xue; Zheng, Jian-Wei; Fang, Hua; Zhao, Xiao-Li

    2011-09-01

    The effect of the different substrates on the photosynthetic characteristics, transpiration rate and SPAD value, and capacity of purify wastewater was investigated by pot experiment, based on five ordinary substrates (soil, sand, mixture of soil and sand, mixture of sand and organic matter, and mixture sand, soil and organic matter). Results showed that the photosynthetic characteristics and transpiration rate of Iris pseudacorus L. were influenced by different substrates. The order of the photosynthetic and transpiration rate of Iris pseudacorus L. in soil was high, and that of Iris pseudacorus L. in sand was the lowest. The value of photosynthetic characteristics and transpiration rate of Iris pseudacorus L. in soil were 11.67 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1) and 9.18 mmol x (m2 x s) (-1) respectively, and that of Iris pseudacorus L. in sand were 8.38 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1) and 4.55 mmol x (m2 x s)(-1), respectively. The photosynthetic characteristics and transpiration rate of Iris pseudacorus L. were significantly correlated with the removal rate of permanganate index, NH4(+) -N and NO3(-) -N (p < 0.05). The SPAD value of Iris pseudacorus L. was also influenced by substrates, and SPAD value of Iris pseudacorus L. in soil was high (58.92), followed by mixture soil, sand and organic matter, that of Iris pseudacorus L. in sand was the lowest (51.14). The significant correlation between the SPAD value of Iris pseudacorus L. and the photosynthetic characteristics, transpiration rate, NH(+) -N was also found (p < 0.05). The SPAD vale of Iris pseudacorus L. in different substrates was different, which was used to monitored operation condition of the removal rate of nitrogen in constructed wetland.

  7. Abundance and patterns of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) in Arctic floodplain lakes of the Mackenzie River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chateauvert, C. Adam; Lesack, Lance F. W.; Bothwell, Max L.

    2012-12-01

    The Mackenzie River Delta is a lake-rich arctic floodplain that receives high inputs of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and suspended particulates from allochthonous and autochthonous sources, and may transfer carbon from dissolved to particulate phase via in situ formation of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP). TEP provides food for grazers, surfaces for bacteria, and increased potential for aggregation and sedimentation of organic matter. During open water 2006, we tracked TEP abundances in three Delta lakes representing gradients that include declining river-to-lake connection times, increasing levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and declining chromophoric-DOM (CDOM). Unexpectedly, TEP abundances were highest immediately after the flood, when autochthonous autotrophic production was at a seasonal low and CDOM a seasonal high. Moreover, the lake with the strongest riverine influence and lowest levels of autochthonous autotrophic production had the highest mean TEP-carbon (TEP-C) concentrations among the lakes. The mean proportion of particulate organic carbon (POC) represented by TEP-C increased with increasing river connection time, and appears to represent a substantial proportion of POC in Mackenzie Delta Lakes. Unexpectedly, the TEP gradient was most strongly related to CDOM (river water source) rather than overall DOC. Variations in CDOM accounted for 53% of TEP-C variation among the lakes, indicating allochthonous matter was the most important source of TEP. DOC release from in situ macrophytes during periods of high photosynthesis may contribute to TEP formation in the lake with lowest riverine influence, but pH levels >9.5 driven by the high photosynthetic rates complicate the interpretation of results from this lake.

  8. Thermal responses of Symbiodinium photosynthetic carbon assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakley, Clinton A.; Schmidt, Gregory W.; Hopkinson, Brian M.

    2014-06-01

    The symbiosis between hermatypic corals and their dinoflagellate endosymbionts, genus Symbiodinium, is based on carbon exchange. This symbiosis is disrupted by thermally induced coral bleaching, a stress response in which the coral host expels its algal symbionts as they become physiologically impaired. The disruption of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) supply or the thermal inactivation of Rubisco have been proposed as sites of initial thermal damage that leads to the bleaching response. Symbiodinium possesses a highly unusual Form II ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), which exhibits a lower CO2:O2 specificity and may be more thermally unstable than the Form I Rubiscos of other algae and land plants. Components of the CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM), which supplies inorganic carbon for photosynthesis, may also be temperature sensitive. Here, we examine the ability of four cultured Symbiodinium strains to acquire and fix DIC across a temperature gradient. Surprisingly, the half-saturation constant of photosynthesis with respect to DIC concentration ( K P), an index of CCM function, declined with increasing temperature in three of the four strains, indicating a greater potential for photosynthetic carbon acquisition at elevated temperatures. In the fourth strain, there was no effect of temperature on K P. Finding no evidence for thermal inhibition of the CCM, we conclude that CCM components are not likely to be the primary sites of thermal damage. Reduced photosynthetic quantum yields, a hallmark of thermal bleaching, were observed at low DIC concentrations, leaving open the possibility that reduced inorganic carbon availability is involved in bleaching.

  9. Photosynthetic water splitting: 1987 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.

    1988-01-01

    This document is an annual report of photosynthetic water splitting for the production of hydrogen and oxygen. Unicellular green algae are capable of evolving molecular hydrogen in the presence of carbon dioxide. Controlling factors that determine hydrogen evolution are either temperature or light intensity. Also, mutants of the green alga Chlamydomonas are capable of evolving hydrogen in the presence of carbon dioxide. The significance of these discoveries is that the presence of carbon dioxide (or bicarbonate) is a key factor in determining the activity of the Photosystem II water splitting complex. Second, a new advance in oxygen sensor technology has been made that, for the first time, allows the absolute measurement of photosynthetically evolved oxygen from a single colony of microalgae growing on a solidified agar medium. The key aspect of this electrochemical sensor is the utilization of ultra-pure potassium hydroxide as the electrolyte and a recognition of the role that electrolyte impurities play in contributing to base line noise. 9 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Respiratory processes in non-photosynthetic plastids

    PubMed Central

    Renato, Marta; Boronat, Albert; Azcón-Bieto, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Chlororespiration is a respiratory process located in chloroplast thylakoids which consists in an electron transport chain from NAD(P)H to oxygen. This respiratory chain involves the NAD(P)H dehydrogenase complex, the plastoquinone pool and the plastid terminal oxidase (PTOX), and it probably acts as a safety valve to prevent the over-reduction of the photosynthetic machinery in stress conditions. The existence of a similar respiratory activity in non-photosynthetic plastids has been less studied. Recently, it has been reported that tomato fruit chromoplasts present an oxygen consumption activity linked to ATP synthesis. Etioplasts and amyloplasts contain several electron carriers and some subunits of the ATP synthase, so they could harbor a similar respiratory process. This review provides an update on the study about respiratory processes in chromoplasts, identifying the major gaps that need to be addressed in future research. It also reviews the proteomic data of etioplasts and amyloplasts, which suggest the presence of a respiratory electron transport chain in these plastids. PMID:26236317

  11. Feedforward non-Michaelis-Menten mechanism for CO(2) uptake by Rubisco: contribution of carbonic anhydrases and photorespiration to optimization of photosynthetic carbon assimilation.

    PubMed

    Igamberdiev, Abir U; Roussel, Marc R

    2012-03-01

    Rubisco, the most abundant protein serving as the primary engine generating organic biomass on Earth, is characterized by a low catalytic constant (in higher plants approx. 3s(-1)) and low specificity for CO(2) leading to photorespiration. We analyze here why this enzyme evolved as the main carbon fixation engine. The high concentration of Rubisco exceeding the concentration of its substrate CO(2) by 2-3 orders of magnitude makes application of Michaelis-Menten kinetics invalid and requires alternative kinetic approaches to describe photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation. Efficient operation of Rubisco is supported by a strong flux of CO(2) to the chloroplast stroma provided by fast equilibration of bicarbonate and CO(2) and forwarding the latter to Rubisco reaction centers. The main part of this feedforward mechanism is a thylakoidal carbonic anhydrase associated with photosystem II and pumping CO(2) from the thylakoid lumen in coordination with the rate of electron transport, water splitting and proton gradient across the thylakoid membrane. This steady flux of CO(2) limits photosynthesis at saturating CO(2) concentrations. At low ambient CO(2) and correspondingly limited capacity of the bicarbonate pool in the stroma, its depletion at the sites of Rubisco is relieved by utilizing O(2) instead of CO(2), i.e. by photorespiration, a process which supplies CO(2) back to Rubisco and buffers the redox state and energy level in the chloroplast. Thus, the regulation of Rubisco function aims to keep steady non-equilibrium levels of CO(2), NADPH/NADP and ATP/ADP in the chloroplast stroma and to optimize the condition of homeostatic photosynthetic flux of matter and energy.

  12. New bio-inorganic photo-electronic devices based on photosynthetic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, Nikolai; Spano, Anthony; Trammell, Scott; Griva, Igor; Tsoi, Stanislav; Schnur, Joel M.

    2007-09-01

    Construction of efficient devices for light energy conversion, including photo-electronic and photovoltaic (PV) devices, is a big challenge for the current science and technology that will have important economic consequences. Most of the modern photovoltaic devices are based on silicon. An innovative approach to the construction of photovoltaic devices is the utilization of biological systems and principles designed for similar purposes by Nature. Biological electronic devices, proteins, have extremely high efficiency, precise spatial organization, and are inexpensive in fabrication. They can be fused with inorganic and organic materials such as conductors, semiconductors, conductive polymers, or quantum dots. The photosynthetic reaction center protein (RC) is one of the most advanced photo-electronic devices developed by Nature. It has nearly 100% quantum yield of primary charge separation, an extremely fast operation time (about 10 -9 s, or operation frequency of ~10 9 Hz), and a very efficient stabilization of separated charges (ratio of charge separation rate to that of charge recombination is about 10 4). The charge separation and stabilization takes place in a complex of 7 nm size and leads to the formation of a local electric field of about 10 6 V/cm. A coupling of photosynthetic RC to inorganic electrodes is attractive for the identification of the mechanisms of inter-protein electron transfer (ET) and for the possible applications in the construction of protein-based innovative photoelectronic and photovoltaic devices. In this presentation we describe a new type of hybrid bio-inorganic photoelectronic devices based on photosynthetic proteins and inorganic materials. Using genetically engineered bacterial RCs and specifically synthesized organic linkers, we were able to construct self-assembled and aligned protein complexes with various metals and semiconductors, including gold, indium tin oxide (ITO), nanoporous TiO II, highly ordered pyrolytic graphite

  13. Relevance of the photosynthetic reaction center from purple bacteria to the structure of photosystem II

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, H.; Deisenhofer, J.

    1988-01-12

    Photosynthetic organisms are able to oxidize organic or inorganic compounds upon the absorption of light, and they use the extracted electron for the fixation of carbon dioxide. The most important oxidation product is oxygen due to the splitting of water. In eukaryotes these processes occur in photosystem II of chloroplasts. Among prokaryotes photosynthetic oxygen evolution is restricted to cyanobacteria and prochloron-type organisms. How water is split in the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II belongs to the most important question to be answered. The primary charge separation occurs in the reaction center of photosystem II. This reaction center is a complex consisting of peripheral and integral membrane proteins, several chlorophyll A molecules, two pheophytin A molecules, two and three plastoquinone molecules, and one non-heme iron atom. The location of the photosystem II reaction center is still a matter of debate. Nakatani et al. (l984) concluded from fluorescence measurements that a protein of apparent molecular weight 47,000 (CP47) is the apoprotein of the photosystem II reaction center. A different view emerged from work with the photosynthetic reaction centers from the purple bacteria. The amino acid sequence of the M subunit of the reaction center from Phodopseudomonas (Rps.) sphaeroides has sequence homologies with the D1 protein from spinach. A substantial amount of structural information can be obtained with the reaction center from Rhodopseudomonas viridis, which can be crystallized. Here the authors discuss the structure of the photosynthetic reaction center from the purple bacterium Rps. viridis and describe the role of those amino acids that are conserved between the bacterial and photosystem II reaction center.

  14. Influence of the Quantity and Quality of Light on Photosynthetic Periodicity in Coral Endosymbiotic Algae

    PubMed Central

    Sorek, Michal; Levy, Oren

    2012-01-01

    Symbiotic corals, which are benthic organisms intimately linked with their environment, have evolved many ways to deal with fluctuations in the local marine environment. One possible coping mechanism is the endogenous circadian clock, which is characterized as free running, maintaining a ∼24 h periodicity of circuits under constant stimuli or in the absence of external cues. The quantity and quality of light were found to be the most influential factors governing the endogenous clock for plants and algae. Unicellular dinoflagellate algae are among the best examples of organisms that exhibit circadian clocks using light as the dominant signal. This study is the first to examine the effects of light intensity and quality on the rhythmicity of photosynthesis in the symbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp., both as a free-living organism and in symbiosis with the coral Stylophora pistillata. Oxygen production measurements in Symbiodinium cultures exhibited rhythmicity with a periodicity of approximately 24 h under constant high light (LL), whereas under medium and low light, the cycle time increased. Exposing Symbiodinium cultures and corals to spectral light revealed different effects of blue and red light on the photosynthetic rhythm, specifically shortening or increasing the cycle time respectively. These findings suggest that the photosynthetic rhythm is entrained by different light cues, which are wired to an endogenous circadian clock. Furthermore, we provide evidence that mRNA expression was higher under blue light for two potential cryptochrome genes and higher under red light for a phytochrome gene isolated from Symbiodinium. These results offer the first evidence of the impact of the intensity and quality of light on the photosynthetic rhythm in algal cells living freely or as part of a symbiotic association. Our results indicate the presence of a circadian oscillator in Symbiodinium governing the photosynthetic apparatus through a light-induced signaling

  15. Functional Inactivation of Putative Photosynthetic Electron Acceptor Ferredoxin C2 (FdC2) Induces Delayed Heading Date and Decreased Photosynthetic Rate in Rice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Juan; Qiu, Zhennan; Ruan, Banpu; Kang, Shujing; He, Lei; Zhang, Sen; Dong, Guojun; Hu, Jiang; Zeng, Dali; Zhang, Guangheng; Gao, Zhenyu; Ren, Deyong; Hu, Xingming; Chen, Guang; Guo, Longbiao; Qian, Qian; Zhu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein as unique electron acceptor, involved in a variety of fundamental metabolic and signaling processes, which is indispensable for plant growth. The molecular mechanisms of Fd such as regulation of electron partitioning, impact of photosynthetic rate and involvement in the carbon fixing remain elusive in rice. Here we reported a heading date delay and yellowish leaf 1 (hdy1) mutant derived from Japonica rice cultivar "Nipponbare" subjected to EMS treatment. In the paddy field, the hdy1 mutant appeared at a significantly late heading date and had yellow-green leaves during the whole growth stage. Further investigation indicated that the abnormal phenotype of hdy1 was connected with depressed pigment content and photosynthetic rate. Genetic analysis results showed that the hdy1 mutant phenotype was caused by a single recessive nuclear gene mutation. Map-based cloning revealed that OsHDY1 is located on chromosome 3 and encodes an ortholog of the AtFdC2 gene. Complementation and overexpression, transgenic plants exhibited the mutant phenotype including head date, leaf color and the transcription levels of the FdC2 were completely rescued by transformation with OsHDY1. Real-time PCR revealed that the expression product of OsHDY1 was detected in almost all of the organs except root, whereas highest expression levels were observed in seeding new leaves. The lower expression levels of HDY1 and content of iron were detected in hdy1 than WT's. The FdC2::GFP was detected in the chloroplasts of rice. Real-time PCR results showed that the expression of many photosynthetic electron transfer related genes in hdy1 were higher than WT. Our results suggest that OsFdC2 plays an important role in photosynthetic rate and development of heading date by regulating electron transfer and chlorophyll content in rice.

