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Sample records for abundant rough endoplasmic

  1. Protein Translocation across the Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Mandon, Elisabet C.; Trueman, Steven F.; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum is a major site of protein biosynthesis in all eukaryotic cells, serving as the entry point for the secretory pathway and as the initial integration site for the majority of cellular integral membrane proteins. The core components of the protein translocation machinery have been identified, and high-resolution structures of the targeting components and the transport channel have been obtained. Research in this area is now focused on obtaining a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of protein translocation and membrane protein integration. PMID:23251026

  2. PROTEOMICS ANALYSIS OF ROUGH ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM IN PANCREATIC BETA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-sook; Wu, Yanning; Skallos, Patracia; Fang, Jingye; Zhang, Xuebao; Karnovsky, Alla; Woods, James; Stemmer, Paul M.; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Kezhong; Chen, Xuequn

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cells have well-developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to accommodate for the massive production and secretion of insulin. ER homeostasis is vital for normal beta cell function. Perturbation of ER homeostasis contributes to beta cell dysfunction in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. To systematically identify the molecular machinery responsible for proinsulin biogenesis and maintenance of beta cell ER homeostasis, a widely used mouse pancreatic beta cell line, MIN6 cell was used to purify rough ER. Two different purification schemes were utilized. In each experiment, the ER pellets were solubilized and analyzed by one dimensional SDS-PAGE coupled with HPLC-MS/MS. A total of 1467 proteins were identified in three experiments with ≥95% confidence, among which 1117 proteins were found in at least two separate experiments and 737 proteins found in all three experiments. Gene ontology analysis revealed a comprehensive profile of known and novel players responsible for proinsulin biogenesis and ER homeostasis. Further bioinformatics analysis also identified potential beta cell specific ER proteins as well as ER proteins present in the risk genetic loci of type 2 diabetes. This dataset defines a molecular environment in the ER for proinsulin synthesis, folding and export and laid a solid foundation for further characterizations of altered ER homeostasis under diabetes-causing conditions. PMID:25546123

  3. Changes in ribbon synapses and rough endoplasmic reticulum of rat utricular macular hair cells in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    This study combined ultrastructural and statistical methods to learn the effects of weightlessness on rat utricular maculae. A principle aim was to determine whether weightlessness chiefly affects ribbon synapses of type II cells, since the cells communicate predominantly with branches of primary vestibular afferent endings. Maculae were microdissected from flight and ground control rat inner ears collected on day 13 of a 14-day spaceflight (F13), landing day (R0) and day 14 postflight (R14) and were prepared for ultrastructural study. Ribbon synapses were counted in hair cells examined in a Zeiss 902 transmission electron microscope. Significance of synaptic mean differences was determined for all hair cells contained within 100 section series, and for a subset of complete hair cells, using SuperANOVA software. The synaptic mean for all type II hair cells of F13 flight rats increased by 100%, and that for complete cells by 200%. Type I cells were less affected, with synaptic mean differences statistically insignificant in complete cells. Synapse deletion began within 8 h upon return to Earth. Additionally, hair cell laminated rough endoplasmic reticulum of flight rats was reversibly disorganized on R0. Results support the thesis that synapses in type II hair cells are uniquely affected by altered gravity. Type II hair cells may be chiefly sensors of gravitational and type I cells of translational linear accelerations.

