Science.gov

Sample records for abundant protein spots

  1. Revised Thorium Abundances for Lunar Red Spots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagerty, J. J.; Lawrence, D. J.; Elphic, R. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Vaniman, D. T.; Hawke, B. R.

    2005-01-01

    Lunar red spots are features on the nearside of the Moon that are characterized by high albedo and by a strong absorption in the ultraviolet. These red spots include the Gruithuisen domes, the Mairan domes, Hansteen Alpha, the southern portion of Montes Riphaeus, Darney Chi and Tau, Helmet, and an area near the Lassell crater. It has been suggested that many of the red spots are extrusive, nonmare, volcanic features that could be composed of an evolved lithlogy enriched in thorium. In fact, Hawke et al. used morphological characteristics to show that Hansteen Alpha is a nonmare volcanic construct. However, because the apparent Th abundances (6 - 7 ppm) were lower than that expected for evolved rock types, Hawke et al. concluded that Hansteen Alpha was composed of an unknown rock type. Subsequent studies by Lawrence et al. used improved knowledge of the Th spatial distribution for small area features on the lunar surface to revisit the interpretation of Th abundances at the Hansteen Alpha red spot. As part of their study, Lawrence et al. used a forward modeling technique to show that the Th abundance at Hansteen Alpha is not 6 ppm, but is more likely closer to 25 ppm, a value consistent with evolved lithologies. This positive correlation between the morphology and composition of Hansteen Alpha provides support for the presence of evolved lithologies on the lunar surface. It is possible, however, that Hansteen Alpha represents an isolated occurrence of non-mare volcanism. That is why we have chosen to use the forward modeling technique of Lawrence et al. to investigate the Th abundances at other lunar red spots, starting with the Gruithuisen domes. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  2. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Reyes, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families, each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility. PMID:21447997

  3. Predicting the Dynamics of Protein Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Ahmed M.; Patrick, Ralph; Bailey, Timothy L.; Bodén, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    Protein synthesis is finely regulated across all organisms, from bacteria to humans, and its integrity underpins many important processes. Emerging evidence suggests that the dynamic range of protein abundance is greater than that observed at the transcript level. Technological breakthroughs now mean that sequencing-based measurement of mRNA levels is routine, but protocols for measuring protein abundance remain both complex and expensive. This paper introduces a Bayesian network that integrates transcriptomic and proteomic data to predict protein abundance and to model the effects of its determinants. We aim to use this model to follow a molecular response over time, from condition-specific data, in order to understand adaptation during processes such as the cell cycle. With microarray data now available for many conditions, the general utility of a protein abundance predictor is broad. Whereas most quantitative proteomics studies have focused on higher organisms, we developed a predictive model of protein abundance for both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe to explore the latitude at the protein level. Our predictor primarily relies on mRNA level, mRNA–protein interaction, mRNA folding energy and half-life, and tRNA adaptation. The combination of key features, allowing for the low certainty and uneven coverage of experimental observations, gives comparatively minor but robust prediction accuracy. The model substantially improved the analysis of protein regulation during the cell cycle: predicted protein abundance identified twice as many cell-cycle-associated proteins as experimental mRNA levels. Predicted protein abundance was more dynamic than observed mRNA expression, agreeing with experimental protein abundance from a human cell line. We illustrate how the same model can be used to predict the folding energy of mRNA when protein abundance is available, lending credence to the emerging view that mRNA folding affects translation

  4. On protein abundance distributions in complex mixtures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry, an analytical technique that measures the mass-to-charge ratio of ionized atoms or molecules, dates back more than 100 years, and has both qualitative and quantitative uses for determining chemical and structural information. Quantitative proteomic mass spectrometry on biological samples focuses on identifying the proteins present in the samples, and establishing the relative abundances of those proteins. Such protein inventories create the opportunity to discover novel biomarkers and disease targets. We have previously introduced a normalized, label-free method for quantification of protein abundances under a shotgun proteomics platform (Griffin et al., 2010). The introduction of this method for quantifying and comparing protein levels leads naturally to the issue of modeling protein abundances in individual samples. We here report that protein abundance levels from two recent proteomics experiments conducted by the authors can be adequately represented by Sichel distributions. Mathematically, Sichel distributions are mixtures of Poisson distributions with a rather complex mixing distribution, and have been previously and successfully applied to linguistics and species abundance data. The Sichel model can provide a direct measure of the heterogeneity of protein abundances, and can reveal protein abundance differences that simpler models fail to show. PMID:23360617

  5. HotSpot Wizard: a web server for identification of hot spots in protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Pavelka, Antonin; Chovancova, Eva; Damborsky, Jiri

    2009-07-01

    HotSpot Wizard is a web server for automatic identification of 'hot spots' for engineering of substrate specificity, activity or enantioselectivity of enzymes and for annotation of protein structures. The web server implements the protein engineering protocol, which targets evolutionarily variable amino acid positions located in the active site or lining the access tunnels. The 'hot spots' for mutagenesis are selected through the integration of structural, functional and evolutionary information obtained from: (i) the databases RCSB PDB, UniProt, PDBSWS, Catalytic Site Atlas and nr NCBI and (ii) the tools CASTp, CAVER, BLAST, CD-HIT, MUSCLE and Rate4Site. The protein structure and e-mail address are the only obligatory inputs for the calculation. In the output, HotSpot Wizard lists annotated residues ordered by estimated mutability. The results of the analysis are mapped on the enzyme structure and visualized in the web browser using Jmol. The HotSpot Wizard server should be useful for protein engineers interested in exploring the structure of their favourite protein and for the design of mutations in site-directed mutagenesis and focused directed evolution experiments. HotSpot Wizard is available at http://loschmidt.chemi.muni.cz/hotspotwizard/.

  6. Abundant storage protein depletion from tuber proteins using ethanol precipitation method: Suitability to proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Min; Gupta, Ravi; Kim, Sun Hyung; Wang, Yiming; Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Kim, Sun Tae

    2015-05-01

    High-abundance proteins (HAPs) hamper in-depth proteome study necessitating development of a HAPs depletion method. Here, we report a novel ethanol precipitation method (EPM) for HAPs depletion from total tuber proteins. Ethanol showed a dose-dependent effect on depletion of sporamin from sweet potato and patatin from potato tubers, respectively. The 50% ethanol was an optimal concentration. 2DE analysis of EPM-prepared sweet potato proteins also revealed enrichment of storage proteins (SPs) in ethanol supernatant (ES) resulting in detection of new low-abundance proteins in ethanol pellet (EP), compared to total fraction. The ES fraction showed even higher trypsin inhibitor activity than total proteins, further showing the efficacy of EPM in enrichment of sporamin in ES fraction. Application of this method was demonstrated for comparative proteomics of two sweet potato cultivars (Hwang-geum and Ho-bac) and purification of SP (sporamin) in its native form, as examples. Comparative proteomics identified many cultivar specific protein spots and selected spots were confidently assigned for their protein identity using MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis. Overall, the EPM is simple, reproducible, and economical for depletion of SPs and is suitable for downstream proteomics study. This study opens a door for its potential application to other tuber crops or fruits rich in carbohydrates.

  7. Abundant storage protein depletion from tuber proteins using ethanol precipitation method: Suitability to proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Min; Gupta, Ravi; Kim, Sun Hyung; Wang, Yiming; Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Kim, Sun Tae

    2015-05-01

    High-abundance proteins (HAPs) hamper in-depth proteome study necessitating development of a HAPs depletion method. Here, we report a novel ethanol precipitation method (EPM) for HAPs depletion from total tuber proteins. Ethanol showed a dose-dependent effect on depletion of sporamin from sweet potato and patatin from potato tubers, respectively. The 50% ethanol was an optimal concentration. 2DE analysis of EPM-prepared sweet potato proteins also revealed enrichment of storage proteins (SPs) in ethanol supernatant (ES) resulting in detection of new low-abundance proteins in ethanol pellet (EP), compared to total fraction. The ES fraction showed even higher trypsin inhibitor activity than total proteins, further showing the efficacy of EPM in enrichment of sporamin in ES fraction. Application of this method was demonstrated for comparative proteomics of two sweet potato cultivars (Hwang-geum and Ho-bac) and purification of SP (sporamin) in its native form, as examples. Comparative proteomics identified many cultivar specific protein spots and selected spots were confidently assigned for their protein identity using MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis. Overall, the EPM is simple, reproducible, and economical for depletion of SPs and is suitable for downstream proteomics study. This study opens a door for its potential application to other tuber crops or fruits rich in carbohydrates. PMID:25689267

  8. Protein patterning: a comparison of direct spotting versus microcontact printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, Kathryn F. A.; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2015-03-01

    Protein microarrays are used various research areas including drug discovery, diagnosis, and analysis of protein-ligand interactions. Their efficacy depends on a well-defined pattern of immobilized proteins that also have retained their bioactivity. Protein microarrays are classically fabricated using the robotic spotting drop method ("pin printing"), which can lead to spots with uneven protein concentration within the spotted area, leading to difficult to quantify readings. Among the alternative techniques, microcontact printing (μCP) with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) stamp appears to deliver more defined protein patterns on surfaces, while maintaining bioactivity for a wide range of proteins. Here we have quantitatively compared the distribution of fluorescently labeled proteins deposited using direct pipetting, pin printing and μCP printing with flat stamps onto various functionalized glass surfaces of different contact angles through fluorescent microscopy. The uniformity of the deposited protein spots across deposition techniques was also qualitatively analyzed. It was found that with the use of either the direct pipetting or pin printing techniques that protein concentration on surfaces varied largely across surfaces with different contact angles, whereas adsorption did not vary significantly when using the μCP printing Furthermore, when μCP printing was performed with flat relief structures the spot inhomogeneity was lower than when classical methods were used, and even less so when a pyramid relief structure was used. This suggests that μCP printing with pyramid relief structures could produce protein patterns on various surfaces and with increased spot uniformity to enable more reliable protein microarrays.

  9. Structural hot spots for the solubility of globular proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ganesan, Ashok; Siekierska, Aleksandra; Beerten, Jacinte; Brams, Marijke; Van Durme, Joost; De Baets, Greet; Van der Kant, Rob; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Ramakers, Meine; Langenberg, Tobias; Wilkinson, Hannah; De Smet, Frederik; Ulens, Chris; Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost

    2016-01-01

    Natural selection shapes protein solubility to physiological requirements and recombinant applications that require higher protein concentrations are often problematic. This raises the question whether the solubility of natural protein sequences can be improved. We here show an anti-correlation between the number of aggregation prone regions (APRs) in a protein sequence and its solubility, suggesting that mutational suppression of APRs provides a simple strategy to increase protein solubility. We show that mutations at specific positions within a protein structure can act as APR suppressors without affecting protein stability. These hot spots for protein solubility are both structure and sequence dependent but can be computationally predicted. We demonstrate this by reducing the aggregation of human α-galactosidase and protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis through mutation. Our results indicate that many proteins possess hot spots allowing to adapt protein solubility independently of structure and function. PMID:26905391

  10. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in legumes.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Marina; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan, and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirm the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions. PMID:23805145

  11. Short-term occupancy and abundance dynamics of the Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) across its core range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Michael J.; Pearl, Christopher A.; Mccreary, Brome; Galvan, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    The Oregon spotted frog (Rana pretiosa) occupies only a fraction of its original range and is listed as Threatened under the Endangered Species Act. We surveyed 93 sites in a rotating frame design (2010–13) in the Klamath and Deschutes Basins, Oregon, which encompass most of the species’ core extant range. Oregon spotted frogs are declining in abundance and probability of site occupancy. We did not find an association between the probability that Oregon spotted frogs disappear from a site (local extinction) and any of the variables hypothesized to affect Oregon spotted frog occupancy. This 4-year study provides baseline data, but the 4-year period was too short to draw firm conclusions. Further study is essential to understand how habitat changes and management practices relate to the status and trends of this species.

  12. Depletion of Abundant Plasma Proteins and Limitations of Plasma Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Chengjian; Rudnick, Paul A.; Martinez, Misti Y.; Cheek, Kristin L.; Stein, Stephen E.; Slebos, Robbert J. C.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2010-01-01

    Immunoaffinity depletion with antibodies to the top 7 or top 14 high abundance plasma proteins is used to enhance detection of lower abundance proteins in both shotgun and targeted proteomic analyses. We evaluated the effects of top 7/top 14 immunodepletion on the shotgun proteomic analysis of human plasma. Our goal was to evaluate the impact of immunodepletion on detection of proteins across detectable ranges of abundance. The depletion columns afforded highly repeatable and efficient plasma protein fractionation. Relatively few nontargeted proteins were captured by the depletion columns. Analyses of unfractionated and immunodepleted plasma by peptide isoelectric focusing (IEF), followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) demonstrated enrichment of nontargeted plasma proteins by an average of 4-fold, as assessed by MS/MS spectral counting. Either top 7 or top 14 immunodepletion resulted in a 25% increase in identified proteins compared to unfractionated plasma. Although 23 low abundance (<10 ng mL−1) plasma proteins were detected, they accounted for only 5–6% of total protein identifications in immunodepleted plasma. In both unfractionated and immunodepleted plasma, the 50 most abundant plasma proteins accounted for 90% of cumulative spectral counts and precursor ion intensities, leaving little capacity to sample lower abundance proteins. Untargeted proteomic analyses using current LC-MS/MS platforms—even with immunodepletion—cannot be expected to efficiently discover low abundance, disease-specific biomarkers in plasma. PMID:20677825

  13. Determining Degradation and Synthesis Rates of Arabidopsis Proteins Using the Kinetics of Progressive 15N Labeling of Two-dimensional Gel-separated Protein Spots*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Nelson, Clark J.; Solheim, Cory; Whelan, James; Millar, A. Harvey

    2012-01-01

    The growth and development of plant tissues is associated with an ordered succession of cellular processes that are reflected in the appearance and disappearance of proteins. The control of the kinetics of protein turnover is central to how plants can rapidly and specifically alter protein abundance and thus molecular function in response to environmental or developmental cues. However, the processes of turnover are largely hidden during periods of apparent steady-state protein abundance, and even when proteins accumulate it is unclear whether enhanced synthesis or decreased degradation is responsible. We have used a 15N labeling strategy with inorganic nitrogen sources coupled to a two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis of two-dimensional IEF/SDS-PAGE gel spots to define the rate of protein synthesis (KS) and degradation (KD) of Arabidopsis cell culture proteins. Through analysis of MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectra from 120 protein spots, we were able to quantify KS and KD for 84 proteins across six functional groups and observe over 65-fold variation in protein degradation rates. KS and KD correlate with functional roles of the proteins in the cell and the time in the cell culture cycle. This approach is based on progressive 15N labeling that is innocuous for the plant cells and, because it can be used to target analysis of proteins through the use of specific gel spots, it has broad applicability. PMID:22215636

  14. A theoretical approach to spot active regions in antimicrobial proteins

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Much effort goes into identifying new antimicrobial compounds able to evade the increasing resistance of microorganisms to antibiotics. One strategy relies on antimicrobial peptides, either derived from fragments released by proteolytic cleavage of proteins or designed from known antimicrobial protein regions. Results To identify these antimicrobial determinants, we developed a theoretical approach that predicts antimicrobial proteins from their amino acid sequence in addition to determining their antimicrobial regions. A bactericidal propensity index has been calculated for each amino acid, using the experimental data reported from a high-throughput screening assay as reference. Scanning profiles were performed for protein sequences and potentially active stretches were identified by the best selected threshold parameters. The method was corroborated against positive and negative datasets. This successful approach means that we can spot active sequences previously reported in the literature from experimental data for most of the antimicrobial proteins examined. Conclusion The method presented can correctly identify antimicrobial proteins with an accuracy of 85% and a sensitivity of 90%. The method can also predict their key active regions, making this a tool for the design of new antimicrobial drugs. PMID:19906288

  15. Distribution and abundance of black bass in Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma, after introduction of smallmouth bass and a liberalized harvest regulation on spotted bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Long, James M.; Fisher, William L.

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a 3-year study to examine the trends in abundance and distribution of three sympatric black bass species (Micropterus) in an Oklahoma reservoir after implementation of a differential harvest regulation to reduce the abundance of spotted bass M. punctulatus and after stocking nonnative smallmouth bass M. dolomieu. Largemouth bass M. salmoides were stocked in Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma, immediately after its creation in 1984 to supplement the existing population in the watershed. Nonnative smallmouth bass were stocked in 1990, and their abundance and distribution have increased ever since. Native spotted bass, which have less fishery value than the other two black bass species, increased fivefold in abundance in 1994, became the predominant black bass species by at least 1996, and appeared to displace largemouth bass from many habitats. From boat-mounted electrofishing sampling conducted in April and May 1997–1999, we found that spotted bass abundance (proportion and catch per hour) had decreased while smallmouth bass abundance and distribution within the reservoir steadily increased. Largemouth bass abundance did not change among years. Throughout our study period, spotted bass was always the most abundant black bass species where differences in abundance were found. Our results suggest that the continually expanding smallmouth bass population is displacing spotted bass from many of their formerly used habitats, much like spotted bass had displaced largemouth bass by 1996.

  16. Volatile Abundances and the Deep Cloud Structure in Jupiter's Great Red Spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjoraker, Gordon; de Pater, Imke; Wong, Michael H.; Adamkovics, Mate; Hewagama, Tilak; Hesman, Brigette

    2016-10-01

    Despite the presence of thick upper level clouds, Jupiter's Great Red Spot preserves the signature of physical conditions at much deeper levels in the troposphere. The Great Red Spot is dark at 5 microns due to thick clouds, but imaging alone does not reveal which cloud layers are responsible for attenuating this radiation. We used NIRSPEC on the Keck telescope and CSHELL on the Infrared Telescope Facility to spectrally resolve line profiles of CH3D and other molecules on Jupiter in order to derive the pressure of the line formation region in the 5-micron window. Variations in CH3D line shape with position on Jupiter are due to cloud structure rather than changes in gas mole fraction.By aligning the slit east/west on Jupiter, we sampled the Great Red Spot and a Hot Spot at the same latitude. The profile of the CH3D lines is very broad in the Hot Spot due to collisions with up to 8 bars of H2, where unit optical depth due to collision induced H2 opacity occurs. The extreme width of these CH3D features implies that Hot Spots do not have significant cloud opacity where water is expected to condense. Within the Great Red Spot, the line profiles are substantially narrower than in the Hot Spot. The best fit to the line shape of CH3D requires an opaque cloud at 5 bars, which we identify as being a water cloud. Thermal radiation from the 5-bar level is further attenuated by upper level clouds, but these colder clouds do not change the shape of the spectrum. Once we have established a cloud structure, gas mole fractions may then be retrieved. Gaseous H2O is clearly evident in the Great Red Spot, which provides independent evidence that we are sounding deep in Jupiter's atmosphere. A combination of Keck and IRTF data allows us to retrieve NH3, PH3, and gaseous H2O inside the Hot Spot and within the Great Red Spot. This technique can be applied to study the deep cloud structure anywhere on Jupiter whether or not upper level clouds are present. We will use this technique to

  17. Crystal Structure of Major Envelope Protein VP24 from White Spot Syndrome Virus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lifang; Su, Yintao; Zhao, Yanhe; Fu, Zheng-Qing; Wu, Yunkun

    2016-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the major and most serious pathogen in the shrimp industry. As one of the most abundant envelope protein, VP24 acts as a core protein interacting with other structure proteins and plays an important role in virus assembly and infection. Here, we have presented the crystal structure of VP24 from WSSV. In the structure, VP24 consists of a nine-stranded β-barrel fold with mostly antiparallel β-strands, and the loops extending out the β-barrel at both N-terminus and C-terminus, which is distinct to those of the other two major envelope proteins VP28 and VP26. Structural comparison of VP24 with VP26 and VP28 reveals opposite electrostatic surface potential properties of them. These structural differences could provide insight into their differential functional mechanisms and roles for virus assembly and infection. Moreover, the structure reveals a trimeric assembly, suggesting a likely natural conformation of VP24 in viral envelope. Therefore, in addition to confirming the evolutionary relationship among the three abundant envelope proteins of WSSV, our structural studies also facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying special roles of VP24 in WSSV assembly and infection. PMID:27572278

  18. Crystal Structure of Major Envelope Protein VP24 from White Spot Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lifang; Su, Yintao; Zhao, Yanhe; Fu, Zheng-qing; Wu, Yunkun

    2016-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is one of the major and most serious pathogen in the shrimp industry. As one of the most abundant envelope protein, VP24 acts as a core protein interacting with other structure proteins and plays an important role in virus assembly and infection. Here, we have presented the crystal structure of VP24 from WSSV. In the structure, VP24 consists of a nine-stranded β–barrel fold with mostly antiparallel β-strands, and the loops extending out the β–barrel at both N-terminus and C-terminus, which is distinct to those of the other two major envelope proteins VP28 and VP26. Structural comparison of VP24 with VP26 and VP28 reveals opposite electrostatic surface potential properties of them. These structural differences could provide insight into their differential functional mechanisms and roles for virus assembly and infection. Moreover, the structure reveals a trimeric assembly, suggesting a likely natural conformation of VP24 in viral envelope. Therefore, in addition to confirming the evolutionary relationship among the three abundant envelope proteins of WSSV, our structural studies also facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying special roles of VP24 in WSSV assembly and infection. PMID:27572278

  19. Protein abundance changes of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in different sugar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Niu, Chen; Liu, Bin; Wei, JianPing; Wang, HuXuan; Yuan, YaHong; Yue, TianLi

    2016-09-16

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a yeast which can cause spoilage in the concentrated juice industries. It exhibits resistance to high sugar concentrations but genome- and proteome-wide studies on Z. rouxii in response to high sugar concentrations have been poorly investigated. Herein, by using a 2-D electrophoresis based workflow, the proteome of a wild strain of Z. rouxii under different sugar concentrations has been analyzed. Proteins were extracted, quantified, and subjected to 2-DE analysis in the pH range 4-7. Differences in growth (lag phase), protein content (13.97-19.23mg/g cell dry weight) and number of resolved spots (196-296) were found between sugar concentrations. ANOVA test showed that 168 spots were different, and 47 spots, corresponding to 40 unique gene products have been identified. These protein species are involved in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, response to stimulus, protein transport and vesicle organization, cell morphogenesis regulation, transcription and translation, nucleotide metabolism, amino-sugar nucleotide-sugar pathways, oxidoreductases balancing, and ribosome biogenesis. The present study provides important information about how Z. rouxii acts to cope with high sugar concentration at molecular levels, which might enhance our global understanding of Z. rouxii's high sugar-tolerance trait. PMID:27322723

  20. Urea may regulate urea transporter protein abundance during osmotic diuresis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongun; Klein, Janet D; Racine, Sandy; Murrell, Brian P; Sands, Jeff M

    2005-01-01

    Rats with diabetes mellitus have an increase in UT-A1 urea transporter protein abundance and absolute urea excretion, but the relative amount (percentage) of urea in total urinary solute is actually decreased due to the marked glucosuria. Urea-specific signaling pathways have been identified in mIMCD3 cells and renal medulla, suggesting the possibility that changes in the percentage or concentration of urea could be a factor that regulates UT-A1 abundance. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that an increase in a urinary solute other than urea would increase UT-A1 abundance, similar to diabetes mellitus, whereas an increase in urine urea would not. In both inner medullary base and tip, UT-A1 protein abundance increased during NaCl- or glucose-induced osmotic diuresis but not during urea-induced osmotic diuresis. Next, rats undergoing NaCl or glucose diuresis were given supplemental urea to increase the percentage of urine urea to control values. UT-A1 abundance did not increase in these urea-supplemented rats compared with control rats. Additionally, both UT-A2 and UT-B protein abundances in the outer medulla increased during urea-induced osmotic diuresis but not in NaCl or glucose diuresis. We conclude that during osmotic diuresis, UT-A1 abundance increases when the percentage of urea in total urinary solute is low and UT-A2 and UT-B abundances increase when the urea concentration in the medullary interstitium is high. These findings suggest that a reduction in urine or interstitial urea results in an increase in UT-A1 protein abundance in an attempt to restore inner medullary interstitial urea and preserve urine-concentrating ability.

  1. A heteromeric protein that binds to a meiotic homologous recombination hot spot: correlation of binding and hot spot activity.

    PubMed

    Wahls, W P; Smith, G R

    1994-07-15

    Homologous recombination hot spots are DNA sites that increase the frequency of recombination in their vicinity. The M26 allele of the ade6 gene in Schizosaccharomyces pombe is the first meiotic hot spot with an identified unique nucleotide sequence. We have purified 40,000-fold a heteromeric protein, containing polypeptides Mts1 (70 kD) and Mts2 (28 kD), that binds to the M26 site. Binding in vitro strictly correlates with hot spot activity in vivo for numerous single base pair substitutions in the vicinity of the M26 site, indicating that Mts1/Mts2 activates the M26 site and promotes a rate-limiting step of meiotic recombination. These and other data suggest that homologous recombination may be regulated primarily by discrete DNA sites and proteins that interact with those sites. PMID:7958849

  2. Proteomics reveals differences in protein abundance and highly similar antigenic profiles between Besnoitia besnoiti and Besnoitia tarandi.

    PubMed

    García-Lunar, P; Regidor-Cerrillo, J; Ortega-Mora, L M; Gutiérrez-Expósito, D; Alvarez-García, G

    2014-10-15

    Besnoitia besnoiti and Besnoitia tarandi are two cyst-forming apicomplexan parasites of the genus Besnoitia. B. besnoiti uses cattle as an intermediate host, in which it causes a disease that progresses in two sequential phases: the acute anasarca stage and the chronic scleroderma stage. Reindeer and caribou act as intermediate hosts for B. tarandi, which causes clinical signs similar to those caused by B. besnoiti. Previous studies demonstrated high molecular similarity, as determined by 18S and ITS-1 RNA sequences, between these Besnoitia spp., and strong serological cross-reactivity between these species has recently been demonstrated. Thus, a difference gel electrophoresis approach and mass spectrometry analysis were used to describe the proteomes and explore differences in protein abundance between B. besnoiti and B. tarandi in tachyzoite extracts. Immunoproteomes were also compared using 2-DE immunoblotting with polyclonal sera from experimentally infected rabbits. From approximately 1400 spots detected in DIGE-gels, 28 and 29 spots were differentially abundant in B. besnoiti and B. tarandi tachyzoites, respectively (± 1.5-fold, p<0.05). Four and 13 spots were exclusively detected in B. besnoiti and B. tarandi, respectively. Of the 32 differentially abundant spots analyzed by MALDI-TOF/MS, 6 up-regulated B. besnoiti proteins (LDH; HSP90; purine nucleoside phosphorylase and 3 hypothetical proteins) and 6 up-regulated B. tarandi proteins (G3PDH; LDH; PDI; mRNA decapping protein and 2 hypothetical proteins) were identified. Interestingly, no specific antigen spots were recognized by sera on any of the Besnoitia species studied and a similar antigen profile has been observed for B. tarandi and B. besnoiti sera when cross reactions were studied. This fact corroborates the difficulty in discerning Besnoitia infections using current serological assays. The present study underscores the importance of sequencing the B. besnoiti genome for species diversity studies of

  3. SoyProLow: A protein database enriched in low abundant soybean proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tavakolan, Mona; Alkharouf, Nadim W; Matthews, Benjamin F; Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2014-01-01

    Soybeans are an important legume crop that contain 2 major storage proteins, β-conglycinin and glycinin, which account about 70- 80% of total seed proteins. These abundant proteins hinder the isolation and characterization of several low abundant proteins in soybean seeds. Several protein extraction methodologies were developed in our laboratory to decrease these abundant storage proteins in seed extracts and to also decrease the amount of ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), which is normally very abundant in leaf extracts. One of the extraction methodologies used 40% isopropanol and was more effective in depleting soybean storage proteins and enhancing low abundant seed proteins than similar methods using 10-80% isopropanol. Extractions performed with 40% isopropanol decreased the amount of storage proteins and revealed 107 low abundant proteins when using the combined approaches of two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) and Mass Spectrometry (MS). The separation of proteins was achieved by iso-electric focusing (IEF) and 2D-PAGE. The proteins were analyzed with MS techniques to provide amino acid sequence. The proteins were identified by comparing their amino acid sequences with those in different databases including NCBI-non redundant, UniprotKB and MSDB databases. In this investigation, previously published results on low abundant soybean seed proteins were used to create an online database (SoyProLow) to provide a data repository that can be used as a reference to identify and characterize low abundance proteins. This database is freely accessible to individuals using similar techniques and can be for the subsequent genetic manipulation to produce value added soybean traits. An intuitive user interface based on dynamic HTML enables users to browse the network and the profiles of the low abundant proteins. Availability http://bioinformatics.towson.edu/Soybean_low_abundance_proteins_2D_Gel_DB/Gel1.aspx PMID:25352730

  4. Mature adipocyte proteome reveals differentially altered protein abundances between lean, overweight and morbidly obese human subjects.

    PubMed

    Benabdelkamel, Hicham; Masood, Afshan; Almidani, Ghaith M; Alsadhan, Abdulmajeed A; Bassas, Abdulelah F; Duncan, Mark W; Alfadda, Assim A

    2015-02-01

    Overweight (OW) and obese individuals are considered to be graded parts of the scale having increasing weight as a common feature. They may not, however, be part of the same continuum and may differ metabolically. In this study we applied an untargeted proteomic approach to compare protein abundances in mature adipocytes derived from the subcutaneous adipose tissue of overweight and morbidly obese female subjects to those of lean age matched controls. Mature adipocytes were isolated from liposuction samples of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue collected from both lean (L; n = 7, 23.3 ± 0.4 kg/m(2); mean BMI ± SD), overweight (OW; n = 8, 27.9 ± 0.6 kg/m(2); mean BMI ± SD) and morbidly obese (MOB; n = 7, 44.8 ± 3.8 kg/m(2); mean BMI ± SD) individuals. Total protein extracts were then compared by two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D DIGE). One hundred and ten differentially expressed protein spots (i.e., fitting the statistical criteria ANOVA test, p < 0.05; fold-change ≥1.5) were detected, and of these, 89 were identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Of these, 66 protein spots were common to both groups whereas 23 were unique to the MOB group. Significant differences were evident in the abundances of key proteins involved in glucose and lipid metabolism, energy regulation, cytoskeletal structure and redox control signaling pathways. Differences in the abundance of some chaperones were also evident. The differentially abundant proteins were investigated using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to establish their associations with known biological functions. The network identified in the OW group with the highest score relates to-: cell-to-cell signaling and interaction; in contrast, in the MOB group the major interacting pathways are associated with lipid metabolism, small molecule biochemistry and cancer. The differences in abundance of the differentially regulated proteins were validated by

  5. Hot spot abundance, ridge subduction and the evolution of greenstone belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, D.; Hoffman, S.

    1986-01-01

    A number of plate tectonic hypotheses have been proposed to explain the origin of Archaean and Phanerozoic greenstone/ophiolite terranes. In these models, ophiolites or greenstone belts represent the remnants of one or more of the following: island arcs, rifted continental margins, oceanic crustal sections, and hot spot volcanic products. If plate tectonics has been active since the creation of the Earth, it is logical to suppose that the same types of tectonic processes which form present day ophiolites also formed Archaean greenstone belts. However, the relative importance of the various tectonic processes may well have been different and are discussed.

  6. An Abundant, Highly Conserved Tonoplast Protein in Seeds 1

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kenneth D.; Herman, Eliot M.; Chrispeels, Maarten J.

    1989-01-01

    We have isolated the membranes of the protein storage vacuoles (protein bodies) from Phaseolus vulgaris cotyledons and purified an integral membrane protein with Mr 25,000 (TP 25). Antiserum to TP 25 recognizes an abundant polypeptide in the total cell extracts of many different seeds (monocots, dicots, and a gymnosperm), and specifically labels the vacuolar membranes of thin-sectioned soybean embryonic axes and cotyledons. TP 25 was not found in the starchy endosperm of barley and wheat or the seed coats of bean but was present in all seed parts examined that consist of living cells at seed maturity. The abundance of TP 25 was not correlated with the amount of storage protein in seed tissue, and the protein was not found in leaves that accumulate leaf storage protein. On the basis of its abundance, evolutionary conservation, and distribution in the plant, we propose that TP 25 may play a role in maintaining the integrity of the tonoplast during the dehydration/rehydration sequence of seeds. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 PMID:16667102

  7. Comparison of Proteins in Whole Blood and Dried Blood Spot Samples by LC/MS/MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, Andrew G.; Percy, Andrew J.; Hardie, Darryl B.; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2013-09-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) sampling methods are desirable for population-wide biomarker screening programs because of their ease of collection, transportation, and storage. Immunoassays are traditionally used to quantify endogenous proteins in these samples but require a separate assay for each protein. Recently, targeted mass spectrometry (MS) has been proposed for generating highly-multiplexed assays for biomarker proteins in DBS samples. In this work, we report the first comparison of proteins in whole blood and DBS samples using an untargeted MS approach. The average number of proteins identified in undepleted whole blood and DBS samples by liquid chromatography (LC)/MS/MS was 223 and 253, respectively. Protein identification repeatability was between 77 %-92 % within replicates and the majority of these repeated proteins (70 %) were observed in both sample formats. Proteins exclusively identified in the liquid or dried fluid spot format were unbiased based on their molecular weight, isoelectric point, aliphatic index, and grand average hydrophobicity. In addition, we extended this comparison to include proteins in matching plasma and serum samples with their dried fluid spot equivalents, dried plasma spot (DPS), and dried serum spot (DSS). This work begins to define the accessibility of endogenous proteins in dried fluid spot samples for analysis by MS and is useful in evaluating the scope of this new approach.

  8. Exoproteome analysis reveals higher abundance of proteins linked to alkaline stress in persistent Listeria monocytogenes strains.

    PubMed

    Rychli, Kathrin; Grunert, Tom; Ciolacu, Luminita; Zaiser, Andreas; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Schmitz-Esser, Stephan; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Wagner, Martin

    2016-02-01

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, responsible for listeriosis a rare but severe infection disease, can survive in the food processing environment for month or even years. So-called persistent L. monocytogenes strains greatly increase the risk of (re)contamination of food products, and are therefore a great challenge for food safety. However, our understanding of the mechanism underlying persistence is still fragmented. In this study we compared the exoproteome of three persistent strains with the reference strain EGDe under mild stress conditions using 2D differential gel electrophoresis. Principal component analysis including all differentially abundant protein spots showed that the exoproteome of strain EGDe (sequence type (ST) 35) is distinct from that of the persistent strain R479a (ST8) and the two closely related ST121 strains 4423 and 6179. Phylogenetic analyses based on multilocus ST genes showed similar grouping of the strains. Comparing the exoproteome of strain EGDe and the three persistent strains resulted in identification of 22 differentially expressed protein spots corresponding to 16 proteins. Six proteins were significantly increased in the persistent L. monocytogenes exoproteomes, among them proteins involved in alkaline stress response (e.g. the membrane anchored lipoprotein Lmo2637 and the NADPH dehydrogenase NamA). In parallel the persistent strains showed increased survival under alkaline stress, which is often provided during cleaning and disinfection in the food processing environments. In addition, gene expression of the proteins linked to stress response (Lmo2637, NamA, Fhs and QoxA) was higher in the persistent strain not only at 37 °C but also at 10 °C. Invasion efficiency of EGDe was higher in intestinal epithelial Caco2 and macrophage-like THP1 cells compared to the persistent strains. Concurrently we found higher expression of proteins involved in virulence in EGDe e.g. the actin-assembly-inducing protein ActA and the

  9. A Standardised Abundance Index from Commercial Spotting Data of Southern Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus maccoyii): Random Effects to the Rescue

    PubMed Central

    Basson, Marinelle; Farley, Jessica H.

    2014-01-01

    Commercial aerial spotting of surface schools of juvenile southern bluefin tuna (SBT), Thunnus maccoyii, is conducted as part of fishing operations in the Great Australian Bight in summer. This provides the opportunity to efficiently collect large amounts of data on sightings of SBT. The data can potentially be used to construct a time-series index of relative abundance by standardising the data for issues such as weather, spotter ability and ocean conditions. Unlike a statistically designed survey, the commercial spotting is governed by business considerations and fishing operations. The SBT dataset is therefore highly unbalanced with regard to spotters operating in each season. This complicates the standardisation of the data, particularly with regard to interactions between covariates. We show how a generalized additive model with random effects can simplify both the fitting of the model and the construction of an index, while also avoiding the need to leave out strata or interaction terms that are important. The approach is applicable to standardisation of more traditional catch and effort data. PMID:25541730

  10. Relation between occupancy and abundance for a territorial species, the California spotted owl.

    PubMed

    Tempel, Douglas J; Gutiérrez, R J

    2013-10-01

    Land and resource managers often use detection-nondetection surveys to monitor the populations of species that may be affected by factors such as habitat alteration, climate change, and biological invasions. Relative to mark-recapture studies, using detection-nondetection surveys is more cost-effective, and recent advances in statistical analyses allow the incorporation of detection probability, covariates, and multiple seasons. We examined the efficacy of using detection-nondetection data (relative to mark-recapture data) for monitoring population trends of a territorial species, the California Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis). We estimated and compared the finite annual rates of population change (λt ) and the resulting realized population change (Δt ) from both occupancy and mark-recapture data collected over 18 years (1993-2010). We used multiseason, robust-design occupancy models to estimate that territory occupancy declined during our study (Δt = 0.702, 95% CI 0.552-0.852) due to increasing territory extinction rates (ε(1993) = 0.019 [SE 0.012]; ε(2009) = 0.134 [SE 0.043]) and decreasing colonization rates (γ(1993) = 0.323 [SE 0.124]; γ(2009) = 0.242 [SE 0.058]). We used Pradel's temporal-symmetry model for mark-recapture data to estimate that the population trajectory closely matched the trends in territory occupancy (Δt = 0.725, 95% CI 0.445-1.004). Individual survival was constant during our study (φ(1993) = 0.816 [SE 0.020]; φ(2009) = 0.815 [SE 0.019]), whereas recruitment declined slightly (f(1993) = 0.195 [SE 0.032]; f(2009) = 0.160 [SE 0.023]). Thus, we concluded that detection-nondetection data can provide reliable inferences on population trends, especially when funds preclude more intensive mark-recapture studies. PMID:23678946

  11. Relation between occupancy and abundance for a territorial species, the California spotted owl.

    PubMed

    Tempel, Douglas J; Gutiérrez, R J

    2013-10-01

    Land and resource managers often use detection-nondetection surveys to monitor the populations of species that may be affected by factors such as habitat alteration, climate change, and biological invasions. Relative to mark-recapture studies, using detection-nondetection surveys is more cost-effective, and recent advances in statistical analyses allow the incorporation of detection probability, covariates, and multiple seasons. We examined the efficacy of using detection-nondetection data (relative to mark-recapture data) for monitoring population trends of a territorial species, the California Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis). We estimated and compared the finite annual rates of population change (λt ) and the resulting realized population change (Δt ) from both occupancy and mark-recapture data collected over 18 years (1993-2010). We used multiseason, robust-design occupancy models to estimate that territory occupancy declined during our study (Δt = 0.702, 95% CI 0.552-0.852) due to increasing territory extinction rates (ε(1993) = 0.019 [SE 0.012]; ε(2009) = 0.134 [SE 0.043]) and decreasing colonization rates (γ(1993) = 0.323 [SE 0.124]; γ(2009) = 0.242 [SE 0.058]). We used Pradel's temporal-symmetry model for mark-recapture data to estimate that the population trajectory closely matched the trends in territory occupancy (Δt = 0.725, 95% CI 0.445-1.004). Individual survival was constant during our study (φ(1993) = 0.816 [SE 0.020]; φ(2009) = 0.815 [SE 0.019]), whereas recruitment declined slightly (f(1993) = 0.195 [SE 0.032]; f(2009) = 0.160 [SE 0.023]). Thus, we concluded that detection-nondetection data can provide reliable inferences on population trends, especially when funds preclude more intensive mark-recapture studies.

  12. A new spot quality control for protein macroarray based on immunological detection.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Shi; Song, Chunmei; Zhao, Shengguo; Li, Jianwu; Zeng, Haijuan; Wu, Shuyan; Guo, Huiqing; Li, Haolin; Liu, Cheng; Liu, Qing

    2015-06-01

    Protein macroarray is a new, simple and multiple biochemistry detection system, in which the test spots are more than 1mm diameter and results directly visible and instrumentation is not necessary. This technology, however, possesses recognized problems with spot quality and uniformity, issues that can limit its application. Previous methods have been developed for spot quality control, but they are complicated or require specific instrumentation. Therefore, we have developed a spot quality control buffer supplement with Ponceau S (SQCB-PS) as a direct and visible means of monitoring spot quality on nitrocellulose membrane prior to hybridization. In this report, 1% (w/v) Ponceau S and 10% (v/v) glycerol in spotting buffer were found to be optimal for spot quality control and food-borne pathogens multiple detection. Furthermore, the sensitivity and specificity of the protein macroarray were not compromised by spotting buffer with Ponceau S. Under optimal conditions, this visible spot quality control method makes the detection more reliable, and should enhance the wider use of the technique.

  13. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4–7 and 8–12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  14. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development.

    PubMed

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-09-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4-7 and 8-12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  15. Electrophoretic extraction of proteins from two-dimensional electrophoresis gel spots

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Jian-Shi; Giometti, C.S.; Tollaksen, S.L.

    1987-09-04

    After two-dimensional electrophoresis of proteins or the like, resulting in a polyacrylamide gel slab having a pattern of protein gel spots thereon, an individual protein gel spot is cored out from the slab, to form a gel spot core which is placed in an extraction tube, with a dialysis membrane across the lower end of the tube. Replicate gel spots can be cored out from replicate gel slabs and placed in the extraction tube. Molten agarose gel is poured into the extraction tube where the agarose gel hardens to form an immobilizing gel, covering the gel spot cores. The upper end portion of the extraction tube is filled with a volume of buffer solution, and the upper end is closed by another dialysis membrane. Upper and lower bodies of a buffer solution are brought into contact with the upper and lower membranes and are provided with electrodes connected to the positive and negative terminals of a dc power supply, thereby producing an electrical current which flows through the upper membrane, the volume of buffer solution, the agarose, the gel spot cores and the lower membrane. The current causes the proteins to be extracted electrophoretically from the gel spot cores, so that the extracted proteins accumulate and are contained in the space between the agarose gel and the upper membrane. 8 figs.

  16. Spatial and Temporal Hot Spots of Aedes albopictus Abundance inside and outside a South European Metropolitan Area.

    PubMed

    Manica, Mattia; Filipponi, Federico; D'Alessandro, Antonello; Screti, Alessia; Neteler, Markus; Rosà, Roberto; Solimini, Angelo; Della Torre, Alessandra; Caputo, Beniamino

    2016-06-01

    Aedes albopictus is a tropical invasive species which in the last decades spread worldwide, also colonizing temperate regions of Europe and US, where it has become a public health concern due to its ability to transmit exotic arboviruses, as well as severe nuisance problems due to its aggressive daytime outdoor biting behaviour. While several studies have been carried out in order to predict the potential limits of the species expansions based on eco-climatic parameters, few studies have so far focused on the specific effects of these variables in shaping its micro-geographic abundance and dynamics. The present study investigated eco-climatic factors affecting Ae. albopictus abundance and dynamics in metropolitan and sub-urban/rural sites in Rome (Italy), which was colonized in 1997 and is nowadays one of the most infested metropolitan areas in Southern Europe. To this aim, longitudinal adult monitoring was carried out along a 70 km-transect across and beyond the most urbanized and densely populated metropolitan area. Two fine scale spatiotemporal datasets (one with reference to a 20m circular buffer around sticky traps used to collect mosquitoes and the second to a 300m circular buffer within each sampling site) were exploited to analyze the effect of climatic and socio-environmental variables on Ae. albopictus abundance and dynamics along the transect. Results showed an association between highly anthropized habitats and high adult abundance both in metropolitan and sub-urban/rural areas, with "small green islands" corresponding to hot spots of abundance in the metropolitan areas only, and a bimodal seasonal dynamics with a second peak of abundance in autumn, due to heavy rains occurring in the preceding weeks in association with permissive temperatures. The results provide useful indications to prioritize public mosquito control measures in temperate urban areas where nuisance, human-mosquito contact and risk of local arbovirus transmission are likely higher

  17. Spatial and Temporal Hot Spots of Aedes albopictus Abundance inside and outside a South European Metropolitan Area

    PubMed Central

    Manica, Mattia; Filipponi, Federico; D’Alessandro, Antonello; Screti, Alessia; Neteler, Markus; Rosà, Roberto; Solimini, Angelo; della Torre, Alessandra; Caputo, Beniamino

    2016-01-01

    Aedes albopictus is a tropical invasive species which in the last decades spread worldwide, also colonizing temperate regions of Europe and US, where it has become a public health concern due to its ability to transmit exotic arboviruses, as well as severe nuisance problems due to its aggressive daytime outdoor biting behaviour. While several studies have been carried out in order to predict the potential limits of the species expansions based on eco-climatic parameters, few studies have so far focused on the specific effects of these variables in shaping its micro-geographic abundance and dynamics. The present study investigated eco-climatic factors affecting Ae. albopictus abundance and dynamics in metropolitan and sub-urban/rural sites in Rome (Italy), which was colonized in 1997 and is nowadays one of the most infested metropolitan areas in Southern Europe. To this aim, longitudinal adult monitoring was carried out along a 70 km-transect across and beyond the most urbanized and densely populated metropolitan area. Two fine scale spatiotemporal datasets (one with reference to a 20m circular buffer around sticky traps used to collect mosquitoes and the second to a 300m circular buffer within each sampling site) were exploited to analyze the effect of climatic and socio-environmental variables on Ae. albopictus abundance and dynamics along the transect. Results showed an association between highly anthropized habitats and high adult abundance both in metropolitan and sub-urban/rural areas, with “small green islands” corresponding to hot spots of abundance in the metropolitan areas only, and a bimodal seasonal dynamics with a second peak of abundance in autumn, due to heavy rains occurring in the preceding weeks in association with permissive temperatures. The results provide useful indications to prioritize public mosquito control measures in temperate urban areas where nuisance, human-mosquito contact and risk of local arbovirus transmission are likely higher

  18. Topology of Protein Interaction Network Shapes Protein Abundances and Strengths of Their Functional and Nonspecific Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, S.; Heo, M.; Shakhnovich, E.

    2011-03-08

    How do living cells achieve sufficient abundances of functional protein complexes while minimizing promiscuous nonfunctional interactions? Here we study this problem using a first-principle model of the cell whose phenotypic traits are directly determined from its genome through biophysical properties of protein structures and binding interactions in a crowded cellular environment. The model cell includes three independent prototypical pathways, whose topologies of protein-protein interaction (PPI) subnetworks are different, but whose contributions to the cell fitness are equal. Model cells evolve through genotypic mutations and phenotypic protein copy number variations. We found a strong relationship between evolved physical-chemical properties of protein interactions and their abundances due to a 'frustration' effect: Strengthening of functional interactions brings about hydrophobic interfaces, which make proteins prone to promiscuous binding. The balancing act is achieved by lowering concentrations of hub proteins while raising solubilities and abundances of functional monomers. On the basis of these principles we generated and analyzed a possible realization of the proteome-wide PPI network in yeast. In this simulation we found that high-throughput affinity capture-mass spectroscopy experiments can detect functional interactions with high fidelity only for high-abundance proteins while missing most interactions for low-abundance proteins.

  19. Electrophoretic extraction of proteins from two-dimensional electrophoresis gel spots

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Jian-Shi; Giometti, Carol S.; Tollaksen, Sandra L.

    1989-01-01

    After two-dimensional electrophoresis of proteins or the like, resulting in a polyacrylamide gel slab having a pattern of protein gel spots thereon, an individual protein gel spot is cored out from the slab, to form a gel spot core which is placed in an extraction tube, with a dialysis membrane across the lower end of the tube. Replicate gel spots can be cored out from replicate gel slabs and placed in the extraction tube. Molten agarose gel is poured into the extraction tube where the agarose gel hardens to form an immobilizing gel, covering the gel spot cores. The upper end portion of the extraction tube is filled with a volume of buffer solution, and the upper end is closed by another dialysis membrane. Upper and lower bodies of a buffer solution are brought into contact with the upper and lower membranes and are provided with electrodes connected to the positive and negative terminals of a DC power supply, thereby producing an electrical current which flows through the upper membrane, the volume of buffer solution, the agarose, the gel spot cores and the lower membrane. The current causes the proteins to be extracted electrophoretically from the gel spot cores, so that the extracted proteins accumulate and are contained in the space between the agarose gel and the upper membrane. A high percentage extraction of proteins is achieved. The extracted proteins can be removed and subjected to partial digestion by trypsin or the like, followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis, resulting in a gel slab having a pattern of peptide gel spots which can be cored out and subjected to electrophoretic extraction to extract individual peptides.

  20. The tropospheric abundances of NH3 and PH3 in Jupiter's Great Red Spot, from Voyager IRIS observations.

    PubMed

    Griffith, C A; Bezard, B; Owen, T; Gautier, D

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the chemistry and dynamics of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS), the tropospheric abundances of NH3 and PH3 in the GRS are determined and compared to those of the surrounding region, the South Tropical Zone (STZ). These gases well up from deep in the atmosphere, and, in the upper troposphere, are depleted by condensation (in the case of NH3), chemical reactions, and UV photolysis. At Jupiter's tropopause, the chemical lifetimes of NH3 and PH3 are comparable to the time constant for vertical transport over the atmospheric scale height. The distributions of these gases are therefore diagnostic of the rate of vertical transport in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Three groups of Voyager IRIS spectra are analyzed, two of the STZ and one of the GRS. The two groups of STZ spectra are defined on the basis of their radiances at 602 and 226 cm-1, which reflect, respectively, the temperature near 150 mbar and the cloud opacity in the 300-600 mbar region. One selection of STZ spectra is chosen to have the same radiance as does the GRS at 226 cm-1. The other STZ selection has a significantly greater radiance, indicative of reduced cloudiness. Variations in the abundances of NH3 and PH3 are determined within the STZ, as a background for our studies of the GRS. Within the uncertainty of our measurements (-55% and +75%), the PH3 mixing ratio at 600 mbar is 3 x 10(-7), the same for all three selections. The NH3 mixing ratio profile in the pressure region between 300 and 600 mbar is the same within error (-25% and +50% at 300 mbar) for both STZ selections. In the GRS, however, NH3 is significantly depleted at 300 mbar, with an abundance of 25% that derived for the STZ selections. Since the GRS is believed to be a region of strong vertical transport, our finding of a depletion of NH3 below the tropopause within the GRS is particularly unexpected. One of the STZ selections has a temperature-pressure profile similar to that of the GRS below the 300-mbar level

  1. Prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces using a random forest model with hybrid features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Chen, Luonan

    2012-03-01

    Prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces provides crucial information for the research on protein-protein interaction and drug design. Existing machine learning methods generally judge whether a given residue is likely to be a hot spot by extracting features only from the target residue. However, hot spots usually form a small cluster of residues which are tightly packed together at the center of protein interface. With this in mind, we present a novel method to extract hybrid features which incorporate a wide range of information of the target residue and its spatially neighboring residues, i.e. the nearest contact residue in the other face (mirror-contact residue) and the nearest contact residue in the same face (intra-contact residue). We provide a novel random forest (RF) model to effectively integrate these hybrid features for predicting hot spots in protein interfaces. Our method can achieve accuracy (ACC) of 82.4% and Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.482 in Alanine Scanning Energetics Database, and ACC of 77.6% and MCC of 0.429 in Binding Interface Database. In a comparison study, performance of our RF model exceeds other existing methods, such as Robetta, FOLDEF, KFC, KFC2, MINERVA and HotPoint. Of our hybrid features, three physicochemical features of target residues (mass, polarizability and isoelectric point), the relative side-chain accessible surface area and the average depth index of mirror-contact residues are found to be the main discriminative features in hot spots prediction. We also confirm that hot spots tend to form large contact surface areas between two interacting proteins. Source data and code are available at: http://www.aporc.org/doc/wiki/HotSpot. PMID:22258275

  2. Practical Immunoaffinity-Enrichment LC-MS for Measuring Protein Kinetics of Low-Abundance Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lassman, Michael E.; McAvoy, Thomas; Lee, Anita Y.H.; Chappell, Derek; Wong, Oitak; Zhou, Haihong; Reyes-Soffer, Gissette; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Millar, John S.; Rader, Daniel J.; Gutstein, David E.; Laterza, Omar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND For a more complete understanding of pharmacodynamic, metabolic, and pathophysiologic effects, protein kinetics, such as production rate and fractional catabolic rate, can offer substantially more information than protein concentration alone. Kinetic experiments with stable isotope tracers typically require laborious sample preparation and are most often used for studying abundant proteins. Here we describe a practical methodology for measuring isotope enrichment into low-abundance proteins that uses an automated procedure and immunoaffinity enrichment (IA) with LC-MS. Low-abundance plasma proteins cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) were studied as examples. METHODS Human participants (n = 39) were infused with [2H3]leucine, and blood samples were collected at multiple time points. Sample preparation and analysis were automated and multiplexed to increase throughput. Proteins were concentrated from plasma by use of IA and digested with trypsin to yield proteotypic peptides that were analyzed by microflow chromatography-mass spectrometry to measure isotope enrichment. RESULTS The IA procedure was optimized to provide the greatest signal intensity. Use of a gel-free method increased throughput while increasing the signal. The intra- and interassay CVs were <15% at all isotope enrichment levels studied. More than 1400 samples were analyzed in <3 weeks without the need for instrument stoppages or user interventions. CONCLUSIONS The use of automated gel-free methods to multiplex the measurement of isotope enrichment was applied to the low-abundance proteins CETP and PCSK9. PMID:24751376

  3. A Machine Learning Approach for Hot-Spot Detection at Protein-Protein Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rita; Fieldhouse, Robert; Melo, André; Correia, João D. G.; Cordeiro, Maria Natália D. S.; Gümüş, Zeynep H.; Costa, Joaquim; Bonvin, Alexandre M. J. J.; Moreira, Irina S.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions is a key challenge in biochemistry. In this work, we describe a more accurate methodology to predict Hot-Spots (HS) in protein-protein interfaces from their native complex structure compared to previous published Machine Learning (ML) techniques. Our model is trained on a large number of complexes and on a significantly larger number of different structural- and evolutionary sequence-based features. In particular, we added interface size, type of interaction between residues at the interface of the complex, number of different types of residues at the interface and the Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM), for a total of 79 features. We used twenty-seven algorithms from a simple linear-based function to support-vector machine models with different cost functions. The best model was achieved by the use of the conditional inference random forest (c-forest) algorithm with a dataset pre-processed by the normalization of features and with up-sampling of the minor class. The method has an overall accuracy of 0.80, an F1-score of 0.73, a sensitivity of 0.76 and a specificity of 0.82 for the independent test set. PMID:27472327

  4. A Machine Learning Approach for Hot-Spot Detection at Protein-Protein Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Melo, Rita; Fieldhouse, Robert; Melo, André; Correia, João D G; Cordeiro, Maria Natália D S; Gümüş, Zeynep H; Costa, Joaquim; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Moreira, Irina S

    2016-01-01

    Understanding protein-protein interactions is a key challenge in biochemistry. In this work, we describe a more accurate methodology to predict Hot-Spots (HS) in protein-protein interfaces from their native complex structure compared to previous published Machine Learning (ML) techniques. Our model is trained on a large number of complexes and on a significantly larger number of different structural- and evolutionary sequence-based features. In particular, we added interface size, type of interaction between residues at the interface of the complex, number of different types of residues at the interface and the Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM), for a total of 79 features. We used twenty-seven algorithms from a simple linear-based function to support-vector machine models with different cost functions. The best model was achieved by the use of the conditional inference random forest (c-forest) algorithm with a dataset pre-processed by the normalization of features and with up-sampling of the minor class. The method has an overall accuracy of 0.80, an F1-score of 0.73, a sensitivity of 0.76 and a specificity of 0.82 for the independent test set. PMID:27472327

  5. Geometrically centered region: a "wet" model of protein binding hot spots not excluding water molecules.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhua; Li, Jinyan

    2010-12-01

    A protein interface can be as "wet" as a protein surface in terms of the number of immobilized water molecules. This important water information has not been explicitly taken by computational methods to model and identify protein binding hot spots, overlooking the water role in forming interface hydrogen bonds and in filing cavities. Hot spot residues are usually clustered at the core of the protein binding interfaces. However, traditional machine learning methods often identify the hot spot residues individually, breaking the cooperativity of the energetic contribution. Our idea in this work is to explore the role of immobilized water and meanwhile to capture two essential properties of hot spots: the compactness in contact and the far distance from bulk solvent. Our model is named geometrically centered region (GCR). The detection of GCRs is based on novel tripartite graphs, and atom burial levels which are a concept more intuitive than SASA. Applying to a data set containing 355 mutations, we achieved an F measure of 0.6414 when ΔΔG ≥ 1.0 kcal/mol was used to define hot spots. This performance is better than Robetta, a benchmark method in the field. We found that all but only one of the GCRs contain water to a certain degree, and most of the outstanding hot spot residues have water-mediated contacts. If the water is excluded, the burial level values are poorly related to the ΔΔG, and the model loses its performance remarkably. We also presented a definition for the O-ring of a GCR as the set of immediate neighbors of the residues in the GCR. Comparative analysis between the O-rings and GCRs reveals that the newly defined O-ring is indeed energetically less important than the GCR hot spot, confirming a long-standing hypothesis. PMID:20818601

  6. Label-Free Protein Quantification for Plant Golgi Protein Localization and Abundance1[W

    PubMed Central

    Nikolovski, Nino; Shliaha, Pavel V.; Gatto, Laurent; Dupree, Paul; Lilley, Kathryn S.

    2014-01-01

    The proteomic composition of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Golgi apparatus is currently reasonably well documented; however, little is known about the relative abundances between different proteins within this compartment. Accurate quantitative information of Golgi resident proteins is of great importance: it facilitates a better understanding of the biochemical processes that take place within this organelle, especially those of different polysaccharide synthesis pathways. Golgi resident proteins are challenging to quantify because the abundance of this organelle is relatively low within the cell. In this study, an organelle fractionation approach targeting the Golgi apparatus was combined with a label-free quantitative mass spectrometry (data-independent acquisition method using ion mobility separation known as LC-IMS-MSE [or HDMSE]) to simultaneously localize proteins to the Golgi apparatus and assess their relative quantity. In total, 102 Golgi-localized proteins were quantified. These data show that organelle fractionation in conjunction with label-free quantitative mass spectrometry is a powerful and relatively simple tool to access protein organelle localization and their relative abundances. The findings presented open a unique view on the organization of the plant Golgi apparatus, leading toward unique hypotheses centered on the biochemical processes of this organelle. PMID:25122472

  7. A practical approach to using spot urine protein/creatinine ratios for assessing proteinuria in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Marnoch, Catherine A; Larson, Lucia; Weitzen, Sherry; Phipps, Maureen G; Sung, C James; Powrie, Raymond O

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to assess the diagnostic accuracy of the spot urine protein/creatinine ratio compared with the 24-hour urine protein in pregnancy. Study Design: In this prospective cohort study of inpatient pregnant women, the protein/creatinine ratio and dipstick protein were assessed from a single urine sample collected at the start of the 24-hour urine. Both tests were compared with the 24-hour urine protein for correlation and test characteristics. Results: In the 196 specimens analysed, we found a strong correlation between the spot urine protein/creatinine ratio and 24-hour urine protein (r 2 = 0.78, P < 0.01). A protein/creatinine ratio <0.1 ruled out significant proteinuria (≥300 mg/day) with sensitivity and negative predictive value 100%. A protein/creatinine ratio ≥0.4 detected significant proteinuria (specificity and positive predictive value of 100%). A protein/creatinine ratio ≥4.6 had a specificity and positive predictive value of 100% for detecting severe proteinuria (≥5000 mg/day). Urine dipsticks correlated poorly with the 24-hour urine protein (r 2 = 0.40, P = 0.826). Nineteen percent of dipsticks reading nil or trace were false-negative results. Conclusion: The spot urine protein/creatinine ratio correlated well with the 24-hour urine protein and performed better than the urine dipsticks. Significant proteinuria in pregnancy was excluded if the protein/creatinine ratio was <0.1 and identified when it was ≥0.4. PMID:27630741

  8. Effects of Tamarindus indica fruit pulp extract on abundance of HepG2 cell lysate proteins and their possible consequential impact on metabolism and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chong, Ursula R W; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri S; Abdul-Aziz, Azlina; Hashim, Onn H; Mat-Junit, Sarni

    2013-01-01

    The fruit pulp extract of Tamarindus indica has been reported for its antioxidant and hypolipidemic properties. In this study, the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp was investigated for its effects on the abundance of HepG2 cell lysate proteins. Cell lysate was extracted from HepG2 cells grown in the absence and presence of the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp. Approximately 2500 spots were resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the abundance of 20 cellular proteins was found to be significantly reduced. Among the proteins of reduced abundance, fourteen, including six proteins involved in metabolism (including ethanolamine phosphate cytidylyltransferase), four mitochondrial proteins (including prohibitin and respiratory chain proteins), and four proteins involved in translation and splicing, were positively identified by mass spectrometry and database search. The identified HepG2 altered abundance proteins, when taken together and analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software, are suggestive of the effects of T. indica fruit pulp extract on metabolism and inflammation, which are modulated by LXR/RXR. In conclusion, the methanol fruit pulp extract of T. indica was shown to cause reduced abundance of HepG2 mitochondrial, metabolic, and regulatory proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, protein synthesis, and cellular metabolism.

  9. Effects of Tamarindus indica Fruit Pulp Extract on Abundance of HepG2 Cell Lysate Proteins and Their Possible Consequential Impact on Metabolism and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Ursula R. W.; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri S.; Abdul-Aziz, Azlina; Hashim, Onn H.; Mat-Junit, Sarni

    2013-01-01

    The fruit pulp extract of Tamarindus indica has been reported for its antioxidant and hypolipidemic properties. In this study, the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp was investigated for its effects on the abundance of HepG2 cell lysate proteins. Cell lysate was extracted from HepG2 cells grown in the absence and presence of the methanol extract of T. indica fruit pulp. Approximately 2500 spots were resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the abundance of 20 cellular proteins was found to be significantly reduced. Among the proteins of reduced abundance, fourteen, including six proteins involved in metabolism (including ethanolamine phosphate cytidylyltransferase), four mitochondrial proteins (including prohibitin and respiratory chain proteins), and four proteins involved in translation and splicing, were positively identified by mass spectrometry and database search. The identified HepG2 altered abundance proteins, when taken together and analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) software, are suggestive of the effects of T. indica fruit pulp extract on metabolism and inflammation, which are modulated by LXR/RXR. In conclusion, the methanol fruit pulp extract of T. indica was shown to cause reduced abundance of HepG2 mitochondrial, metabolic, and regulatory proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, protein synthesis, and cellular metabolism. PMID:24455694

  10. Preparation of recombinant protein spotted arrays for proteome-wide identification of kinase targets.

    PubMed

    Im, Hogune; Snyder, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Protein microarrays allow unique approaches for interrogating global protein interaction networks. Protein arrays can be divided into two categories: antibody arrays and functional protein arrays. Antibody arrays consist of various antibodies and are appropriate for profiling protein abundance and modifications. Functional full-length protein arrays employ full-length proteins with various post-translational modifications. A key advantage of the latter is rapid parallel processing of large number of proteins for studying highly controlled biochemical activities, protein-protein interactions, protein-nucleic acid interactions, and protein-small molecule interactions. This unit presents a protocol for constructing functional yeast protein microarrays for global kinase substrate identification. This approach enables the rapid determination of protein interaction networks in yeast on a proteome-wide level. The same methodology can be readily applied to higher eukaryotic systems with careful consideration of overexpression strategy.

  11. The FTMap family of web servers for determining and characterizing ligand binding hot spots of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kozakov, Dima; Grove, Laurie E.; Hall, David R.; Bohnuud, Tanggis; Mottarella, Scott; Luo, Lingqi; Xia, Bing; Beglov, Dmitri; Vajda, Sandor

    2016-01-01

    FTMap is a computational mapping server that identifies binding hot spots of macromolecules, i.e., regions of the surface with major contributions to the ligand binding free energy. To use FTMap, users submit a protein, DNA, or RNA structure in PDB format. FTMap samples billions of positions of small organic molecules used as probes and scores the probe poses using a detailed energy expression. Regions that bind clusters of multiple probe types identify the binding hot spots, in good agreement with experimental data. FTMap serves as basis for other servers, namely FTSite to predict ligand binding sites, FTFlex to account for side chain flexibility, FTMap/param to parameterize additional probes, and FTDyn to map ensembles of protein structures. Applications include determining druggability of proteins, identifying ligand moieties that are most important for binding, finding the most bound-like conformation in ensembles of unliganded protein structures, and providing input for fragment based drug design. FTMap is more accurate than classical mapping methods such as GRID and MCSS, and is much faster than the more recent approaches to protein mapping based on mixed molecular dynamics. Using 16 probe molecules, the FTMap server finds the hot spots of an average size protein in less than an hour. Since FTFlex performs mapping for all low energy conformers of side chains in the binding site, its completion time is proportionately longer. PMID:25855957

  12. Regular Patterns for Proteome-Wide Distribution of Protein Abundance across Species

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ying; Ying, Wantao; Wu, Songfeng; Zhu, Yunping; Liu, Siqi; Yang, Pengyuan; Qian, Xiaohong; He, Fuchu

    2012-01-01

    A proteome of the bio-entity, including cell, tissue, organ, and organism, consists of proteins of diverse abundance. The principle that determines the abundance of different proteins in a proteome is of fundamental significance for an understanding of the building blocks of the bio-entity. Here, we report three regular patterns in the proteome-wide distribution of protein abundance across species such as human, mouse, fly, worm, yeast, and bacteria: in most cases, protein abundance is positively correlated with the protein's origination time or sequence conservation during evolution; it is negatively correlated with the protein's domain number and positively correlated with domain coverage in protein structure, and the correlations became stronger during the course of evolution; protein abundance can be further stratified by the function of the protein, whereby proteins that act on material conversion and transportation (mass category) are more abundant than those that act on information modulation (information category). Thus, protein abundance is intrinsically related to the protein's inherent characters of evolution, structure, and function. PMID:22427835

  13. Co-Occurring Atomic Contacts for the Characterization of Protein Binding Hot Spots.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Ren, Jing; Song, Jiangning; Li, Jinyan

    2015-01-01

    A binding hot spot is a small area at a protein-protein interface that can make significant contribution to binding free energy. This work investigates the substantial contribution made by some special co-occurring atomic contacts at a binding hot spot. A co-occurring atomic contact is a pair of atomic contacts that are close to each other with no more than three covalent-bond steps. We found that two kinds of co-occurring atomic contacts can play an important part in the accurate prediction of binding hot spot residues. One is the co-occurrence of two nearby hydrogen bonds. For example, mutations of any residue in a hydrogen bond network consisting of multiple co-occurring hydrogen bonds could disrupt the interaction considerably. The other kind of co-occurring atomic contact is the co-occurrence of a hydrophobic carbon contact and a contact between a hydrophobic carbon atom and a π ring. In fact, this co-occurrence signifies the collective effect of hydrophobic contacts. We also found that the B-factor measurements of several specific groups of amino acids are useful for the prediction of hot spots. Taking the B-factor, individual atomic contacts and the co-occurring contacts as features, we developed a new prediction method and thoroughly assessed its performance via cross-validation and independent dataset test. The results show that our method achieves higher prediction performance than well-known methods such as Robetta, FoldX and Hotpoint. We conclude that these contact descriptors, in particular the novel co-occurring atomic contacts, can be used to facilitate accurate and interpretable characterization of protein binding hot spots.

  14. Thyroid hormone responsive protein Spot14 enhances catalysis of fatty acid synthase in lactating mammary epithelium[S

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Michael C.; Wellberg, Elizabeth A.; Lewis, Andrew S.; Terrell, Kristina L.; Merz, Andrea L.; Maluf, N. Karl; Serkova, Natalie J.; Anderson, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone responsive protein Spot 14 has been consistently associated with de novo fatty acid synthesis activity in multiple tissues, including the lactating mammary gland, which synthesizes large quantities of medium chain fatty acids (MCFAs) exclusively via FASN. However, the molecular function of Spot14 remains undefined during lactation. Spot14-null mice produce milk deficient in total triglyceride and de novo MCFA that does not sustain optimal neonatal growth. The lactation defect was rescued by provision of a high fat diet to the lactating dam. Transgenic mice overexpressing Spot14 in mammary epithelium produced total milk fat equivalent to controls, but with significantly greater MCFA. Spot14-null dams have no diminution of metabolic gene expression, enzyme protein levels, or intermediate metabolites that accounts for impaired de novo MCFA. When [13C] fatty acid products were quantified in vitro using crude cytosolic lysates, native FASN activity was 1.6-fold greater in control relative to Spot14-null lysates, and add back of Spot14 partially restored activity. Recombinant FASN catalysis increased 1.4-fold and C = 14:0 yield was enhanced 4-fold in vitro following addition of Spot14. These findings implicate Spot14 as a direct protein enhancer of FASN catalysis in the mammary gland during lactation when maximal MCFA production is needed. PMID:24771867

  15. Identification of a New Genomic Hot Spot of Evolutionary Diversification of Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, Aline; You, Xiantian; Grünewald, Nora; Häussler, Ute; Krestel, Heinz; Haas, Carola A.; Schwarz, Günter; Chen, Wei; Meier, Jochen C.