  16. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of EUVE spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. Findings are that: (1) ASCA and EUVE spectra are both dominated by a region at 6 x 10(exp 6) K. (2) The high energy cut-off of the ASCA spectrum is consistent with emission from the highest ionization stages of EUVE, namely Fe XXIV. (3) EUVE requires a continuous emission measure distribution with more than two temperatures. (4) The ASCA spectra are of such high statistical significance that systematic uncertainties dominate, including atomic physics issues and calibration issues. (5) While the ASCA spectral fits achieve lower Chi(exp 2 with two-temperature fits, the EUVE-derived emission measure distribution models are also consistent with the spectra. (6) The Fe/H ratio obtained from the ASCA fit is within 20 % of the Fe/H abundance obtained from the summed spectra of Capella over 5 EUVE pointings, as well as the 1996 EUVE data. This result confirms our claims that quasi-continua composed of weak emission lines in the short wavelength spectrometer of EUVE are not major contributors to the measured Capella continuum. Other abundance ratios are also determined from the ASCA data, using models derived with EUVE. Si, Si, and Mg appear to be close to solar photospheric values, while the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined

  17. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  18. Morning reduction of photosynthetic capacity before midday depression

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Kohei; Takemoto, Shuhei

    2014-01-01

    Midday depression of photosynthesis has important consequences for ecosystem carbon exchange. Recent studies of forest trees have demonstrated that latent reduction of photosynthetic capacity can begin in the early morning, preceding the midday depression. We investigated whether such early morning reduction also occurs in an herbaceous species, Oenothera biennis. Diurnal changes of the photosynthetic light response curve (measured using a light-emitting diode) and incident sunlight intensity were measured under field conditions. The following results were obtained: (1) the light-saturated photosynthetic rate decreased beginning at sunrise; (2) the incident sunlight intensity on the leaves increased from sunrise; and (3) combining (1) and (2), the net photosynthetic rate under natural sunlight intensity increased from sunrise, reached a maximum at mid-morning, and then showed midday depression. Our results demonstrate that the latent morning reduction of photosynthetic capacity begins at sunrise, preceding the apparent midday depression, in agreement with previous studies of forest trees. PMID:24633128

  19. Dynamics of phytoplankton distribution and photosynthetic capacity in a western Norwegian fjord during coastal upwelling: Effects on optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erga, Svein Rune; Ssebiyonga, Nicolausi; Frette, Øyvind; Hamre, Børge; Aure, Jan; Strand, Øivind; Strohmeier, Tore

    2012-01-01

    The present study describes the coupling between optical properties and the dynamics of phytoplankton distribution and photosynthetic capacity in the Lysefjord during an exceptional coastal upwelling. At the mouth of the fjord, transparent Coastal water was "piled up" against the sill, while more turbid Fjord water from the outer fjord system was flowing over the sill, creating the intermediate layer which extended further into the fjord. This was reflected by high spectral attenuation coefficients in the upper 10 m of the fjord. Outside the sill, clear water with low spectral attenuation coefficients were found below sill depth down to at least 30 m, while the attenuation coefficients inside the sill were significantly higher between 10 and 20 m. About 4-7 km outwards from the head of the fjord clearer deep basin water was entering the upper layer due to the upwelling which could be traced up to 7 m, bounded by the 7.5 °C and the 31 salinity isolines. In the outer part of the fjord waters with a high chl a content and photosynthetic capacity were observed below the outflowing surface layer containing "old water" from the inner part of the fjord, which was characterized by low nutrient and chl a concentrations. Maximum quantum efficiencies (0.5) were encountered within this subsurface layer. Quantum efficiencies exceeded 0.3 when nitrate and silicate concentrations increased above 2 mmol m -3. About 50% of the PAR light attenuation (0-30 m) was caused by chl a, and the 1% light depth varied between 27 and 35 m along the transect. Due to the influence of freshwater outlets, non-pigmented particles were more abundant in the inner part of the fjord than in the outer part. Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) contributed strongly to absorption within the upper 10 m at wavelengths below 470 nm while scattering was the major attenuation contributor for wavelengths above 600 nm. With respect to possible climate change effects on the growth of phytoplankton in

  20. [Influence of photosynthetic parameters on leaf longevity].

    PubMed

    Vasfilov, S P

    2015-01-01

    Higher plants show a wide range of leaf lifespan (LL) variability. LL is calculated as a sum of functional LL(f) (corresponding to the time of active photosynthesis and CO2 accumulation in the leaf) and nonfunctional LL(n) (the time of photosynthetic activity absence). For evergreen species of boreal zones, LL(n) corresponds to the period of winter rest. Photosynthetic potential of leaf (PPL), interpreted as the maximum possible amount of CO2 that can be fixed during its life, can be estimated on the basis of maximum photosynthesis rate (P(a)) dynamics during LL(f); the maximum (P(a max)) being achieved in mature leaf. Photosynthetic potential depends on LL(f) more strongly than on P(a max). The PPL/LL(f) ratio is indicative of the rate of PPL realization over leaf lifespan. As LL(f) shows strong positive correlation with LL, the latter parameter can also characterize the rate of PPL realization. Long LL(f) in evergreen species provides higher PPL, which is advantageous by comparison with deciduous ones. In evergreen species, the PPL itself is realized slower than in deciduous ones. The increase in LL(f) and LL is accompanied by the increase in leaf constructional cost (LCC(a)) as well as the decrease in photosynthesis rate. At that, photosynthesis rate per unit of dry weight (P(m)) decreases much faster than that per unit of leaf area (P(a)). Apparently, when considering dry leaf weight, the apoplast share seems to be much higher in long-living leaves of evergreen species than in short-living leaves of deciduous species. The leaf payback (LP) may be stabilized by unidirectional shifts in PPL and LCC(a). Species with short/long LL(f) and high/low PPL realization rate are typical for early/late succession stages and for habitats with the environmental conditions favorable/adverse for photosynthesis and growth. If the conditions for photosynthesis and growth are favorable, high PPL realization rate provides advantage in competition. The PPL realization rate is

  1. Radiative Energy Budgets of Phototrophic Surface-Associated Microbial Communities and their Photosynthetic Efficiency Under Diffuse and Collimated Light.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Brodersen, Kasper E; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the radiative energy budgets of a heterogeneous photosynthetic coral reef sediment and a compact uniform cyanobacterial biofilm on top of coastal sediment. By combining electrochemical, thermocouple and fiber-optic microsensor measurements of O2, temperature and light, we could calculate the proportion of the absorbed light energy that was either dissipated as heat or conserved by photosynthesis. We show, across a range of different incident light regimes, that such radiative energy budgets are highly dominated by heat dissipation constituting up to 99.5% of the absorbed light energy. Highest photosynthetic energy conservation efficiency was found in the coral sediment under low light conditions and amounted to 18.1% of the absorbed light energy. Additionally, the effect of light directionality, i.e., diffuse or collimated light, on energy conversion efficiency was tested on the two surface-associated systems. The effects of light directionality on the radiative energy budgets of these phototrophic communities were not unanimous but, resulted in local spatial differences in heat-transfer, gross photosynthesis, and light distribution. The light acclimation index, Ek, i.e., the irradiance at the onset of saturation of photosynthesis, was >2 times higher in the coral sediment compared to the biofilm and changed the pattern of photosynthetic energy conservation under light-limiting conditions. At moderate to high incident irradiances, the photosynthetic conservation of absorbed energy was highest in collimated light; a tendency that changed in the biofilm under sub-saturating incident irradiances, where higher photosynthetic efficiencies were observed under diffuse light. The aim was to investigate how the physical structure and light propagation affected energy budgets and light utilization efficiencies in loosely organized vs. compact phototrophic sediment under diffuse and collimated light. Our results suggest that the optical properties and the

  2. Radiative Energy Budgets of Phototrophic Surface-Associated Microbial Communities and their Photosynthetic Efficiency Under Diffuse and Collimated Light

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, Mads; Brodersen, Kasper E.; Kühl, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the radiative energy budgets of a heterogeneous photosynthetic coral reef sediment and a compact uniform cyanobacterial biofilm on top of coastal sediment. By combining electrochemical, thermocouple and fiber-optic microsensor measurements of O2, temperature and light, we could calculate the proportion of the absorbed light energy that was either dissipated as heat or conserved by photosynthesis. We show, across a range of different incident light regimes, that such radiative energy budgets are highly dominated by heat dissipation constituting up to 99.5% of the absorbed light energy. Highest photosynthetic energy conservation efficiency was found in the coral sediment under low light conditions and amounted to 18.1% of the absorbed light energy. Additionally, the effect of light directionality, i.e., diffuse or collimated light, on energy conversion efficiency was tested on the two surface-associated systems. The effects of light directionality on the radiative energy budgets of these phototrophic communities were not unanimous but, resulted in local spatial differences in heat-transfer, gross photosynthesis, and light distribution. The light acclimation index, Ek, i.e., the irradiance at the onset of saturation of photosynthesis, was >2 times higher in the coral sediment compared to the biofilm and changed the pattern of photosynthetic energy conservation under light-limiting conditions. At moderate to high incident irradiances, the photosynthetic conservation of absorbed energy was highest in collimated light; a tendency that changed in the biofilm under sub-saturating incident irradiances, where higher photosynthetic efficiencies were observed under diffuse light. The aim was to investigate how the physical structure and light propagation affected energy budgets and light utilization efficiencies in loosely organized vs. compact phototrophic sediment under diffuse and collimated light. Our results suggest that the optical properties and the

  3. Heterologous expression of Arabidopsis phytochrome B in transgenic potato influences photosynthetic performance and tuber development

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, A.; Herold, M.; Lenk, I.; Gatz, C. . Albrecht von Haller Inst. fuer Pflanzenwissenschaften); Quail, P.H. )

    1999-05-01

    Transgenic potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants expressing Arabidopsis phytochrome B were characterized morphologically and physiologically under white light in a greenhouse to explore their potential for improved photosynthesis and higher tuber yields. As expected, overexpression of functional phytochrome B caused pleiotropic effects such as semidwarfism, decreased apical dominance, a higher number of smaller but thicker leaves, and increased pigmentation. Because of increased numbers of chloroplasts in elongated palisade cells, photosynthesis per leaf area and in each individual plant increased. In addition, photosynthesis was less sensitive to photoinactivation under prolonged light stress. The beginning of senescence was not delayed, but deceleration of chlorophyll degradation extended the lifetime of photosynthetically active plants. Both the higher photosynthetic performance and the longer lifespan of the transgenic plants allowed greater biomass production, resulting in extended underground organs with increased tuber yields.

  4. In-situ measurement of photosynthetic oxygen production in the water column.

    PubMed

    Häder, D P; Schäfer, J

    1994-09-01

    A novel hardware device is described to determine photosynthetic and respiratory oxygen uptake and release, respectively, in organisms in their natural habitat even under the rough conditions of their marine environment. Both macroalgae and phytoplankton can be utilized and oxygen exchange can be determined in solar radiation. The chamber can be used at or above the water surface or can be lowered into the water column. The data of oxygen concentration, irradiance and temperature are constantly monitored by a laptop computer and stored in disk files. The experimental data measured in some macroalgae as well as in phytoplankton indicate that the irradiance window for positive net photosynthetic oxygen production is fairly limited under natural conditions; at too low irradiances respiration exceeds photosynthesis and at too high irradiances photosynthesis is shut down by photoinhibition, at least in species not adapted to unattenuated solar radiation.

  5. Structure, Function, and Regulation of Antenna Complexes of Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Robert E. Blankenship

    2001-04-27

    This project is concerned with the structure and function of the chlorosome antennas found in green photosynthetic bacteria. Chlorosomes are ellipsoidal structures attached to the cytoplasmic side of the inner cell membrane. These antenna complexes provide a very large absorption cross section for light capture. Evidence is overwhelming that the chlorosome represents a very different type of antenna from that found in any other photosynthetic system yet studied. It is now clear that chlorosomes do not contain traditional pigment-proteins, in which the pigments bind to specific sites on proteins. Instead, the chlorosome pigments are organized in vivo into pigment oligomers in which direct pigment-pigment interactions are of dominant importance. Our group has used a multidisciplinary approach to investigate this unique system, including model systems, ultrafast spectroscopy, molecular biology, protein chemistry and X-ray crystallography.

  6. Influence on photosynthesis of starlight, moonlight, planetlight, and light pollution (reflections on photosynthetically active radiation in the universe).

    PubMed

    Raven, J A; Cockell, C S

    2006-08-01

    Photosynthesis on Earth can occur in a diversity of organisms in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) range of 10 nmol of photons m(-2) s(-1) to 8 mmol of photons m(-2) s(-1). Similar considerations would probably apply to photosynthetic organisms on Earth-like planets (ELPs) in the continuously habitable zone of other stars. On Earth, starlight PAR is inadequate for photosynthetically supported growth. An increase in starlight even to reach the minimum theoretical levels to allow for photosynthesis would require a universe that was approximately ten million times older, or with a ten million times greater density of stars, than is the case for the present universe. Photosynthesis on an ELP using PAR reflected from a natural satellite with the same size as our Moon, but at the Roche limit, could support a low rate of photosynthesis at full Moon. Photosynthesis on an ELP-like satellite of a Jupiter-sized planet using light reflected from the planet could be almost 1% of the rate in full sunlight on Earth when the planet was full. These potential contributions to photosynthesis require that the contribution is compared with the rate of photosynthesis driven by direct radiation from the star. Light pollution on Earth only energizes photosynthesis by organisms that are very close to the light source. However, effects of light pollution on photosynthesis can be more widespread if the photosynthetic canopy is retained for more of the year, caused by effects on photoperiodism, with implications for the influence of civilizations on photosynthesis.