  4. Quantitative organellar proteomics analysis of rough endoplasmic reticulum from normal and acute pancreatitis rat pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuequn; Sans, Maria Dolors; Strahler, John R.; Karnovsky, Alla; Ernst, Stephen A.; Michailidis, George; Andrews, Philip C.; Williams, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) is a central organelle for synthesizing and processing digestive enzymes and alteration of ER functions may participate in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP). To comprehensively characterize the normal and diseased RER subproteome, this study quantitatively compared the protein compositions of pancreatic RER between normal and AP animals using isobaric tags (iTRAQ) and 2D LC-MALDI-MS/MS. A total of 469 unique proteins were revealed from four independent experiments using two different AP models. These proteins belong to a large number of functional categories including ribosomal proteins, translocon subunits, chaperones, secretory proteins, and glyco- and lipid-processing enzymes. 37 RER proteins (25 unique in arginine-induced, 6 unique in caerulein-induced and 6 common in both models of AP) showed significant changes during AP including translational regulators and digestive enzymes whereas only mild changes were found in some ER chaperones. The six proteins common to both AP models including a decrease in pancreatic triacylglycerol lipase precursor, Erp27, and prolyl 4-hydroxylase beta polypeptide as well as a dramatic increase in fibrinogen alpha, beta and gamma chains. These results suggest that the early stages of AP involve changes of multiple RER proteins that may affect the synthesis and processing of digestive enzymes. PMID:19954227

  5. Distinct mechanisms controlling rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum contacts with mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peter T C; Garcin, Pierre O; Fu, Min; Masoudi, Matthew; St-Pierre, Pascal; Panté, Nelly; Nabi, Ivan R

    2015-08-01

    Gp78 (also known as AMFR), an endoplasmic-reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) E3 ubiquitin ligase, localizes to mitochondria-associated ER and targets the mitofusin (Mfn1 and Mfn2) mitochondrial fusion proteins for degradation. Gp78 is also the cell surface receptor for autocrine motility factor (AMF), which prevents Gp78-dependent mitofusin degradation. Gp78 ubiquitin ligase activity promotes ER-mitochondria association and ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) coupling, processes that are reversed by AMF. Electron microscopy of HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cancer cells identified both smooth ER (SER; ∼8 nm) and wider (∼50-60 nm) rough ER (RER)-mitochondria contacts. Both short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of Gp78 (shGp78) and AMF treatment selectively reduced the extent of RER-mitochondria contacts without impacting on SER--mitochondria contacts. Concomitant small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Mfn1 increased SER-mitochondria contacts in both control and shGp78 cells, whereas knockdown of Mfn2 increased RER-mitochondria contacts selectively in shGp78 HT-1080 cells. The mitofusins therefore inhibit ER-mitochondria interaction. Regulation of close SER-mitochondria contacts by Mfn1 and of RER-mitochondria contacts by AMF-sensitive Gp78-mediated degradation of Mfn2 define new mechanisms that regulate ER-mitochondria interactions.

  6. Unique Matrix Structure in the Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum Cisternae of Pseudoachondroplasia Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Merritt, Thomas M.; Bick, Roger; Poindexter, Brian J.; Alcorn, Joseph L.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.

    2007-01-01

    Mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) cause two skeletal dysplasias, pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED/EDM1). Because COMP exists as a homopentamer, only one mutant COMP subunit may result in an abnormal complex that is accumulated in expanded rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) cisternae, a hallmark of PSACH. Type IX collagen and matrilin-3 (MATN3), also accumulate in the rER cisternae of PSACH chondrocytes, but it is unknown how mutant COMP interacts with these proteins. The studies herein focus on defining the organization of these intracellularly retained proteins using fluorescence deconvolution microscopy. A unique matrix organization was identified in which type II procollagen formed a central core surrounded by a protein network of mutant COMP, type IX collagen, and MATN3. This pattern of matrix organization was found in multiple cisternae from single chondrocytes and in chondrocytes with different COMP mutations, indicating a common pattern of interaction. This suggests that stalling of mutant COMP and an interaction between mutant COMP and type II procollagen are initiating events in the assembly of matrix in the rER, possibly explaining why the material is not readily cleared from the rER. Altogether, these data suggest that mutant COMP initiates and perhaps catalyzes premature intracellular matrix assembly. PMID:17200202

  7. The phagosome containing Legionella pneumophila within the protozoan Hartmannella vermiformis is surrounded by the rough endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Abu Kwaik, Y