    2015-01-01

    Establishment of phylogenetic relationships remains a challenging task because it is based on computational analysis of genomic hot spots that display species-specific sequence variations. Here, we identify a species-specific thymine-to-guanine sequence variation in the Glrb gene which gives rise to species-specific splice donor sites in the Glrb genes of mouse and bushbaby. The resulting splice insert in the receptor for the inhibitory neurotransmitter glycine (GlyR) conveys synaptic receptor clustering and specific association with a particular synaptic plasticity-related splice variant of the postsynaptic scaffold protein gephyrin. This study identifies a new genomic hot spot which contributes to phylogenetic diversification of protein function and advances our understanding of phylogenetic relationships. PMID:25955356

  16. Sensing Small Changes in Protein Abundance: Stimulation of Caco-2 Cells by Human Whey Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cundiff, Judy K; McConnell, Elizabeth J; Lohe, Kimberly J; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approaches have largely facilitated our systemic understanding of cellular processes and biological functions. Cutoffs in protein expression fold changes (FCs) are often arbitrarily determined in MS-based quantification with no demonstrable determination of small magnitude changes in protein expression. Therefore, many biological insights may remain veiled due to high FC cutoffs. Herein, we employ the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line Caco-2 as a model system to demonstrate the dynamicity of tandem-mass-tag (TMT) labeling over a range of 5-40% changes in protein abundance, with the variance controls of ± 5% FC for around 95% of TMT ratios when sampling 9-12 biological replicates. We further applied this procedure to examine the temporal proteome of Caco-2 cells upon exposure to human whey proteins (WP). Pathway assessments predict subtle effects due to WP in moderating xenobiotic metabolism, promoting proliferation and various other cellular functions in differentiating enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This demonstration of a sensitive MS approach may open up new perspectives in the system-wide exploration of elusive or transient biological effects by facilitating scrutiny of narrow windows of proteome abundance changes. Furthermore, we anticipate this study will encourage more investigations of WP on infant gastrointestinal tract development.

  17. Prediction of hot spot residues at protein-protein interfaces by combining machine learning and energy-based methods

    PubMed Central

    Lise, Stefano; Archambeau, Cedric; Pontil, Massimiliano; Jones, David T

    2009-01-01

    Background Alanine scanning mutagenesis is a powerful experimental methodology for investigating the structural and energetic characteristics of protein complexes. Individual amino-acids are systematically mutated to alanine and changes in free energy of binding (ΔΔG) measured. Several experiments have shown that protein-protein interactions are critically dependent on just a few residues ("hot spots") at the interface. Hot spots make a dominant contribution to the free energy of binding and if mutated they can disrupt the interaction. As mutagenesis studies require significant experimental efforts, there is a need for accurate and reliable computational methods. Such methods would also add to our understanding of the determinants of affinity and specificity in protein-protein recognition. Results We present a novel computational strategy to identify hot spot residues, given the structure of a complex. We consider the basic energetic terms that contribute to hot spot interactions, i.e. van der Waals potentials, solvation energy, hydrogen bonds and Coulomb electrostatics. We treat them as input features and use machine learning algorithms such as Support Vector Machines and Gaussian Processes to optimally combine and integrate them, based on a set of training examples of alanine mutations. We show that our approach is effective in predicting hot spots and it compares favourably to other available methods. In particular we find the best performances using Transductive Support Vector Machines, a semi-supervised learning scheme. When hot spots are defined as those residues for which ΔΔG ≥ 2 kcal/mol, our method achieves a precision and a recall respectively of 56% and 65%. Conclusion We have developed an hybrid scheme in which energy terms are used as input features of machine learning models. This strategy combines the strengths of machine learning and energy-based methods. Although so far these two types of approaches have mainly been applied separately to

  18. Natural variability in abundance of prevalent soybean proteins.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2010-12-01

    Soybean is an inexpensive source of protein for humans and animals. Genetic modifications (GMO) to soybean have become inevitable on two fronts, both quality and yield will need to improve to meet increasing global demand. To ensure the safety of the crop for consumers it is important to determine the natural variation in seed protein constituents as well as any unintended changes that may occur in the GMO as a result of genetic modification. Understanding the natural variation of seed proteins in wild and cultivated soybeans that have been used in conventional soybean breeding programs is critical for determining unintended protein expression in GMO soybeans. In recent years, proteomic technologies have been used as an effective analytical tool for examining modifications of protein profiles. We have standardized and applied these technologies to determine and quantify the spectrum of proteins present in soybean seed. We used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for the separation, quantification, and identification of different classes of soybean seed proteins. We have observed significant variations in different classes of proteins, including storage, allergen and anti-nutritional protein profiles, between non-GMO cultivated and wild soybean varieties. This information is useful for scientists and regulatory agencies to determine whether the unintended expression of proteins found in transgenic soybean is within the range of natural variation. PMID:20709130

  19. Natural variability in abundance of prevalent soybean proteins.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2010-12-01

    Soybean is an inexpensive source of protein for humans and animals. Genetic modifications (GMO) to soybean have become inevitable on two fronts, both quality and yield will need to improve to meet increasing global demand. To ensure the safety of the crop for consumers it is important to determine the natural variation in seed protein constituents as well as any unintended changes that may occur in the GMO as a result of genetic modification. Understanding the natural variation of seed proteins in wild and cultivated soybeans that have been used in conventional soybean breeding programs is critical for determining unintended protein expression in GMO soybeans. In recent years, proteomic technologies have been used as an effective analytical tool for examining modifications of protein profiles. We have standardized and applied these technologies to determine and quantify the spectrum of proteins present in soybean seed. We used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for the separation, quantification, and identification of different classes of soybean seed proteins. We have observed significant variations in different classes of proteins, including storage, allergen and anti-nutritional protein profiles, between non-GMO cultivated and wild soybean varieties. This information is useful for scientists and regulatory agencies to determine whether the unintended expression of proteins found in transgenic soybean is within the range of natural variation.

  20. Chloroplast isolation and affinity chromatography for enrichment of low-abundant proteins in complex proteomes.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Roman G; Stael, Simon; Teige, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of the proteome is crucial to advance the biological sciences. Low-abundant proteins are of particular interest to many biologists as they include, for example those proteins involved in signal transduction. Recent technological advances resulted in a tremendous increase in protein identification sensitivity by mass spectrometry (MS). However, the dynamic range in protein abundance still forms a fundamental problem that limits the detection of low-abundant proteins in complex proteomes. These proteins will typically escape detection in shotgun MS experiments due to the presence of other proteins at an abundance several-fold higher in order of magnitude. Therefore, specific enrichment strategies are required to overcome this technical limitation of MS-based protein discovery. We have searched for novel signal transduction proteins, more specifically kinases and calcium-binding proteins, and here we describe different approaches for enrichment of these low-abundant proteins from isolated chloroplasts from pea and Arabidopsis for subsequent proteomic analysis by MS. These approaches could be extended to include other signal transduction proteins and target different organelles. PMID:25820724

  1. New algorithmic approaches to protein spot detection and pattern matching in two-dimensional electrophoresis gel databases.

    PubMed

    Pleissner, K P; Hoffmann, F; Kriegel, K; Wenk, C; Wegner, S; Sahlström, A; Oswald, H; Alt, H; Fleck, E

    1999-01-01

    Protein spot identification in two-dimensional electrophoresis gels can be supported by the comparison of gel images accessible in different World Wide Web two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gel protein databases. The comparison may be performed either by visual cross-matching between gel images or by automatic recognition of similar protein spot patterns. A prerequisite for the automatic point pattern matching approach is the detection of protein spots yielding the x(s),y(s) coordinates and integrated spot intensities i(s). For this purpose an algorithm is developed based on a combination of hierarchical watershed transformation and feature extraction methods. This approach reduces the strong over-segmentation of spot regions normally produced by watershed transformation. Measures for the ellipticity and curvature are determined as features of spot regions. The resulting spot lists containing x(s),y(s),i(s)-triplets are calculated for a source as well as for a target gel image accessible in 2-DE gel protein databases. After spot detection a matching procedure is applied. Both the matching of a local pattern vs. a full 2-DE gel image and the global matching between full images are discussed. Preset slope and length tolerances of pattern edges serve as matching criteria. The local matching algorithm relies on a data structure derived from the incremental Delaunay triangulation of a point set and a two-step hashing technique. For the incremental construction of triangles the spot intensities are considered in decreasing order. The algorithm needs neither landmarks nor an a priori image alignment. A graphical user interface for spot detection and gel matching is written in the Java programming language for the Internet. The software package called CAROL (http://gelmatching.inf.fu-berlin.de) is realized in a client-server architecture.

  2. Expression, purification and crystallization of a novel nonstructural protein VP9 from white spot syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Sivaraman, J.; Hew, Choy L.

    2006-08-01

    The nonstructural protein VP9 from white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has been identified and expressed in Escherichia coli. Native protein was purified and crystallized by vapour diffusion. The nonstructural protein VP9 from white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has been identified and expressed in Escherichia coli. To facilitate purification, a cleavable His{sub 6} tag was introduced at the N-terminus. The native protein was purified and crystallized by vapour diffusion against mother liquor containing 2 M sodium acetate, 100 mM MES pH 6.3, 25 mM cadmium sulfate and 3% glycerol. Crystals were obtained within 7 d and diffracted to 2.2 Å; they belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.13, b = 78.21, c = 78.98 Å and four molecules in the asymmetric unit. The selenomethionine-labelled protein produced isomorphous crystals that diffracted to approximately 3.3 Å.

  3. Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins of Edwardsiella ictaluri during Iron Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Dumpala, Pradeep R.; Peterson, Brian C.; Lawrence, Mark L.; Karsi, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe intracellular bacterium that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish. Iron is an essential inorganic nutrient of bacteria and is crucial for bacterial invasion. Reduced availability of iron by the host may cause significant stress for bacterial pathogens and is considered a signal that leads to significant alteration in virulence gene expression. However, the precise effect of iron-restriction on E. ictaluri protein abundance is unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify differentially abundant proteins of E. ictaluri during in vitro iron-restricted conditions. We applied two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) for determining differentially abundant proteins and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF MS) for protein identification. Gene ontology and pathway-based functional modeling of differentially abundant proteins was also conducted. A total of 50 unique differentially abundant proteins at a minimum of 2-fold (p ≤ 0.05) difference in abundance due to iron-restriction were detected. The numbers of up- and down-regulated proteins were 37 and 13, respectively. We noted several proteins, including EsrB, LamB, MalM, MalE, FdaA, and TonB-dependent heme/hemoglobin receptor family proteins responded to iron restriction in E. ictaluri. PMID:26168192

  4. A differential protein solubility approach for the depletion of highly abundant proteins in plasma using ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Guldvik, Ingrid J; Grönberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Mills, Ian G; Thiede, Bernd

    2015-12-21

    Depletion of highly abundant proteins is an approved step in blood plasma analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). In this study, we explored a precipitation and differential protein solubility approach as a fractionation strategy for abundant protein removal from plasma. Total proteins from plasma were precipitated with 90% saturated ammonium sulfate, followed by differential solubilization in 55% and 35% saturated ammonium sulfate solutions. Using a four hour liquid chromatography (LC) gradient and an LTQ-Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer, a total of 167 and 224 proteins were identified from the 55% and 35% ammonium sulfate fractions, whereas 235 proteins were found in the remaining protein fractions with at least two unique peptides. SDS-PAGE and exclusive total spectrum counts from LC-MS/MS analyses clearly showed that majority of the abundant plasma proteins were solubilized in 55% and 35% ammonium sulfate solutions, indicating that the remaining protein fraction is of potential interest for identification of less abundant plasma proteins. Serum albumin, serotransferrin, alpha-1-antitrypsin and transthyretin were the abundant proteins that were highly enriched in 55% ammonium sulfate fractions. Immunoglobulins, complement system proteins, and apolipoproteins were among other abundant plasma proteins that were enriched in 35% ammonium sulfate fractions. In the remaining protein fractions a total of 40 unique proteins were identified of which, 32 proteins were identified with at least 10 exclusive spectrum counts. According to PeptideAtlas, 9 of these 32 proteins were estimated to be present at low μg ml(-1) (0.12-1.9 μg ml(-1)) concentrations in the plasma, and 17 at low ng ml(-1) (0.1-55 ng ml(-1)) range.

  5. Abundance and Distribution of Dimethylsulfoniopropionate Degradation Genes and the Corresponding Bacterial Community Structure at Dimethyl Sulfide Hot Spots in the Tropical and Subtropical Pacific Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shotaro; Omori, Yuko; Wong, Shu-Kuan; Ijichi, Minoru; Kaneko, Ryo; Kameyama, Sohiko; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Hamasaki, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is mainly produced by marine phytoplankton but is released into the microbial food web and degraded by marine bacteria to dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and other products. To reveal the abundance and distribution of bacterial DMSP degradation genes and the corresponding bacterial communities in relation to DMS and DMSP concentrations in seawater, we collected surface seawater samples from DMS hot spot sites during a cruise across the Pacific Ocean. We analyzed the genes encoding DMSP lyase (dddP) and DMSP demethylase (dmdA), which are responsible for the transformation of DMSP to DMS and DMSP assimilation, respectively. The averaged abundance (±standard deviation) of these DMSP degradation genes relative to that of the 16S rRNA genes was 33% ± 12%. The abundances of these genes showed large spatial variations. dddP genes showed more variation in abundances than dmdA genes. Multidimensional analysis based on the abundances of DMSP degradation genes and environmental factors revealed that the distribution pattern of these genes was influenced by chlorophyll a concentrations and temperatures. dddP genes, dmdA subclade C/2 genes, and dmdA subclade D genes exhibited significant correlations with the marine Roseobacter clade, SAR11 subgroup Ib, and SAR11 subgroup Ia, respectively. SAR11 subgroups Ia and Ib, which possessed dmdA genes, were suggested to be the main potential DMSP consumers. The Roseobacter clade members possessing dddP genes in oligotrophic subtropical regions were possible DMS producers. These results suggest that DMSP degradation genes are abundant and widely distributed in the surface seawater and that the marine bacteria possessing these genes influence the degradation of DMSP and regulate the emissions of DMS in subtropical gyres of the Pacific Ocean. PMID:25862229

  6. Abundance and distribution of dimethylsulfoniopropionate degradation genes and the corresponding bacterial community structure at dimethyl sulfide hot spots in the tropical and subtropical pacific ocean.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yingshun; Suzuki, Shotaro; Omori, Yuko; Wong, Shu-Kuan; Ijichi, Minoru; Kaneko, Ryo; Kameyama, Sohiko; Tanimoto, Hiroshi; Hamasaki, Koji

    2015-06-15

    Dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) is mainly produced by marine phytoplankton but is released into the microbial food web and degraded by marine bacteria to dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and other products. To reveal the abundance and distribution of bacterial DMSP degradation genes and the corresponding bacterial communities in relation to DMS and DMSP concentrations in seawater, we collected surface seawater samples from DMS hot spot sites during a cruise across the Pacific Ocean. We analyzed the genes encoding DMSP lyase (dddP) and DMSP demethylase (dmdA), which are responsible for the transformation of DMSP to DMS and DMSP assimilation, respectively. The averaged abundance (±standard deviation) of these DMSP degradation genes relative to that of the 16S rRNA genes was 33% ± 12%. The abundances of these genes showed large spatial variations. dddP genes showed more variation in abundances than dmdA genes. Multidimensional analysis based on the abundances of DMSP degradation genes and environmental factors revealed that the distribution pattern of these genes was influenced by chlorophyll a concentrations and temperatures. dddP genes, dmdA subclade C/2 genes, and dmdA subclade D genes exhibited significant correlations with the marine Roseobacter clade, SAR11 subgroup Ib, and SAR11 subgroup Ia, respectively. SAR11 subgroups Ia and Ib, which possessed dmdA genes, were suggested to be the main potential DMSP consumers. The Roseobacter clade members possessing dddP genes in oligotrophic subtropical regions were possible DMS producers. These results suggest that DMSP degradation genes are abundant and widely distributed in the surface seawater and that the marine bacteria possessing these genes influence the degradation of DMSP and regulate the emissions of DMS in subtropical gyres of the Pacific Ocean.

  7. DNA condensates organized by the capsid protein VP15 in White Spot Syndrome Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yingjie; Wu Jinlu; Chen Hu; Hew, Choy Leong; Yan Jie

    2010-12-20

    The White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) has a large circular double-stranded DNA genome of around 300 kb and it replicates in the nucleus of the host cells. The machinery of how the viral DNA is packaged has been remained unclear. VP15, a highly basic protein, is one of the major capsid proteins found in the virus. Previously, it was shown to be a DNA binding protein and was hypothesized to participate in the viral DNA packaging process. Using Atomic Force Microscopy imaging, we show that the viral DNA is associated with a (or more) capsid proteins. The organized viral DNA qualitatively resembles the conformations of VP15 induced DNA condensates in vitro. Furthermore, single-DNA manipulation experiments revealed that VP15 is able to condense single DNA against forces of a few pico Newtons. Our results suggest that VP15 may aid in the viral DNA packaging process by directly condensing DNA.

  8. Influence of erythrocyte iodothyronine-binding proteins on radioimmunoassay of thyroxin in dried blood spots

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, W.A.; Lynskey, C.P.

    1982-01-01

    Three erythrocyte proteins, one identified as hemoglobin, bind thyroid hormones. Using a dextran/charcoal radioimmunoassay for thyroxin in dried blood spots, we demonstrate that such binding differs with the buffer used. Barbital, phosphate, and borate buffers significantly enhance the binding more than glycine and tris(hydroxymethyl)methylamine buffers. Binding is not affected by agents commonly used to inhibit thyroxin binding to serum proteins. A highly significant nonlinear direct relationship between sample storage (temperature and duration) and increased thyroxin-erythrocyte binding is documented, together with an associated decrease in assayed concentrations of thyroxin. However, concomitant serial measurement of thyroxin with polyethylene glycol and combined double-antibody/polyethylene glycol radioimmunoassays produced no evidence of interference by erythrocyte proteins in the radioimmune reaction. We conclude that erythrocyte proteins act only as low-affinity secondary binders in radioimmunoassay for thyroxin.

  9. Transcriptional abundance is not the single force driving the evolution of bacterial proteins

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite rapid progress in understanding the mechanisms that shape the evolution of proteins, the relative importance of various factors remain to be elucidated. In this study, we have assessed the effects of 16 different biological features on the evolutionary rates (ERs) of protein-coding sequences in bacterial genomes. Results Our analysis of 18 bacterial species revealed new correlations between ERs and constraining factors. Previous studies have suggested that transcriptional abundance overwhelmingly constrains the evolution of yeast protein sequences. This transcriptional abundance leads to selection against misfolding or misinteractions. In this study we found that there was no single factor in determining the evolution of bacterial proteins. Not only transcriptional abundance (codon adaptation index and expression level), but also protein-protein associations (PPAs), essentiality (ESS), subcellular localization of cytoplasmic membrane (SLM), transmembrane helices (TMH) and hydropathicity score (HS) independently and significantly affected the ERs of bacterial proteins. In some species, PPA and ESS demonstrate higher correlations with ER than transcriptional abundance. Conclusions Different forces drive the evolution of protein sequences in yeast and bacteria. In bacteria, the constraints are involved in avoiding a build-up of toxic molecules caused by misfolding/misinteraction (transcriptional abundance), while retaining important functions (ESS, PPA) and maintaining the cell membrane (SLM, TMH and HS). Each of these independently contributes to the variation in protein evolution. PMID:23914835

  10. Dried blood spot proteomics: surface extraction of endogenous proteins coupled with automated sample preparation and mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Martin, Nicholas J; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J

    2013-08-01

    Dried blood spots offer many advantages as a sample format including ease and safety of transport and handling. To date, the majority of mass spectrometry analyses of dried blood spots have focused on small molecules or hemoglobin. However, dried blood spots are a potentially rich source of protein biomarkers, an area that has been overlooked. To address this issue, we have applied an untargeted bottom-up proteomics approach to the analysis of dried blood spots. We present an automated and integrated method for extraction of endogenous proteins from the surface of dried blood spots and sample preparation via trypsin digestion by use of the Advion Biosciences Triversa Nanomate robotic platform. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of the resulting digests enabled identification of 120 proteins from a single dried blood spot. The proteins identified cross a concentration range of four orders of magnitude. The method is evaluated and the results discussed in terms of the proteins identified and their potential use as biomarkers in screening programs.

  11. Dried Blood Spot Proteomics: Surface Extraction of Endogenous Proteins Coupled with Automated Sample Preparation and Mass Spectrometry Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Nicholas J.; Bunch, Josephine; Cooper, Helen J.

    2013-08-01

    Dried blood spots offer many advantages as a sample format including ease and safety of transport and handling. To date, the majority of mass spectrometry analyses of dried blood spots have focused on small molecules or hemoglobin. However, dried blood spots are a potentially rich source of protein biomarkers, an area that has been overlooked. To address this issue, we have applied an untargeted bottom-up proteomics approach to the analysis of dried blood spots. We present an automated and integrated method for extraction of endogenous proteins from the surface of dried blood spots and sample preparation via trypsin digestion by use of the Advion Biosciences Triversa Nanomate robotic platform. Liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry of the resulting digests enabled identification of 120 proteins from a single dried blood spot. The proteins identified cross a concentration range of four orders of magnitude. The method is evaluated and the results discussed in terms of the proteins identified and their potential use as biomarkers in screening programs.

  12. The Role of Water Occlusion for the Definition of a Protein Binding Hot-Spot.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Irina S

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems rely on the establishment of interactions between biomolecules, which take place in the aqueous environment of the cell. It was already demonstrated that a small set of residues at the interface, Hot-Spots(HS), contributes significantly to the binding free energy. However, these energetic determinants of affinity and specificity are still not fully understood. Moreover, the contribution of water to their HS character is also poorly characterized. In this review, we have focused on the structural data available that support the occlusion of HS from solvent, and therefore the "O-ring theory"not only on protein-protein but also on protein-DNA complexes. We also emphasized the use of Solvent Accessible Surface Area (SASA) features in a variety of machine-learning approaches that aim to detect binding HS. PMID:25986686

  13. Expression, purification and crystallization of a novel nonstructural protein VP9 from white spot syndrome virus.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Y.; Sivaraman, J.; Hew, C.

    2006-01-01

    The nonstructural protein VP9 from white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has been identified and expressed in Escherichia coli. To facilitate purification, a cleavable His{sub 6} tag was introduced at the N-terminus. The native protein was purified and crystallized by vapor diffusion against mother liquor containing 2 M sodium acetate, 100 mM MES pH 6.3, 25 mM cadmium sulfate and 3% glycerol. Crystals were obtained within 7 d and diffracted to 2.2 Angstroms; they belonged to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 74.13, b = 78.21, c = 78.98 Angstroms and four molecules in the asymmetric unit. The selenomethionine-labeled protein produced isomorphous crystals that diffracted to approximately 3.3 Angstroms.

  14. Two Novel Heat-Soluble Protein Families Abundantly Expressed in an Anhydrobiotic Tardigrade

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D.; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals. PMID:22937162

  15. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals.

  16. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals. PMID:22937162

  17. RNA protein interactions governing expression of the most abundant protein in human body, type I collagen.

    PubMed

    Stefanovic, Branko

    2013-01-01

    Type I collagen is the most abundant protein in human body. The protein turns over slowly and its replacement synthesis is low. However, in wound healing or in pathological fibrosis the cells can increase production of type I collagen several hundred fold. This increase is predominantly due to posttranscriptional regulation, including increased half-life of collagen messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and their increased translatability. Type I collagen is composed of two α1 and one α2 polypeptides that fold into a triple helix. This stoichiometry is strictly regulated to prevent detrimental synthesis of α1 homotrimers. Collagen polypeptides are co-translationally modified and the rate of modifications is in dynamic equilibrium with the rate of folding, suggesting coordinated translation of collagen α1(I) and α2(I) polypeptides. Collagen α1(I) mRNA has in the 3' untranslated region (UTR) a C-rich sequence that binds protein αCP, this binding stabilizes the mRNA in collagen producing cells. In the 5' UTR both collagen mRNAs have a conserved stem-loop (5' SL) structure. The 5' SL is critical for high collagen expression, knock in mice with disruption of the 5' SL are resistant to liver fibrosis. the 5' SL binds protein LARP6 with strict sequence specificity and high affinity. LARP6 recruits RNA helicase A to facilitate translation initiation and associates collagen mRNAs with vimentin and nonmuscle myosin filaments. Binding to vimentin stabilizes collagen mRNAs, while nonmuscle myosin regulates coordinated translation of α1(I) and α2(I) mRNAs. When nonmuscle myosin filaments are disrupted the cells secrete only α1 homotrimers. Thus, the mechanism governing high collagen expression involves two RNA binding proteins and development of cytoskeletal filaments.

  18. HotSpot Wizard 2.0: automated design of site-specific mutations and smart libraries in protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Stourac, Jan; Sebestova, Eva; Vavra, Ondrej; Musil, Milos; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-07-01

    HotSpot Wizard 2.0 is a web server for automated identification of hot spots and design of smart libraries for engineering proteins' stability, catalytic activity, substrate specificity and enantioselectivity. The server integrates sequence, structural and evolutionary information obtained from 3 databases and 20 computational tools. Users are guided through the processes of selecting hot spots using four different protein engineering strategies and optimizing the resulting library's size by narrowing down a set of substitutions at individual randomized positions. The only required input is a query protein structure. The results of the calculations are mapped onto the protein's structure and visualized with a JSmol applet. HotSpot Wizard lists annotated residues suitable for mutagenesis and can automatically design appropriate codons for each implemented strategy. Overall, HotSpot Wizard provides comprehensive annotations of protein structures and assists protein engineers with the rational design of site-specific mutations and focused libraries. It is freely available at http://loschmidt.chemi.muni.cz/hotspotwizard.

  19. HotSpot Wizard 2.0: automated design of site-specific mutations and smart libraries in protein engineering.

    PubMed

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Stourac, Jan; Sebestova, Eva; Vavra, Ondrej; Musil, Milos; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-07-01

    HotSpot Wizard 2.0 is a web server for automated identification of hot spots and design of smart libraries for engineering proteins' stability, catalytic activity, substrate specificity and enantioselectivity. The server integrates sequence, structural and evolutionary information obtained from 3 databases and 20 computational tools. Users are guided through the processes of selecting hot spots using four different protein engineering strategies and optimizing the resulting library's size by narrowing down a set of substitutions at individual randomized positions. The only required input is a query protein structure. The results of the calculations are mapped onto the protein's structure and visualized with a JSmol applet. HotSpot Wizard lists annotated residues suitable for mutagenesis and can automatically design appropriate codons for each implemented strategy. Overall, HotSpot Wizard provides comprehensive annotations of protein structures and assists protein engineers with the rational design of site-specific mutations and focused libraries. It is freely available at http://loschmidt.chemi.muni.cz/hotspotwizard. PMID:27174934

  20. In-depth analysis of low abundant proteins in bovine colostrum using different fractionation techniques.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Asger; Bendixen, Emøke; Ingvartsen, Klaus Lønne; Røntved, Christine Maria

    2012-09-01

    Bovine colostrum is well known for its large content of bioactive components and its importance for neonatal survival. Unfortunately, the colostrum proteome is complicated by a wide dynamic range, because of a few dominating proteins that hamper sensitivity and proteome coverage achieved on low abundant proteins. Moreover, the composition of colostrum is complex and the proteins are located within different physical fractions that make up the colostrum. To gain a more exhaustive picture of the bovine colostrum proteome and gather information on protein location, we performed an extensive pre-analysis fractionation of colostrum prior to 2D-LC-MS/MS analysis. Physical and chemical properties of the proteins and colostrum were used alone or in combination for the separation of proteins. ELISA was used to quantify and verify the presence of proteins in colostrum. In total, 403 proteins were identified in the nonfractionated colostrum (NF) and seven fractions (F1-F7) using six different fractionation techniques. Fractionation contributed with 69 additional proteins in the fluid phase compared with NF. Different fractionation techniques each resulted in detection of unique subsets of proteins. Whey production by high-speed centrifugation contributed most to detection of low abundant proteins. Hence, prefractionation of colostrum prior to 2D-LC-MS/MS analysis expanded our knowledge on the presence and location of low abundant proteins in bovine colostrum. PMID:22848049

  1. Antiviral RNA silencing suppression activity of Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein.

    PubMed

    Ocampo Ocampo, T; Gabriel Peralta, S M; Bacheller, N; Uiterwaal, S; Knapp, A; Hennen, A; Ochoa-Martinez, D L; Garcia-Ruiz, H

    2016-01-01

    In addition to regulating gene expression, RNA silencing is an essential antiviral defense system in plants. Triggered by double-stranded RNA, silencing results in degradation or translational repression of target transcripts. Viruses are inducers and targets of RNA silencing. To condition susceptibility, most plant viruses encode silencing suppressors that interfere with this process, such as the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) NSs protein. The mechanism by which NSs suppresses RNA silencing and its role in viral infection and movement remain to be determined. We cloned NSs from the Hawaii isolate of TSWV and using two independent assays show for the first time that this protein restored pathogenicity and supported the formation of local infection foci by suppressor-deficient Turnip mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus. Demonstrating the suppression of RNA silencing directed against heterologous viruses establishes the foundation to determine the means used by NSs to block this antiviral process. PMID:27323202

  2. Antiviral RNA silencing suppression activity of Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein.

    PubMed

    Ocampo Ocampo, T; Gabriel Peralta, S M; Bacheller, N; Uiterwaal, S; Knapp, A; Hennen, A; Ochoa-Martinez, D L; Garcia-Ruiz, H

    2016-06-17

    In addition to regulating gene expression, RNA silencing is an essential antiviral defense system in plants. Triggered by double-stranded RNA, silencing results in degradation or translational repression of target transcripts. Viruses are inducers and targets of RNA silencing. To condition susceptibility, most plant viruses encode silencing suppressors that interfere with this process, such as the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) NSs protein. The mechanism by which NSs suppresses RNA silencing and its role in viral infection and movement remain to be determined. We cloned NSs from the Hawaii isolate of TSWV and using two independent assays show for the first time that this protein restored pathogenicity and supported the formation of local infection foci by suppressor-deficient Turnip mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus. Demonstrating the suppression of RNA silencing directed against heterologous viruses establishes the foundation to determine the means used by NSs to block this antiviral process.

  3. Assessment of the natural variation of low abundant metabolic proteins in soybean seeds using proteomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we investigated the distribution of the low abundant proteins that are involved in soybean seed development in four wild and twelve cultivated soybean genotypes. We found proteomic variation of these proteins within and...

  4. HotSpot Wizard 2.0: automated design of site-specific mutations and smart libraries in protein engineering

    PubMed Central

    Bendl, Jaroslav; Stourac, Jan; Sebestova, Eva; Vavra, Ondrej; Musil, Milos; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    HotSpot Wizard 2.0 is a web server for automated identification of hot spots and design of smart libraries for engineering proteins’ stability, catalytic activity, substrate specificity and enantioselectivity. The server integrates sequence, structural and evolutionary information obtained from 3 databases and 20 computational tools. Users are guided through the processes of selecting hot spots using four different protein engineering strategies and optimizing the resulting library's size by narrowing down a set of substitutions at individual randomized positions. The only required input is a query protein structure. The results of the calculations are mapped onto the protein's structure and visualized with a JSmol applet. HotSpot Wizard lists annotated residues suitable for mutagenesis and can automatically design appropriate codons for each implemented strategy. Overall, HotSpot Wizard provides comprehensive annotations of protein structures and assists protein engineers with the rational design of site-specific mutations and focused libraries. It is freely available at http://loschmidt.chemi.muni.cz/hotspotwizard. PMID:27174934

  5. High-grain diets suppress ruminal tissue abundance of angiopoietin-like protein 4 in cattle.

    PubMed

    Li, S; Yuan, K; Mamedova, L K; Penner, G B; Oba, M; Beauchemin, K A; Bradford, B J

    2014-09-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is expressed in bovine ruminal epithelium, making it possible that dietary components or commensal microbes may influence gastrointestinal ANGPTL4 production via interactions at the mucosal surface. Therefore, we conducted 3 experiments to evaluate the effects of dietary concentrate level and VFA infusions on ANGPTL4 abundance in ruminal tissue. In Exp. 1, we assigned 12 nonlactating Holstein cows to either 8% or 64% concentrate diets; diets were fed 28 d before euthanasia and ruminal tissue collection. Ruminal tissue and plasma ANGPTL4 protein abundance were unaltered by treatment. In Exp. 2, we assigned 8 continental crossbred heifers to either a 45% or 90% concentrate diet; diets were fed for 75 d before euthanasia and ruminal tissue collection. Compared with the 45% concentrate diet, the 90% concentrate diet decreased (P < 0.01) ruminal tissue ANGPTL4 protein abundance. In Exp. 3, we assigned 6 ruminally cannulated lactating Holstein cows to a treatment sequence in replicated 3 × 3 Latin squares and fed a standard lactation diet. Cows were infused with 5 mol/d sodium acetate, sodium propionate, or sodium butyrate for 2 d. Infusions of VFA did not affect (P > 0.10) mRNA or protein abundance of ANGPTL4 in ruminal papillae. Ruminal papillae ANGPTL4 abundance was, however, negatively correlated with (P = 0.01) ruminal VFA concentrations. ANGPTL4 abundance in ruminal tissue decreases in response to very high dietary concentrate and is inversely correlated with ruminal total VFA concentrations.

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Age Specific Variation in the Abundance of Human Female Parotid Salivary Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ambatipudi, Kiran S.; Lu, Bingwen; Hagen, Fred K; Melvin, James E.; Yates, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Human saliva is a protein-rich, easily accessible source of potential local and systemic biomarkers to monitor changes that occur under pathological conditions; however little is known about the changes in abundance associated with normal aging. In this study, we performed a comprehensive proteomic profiling of pooled saliva collected from the parotid glands of healthy female subjects, divided into two age groups 1 and 2 (20–30 and 55–65 years old, respectively). Hydrophobic charge interaction chromatography was used to separate high from low abundant proteins prior to characterization of the parotid saliva using multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Collectively, 532 proteins were identified in the two age groups. Of these proteins, 266 were identified exclusively in one age group, while 266 proteins were common to both groups. The majority of the proteins identified in the two age groups belonged to the defense and immune response category. Of note, several defense related proteins (e.g. lysozyme, lactoferrin and histatin-1) were significantly more abundant in group 2 as determined by G-test. Selected representative mass spectrometric findings were validated by western blot analysis. Our study reports the first quantitative analysis of differentially regulated proteins in ductal saliva collected from young and older female subjects. This study supports the use of high-throughput proteomics as a robust discovery tool. Such results provide a foundation for future studies to identify specific salivary proteins which may be linked to age-related diseases specific to women. PMID:19764810

  7. Expression, purification and crystallization of two major envelope proteins from white spot syndrome virus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xuhua; Hew, Choy Leong

    2007-07-01

    The crystallization of the N-terminal transmembrane region-truncated VP26 and VP28 of white spot syndrome virus is described. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major virulent pathogen known to infect penaeid shrimp and other crustaceans. VP26 and VP28, two major envelope proteins from WSSV, have been identified and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In order to facilitate purification and crystallization, predicted N-terminal transmembrane regions of approximately 35 amino acids have been truncated from both VP26 and VP28. Truncated VP26 and VP28 and their corresponding SeMet-labelled proteins were purified and the SeMet proteins were crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 were obtained using a reservoir consisting of 0.1 M citric acid pH 3.5, 3.0 M sodium chloride and 1%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350, whereas SeMet VP28 was crystallized using a reservoir solution consisting of 25% polyethylene glycol 8000, 0.2 M calcium acetate, 0.1 M Na HEPES pH 7.5 and 1.5%(w/v) 1,2,3-heptanetriol. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 diffract to 2.2 Å resolution and belong to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.92, c = 199.31 Å. SeMet-labelled VP28 crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 105.33, b = 106.71, c = 200.37 Å, and diffracts to 2.0 Å resolution.

  8. Choice of dietary protein of vegetarians and omnivores is reflected in their hair protein 13C and 15N abundance.

    PubMed

    Petzke, Klaus J; Boeing, Heiner; Metges, Cornelia C

    2005-01-01

    Stable isotopic (15N, 13C) composition of tissues depends on isotopic pattern of food sources. We investigated whether the isotopic compositions of human hair protein and amino acids reflect the habitual dietary protein intake. Hair samples were analyzed from 100 omnivores (selected randomly out of the 1987-1988 German nutrition survey VERA), and from 15 ovo-lacto-vegetarians (OLV), and from 6 vegans recruited separately. Hair bulk and amino acid specific isotopic compositions were analyzed by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS and GC/C/IRMS, respectively) and the results were correlated with data of the 7 day dietary records. Hair bulk 15N and 13C abundances clearly reflect the particular eating habits. Vegans can be distinguished from OLV and both are significantly distinct from omnivores in both 15N and 13C abundances. 15N and 13C abundances rose with a higher proportion of animal to total protein intake (PAPI). Individual proportions of animal protein consumption (IPAP) were calculated using isotopic abundances and a linear regression model using animal protein consumption data of vegans (PAPI = 0) and omnivores (mean PAPI = 0.639). IPAP values positively correlated with the intake of protein, meat, meat products, and animal protein. Distinct patterns for hair amino acid specific 15N and 13C abundances were measured but with lower resolution between food preference groups compared with bulk values. In conclusion, hair 13C and 15N values both reflected the extent of animal protein consumption. Bulk isotopic abundance of hair can be tested for future use in the validation of dietary assessment methods. PMID:15880664

  9. Choice of dietary protein of vegetarians and omnivores is reflected in their hair protein 13C and 15N abundance.

    PubMed

    Petzke, Klaus J; Boeing, Heiner; Metges, Cornelia C

    2005-01-01

    Stable isotopic (15N, 13C) composition of tissues depends on isotopic pattern of food sources. We investigated whether the isotopic compositions of human hair protein and amino acids reflect the habitual dietary protein intake. Hair samples were analyzed from 100 omnivores (selected randomly out of the 1987-1988 German nutrition survey VERA), and from 15 ovo-lacto-vegetarians (OLV), and from 6 vegans recruited separately. Hair bulk and amino acid specific isotopic compositions were analyzed by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS and GC/C/IRMS, respectively) and the results were correlated with data of the 7 day dietary records. Hair bulk 15N and 13C abundances clearly reflect the particular eating habits. Vegans can be distinguished from OLV and both are significantly distinct from omnivores in both 15N and 13C abundances. 15N and 13C abundances rose with a higher proportion of animal to total protein intake (PAPI). Individual proportions of animal protein consumption (IPAP) were calculated using isotopic abundances and a linear regression model using animal protein consumption data of vegans (PAPI = 0) and omnivores (mean PAPI = 0.639). IPAP values positively correlated with the intake of protein, meat, meat products, and animal protein. Distinct patterns for hair amino acid specific 15N and 13C abundances were measured but with lower resolution between food preference groups compared with bulk values. In conclusion, hair 13C and 15N values both reflected the extent of animal protein consumption. Bulk isotopic abundance of hair can be tested for future use in the validation of dietary assessment methods.

  10. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Frank W.; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-02-01

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or several genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power. Consequently, many eQTL are probably missed, especially those with smaller effects. Furthermore, most studies use messenger RNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics reported unexpected differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green fluorescent protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high versus low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci that we detected were clustered in `hotspots' that influence multiple proteins, and some hotspots were found to influence more than half of the proteins that we examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell

  11. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution.

    PubMed

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27220911

  12. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-05-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions.

  13. Envelope protein VP24 from White spot syndrome virus: expression, purification and crystallization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lifang; Wu, Yunkun

    2016-08-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major shrimp pathogen known to infect penaeid shrimp and other crustaceans. VP24 is one of the major envelope proteins of WSSV. In order to facilitate purification, crystallization and structure determination, the predicted N-terminal transmembrane region of approximately 26 amino acids was truncated from VP24 and several mutants were prepared to increase the proportion of selenomethionine (SeMet) residues for subsequent structural determination using the SAD method. Truncated VP24, its mutants and the corresponding SeMet-labelled proteins were purified, and the native and SeMet proteins were crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Crystals of VP24 were obtained using a reservoir consisting of 0.1 M Tris-HCl pH 8.5, 2.75 M ammonium acetate with a drop volume ratio of two parts protein solution to one part reservoir solution. Notably, ATP was added as a critical additive to the drop with a final concentration of 10 mM. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP24 mutant diffracted to 3.0 Å resolution and those of the native diffracted to 2.4 Å resolution; the crystals belonged to space group I213, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 140 Å. PMID:27487921

  14. Quantitation of tyrosine hydroxylase, protein levels: Spot immunolabeling with an affinity-purified antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Haycock, J.W. )

    1989-09-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase was purified from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells and rat pheochromocytoma using a rapid (less than 2 days) procedure performed at room temperature. Rabbits were immunized with purified enzyme that was denatured with sodium dodecylsulfate, and antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase were affinity-purified from immune sera. A Western blot procedure using the affinity-purified antibodies and {sup 125}I-protein A demonstrated a selective labeling of a single Mr approximately 62,000 band in samples from a number of different tissues. The relative lack of background {sup 125}I-protein A binding permitted the development of a quantitative spot immunolabeling procedure for tyrosine hydroxylase protein. The sensitivity of the assay is 1-2 ng of enzyme. Essentially identical standard curves were obtained with tyrosine hydroxylase purified from rat pheochromocytoma, rat corpus striatum, and bovine adrenal medulla. An extract of PC 12 cells (clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells) was calibrated against purified rat pheochromocytoma tyrosine hydroxylase and used as an external standard against which levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in PC12 cells and other tissue were quantified. With this procedure, qualitative assessment of tyrosine hydroxylase protein levels can be obtained in a few hours and quantitative assessment can be obtained in less than a day.

  15. Predicting hot spots in protein interfaces based on protrusion index, pseudo hydrophobicity and electron-ion interaction pseudopotential features

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Junfeng; Yue, Zhenyu; Di, Yunqiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2016-01-01

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming more important for the research of drug design and cancer development. Based on our previous methods (APIS and KFC2), here we proposed a novel hot spot prediction method. For each hot spot residue, we firstly constructed a wide variety of 108 sequence, structural, and neighborhood features to characterize potential hot spot residues, including conventional ones and new one (pseudo hydrophobicity) exploited in this study. We then selected 3 top-ranking features that contribute the most in the classification by a two-step feature selection process consisting of minimal-redundancy-maximal-relevance algorithm and an exhaustive search method. We used support vector machines to build our final prediction model. When testing our model on an independent test set, our method showed the highest F1-score of 0.70 and MCC of 0.46 comparing with the existing state-of-the-art hot spot prediction methods. Our results indicate that these features are more effective than the conventional features considered previously, and that the combination of our and traditional features may support the creation of a discriminative feature set for efficient prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces. PMID:26934646

  16. Predicting hot spots in protein interfaces based on protrusion index, pseudo hydrophobicity and electron-ion interaction pseudopotential features.

    PubMed

    Xia, Junfeng; Yue, Zhenyu; Di, Yunqiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2016-04-01

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming more important for the research of drug design and cancer development. Based on our previous methods (APIS and KFC2), here we proposed a novel hot spot prediction method. For each hot spot residue, we firstly constructed a wide variety of 108 sequence, structural, and neighborhood features to characterize potential hot spot residues, including conventional ones and new one (pseudo hydrophobicity) exploited in this study. We then selected 3 top-ranking features that contribute the most in the classification by a two-step feature selection process consisting of minimal-redundancy-maximal-relevance algorithm and an exhaustive search method. We used support vector machines to build our final prediction model. When testing our model on an independent test set, our method showed the highest F1-score of 0.70 and MCC of 0.46 comparing with the existing state-of-the-art hot spot prediction methods. Our results indicate that these features are more effective than the conventional features considered previously, and that the combination of our and traditional features may support the creation of a discriminative feature set for efficient prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces.

  17. Predicting hot spots in protein interfaces based on protrusion index, pseudo hydrophobicity and electron-ion interaction pseudopotential features.

    PubMed

    Xia, Junfeng; Yue, Zhenyu; Di, Yunqiang; Zhu, Xiaolei; Zheng, Chun-Hou

    2016-04-01

    The identification of hot spots, a small subset of protein interfaces that accounts for the majority of binding free energy, is becoming more important for the research of drug design and cancer development. Based on our previous methods (APIS and KFC2), here we proposed a novel hot spot prediction method. For each hot spot residue, we firstly constructed a wide variety of 108 sequence, structural, and neighborhood features to characterize potential hot spot residues, including conventional ones and new one (pseudo hydrophobicity) exploited in this study. We then selected 3 top-ranking features that contribute the most in the classification by a two-step feature selection process consisting of minimal-redundancy-maximal-relevance algorithm and an exhaustive search method. We used support vector machines to build our final prediction model. When testing our model on an independent test set, our method showed the highest F1-score of 0.70 and MCC of 0.46 comparing with the existing state-of-the-art hot spot prediction methods. Our results indicate that these features are more effective than the conventional features considered previously, and that the combination of our and traditional features may support the creation of a discriminative feature set for efficient prediction of hot spots in protein interfaces. PMID:26934646

  18. Expression profile of key immune-related genes in Penaeus monodon juveniles after oral administration of recombinant envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ancy; Sudheer, Naduvilamuriparampu Saidumuhammed; Kiron, Viswanath; Bright Singh, Issac S; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri

    2016-07-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is the most catastrophic pathogen the shrimp industry has ever encountered. VP28, the abundant envelope protein of WSSV was expressed in bacteria, the purified protein administered orally to Penaeus monodon juveniles and its immune modulatory effects examined. The results indicated significant up-regulation of caspase, penaeidin, crustin, astakine, syntenin, PmRACK, Rab7, STAT and C-type lectin in animals orally administered with this antigen. This revealed the immune modulations in shrimps followed by oral administration of rVP28P which resulted in the reduced transcription of viral gene vp28 and delay in mortality after WSSV challenge. The study suggests the potential of rVP28P to elicit a non-specific immune stimulation in shrimps.

  19. Natural Genetic Variation Influences Protein Abundances in C. elegans Developmental Signalling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kapil Dev; Roschitzki, Bernd; Snoek, L Basten; Grossmann, Jonas; Zheng, Xue; Elvin, Mark; Kamkina, Polina; Schrimpf, Sabine P; Poulin, Gino B; Kammenga, Jan E; Hengartner, Michael O

    2016-01-01

    Complex traits, including common disease-related traits, are affected by many different genes that function in multiple pathways and networks. The apoptosis, MAPK, Notch, and Wnt signalling pathways play important roles in development and disease progression. At the moment we have a poor understanding of how allelic variation affects gene expression in these pathways at the level of translation. Here we report the effect of natural genetic variation on transcript and protein abundance involved in developmental signalling pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans. We used selected reaction monitoring to analyse proteins from the abovementioned four pathways in a set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) generated from the wild-type strains N2 (Bristol) and CB4856 (Hawaii) to enable quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. About half of the cases from the 44 genes tested showed a statistically significant change in protein abundance between various strains, most of these were however very weak (below 1.3-fold change). We detected a distant QTL on the left arm of chromosome II that affected protein abundance of the phosphatidylserine receptor protein PSR-1, and two separate QTLs that influenced embryonic and ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis on chromosome IV. Our results demonstrate that natural variation in C. elegans is sufficient to cause significant changes in signalling pathways both at the gene expression (transcript and protein abundance) and phenotypic levels. PMID:26985669

  20. RNA associated with a heterodimeric protein that activates a meiotic homologous recombination hot spot: RL/RT/PCR strategy for cloning any unknown RNA or DNA.

    PubMed

    Wahls, W P

    1994-04-01

    The ade6-M26 mutation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe creates a meiotic homologous recombination hot spot. We have achieved 40,000-fold purification of a heterodimeric DNA-binding protein, Mts1/Mts2, that activates the recombination hot spot. Physical studies suggested the presence of a third subunit. It is demonstrated here that RNA molecules of approximately 210 nucleotides copurified with the heterodimer. To characterize the RNA component, it was necessary to develop a new strategy for cloning of the unknown, low-abundance, partially degraded RNAs that were present in purified Mts1/Mts2 protein preparations. The strategy uses RNA ligase to add DNA oligonucleotide priming sites to the RNA for subsequent reverse transcription and PCR (RNA ligase, reverse transcription-PCR, or RL/RT/PCR). This cloning procedure could be applied to the cloning of any unknown RNA or DNA molecules. Because the cDNA clones obtained from Mts1/Mts2 were largely heterogeneous, it seems likely that the RNAs copurified as a result of tight but nonspecific interactions with the heterodimeric protein. PMID:7518718

  1. Visualization and Dissemination of Multidimensional Proteomics Data Comparing Protein Abundance During Caenorhabditis elegans Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffle, Michael; Merrihew, Gennifer E.; Jaschob, Daniel; Sharma, Vagisha; Davis, Trisha N.; Noble, William S.; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2015-11-01

    Regulation of protein abundance is a critical aspect of cellular function, organism development, and aging. Alternative splicing may give rise to multiple possible proteoforms of gene products where the abundance of each proteoform is independently regulated. Understanding how the abundances of these distinct gene products change is essential to understanding the underlying mechanisms of many biological processes. Bottom-up proteomics mass spectrometry techniques may be used to estimate protein abundance indirectly by sequencing and quantifying peptides that are later mapped to proteins based on sequence. However, quantifying the abundance of distinct gene products is routinely confounded by peptides that map to multiple possible proteoforms. In this work, we describe a technique that may be used to help mitigate the effects of confounding ambiguous peptides and multiple proteoforms when quantifying proteins. We have applied this technique to visualize the distribution of distinct gene products for the whole proteome across 11 developmental stages of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. The result is a large multidimensional dataset for which web-based tools were developed for visualizing how translated gene products change during development and identifying possible proteoforms. The underlying instrument raw files and tandem mass spectra may also be downloaded. The data resource is freely available on the web at http://www.yeastrc.org/wormpes/.

  2. Visualization and dissemination of multidimensional proteomics data comparing protein abundance during Caenorhabditis elegans development.

    PubMed

    Riffle, Michael; Merrihew, Gennifer E; Jaschob, Daniel; Sharma, Vagisha; Davis, Trisha N; Noble, William S; MacCoss, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Regulation of protein abundance is a critical aspect of cellular function, organism development, and aging. Alternative splicing may give rise to multiple possible proteoforms of gene products where the abundance of each proteoform is independently regulated. Understanding how the abundances of these distinct gene products change is essential to understanding the underlying mechanisms of many biological processes. Bottom-up proteomics mass spectrometry techniques may be used to estimate protein abundance indirectly by sequencing and quantifying peptides that are later mapped to proteins based on sequence. However, quantifying the abundance of distinct gene products is routinely confounded by peptides that map to multiple possible proteoforms. In this work, we describe a technique that may be used to help mitigate the effects of confounding ambiguous peptides and multiple proteoforms when quantifying proteins. We have applied this technique to visualize the distribution of distinct gene products for the whole proteome across 11 developmental stages of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. The result is a large multidimensional dataset for which web-based tools were developed for visualizing how translated gene products change during development and identifying possible proteoforms. The underlying instrument raw files and tandem mass spectra may also be downloaded. The data resource is freely available on the web at http://www.yeastrc.org/wormpes/ . Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  3. Mapping protein abundance patterns in the brain using voxelation combined with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2010-02-01

    Voxelation creates expression atlases by high-throughput analysis of spatially registered cubes or voxels harvested from the brain. The modality independence of voxelation allows a variety of bioanalytical techniques to be used to map abundance. Protein expression patterns in the brain can be obtained using liquid chromatography (LC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS). Here we describe the methodology of voxelation as it pertains particularly to LC-MS proteomic analysis: sample preparation, instrumental set up and analysis, peptide identification and protein relative abundance quantitation. We also briefly describe some of the advantages, limitations and insights into the brain that can be obtained using combined proteomic and transcriptomic maps

  4. Z-score biological significance of binding hot spots of protein interfaces by using crystal packing as the reference state.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Wong, Limsoon; Li, Jinyan

    2012-12-01

    Characterization of binding hot spots of protein interfaces is a fundamental study in molecular biology. Many computational methods have been proposed to identify binding hot spots. However, there are few studies to assess the biological significance of binding hot spots. We introduce the notion of biological significance of a contact residue for capturing the probability of the residue occurring in or contributing to protein binding interfaces. We take a statistical Z-score approach to the assessment of the biological significance. The method has three main steps. First, the potential score of a residue is defined by using a knowledge-based potential function with relative accessible surface area calculations. A null distribution of this potential score is then generated from artifact crystal packing contacts. Finally, the Z-score significance of a contact residue with a specific potential score is determined according to this null distribution. We hypothesize that residues at binding hot spots have big absolute values of Z-score as they contribute greatly to binding free energy. Thus, we propose to use Z-score to predict whether a contact residue is a hot spot residue. Comparison with previously reported methods on two benchmark datasets shows that this Z-score method is mostly superior to earlier methods. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Methods for Protein Interaction and Structural Prediction.

  5. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E.; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D.; Chrisler, William B.; Markillie, Lye M.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Sorger, Peter K.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H. Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components—16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators—of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling. PMID:27405981

  6. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D; Chrisler, William B; Markillie, Lye M; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Smith, Richard D; Rodland, Karin D; Sorger, Peter K; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components-16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators-of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling. PMID:27405981

  7. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Frank W.; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or multiple genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) 1. Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power 2–6. Consequently, many eQTL are likely missed, especially those with smaller effects 7. Further, most studies use mRNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics 8–13 reported surprising differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes 9,10, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here, we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyes cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green-fluorescent-protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high vs. low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci cluster at hotspot locations that influence multiple proteins—in some cases, more than half of those examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell physiology between yeast strains. PMID:24402228

  8. Envelope Proteins of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) Interact with Litopenaeus vannamei Peritrophin-Like Protein (LvPT)

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shijun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jiquan; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen in shrimp cultures. The interactions between viral proteins and their receptors on the surface of cells in a frontier target tissue are crucial for triggering an infection. In this study, a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) library was constructed using cDNA obtained from the stomach and gut of Litopenaeus vannamei, to ascertain the role of envelope proteins in WSSV infection. For this purpose, VP37 was used as the bait in the Y2H library screening. Forty positive clones were detected after screening. The positive clones were analyzed and discriminated, and two clones belonging to the peritrophin family were subsequently confirmed as genuine positive clones. Sequence analysis revealed that both clones could be considered as the same gene, LV-peritrophin (LvPT). Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between LvPT and VP37. Further studies in the Y2H system revealed that LvPT could also interact with other WSSV envelope proteins such as VP32, VP38A, VP39B, and VP41A. The distribution of LvPT in tissues revealed that LvPT was mainly expressed in the stomach than in other tissues. In addition, LvPT was found to be a secretory protein, and its chitin-binding ability was also confirmed. PMID:26692362

  9. Envelope Proteins of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) Interact with Litopenaeus vannamei Peritrophin-Like Protein (LvPT).

    PubMed

    Xie, Shijun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zhang, Jiquan; Li, Fuhua; Xiang, Jianhai

    2015-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen in shrimp cultures. The interactions between viral proteins and their receptors on the surface of cells in a frontier target tissue are crucial for triggering an infection. In this study, a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) library was constructed using cDNA obtained from the stomach and gut of Litopenaeus vannamei, to ascertain the role of envelope proteins in WSSV infection. For this purpose, VP37 was used as the bait in the Y2H library screening. Forty positive clones were detected after screening. The positive clones were analyzed and discriminated, and two clones belonging to the peritrophin family were subsequently confirmed as genuine positive clones. Sequence analysis revealed that both clones could be considered as the same gene, LV-peritrophin (LvPT). Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed the interaction between LvPT and VP37. Further studies in the Y2H system revealed that LvPT could also interact with other WSSV envelope proteins such as VP32, VP38A, VP39B, and VP41A. The distribution of LvPT in tissues revealed that LvPT was mainly expressed in the stomach than in other tissues. In addition, LvPT was found to be a secretory protein, and its chitin-binding ability was also confirmed.

  10. Induction of necrosis via mitochondrial targeting of Melon necrotic spot virus replication protein p29 by its second transmembrane domain

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Hirai, Katsuyuki; Kanda, Ayami; Ohnishi, Jun; Ohki, Takehiro; Tsuda, Shinya

    2009-08-01

    The virulence factor of Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV), a virus that induces systemic necrotic spot disease on melon plants, was investigated. When the replication protein p29 was expressed in N. benthamiana using a Cucumber mosaic virus vector, necrotic spots appeared on the leaf tissue. Transmission electron microscopy revealed abnormal mitochondrial aggregation in these tissues. Fractionation of tissues expressing p29 and confocal imaging using GFP-tagged p29 revealed that p29 associated with the mitochondrial membrane as an integral membrane protein. Expression analysis of p29 deletion fragments and prediction of hydrophobic transmembrane domains (TMDs) in p29 showed that deletion of the second putative TMD from p29 led to deficiencies in both the mitochondrial localization and virulence of p29. Taken together, these results indicated that MNSV p29 interacts with the mitochondrial membrane and that p29 may be a virulence factor causing the observed necrosis.

  11. Isolation and characterization of hardening-induced proteins in Chlorella vulgaris C-27: identification of late embryogenesis abundant proteins.

    PubMed

    Honjoh, K; Yoshimoto, M; Joh, T; Kajiwara, T; Miyamoto, T; Hatano, S

    1995-12-01

    Hardening-induced soluble proteins of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerink IAM C-27 (formerly Chlorella ellipsoidea Gerneck IAM C-27) were isolated and purified by two-dimensional high-performance liquid chromatography (2D-HPLC) on an anion-exchange column, with subsequent reversed-phase chromatography. Some of the proteins were resolved by SDS-PAGE, characterized by amino-terminal sequencing and identified by searching for homologies in databases. Separation of the soluble proteins during the hardening of Chlorella by a combination of 2D-HPLC and SDS-PAGE revealed that at least 31 proteins were induced or increased in abundance. Of particular interest was the induction after 12 h of a 10-kDa protein with the amino-terminal amino acid sequence AGNKPITEQISDAVGAAGQKVG and the induction after 6 h of a 14-kDa protein with the amino-terminal sequence ALGEESLGDKAKNAFEDAKDAVKDAAGNVKEAV. The amino-terminal sequences of these proteins indicated that they were homologous to late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. Furthermore, the level of a 22-kDa protein also increased after 12 h. The amino-terminal sequence of this protein, AAPLVGGPAPDFTAAAVFD, indicated that it was homologous to thioredoxin peroxidase. PMID:8589927

  12. Hsp90 is involved in the regulation of cytosolic precursor protein abundance in tomato.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, Bodo; Röth, Sascha; Bublak, Daniela; Sommer, Manuel; Stelzer, Ernst H K; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter; Schleiff, Enrico

    2015-02-01

    Cytosolic chaperones are involved in the regulation of cellular protein homeostasis in general. Members of the families of heat stress proteins 70 (Hsp70) and 90 (Hsp90) assist the transport of preproteins to organelles such as chloroplasts or mitochondria. In addition, Hsp70 was described to be involved in the degradation of chloroplast preproteins that accumulate in the cytosol. Because a similar function has not been established for Hsp90, we analyzed the influences of Hsp90 and Hsp70 on the protein abundance in the cellular context using an in vivo system based on mesophyll protoplasts. We observed a differential behavior of preproteins with respect to the cytosolic chaperone-dependent regulation. Some preproteins such as pOE33 show a high dependence on Hsp90, whereas the abundance of preproteins such as pSSU is more strongly dependent on Hsp70. The E3 ligase, C-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (Chip), appears to have a more general role in the control of cytosolic protein abundance. We discuss why the different reaction modes are comparable with the cytosolic unfolded protein response. PMID:25619681

  13. The FTMap family of web servers for determining and characterizing ligand-binding hot spots of proteins.

    PubMed

    Kozakov, Dima; Grove, Laurie E; Hall, David R; Bohnuud, Tanggis; Mottarella, Scott E; Luo, Lingqi; Xia, Bing; Beglov, Dmitri; Vajda, Sandor

    2015-05-01

    FTMap is a computational mapping server that identifies binding hot spots of macromolecules-i.e., regions of the surface with major contributions to the ligand-binding free energy. To use FTMap, users submit a protein, DNA or RNA structure in PDB (Protein Data Bank) format. FTMap samples billions of positions of small organic molecules used as probes, and it scores the probe poses using a detailed energy expression. Regions that bind clusters of multiple probe types identify the binding hot spots in good agreement with experimental data. FTMap serves as the basis for other servers, namely FTSite, which is used to predict ligand-binding sites, FTFlex, which is used to account for side chain flexibility, FTMap/param, used to parameterize additional probes and FTDyn, for mapping ensembles of protein structures. Applications include determining the druggability of proteins, identifying ligand moieties that are most important for binding, finding the most bound-like conformation in ensembles of unliganded protein structures and providing input for fragment-based drug design. FTMap is more accurate than classical mapping methods such as GRID and MCSS, and it is much faster than the more-recent approaches to protein mapping based on mixed molecular dynamics. By using 16 probe molecules, the FTMap server finds the hot spots of an average-size protein in <1 h. As FTFlex performs mapping for all low-energy conformers of side chains in the binding site, its completion time is proportionately longer.

  14. VP24 Is a Chitin-Binding Protein Involved in White Spot Syndrome Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zaipeng; Han, Yali; Xu, Limei

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oral ingestion is the major route of infection for the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). However, the mechanism by which virus particles in the digestive tract invade host cells is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that WSSV virions can bind to chitin through one of the major envelope proteins (VP24). Mutagenesis analysis indicated that amino acids (aa) 186 to 200 in the C terminus of VP24 were required for chitin binding. Moreover, the P-VP24186–200 peptide derived from the VP24 chitin binding region significantly inhibited the VP24-chitin interaction and the WSSV-chitin interaction, implying that VP24 participates in WSSV binding to chitin. Oral inoculation experiments showed that P-VP24186–200 treatment reduced the number of virus particles remaining in the digestive tract during the early stage of infection and greatly hindered WSSV proliferation in shrimp. These data indicate that binding of WSSV to chitin through the viral envelope protein VP24 is essential for WSSV per os infection and provide new ideas for preventing WSSV infection in shrimp farms. IMPORTANCE In this study, we show that WSSV can bind to chitin through the envelope protein VP24. The chitin-binding domain of VP24 maps to amino acids 186 to 200 in the C terminus. Binding of WSSV to chitin through the viral envelope protein VP24 is essential for WSSV per os infection. These findings not only extend our knowledge of WSSV infection but also provide new insights into strategies to prevent WSSV infection in shrimp farms. PMID:26512091

  15. ICP35 Is a TREX-Like Protein Identified in White Spot Syndrome Virus

    PubMed Central

    Phairoh, Panapat; Suthibatpong, Thana; Rattanarojpong, Triwit; Jongruja, Nujarin; Senapin, Saengchan; Choowongkomon, Kiattawee; Khunrae, Pongsak

    2016-01-01

    ICP35 is a non-structural protein from White spot syndrome virus believed to be important in viral replication. Since ICP35 was found to localize in the host nucleus, it has been speculated that the function of ICP35 might be involved in the interaction of DNA. In this study, we overexpressed, purified and characterized ICP35. The thioredoxin-fused ICP35 (thio-ICP35) was strongly expressed in E. coli and be able to form itself into dimers. Investigation of the interaction between ICP35 and DNA revealed that ICP35 can perform DNase activity. Structural model of ICP35 was successfully built on TREX1, suggesting that ICP35 might adopt the folding similar to that of TREX1 protein. Several residues important for dimerization in TREX1 are also conserved in ICP35. Residue Asn126 and Asp132, which are seen to be in close proximity to metal ions in the ICP35 model, were shown through site-directed mutagenesis to be critical for DNase activity. PMID:27348862

  16. Using antibody arrays to measure protein abundance and glycosylation: considerations for optimal performance.

    PubMed

    Haab, Brian B; Partyka, Katie; Cao, Zheng

    2013-09-24

    Antibody arrays provide a valuable method for obtaining multiple protein measurements from small volumes of biological samples. Antibody arrays can be designed to target not only core protein abundances (relative or absolute abundances, depending on the availability of standards for calibration), but also posttranslational modifications, provided antibodies or other affinity reagents are available to detect them. Glycosylation is a common modification that has important and diverse functions in both normal and disease biology. Significant progress has been made in developing methods for measuring glycan levels on multiple specific proteins using antibody arrays and glycan-binding reagents. This unit describes practical approaches for developing, optimizing, and using antibody array assays to determine both protein abundance and glycosylation state. Low-volume arrays can be used to reduce sample consumption, and a new way to improve the binding strength of particular glycan-binding reagents through multimerization is discussed. These methods can be useful for a wide range of biological studies in which glycosylation may change and/or affect protein function.

  17. Identification of Proteins of Altered Abundance in Oil Palm Infected with Ganoderma boninense

    PubMed Central

    Al-Obaidi, Jameel R.; Mohd-Yusuf, Yusmin; Razali, Nurhanani; Jayapalan, Jaime Jacqueline; Tey, Chin-Chong; Md-Noh, Normahnani; Junit, Sarni Mat; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Hashim, Onn Haji

    2014-01-01

    Basal stem rot is a common disease that affects oil palm, causing loss of yield and finally killing the trees. The disease, caused by fungus Ganoderma boninense, devastates thousands of hectares of oil palm plantings in Southeast Asia every year. In the present study, root proteins of healthy oil palm seedlings, and those infected with G. boninense, were analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). When the 2-DE profiles were analyzed for proteins, which exhibit consistent significant change of abundance upon infection with G. boninense, 21 passed our screening criteria. Subsequent analyses by mass spectrometry and database search identified caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase, enolase, fructokinase, cysteine synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and ATP synthase as among proteins of which abundances were markedly altered. PMID:24663087

  18. Identification of proteins of altered abundance in oil palm infected with Ganoderma boninense.

    PubMed

    Al-Obaidi, Jameel R; Mohd-Yusuf, Yusmin; Razali, Nurhanani; Jayapalan, Jaime Jacqueline; Tey, Chin-Chong; Md-Noh, Normahnani; Junit, Sarni Mat; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Hashim, Onn Haji

    2014-01-01

    Basal stem rot is a common disease that affects oil palm, causing loss of yield and finally killing the trees. The disease, caused by fungus Ganoderma boninense, devastates thousands of hectares of oil palm plantings in Southeast Asia every year. In the present study, root proteins of healthy oil palm seedlings, and those infected with G. boninense, were analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). When the 2-DE profiles were analyzed for proteins, which exhibit consistent significant change of abundance upon infection with G. boninense, 21 passed our screening criteria. Subsequent analyses by mass spectrometry and database search identified caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase, enolase, fructokinase, cysteine synthase, malate dehydrogenase, and ATP synthase as among proteins of which abundances were markedly altered. PMID:24663087

  19. Expression, Purification, Crystallization of Two Major Envelope Proteins from White Spot Syndrome Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Tang,X.; Hew, C.

    2007-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major virulent pathogen known to infect penaeid shrimp and other crustaceans. VP26 and VP28, two major envelope proteins from WSSV, have been identified and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. In order to facilitate purification and crystallization, predicted N-terminal transmembrane regions of approximately 35 amino acids have been truncated from both VP26 and VP28. Truncated VP26 and VP28 and their corresponding SeMet-labelled proteins were purified and the SeMet proteins were crystallized by the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 were obtained using a reservoir consisting of 0.1 M citric acid pH 3.5, 3.0 M sodium chloride and 1%(w/v) polyethylene glycol 3350, whereas SeMet VP28 was crystallized using a reservoir solution consisting of 25% polyethylene glycol 8000, 0.2 M calcium acetate, 0.1 M Na HEPES pH 7.5 and 1.5%(w/v) 1,2,3-heptanetriol. Crystals of SeMet-labelled VP26 diffract to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution and belong to space group R32, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 73.92, c = 199.31 {angstrom}. SeMet-labelled VP28 crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 105.33, b = 106.71, c = 200.37 {angstrom}, and diffracts to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution.

  20. Proteomic analysis reveals differential accumulation of small heat shock proteins and late embryogenesis abundant proteins between ABA-deficient mutant vp5 seeds and wild-type Vp5 seeds in maize.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Gong, Fangping; Yang, Le; Hu, Xiuli; Tai, Fuju; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    ABA is a major plant hormone that plays important roles during many phases of plant life cycle, including seed development, maturity and dormancy, and especially the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. Understanding of the molecular basis of ABA-mediated plant response to stress is of interest not only in basic research on plant adaptation but also in applied research on plant productivity. Maize mutant viviparous-5 (vp5), deficient in ABA biosynthesis in seeds, is a useful material for studying ABA-mediated response in maize. Due to carotenoid deficiency, vp5 endosperm is white, compared to yellow Vp5 endosperm. However, the background difference at proteome level between vp5 and Vp5 seeds is unclear. This study aimed to characterize proteome alterations of maize vp5 seeds and to identify ABA-dependent proteins during seed maturation. We compared the embryo and endosperm proteomes of vp5 and Vp5 seeds by gel-based proteomics. Up to 46 protein spots, most in embryos, were found to be differentially accumulated between vp5 and Vp5. The identified proteins included small heat shock proteins (sHSPs), late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, stress proteins, storage proteins and enzymes among others. However, EMB564, the most abundant LEA protein in maize embryo, accumulated in comparable levels between vp5 and Vp5 embryos, which contrasted to previously characterized, greatly lowered expression of emb564 mRNA in vp5 embryos. Moreover, LEA proteins and sHSPs displayed differential accumulations in vp5 embryos: six out of eight identified LEA proteins decreased while nine sHSPs increased in abundance. Finally, we discussed the possible causes of global proteome alterations, especially the observed differential accumulation of identified LEA proteins and sHSPs in vp5 embryos. The data derived from this study provides new insight into ABA-dependent proteins and ABA-mediated response during maize seed maturation. PMID:25653661

  1. Detection of ligand binding hot spots on protein surfaces via fragment-based methods: application to DJ-1 and glucocerebrosidase

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, Melissa R.; Lieberman, Raquel L.; Hoang, Quyen Q.; Ju, Shulin; Caaveiro, Jose M.M.; Orwig, Susan D.; Kozakov, Dima; Brenke, Ryan; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Beglov, Dmitry; Vajda, Sandor; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar

    2010-08-04

    The identification of hot spots, i.e., binding regions that contribute substantially to the free energy of ligand binding, is a critical step for structure-based drug design. Here we present the application of two fragment-based methods to the detection of hot spots for DJ-1 and glucocerebrosidase (GCase), targets for the development of therapeutics for Parkinson's and Gaucher's diseases, respectively. While the structures of these two proteins are known, binding information is lacking. In this study we employ the experimental multiple solvent crystal structures (MSCS) method and computational fragment mapping (FTMap) to identify regions suitable for the development of pharmacological chaperones for DJ-1 and GCase. Comparison of data derived via MSCS and FTMap also shows that FTMap, a computational method for the identification of fragment binding hot spots, is an accurate and robust alternative to the performance of expensive and difficult crystallographic experiments.