  7. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of ASCA spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous EUVE data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated, resulting in a paper in process by Liedahl and Brickhouse. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. While solar abundance ratios are generally consistent with the ASCA data, the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined from these data. Detailed discussion has been provided to NASA in the most recent annual report (1997). Two poster presentations have been made regarding modeling requirements. A substantial paper is in the final revision form, following review by six co-authors. The results of this work have wide implications, since the newly calculated emission lines almost certainly contribute to other problems in fitting not only other stellar spectra, but also composite supernova remnants, galaxies, and cooling flow clusters of galaxies. Furthermore, Liedahl and Brickhouse have identified other species for which lines of a similar nature (high principal quantum number) will contribute significant flux. For moderate resolution X-ray spectra, lines left out of the models in relatively isolated bands, will be attributed to continuum flux by spectral fitting engines, causing errors in line-to-continuum ratios. Thus addressing the general theoretical problem is of crucial importance.

  8. [An efficient mutational method for photosynthetic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Lin, J Q; Xiao, M; Long, M T; Han, B; Quian, W; Du, J

    2006-01-01

    The pigment and auxotrophic mutants of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Y6 were obtained by treatment with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) followed by lithium chloride (LiCI). Treatment with 0.081 M EPS and subsequent treatment with 0.071 M LiCI resulted in 12% higher frequency of pigment mutations than application of 0.081 M EMS alone; the frequency of auxotrophic mutations increased 2.5-fold when treatment with lithium chloride was applied. A blue shift 10 nm was recorded in the absorption spectrum of carotenoids form YM5-3 green mutant; considerable accumulation of neurosporine was revealed by HPLC and mass spectrometry. The method is efficient for isolating mutants of photosynthetic bacteria.

  9. Phytoplankton strategies for photosynthetic energy allocation.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Kimberly H; Jones, Bethan M

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton physiology is dynamic and highly responsive to the environment. Phytoplankton acclimate to changing environmental conditions by a complex reallocation of carbon and energy through metabolic pathways to optimize growth. Considering the tremendous diversity of phytoplankton, it is not surprising that different phytoplankton taxa use different strategies to partition carbon and energy resources. It has therefore been satisfying to discover that general principles of energetic stoichiometry appear to govern these complex processes and can be broadly applied to interpret phytoplankton distributions, productivity, and food web dynamics. The expectation of future changes in aquatic environments brought on by climate change warrants gathering knowledge about underlying patterns of photosynthetic energy allocation and their impacts on community structure and ecosystem productivity.

  10. Energy transfer dynamics in an RC-LH1-PufX tubular photosynthetic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsin, J.; Strümpfer, J.; Şener, M.; Qian, P.; Hunter, C. N.; Schulten, K.

    2010-08-01

    Light absorption and the subsequent transfer of excitation energy are the first two steps in the photosynthetic process, carried out by protein-bound pigments, mainly bacteriochlorophylls (BChls), in photosynthetic bacteria. BChls are anchored in light-harvesting (LH) complexes, such as light-harvesting complex I (LH1), which directly associates with the reaction center (RC), forming the RC-LH1 core complex. In Rhodobacter sphaeroides, RC-LH1 core complexes contain an additional protein, PufX, and assemble into dimeric RC-LH1-PufX core complexes. In the absence of LH complex II (LH2), the former complexes can aggregate into a helically ordered tubular photosynthetic membrane. We have examined the excitation transfer dynamics in a single RC-LH1-PufX core complex dimer using the hierarchical equations of motion for dissipative quantum dynamics that accurately, yet in a computationally costly manner, treat the coupling between BChls and their protein environment. A widely employed description, the generalized Förster (GF) theory, was also used to calculate the transfer rates of the same excitonic system in order to verify the accuracy of this computationally cheap method. Additionally, in light of the structural uncertainties in the Rba. sphaeroides RC-LH1-PufX core complex, geometrical alterations were introduced into the BChl organization. It is shown that the energy transfer dynamics are not affected by the considered changes in the BChl organization and that the GF theory provides accurate transfer rates. An all-atom model for a tubular photosynthetic membrane is then constructed on the basis of electron microscopy data, and the overall energy transfer properties of this membrane are computed.

  11. Digestion and depletion of abundant proteins improves proteomic coverage

    PubMed Central

    Fonslow, Bryan R.; Stein, Benjamin D.; Webb, Kristofor J.; Xu, Tao; Choi, Jeong; Park, Sung Kyu; Yates, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Two major challenges in proteomics are the large number of proteins and their broad dynamic range within the cell. We exploited the abundance-dependent Michaelis-Menten kinetics of trypsin digestion to selectively digest and deplete abundant proteins with a method we call DigDeAPr. We validated the depletion mechanism with known yeast protein abundances and observed greater than 3-fold improvement in low abundance human protein identification and quantitation metrics. This methodology should be broadly applicable to many organisms, proteases, and proteomic pipelines. PMID:23160281

  12. Measuring Solar Abundances with Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussack, K.; Gough, D.

    2009-12-01

    The revision of the photospheric abundances proferred by Asplund et al. (2005) has rendered opacity theory inconsistent with the seismologically determined opacity through the Sun. This highlights the need for a direct seismological measurement of solar abundances. Here we describe the technique used to measure abundances with seismology, examine our ability to detect differences between solar models using this technique, and discuss its application in the Sun.

  13. Strong Coupling of Shoot Assimilation and Soil Respiration during Drought and Recovery Periods in Beech As Indicated by Natural Abundance δ(13)C Measurements.

    PubMed

    Blessing, Carola H; Barthel, Matti; Gentsch, Lydia; Buchmann, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Drought down-regulates above- and belowground carbon fluxes, however, the resilience of trees to drought will also depend on the speed and magnitude of recovery of these above- and belowground fluxes after re-wetting. Carbon isotope composition of above- and belowground carbon fluxes at natural abundance provides a methodological approach to study the coupling between photosynthesis and soil respiration (SR) under conditions (such as drought) that influence photosynthetic carbon isotope discrimination. In turn, the direct supply of root respiration with recent photoassimilates will impact on the carbon isotope composition of soil-respired CO2. We independently measured shoot and soil CO2 fluxes of beech saplings (Fagus sylvatica L.) and their respective δ(13)C continuously with laser spectroscopy at natural abundance. We quantified the speed of recovery of drought stressed trees after re-watering and traced photosynthetic carbon isotope signal in the carbon isotope composition of soil-respired CO2. Stomatal conductance responded strongly to the moderate drought (-65%), induced by reduced soil moisture content as well as increased vapor pressure deficit. Simultaneously, carbon isotope discrimination decreased by 8‰, which in turn caused a significant increase in δ(13)C of recent metabolites (1.5-2.5‰) and in δ(13)C of SR (1-1.5‰). Generally, shoot and soil CO2 fluxes and their δ(13)C were in alignment during drought and subsequent stress release, clearly demonstrating a permanent dependence of root respiration on recently fixed photoassimilates, rather than on older reserves. After re-watering, the drought signal persisted longer in δ(13)C of the water soluble fraction that integrates multiple metabolites (soluble sugars, amino acids, organic acids) than in the neutral fraction which represents most recently assimilated sugars or in the δ(13)C of SR. Nevertheless, full recovery of all aboveground physiological variables was reached within 4 days - and

  14. Structure and function of isozymes: Evolutionary aspects and role of oxygen in eucaryotic organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, T.

    1985-01-01

    Oxygen is not only one of the most abundant elements on the Earth, but it is also one of the most important elements for life. In terms of composition, the feature of the atmosphere that most distinguishes Earth from other planets is the presence of abundant amounts of oxygen. The first forms of life may have been similar to present day anaerobic bacteria such as clostridium. The relationship between prokaryotes and eukaryotes, if any, has been a topic of much speculation. With only a few exceptions eukaryotes are oxygen-utilizing organisms. This research eukaryotes or eukaryotic biochemical processes requiring oxygen, could have arisen quite early in evolution and utilized the small quantities of photocatalytically produced oxygen which are thought to have been present on the Earth prior to the evolution of massive amounts of photosynthetically-produced oxygen.

  15. The post-Paleozoic chronology and mechanism of 13C depletion in primary marine organic matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popp, B. N.; Takigiku, R.; Hayes, J. M.; Louda, J. W.; Baker, E. W.

    1989-01-01

    Carbon-isotopic compositions of geoporphyrins have been measured from marine sediments of Mesozoic and Cenozoic age in order to elucidate the timing and extent of depletion of 13C in marine primary producers. These results indicate that the difference in isotopic composition of coeval marine carbonates and marine primary photosynthate was approximately 5 to 7 permil greater during the Mesozoic and early Cenozoic than at present. In contrast to the isotopic record of marine primary producers, isotopic compositions of terrestrial organic materials have remained approximately constant for this same interval of time. This difference in the isotopic records of marine and terrestrial organic matter is considered in terms of the mechanisms controlling the isotopic fractionation associated with photosynthetic fixation of carbon. We show that the decreased isotopic fractionation between marine carbonates and organic matter from the Early to mid-Cenozoic may record variations in the abundance of atmospheric CO2.

  16. Photosynthetic characteristics of plants of a Californian cool coastal environment.

    PubMed

    Mooney, H A; Field, C; Williams, W E; Berry, J A; Björkman, O

    1983-03-01

    Herbaceous perennials native to coastal bluffs in northern California all had similar photosynthetic characteristics: moderate photosynthetic capacities, light saturation at relatively low irradiances, and low photosynthetic temperature optima. They all decreased stomatal conductance in response to decreased humidity. Though the coastal habitat generally has high humidities and cool air temperatures leaf microclimatic conditions lead frequently to large vapor-concentration gradients between leaf and air. Stomatal sensitivty to the vapor-concentration gradient may result in important plant-water conservation in this summer drought habitat.

  17. Mimicking the Role of the Antenna in Photosynthetic Photoprotection

    SciTech Connect

    Terazono, Yuichi; Kodis, Gerdenis; Bhushan, Kul; Zaks, Julia; Madden, Christopher; Moore, Ana L.; Moore, Thomas A.; Fleming, Graham R.; Gust, Devens

    2011-03-09

    One mechanism used by plants to protect against damage from excess sunlight is called nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ). Triggered by low pH in the thylakoid lumen, NPQ leads to conversion of excess excitation energy in the antenna system to heat before it can initiate production of harmful chemical species by photosynthetic reaction centers. Here we report a synthetic hexad molecule that functionally mimics the role of the antenna in NPQ. When the hexad is dissolved in an organic solvent, five zinc porphyrin antenna moieties absorb light, exchange excitation energy, and ultimately decay by normal photophysical processes. Their excited-state lifetimes are long enough to permit harvesting of the excitation energy for photoinduced charge separation or other work. However, when acid is added, a pH-sensitive dye moiety is converted to a form that rapidly quenches the first excited singlet states of all five porphyrins, converting the excitation energy to heat and rendering the porphyrins kinetically incompetent to readily perform useful photochemistry.

  18. Engineering analysis of potential photosynthetic bacterial hydrogen-production systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlevich, A.; Karpuk, M. E.

    1982-06-01

    Photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) are capable of generating hydrogen from organics in effluents from food processing, pulp and paper, and chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Hydrogen evolution takes place under light in the absence of air. The rate of hydrogen production is expected to range between 300 to 600 scf of hydrogen per 1000 galloons of waste stream treated per hour. This hydrogen production system has been demonstrated at a bench-scale level and is ready for engineering development. A conceptual design for a PSB hydrogen production system is described. The system is expected to be sited adjacent to a waste stream source which will be pretreated by fermentation and pH adjustment, innoculated with bacteria, and then passed into the reactor. The reactor effluent can either be discharged into a rapid infiltration system, an irrigation ditch, and/or recycled back into the reactor. Several potential reactor designs have been developed, analyzed, and costed. A large covered pond appears to be the most economical design approach.

  19. Photosynthetic efficiency predicts toxic effects of metal nanomaterials in phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert J; Muller, Erik B; Cole, Bryan; Martin, Tyronne; Nisbet, Roger; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K; Jarvis, Tayler A; Keller, Arturo A; Cherr, Gary; Lenihan, Hunter S

    2017-02-01

    High Throughput Screening (HTS) using in vitro assessments at the subcellular level has great promise for screening new chemicals and emerging contaminants to identify high-risk candidates, but their linkage to ecological impacts has seldom been evaluated. We tested whether a battery of subcellular HTS tests could be used to accurately predict population-level effects of engineered metal nanoparticles (ENPs) on marine phytoplankton, important primary producers that support oceanic food webs. To overcome well-known difficulties of estimating ecologically meaningful toxicity parameters, we used novel Dynamic Energy Budget and Toxicodynamic (DEBtox) modeling techniques to evaluate impacts of ENPs on population growth rates. Our results show that population growth was negatively impacted by all four ENPs tested, but the HTS tests assessing many cell/physiological functions lacked predictive power at the population level. However, declining photosynthetic efficiency, a traditional physiological endpoint for photoautotrophs, was a good predictor of population level effects in phytoplankton. DEBtox techniques provided robust estimates of EC10 for population growth rates in exponentially growing batch cultures of phytoplankton, and should be widely useful for ecotoxicological testing. Adoption of HTS approaches for ecotoxicological assessment should carefully evaluate the predictive power of specific assays to minimize the risk that effects at higher levels of biological organization may go undetected.

  20. ATP drives direct photosynthetic production of 1-butanol in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Lan, Ethan I; Liao, James C

    2012-04-17

    While conservation of ATP is often a desirable trait for microbial production of chemicals, we demonstrate that additional consumption of ATP may be beneficial to drive product formation in a nonnatural pathway. Although production of 1-butanol by the fermentative coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent pathway using the reversal of β-oxidation exists in nature and has been demonstrated in various organisms, the first step of the pathway, condensation of two molecules of acetyl-CoA to acetoacetyl-CoA, is thermodynamically unfavorable. Here, we show that artificially engineered ATP consumption through a pathway modification can drive this reaction forward and enables for the first time the direct photosynthetic production of 1-butanol from cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We further demonstrated that substitution of bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE2) with separate butyraldehyde dehydrogenase (Bldh) and NADPH-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (YqhD) increased 1-butanol production by 4-fold. These results demonstrated the importance of ATP and cofactor driving forces as a design principle to alter metabolic flux.