    1996-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular parasite of protozoa and human phagocytes. To examine adaptation of this bacterium to parasitize protozoa, the sequence of events of the intracellular infection of the amoeba Hartmannella vermiformis was examined. The previously described uptake phenomenon of coiling phagocytosis by human monocytes was not detected. A 1 h postinfection with wild-type strain AA100, mitochondria were observed within the vicinity of the phagosome. At 2.5 h postinfection, numerous vesicles surrounded the phagosomes and mitochondria were in close proximity to the phagosome. At 5 h postinfection, the bacterium was surrounded by a ribosome-studded multilayer membrane. Bacterial multiplication was evident by 8 h postinfection, and the phagosome was surrounded by a ribosome-studded multilayer membrane until 15 h postinfection. The recruitment of organelles and formation of the ribosome-studded phagosome was defective in an isogenic attenuated mutant of L. pneumophila (strain AA101A) that failed to replicate within amoebae. At 20 h postinfection with wild-type strain AA100, numerous bacteria were present in the phagosome and ribosome were not detected around the phagosome. These data showed that, at the ultrastructural level, the intracellular infection of protozoa by L. pneumophila is highly similar to that of infection of macrophages. Immunocytochemical studies provided evidence that at 5 h postinfection the phagosome containing L. pneumophila acquired an abundant amount of the endoplasmic reticulum-specific protein (BiP). Similar to phagosomes containing heat-killed wild-type L. pneumophila, the BiP protein was not detectable in phagosomes containing the mutant strain AA101A. In addition to the absence of ribosomes and mitochondria, the BiP protein was not detected in the phagosomes at 20 h postinfection with wild-type L. pneumophila. The data indicated that the ability of L. pneumophila to establish the intracellular infection of amoebae is

  8. Analysis of a novel double-barreled anion channel from rat liver rough endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Morier, N; Sauvé, R

    1994-01-01

    The presence of anionic channels in stripped rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from rat hepatocytes was investigated by fusing microsomes from these membranes to a planar lipid bilayer. Several types of anion-selective channels were observed including a voltage-gated Cl- channel, the activity of which appeared in bursts characterized by transitions among three distinct conductance levels of 0 pS (0 level), 160 pS (O1 level), and 320 pS (O2 level), respectively, in 450 mM (cis) 50 mM (trans) KCl conditions. A chi 2 analysis on current records where interburst silent periods were omitted showed that the relative probability of current levels 0 (baseline), O1, and O2 followed a binomial statistic. However, measurements of the conditional probabilities W(level 0 at tau/level O2 at 0) and W(level O2 at tau/level 0 at 0) provided clear evidence of direct transitions between the current levels 0 and O2 without any detectable transitions to the intermediate level O1. It was concluded on the basis of these results that the observed channel was controlled by at least two distinct gating processes, namely 1) a voltage-dependent activation mechanism in which the entire system behaves as two independent monomeric channels of 160 pS with each channel characterized by a simple Open-Closed kinetic, and 2) a slow voltage-dependent process that accounts for both the appearance of silent periods between bursts of channel activity and the transitions between the current levels 0 and O2. Finally, an analysis of the relative probability for the system to be in levels 0, O1, and O2 showed that our results are more compatible with a model in which all the states resulting from the superposition of the two independent monomeric channels have access at different rates to a common inactivated state than with a model where a simple Open-Closed main gate either occludes or exposes simultaneously two independent 160-pS monomers. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6 PMID:7524709

  9. Progressive Depletion of Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum in Epithelial Cells of the Small Intestine in Monosodium Glutamate Mice Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Nakadate, Kazuhiko; Motojima, Kento; Hirakawa, Tomoya; Tanaka-Nakadate, Sawako