  2. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease.

  3. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease. PMID:27453073

  4. Mutations in Protein-Binding Hot-Spots on the Hub Protein Smad3 Differentially Affect Its Protein Interactions and Smad3-Regulated Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schiro, Michelle M.; Stauber, Sara E.; Peterson, Tami L.; Krueger, Chateen; Darnell, Steven J.; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Drinkwater, Norman R.; Newton, Michael A.; Hoffmann, F. Michael

    2011-01-01

    Background Hub proteins are connected through binding interactions to many other proteins. Smad3, a mediator of signal transduction induced by transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), serves as a hub protein for over 50 protein-protein interactions. Different cellular responses mediated by Smad3 are the product of cell-type and context dependent Smad3-nucleated protein complexes acting in concert. Our hypothesis is that perturbation of this spectrum of protein complexes by mutation of single protein-binding hot-spots on Smad3 will have distinct consequences on Smad3-mediated responses. Methodology/Principal Findings We mutated 28 amino acids on the surface of the Smad3 MH2 domain and identified 22 Smad3 variants with reduced binding to subsets of 17 Smad3-binding proteins including Smad4, SARA, Ski, Smurf2 and SIP1. Mutations defective in binding to Smad4, e.g., D408H, or defective in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, e.g., W406A, were compromised in modulating the expression levels of a Smad3-dependent reporter gene or six endogenous Smad3-responsive genes: Mmp9, IL11, Tnfaip6, Fermt1, Olfm2 and Wnt11. However, the Smad3 mutants Y226A, Y297A, W326A, K341A, and E267A had distinct differences on TGF-β signaling. For example, K341A and Y226A both reduced the Smad3-mediated activation of the reporter gene by ∼50% but K341A only reduced the TGF-β inducibilty of Olfm2 in contrast to Y226A which reduced the TGF-β inducibility of all six endogenous genes as severely as the W406A mutation. E267A had increased protein binding but reduced TGF-β inducibility because it caused higher basal levels of expression. Y297A had increased TGF-β inducibility because it caused lower Smad3-induced basal levels of gene expression. Conclusions/Significance Mutations in protein binding hot-spots on Smad3 reduced the binding to different subsets of interacting proteins and caused a range of quantitative changes in the expression of genes induced by Smad3. This approach should be useful

  5. Molecular docking analyses of Avicennia marinaderived phytochemicals against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) envelope protein-VP28.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Sunil Kumar; Kathiresan, Kandasamy; Singh, Reena; Senthilraja, Poomalai

    2012-01-01

    White spot syndrome (WSS) is one of the most common and most disastrous diseases of shrimp worldwide. It causes up to 100% mortality within 3 to 4 days in commercial shrimp farms, resulting in large economic losses to the shrimp farming industry. VP28 envelope protein of WSSV is reported to play a key role in the systemic infection in shrimps. Considering the most sombre issue of viral disease in cultivated shrimp, the present study was undertaken to substantiate the inhibition potential of Avicennia marinaderived phytochemicals against the WSSV envelope protein VP28. Seven A. marina-derived phytochemicals namely stigmasterol, triterpenoid, betulin, lupeol, avicenol-A, betulinic acid and quercetin were docked against the WSSV protein VP28 by using Argus lab molecular docking software. The chemical structures of the phytochemicals were retrieved from Pubchem database and generated from SMILES notation. Similarly the protein structure of the envelope protein was obtained from protein data bank (PDB-ID: 2ED6). Binding sites were predicted by using ligand explorer software. Among the phytochemicals screened, stigmasterol, lupeol and betulin showed the best binding exhibiting the potential to block VP28 envelope protein of WSSV, which could possibly inhibit the attachment of WSSV to the host species. Further experimental studies will provide a clear understanding on the mode of action of these phytochemicals individually or synergistically against WSSV envelope protein and can be used as an inhibitory drug to reduce white spot related severe complications in crustaceans.

  6. Preferential Binding of Hot Spot Mutant p53 Proteins to Supercoiled DNA In Vitro and in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brázdová, Marie; Navrátilová, Lucie; Tichý, Vlastimil; Němcová, Kateřina; Lexa, Matej; Hrstka, Roman; Pečinka, Petr; Adámik, Matej; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Paleček, Emil; Deppert, Wolfgang; Fojta, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Hot spot mutant p53 (mutp53) proteins exert oncogenic gain-of-function activities. Binding of mutp53 to DNA is assumed to be involved in mutp53-mediated repression or activation of several mutp53 target genes. To investigate the importance of DNA topology on mutp53-DNA recognition in vitro and in cells, we analyzed the interaction of seven hot spot mutp53 proteins with topologically different DNA substrates (supercoiled, linear and relaxed) containing and/or lacking mutp53 binding sites (mutp53BS) using a variety of electrophoresis and immunoprecipitation based techniques. All seven hot spot mutp53 proteins (R175H, G245S, R248W, R249S, R273C, R273H and R282W) were found to have retained the ability of wild-type p53 to preferentially bind circular DNA at native negative superhelix density, while linear or relaxed circular DNA was a poor substrate. The preference of mutp53 proteins for supercoiled DNA (supercoil-selective binding) was further substantiated by competition experiments with linear DNA or relaxed DNA in vitro and ex vivo. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, the preferential binding of mutp53 to a sc mutp53BS was detected also in cells. Furthermore, we have shown by luciferase reporter assay that the DNA topology influences p53 regulation of BAX and MSP/MST1 promoters. Possible modes of mutp53 binding to topologically constrained DNA substrates and their biological consequences are discussed. PMID:23555710

  7. Changes in protein abundance are observed in bacterial isolates from a natural host

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Megan A.; Stinear, Timothy P.; Goode, Robert J. A.; Coppel, Ross L.; Smith, Alexander I.; Kleifeld, Oded

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial proteomic studies frequently use strains cultured in synthetic liquid media over many generations. It is uncertain whether bacterial proteins expressed under these conditions will be the same as the repertoire found in natural environments, or when bacteria are infecting a host organism. Thus, genomic and proteomic characterization of bacteria derived from the host environment in comparison to reference strains grown in the lab, should aid understanding of pathogenesis. Isolates of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis were obtained from the lymph nodes of three naturally infected sheep and compared to a laboratory reference strain using bottom-up proteomics, after whole genome sequencing of each of the field isolates. These comparisons were performed following growth in liquid media that allowed us to reach the required protein amount for proteomic analysis. Over 1350 proteins were identified in the isolated strains, from which unique proteome features were revealed. Several of the identified proteins demonstrated a significant abundance difference in the field isolates compared to the reference strain even though there were no obvious differences in the DNA sequence of the corresponding gene or in nearby non-coding DNA. Higher abundance in the field isolates was observed for proteins related to hypoxia and nutrient deficiency responses as well as to thiopeptide biosynthesis. PMID:26528441

  8. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota. PMID:27042829

  9. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota. PMID:27042829

  10. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota.

  11. Identification of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Protein Putative Interactors Using Phage Display

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Lloyd, Taylor D.; Schäfermeyer, Kim R.; Kumar, Santosh; Downie, Allan Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana seeds without functional SEED MATURATION PROTEIN1 (SMP1), a boiling soluble protein predicted to be of intrinsic disorder, presumed to be a LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT (LEA) family protein based on sequence homology, do not enter secondary dormancy after 3 days at 40 °C. We hypothesized that SMP1 may protect a heat labile protein involved in the promotion of secondary dormancy. Recombinant SMP1 and GmPM28, its soybean (Glycine max), LEA4 homologue, protected the labile GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYROGENASE enzyme from heat stress, as did a known protectant, Bovine Serum Albumin, whether the LEA protein was in solution or attached to the bottom of microtiter plates. Maintenance of a biological function for both recombinant LEA proteins when immobilized encouraged a biopanning approach to screen for potential protein interactors. Phage display with two Arabidopsis seed, T7 phage, cDNA libraries, normalized for transcripts present in the mature, dehydrated, 12-, 24-, or 36-h imbibed seeds, were used in biopans against recombinant SMP1 and GmPM28. Phage titer increased considerably over four rounds of biopanning for both LEA proteins, but not for BSA, at both 25 and at 41 °C, regardless of the library used. The prevalence of multiple, independent clones encoding portions of specific proteins repeatedly retrieved from different libraries, temperatures and baits, provides evidence suggesting these LEA proteins are discriminating which proteins they protect, a novel finding. The identification of putative LEA-interacting proteins provides targets for reverse genetic approaches to further dissect the induction of secondary dormancy in seeds in response to heat stress. PMID:22837651

  12. Protein abundance of clinically relevant multidrug transporters along the entire length of the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Drozdzik, Marek; Gröer, Christian; Penski, Jette; Lapczuk, Joanna; Ostrowski, Marek; Lai, Yurong; Prasad, Bhagwat; Unadkat, Jashvant D; Siegmund, Werner; Oswald, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Intestinal transporters are crucial determinants in the oral absorption of many drugs. We therefore studied the mRNA expression (N = 33) and absolute protein content (N = 10) of clinically relevant transporters in healthy epithelium of the duodenum, the proximal and distal jejunum and ileum, and the ascending, transversal, descending, and sigmoidal colon of six organ donors (24-54 years). In the small intestine, the abundance of nearly all studied proteins ranged between 0.2 and 1.6 pmol/mg with the exception of those of OCT3 (<0.1 pmol/mg) and PEPT1 (2.6-4.9 pmol/mg) that accounted for ∼50% of all measured transporters. OATP1A2 was not detected in any intestinal segment. ABCB1, ABCG2, PEPT1, and ASBT were significantly more abundant in jejunum and ileum than in colon. In contrast to this, the level of expression of ABCC2, ABCC3, and OCT3 was found to be highest in colon. Site-dependent differences in the levels of gene and protein expression were observed for ABCB1 and ASBT. Significant correlations between mRNA and protein levels have been found for ABCG2, ASBT, OCT3, and PEPT1 in the small intestine. Our data provide further physiological pieces of the puzzle required to predict intestinal drug absorption in humans.

  13. A Systems Approach to Elucidate Heterosis of Protein Abundances in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Blein-Nicolas, Mélisande; Albertin, Warren; da Silva, Telma; Valot, Benoît; Balliau, Thierry; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe; Sicard, Delphine; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Zivy, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Heterosis is a universal phenomenon that has major implications in evolution and is of tremendous agro-economic value. To study the molecular manifestations of heterosis and to find factors that maximize its strength, we implemented a large-scale proteomic experiment in yeast. We analyzed the inheritance of 1,396 proteins in 55 inter- and intraspecific hybrids obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum that were grown in grape juice at two temperatures. We showed that the proportion of heterotic proteins was highly variable depending on the parental strain and on the temperature considered. For intraspecific hybrids, this proportion was higher at nonoptimal temperature. Unexpectedly, heterosis for protein abundance was strongly biased toward positive values in interspecific hybrids but not in intraspecific hybrids. Computer modeling showed that this observation could be accounted for by assuming concave relationships between protein abundances and their controlling factors, in line with the metabolic model of heterosis. These results point to nonlinear processes that could play a central role in heterosis. PMID:25971257

  14. Changes in Relative Thylakoid Protein Abundance Induced by Fluctuating Light in the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Grouneva, Irina; Muth-Pawlak, Dorota; Battchikova, Natalia; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2016-05-01

    One of the hallmarks of marine diatom biology is their ability to cope with rapid changes in light availability due to mixing of the water column and the lens effect. We investigated how irradiance fluctuations influence the relative abundance of key photosynthetic proteins in the centric diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana by means of mass-spectrometry-based approaches for relative protein quantitation. Most notably, fluctuating-light conditions lead to a substantial overall up-regulation of light-harvesting complex proteins as well as several subunits of photosystems II and I. Despite an initial delay in growth under FL, there were no indications of FL-induced photosynthesis limitation, in contrast to other photosynthetic organisms. Our findings further strengthen the notion that diatoms use a qualitatively different mechanism of photosynthetic regulation in which chloroplast-mitochondria interaction has overtaken crucial regulatory processes of photosynthetic light reactions that are typical for the survival of land plants, green algae, and cyanobacteria. PMID:27025989

  15. Mass Spectrometry and Next-Generation Sequencing Reveal an Abundant and Rapidly Evolving Abalone Sperm Protein

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Melody R.; McDowall, Margo H.; Stewart, Lia; Ouaddi, Aleena; MacCoss, Michael J.; Swanson, Willie J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Abalone, a broadcast spawning marine mollusk, is an important model for molecular interactions and positive selection in fertilization, but the focus has previously been on only two sperm proteins, lysin and sp18.We used genomic and proteomic techniques to bring new insights to this model by characterizing the testis transcriptome and sperm proteome of the Red abalone Haliotis rufescens. One pair of homologous, testis-specific proteins contains a secretion signal and is small, abundant, and associated with the acrosome. Comparative analysis revealed that homologs are extremely divergent between species, and show strong evidence for positive selection. The acrosomal localization and rapid evolution of these proteins indicates that they play an important role in fertilization, and could be involved in the species-specificity of sperm-egg interactions in abalone. Our genomic and proteomic characterization of abalone fertilization resulted in the identification of interesting, novel peptides that have eluded detection in this important model system for 20 years. PMID:23585193

  16. Protein Abundance Changes and Ubiquitylation Targets Identified after Inhibition of the Proteasome with Syringolin A*

    PubMed Central

    Svozil, Julia; Hirsch-Hoffmann, Matthias; Dudler, Robert; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baerenfaller, Katja

    2014-01-01

    As proteins are the main effectors inside cells, their levels need to be tightly regulated. This is partly achieved by specific protein degradation via the Ubiquitin-26S proteasome system (UPS). In plants, an exceptionally high number of proteins are involved in Ubiquitin-26S proteasome system-mediated protein degradation and it is known to regulate most, if not all, important cellular processes. Here, we investigated the response to the inhibition of the proteasome at the protein level treating leaves with the specific inhibitor Syringolin A (SylA) in a daytime specific manner and found 109 accumulated and 140 decreased proteins. The patterns of protein level changes indicate that the accumulating proteins cause proteotoxic stress that triggers various responses. Comparing protein level changes in SylA treated with those in a transgenic line over-expressing a mutated ubiquitin unable to form polyubiquitylated proteins produced little overlap pointing to different response pathways. To distinguish between direct and indirect targets of the UPS we also enriched and identified ubiquitylated proteins after inhibition of the proteasome, revealing a total of 1791 ubiquitylated proteins in leaves and roots and 1209 that were uniquely identified in our study. The comparison of the ubiquitylated proteins with those changing in abundance after SylA-mediated inhibition of the proteasome confirmed the complexity of the response and revealed that some proteins are regulated both at transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. For the ubiquitylated proteins that accumulate in the cytoplasm but are targeted to the plastid or the mitochondrion, we often found peptides in their target sequences, demonstrating that the UPS is involved in controlling organellar protein levels. Attempts to identify the sites of ubiquitylation revealed that the specific properties of this post-translational modification can lead to incorrect peptide spectrum assignments in complex peptide mixtures

  17. Improved method for identification of low abundance proteins using 2D-gel electrophoresis, MALDI-TOF and TOF/TOF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Differential protein expression studies have been routinely performed in our laboratory to determine the health effects of environmentally-important chemicals. In this abstract, improvements in the in-gel protein digestion, MALDI plate spotting and data acquisition...

  18. Nanomagnetic competition assay for low-abundance protein biomarker quantification in unprocessed human sera.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanpeng; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian; Jing, Ying; Yao, Xiaofeng; Hugger, Marie A; Wang, Jian-Ping; Xing, Chengguo

    2010-03-31

    A novel giant magnetoresistive sensor and uniform high-magnetic-moment FeCo nanoparticles (12.8 nm)-based detecting platform with minimized detecting distance was developed for rapid biomolecule quantification from body fluids. Such a system demonstrates specific, accurate, and quick detection and quantification of interleukin-6, a low-abundance protein and a potential cancer biomarker, directly in 4 muL of unprocessed human sera. This platform is expected to facilitate the identification and validation of disease biomarkers. It may eventually lead to a low-cost personal medical device for chronic disease early detection, diagnosis, and prognosis.

  19. Characterization of the Bacterioferritin/Bacterioferritin Associated Ferredoxin Protein-Protein Interaction in Solution and Determination of Binding Energy Hot Spots.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Yao, Huili; Cheng, Yuan; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P; Midaugh, C Russell; Rivera, Mario

    2015-10-13

    Mobilization of iron stored in the interior cavity of BfrB requires electron transfer from the [2Fe−2S] cluster in Bfd to the core iron in BfrB. A crystal structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa BfrB:Bfd complex revealed that BfrB can bind up to 12 Bfd molecules at 12 structurally identical binding sites, placing the [2Fe−2S] cluster of each Bfd immediately above a heme group in BfrB [Yao, H., et al. (2012) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 134, 13470−13481]. We report here study aimed at characterizing the strength of the P. aeruginosa BfrB:Bfd association using surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry as well as determining the binding energy hot spots at the protein−protein interaction interface. The results show that the 12 Bfd-binding sites on BfrB are equivalent and independent and that the protein−protein association at each of these sites is driven entropically and is characterized by a dissociation constant (Kd) of approximately 3 μM. Determination of the binding energy hot spots was carried out by replacing certain residues that comprise the protein−protein interface with alanine and by evaluating the effect of the mutation on Kd and on the efficiency of core iron mobilization from BfrB. The results identified hot spot residues in both proteins [LB 68, EA 81, and EA 85 in BfrB (superscript for residue number and subscript for chain) and Y2 and L5 in Bfd] that network at the interface to produce a highly complementary hot region for the interaction. The hot spot residues are conserved in the amino acid sequences of Bfr and Bfd proteins from a number of Gram-negative pathogens, indicating that the BfrB:Bfd interaction is of widespread significance in bacterial iron metabolism.

  20. Low-abundant protein extraction from complex protein sample using a novel continuous aqueous two-phase systems device.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Villegas, Patricia; Espitia-Saloma, Edith; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Aguilar, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    The present work describes the application of a novel continuous aqueous two-phase system prototype for the recovery of biomolecules. The prototype is an alternative platform for protein recovery and α-amylase from soybean extracts was used as a model system. The system was selected as an example of low-abundant protein present in complex mixtures. Compared with batch systems, continuous operation in this prototype seems to increase partition coefficient with higher recovery efficiencies. Processing time is reduced at least three times in the continuous system when compared to batch mode, while hold up (volumetric quantity of the opposing phase in a determined phase sample) decreases with decreasing phases flow. Furthermore, similar partition coefficient (Kp > 4) with a higher top phase enzyme recovery (81%) is also obtained in this system probably due to better contact surface between phases, compared with that obtained in batch (79%). A continuous aqueous two-phase system process with purification factor 40-fold higher than batch experiments was achieved. These preliminary results exhibit the potential of continuous systems for the recovery of low-abundant proteins from complex mixtures. The promising performance of this prototype can raise the attention of the industry for the adoption of aqueous two-phase system processes.

  1. Selected Reaction Monitoring to Determine Protein Abundance in Arabidopsis Using the Arabidopsis Proteotypic Predictor1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Nicolas L.; Fenske, Ricarda; Castleden, Ian; Tomaz, Tiago; Nelson, Clark J.; Millar, A. Harvey

    2014-01-01

    In reverse genetic knockout (KO) studies that aim to assign function to specific genes, confirming the reduction in abundance of the encoded protein will often aid the link between genotype and phenotype. However, measuring specific protein abundance is particularly difficult in plant research, where only a limited number of antibodies are available. This problem is enhanced when studying gene families or different proteins derived from the same gene (isoforms), as many antibodies cross react with more than one protein. We show that utilizing selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry allows researchers to confirm protein abundance in mutant lines, even when discrimination between very similar proteins is needed. Selecting the best peptides for SRM analysis to ensure that protein- or gene-specific information can be obtained requires a series of steps, aids, and interpretation. To enable this process in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), we have built a Web-based tool, the Arabidopsis Proteotypic Predictor, to select candidate SRM transitions when no previous mass spectrometry evidence exists. We also provide an in-depth analysis of the theoretical Arabidopsis proteome and its use in selecting candidate SRM peptides to establish assays for use in determining protein abundance. To test the effectiveness of SRM mass spectrometry in determining protein abundance in mutant lines, we selected two enzymes with multiple isoforms, aconitase and malate dehydrogenase. Selected peptides were quantified to estimate the abundance of each of the two mitochondrial isoforms in wild-type, KO, double KO, and complemented plant lines. We show that SRM protein analysis is a sensitive and rapid approach to quantify protein abundance differences in Arabidopsis for specific and highly related enzyme isoforms. PMID:24296071

  2. Cold-Regulated Cereal Chloroplast Late Embryogenesis Abundant-Like Proteins. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analyses

    PubMed Central

    NDong, Christian; Danyluk, Jean; Wilson, Kenneth E.; Pocock, Tessa; Huner, Norman P.A.; Sarhan, Fathey

    2002-01-01

    Cold acclimation and freezing tolerance are the result of complex interaction between low temperature, light, and photosystem II (PSII) excitation pressure. Previous results have shown that expression of the Wcs19 gene is correlated with PSII excitation pressure measured in vivo as the relative reduction state of PSII. Using cDNA library screening and data mining, we have identified three different groups of proteins, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) 3-L1, LEA3-L2, and LEA3-L3, sharing identities with WCS19. These groups represent a new class of proteins in cereals related to group 3 LEA proteins. They share important characteristics such as a sorting signal that is predicted to target them to either the chloroplast or mitochondria and a C-terminal sequence that may be involved in oligomerization. The results of subcellular fractionation, immunolocalization by electron microscopy and the analyses of target sequences within the Wcs19 gene are consistent with the localization of WCS19 within the chloroplast stroma of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and rye (Secale cereale). Western analysis showed that the accumulation of chloroplastic LEA3-L2 proteins is correlated with the capacity of different wheat and rye cultivars to develop freezing tolerance. Arabidopsis was transformed with the Wcs19 gene and the transgenic plants showed a significant increase in their freezing tolerance. This increase was only evident in cold-acclimated plants. The putative function of this protein in the enhancement of freezing tolerance is discussed. PMID:12114590

  3. Dual-nanogold-linked bio-barcodes with superstructures for in situ amplified electronic detection of low-abundance proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jun; Zhuang, Junyang; Tang, Juan; Li, Qunfang; Tang, Dianping; Chen, Guonan

    2013-04-01

    A novel and nonenzyme immunosensing protocol is proposed for ultrahighly sensitive detection of low-abundance-proteins (carcinoembryonic antigen as a model) using dual nanogold-linked complementary bio-barcodes with superstructures for in situ amplified electronic signals.

  4. ADP1 affects abundance and endocytosis of PIN-FORMED proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieru; Li, Ruixi; Jiang, Zhaoyun; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia

    2015-01-01

    Auxin, as a vital plant hormone, regulates almost every aspect of plant growth and development. We previously identified a dominant mutant, adp1-D, displaying loss of apical dominance. We also demonstrated that down-regulation of local auxin biosynthesis in adp1-D was responsible for the bushy phenotype of this mutant. Consistent with the reduction of local auxin biosynthesis, we recently discovered that protein abundance of PIN1, PIN3, and PIN7 was reduced in adp1-D without accompanying transcription level changes. Additionally, subcellular analysis revealed that over-expression of ADP1 inhibited endocytosis of PIN proteins. Taken together, we conclude that ADP1 regulates plant architecture through the fine-tuning of local auxin biosynthesis and through post-transcriptional regulation of auxin transporters. PMID:25482774

  5. LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) proteins and their encoding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hundertmark, Michaela; Hincha, Dirk K

    2008-01-01

    Background LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins have first been described about 25 years ago as accumulating late in plant seed development. They were later found in vegetative plant tissues following environmental stress and also in desiccation tolerant bacteria and invertebrates. Although they are widely assumed to play crucial roles in cellular dehydration tolerance, their physiological and biochemical functions are largely unknown. Results We present a genome-wide analysis of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. We identified 51 LEA protein encoding genes in the Arabidopsis genome that could be classified into nine distinct groups. Expression studies were performed on all genes at different developmental stages, in different plant organs and under different stress and hormone treatments using quantitative RT-PCR. We found evidence of expression for all 51 genes. There was only little overlap between genes expressed in vegetative tissues and in seeds and expression levels were generally higher in seeds. Most genes encoding LEA proteins had abscisic acid response (ABRE) and/or low temperature response (LTRE) elements in their promoters and many genes containing the respective promoter elements were induced by abscisic acid, cold or drought. We also found that 33% of all Arabidopsis LEA protein encoding genes are arranged in tandem repeats and that 43% are part of homeologous pairs. The majority of LEA proteins were predicted to be highly hydrophilic and natively unstructured, but some were predicted to be folded. Conclusion The analyses indicate a wide range of sequence diversity, intracellular localizations, and expression patterns. The high fraction of retained duplicate genes and the inferred functional diversification indicate that they confer an evolutionary advantage for an organism under varying stressful environmental conditions. This comprehensive analysis will be an important starting point for future efforts to elucidate

  6. Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation Integrated with High-Throughput Liquid Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A; Qian, Weijun; Chin, Mark H; Wang, Haixing H; Livesay, Eric A; Monroe, Matthew E; Adkins, Joshua N; Jaitly, Navdeep; Anderson, David J; Camp, David G; Smith, Desmond J; Smith, Richard D

    2007-01-25

    Temporally and spatially resolved mapping of protein abundance patterns within the mammalian brain is of significant interest for understanding brain function and molecular etiologies of neurodegenerative diseases; however, such imaging efforts have been greatly challenged by complexity of the proteome, throughput and sensitivity of applied analytical methodologies, and accurate quantitation of protein abundances across the brain. Here, we describe a methodology for comprehensive spatial proteome mapping that addresses these challenges by employing voxelation integrated with automated microscale sample processing, high-throughput LC system coupled with high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer and a “universal” stable isotope labeled reference sample approach for robust quantitation. We applied this methodology as a proof-of-concept trial for the analysis of protein distribution within a single coronal slice of a C57BL/6J mouse brain. For relative quantitation of the protein abundances across the slice, an 18O-isotopically labeled reference sample, derived from a whole control coronal slice from another mouse, was spiked into each voxel sample and stable isotopic intensity ratios were used to obtain measures of relative protein abundances. In total, we generated maps of protein abundance patterns for 1,028 proteins. The significant agreement of the protein distributions with previously reported data supports the validity of this methodology, which opens new opportunities for studying the spatial brain proteome and its dynamics during the course of disease progression and other important biological and associated health aspects in a discovery-driven fashion.

  7. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins protect human hepatoma cells during acute desiccation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shumin; Chakraborty, Nilay; Borcar, Apurva; Menze, Michael A.; Toner, Mehmet; Hand, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    Expression of late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins is highly correlated with desiccation tolerance in anhydrobiotic animals, selected land plants, and bacteria. Genes encoding two LEA proteins, one localized to the cytoplasm/nucleus (AfrLEA2) and one targeted to mitochondria (AfrLEA3m), were stably transfected into human HepG2 cells. A trehalose transporter was used for intracellular loading of this disaccharide. Cells were rapidly and uniformly desiccated to low water content (<0.12 g H2O/g dry weight) with a recently developed spin-drying technique. Immediately on rehydration, control cells without LEA proteins or trehalose exhibited 0% membrane integrity, compared with 98% in cells loaded with trehalose and expressing AfrLEA2 or AfrLEA3m; surprisingly, AfrLEA3m without trehalose conferred 94% protection. Cell proliferation across 7 d showed an 18-fold increase for cells dried with AfrLEA3m and trehalose, compared with 27-fold for nondried controls. LEA proteins dramatically enhance desiccation tolerance in mammalian cells and offer the opportunity for engineering biostability in the dried state. PMID:23185012

  8. A mitochondrial late embryogenesis abundant protein stabilizes model membranes in the dry state.

    PubMed

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Hincha, Dirk K; Macherel, David

    2010-10-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a highly diverse group of polypeptides expected to play important roles in desiccation tolerance of plant seeds. They are also found in other plant tissues and in some anhydrobotic invertebrates, fungi, protists and prokaryotes. The LEA protein LEAM accumulates in the matrix space of pea (Pisum sativum) mitochondria during late seed maturation. LEAM is an intrinsically disordered protein folding into amphipathic alpha-helix upon desiccation. This suggests that it could interact with the inner mitochondrial membrane, providing structural protection in dry seeds. Here, we have used Fourier-transform infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy to gain insight into the molecular details of interactions of LEAM with phospholipid bilayers in the dry state and their effects on liposome stability. LEAM interacted specifically with negatively charged phosphate groups in dry phospholipids, increasing fatty acyl chain mobility. This led to an enhanced stability of liposomes during drying and rehydration, but also upon freezing. Protection depended on phospholipid composition and was strongly enhanced in membranes containing the mitochondrial phospholipid cardiolipin. Collectively, the results provide strong evidence for a function of LEAM as a mitochondrial membrane protectant during desiccation and highlight the role of lipid composition in the interactions between LEA proteins and membranes.

  9. Regulation of NEIL1 protein abundance by RAD9 is important for efficient base excision repair.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Sunil K; Hopkins, Kevin M; Lieberman, Howard B

    2015-05-19

    RAD9 participates in DNA damage-induced cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair. As a member of the RAD9-HUS1-RAD1 (9-1-1) complex, it can sense DNA damage and recruit ATR to damage sites. RAD9 binding can enhance activities of members of different DNA repair pathways, including NEIL1 DNA glycosylase, which initiates base excision repair (BER) by removing damaged DNA bases. Moreover, RAD9 can act independently of 9-1-1 as a gene-specific transcription factor. Herein, we show that mouse Rad9(-/-) relative to Rad9(+/+) embryonic stem (ES) cells have reduced levels of Neil1 protein. Also, human prostate cancer cells, DU145 and PC-3, knocked down for RAD9 demonstrate reduced NEIL1 abundance relative to controls. We found that Rad9 is required for Neil1 protein stability in mouse ES cells, whereas it regulates NEIL1 transcription in the human cells. RAD9 depletion enhances sensitivity to UV, gamma rays and menadione, but ectopic expression of RAD9 or NEIL1 restores resistance. Glycosylase/apurinic lyase activity was reduced in Rad9(-/-) mouse ES and RAD9 knocked-down human prostate cancer whole cell extracts, relative to controls. Neil1 or Rad9 addition restored this incision activity. Thus, we demonstrate that RAD9 regulates BER by controlling NEIL1 protein levels, albeit by different mechanisms in human prostate cancer versus mouse ES cells.

  10. Proteome analysis of abundant proteins extracted from the leaf of Gynura procumbens (Lour.) Merr.

    PubMed

    Hew, Chaw-Sen; Gam, Lay-Harn

    2011-12-01

    Gynura procumbens (Lour.) Merr. is a traditionally used medicinal plant to decrease cholesterol level, reduce high blood pressure, control diabetics, and for treatment of cancer. In our present study, a proteomic approach was applied to study the proteome of the plant that had never analyzed before. We have identified 92 abundantly expressed proteins from the leaves of G. procumbens (Lour.) Merr. Amongst the identified proteins was miraculin, a taste-masking agent with high commercial value. Miraculin made up ∼0.1% of the total protein extracted; the finding of miraculin gave a great commercial value to G. procumbens (Lour.) Merr. as miraculin's natural source is limited while the production of recombinant miraculin faced challenges of not being able to exhibit the taste-masking effect as in the natural miraculin. We believe the discovery of miraculin in G. procumbens (Lour.) Merr., provides commercial feasibility of miraculin in view of the availability of G. procumbens (Lour.) Merr. that grow wildly and easily in tropical climate. PMID:21938418

  11. Phosphotransferase protein EIIANtr interacts with SpoT, a key enzyme of the stringent response, in Ralstonia eutropha H16.

    PubMed

    Karstens, Katja; Zschiedrich, Christopher P; Bowien, Botho; Stülke, Jörg; Görke, Boris

    2014-04-01

    EIIA(Ntr) is a member of a truncated phosphotransferase (PTS) system that serves regulatory functions and exists in many Proteobacteria in addition to the sugar transport PTS. In Escherichia coli, EIIA(Ntr) regulates K(+) homeostasis through interaction with the K(+) transporter TrkA and sensor kinase KdpD. In the β-Proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16, EIIA(Ntr) influences formation of the industrially important bioplastic poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). PHB accumulation is controlled by the stringent response and induced under conditions of nitrogen deprivation. Knockout of EIIA(Ntr) increases the PHB content. In contrast, absence of enzyme I or HPr, which deliver phosphoryl groups to EIIA(Ntr), has the opposite effect. To clarify the role of EIIA(Ntr) in PHB formation, we screened for interacting proteins that co-purify with Strep-tagged EIIA(Ntr) from R. eutropha cells. This approach identified the bifunctional ppGpp synthase/hydrolase SpoT1, a key enzyme of the stringent response. Two-hybrid and far-Western analyses confirmed the interaction and indicated that only non-phosphorylated EIIA(Ntr) interacts with SpoT1. Interestingly, this interaction does not occur between the corresponding proteins of E. coli. Vice versa, interaction of EIIA(Ntr) with KdpD appears to be absent in R. eutropha, although R. eutropha EIIA(Ntr) can perfectly substitute its homologue in E. coli in regulation of KdpD activity. Thus, interaction with KdpD might be an evolutionary 'ancient' task of EIIA(Ntr) that was subsequently replaced by interaction with SpoT1 in R. eutropha. In conclusion, EIIA(Ntr) might integrate information about nutritional status, as reflected by its phosphorylation state, into the stringent response, thereby controlling cellular PHB content in R. eutropha. PMID:24515609

  12. An in vivo detection system for transient and low-abundant protein interactions and their kinetics in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Brezovich, Andrea; Schuschnig, Martina; Ammerer, Gustav; Kraft, Claudine

    2015-03-01

    Methylation tracking (M-Track) is a protein-proximity assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, allowing the detection of transient protein-protein interactions in living cells. The bait protein is fused to a histone lysine methyl transferase and the prey protein to a methylation acceptor peptide derived from histone 3. Upon interaction, the histone 3 fragment is stably methylated on lysine 9 and can be detected by methylation-specific antibodies. Since methylation marking is irreversible in budding yeast and only takes place in living cells, the occurrence of artifacts during cell lysate preparation is greatly reduced, leading to a more accurate representation of native interactions. So far, this method has been limited to highly abundant or overexpressed proteins. However, many proteins of interest are low-abundant, and overexpression of proteins may interfere with their function, leading to an artificial situation. Here we report the generation of a toolbox including a novel cleavage-enrichment system for the analysis of very low-abundant proteins at their native expression levels. In addition, we developed a system for the parallel analysis of two prey proteins in a single cell, as well as an inducible methylation system. The inducible system allows precise control over the time during which the interaction is detected and can be used to determine interaction kinetics. Furthermore, we generated a set of constructs facilitating the cloning-free genomic tagging of proteins at their endogenous locus by homologous recombination, and their expression from centromeric plasmids.

  13. A conserved abundant cytoplasmic long noncoding RNA modulates repression by Pumilio proteins in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Tichon, Ailone; Gil, Noa; Lubelsky, Yoav; Havkin Solomon, Tal; Lemze, Doron; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Ulitsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) genes are encoded in the human genome, and hundreds of them are evolutionarily conserved, but their functions and modes of action remain largely obscure. Particularly enigmatic lncRNAs are those that are exported to the cytoplasm, including NORAD—an abundant and highly conserved cytoplasmic lncRNA. Here we show that most of the sequence of NORAD is comprised of repetitive units that together contain at least 17 functional binding sites for the two mammalian Pumilio homologues. Through binding to PUM1 and PUM2, NORAD modulates the mRNA levels of their targets, which are enriched for genes involved in chromosome segregation during cell division. Our results suggest that some cytoplasmic lncRNAs function by modulating the activities of RNA-binding proteins, an activity which positions them at key junctions of cellular signalling pathways. PMID:27406171

  14. Structure and Function Analysis of Nucleocapsid Protein of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Interacting with RNA Using Homology Modeling*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Feng, Zhike; Wu, Jianyan; Huang, Ying; Lu, Gang; Zhu, Min; Wang, Bi; Mao, Xiang; Tao, Xiaorong

    2015-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) plays key roles in assembling genomic RNA into ribonucleoprotein (RNP), which serves as a template for both viral gene transcription and genome replication. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of how TSWV N interacts with genomic RNA. In this study, we demonstrated that TSWV N protein forms a range of higher ordered oligomers. Analysis of the RNA binding behavior of N protein revealed that no specific oligomer binds to RNA preferentially, instead each type of N oligomer is able to bind RNA. To better characterize the structure and function of N protein interacting with RNA, we constructed homology models of TSWV N and N-RNA complexes. Based on these homology models, we demonstrated that the positively charged and polar amino acids in its predicted surface cleft of TSWV N are critical for RNA binding. Moreover, by N-RNA homology modeling, we found that the RNA component is deeply embedded in the predicted protein cleft; consistently, TSWV N-RNA complexes are relatively resistant to digestion by RNase. Collectively, using homology modeling, we determined the RNA binding sites on N and found a new protective feature for N protein. Our findings also provide novel insights into the molecular details of the interaction of TSWV N with RNA components. PMID:25540203

  15. The Hexapeptide Repeated Segment LIAGY is a Hot Spot of Aggregation of the Pseudomonas syringae Ice Nucleation Protein.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleation proteins (INPs) form oligomeric structures by self-assembly and aggregation. We looked for the presence of potential aggregating sequences inside the INP from Pseudomonas syringae by a computational approach with the AGGRESCAN, FOMDAMYLOID and TANGO softwares. A total of 38 hot spots of aggregation were predicted in the INP sequence: 7 localized in the Nterminal domain, 2 in the C-terminal region, 28 in the highly repetitive central (HRC) region and 1 shared between the HRC and the Carboxyl-terminus regions of the protein. All the hot spots of aggregation identified in the HRC domain overlapped a 8-residue low fidelity repeat including a LIAGYrelated sequence. We confirmed the predictions by an experimental approach using synthetic peptides corresponding to different parts of the INP central sequence, absorbance spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy in the presence of Congo red (CR) or Thioflavin T (ThT), respectively. Peptide 620-SFIIAGYG-627 predicted to aggregate by the three softwares induced an increase in fluorescence of ThT. Peptide 729-GFKSILTAGY-738 predicted to aggregate by AGGRESCAN and FOLDAMYLOID induced a shift in the maximum of absorbance of CR. Peptide 1124-SVLTAGA-1130 predicted to aggregate only by TANGO did not interfere with CR absorbance or ThT fluorescence. In conclusion, the use of three aggregation prediction algorithms and two biochemical assays showed that the hexapeptide repeated segment LIAGY, previously shown to form a hairpin loop may be involved in the aggregation of the P. syringae INP. PMID:26548995

  16. Relative Abundance of Integral Plasma Membrane Proteins in Arabidopsis Leaf and Root Tissue Determined by Metabolic Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Bernfur, Katja; Larsson, Olaf; Larsson, Christer; Gustavsson, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic labeling of proteins with a stable isotope (15N) in intact Arabidopsis plants was used for accurate determination by mass spectrometry of differences in protein abundance between plasma membranes isolated from leaves and roots. In total, 703 proteins were identified, of which 188 were predicted to be integral membrane proteins. Major classes were transporters, receptors, proteins involved in membrane trafficking and cell wall-related proteins. Forty-one of the integral proteins, including nine of the 13 isoforms of the PIP (plasma membrane intrinsic protein) aquaporin subfamily, could be identified by peptides unique to these proteins, which made it possible to determine their relative abundance in leaf and root tissue. In addition, peptides shared between isoforms gave information on the proportions of these isoforms. A comparison between our data for protein levels and corresponding data for mRNA levels in the widely used database Genevestigator showed an agreement for only about two thirds of the proteins. By contrast, localization data available in the literature for 21 of the 41 proteins show a much better agreement with our data, in particular data based on immunostaining of proteins and GUS-staining of promoter activity. Thus, although mRNA levels may provide a useful approximation for protein levels, detection and quantification of isoform-specific peptides by proteomics should generate the most reliable data for the proteome. PMID:23990937

  17. Identification and characterization of a prawn white spot syndrome virus gene that encodes an envelope protein VP31

    SciTech Connect

    Li Li; Xie Xixian; Yang Feng . E-mail: mbiotech@public.xm.fj.cn

    2005-09-15

    Based on a combination of SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry, a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 31 kDa (termed as VP31) was identified from purified shrimp white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) envelope fraction. The resulting amino acid (aa) sequence matched an open reading frame (WSV340) of the WSSV genome. This ORF contained 783 nucleotides (nt), encoding 261 aa. A fragment of WSV340 was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein with a 6His-tag, and then specific antibody was raised. Western blot analysis and the immunoelectron microscope method (IEM) confirmed that VP31 was present exclusively in the viral envelope fraction. The neutralization experiment suggested that VP31 might play an important role in WSSV infectivity.

  18. Tsw gene-based resistance is triggered by a functional RNA silencing suppressor protein of the Tomato spotted wilt virus.

    PubMed

    de Ronde, Dryas; Butterbach, Patrick; Lohuis, Dick; Hedil, Marcio; van Lent, Jan W M; Kormelink, Richard

    2013-05-01

    As a result of contradictory reports, the avirulence (Avr) determinant that triggers Tsw gene-based resistance in Capsicum annuum against the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is still unresolved. Here, the N and NSs genes of resistance-inducing (RI) and resistance-breaking (RB) isolates were cloned and transiently expressed in resistant Capsicum plants to determine the identity of the Avr protein. It was shown that the NSs(RI) protein triggered a hypersensitive response (HR) in Tsw-containing Capsicum plants, but not in susceptible Capsicum, whereas no HR was discerned after expression of the N(RI) (/) (RB) protein, or when NSs(RB) was expressed. Although NSs(RI) was able to suppress the silencing of a functional green fluorescence protein (GFP) construct during Agrobacterium tumefaciens transient assays on Nicotiana benthamiana, NSs(RB) had lost this capacity. The observation that RB isolates suppressed local GFP silencing during an infection indicated a recovery of RNA silencing suppressor activity for the NSs protein or the presence of another RNA interference (RNAi) suppressor. The role of NSs as RNA silencing suppressor and Avr determinant is discussed in the light of a putative interplay between RNAi and the natural Tsw resistance gene.

  19. Liver spots

    MedlinePlus

    Sun-induced skin changes - liver spots; Senile or solar lentigines; Skin spots - aging; Age spots ... Liver spots are changes in skin color that occur in older skin. The coloring may be due to aging, exposure to the sun or other sources of ...

  20. Abscisic acid and late embryogenesis abundant protein profile changes in winter wheat under progressive drought stress.

    PubMed

    Vaseva, I I; Grigorova, B S; Simova-Stoilova, L P; Demirevska, K N; Feller, U

    2010-09-01

    Three varieties (cv. Pobeda, Katya and Sadovo) of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum), differing in their agronomic characteristics, were analysed during progressive soil water stress and recovery at early vegetation stages. Changes in abscisic acid content, SDS-PAGE and immunoblot profiles of proteins that remained soluble upon heating were monitored. Initially higher ABA content in control Pobeda and Katya corresponded to earlier expression of the studied late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. A combination of higher ABA content, early immunodetection of dehydrins, and a significant increase of WZY2 transcript levels were observed in drought-stressed leaves of the tolerant variety Katya. One-step RT-PCR analyses of some acidic dehydrin genes (WCOR410b, TADHN) documented their relatively constant high expression levels in leaves under drought stress during early vegetative development. Neutral WZY2 dehydrin, TaLEA2 and TaLEA3 transcripts accumulated gradually with increasing water deficit. Delayed expression of TaLEA2 and TaLEA3 genes was found in the least drought-tolerant wheat, Sadovo. The expression profile of WZY2 revealed two distinct and separate bands, suggesting alternative splicing, which altered as water stress increased.

  1. Ubiquitous Autofragmentation of Fluorescent Proteins Creates Abundant Defective Ribosomal Products (DRiPs) for Immunosurveillance*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jiajie; Gibbs, James S.; Hickman, Heather D.; Cush, Stephanie S.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    broadly, given the wide use of fluorescent proteins, their ubiquitous and abundant fragmentation must be considered when interpreting experiments using these extremely useful probes. PMID:25971973

  2. Comparative Study of Human and Mouse Postsynaptic Proteomes Finds High Compositional Conservation and Abundance Differences for Key Synaptic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bayés, Àlex; Collins, Mark O.; Croning, Mike D. R.; van de Lagemaat, Louie N.; Choudhary, Jyoti S.; Grant, Seth G. N.

    2012-01-01

    Direct comparison of protein components from human and mouse excitatory synapses is important for determining the suitability of mice as models of human brain disease and to understand the evolution of the mammalian brain. The postsynaptic density is a highly complex set of proteins organized into molecular networks that play a central role in behavior and disease. We report the first direct comparison of the proteome of triplicate isolates of mouse and human cortical postsynaptic densities. The mouse postsynaptic density comprised 1556 proteins and the human one 1461. A large compositional overlap was observed; more than 70% of human postsynaptic density proteins were also observed in the mouse postsynaptic density. Quantitative analysis of postsynaptic density components in both species indicates a broadly similar profile of abundance but also shows that there is higher abundance variation between species than within species. Well known components of this synaptic structure are generally more abundant in the mouse postsynaptic density. Significant inter-species abundance differences exist in some families of key postsynaptic density proteins including glutamatergic neurotransmitter receptors and adaptor proteins. Furthermore, we have identified a closely interacting set of molecules enriched in the human postsynaptic density that could be involved in dendrite and spine structural plasticity. Understanding synapse proteome diversity within and between species will be important to further our understanding of brain complexity and disease. PMID:23071613

  3. Universal stress protein Rv2624c alters abundance of arginine and enhances intracellular survival by ATP binding in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qiong; Hu, Xinling; Shi, Dawei; Zhang, Yan; Sun, Meihao; Wang, Jianwei; Mi, Kaixia; Zhu, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    The universal stress protein family is a family of stress-induced proteins. Universal stress proteins affect latency and antibiotic resistance in mycobacteria. Here, we showed that Mycobacterium smegmatis overexpressing M. tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2624c exhibits increased survival in human monocyte THP-1 cells. Transcriptome analysis suggested that Rv2624c affects histidine metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism. LC-MS/MS analysis showed that Rv2624c affects the abundance of arginine, a modulator of both mycobacteria and infected THP-1 cells. Biochemical analysis showed that Rv2624c is a nucleotide-binding universal stress protein, and an Rv2624c mutant incapable of binding ATP abrogated the growth advantage in THP-1 cells. Rv2624c may therefore modulate metabolic pathways in an ATP-dependent manner, changing the abundance of arginine and thus increasing survival in THP-1 cells. PMID:27762279

  4. Studies of the viral binding proteins of shrimp BP53, a receptor of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Gao, Xiao-Xiao; Huang, Jie; Liang, Yan

    2016-02-01

    The specific binding between viral attachment proteins (VAPs) of a virus and its cellular receptors on host cells mediates virus entry into host cells, which triggers subsequent viral infections. Previous studies indicate that F1 ATP synthase β subunit (named BP53), is found on the surface of shrimp cells and involved in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection by functioning as a potential viral receptor. Herein, in a far-western blotting assay, three WSSV proteins with molecular weights of 28 kDa, 37 kDa, and >50 kDa were found to interact with BP53. The 28 kDa and 37 kDa proteins were identified as the envelope protein VP28 and VP37 of WSSV respectively, which could be recognized by the polyclonal antibodies. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent binding assays revealed that VP37 contributed to almost 80% of the binding capability for BP53 compared with the same amount of total WSSV protein. The relationship between BP53 and its complementary interacting protein, VP37, was visualized using a co-localization assay. Bound VP37 on the cell surface co-localized with BP53 and shared a similar subcellular location on the outer surface of shrimp cells. Pearson's correlation coefficients reached to 0.67 ± 0.05 and the Mander's overlap coefficients reached 0.70 ± 0.05, which indicated a strong relationship between the localization of BP53 and bound rVP37. This provides evidence for an interaction between BP53 and VP37 obtained at the molecular and cellular levels, supporting the hypothesis that BP53 serves as a receptor for WSSV by binding to VP37. The identification of the viral binding proteins of shrimp BP53 is helpful for better understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of WSSV to infect shrimp at the cellular level.

  5. The NSs Protein of Tomato spotted wilt virus Is Required for Persistent Infection and Transmission by Frankliniella occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Margaria, P.; Bosco, L.; Vallino, M.; Ciuffo, M.; Mautino, G. C.; Tavella, L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is the type member of tospoviruses (genus Tospovirus), plant-infecting viruses that cause severe damage to ornamental and vegetable crops. Tospoviruses are transmitted by thrips in the circulative propagative mode. We generated a collection of NSs-defective TSWV isolates and showed that TSWV coding for truncated NSs protein could not be transmitted by Frankliniella occidentalis. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and immunostaining of individual insects detected the mutant virus in second-instar larvae and adult insects, demonstrating that insects could acquire and accumulate the NSs-defective virus. Nevertheless, adults carried a significantly lower viral load, resulting in the absence of transmission. Genome sequencing and analyses of reassortant isolates showed genetic evidence of the association between the loss of competence in transmission and the mutation in the NSs coding sequence. Our findings offer new insight into the TSWV-thrips interaction and Tospovirus pathogenesis and highlight, for the first time in the Bunyaviridae family, a major role for the S segment, and specifically for the NSs protein, in virulence and efficient infection in insect vector individuals. IMPORTANCE Our work is the first to show a role for the NSs protein in virus accumulation in the insect vector in the Bunyaviridae family: demonstration was obtained for the system TSWV-F. occidentalis, arguably one of the most damaging combination for vegetable crops. Genetic evidence of the involvement of the NSs protein in vector transmission was provided with multiple approaches. PMID:24623427

  6. Molecular cloning and expression of hardening-induced genes in Chlorella vulgaris C-27: the most abundant clone encodes a late embryogenesis abundant protein.

    PubMed

    Joh, T; Honjoh, K; Yoshimoto, M; Funabashi, J; Miyamoto, T; Hatano, S

    1995-01-01

    To investigate the effects of hardening on gene expression in Chlorella vulgaris Beijerink IAM C-27 (formerly Chlorella ellipsoidea Gerneck IAM C-27), a frost-hardy strain, 17 cDNA clones corresponding to hardening-induced Chlorella (hiC) genes were isolated by differential screening of a cDNA library from 6-h hardened cells. Northern blot analysis of transcripts of hiC genes showed that these genes are specifically induced by hardening and that their patterns of induction vary. Southern blots of genomic DNAs from two strains (Chlorella ellipsoidea Gerneck IAM C-102, chilling-sensitive; and C. vulgaris C-27, frost-hardy) of Chlorella indicated that ten hiC clones out of 17 hybridized only with DNA of strain C-27 and the other seven clones hybridized with DNA of both strains. However, of these seven clones, transcripts corresponding to six clones did not accumulate in strain C-102 at low temperatures. The sequence of a deduced protein encoded by the most abundant clone, hiC6, exhibited homology to sequences of Group III LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins and had an amino-terminal amino acid sequence that was similar to the sequences of chloroplast transit peptides. PMID:7719632

  7. Identification of the Bcl-2 family protein gene BOK from orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) involved in SGIV infection.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jia; Yu, Dapeng; Wei, Shina; Tang, Jufen; Lu, Yishan; Wu, Zaohe; Qin, Qiwei; Jian, Jichang

    2016-05-01

    Apoptosis plays vital roles in many physiological process and immune response. BOK is one of the central regulators in apoptosis. In this study, a new BOK homolog (Ec-BOK) was cloned and characterized from Orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides. Ec-BOK encoded a 210 amino acid peptides which shared 97% identity to Stegastes partitus BOK protein, contained four BH domains and one transmembrane region. Ec-BOK widely expressed in all analyzed tissues with the higher expressions in kidney and spleen. Its expression level was up-regulated after SGIV infection in vitro. Further analysis revealed that overexpression of Ec-BOK inhibited viral genes transcriptions and virus replication in fish cell. Our findings suggested that Ec-BOK might play a role in the immune response against virus.

  8. Mass spectrometry in cancer biomarker research: a case for immunodepletion of abundant blood-derived proteins from clinical tissue specimens

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, DaRue A; Johann, Donald J; Wei, Bih-Rong; Ye, Xiaoying; Chan, King C; Nissley, Dwight V; Simpson, R Mark; Citrin, Deborah E; Mackall, Crystal L; Linehan, W Marston; Blonder, Josip

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of clinically relevant cancer biomarkers using mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has proven difficult, primarily because of the enormous dynamic range of blood-derived protein concentrations and the fact that the 22 most abundant blood-derived proteins constitute approximately 99% of the total plasma protein mass. Immunodepletion of clinical body fluid specimens (e.g., serum/plasma) for the removal of highly abundant proteins is a reasonable and reproducible solution. Often overlooked, clinical tissue specimens also contain a formidable amount of highly abundant blood-derived proteins present in tissue-embedded networks of blood/lymph capillaries and interstitial fluid. Hence, the dynamic range impediment to biomarker discovery remains a formidable obstacle, regardless of clinical sample type (solid tissue and/or body fluid). Thus, we optimized and applied simultaneous immunodepletion of blood-derived proteins from solid tissue and peripheral blood, using clear cell renal cell carcinoma as a model disease. Integrative analysis of data from this approach and genomic data obtained from the same type of tumor revealed concordant key pathways and protein targets germane to clear cell renal cell carcinoma. This includes the activation of the lipogenic pathway characterized by increased expression of adipophilin (PLIN2) along with 'cadherin switching', a phenomenon indicative of transcriptional reprogramming linked to renal epithelial dedifferentiation. We also applied immunodepletion of abundant blood-derived proteins to various tissue types (e.g., adipose tissue and breast tissue) showing unambiguously that the removal of abundant blood-derived proteins represents a powerful tool for the reproducible profiling of tissue proteomes. Herein, we show that the removal of abundant blood-derived proteins from solid tissue specimens is of equal importance to depletion of body fluids and recommend its routine use in the context of biological discovery and

  9. Phylogenetic analysis of microalgae based on highly abundant proteins using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Won; Roh, Seong Woon; Cho, Kichul; Kim, Kil-Nam; Cha, In-Tae; Yim, Kyung June; Song, Hye Seon; Nam, Young-Do; Oda, Tatsuya; Chung, Young-Ho; Kim, Soo Jung; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Daekyung

    2015-01-01

    The blooms of toxic phototrophic microorganisms, such as microalgae and cyanobacteria, which are typically found in freshwater and marine environments, are becoming more frequent and problematic in aquatic systems. Due to accumulation of toxic algae, harmful algal blooms (HABs) exert negative effects on aquatic systems. Therefore, rapid detection of harmful microalgae is important for monitoring the occurrence of HABs. Mass spectrometry-based methods have become sensitive, specific techniques for the identification and characterization of microorganisms. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) allows us to measure a unique molecular fingerprint of highly abundant proteins in a microorganism and has been used for the rapid, accurate identification of bacteria and fungi in clinical microbiology. Here, we tested the specificity of MALDI-TOF MS using microalgal strains (Heterocapsa, Alexandrium, Nannochloropsis, Chaetoceros, Chlorella, and Dunaliella spp.). Our research suggested that this method was comparable in terms of the rapid identification of microalgea to conventional methods based on genetic information and morphology. Thus, this efficient mass spectrometry-based technique may have applications in the rapid identification of harmful microorganisms from aquatic environmental samples.

  10. Brugia malayi abundant larval transcript 2 protein treatment attenuates experimentally-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Vishal; Amdare, Nitin; Yadav, Ravi Shankar; Tarnekar, Aaditya; Goswami, Kalyan; Reddy, Maryada Venkata Rami

    2015-11-01

    Helminths are known to modulate host's immunity by suppressing host protective pro-inflammatory responses. Such immunomodulatory effects have been experimentally shown to have therapeutic implications in immune mediated disorders. In the present study, we have explored a filarial protein i.e. Brugia malayi recombinant abundant larval transcript 2 (rBmALT2) for its therapeutic effect in dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced colitis in mouse model. The immunomodulatory activity of rBmALT-2 was initially confirmed by demonstrating that it suppressed the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced nitric oxide synthesis and down-regulated the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro by peritoneal exudate cells of mice. Treatment with rBmALT2 reduced severity of colitis associated with significant reduction in weight loss, disease activity, colon damage, mucosal edema and histopathological score including myeloperoxidase activity in colon tissues. rBmALT2 was comparatively more effective in attenuation of colitis when used in the preventive mode than when used for curative purpose. The therapeutic effect of rBmALT2 was found to be associated with downregulation of IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-17 and upregulation of IL-10 cytokines. These results provide strong experimental evidence that BmALT2 could be a potential alternative therapeutic agent in colitis. PMID:26669016

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of microalgae based on highly abundant proteins using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Won; Roh, Seong Woon; Cho, Kichul; Kim, Kil-Nam; Cha, In-Tae; Yim, Kyung June; Song, Hye Seon; Nam, Young-Do; Oda, Tatsuya; Chung, Young-Ho; Kim, Soo Jung; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Daekyung

    2015-01-01

    The blooms of toxic phototrophic microorganisms, such as microalgae and cyanobacteria, which are typically found in freshwater and marine environments, are becoming more frequent and problematic in aquatic systems. Due to accumulation of toxic algae, harmful algal blooms (HABs) exert negative effects on aquatic systems. Therefore, rapid detection of harmful microalgae is important for monitoring the occurrence of HABs. Mass spectrometry-based methods have become sensitive, specific techniques for the identification and characterization of microorganisms. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) allows us to measure a unique molecular fingerprint of highly abundant proteins in a microorganism and has been used for the rapid, accurate identification of bacteria and fungi in clinical microbiology. Here, we tested the specificity of MALDI-TOF MS using microalgal strains (Heterocapsa, Alexandrium, Nannochloropsis, Chaetoceros, Chlorella, and Dunaliella spp.). Our research suggested that this method was comparable in terms of the rapid identification of microalgea to conventional methods based on genetic information and morphology. Thus, this efficient mass spectrometry-based technique may have applications in the rapid identification of harmful microorganisms from aquatic environmental samples. PMID:25476355

  12. Effects of elevated circulating cortisol levels on hydromineral status and gill tight junction protein abundance in the stenohaline goldfish.

    PubMed

    Chasiotis, Helen; Kelly, Scott P

    2012-01-15

    A role for cortisol in the regulation of hydromineral balance and gill tight junction (TJ) protein transcript abundance in the stenohaline freshwater goldfish was investigated. Intraperitoneal cortisol implants (50, 100, 200, 400 μg cortisol/g body weight) were used to dose-dependently elevate circulating cortisol levels over a 4 day period. Elevated cortisol did not significantly alter serum osmolality, serum Na(+) or muscle water content, however serum glucose and gill Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity were significantly increased and serum Cl(-) levels were significantly reduced when compared to control groups. Transcript levels for glucocorticoid receptor 1 (GR1) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in the gill remained unchanged by cortisol treatment, however glucocorticoid receptor 2 (GR2) mRNA abundance was significantly down-regulated. Conversely, cortisol treatment significantly increased transcript and protein abundance of the TJ protein occludin in goldfish gill tissue, as well as mRNA abundance for claudin e, 7 and 8d. Goldfish tissue expression profiles demonstrated that transcripts encoding for these claudins are particularly abundant in the gill. Overall, results suggest a 'tightened' gill epithelium in response to elevated cortisol levels in goldfish. However, negative autoregulation of gill GR2 transcript suggests a lessened capacity to respond to cortisol and thus a potentially 'dampened' corticosteroid-mediated effect in the gill. Reduced systemic Cl(-) levels also suggest that sustained cortisol elevation in goldfish may have a detrimental effect on other ionoregulatory tissues.

  13. Protein crystallography: From X-ray diffraction spots to a three dimensional image

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, T.C.; Berendzen, J.

    1998-02-25

    Proteins are remarkable molecular machines that are essential for life. They can do many things ranging from the precise control of blood clotting to synthesizing complex organic compounds. Pictures of protein molecules are in high demand in biotechnology because they are important for applications such as drug discovery and for engineering enzymes for commercial use. X-ray crystallography is the most common method for determining the three-dimensional structures of protein molecules. When a crystal of a protein is placed in an X-ray beam, scattering of X-rays off the ordered molecules produces a diffraction pattern that can be measured on a position-sensitive CCD or image-plate detector. Protein crystals typically contain thousands of atoms and the diffraction data are generally measured to relatively low resolution. Consequently the direct methods approaches generally cannot be applied. Instead, if the crystal is modified by adding metal atoms at specific sites or by tuning the wavelength of the X-rays to cross an absorption edge of a metal atom in the crystal, then the information from these additional measurements is sufficient to first identify the /locations of the metal atoms. This information is then used along with the diffraction data to make a three-dimensional picture of electron densities. This picture can be used to determine the position of most or all of the atoms in the protein.

  14. Regulation of the Abundance of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF50 Protein by Oncoprotein MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Chen, Lee-Wen; Shih, Ying-Ju; Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung; Chang, Pey-Jium

    2016-01-01

    The switch between latency and the lytic cycle of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is controlled by the expression of virally encoded ORF50 protein. Thus far, the regulatory mechanism underlying the protein stability of ORF50 is unknown. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that a protein abundance regulatory signal (PARS) at the ORF50 C-terminal region modulates its protein abundance. The PARS region consists of PARS-I (aa 490–535) and PARS-II (aa 590–650), and mutations in either component result in abundant expression of ORF50. Here, we show that ORF50 protein is polyubiquitinated and its abundance is controlled through the proteasomal degradation pathway. The PARS-I motif mainly functions as a nuclear localization signal in the control of ORF50 abundance, whereas the PARS-II motif is required for the binding of ubiquitin enzymes in the nucleus. We find that human oncoprotein MDM2, an ubiquitin E3 ligase, is capable of interacting with ORF50 and promoting ORF50 degradation in cells. The interaction domains between both proteins are mapped to the PARS region of ORF50 and the N-terminal 220-aa region of MDM2. Additionally, we identify lysine residues at positions 152 and 154 in the N-terminal domain of ORF50 critically involved in MDM2-mediated downregulation of ORF50 levels. Within KSHV-infected cells, the levels of MDM2 were greatly reduced during viral lytic cycle and genetic knockdown of MDM2 in these cells favored the enhancement of ORF50 expression, supporting that MDM2 is a negative regulator of ORF50 expression. Collectively, the study elucidates the regulatory mechanism of ORF50 stability and implicates that MDM2 may have a significant role in the maintenance of viral latency by lowering basal level of ORF50. PMID:27698494

  15. Transactivation, dimerization, and DNA-binding activity of white spot syndrome virus immediate-early protein IE1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wang-Jing; Chang, Yun-Shiang; Wang, Hao-Ching; Leu, Jiann-Horng; Kou, Guang-Hsiung; Lo, Chu-Fang

    2008-11-01

    Immediate-early proteins from many viruses function as transcriptional regulators and exhibit transactivation activity, DNA binding activity, and dimerization. In this study, we investigated these characteristics in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) immediate-early protein 1 (IE1) and attempted to map the corresponding functional domains. Transactivation was investigated by transiently expressing a protein consisting of the DNA binding domain of the yeast transactivator GAL4 fused to full-length IE1. This GAL4-IE1 fusion protein successfully activated the Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus p35 basal promoter when five copies of the GAL4 DNA binding site were inserted upstream of the TATA box. A deletion series of GAL4-IE1 fusion proteins suggested that the transactivation domain of WSSV IE1 was carried within its first 80 amino acids. A point mutation assay further showed that all 12 of the acidic residues in this highly acidic domain were important for IE1's transactivation activity. DNA binding activity was confirmed by an electrophoresis mobility shift assay using a probe with (32)P-labeled random oligonucleotides. The DNA binding region of WSSV IE1 was located in its C-terminal end (amino acids 81 to 224), but mutation of a putative zinc finger motif in this C-terminal region suggested that this motif was not directly involved in the DNA binding activity. A homotypic interaction between IE1 molecules was demonstrated by glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay and a coimmunoprecipitation analysis. A glutaraldehyde cross-linking experiment and gel filtration analysis showed that this self-interaction led to the formation of stable IE1 dimers. PMID:18768963

  16. Prohibitin Interacts with envelope proteins of white spot syndrome virus and prevents infection in the red swamp crayfish, Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Lan, Jiang-Feng; Li, Xin-Cang; Sun, Jie-Jie; Gong, Jing; Wang, Xian-Wei; Shi, Xiu-Zhen; Shi, Li-Jie; Weng, Yu-Ding; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2013-12-01

    Prohibitins (PHBs) are ubiquitously expressed conserved proteins in eukaryotes that are associated with apoptosis, cancer formation, aging, stress responses, cell proliferation, and immune regulation. However, the function of PHBs in crustacean immunity remains largely unknown. In the present study, we identified a PHB in Procambarus clarkii red swamp crayfish, which was designated PcPHB1. PcPHB1 was widely distributed in several tissues, and its expression was significantly upregulated by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge at the mRNA level and the protein level. These observations prompted us to investigate the role of PcPHB1 in the crayfish antiviral response. Recombinant PcPHB1 (rPcPHB1) significantly reduced the amount of WSSV in crayfish and the mortality of WSSV-infected crayfish. The quantity of WSSV in PcPHB1 knockdown crayfish was increased compared with that in the controls. The effects of RNA silencing were rescued by rPcPHB1 reinjection. We further confirmed the interaction of PcPHB1 with the WSSV envelope proteins VP28, VP26, and VP24 using pulldown and far-Western overlay assays. Finally, we observed that the colloidal gold-labeled PcPHB1 was located on the outer surface of the WSSV, which suggests that PcPHB1 specifically binds to the envelope proteins of WSSV. VP28, VP26, and VP24 are structural envelope proteins and are essential for attachment and entry into crayfish cells. Therefore, PcPHB1 exerts its anti-WSSV effect by binding to VP28, VP26, and VP24, preventing viral infection. This study is the first report on the antiviral function of PHB in the innate immune system of crustaceans.

  17. Transcriptional analysis for oral vaccination of recombinant viral proteins against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi Ran; Kim, Yeong Jin; Jang, Ji-Suk; Kim, Sung-Koo

    2011-02-01

    This study was carried out for the molecular level identification of recombinant protein vaccine efficacy, by oral feeding against white spot syndrome virus infection, with the comparison of viral mRNA transcriptional levels in shrimp cells. For the determination of WSSV dilution ratio for the vaccination experiment by oral feeding, in vivo virus titration was carried out using different virus dilutions of virus stock (1×10(2), 2×10(2), and 1×10(3)). Among the dilution ratios, 2×10(2) diluted WSSV stock was chosen as the optimal condition because this dilution showed 90% mortality at 10 days after virus injection. Recombinant viral proteins, rVP19 and rVP28, produced as protein vaccines were delivered in shrimps by oral feeding. The cumulative mortalities of the shrimps vaccinated with rVP19 and rVP28 at 21 days after the challenge with WSSV were 66.7% and 41.7%, respectively. This indicates that rVP28 showed a better protective effect against WSSV in shrimp than rVP19. Through the comparison of mRNA transcriptional levels of viral genes from collected shrimp organ samples, it was confirmed that viral gene transcriptions of vaccinated shrimps were delayed for 4~10 days compared with those of unvaccinated shrimps. Protection from WSSV infection in shrimp by the vaccination with recombinant viral proteins could be accomplished by the prevention of entry of WSSV due to the shrimp immune system activated by recombinant protein vaccines.

  18. Nuclear localization and hepatic zonation of rat "spot 14" protein: immunohistochemical investigation employing anti-fusion protein antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kinlaw, W B; Tron, P; Friedmann, A S

    1992-12-01

    S14 protein and mRNA levels are rapidly regulated by hormones and diet. We have purified a 45-Kd fusion protein from lysates of transformed E. coli that includes the entire S14 polypeptide. Affinity-purified rabbit anti-fusion protein antibodies were used in immunohistochemistry to determine the distribution of S14 protein across the hepatic lobule, and to reassess its intracellular location. In hyperthyroid liver, S14 protein clustered near the central venous zone, and was not detectable in the periportal area of the acinus. The signal in perivenous hepatocytes was primarily nuclear in location, in stark contrast to previous subcellular fractionation studies. Visualization of identical hepatic distribution and subcellular localization employing anti-synthetic peptide antiserum provided evidence for the specificity of the immunostaining, as did attenuation of the signal by preincubation of the antibody with its antigen. No staining was observed in sections of heart or hypothyroid liver, as expected from the low levels of S14 protein in those tissues. The data indicate that induction of S14 protein expression by T3 occurs through enhanced expression by perivenous hepatocytes, rather than by recruitment of cells in more peripheral zones of the lobule. Nuclear localization of the S14 protein by immunohistochemistry suggests that it is lost from nuclei during standard fractionation procedures, and prompts consideration of a role for S14 in regulation of nuclear structure and/or function.