  1. Detection of an intermediate of photosynthetic water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Juergen; Junge, Wolfgang

    2004-07-22

    The oxygen that we breathe is produced by photosystem II of cyanobacteria and plants. The catalytic centre, a Mn4Ca cluster, accumulates four oxidizing equivalents before oxygen is formed, seemingly in a single reaction step 2H2O<==>O2 + 4H+ + 4e-. The energy and cycling of this reaction derives solely from light. No intermediate oxidation product of water has been detected so far. Here, we shifted the equilibrium of the terminal reaction backward by increasing the oxygen pressure and monitoring (by absorption transients in the near-ultraviolet spectrum) the electron transfer from bound water into the catalytic centre. A tenfold increase of ambient oxygen pressure (2.3 bar) half-suppressed the full progression to oxygen. The remaining electron transfer at saturating pressure (30 bar) was compatible with the formation of a stabilized intermediate. The abstraction of four electrons from water was probably split into at least two electron transfers: mildly endergonic from the centre's highest oxidation state to an intermediate, and exergonic from the intermediate to oxygen. There is little leeway for photosynthetic organisms to push the atmospheric oxygen concentration much above the present level.

  2. Thermal Quantum Correlations in Photosynthetic Light-Harvesting Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdian, M.; Kouhestani, H.

    2015-08-01

    Photosynthesis is one of the ancient biological processes, playing crucial role converting solar energy to cellular usable currency. Environmental factors and external perturbations has forced nature to choose systems with the highest efficiency and performance. Recent theoretical and experimental studies have proved the presence of quantum properties in biological systems. Energy transfer systems like Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex shows quantum entanglement between sites of Bacteriophylla molecules in protein environment and presence of decoherence. Complex biological systems implement more truthful mechanisms beside chemical-quantum correlations to assure system's efficiency. In this study we investigate thermal quantum correlations in FMO protein of the photosynthetic apparatus of green sulfur bacteria by quantum discord measure. The results confirmed existence of remarkable quantum correlations of of BChla pigments in room temperature. This results approve involvement of quantum correlation mechanisms for information storage and retention in living organisms that could be useful for further evolutionary studies. Inspired idea of this study is potentially interesting to practice by the same procedure in genetic data transfer mechanisms.

  3. The Arabidopsis Thylakoid Chloride Channel AtCLCe Functions in Chloride Homeostasis and Regulation of Photosynthetic Electron Transport

    PubMed Central

    Herdean, Andrei; Nziengui, Hugues; Zsiros, Ottó; Solymosi, Katalin; Garab, Győző; Lundin, Björn; Spetea, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    Chloride ions can be translocated across cell membranes through Cl− channels or Cl−/H+ exchangers. The thylakoid-located member of the Cl− channel CLC family in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtCLCe) was hypothesized to play a role in photosynthetic regulation based on the initial photosynthetic characterization of clce mutant lines. The reduced nitrate content of Arabidopsis clce mutants suggested a role in regulation of plant nitrate homeostasis. In this study, we aimed to further investigate the role of AtCLCe in the regulation of ion homeostasis and photosynthetic processes in the thylakoid membrane. We report that the size and composition of proton motive force were mildly altered in two independent Arabidopsis clce mutant lines. Most pronounced effects in the clce mutants were observed on the photosynthetic electron transport of dark-adapted plants, based on the altered shape and associated parameters of the polyphasic OJIP kinetics of chlorophyll a fluorescence induction. Other alterations were found in the kinetics of state transition and in the macro-organization of photosystem II supercomplexes, as indicated by circular dichroism measurements. Pre-treatment with KCl but not with KNO3 restored the wild-type photosynthetic phenotype. Analyses by transmission electron microscopy revealed a bow-like arrangement of the thylakoid network and a large thylakoid-free stromal region in chloroplast sections from the dark-adapted clce plants. Based on these data, we propose that AtCLCe functions in Cl− homeostasis after transition from light to dark, which affects chloroplast ultrastructure and regulation of photosynthetic electron transport. PMID:26904077

  4. A compendium of temperature responses of Rubisco kinetic traits: variability among and within photosynthetic groups and impacts on photosynthesis modeling

    PubMed Central

    Galmés, Jeroni; Hermida-Carrera, Carmen; Laanisto, Lauri; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    The present study provides a synthesis of the in vitro and in vivo temperature responses of Rubisco Michaelis–Menten constants for CO2 (Kc) and O2 (Ko), specificity factor (Sc,o) and maximum carboxylase turnover rate (kcatc) for 49 species from all the main photosynthetic kingdoms of life. Novel correction routines were developed for in vitro data to remove the effects of study-to-study differences in Rubisco assays. The compilation revealed differences in the energy of activation (∆Ha) of Rubisco kinetics between higher plants and other photosynthetic groups, although photosynthetic bacteria and algae were under-represented and very few species have been investigated so far. Within plants, the variation in Rubisco temperature responses was related to species’ climate and photosynthetic mechanism, with differences in ∆Ha for kcatc among C3 plants from cool and warm environments, and in ∆Ha for kcatc and Kc among C3 and C4 plants. A negative correlation was observed among ∆Ha for Sc/o and species’ growth temperature for all data pooled, supporting the convergent adjustment of the temperature sensitivity of Rubisco kinetics to species’ thermal history. Simulations of the influence of varying temperature dependences of Rubisco kinetics on Rubisco-limited photosynthesis suggested improved photosynthetic performance of C3 plants from cool habitats at lower temperatures, and C3 plants from warm habitats at higher temperatures, especially at higher CO2 concentration. Thus, variation in Rubisco kinetics for different groups of photosynthetic organisms might need consideration to improve prediction of photosynthesis in future climates. Comparisons between in vitro and in vivo data revealed common trends, but also highlighted a large variability among both types of Rubisco kinetics currently used to simulate photosynthesis, emphasizing the need for more experimental work to fill in the gaps in Rubisco datasets and improve scaling from enzyme kinetics to

  5. A compendium of temperature responses of Rubisco kinetic traits: variability among and within photosynthetic groups and impacts on photosynthesis modeling.

    PubMed

    Galmés, Jeroni; Hermida-Carrera, Carmen; Laanisto, Lauri; Niinemets, Ülo

    2016-09-01

    The present study provides a synthesis of the in vitro and in vivo temperature responses of Rubisco Michaelis-Menten constants for CO2 (Kc) and O2 (Ko), specificity factor (Sc,o) and maximum carboxylase turnover rate (kcatc) for 49 species from all the main photosynthetic kingdoms of life. Novel correction routines were developed for in vitro data to remove the effects of study-to-study differences in Rubisco assays. The compilation revealed differences in the energy of activation (∆Ha) of Rubisco kinetics between higher plants and other photosynthetic groups, although photosynthetic bacteria and algae were under-represented and very few species have been investigated so far. Within plants, the variation in Rubisco temperature responses was related to species' climate and photosynthetic mechanism, with differences in ∆Ha for kcatc among C3 plants from cool and warm environments, and in ∆Ha for kcatc and Kc among C3 and C4 plants. A negative correlation was observed among ∆Ha for Sc/o and species' growth temperature for all data pooled, supporting the convergent adjustment of the temperature sensitivity of Rubisco kinetics to species' thermal history. Simulations of the influence of varying temperature dependences of Rubisco kinetics on Rubisco-limited photosynthesis suggested improved photosynthetic performance of C3 plants from cool habitats at lower temperatures, and C3 plants from warm habitats at higher temperatures, especially at higher CO2 concentration. Thus, variation in Rubisco kinetics for different groups of photosynthetic organisms might need consideration to improve prediction of photosynthesis in future climates. Comparisons between in vitro and in vivo data revealed common trends, but also highlighted a large variability among both types of Rubisco kinetics currently used to simulate photosynthesis, emphasizing the need for more experimental work to fill in the gaps in Rubisco datasets and improve scaling from enzyme kinetics to realized

  6. Abundance models improve spatial and temporal prioritization of conservation resources.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Alison; Fink, Daniel; Reynolds, Mark D; Hochachka, Wesley M; Sullivan, Brian L; Bruns, Nicholas E; Hallstein, Eric; Merrifield, Matt S; Matsumoto, Sandi; Kelling, Steve

    2015-10-01

    Conservation prioritization requires knowledge about organism distribution and density. This information is often inferred from models that estimate the probability of species occurrence rather than from models that estimate species abundance, because abundance data are harder to obtain and model. However, occurrence and abundance may not display similar patterns and therefore development of robust, scalable, abundance models is critical to ensuring that scarce conservation resources are applied where they can have the greatest benefits. Motivated by a dynamic land conservation program, we develop and assess a general method for modeling relative abundance using citizen science monitoring data. Weekly estimates of relative abundance and occurrence were compared for prioritizing times and locations of conservation actions for migratory waterbird species in California, USA. We found that abundance estimates consistently provided better rankings of observed counts than occurrence estimates. Additionally, the relationship between abundance and occurrence was nonlinear and varied by species and season. Across species, locations prioritized by occurrence models had only 10-58% overlap with locations prioritized by abundance models, highlighting that occurrence models will not typically identify the locations of highest abundance that are vital for conservation of populations.

  7. Comparing photosynthetic characteristics of Isoetes sinensis Palmer under submerged and terrestrial conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tao; Liu, Xing

    2015-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is widespread in terrestrial and aquatic species, plastic in response to environmental changes. Isoetes L. is one of the earliest basal vascular plants and CAM is popular in this genus. Isoetes sinensis Palmer is an amphibious species, alternating frequently between terrestrial and aquatic environments. Given this, we investigated and compared photosynthetic characteristics over a diurnal cycle under submerged condition (SC) and terrestrial condition (TC). The results suggest that I. sinensis possesses a stronger CAM capacity under SC. Compared with under TC, titratable acidity levels and organic acid concentrations were more enriched under SC, whereas soluble sugar or starch and protein levels were lower under SC. Transcript analyses for nine photosynthetic genes revealed that CAM-associated genes possessed high transcripts under SC, but C3-related transcripts were highly expressed under TC. In addition, the enzyme activity measurements demonstrated that PEPC activity over a diurnal cycle was slightly higher under SC, whereas Rubisco activity during the daytime was greater under TC. This comprehensive study probably facilitates general understandings about the CAM photosynthetic characteristics of Isoetes in response to the environmental changes. PMID:26634994

  8. Radiative energy budget reveals high photosynthetic efficiency in symbiont-bearing corals

    PubMed Central

    Brodersen, Kasper Elgetti; Lichtenberg, Mads; Ralph, Peter J.; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The light field on coral reefs varies in intensity and spectral composition, and is the key regulating factor for phototrophic reef organisms, for example scleractinian corals harbouring microalgal symbionts. However, the actual efficiency of light utilization in corals and the mechanisms affecting the radiative energy budget of corals are underexplored. We present the first balanced light energy budget for a symbiont-bearing coral based on a fine-scale study of the microenvironmental photobiology of the massive coral Montastrea curta. The majority (more than 96%) of the absorbed light energy was dissipated as heat, whereas the proportion of the absorbed light energy used in photosynthesis was approximately 4.0% under an irradiance of 640 µmol photons m−2 s−1. With increasing irradiance, the proportion of heat dissipation increased at the expense of photosynthesis. Despite such low energy efficiency, we found a high photosynthetic efficiency of the microalgal symbionts showing high gross photosynthesis rates and quantum efficiencies (QEs) of approximately 0.1 O2 photon−1 approaching theoretical limits under moderate irradiance levels. Corals thus appear as highly efficient light collectors with optical properties enabling light distribution over the corallite/tissue microstructural canopy that enables a high photosynthetic QE of their photosynthetic microalgae in hospite. PMID:24478282

  9. Survival potential and photosynthetic activity of lichens under Mars-like conditions: a laboratory study.

    PubMed

    de Vera, Jean-Pierre; Möhlmann, Diedrich; Butina, Frederike; Lorek, Andreas; Wernecke, Roland; Ott, Sieglinde

    2010-03-01

    Lichens were repetitively exposed over 22 days to thermophysical Mars-like conditions at low-and mid-latitudes. The simulated parameters and the experimental setup are described. Natural samples of the lichen Xanthoria elegans were used to investigate their ability to survive the applied Mars-like conditions. The effects of atmospheric pressure, CO(2) concentration, low temperature, water availability, and light on Mars were also studied. The results of these experiments indicate that no significant decrease in the vitality of the lichen occurred after exposure to simulated martian conditions, which was demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis, and a 95% CO(2) atmosphere with 100% humidity, low pressure (partial pressure of CO(2) was 600 Pa), and low temperature has a balancing effect on photosynthetic activity as a function of temperature. This means a starting low photosynthetic activity at high CO(2) concentrations with Earth-like pressure has a reduction of 60%. But, if the simulated atmospheric pressure is reduced to Mars-like conditions with the maintenance of the same Mars-like 95% CO(2) concentration, the photosynthetic activity increases and again reaches similar values as those exhibited under terrestrial atmospheric pressure and concentration. Based on these results, we presume that, in any region on Mars where liquid water might be available, even for short periods of time, a eukaryotic symbiotic organism would have the ability to survive, at least over weeks, and to temporarily photosynthesize.

  10. A new perspective on hydrogen production by photosynthetic water-splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.W.; Greenbaum, E.

    1996-05-01

    Present energy systems are heavily dependent on fossil fuels. This will eventually lead to the foreseeable depletion of fossil energy resources and, according to some reports, global climate changes due to the emission of carbon dioxide. In principle, hydrogen production by biophotolysis of water can be an ideal solar energy conversion system for sustainable development of human activities in harmony with the global environment. In photosynthetic hydrogen production research, there are currently two main efforts: (1) Direct photoevolution of hydrogen and oxygen by photosynthetic water splitting using the ferredoxin/hydrogenase pathway; (2) Dark hydrogen production by fermentation of organic reserves such as starch that are generated by photosynthesis during the light period. In this chapter, the advantages and challenges of the two approaches for hydrogen production will be discussed, in relation to a new opportunity brought by our recent discovery of a new photosynthetic water-splitting reaction which, potentially, has twice the energy efficiency of conventional watersplitting via the two light reaction Z-scheme of photosynthesis.

  11. Temporal matching among diurnal photosynthetic patterns within the crown of the evergreen sclerophyll Olea europaea L.