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obesity is a known risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about pathological changes in the small intestine associated with chronic obesity. This study investigated cellular and subcellular level changes in the small intestine of obese mice. In this study, a mouse model of obesity was established by early postnatal administration of monosodium glutamate. Changes in body weight were monitored, and pathological changes in the small intestine were evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining and light and electron microscopy. Consequently, obese mice were significantly heavier compared with controls from 9 weeks of age. Villi in the small intestine of obese mice were elongated and thinned. There was reduced hematoxylin staining in the epithelium of the small intestine of obese mice. Electron microscopy revealed a significant decrease in and shortening of rough endoplasmic reticulum in epithelial cells of the small intestine of obese mice compared with normal mice. The decrease in rough endoplasmic reticulum in the small intestine epithelial cells of obese mice indicates that obesity starting in childhood influences various functions of the small intestine, such as protein synthesis, and could impair both the defense mechanism against invasion of pathogenic microbes and nutritional absorption. PMID:27437400

  10. Progressive Depletion of Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum in Epithelial Cells of the Small Intestine in Monosodium Glutamate Mice Model of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Nakadate, Kazuhiko; Motojima, Kento; Hirakawa, Tomoya; Tanaka-Nakadate, Sawako

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obesity is a known risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about pathological changes in the small intestine associated with chronic obesity. This study investigated cellular and subcellular level changes in the small intestine of obese mice. In this study, a mouse model of obesity was established by early postnatal administration of monosodium glutamate. Changes in body weight were monitored, and pathological changes in the small intestine were evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining and light and electron microscopy. Consequently, obese mice were significantly heavier compared with controls from 9 weeks of age. Villi in the small intestine of obese mice were elongated and thinned. There was reduced hematoxylin staining in the epithelium of the small intestine of obese mice. Electron microscopy revealed a significant decrease in and shortening of rough endoplasmic reticulum in epithelial cells of the small intestine of obese mice compared with normal mice. The decrease in rough endoplasmic reticulum in the small intestine epithelial cells of obese mice indicates that obesity starting in childhood influences various functions of the small intestine, such as protein synthesis, and could impair both the defense mechanism against invasion of pathogenic microbes and nutritional absorption.

  11. The rough endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus visualized using specific antibodies in normal and tumoral prolactin cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Antibodies directed against membrane components of dog pancreas rough endoplasmic reticulum (A-RER) and rat liver Golgi apparatus (A-Golgi) (Louvard, D., H. Reggio, and G. Warren, 1982, J. Cell Biol. 92:92-107) have been applied to cultured rat prolactin (PRL) cells, either normal cells in primary cultures, or clonal GH3 cells. In normal PRL cells, the A-RER stained the membranes of the perinuclear cisternae as well as those of many parallel RER cisternae. The A-Golgi stained part of the Golgi membranes. In the stacks it stained the medial saccules and, with a decreasing intensity, the saccules of the trans side, as well as, in some cells, a linear cisterna in the center of the Golgi zone. It also stained the membrane of many small vesicles as well as that of lysosomelike structures in all cells. In contrast, it never stained the secretory granule membrane, except at the level of very few segregating granules on the trans face of the Golgi zone. In GH3 cells the A-RER stained the membrane of the perinuclear cisternae, as well as that of short discontinuous flat cisternae. The A-Golgi stained the same components of the Golgi zone as in normal PRL cells. In some cells of both types the A-Golgi also stained discontinuous patches on the plasma membrane and small vesicles fusing with the plasma membrane. Immunostaining of Golgi membranes revealed modifications of membrane flow in relation to either acute stimulation of PRL release by thyroliberin or inhibition of basal secretion by monensin. PMID:6404908