  19. Comparative genomics and evolution of genes encoding bacterial (p)ppGpp synthetases/hydrolases (the Rel, RelA and SpoT proteins).

    PubMed

    Mittenhuber, G

    2001-10-01

    In the gram-negative model organism Escherichia coli, the effector molecule of the stringent response, (p)ppGpp, is synthesized by two different enzymes, RelA and SpoT, whereas in the gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis only one enzyme named Rel is responsible for this activity. Rel and SpoT also possess (p)ppGpp hydrolase activity. BLAST searches were used to identify orthologous genes in databases. The construction and bootstrapping of phylogenetic trees allowed classification of these orthologs. Four groups could be distinguished: With the exception of Neisseria and Bordetella (beta subdivision), the RelA and SpoT groups are exclusively found in the gamma subdivision of proteobacteria. Two Rel groups representing the actinobacterial and the Bacillus/Clostridium group were also identified. The SpoT proteins are related to the gram positive Rel proteins. RelA proteins carry substitutions in the HD domain (Aravind and Koonin, 1998, TIBS 23: 469-472) responsible for ppGpp degradation. A theory for the evolution of the specialized, paralogous relA and spoT genes is presented: After gene duplication of an ancestral rellike gene, the spoT and relA genes evolved from the duplicated genes. The distribution pattern of the paralogous RelA and SpoT proteins supports a new model of linear bacterial evolution (Gupta, 2000, FEMS Microbiol. Rev. 24: 367-402). This model postulates that the gamma subdivision of proteobacteria represents the most recently evolved bacterial lineage. However, two paralogous, closely related genes of Porphyromonas gingivalis (Cytophaga-Flavobacterium-Bacteroides phylum) encoding proteins with functions probably identical to the RelA and SpoT proteins do not fit in this model. Completely sequenced genomes of several obligately parasitic organisms (Treponema pallidum, Chlamydia species, Rickettsia prowazekii) and the obligate aphid symbiont Buchnera sp. APS as well as archaea do not contain rel-like genes but they are present in the

  20. Global patterns of protein abundance during the development of cold hardiness in blueberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain a better understanding of cold acclimation process in blueberry, we investigated the proteome-level changes that occur in flower buds with increasing exposure to chilling temperatures using the 2D-DIGE technique. A total of 104 differentially expressed spots were identified by mass spectrome...

  1. SPOT-Seq-RNA: predicting protein-RNA complex structure and RNA-binding function by fold recognition and binding affinity prediction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yuedong; Zhao, Huiying; Wang, Jihua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) play key roles in RNA metabolism and post-transcriptional regulation. Computational methods have been developed separately for prediction of RBPs and RNA-binding residues by machine-learning techniques and prediction of protein-RNA complex structures by rigid or semiflexible structure-to-structure docking. Here, we describe a template-based technique called SPOT-Seq-RNA that integrates prediction of RBPs, RNA-binding residues, and protein-RNA complex structures into a single package. This integration is achieved by combining template-based structure-prediction software, SPARKS X, with binding affinity prediction software, DRNA. This tool yields reasonable sensitivity (46 %) and high precision (84 %) for an independent test set of 215 RBPs and 5,766 non-RBPs. SPOT-Seq-RNA is computationally efficient for genome-scale prediction of RBPs and protein-RNA complex structures. Its application to human genome study has revealed a similar sensitivity and ability to uncover hundreds of novel RBPs beyond simple homology. The online server and downloadable version of SPOT-Seq-RNA are available at http://sparks-lab.org/server/SPOT-Seq-RNA/.

  2. Alteration in abundance of specific membrane proteins of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is attributed to deletion of the inner membrane protein MorC

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kenneth P.; Fields, Julia G.; Voogt, Richard D.; Deng, Bin; Lam, Ying-Wai; Mintz, Keith P.

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an important pathogen in the etiology of human periodontal and systemic diseases. Inactivation of the gene coding for the inner membrane protein, morphogenesis protein C (MorC), results is pleotropic effects pertaining to the membrane structure and function of this bacterium. The role of this protein in membrane biogenesis is unknown. To begin to understand the role of this conserved protein, stable isotope dimethyl labeling in conjunction with mass spectrometry was used to quantitatively analyze differences in the membrane proteomes of the isogenic mutant and wild-type strain. A total of 613 proteins were quantified and 601 of these proteins were found to be equal in abundance between the two strains. The remaining 12 proteins were found in lesser (10) or greater (2) abundance in the membrane preparation of the mutant strain compared with the wild-type strain. The 12 proteins were ascribed functions associated with protein quality control systems, oxidative stress responses, and protein secretion. The potential relationship between these proteins and the phenotypes of the morC mutant strain is discussed. PMID:25684173

  3. Differential expression analysis of nuclear oligomerization domain proteins NOD1 and NOD2 in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Hou, Qing-Hua; Yi, Shi-Bai; Ding, Xu; Zhang, Hui-Xian; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xiao-Chun; Lu, Dan-Qi; Lin, Hao-Ran

    2012-11-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins-1 and -2 (NOD1 and NOD2) are members of the NOD-like receptors (NLRs) family. They are both cytoplasmic receptors, and sense microbial infections/danger molecules to induce host innate immune response. In this study, the full-length ORF sequences of NOD1 and NOD2 were cloned, and the putative amino acid sequences were identified in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). The complete open reading frame (ORF) of grouper NOD1 contained 2823 bp encoding a 940 amino acid protein. Grouper NOD2 cDNA contained a 2967 bp ORF, encoding a protein of 988 amino acid residues. Both grouper NOD1 and NOD2 had similar domains to human and fish counterparts. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that grouper NOD1 clustered with grass carp, zebrafish and channel catfish, while NOD2 was most closely related to fugu. Expression patterns of grouper NOD1 and NOD2 were next studied. NOD1 had the highest level of expression in skin while NOD2 in trunk kidney. Post Vibrio alginolyticus (strain EcGS020401), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PolyI:C challenges, gene expression of grouper NOD1 and NOD2 was stimulated to different extents. NOD1 showed a significant enhancement after LPS stimulation, but NOD2 increased more significantly after PolyI:C invasion, indicating that NOD1 and NOD2 may exert different effects on the eradication of bacteria and virus. The adaptor protein RIP-like-interacting CLARP kinase (RICK) and downstream molecule interleukin-8 (IL-8) were also induced at different levels after stimulation, which indicated that NOD1 and NOD2 signal transduction was involved in grouper innate immune protection against bacterial and viral infections. PMID:22982325

  4. Differential expression analysis of nuclear oligomerization domain proteins NOD1 and NOD2 in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Hou, Qing-Hua; Yi, Shi-Bai; Ding, Xu; Zhang, Hui-Xian; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Xiao-Chun; Lu, Dan-Qi; Lin, Hao-Ran

    2012-11-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing proteins-1 and -2 (NOD1 and NOD2) are members of the NOD-like receptors (NLRs) family. They are both cytoplasmic receptors, and sense microbial infections/danger molecules to induce host innate immune response. In this study, the full-length ORF sequences of NOD1 and NOD2 were cloned, and the putative amino acid sequences were identified in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). The complete open reading frame (ORF) of grouper NOD1 contained 2823 bp encoding a 940 amino acid protein. Grouper NOD2 cDNA contained a 2967 bp ORF, encoding a protein of 988 amino acid residues. Both grouper NOD1 and NOD2 had similar domains to human and fish counterparts. Phylogenetic tree analysis showed that grouper NOD1 clustered with grass carp, zebrafish and channel catfish, while NOD2 was most closely related to fugu. Expression patterns of grouper NOD1 and NOD2 were next studied. NOD1 had the highest level of expression in skin while NOD2 in trunk kidney. Post Vibrio alginolyticus (strain EcGS020401), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or PolyI:C challenges, gene expression of grouper NOD1 and NOD2 was stimulated to different extents. NOD1 showed a significant enhancement after LPS stimulation, but NOD2 increased more significantly after PolyI:C invasion, indicating that NOD1 and NOD2 may exert different effects on the eradication of bacteria and virus. The adaptor protein RIP-like-interacting CLARP kinase (RICK) and downstream molecule interleukin-8 (IL-8) were also induced at different levels after stimulation, which indicated that NOD1 and NOD2 signal transduction was involved in grouper innate immune protection against bacterial and viral infections.

  5. Assessment of 24-hours Aldosterone Administration on Protein Abundances in Fluorescence-Sorted Mouse Distal Renal Tubules by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Thomas B; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hoffert, Jason D; Jensen, Uffe B; Fenton, Robert A; Praetorius, Helle A; Knepper, Mark A; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Aldosterone exerts multiple long-term effects in the distal renal tubules. The aim of this study was to establish a method for identifying proteins in these tubules that change in abundance by only 24-hours aldosterone administration. Methods Mice endogenously expressing green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in the connecting tubule and cortical collecting ducts were treated with a subcutaneous injection of 2.0 mg/kg aldosterone or vehicle (n=5), and sacrificed 24 hours later. Suspensions of single cells were obtained enzymatically, and eGFP positive cells were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Samples of 100 μg proteins were digested with trypsin and labeled with 8-plex iTRAQ reagents and processed for liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results FACS yielded 1.4 million cells per mouse. The LC-MS/MS spectra were matched to peptides by the SEQUEST search algorithm, which identified 3002 peptides corresponding to 506 unique proteins of which 20 significantly changed abundance 24-hours after aldosterone injection. Conclusion We find the method suitable and useful for studying hormonal effects on protein abundance in distal tubular segments. PMID:23428628

  6. Identification of immunogenic hot spots within plum pox potyvirus capsid protein for efficient antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fernández, M Rosario; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L; Roncal, Fernando; Domínguez, Elvira; García, Juan Antonio

    2002-12-01

    PEPSCAN analysis has been used to characterize the immunogenic regions of the capsid protein (CP) in virions of plum pox potyvirus (PPV). In addition to the well-known highly immunogenic N- and C-terminal domains of CP, regions within the core domain of the protein have also shown high immunogenicity. Moreover, the N terminus of CP is not homogeneously immunogenic, alternatively showing regions frequently recognized by antibodies and others that are not recognized at all. These results have helped us to design efficient antigen presentation vectors based on PPV. As predicted by PEPSCAN analysis, a small displacement of the insertion site in a previously constructed vector, PPV-gamma, turned the derived chimeras into efficient immunogens. Vectors expressing foreign peptides at different positions within a highly immunogenic region (amino acids 43 to 52) in the N-terminal domain of CP were the most effective at inducing specific antibody responses against the foreign sequence.

  7. In vivo versus in vitro protein abundance analysis of Shigella dysenteriae type 1 reveals changes in the expression of proteins involved in virulence, stress and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (SD1) causes the most severe form of epidemic bacillary dysentery. Quantitative proteome profiling of Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1 (SD1) in vitro (derived from LB cell cultures) and in vivo (derived from gnotobiotic piglets) was performed by 2D-LC-MS/MS and APEX, a label-free computationally modified spectral counting methodology. Results Overall, 1761 proteins were quantitated at a 5% FDR (false discovery rate), including 1480 and 1505 from in vitro and in vivo samples, respectively. Identification of 350 cytoplasmic membrane and outer membrane (OM) proteins (38% of in silico predicted SD1 membrane proteome) contributed to the most extensive survey of the Shigella membrane proteome reported so far. Differential protein abundance analysis using statistical tests revealed that SD1 cells switched to an anaerobic energy metabolism under in vivo conditions, resulting in an increase in fermentative, propanoate, butanoate and nitrate metabolism. Abundance increases of transcription activators FNR and Nar supported the notion of a switch from aerobic to anaerobic respiration in the host gut environment. High in vivo abundances of proteins involved in acid resistance (GadB, AdiA) and mixed acid fermentation (PflA/PflB) indicated bacterial survival responses to acid stress, while increased abundance of oxidative stress proteins (YfiD/YfiF/SodB) implied that defense mechanisms against oxygen radicals were mobilized. Proteins involved in peptidoglycan turnover (MurB) were increased, while β-barrel OM proteins (OmpA), OM lipoproteins (NlpD), chaperones involved in OM protein folding pathways (YraP, NlpB) and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis (Imp) were decreased, suggesting unexpected modulations of the outer membrane/peptidoglycan layers in vivo. Several virulence proteins of the Mxi-Spa type III secretion system and invasion plasmid antigens (Ipa proteins) required for invasion of colonic epithelial cells, and release of bacteria

  8. The ubiquitous distribution of late embryogenesis abundant proteins across cell compartments in Arabidopsis offers tailored protection against abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Candat, Adrien; Paszkiewicz, Gaël; Neveu, Martine; Gautier, Romain; Logan, David C; Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Macherel, David

    2014-07-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are hydrophilic, mostly intrinsically disordered proteins, which play major roles in desiccation tolerance. In Arabidopsis thaliana, 51 genes encoding LEA proteins clustered into nine families have been inventoried. To increase our understanding of the yet enigmatic functions of these gene families, we report the subcellular location of each protein. Experimental data highlight the limits of in silico predictions for analysis of subcellular localization. Thirty-six LEA proteins localized to the cytosol, with most being able to diffuse into the nucleus. Three proteins were exclusively localized in plastids or mitochondria, while two others were found dually targeted to these organelles. Targeting cleavage sites could be determined for five of these proteins. Three proteins were found to be endoplasmic reticulum (ER) residents, two were vacuolar, and two were secreted. A single protein was identified in pexophagosomes. While most LEA protein families have a unique subcellular localization, members of the LEA_4 family are widely distributed (cytosol, mitochondria, plastid, ER, and pexophagosome) but share the presence of the class A α-helix motif. They are thus expected to establish interactions with various cellular membranes under stress conditions. The broad subcellular distribution of LEA proteins highlights the requirement for each cellular compartment to be provided with protective mechanisms to cope with desiccation or cold stress. PMID:25005920

  9. A cancer-predisposing "hot spot" mutation of the fumarase gene creates a dominant negative protein.

    PubMed

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Perro, Mario; Brière, Jean Jacques; Rustin, Pierre; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2008-02-15

    The Fumarase (Fumarate Hydratase, FH) is a tumor suppressor gene whose germline heterozygous mutations predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). The FH gene encodes an enzyme of the Krebs cycle, functioning as a homotetramer and catalyzing the hydration of fumarate to malate. Among the numerous FH mutations reported so far, the R190H missense mutation is the most frequent in HLRCC patients. Here we show the functional analyses of the R190H, in comparison to the better characterized E319Q mutation. We first expressed wild-type and mutated proteins in FH deficient human skin fibroblasts, using lentiviral vectors. The wild-type transgene was able to restore the FH enzymatic activity in cells, while the R190H- and E319Q-FH were not. More interestingly, when the same transgenes were expressed in normal, FH-proficient cells, only the R190H-FH reduced the endogenous FH enzymatic activity. By enforcing the expression of equal amount of wild-type and R190H-FH in the same cell, we showed that the mutated FH protein directly inhibited enzymatic activity by nearly abrogating the FH homotetramer formation. These data demonstrate the dominant negative effect of the R190H missense mutation in the FH gene and suggest that the FH tumor-suppressing activity might be impaired in cells carrying a heterozygous mutation.

  10. A cancer-predisposing "hot spot" mutation of the fumarase gene creates a dominant negative protein.

    PubMed

    Lorenzato, Annalisa; Olivero, Martina; Perro, Mario; Brière, Jean Jacques; Rustin, Pierre; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2008-02-15

    The Fumarase (Fumarate Hydratase, FH) is a tumor suppressor gene whose germline heterozygous mutations predispose to hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). The FH gene encodes an enzyme of the Krebs cycle, functioning as a homotetramer and catalyzing the hydration of fumarate to malate. Among the numerous FH mutations reported so far, the R190H missense mutation is the most frequent in HLRCC patients. Here we show the functional analyses of the R190H, in comparison to the better characterized E319Q mutation. We first expressed wild-type and mutated proteins in FH deficient human skin fibroblasts, using lentiviral vectors. The wild-type transgene was able to restore the FH enzymatic activity in cells, while the R190H- and E319Q-FH were not. More interestingly, when the same transgenes were expressed in normal, FH-proficient cells, only the R190H-FH reduced the endogenous FH enzymatic activity. By enforcing the expression of equal amount of wild-type and R190H-FH in the same cell, we showed that the mutated FH protein directly inhibited enzymatic activity by nearly abrogating the FH homotetramer formation. These data demonstrate the dominant negative effect of the R190H missense mutation in the FH gene and suggest that the FH tumor-suppressing activity might be impaired in cells carrying a heterozygous mutation. PMID:17960613

  11. Dexamethasone modulates rat renal brush border membrane phosphate transporter mRNA and protein abundance and glycosphingolipid composition.

    PubMed Central

    Levi, M; Shayman, J A; Abe, A; Gross, S K; McCluer, R H; Biber, J; Murer, H; Lötscher, M; Cronin, R E

    1995-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are important regulators of renal phosphate transport. This study investigates the role of alterations in renal brush border membrane (BBM) sodium gradient-dependent phosphate transport (Na-Pi cotransporter) mRNA and protein abundance in the dexamethasone induced inhibition of Na-Pi cotransport in the rat. Dexamethasone administration for 4 d caused a 1.5-fold increase in the Vmax of Na-Pi cotransport (1785 +/- 119 vs. 2759 +/- 375 pmol/5 s per mg BBM protein in control, P < 0.01), which was paralleled by a 2.5-fold decrease in the abundance of Na-Pi mRNA and Na-Pi protein. There was also a 1.7-fold increase in BBM glucosylceramide content (528 +/- 63 vs. 312 +/- 41 ng/mg BBM protein in control, P < 0.02). To determine whether the alteration in glucosylceramide content per se played a functional role in the decrease in Na-Pi cotransport, control rats were treated with the glucosylceramide synthase inhibitor, D-threo-1-phenyl-2-decanoyl-amino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PDMP). The resultant 1.5-fold decrease in BBM glucosylceramide content (199 +/- 19 vs. 312 +/- 41 ng/mg BBM protein in control, P < 0.02) was associated with a 1.4-fold increase in Na-Pi cotransport activity (1422 +/- 73 vs. 1048 +/- 85 pmol/5 s per mg BBM protein in control, P < 0.01), and a 1.5-fold increase in BBM Na-Pi protein abundance. Thus, dexamethasone-induced inhibition of Na-Pi cotransport is associated with a decrease in BBM Na-Pi cotransporter abundance, and an increase in glucosylceramide. Since primary alteration in BBM glucosylceramide content per se directly and selectively modulates BBM Na-Pi cotransport activity and Na-Pi protein abundance, we propose that the increase in BBM glucosylceramide content plays an important role in mediating the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on Na-Pi cotransport activity. Images PMID:7615789

  12. Yeast Surface Display of Two Proteins Previously Shown to Be Protective Against White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) in Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Ananphongmanee, Vorawit; Srisala, Jiraporn; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Boonchird, Chuenchit

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface display using the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris has been extensively developed for application in bioindustrial processes. Due to the rigid structure of their cell walls, a number of proteins have been successfully displayed on their cell surfaces. It was previously reported that the viral binding protein Rab7 from the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (PmRab7) and its binding partner envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) could independently protect shrimp against WSSV infection. Thus, we aimed to display these two proteins independently on the cell surfaces of 2 yeast clones with the ultimate goal of using a mixture of the two clones as an orally deliverable, antiviral agent to protect shrimp against WSSV infection. PmRab7 and VP28 were modified by N-terminal tagging to the C-terminal half of S. cerevisiae α-agglutinin. DNA fragments, harboring fused-gene expression cassettes under control of an alcohol oxidase I (AOX1) promoter were constructed and used to transform the yeast cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy with antibodies specific to both proteins demonstrated that mutated PmRab7 (mPmRab7) and partial VP28 (pVP28) were localized on the cell surfaces of the respective clones, and fluorescence intensity for each was significantly higher than that of control cells by flow cytometry. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) using cells displaying mPmRab7 or pVP28 revealed that the binding of specific antibodies for each was dose-dependent, and could be saturated. In addition, the binding of mPmRab7-expressing cells with free VP28, and vice versa was dose dependent. Binding between the two surface-expressed proteins was confirmed by an assay showing agglutination between cells expressing complementary mPmRab7 and pVP28. In summary, our genetically engineered P. pastoris can display biologically active mPmRab7 and pVP28 and is now ready for evaluation of efficacy in protecting shrimp against WSSV by oral

  13. Yeast Surface Display of Two Proteins Previously Shown to Be Protective Against White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) in Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Ananphongmanee, Vorawit; Srisala, Jiraporn; Sritunyalucksana, Kallaya; Boonchird, Chuenchit

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface display using the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris has been extensively developed for application in bioindustrial processes. Due to the rigid structure of their cell walls, a number of proteins have been successfully displayed on their cell surfaces. It was previously reported that the viral binding protein Rab7 from the giant tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (PmRab7) and its binding partner envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) could independently protect shrimp against WSSV infection. Thus, we aimed to display these two proteins independently on the cell surfaces of 2 yeast clones with the ultimate goal of using a mixture of the two clones as an orally deliverable, antiviral agent to protect shrimp against WSSV infection. PmRab7 and VP28 were modified by N-terminal tagging to the C-terminal half of S. cerevisiae α-agglutinin. DNA fragments, harboring fused-gene expression cassettes under control of an alcohol oxidase I (AOX1) promoter were constructed and used to transform the yeast cells. Immunofluorescence microscopy with antibodies specific to both proteins demonstrated that mutated PmRab7 (mPmRab7) and partial VP28 (pVP28) were localized on the cell surfaces of the respective clones, and fluorescence intensity for each was significantly higher than that of control cells by flow cytometry. Enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) using cells displaying mPmRab7 or pVP28 revealed that the binding of specific antibodies for each was dose-dependent, and could be saturated. In addition, the binding of mPmRab7-expressing cells with free VP28, and vice versa was dose dependent. Binding between the two surface-expressed proteins was confirmed by an assay showing agglutination between cells expressing complementary mPmRab7 and pVP28. In summary, our genetically engineered P. pastoris can display biologically active mPmRab7 and pVP28 and is now ready for evaluation of efficacy in protecting shrimp against WSSV by oral

  14. Absolute quantification of protein and post-translational modification abundance with stable isotope–labeled synthetic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kettenbach, Arminja N; Rush, John; Gerber, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    In the analysis of biological systems, it is of interest to identify the components of the system and to monitor their changes in abundance under different conditions. The AQUA (for ‘absolute quantification’) method allows sensitive and specific targeted quantification of protein and post-translational modifications in complex protein mixtures using stable isotope–labeled peptides as internal standards. Each AQUA experiment is composed of two stages: method development and application to a biological scenario. In the method development stage, peptides from the protein of interest are chosen and then synthesized with stable isotopes such as 13C, 2H or 15N. The abundance of these internal standards and their endogenous counterparts can be measured by mass spectrometry with selected reaction monitoring or selected ion monitoring methods. Once an AQUA method is established, it can be rapidly applied to a wide range of biological samples, from tissue culture cells to human plasma and tissue. After AQUA peptide synthesis, the development, optimization and application of AQUA analyses to a specific biological problem can be achieved in ~1 week. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of this method by monitoring both Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) protein abundance in multiple lung cancer cell lines and the extent of Plk1 activation loop phosphorylation (pThr-210) during release from S phase. PMID:21293459

  15. Region-Specific Protein Abundance Changes in the Brain of MPTP-induced Parkinson’s Disease Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jianying; Chin, Mark H; Schepmoes, Athena A; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Weitz, Karl K; Petritis, Brianne O; Monroe, Matthew E; Camp, David G; Wood, Stephen A; Melega, William P; Bigelow, Diana J; Smith, Desmond J; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D

    2010-02-15

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the nigrostriatal region of the brain; however, the neurodegeneration extends well beyond dopaminergic neurons. To gain a better understanding of the molecular changes relevant to PD, we applied two-dimensional LC-MS/MS to comparatively analyze the proteome changes in four brain regions (striatum, cerebellum, cortex, and the rest of brain) using a MPTP-induced PD mouse model with the objective to identify nigrostriatal-specific and other region-specific protein abundance changes. The combined analyses resulted in the identification of 4,895 non-redundant proteins with at least two unique peptides per protein. The relative abundance changes in each analyzed brain region were estimated based on the spectral count information. A total of 518 proteins were observed with significant MPTP-induced changes across different brain regions. 270 of these proteins were observed with specific changes occurring either only in the striatum and/or in the rest of the brain region that contains substantia nigra, suggesting that these proteins are associated with the underlying nigrostriatal pathways. Many of the proteins that exhibit significant abundance changes were associated with dopamine signaling, mitochondrial dysfunction, the ubiquitin system, calcium signaling, the oxidative stress response, and apoptosis. A set of proteins with either consistent change across all brain regions or with changes specific to the cortex and cerebellum regions were also detected. One of the interesting proteins is ubiquitin specific protease (USP9X), a deubiquination enzyme involved in the protection of proteins from degradation and promotion of the TGF-β pathway, which exhibited altered abundances in all brain regions. Western blot validation showed similar spatial changes, suggesting that USP9X is potentially associated with neurodegeneration. Together, this study for the first time presents an overall picture of

  16. Substrate, focal adhesions, and actin filaments: a mechanical unit with a weak spot for mechanosensitive proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchenbüchler, David; Born, Simone; Kirchgeßner, Norbert; Houben, Sebastian; Hoffmann, Bernd; Merkel, Rudolf

    2010-05-01

    Mechanosensing is a vital prerequisite for dynamic remodeling of focal adhesions and cytoskeletal structures upon substrate deformation. For example, tissue formation, directed cell orientation or cell differentiation are regulated by such mechanosensing processes. Focal adhesions and the actin cytoskeleton are believed to be involved in these processes, but where mechanosensing molecules are located and how elastic substrate, focal adhesions and the cytoskeleton couple with each other upon substrate deformation still remains obscure. To approach these questions we have developed a sensitive method to apply defined spatially decaying deformation fields to cells cultivated on ultrasoft elastic substrates and to accurately quantify the resulting displacements of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesions, as well as the substrate. Displacement fields were recorded in live cell microscopy by tracking either signals from fluorescent proteins or marker particles in the substrate. As model cell type we used myofibroblasts. These cells are characterized by highly stable adhesion and force generating structures but are still able to detect mechanical signals with high sensitivity. We found a rigid connection between substrate and focal adhesions. Furthermore, stress fibers were found to be barely extendable almost over their whole lengths. Plastic deformation took place only at the very ends of actin filaments close to focal adhesions. As a result, this area became elongated without extension of existing actin filaments by polymerization. Both ends of the stress fibers were mechanically coupled with detectable plastic deformations on either site. Interestingly, traction force dependent substrate deformation fields remained mostly unaffected even when stress fiber elongations were released. These data argue for a location of mechanosensing proteins at the ends of actin stress fibers and describe, except for these domains, the whole system to be relatively rigid for tensile

  17. Method optimization for proteomic analysis of soybean leaf: Improvements in identification of new and low-abundance proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Rosilene Oliveira; de Almeida Soares, Eduardo; de Barros, Everaldo Gonçalves; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers

    2012-01-01

    The most critical step in any proteomic study is protein extraction and sample preparation. Better solubilization increases the separation and resolution of gels, allowing identification of a higher number of proteins and more accurate quantitation of differences in gene expression. Despite the existence of published results for the optimization of proteomic analyses of soybean seeds, no comparable data are available for proteomic studies of soybean leaf tissue. In this work we have tested the effects of modification of a TCA-acetone method on the resolution of 2-DE gels of leaves and roots of soybean. Better focusing was obtained when both mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol were used in the extraction buffer simultaneously. Increasing the number of washes of TCA precipitated protein with acetone, using a final wash with 80% ethanol and using sonication to ressuspend the pellet increased the number of detected proteins as well the resolution of the 2-DE gels. Using this approach we have constructed a soybean protein map. The major group of identified proteins corresponded to genes of unknown function. The second and third most abundant groups of proteins were composed of photosynthesis and metabolism related genes. The resulting protocol improved protein solubility and gel resolution allowing the identification of 122 soybean leaf proteins, 72 of which were not detected in other published soybean leaf 2-DE gel datasets, including a transcription factor and several signaling proteins. PMID:22802721

  18. Abundant class III acidic chitinase homologue in tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seed serves as the major storage protein.

    PubMed

    Rao, Devavratha H; Gowda, Lalitha R

    2008-03-26

    The phyla Leguminosae contains protease inhibitors, lectins, chitinases, and glycohydrolases as major defense proteins in their seeds. Electrophoretic analysis of the seed proteins of tamarind ( Tamarindus indica L.), an agri-waste material, indicated the unusual presence of two major proteins comparable to overexpression of recombinant proteins. These proteins were identified by amino-terminal analysis to be (1) Kunitz-type trypsin inhibitor and (2) class III endochitinase (34000 Da). These two proteins were purified to apparent homogeneity by a single-step chitin bead affinity chromatography and characterized. The Kunitz inhibitor was specific toward inhibiting trypsin with a stoichiometry of 1:1. The 33000 +/- 1000 Da protein, accounting for >50% of the total seed protein, is an acidic glycoprotein exhibiting a very low endotype hydrolytic activity toward chitin derivatives. SDS-PAGE followed by densitometry of tamarind seed germination indicates the disappearance of the chitinase with the concomitant appearance of a cysteine endopeptidase. On the basis of its abundance, accumulation without any pathogenesis-related stimulus, temporal regulation, amino acid composition, and very low enzyme activity, this 34000 Da protein designated "tamarinin" physiologically serves as the major storage protein.

  19. High-resolution spot-scan electron microscopy of microcrystals of an alpha-helical coiled-coil protein.

    PubMed

    Bullough, P A; Tulloch, P A

    1990-09-01

    We describe the electron microscopy of a crystalline assembly of an alpha-helical coiled-coil protein extracted from the ootheca of the praying mantis. Electron diffraction patterns of unstained crystals show crystal lattice sampling of the coiled-coil molecular transform to a resolution beyond 1.5 A. Using a "spot-scan" method of electron imaging, micrographs of unstained crystals have been obtained that visibly diffract laser light from crystal spacings as small as 4.3 A. A projection map was calculated to 4 A using electron diffraction amplitudes and phases from computer-processed images. The projection map clearly shows modulations in density arising from the 5.1 A alpha-helical repeat, the first time this type of modulation has been revealed by electron microscopy. The crystals have p2 plane group symmetry with a = 92.4 A, b = 150.7 A, y = 92.4 degrees. Examination of tilted specimens shows that c is approximately 18 A, indicating that the unit cell is only one molecule thick. A preliminary interpretation shows tightly packed molecules some 400 A long lying with their long axes in the plane of the projection. The molecules have a coiled-coil configuration for most of their length. The possible modes of packing of the molecules in three dimensions are discussed. PMID:2398496

  20. Cellular expression of human centromere protein C demonstrates a cyclic behavior with highest abundance in the G1 phase.

    PubMed Central

    Knehr, M; Poppe, M; Schroeter, D; Eickelbaum, W; Finze, E M; Kiesewetter, U L; Enulescu, M; Arand, M; Paweletz, N

    1996-01-01

    Centromere proteins are localized within the centromere-kinetochore complex, which can be proven by means of immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy. In consequence, their putative functions seem to be related exclusively to mitosis, namely to the interaction of the chromosomal kinetochores with spindle microtubules. However, electron microscopy using immune sera enriched with specific antibodies against human centromere protein C (CENP-C) showed that it occurs not only in mitosis but during the whole cell cycle. Therefore, we investigated the cell cycle-specific expression of CENP-C systematically on protein and mRNA levels applying HeLa cells synchronized in all cell cycle phases. Immunoblotting confirmed protein expression during the whole cell cycle and revealed an increase of CENP-C from the S phase through the G2 phase and mitosis to highest abundance in the G1 phase. Since this was rather surprising, we verified it by quantifying phase-specific mRNA levels of CENP-C, paralleled by the amplification of suitable internal standards, using the polymerase chain reaction. The results were in excellent agreement with abundant protein amounts and confirmed the cyclic behavior of CENP-C during the cell cycle. In consequence, we postulate that in addition to its role in mitosis, CENP-C has a further role in the G1 phase that may be related to cell cycle control. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8816782

  1. From a 2DE-Gel Spot to Protein Function: Lesson Learned From HS1 in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Apollonio, Benedetta; Bertilaccio, Maria Teresa Sabrina; Restuccia, Umberto; Ranghetti, Pamela; Barbaglio, Federica; Ghia, Paolo; Caligaris-Cappio, Federico; Scielzo, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    The identification of molecules involved in tumor initiation and progression is fundamental for understanding disease’s biology and, as a consequence, for the clinical management of patients. In the present work we will describe an optimized proteomic approach for the identification of molecules involved in the progression of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL). In detail, leukemic cell lysates are resolved by 2-dimensional Electrophoresis (2DE) and visualized as “spots” on the 2DE gels. Comparative analysis of proteomic maps allows the identification of differentially expressed proteins (in terms of abundance and post-translational modifications) that are picked, isolated and identified by Mass Spectrometry (MS). The biological function of the identified candidates can be tested by different assays (i.e. migration, adhesion and F-actin polymerization), that we have optimized for primary leukemic cells. PMID:25350848

  2. Development stage-specific proteomic profiling uncovers small, lineage specific proteins most abundant in the Aspergillus Fumigatus conidial proteome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus is the most frequent infectious cause of death in severely immunocompromised individuals such as leukemia and bone marrow transplant patients. Germination of inhaled conidia (asexual spores) in the host is critical for the initiation of infection, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms of this process. Results To gain insights into early germination events and facilitate the identification of potential stage-specific biomarkers and vaccine candidates, we have used quantitative shotgun proteomics to elucidate patterns of protein abundance changes during early fungal development. Four different stages were examined: dormant conidia, isotropically expanding conidia, hyphae in which germ tube emergence has just begun, and pre-septation hyphae. To enrich for glycan-linked cell wall proteins we used an alkaline cell extraction method. Shotgun proteomic resulted in the identification of 375 unique gene products with high confidence, with no evidence for enrichment of cell wall-immobilized and secreted proteins. The most interesting discovery was the identification of 52 proteins enriched in dormant conidia including 28 proteins that have never been detected in the A. fumigatus conidial proteome such as signaling protein Pil1, chaperones BipA and calnexin, and transcription factor HapB. Additionally we found many small, Aspergillus specific proteins of unknown function including 17 hypothetical proteins. Thus, the most abundant protein, Grg1 (AFUA_5G14210), was also one of the smallest proteins detected in this study (M.W. 7,367). Among previously characterized proteins were melanin pigment and pseurotin A biosynthesis enzymes, histones H3 and H4.1, and other proteins involved in conidiation and response to oxidative or hypoxic stress. In contrast, expanding conidia, hyphae with early germ tubes, and pre-septation hyphae samples were enriched for proteins responsible for housekeeping functions, particularly

  3. Characterization of the Bacterioferritin/Bacterioferritin Associated Ferredoxin Protein–Protein Interaction in Solution and Determination of Binding Energy Hot Spots

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mobilization of iron stored in the interior cavity of BfrB requires electron transfer from the [2Fe–2S] cluster in Bfd to the core iron in BfrB. A crystal structure of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa BfrB:Bfd complex revealed that BfrB can bind up to 12 Bfd molecules at 12 structurally identical binding sites, placing the [2Fe–2S] cluster of each Bfd immediately above a heme group in BfrB [Yao, H., et al. (2012) J. Am. Chem. Soc., 134, 13470–13481]. We report here a study aimed at characterizing the strength of the P. aeruginosa BfrB:Bfd association using surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry as well as determining the binding energy hot spots at the protein–protein interaction interface. The results show that the 12 Bfd-binding sites on BfrB are equivalent and independent and that the protein–protein association at each of these sites is driven entropically and is characterized by a dissociation constant (Kd) of approximately 3 μM. Determination of the binding energy hot spots was carried out by replacing certain residues that comprise the protein–protein interface with alanine and by evaluating the effect of the mutation on Kd and on the efficiency of core iron mobilization from BfrB. The results identified hot spot residues in both proteins [LB68, EA81, and EA85 in BfrB (superscript for residue number and subscript for chain) and Y2 and L5 in Bfd] that network at the interface to produce a highly complementary hot region for the interaction. The hot spot residues are conserved in the amino acid sequences of Bfr and Bfd proteins from a number of Gram-negative pathogens, indicating that the BfrB:Bfd interaction is of widespread significance in bacterial iron metabolism. PMID:26368531

  4. Application of an Improved Proteomics Method for Abundant Protein Cleanup: Molecular and Genomic Mechanisms Study in Plant Defense*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yixiang; Gao, Peng; Xing, Zhuo; Jin, Shumei; Chen, Zhide; Liu, Lantao; Constantino, Nasie; Wang, Xinwang; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S.; Dai, Susie Y.

    2013-01-01

    High abundance proteins like ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) impose a consistent challenge for the whole proteome characterization using shot-gun proteomics. To address this challenge, we developed and evaluated Polyethyleneimine Assisted Rubisco Cleanup (PARC) as a new method by combining both abundant protein removal and fractionation. The new approach was applied to a plant insect interaction study to validate the platform and investigate mechanisms for plant defense against herbivorous insects. Our results indicated that PARC can effectively remove Rubisco, improve the protein identification, and discover almost three times more differentially regulated proteins. The significantly enhanced shot-gun proteomics performance was translated into in-depth proteomic and molecular mechanisms for plant insect interaction, where carbon re-distribution was used to play an essential role. Moreover, the transcriptomic validation also confirmed the reliability of PARC analysis. Finally, functional studies were carried out for two differentially regulated genes as revealed by PARC analysis. Insect resistance was induced by over-expressing either jacalin-like or cupin-like genes in rice. The results further highlighted that PARC can serve as an effective strategy for proteomics analysis and gene discovery. PMID:23943779

  5. Application of an improved proteomics method for abundant protein cleanup: molecular and genomic mechanisms study in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yixiang; Gao, Peng; Xing, Zhuo; Jin, Shumei; Chen, Zhide; Liu, Lantao; Constantino, Nasie; Wang, Xinwang; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S; Dai, Susie Y

    2013-11-01

    High abundance proteins like ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) impose a consistent challenge for the whole proteome characterization using shot-gun proteomics. To address this challenge, we developed and evaluated Polyethyleneimine Assisted Rubisco Cleanup (PARC) as a new method by combining both abundant protein removal and fractionation. The new approach was applied to a plant insect interaction study to validate the platform and investigate mechanisms for plant defense against herbivorous insects. Our results indicated that PARC can effectively remove Rubisco, improve the protein identification, and discover almost three times more differentially regulated proteins. The significantly enhanced shot-gun proteomics performance was translated into in-depth proteomic and molecular mechanisms for plant insect interaction, where carbon re-distribution was used to play an essential role. Moreover, the transcriptomic validation also confirmed the reliability of PARC analysis. Finally, functional studies were carried out for two differentially regulated genes as revealed by PARC analysis. Insect resistance was induced by over-expressing either jacalin-like or cupin-like genes in rice. The results further highlighted that PARC can serve as an effective strategy for proteomics analysis and gene discovery.

  6. Analysis of the c-src gene product structure, abundance, and protein kinase activity in human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, J; Deseau, V; Amini, S; Rosen, N; Bolen, J B

    1987-01-01

    We have compared in different human neuroblastoma cell lines and human glioblastoma cells the expression level, structure, and tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity of pp60c-src. Our results show that not all human neuroblastoma cell lines express pp60c-src molecules with amino-terminal structural alterations. In neuroblastoma cells which possess pp60c-src with altered gel migration, the diminished polyacrylamide gel mobility of pp60c-src was found not to be dependent upon amino-terminal phosphorylations since extensive treatment of these molecules with phosphatase did not significantly change their gel migration properties. Similar differences in gel migration were observed when RNA from the various neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells was translated in vitro using either rabbit reticulocyte or wheat germ lysates. White the level of c-src mRNA in the different cells analyzed was found to be similar, the abundance of pp60c-src in these same cells was found to vary by as much as 12-fold. This suggests that the abundance of pp60c-src in human neuroendocrine tumors is regulated through post-transcriptional and/or post-translational events which may be related to the stage of neuronal differentiation of the cells. Based upon determination of pp60c-src abundance by immunoblot analysis, we demonstrate that pp60c-src molecules derived from human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells have very similar in vitro protein kinase activities.

  7. Comparison of amino acids physico-chemical properties and usage of late embryogenesis abundant proteins, hydrophilins and WHy domain.

    PubMed

    Jaspard, Emmanuel; Hunault, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant proteins (LEAPs) comprise several diverse protein families and are mostly involved in stress tolerance. Most of LEAPs are intrinsically disordered and thus poorly functionally characterized. LEAPs have been classified and a large number of their physico-chemical properties have been statistically analyzed. LEAPs were previously proposed to be a subset of a very wide family of proteins called hydrophilins, while a domain called WHy (Water stress and Hypersensitive response) was found in LEAP class 8 (according to our previous classification). Since little is known about hydrophilins and WHy domain, the cross-analysis of their amino acids physico-chemical properties and amino acids usage together with those of LEAPs helps to describe some of their structural features and to make hypothesis about their function. Physico-chemical properties of hydrophilins and WHy domain strongly suggest their role in dehydration tolerance, probably by interacting with water and small polar molecules. The computational analysis reveals that LEAP class 8 and hydrophilins are distinct protein families and that not all LEAPs are a protein subset of hydrophilins family as proposed earlier. Hydrophilins seem related to LEAP class 2 (also called dehydrins) and to Heat Shock Proteins 12 (HSP12). Hydrophilins are likely unstructured proteins while WHy domain is structured. LEAP class 2, hydrophilins and WHy domain are thus proposed to share a common physiological role by interacting with water or other polar/charged small molecules, hence contributing to dehydration tolerance. PMID:25296175

  8. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J.; Laclette, Juan P.; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-01-01

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest. PMID:25989346

  9. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    PubMed

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-05-19

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest.

  10. Uses of phage display in agriculture: sequence analysis and comparative modeling of late embryogenesis abundant client proteins suggest protein-nucleic acid binding functionality.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Downie, A Bruce; Payne, Christina M

    2013-01-01

    A group of intrinsically disordered, hydrophilic proteins-Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins-has been linked to survival in plants and animals in periods of stress, putatively through safeguarding enzymatic function and prevention of aggregation in times of dehydration/heat. Yet despite decades of effort, the molecular-level mechanisms defining this protective function remain unknown. A recent effort to understand LEA functionality began with the unique application of phage display, wherein phage display and biopanning over recombinant Seed Maturation Protein homologs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max were used to retrieve client proteins at two different temperatures, with one intended to represent heat stress. From this previous study, we identified 21 client proteins for which clones were recovered, sometimes repeatedly. Here, we use sequence analysis and homology modeling of the client proteins to ascertain common sequence and structural properties that may contribute to binding affinity with the protective LEA protein. Our methods uncover what appears to be a predilection for protein-nucleic acid interactions among LEA client proteins, which is suggestive of subcellular residence. The results from this initial computational study will guide future efforts to uncover the protein protective mechanisms during heat stress, potentially leading to phage-display-directed evolution of synthetic LEA molecules.

  11. Exploiting the multiplexing capabilities of tandem mass tags for high-throughput estimation of cellular protein abundances by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahrné, Erik; Martinez-Segura, Amalia; Syed, Afzal Pasha; Vina-Vilaseca, Arnau; Gruber, Andreas J; Marguerat, Samuel; Schmidt, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    The generation of dynamic models of biological processes critically depends on the determination of precise cellular concentrations of biomolecules. Measurements of system-wide absolute protein levels are particularly valuable information in systems biology. Recently, mass spectrometry based proteomics approaches have been developed to estimate protein concentrations on a proteome-wide scale. However, for very complex proteomes, fractionation steps are required, increasing samples number and instrument analysis time. As a result, the number of full proteomes that can be routinely analyzed is limited. Here we combined absolute quantification strategies with the multiplexing capabilities of isobaric tandem mass tags to determine cellular protein abundances in a high throughput and proteome-wide scale even for highly complex biological systems, such as a whole human cell line. We generated two independent data sets to demonstrate the power of the approach regarding sample throughput, dynamic range, quantitative precision and accuracy as well as proteome coverage in comparison to existing mass spectrometry based strategies.

  12. Biochemical and structural characterization of an endoplasmic reticulum-localized late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Rie; Furuki, Takao; Shimizu, Tempei; Takezawa, Daisuke; Kikawada, Takahiro; Sakurai, Minoru; Sugawara, Yasutake

    2014-11-28

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate to high levels in seeds during late maturation, are associated with desiccation tolerance. A member of the LEA protein family was found in cultured cells of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha; preculture treatment of these cells with 0.5M sucrose medium led to their acquisition of desiccation tolerance. We characterized this preculture-induced LEA protein, designated as MpLEA1. MpLEA1 is predominantly hydrophilic with a few hydrophobic residues that may represent its putative signal peptide. The protein also contains a putative endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention sequence, HEEL, at the C-terminus. Microscopic observations indicated that GFP-fused MpLEA1 was mainly localized in the ER. The recombinant protein MpLEA1 is intrinsically disordered in solution. On drying, MpLEA1 shifted predominantly toward α-helices from random coils. Such changes in conformation are a typical feature of the group 3 LEA proteins. Recombinant MpLEA1 prevented the aggregation of α-casein during desiccation-rehydration events, suggesting that MpLEA1 exerts anti-aggregation activity against desiccation-sensitive proteins by functioning as a "molecular shield". Moreover, the anti-aggregation activity of MpLEA1 was ten times greater than that of BSA or insect LEA proteins, which are known to prevent aggregation on drying. Here, we show that an ER-localized LEA protein, MpLEA1, possesses biochemical and structural features specific to group 3 LEA proteins. PMID:25450698

  13. Pro-inflammatory flagellin proteins of prevalent motile commensal bacteria are variably abundant in the intestinal microbiome of elderly humans.

    PubMed

    Neville, B Anne; Sheridan, Paul O; Harris, Hugh M B; Coughlan, Simone; Flint, Harry J; Duncan, Sylvia H; Jeffery, Ian B; Claesson, Marcus J; Ross, R Paul; Scott, Karen P; O'Toole, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Some Eubacterium and Roseburia species are among the most prevalent motile bacteria present in the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults. These flagellate species contribute "cell motility" category genes to the intestinal microbiome and flagellin proteins to the intestinal proteome. We reviewed and revised the annotation of motility genes in the genomes of six Eubacterium and Roseburia species that occur in the human intestinal microbiota and examined their respective locus organization by comparative genomics. Motility gene order was generally conserved across these loci. Five of these species harbored multiple genes for predicted flagellins. Flagellin proteins were isolated from R. inulinivorans strain A2-194 and from E. rectale strains A1-86 and M104/1. The amino-termini sequences of the R. inulinivorans and E. rectale A1-86 proteins were almost identical. These protein preparations stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human intestinal epithelial cell lines, suggesting that these flagellins were pro-inflammatory. Flagellins from the other four species were predicted to be pro-inflammatory on the basis of alignment to the consensus sequence of pro-inflammatory flagellins from the β- and γ- proteobacteria. Many fliC genes were deduced to be under the control of σ(28). The relative abundance of the target Eubacterium and Roseburia species varied across shotgun metagenomes from 27 elderly individuals. Genes involved in the flagellum biogenesis pathways of these species were variably abundant in these metagenomes, suggesting that the current depth of coverage used for metagenomic sequencing (3.13-4.79 Gb total sequence in our study) insufficiently captures the functional diversity of genomes present at low (≤1%) relative abundance. E. rectale and R. inulinivorans thus appear to synthesize complex flagella composed of flagellin proteins that stimulate IL-8 production. A greater depth of sequencing, improved evenness of sequencing and improved

  14. Effects of heat stress on proliferation, protein turnover, and abundance of heat shock protein messenger ribonucleic acid in cultured porcine muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Kamanga-Sollo, E; Pampusch, M S; White, M E; Hathaway, M R; Dayton, W R

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that heat stress (HS) negatively affects growth rate in swine. Although reduced feed intake undoubtedly plays a significant role in this reduction, studies in laboratory animals and other nonswine species indicate muscle growth also is affected by HS-related alterations in muscle physiology. Evidence is now emerging that heat shock proteins (Hsp), produced in response to HS and other types of cellular stress, may play an important role in regulating the rate and efficiency of muscle growth. Because muscle satellite cells play a crucial role in postnatal muscle growth, the effects of HS on rates of satellite cell proliferation, protein synthesis, and protein degradation play an important role in determining the rate and extent of muscle growth. Consequently, in the current study we have examined the effects of mild HS (40.5°C for 48 h) on the rates of proliferation, protein synthesis, and protein degradation and on quantities of Hsp90, Hsp70, and Hsp25/27 mRNA and protein in cultured porcine muscle satellite cells (PSC). Mild HS of PSC cultures resulted in 2.5-, 1.4-, and 6.5-fold increases (P < 0.05) in the abundance of Hsp90, Hsp70, and Hsp25/27 mRNA, respectively, relative to control cultures. Abundance of Hsp 90, 70, and 25/27 proteins was also increased in HS PSC cultures compared with those in control cultures. Proliferation rates in HS PSC cultures were 35% less (P < 0.05) than those in control cultures. Protein synthesis rates in HS-fused PSC cultures were 85% greater (P < 0.05) than those in control cultures, and protein degradation rates in HS-fused PSC were 23% less (P < 0.05) than those in control cultures. In light of the crucial role satellite cells play in postnatal muscle growth, the HS-induced changes we have observed in rates of proliferation, protein turnover, and abundance of Hsp mRNA and Hsp protein in PSC cultures indicate that mild HS affects the physiology of PSC in ways that could affect muscle growth in swine.

  15. An odorant-binding protein is abundantly expressed in the nose and in the seminal fluid of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Mastrogiacomo, Rosa; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Niccolini, Alberto; Serra, Andrea; Gazzano, Angelo; Scaloni, Andrea; Pelosi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    We have purified an abundant lipocalin from the seminal fluid of the rabbit, which shows significant similarity with the sub-class of pheromone carriers "urinary" and "salivary" and presents an N-terminal sequence identical with that of an odorant-binding protein (rabOBP3) expressed in the nasal tissue of the same species. This protein is synthesised in the prostate and found in the seminal fluid, but not in sperm cells. The same protein is also expressed in the nasal epithelium of both sexes, but is completely absent in female reproductive organs. It presents four cysteines, among which two are arranged to form a disulphide bridge, and is glycosylated. This is the first report of an OBP identified at the protein level in the seminal fluid of a vertebrate species. The protein purified from seminal fluid is bound to some organic chemicals whose structure is currently under investigation. We reasonably speculate that, like urinary and salivary proteins reported in other species of mammals, this lipocalin performs a dual role, as carrier of semiochemicals in the seminal fluid and as detector of chemical signals in the nose. PMID:25391153

  16. Mastitomics, the integrated omics of bovine milk in an experimental model of Streptococcus uberis mastitis: 1. High abundance proteins, acute phase proteins and peptidomics.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Funmilola Clara; Mullen, William; Tassi, Riccardo; Ramírez-Torres, Adela; Mudaliar, Manikhandan; McNeilly, Tom N; Zadoks, Ruth N; Burchmore, Richard; David Eckersall, P

    2016-08-16

    A peptidomic investigation of milk from an experimental model of Streptococcus uberis mastitis in dairy cows has incorporated a study of milk high abundance and acute phase (APP) proteins as well as analysis of low molecular weight peptide biomarkers. Intramammary infection (IMI) with S. uberis caused a shift in abundance from caseins, β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin to albumin, lactoferrin and IgG with the increase in lactoferrin occurring last. The APP response of haptoglobin, mammary associated serum amyloid A3 and C-reactive protein occurred between 30-48 hours post challenge with peak concentrations of APPs at 72-96 hours post challenge and declined thereafter at a rate resembling the fall in bacterial count rather than the somatic cell count. A peptide biomarker panel for IMI based on capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was developed. It comprised 77 identified peptides (IMI77) composed mainly of casein derived peptides but also including peptides of glycosylation dependent cell adhesion molecule and serum amyloid A. The panel had a biomarker classification score that increased from 36 hour to 81 hour post challenge, significantly differentiating infected from non-infected milk, thus suggesting potential as a peptide biomarker panel of bovine mastitis and specifically that of S. uberis origin. The use of omic technology has shown a multifactorial cross system reaction in high and low abundance proteins and their peptide derivatives with changes of over a thousand fold in analyte levels in response to S. uberis infection. PMID:27412456

  17. A Comparison of Antiserum and Protein A as Secondary Reagents to Assess Toxoplasma gondii Antibody Titers in Cats and Spotted Hyenas.

    PubMed

    Wait, L F; Srour, A; Smith, I G; Cassey, P; Sims, S K; McAllister, M M

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoal parasite with worldwide distribution that is able to infect a wide variety of mammals and birds. Our main goal was to screen for T. gondii antibody titers in a previously untested species, the spotted hyena ( Crocuta crocuta); however, this goal first required us to investigate serological procedures that could be suitable for hyenas. Cats are the closest domestic relations of hyenas, so T. gondii antibody titers were first compared in 26 feral cats with specific or nonspecific fluorophore-labeled secondary reagents, i.e., anti-cat IgG or protein A. Substitution of anti-cat IgG with protein A caused a statistically significant drop in titer measurements in cats (P = 0.01) with a reduction of the geometric mean titer equivalent to 1 doubling-dilution. The same procedures were then applied to captive spotted hyenas. Titers measured in 9 of 10 hyenas were identical whether anti-cat IgG or protein A was used as the secondary reagent: 5 had titers <1:16, 2 had titers of 1:16, and 2 had titers of 1:32. One hyena had maximum titers of 1:64 or 1:32 when anti-cat IgG or protein A was used, respectively. The use of protein A as the secondary reagent in serologic assays can be applied to a range of mammalian species and seems unlikely to affect test specificity; however, the use of protein A may reduce test sensitivity, as suggested in the present study using cats. Despite a control program, some exposure to T. gondii had occurred in the Zoo's spotted hyenas. PMID:25710628

  18. A Comparison of Antiserum and Protein A as Secondary Reagents to Assess Toxoplasma gondii Antibody Titers in Cats and Spotted Hyenas.

    PubMed

    Wait, L F; Srour, A; Smith, I G; Cassey, P; Sims, S K; McAllister, M M

    2015-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoal parasite with worldwide distribution that is able to infect a wide variety of mammals and birds. Our main goal was to screen for T. gondii antibody titers in a previously untested species, the spotted hyena ( Crocuta crocuta); however, this goal first required us to investigate serological procedures that could be suitable for hyenas. Cats are the closest domestic relations of hyenas, so T. gondii antibody titers were first compared in 26 feral cats with specific or nonspecific fluorophore-labeled secondary reagents, i.e., anti-cat IgG or protein A. Substitution of anti-cat IgG with protein A caused a statistically significant drop in titer measurements in cats (P = 0.01) with a reduction of the geometric mean titer equivalent to 1 doubling-dilution. The same procedures were then applied to captive spotted hyenas. Titers measured in 9 of 10 hyenas were identical whether anti-cat IgG or protein A was used as the secondary reagent: 5 had titers <1:16, 2 had titers of 1:16, and 2 had titers of 1:32. One hyena had maximum titers of 1:64 or 1:32 when anti-cat IgG or protein A was used, respectively. The use of protein A as the secondary reagent in serologic assays can be applied to a range of mammalian species and seems unlikely to affect test specificity; however, the use of protein A may reduce test sensitivity, as suggested in the present study using cats. Despite a control program, some exposure to T. gondii had occurred in the Zoo's spotted hyenas.

  19. Ferritin acts as the most abundant binding protein for snowdrop lectin in the midgut of rice brown planthoppers (Nilaparvata lugens).

    PubMed

    Du, J; Foissac, X; Carss, A; Gatehouse, A M; Gatehouse, J A

    2000-04-01

    The mannose-specific snowdrop lectin [Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA)] displays toxicity to the rice brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens. A 26kDa GNA-binding polypeptide from N. lugens midgut was identified by lectin blotting and affinity chromatography, and characterized by N-terminal sequencing. This polypeptide is the most abundant binding protein for GNA in the N. lugens midgut. A cDNA (fersub2) encoding this protein was isolated from an N. lugens cDNA library. The deduced amino acid sequence shows significant homology to ferritin subunits from Manduca sexta and other arthropods, plants and vertebrates, and contains a putative N-glycosylation site. Native ferritin was purified from whole insects as a protein of more than 400kDa in size and characterized biochemically. Three subunits of 20, 26 and 27kDa were released from the native complex. The 26kDa subunit binds GNA, and its N-terminal sequence was identical to that of fersub2. A second cDNA (fersub1), exhibiting strong homology with dipteran ferritin, was identified as an abundant cDNA in an N. lugens midgut-specific cDNA library, and could encode the larger ferritin subunit. The fersub1 cDNA carries a stem-loop structure (iron-responsive element) upstream from the start codon, similar to structures that have been shown to play a role in the control of ferritin synthesis in other insects.

  20. Identification of an abundant 56 kDa protein implicated in food allergy as granule-bound starch synthase.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Chen, Ming-Hsuan

    2013-06-01

    Rice, the staple food of south and east Asian counties, is considered to be hypoallergenic. However, several clinical studies have documented rice-induced allergy in sensitive patients. Rice proteins with molecular weights of 14-16, 26, 33, and 56 kDa have been identified as allergens. Recently, it was documented that the 56 kDa rice allergen was responsible for rice-induced anaphylaxis. The 14-16 kDa allergens have been identified as α-amylase inhibitors; the 26 kDa protein has been identified as α-globulin; and the 33 kDa protein has been identified as glyoxalase I. However, the identity of the 56 kDa rice allergen has not yet been determined. In this study, we demonstrate that serum from patients allergic to maize shows IgE binding to a 56 kDa protein that was present in both maize and rice but not in the oil seeds soybean and peanut. The 56 kDa IgE-binding protein was abundant in the rice endosperm. We have purified this protein from rice endosperm and demonstrated its reactivity to IgE antibodies from the serum of maize-allergic patients. The purified protein was subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, resulting in identification of this rice allergen as granule-bound starch synthase, a product of the Waxy gene. Immunoblot analysis using protein extracts from a waxy mutant of rice revealed the absence of the 56 kDa IgE-binding protein. Our results demonstrate that the 56 kDa rice allergen is granule-bound starch synthase and raise the possibility of using waxy mutants of rice as a potential source of the hypoallergenic diet for patients sensitized to the 56 kDa rice allergen.

  1. Spotted inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Tomohiro

    2010-11-01

    We describe new scenarios for generating curvature perturbations when inflaton (curvaton) has significant interactions. We consider a ''spot'', which arises from interactions associated with an enhanced symmetric point (ESP) on the trajectory. Our first example uses the spot to induce a gap in the field equation. We observe that the gap in the field equation may cause generation of curvature perturbation if it does not appear simultaneous in space. The mechanism is similar to the scenario of inhomogeneous phase transition. Then we observe that the spot interactions may initiate warm inflation in the cold Universe. Creation of cosmological perturbation is discussed in relation to the inflaton dynamics and the modulation associated with the spot interactions.

  2. A High-Content Imaging Screen for Cellular Regulators of β-Catenin Protein Abundance.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xin; Montoute, Monica; Bee, Tiger W; Lin, Hong; Kallal, Lorena A; Liu, Yan; Agarwal, Pankaj; Wang, Dayuan; Lu, Quinn; Morrow, Dwight; Pope, Andrew J; Wu, Zining

    2016-03-01

    Abnormal accumulation of β-catenin protein, a key transcriptional activator required for Wnt signaling, is the hallmark of many tumor types, including colon cancer. In normal cells, β-catenin protein level is tightly controlled by a multiprotein complex through the proteosome pathway. Mutations in the components of the β-catenin degradation complex, such as adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and Axin, lead to β-catenin stabilization and the constitutive activation of target genes. Since the signal transduction of Wnt/β-catenin is mainly mediated by protein-protein interactions, this pathway has been particularly refractory to conventional target-based small-molecule screening. Here we designed a cellular high-content imaging assay to detect β-catenin protein through immunofluorescent staining in the SW480 colon cancer cell line, which has elevated β-catenin endogenously. We demonstrate that the assay is robust and specific to screen a focused biologically diverse chemical library set against known targets that play diverse cellular functions. We identified a number of hits that reduce β-catenin levels without causing cell death. These hits may serve as tools to understand the dynamics of β-catenin degradation. This study demonstrates that detecting cell-based β-catenin protein stability is a viable approach to identifying novel mechanisms of β-catenin regulation as well as small molecules of therapeutic potential. PMID:26656867

  3. Direct Correlation between Motile Behavior and Protein Abundance in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Yann S; Gillet, Sébastien; Frankel, Nicholas W; Weibel, Douglas B; Emonet, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how stochastic molecular fluctuations affect cell behavior requires the quantification of both behavior and protein numbers in the same cells. Here, we combine automated microscopy with in situ hydrogel polymerization to measure single-cell protein expression after tracking swimming behavior. We characterized the distribution of non-genetic phenotypic diversity in Escherichia coli motility, which affects single-cell exploration. By expressing fluorescently tagged chemotaxis proteins (CheR and CheB) at different levels, we quantitatively mapped motile phenotype (tumble bias) to protein numbers using thousands of single-cell measurements. Our results disagreed with established models until we incorporated the role of CheB in receptor deamidation and the slow fluctuations in receptor methylation. Beyond refining models, our central finding is that changes in numbers of CheR and CheB affect the population mean tumble bias and its variance independently. Therefore, it is possible to adjust the degree of phenotypic diversity of a population by adjusting the global level of expression of CheR and CheB while keeping their ratio constant, which, as shown in previous studies, confers functional robustness to the system. Since genetic control of protein expression is heritable, our results suggest that non-genetic diversity in motile behavior is selectable, supporting earlier hypotheses that such diversity confers a selective advantage. PMID:27599206

  4. Direct Correlation between Motile Behavior and Protein Abundance in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Sébastien; Frankel, Nicholas W.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how stochastic molecular fluctuations affect cell behavior requires the quantification of both behavior and protein numbers in the same cells. Here, we combine automated microscopy with in situ hydrogel polymerization to measure single-cell protein expression after tracking swimming behavior. We characterized the distribution of non-genetic phenotypic diversity in Escherichia coli motility, which affects single-cell exploration. By expressing fluorescently tagged chemotaxis proteins (CheR and CheB) at different levels, we quantitatively mapped motile phenotype (tumble bias) to protein numbers using thousands of single-cell measurements. Our results disagreed with established models until we incorporated the role of CheB in receptor deamidation and the slow fluctuations in receptor methylation. Beyond refining models, our central finding is that changes in numbers of CheR and CheB affect the population mean tumble bias and its variance independently. Therefore, it is possible to adjust the degree of phenotypic diversity of a population by adjusting the global level of expression of CheR and CheB while keeping their ratio constant, which, as shown in previous studies, confers functional robustness to the system. Since genetic control of protein expression is heritable, our results suggest that non-genetic diversity in motile behavior is selectable, supporting earlier hypotheses that such diversity confers a selective advantage. PMID:27599206

  5. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty–three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers. PMID:26781930

  6. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty-three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers. PMID:26781930

  7. New genetic regulators question relevance of abundant yolk protein production in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Rompay, Liesbeth Van; Borghgraef, Charline; Beets, Isabel; Caers, Jelle; Temmerman, Liesbet

    2015-01-01

    Vitellogenesis or maternal yolk formation is considered critical to the reproduction of egg-laying animals. In invertebrates, however, most of its regulatory genes are still unknown. Via a combined mapping and whole-genome sequencing strategy, we performed a forward genetic screen to isolate novel regulators of yolk production in the nematode model system Caenorhabditis elegans. In addition to isolating new alleles of rab-35, rab-10 and M04F3.2, we identified five mutant alleles corresponding to three novel regulatory genes potently suppressing the expression of a GFP-based yolk reporter. We confirmed that mutations in vrp-1, ceh-60 and lrp-2 disrupt endogenous yolk protein synthesis at the transcriptional and translational level. In contrast to current beliefs, our discovered set of mutants with strongly reduced yolk proteins did not show serious reproduction defects. This raises questions as to whether yolk proteins per se are needed for ultimate reproductive success. PMID:26553710

  8. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment

    PubMed Central

    Rashydov, Namik M.; Hajduch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk. PMID:26217350

  9. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment.

    PubMed

    Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk.

  10. Visualizing and Quantifying Intracellular Behavior and Abundance of the Core Circadian Clock Protein PERIOD2.

    PubMed

    Smyllie, Nicola J; Pilorz, Violetta; Boyd, James; Meng, Qing-Jun; Saer, Ben; Chesham, Johanna E; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Krogager, Toke P; Spiller, David G; Boot-Handford, Raymond; White, Michael R H; Hastings, Michael H; Loudon, Andrew S I

    2016-07-25

    Transcriptional-translational feedback loops (TTFLs) are a conserved molecular motif of circadian clocks. The principal clock in mammals is the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. In SCN neurons, auto-regulatory feedback on core clock genes Period (Per) and Cryptochrome (Cry) following nuclear entry of their protein products is the basis of circadian oscillation [1, 2]. In Drosophila clock neurons, the movement of dPer into the nucleus is subject to a circadian gate that generates a delay in the TTFL, and this delay is thought to be critical for oscillation [3, 4]. Analysis of the Drosophila clock has strongly influenced models of the mammalian clock, and such models typically infer complex spatiotemporal, intracellular behaviors of mammalian clock proteins. There are, however, no direct measures of the intracellular behavior of endogenous circadian proteins to support this: dynamic analyses have been limited and often have no circadian dimension [5-7]. We therefore generated a knockin mouse expressing a fluorescent fusion of native PER2 protein (PER2::VENUS) for live imaging. PER2::VENUS recapitulates the circadian functions of wild-type PER2 and, importantly, the behavior of PER2::VENUS runs counter to the Drosophila model: it does not exhibit circadian gating of nuclear entry. Using fluorescent imaging of PER2::VENUS, we acquired the first measures of mobility, molecular concentration, and localization of an endogenous circadian protein in individual mammalian cells, and we showed how the mobility and nuclear translocation of PER2 are regulated by casein kinase. These results provide new qualitative and quantitative insights into the cellular mechanism of the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:27374340

  11. Study of model systems to test the potential function of Artemia group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins.

    PubMed

    Warner, Alden H; Guo, Zhi-hao; Moshi, Sandra; Hudson, John W; Kozarova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Embryos of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana, are genetically programmed to develop either ovoviparously or oviparously depending on environmental conditions. Shortly upon their release from the female, oviparous embryos enter diapause during which time they undergo major metabolic rate depression while simultaneously synthesize proteins that permit them to tolerate a wide range of stressful environmental events including prolonged periods of desiccation, freezing, and anoxia. Among the known stress-related proteins that accumulate in embryos entering diapause are the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. This large group of intrinsically disordered proteins has been proposed to act as molecular shields or chaperones of macromolecules which are otherwise intolerant to harsh conditions associated with diapause. In this research, we used two model systems to study the potential function of the group 1 LEA proteins from Artemia. Expression of the Artemia group 1 gene (AfrLEA-1) in Escherichia coli inhibited growth in proportion to the number of 20-mer amino acid motifs expressed. As well, clones of E. coli, transformed with the AfrLEA-1 gene, expressed multiple bands of LEA proteins, either intrinsically or upon induction with isopropyl-β-thiogalactoside (IPTG), in a vector-specific manner. Expression of AfrLEA-1 in E. coli did not overcome the inhibitory effects of high concentrations of NaCl and KCl but modulated growth inhibition resulting from high concentrations of sorbitol in the growth medium. In contrast, expression of the AfrLEA-1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae did not alter the growth kinetics or permit yeast to tolerate high concentrations of NaCl, KCl, or sorbitol. However, expression of AfrLEA-1 in yeast improved its tolerance to drying (desiccation) and freezing. Under our experimental conditions, both E. coli and S. cerevisiae appear to be potentially suitable hosts to study the function of Artemia group 1 LEA proteins under environmentally

  12. Bioinformatics Analysis Reveals Abundant Short Alpha-Helices as a Common Structural Feature of Oomycete RxLR Effector Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wenwu; Wang, Yang; Wang, Yuanchao

    2015-01-01

    RxLR effectors represent one of the largest and most diverse effector families in oomycete plant pathogens. These effectors have attracted enormous attention since they can be delivered inside the plant cell and manipulates host immunity. With the exceptions of a signal peptide and the following RxLR-dEER and C-terminal W/Y/L motifs identified from the sequences themselves, nearly no functional domains have been found. Recently, protein structures of several RxLRs were revealed to comprise alpha-helical bundle repeats. However, approximately half of all RxLRs lack obvious W/Y/L motifs, which are associated with helical structures. In this study, secondary structure prediction of the putative RxLR proteins was performed. We found that the C-terminus of the majority of these RxLR proteins, irrespective of the presence of W/Y/L motifs, contains abundant short alpha-helices. Since a large-scale experimental determination of protein structures has been difficult to date, results of the current study extend our understanding on the oomycete RxLR effectors in protein secondary structures from individual members to the entire family. Moreover, we identified less alpha-helix-rich proteins from secretomes of several oomycete and fungal organisms in which RxLRs have not been identified, providing additional evidence that these organisms are unlikely to harbor RxLR-like proteins. Therefore, these results provide additional information that will aid further studies on the evolution and functional mechanisms of RxLR effectors. PMID:26252511

  13. PRODUCTION OF POLYCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST PELARGONIUM ZONATE SPOT VIRUS COAT PROTEIN EXPRESSED IN ESCHERICHIA COLI AND APPLICATION FOR IMMUNODIAGNOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pelargonium zonate spot virus (PZSV), a new emerging disease on tomato in the United States, has been classified as the first member of new proposed genus, Anulavirus, within the family Bromoviridae and characterized as having unstable virions with weakly immunogenic properties. To develop serologic...