    PubMed

    Granado-Yela, C; García-Verdugo, C; Carrillo, K; Rubio DE Casas, R; Kleczkowski, L A; Balaguer, L

    2011-05-01

    Trees are modular organisms that adjust their within-crown morphology and physiology in response to within-crown light gradients. However, whether within-plant variation represents a strategy for optimizing light absorption has not been formally tested. We investigated the arrangement of the photosynthetic surface throughout one day and its effects on the photosynthetic process, at the most exposed and most sheltered crown layers of a wild olive tree (Olea europaea L.). Similar measurements were made for cuttings taken from this individual and grown in a greenhouse at contrasted irradiance-levels (100 and 20% full sunlight). Diurnal variations in light interception, carbon fixation and carbohydrate accumulation in sun leaves were negatively correlated with those in shade leaves under field conditions when light intensity was not limiting. Despite genetic identity, these complementary patterns were not found in plants grown in the greenhouse. The temporal disparity among crown positions derived from specialization of the photosynthetic behaviour at different functional and spatial scales: architectural structure (crown level) and carbon budget (leaf level). Our results suggest that the profitability of producing a new module may not only respond to construction costs or light availability, but also rely on its spatio-temporal integration within the productive processes at the whole-crown level.

  12. Communication: Coherences observed in vivo in photosynthetic bacteria using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Peter D.; Norris, Graham J.; Wang, Cheng; Viswanathan, Subha; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Energy transfer through large disordered antenna networks in photosynthetic organisms can occur with a quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. This energy transfer is facilitated by the electronic structure of the photosynthetic antennae as well as interactions between electronic states and the surrounding environment. Coherences in time-domain spectroscopy provide a fine probe of how a system interacts with its surroundings. In two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, coherences can appear on both the ground and excited state surfaces revealing detailed information regarding electronic structure, system-bath coupling, energy transfer, and energetic coupling in complex chemical systems. Numerous studies have revealed coherences in isolated photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, but these coherences have not been observed in vivo due to the small amplitude of these signals and the intense scatter from whole cells. Here, we present data acquired using ultrafast video-acquisition gradient-assisted photon echo spectroscopy to observe quantum beating signals from coherences in vivo. Experiments were conducted on isolated light harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, whole cells of R. sphaeroides, and whole cells of R. sphaeroides grown in 30% deuterated media. A vibronic coherence was observed following laser excitation at ambient temperature between the B850 and the B850∗ states of LH2 in each of the 3 samples with a lifetime of ∼40-60 fs. PMID:26373989

  13. Communication: Coherences observed in vivo in photosynthetic bacteria using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlberg, Peter D.; Norris, Graham J.; Wang, Cheng; Viswanathan, Subha; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2015-09-01

    Energy transfer through large disordered antenna networks in photosynthetic organisms can occur with a quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. This energy transfer is facilitated by the electronic structure of the photosynthetic antennae as well as interactions between electronic states and the surrounding environment. Coherences in time-domain spectroscopy provide a fine probe of how a system interacts with its surroundings. In two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, coherences can appear on both the ground and excited state surfaces revealing detailed information regarding electronic structure, system-bath coupling, energy transfer, and energetic coupling in complex chemical systems. Numerous studies have revealed coherences in isolated photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, but these coherences have not been observed in vivo due to the small amplitude of these signals and the intense scatter from whole cells. Here, we present data acquired using ultrafast video-acquisition gradient-assisted photon echo spectroscopy to observe quantum beating signals from coherences in vivo. Experiments were conducted on isolated light harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, whole cells of R. sphaeroides, and whole cells of R. sphaeroides grown in 30% deuterated media. A vibronic coherence was observed following laser excitation at ambient temperature between the B850 and the B850∗ states of LH2 in each of the 3 samples with a lifetime of ˜40-60 fs.

  14. Redundant roles of photoreceptors and cytokinins in regulating photosynthetic acclimation to canopy density

    PubMed Central

    Boonman, A.; Prinsen, E.; Voesenek, L. A. C. J.; Pons, T. L.

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of photosynthetic acclimation to canopy density was investigated in tobacco canopies and in tobacco and Arabidopsis plants with part of their foliage experimentally shaded. Both species acclimated to canopy light gradients and partial shading by allocating photosynthetic capacity to leaves in high light and adjusting chloroplast organization to the local light conditions. An investigation was carried out to determine whether signalling mediated by photoreceptors, sugars, cytokinin, and nitrate is involved in and necessary for proper photosynthetic acclimation. No evidence was found for a role for sugars, or for nitrate. The distribution of cytokinins in tobacco stands of contrasting density could be explained in part by irradiance-dependent delivery of cytokinins through the transpiration stream. Functional studies using a comprehensive selection of Arabidopsis mutants and transgenics showed that normal wild-type responses to partial shading were retained when signalling mediated by photoreceptors or cytokinins was disrupted. This indicates that these pathways probably operate in a redundant manner. However, the reduction of the chlorophyll a/b ratio in response to local shade was completely absent in the Arabidopsis Ws-2 accession mutated in PHYTOCHROME D and in the triple phyAphyCphyD mutant. Moreover, cytokinin receptor mutants also showed a reduced response, suggesting a previously unrecognized function of phyD and cytokinins. PMID:19240103

  15. Communication: Coherences observed in vivo in photosynthetic bacteria using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlberg, Peter D.; Norris, Graham J.; Wang, Cheng; Viswanathan, Subha; Singh, Ved P.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2015-09-14

    Energy transfer through large disordered antenna networks in photosynthetic organisms can occur with a quantum efficiency of nearly 100%. This energy transfer is facilitated by the electronic structure of the photosynthetic antennae as well as interactions between electronic states and the surrounding environment. Coherences in time-domain spectroscopy provide a fine probe of how a system interacts with its surroundings. In two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, coherences can appear on both the ground and excited state surfaces revealing detailed information regarding electronic structure, system-bath coupling, energy transfer, and energetic coupling in complex chemical systems. Numerous studies have revealed coherences in isolated photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, but these coherences have not been observed in vivo due to the small amplitude of these signals and the intense scatter from whole cells. Here, we present data acquired using ultrafast video-acquisition gradient-assisted photon echo spectroscopy to observe quantum beating signals from coherences in vivo. Experiments were conducted on isolated light harvesting complex II (LH2) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides, whole cells of R. sphaeroides, and whole cells of R. sphaeroides grown in 30% deuterated media. A vibronic coherence was observed following laser excitation at ambient temperature between the B850 and the B850{sup ∗} states of LH2 in each of the 3 samples with a lifetime of ∼40-60 fs.

  16. Structure, Function and Reconstitution of Antenna Complexes of Green Photosynthetic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, Robert E.

    2005-06-10

    Most chlorophyll-type pigments in a photosynthetic organism function as an antenna, absorbing light and transferring excitations to a photochemical reaction center where energy storage takes place by a series of chemical reactions. The green photosynthetic bacteria are characterized by large antenna complexes known as chlorosomes, in which pigment-pigment interactions are of dominant importance. The overall objective of this project is to determine the mechanisms of excitation transfer and regulation of this unique antenna system, including how it is integrated into the rest of the photosynthetic energy transduction apparatus. Techniques that are being used in this research include biochemical analysis, spectroscopy, microscopy, X-ray structural studies, and reconstitution from purified components. Our recent results indicate that the chlorosome baseplate structure, which is the membrane attachment site for the chlorosome to the membrane, is a unique pigment-protein that contains large amounts of carotenoids and small amounts of bacteriochlorophyll a. Reconstitution of directed energy transfer in chlorosomes will be carried out using purified baseplates and oligomeric pigments. The integral membrane B808-866 antenna complex from Chloroflexus aurantiacus and the Fenna-Matthews-Olson protein-reaction center complex from green sulfur bacteria will be characterized by spectroscopic and structural techniques.

  17. Radiative energy budget reveals high photosynthetic efficiency in symbiont-bearing corals.

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Kasper Elgetti; Lichtenberg, Mads; Ralph, Peter J; Kühl, Michael; Wangpraseurt, Daniel

    2014-04-06

    The light field on coral reefs varies in intensity and spectral composition, and is the key regulating factor for phototrophic reef organisms, for example scleractinian corals harbouring microalgal symbionts. However, the actual efficiency of light utilization in corals and the mechanisms affecting the radiative energy budget of corals are underexplored. We present the first balanced light energy budget for a symbiont-bearing coral based on a fine-scale study of the microenvironmental photobiology of the massive coral Montastrea curta. The majority (more than 96%) of the absorbed light energy was dissipated as heat, whereas the proportion of the absorbed light energy used in photosynthesis was approximately 4.0% under an irradiance of 640 µmol photons m(-2) s(-1). With increasing irradiance, the proportion of heat dissipation increased at the expense of photosynthesis. Despite such low energy efficiency, we found a high photosynthetic efficiency of the microalgal symbionts showing high gross photosynthesis rates and quantum efficiencies (QEs) of approximately 0.1 O2 photon(-1) approaching theoretical limits under moderate irradiance levels. Corals thus appear as highly efficient light collectors with optical properties enabling light distribution over the corallite/tissue microstructural canopy that enables a high photosynthetic QE of their photosynthetic microalgae in hospite.

  18. Photosynthetic recovery following desiccation of desert green algae (Chlorophyta) and their aquatic relatives.

    PubMed

    Gray, Dennis W; Lewis, Louise A; Cardon, Zoe G

    2007-10-01

    Recent molecular data suggest that desert green algae have evolved from freshwater ancestors at least 14 times in three major classes (Chlorophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Charophyceae), offering a unique opportunity to study the adaptation of photosynthetic organisms to life on land in a comparative phylogenetic framework. We examined the photorecovery of phylogenetically matched desert and aquatic algae after desiccation in darkness and under illumination. Desert algae survived desiccation for at least 4 weeks when dried in darkness, and recovered high levels of photosynthetic quantum yield within 1 h of rehydration in darkness. However, when 4 weeks of desiccation was accompanied by illumination, three of six desert taxa lost their ability to recover quantum yield during rehydration in the dark. Aquatic algae, in contrast, recovered very little during dark rehydration following even just 24 h of desiccation. Re-illuminating rehydrated algae produced a nearly complete recovery of quantum yield in all desert and two of five aquatic taxa. These contrasts provide physiological evidence that desert green algae possess mechanisms for photosynthetic recovery after desiccation distinct from those in aquatic relatives, corroborating molecular evidence that they are not happenstance, short-term visitors from aquatic environments. Photosensitivity during desiccation among desert algae further suggests that they may reside in protected microsites within crusts, and species specificity of photosensitivity suggests that disturbances physically disrupting crusts could lead to shifts or losses of taxonomic diversity within these habitats.

  19. Spatial patterns of photosynthesis in thin- and thick-leaved epiphytic orchids: unravelling C3–CAM plasticity in an organ-compartmented way

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Maria Aurineide; Matiz, Alejandra; Cruz, Aline Bertinatto; Matsumura, Aline Tiemi; Takahashi, Cassia Ayumi; Hamachi, Leonardo; Félix, Lucas Macedo; Pereira, Paula Natália; Latansio-Aidar, Sabrina Ribeiro; Aidar, Marcos Pereira Marinho; Demarco, Diego; Freschi, Luciano; Mercier, Helenice; Kerbauy, Gilberto Barbante

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims A positive correlation between tissue thickness and crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) expression has been frequently suggested. Therefore, this study addressed the question of whether water availability modulates photosynthetic plasticity in different organs of two epiphytic orchids with distinct leaf thickness. Methods Tissue morphology and photosynthetic mode (C3 and/or CAM) were examined in leaves, pseudobulbs and roots of a thick-leaved (Cattleya walkeriana) and a thin-leaved (Oncidium ‘Aloha’) epiphytic orchid. Morphological features were studied comparing the drought-induced physiological responses observed in each organ after 30 d of either drought or well-watered treatments. Key Results Cattleya walkeriana, which is considered a constitutive CAM orchid, displayed a clear drought-induced up-regulation of CAM in its thick leaves but not in its non-leaf organs (pseudobulbs and roots). The set of morphological traits of Cattleya leaves suggested the drought-inducible CAM up-regulation as a possible mechanism of increasing water-use efficiency and carbon economy. Conversely, although belonging to an orchid genus classically considered as performing C3 photosynthesis, Oncidium ‘Aloha’ under drought seemed to express facultative CAM in its roots and pseudobulbs but not in its leaves, indicating that such photosynthetic responses might compensate for the lack of capacity to perform CAM in its thin leaves. Morphological features of Oncidium leaves also indicated lower efficiency in preventing water and CO2 losses, while aerenchyma ducts connecting pseudobulbs and leaves suggested a compartmentalized mechanism of nighttime carboxylation via phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) (pseudobulbs) and daytime carboxylation via Rubisco (leaves) in drought-exposed Oncidium plants. Conclusions Water availability modulated CAM expression in an organ-compartmented manner in both orchids studied. As distinct regions of the same orchid could perform

  20. Mapping of Photosynthetic Pigments in Spanish Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Martinez, R.; Domínguez-Gómez, J.-A.; de Hoyos, C.; Ruiz-Verdú, A.

    2004-05-01

    We present the preliminary results of the first stage of the project AO-594, which comprises the development and calibration of algorithms for photosynthetic pigment mapping in Spanish reservoirs. In the years 2001-2002, an extensive field campaign was made in 36 reservoirs and lakes in order to obtain a database of Rrs spectra (400-1000 nm), photosynthetic pigments concentration and phytoplankton composition. The sampled water bodies cover a wide range of environmental conditions, trophic levels and phytoplankton communities. As a first approach in algorithm development, we have explored the relationships between ratios of MERIS bands and pigment concentrations through simple linear regression analysis. The bands have been selected based on the spectral properties of each pigment and a peak analysis of the Rrs spectra. For chlorophyll a, we have found a very good linear relationship (R2 =0.919) using the ratio between bands 9 and 7. Similar results are found using band 8 instead of 7. In any case, the model derived for the whole range of concentrations (0-500 mg m3 ) fails for low values (<15 mg m-3 ). Possible solutions include the use of - non-linear models or the use of two different models depending on the ratio values. For cyanobacteria detection, the ratio between bands 9 and 6 (the later centred at 620 nm) shows a good correlation (R2 =0.723) with phycocyanin concentration measured fluorometrically, and better (R2 =0.945) with zeaxanthin measured using HPLC. The correlation of other indicator pigments with MERIS band ratios is less strong, but is still possible to develop algorithms accurate enough for bloom monitoring. We also discuss the problems found with the L2 MERIS reflectance imagery that we have tried to use for model calibration. We present the results of the study carried on six reservoirs in northeastern Spain. In a date coincident with a MERIS image (June 19th, 2003) we have collected pigment concentration and reflectance data measured from a

  1. Impacts of genetically engineered alterations in carbon sink pathways on photosynthetic performance

    DOE PAGES

    Holland, Steven C.; Artier, Juliana; Miller, Neil T.; ...