  12. Mobility of ribosomes bound to microsomal membranes. A freeze-etch and thin-section electron microscope study of the structure and fluidity of the rough endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    The lateral mobility of ribosomes bound to rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) membranes was demonstrated under experimental conditions. High- salt-washed rough microsomes were treated with pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase) to cleave the mRNA of bound polyribosomes and allow the movement of individual bound ribosomesmfreeze-etch and thin-section electron microscopy demonstrated that, when rough microsomes were treated with RNase at 4 degrees C and then maintained at this temperature until fixation, the bound ribosomes retained their homogeneous distribution on the microsomal surface. However, when RNase- treated rough microsomes were brought to 24 degrees C, a temperature above the thermotropic phase transition of the microsomal phospholipids, bound ribosomes were no longer distributed homogeneously but, instead, formed large, tightly packed aggregates on the microsomal surface. Bound polyribosomes could also be aggregated by treating rough microsomes with antibodies raised against large ribosomal subunit proteins. In these experiments, extensive cross-linking of ribosomes from adjacent microsomes also occurred, and large ribosome-free membrane areas were produced. Sedimentation analysis in sucrose density gradients demonstrated that the RNase treatment did not release bound ribosomes from the membranes; however, the aggregated ribosomes remain capable of peptide bond synthesis and were released by puromycin. It is proposed that the formation of ribosomal aggregates on the microsomal surface results from the lateral displacement of ribosomes along with their attached binding sites, nascent polypeptide chains, and other associated membrane proteins; The inhibition of ribosome mobility after maintaining rough microsomes at 4 degrees C after RNase, or antibody, treatment suggests that the ribosome binding sites are integral membrane proteins and that their mobility is controlled by the fluidity of the RER membrane. Examination of the hydrophobic interior of microsomal

  13. Structural organization of the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Voeltz, Gia K.; Rolls, Melissa M.; Rapoport, Tom A.

    2002-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a continuous membrane system but consists of various domains that perform different functions. Structurally distinct domains of this organelle include the nuclear envelope (NE), the rough and smooth ER, and the regions that contact other organelles. The establishment of these domains and the targeting of proteins to them are understood to varying degrees. Despite its complexity, the ER is a dynamic structure. In mitosis it must be divided between daughter cells and domains must be re-established, and even in interphase it is constantly rearranged as tubules extend along the cytoskeleton. Throughout these rearrangements the ER maintains its basic structure. How this is accomplished remains mysterious, but some insight has been gained from in vitro systems. PMID:12370207

  14. Altered Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Pump Expression during Breast Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Béla; Brouland, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis is involved in several essential cell functions including cell proliferation, protein synthesis, stress responses or secretion. Calcium uptake into the endoplasmic reticulum is performed by Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPases (SERCA enzymes). In order to study endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis in situ in mammary tissue, in this work SERCA3 expression was investigated in normal breast and in its benign and malignant lesions in function of the cell type, degree of malignancy, and histological and molecular parameters of the tumors. Our data indicate, that although normal breast acinar epithelial cells express SERCA3 abundantly, its expression is strongly decreased already in very early non-malignant epithelial lesions such as adenosis, and remains low in lobular carcinomas. Whereas normal duct epithelium expresses significant amounts of SERCA3, its expression is decreased in several benign ductal lesions, as well as in ductal adenocarcinoma. The loss of SERCA3 expression is correlated with Elston-Ellis grade, negative hormone receptor expression or triple negative status in ductal carcinomas. The concordance between decreased SERCA3 expression and several histological, as well as molecular markers of ductal carcinogenesis indicates that endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis is remodeled during tumorigenesis in the breast epithelium. PMID:21863130

  15. Isolation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Fractions from Mammary Epithelial Tissue.

    PubMed

    Chanat, Eric; Le Parc, Annabelle; Lahouassa, Hichem; Badaoui, Bouabid

    2016-06-01

    In the mammary glands of lactating animals, the mammary epithelial cells that surround the lumen of the acini produce and secrete copious amounts of milk. Functional differentiation of these mammary epithelial cells depends on the development of high-efficiency secretory pathways, notably for protein and lipid secretion. Protein secretion is a fundamental process common to all animal cells that involves a subset of cellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. In contrast, en masse secretion of triglycerides and cholesterol esters in the form of milk fat globules is a unique feature of the mammary epithelial cell. Cytoplasmic lipid droplets, the intracellular precursors of milk fat globules, originate from the endoplasmic reticulum, as do most milk-specific proteins. This organelle is therefore pivotal in the biogenesis of milk components. Fractionation of the cell into its subcellular parts is an approach that has proven very powerful for understanding organelle function and for studying the specific role of an organelle in a given cell activity. Here we describe a method for the purification of both smooth and rough microsomes, the membrane-bound endoplasmic reticulum fragments that form from endoplasmic reticulum domains when cells are broken up, from mammary gland tissue at lactation.