  14. [Identification of Host Factors Interacting with the Movement Protein of Apple Chlorotic Leaf Spot Virus by Yeast Two-Hybrid System].

    PubMed

    He, Yikun; Zhong, Min; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Yanan; Cao, Keqiang

    2015-03-01

    In order to identify host factors which interact with the movement protein (MP) of Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV), ACLSV MP was cloned into the bait vector pGBKT7 and used to screen a cDNA library of Malus sylvestris cv. R12740-7A, which had previously been constructed by yeast two-hybrid sequencing transformation. The protein functions of the identified host factors were determined according to their gene annotations in GenBank. The result showed that the bait plasmid pGBKT7-MP showed no virulence or self-activating effect on yeast strain Y2H Gold. Sixty-nine interactor proteins were identified, which were divided into the following 10 classes according to their described functions: hydrolases; pathogenesis-related proteins; DNA binding proteins; phosphatases; ligases; proteins with catalytic activity; phenylalanine ammonialyases; peroxidases; NAD binding proteins; and proteins of unknown function. Bioinformatic analysis of gene homology suggested that phosphatases, pathogenesis-related proteins and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase A may play an important role in the interaction between virus and host. This study may provide a theoretical basis for the further study of viral pathogenesis and virus-host interaction mechanisms.

  15. Disordered nucleiome: Abundance of intrinsic disorder in the DNA- and RNA-binding proteins in 1121 species from Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are abundant in various proteomes, where they play numerous important roles and complement biological activities of ordered proteins. Among functions assigned to IDPs are interactions with nucleic acids. However, often, such assignments are made based on the guilty-by-association principle. The validity of the extension of these correlations to all nucleic acid binding proteins has never been analyzed on a large scale across all domains of life. To fill this gap, we perform a comprehensive computational analysis of the abundance of intrinsic disorder and intrinsically disordered domains in nucleiomes (∼548 000 nucleic acid binding proteins) of 1121 species from Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. Nucleiome is a whole complement of proteins involved in interactions with nucleic acids. We show that relative to other proteins in the corresponding proteomes, the DNA-binding proteins have significantly increased disorder content and are significantly enriched in disordered domains in Eukaryotes but not in Archaea and Bacteria. The RNA-binding proteins are significantly enriched in the disordered domains in Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota, while the overall abundance of disorder in these proteins is significantly increased in Bacteria, Archaea, animals and fungi. The high abundance of disorder in nucleiomes supports the notion that the nucleic acid binding proteins often require intrinsic disorder for their functions and regulation.

  16. Disordered nucleiome: Abundance of intrinsic disorder in the DNA- and RNA-binding proteins in 1121 species from Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2016-05-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) are abundant in various proteomes, where they play numerous important roles and complement biological activities of ordered proteins. Among functions assigned to IDPs are interactions with nucleic acids. However, often, such assignments are made based on the guilty-by-association principle. The validity of the extension of these correlations to all nucleic acid binding proteins has never been analyzed on a large scale across all domains of life. To fill this gap, we perform a comprehensive computational analysis of the abundance of intrinsic disorder and intrinsically disordered domains in nucleiomes (∼548 000 nucleic acid binding proteins) of 1121 species from Archaea, Bacteria and Eukaryota. Nucleiome is a whole complement of proteins involved in interactions with nucleic acids. We show that relative to other proteins in the corresponding proteomes, the DNA-binding proteins have significantly increased disorder content and are significantly enriched in disordered domains in Eukaryotes but not in Archaea and Bacteria. The RNA-binding proteins are significantly enriched in the disordered domains in Bacteria, Archaea and Eukaryota, while the overall abundance of disorder in these proteins is significantly increased in Bacteria, Archaea, animals and fungi. The high abundance of disorder in nucleiomes supports the notion that the nucleic acid binding proteins often require intrinsic disorder for their functions and regulation. PMID:27037624

  17. Abundant and broad expression of transcription-induced chimeras and protein products in mammalian genomes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guanting; Wu, Jin; Zhao, Gangbin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Weihua; Mu, Shijie

    2016-02-12

    The expression of transcription-induced chimeras (TICs) was underestimated due to strategic and logical reasons. In order to thoroughly examine TICs, systematic survey of TIC events was conducted in mammalian genomes using ESTs, followed by experimental validation using RT-PCR and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The expression of ∼98% TIC events in at least one tissue or cell line from both mouse and human was verified. Besides, ∼40% TICs were broadly expressed, and ∼33% of TICs showed expression levels comparable to or higher than their upstream parental genes. We further identified putative chimeric proteins in public databases and validated two using Western blotting. GO analysis revealed that proteins resided in one multi-protein complex or functioning in metabolic or signaling pathway tended to produce fused products. Taken together, we have shown substantial evidence for the underestimated TIC events; and TICs could be a novel regulated way to further increases the proteome complexity in mammalian genomes. Possible regulation mechanisms and evolution of TICs were also discussed. PMID:26718406

  18. SPOT Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jason T.; Welsh, Sam J.; Farinetti, Antonio L.; Wegner, Tim; Blakeslee, James; Deboeck, Toni F.; Dyer, Daniel; Corley, Bryan M.; Ollivierre, Jarmaine; Kramer, Leonard; Zimmerman, Patrick L.; Khatri, Reshma

    2010-01-01

    A Spacecraft Position Optimal Tracking (SPOT) program was developed to process Global Positioning System (GPS) data, sent via telemetry from a spacecraft, to generate accurate navigation estimates of the vehicle position and velocity (state vector) using a Kalman filter. This program uses the GPS onboard receiver measurements to sequentially calculate the vehicle state vectors and provide this information to ground flight controllers. It is the first real-time ground-based shuttle navigation application using onboard sensors. The program is compact, portable, self-contained, and can run on a variety of UNIX or Linux computers. The program has a modular objec-toriented design that supports application-specific plugins such as data corruption remediation pre-processing and remote graphics display. The Kalman filter is extensible to additional sensor types or force models. The Kalman filter design is also strong against data dropouts because it uses physical models from state and covariance propagation in the absence of data. The design of this program separates the functionalities of SPOT into six different executable processes. This allows for the individual processes to be connected in an a la carte manner, making the feature set and executable complexity of SPOT adaptable to the needs of the user. Also, these processes need not be executed on the same workstation. This allows for communications between SPOT processes executing on the same Local Area Network (LAN). Thus, SPOT can be executed in a distributed sense with the capability for a team of flight controllers to efficiently share the same trajectory information currently being computed by the program. SPOT is used in the Mission Control Center (MCC) for Space Shuttle Program (SSP) and International Space Station Program (ISSP) operations, and can also be used as a post -flight analysis tool. It is primarily used for situational awareness, and for contingency situations.

  19. LEA polypeptide profiling of recalcitrant and orthodox legume seeds reveals ABI3-regulated LEA protein abundance linked to desiccation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Delahaie, Julien; Hundertmark, Michaela; Bove, Jérôme; Leprince, Olivier; Rogniaux, Hélène; Buitink, Julia

    2013-11-01

    In contrast to orthodox seeds that acquire desiccation tolerance during maturation, recalcitrant seeds are unable to survive drying. These desiccation-sensitive seeds constitute an interesting model for comparative analysis with phylogenetically close species that are desiccation tolerant. Considering the importance of LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins as protective molecules both in drought and in desiccation tolerance, the heat-stable proteome was characterized in cotyledons of the legume Castanospermum australe and it was compared with that of the orthodox model legume Medicago truncatula. RNA sequencing identified transcripts of 16 homologues out of 17 LEA genes for which polypeptides are detected in M. truncatula seeds. It is shown that for 12 LEA genes, polypeptides were either absent or strongly reduced in C. australe cotyledons compared with M. truncatula seeds. Instead, osmotically responsive, non-seed-specific dehydrins accumulated to high levels in the recalcitrant cotyledons compared with orthodox seeds. Next, M. truncatula mutants of the abscisic acid insensitive3 (ABI3) gene were characterized. Mature Mtabi3 seeds were found to be desiccation sensitive when dried below a critical water content of 0.4 g H2O g DW(-1). Characterization of the LEA proteome of the Mtabi3 seeds revealed a subset of LEA proteins with severely reduced abundance that were also found to be reduced or absent in C. australe cotyledons. Transcripts of these genes were indeed shown to be ABI3 responsive. The results highlight those LEA proteins that are critical to desiccation tolerance and suggest that comparable regulatory pathways responsible for their accumulation are missing in both desiccation-sensitive genotypes, revealing new insights into the mechanistic basis of the recalcitrant trait in seeds.

  20. Norvaline and Norleucine May Have Been More Abundant Protein Components during Early Stages of Cell Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Carreño, Claudia; Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The absence of the hydrophobic norvaline and norleucine in the inventory of protein amino acids is readdressed. The well-documented intracellular accumulation of these two amino acids results from the low-substrate specificity of the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic enzymes that act over a number of related α-ketoacids. The lack of absolute substrate specificity of leucyl-tRNA synthase leads to a mischarged norvalyl-tRNALeu that evades the translational proofreading activites and produces norvaline-containing proteins, (cf. Apostol et al. J Biol Chem 272:28980-28988, 1997). A similar situation explains the presence of minute but detectable amounts of norleucine in place of methionine. Since with few exceptions both leucine and methionine are rarely found in the catalytic sites of most enzymes, their substitution by norvaline and norleucine, respectively, would have not been strongly hindered in small structurally simple catalytic polypeptides during the early stages of biological evolution. The report that down-shifts of free oxygen lead to high levels of intracellular accumulation of pyruvate and the subsequent biosynthesis of norvaline (Soini et al. Microb Cell Factories 7:30, 2008) demonstrates the biochemical and metabolic consequences of the development of a highly oxidizing environment. The results discussed here also suggest that a broader definition of biomarkers in the search for extraterrestrial life may be required.

  1. Norvaline and norleucine may have been more abundant protein components during early stages of cell evolution.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Carreño, Claudia; Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    The absence of the hydrophobic norvaline and norleucine in the inventory of protein amino acids is readdressed. The well-documented intracellular accumulation of these two amino acids results from the low-substrate specificity of the branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic enzymes that act over a number of related α-ketoacids. The lack of absolute substrate specificity of leucyl-tRNA synthase leads to a mischarged norvalyl-tRNA(Leu) that evades the translational proofreading activities and produces norvaline-containing proteins, (cf. Apostol et al. J Biol Chem 272:28980-28988, 1997). A similar situation explains the presence of minute but detectable amounts of norleucine in place of methionine. Since with few exceptions both leucine and methionine are rarely found in the catalytic sites of most enzymes, their substitution by norvaline and norleucine, respectively, would have not been strongly hindered in small structurally simple catalytic polypeptides during the early stages of biological evolution. The report that down-shifts of free oxygen lead to high levels of intracellular accumulation of pyruvate and the subsequent biosynthesis of norvaline (Soini et al. Microb Cell Factories 7:30, 2008) demonstrates the biochemical and metabolic consequences of the development of a highly oxidizing environment. The results discussed here also suggest that a broader definition of biomarkers in the search for extraterrestrial life may be required. PMID:24013929

  2. Molecular evolution of myelin basic protein, an abundant structural myelin component.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Schanila; Schweitzer, Jörn; Jahn, Olaf; Werner, Hauke B

    2013-08-01

    Rapid nerve conduction in jawed vertebrates is facilitated by the myelination of axons, which evolved in ancient cartilaginous fish. We aim to understand the coevolution of myelin and the major myelin proteins. We found that myelin basic protein (MBP) derived from living cartilaginous fish (sharks and rays) associated with the plasma membrane of glial cells similar to the phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP₂)-binding marker PH-PLCδ1, and that ionomycin-induced PIP₂-hydrolysis led to its cellular redistribution. We identified two paralogous mbp genes in multiple teleost species, consistent with a genome duplication at the root of the teleost clade. Zebrafish mbpb is organized in a complex transcription unit together with the unrelated gene-of-the-oligodendrocyte-lineage (golli) while mbpa does not encode GOLLI. Moreover, the embryonic expression of mbpa and mbpb differed, indicating functional specialization after duplication. However, both mbpa and mbpb-mRNAs were detected in mature oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, MBPa and MBPb were mass spectrometrically identified in zebrafish myelin, both associated with the plasma membrane via PIP₂, and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide-substitution rates (Ka/Ks) was low. Together, this indicates selective pressure to conserve many aspects of the cellular expression and function of MBP across vertebrate species. We propose that the PIP₂-binding function of MBP is evolutionarily old and that its emergence in ancient gnathostomata provided glial cells with the competence to myelinate. PMID:24040667

  3. Molecular evolution of myelin basic protein, an abundant structural myelin component.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Schanila; Schweitzer, Jörn; Jahn, Olaf; Werner, Hauke B

    2013-08-01

    Rapid nerve conduction in jawed vertebrates is facilitated by the myelination of axons, which evolved in ancient cartilaginous fish. We aim to understand the coevolution of myelin and the major myelin proteins. We found that myelin basic protein (MBP) derived from living cartilaginous fish (sharks and rays) associated with the plasma membrane of glial cells similar to the phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP₂)-binding marker PH-PLCδ1, and that ionomycin-induced PIP₂-hydrolysis led to its cellular redistribution. We identified two paralogous mbp genes in multiple teleost species, consistent with a genome duplication at the root of the teleost clade. Zebrafish mbpb is organized in a complex transcription unit together with the unrelated gene-of-the-oligodendrocyte-lineage (golli) while mbpa does not encode GOLLI. Moreover, the embryonic expression of mbpa and mbpb differed, indicating functional specialization after duplication. However, both mbpa and mbpb-mRNAs were detected in mature oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells, MBPa and MBPb were mass spectrometrically identified in zebrafish myelin, both associated with the plasma membrane via PIP₂, and the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous nucleotide-substitution rates (Ka/Ks) was low. Together, this indicates selective pressure to conserve many aspects of the cellular expression and function of MBP across vertebrate species. We propose that the PIP₂-binding function of MBP is evolutionarily old and that its emergence in ancient gnathostomata provided glial cells with the competence to myelinate.

  4. Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana: structural properties and protective abilities during desiccation.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Leaf C; Menze, Michael A; Hand, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are highly hydrophilic, and their expression is associated with desiccation tolerance in both plants and animals. Here we show that two LEA proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana, AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m, are intrinsically disordered in solution but upon desiccation gain secondary structure, as measured by circular dichroism. Trifluoroethanol and sodium dodecyl sulfate are both shown to induce α-helical structure in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. Bioinformatic predictions of secondary-structure content for both proteins correspond most closely to conformations measured in the dry state. Because some LEA proteins afford protection to desiccation-sensitive proteins during drying and subsequent rehydration, we tested for this capacity in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. The protective capacities vary, depending on the target enzyme. For the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, neither AfrLEA2 nor AfrLEA3m, with or without trehalose present, was able to afford protection better than that provided by bovine serum albumin (BSA) under the same conditions. However, for another cytoplasmic enzyme, phosphofructokinase, both AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m in the presence of trehalose were able to afford protection far greater than that provided by BSA with trehalose. Finally, for the mitochondrial enzyme citrate synthase, 400-μg/mL AfrLEA3m without trehalose provided significantly more protection than the same concentration of either AfrLEA2 or BSA. PMID:25244376

  5. The abundant and essential HU proteins in Deinococcus deserti and Deinococcus radiodurans are translated from leaderless mRNA.

    PubMed

    Bouthier de la Tour, Claire; Blanchard, Laurence; Dulermo, Rémi; Ludanyi, Monika; Devigne, Alice; Armengaud, Jean; Sommer, Suzanne; de Groot, Arjan

    2015-12-01

    HU proteins have an important architectural role in nucleoid organization in bacteria. Compared with HU of many bacteria, HU proteins from Deinococcus species possess an N-terminal lysine-rich extension similar to the eukaryotic histone H1 C-terminal domain involved in DNA compaction. The single HU gene in Deinococcus radiodurans, encoding DrHU, is required for nucleoid compaction and cell viability. Deinococcus deserti contains three expressed HU genes, encoding DdHU1, DdHU2 and DdHU3. Here, we show that either DdHU1 or DdHU2 is essential in D. deserti. DdHU1 and DdHU2, but not DdHU3, can substitute for DrHU in D. radiodurans, indicating that DdHU3 may have a non-essential function different from DdHU1, DdHU2 and DrHU. Interestingly, the highly abundant DrHU and DdHU1 proteins, and also the less expressed DdHU2, are translated in Deinococcus from leaderless mRNAs, which lack a 5'-untranslated region and, hence, the Shine-Dalgarno sequence. Unexpectedly, cloning the DrHU or DdHU1 gene under control of a strong promoter in an expression plasmid, which results in leadered transcripts, strongly reduced the DrHU and DdHU1 protein level in D. radiodurans compared with that obtained from the natural leaderless gene. We also show that the start codon position for DrHU and DdHU1 should be reannotated, resulting in proteins that are 15 and 4 aa residues shorter than initially reported. The expression level and start codon correction were crucial for functional characterization of HU in Deinococcus.

  6. A Group 6 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Common Bean Is a Disordered Protein with Extended Helical Structure and Oligomer-forming Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y.; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O.; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M.; Reyes, José L.; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2014-01-01

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  7. A group 6 late embryogenesis abundant protein from common bean is a disordered protein with extended helical structure and oligomer-forming properties.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2014-11-14

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the structural characterization of a group 6 LEA protein from a common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (PvLEA6) by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance showing that it is a disordered protein in aqueous solution. Using the same techniques, we show that despite its unstructured nature, the addition of trifluoroethanol exhibited an intrinsic potential in this protein to gain helicity. This property was also promoted by high osmotic potentials or molecular crowding. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PvLEA6 protein is able to form soluble homo-oligomeric complexes that also show high levels of structural disorder. The association between PvLEA6 monomers to form dimers was shown to occur in plant cells by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, pointing to the in vivo functional relevance of this association. PMID:25271167

  8. Proteome profiling of the growth phases of Leishmania pifanoi promastigotes in axenic culture reveals differential abundance of immunostimulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Alonso, Ana; García-Tabares, Francisco; Mena, María del Carmen; Ciordia, Sergio; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a term that encompasses a compendium of neglected tropical diseases caused by dimorphic and digenetic protozoan parasites from the genus Leishmania (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). The clinical manifestations of neotropical cutaneous leishmaniasis (NCL) caused by Leishmania pifanoi and other species of the "Leishmania mexicana complex" mainly correspond to anergic diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (ADCL), which is the origin of considerable morbidity. Despite the outstanding advances in the characterization of the trypanosomatid genomes and proteomes, the biology of this species has been scarcely explored. However, the close relation of L. pifanoi to the sequenced species L. mexicana and others included in the "L. mexicana complex" allowed us to perform a two-dimension electrophoresis (2DE) approach to the promastigote proteome at the differential expression level. Protein identifications were performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). This insight has revealed similarities and differences between L. pifanoi and other species responsible for cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Interestingly, certain proteins that were previously described as immunostimulatory (elongation factor 1β, trypanothione peroxidase, heat shock protein 70, enolase, GDP-forming succinyl-CoA and aldehyde dehydrogenase) are more abundant in the final growth stages of promastigotes (late-logarithmic and/or stationary phase) in the case of L. pifanoi. PMID:26992294

  9. Increased Abundance of Proteins Involved in Phytosiderophore Production in Boron-Tolerant Barley1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, John; Ford, Kris; Cassin, Andrew; Natera, Siria; Bacic, Antony

    2007-01-01

    Boron (B) phytotoxicity affects cereal-growing regions worldwide. Although B-tolerant barley (Hordeum vulgare) germplasm is available, molecules responsible for this tolerance mechanism have not been defined. We describe and use a new comparative proteomic technique, iTRAQ peptide tagging (iTRAQ), to compare the abundances of proteins from B-tolerant and -intolerant barley plants from a ‘Clipper’ × ‘Sahara’ doubled-haploid population selected on the basis of a presence or absence of two B-tolerance quantitative trait loci. iTRAQ was used to identify three enzymes involved in siderophore production (Iron Deficiency Sensitive2 [IDS2], IDS3, and a methylthio-ribose kinase) as being elevated in abundance in the B-tolerant plants. Following from this result, we report a potential link between iron, B, and the siderophore hydroxymugineic acid. We believe that this study highlights the potency of the iTRAQ approach to better understand mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance in cereals, particularly when applied in conjunction with bulked segregant analysis. PMID:17478636

  10. The Drosophila CLOCK protein undergoes daily rhythms in abundance, phosphorylation, and interactions with the PER-TIM complex.

    PubMed

    Lee, C; Bae, K; Edery, I

    1998-10-01

    We report the in vivo characterization of the Drosophila CLOCK protein (dCLOCK), a transcription factor that is required for the expression of the circadian clock genes period (per) and timeless (tim). dCLOCK undergoes circadian fluctuations in abundance, is phosphorylated throughout a daily cycle, and interacts with PER, TIM, and/or the PER-TIM complex during the night but not during most of the day. Our results suggest that PER and TIM participate in transcriptional autoinhibition by physically interacting with dCLOCK or a dCLOCK-containing complex. Nevertheless, in the absence of PER or TIM, the levels of dCLOCK are constitutively low, indicating that PER and TIM also act as positive elements in the feedback loop by stimulating the production of dCLOCK.

  11. Engineering protein processing of the mammary gland to produce abundant hemophilia B therapy in milk

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianguo; Xu, Weijie; Ross, Jason W.; Walters, Eric M.; Butler, Stephen P.; Whyte, Jeff J.; Kelso, Lindsey; Fatemi, Mostafa; Vanderslice, Nicholas C.; Giroux, Keith; Spate, Lee D.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Murphy, Cliff N.; Wells, Kevin D.; Masiello, Nick C.; Prather, Randall S.; Velander, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Both the low animal cell density of bioreactors and their ability to post-translationally process recombinant factor IX (rFIX) limit hemophilia B therapy to <20% of the world’s population. We used transgenic pigs to make rFIX in milk at about 3,000-fold higher output than provided by industrial bioreactors. However, this resulted in incomplete γ-carboxylation and propeptide cleavage where both processes are transmembrane mediated. We then bioengineered the co-expression of truncated, soluble human furin (rFurin) with pro-rFIX at a favorable enzyme to substrate ratio. This resulted in the complete conversion of pro-rFIX to rFIX while yielding a normal lactation. Importantly, these high levels of propeptide processing by soluble rFurin did not preempt γ-carboxylation in the ER and therefore was compartmentalized to the Trans-Golgi Network (TGN) and also to milk. The Golgi specific engineering demonstrated here segues the ER targeted enhancement of γ-carboxylation needed to biomanufacture coagulation proteins like rFIX using transgenic livestock. PMID:26387706

  12. White Spot Syndrome Virus Protein Kinase 1 Defeats the Host Cell's Iron-Withholding Defense Mechanism by Interacting with Host Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shin-Jen; Lee, Der-Yen; Wang, Hao-Ching; Kang, Shih-Ting; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Kou, Guang-Hsiung; Huang, Ming-Fen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iron is an essential nutrient for nearly all living organisms, including both hosts and invaders. Proteins such as ferritin regulate the iron levels in a cell, and in the event of a pathogenic invasion, the host can use an iron-withholding mechanism to restrict the availability of this essential nutrient to the invading pathogens. However, pathogens use various strategies to overcome this host defense. In this study, we demonstrated that white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) protein kinase 1 (PK1) interacted with shrimp ferritin in the yeast two-hybrid system. A pulldown assay and 27-MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) analysis confirmed the interaction between PK1 and both ferritin and apoferritin. PK1 did not promote the release of iron ions from ferritin, but it prevented apoferritin from binding ferrous ions. When PK1 was overexpressed in Sf9 cells, the cellular labile iron pool (LIP) levels were elevated significantly. Immunoprecipitation and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) further showed that the number of iron ions bound by ferritin decreased significantly at 24 h post-WSSV infection. Taken together, these results suggest that PK1 prevents apoferritin from iron loading, and thus stabilizes the cellular LIP levels, and that WSSV uses this novel mechanism to counteract the host cell's iron-withholding defense mechanism. IMPORTANCE We show here that white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) ensures the availability of iron by using a previously unreported mechanism to defeat the host cell's iron-withholding defense mechanism. This defense is often implemented by ferritin, which can bind up to 4,500 iron atoms and acts to sequester free iron within the cell. WSSV's novel counterstrategy is mediated by a direct protein-protein interaction between viral protein kinase 1 (PK1) and host ferritin. PK1 interacts with both ferritin and apoferritin, suppresses apoferritin's ability to sequester free iron ions, and maintains the intracellular labile iron pool (LIP

  13. Characterization of the Human Adipocyte Proteome and Reproducibility of Protein Abundance by One-dimensional Gel Electrophoresis and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xitao; Yi, Zhengping; Bowen, Benjamin; Wolf, Cassandra; Flynn, Charles R.; Sinha, Sandeep; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Meyer, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in adipocytes play an important role in various conditions, including the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease, but little is known about alterations at the protein level. We therefore sought to 1) comprehensively characterize the human adipocyte proteome for the first time, and 2) demonstrate feasibility of measuring adipocyte protein abundances by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE and High Performance Liquid Chromatography -Electron Spray Ionization - tandem Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). In adipocytes isolated from ~0.5 g subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue of three healthy, lean subjects we identified a total of 1493 proteins. Triplicate analysis indicated a 22.5% coefficient of variation of protein abundances. Proteins ranged from 5.8 to 629 kDa and included a large number of proteins involved in lipid metabolism, such as fatty acid transport, fatty acid oxidation, lipid storage, lipolysis and lipid droplet maintenance. Furthermore, we found most glycolysis enzymes and numerous proteins associated with oxidative stress, protein synthesis and degradation as well as some adipokines. 22% of all proteins were of mitochondrial origin. These results provide the first detailed characterization of the human adipocyte proteome, suggest an important role of adipocyte mitochondria, and demonstrate feasibility of this approach to examine alterations of adipocyte protein abundances in human diseases. PMID:20812759

  14. Crystal Structures of Major Envelope Proteins VP26 and VP28 from White Spot Syndrome Virus Shed Light on Their Evolutionary Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Tang,X.; Wu, J.; Sivaraman, J.; Hew, C.

    2007-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a virulent pathogen known to infect various crustaceans. It has bacilliform morphology with a tail-like appendage at one end. The envelope consists of four major proteins. Envelope structural proteins play a crucial role in viral infection and are believed to be the first molecules to interact with the host. Here, we report the localization and crystal structure of major envelope proteins VP26 and VP28 from WSSV at resolutions of 2.2 and 2.0 {angstrom}, respectively. These two proteins alone account for approximately 60% of the envelope, and their structures represent the first two structural envelope proteins of WSSV. Structural comparisons among VP26, VP28, and other viral proteins reveal an evolutionary relationship between WSSV envelope proteins and structural proteins from other viruses. Both proteins adopt {beta}-barrel architecture with a protruding N-terminal region. We have investigated the localization of VP26 and VP28 using immunoelectron microscopy. This study suggests that VP26 and VP28 are located on the outer surface of the virus and are observed as a surface protrusion in the WSSV envelope, and this is the first convincing observation for VP26. Based on our studies combined with the literature, we speculate that the predicted N-terminal transmembrane region of VP26 and VP28 may anchor on the viral envelope membrane, making the core {beta}-barrel protrude outside the envelope, possibly to interact with the host receptor or to fuse with the host cell membrane for effective transfer of the viral infection. Furthermore, it is tempting to extend this host interaction mode to other structural viral proteins of similar structures. Our finding has the potential to extend further toward drug and vaccine development against WSSV.

  15. Evidence that the nonstructural protein of Tomato spotted wilt virus is the avirulence determinant in the interaction with resistant pepper carrying the TSW gene.

    PubMed

    Margaria, P; Ciuffo, M; Pacifico, D; Turina, M

    2007-05-01

    All known pepper cultivars resistant to Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) possess a single dominant resistance gene, Tsw. Recently, naturally occurring resistance-breaking (RB) TSWV strains have been identified, causing major concerns. We used a collection of such strains to identify the specific genetic determinant that allows the virus to overcome the Tsw gene in Capsicum spp. A reverse genetic approach is still not feasible for TSWV; therefore, we analyzed reassortants between wild-type (WT) and RB strains. Our results confirmed that the S RNA, which encodes both the nucleocapsid protein (N) and a nonstructural protein (NSs), carries the genetic determinant responsible for Tsw resistance breakdown. We then used full-length S RNA segments or the proteins they encode to compare the sequences of WT and related RB strains, and obtained indirect evidence that the NSs protein is the avirulence factor in question. Transient expression of NSs protein from WT and RB strains showed that they both can equally suppress post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Moreover, biological characterization of two RB strains carrying deletions in the NSs protein showed that NSs is important in maintaining TSWV infection in newly emerging leaves over time, preventing recovery. Analysis of another RB strain phenotype allowed us to conclude that local necrotic response is not sufficient for resistance in Capsicum spp. carrying the Tsw gene.

  16. Abundance of some skeletal muscle mitochondrial proteins is associated with increased blood serum insulin in bovine fetuses.

    PubMed

    Pajak, Beata; Pawlikowska, Patrycja; Cassar-Malek, Isabelle; Picard, Brigitte; Hocquette, Jean-François; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the evolution of the abundance of cytochrome oxidase c subunit IV (NCOIV) and beta subunit of ATP synthase (β-ATP) during the last third of gestation in bovine skeletal muscles. Semitendinosus, longissimus thoracis and rectus abdominis muscles were chosen for the immunoblotting of the respective protein levels. Muscle and blood samples from bovine fetuses of randomly selected breeds were collected at 180, 210, and 260 days post-conception (dpc). The muscle tissue expressions of NCOIV, β-ATP were compared to blood glucose and insulin. At 260 dpc, protein levels of NCOIV raised in skeletal muscles. Additionally, β-ATP in semitendinosus and longissimus thoracis were elevated and paralleled by higher concentrations of blood serum insulin. It corroborates our previous observations indicating that accelerated metabolic differentiation of bovine skeletal muscles is associated with elevated blood insulin and occurs during the last trimester of gestation. Our observations point to the connection between insulin-sensitivity and the molecular mechanisms of mitochondrial contribution to ontogenesis of skeletal muscles.

  17. Integrated analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data of Desulfovibrio vulgaris: Zero-Inflated Poisson regression models to predict abundance of undetected proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, Gang; Brockman, Fred J.; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-05-04

    Abstract Advances in DNA microarray and proteomics technologies have enabled high-throughput measurement of mRNA expression and protein abundance. Parallel profiling of mRNA and protein on a global scale and integrative analysis of these two data types could provide additional insight into the metabolic mechanisms underlying complex biological systems. However, because protein abundance and mRNA expression are affected by many cellular and physical processes, there have been conflicting results on the correlation of these two measurements. In addition, as current proteomic methods can detect only a small fraction of proteins present in cells, no correlation study of these two data types has been done thus far at the whole-genome level. In this study, we describe a novel data-driven statistical model to integrate whole-genome microarray and proteomic data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris grown under three different conditions. Based on the Poisson distribution pattern of proteomic data and the fact that a large number of proteins were undetected (excess zeros), Zero-inflated Poisson models were used to define the correlation pattern of mRNA and protein abundance. The models assumed that there is a probability mass at zero representing some of the undetected proteins because of technical limitations. The models thus use abundance measurements of transcripts and proteins experimentally detected as input to generate predictions of protein abundances as output for all genes in the genome. We demonstrated the statistical models by comparatively analyzing D. vulgaris grown on lactate-based versus formate-based media. The increased expressions of Ech hydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh)-periplasmic Fe-only hydrogenase (Hyd) pathway for ATP synthesis were predicted for D. vulgaris grown on formate.

  18. The bioactivity of teleost IL-6: IL-6 protein in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) induces Th2 cell differentiation pathway and antibody production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Han-Tso; Foung, Yi-Fan; Han-You Lin, John

    2012-10-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a protein secreted by T cells and macrophages and plays an important role in immune response. IL-6 regulates the proliferation and differentiation of T cells, and elicits immunoglobulin production in B cells. In this study, the cDNA il-6 (gil-6) sequence of the orange spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) was obtained. The deduced IL-6 (gIL-6) protein comprised 223 amino acids, the sequence shared approximately 30% similarity with mammalian IL-6, and between 47% and 69% similarity with other available teleost IL-6. The protein comprises the signal peptide, the IL-6 family signature, and conserved amino acid residues found in IL-6 sequences of other teleost. In order to understand the bioactivity and influence of gIL-6 on humoral immune response, recombinant gIL-6 (rgIL-6) synthesized by prokaryotes was injected into orange spotted groupers, and the immune-related gene expression at various times in various organs was observed. Our results revealed that the Th1 specific transcription factor t-bet was down-regulated and Th2 specific transcription factors gata3, and c-maf were up-regulated in immune organs, following IL-6 stimulation. Additionally, higher levels of igm mRNA and translated protein were detected in rgIL-6 stimulated fish. These results indicate that IL-6 in groupers regulates the differentiation of naїve T helper cells into Th2 cells and elicits the production of antibodies. PMID:22858412

  19. The bioactivity of teleost IL-6: IL-6 protein in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) induces Th2 cell differentiation pathway and antibody production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Han-Tso; Foung, Yi-Fan; Han-You Lin, John

    2012-10-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is a protein secreted by T cells and macrophages and plays an important role in immune response. IL-6 regulates the proliferation and differentiation of T cells, and elicits immunoglobulin production in B cells. In this study, the cDNA il-6 (gil-6) sequence of the orange spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) was obtained. The deduced IL-6 (gIL-6) protein comprised 223 amino acids, the sequence shared approximately 30% similarity with mammalian IL-6, and between 47% and 69% similarity with other available teleost IL-6. The protein comprises the signal peptide, the IL-6 family signature, and conserved amino acid residues found in IL-6 sequences of other teleost. In order to understand the bioactivity and influence of gIL-6 on humoral immune response, recombinant gIL-6 (rgIL-6) synthesized by prokaryotes was injected into orange spotted groupers, and the immune-related gene expression at various times in various organs was observed. Our results revealed that the Th1 specific transcription factor t-bet was down-regulated and Th2 specific transcription factors gata3, and c-maf were up-regulated in immune organs, following IL-6 stimulation. Additionally, higher levels of igm mRNA and translated protein were detected in rgIL-6 stimulated fish. These results indicate that IL-6 in groupers regulates the differentiation of naїve T helper cells into Th2 cells and elicits the production of antibodies.

  20. Looking Deep Inside: Detection of Low-Abundance Proteins in Leaf Extracts of Arabidopsis and Phloem Exudates of Pumpkin1[W

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Andreas; Gaupels, Frank; Sarioglu, Hakan; Holzmeister, Christian; Spannagl, Manuel; Durner, Jörg; Lindermayr, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The field of proteomics suffers from the immense complexity of even small proteomes and the enormous dynamic range of protein concentrations within a given sample. Most protein samples contain a few major proteins, which hamper in-depth proteomic analysis. In the human field, combinatorial hexapeptide ligand libraries (CPLL; such as ProteoMiner) have been used for reduction of the dynamic range of protein concentrations; however, this technique is not established in plant research. In this work, we present the application of CPLL to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaf proteins. One- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed a decrease in high-abundance proteins and an enrichment of less abundant proteins in CPLL-treated samples. After optimization of the CPLL protocol, mass spectrometric analyses of leaf extracts led to the identification of 1,192 proteins in control samples and an additional 512 proteins after the application of CPLL. Upon leaf infection with virulent Pseudomonas syringae DC3000, CPLL beads were also used for investigating the bacterial infectome. In total, 312 bacterial proteins could be identified in infected Arabidopsis leaves. Furthermore, phloem exudates of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) were analyzed. CPLL prefractionation caused depletion of the major phloem proteins 1 and 2 and improved phloem proteomics, because 67 of 320 identified proteins were detectable only after CPLL treatment. In sum, our results demonstrate that CPLL beads are a time- and cost-effective tool for reducing major proteins, which often interfere with downstream analyses. The concomitant enrichment of less abundant proteins may facilitate a deeper insight into the plant proteome. PMID:22555880

  1. Competition between Heterochromatic Loci Allows the Abundance of the Silencing Protein, Sir4, to Regulate de novo Assembly of Heterochromatin

    PubMed Central

    Larin, Michelle L.; Harding, Katherine; Williams, Elizabeth C.; Lianga, Noel; Doré, Carole; Pilon, Sophie; Langis, Éric; Yanofsky, Corey; Rudner, Adam D.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in the locations and boundaries of heterochromatin are critical during development, and de novo assembly of silent chromatin in budding yeast is a well-studied model for how new sites of heterochromatin assemble. De novo assembly cannot occur in the G1 phase of the cell cycle and one to two divisions are needed for complete silent chromatin assembly and transcriptional repression. Mutation of DOT1, the histone H3 lysine 79 (K79) methyltransferase, and SET1, the histone H3 lysine 4 (K4) methyltransferase, speed de novo assembly. These observations have led to the model that regulated demethylation of histones may be a mechanism for how cells control the establishment of heterochromatin. We find that the abundance of Sir4, a protein required for the assembly of silent chromatin, decreases dramatically during a G1 arrest and therefore tested if changing the levels of Sir4 would also alter the speed of de novo establishment. Halving the level of Sir4 slows heterochromatin establishment, while increasing Sir4 speeds establishment. yku70Δ and ubp10Δ cells also speed de novo assembly, and like dot1Δ cells have defects in subtelomeric silencing, suggesting that these mutants may indirectly speed de novo establishment by liberating Sir4 from telomeres. Deleting RIF1 and RIF2, which suppresses the subtelomeric silencing defects in these mutants, rescues the advanced de novo establishment in yku70Δ and ubp10Δ cells, but not in dot1Δ cells, suggesting that YKU70 and UBP10 regulate Sir4 availability by modulating subtelomeric silencing, while DOT1 functions directly to regulate establishment. Our data support a model whereby the demethylation of histone H3 K79 and changes in Sir4 abundance and availability define two rate-limiting steps that regulate de novo assembly of heterochromatin. PMID:26587833

  2. Identification of a Novel Nonstructural Protein, VP9, from White Spot Syndrome Virus: Its Structure Reveals a Ferredoxin Fold with Specific Metal Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Liu,Y.; Wu, J.; Song, J.; Sivaraman, J.; Hew, C.

    2006-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen in shrimp aquaculture. VP9, a full-length protein of WSSV, encoded by open reading frame wsv230, was identified for the first time in the infected Penaeus monodon shrimp tissues, gill, and stomach as a novel, nonstructural protein by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the transcription of VP9 started from the early to the late stage of WSSV infection as a major mRNA species. The structure of full-length VP9 was determined by both X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. It is the first structure to be reported for WSSV proteins. The crystal structure of VP9 revealed a ferredoxin fold with divalent metal ion binding sites. Cadmium sulfate was found to be essential for crystallization. The Cd2+ ions were bound between the monomer interfaces of the homodimer. Various divalent metal ions have been titrated against VP9, and their interactions were analyzed using NMR spectroscopy. The titration data indicated that VP9 binds with both Zn2+ and Cd2+. VP9 adopts a similar fold as the DNA binding domain of the papillomavirus E2 protein. Based on our present investigations, we hypothesize that VP9 might be involved in the transcriptional regulation of WSSV, a function similar to that of the E2 protein during papillomavirus infection of the host cells.

  3. Identification of a novel nonstructural protein, VP9, from white spot syndrome virus: its structure reveals a ferredoxin fold with specific metal binding sites.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Wu, Jinlu; Song, Jianxing; Sivaraman, J; Hew, Choy L

    2006-11-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen in shrimp aquaculture. VP9, a full-length protein of WSSV, encoded by open reading frame wsv230, was identified for the first time in the infected Penaeus monodon shrimp tissues, gill, and stomach as a novel, nonstructural protein by Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Real-time reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that the transcription of VP9 started from the early to the late stage of WSSV infection as a major mRNA species. The structure of full-length VP9 was determined by both X-ray and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. It is the first structure to be reported for WSSV proteins. The crystal structure of VP9 revealed a ferredoxin fold with divalent metal ion binding sites. Cadmium sulfate was found to be essential for crystallization. The Cd2+ ions were bound between the monomer interfaces of the homodimer. Various divalent metal ions have been titrated against VP9, and their interactions were analyzed using NMR spectroscopy. The titration data indicated that VP9 binds with both Zn2+ and Cd2+. VP9 adopts a similar fold as the DNA binding domain of the papillomavirus E2 protein. Based on our present investigations, we hypothesize that VP9 might be involved in the transcriptional regulation of WSSV, a function similar to that of the E2 protein during papillomavirus infection of the host cells.

  4. PmTBC1D20, a Rab GTPase-activating protein from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, is involved in white spot syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Yingvilasprasert, Wanchart; Supungul, Premruethai; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2014-02-01

    TBC (TRE2/BUB2/CDC16) domain proteins contain an ≈ 200-amino-acid motif and function as Rab GTPase-activating proteins that are required for regulating the activity of Rab proteins, and so, in turn, endocytic membrane trafficking in cells. TBC domain family member 20 (TBC1D20) has recently been reported to mediate Hepatitis C virus replication. Herein, PmTBC1D20 identified from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, was characterized and evaluated for its role in white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. The full-length cDNA sequence of PmTBC1D20 contains 2003 bp with a predicted 1443 bp open reading frame encoding a deduced 480 amino acid protein. Its transcript levels were significantly up-regulated at 24 and 48 h by ≈ 2.3- and 2.1-fold, respectively, after systemic infection with WSSV. In addition, depletion of PmTBC1D20 transcript in shrimps by double stranded RNA interference led to a decrease in the level of transcripts of three WSSV genes (VP28, ie1 and wsv477). This suggests the importance of PmTBC1D20 in WSSV infection. This is the first report of TBC1D20 in a crustacean and reveals the possible mechanism used by WSSV to modulate the activity of the host protein, PmTBC1D20, for its benefit in viral trafficking and replication.

  5. Integrated Proteomic and Glycoproteomic Analyses of Prostate Cancer Cells Reveal Glycoprotein Alteration in Protein Abundance and Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Punit; Wang, Xiangchun; Yang, Weiming; Toghi Eshghi, Shadi; Sun, Shisheng; Hoti, Naseruddin; Chen, Lijun; Yang, Shuang; Pasay, Jered; Rubin, Abby; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the U.S. and worldwide, and androgen-deprivation therapy remains the principal treatment for patients. Although a majority of patients initially respond to androgen-deprivation therapy, most will eventually develop castration resistance. An increased understanding of the mechanisms that underline the pathogenesis of castration resistance is therefore needed to develop novel therapeutics. LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines are models for androgen-dependence and androgen-independence, respectively. Herein, we report the comparative analysis of these two prostate cancer cell lines using integrated global proteomics and glycoproteomics. Global proteome profiling of the cell lines using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and two- dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) led to the quantification of 8063 proteins. To analyze the glycoproteins, glycosite-containing peptides were isolated from the same iTRAQ-labeled peptides from the cell lines using solid phase extraction followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Among the 1810 unique N-linked glycosite-containing peptides from 653 identified N-glycoproteins, 176 glycoproteins were observed to be different between the two cell lines. A majority of the altered glycoproteins were also observed with changes in their global protein expression levels. However, alterations in 21 differentially expressed glycoproteins showed no change at the protein abundance level, indicating that the glycosylation site occupancy was different between the two cell lines. To determine the glycosylation heterogeneity at specific glycosylation sites, we further identified and quantified 1145 N-linked glycopeptides with attached glycans in the same iTRAQ-labeled samples. These intact glycopeptides contained 67 glycan compositions and showed increased fucosylation in PC3 cells in several of the examined glycosylation sites. The increase in

  6. Integrated Proteomic and Glycoproteomic Analyses of Prostate Cancer Cells Reveal Glycoprotein Alteration in Protein Abundance and Glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Punit; Wang, Xiangchun; Yang, Weiming; Toghi Eshghi, Shadi; Sun, Shisheng; Hoti, Naseruddin; Chen, Lijun; Yang, Shuang; Pasay, Jered; Rubin, Abby; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the U.S. and worldwide, and androgen-deprivation therapy remains the principal treatment for patients. Although a majority of patients initially respond to androgen-deprivation therapy, most will eventually develop castration resistance. An increased understanding of the mechanisms that underline the pathogenesis of castration resistance is therefore needed to develop novel therapeutics. LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines are models for androgen-dependence and androgen-independence, respectively. Herein, we report the comparative analysis of these two prostate cancer cell lines using integrated global proteomics and glycoproteomics. Global proteome profiling of the cell lines using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling and two- dimensional (2D) liquid chromatography-tandem MS (LC-MS/MS) led to the quantification of 8063 proteins. To analyze the glycoproteins, glycosite-containing peptides were isolated from the same iTRAQ-labeled peptides from the cell lines using solid phase extraction followed by LC-MS/MS analysis. Among the 1810 unique N-linked glycosite-containing peptides from 653 identified N-glycoproteins, 176 glycoproteins were observed to be different between the two cell lines. A majority of the altered glycoproteins were also observed with changes in their global protein expression levels. However, alterations in 21 differentially expressed glycoproteins showed no change at the protein abundance level, indicating that the glycosylation site occupancy was different between the two cell lines. To determine the glycosylation heterogeneity at specific glycosylation sites, we further identified and quantified 1145 N-linked glycopeptides with attached glycans in the same iTRAQ-labeled samples. These intact glycopeptides contained 67 glycan compositions and showed increased fucosylation in PC3 cells in several of the examined glycosylation sites. The increase in

  7. The novel white spot syndrome virus-induced gene, PmERP15, encodes an ER stress-responsive protein in black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Leu, Jiann-Horng; Liu, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Wang, Yu-Bin; Lin, Chung-Yen; Lo, Chu-Fang

    2015-04-01

    By microarray screening, we identified a white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-strongly induced novel gene in gills of Penaeus monodon. The gene, PmERP15, encodes a putative transmembrane protein of 15 kDa, which only showed some degree of similarity (54-59%) to several unknown insect proteins, but had no hits to shrimp proteins. RT-PCR showed that PmERP15 was highly expressed in the hemocytes, heart and lymphoid organs, and that WSSV-induced strong expression of PmERP15 was evident in all tissues examined. Western blot analysis likewise showed that WSSV strongly up-regulated PmERP15 protein levels. In WSSV-infected hemocytes, immunofluorescence staining showed that PmERP15 protein was colocalized with an ER enzyme, protein disulfide isomerase, and in Sf9 insect cells, PmERP15-EGFP fusion protein colocalized with ER -Tracker™ Red dye as well. GRP78, an ER stress marker, was found to be up-regulated in WSSV-infected P. monodon, and both PmERP15 and GRP78 were up-regulated in shrimp injected with ER stress inducers tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Silencing experiments showed that although PmERP15 dsRNA-injected shrimp succumbed to WSSV infection more rapidly, the WSSV copy number had no significant changes. These results suggest that PmERP15 is an ER stress-induced, ER resident protein, and its induction in WSSV-infected shrimp is caused by the ER stress triggered by WSSV infection. Furthermore, although PmERP15 has no role in WSSV multiplication, its presence is essential for the survival of WSSV-infected shrimp.

  8. The novel white spot syndrome virus-induced gene, PmERP15, encodes an ER stress-responsive protein in black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon.

    PubMed

    Leu, Jiann-Horng; Liu, Kuan-Fu; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Wang, Yu-Bin; Lin, Chung-Yen; Lo, Chu-Fang

    2015-04-01

    By microarray screening, we identified a white spot syndrome virus (WSSV)-strongly induced novel gene in gills of Penaeus monodon. The gene, PmERP15, encodes a putative transmembrane protein of 15 kDa, which only showed some degree of similarity (54-59%) to several unknown insect proteins, but had no hits to shrimp proteins. RT-PCR showed that PmERP15 was highly expressed in the hemocytes, heart and lymphoid organs, and that WSSV-induced strong expression of PmERP15 was evident in all tissues examined. Western blot analysis likewise showed that WSSV strongly up-regulated PmERP15 protein levels. In WSSV-infected hemocytes, immunofluorescence staining showed that PmERP15 protein was colocalized with an ER enzyme, protein disulfide isomerase, and in Sf9 insect cells, PmERP15-EGFP fusion protein colocalized with ER -Tracker™ Red dye as well. GRP78, an ER stress marker, was found to be up-regulated in WSSV-infected P. monodon, and both PmERP15 and GRP78 were up-regulated in shrimp injected with ER stress inducers tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Silencing experiments showed that although PmERP15 dsRNA-injected shrimp succumbed to WSSV infection more rapidly, the WSSV copy number had no significant changes. These results suggest that PmERP15 is an ER stress-induced, ER resident protein, and its induction in WSSV-infected shrimp is caused by the ER stress triggered by WSSV infection. Furthermore, although PmERP15 has no role in WSSV multiplication, its presence is essential for the survival of WSSV-infected shrimp. PMID:25499032

  9. The Cytosolic Nucleoprotein of the Plant-Infecting Bunyavirus Tomato Spotted Wilt Recruits Endoplasmic Reticulum–Resident Proteins to Endoplasmic Reticulum Export Sites[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Daniela; Jung, Maartje; Moling, Sjef; Borst, Jan Willem; Goldbach, Rob; Kormelink, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In contrast with animal-infecting viruses, few known plant viruses contain a lipid envelope, and the processes leading to their membrane envelopment remain largely unknown. Plant viruses with lipid envelopes include viruses of the Bunyaviridae, which obtain their envelope from the Golgi complex. The envelopment process is predominantly dictated by two viral glycoproteins (Gn and Gc) and the viral nucleoprotein (N). During maturation of the plant-infecting bunyavirus Tomato spotted wilt, Gc localizes at endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes and becomes ER export competent only upon coexpression with Gn. In the presence of cytosolic N, Gc remains arrested in the ER but changes its distribution from reticular into punctate spots. Here, we show that these areas correspond to ER export sites (ERESs), distinct ER domains where glycoprotein cargo concentrates prior to coat protein II vesicle–mediated transport to the Golgi. Gc concentration at ERES is mediated by an interaction between its cytoplasmic tail (CT) and N. Interestingly, an ER-resident calnexin provided with Gc-CT was similarly recruited to ERES when coexpressed with N. Furthermore, disruption of actin filaments caused the appearance of a larger amount of smaller ERES loaded with N-Gc complexes, suggesting that glycoprotein cargo concentration acts as a trigger for de novo synthesis of ERES. PMID:24045023

  10. PmVRP15, a novel viral responsive protein from the black tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon, promoted white spot syndrome virus replication.

    PubMed

    Vatanavicharn, Tipachai; Prapavorarat, Adisak; Jaree, Phattarunda; Somboonwiwat, Kunlaya; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2014-01-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization of Penaeus monodon hemocytes challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) has identified the viral responsive gene, PmVRP15, as the highest up-regulated gene ever reported in shrimps. Expression analysis by quantitative real time RT-PCR revealed 9410-fold up-regulated level at 48 h post WSSV injection. Tissue distribution analysis showed that PmVRP15 transcript was mainly expressed in the hemocytes of shrimp. The full-length cDNA of PmVRP15 transcript was obtained and showed no significant similarity to any known gene in the GenBank database. The predicted open reading frame of PmVRP15 encodes for a deduced 137 amino acid protein containing a putative transmembrane helix. Immunofluorescent localization of the PmVRP15 protein revealed it accumulated around the nuclear membrane in all three types of shrimp hemocytes and that the protein was highly up-regulated in WSSV-infected shrimps. Double-stranded RNA interference-mediated gene silencing of PmVRP15 in P. monodon significantly decreased WSSV propagation compared to the control shrimps (injected with GFP dsRNA). The significant decrease in cumulative mortality rate of WSSV-infected shrimp following PmVRP15 knockdown was observed. These results suggest that PmVRP15 is likely to be a nuclear membrane protein and that it acts as a part of WSSV propagation pathway.

  11. Expression level and immunolocalization of de novo methyltransferase 3 protein (TuDNMT3) in adult females and males of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Si-Xia; Guo, Chao; Zhang, Yan-Kai; Sun, Jing-Tao; Hong, Xiao-Yue

    2015-11-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism for regulating developmental and other important processes in eukaryotes. Several essential components of the DNA methylation machinery have been identified, such as DNA methyltransferases. In the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae Koch, we have identified one DNA methyltransferase 3 gene (Tudnmt3) and tentatively investigated its potential role in adult females and males. Here, to better elucidate the functional role of Tudnmt3, its protein structure, expression and localization were subjected to more detailed analyses. Bioinformatic analyses clearly showed that the structure of TuDNMT3 was highly conserved, with several vital amino acid residues for the activation and stabilization of its confirmation. Western blot analyses revealed that this protein was expressed in both genders, with higher expression in adult females, which was inconsistent with the gene expression, suggesting translational regulation of Tudnmt3. Subsequent immunodetection provided supportive evidence for higher expression of the TuDNMT3 protein in adult females and indicated that this protein was generally localized in the cytoplasm and that its expression was predominantly confined to the genital region of spider mites, strengthening the hypothesis that de novo methylation mediated by Tudnmt3 in gonad development or gametogenesis has a different mechanism from maintenance methyltransferase.

  12. Expression profiles of 12 late embryogenesis abundant protein genes from Tamarix hispida in response to abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Gao, Caiqiu; Liu, Yali; Wang, Chao; Zhang, Kaimin; Wang, Yucheng

    2014-01-01

    Twelve embryogenesis abundant protein (LEA) genes (named ThLEA-1 to -12) were cloned from Tamarix hispida. The expression profiles of these genes in response to NaCl, PEG, and abscisic acid (ABA) in roots, stems, and leaves of T. hispida were assessed using real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). These ThLEAs all showed tissue-specific expression patterns in roots, stems, and leaves under normal growth conditions. However, they shared a high similar expression patterns in the roots, stems, and leaves when exposed to NaCl and PEG stress. Furthermore, ThLEA-1, -2, -3, -4, and -11 were induced by NaCl and PEG, but ThLEA-5, -6, -8, -10, and -12 were downregulated by salt and drought stresses. Under ABA treatment, some ThLEA genes, such as ThLEA-1, -2, and -3, were only slightly differentially expressed in roots, stems, and leaves, indicating that they may be involved in the ABA-independent signaling pathway. These findings provide a basis for the elucidation of the function of LEA genes in future work. PMID:25133264

  13. Integration of multi-omics data of a genome-reduced bacterium: Prevalence of post-transcriptional regulation and its correlation with protein abundances

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Hua; van Noort, Vera; Lluch-Senar, Maria; Hennrich, Marco L.; H. Wodke, Judith A.; Yus, Eva; Alibés, Andreu; Roma, Guglielmo; Mende, Daniel R.; Pesavento, Christina; Typas, Athanasios; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Serrano, Luis; Bork, Peer

    2016-01-01

    We developed a comprehensive resource for the genome-reduced bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae comprising 1748 consistently generated ‘-omics’ data sets, and used it to quantify the power of antisense non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), lysine acetylation, and protein phosphorylation in predicting protein abundance (11%, 24% and 8%, respectively). These factors taken together are four times more predictive of the proteome abundance than of mRNA abundance. In bacteria, post-translational modifications (PTMs) and ncRNA transcription were both found to increase with decreasing genomic GC-content and genome size. Thus, the evolutionary forces constraining genome size and GC-content modify the relative contributions of the different regulatory layers to proteome homeostasis, and impact more genomic and genetic features than previously appreciated. Indeed, these scaling principles will enable us to develop more informed approaches when engineering minimal synthetic genomes. PMID:26773059

  14. Integration of multi-omics data of a genome-reduced bacterium: Prevalence of post-transcriptional regulation and its correlation with protein abundances.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hua; van Noort, Vera; Lluch-Senar, Maria; Hennrich, Marco L; Wodke, Judith A H; Yus, Eva; Alibés, Andreu; Roma, Guglielmo; Mende, Daniel R; Pesavento, Christina; Typas, Athanasios; Gavin, Anne-Claude; Serrano, Luis; Bork, Peer

    2016-02-18

    We developed a comprehensive resource for the genome-reduced bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae comprising 1748 consistently generated '-omics' data sets, and used it to quantify the power of antisense non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), lysine acetylation, and protein phosphorylation in predicting protein abundance (11%, 24% and 8%, respectively). These factors taken together are four times more predictive of the proteome abundance than of mRNA abundance. In bacteria, post-translational modifications (PTMs) and ncRNA transcription were both found to increase with decreasing genomic GC-content and genome size. Thus, the evolutionary forces constraining genome size and GC-content modify the relative contributions of the different regulatory layers to proteome homeostasis, and impact more genomic and genetic features than previously appreciated. Indeed, these scaling principles will enable us to develop more informed approaches when engineering minimal synthetic genomes.

  15. SUMO-conjugating enzyme E2 UBC9 mediates viral immediate-early protein SUMOylation in crayfish to facilitate reproduction of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, An-Jing; Gao, Lu; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2013-01-01

    Successful viruses have evolved superior strategies to escape host defenses or exploit host biological pathways. Most of the viral immediate-early (ie) genes are essential for viral infection and depend solely on host proteins; however, the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the modification of viral IE proteins by the crayfish small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) and investigated the role of SUMOylation during the viral life cycle. SUMO and SUMO ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (UBC9) involved in SUMOylation were identified in red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). Both SUMO and UBC9 were upregulated in crayfish challenged with white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Replication of WSSV genes increased in crayfish injected with recombinant SUMO or UBC9, but injection of mutant SUMO or UBC9 protein had no effect. Subsequently, we analyzed the mechanism by which crayfish SUMOylation facilitates WSSV replication. Crayfish UBC9 bound to all three WSSV IE proteins tested, and one of these IE proteins (WSV051) was covalently modified by SUMO in vitro. The expression of viral ie genes was affected and that of late genes was significantly inhibited in UBC9-silenced or SUMO-silenced crayfish, and the inhibition effect was rescued by injection of recombinant SUMO or UBC9. The results of this study demonstrate that viral IE proteins can be modified by crayfish SUMOylation, prompt the expression of viral genes, and ultimately benefit WSSV replication. Understanding of the mechanisms by which viruses exploit host components will greatly improve our knowledge of the virus-host "arms race" and contribute to the development of novel methods against virulent viruses.

  16. Changes in abundance of aquaporin-like proteins occurs concomitantly with seasonal acquisition of freeze tolerance in the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis.

    PubMed

    Philip, Benjamin N; Lee, Richard E

    2010-07-01

    The accumulation of cryoprotectants and the redistribution of water between body compartments play central roles in the capacity of insects to survive freezing. Aquaporins (AQPs) allow for rapid redistribution of water and small solutes (e.g. glycerol) across the cell membrane and were recently implicated in promoting freeze tolerance. Here, we examined whether aquaporin-like protein abundance correlated with the seasonal acquisition of freezing tolerance in the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis (Diptera: Tephritidae). Through the autumn, larvae became tolerant of freezing at progressively lower temperatures and accumulated the cryoprotectant glycerol. Furthermore, larvae significantly increased the abundance of membrane-bound aquaporin and aquaglyceroporin-like proteins from July through January. Acute exposure of larvae to cold and desiccation resulted in upregulation of the AQP3-like proteins in October, suggesting that their abundance is regulated by environmental cues. The seasonal increase in abundance of both putative aquaporins and aquaglyceroporins supports the hypothesis that these proteins are closely tied to the seasonal acquisition of freeze tolerance, functioning to permit cells to quickly lose water and take-up glycerol during extracellular ice formation, as well as reestablish water and glycerol concentrations upon thawing.

  17. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression analysis of tumor suppressor protein p53 from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides in response to temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zeng-Hua; Liu, Yu-Feng; Luo, Sheng-Wei; Chen, Chu-Xian; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Wei-Na

    2013-11-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is a critical component of cell cycle checkpoint responses. It upregulates the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in response to DNA damage and other cellular perturbations, and promotes apoptosis when DNA repair pathways are overwhelmed. In the present study, the cDNA of p53 from the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) (Ec-p53) was cloned by the combination of homology cloning and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) approaches. The full-length cDNA of Ec-p53 was of 1921 bp, including an open reading frame (ORF) of 1143 bp encoding a polypeptide of 380 amino acids with predicted molecular weight of 42.3 kDa and theoretical isoelectric point of 7.0. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) assays revealed that Ec-p53 was ubiquitously expressed in all the examined tissues but with high levels in intestine and liver of the orange-spotted grouper. In addition, we measured the DNA damage and apoptosis in the blood cells and the percentage of dead and damaged blood cells. Our results suggest that oxidative stress and DNA damage occurred in grouper in conditions where the temperature was 15 ± 0.5 °C. Furthermore, qRT-PCR and western blot confirmed that low temperature stress induced upregulation of Ec-p53 in the mRNA and protein levels. These results suggest that low temperature-induced oxidative stress may cause DNA damage or apoptosis, and cooperatively stimulate the expression of Ec-p53, which plays a critical role in immune defense and antioxidant responses.

  18. Increased Abundance of Proteins Involved in Resistance to Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress at the Last Stages of Growth and Development of Leishmania amazonensis Promastigotes Revealed by Proteome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Ana; García-Tabares, Francisco; Mena, María C.; Ciordia, Sergio; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is one of the major etiological agents of the neglected, stigmatizing disease termed american cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL). ACL is a zoonosis and rodents are the main reservoirs. Most cases of ACL are reported in Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia and Peru. The biological cycle of the parasite is digenetic because sand fly vectors transmit the motile promastigote stage to the mammalian host dermis during blood meal intakes. The amastigote stage survives within phagocytes of the mammalian host. The purpose of this study is detection and identification of changes in protein abundance by 2DE/MALDI-TOF/TOF at the main growth phases of L. amazonensis promastigotes in axenic culture and the differentiation process that takes place simultaneously. The average number of proteins detected per gel is 202 and the non-redundant cumulative number is 339. Of those, 63 are differentially abundant throughout growth and simultaneous differentiation of L. amazonensis promastigotes. The main finding is that certain proteins involved in resistance to nitrosative and oxidative stress are more abundant at the last stages of growth and differentiation of cultured L. amazonensis promastigotes. These proteins are the arginase, a light variant of the tryparedoxin peroxidase, the iron superoxide dismutase, the regulatory subunit of the protein kinase A and a light HSP70 variant. These data taken together with the decrease of the stress-inducible protein 1 levels are additional evidence supporting the previously described pre-adaptative hypothesis, which consists of preparation in advance towards the amastigote stage. PMID:27776144

  19. Interleukin (IL)-1 in rat parturition: IL-1 receptors 1 and 2 and accessory proteins abundance in pregnant rat uterus at term - regulation by progesterone.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Tomohito; Takeda, Jun; Fang, Xin; Bronson, Heather; Olson, David M

    2016-07-01

    The role of interleukin-1 (IL-1), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, in parturition is typically noted by changes in its concentrations. Studying the expression of its receptor family, IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) 1, IL-1R2, IL-1R accessory protein (IL-1RAcP), and its predominantly brain isoform, IL-1RAcPb, during late gestation in the uterus in the Long-Evans rat is another. We assessed changes in their mRNA and protein relative abundance in the uterus and compared IL-1RAcP and IL-1RAcPb mRNA abundance in uterus, cervix, ovaries, placenta, and whole blood of Long-Evans rats during late gestation or in RU486 and progesterone-treated dams using quantitative real-time PCR and western immunoblotting. IL-1R1, IL-1RAcP, and IL-1RAcPb mRNA abundance significantly increased in the uterus at delivery whereas IL-1R2 mRNA abundance significantly decreased. IL-1R1 protein increased at term and IL-1R2 protein decreased at term compared to nonpregnant uteri. IL1-RAcPb mRNA abundance was less than IL-1RAcP, but in the lower uterine segment it was the highest of all tissues examined. RU486 stimulated preterm delivery and an increase in IL-1R1 mRNA abundance whereas progesterone administration extended pregnancy and suppressed the increase in IL-1R1. These data suggest that changes in uterine sensitivity to IL-1 occur during late gestation and suggest another level of regulation for the control of delivery. The roles for IL-1RAcP and IL-1RAcPb need to be determined, but may relate to different intracellular signaling pathways. PMID:27440742

  20. Interleukin (IL)-1 in rat parturition: IL-1 receptors 1 and 2 and accessory proteins abundance in pregnant rat uterus at term - regulation by progesterone.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Tomohito; Takeda, Jun; Fang, Xin; Bronson, Heather; Olson, David M

    2016-07-01

    The role of interleukin-1 (IL-1), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, in parturition is typically noted by changes in its concentrations. Studying the expression of its receptor family, IL-1 receptor (IL-1R) 1, IL-1R2, IL-1R accessory protein (IL-1RAcP), and its predominantly brain isoform, IL-1RAcPb, during late gestation in the uterus in the Long-Evans rat is another. We assessed changes in their mRNA and protein relative abundance in the uterus and compared IL-1RAcP and IL-1RAcPb mRNA abundance in uterus, cervix, ovaries, placenta, and whole blood of Long-Evans rats during late gestation or in RU486 and progesterone-treated dams using quantitative real-time PCR and western immunoblotting. IL-1R1, IL-1RAcP, and IL-1RAcPb mRNA abundance significantly increased in the uterus at delivery whereas IL-1R2 mRNA abundance significantly decreased. IL-1R1 protein increased at term and IL-1R2 protein decreased at term compared to nonpregnant uteri. IL1-RAcPb mRNA abundance was less than IL-1RAcP, but in the lower uterine segment it was the highest of all tissues examined. RU486 stimulated preterm delivery and an increase in IL-1R1 mRNA abundance whereas progesterone administration extended pregnancy and suppressed the increase in IL-1R1. These data suggest that changes in uterine sensitivity to IL-1 occur during late gestation and suggest another level of regulation for the control of delivery. The roles for IL-1RAcP and IL-1RAcPb need to be determined, but may relate to different intracellular signaling pathways.

  1. Dystrophin Hot-Spot Mutants Leading to Becker Muscular Dystrophy Insert More Deeply into Membrane Models than the Native Protein.

    PubMed

    Ameziane-Le Hir, Sarah; Paboeuf, Gilles; Tascon, Christophe; Hubert, Jean-François; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Vié, Véronique; Raguénès-Nicol, Céline

    2016-07-26

    Dystrophin (DYS) is a membrane skeleton protein whose mutations lead to lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy or to the milder Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). One third of BMD "in-frame" exon deletions are located in the region that codes for spectrin-like repeats R16 to R21. We focused on four prevalent mutated proteins deleted in this area (called RΔ45-47, RΔ45-48, RΔ45-49, and RΔ45-51 according to the deleted exon numbers), analyzing protein/membrane interactions. Two of the mutants, RΔ45-48 and RΔ45-51, led to mild pathologies and displayed a similar triple coiled-coil structure as the full-length DYS R16-21, whereas the two others, RΔ45-47 and RΔ45-49, induced more severe pathologies and showed "fractional" structures unrelated to the normal one. To explore lipid packing, small unilamellar liposomes (SUVs) and planar monolayers were used at various initial surface pressures. The dissociation constants determined by microscale thermophoresis (MST) were much higher for the full-length DYS R161-21 than for the mutants; thus the wild type protein has weaker SUV binding. Comparing surface pressures after protein adsorption and analysis of atomic force microscopy images of mixed protein/lipid monolayers revealed that the mutants insert more into the lipid monolayer than the wild type does. In fact, in both models every deletion mutant showed more interactions with membranes than the full-length protein did. This means that mutations in the R16-21 part of dystrophin disturb the protein's molecular behavior as it relates to membranes, regardless of whether the accompanying pathology is mild or severe. PMID:27367833

  2. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a major White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) envelope protein VP24 expressed in Escherichia coli against WSSV.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ancy; Sudheer, Naduvilamuriparampu Saidumuhammed; Viswanathan, Karthik; Kiron, Viswanath; Bright Singh, Issac S; Narayanan, Rangarajan Badri

    2014-11-01

    The study reports cloning, expression and characterization of immunogenic activity of VP24, a major envelope protein of White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV). His-tagged VP24 was expressed as truncated protein and purified from inclusion bodies by metal affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. The ability to confer protection from WSSV by oral administration of recombinant viral protein (rVP24) was examined in black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon (P. monodon) juveniles (advanced post larvae). Animals were fed with rVP24 for 10 days, orally challenged with WSSV and assayed for expression of viral genes and shrimp immune genes on the 2nd, 5th and 8th days of challenge. The survival of juvenile shrimps in the vaccinated and challenged group was significantly higher compared to the unvaccinated and challenged group with lesser viral gene expression (DNA polymerase, latency 1 and vp28). Analysis of immune gene expression showed upregulation of syntenin and down regulation of STAT, Rab 7 and caspase during the experimental period. This study points to the feasibility of using rVP24 as candidate vaccine in P. monodon against WSSV.

  3. Biophysical approach for studying the MinD protein dynamics and energy landscape: a novel use of the spot tracking technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanthang, P.; Ngamsaad, W.; Nuttavut, N.; Triampo, W.; Triampo, D.; Krittanai, C.

    2011-07-01

    The dynamics of MinD proteins have been acknowledged as playing a central role in accurate cell division. In our study, a spot tracking technique (STT) was applied to track motion and quantitatively characterize the dynamic behavior of MinD proteins on the level of particle cluster in Escherichia coli. We focused on the time and spatial distribution of MinD proteins. With the STT technique, the main quantitative results are twofold: (i) dynamic local and global pattern formations and (ii) energy landscape. The overall MinD cluster motion is governed by two dynamical time scales, namely the (slow) trapping time (~26 s) that appears at the cell poles, and the (fast) switching time (~1-2 s) which emerges between the cell poles. MinD cluster motion at the polar zones performs subdiffusion. The energy landscape is found to be two wells and one barrier. These energy landscape results are to relate with the memory effect of GFP-MinD cluster motion, measuring the PSD exponent approximately 1.57 (α ~ 0.57) corresponding to the estimated potential depth U0 ~ 1.75kBT.