    2016-10-05

    Genetic engineering of photosynthetic organisms typically redirects native metabolism towards desirable products, which thereby represent new metabolic sinks. There is limited information on how these modifications impact the evolved mechanisms of photosynthetic energy metabolism and cellular growth. Two engineered strains of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 with altered carbon sink capacity were assayed for their photosynthetic and CO2 concentrating mechanism properties in conditions of high and low inorganic carbon (Ci) availability. In the ΔglgC mutant, glycogen cannot be synthesized and a carbon sink pathway has been effectively removed. The JU547 strain has been engineered by integration of the Pseudomonas syringae ethylenemore » forming enzyme and provides a new sink. When cultured under high carbon conditions, ΔglgC displayed diminished photochemical efficiency, a more reduced NADPH pool, delayed initiation of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle, and impairment of linear and cyclic electron flows. It also exhibited a large decrease in photochemical quenching indicative of the accumulation of QA-, normally associated with a reduced PQ pool, but appears instead to be the result of an undefined dissipative mechanism to spill excess energy. In the case of carbon sink integration, JU547 displayed slightly more oxidized PQ and NADPH pools and increased rates of cyclic electron flow and an enhanced demand for inorganic carbon as suggested by increase in the expression of the bicarbonate transporter, SbtA. Overall, the results highlight the importance of the native regulatory network of autotrophic metabolism in governing photosynthetic performance and provide cogent examples of both predicable and difficult to predict phenotypic consequences upon installation of new pathways in autotrophs.« less

  2. Impacts of genetically engineered alterations in carbon sink pathways on photosynthetic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Steven C.; Artier, Juliana; Miller, Neil T.; Cano, Melissa; Yu, Jianping; Ghirardi, Maria L.; Burnap, Robert L.

    2016-10-05

    Genetic engineering of photosynthetic organisms typically redirects native metabolism towards desirable products, which thereby represent new metabolic sinks. There is limited information on how these modifications impact the evolved mechanisms of photosynthetic energy metabolism and cellular growth. Two engineered strains of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 with altered carbon sink capacity were assayed for their photosynthetic and CO2 concentrating mechanism properties in conditions of high and low inorganic carbon (Ci) availability. In the ΔglgC mutant, glycogen cannot be synthesized and a carbon sink pathway has been effectively removed. The JU547 strain has been engineered by integration of the Pseudomonas syringae ethylene forming enzyme and provides a new sink. When cultured under high carbon conditions, ΔglgC displayed diminished photochemical efficiency, a more reduced NADPH pool, delayed initiation of the Calvin-Benson-Bassham cycle, and impairment of linear and cyclic electron flows. It also exhibited a large decrease in photochemical quenching indicative of the accumulation of QA-, normally associated with a reduced PQ pool, but appears instead to be the result of an undefined dissipative mechanism to spill excess energy. In the case of carbon sink integration, JU547 displayed slightly more oxidized PQ and NADPH pools and increased rates of cyclic electron flow and an enhanced demand for inorganic carbon as suggested by increase in the expression of the bicarbonate transporter, SbtA. Overall, the results highlight the importance of the native regulatory network of autotrophic metabolism in governing photosynthetic performance and provide cogent examples of both predicable and difficult to predict phenotypic consequences upon installation of new pathways in autotrophs.

  3. Cultivar variation in cotton photosynthetic performance under different temperature regimes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) yields are impacted by overall photosynthetic production. Factors that influence crop photosynthesis are the plants genetic makeup and the environmental conditions. This study investigated cultivar variation in photosynthesis when plants were grown in the field under...

  4. Towards autotrophic tissue engineering: Photosynthetic gene therapy for regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Myra Noemi; Schenck, Thilo Ludwig; Hopfner, Ursula; Centeno-Cerdas, Carolina; Somlai-Schweiger, Ian; Schwarz, Christian; Machens, Hans-Günther; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Bono, María Rosa; Allende, Miguel L; Nickelsen, Jörg; Egaña, José Tomás

    2016-01-01

    The use of artificial tissues in regenerative medicine is limited due to hypoxia. As a strategy to overcome this drawback, we have shown that photosynthetic biomaterials can produce and provide oxygen independently of blood perfusion by generating chimeric animal-plant tissues during dermal regeneration. In this work, we demonstrate the safety and efficacy of photosynthetic biomaterials in vivo after engraftment in a fully immunocompetent mouse skin defect model. Further, we show that it is also possible to genetically engineer such photosynthetic scaffolds to deliver other key molecules in addition to oxygen. As a proof-of-concept, biomaterials were loaded with gene modified microalgae expressing the angiogenic recombinant protein VEGF. Survival of the algae, growth factor delivery and regenerative potential were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. This work proposes the use of photosynthetic gene therapy in regenerative medicine and provides scientific evidence for the use of engineered microalgae as an alternative to deliver recombinant molecules for gene therapy.

  5. Unique role for translation initiation factor 3 in the light color regulation of photosynthetic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gutu, Andrian; Nesbit, April D; Alverson, Andrew J; Palmer, Jeffrey D; Kehoe, David M

    2013-10-01

    Light-harvesting antennae are critical for collecting energy from sunlight and providing it to photosynthetic reaction centers. Their abundance and composition are tightly regulated to maintain efficient photosynthesis in changing light conditions. Many cyanobacteria alter their light-harvesting antennae in response to changes in ambient light-color conditions through the process of chromatic acclimation. The control of green light induction (Cgi) pathway is a light-color-sensing system that controls the expression of photosynthetic genes during chromatic acclimation, and while some evidence suggests that it operates via transcription attenuation, the components of this pathway have not been identified. We provide evidence that translation initiation factor 3 (IF3), an essential component of the prokaryotic translation initiation machinery that binds the 30S subunit and blocks premature association with the 50S subunit, is part of the control of green light induction pathway. Light regulation of gene expression has not been previously described for any translation initiation factor. Surprisingly, deletion of the IF3-encoding gene infCa was not lethal in the filamentous cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon, and its genome was found to contain a second, redundant, highly divergent infC gene which, when deleted, had no effect on photosynthetic gene expression. Either gene could complement an Escherichia coli infC mutant and thus both encode bona fide IF3s. Analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genome databases established that multiple infC genes are present in the genomes of diverse groups of bacteria and land plants, most of which do not undergo chromatic acclimation. This suggests that IF3 may have repeatedly evolved important roles in the regulation of gene expression in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

  6. Renewable hydrogen production by photosynthetic water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.

    1998-06-01

    This mission-oriented research project is focused on the production of renewable hydrogen. The authors have demonstrated that certain unicellular green algae are capable of sustained simultaneous photoproduction of hydrogen and oxygen by light-activated photosynthetic water splitting. It is the goal of this project to develop a practical chemical engineering system for the development of an economic process that can be used to produce renewable hydrogen. There are several fundamental problems that need to be solved before the application of this scientific knowledge can be applied to the development a practical process: (I) maximizing net thermodynamic conversion efficiency of light energy into hydrogen energy, (2) development of oxygen-sensitive hydrogenase-containing mutants, and (3) development of bioreactors that can be used in a real-world chemical engineering process. The authors are addressing each of these problems here at ORNL and in collaboration with their research colleagues at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Hawaii. This year the authors have focused on item 1 above. In particular, they have focused on the question of how many light reactions are required to split water to molecular hydrogen and oxygen.

  7. Photocurrent of a single photosynthetic protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerster, Daniel; Reichert, Joachim; Bi, Hai; Barth, Johannes V.; Kaniber, Simone M.; Holleitner, Alexander W.; Visoly-Fisher, Iris; Sergani, Shlomi; Carmeli, Itai

    2012-10-01

    Photosynthesis is used by plants, algae and bacteria to convert solar energy into stable chemical energy. The initial stages of this process--where light is absorbed and energy and electrons are transferred--are mediated by reaction centres composed of chlorophyll and carotenoid complexes. It has been previously shown that single small molecules can be used as functional components in electric and optoelectronic circuits, but it has proved difficult to control and probe individual molecules for photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical applications. Here, we show that the photocurrent generated by a single photosynthetic protein--photosystem I--can be measured using a scanning near-field optical microscope set-up. One side of the protein is anchored to a gold surface that acts as an electrode, and the other is contacted by a gold-covered glass tip. The tip functions as both counter electrode and light source. A photocurrent of ~10 pA is recorded from the covalently bound single-protein junctions, which is in agreement with the internal electron transfer times of photosystem I.

  8. Light gradients in spherical photosynthetic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Paillotin, G; Leibl, W; Gapiński, J; Breton, J; Dobek, A

    1998-07-01

    Light-gradient photovoltage measurements were performed on EDTA-treated thylakoids and on osmotically swollen thylakoids (blebs), both of spherical symmetry but of different sizes. In the case of EDTA vesicles, a negative polarity (due to the normal light gradient) was observed in the blue range of the absorption spectrum, and a positive polarity, corresponding to an inverse light gradient, was observed at lambda = 530 and lambda = 682 nm. The sign of the photovoltage polarity measured in large blebs (swollen thylakoids) is the same as that obtained for whole chloroplasts, although differences in the amplitudes are observed. An approach based on the use of polar coordinates was adapted for a theoretical description of these membrane systems of spherical symmetry. The light intensity distribution and the photovoltage in such systems were calculated. Fits to the photovoltage amplitudes, measured as a function of light wavelength, made it possible to derive the values of the dielectric constant of the protein, epsilons = 3, and the refractive index of the photosynthetic membrane for light propagating perpendicular and parallel to the membrane surface, nt = 1.42 and nn = 1.60, respectively. The latter two values determine the birefringence of the biological membrane, Deltan = nn - nt = 0.18.

  9. Plasmidless, photosynthetically incompetent mutants of Rhodospirillum rubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Kuhl, S A; Wimer, L T; Yoch, D C

    1984-01-01

    Ethyl methanesulfonate rendered a high percentage of Rhodospirillum rubrum cells plasmidless and photosynthetically incompetent (Kuhl et al., J. Bacteriol. 156:737-742, 1983). By probing restriction endonuclease-digested chromosomal DNA from these plasmidless strains with 32P-labeled R. rubrum plasmid DNA, we showed that no homology exists between the plasmid and the chromosomal DNA of the mutant. Loss of the plasmid in all the nonphotosynthetic isolates was accompanied by the synthesis of spirilloxanthin under aerobic growth conditions, resistance to cycloserine and HgCl2, and loss of ability to grow fermentatively on fructose. Changes in both the protein and lipid composition of the membranes and the impaired uptake of 203HgCl2 in the plasmidless strains (compared with the wild type) suggest either that membrane modification occurs as a result of plasmid loss, accounting for several of the acquired phenotype characteristics of the cured strains, or that both membrane modification and plasmid loss are part of the same pleiotropic mutation. Images PMID:6434514

  10. Photosynthetic light harvesting: excitons and coherence

    PubMed Central

    Fassioli, Francesca; Dinshaw, Rayomond; Arpin, Paul C.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis begins with light harvesting, where specialized pigment–protein complexes transform sunlight into electronic excitations delivered to reaction centres to initiate charge separation. There is evidence that quantum coherence between electronic excited states plays a role in energy transfer. In this review, we discuss how quantum coherence manifests in photosynthetic light harvesting and its implications. We begin by examining the concept of an exciton, an excited electronic state delocalized over several spatially separated molecules, which is the most widely available signature of quantum coherence in light harvesting. We then discuss recent results concerning the possibility that quantum coherence between electronically excited states of donors and acceptors may give rise to a quantum coherent evolution of excitations, modifying the traditional incoherent picture of energy transfer. Key to this (partially) coherent energy transfer appears to be the structure of the environment, in particular the participation of non-equilibrium vibrational modes. We discuss the open questions and controversies regarding quantum coherent energy transfer and how these can be addressed using new experimental techniques. PMID:24352671

  11. ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

    2001-07-25

    This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/03/2001 through 7/02/2001. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Note that this version of the quarterly technical report is a revision to add the reports from subcontractors Montana State and Oak Ridge National Laboratories The significant accomplishments for this quarter include: Development of an experimental plan and initiation of experiments to create a calibration curve that correlates algal chlorophyll levels with carbon levels (to simplify future experimental procedures); Completion of debugging of the slug flow reactor system, and development of a plan for testing the pressure drop of the slug flow reactor; Design and development of a new bioreactor screen design which integrates the nutrient delivery drip system and the harvesting system; Development of an experimental setup for testing the new integrated drip system/harvesting system; Completion of model-scale bioreactor tests examining the effects of CO{sub 2} concentration levels and lighting levels on Nostoc 86-3 growth rates; Completion of the construction of a larger model-scale bioreactor to improve and expand testing capabilities and initiation of tests; Substantial progress on construction of a pilot-scale bioreactor; and Preliminary economic analysis of photobioreactor deployment. Plans for next quarter's work are included in the conclusions. A preliminary economic analysis is included as an appendix.

  12. Supplemental photosynthetic lighting for greenhouse tomato production

    SciTech Connect

    Godfriaux, B.L.; Wittman, W.K. ); Janes, H.W.; McAvoy, R.J.; Putman, J.; Logendra, S. . Dept. of Horticulture and Forestry); Mears, D.R.; Giacommelli, G.; Giniger, M. . Dept. of Biological and Agricultural Engineering)

    1989-12-01

    The influence of supplemental light on the growth and productivity of greenhouse tomatoes grown to a single cluster on movable benches is examined, and the economic feasibility of such a system is evaluated. Experiments were conducted to quantify the tomato plants' response to various levels of supplemental light in terms of growth rate and yield at various stages in their development (e.g., seedling, flowering plant, etc.). The 1984--85 experiments showed that supplemental photosynthetic lighting nearly doubled tomato yields, from 0.48 to 0.86 lbs/plant. Subsequent experiments in 1985--86 identified the best tomato varieties for this treatment and further increased yields to 1.3 lbs/plant. In addition, the use of supplemental lighting was found to hasten tomato crop maturity. An economic analysis was performed on the 1985--86 empirical data using the tax rates and provisions then in force. It indicated that a 10-acre greenhouse could provide an after-tax internal rate of return of 10% to 12% using only equity financing. This return could likely be increased to 15--18% with the use of combined debt/equity financing. Using supplemental lighting on 10,000 acres of greenhouse production would require an estimated 7.5 billion kWh of additional electricity per year and, at 4.7 cents/kWh, generate an estimated $350 million in additional utility revenues. 48 refs., 34 figs., 24 tabs.