  16. In vivo and in vitro processing of seed reserve protein in the endoplasmic reticulum: evidence for two glycosylation steps

    PubMed Central

    Bollini, R; Vitale, A; Chrispeels, MJ

    1983-01-01

    Cotyledons of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) synthesize large amounts of the reserve protein phaseolin. The polypeptides are synthesized on membrane-bound polysomes, pass through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and accumulate in protein bodies. For a study of the biosynthesis and processing of phaseolin, developing cotyledons were labeled with radioactive amino acids, glucosamine and mannose, and isolated fractions (polysomal RNA, polysomes, and rough ER) were used for in vitro protein synthesis. Newly synthesized phaseolin present in the ER of developing cotyledons can be fractioned into four glycopolypeptides by SDS PAGE. In vitro synthesis with polysomal RNA results in the formation of two polypeptides by polysome run-off shows that glycosylation is a co-translational event. The two unglycosylated polypeptides formed by polysome run-off are slightly smaller than the two polypeptides formed by in vitro translation of isolated RNA, indicating that a signal peptide may be present on these polypeptides. Run-off synthesis with rough ER produces a pattern of four polypeptides similar to the one obtained by in vivo labeling. The two abundant glycopolypeptides formed by polysome run-off. This result indicates the existence of a second glycosylation event for the abundant polypeptides. Inhibition of glycosylation by Triton X-100 during chain-completion with rough ER was used to show that these two glycosylation steps normally occur sequentially. Both glycosylation steps are inhibited by tunicamycin. Analysis of carhohydrate to protein ratios of the different polypeptides and of trypsin digests of polypeptides labeled with [(3)H]glucosamine confirmed the conclusion that some glycosylated polypeptides contain two oligosaccharide chains, while others contain only one. An analysis of tryptic peptide maps shows that each of the unglycosylated polypeptides is the precursor for one glycosylated polypeptide with one oligosaccharide chain and one with two oligosaccharide

  17. Unusual configurations of endoplasmic reticulum in cells of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Parkin, J L; Brunning, R D

    1978-08-01

    An ultrastructural study of leukemia cells from 8 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia revealed several features that have not previously been emphasized: prominent dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum and two unusual configurations of endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The two membrane structures, multilaminar ER and complex stellate arrangements of ER, appeared to be morphogenetically related. The multilaminar ER was observed in every mitotic cell and less frequently in interphase cells. The stellate ER complex was observed only in interphase cells. Ultrastructural evidence is presented to support the possible evolution of the stellate ER complex from the multilaminar ER.

  18. Co-chaperones of the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Armin; Rieger, Heiko; Zimmermann, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the rough endoplasmic reticulum or ER plays a central role in the biogenesis of most extracellular plus many organellar proteins and in cellular calcium homeostasis. Therefore, this organelle comprises molecular chaperones that are involved in import, folding/assembly, export, and degradation of polypeptides in millimolar concentrations. In addition, there are calcium channels/pumps and signal transduction components present in the ER membrane that affect and are affected by these processes. The ER lumenal Hsp70, termed immunoglobulin-heavy chain binding protein or BiP, is the central player in all these activities and involves up to seven different co-chaperones, i.e. ER-membrane integrated as well as ER-lumenal Hsp40s, which are termed ERj or ERdj, and two nucleotide exchange factors.