  4. Exogenous GDF9 but not Activin A, BMP15 or TGFβ alters tight junction protein transcript abundance in zebrafish ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Clelland, Eric S; Kelly, Scott P

    2011-04-01

    The tight junction (TJ) complex plays an important role in regulating paracellular permeability and provides mechanical stability in vertebrate epithelia and endothelia. In zebrafish ovarian follicles, TJ complexes in the follicular envelope degenerate as the follicles develop towards maturation. In the current study, transcript abundance of claudins (cldn d, g, h, 1, and 12) and occludins (ocln, and ocln b) were assessed in mid-vitellogenic follicles in response to treatment with exogenous growth factors that are reported to be involved in zebrafish follicle development (i.e. Activin A, BMP15, GDF9 and TGFβ). Exogenous GDF9 reduced the transcript abundance of cldn g, ocln and ocln b in mid-vitellogenic follicles, whereas Activin A, BMP15, and TGFβ had no effect. Subsequent studies with GDF9 revealed that this factor did not alter TJ protein transcript abundance in pre-vitellogenic follicles but did increase the abundance of ocln b in fully grown (maturing) follicles. GDF9 was also seen to increase the abundance of StAR mRNA in all but primary stage follicles. These data suggest a role for GDF9 in the regulation of TJ integrity in zebrafish ovarian follicles, perhaps in the facilitation of ovulation, and support a previously postulated role for GDF9 in zebrafish ovarian follicle development. In addition, data also support the idea that endocrine factors play an important role in the regulation of TJ proteins during ovarian follicle development.

  5. Reaction of sorghum lines to zonate leaf spot and rough leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abundant, frequent rains, along with humid and cloudy conditions during the early part of the 2015 growing season, provided conducive conditions for an unusually severe outbreak of zonate leaf spot and rough leaf spot in a block of sorghum lines at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research Farm, Burleson Coun...

  6. Isolation and characterization of a thioredoxin domain-containing protein 12 from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingguang; Ji, Huasong; Guo, Minglan; Qin, Qiwei

    2012-09-01

    Thioredoxin domain-containing protein 12 (Txndc12) belongs to the thioredoxin superfamily, and has roles in redox regulation, defense against oxidative stress, refolding of disulfide-containing proteins, and regulation of transcription factors. In this study, a thioredoxin domain-containing protein 12 was cloned from the marine fish grouper, Epinephelus coioides by RACE PCR, named as Ec-Txndc12. The Ec-Txndc12 encodes 173 amino acid residues with signal peptide in its N-terminal and a thioredoxin (Trx) domain that is homologous with some genes in Mus musculus, Xenopus laveis, etc. Ec-Txndc12 mRNA is predominately expressed in liver, brain and muscle. The expression of Ec-Txndc12 was up-regulated in the liver of grouper challenged with SGIV. In order to elucidate its biological functions, Ec-Txndc12 was recombined and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The rEc-Txndc12 fusion protein was demonstrated to possess the antioxidant activity. The grouper spleen (GS) cells were treated with a high concentration of rEc-Txndc12 (30 μg/ml), which significantly enhanced cells viability under oxidative damage caused by viral infection. These results together indicated that Ec-Txndc12 could function as an important antioxidant in a physiological context, and might be involved in the responses to viral challenge.

  7. Unchanged [3H]ouabain binding site content but reduced Na+-K+ pump α2-protein abundance in skeletal muscle in older adults.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Michael J; Perry, Ben D; Serpiello, Fabio R; Caldow, Marissa K; Levinger, Pazit; Cameron-Smith, David; Levinger, Itamar

    2012-11-01

    Aging is associated with reduced muscle mass, weakness, and increased fatigability. In skeletal muscle, the Na(+)-K(+) pump (NKA) is important in regulating Na(+)-K(+) gradients, membrane excitability, and thus contractility, but the effects of aging on muscle NKA are unclear. We investigated whether aging is linked with reduced muscle NKA by contrasting muscle NKA isoform gene expression and protein abundance, and NKA total content in 17 Elderly (66.8 ± 6.4 yr, mean ± SD) and 16 Young adults (23.9 ± 2.2 yr). Participants underwent peak oxygen consumption assessment and a vastus lateralis muscle biopsy, which was analyzed for NKA α(1)-, α(2)-, α(3)-, β(1)-, β(2)-, and β(3)-isoform gene expression (real-time RT-PCR), protein abundance (immunoblotting), and NKA total content ([(3)H]ouabain binding sites). The Elderly had lower peak oxygen consumption (-36.7%, P = 0.000), strength (-36.3%, P = 0.001), NKA α(2)- (-24.4%, 11.9 ± 4.4 vs. 9.0 ± 2.7 arbitrary units, P = 0.049), and NKA β(3)-protein abundance (-23.0%, P = 0.041) than Young. The β(3)-mRNA was higher in Elderly compared with Young (P = 0.011). No differences were observed between groups for other NKA isoform mRNA or protein abundance, or for [(3)H]ouabain binding site content. Thus skeletal muscle in elderly individuals was characterized by decreased NKA α(2)- and β(3)-protein abundance, but unchanged α(1) abundance and [(3)H]ouabain binding. The latter was likely caused by reduced α(2) abundance with aging, preventing an otherwise higher [(3)H]ouabain binding that might occur with a greater membrane density in smaller muscle fibers. Further study is required to verify reduced muscle NKA α(2) with aging and possible contributions to impaired exercise capability and daily living activities. PMID:22936730

  8. Generation of recombinant monoclonal antibodies to study structure-function of envelope protein VP28 of white spot syndrome virus from shrimp

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yuzhen; Zhang Xiaohua; Yuan Li; Xu Tao; Rao Yu; Li Jia; Dai Heping

    2008-08-08

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a major pathogen in shrimp aquaculture. VP28 is one of the most important envelope proteins of WSSV. In this study, a recombinant antibody library, as single-chain fragment variable (scFv) format, displayed on phage was constructed using mRNA from spleen cells of mice immunized with full-length VP28 expressed in Escherichia coli. After several rounds of panning, six scFv antibodies specifically binding to the epitopes in the N-terminal, middle, and C-terminal regions of VP28, respectively, were isolated from the library. Using these scFv antibodies as tools, the epitopes in VP28 were located on the envelope of the virion by immuno-electron microscopy. Neutralization assay with these antibodies in vitro suggested that these epitopes may not be the attachment site of WSSV to host cell receptor. This study provides a new way to investigate the structure and function of the envelope proteins of WSSV.

  9. Sulfated galactans isolated from the red seaweed Gracilaria fisheri target the envelope proteins of white spot syndrome virus and protect against viral infection in shrimp haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Rudtanatip, Tawut; Asuvapongpatana, Somluk; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Wongprasert, Kanokpan

    2014-05-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating an underlying mechanism of the antiviral activity of the sulfated galactans (SG) isolated from the red seaweed Gracilaria fisheri against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection in haemocytes of the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon. Primary culture of haemocytes from Penaeus monodon was performed and inoculated with WSSV, after which the cytopathic effect (CPE), cell viability and viral load were determined. Haemocytes treated with WSSV-SG pre-mix showed decreased CPE, viral load and cell mortality from the viral infection. Solid-phase virus-binding assays revealed that SG bound to WSSV in a dose-related manner. Far Western blotting analysis indicated that SG bound to VP 26 and VP 28 proteins of WSSV. In contrast to the native SG, desulfated SG did not reduce CPE and cell mortality, and showed low binding activity with WSSV. The current study suggests that SG from Gracilaria fisheri elicits its anti-WSSV activity by binding to viral proteins that are important for the process of viral attachment to the host cells. It is anticipated that the sulfate groups of SG are important for viral binding.

  10. The movement protein (NSm) of Tomato spotted wilt virus is the avirulence determinant in the tomato Sw-5 gene-based resistance.

    PubMed

    Peiró, Ana; Cañizares, M Carmen; Rubio, Luis; López, Carmelo; Moriones, Enrique; Aramburu, José; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús

    2014-10-01

    The avirulence determinant triggering the resistance conferred by the tomato gene Sw-5 against Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is still unresolved. Sequence comparison showed two substitutions (C118Y and T120N) in the movement protein NSm present only in TSWV resistance-breaking (RB) isolates. In this work, transient expression of NSm of three TSWV isolates [RB1 (T120N), RB2 (C118Y) and non-resistance-breaking (NRB)] in Nicotiana benthamiana expressing Sw-5 showed a hypersensitive response (HR) only with NRB. Exchange of the movement protein of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) with NSm supported cell-to-cell and systemic transport of the chimeric AMV RNAs into N. tabacum with or without Sw-5, except for the constructs with NBR when Sw-5 was expressed, although RB2 showed reduced cell-to-cell transport. Mutational analysis revealed that N120 was sufficient to avoid the HR, but the substitution V130I was required for systemic transport. Finally, co-inoculation of RB and NRB AMV chimeric constructs showed different prevalence of RB or NBR depending on the presence or absence of Sw-5. These results indicate that NSm is the avirulence determinant for Sw-5 resistance, and mutations C118Y and T120N are responsible for resistance breakdown and have a fitness penalty in the context of the heterologous AMV system. PMID:24690181

  11. Molecular cloning and expression of a C-type lectin-like protein from orange-spotted grouper Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Ji, H; Wei, J; Wei, S; Yan, Y; Huang, Y; Huang, X; Zhou, S; Zhou, Y; Qin, Q

    2014-02-01

    A C-type lectin-like protein (Ec-CTLP) was cloned from the grouper Epinephelus coioides. The full-length cDNA of Ec-CTLP was composed of 905 bp with a 522 bp open reading frame that encodes a 174-residue protein. The putative amino acid sequence of Ec-CTLP contains a signal peptide of 19 residues at the N-terminus and a CLECT domain from Cys43 to Arg169 and a conserved imperfect WND (Trp-Asn-Asp) motif. The homologous identity of deduced amino acid sequences is from 32 to 42% with other fishes. The expression of Ec-CTLP was differently upregulated in E. coioides spleen (germline stem) cells after being challenged at 16 and 4° C. Intracellular localization revealed that Ec-CTLP was distributed only in the cytoplasm. Recombinant Ec-CTLP (rEc-CTLP) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified for mouse Mus musculus anti-Ec-CTLP serum preparation. The rEc-CTLP fusion protein does not possess haemagglutinating activity, but improves survival from frozen bacteria. The survival of bacteria (including gram-negative E. coli and gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus) was positively correlated with the concentration of the rEc-CTLP. These findings can provide clues to help understand the probable C-type lectin in marine fish innate immunity.

  12. Mongolian blue spots

    MedlinePlus

    Mongolian spots; Congenital dermal melanocytosis; Dermal melanocytosis ... Mongolian blue spots are common among persons who are of Asian, Native American, Hispanic, East Indian, and African descent. The color ...

  13. The DNA Virus White Spot Syndrome Virus Uses an Internal Ribosome Entry Site for Translation of the Highly Expressed Nonstructural Protein ICP35

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Shih-Ting; Wang, Han-Ching; Yang, Yi-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Although shrimp white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) is a large double-stranded DNA virus (∼300 kbp), it expresses many polycistronic mRNAs that are likely to use internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements for translation. A polycistronic mRNA encodes the gene of the highly expressed nonstructural protein ICP35, and here we use a dual-luciferase assay to demonstrate that this protein is translated cap independently by an IRES element located in the 5′ untranslated region of icp35. A deletion analysis of this region showed that IRES activity was due to stem-loops VII and VIII. A promoterless assay, a reverse transcription-PCR together with quantitative real-time PCR analysis, and a stable stem-loop insertion upstream of the Renilla luciferase open reading frame were used, respectively, to rule out the possibility that cryptic promoter activity, abnormal splicing, or read-through was contributing to the IRES activity. In addition, a Northern blot analysis was used to confirm that only a single bicistronic mRNA was expressed. The importance of ICP35 to viral replication was demonstrated in a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) interference knockdown experiment in which the mortality of the icp35 dsRNA group was significantly reduced. Tunicamycin was used to show that the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 is required for icp35 IRES activity. We also found that the intercalating drug quinacrine significantly inhibited icp35 IRES activity in vitro and reduced the mortality rate and viral copy number in WSSV-challenged shrimp. Lastly, in Sf9 insect cells, we found that knockdown of the gene for the Spodoptera frugiperda 40S ribosomal protein RPS10 decreased icp35 IRES-regulated firefly luciferase activity but had no effect on cap-dependent translation. PMID:24089551

  14. Correlation of mRNA expression and protein abundance affected by multiple sequence features related to translational efficiency in Desulfovibrio vulgaris: A quantitative analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-12-01

    The modest correlation between mRNA expression and protein abundance in large scale datasets is explained in part by experimental challenges, such as technological limitations, and in part by fundamental biological factors in the transcription and translation processes. Among various factors affecting the mRNA-protein correlation, the roles of biological factors related to translation are poorly understood. In this study, using experimental mRNA expression and protein abundance data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris by DNA microarray and LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis, we quantitatively examined the effects of several translational-efficiency-related sequence features on mRNA-protein correlation. Three classes of sequence features were investigated according to different translational stages: (1) initiation: Shine-Dalgarno sequences, start codon identity and start codon context; (2) elongation: codon usage and amino acid usage; and (3) termination: stop codon identity and stop codon context. Surprisingly, although it is widely accepted that translation initiation is a rate-limiting step for translation, our results showed that the mRNA-protein correlation was affected the most by the features at elongation stages, codon usage and amino acid composition (7.4-12.6% and 5.3-9.3% of the total variation of mRNA-protein correlation, respectively), followed by stop codon context and the Shine-Dalgarno sequence (2.5-4.2% and 2.3%, respectively). Taken together, all sequence features contributed to 18.4-21.8% of the total variation of mRNA-protein correlation. As the first comprehensive quantitative analysis of the mRNA-protein correlation in bacterial D. vulgaris, our results suggest that the traditional view of the relative importance of various sequence features in prokaryotic protein translation might be questionable.

  15. Preovulatory Aging In Vivo and In Vitro Affects Maturation Rates, Abundance of Selected Proteins, Histone Methylation Pattern and Spindle Integrity in Murine Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Demond, Hannah; Trapphoff, Tom; Dankert, Deborah; Heiligentag, Martyna; Grümmer, Ruth; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Delayed ovulation and delayed fertilization can lead to reduced developmental competence of the oocyte. In contrast to the consequences of postovulatory aging of the oocyte, hardly anything is known about the molecular processes occurring during oocyte maturation if ovulation is delayed (preovulatory aging). We investigated several aspects of oocyte maturation in two models of preovulatory aging: an in vitro follicle culture and an in vivo mouse model in which ovulation was postponed using the GnRH antagonist cetrorelix. Both models showed significantly reduced oocyte maturation rates after aging. Furthermore, in vitro preovulatory aging deregulated the protein abundance of the maternal effect genes Smarca4 and Nlrp5, decreased the levels of histone H3K9 trimethylation and caused major deterioration of chromosome alignment and spindle conformation. Protein abundance of YBX2, an important regulator of mRNA stability, storage and recruitment in the oocyte, was not affected by in vitro aging. In contrast, in vivo preovulatory aging led to reduction in Ybx2 transcript and YBX2 protein abundance. Taken together, preovulatory aging seems to affect various processes in the oocyte, which could explain the low maturation rates and the previously described failures in fertilization and embryonic development. PMID:27611906

  16. Preovulatory Aging In Vivo and In Vitro Affects Maturation Rates, Abundance of Selected Proteins, Histone Methylation Pattern and Spindle Integrity in Murine Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Demond, Hannah; Trapphoff, Tom; Dankert, Deborah; Heiligentag, Martyna; Grümmer, Ruth; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Eichenlaub-Ritter, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Delayed ovulation and delayed fertilization can lead to reduced developmental competence of the oocyte. In contrast to the consequences of postovulatory aging of the oocyte, hardly anything is known about the molecular processes occurring during oocyte maturation if ovulation is delayed (preovulatory aging). We investigated several aspects of oocyte maturation in two models of preovulatory aging: an in vitro follicle culture and an in vivo mouse model in which ovulation was postponed using the GnRH antagonist cetrorelix. Both models showed significantly reduced oocyte maturation rates after aging. Furthermore, in vitro preovulatory aging deregulated the protein abundance of the maternal effect genes Smarca4 and Nlrp5, decreased the levels of histone H3K9 trimethylation and caused major deterioration of chromosome alignment and spindle conformation. Protein abundance of YBX2, an important regulator of mRNA stability, storage and recruitment in the oocyte, was not affected by in vitro aging. In contrast, in vivo preovulatory aging led to reduction in Ybx2 transcript and YBX2 protein abundance. Taken together, preovulatory aging seems to affect various processes in the oocyte, which could explain the low maturation rates and the previously described failures in fertilization and embryonic development. PMID:27611906

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) NSs protein demonstrates the isolated emergence of resistance-breaking strains in pepper.

    PubMed

    Almási, Asztéria; Csilléry, Gábor; Csömör, Zsófia; Nemes, Katalin; Palkovics, László; Salánki, Katalin; Tóbiás, István

    2015-02-01

    Resurgence of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) worldwide as well as in Hungary causing heavy economic losses directed the attention to the factors contributing to the outbreak of this serious epidemics. The introgression of Tsw resistance gene into various pepper cultivars seemed to solve TSWV control, but widely used resistant pepper cultivars bearing the same, unique resistance locus evoked the rapid emergence of resistance-breaking (RB) TSWV strains. In Hungary, the sporadic appearance of RB strains in pepper-producing region was first observed in 2010-2011, but in 2012 it was detected frequently. Previously, the non-structural protein (NSs) encoded by small RNA (S RNA) of TSWV was verified as the avirulence factor for Tsw resistance, therefore we analyzed the S RNA of the Hungarian RB and wild type (WT) isolates and compared to previously analyzed TSWV strains with RB properties from different geographical origins. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the different RB strains had the closest relationship with the local WT isolates and there is no conserved mutation present in all the NSs genes of RB isolates from different geographical origins. According to these results, we concluded that the RB isolates evolved separately in geographic point of view, and also according to the RB mechanism.

  18. Effects of a Dissostichus mawsoni-CaM recombinant proteins feed additive on the juvenile orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) under the acute low temperature challenge.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng-Wei; Wang, Wei-Na; Cai, Luo; Qi, Zeng-Hua; Wang, Cong; Liu, Yuan; Peng, Chang-Lian; Chen, Liang-Biao

    2015-10-01

    The effects of Dissostichus mawsoni-Calmodulin (Dm-CaM) on growth performance, enzyme activities, respiratory burst, MDA level and immune-related gene expressions of the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) exposed to the acute low temperature stress were evaluated. The commercial diet supplemented with Dm-CaM protein was fed to the groupers for 6 weeks. No significant difference was observed in the specific growth rates, weight gains and survivals. After the feeding trial, the groupers were exposed to acute low temperature challenge. The groupers fed with Dm-CaM additive diet showed a significant decrease in the respiratory burst activity, while the blood cell number increased significantly at 25 °C by comparing with the control and additive control group. The enzymatic activity of SOD, ACP and ALP increased significantly in Dm-CaM additive group, while MDA level maintained stable with the lowest value. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that the up-regulated transcript expressions of CaM, C3, SOD2, LysC and HSPA4 were observed in Dm-CaM additive group. These results indicated that Dm-CaM additive diet may regulate the grouper immune response to the acute low temperature challenge. PMID:26122279

  19. Effects of a Dissostichus mawsoni-CaM recombinant proteins feed additive on the juvenile orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) under the acute low temperature challenge.

    PubMed

    Luo, Sheng-Wei; Wang, Wei-Na; Cai, Luo; Qi, Zeng-Hua; Wang, Cong; Liu, Yuan; Peng, Chang-Lian; Chen, Liang-Biao

    2015-10-01

    The effects of Dissostichus mawsoni-Calmodulin (Dm-CaM) on growth performance, enzyme activities, respiratory burst, MDA level and immune-related gene expressions of the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) exposed to the acute low temperature stress were evaluated. The commercial diet supplemented with Dm-CaM protein was fed to the groupers for 6 weeks. No significant difference was observed in the specific growth rates, weight gains and survivals. After the feeding trial, the groupers were exposed to acute low temperature challenge. The groupers fed with Dm-CaM additive diet showed a significant decrease in the respiratory burst activity, while the blood cell number increased significantly at 25 °C by comparing with the control and additive control group. The enzymatic activity of SOD, ACP and ALP increased significantly in Dm-CaM additive group, while MDA level maintained stable with the lowest value. qRT-PCR analysis indicated that the up-regulated transcript expressions of CaM, C3, SOD2, LysC and HSPA4 were observed in Dm-CaM additive group. These results indicated that Dm-CaM additive diet may regulate the grouper immune response to the acute low temperature challenge.

  20. Transformation of blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) by barley chitinase and ribosome-inactivating protein genes towards improving resistance to Corynespora leaf spot fungal disease.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Rajan; Saini, Raman

    2014-12-01

    Blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper), an important grain legume crop, is sensitive to many fungal pathogens including Corynespora cassiicola, the causal agent of corynespora leaf spot disease. In the present study, plasmid pGJ42 harboring neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) a selectable marker gene, the barley antifungal genes chitinase (AAA56786) and ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP; AAA32951) were used for the transformation, to develop fungal resistance for the first time in blackgram. The presence and integration of transgene into the blackgram genome was confirmed by PCR and Southern analysis with an overall transformation frequency of 10.2 %. Kanamycin selection and PCR analysis of T0 progeny revealed the inheritance of transgene in Mendelian fashion (3:1). Transgenic plants (T1), evaluated for fungal resistance by in vitro antifungal assay, arrested the growth of C. cassiicola up to 25-40 % over the wild-type plants. In fungal bio-assay screening, the transgenic plants (T1) sprayed with C. cassiicola spores showed a delay in onset of disease along with their lesser extent in terms of average number of diseased leaves and reduced number and size of lesions. The percent disease protection among different transformed lines varies in the range of 27-47 % compare to control (untransformed) plants. These results demonstrate potentiality of chitinase and RIP from a heterologous source in developing fungal disease protection in blackgram and can be helpful in increasing the production of blackgram.

  1. Effect of postnatal age and a beta(3)-adrenergic agonist (Zeneca D7114) administration on uncoupling protein-1 abundance in the lamb.

    PubMed

    Bird, J A; Mostyn, A; Clarke, L; Juniper, D T; Budge, H; Stephenson, T; Symonds, M E

    2001-01-01

    We examined the effect of time after birth and beta(3)-adrenergic agonist (Zeneca D7114) administration on uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) abundance and thermoregulation in the lamb. Forty twin lambs, all born normally at term, were maintained at a cold ambient temperature of between 3 and 8 degrees C. At 0.5, 1.75, 5.25, 11.25 and 23.25 h after birth eight sets of twins were fed 20 ml of formula milk +/- 10 mg kg(-1) of beta(3)-adrenergic agonist, and 45 min after feeding brown adipose tissue (BAT) was sampled. Colonic temperature was measured and BAT analysed for UCP1 abundance, GDP-binding to mitochondrial protein (i.e. thermogenic activity) and catecholamine content. Colonic temperature declined between 1.25 and 6 h from 40.2 degrees C to 39.2 degrees C and then increased to 39.8 degrees C at 12 h, but increased after feeding at all ages. UCP1 abundance increased from 1.25 h after birth, to peak at 2 h after birth in controls, compared with 6 h after birth in beta(3)-adrenergic agonist-treated lambs. The level of GDP-binding to mitochondrial protein did not change significantly with age but was increased by beta(3)-adrenergic agonist treatment. The noradrenaline (norepinephrine) content of BAT increased between 1.25 and 12 h after birth, irrespective of beta(3)-adrenergic agonist administration. The total weight of perirenal BAT plus its lipid, protein and mitochondrial protein content declined over the first 6 h of life. UCP1 development continues over the first 24 h of neonatal life, and can be manipulated by beta(3)-adrenergic agonist administration. This may represent one method of improving thermoregulation in newborn lambs. Experimental Physiology (2001) 86.1, 65-70. PMID:11429621

  2. The Unstructured N-terminal Region of Arabidopsis Group 4 Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Proteins Is Required for Folding and for Chaperone-like Activity under Water Deficit.

    PubMed

    Cuevas-Velazquez, Cesar L; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Reyes, José Luis; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2016-05-13

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a conserved group of proteins widely distributed in the plant kingdom that participate in the tolerance to water deficit of different plant species. In silico analyses indicate that most LEA proteins are structurally disordered. The structural plasticity of these proteins opens the question of whether water deficit modulates their conformation and whether these possible changes are related to their function. In this work, we characterized the secondary structure of Arabidopsis group 4 LEA proteins. We found that they are disordered in aqueous solution, with high intrinsic potential to fold into α-helix. We demonstrate that complete dehydration is not required for these proteins to sample ordered structures because milder water deficit and macromolecular crowding induce high α-helix levels in vitro, suggesting that prevalent conditions under water deficit modulate their conformation. We also show that the N-terminal region, conserved across all group 4 LEA proteins, is necessary and sufficient for conformational transitions and that their protective function is confined to this region, suggesting that folding into α-helix is required for chaperone-like activity under water limitation. We propose that these proteins can exist as different conformers, favoring functional diversity, a moonlighting property arising from their structural dynamics. PMID:27006402

  3. Heterologous Expression of MeLEA3: A 10 kDa Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein of Cassava, Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stress in Escherichia coli with Recombinant Protein Showing In Vitro Chaperone Activity.

    PubMed

    Barros, Nicolle L F; da Silva, Diehgo T; Marques, Deyvid N; de Brito, Fabiano M; dos Reis, Savio P; de Souza, Claudia R B

    2015-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are small molecular weight proteins involved in acquisition of tolerance to drought, salinity, high temperature, cold, and freezing stress in many plants. Previous studies revealed a cDNA sequence coding for a 10 kDa atypical LEA protein, named MeLEA3, predicted to be located into mitochondria with potential role in salt stress response of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz). Here we aimed to produce the recombinant MeLEA3 protein by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and evaluate the tolerance of bacteria expressing this protein under abiotic stress. Our result revealed that the recombinant MeLEA3 protein conferred a protective function against heat and salt stress in bacterial cells. Also, the recombinant MeLEA3 protein showed in vitro chaperone activity by protection of NdeI restriction enzyme activity under heat stress. PMID:25990084

  4. The ER-Membrane Transport System Is Critical for Intercellular Trafficking of the NSm Movement Protein and Tomato Spotted Wilt Tospovirus

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhike; Xue, Fan; Xu, Min; Chen, Xiaojiao; Zhao, Wenyang; Garcia-Murria, Maria J.; Mingarro, Ismael; Liu, Yong; Huang, Ying; Jiang, Lei; Zhu, Min; Tao, Xiaorong

    2016-01-01

    Plant viruses move through plasmodesmata to infect new cells. The plant endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is interconnected among cells via the ER desmotubule in the plasmodesma across the cell wall, forming a continuous ER network throughout the entire plant. This ER continuity is unique to plants and has been postulated to serve as a platform for the intercellular trafficking of macromolecules. In the present study, the contribution of the plant ER membrane transport system to the intercellular trafficking of the NSm movement protein and Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) is investigated. We showed that TSWV NSm is physically associated with the ER membrane in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. An NSm-GFP fusion protein transiently expressed in single leaf cells was trafficked into neighboring cells. Mutations in NSm that impaired its association with the ER or caused its mis-localization to other subcellular sites inhibited cell-to-cell trafficking. Pharmacological disruption of the ER network severely inhibited NSm-GFP trafficking but not GFP diffusion. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant rhd3 with an impaired ER network, NSm-GFP trafficking was significantly reduced, whereas GFP diffusion was not affected. We also showed that the ER-to-Golgi secretion pathway and the cytoskeleton transport systems were not involved in the intercellular trafficking of TSWV NSm. Importantly, TSWV cell-to-cell spread was delayed in the ER-defective rhd3 mutant, and this reduced viral infection was not due to reduced replication. On the basis of robust biochemical, cellular and genetic analysis, we established that the ER membrane transport system serves as an important direct route for intercellular trafficking of NSm and TSWV. PMID:26863622

  5. Regulation of the Mts1-Mts2-dependent ade6-M26 meiotic recombination hot spot and developmental decisions by the Spc1 mitogen-activated protein kinase of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Kon, N; Schroeder, S C; Krawchuk, M D; Wahls, W P

    1998-12-01

    The M26 meiotic recombination hot spot in the ade6 gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is activated by the heterodimeric M26 binding protein Mts1-Mts2. The individual Mts1 (Atf1, Gad7) and Mts2 (Pcr1) proteins are also transcription factors involved in developmental decisions. We report that the Mts proteins are key effectors of at least two distinct classes of developmental decisions regulated by the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade. The first class (osmoregulation, spore viability, and spore quiescence) requires the Spc1 MAP kinase and the Mts1 protein but does not require the Mts2 protein. The second class (mating, meiosis, and recombination hot spot activation) requires the Spc1 kinase and the Mts1-Mts2 heterodimer. Northern and Western blotting eliminated any significant role for the Spc1 kinase in regulating the expression levels of the Mts proteins. Gel mobility shift experiments indicated that the Mts1-Mts2 heterodimer does not need to be phosphorylated to bind to ade6-M26 DNA in vitro. However, in vivo dimethyl sulfate footprinting demonstrated that protein-DNA interaction within cells is dependent upon the Spc1 MAP kinase, which phosphorylates the Mts1 protein. Thus, the Spc1 kinase helps regulate the effector activities of the Mts1-Mts2 heterodimer in part by modulating its ability to occupy the M26 DNA site in vivo. Meiotic recombination hot spot function is likely the result of DNA conformational changes imparted by binding of the Mts1-Mts2 meiotic transcription factor. PMID:9819443

  6. Annexin A5 is the Most Abundant Membrane-Associated Protein in Stereocilia but is Dispensable for Hair-Bundle Development and Function

    PubMed Central

    Krey, Jocelyn F.; Drummond, Meghan; Foster, Sarah; Porsov, Edward; Vijayakumar, Sarath; Choi, Dongseok; Friderici, Karen; Jones, Sherri M.; Nuttall, Alfred L.; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    The phospholipid- and Ca2+-binding protein annexin A5 (ANXA5) is the most abundant membrane-associated protein of ~P23 mouse vestibular hair bundles, the inner ear’s sensory organelle. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we estimated that ANXA5 accounts for ~15,000 copies per stereocilium, or ~2% of the total protein there. Although seven other annexin genes are expressed in mouse utricles, mass spectrometry showed that none were present at levels near ANXA5 in bundles and none were upregulated in stereocilia of Anxa5−/− mice. Annexins have been proposed to mediate Ca2+-dependent repair of membrane lesions, which could be part of the repair mechanism in hair cells after noise damage. Nevertheless, mature Anxa5−/− mice not only have normal hearing and balance function, but following noise exposure, they are identical to wild-type mice in their temporary or permanent changes in hearing sensitivity. We suggest that despite the unusually high levels of ANXA5 in bundles, it does not play a role in the bundle’s key function, mechanotransduction, at least until after two months of age in the cochlea and six months of age in the vestibular system. These results reinforce the lack of correlation between abundance of a protein in a specific compartment or cellular structure and its functional significance. PMID:27251877

  7. Annexin A5 is the Most Abundant Membrane-Associated Protein in Stereocilia but is Dispensable for Hair-Bundle Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Krey, Jocelyn F; Drummond, Meghan; Foster, Sarah; Porsov, Edward; Vijayakumar, Sarath; Choi, Dongseok; Friderici, Karen; Jones, Sherri M; Nuttall, Alfred L; Barr-Gillespie, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    The phospholipid- and Ca(2+)-binding protein annexin A5 (ANXA5) is the most abundant membrane-associated protein of ~P23 mouse vestibular hair bundles, the inner ear's sensory organelle. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we estimated that ANXA5 accounts for ~15,000 copies per stereocilium, or ~2% of the total protein there. Although seven other annexin genes are expressed in mouse utricles, mass spectrometry showed that none were present at levels near ANXA5 in bundles and none were upregulated in stereocilia of Anxa5(-/-) mice. Annexins have been proposed to mediate Ca(2+)-dependent repair of membrane lesions, which could be part of the repair mechanism in hair cells after noise damage. Nevertheless, mature Anxa5(-/-) mice not only have normal hearing and balance function, but following noise exposure, they are identical to wild-type mice in their temporary or permanent changes in hearing sensitivity. We suggest that despite the unusually high levels of ANXA5 in bundles, it does not play a role in the bundle's key function, mechanotransduction, at least until after two months of age in the cochlea and six months of age in the vestibular system. These results reinforce the lack of correlation between abundance of a protein in a specific compartment or cellular structure and its functional significance.

  8. Variations in the abundance of 24 protein biomarkers of beef tenderness according to muscle and animal type.

    PubMed

    Guillemin, N; Jurie, C; Cassar-Malek, I; Hocquette, J-F; Renand, G; Picard, B

    2011-05-01

    Some proteins have been revealed as biomarkers for beef tenderness by previous studies. These markers could be used in immunological tests to predict beef tenderness, in living animals as well as in carcasses. It is well known that rearing practices modify the amounts of mRNA and proteins. Therefore, the reliability of protein tests could be affected by livestock and biological effects such as production systems, breed, muscle and animal type. This study analysed the effects of animal and muscle type on 24 proteins. The animals studied were 67 young bulls and 44 steers of the Charolais breed, and muscles were Longissimus thoracis and Semitendinosus. Protein amounts were determined by Dot blot, an immunological technique. Results showed that expressions of 20 proteins were influenced by animal and/or muscle type. These results could lead to modifications and adaptations of prediction tests according to rearing practice, bovine breed and beef cut.

  9. Purification and in vitro chaperone activity of a class I small heat-shock protein abundant in recalcitrant chestnut seeds.

    PubMed

    Collada, C; Gomez, L; Casado, R; Aragoncillo, C

    1997-09-01

    A 20-kD protein has been purified from cotyledons of recalcitrant (desiccation-sensitive) chestnut (Castanea sativa) seeds, where it accumulates at levels comparable to those of major seed storage proteins. This protein, termed Cs smHSP 1, forms homododecameric complexes under nondenaturing conditions and appears to be homologous to cytosolic class I small heat-shock proteins (smHSPs) from plant sources. In vitro evidence has been obtained that the isolated protein can function as a molecular chaperone; it increases, at stoichiometric levels, the renaturation yields of chemically denatured citrate synthase and also prevents the irreversible thermal inactivation of this enzyme. Although a role in desiccation tolerance has been hypothesized for seed smHSPs, this does not seem to be the case for Cs smHSP 1. We have investigated the presence of immunologically related proteins in orthodox and recalcitrant seeds of 13 woody species. Our results indicate that the presence of Cs smHSP 1-like proteins, even at high levels, is not enough to confer desiccation tolerance, and that the amount of these proteins does not furnish a reliable criterion to identify desiccation-sensitive seeds. Additional proteins or mechanisms appear necessary to keep the viability of orthodox seeds upon shedding.

  10. Bee bread increases honeybee haemolymph protein and promote better survival despite of causing higher Nosema ceranae abundance in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Basualdo, Marina; Barragán, Sergio; Antúnez, Karina

    2014-08-01

    Adequate protein nutrition supports healthy honeybees and reduces the susceptibility to disease. However little is known concerning the effect of the diet on Nosema ceranae development, an obligate intracellular parasite that disturbs the protein metabolism of honeybees (Apis mellifera). Here we tested the effect of natural (bee bread) and non-natural protein diets (substitute) on haemolymph proteins titers of honeybee and N. ceranae spore production. The natural diet induced higher levels of protein and parasite development, but the survival of bees was also higher than with non-natural diets. The data showed that the administration of an artificially high nutritious diet in terms of crude protein content is not sufficient to promote healthy bees; rather the protein ingested should be efficiently assimilated. The overall results support the idea that the physiological condition of the bees is linked to protein levels in the haemolymph, which affects the tolerance to parasite; consequently the negative impact of the parasite on host fitness is not associated only with the level of infection.

  11. Bee bread increases honeybee haemolymph protein and promote better survival despite of causing higher Nosema ceranae abundance in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Basualdo, Marina; Barragán, Sergio; Antúnez, Karina

    2014-08-01

    Adequate protein nutrition supports healthy honeybees and reduces the susceptibility to disease. However little is known concerning the effect of the diet on Nosema ceranae development, an obligate intracellular parasite that disturbs the protein metabolism of honeybees (Apis mellifera). Here we tested the effect of natural (bee bread) and non-natural protein diets (substitute) on haemolymph proteins titers of honeybee and N. ceranae spore production. The natural diet induced higher levels of protein and parasite development, but the survival of bees was also higher than with non-natural diets. The data showed that the administration of an artificially high nutritious diet in terms of crude protein content is not sufficient to promote healthy bees; rather the protein ingested should be efficiently assimilated. The overall results support the idea that the physiological condition of the bees is linked to protein levels in the haemolymph, which affects the tolerance to parasite; consequently the negative impact of the parasite on host fitness is not associated only with the level of infection. PMID:24992539

  12. Application of an LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous quantification of human intestinal transporter proteins absolute abundance using a QconCAT technique.

    PubMed

    Harwood, M D; Achour, B; Russell, M R; Carlson, G L; Warhurst, G; Rostami-Hodjegan, A

    2015-06-10

    obtain the absolute abundances for all targeted proteins. In all samples, Na/K-ATPase, HPT1, P-gp and BCRP were detected above the lower limit of quantitation (i.e., >0.2 fmol/μg membrane protein). MRP2 abundance could be quantified in distal jejunum but not in the distal ileum sample. OST-α was not detected in 2 out of 3 jejunum samples. This study highlights the utility of a QconCAT strategy to quantify absolute transporter abundances in human intestinal tissues.

  13. KvLEA, a New Isolated Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Gene from Kosteletzkya virginica Responding to Multiabiotic Stresses.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongyan; Chu, Liye; Shao, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    The LEA proteins are a kind of hydrophilic proteins, playing main functions in desiccation tolerance. However, their importance as a kind of stress proteins in abiotic stress is being clarified little by little. In this study we isolated, cloned, and identified the first KvLEA gene in Kosteletzkya virginica. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the protein encoded by this gene had common properties of LEA proteins and the multiple sequences alignment and phylogenetic analysis further showed that this protein had high homology with two Arabidopsis LEA proteins. Gene expression analysis revealed that this gene had a higher expression in root and it was induced obviously by salt stress. Moreover, the transcripts of KvLEA were also induced by other abiotic stresses including drought, high temperature, chilling, and ABA treatment. Among these abiotic stresses, ABA treatment brought about the biggest changes to this gene. Collectively, our research discovered a novel LEA gene and uncovered its involvement in multiabiotic stresses in K. virginica. This research not only enriched studies on LEA gene in plant but also would accelerate more studies on K. virginica in the future. PMID:27123459

  14. KvLEA, a New Isolated Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Gene from Kosteletzkya virginica Responding to Multiabiotic Stresses

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoli; Wang, Hongyan; Chu, Liye; Shao, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    The LEA proteins are a kind of hydrophilic proteins, playing main functions in desiccation tolerance. However, their importance as a kind of stress proteins in abiotic stress is being clarified little by little. In this study we isolated, cloned, and identified the first KvLEA gene in Kosteletzkya virginica. Bioinformatic analysis showed that the protein encoded by this gene had common properties of LEA proteins and the multiple sequences alignment and phylogenetic analysis further showed that this protein had high homology with two Arabidopsis LEA proteins. Gene expression analysis revealed that this gene had a higher expression in root and it was induced obviously by salt stress. Moreover, the transcripts of KvLEA were also induced by other abiotic stresses including drought, high temperature, chilling, and ABA treatment. Among these abiotic stresses, ABA treatment brought about the biggest changes to this gene. Collectively, our research discovered a novel LEA gene and uncovered its involvement in multiabiotic stresses in K. virginica. This research not only enriched studies on LEA gene in plant but also would accelerate more studies on K. virginica in the future. PMID:27123459

  15. Constrained Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Relative Abundances of Protein Conformation in a Heterogeneous Mixture from Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Intensity Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Onuk, A. Emre; Akcakaya, Murat; Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Erdogmus, Deniz; Brooks, Dana H.; Makowski, Lee

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a model for maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) of the relative abundances of different conformations of a protein in a heterogeneous mixture from small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) intensities. To consider cases where the solution includes intermediate or unknown conformations, we develop a subset selection method based on k-means clustering and the Cramér-Rao bound on the mixture coefficient estimation error to find a sparse basis set that represents the space spanned by the measured SAXS intensities of the known conformations of a protein. Then, using the selected basis set and the assumptions on the model for the intensity measurements, we show that the MLE model can be expressed as a constrained convex optimization problem. Employing the adenylate kinase (ADK) protein and its known conformations as an example, and using Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate the performance of the proposed estimation scheme. Here, although we use 45 crystallographically determined experimental structures and we could generate many more using, for instance, molecular dynamics calculations, the clustering technique indicates that the data cannot support the determination of relative abundances for more than 5 conformations. The estimation of this maximum number of conformations is intrinsic to the methodology we have used here. PMID:26924916

  16. Conformation of a Group 2 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein from Soybean. Evidence of Poly (l-Proline)-type II Structure1

    PubMed Central

    Soulages, Jose L.; Kim, Kangmin; Arrese, Estela L.; Walters, Christina; Cushman, John C.

    2003-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are members of a large group of hydrophilic, glycine-rich proteins found in plants, algae, fungi, and bacteria known collectively as hydrophilins that are preferentially expressed in response to dehydration or hyperosmotic stress. Group 2 LEA (dehydrins or responsive to abscisic acid) proteins are postulated to stabilize macromolecules against damage by freezing, dehydration, ionic, or osmotic stress. However, the structural and physicochemical properties of group 2 LEA proteins that account for such functions remain unknown. We have analyzed the structural properties of a recombinant form of a soybean (Glycine max) group 2 LEA (rGmDHN1). Differential scanning calorimetry of purified rGmDHN1 demonstrated that the protein does not display a cooperative unfolding transition upon heating. Ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the protein is in a largely hydrated and unstructured conformation in solution. However, ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism measurements collected at different temperatures showed that the protein exists in equilibrium between two extended conformational states: unordered and left-handed extended helical or poly (l-proline)-type II structures. It is estimated that 27% of the residues of rGmDHN1 adopt or poly (l-proline)-type II-like helical conformation at 12°C. The content of extended helix gradually decreases to 15% as the temperature is increased to 80°C. Studies of the conformation of the protein in solution in the presence of liposomes, trifluoroethanol, and sodium dodecyl sulfate indicated that rGmDHN1 has a very low intrinsic ability to adopt α-helical structure and to interact with phospholipid bilayers through amphipathic α-helices. The ability of the protein to remain in a highly extended conformation at low temperatures could constitute the basis of the functional role of GmDHN1 in the prevention of freezing, desiccation, ionic, or osmotic

  17. Correlation between mRNA and protein abundance in Desulfovibrio vulgaris: A multiple regression to identify sources of variations

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, Lei; Wu, G; Zhang, Weiwen

    2006-01-13

    Using whole-genome microarray and LC-MC/MS proteomic data collected from Desulfovibrio vulgaris grown under three different conditions, we systematically investigate the relationship between mRNA and protein abundunce by a multiple regression approach.

  18. Abundant constitutive expression of the immediate-early 94K protein from cytomegalovirus (Colburn) in a DNA-transfected mouse cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Jeang, K.T.; Cho, M.S.; Hayward, G.S.

    1984-10-01

    A 94-kilodalton phosphoprotein known as IE94 is the only viral polypeptide synthesized in abundance under immediate-early conditions after infection by cytomegalovirus (CMV) strain Colburn in either permissive primate or nonpermissive rodent cells. The authors isolated a clonal Ltk/sup +/ cell line which expressed the /sup 35/methionine-labeled IE94 polypeptide in sufficient abundance to be visualized directly in autoradiographs after gel electrophoresis of total-cell-culture protein extracts. The IE94 polypeptide synthesized in the transfected cells was indistinguishable in size and overall net charge from that produced in virus-infected cells. In addition, the IE94 protein expressed in LH/sub 2/p198-3 cells was phosphorylated (presumably by a cellular protein kinase) and generated similar phosphopeptide patterns after partial tryptic digestion to those obtained with the CMV IE94 protein from infected cells. The cell line contained two to four stably integrated copies of the IE94 gene and synthesized a single virus-specific mRNA of 2.5 kilobases detectable on Northern blots. A new antigen, detectable by indirect anticomplement immunofluorescence with monoclonal antibody against the human CMV IE68 protein, was present in the nuclei of more than 95% of the LH/sub 2/l198-3 cells. This evidence suggests that (unlike most herpesvirus genes) the CMV IE94 gene, together with its complex promoter and spliced mRNA structure, may contain all of the regulatory elements necessary for strong constitutive expression in mammalian cells in the absence of other viral factors.

  19. Rocky Mountain spotted fever

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mountain spotted fever is caused by the bacteria Rickettsia rickettsii (R. Rickettsii) , which is carried by ticks. ... Saunders; 2014:chap 212. Walker DH, Blaton LS. Rickettsia rickettsii and other spotted fever group rickettsiae (Rocky ...

  20. Identification of Putative Genes Involved in Bisphenol A Degradation Using Differential Protein Abundance Analysis of Sphingobium sp. BiD32.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nicolette A; Kjeldal, Henrik; Gough, Heidi L; Nielsen, Jeppe L

    2015-10-20

    Discharge of the endocrine disrupting compound bisphenol A (BPA) with wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents into surface waters results in deleterious effects on aquatic life. Sphingobium sp. BiD32 was previously isolated from activated sludge based on its ability to degrade BPA. This study investigated BPA metabolism by Sphingobium sp. BiD32 using label-free quantitative proteomics. The genome of Sphingobium sp. BiD32 was sequenced to provide a species-specific platform for optimal protein identification. The bacterial proteomes of Sphingobium sp. BiD32 in the presence and absence of BPA were identified and quantified. A total of 2155 proteins were identified; 1174 of these proteins were quantified, and 184 of these proteins had a statistically significant change in abundance in response to the presence/absence of BPA (p ≤ 0.05). Proteins encoded by genes previously identified to be responsible for protocatechuate degradation were upregulated in the presence of BPA. The analysis of the metabolites from BPA degradation by Sphingobium sp. BiD32 detected a hydroxylated metabolite. A novel p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase enzyme detected by proteomics was implicated in the metabolic pathway associated with the detected metabolite. This enzyme is hypothesized to be involved in BPA degradation by Sphingobium sp. BiD32, and may serve as a future genetic marker for BPA degradation. PMID:26390302

  1. Dataset of liver proteins of eu- and hypothyroid rats affected in abundance by any of three factors: in vivo exposure to hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), thyroid status, gender differences.

    PubMed

    Miller, I; Renaut, J; Cambier, S; Murk, A J; Gutleb, A C; Serchi, T

    2016-09-01

    Male Wistar rats with different thyroid status (eu-, hypothyroid) were exposed to 0, 3 or 30 mg/kg body weight of the flame retardant HBCD for 7 days and obtained data compared with a previous study in females, "Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) induced changes in the liver proteome of eu- and hypothyroid female rats" (Miller et al., 2016) [1]. Specifically, proteomic investigation of liver protein patterns obtained by 2D-DIGE was performed and differences between animals groups recorded, based on the factors exposure, thyroid status and gender. All proteins with significantly changed abundance in any of these comparisons were identified by mass spectrometry. General, hormone and proteomic data of both the present and the previous studies are discussed in Miller et al. (2016) [1] and in "Gender specific differences in the liver proteome of rats exposed to hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD)" Miller et al. (2016) [2]. PMID:27579339

  2. Detection and abundance of mRNA and protein encoded by transposable element activator (Ac) in maize.

    PubMed

    Fusswinkel, H; Schein, S; Courage, U; Starlinger, P; Kunze, R

    1991-02-01

    The 3.5 kb long mRNA of the maize transposable element Ac contains an open reading frame (ORFa) which encodes a polypeptide of 807 amino acids, the putative transposase of Ac. The Ac mRNA is a rare transcript: we now estimate the fraction of Ac mRNA in wx-m7::Ac seedlings to be 2-13 x 10(-5) of the polyA RNA. Assuming that maize cells contain similar amounts of polyA RNA as another monocot (0.16 pg/cell), this is equivalent to 1.5-10 transcripts in each cell. A protein with an apparent molecular weight of 112 kDa is detected, by five antisera directed against different segments of ORFa, exclusively in nuclear extracts from Ac-containing maize. This protein is most likely the full-length Ac ORFa protein. We estimate its concentration to be in the range of 3 x 10(-7) of the nuclear proteins, or about 1000 molecules per triploid endosperm cell containing one Ac element. PMID:1848648

  3. Identification of an abundant 56 kDa protein implicated in food allergy as granule-bound starch synthase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice, the staple food of South and East Asian counties, is considered to be hypoallergenic. However, several clinical studies have documented rice-induced allergy in sensitive patients. Rice proteins with molecular weights of 14-16 kDa, 26 kDa, 33 kDa and 56 kDa have been identified as allergens. Re...

  4. Abundance of BER-related proteins depends on cell proliferation status and the presence of DNA polymerase β

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Mizuki; Yamamoto, Ryohei; Takenaka, Shigeo; Matsuyama, Satoshi; Kubo, Kihei

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells, murine N-methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG) removes bases damaged spontaneously or by chemical agents through the process called base excision repair (BER). In this study, we investigated the influence of POL β deficiency on MPG-initiated BER efficiency and the expression levels of BER-related proteins in log-phase and growth-arrested (G0) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). G0 wild-type (WT) or POL β–deficient (Pol β–KO) cells showed greater resistance to methyl methanesulfonate than did log-phase cells, and repair of methylated bases was less efficient in the G0 cells. Apex1 mRNA expression was significantly lower in Pol β–KO or G0 WT MEFs than in log-phase WT MEFs. Moreover, although Mpg mRNA levels did not differ significantly among cell types, MPG protein levels were significantly higher in log-phase WT cells than in log-phase Pol β–KO cells or either type of G0 cells. Additionally, proliferating cell nuclear antigen protein levels were also reduced in log-phase Pol β–KO cells or either type of G0 cells. These results indicated that MPG-initiated BER functions mainly in proliferating cells, but less so in G0 cells, and that POL β may be involved in regulation of the amount of intracellular repair proteins. PMID:25829532

  5. Antagonist-induced micro-opioid receptor up-regulation decreases G-protein receptor kinase-2 and dynamin-2 abundance in mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minesh; Gomes, Benedict; Patel, Chintan; Yoburn, Byron C

    2002-06-20

    Chronic treatment with opioid receptor antagonists has been shown to increase the density of micro-, delta- and kappa-opioid receptors in cell culture and in the intact animal. Although opioid receptor antagonist-induced up-regulation is a robust phenomenon, the mechanisms responsible for the increase in receptor density remain unclear. In the present study, changes in a kinase and a GTPase that have been implicated in G-protein-coupled receptor regulation were examined following opioid receptor antagonist treatment. Mice were implanted s.c. with a naltrexone pellet or placebo pellet. On the eighth day following implantation, spinal cord was removed and G-protein receptor kinase-2 (GRK-2) and dynamin-2 abundance were determined using a quantitative immunoblot approach. Changes in micro-opioid receptor density were also determined. Naltrexone treatment produced a significant (145%) increase in micro-opioid receptor density. Naltrexone treatment was associated with a significant 36% decrease in GRK-2 and 30% decrease in dynamin-2 abundance in spinal cord. These data raise the possibility that opioid receptor antagonist-induced micro-opioid receptor up-regulation in the intact animal may be due to a reduction in constitutive internalization of opioid receptors.

  6. Neuronal Elav-like (Hu) proteins regulate RNA splicing and abundance to control glutamate levels and neuronal excitability

    PubMed Central

    Ince-Dunn, Gulayse; Okano, Hirotaka James; Jensen, Kirk; Park, Woong-Yang; Ru, Zhong; Ule, Jernej; Mele, Aldo; Fak, Jak; Yang, ChingWen; Zhang, Chaolin; Yoo, Jong; Herre, Margaret; Okano, Hideyuki; Noebels, Jeffrey L.; Darnell, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The paraneoplastic neurologic disorders target several families of neuron-specific RNA binding proteins (RNABPs), revealing that there are unique aspects of gene expression regulation in the mammalian brain. Here we used HITS-CLIP to determine robust binding sites targeted by the neuronal Elav-like (nElavl) RNABPs. Surprisingly, nElav protein bind preferentially to GU-rich sequences in vivo and in vitro, with secondary binding to AU-rich sequences. nElavl-null mice were used to validate the consequence of these binding events in the brain, demonstrating that they bind intronic sequences in a position dependent manner to regulate alternative splicing and to 3’UTR sequences to regulate mRNA levels. These controls converge on the glutamate synthesis pathway in neurons; nElavl proteins are required to maintain neurotransmitter glutamate levels, and the lack of nElavl leads to spontaneous epileptic seizure activity. The genome-wide analysis of nElavl targets reveals that one function of neuron-specific RNABPs is to control excitation-inhibition balance in the brain. PMID:22998874

  7. RcLEA, a late embryogenesis abundant protein gene isolated from Rosa chinensis, confers tolerance to Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana and stabilizes enzyme activity under diverse stresses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuan; Lu, Songchong; Jiang, Changhua; Wang, Yaofeng; Lv, Bo; Shen, Jiabin; Ming, Feng

    2014-07-01

    The late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family is a large protein family that is closely associated with resistance to abiotic stresses in many organisms, such as plants, bacteria and animals. In this study, we isolated a LEA gene, RcLEA, which was cytoplasm-localized, from Rosa chinensis. RcLEA was found to be induced by high temperature through RT-PCR. Overexpression of RcLEA in Escherichia coli improved its growth performance compared with the control under high temperature, low temperature, NaCl and oxidative stress conditions. RcLEA was also overexpressed in Arabidopsis thaliana. The transgenic Arabidopsis showed better growth after high and low temperature treatment and exhibited less peroxide according to 3, 3-diaminobenzidine staining. However, RcLEA did not improve the tolerance to NaCl or osmotic stress in Arabidopsis. In vitro analysis showed that RcLEA was able to prevent the freeze-thaw-induced inactivation or heat-induced aggregation of various substrates, such as lactate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. It also protected the proteome of E. coli from denaturation when the proteins were heat-shocked or subjected to acidic conditions. Furthermore, bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays suggested that RcLEA proteins function in a complex manner by making the form of homodimers. PMID:24760474

  8. The effects of antisense to Gialpha2 on opioid agonist potency and Gialpha2 protein and mRNA abundance in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Shen, J; Shah, S; Hsu, H; Yoburn, B C

    1998-08-31

    In this study, mice received a single intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. ) injection of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) directed towards the mRNA of Gialpha2. Controls received a saline or a nonsense ODN injection. The subsequent effects on protein levels and mRNA of Gialpha2 were determined in mouse striatum, as well as, the effect on opioid ([d-Ala2, d-Leu5]-enkephalin; DADLE) inhibition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) formation in striatum and morphine analgesic potency. At 48 h after treatment, maximal inhibition (Emax) of cAMP formation was significantly reduced for the antisense group compared to controls. Antisense ODN treatment only changed the Emax and did not significantly alter the IC50s of the dose-effect curves for inhibition of cAMP formation. Antisense ODN, but not nonsense ODN, significantly reduced morphine's analgesic potency by >2-fold, 48 h following treatment. Using a quantitative immunoblotting procedure, antisense treatment was shown to decrease striatal Gialpha2 protein 48 h after antisense injection, while there were no changes in protein levels at 2, 12 and 24 h. In contrast, no changes in Gialpha2 mRNA in mouse striatum were noted at any time after antisense treatment. Taken together, these data suggest that Gialpha2 mediates opioid-induced analgesia and opioid inhibition of cAMP production in the mouse. These data also suggest that antisense reduces target protein by a mechanism independent of changes in mRNA abundance.

  9. Retinoic acid-induced differentiation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells is associated with changes in the abundance of G proteins.

    PubMed

    Ammer, H; Schulz, R

    1994-04-01

    Western blot analysis, using subtype-specific anti-G protein antibodies, revealed the presence of the following G protein subunits in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells: Gs alpha, Gi alpha 1, Gi alpha 2, Go alpha, Gz alpha, and G beta. Differentiation of the cells by all-trans-retinoic acid (RA) treatment (10 mumol/L; 6 days) caused substantial alterations in the abundance of distinct G protein subunits. Concomitant with an enhanced expression of mu-opioid binding sites, the levels of the inhibitory G proteins Gi alpha 1 and Gi alpha 2 were found to be significantly increased. This coordinate up-regulation is accompanied by functional changes in mu-opioid receptor-stimulated low-Km GTPase, mu-receptor-mediated adenylate cyclase inhibition, and receptor-independent guanosine 5'-(beta gamma-imido)triphosphate [Gpp(NH)p; 10 nmol/L]-mediated attenuation of adenylate cyclase activity. In contrast, increased levels of inhibitory G proteins had no effect on muscarinic cholinergic receptor-mediated adenylate cyclase inhibition. With respect to stimulatory receptor systems, a reciprocal regulation was observed for prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) receptors and Gs alpha, the G protein subunit activating adenylate cyclase. RA treatment of SH-SY5Y cells increases both the number of PGE1 binding sites and PGE1-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity, but significantly reduced amounts of Gs alpha were found. This down-regulation is paralleled by a decrease in the stimulatory activity of Gs alpha as assessed in S49 cyc- reconstitution assays.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8133263

  10. The freshwater Amazonian stingray, Potamotrygon motoro, up-regulates glutamine synthetase activity and protein abundance, and accumulates glutamine when exposed to brackish (15 per thousand) water.

    PubMed

    Ip, Y K; Loong, A M; Ching, B; Tham, G H Y; Wong, W P; Chew, S F

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed to examine whether the stenohaline freshwater stingray, Potamotrygon motoro, which lacks a functional ornithine-urea cycle, would up-regulate glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and protein abundance, and accumulate glutamine during a progressive transfer from freshwater to brackish (15 per thousand) water with daily feeding. Our results revealed that, similar to other freshwater teleosts, P. motoro performed hyperosmotic regulation, with very low urea concentrations in plasma and tissues, in freshwater. In 15 per thousand water, it was non-ureotelic and non-ureoosmotic, acting mainly as an osmoconformer with its plasma osmolality, [Na+] and [Cl-] comparable to those of the external medium. There were significant increases in the content of several free amino acids (FAAs), including glutamate, glutamine and glycine, in muscle and liver, but not in plasma, indicating that FAAs could contribute in part to cell volume regulation. Furthermore, exposure of P. motoro to 15 per thousand water led to up-regulation of GS activity and protein abundance in both liver and muscle. Thus, our results indicate for the first time that, despite the inability to synthesize urea and the lack of functional carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III (CPS III) which uses glutamine as a substrate, P. motoro retained the capacity to up-regulate the activity and protein expression of GS in response to salinity stress. Potamotrygon motoro was not nitrogen (N) limited when exposed to 15 per thousand water with feeding, and there were no significant changes in the amination and deamination activities of hepatic glutamate dehydrogenase. In contrast, P. motoro became N limited when exposed to 10 per thousand water with fasting and could not survive well in 15 per thousand water without food.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to a 100-kd protein reveal abundant A beta-negative plaques throughout gray matter of Alzheimer's disease brains.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M. L.; Lee, V. M.; Forman, M.; Chiu, T. S.; Trojanowski, J. Q.

    1997-01-01

    Here we describe the initial characterization of a 100-kd protein recognized by four new monoclonal antibodies that reveal abundant and unique plaque-like lesions throughout gray matter of Alzheimer's disease brains. This 100-kd protein and these new plaque-like lesions were identified by four monoclonal antibodies raised to immunogens extracted from Alzheimer's disease neurofibrillary abnormalities. However, these antibodies did not recognize hyperphosphorylated tau in Western blots or neurofibrillary lesions by immunohistochemistry. As all of these antibodies displayed similar properties, one, AMY117, was used to characterize the new plaque-like lesions in detail. These studies demonstrated that AMY117-positive plaques were not visualized by amyloid stains and never co-localized with A beta deposits, although AMY117-positive and A beta-positive lesions frequently occurred in the same cortical and subcortical gray matter regions. Abundant AMY117-positive plaques were found in the brains of all 32 sporadic Alzheimer's disease patients and all 6 elderly Down's syndrome subjects. Although AMY117-positive plaques also were seen in the brains of nondemented patients with numerous A beta deposits. AMY117-positive plaques were rare or absent in the brains of other elderly controls and patients with other neurodegenerative or neuropsychiatric disorders. We conclude that the AMY117-positive plaques described here for the first time are major lesions of the Alzheimer's disease brain. Thus, it will be important to elucidate the role played by the 100-kd protein and the AMY117 plaques in the etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:9212733

  12. Dimerization and DNA-binding of ASR1, a small hydrophilic protein abundant in plant tissues suffering from water loss

    SciTech Connect

    Maskin, Laura; Frankel, Nicolas; Gudesblat, Gustavo; Demergasso, Maria J.; Pietrasanta, Lia I.; Iusem, Norberto D. . E-mail: norbius@fbmc.fcen.uba.ar

    2007-01-26

    The Asr gene family is present in Spermatophyta. Its members are generally activated under water stress. We present evidence that tomato ASR1, one of the proteins of the family, accumulates in seed during late stages of embryogenesis, a physiological process characterized by water loss. In vitro, electrophoretic assays show a homo-dimeric structure for ASR1 and highlight strong non-covalent interactions between monomers prone to self-assemble. Direct visualization of single molecules by atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirms that ASR1 forms homodimers and that uncovers both monomers and dimers bind double stranded DNA.

  13. Regulation of mRNA Abundance by Polypyrimidine Tract-Binding Protein-Controlled Alternate 5′ Splice Site Choice

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Fursham M.; Makeyev, Eugene V.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) provides a potent mechanism for increasing protein diversity and modulating gene expression levels. How alternate splice sites are selected by the splicing machinery and how AS is integrated into gene regulation networks remain important questions of eukaryotic biology. Here we report that polypyrimidine tract-binding protein 1 (Ptbp1/PTB/hnRNP-I) controls alternate 5′ and 3′ splice site (5′ss and 3′ss) usage in a large set of mammalian transcripts. A top scoring event identified by our analysis was the choice between competing upstream and downstream 5′ss (u5′ss and d5′ss) in the exon 18 of the Hps1 gene. Hps1 is essential for proper biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles and loss of its function leads to a disease called type 1 Hermansky-Pudlak Syndrome (HPS). We show that Ptbp1 promotes preferential utilization of the u5′ss giving rise to stable mRNAs encoding a full-length Hps1 protein, whereas bias towards d5′ss triggered by Ptbp1 down-regulation generates transcripts susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). We further demonstrate that Ptbp1 binds to pyrimidine-rich sequences between the u5′ss and d5′ss and activates the former site rather than repressing the latter. Consistent with this mechanism, u5′ss is intrinsically weaker than d5′ss, with a similar tendency observed for other genes with Ptbp1-induced u5′ss bias. Interestingly, the brain-enriched Ptbp1 paralog Ptbp2/nPTB/brPTB stimulated the u5′ss utilization but with a considerably lower efficiency than Ptbp1. This may account for the tight correlation between Hps1 with Ptbp1 expression levels observed across mammalian tissues. More generally, these data expand our understanding of AS regulation and uncover a post-transcriptional strategy ensuring co-expression of a subordinate gene with its master regulator through an AS-NMD tracking mechanism. PMID:25375251

  14. Protein covalent immobilization via its scarce thiol versus abundant amine groups: Effect on orientation, cell binding domain exposure and conformational lability.

    PubMed

    Ba, O M; Hindie, M; Marmey, P; Gallet, O; Anselme, K; Ponche, A; Duncan, A C

    2015-10-01

    Quantity, orientation, conformation and covalent linkage of naturally cell adhesive proteins adsorbed or covalently linked to a surface, are known to influence the preservation of their subsequent long term cell adhesion properties and bioactivity. In the present work, we explore two different strategies for the covalent linking of plasma fibronectin (pFN) - used as a cell adhesive model protein, onto a polystyrene (PS) surface. One is aimed at tethering the protein to the surface in a semi-oriented fashion (via one of the 4 free thiol reactive groups on the protein) with a heterofunctional coupling agent (SSMPB method). The other aims to immobilize the protein in a more random fashion by reaction between the abundant pendant primary amine bearing amino acids of the pFN and activated carboxylic surface functions obtained after glutaric anhydride surface treatment (GA method). The overall goal will be to verify the hypothesis of a correlation between covalent immobilization of a model cell adhesive protein to a PS surface in a semi-oriented configuration (versus randomly oriented) with promotion of enhanced exposure of the protein's cell binding domain. This in turn would lead to enhanced cell adhesion. Ideally the goal is to elaborate substrates exhibiting a long term stable protein monolayer with preserved cell adhesive properties and bioactivity for biomaterial and/or cell adhesion commercial plate applications. However, the initial restrictive objective of this paper is to first quantitatively and qualitatively investigate the reversibly (merely adsorbed) versus covalently irreversibly bound protein to the surface after the immobilization procedure. Although immobilized surface amounts were similar (close to the monolayer range) for all immobilization approaches, covalent grafting showed improved retention and stronger "tethering" of the pFN protein to the surface (roughly 40%) after SDS rinsing compared to that for mere adsorption (0%) suggesting an added value

  15. Changes in transcript abundance for cuticular proteins and other genes three hours after a blood meal in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Vannini, Laura; Dunn, W. Augustine; Reed, Tyler W.; Willis, Judith H.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined changes in transcript levels after Anopheles gambiae takes a blood meal. Marinotti et al. (2006) used microarrays and reported massive changes in transcript levels 3 h after feeding (BF3h) compared to non-blood fed (NBF). We were intrigued by the number of transcripts for structural cuticular proteins (CPs) that showed such major differences in levels and employed paired-end (50 bp) RNA-seq technology to compare whole body transcriptomes from 5-day-old females NBF and BF3h. We detected transcripts for the majority of CPs (164/243) but levels of only 12 were significantly altered by the blood meal. While relative transcript levels of NBF females were somewhat similar to the microarray data, there were major differences in BF3h animals, resulting in levels of many transcripts, both for CPs and other genes changing in the opposite direction. We compared our data also to other studies done with both microarrays and RNA-seq. Findings were consistent that a small number of CP genes have transcripts that persist even in 5-day-old adults. Some of these transcripts showed diurnal rhythms (Rund et al., 2013; Rinker et al., 2013). In situ hybridization revealed that transcripts for several of these CP genes were found exclusively or predominantly in the eye. Transcripts other than for CPs that changed in response to blood-feeding were predominantly expressed in midgut and Malpighian tubules. Even in these tissues, genes responsible for proteins with similar functions, such as immunity or digestion, responded differently, with transcript levels for some rising and others falling. These data demonstrate that genes coding for some CPs are dynamic in expression even in adults and that the response to a blood meal is rapid and precisely orchestrated. PMID:24269292

  16. Changes in transcript abundance for cuticular proteins and other genes three hours after a blood meal in Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Vannini, Laura; Augustine Dunn, W; Reed, Tyler W; Willis, Judith H

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined changes in transcript levels after Anopheles gambiae takes a blood meal. Marinotti et al. (2006) used microarrays and reported massive changes in transcript levels 3 h after feeding (BF3h) compared to non-blood fed (NBF). We were intrigued by the number of transcripts for structural cuticular proteins (CPs) that showed such major differences in levels and employed paired-end (50 bp) RNA-seq technology to compare whole body transcriptomes from 5-day-old females NBF and BF3h. We detected transcripts for the majority of CPs (164/243) but levels of only 12 were significantly altered by the blood meal. While relative transcript levels of NBF females were somewhat similar to the microarray data, there were major differences in BF3h animals, resulting in levels of many transcripts, both for CPs and other genes changing in the opposite direction. We compared our data also to other studies done with both microarrays and RNA-seq. Findings were consistent that a small number of CP genes have transcripts that persist even in 5-day-old adults. Some of these transcripts showed diurnal rhythms (Rund et al., 2013; Rinker et al., 2013). In situ hybridization revealed that transcripts for several of these CP genes were found exclusively or predominantly in the eye. Transcripts other than for CPs that changed in response to blood-feeding were predominantly expressed in midgut and Malpighian tubules. Even in these tissues, genes responsible for proteins with similar functions, such as immunity or digestion, responded differently, with transcript levels for some rising and others falling. These data demonstrate that genes coding for some CPs are dynamic in expression even in adults and that the response to a blood meal is rapid and precisely orchestrated.