  13. Fluctuating Two-State Light Harvesting in a Photosynthetic Membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Duohai; Hu, Dehong; Liu, Ruchuan; Zeng, Xiaohua; Kaplan, Samuel; Lu, H. Peter

    2007-06-28

    How light is converted into chemical energy in a natural photosynthetic system is of great interest in energy sciences. Using single-molecule and single-vesicle fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging, we have observed fluctuating inter-molecular protein energy transfers in the photosynthetic membranes of R. sphaeroides. Our results suggest that there are dynamic coupled and non-coupled states in the light-harvesting protein assembly.

  14. On the photosynthetic potential in the very Early Archean oceans.

    PubMed

    Avila, Daile; Cardenas, Rolando; Martin, Osmel

    2013-02-01

    In this work we apply a mathematical model of photosynthesis to quantify the potential for photosynthetic life in the very Early Archean oceans. We assume the presence of oceanic blockers of ultraviolet radiation, specifically ferrous ions. For this scenario, our results suggest a potential for photosynthetic life greater than or similar to that in later eras/eons, such as the Late Archean and the current Phanerozoic eon.

  15. Production of bioplastics and hydrogen gas by photosynthetic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuo, Asada; Masato, Miyake; Jun, Miyake

    1998-03-01

    Our efforts have been aimed at the technological basis of photosynthetic-microbial production of materials and an energy carrier. We report here accumulation of poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), a raw material of biodegradable plastics and for production of hydrogen gas, and a renewable energy carrier by photosynthetic microorganisms (tentatively defined as cyanobacteria plus photosynthetic bateria, in this report). A thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. MA19 that accumulates PHB at more than 20% of cell dry wt under nitrogen-starved conditions was isolated and microbiologically identified. The mechanism of PHB accumulation was studied. A mesophilic Synechococcus PCC7942 was transformed with the genes encoding PHB-synthesizing enzymes from Alcaligenes eutrophus. The transformant accumulated PHB under nitrogen-starved conditions. The optimal conditions for PHB accumulation by a photosynthetic bacterium grown on acetate were studied. Hydrogen production by photosynthetic microorganisms was studied. Cyanobacteria can produce hydrogen gas by nitrogenase or hydrogenase. Hydrogen production mediated by native hydrogenase in cyanobacteria was revealed to be in the dark anaerobic degradation of intracellular glycogen. A new system for light-dependent hydrogen production was targeted. In vitro and in vivo coupling of cyanobacterial ferredoxin with a heterologous hydrogenase was shown to produce hydrogen under light conditions. A trial for genetic trasformation of Synechococcus PCC7942 with the hydrogenase gene from Clostridium pasteurianum is going on. The strong hydrogen producers among photosynthetic bacteria were isolated and characterized. Co-culture of Rhodobacter and Clostriumdium was applied to produce hydrogen from glucose. Conversely in the case of cyanobacteria, genetic regulation of photosynthetic proteins was intended to improve conversion efficiency in hydrogen production by the photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV. A mutant acquired by

  16. Rice photosynthetic productivity and PSII photochemistry under nonflooded irrigation.

    PubMed

    He, Haibing; Yang, Ru; Jia, Biao; Chen, Lin; Fan, Hua; Cui, Jing; Yang, Dong; Li, Menglong; Ma, Fu-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Nonflooded irrigation is an important water-saving rice cultivation technology, but little is known on its photosynthetic mechanism. The aims of this work were to investigate photosynthetic characteristics of rice during grain filling stage under three nonflooded irrigation treatments: furrow irrigation with plastic mulching (FIM), furrow irrigation with nonmulching (FIN), and drip irrigation with plastic mulching (DI). Compared with the conventional flooding (CF) treatment, those grown in the nonflooded irrigation treatments showed lower net photosynthetic rate (PN), lower maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm), and lower effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII). And the poor photosynthetic characteristics in the nonflooded irrigation treatments were mainly attributed to the low total nitrogen content (TNC). Under non-flooded irrigation, the PN, Fv/Fm, and ΦPSII significantly decreased with a reduction in the soil water potential, but these parameters were rapidly recovered in the DI and FIM treatments when supplementary irrigation was applied. Moreover, The DI treatment always had higher photosynthetic productivity than the FIM and FIN treatments. Grain yield, matter translocation, and dry matter post-anthesis (DMPA) were the highest in the CF treatment, followed by the DI, FIM, and FIN treatments in turn. In conclusion, increasing nitrogen content in leaf of rice plants could be a key factor to improve photosynthetic capacity in nonflooded irrigation.

  17. Rice Photosynthetic Productivity and PSII Photochemistry under Nonflooded Irrigation

    PubMed Central

    He, Haibing; Yang, Ru; Jia, Biao; Chen, Lin; Fan, Hua; Cui, Jing; Yang, Dong; Li, Menglong; Ma, Fu-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Nonflooded irrigation is an important water-saving rice cultivation technology, but little is known on its photosynthetic mechanism. The aims of this work were to investigate photosynthetic characteristics of rice during grain filling stage under three nonflooded irrigation treatments: furrow irrigation with plastic mulching (FIM), furrow irrigation with nonmulching (FIN), and drip irrigation with plastic mulching (DI). Compared with the conventional flooding (CF) treatment, those grown in the nonflooded irrigation treatments showed lower net photosynthetic rate (PN), lower maximum quantum yield (Fv/Fm), and lower effective quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (ΦPSII). And the poor photosynthetic characteristics in the nonflooded irrigation treatments were mainly attributed to the low total nitrogen content (TNC). Under non-flooded irrigation, the PN, Fv/Fm, and ΦPSII significantly decreased with a reduction in the soil water potential, but these parameters were rapidly recovered in the DI and FIM treatments when supplementary irrigation was applied. Moreover, The DI treatment always had higher photosynthetic productivity than the FIM and FIN treatments. Grain yield, matter translocation, and dry matter post-anthesis (DMPA) were the highest in the CF treatment, followed by the DI, FIM, and FIN treatments in turn. In conclusion, increasing nitrogen content in leaf of rice plants could be a key factor to improve photosynthetic capacity in nonflooded irrigation. PMID:24741364

  18. Hydraulic basis for the evolution of photosynthetic productivity.

    PubMed

    Scoffoni, Christine; Chatelet, David S; Pasquet-Kok, Jessica; Rawls, Michael; Donoghue, Michael J; Edwards, Erika J; Sack, Lawren

    2016-05-27

    Clarifying the evolution and mechanisms for photosynthetic productivity is a key to both improving crops and understanding plant evolution and habitat distributions. Current theory recognizes a role for the hydraulics of water transport as a potential determinant of photosynthetic productivity based on comparative data across disparate species. However, there has never been rigorous support for the maintenance of this relationship during an evolutionary radiation. We tested this theory for 30 species of Viburnum, diverse in leaf shape and photosynthetic anatomy, grown in a common garden. We found strong support for a fundamental requirement for leaf hydraulic capacity (Kleaf) in determining photosynthetic capacity (Amax), as these traits diversified across this lineage in tight coordination, with their proportionality modulated by the climate experienced in the species' range. Variation in Kleaf arose from differences in venation architecture that influenced xylem and especially outside-xylem flow pathways. These findings substantiate an evolutionary basis for the coordination of hydraulic and photosynthetic physiology across species, and their co-dependence on climate, establishing a fundamental role for water transport in the evolution of the photosynthetic rate.

  19. Photonic multilayer structure of Begonia chloroplasts enhances photosynthetic efficiency.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Matthew; Lopez-Garcia, Martin; Phrathep, O-Phart; Lawson, Tracy; Oulton, Ruth; Whitney, Heather M

    2016-10-24

    Enhanced light harvesting is an area of interest for optimizing both natural photosynthesis and artificial solar energy capture(1,2). Iridescence has been shown to exist widely and in diverse forms in plants and other photosynthetic organisms and symbioses(3,4), but there has yet to be any direct link demonstrated between iridescence and photosynthesis. Here we show that epidermal chloroplasts, also known as iridoplasts, in shade-dwelling species of Begonia(5), notable for their brilliant blue iridescence, have a photonic crystal structure formed from a periodic arrangement of the light-absorbing thylakoid tissue itself. This structure enhances photosynthesis in two ways: by increasing light capture at the predominantly green wavelengths available in shade conditions, and by directly enhancing quantum yield by 5-10% under low-light conditions. These findings together imply that the iridoplast is a highly modified chloroplast structure adapted to make best use of the extremely low-light conditions in the tropical forest understorey in which it is found(5,6). A phylogenetically diverse range of shade-dwelling plant species has been found to produce similarly structured chloroplasts(7-9), suggesting that the ability to produce chloroplasts whose membranes are organized as a multilayer with photonic properties may be widespread. In fact, given the well-established diversity and plasticity of chloroplasts(10,11), our results imply that photonic effects may be important even in plants that do not show any obvious signs of iridescence to the naked eye but where a highly ordered chloroplast structure may present a clear blue reflectance at the microscale. Chloroplasts are generally thought of as purely photochemical; we suggest that one should also think of them as a photonic structure with a complex interplay between control of light propagation, light capture and photochemistry.

  20. Low levels of ribosomal RNA partly account for the very high photosynthetic phosphorus-use efficiency of Proteaceae species

    PubMed Central

    Sulpice, Ronan; Ishihara, Hirofumi; Schlereth, Armin; Cawthray, Gregory R; Encke, Beatrice; Giavalisco, Patrick; Ivakov, Alexander; Arrivault, StÉphanie; Jost, Ricarda; Krohn, Nicole; Kuo, John; Laliberté, Etienne; Pearse, Stuart J; Raven, John A; Scheible, Wolf-rüdiger; Teste, François; Veneklaas, Erik J; Stitt, Mark; Lambers, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Proteaceae species in south-western Australia occur on phosphorus- (P) impoverished soils. Their leaves contain very low P levels, but have relatively high rates of photosynthesis. We measured ribosomal RNA (rRNA) abundance, soluble protein, activities of several enzymes and glucose 6-phosphate (Glc6P) levels in expanding and mature leaves of six Proteaceae species in their natural habitat. The results were compared with those for Arabidopsis thaliana. Compared with A. thaliana, immature leaves of Proteaceae species contained very low levels of rRNA, especially plastidic rRNA. Proteaceae species showed slow development of the photosynthetic apparatus (‘delayed greening’), with young leaves having very low levels of chlorophyll and Calvin–Benson cycle enzymes. In mature leaves, soluble protein and Calvin–Benson cycle enzyme activities were low, but Glc6P levels were similar to those in A. thaliana. We propose that low ribosome abundance contributes to the high P efficiency of these Proteaceae species in three ways: (1) less P is invested in ribosomes; (2) the rate of growth and, hence, demand for P is low; and (3) the especially low plastidic ribosome abundance in young leaves delays formation of the photosynthetic machinery, spreading investment of P in rRNA. Although Calvin–Benson cycle enzyme activities are low, Glc6P levels are maintained, allowing their effective use. PMID:24895754

  1. Enhanced cytokinin synthesis in tobacco plants expressing PSARK::IPT prevents the degradation of photosynthetic protein complexes during drought.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Rosa M; Gimeno, Jacinta; Van Deynze, Allen; Walia, Harkamal; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2010-11-01

    To identify genes associated with the cytokinin-induced enhanced drought tolerance, we analyzed the transcriptome of wild-type and transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum 'SR1') plants expressing P(SARK)::IPT (for senescence-associated receptor kinase::isopentenyltransferase) grown under well-watered and prolonged water deficit conditions using the tomato GeneChip. During water deficit, the expression of genes encoding components of the carotenoid pathway leading to ABA biosynthesis was enhanced in the wild-type plants, but repressed in the transgenic plants. On the other hand, transgenic plants displayed higher transcript abundance of genes involved in the brassinosteroid biosynthetic pathways. Several genes coding for proteins associated with Chl synthesis, light reactions, the Calvin-Benson cycle and photorespiration were induced in the transgenic plants. Notably, increased transcript abundance of genes associated with PSII, the cytochrome b(6)/f complex, PSI, NADH oxidoreductase and the ATP complex was found in the P(SARK)::IPT plants. The increased transcript abundance was assessed by quantitative PCR and the increased protein levels were confirmed by Western blots. Our results indicated that while the photosynthetic apparatus in the wild-type plants was degraded, photosynthesis in the transgenic plants was not affected and photosynthetic proteins were not degraded. During water deficit, wild-type plants displayed a significant reduction in electron transfer and photochemical quenching, with a marked increase in non-photochemical quenching, suggesting a decrease in energy transfer to the PSII core complexes and an increase in cyclic electron transfer reactions.

  2. THE OXYGEN ABUNDANCE IN THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD

    SciTech Connect

    RodrIguez, Monica; Delgado-Inglada, Gloria E-mail: gloria@inaoep.mx

    2011-06-01

    We present a homogeneous analysis of the oxygen abundance in five H II regions and eight planetary nebulae (PNe) located at distances lower than 2 kpc and with available spectra of high quality. We find that both the collisionally excited lines (CELs) and recombination lines imply that the PNe are overabundant in oxygen by about 0.2 dex. An explanation that reconciles the oxygen abundances derived with CELs for H II regions and PNe with the values found for B stars, the Sun, and the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) requires the presence in H II regions of an organic refractory dust component that is not present in PNe. This dust component has already been invoked to explain the depletion of oxygen in molecular clouds and in the diffuse ISM.

  3. Top consumer abundance influences lake methane efflux.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Shawn P; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Syväranta, Jari; Jones, Roger I

    2015-11-04

    Lakes are important habitats for biogeochemical cycling of carbon. The organization and structure of aquatic communities influences the biogeochemical interactions between lakes and the atmosphere. Understanding how trophic structure regulates ecosystem functions and influences greenhouse gas efflux from lakes is critical to understanding global carbon cycling and climate change. With a whole-lake experiment in which a previously fishless lake was divided into two treatment basins where fish abundance was manipulated, we show how a trophic cascade from fish to microbes affects methane efflux to the atmosphere. Here, fish exert high grazing pressure and remove nearly all zooplankton. This reduction in zooplankton density increases the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria, which in turn reduce CH4 efflux rates by roughly 10 times. Given that globally there are millions of lakes emitting methane, an important greenhouse gas, our findings that aquatic trophic interactions significantly influence the biogeochemical cycle of methane has important implications.