  19. Fault Roughness Records Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, E. E.; Candela, T.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Fault roughness is commonly ~0.1-1% at the outcrop exposure scale. More mature faults are smoother than less mature ones, but the overall range of roughness is surprisingly limited which suggests dynamic control. In addition, the power spectra of many exposed fault surfaces follow a single power law over scales from millimeters to 10's of meters. This is another surprising observation as distinct structures such as slickenlines and mullions are clearly visible on the same surfaces at well-defined scales. We can reconcile both observations by suggesting that the roughness of fault surfaces is controlled by the maximum strain that can be supported elastically in the wallrock. If the fault surface topography requires more than 0.1-1% strain, it fails. Invoking wallrock strength explains two additional observations on the Corona Heights fault for which we have extensive roughness data. Firstly, the surface is isotropic below a scale of 30 microns and has grooves at larger scales. Samples from at least three other faults (Dixie Valley, Mount St. Helens and San Andreas) also are isotropic at scales below 10's of microns. If grooves can only persist when the walls of the grooves have a sufficiently low slope to maintain the shape, this scale of isotropy can be predicted based on the measured slip perpendicular roughness data. The observed 30 micron scale at Corona Heights is consistent with an elastic strain of 0.01 estimated from the observed slip perpendicular roughness with a Hurst exponent of 0.8. The second observation at Corona Heights is that slickenlines are not deflected around meter-scale mullions. Yielding of these mullions at centimeter to meter scale is predicted from the slip parallel roughness as measured here. The success of the strain criterion for Corona Heights supports it as the appropriate control on fault roughness. Micromechanically, the criterion implies that failure of the fault surface is a continual process during slip. Macroscopically, the

  20. ROUGH ROCK DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FORBES, JACK

    THE ROUGH ROCK DEMONSTRATION SCHOOL IS LOCATED IN NORTHEASTERN ARIZONA, WHERE THE NAVAJO LANGUAGE IS UNIVERSALLY SPOKEN BY THE NAVAJO PEOPLE. IT IS LOCATED ON A NAVAJO RESERVATION AND WAS DESIGNED AS A BIA EXPERIMENTAL SCHOOL TO SERVE 200 ELEMENTARY PUPILS, MOST OF WHOM ARE IN THE BOARDING SCHOOL SITUATION. AN OBJECTIVE OF THE SCHOOL IS TO GAIN…

  1. Surface Roughness Lengths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    m trees 110 - 170 Thom 1972 Pine forest - 20 m trees 128 DeBruin and Moore 1985 Forested plateau, rolling 120 - 130 Ming et al. 1983 Rolling terrain...H. A. R., and C. J. Moore , 1985 , "Zero-Plane Displacement and Roughness Length for Tall Vegetation, Derived from a Simple Mass Conservation

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases: biochemistry, physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi

    2013-09-01

    The human endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase (ERAP) 1 and 2 proteins were initially identified as homologues of human placental leucine aminopeptidase/insulin-regulated aminopeptidase. They are categorized as a unique class of proteases based on their subcellular localization on the luminal side of the endoplasmic reticulum. ERAPs play an important role in the N-terminal processing of the antigenic precursors that are presented on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. ERAPs are also implicated in the regulation of a wide variety of physiological phenomena and pathogenic conditions. In this review, the current knowledge on ERAPs is summarized.

  3. Neuropeptide accretions in the endoplasmic reticulum of oxytocinergic neurons in cats, monkeys and rabbits: a widespread phenomenon.