  17. The pepper late embryogenesis abundant protein CaLEA1 acts in regulating abscisic acid signaling, drought and salt stress response.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Lim, Sohee; Baek, Woonhee; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-08-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are constantly challenged by environmental stresses, including drought and high salinity. Among the various abiotic stresses, osmotic stress is one of the most important factors for growth and significantly reduces crop productivity in agriculture. Here, we report a function of the CaLEA1 protein in the defense responses of plants to osmotic stress. Our analyses showed that the CaLEA1 gene was strongly induced in pepper leaves exposed to drought and increased salinity. Furthermore, we determined that the CaLEA1 protein has a late embryogenesis abundant (LEA)_3 homolog domain highly conserved among other known group 5 LEA proteins and is localized in the processing body. We generated CaLEA1-silenced peppers and CaLEA1-overexpressing (OX) transgenic Arabidopsis plants to evaluate their responses to dehydration and high salinity. Virus-induced gene silencing of CaLEA1 in pepper plants conferred enhanced sensitivity to drought and salt stresses, which was accompanied by high levels of lipid peroxidation in dehydrated and NaCl-treated leaves. CaLEA1-OX plants exhibited enhanced sensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) during seed germination and in the seedling stage; furthermore, these plants were more tolerant to drought and salt stress than the wild-type plants because of enhanced stomatal closure and increased expression of stress-responsive genes. Collectively, our data suggest that CaLEA1 positively regulates drought and salinity tolerance through ABA-mediated cell signaling. PMID:25302464

  18. What Glues a Homodimer Together: Systematic Analysis of the Stabilizing Effect of an Aromatic Hot Spot in the Protein-Protein Interface of the tRNA-Modifying Enzyme Tgt.

    PubMed

    Jakobi, Stephan; Nguyen, Phong T X; Debaene, François; Cianférani, Sarah; Reuter, Klaus; Klebe, Gerhard

    2015-08-21

    Shigella bacteria constitute the causative agent of bacillary dysentery, an acute inflammatory disease causing the death of more than one million humans per year. A null mutation in the tgt gene encoding the tRNA-modifying enzyme tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (Tgt) was found to drastically decrease the pathogenicity of Shigella bacteria, suggesting the use of Tgt as putative target for selective antibiotics. The enzyme is only functionally active as a homodimer; thus, interference with the formation of its protein-protein interface is an attractive opportunity for therapeutic intervention. To better understand the driving forces responsible for the assembly, stability, and formation of the homodimer, we studied the properties of the residues that establish the dimer interface in detail. We performed site-directed mutagenesis and controlled shifts in the monomer/dimer equilibrium ratio in solution in a concentration-dependent manner by native mass spectrometry and used crystal structure analysis to elucidate the geometrical modulations resulting from mutational variations. The wild-type enzyme exhibits nearly exclusive dimer geometry. A patch of four aromatic amino acids, embedded into a ring of hydrophobic residues and further stabilized by a network of H-bonds, is essential for the stability of the dimer's contact. Accordingly, any perturbance in the constitution of this aromatic patch by nonaromatic residues reduces dimer stability significantly, with some of these exchanges resulting in a nearly exclusively monomeric state. Apart from the aromatic hot spot, the interface comprises an extended loop-helix motif that exhibits remarkable flexibility. In the destabilized mutated variants, the loop-helix motif adopts deviating conformations in the interface region, and a number of water molecules, penetrating into the interface, are observed. PMID:25951081

  19. The AP2 clathrin adaptor protein complex regulates the abundance of GLR-1 glutamate receptors in the ventral nerve cord of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Garafalo, Steven D.; Luth, Eric S.; Moss, Benjamin J.; Monteiro, Michael I.; Malkin, Emily; Juo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of glutamate receptor (GluR) abundance at synapses by clathrin-mediated endocytosis can control synaptic strength and plasticity. We take advantage of viable, null mutations in subunits of the clathrin adaptor protein 2 (AP2) complex in Caenorhabditis elegans to characterize the in vivo role of AP2 in GluR trafficking. In contrast to our predictions for an endocytic adaptor, we found that levels of the GluR GLR-1 are decreased at synapses in the ventral nerve cord (VNC) of animals with mutations in the AP2 subunits APM-2/μ2, APA-2/α, or APS-2/σ2. Rescue experiments indicate that APM-2/μ2 functions in glr-1–expressing interneurons and the mature nervous system to promote GLR-1 levels in the VNC. Genetic analyses suggest that APM-2/μ2 acts upstream of GLR-1 endocytosis in the VNC. Consistent with this, GLR-1 accumulates in cell bodies of apm-2 mutants. However, GLR-1 does not appear to accumulate at the plasma membrane of the cell body as expected, but instead accumulates in intracellular compartments including Syntaxin-13– and RAB-14–labeled endosomes. This study reveals a novel role for the AP2 clathrin adaptor in promoting the abundance of GluRs at synapses in vivo, and implicates AP2 in the regulation of GluR trafficking at an early step in the secretory pathway. PMID:25788288

  20. Are hot-spots occluded from water?

    PubMed

    Moreira, Irina Sousa; Ramos, Rui Miguel; Martins, Joao Miguel; Fernandes, Pedro Alexandrino; Ramos, Maria João

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are the basis of many biological processes and are governed by focused regions with high binding affinities, the warm- and hot-spots. It was proposed that these regions are surrounded by areas with higher packing density leading to solvent exclusion around them - "the O-ring theory." This important inference still lacks sufficient demonstration. We have used Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the validity of the O-ring theory in the context of the conformational flexibility of the proteins, which is critical for function, in general, and for interaction with water, in particular. The MD results were analyzed for a variety of solvent-accessible surface area (SASA) features, radial distribution functions (RDFs), protein-water distances, and water residence times. The measurement of the average solvent-accessible surface area features for the warm- and hot-spots and the null-spots, as well as data for corresponding RDFs, identify distinct properties for these two sets of residues. Warm- and hot-spots are found to be occluded from the solvent. However, it has to be borne in mind that water-mediated interactions have significant power to construct an extensive and strongly bonded interface. We observed that warm- and hot-spots tend to form hydrogen bond (H-bond) networks with water molecules that have an occupancy around 90%. This study provides strong evidence in support of the O-ring theory and the results show that hot-spots are indeed protected from the bulk solvent. Nevertheless, the warm- and hot-spots still make water-mediated contacts, which are also important for protein-protein binding. PMID:23384183

  1. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the N-terminal PDZ-like domain of periaxin, an abundant peripheral nerve protein linked to human neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Huijong; Kursula, Petri

    2013-01-01

    Periaxin (PRX) is an abundant protein in peripheral nerves and contains a predicted PDZ-like domain at its N-terminus. The large isoform, L-PRX, is required for the maintenance of myelin in the peripheral nervous system and its defects cause neurological disease. Here, the human periaxin PDZ-like domain was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.85 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to the primitive hexagonal space group P3121 or P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 80.6, c = 81.0 Å, γ = 120° and either two or three molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure of PRX will shed light on its poorly characterized function in the nervous system. PMID:23832213

  2. Knockout of the abundant Trichomonas vaginalis hydrogenosomal membrane protein TvHMP23 increases hydrogenosome size but induces no compensatory up-regulation of paralogous copies.

    PubMed

    Brás, Xavier Pereira; Zimorski, Verena; Bolte, Kathrin; Maier, Uwe-G; Martin, William F; Gould, Sven B

    2013-05-01

    The Trichomonas vaginalis genome encodes up to 60000 genes, many of which stem from genome duplication events. Paralogous copies thus accompany most T. vaginalis genes, a phenomenon that limits genetic manipulation. We characterized one of the parasite's most abundant hydrogenosomal membrane proteins, TvHMP23, which is phylogenetically distinct from canonical metabolite carriers, and which localizes to the inner hydrogenosomal membrane as shown through sub-organellar fractionation and protease protection assays. Knockout of Tvhmp23 through insertion of the selectable neomycin marker led to a size increase of hydrogenosomes, the first knockout-induced phenotypes reported for Trichomonas, but no growth impairment. The transcriptional response of its four paralogous copies then analyzed revealed that they are not up-regulated, and hence do not compensate for the Tvhmp23 knockout. PMID:23499435

  3. Enhanced Colorimetric Immunoassay Accompanying with Enzyme Cascade Amplification Strategy for Ultrasensitive Detection of Low-Abundance Protein

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhuangqiang; Hou, Li; Xu, Mingdi; Tang, Dianping

    2014-01-01

    Methods based on enzyme labels have been developed for colorimetric immunoassays, but most involve poor sensitivity and are unsuitable for routine use. Herein, we design an enhanced colorimetric immunoassay for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) coupling with an enzyme-cascade-amplification strategy (ECAS-CIA). In the presence of target PSA, the labeled alkaline phosphatase on secondary antibody catalyzes the formation of palladium nanostructures, which catalyze 3,3′,5,5′-tetramethylbenzidine-H2O2 system to produce the colored products, thus resulting in the signal cascade amplification. Results indicated that the ECAS-CIA presents good responses toward PSA, and allows detection of PSA at a concentration as low as 0.05 ng mL−1. Intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation are below 9.5% and 10.7%, respectively. Additionally, the methodology is validated for analysis of clinical serum specimens with consistent results obtained by PSA ELISA kit. Importantly, the ECAS-CIA opens a new horizon for protein diagnostics and biosecurity. PMID:24509941

  4. Microscale depletion of high abundance proteins in human biofluids using IgY14 immunoaffinity resin: Analysis of human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid

    DOE PAGES

    Hyung, Seok Won; Piehowski, Paul D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Clauss, Therese R.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Liu, Tao; et al

    2014-09-06

    Removal of highly abundant proteins in plasma is often carried out using immunoaffinity depletion to extend the dynamic range of measurements to lower abundance species. While commercial depletion columns are available for this purpose, they generally are not applicable to limited sample quantities (<20 µL) due to low yields stemming from losses caused by nonspecific binding to the column matrix. Additionally, the cost of the depletion media can be prohibitive for larger scale studies. Modern LC-MS instrumentation provides the sensitivity necessary to scale-down depletion methods with minimal sacrifice to proteome coverage, which makes smaller volume depletion columns desirable for maximizingmore » sample recovery when samples are limited, as well as for reducing the expense of large scale studies. We characterized the performance of a 346 µL column volume micro-scale depletion system, using four different flow rates to determine the most effective depletion conditions for ~6 μL injections of human plasma proteins and then evaluated depletion reproducibility at the optimum flow rate condition. Depletion of plasma using a commercial 10 mL depletion column served as the control. Results showed depletion efficiency of the micro-scale column increased as flow rate decreased, and that our micro-depletion was reproducible. We found, in an initial application, a 600 µL sample of human cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) pooled from multiple sclerosis patients was depleted and then analyzed using reversed phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to demonstrate the utility of the system for this important biofluid where sample quantities are more commonly limited.« less

  5. Microscale depletion of high abundance proteins in human biofluids using IgY14 immunoaffinity resin: Analysis of human plasma and cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hyung, Seok Won; Piehowski, Paul D.; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Clauss, Therese R.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Brewer, Heather M.; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Rui; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-09-06

    Removal of highly abundant proteins in plasma is often carried out using immunoaffinity depletion to extend the dynamic range of measurements to lower abundance species. While commercial depletion columns are available for this purpose, they generally are not applicable to limited sample quantities (<20 µL) due to low yields stemming from losses caused by nonspecific binding to the column matrix. Additionally, the cost of the depletion media can be prohibitive for larger scale studies. Modern LC-MS instrumentation provides the sensitivity necessary to scale-down depletion methods with minimal sacrifice to proteome coverage, which makes smaller volume depletion columns desirable for maximizing sample recovery when samples are limited, as well as for reducing the expense of large scale studies. We characterized the performance of a 346 µL column volume micro-scale depletion system, using four different flow rates to determine the most effective depletion conditions for ~6 μL injections of human plasma proteins and then evaluated depletion reproducibility at the optimum flow rate condition. Depletion of plasma using a commercial 10 mL depletion column served as the control. Results showed depletion efficiency of the micro-scale column increased as flow rate decreased, and that our micro-depletion was reproducible. We found, in an initial application, a 600 µL sample of human cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) pooled from multiple sclerosis patients was depleted and then analyzed using reversed phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to demonstrate the utility of the system for this important biofluid where sample quantities are more commonly limited.

  6. Influence of pregnancy in mid-to-late gestation on circulating metabolites, visceral organ mass, and abundance of proteins relating to energy metabolism in mature beef cows.

    PubMed

    Wood, K M; Awda, B J; Fitzsimmons, C; Miller, S P; McBride, B W; Swanson, K C

    2013-12-01

    In mid-to-late gestation, nutrient demand increases to meet the growth requirements of the conceptus and cows may alter metabolism in response to energy demands of pregnancy. By better understanding the metabolic role of pregnancy, there may be opportunities to better understand maintenance energy costs and improve overall feed efficiency. Eighteen mature Simmental/Angus crossbred cows, pregnant (PREG; n = 9) and nonpregnant (OPEN; n = 9), were used to investigate the effect of pregnancy on BW change, carcass traits, visceral organ mass, and circulating serum metabolites. Cows were blocked by day of expected parturition such that each block was slaughtered 4 to 5 wk before parturition. Cows were individually fed for ad libitum intake using Calan gates for 89 to 105 d. Cows were weighed, ultrasounded for rib (over the 12th and 13th rib) and rump fat, and a serum sample obtained at d 1, 56, and 3 to 5 d before slaughter. At slaughter, organs were removed, trimmed of fat, and weighed. Serum was analyzed for β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA), NEFA, glucose, urea, total cholesterol, and triiodothyronine (T3). Tissue samples from liver, kidney, sternomandibularis muscle, ruminal papillae, pancreas, and small intestinal mucosa were collected at slaughter and snap frozen in liquid N. Western blots were conducted to quantify abundance of: proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), ATP synthase, ubiquitin, and Na(+)/K+ ATPase for all tissues; PPARγ, PPARγ coactivator 1α (PGC1-α), 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphorylated-AMPK (pAMPK) for liver, muscle, and rumen; phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) for liver and kidney; and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) for liver. Data were analyzed using PROC MIXED in SAS as a replicated randomized complete block. Liver weights (actual, relative to BW, relative to HCW) were heavier (P ≤ 0.02) in OPEN. Rumen mass and kidney fat weight, both relative to BW, were also greater (P ≤ 0.04) in OPEN. On d 56

  7. The Earth's Hot Spots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vink, Gregory E.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Hot spots are isolated areas of geologic activity where volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, and upwelling currents occur far from plate boundaries. These mantle plumes are relatively stable and crustal plates drift over them. The nature and location of hot spots (with particular attention to the Hawaiian Islands and Iceland) are discussed. (DH)

  8. Biochemical and structural analysis of the IgE binding sites on ara h1, an abundant and highly allergenic peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Shin, D S; Compadre, C M; Maleki, S J; Kopper, R A; Sampson, H; Huang, S K; Burks, A W; Bannon, G A

    1998-05-29

    Allergy to peanut is a significant IgE-mediated health problem because of the high prevalence, potential severity, and chronicity of the reaction. Ara h1, an abundant peanut protein, is recognized by serum IgE from >90% of peanut-sensitive individuals. It has been shown to belong to the vicilin family of seed storage proteins and to contain 23 linear IgE binding epitopes. In this communication, we have determined the critical amino acids within each of the IgE binding epitopes of Ara h1 that are important for immunoglobulin binding. Surprisingly, substitution of a single amino acid within each of the epitopes led to loss of IgE binding. In addition, hydrophobic residues appeared to be most critical for IgE binding. The position of each of the IgE binding epitopes on a homology-based molecular model of Ara h1 showed that they were clustered into two main regions, despite their more even distribution in the primary sequence. Finally, we have shown that Ara h1 forms a stable trimer by the use of a reproducible fluorescence assay. This information will be important in studies designed to reduce the risk of peanut-induced anaphylaxis by lowering the IgE binding capacity of the allergen.

  9. CpLEA5, the Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Gene from Chimonanthus praecox, Possesses Low Temperature and Osmotic Resistances in Prokaryote and Eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiling; Xie, Lixia; Liang, Xilong; Zhang, Shihong

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize and accumulate a series of stress-resistance proteins to protect normal physiological activities under adverse conditions. Chimonanthus praecox which blooms in freezing weather accumulates late embryogenesis abundant proteins (LEAs) in flowers, but C. praecox LEAs are little reported. Here, we report a group of five LEA genes of C. praecox (CpLEA5, KT727031). Prokaryotic-expressed CpLEA5 was employed in Escherichia coli to investigate bioactivities and membrane permeability at low-temperature. In comparison with the vacant strains, CpLEA5-containing strains survived in a 20% higher rate; and the degree of cell membrane damage in CpLEA5-containing strains was 55% of that of the vacant strains according to a conductivity test, revealing the low-temperature resistance of CpLEA5 in bacteria. CpLEA5 was also expressed in Pichia pastoris. Interestingly, besides low-temperature resistance, CpLEA5 conferred high resistance to salt and alkali in CpLEA5 overexpressing yeast. The CpLEA5 gene was transferred into Arabidopsis thaliana to also demonstrate CpLEA5 actions in plants. As expected, the transgenic lines were more resistant against low-temperature and drought while compared with the wild type. Taken together, CpLEA5-conferred resistances to several conditions in prokaryote and eukaryotes could have great value as a genetic technology to enhance osmotic stress and low-temperature tolerance. PMID:26569231

  10. CpLEA5, the Late Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Gene from Chimonanthus praecox, Possesses Low Temperature and Osmotic Resistances in Prokaryote and Eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiling; Xie, Lixia; Liang, Xilong; Zhang, Shihong

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize and accumulate a series of stress-resistance proteins to protect normal physiological activities under adverse conditions. Chimonanthus praecox which blooms in freezing weather accumulates late embryogenesis abundant proteins (LEAs) in flowers, but C. praecox LEAs are little reported. Here, we report a group of five LEA genes of C. praecox (CpLEA5, KT727031). Prokaryotic-expressed CpLEA5 was employed in Escherichia coli to investigate bioactivities and membrane permeability at low-temperature. In comparison with the vacant strains, CpLEA5-containing strains survived in a 20% higher rate; and the degree of cell membrane damage in CpLEA5-containing strains was 55% of that of the vacant strains according to a conductivity test, revealing the low-temperature resistance of CpLEA5 in bacteria. CpLEA5 was also expressed in Pichia pastoris. Interestingly, besides low-temperature resistance, CpLEA5 conferred high resistance to salt and alkali in CpLEA5 overexpressing yeast. The CpLEA5 gene was transferred into Arabidopsis thaliana to also demonstrate CpLEA5 actions in plants. As expected, the transgenic lines were more resistant against low-temperature and drought while compared with the wild type. Taken together, CpLEA5-conferred resistances to several conditions in prokaryote and eukaryotes could have great value as a genetic technology to enhance osmotic stress and low-temperature tolerance. PMID:26569231

  11. A late embryogenesis abundant protein HVA1 regulated by an inducible promoter enhances root growth and abiotic stress tolerance in rice without yield penalty.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Shih; Lo, Shuen-Fang; Sun, Peng-Kai; Lu, Chung-An; Ho, Tuan-Hua D; Yu, Su-May

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of root architecture is essential for maintaining plant growth under adverse environment. A synthetic abscisic acid (ABA)/stress-inducible promoter was designed to control the expression of a late embryogenesis abundant protein (HVA1) in transgenic rice. The background of HVA1 is low but highly inducible by ABA, salt, dehydration and cold. HVA1 was highly accumulated in root apical meristem (RAM) and lateral root primordia (LRP) after ABA/stress treatments, leading to enhanced root system expansion. Water-use efficiency (WUE) and biomass also increased in transgenic rice, likely due to the maintenance of normal cell functions and metabolic activities conferred by HVA1 which is capable of stabilizing proteins, under osmotic stress. HVA1 promotes lateral root (LR) initiation, elongation and emergence and primary root (PR) elongation via an auxin-dependent process, particularly by intensifying asymmetrical accumulation of auxin in LRP founder cells and RAM, even under ABA/stress-suppressive conditions. We demonstrate a successful application of an inducible promoter in regulating the spatial and temporal expression of HVA1 for improving root architecture and multiple stress tolerance without yield penalty. PMID:25200982

  12. A late embryogenesis abundant protein HVA1 regulated by an inducible promoter enhances root growth and abiotic stress tolerance in rice without yield penalty.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Shih; Lo, Shuen-Fang; Sun, Peng-Kai; Lu, Chung-An; Ho, Tuan-Hua D; Yu, Su-May

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of root architecture is essential for maintaining plant growth under adverse environment. A synthetic abscisic acid (ABA)/stress-inducible promoter was designed to control the expression of a late embryogenesis abundant protein (HVA1) in transgenic rice. The background of HVA1 is low but highly inducible by ABA, salt, dehydration and cold. HVA1 was highly accumulated in root apical meristem (RAM) and lateral root primordia (LRP) after ABA/stress treatments, leading to enhanced root system expansion. Water-use efficiency (WUE) and biomass also increased in transgenic rice, likely due to the maintenance of normal cell functions and metabolic activities conferred by HVA1 which is capable of stabilizing proteins, under osmotic stress. HVA1 promotes lateral root (LR) initiation, elongation and emergence and primary root (PR) elongation via an auxin-dependent process, particularly by intensifying asymmetrical accumulation of auxin in LRP founder cells and RAM, even under ABA/stress-suppressive conditions. We demonstrate a successful application of an inducible promoter in regulating the spatial and temporal expression of HVA1 for improving root architecture and multiple stress tolerance without yield penalty.

  13. The N protein of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is associated with the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) in Capsicum chinense plants, a hypersensitive host to TSWV infection.

    PubMed

    Lovato, Fernanda Antinolfi; Inoue-Nagata, Alice Kazuko; Nagata, Tatsuya; de Avila, Antônio Carlos; Pereira, Luiz Alfredo Rodrigues; Resende, Renato Oliveira

    2008-11-01

    In sweet pepper, the Tsw gene, originally described in Capsicum chinense, has been widely used as an efficient gene for inducing a hypersensitivity response (HR) derived Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) resistance. Since previously reported studies suggested that the TSWV-S RNA mutation(s) are associated with the breakdown of Tsw mediated TSWV resistance in peppers, the TSWV genes N (structural nucleocapsid protein) and NS(S) (non-structural silencing suppressor protein) were cloned into a Potato virus X (PVX)-based expression vector, and inoculated into the TSWV-resistant C. chinense genotype, PI 159236, to identify the Tsw-HR viral elicitor. Typical HR-like chlorotic and necrotic lesions followed by leaf abscission were observed only in C. chinense plants inoculated with the PVX-N construct. Cytopathological analyses of these plants identified fragmented genomic DNA, indicative of programmed cell death (PCD), in mesophyll cell nuclei surrounding PVX-N-induced necrotic lesions. The other constructs induced only PVX-like symptoms without HR-like lesions and there were no microscopic signs of PCD. The mechanism of TSWV N-gene HR induction is apparently species specific as the N gene of a related tospovirus, Tomato chlorotic spot virus, was not a HR elicitor and did not cause PCD in infected cells.

  14. Watermarking spot colors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alattar, Osama M.; Reed, Alastair M.

    2003-06-01

    Watermarking of printed materials has usually focused on process inks of cyan, magenta, yellow and black (CMYK). In packaging, almost three out of four printed materials include spot colors. Spot colors are special premixed inks, which can be produced in a vibrant range of colors, often outside the CMYK color gamut. In embedding a watermark into printed material, a common approach is to modify the luminance value of each pixel in the image. In the case of process color work pieces, the luminance change can be scaled to the C, M, Y and K channels using a weighting function, to produce the desired change in luminance. In the case of spot color art designs, there is only one channel available and the luminance change is applied to this channel. In this paper we develop a weighting function to embed the watermark signal across the range of different spot colors. This weighting function normalizes visibility effect and signal robustness across a wide range of different spot colors. It normalizes the signal robustness level over the range of an individual spot color"s intensity levels. Further, it takes into account the sensitivity of the capturing device to the different spot colors.

  15. Radiometry spot measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Harry H.; Lawn, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    The radiometry spot measurement system (RSMS) has been designed for use in the Diffusive And Radiative Transport in Fires (DARTFire) experiment, currently under development at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The RSMS can measure the radiation emitted from a spot of specific size located on the surface of a distant radiation source within a controlled wavelength range. If the spot is located on a blackbody source, its radiation and temperature can be measured directly or indirectly by the RSMS. This report presents computer simulation results used to verify RSMS performance.

  16. SPOT4 Management Centre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labrune, Yves; Labbe, X.; Roussel, A.; Vielcanet, P.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of the CNES SPOT4 program CISI is particularly responsible for the development of the SPOT4 Management Centre, part of the SPOT4 ground control system located at CNES Toulouse (France) designed to provide simultaneous control over two satellites. The main operational activities are timed to synchronize with satellite visibilities (ten usable passes per day). The automatic capability of this system is achieved through agenda services (sequence of operations as defined and planned by operator). Therefore, the SPOT4 Management Centre offers limited, efficient and secure human interventions for supervision and decision making. This paper emphasizes the main system characteristics as degree of automation, level of dependability and system parameterization.

  17. Mononucleosis spot test

    MedlinePlus

    Monospot test; Heterophile antibody test; Heterophile agglutination test; Paul-Bunnell test; Forssman antibody test ... The mononucleosis spot test is done when symptoms of mononucleosis are ... Fatigue Fever Large spleen (possibly) Sore throat Tender ...

  18. Lincoln's Spot Resolutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Jean West; Schamel, Wynell Burroughs

    1988-01-01

    Examines the events leading to and immediately following the declaration of war on Mexico in 1846. Includes the second and third pages of Abraham Lincoln's "Spot Resolutions" and presents teaching suggestions for interpreting the document and assessing public opinion. (GEA)

  19. Identification and quantification of host proteins in the vesicular fluid of porcine Taenia solium cysticerci.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Perea, José; Moguel, Bárbara; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Fragoso, Gladis; Sciutto, Edda; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P

    2014-08-01

    The host-parasite relationship in cestode infections is complex. One feature of this bidirectional molecular communication is the uptake of host proteins by the parasite. Here we describe the presence of several host proteins in the vesicular fluid of Taenia solium cysticerci dissected from the central nervous system and the skeletal muscle of naturally infected pigs. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis we compared the protein patterns of vesicular fluids of cysticerci vs. the sera of cysticercotic pigs. We found that the vesicular fluids of both groups of cysts showed 17 protein spots matching with the pig's sera spots. After mass spectrometry sequencing of these spots, five host proteins were identified: hemoglobin, albumin, serpin A3-8, haptoglobin, rho GTPase-activating protein 36-like. Three of the 17 spots corresponded to host protein fragments: hemoglobin, albumin and serpin A3-8. IgG heavy and light chains were also identified by Western blot using a specific antibody. Quantitative estimations indicated that the host proteins represented 11-13% of the protein content in the vesicular fluids. We also calculated the relative abundance of these host proteins in the vesicular fluids; all were represented in similar relative abundances as in host sera. This suggests that uptake of host proteins by cysticerci proceeds through an unspecific mechanism such as non-specific fluid pinocytosis.

  20. FcLDP1, a Gene Encoding a Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Domain Protein, Responds to Brassinosteroids and Abscisic Acid during the Development of Fruits in Fragaria chiloensis.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Analía; Contreras, Rodrigo; Zúñiga, Gustavo E; Herrera, Raúl; Moya-León, María Alejandra; Norambuena, Lorena; Handford, Michael

    2016-01-01

    White Chilean strawberries (Fragaria chiloensis) are non-climacteric fruits, with an exotic color and aroma. In order to discover genes involved in the development of these fruits, we identified a fragment of a gene encoding a late embryogenesis abundant domain protein, FcLDP1, that was expressed in early stages of fruit development, particularly in receptacles. Hormones play key roles in regulating the development of non-climacteric fruits. We show that the brassinosteroid content of the white strawberry varies during development. Additionally, FcLDP1 as well as the closest ortholog in the woodland strawberry, F. vesca (FvLDP1) possess multiple brassinosteroid, as well as abscisic acid (ABA) response motifs in the promoter region, consistent with the response of transiently expressed FcLDP1 promoter-GFP fusions to these hormones, and the rise in FcLDP1 transcript levels in white strawberry fruits treated with brassinosteroids or ABA. These findings suggest that both hormones regulate FcLDP1 expression during the development of white strawberries.

  1. FcLDP1, a Gene Encoding a Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Domain Protein, Responds to Brassinosteroids and Abscisic Acid during the Development of Fruits in Fragaria chiloensis.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Analía; Contreras, Rodrigo; Zúñiga, Gustavo E; Herrera, Raúl; Moya-León, María Alejandra; Norambuena, Lorena; Handford, Michael

    2016-01-01

    White Chilean strawberries (Fragaria chiloensis) are non-climacteric fruits, with an exotic color and aroma. In order to discover genes involved in the development of these fruits, we identified a fragment of a gene encoding a late embryogenesis abundant domain protein, FcLDP1, that was expressed in early stages of fruit development, particularly in receptacles. Hormones play key roles in regulating the development of non-climacteric fruits. We show that the brassinosteroid content of the white strawberry varies during development. Additionally, FcLDP1 as well as the closest ortholog in the woodland strawberry, F. vesca (FvLDP1) possess multiple brassinosteroid, as well as abscisic acid (ABA) response motifs in the promoter region, consistent with the response of transiently expressed FcLDP1 promoter-GFP fusions to these hormones, and the rise in FcLDP1 transcript levels in white strawberry fruits treated with brassinosteroids or ABA. These findings suggest that both hormones regulate FcLDP1 expression during the development of white strawberries. PMID:27379111

  2. Analysis of genetic diversity of the heat shock protein 70 gene on the basis of abundant sequence polymorphisms in chicken breeds.

    PubMed

    Gan, J K; Jiang, L Y; Kong, L N; Zhang, X Q; Luo, Q B

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to detect the sequence variation of the chicken heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) gene. A total of 102 individuals from 8 native Chinese breeds together with Dwarf White Chicken and Red Junglefowl were used to detect sequence variations. The coding regions of the chicken HSP70 gene from 102 individuals were cloned and sequenced. Thirty-six variations were identified, which included 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 2 indel mutations. Fifty-seven haplotypes were observed, of which, 43 were breed-specific and 14 were shared. There were 7 Red Junglefowl-specific haplotypes, while Haidong and Silkie only had 2 specific haplotypes. Eleven and 3 haplotypes were shared between and within species, respectively. The variation in nucleotide diversity (Pi) and average number of nucleotide differences (K) among species were consistent. The total Pi of HSP70 was 0.0016, and the total K was 4.1998. The Pi value of Red Junglefowl was the highest (0.0018) and K was 4.8000, while the Pi of Silkie was the lowest (0.0010) and K was 2.5000. These results demonstrated that variation in chicken HSP70 was abundant between and within species. PMID:25867297

  3. FcLDP1, a Gene Encoding a Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Domain Protein, Responds to Brassinosteroids and Abscisic Acid during the Development of Fruits in Fragaria chiloensis

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Analía; Contreras, Rodrigo; Zúñiga, Gustavo E.; Herrera, Raúl; Moya-León, María Alejandra; Norambuena, Lorena; Handford, Michael

    2016-01-01

    White Chilean strawberries (Fragaria chiloensis) are non-climacteric fruits, with an exotic color and aroma. In order to discover genes involved in the development of these fruits, we identified a fragment of a gene encoding a late embryogenesis abundant domain protein, FcLDP1, that was expressed in early stages of fruit development, particularly in receptacles. Hormones play key roles in regulating the development of non-climacteric fruits. We show that the brassinosteroid content of the white strawberry varies during development. Additionally, FcLDP1 as well as the closest ortholog in the woodland strawberry, F. vesca (FvLDP1) possess multiple brassinosteroid, as well as abscisic acid (ABA) response motifs in the promoter region, consistent with the response of transiently expressed FcLDP1 promoter-GFP fusions to these hormones, and the rise in FcLDP1 transcript levels in white strawberry fruits treated with brassinosteroids or ABA. These findings suggest that both hormones regulate FcLDP1 expression during the development of white strawberries. PMID:27379111

  4. Simple method for three-dimensional representation of 2-DE spots using a spreadsheet program.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Martin H

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative protein expression analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis requires comparison of spot volumes. We describe an algorithm to visualize two-dimensional spot patterns in three dimensions using a spreadsheet program for surface plotting.

  5. Induction of ketosis in rats fed low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets depends on the relative abundance of dietary fat and protein.

    PubMed

    Bielohuby, Maximilian; Menhofer, Dominik; Kirchner, Henriette; Stoehr, Barbara J M; Müller, Timo D; Stock, Peggy; Hempel, Madlen; Stemmer, Kerstin; Pfluger, Paul T; Kienzle, Ellen; Christ, Bruno; Tschöp, Matthias H; Bidlingmaier, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Low-carbohydrate/high-fat diets (LC-HFDs) in rodent models have been implicated with both weight loss and as a therapeutic approach to treat neurological diseases. LC-HFDs are known to induce ketosis; however, systematic studies analyzing the impact of the macronutrient composition on ketosis induction and weight loss success are lacking. Male Wistar rats were pair-fed for 4 wk either a standard chow diet or one of three different LC-HFDs, which only differed in the relative abundance of fat and protein (percentages of fat/protein in dry matter: LC-75/10; LC-65/20; LC-55/30). We subsequently measured body composition by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), analyzed blood chemistry and urine acetone content, evaluated gene expression changes of key ketogenic and gluconeogenic genes, and measured energy expenditure (EE) and locomotor activity (LA) during the first 4 days and after 3 wk on the respective diets. Compared with chow, rats fed with LC-75/10, LC-65/20, and LC-55/30 gained significantly less body weight. Reductions in body weight were mainly due to lower lean body mass and paralleled by significantly increased fat mass. Levels of β-hydroxybutyate were significantly elevated feeding LC-75/10 and LC-65/20 but decreased in parallel to reductions in dietary fat. Acetone was about 16-fold higher with LC-75/10 only (P < 0.001). In contrast, rats fed with LC-55/30 were not ketotic. Serum fibroblast growth factor-21, hepatic mRNA expression of hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA-lyase, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1β were increased with LC-75/10 only. Expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and glucose-6-phosphatase was downregulated by 50-70% in LC-HF groups. Furthermore, EE and LA were significantly decreased in all groups fed with LC-HFDs after 3 wk on the diets. In rats, the absence of dietary carbohydrates per se does not induce ketosis. LC-HFDs must be high in fat

  6. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Constitutes a Large and Diverse Family of Proteins Involved in Development and Abiotic Stress Responses in Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb.)

    PubMed Central

    Pedrosa, Andresa Muniz; Martins, Cristina de Paula Santos; Gonçalves, Luana Pereira; Costa, Marcio Gilberto Cardoso

    2015-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are an ubiquitous group of polypeptides that were first described to accumulate during plant seed dehydration, at the later stages of embryogenesis. Since then they have also been recorded in vegetative plant tissues experiencing water limitation and in anhydrobiotic bacteria and invertebrates and, thereby, correlated with the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. This study provides the first comprehensive study about the LEA gene family in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb.), the most important and widely grown fruit crop around the world. A surprisingly high number (72) of genes encoding C. sinensis LEAs (CsLEAs) were identified and classified into seven groups (LEA_1, LEA_2, LEA_3 and LEA_4, LEA_5, DEHYDRIN and SMP) based on their predicted amino acid sequences and also on their phylogenetic relationships with the complete set of Arabidopsis thaliana LEA proteins (AtLEAs). Approximately 60% of the CsLEAs identified in this study belongs to the unusual LEA_2 group of more hydrophobic LEA proteins, while the other LEA groups contained a relatively small number of members typically hydrophilic. A correlation between gene structure and motif composition was observed within each LEA group. Investigation of their chromosomal localizations revealed that the CsLEAs were non-randomly distributed across all nine chromosomes and that 33% of all CsLEAs are segmentally or tandemly duplicated genes. Analysis of the upstream sequences required for transcription revealed the presence of various stress-responsive cis-acting regulatory elements in the promoter regions of CsLEAs, including ABRE, DRE/CRT, MYBS and LTRE. Expression analysis using both RNA-seq data and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR) revealed that the CsLEA genes are widely expressed in various tissues, and that many genes containing the ABRE promoter sequence are induced by drought, salt and PEG. These results provide a useful reference for further exploration of

  7. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Constitutes a Large and Diverse Family of Proteins Involved in Development and Abiotic Stress Responses in Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb.).

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Andresa Muniz; Martins, Cristina de Paula Santos; Gonçalves, Luana Pereira; Costa, Marcio Gilberto Cardoso

    2015-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are an ubiquitous group of polypeptides that were first described to accumulate during plant seed dehydration, at the later stages of embryogenesis. Since then they have also been recorded in vegetative plant tissues experiencing water limitation and in anhydrobiotic bacteria and invertebrates and, thereby, correlated with the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. This study provides the first comprehensive study about the LEA gene family in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb.), the most important and widely grown fruit crop around the world. A surprisingly high number (72) of genes encoding C. sinensis LEAs (CsLEAs) were identified and classified into seven groups (LEA_1, LEA_2, LEA_3 and LEA_4, LEA_5, DEHYDRIN and SMP) based on their predicted amino acid sequences and also on their phylogenetic relationships with the complete set of Arabidopsis thaliana LEA proteins (AtLEAs). Approximately 60% of the CsLEAs identified in this study belongs to the unusual LEA_2 group of more hydrophobic LEA proteins, while the other LEA groups contained a relatively small number of members typically hydrophilic. A correlation between gene structure and motif composition was observed within each LEA group. Investigation of their chromosomal localizations revealed that the CsLEAs were non-randomly distributed across all nine chromosomes and that 33% of all CsLEAs are segmentally or tandemly duplicated genes. Analysis of the upstream sequences required for transcription revealed the presence of various stress-responsive cis-acting regulatory elements in the promoter regions of CsLEAs, including ABRE, DRE/CRT, MYBS and LTRE. Expression analysis using both RNA-seq data and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR) revealed that the CsLEA genes are widely expressed in various tissues, and that many genes containing the ABRE promoter sequence are induced by drought, salt and PEG. These results provide a useful reference for further exploration of

  8. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) Constitutes a Large and Diverse Family of Proteins Involved in Development and Abiotic Stress Responses in Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb.).

    PubMed

    Pedrosa, Andresa Muniz; Martins, Cristina de Paula Santos; Gonçalves, Luana Pereira; Costa, Marcio Gilberto Cardoso

    2015-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins are an ubiquitous group of polypeptides that were first described to accumulate during plant seed dehydration, at the later stages of embryogenesis. Since then they have also been recorded in vegetative plant tissues experiencing water limitation and in anhydrobiotic bacteria and invertebrates and, thereby, correlated with the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. This study provides the first comprehensive study about the LEA gene family in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osb.), the most important and widely grown fruit crop around the world. A surprisingly high number (72) of genes encoding C. sinensis LEAs (CsLEAs) were identified and classified into seven groups (LEA_1, LEA_2, LEA_3 and LEA_4, LEA_5, DEHYDRIN and SMP) based on their predicted amino acid sequences and also on their phylogenetic relationships with the complete set of Arabidopsis thaliana LEA proteins (AtLEAs). Approximately 60% of the CsLEAs identified in this study belongs to the unusual LEA_2 group of more hydrophobic LEA proteins, while the other LEA groups contained a relatively small number of members typically hydrophilic. A correlation between gene structure and motif composition was observed within each LEA group. Investigation of their chromosomal localizations revealed that the CsLEAs were non-randomly distributed across all nine chromosomes and that 33% of all CsLEAs are segmentally or tandemly duplicated genes. Analysis of the upstream sequences required for transcription revealed the presence of various stress-responsive cis-acting regulatory elements in the promoter regions of CsLEAs, including ABRE, DRE/CRT, MYBS and LTRE. Expression analysis using both RNA-seq data and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR) revealed that the CsLEA genes are widely expressed in various tissues, and that many genes containing the ABRE promoter sequence are induced by drought, salt and PEG. These results provide a useful reference for further exploration of

  9. Characterization of Streptococcus equi subsp. ruminatorum isolated from spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) and plains zebras (Equus burchelli), and identification of a M-like protein (SrM) encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Speck, Stephanie; Höner, Oliver P; Wachter, Bettina; Fickel, Jörns

    2008-04-01

    Thirteen strains of Streptococcus equi subsp. ruminatorum from free-ranging spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) and plains zebras (Equus burchelli) in Tanzania were characterized by biochemical and molecular-biological methods. Although the colony appearance of the S.e. ruminatorum wildlife strains differed from that of the S.e. ruminatorum type strain CECT 5772(T), all biochemical reactions of the wildlife strains were similar to those of the type strain. In addition, all wildlife strains produced hyaluronidase and were capable of hydrolysing arginine, three strains (23%) synthesized acetoin, but only eight strains (62%) produced acid from ribose. rep-PCR indicated that different clones of S.e. ruminatorum were distributed among the hyena and zebra populations in the study area. Identical rep-PCR patterns in hyena and zebra strains suggest that a direct transmission of S.e. ruminatorum between these species may occur. The presence of a M-like protein (SrM) gene was demonstrated in all S.e. ruminatorum strains including the type strain. Sequencing of the M-like protein gene revealed a hypervariable region within the deduced amino acid sequence. Most of the strains clustered with previously described strains based on the hypervariable region of the S.e. zooepidemicus SzP protein. Sequencing also demonstrated that identical SrM protein sequences were shared among S.e. ruminatorum strains from different host species.

  10. Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Production and Lower Abundance of Complex I Subunits and Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1B Protein Despite Normal Mitochondrial Respiration in Insulin-Resistant Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lefort, Natalie; Glancy, Brian; Bowen, Benjamin; Willis, Wayne T.; Bailowitz, Zachary; De Filippis, Elena A.; Brophy, Colleen; Meyer, Christian; Højlund, Kurt; Yi, Zhengping; Mandarino, Lawrence J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction to skeletal muscle insulin resistance remains elusive. Comparative proteomics are being applied to generate new hypotheses in human biology and were applied here to isolated mitochondria to identify novel changes in mitochondrial protein abundance present in insulin-resistant muscle. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mitochondria were isolated from vastus lateralis muscle from lean and insulin-sensitive individuals and from obese and insulin-resistant individuals who were otherwise healthy. Respiration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production rates were measured in vitro. Relative abundances of proteins detected by mass spectrometry were determined using a normalized spectral abundance factor method. RESULTS NADH- and FADH2-linked maximal respiration rates were similar between lean and obese individuals. Rates of pyruvate and palmitoyl-dl-carnitine (both including malate) ROS production were significantly higher in obesity. Mitochondria from obese individuals maintained higher (more negative) extramitochondrial ATP free energy at low metabolic flux, suggesting that stronger mitochondrial thermodynamic driving forces may underlie the higher ROS production. Tandem mass spectrometry identified protein abundance differences per mitochondrial mass in insulin resistance, including lower abundance of complex I subunits and enzymes involved in the oxidation of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) and fatty acids (e.g., carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B). CONCLUSIONS We provide data suggesting normal oxidative capacity of mitochondria in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle in parallel with high rates of ROS production. Furthermore, we show specific abundance differences in proteins involved in fat and BCAA oxidation that might contribute to the accumulation of lipid and BCAA frequently associated with the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. PMID:20682693

  11. Red light-regulated growth. I. Changes in the abundance of indoleacetic acid and a 22-kilodalton auxin-binding protein in the maize mesocotyl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, A. M.; Cochran, D. S.; Lamerson, P. M.; Evans, M. L.; Cohen, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    We examined the changes in the levels of indoleacetic acid (IAA), IAA esters, and a 22-kilodalton subunit auxin-binding protein (ABP1) in apical mesocotyl tissue of maize (Zea mays L.) during continuous red light (R) irradiation. These changes were compared with the kinetics of R-induced growth inhibition in the same tissue. Upon the onset of continuous irradiation, growth decreased in a continuous manner following a brief lag period. The decrease in growth continued for 5 hours, then remained constant at 25% of the dark rate. The abundance of ABP1 and the level of free IAA both decreased in the mesocotyl. Only the kinetics of the decrease in IAA within the apical mesocotyl correlated with the initial change in growth, although growth continued to decrease even after IAA content reached its final level, 50% of the dark control. This decrease in IAA within the mesocotyl probably occurs primarily by a change in its transport within the shoot since auxin applied as a pulse move basipetally in R-irradiated tissue at the same rate but with half the area as dark control tissue. In situ localization of auxin in etiolated maize shoots revealed that R-irradiated shoots contained less auxin in the epidermis than the dark controls. Irradiated mesocotyl grew 50% less than the dark controls even when incubated in an optimal level of auxin. However, irradiated and dark tissue contained essentially the same amount of radioactivity after incubation in [14C]IAA indicating that the light treatment does not affect the uptake into the tissue through the cut end, although it is possible that a small subset of cells within the mesocotyl is affected. These observations support the hypothesis that R causes a decrease in the level of auxin in epidermal cells of the mesocotyl, consequently constraining the growth of the entire mesocotyl.

  12. Identification of Winter-Responsive Proteins in Bread Wheat Using Proteomics Analysis and Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Huo, Wang; Zhang, Lingran; Chen, Feng; Cui, Dangqun

    2016-09-01

    Proteomic approaches were applied to identify protein spots involved in cold responses in wheat. By comparing the differentially accumulated proteins from two cultivars (UC1110 and PI 610750) and their derivatives, as well as the F10 recombinant inbred line population differing in cold-tolerance, a total of 20 common protein spots representing 16 unique proteins were successfully identified using 2-DE method. Of these, 14 spots had significantly enhanced abundance in the cold-sensitive parental cultivar UC1110 and its 20 descendant lines when compared with the cold-tolerant parental cultivar PI 610750 and its 20 descendant lines. Six protein spots with reduced abundance were also detected. The identified protein spots are involved in stress/defense, carbohydrate metabolism, protein metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, energy metabolism, and photosynthesis. The 20 differentially expressed protein spots were chosen for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) to investigate expression changes at the RNA level. The results indicated that the transcriptional expression patterns of 11 genes were consistent with their protein expression models. Among the three unknown proteins, Spot 20 (PAP6-like) showed high sequence similarities with PAP6. qRT-PCR results implied that cold and salt stresses increased the expression of PAP6-like in wheat leaves. Furthermore, VIGS (virus-induced gene silencing)-treated plants generated for PAP6-like were subjected to freezing stress, these plants had more serious droop and wilt, an increased rate of relative electrolyte leakage, reduced relative water content (RWC) and decreased tocopherol levels when compared with viral control plants. However, the plants that were silenced for the other two unknown proteins had no significant differences in comparison to the BSMV0-inoculated plants under freezing conditions. These results indicate that PAP6-like possibly plays an important role in conferring cold tolerance in wheat. PMID

  13. The Cucumber leaf spot virus p25 auxiliary replicase protein binds and modifies the endoplasmic reticulum via N-terminal transmembrane domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ghoshal, Kankana; Theilmann, Jane; Reade, Ron; Sanfacon, Helene; Rochon, D’Ann

    2014-11-15

    Cucumber leaf spot virus (CLSV) is a member of the Aureusvirus genus, family Tombusviridae. The auxiliary replicase of Tombusvirids has been found to localize to endoplasmic reticulum (ER), peroxisomes or mitochondria; however, localization of the auxiliary replicase of aureusviruses has not been determined. We have found that the auxiliary replicase of CLSV (p25) fused to GFP colocalizes with ER and that three predicted transmembrane domains (TMDs) at the N-terminus of p25 are sufficient for targeting, although the second and third TMDs play the most prominent roles. Confocal analysis of CLSV infected 16C plants shows that the ER becomes modified including the formation of punctae at connections between ER tubules and in association with the nucleus. Ultrastructural analysis shows that the cytoplasm contains numerous vesicles which are also found between the perinuclear ER and nuclear membrane. It is proposed that these vesicles correspond to modified ER used as sites for CLSV replication. - Highlights: • The CLSV p25 auxiliary replicase targets the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). • Targeting of CLSV p25 is associated with ER restructuring. • Restructuring of the ER occurs during CLSV infection. • CLSV p25 contains 3 predicted transmembrane domains 2 of which are required for ER targeting. • Vesicles derived from the ER may be sites of CLSV replication.

  14. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, datamore » analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.« less

  15. IR Spot Weld Inspect

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jian; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    In automotive industry, destructive inspection of spot welds is still the mandatory quality assurance method due to the lack of efficient non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tools. However, it is costly and time-consuming. Recently at ORNL, a new NDE prototype system for spot weld inspection using infrared (IR) thermography has been developed to address this problem. This software contains all the key functions that ensure the NDE system to work properly: system input/output control, image acquisition, data analysis, weld quality database generation and weld quality prediction, etc.

  16. Triggered tremor sweet spots in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan; Prejean, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    To better understand what controls fault slip along plate boundaries, we have exploited the abundance of seismic and geodetic data available from the richly varied tectonic environments composing Alaska. A search for tremor triggered by 11 large earthquakes throughout all of seismically monitored Alaska reveals two tremor “sweet spots”—regions where large-amplitude seismic waves repeatedly triggered tremor between 2006 and 2012. The two sweet spots locate in very different tectonic environments—one just trenchward and between the Aleutian islands of Unalaska and Akutan and the other in central mainland Alaska. The Unalaska/Akutan spot corroborates previous evidence that the region is ripe for tremor, perhaps because it is located where plate-interface frictional properties transition between stick-slip and stably sliding in both the dip direction and laterally. The mainland sweet spot coincides with a region of complex and uncertain plate interactions, and where no slow slip events or major crustal faults have been noted previously. Analyses showed that larger triggering wave amplitudes, and perhaps lower frequencies (<~0.03 Hz), may enhance the probability of triggering tremor. However, neither the maximum amplitude in the time domain or in a particular frequency band, nor the geometric relationship of the wavefield to the tremor source faults alone ensures a high probability of triggering. Triggered tremor at the two sweet spots also does not occur during slow slip events visually detectable in GPS data, although slow slip below the detection threshold may have facilitated tremor triggering.

  17. Bacterial leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial leaf spot has been reported in Australia (Queensland), Egypt, El Salvador, India, Japan, Nicaragua, Sudan, and the United States (Florida, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, and Wisconsin). It occasionally causes locally severe defoliation and post-emergence damping-off and stunting. The disease is...

  18. Arc spot grouping: An entanglement of arc spot cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kajita, Shin; Hwangbo, Dogyun; Ohno, Noriyasu; Tsventoukh, Mikhail M.; Barengolts, Sergey A.

    2014-12-21

    In recent experiments, clear transitions in velocity and trail width of an arc spot initiated on nanostructured tungsten were observed on the boundary of the thick and thin nanostructured layer regions. The velocity of arc spot was significantly decreased on the thick nanostructured region. It was suggested that the grouping decreased the velocity of arc spot. In this study, we try to explain the phenomena using a simple random walk model that has properties of directionality and self-avoidance. And grouping feature was added by installing an attractive force between spot cells with dealing with multi-spots. It was revealed that an entanglement of arc spot cells decreased the spot velocity, and spot cells tend to stamp at the same location many times.

  19. Spot the Difference—Development of a Syndrome Based Protein Microarray for Specific Serological Detection of Multiple Flavivirus Infections in Travelers

    PubMed Central

    Cleton, Natalie B.; Godeke, Gert-Jan; Reimerink, Johan; Beersma, Mathias F.; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Franco, Leticia; Goeijenbier, Marco; Jimenez-Clavero, Miguel A.; Johnson, Barbara W.; Niedrig, Matthias; Papa, Anna; Sambri, Vittorio; Tami, Adriana; Velasco-Salas, Zoraida I.; Koopmans, Marion P. G.; Reusken, Chantal B. E. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The family Flaviviridae, genus Flavivirus, holds many of the world’s most prevalent arboviral diseases that are also considered the most important travel related arboviral infections. In most cases, flavivirus diagnosis in travelers is primarily based on serology as viremia is often low and typically has already been reduced to undetectable levels when symptoms set in and patients seek medical attention. Serological differentiation between flaviviruses and the false-positive results caused by vaccination and cross-reactivity among the different species, are problematic for surveillance and diagnostics of flaviviruses. Their partially overlapping geographic distribution and symptoms, combined with increase in travel, and preexisting antibodies due to flavivirus vaccinations, expand the need for rapid and reliable multiplex diagnostic tests to supplement currently used methods. Goal We describe the development of a multiplex serological protein microarray using recombinant NS1 proteins for detection of medically important viruses within the genus Flavivirus. Sera from clinical flavivirus patients were used for primary development of the protein microarray. Results Results show a high IgG and IgM sensitivity and specificity for individual NS1 antigens, and limited cross reactivity, even within serocomplexes. In addition, the serology based on this array allows for discrimination between infection and vaccination response for JEV vaccine, and no cross-reactivity with TBEV and YFV vaccine induced antibodies when testing for antibodies to other flaviviruses. Conclusion Based on these data, multiplex NS1-based protein microarray is a promising tool for surveillance and diagnosis of flaviviruses. PMID:25767876

  20. Integrating sustainable hunting in biodiversity protection in Central Africa: hot spots, weak spots, and strong spots.

    PubMed

    Fa, John E; Olivero, Jesús; Farfán, Miguel Ángel; Márquez, Ana Luz; Vargas, Juan Mario; Real, Raimundo; Nasi, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Wild animals are a primary source of protein (bushmeat) for people living in or near tropical forests. Ideally, the effect of bushmeat harvests should be monitored closely by making regular estimates of offtake rate and size of stock available for exploitation. However, in practice, this is possible in very few situations because it requires both of these aspects to be readily measurable, and even in the best case, entails very considerable time and effort. As alternative, in this study, we use high-resolution, environmental favorability models for terrestrial mammals (N = 165) in Central Africa to map areas of high species richness (hot spots) and hunting susceptibility. Favorability models distinguish localities with environmental conditions that favor the species' existence from those with detrimental characteristics for its presence. We develop an index for assessing Potential Hunting Sustainability (PHS) of each species based on their ecological characteristics (population density, habitat breadth, rarity and vulnerability), weighted according to restrictive and permissive assumptions of how species' characteristics are combined. Species are classified into five main hunting sustainability classes using fuzzy logic. Using the accumulated favorability values of all species, and their PHS values, we finally identify weak spots, defined as high diversity regions of especial hunting vulnerability for wildlife, as well as strong spots, defined as high diversity areas of high hunting sustainability potential. Our study uses relatively simple models that employ easily obtainable data of a species' ecological characteristics to assess the impacts of hunting in tropical regions. It provides information for management by charting the geography of where species are more or less likely to be at risk of extinction from hunting.

  1. Integrating Sustainable Hunting in Biodiversity Protection in Central Africa: Hot Spots, Weak Spots, and Strong Spots

    PubMed Central

    Fa, John E.; Olivero, Jesús; Farfán, Miguel Ángel; Márquez, Ana Luz; Vargas, Juan Mario; Real, Raimundo; Nasi, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Wild animals are a primary source of protein (bushmeat) for people living in or near tropical forests. Ideally, the effect of bushmeat harvests should be monitored closely by making regular estimates of offtake rate and size of stock available for exploitation. However, in practice, this is possible in very few situations because it requires both of these aspects to be readily measurable, and even in the best case, entails very considerable time and effort. As alternative, in this study, we use high-resolution, environmental favorability models for terrestrial mammals (N = 165) in Central Africa to map areas of high species richness (hot spots) and hunting susceptibility. Favorability models distinguish localities with environmental conditions that favor the species' existence from those with detrimental characteristics for its presence. We develop an index for assessing Potential Hunting Sustainability (PHS) of each species based on their ecological characteristics (population density, habitat breadth, rarity and vulnerability), weighted according to restrictive and permissive assumptions of how species' characteristics are combined. Species are classified into five main hunting sustainability classes using fuzzy logic. Using the accumulated favorability values of all species, and their PHS values, we finally identify weak spots, defined as high diversity regions of especial hunting vulnerability for wildlife, as well as strong spots, defined as high diversity areas of high hunting sustainability potential. Our study uses relatively simple models that employ easily obtainable data of a species' ecological characteristics to assess the impacts of hunting in tropical regions. It provides information for management by charting the geography of where species are more or less likely to be at risk of extinction from hunting. PMID:25372705

  2. Pvlea-18, a Member of a New Late-Embryogenesis-Abundant Protein Family That Accumulates during Water Stress and in the Growing Regions of Well-Irrigated Bean Seedlings1

    PubMed Central

    Colmenero-Flores, José M.; Moreno, Liz P.; Smith, Claudia E.; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    1999-01-01

    Pvlea-18 is a novel stress gene whose transcript is present in the dry embryo and the endosperm from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seeds. It accumulates in vegetative tissues in response to water deficit and abscisic acid application (J.M. Colmenero-Flores, F. Campos, A. Garciarrubio, A.A. Covarrubias [1997] Plant Mol Biol 35: 393–405). We show that the Pvlea-18 gene encodes a 14-kD protein that accumulates during late embryogenesis. Related proteins have been detected in both monocots and dicots, indicating that PvLEA-18 is a member of a new family of LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) proteins. We also show that the PvLEA-18 transcript and protein accumulate not only in different organs of the bean seedlings during water stress but also in well-irrigated seedlings. This accumulation occurs in seedling regions with more negative values of water and osmotic potentials, such as the growing region of the hypocotyl. This phenomenon has not previously been described for LEA proteins. Immunohistochemical localization showed that the PvLEA-18 protein is present in the nucleus and cytoplasm of all cell types, with a higher accumulation in the epidermis and vascular cylinder tissues, particularly in protoxylem cells and root meristematic tissues. We found a similar localization but a higher abundance in water-stressed seedlings. PMID:10318687

  3. The interaction of two-spotted spider mites, Tetranychus urticae Koch, with Cry protein production and predation by Amblyseius andersoni (Chant) in Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab cotton and Cry1F maize.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Yan; Tian, Jun-Ce; Shi, Wang-Peng; Dong, Xue-Hui; Romeis, Jörg; Naranjo, Steven E; Hellmich, Richard L; Shelton, Anthony M

    2016-02-01

    Crops producing insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), are an important tool for managing lepidopteran pests on cotton and maize. However, the effects of these Bt crops on non-target organisms, especially natural enemies that provide biological control services, are required to be addressed in an environmental risk assessment. Amblyseius andersoni (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is a cosmopolitan predator of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae), a significant pest of cotton and maize. Tri-trophic studies were conducted to assess the potential effects of Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab cotton and Cry1F maize on life history parameters (survival rate, development time, fecundity and egg hatching rate) of A. andersoni. We confirmed that these Bt crops have no effects on the biology of T. urticae and, in turn, that there were no differences in any of the life history parameters of A. andersoni when it fed on T. urticae feeding on Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab or non-Bt cotton and Cry1F or non-Bt maize. Use of a susceptible insect assay demonstrated that T. urticae contained biologically active Cry proteins. Cry proteins concentrations declined greatly as they moved from plants to herbivores to predators and protein concentration did not appear to be related to mite density. Free-choice experiments revealed that A. andersoni had no preference for Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab cotton or Cry1F maize-reared T. urticae compared with those reared on non-Bt cotton or maize. Collectively these results provide strong evidence that these crops can complement other integrated pest management tactics including biological control. PMID:26545599

  4. The interaction of two-spotted spider mites, Tetranychus urticae Koch, with Cry protein production and predation by Amblyseius andersoni (Chant) in Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab cotton and Cry1F maize.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Yan; Tian, Jun-Ce; Shi, Wang-Peng; Dong, Xue-Hui; Romeis, Jörg; Naranjo, Steven E; Hellmich, Richard L; Shelton, Anthony M

    2016-02-01

    Crops producing insecticidal crystal (Cry) proteins from the bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt), are an important tool for managing lepidopteran pests on cotton and maize. However, the effects of these Bt crops on non-target organisms, especially natural enemies that provide biological control services, are required to be addressed in an environmental risk assessment. Amblyseius andersoni (Acari: Phytoseiidae) is a cosmopolitan predator of the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae (Acari: Tetranychidae), a significant pest of cotton and maize. Tri-trophic studies were conducted to assess the potential effects of Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab cotton and Cry1F maize on life history parameters (survival rate, development time, fecundity and egg hatching rate) of A. andersoni. We confirmed that these Bt crops have no effects on the biology of T. urticae and, in turn, that there were no differences in any of the life history parameters of A. andersoni when it fed on T. urticae feeding on Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab or non-Bt cotton and Cry1F or non-Bt maize. Use of a susceptible insect assay demonstrated that T. urticae contained biologically active Cry proteins. Cry proteins concentrations declined greatly as they moved from plants to herbivores to predators and protein concentration did not appear to be related to mite density. Free-choice experiments revealed that A. andersoni had no preference for Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab cotton or Cry1F maize-reared T. urticae compared with those reared on non-Bt cotton or maize. Collectively these results provide strong evidence that these crops can complement other integrated pest management tactics including biological control.

  5. Identification and characterization of TRP14, a thioredoxin-related protein of 14 kDa from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingguang; Ji, Huasong; Guo, Minglan; Yan, Yang; Qin, Qiwei

    2013-11-01

    Thioredoxin (abbreviated as Trx) is an important ubiquitous disulfide reductase, which can protect organisms against various oxidative stresses. In the present study, a thioredoxin-related protein of 14 kDa (named as Ec-TRP14) was identified from the marine fish grouper, Epinephelus coioides by RACE PCR. The full-length cDNA of Ec-TRP14 was comprised of 1066 bp with a 372 bp open reading frame that encodes a putative protein of 123 amino acids. Similar to most TRP14s, Ec-TRP14 contained the conserved motif C-P-D-C. Ec-TRP14 mRNA is predominately expressed in liver, brain and muscle. The expression of Ec-TRP14 was up-regulated in the liver of grouper challenged with SGIV. Ec-TRP14 was recombined and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3), and the rEc-Ec-TRP14 fusion protein was demonstrated to possess the antioxidant activity. The grouper spleen (GS) cells were treated with a high concentration of rEc-TRP14 (8.3 μg/ml), which significantly enhanced cells viability under damage caused by viral infection. These results together indicated that Ec-TRP14 could function as an important antioxidant in a physiological context, and might be involved in the responses to viral challenge.

  6. Quantitative analysis of low-abundance serological proteins with peptide affinity-based enrichment and pseudo-multiple reaction monitoring by hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Hoe; Ahn, Yeong Hee; Ji, Eun Sun; Lee, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jin Young; An, Hyun Joo; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-07-01

    Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) is commonly used for the quantitative analysis of proteins during mass pectrometry (MS), and has excellent specificity and sensitivity for an analyte in a complex sample. In this study, a pseudo-MRM method for the quantitative analysis of low-abundance serological proteins was developed using hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (hybrid Q-TOF) MS and peptide affinity-based enrichment. First, a pseudo-MRM-based analysis using hybrid Q-TOF MS was performed for synthetic peptides selected as targets and spiked into tryptic digests of human serum. By integrating multiple transition signals corresponding to fragment ions in the full scan MS/MS spectrum of a precursor ion of the target peptide, a pseudo-MRM MS analysis of the target peptide showed an increased signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and sensitivity, as well as an improved reproducibility. The pseudo-MRM method was then used for the quantitative analysis of the tryptic peptides of two low-abundance serological proteins, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) and tissue-type protein tyrosine phosphatase kappa (PTPκ), which were prepared with peptide affinity-based enrichment from human serum. Finally, this method was used to detect femtomolar amounts of target peptides derived from TIMP1 and PTPκ, with good coefficients of variation (CV 2.7% and 9.8%, respectively), using a few microliters of human serum from colorectal cancer patients. The results suggest that pseudo-MRM using hybrid Q-TOF MS, combined with peptide affinity-based enrichment, could become a promising alternative for the quantitative analysis of low-abundance target proteins of interest in complex serum samples that avoids protein depletion.

  7. Poisson Spot with Magnetic Levitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Matthew; Everhart, Michael; D'Arruda, Jose

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe a unique method for obtaining the famous Poisson spot without adding obstacles to the light path, which could interfere with the effect. A Poisson spot is the interference effect from parallel rays of light diffracting around a solid spherical object, creating a bright spot in the center of the shadow.

  8. Saturn's Great White Spots.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Lavega, Agustin

    1994-06-01

    The term, Great White Spot, is used for large and unusual atmospheric disturbances on the planet Saturn. The phenomenology has been recorded only in five occasions during the last century, and its evolution can be described in terms of four different phases: (i) Onset (first week), outburst and rapid growth of a very bright cloud up to a size of approximately 20 000 km; (ii) planetary disturbance (spot remains detached from this latitude band of white clouds; (iii) mature stage (two to three months), attained when the zonal expansion has fully encircled the latitude band. The white band of clouds has a turbulent texture and wavy structures develop along the periphery. The storm nucleus still survives and new outbreaks of smaller-scale bright spots take place at distant longitudes from it; and (iv) evolved and decay stage ( greater, similar one to three years), dissipation of the storm nucleus and gradual homogenization of the cloud banding, but with transient localized brightenings. Afterward there are changes in the location and reflectivity of the belts within the active band. Of the five events classified as GWS, three appeared in the equator, one in temperate latitudes (36 degrees N) and the fifth in the subpolar region (60 degrees N), with an average periodicity of 28.5+/-0.4 yr. This interval is close to the Saturnian year of 29.46 yr, so the outbursts could be linked to the seasonal insolation cycle. We propose that the initial spot could be driven by moist convection from the lower water clouds, whereas the planetary disturbance is the result of a wave dynamical instability, as indicated by cloud morphology and wind measurements.

  9. Great Red Spot (GRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A huge permanent anticyclone in Jupiter's southern hemisphere, visible as a reddish oval at just over 20 °S. The earliest unequivocal observation was by Heinrich Schwabe in 1831 (the often-quoted sighting by Robert Hooke in 1664 now seems to have been of a similar but different spot). The GRS became a striking feature around 1880, when it developed a deep red coloration. It was also prominent in ...

  10. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs.

  11. Factor VIII Interacts with the Endocytic Receptor Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor-related Protein 1 via an Extended Surface Comprising "Hot-Spot" Lysine Residues.

    PubMed

    van den Biggelaar, Maartje; Madsen, Jesper J; Faber, Johan H; Zuurveld, Marleen G; van der Zwaan, Carmen; Olsen, Ole H; Stennicke, Henning R; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2015-07-01

    Lysine residues are implicated in driving the ligand binding to the LDL receptor family. However, it has remained unclear how specificity is regulated. Using coagulation factor VIII as a model ligand, we now study the contribution of individual lysine residues in the interaction with the largest member of the LDL receptor family, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1). Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and SPR interaction analysis on a library of lysine replacement variants as two independent approaches, we demonstrate that the interaction between factor VIII (FVIII) and LRP1 occurs over an extended surface containing multiple lysine residues. None of the individual lysine residues account completely for LRP1 binding, suggesting an additive binding model. Together with structural docking studies, our data suggest that FVIII interacts with LRP1 via an extended surface of multiple lysine residues that starts at the bottom of the C1 domain and winds around the FVIII molecule. PMID:25903134

  12. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of an orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides) secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) and characterization of its expression response to nodavirus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Young-Mao; Kuo, Cham-En; Huang, Yi-Ling; Shie, Pei-Shiuan; Liao, Jhong-Jian; Yang, Yuan-Chih; Chen, Tzong-Yueh

    2011-08-01

    Mammalian secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is the primary regulator of cell shape and cell adhesion to fibronectin. We, for the first time, report the complete sequencing of SPARC cDNA from orange-spotted grouper. Despite the difference in the lengths of the SPARC transcripts, all of the SPARC molecules encoded a signal peptide, follistain-like copper binding sequence (KGHK) domain, and extracellular domain. The grouper SPARC gene was differentially expressed in vivo and contributed differently to high-level expression of SPARC in muscle. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated a decreased level of SPARC in nodavirus-infected grouper compared with healthy grouper. Comparative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses of eye tissues of viral nervous necrosis grouper and healthy grouper were performed. Recombinant SPARC produced changes in grouper cell shape 24 h after treatment. The results provide new insight into the pathogenesis of nodavirus, and demonstrate an experimental rationale for SPARC characterization in nodavirus-infected grouper. PMID:21609765

  13. Red Spot Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie shows counterclockwise atmospheric motion around Jupiter's Great Red Spot. The clip was made from blue-filter images taken with the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft during seven separate rotations of Jupiter between Oct. 1 and Oct. 5, 2000.

    The clip also shows the eastward and westward motion of the zonal jets, seen as the horizontal stripes flowing in opposite directions. The zonal jets circle the planet. As far as can be determined from both Earth-based and spacecraft measurements, the positions and speeds of the jets have not changed for 100 years. Since Jupiter is a fluid planet without a solid boundary, the jet speeds are measured relative to Jupiter's magnetic field, which rotates, wobbling like a top because of its tilt, every 9 hours 55.5 minutes. The movie shows motions in the magnetic reference frame, so winds to the west correspond to features that are rotating a little slower than the magnetic field, and eastward winds correspond to features rotating a little faster.

    Because the Red Spot is in the southern hemisphere, the direction of motion indicates it is a high-pressure center. Small bright clouds appear suddenly to the west of the Great Red Spot. Scientists suspect these small white features are lightning storms. The storms eventually merge with the Red Spot and surrounding jets, and may be the main energy source for the large-scale features.

    The smallest features in the movie are about 500 kilometers (about 300 miles) across. The spacing of the movie frames in time is not uniform; some consecutive images are separated by two Jupiter rotations, and some by one. The images have been re-projected using a simple cylindrical map projection. They show an area from 50 degrees north of Jupiter's equator to 50 degrees south, extending 100 degrees east-west, about one quarter of Jupiter's circumference.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet

  14. Spiral sunspot spotted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A pinwheel-shaped sunspot sighted by astronomers at Kitt Peak National Observatory has been labeled by veteran solar observers as ‘unprecedented,’ according to the National Science Foundation. The sunspot, with a diameter about 6 times that of the earth, was spotted on February 19 with the vacuum solar telescope at Kitt Peak.The average sunspot, which usually appears in photographs as an irregularly shaped dark hole, has a diameter of about 9600 km. The spiral sunspot's diameter approximated 80,450 km. It maintained its shape for about 2 days before it broke up and changed form.