  4. Changes in photosynthetic performance and antioxidative strategies during maturation of Norway maple (Acer platanoides L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Lepeduš, Hrvoje; Gaća, Vlatka; Viljevac, Marija; Kovač, Spomenka; Fulgosi, Hrvoje; Simić, Domagoj; Jurković, Vlatka; Cesar, Vera

    2011-04-01

    Different structural and functional changes take place during leaf development. Since some of them are highly connected to oxidative metabolism, regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) abundance is required. Most of the reactive oxygen species ROS in plant cells are produced in chloroplasts as a result of highly energetic reactions of photosynthesis. The aim of our study was to examine the changes in concentration of oxidative stress parameters (TBARS - thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances and protein carbonyls) as well as antioxidative strategies during development of maple (Acer platanoides L.) leaves in the light of their enhanced photosynthetic performance. We reveal that biogenesis of the photosynthetic apparatus during maple leaf maturation corresponded with oxidative damage of lipids, but not proteins. In addition, antioxidative responses in young leaves differed from that in older leaves. Young leaves had high values of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and catalase (CAT, EC 1.11.1.6) activity which declined during the maturation process. Developing leaves were characterized by an increase in TBARS level, the content of non-enzymatic antioxidants as well as ascorbate peroxidase activity (APX, EC 1.11.1.11), while the content of protein carbonyls decreased with leaf maturation. Fully developed leaves had the highest lipid peroxidation level accompanied by a maximum in ascorbic acid content and superoxide dismutase activity (SOD, EC1.15.1.1). These observations imply completely different antioxidative strategies during leaf maturation enabling them to perform their basic function.

  5. Alternative oxidase: a respiratory electron transport chain pathway essential for maintaining photosynthetic performance during drought stress.

    PubMed

    Vanlerberghe, Greg C; Martyn, Greg D; Dahal, Keshav

    2016-07-01

    Photosynthesis and respiration are the hubs of energy metabolism in plants. Drought strongly perturbs photosynthesis as a result of both diffusive limitations resulting from stomatal closure, and in some cases biochemical limitations that are associated with a reduced abundance of key photosynthetic components. The effects of drought on respiration, particularly respiration in the light (RL ), are less understood. The plant mitochondrial electron transport chain includes a non-energy conserving terminal oxidase called alternative oxidase (AOX). Several studies have shown that drought increases AOX transcript, protein and maximum capacity. Here we review recent studies comparing wild-type (WT) tobacco to transgenic lines with altered AOX protein amount. Specifically during drought, RL was compromised in AOX knockdown plants and enhanced in AOX overexpression plants, compared with WT. Significantly, these differences in RL were accompanied by dramatic differences in photosynthetic performance. Knockdown of AOX increased the susceptibility of photosynthesis to drought-induced biochemical limitations, while overexpression of AOX delayed the development of such biochemical limitations, compared with WT. Overall, the results indicate that AOX is essential to maintaining RL during drought, and that this non-energy conserving respiration maintains photosynthesis during drought by promoting energy balance in the chloroplast. This review also outlines several areas for future research, including the possibility that enhancement of non-energy conserving respiratory electron sinks may be a useful biotechnological approach to increase plant performance during stress.

  6. Development of the photosynthetic apparatus of Cunninghamia lanceolata in light and darkness.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xian; Wang, Qi; Qu, Yanli; Wu, Hongyang; Dong, Fengqin; Cao, Haoyan; Wang, Hou-Ling; Xiao, Jianwei; Shen, Yingbai; Wan, Yinglang

    2017-01-01

    Here, we compared the development of dark- and light-grown Chinese fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) cotyledons, which synthesize chlorophyll in the dark, representing a different phenomenon from angiosperm model plants. We determined that the grana lamellar membranes were well developed in both chloroplasts and etiochloroplasts. The accumulation of thylakoid membrane protein complexes was similar between chloroplasts and etiochloroplasts. Measurement of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters indicated that photosystem II (PSII) had low photosynthetic activities, whereas the photosystem I (PSI)-driven cyclic electron flow (CEF) rate exceeded the rate of PSII-mediated photon harvesting in etiochloroplasts. Analysis of the protein contents in etiochloroplasts indicated that the light-harvesting complex II remained mostly in its monomeric conformation. The ferredoxin NADP(+) oxidoreductase and NADH dehydrogenase-like complexes were relatively abundantly expressed in etiochloroplasts for Chinese fir. Our transcriptome analysis contributes a global expression database for Chinese fir cotyledons, providing background information on the regulatory mechanisms of different genes involved in the development of dark- and light-grown cotyledons. In conclusion, we provide a novel description of the early developmental status of the light-dependent and light-independent photosynthetic apparatuses in gymnosperms.

  7. Structural and Functional Hierarchy in Photosynthetic Energy Conversion—from Molecules to Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabó, Tibor; Magyar, Melinda; Hajdu, Kata; Dorogi, Márta; Nyerki, Emil; Tóth, Tünde; Lingvay, Mónika; Garab, Győző; Hernádi, Klára; Nagy, László

    2015-12-01

    Basic principles of structural and functional requirements of photosynthetic energy conversion in hierarchically organized machineries are reviewed. Blueprints of photosynthesis, the energetic basis of virtually all life on Earth, can serve the basis for constructing artificial light energy-converting molecular devices. In photosynthetic organisms, the conversion of light energy into chemical energy takes places in highly organized fine-tunable systems with structural and functional hierarchy. The incident photons are absorbed by light-harvesting complexes, which funnel the excitation energy into reaction centre (RC) protein complexes containing redox-active chlorophyll molecules; the primary charge separations in the RCs are followed by vectorial transport of charges (electrons and protons) in the photosynthetic membrane. RCs possess properties that make their use in solar energy-converting and integrated optoelectronic systems feasible. Therefore, there is a large interest in many laboratories and in the industry toward their use in molecular devices. RCs have been bound to different carrier matrices, with their photophysical and photochemical activities largely retained in the nano-systems and with electronic connection to conducting surfaces. We show examples of RCs bound to carbon-based materials (functionalized and non-functionalized single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes), transitional metal oxides (ITO) and conducting polymers and porous silicon and characterize their photochemical activities. Recently, we adapted several physical and chemical methods for binding RCs to different nanomaterials. It is generally found that the P+(QAQB)- charge pair, which is formed after single saturating light excitation is stabilized after the attachment of the RCs to the nanostructures, which is followed by slow reorganization of the protein structure. Measuring the electric conductivity in a direct contact mode or in electrochemical cell indicates that there is an

  8. Differential Allocation to Photosynthetic and Non-Photosynthetic Nitrogen Fractions among Native and Invasive Species

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Jennifer L.; Glenwinkel, Lori A.; Sack, Lawren

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are expected to cluster on the “high-return” end of the leaf economic spectrum, displaying leaf traits consistent with higher carbon assimilation relative to native species. Intra-leaf nitrogen (N) allocation should support these physiological differences; however, N biochemistry has not been examined in more than a few invasive species. We measured 34 leaf traits including seven leaf N pools for five native and five invasive species from Hawaii under low irradiance to mimic the forest understory environment. We found several trait differences between native and invasive species. In particular, invasive species showed preferential N allocation to metabolism (amino acids) rather than photosynthetic light reactions (membrane-bound protein) by comparison with native species. The soluble protein concentration did not vary between groups. Under these low irradiance conditions, native species had higher light-saturated photosynthetic rates, possibly as a consequence of a greater investment in membrane-bound protein. Invasive species may succeed by employing a wide range of N allocation mechanisms, including higher amino acid production for fast growth under high irradiance or storage of N in leaves as soluble protein or amino acids. PMID:23700483

  9. Differential allocation to photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic nitrogen fractions among native and invasive species.

    PubMed

    Funk, Jennifer L; Glenwinkel, Lori A; Sack, Lawren

    2013-01-01

    Invasive species are expected to cluster on the "high-return" end of the leaf economic spectrum, displaying leaf traits consistent with higher carbon assimilation relative to native species. Intra-leaf nitrogen (N) allocation should support these physiological differences; however, N biochemistry has not been examined in more than a few invasive species. We measured 34 leaf traits including seven leaf N pools for five native and five invasive species from Hawaii under low irradiance to mimic the forest understory environment. We found several trait differences between native and invasive species. In particular, invasive species showed preferential N allocation to metabolism (amino acids) rather than photosynthetic light reactions (membrane-bound protein) by comparison with native species. The soluble protein concentration did not vary between groups. Under these low irradiance conditions, native species had higher light-saturated photosynthetic rates, possibly as a consequence of a greater investment in membrane-bound protein. Invasive species may succeed by employing a wide range of N allocation mechanisms, including higher amino acid production for fast growth under high irradiance or storage of N in leaves as soluble protein or amino acids.

  10. Bringing abundance into environmental politics: Constructing a Zionist network of water abundance, immigration, and colonization.

    PubMed

    Alatout, Samer

    2009-06-01

    For more than five decades, resource scarcity has been the lead story in debates over environmental politics. More importantly, and whenever environmental politics implies conflict, resource scarcity is constructed as the culprit. Abundance of resources, if at all visited in the literature, holds less importance. Resource abundance is seen, at best, as the other side of scarcity--maybe the successful conclusion of multiple interventions that may turn scarcity into abundance. This paper reinstates abundance as a politico-environmental category in its own right. Rather than relegating abundance to a second-order environmental actor that matters only on occasion, this paper foregrounds it as a crucial element in modern environmental politics. On the substantive level, and using insights from science and technology studies, especially a slightly modified actor-network framework, I describe the emergence and consolidation of a Zionist network of abundance, immigration, and colonization in Palestine between 1918 and 1948. The essential argument here is that water abundance was constructed as fact, and became a political rallying point around which a techno-political network emerged that included a great number of elements. To name just a few, the following were enrolled in the service of such a network: geologists, geophysicists, Zionist settlement experts, Zionist organizations, political and technical categories of all sorts, Palestinians as the negated others, Palestinian revolts in search of political rights, the British Mandate authorities, the hydrological system of Palestine, and the absorptive capacity of Palestine, among others. The point was to successfully articulate these disparate elements into a network that seeks opening Palestine for Jewish immigration, redefining Palestinian geography and history through Judeo-Christian Biblical narratives, and, in the process, de-legitimizing political Palestinian presence in historic Palestine.

  11. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-01-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  12. Ammonia abundances in four comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S. C.; Engel, L.

    1991-02-01

    NH2 emission band strengths were measured in four comets and the NH2 column densities were determined in order to measure the ammonia content of the comets. The mean ammonia/water abundance ratio derived for the four comets is found to be 0.13 + or - 0.06 percent, with no significant variation among the comets. The uniformity of this abundance attests to a remarkable degree of chemical homogeneity over large scales in the comet-forming region of the primordial solar nebula, and contrasts with the CO abundance variations found previously in comets. The N2 and NH3 abundances indicate a condensation temperature in the range 20-160 K, consistent with virtually all comet formation hypotheses.

  13. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-05-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  14. Low CO2 results in a rearrangement of carbon metabolism to support C4 photosynthetic carbon assimilation in Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Kustka, Adam B; Milligan, Allen J; Zheng, Haiyan; New, Ashley M; Gates, Colin; Bidle, Kay D; Reinfelder, John R

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms of carbon concentration in marine diatoms are controversial. At low CO2 , decreases in O2 evolution after inhibition of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylases (PEPCs), and increases in PEPC transcript abundances, have been interpreted as evidence for a C4 mechanism in Thalassiosira pseudonana, but the ascertainment of which proteins are responsible for the subsequent decarboxylation and PEP regeneration steps has been elusive. We evaluated the responses of T. pseudonana to steady-state differences in CO2 availability, as well as to transient shifts to low CO2 , by integrated measurements of photosynthetic parameters, transcript abundances and quantitative proteomics. On shifts to low CO2 , two PEPC transcript abundances increased and then declined on timescales consistent with recoveries of Fv /Fm , non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and maximum chlorophyll a-specific carbon fixation (Pmax ), but transcripts for archetypical decarboxylation enzymes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and malic enzyme (ME) did not change. Of 3688 protein abundances measured, 39 were up-regulated under low CO2 , including both PEPCs and pyruvate carboxylase (PYC), whereas ME abundance did not change and PEPCK abundance declined. We propose a closed-loop biochemical model, whereby T. pseudonana produces and subsequently decarboxylates a C4 acid via PEPC2 and PYC, respectively, regenerates phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) from pyruvate in a pyruvate phosphate dikinase-independent (but glycine decarboxylase (GDC)-dependent) manner, and recuperates photorespiratory CO2 as oxaloacetate (OAA).

  15. Abundance, Distribution and Cycling of Organic Carbon and Nitrogen in University Valley (McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica) Permafrost Soils with Differing Ground Thermal and Moisture Conditions: Analogue to C-N Cycle on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, B. F.; Lacelle, D. L.; Davila, A. D.; Pollard, W. P.; McKay, C. P. M.

    2016-05-01

    High elevation McMurdo Dry Valleys of Antarctica are key Mars analogue sites. Our investigation focuses on the link between ground ice origin, distribution and cycling of organic carbon and nitrogen in University Valley, and its soil habitability.

  16. Photosynthetic antennas and reaction centers: Current understanding and prospects for improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    A brief introduction to the principles, structures and kinetic processes that take place in natural photosynthetic reaction center complexes is presented. Energy is first collected by an antenna system, and is transferred to a reaction center complex where primary electron transfer takes place. Secondary reactions lead to oxidation of water and reduction of CO{sub 2} in some classes of organisms. Antenna systems are highly regulated to maximize energy collection efficiency while avoiding photodamage. Some areas that are presently not well understood are listed.

  17. Photosynthetic membrane-less microbial fuel cells to enhance microalgal biomass concentration.

    PubMed

    Uggetti, Enrica; Puigagut, Jaume

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively assess the net increase in microalgal biomass concentration induced by photosynthetic microbial fuel cells (PMFC). The experiment was conducted on six lab-scale PMFC constituted by an anodic chamber simulating an anaerobic digester connected to a cathodic chamber consisting of a mixed algae consortia culture. Three PMFC were operated at closed circuit (PMFC(+)) whereas three PMFC were left unconnected as control (PMFC(-)). PMFC(+) produced a higher amount of carbon dioxide as a product of the organic matter oxidation that resulted in 1.5-3 times higher biomass concentration at the cathode compartment when compared to PMFC(-).

  18. Chlorine Abundances in Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Z. G.; Pilachowski, C. A.; Hinkle, K.

    2016-12-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and 1 M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H35Cl at 3.69851 μm. The high-resolution L-band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4 m telescope. The average [35Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with -0.72 < [Fe/H] < 0.20 is [35Cl/Fe] = (-0.10 ± 0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [35Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16 ± 0.15) dex. The [35Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of ˜0.35 dex above model predictions, suggesting that chemical evolution models are underproducing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and H ii regions. In one star where both H35Cl and H37Cl could be measured, a 35Cl/37Cl isotope ratio of 2.2 ± 0.4 was found, consistent with values found in the Galactic ISM and predicted chemical evolution models.