  15. Cold spots in neonatal incubators are hot spots for microbial contamination.

    PubMed

    de Goffau, Marcus C; Bergman, Klasien A; de Vries, Hendrik J; Meessen, Nico E L; Degener, John E; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Harmsen, Hermie J M

    2011-12-01

    Thermal stability is essential for the survival and well-being of preterm neonates. This is achieved in neonatal incubators by raising the ambient temperature and humidity to sufficiently high levels. However, potentially pathogenic microorganisms also can thrive in such warm and humid environments. We therefore investigated whether the level of microbial contamination (i.e., the bacterial load) inside neonatal incubators can be predicted on the basis of their average temperature and relative humidity settings, paying special attention to local temperature differences. Swab samples were taken from the warmest and coldest spots found within Caleo incubators, and these were plated to determine the number of microbial CFU per location. In incubators with high average temperature (≥ 34°C) and relative humidity (≥ 60%) values, the level of microbial contamination was significantly higher at cold spots than at hot spots. This relates to the fact that the local equilibrium relative humidity at cold spots is sufficiently high to sustain microbial growth. The abundance of staphylococci, which are the main causative agents of late-onset sepsis in preterm neonates, was found to be elevated significantly in cold areas. These findings can be used to improve basic incubator hygiene.

  16. Cold Spots in Neonatal Incubators Are Hot Spots for Microbial Contamination▿

    PubMed Central

    de Goffau, Marcus C.; Bergman, Klasien A.; de Vries, Hendrik J.; Meessen, Nico E. L.; Degener, John E.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal stability is essential for the survival and well-being of preterm neonates. This is achieved in neonatal incubators by raising the ambient temperature and humidity to sufficiently high levels. However, potentially pathogenic microorganisms also can thrive in such warm and humid environments. We therefore investigated whether the level of microbial contamination (i.e., the bacterial load) inside neonatal incubators can be predicted on the basis of their average temperature and relative humidity settings, paying special attention to local temperature differences. Swab samples were taken from the warmest and coldest spots found within Caleo incubators, and these were plated to determine the number of microbial CFU per location. In incubators with high average temperature (≥34°C) and relative humidity (≥60%) values, the level of microbial contamination was significantly higher at cold spots than at hot spots. This relates to the fact that the local equilibrium relative humidity at cold spots is sufficiently high to sustain microbial growth. The abundance of staphylococci, which are the main causative agents of late-onset sepsis in preterm neonates, was found to be elevated significantly in cold areas. These findings can be used to improve basic incubator hygiene. PMID:22003021

  17. Identification of Protein Targets of Reactive Metabolites of Tienilic Acid in Human Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Koen, Yakov M.; Sarma, Diganta; Williams, Todd D.; Galeva, Nadezhda A.; Obach, R. Scott; Hanzlik, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Tienilic acid (TA) is a uricosuric diuretic that was withdrawn from the market only months after its introduction because of reports of serious incidents of drug-induced liver injury including some fatalities. Its hepatotoxicity is considered to be primarily immunoallergic in nature. Like other thiophene compounds, TA undergoes biotransformation to a S-oxide metabolite which then reacts covalently with cellular proteins. To identify protein targets of TA metabolites, we incubated [14C]-TA with human hepatocytes, separated cellular proteins by 2D gel electrophoresis, and analyzed proteins in 36 radioactive spots by tryptic digestion followed by LC-MS/MS. Thirty one spots contained at least one identifiable protein. Sixteen spots contained only one of 14 non-redundant proteins which were thus considered to be targets of TA metabolites. Six of the 14 were also found in other radioactive spots that contained from 1 to 3 additional proteins. Eight of the 14 had not been reported to be targets for any reactive metabolite other than TA. The other 15 spots each contained from 2–4 identifiable proteins, many of which are known targets of other chemically reactive metabolites, but since adducted peptides were not observed, the identity of the adducted protein(s) in these spots is ambiguous. Interestingly, all the radioactive spots corresponded to proteins of low abundance, while many highly abundant proteins in the mixture showed no radioactivity. Furthermore, of approximately 16 previously reported protein targets of TA in rat liver (Methogo, R., Dansette, P. and Klarskov, K. (2007) Int. J. Mass Spectrom., 268, 284–295), only one (fumarylacetoacetase) is among the 14 targets identified in this work. One reason for this difference may be statistical, given that each study identified a small number of targets from among thousands present in hepatocytes. Another may be the species difference (i.e. rat vs. human), and still another may be the method of detection of adducted

  18. Jovian Dark Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A recently discovered black spot in Jupiter's clouds is darker than any feature ever before observed on the giant planet. The spot may be the result of a downward spiraling wind that blows away high clouds and reveals deeper, very dark cloud layers. These three panels depict the same area of Jupiter's atmosphere. A map of Jovian temperatures near 250 millibar pressure (top) panel is derived from the photopolarimeter-radiometer instrument on NASA's Galileo Jupiter orbiter. This map is compared with maps derived from images of the same area in visible light (middle panel)and thermal radiation sensitive to cloud-top temperatures (bottom panel).

    The single downward-pointing arrow in the top panel indicates the location of a warm area that corresponds to the position of a so-called 'black spot'(shown in the middle panel), a feature that is about a year old. Features this dark are rare on Jupiter. The bottom panel, sensitive to temperatures at Jupiter's cloud tops, shows this feature as a bright object, meaning that upper-level cold clouds are missing - allowing us to see deeper into Jupiter's warmer interior. The dark visible appearance of the feature than most likely represents the color of very deep clouds. The warm temperatures and cloud-free conditions imply that this feature is a region where dry upper-atmospheric gas is being forced to converge, is warmed up and then forced to descend, clearing out clouds. It is the opposite of wet, upwelling gas in areas such as Jupiter's Great Red Spot or white ovals. On the other hand, it is unlike the dry and relatively cloudless feature into which the Galileo probe descended in 1995, because that region had the same temperatures as its surroundings and did not appear nearly as dark as this new spot.

    The temperatures sampled by the photopolarimeter radiometer are near the top of Jupiter's troposphere, where wind motions control the atmosphere. The top row of arrows shows the location of temperature waves in a warm region

  19. In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation Scaling Factors for Intestinal P-Glycoprotein and Breast Cancer Resistance Protein: Part I: A Cross-Laboratory Comparison of Transporter-Protein Abundances and Relative Expression Factors in Human Intestine and Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Matthew D; Achour, Brahim; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Russell, Matthew R; Carlson, Gordon; Warhurst, Geoffrey

    2016-03-01

    Over the last 5 years the quantification of transporter-protein absolute abundances has dramatically increased in parallel to the expanded use of in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) and physiologically based pharmacokinetics (PBPK)-linked models, for decision-making in pharmaceutical company drug development pipelines and regulatory submissions. Although several research groups have developed laboratory-specific proteomic workflows, it is unclear if the large range of reported variability is founded on true interindividual variability or experimental variability resulting from sample preparation or the proteomic methodology used. To assess the potential for methodological bias on end-point abundance quantification, two independent laboratories, the University of Manchester (UoM) and Bertin Pharma (BPh), employing different proteomic workflows, quantified the absolute abundances of Na/K-ATPase, P-gp, and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) in the same set of biologic samples from human intestinal and Caco-2 cell membranes. Across all samples, P-gp abundances were significantly correlated (P = 0.04, Rs = 0.72) with a 2.4-fold higher abundance (P = 0.001) generated at UoM compared with BPh. There was a systematically higher BCRP abundance in Caco-2 cell samples quantified by BPh compared with UoM, but not in human intestinal samples. Consequently, a similar intestinal relative expression factor (REF), derived from distal jejunum and Caco-2 monolayer samples, between laboratories was found for P-gp. However, a 2-fold higher intestinal REF was generated by UoM (2.22) versus BPh (1.11). We demonstrate that differences in absolute protein abundance are evident between laboratories and they probably result from laboratory-specific methodologies relating to peptide choice.

  20. Changes in uterine expression of leukemia inhibitory factor during pregnancy in the Western spotted skunk.

    PubMed

    Hirzel, D J; Wang, J; Das, S K; Dey, S K; Mead, R A

    1999-02-01

    Mutation of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) gene results in reproductive failure in LIF -/- mice due to an inability to implant their blastocysts. This condition is reversed by infusion of LIF or by transferral of embryos to pseudopregnant, wild-type mice. This led us to hypothesize that embryonic diapause in the spotted skunk is due to insufficient uterine expression of LIF whereas resumption of development and implantation are associated with increased LIF expression. We also investigated the hormonal control of LIF expression. Uterine concentrations of LIF mRNA were determined by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Changes in cell-specific localization of LIF mRNA and protein were determined by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. LIF mRNA was detected but was not abundant during embryonic diapause; it then increased when blastocysts resumed development and remained elevated prior to implantation. LIF mRNA and protein could not be localized in the uterus during embryonic diapause but were quite apparent in luminal and glandular epithelium during blastocyst activation. Prolactin, progesterone, and estradiol failed to increase uterine concentrations of LIF mRNA above those in ovariectomized controls. These data are consistent with the initial hypothesis and suggest that LIF may somehow be involved in preparing the uterus for implantation in the spotted skunk.

  1. The SPOT satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fouquet, J.-P.

    1981-03-01

    The background, objectives and data products of the French SPOT remote sensing satellite system are presented. The system, which was developed starting in 1978 with the subsequent participation of Sweden and Belgium, is based on a standard multimission platform with associated ground control station and a mission-specific payload, which includes two High-Resolution Visible range instruments allowing the acquisition of stereoscopic views from different orbits. Mission objectives include the definition of future remote sensing systems, the compilation of a cartographic and resources data base, the study of species discrimination and production forecasting based on frequent access and off-nadir viewing, the compilation of a stereoscopic data base, and platform and instrument qualification, for possible applications in cartography, geology and agriculture. Standard data products will be available at three levels of preprocessing: radiometric correction only, precision processing for vertical viewing, and cartographic quality processing.

  2. Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) Signaling during Gastrulation Negatively Modulates the Abundance of MicroRNAs That Regulate Proteins Required for Cell Migration and Embryo Patterning*

    PubMed Central

    Bobbs, Alexander S.; Saarela, Aleksi V.; Yatskievych, Tatiana A.; Antin, Parker B.

    2012-01-01

    FGF signaling plays a pivotal role in regulating cell movements and lineage induction during gastrulation. Here we identify 44 microRNAs that are expressed in the primitive streak region of gastrula stage chicken embryos. We show that the primary effect of FGF signaling on microRNA abundance is to negatively regulate the levels of miR-let-7b, -9, -19b, -107, -130b, and -218. LIN28B inhibits microRNA processing and is positively regulated by FGF signaling. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments show that LIN28B negatively regulates the expression of miR-19b, -130b, and let-7b, whereas negative modulation of miR-9, -107, and -218 appears to be independent of LIN28B function. Predicted mRNA targets of the FGF-regulated microRNAs are over-represented in serine/threonine and tyrosine kinase receptors, including ACVR1, ACVR2B, PDGFRA, TGFBR1, and TGFBR3. Luciferase assays show that these and other candidates are targeted by FGF-regulated microRNAs. PDGFRA, a receptor whose activity is required for cell migration through the primitive streak, is a target of miR-130b and -218 in vivo. These results identify a novel mechanism by which FGF signaling regulates gene expression by negatively modulating microRNA abundance through both LIN28B-dependent and LIN28B-independent pathways. PMID:22995917

  3. The SLE variant Ala71Thr of BLK severely decreases protein abundance and binding to BANK1 through impairment of the SH3 domain function.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Barreiro, A; Bernal-Quirós, M; Georg, I; Marañón, C; Alarcón-Riquelme, M E; Castillejo-López, C

    2016-03-01

    The B-lymphocyte kinase (BLK) gene is associated genetically with several human autoimmune diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus. We recently described that the genetic risk is given by two haplotypes: one covering several strongly linked single-nucleotide polymorphisms within the promoter of the gene that correlated with low transcript levels, and a second haplotype that includes a rare nonsynonymous variant (Ala71Thr). Here we show that this variant, located within the BLK SH3 domain, is a major determinant of protein levels. In vitro analyses show that the 71Thr isoform is hyperphosphorylated and promotes kinase activation. As a consequence, BLK is ubiquitinated, its proteasomal degradation enhanced and the average life of the protein is reduced by half. Altogether, these findings suggest that an intrinsic autoregulatory mechanism previously unappreciated in BLK is disrupted by the 71Thr substitution. Because the SH3 domain is also involved in protein interactions, we sought for differences between the two isoforms in trafficking and binding to protein partners. We found that binding of the 71Thr variant to the adaptor protein BANK1 is severely reduced. Our study provides new insights on the intrinsic regulation of BLK activation and highlights the dominant role of its SH3 domain in BANK1 binding. PMID:26821283

  4. The absence of protein Y4yS affects negatively the abundance of T3SS Mesorhizobium loti secretin, RhcC2, in bacterial membranes.

    PubMed

    Mercante, Virginia; Duarte, Cecilia M; Sánchez, Cintia M; Zalguizuri, Andrés; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo; Lepek, Viviana C

    2015-01-01

    Mesorhizobium loti MAFF303099 has a functional type III secretion system (T3SS) that is involved in the determination of nodulation competitiveness on Lotus. The M. loti T3SS cluster contains gene y4yS (mlr8765) that codes for a protein of unknown function (Y4yS). A mutation in the y4yS gene favors the M. loti symbiotic competitive ability on Lotus tenuis cv. Esmeralda and affects negatively the secretion of proteins through T3SS. Here we localize Y4yS in the bacterial membrane using a translational reporter peptide fusion. In silico analysis indicated that this protein presents a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain, a signal peptide and a canonical lipobox LGCC in the N-terminal sequence. These features that are shared with proteins required for the formation of the secretin complex in type IV secretion systems and in the Tad system, together with its localization, suggest that the y4yS-encoded protein is required for the formation of the M. loti T3SS secretin (RhcC2) complex. Remarkably, analysis of RhcC2 in the wild-type and M. loti y4yS mutant strains indicated that the absence of Y4yS affects negatively the accumulation of normal levels of RhcC2 in the membrane.

  5. The human protein p19ARF is not detected in hemopoietic human cell lines that abundantly express the alternative beta transcript of the p16INK4a/MTS1 gene.

    PubMed

    Della Valle, V; Duro, D; Bernard, O; Larsen, C J

    1997-11-13

    The p16/MTS1/CDKN2 gene on human chromosome band 9p21 encodes two unrelated proteins: p16INK4a, a specific inhibitor of the cyclin D-dependent kinases CKD4 and CDK6, and the structurally unrelated p19ARF protein that arrests cell growth in G1/S and also in G2/M. By use of polyclonal antibodies, the human p19ARF (hp19ARF) protein has been identified in the nucleus of various cells including normal cultured fibroblasts. The level of this protein did not fluctuate throughout the cell cycle and was more elevated in fibroblasts with limited or arrested growth, suggesting that p19ARF accumulated in presenescent or senescent cells. Interestingly, hp19ARF was not detected in several hemopoietic tumor cell lines (mainly of B-type lymphoid origin) that expressed abundant amounts of the p16beta transcript. This finding indicates that in certain tumors, the expression of hp19ARF RNA and protein may be uncoupled. Furthermore, it suggests that disruption of a translational mechanism may be involved in the inactivation of hp19ARF. PMID:9395243

  6. Hot Spot Cosmic Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    length of more than 3 million light-years, or no less than one-and-a-half times the distance from the Milky Way to the Andromeda galaxy, this structure is indeed gigantic. The region where the jets collide with the intergalactic medium are known as " hot spots ". Superposing the intensity contours of the radio emission from the southern "hot spot" on a near-infrared J-band (wavelength 1.25 µm) VLT ISAAC image ("b") shows three distinct emitting areas; they are even better visible on the I-band (0.9 µm) FORS1 image ("c"). This emission is obviously associated with the shock front visible on the radio image. This is one of the first times it has been possible to obtain an optical/near-IR image of synchrotron emission from such an intergalactic shock and, thanks to the sensitivity and image sharpness of the VLT, the most detailed view of its kind so far . The central area (with the strongest emission) is where the plasma jet from the galaxy centre hits the intergalactic medium. The light from the two other "knots", some 10 - 15,000 light-years away from the central "hot spot", is also interpreted as synchrotron emission. However, in view of the large distance, the astronomers are convinced that it must be caused by electrons accelerated in secondary processes at those sites . The new images thus confirm that electrons are being continuously accelerated in these "knots" - hence called "cosmic accelerators" - far from the galaxy and the main jets, and in nearly empty space. The exact physical circumstances of this effect are not well known and will be the subject of further investigations. The present VLT-images of the "hot spots" near 3C 445 may not have the same public appeal as some of those beautiful images that have been produced by the same instruments during the past years. But they are not less valuable - their unusual importance is of a different kind, as they now herald the advent of fundamentally new insights into the mysteries of this class of remote and active

  7. Crystal structure of Spot 14, a modulator of fatty acid synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Colbert, Christopher L.; Kim, Chai-Wan; Moon, Young-Ah; Henry, Lisa; Palnitkar, Maya; McKean, William B.; Fitzgerald, Kevin; Deisenhofer, Johann; Horton, Jay D.; Kwon, Hyock Joo

    2011-09-06

    Spot 14 (S14) is a protein that is abundantly expressed in lipogenic tissues and is regulated in a manner similar to other enzymes involved in fatty acid synthesis. Deletion of S14 in mice decreased lipid synthesis in lactating mammary tissue, but the mechanism of S14's action is unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of S14 to 2.65 {angstrom} and biochemical data showing that S14 can form heterodimers with MIG12. MIG12 modulates fatty acid synthesis by inducing the polymerization and activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, the first committed enzymatic reaction in the fatty acid synthesis pathway. Coexpression of S14 and MIG12 leads to heterodimers and reduced acetyl-CoA carboxylase polymerization and activity. The structure of S14 suggests a mechanism whereby heterodimer formation with MIG12 attenuates the ability of MIG12 to activate ACC.

  8. Determination of protein markers in human serum: Analysis of protein expression in toxic oil syndrome studies.

    PubMed

    Quero, Carmen; Colomé, Nuria; Prieto, Maria Rosario; Carrascal, Montserrat; Posada, Manuel; Gelpí, Emilio; Abian, Joaquin

    2004-02-01

    Toxic oil syndrome (TOS) is a disease that appeared in Spain in 1981. It affected more than 20 000 people and produced over 300 deaths in the first 2 years. In this paper, a prospective study on the differences in gene expression in sera between a control versus a TOS-affected population, both originally exposed to the toxic oil, is presented. Differential protein expression was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Several problems related with serum analysis by 2-DE were addressed in order to improve protein detection in the gel images. Three new commercial systems for albumin depletion were tested to optimize the detection of minor proteins that can be obscured by the presence of a few families of high abundance proteins (albumin, immunoglobulins). Other factors, such as the use of nonionic reductants or the presence of thiourea in the gels, were also tested. From these optimized images, a group of 329 major gel spots was located, matched and compared in serum samples. Thirty-five of these protein spots were found to be under- or overexpressed in TOS patients (> three-fold increase or decrease). Proteins in the differential spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight peptide map fingerprinting and database search. Several haptoglobin isoforms were found to be differentially expressed, showing expression phenotypes that could be related with TOS affection. Haptoglobin phenotypes have been previously reported to have important biological and clinical consequences and have been described as risk factors for several diseases.

  9. Empathy's blind spot.

    PubMed

    Slaby, Jan

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to mount a philosophical challenge to the currently highly visible research and discourse on empathy. The notion of empathetic perspective-shifting-a conceptually demanding, high-level construal of empathy in humans that arguably captures the core meaning of the term-is criticized from the standpoint of a philosophy of normatively accountable agency. Empathy in this demanding sense fails to achieve a true understanding of the other and instead risks to impose the empathizer's self-constitutive agency upon the person empathized with. Attempts to 'simulate' human agency, or attempts to emulate its cognitive or emotional basis, will likely distort their target phenomena in profound ways. Thus, agency turns out to be empathy's blind spot. Elements of an alternative understanding of interpersonal relatedness are also discussed, focusing on aspects of 'interaction theory'. These might do some of the work that high-level constructs of empathy had been supposed to do without running into similar conceptual difficulties. PMID:24420745

  10. Saturn's Hot Spot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This is the sharpest image of Saturn's temperature emissions taken from the ground; it is a mosaic of 35 individual exposures made at the W.M. Keck I Observatory, Mauna Kea, Hawaii on Feb. 4, 2004.

    The images to create this mosaic were taken with infrared radiation. The mosaic was taken at a wavelength near 17.65 microns and is sensitive to temperatures in Saturn's upper troposphere. The prominent hot spot at the bottom of the image is right at Saturn's south pole. The warming of the southern hemisphere was expected, as Saturn was just past southern summer solstice, but the abrupt changes in temperature with latitude were not expected. The tropospheric temperature increases toward the pole abruptly near 70 degrees latitude from 88 to 89 Kelvin (-301 to -299 degrees Fahrenheit) and then to 91 Kelvin (-296 degrees Fahrenheit) right at the pole.

    Ring particles are not at a uniform temperature everywhere in their orbit around Saturn. The ring particles are orbiting clockwise in this image. Particles are coldest just after having cooled down in Saturn's shadow (lower left). As they orbit Saturn, the particles increase in temperature up to a maximum (lower right) just before passing behind Saturn again in shadow.

    A small section of the ring image is missing because of incomplete mosaic coverage during the observing sequence.

  11. Abiotic stress induces change in Cinnamoyl CoA Reductase (CCR) protein abundance and lignin deposition in developing seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sameer; Vishwakarma, Rishi K; Arafat, Yasir Ali; Gupta, Sushim K; Khan, Bashir M

    2015-04-01

    Aboitic stress such as drought and salinity are class of major threats, which plants undergo through their lifetime. Lignin deposition is one of the responses to such abiotic stresses. The gene encoding Cinnamoyl CoA Reductase (CCR) is a key gene for lignin biosynthesis, which has been shown to be over-expressed under stress conditions. In the present study, developing seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala (Vernacular name: Subabul, White popinac) were treated with 1 % mannitol and 200 mM NaCl to mimic drought and salinity stress conditions, respectively. Enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) based expression pattern of CCR protein was monitored coupled with Phlorogucinol/HCl activity staining of lignin in transverse sections of developing L. leucocephala seedlings under stress. Our result suggests a differential lignification pattern in developing root and stem under stress conditions. Increase in lignification was observed in mannitol treated stems and corresponding CCR protein accumulation was also higher than control and salt stress treated samples. On the contrary CCR protein was lower in NaCl treated stems and corresponding lignin deposition was also low. Developing root tissue showed a high level of CCR content and lignin deposition than stem samples under all conditions tested. Overall result suggested that lignin accumulation was not affected much in case of developing root however developing stems were significantly affected under drought and salinity stress condition. PMID:25931776

  12. An abundant and ubiquitous homo-oligomeric ring-shaped ATPase particle related to the putative vesicle fusion proteins Sec18p and NSF.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, J M; Walsh, M J; Franke, W W

    1990-01-01

    We have discovered a ring-shaped particle of 12.5 nm diameter, 14.5S and apparent molecular weight of approximately 570,000 that displays 6-fold radial symmetry and is composed of a single kind of an acidic (pI approximately 5.5) polypeptide of Mr 97,000 (p97). Using antibodies to this protein we have detected its occurrence in a wide range of cells and tissues of diverse species from frog to man, including highly specialized cells such as mammalian erythrocytes and spermatozoa. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, the particle is found in both isolated nuclei and in manually enucleated ooplasms, which corresponds to immunofluorescence staining dispersed over both nucleoplasm and cytoplasm. The particle has a N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-inhibitable Mg2(+)-ATPase activity, and its amino acid sequence, as deduced from cDNA clones, displays considerable homology to the mammalian NEM-sensitive fusion protein (NSF) and yeast Sec18p believed to be essential for vesicle fusion in secretory processes, indicating that these three proteins belong to the same multigene family. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2140770

  13. Solar abundance of osmium

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    The abundance parameter, log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance (by numbers of atoms with respect to hydrogen), has been derived for three lines of osmium by a method of spectrum synthesis. An apparent discordance of the derived abundance with that found from the carbonaceous chondrites is probably to be attributed primarily to errors in the f-values, and blending with unknown contributors. PMID:16592314

  14. Spot14/Spot14R expression may be involved in MSC adipogenic differentiation in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    WANG, QIFEI; YANG, JUNLIN; LIN, XIANG; HUANG, ZIFANG; XIE, CHAOFAN; FAN, HENGWEI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the different expression levels of thyroid hormone responsive (THRSP; Spot14)/S14 related, Mig12 (S14R) during bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BM-MSC) adipogenesis in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients. MSCs were retrospectively isolated from AIS patients and controls, and adipogenic differentiation was induced. Total RNA was extracted for Affymetrix 3′-IVT expression profiling microarrays and compared with the results from healthy controls. The results were confirmed by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) validation and the protein expression levels of Spot14 and its paralogous gene S14R by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. A total of 300 significantly altered mRNAs were detected (111 upregulated and 189 downregulated) and confirmed by RT-qPCR. The mRNA expression levels of seven genes, including Spot14, were altered by >2-fold in AIS patients. Spot14/S14R was selected for further investigation. The results of the western blotting demonstrated that mRNA and protein expression levels of Spot14/S14R were significantly higher in AIS patients than the controls (P<0.05). Immunohistochemistry demonstrated Spot14 was expressed in 85% (17/20 cases) in adipose tissue samples from AIS patients and 23.1% (3/13 cases) of adipose tissue samples from controls. The positive ratio of Spot14 in adipose tissue samples from AIS was significantly higher than the controls (P<0.001). The results of the present study indicated that Spot14/S14R were differently expressed in MSC adipogenesis in AIS patients, and they may be important in the abnormal adipogenic differentiation in AIS. PMID:27082501

  15. Weird Warm Spot on Exoplanet

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation illustrates an unexpected warm spot on the surface of a gaseous exoplanet. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope discovered that the hottest part of the planet, shown here as bright, orange...

  16. Retinal spot size with wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Eilert, Brent; Druessel, Jeffrey J.; Payne, Dale J.; Phillips, Shana L.; Stolarski, David J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Thomas, Robert J.; Cain, Clarence P.

    1997-06-01

    We have made an indirect in-vivo determination of spot size focusing in the rhesus monkey model. Measurement of the laser induced breakdown threshold both in-vitro and in-vivo allow correlation and assignment of a spot size after focusing through the living eye. We discuss and analyze the results and show how trends in minimum visible lesion data should be assessed in light of chromatic aberration. National laser safety standards are based on minimal visual lesion (MVL) threshold studies in different animal models. The energy required for a retinal lesion depends upon may parameters including wavelength and retinal spot size. We attempt to explain trends in reported MVL threshold studies using a model of the eye which allows calculation of changes in retinal spot size due to chromatic aberration.

  17. Coulomb explosion of "hot spot"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreshkin, V. I.; Oreshkin, E. V.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Artyomov, A. P.

    2016-09-01

    The study presented in this paper has shown that the generation of hard x rays and high-energy ions, which are detected in pinch implosion experiments, may be associated with the Coulomb explosion of the hot spot that is formed due to the outflow of the material from the pinch cross point. During the process of material outflow, the temperature of the hot spot plasma increases, and conditions arise for the plasma electrons to become continuously accelerated. The runaway of electrons from the hot spot region results in the buildup of positive space charge in this region followed by a Coulomb explosion. The conditions for the hot spot plasma electrons to become continuously accelerated have been revealed, and the estimates have been obtained for the kinetic energy of the ions generated by the Coulomb explosion.

  18. Ultrasensitive Detection of Low-Abundance Surface-Marker Protein using Isothermal Rolling Circle Amplification in Microfluidic Nano-Liter Platform

    PubMed Central

    Konry, Tania; Yarmush, Joel M.; Irimia, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    With advances in immunology and cancer biology, there is an unmet need for increasingly sensitive systems to monitor the expression of specific cell markers for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. To address this challenge, we have applied a highly sensitive labeling method that translates antigen-antibody recognition processes into DNA detection event that can be greatly amplified via isothermal Rolling Circle Amplification (RCA). By merging the single-molecule detection power of RCA reaction with microfluidic technology we were able to demonstrate that identification of specific protein markers can be achieved on tumor cell surface in miniaturized nano-liter reaction droplets. Furthermore, this combined approach of signal amplification in a microfluidic format could extend the utility of existing methods by reducing sample and reagent consumption and enhancing the sensitivities and specificities for various applications, including early diagnosis of cancer. PMID:21294269

  19. Sertoli cell processes have axoplasmic features: an ordered microtubule distribution and an abundant high molecular weight microtubule- associated protein (cytoplasmic dynein)

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Microtubules in the cytoplasm of rat Sertoli cell stage VI-VIII testicular seminiferous epithelium were studied morphometrically by electron microscopy. The Sertoli cell microtubules demonstrated axonal features, being largely parallel in orientation and predominantly spaced one to two microtubule diameters apart, suggesting the presence of microtubule-bound spacer molecules. Testis microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) were isolated by a taxol, salt elution procedure. Testis MAPs promoted microtubule assembly, but to a lesser degree than brain MAPs. High molecular weight MAPs, similar in electrophoretic mobilities to brain MAP-1 and MAP-2, were prominent components of total testis MAPs, though no shared immunoreactivity was detected between testis and brain high molecular weight MAPs using both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. Unlike brain high molecular weight MAPs, testis high molecular weight MAPs were not heat stable. Testis MAP composition, studied on postnatal days 5, 10, 15, and 24 and in the adult, changed dramatically during ontogeny. However, the expression of the major testis high molecular weight MAP, called HMW-2, was constitutive and independent of the development of mature germ cells. The Sertoli cell origin of HMW-2 was confirmed by identifying this protein as the major MAP found in an enriched Sertoli cell preparation and in two rat models of testicular injury characterized by germ cell depletion. HMW-2 was selectively released from testis microtubules by ATP and co-purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation with MAP- 1C, a neuronal cytoplasmic dynein. The inhibition of the microtubule- activated ATPase activity of HMW-2 by vanadate and erythro-(2-hydroxy-3- nonyl)adenine and its proteolytic breakdown by vanadate-dependent UV photocleavage confirmed the dynein-like nature of HMW-2. As demonstrated by this study, the neuronal and Sertoli cell cytoskeletons share morphological, structural and functional properties. PMID:2972729

  20. Evaluation of SPOT imagery data

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Z.; Brovey, R.L.; Merembeck, B.F.; Hopkins, H.R.

    1988-01-01

    SPOT, the French satellite imaging system that became operational in April 1986, provides two major advances in satellite imagery technology: (1) a significant increase in spatial resolution of the data to 20 m multispectral and 10 m panchromatic, and (2) stereoscopic capabilities. The structural and stratigraphic mapping capabilities of SPOT data and compare favorably with those of other available space and airborne remote sensing data. In the Rhine graben and Jura Mountains, strike and dip of folded strata can be determined using SPOT stereoscopic imagery, greatly improving the ability to analyze structures in complex areas. The increased spatial resolution also allows many features to be mapped that are not visible on thematic mapper (TM) imagery. In the San Rafael swell, Utah, TM spectral data were combined with SPOT spatial data to map lithostratigraphic units of the exposed Jurassic and Cretaceous rocks. SPOT imagery provides information on attitude, geometry, and geomorphic expressions of key marker beds that is not available on TM imagery. Over the Central Basin platform, west Texas, SPOT imagery, compared to TM imagery, provided more precise information on the configuration of outcropping beds and drainage patterns that reflect the subtle surface expression of buried structures.

  1. Application of Natural Isotopic Abundance ¹H-¹³C- and ¹H-¹⁵N-Correlated Two-Dimensional NMR for Evaluation of the Structure of Protein Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Arbogast, Luke W; Brinson, Robert G; Marino, John P

    2016-01-01

    Methods for characterizing the higher-order structure of protein therapeutics are in great demand for establishing consistency in drug manufacturing, for detecting drug product variations resulting from modifications in the manufacturing process, and for comparing a biosimilar to an innovator reference product. In principle, solution NMR can provide a robust approach for characterization of the conformation(s) of protein therapeutics in formulation at atomic resolution. However, molecular weight limitations and the perceived need for stable isotope labeling have to date limited its practical applications in the biopharmaceutical industry. Advances in NMR magnet and console technologies, cryogenically cooled probes, and new rapid acquisition methodologies, particularly selective optimized flip-angle short transient pulse schemes and nonuniform sampling, have greatly ameliorated these limitations. Here, we describe experimental methods for the collection and analysis of 2D (1)H(N)-(15)N-amide- and (1)H-(13)C-methyl-correlated spectra applied to protein drug products at natural isotopic abundance, including representatives from the rapidly growing class of monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics. Practical aspects of experimental setup and data acquisition for both standard and rapid acquisition NMR techniques are described. Furthermore, strategies for the statistical comparison of 2D (1)H(N)-(15)N-amide- and (1)H-(13)C-methyl-correlated spectra are detailed.

  2. Perturbations of Amino Acid Metabolism Associated with Glyphosate-Dependent Inhibition of Shikimic Acid Metabolism Affect Cellular Redox Homeostasis and Alter the Abundance of Proteins Involved in Photosynthesis and Photorespiration1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Driscoll, Simon P.; Bulman, Christopher A.; Ying, Liu; Emami, Kaveh; Treumann, Achim; Mauve, Caroline; Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate inhibits the shikimate pathway of the synthesis of amino acids such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. However, much uncertainty remains concerning precisely how glyphosate kills plants or affects cellular redox homeostasis and related processes in glyphosate-sensitive and glyphosate-resistant crop plants. To address this issue, we performed an integrated study of photosynthesis, leaf proteomes, amino acid profiles, and redox profiles in the glyphosate-sensitive soybean (Glycine max) genotype PAN809 and glyphosate-resistant Roundup Ready Soybean (RRS). RRS leaves accumulated much more glyphosate than the sensitive line but showed relatively few changes in amino acid metabolism. Photosynthesis was unaffected by glyphosate in RRS leaves, but decreased abundance of photosynthesis/photorespiratory pathway proteins was observed together with oxidation of major redox pools. While treatment of a sensitive genotype with glyphosate rapidly inhibited photosynthesis and triggered the appearance of a nitrogen-rich amino acid profile, there was no evidence of oxidation of the redox pools. There was, however, an increase in starvation-associated and defense proteins. We conclude that glyphosate-dependent inhibition of soybean leaf metabolism leads to the induction of defense proteins without sustained oxidation. Conversely, the accumulation of high levels of glyphosate in RRS enhances cellular oxidation, possibly through mechanisms involving stimulation of the photorespiratory pathway. PMID:21757634

  3. Mastitomics, the integrated omics of bovine milk in an experimental model of Streptococcus uberis mastitis: 1. High abundance proteins, acute phase proteins and peptidomics† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6mb00239k Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Funmilola Clara; Mullen, William; Tassi, Riccardo; Ramírez-Torres, Adela; Mudaliar, Manikhandan; McNeilly, Tom N.; Zadoks, Ruth N.; Burchmore, Richard

    2016-01-01

    A peptidomic investigation of milk from an experimental model of Streptococcus uberis mastitis in dairy cows has incorporated a study of milk high abundance and acute phase (APP) proteins as well as analysis of low molecular weight peptide biomarkers. Intramammary infection (IMI) with S. uberis caused a shift in abundance from caseins, β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin to albumin, lactoferrin and IgG with the increase in lactoferrin occurring last. The APP response of haptoglobin, mammary associated serum amyloid A3 and C-reactive protein occurred between 30–48 hours post challenge with peak concentrations of APPs at 72–96 hours post challenge and declined thereafter at a rate resembling the fall in bacterial count rather than the somatic cell count. A peptide biomarker panel for IMI based on capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was developed. It comprised 77 identified peptides (IMI77) composed mainly of casein derived peptides but also including peptides of glycosylation dependent cell adhesion molecule and serum amyloid A. The panel had a biomarker classification score that increased from 36 hour to 81 hour post challenge, significantly differentiating infected from non-infected milk, thus suggesting potential as a peptide biomarker panel of bovine mastitis and specifically that of S. uberis origin. The use of omic technology has shown a multifactorial cross system reaction in high and low abundance proteins and their peptide derivatives with changes of over a thousand fold in analyte levels in response to S. uberis infection. PMID:27412456

  4. Interferon gamma regulation of de novo protein synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts in culture is anatomic site dependent.

    PubMed

    Smith, T J; Higgins, P J

    1993-03-01

    The propensity of the skin of the lower anterior leg to be involved in Graves' dermopathy prompted an examination of the specific protein synthesis and response to interferon gamma in cultured fibroblasts from this area. Confluent cultures from normal skin of the lower leg and from the abdomen of the same three donors were pulse labeled with [35S]methionine for 3 h and subjected to two-dimensional protein gel electrophoresis and fluorography. Protein spots were mapped using a computer-driven program and the relative densities of the resolvable spots analyzed. Fibroblasts from the two anatomic sites display distinct patterns of de novo protein synthesis. Of the 157 abundant spots arbitrarily chosen for analysis, 31% varied substantially in levels of expression between the sites. A number of proteins appear to be expressed only in cultures derived from one of the two anatomic sites. Interferon gamma (100 U/ml) present in the culture medium for 48 h influenced the abundance of a number of proteins in a site-specific manner. Among them, plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 was induced three to five times in the leg cultures, whereas this same polypeptide was down-regulated in abdominal fibroblasts. A 54-kD protein was induced in interferon-treated cultures from both sites at least 50 times. It appears that fibroblasts from different regions of the integument are intrinsically distinct in terms of both their protein synthetic programs and their responses to cytokines.

  5. Exploring the limit of metazoan thermal tolerance via comparative proteomics: thermally induced changes in protein abundance by two hydrothermal vent polychaetes

    PubMed Central

    Dilly, Geoffrey F.; Young, C. Robert; Lane, William S.; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Girguis, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Temperatures around hydrothermal vents are highly variable, ranging from near freezing up to 300°C. Nevertheless, animals thrive around vents, some of which live near the known limits of animal thermotolerance. Paralvinella sulfincola, an extremely thermotolerant vent polychaete, and Paralvinella palmiformis, a cooler-adapted congener, are found along the Juan de Fuca Ridge in the northwestern Pacific. We conducted shipboard high-pressure thermotolerance experiments on both species to characterize the physiological adaptations underlying P. sulfincola's pronounced thermotolerance. Quantitative proteomics, expressed sequence tag (EST) libraries and glutathione assays revealed that P. sulfincola (i) exhibited an upregulation in the synthesis and recycling of glutathione with increasing temperature, (ii) downregulated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate dehydrogenases (key enzymes in oxidative phosphorylation) with increasing temperature, and (iii) maintained elevated levels of heat shock proteins (HSPs) across all treatments. In contrast, P. palmiformis exhibited more typical responses to increasing temperatures (e.g. increasing HSPs at higher temperatures). These data reveal differences in how a mesotolerant and extremely thermotolerant eukaryote respond to thermal stress, and suggest that P. sulfincola's capacity to mitigate oxidative stress via increased synthesis of antioxidants and decreased flux through the mitochondrial electron transport chain enable pronounced thermotolerance. Ultimately, oxidative stress may be the key factor in limiting all metazoan thermotolerance. PMID:22553092

  6. Sweet Spot Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ibe, Masahiro; Kitano, Ryuichiro; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-06-06

    We find that there is no supersymmetric flavor/CP problem, {mu}-problem, cosmological moduli/gravitino problem or dimension four/five proton decay problem in a class of supersymmetric theories with O(1) GeV gravitino mass. The cosmic abundance of the nonthermally produced gravitinos naturally explains the dark matter component of the universe. A mild hierarchy between the mass scale of supersymmetric particles and electroweak scale is predicted, consistent with the null result of a search for the Higgs boson at the LEP-II experiments. A relation to the strong CP problem is addressed. We propose a parametrization of the model for the purpose of collider studies. The scalar tau lepton is the next to lightest supersymmetric particle in a theoretically favored region of the parameter space. The lifetime of the scalar tau is of O(1000) seconds with which it is regarded as a charged stable particle in collider experiments. We discuss characteristic signatures and a strategy for confirmation of this class of theories at the LHC experiments.

  7. Enhanced Detection of Low-Abundance Host Cell Protein Impurities in High-Purity Monoclonal Antibodies Down to 1 ppm Using Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry Coupled with Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Doneanu, Catalin E; Anderson, Malcolm; Williams, Brad J; Lauber, Matthew A; Chakraborty, Asish; Chen, Weibin

    2015-10-20

    The enormous dynamic range of proteinaceous species present in protein biotherapeutics poses a significant challenge for current mass spectrometry (MS)-based methods to detect low-abundance HCP impurities. Previously, an HCP assay based on two-dimensional chromatographic separation (high pH/low pH) coupled to high-resolution quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry and developed in the author's laboratory has been shown to achieve a detection limit of about 50 ppm (parts per milion) for the identification and quantification of HCPs present in monoclonal antibodies following Protein A purification.1 To improve the HCP detection limit we have explored the utility of several new analytical techniques for HCP analysis and thereby developed an improved liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) methodology for enhanced detection of HCPs. The new method includes (1) the use of a new charge-surface-modified (CSH) C18 stationary phase to mitigate the challenges of column saturation, peak tailing, and distortion that are commonly observed in the HCP analysis; (2) the incorporation of traveling-wave ion mobility (TWIM) separation of coeluting peptide precursors, and (3) the improvement of fragmentation efficiency of low-abundance HCP peptides by correlating the collision energy used for precursor fragmentation with their mobility drift time. As a result of these improvements, the detection limit of the new methodology was greatly improved, and HCPs present at a concentration as low as 1 ppm (1 ng HCP/mg mAb) were successfully identified and quantified. The newly developed method was applied to analyze two high-purity mAbs (NIST mAb and Infliximab) expressed in a murine cell line. For both samples, low-abundance HCPs (down to 1 ppm) were confidently identified, and the identities of the HCPs were further confirmed by targeted MS/MS experiments. In addition, the performance of the assay was evaluated by an interlaboratory study in which three independent

  8. Global transcriptome analysis of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells (BMSCs) reveals proliferative, mobile, and Interactive cells that produce abundant extracellular matrix proteins, some of which may affect BMSC Potency

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiaqiang; Jin, Ping; Sabatino, Marianna; Balakumaran, Arun; Feng, Ji; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Klein, Harvey G.; Robey, Pamela G.; Stroncek, David F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are being used for immune modulatory, anti-inflammatory and tissue engineering applications, but the properties responsible for these effects are not completely understood. Human BMSCs were characterized to identify factors that might be responsible for their clinical effects and biomarkers for assessing their quality. Methods Early passage BMSCs prepared from marrow aspirates of 4 healthy subjects were compared to 3 human embryonic stem cell (hESC) samples, CD34+ cells from 3 healthy subjects and 3 fibroblast cell lines. The cells were analyzed with oligonucleotide expression microarrays with more than 35,000 probes. Results BMSC gene expression signatures of BMSCs differed from those of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), hESCs and fibroblasts. Genes up-regulated in BMSCs were involved with cell movement, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction and proliferation. The up-regulated genes most likely belonged to pathways for integrin signaling, integrin linked kinase (ILK) signaling, NFR2-mediated oxidative stress response, regulation of actin-based motility by Rho, actin cytoskeletal signaling, caveolar-mediated endocytosis, clathrin-mediated endocytosis and Wnt/β catenin signaling. Among the most highly up-regulated genes were structural extracellular (ECM) proteins:α5 and β 5 integrin chains, fibronectin, collagen type IIIα1 and Vα1; and functional EMC proteins: connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), transforming growth factor beta induced protein (TGFBI) and ADAM12. Conclusions Global analysis of human BMSCs suggests that they are mobile, metabolically active, proliferative and interactive cells that make use of integrins and integrin signaling. They produce abundant ECM proteins that may contribute to their clinical immune modulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:21250865

  9. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  10. Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, Ulysses J.; Meyer, David M.

    2001-06-01

    We evaluate the stellar abundances often used to represent the total (gas plus dust) composition of the interstellar medium. Published abundances for B stars, young later type (F and G) stars, and the Sun are compared to the modeled dust-phase and measured gas-phase compositions of the interstellar medium. This study uses abundances for the five most populous elements in dust grains-C, O, Mg, Si, and Fe-and the cosmically abundant element, N. We find that B stars have metal abundances that are too low to be considered valid representations of the interstellar medium. The commonly invoked interstellar standard that is two-thirds of the solar composition is also rejected by recent observations. Young (<=2 Gyr) F and G disk stars and the Sun, however, cannot be ruled out as reliable proxies for the total interstellar composition. If their abundances are valid representations of the interstellar medium, then the apparent underabundance of carbon with respect to that required by dust models, i.e., the carbon crisis, is substantially eased.

  11. Intermittency Models and Spot Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashworth, D. A.

    2007-01-01

    Experimental work at the University of Oxford Osney Lab has demonstrated characteristics of the late-stage transition process by the use of thin-film heat transfer gauges. The development of turbulent spots has been observed in a range of environments, including flat plates, turbine blade cascade tests and wake-passing experiments. These results were taken at Mach/Reynolds numbers and gas-to-wall temperature ratios representative of gas turbines. Analyses of the spot characteristics are consistent with measurements taken in low speed experiments, and support the Schubauer and Klebanoff type of turbulent spots. The addition of simulated wakes from upstream stages has been observed to be primarily superpositional for these tests.

  12. Hematozoa from the spotted owl.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, R J

    1989-10-01

    One hundred five spotted owls (Strix occidentalis) from seven populations and three subspecies were examined for hematozoa. Haemoproteus noctuae, H. syrnii, Leucocytozoon ziemanni, Trypanosoma avium, Atoxoplasma sp. and unidentified microfilariae were recorded. All northern (S. occidentalis caurina), California (S. occidentalis occidentalis) and Mexican (S. occidentalis lucida) spotted owls were infected with at least one hematozoan; 79% had multiple infections. Twenty-two percent of the owls were infected with as many as four species of parasites. There were significant differences in the prevalence of these species of parasites occurring among the five populations of northern and California spotted owls sampled in California. Haemoproteus noctuae, H. syrnii and Atoxoplasma sp. represented new host records for this host species. PMID:2810564

  13. Polarization from an orbiting spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovčiak, Michal; Karas, Vladimír; Matt, Giorgio

    2007-04-01

    The polarization from a spot orbiting around Schwarzschild and extreme Kerr black holes is studied. We assume different models of local polarization. Firstly, as a toy model we set local polarization vector either normal to the disc plane, or we assume strictly azimuthal direction. Then we examine more realistic situation with a spot arising due to the emission from the primary source above the disc. We employ either Rayleigh single scattering or Compton multiple scattering approximations. Overall flux, degree and angle of polarization integrated over the whole orbit as well as their time dependence during the spot revolution are examined as functions of the observer's inclination angle. The gravitational and Doppler shifts, lensing effect as well as time delays are taken into account.

  14. Laser based spot weld characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonietz, Florian; Myrach, Philipp; Rethmeier, Michael; Suwala, Hubert; Ziegler, Mathias

    2016-02-01

    Spot welding is one of the most important joining technologies, especially in the automotive industry. Hitherto, the quality of spot welded joints is tested mainly by random destructive tests. A nondestructive testing technique offers the benefit of cost reduction of the testing procedure and optimization of the fabrication process, because every joint could be examined. This would lead to a reduced number of spot welded joints, as redundancies could be avoided. In the procedure described here, the spot welded joint between two zinc-coated steel sheets (HX340LAD+Z100MB or HC340LA+ZE 50/50) is heated optically on one side. Laser radiation and flash light are used as heat sources. The melted zone, the so called "weld nugget" provides the mechanical stability of the connection, but also constitutes a thermal bridge between the sheets. Due to the better thermal contact, the spot welded joint reveals a thermal behavior different from the surrounding material, where the heat transfer between the two sheets is much lower. The difference in the transient thermal behavior is measured with time resolved thermography. Hence, the size of the thermal contact between the two sheets is determined, which is directly correlated to the size of the weld nugget, indicating the quality of the spot weld. The method performs well in transmission with laser radiation and flash light. With laser radiation, it works even in reflection geometry, thus offering the possibility of testing with just one-sided accessibility. By using heating with collimated laser radiation, not only contact-free, but also remote testing is feasible. A further convenience compared to similar thermographic approaches is the applicability on bare steel sheets without any optical coating for emissivity correction. For this purpose, a proper way of emissivity correction was established.

  15. Stabilized dried blood spot collection.

    PubMed

    McMorran, Darren; Chung, Dwayne Chung Kim; Toth, Monika; Liew, Oi Wah; Muradoglu, Murat; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2016-08-01

    During the collection phase of the dried blood spot method, practitioners need to ensure that there is no smearing of the blood sample on the filter paper or else readings from it will be invalid. This can be difficult to accomplish in the field if there is relative motion between the site of blood discharge on the finger and the filter paper. In this article, a gyroscope stabilization method is introduced and demonstrated to provide consistent and improved dried blood spot collection within a circular guide region notwithstanding the presence of rocking. PMID:27156813

  16. Variability of Jupiter's Five-Micron Hot Spot Inventory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.; Orton, G. S.; Wakefield, L.; Rogers, J. H.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; Boydstun, K.

    2012-01-01

    Global upheavals on Jupiter involve changes in the albedo of entire axisymmetric regions, lasting several years, with the last two occurring in 1989 and 2006. Against this backdrop of planetary-scale changes, discrete features such as the Great Red Spot (GRS), and other vortices exhibit changes on shorter spatial- and time-scales. We track the variability of the discrete equatorial 5-micron hot spots, semi-evenly spaced in longitude and confined to a narrow latitude band centered at 6.5degN (southern edge of the North Equatorial Belt, NEB), abundant in Voyager images. Tantalizingly similar patterns were observed in the visible (bright plumes and blue-gray regions), where reflectivity in the red is anti-correlated with 5-microns thermal radiance. Ortiz et al. (1998, GRL, 103) characterized the latitude and drift rates of the hot spots, including the descent of the Galileo probe at the southern edge of a 5-micron hot spot, as the superposition of equatorial Rossby waves, with phase speeds between 99 - 103m/s, relative to System III. We note that the high 5-micron radiances correlate well but not perfectly with high 8.57-micron radiances. Because the latter are modulated primarily by changes in the upper ammonia (NH3) ice cloud opacity, this correlation implies that changes in the ammonia ice cloud field may be responsible for the variability seen in the 5-m maps. During the NEB fade (2011 - early 2012), however, these otherwise ubiquitous features were absent, an atmospheric state not seen in decades. The ongoing NEB revival indicates nascent 5-m hot spots as early as April 2012, with corresponding visible dark spots. Their continuing growth through July 2012 indicates the possit.le re-establishment of Rossby waves. The South Equatorial Belt (SEB) and NEB revivals began similarly with an instability that developed into a major outbreak, and many similarities in the observed propagation of clear regions.

  17. Cloning, characterization, and expression analysis of a thioredoxin from orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Wei, Jingguang; Guo, Minglan; Ji, Huasong; Yan, Yang; Ouyang, Zhengliang; Huang, Xiaohong; Hang, Youhua; Qin, Qiwei

    2012-09-01

    Thioredoxins (TRXs) are a family of small, highly conserved proteins that are essential for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. In this study, a thioredoxin gene was cloned from orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides (designated as Ec-TRX). The full-length cDNA of Ec-TRX was comprised of 767bp with a 327bp open reading frame that encodes a putative protein of 108 amino acids. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that the Ec-TRX mRNA was distributed abundantly in grouper, E. coioides skin and liver, and the expression in liver was up-regulated after viral challenge with Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV). Recombinant Ec-TRX (rEc-TRX) was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) and purified for mouse anti-Ec-TRX serum preparation. The rEc-TRX fusion protein was demonstrated to possess the expected redox activity in enzymatic analysis, and scavenge free radicals and protect supercoiled DNA from oxidative damage induced by a metal-ion catalyzed oxidation reaction. Subcellular localization revealed that Ec-TRX was distributed in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Overexpression of Ec-TRX in grouper spleen (GS) cells could promote the growth of GS cells and inhibit the replication of SGIV. These results suggest that Ec-TRX could function as an important antioxidant in a physiological context, and perhaps is involved in the responses to viral challenge.

  18. Characterization of a type II chlorophyll a/b-binding protein gene (Lhcb2*Pp1) in peach. II. mRNA abundance in developing leaves exposed to sun or shade.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Carole L; Callahan, Ann M

    2003-05-01

    Leaf development of shoots exposed to full sunlight and shoots shaded by the canopy was followed in field-grown, mature peach trees (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch, cv. Loring) during the first half of the 1995 growing season. The architecture and size of shaded shoots and sun-exposed shoots differed significantly. Total number of leaves produced on shaded shoots was significantly less than on sun-exposed shoots throughout the season, and differences in leaf number between light conditions increased as the season progressed. The overall patterns of leaf development along sun-exposed and shaded shoots were qualitatively similar. The expression pattern of the type II chlorophyll a/b-binding protein gene, Lhcb2*Pp1, determined by RNA abundance in leaves at different positions along the shoot, was also similar between the two light conditions. The major difference between sun-exposed and shaded leaves was a lower abundance of Lhcb2*Pp1 RNA in mature, shaded leaves compared with sun-exposed leaves. Although the number of fruit per shoot was significantly lower on shaded shoots than on sun-exposed shoots, the rate of fruit drop was not substantially different during the growing season, indicating that quantitative differences in leaf initiation and growth caused by differences in light exposure did not adversely affect fruit retention. However, based on comparison with a previous study of leaf development in non-fruiting trees, reproductive development slowed the rate of vegetative growth without affecting the overall pattern of leaf development along the shoots. PMID:12670801

  19. Interaction of unsaturated fat or coconut oil with monensin in lactating dairy cows fed 12 times daily. I. Protozoal abundance, nutrient digestibility, and microbial protein flow to the omasum.

    PubMed

    Reveneau, C; Karnati, S K R; Oelker, E R; Firkins, J L

    2012-04-01

    Monensin (tradename: Rumensin) should reduce the extent of amino acid deamination in the rumen, and supplemental fat should decrease protozoal abundance and intraruminal N recycling. Because animal-vegetable (AV) fat can be biohydrogenated in the rumen and decrease its effectiveness as an anti-protozoal agent, we included diets supplemented with coconut oil (CNO) to inhibit protozoa. In a 6 × 6 Latin square design with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments, 6 rumen-cannulated cows were fed diets without or with Rumensin (12 g/909 kg) and either no fat (control), 5% AV fat, or 5% CNO. The log10 concentrations (cells/mL) of total protozoa were not different between control (5.97) and AV fat (5.95) but were decreased by CNO (4.79; main effect of fat source). Entodinium and Dasytricha decreased as a proportion of total cells from feeding CNO, whereas Epidinium was unchanged in total abundance and thus increased proportionately. Total volatile fatty acid concentration was not affected by diet, but the acetate:propionate ratio decreased for CNO (1.85) versus control (2.95) or AV fat (2.58). Feeding CNO (23.8%) decreased ruminal neutral detergent fiber digestibility compared with control (31.1%) and AV fat (30.5%). The total-tract digestibility of NDF was lower for CNO (45.8%) versus control (57.0%) and AV fat (54.6%), with no difference in apparent organic matter digestibility (averaging 69.8%). The omasal flows of microbial N and non-ammonia N were lower for CNO versus control and AV fat, but efficiency of microbial protein synthesis was not affected. The dry matter intake was 4.5 kg/d lower with CNO, which decreased milk production by 3.1 kg/d. Main effect means of dry matter intake and milk yield tended to decrease by 0.7 and 1.2 kg/d, respectively, when Rumensin was added. Both percentage and production of milk fat decreased for CNO (main effect of fat source). An interaction was observed such that AV decreased milk fat yield more when combined with Rumensin

  20. Identification of embryo proteins associated with seed germination and seedling establishment in germinating rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Jun; Xu, Heng-Heng; Wang, Wei-Qing; Li, Ni; Wang, Wei-Ping; Lu, Zhuang; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2016-06-01

    Seed germination is a critical phase in the plant life cycle, but the mechanism of seed germination is still poorly understood. In the present study, rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Peiai 64S) seeds were sampled individually when they reached different germination stages, quiescent, germinated sensu stricto, germinated completely and seedling, and were used to study the changes in the embryo proteome. A total of 88 protein spots showed a significant change in abundance during germination in water, and the results showed an activation of metabolic processes. Cell division, cell wall synthesis, and secondary metabolism were activated at late seed germination and during preparation for subsequent seedling establishment. Cycloheximide (CHX) at 70μM inhibited seedling establishment without an apparent negative effect on seed germination, while CHX at 500μM completely blocked seed germination. We used this observation to identify the potentially important proteins involved in seed germination (coleoptile protrusion) and seedling establishment (coleoptile and radicle protrusion). Twenty-six protein spots, mainly associated with sugar/polysaccharide metabolism and energy production, showed a significant difference in abundance during seed germination. Forty-nine protein spots, mainly involved in cell wall biosynthesis, proteolysis as well as cell defense and rescue, were required for seedling establishment. The results help improve our understanding of the key events (proteins) involved in germination and seedling development.

  1. Identification of embryo proteins associated with seed germination and seedling establishment in germinating rice seeds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Jun; Xu, Heng-Heng; Wang, Wei-Qing; Li, Ni; Wang, Wei-Ping; Lu, Zhuang; Møller, Ian Max; Song, Song-Quan

    2016-06-01

    Seed germination is a critical phase in the plant life cycle, but the mechanism of seed germination is still poorly understood. In the present study, rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Peiai 64S) seeds were sampled individually when they reached different germination stages, quiescent, germinated sensu stricto, germinated completely and seedling, and were used to study the changes in the embryo proteome. A total of 88 protein spots showed a significant change in abundance during germination in water, and the results showed an activation of metabolic processes. Cell division, cell wall synthesis, and secondary metabolism were activated at late seed germination and during preparation for subsequent seedling establishment. Cycloheximide (CHX) at 70μM inhibited seedling establishment without an apparent negative effect on seed germination, while CHX at 500μM completely blocked seed germination. We used this observation to identify the potentially important proteins involved in seed germination (coleoptile protrusion) and seedling establishment (coleoptile and radicle protrusion). Twenty-six protein spots, mainly associated with sugar/polysaccharide metabolism and energy production, showed a significant difference in abundance during seed germination. Forty-nine protein spots, mainly involved in cell wall biosynthesis, proteolysis as well as cell defense and rescue, were required for seedling establishment. The results help improve our understanding of the key events (proteins) involved in germination and seedling development. PMID:27085178

  2. The Multi-Copy Mouse Gene Sycp3-Like Y-Linked (Sly) Encodes an Abundant Spermatid Protein That Interacts with a Histone Acetyltransferase and an Acrosomal Protein1

    PubMed Central

    Reynard, Louise N.; Cocquet, Julie; Burgoyne, Paul S.

    2009-01-01

    Deletion analysis has established that genes on the Y chromosome are essential for normal sperm production in humans, mice, and Drosophila. In mice, long-arm deletions have an impact on spermiogenesis, with the most extensive deletions resulting in severe sperm head malformations and infertility. Intriguingly, smaller deletions are compatible with fertility but result in a distorted sex ratio in favor of females, and recently it was found that Y long-arm deletions are also associated with a marked upregulation of several X-encoded and Y-encoded spermatid-expressed genes. The mouse Y long arm encodes a number of distinct transcripts, each of which derives from multiple gene copies. Of these multicopy genes, the recently described Sly has been favored as the gene underlying the spermiogenic defects associated with Y long-arm deletions. To assess the candidacy of Sly, the expression of this gene was examined in the testis at the transcript and protein levels. Sly is transcribed after the first meiotic division in secondary spermatocytes and round spermatids and encodes two transcript variants, Sly_v1 and Sly_v2 (proteins referred to as SLY1 and SLY2). We raised an antibody against SLY1 which detected the protein in round and early elongating spermatids, where it is predominantly cytoplasmic. Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that SLY1 interacts with the acrosomal protein DKKL1, the histone acetyltransferase KAT5 (also known as TIP60), and the microtubule-associated protein APPBP2. Together, these data suggest SLY1 may be involved in multiple processes during spermiogenesis, including the control of gene expression and the development or function of the acrosome. PMID:19176879

  3. California spotted owls: Chapter 5 in Managing Sierra Nevada forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Suzanne C.; Brooks, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    California spotted owls (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) are habitat specialists that are strongly associated with late-successional forests. For nesting and roosting, they require large trees and snags embedded in a stand with a complex forest structure (Blakesley et al. 2005, Gutiérrez et al. 1992, Verner et al. 1992b). In mixedconifer forests of the Sierra Nevada, California spotted owls typically nest and roost in stands with high canopy closure (≥75 percent) [Note: when citing studies, we use terminology consistent with Jennings et al. (1999), however, not all studies properly distinguish between canopy cover and closure and often use the terms interchangeably (see chapter 14 for clarification)] and an abundance of large trees (>24 in (60 cm) diameter at breast height [d.b.h.]) (Bias and Gutiérrez 1992, Gutiérrez et al. 1992, LaHaye et al. 1997, Moen and Gutiérrez 1997, Verner et al. 1992a). The California spotted owl guidelines (Verner et al. 1992b) effectively summarized much of the information about nesting and roosting habitat. Since that report, research on the California spotted owl has continued with much of the new information concentrated in five areas: population trends, barred owl (Strix varia) invasion, climate effects, foraging habitat, and owl response to fire.

  4. Solar abundance of platinum

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Harry; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1975-01-01

    Three lines of neutral platinum, located at λ 2997.98 Å, λ 3064.71 Å, and λ 3301.86 Å have been used to determine the solar platinum abundance by the method of spectral synthesis. On the scale, log A(H) = 12.00, the thus-derived solar platinum abundance is 1.75 ± 0.10, in fair accord with Cameron's value of log A(Pt) = 1.69 derived by Mason from carbonaceous chondrites and calculated on the assumption that log A(Si) = 7.55 in the sun. PMID:16592278

  5. Spinning-Spot Shadowless TIRF Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ellefsen, Kyle L; Dynes, Joseph L; Parker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful tool for visualizing near-membrane cellular structures and processes, including imaging of local Ca2+ transients with single-channel resolution. TIRF is most commonly implemented in epi-fluorescence mode, whereby laser excitation light is introduced at a spot near the periphery of the back focal plane of a high numerical aperture objective lens. However, this approach results in an irregular illumination field, owing to interference fringes and scattering and shadowing by cellular structures. We describe a simple system to circumvent these limitations, utilizing a pair of galvanometer-driven mirrors to rapidly spin the laser spot in a circle at the back focal plane of the objective lens, so that irregularities average out during each camera exposure to produce an effectively uniform field. Computer control of the mirrors enables precise scanning at 200 Hz (5ms camera exposure times) or faster, and the scan radius can be altered on a frame-by-frame basis to achieve near-simultaneous imaging in TIRF, widefield and 'skimming plane' imaging modes. We demonstrate the utility of the system for dynamic recording of local inositol trisphosphate-mediated Ca2+ signals and for imaging the redistribution of STIM and Orai proteins during store-operated Ca2+ entry. We further anticipate that it will be readily applicable for numerous other near-membrane studies, especially those involving fast dynamic processes.

  6. Spinning-Spot Shadowless TIRF Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ellefsen, Kyle L; Dynes, Joseph L; Parker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is a powerful tool for visualizing near-membrane cellular structures and processes, including imaging of local Ca2+ transients with single-channel resolution. TIRF is most commonly implemented in epi-fluorescence mode, whereby laser excitation light is introduced at a spot near the periphery of the back focal plane of a high numerical aperture objective lens. However, this approach results in an irregular illumination field, owing to interference fringes and scattering and shadowing by cellular structures. We describe a simple system to circumvent these limitations, utilizing a pair of galvanometer-driven mirrors to rapidly spin the laser spot in a circle at the back focal plane of the objective lens, so that irregularities average out during each camera exposure to produce an effectively uniform field. Computer control of the mirrors enables precise scanning at 200 Hz (5ms camera exposure times) or faster, and the scan radius can be altered on a frame-by-frame basis to achieve near-simultaneous imaging in TIRF, widefield and 'skimming plane' imaging modes. We demonstrate the utility of the system for dynamic recording of local inositol trisphosphate-mediated Ca2+ signals and for imaging the redistribution of STIM and Orai proteins during store-operated Ca2+ entry. We further anticipate that it will be readily applicable for numerous other near-membrane studies, especially those involving fast dynamic processes. PMID:26308212

  7. Absolute Quantification of Endogenous Ras Isoform Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Mageean, Craig J.; Griffiths, John R.; Smith, Duncan L.; Clague, Michael J.; Prior, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Ras proteins are important signalling hubs situated near the top of networks controlling cell proliferation, differentiation and survival. Three almost identical isoforms, HRAS, KRAS and NRAS, are ubiquitously expressed yet have differing biological and oncogenic properties. In order to help understand the relative biological contributions of each isoform we have optimised a quantitative proteomics method for accurately measuring Ras isoform protein copy number per cell. The use of isotopic protein standards together with selected reaction monitoring for diagnostic peptides is sensitive, robust and suitable for application to sub-milligram quantities of lysates. We find that in a panel of isogenic SW48 colorectal cancer cells, endogenous Ras proteins are highly abundant with ≥260,000 total Ras protein copies per cell and the rank order of isoform abundance is KRAS>NRAS≥HRAS. A subset of oncogenic KRAS mutants exhibit increased total cellular Ras abundance and altered the ratio of mutant versus wild type KRAS protein. These data and methodology are significant because Ras protein copy number is required to parameterise models of signalling networks and informs interpretation of isoform-specific Ras functional data. PMID:26560143

  8. Characterization of storage proteins in wild (Glycine soja) and cultivated (Glycine max) soybean seeds using proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Savithiry S; Xu, Chenping; Bae, Hanhong; Caperna, Thomas J; Garrett, Wesley M

    2006-04-19

    A combined proteomic approach was applied for the separation, identification, and comparison of two major storage proteins, beta-conglycinin and glycinin, in wild (Glycine soja) and cultivated (Glycine max) soybean seeds. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE) with three different immobilized pH gradient (IPG) strips was an effective method to separate a large number of abundant and less-abundant storage proteins. Most of the subunits of beta-conglycinin were well-separated in the pH range 3.0-10.0, while acidic and basic glycinin polypeptides were well-separated in pH ranges 4.0-7.0 and 6.0-11.0, respectively. Although the overall distribution pattern of the protein spots was similar in both genotypes using pH 3.0-10.0, variations in number and intensity of protein spots were better resolved using a combination of pH 4.0-7.0 and pH 6.0-11.0. The total number of storage protein spots detected in wild and cultivated genotypes was approximately 44 and 34, respectively. This is the first study reporting the comparison of protein profiles of wild and cultivated genotypes of soybean seeds using proteomic tools.

  9. Abundances of light elements.

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, B E

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of abundances of light elements and their relevance to cosmological nucleosynthesis are briefly reviewed. The simplest model, based on standard cosmology and particle physics and assuming homogeneous baryon density at the relevant times, continues to stand up well. PMID:11607388

  10. Abundance of adiponectin system and G-protein coupled receptor GPR109A mRNA in adipose tissue and liver of F2 offspring cows of Charolais × German Holstein crosses that differ in body fat accumulation.

    PubMed

    Mielenz, M; Kuhla, B; Hammon, H M

    2013-01-01

    In addition to its role in energy storage, adipose tissue (AT) is an important endocrine organ and it secretes adipokines. The adipokine adiponectin improves insulin sensitivity by activation of its receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2. Lipolysis in AT is downregulated by the G-protein coupled receptor (GPR109A), which binds the endogenous ligand β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA). Insulin sensitivity is reduced during the transition from late pregnancy to early lactation in dairy cattle and BHBA is increased postpartum, implying the involvement of the adiponectin system and GPR109A in this process. The aim of the current investigation was to study the effect of the genetic background of cows on the mRNA abundance of the adiponectin system, as well as GPR109A, in an F(2) population of 2 Charolais × German Holstein families. These families were deduced from full- and half-sibs sharing identical but reciprocal paternal and maternal Charolais grandfathers. The animals of the 2 families showed significant differences in fat accretion and milk secretion and were designated fat-type (high fat accretion but low milk production) and lean-type (low fat accretion but high milk production). The mRNA of the adiponectin system and GPR109A were quantified by real-time PCR in different fat depots (subcutaneous from back, mesenteric, kidney) and liver. The mRNA data were correlated with AT masses (intermuscular topside border fat, kidney, mesenteric, omental, total inner fat mass, total subcutaneous fat mass, and total fat mass) and blood parameters (glucose, nonesterified fatty acids, BHBA, urea, insulin, and glucagon). The abundance of adiponectin system mRNA was higher in discrete AT depots of fat-type cows [adiponectin mRNA in mesenteric fat (trend), AdipoR1 in kidney and mesenteric AT, and AdipoR2 in subcutaneous fat (trend)] than in lean-type cows. More GPR109A mRNA was found in kidney fat of the lean-type family than in that of the fat-type family. In liver, the abundance of AdipoR2 and

  11. Chemical spots and oscillatory diffusion modes in magnetic stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urpin, V.

    2016-07-01

    The stars of the middle main sequence often have spot-like chemical structures at their surfaces. We consider diffusion caused by electric currents and argue that such current-driven diffusion can form chemical inhomogeneities in a plasma. The considered mechanism can contribute to a formation of element spots in Hg-Mn and Ap-stars. Due to the Hall effect, diffusion in the presence of electric currents can be accompanied by the propagation of a particular type of magnetohydrodynamic modes in which only the impurity number density oscillates. Such modes exist if the magnetic pressure is much greater than the gas pressure and can be the reason for variations of the abundance peculiarities in stars.

  12. The impaired intestinal mucosal immune system by valine deficiency for young grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) is associated with decreasing immune status and regulating tight junction proteins transcript abundance in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian-Bo; Feng, Lin; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Wu, Pei; Jiang, Jun; Kuang, Sheng-Yao; Tang, Ling; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the effects of dietary valine on the growth, intestinal immune response, tight junction proteins transcript