    PubMed Central

    Pow, D V

    1992-01-01

    Light microscopic observations using Nomarski optics on the aldehyde-fixed hypothalamus of normal adult cats, monkeys and rabbits revealed the presence of cells in the supraoptic, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei which possessed yellow birefringent inclusions. Immunogold labelling showed that in each species the cells displayed oxytocin-like immunoreactivity, both in electron-dense inclusions within some (but not all) cisterns of rough endoplasmic reticulum and in secretory granules. The cells in cats and rabbits were in all respects indistinguishable from the homologous 'birefringent' cells previously described in rats, but in monkeys, cells frequently contained additional inclusions in cisterns of rough endoplasmic reticulum which did not display oxytocin or vasopressin-like immunoreactivity, even after trypsin, pepsin or chymotrypsin treatment of sections. Observations on cats and rabbits using fluorescence microscopy revealed that the birefringent cells possessed bright autofluorescence which facilitated the identification of more cells than were seen using Nomarski optics alone. Autofluorescence was abolished when sections were mounted in glycerol, or when exposed to light for protracted periods of time. Attempts to label for monoamines in these cells were not successful, suggesting that the fluorescence is not due to aldehyde-induced amine fluorescence. It is not clear why neuropeptides are retained in some rough endoplasmic reticulum cisterns. It is possible that these birefringent cells contain a peptide, or peptides, which are abnormal in some manner, or which may be other members of the oxytocin gene family. Alternatively, the processing of neuropeptides to permit their export to the Golgi apparatus may be deficient. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry revealed that, unlike other oxytocin neurons, cells with intracellular accretions lacked detectable acetyl cholinesterase. As AChE is a known peptidase, it may be involved in regulating

  4. Drosophila vigilin, DDP1, localises to the cytoplasm and associates to the rough endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Batlle, Marta; Marsellach, Francesc-Xavier; Huertas, Dori; Azorín, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Functional characterisation of vigilin, a highly conserved multi-KH-domain protein that binds RNA and ssDNA, remains elusive and, to some extent, controversial. Studies performed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human cells indicate that vigilin localises to the cytoplasm, binds ribosomes, associates to RER and regulates mRNA translation. On the other hand, we and others reported a contribution to heterochromatin-mediated gene silencing (PEV) and chromosome segregation in S. cerevisiae, Drosophila and human cells. Whether this contribution is direct remains, however, unclear. Here, we report that Drosophila vigilin, DDP1, vastly localises to the cytoplasm, being largely excluded from the nucleus. We also show that DDP1 preferentially associates to RER and co-purifies with several ribosomal proteins, suggesting a contribution to mRNA translation. In light of these results, the contribution of DDP1 to PEV was re-examined. Here, we show that a newly generated null ddp1(Δ) mutation is only a weak suppressor of PEV, which is in contrast with our own previous results showing dominant suppression in the presence of a strong hypomorphic ddp1(15.1) mutation. Similar results were obtained in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, where vigilin (Vgl1) also associates to RER, having no significant contribution to PEV at centromeres, telomeres and the mating-type locus. Altogether, these results indicate that cytoplasmic localisation and association to RER, but not contribution to heterochromatin organisation, are evolutionarily conserved features of vigilin, favouring a model by which vigilin acts in the cytoplasm, regulating RNA metabolism, and affects nuclear functions only indirectly.

  5. Rough and Tumble Play 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Frances

    2009-01-01

    Many people fear that play-fighting or rough and tumble play is the same as real fighting. There is also a fear that this rough play will become real fighting if allowed to continue. Most of all, parents and teachers fear that during the course of rough and tumble play a child may be hurt. To provide for and allow children to play rough without…

  6. Rough Sea Transfer Ship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    GROUP 2.3 2.36003 TRIAGE 20.00 60.00 GROUP 2.4 2.41005 VENDING MACHINE AREA 1.84 5.53 2.42001 LAUNDRY 27.15 81.44 GROUP 2.5...Research Enterprise Intern Program Rough Seas Transfer Ship Acknowledgements This report is the culmination of work conducted by students hired...under the National Research Enterprise Intern Program sponsored by the Office of Naval Research. This program provides an opportunity for students to

  7. Armor Plate Surface Roughness Measurements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    Armor Plate Surface Roughness Measurements by Brian Stanton, William Coburn, and Thomas J. Pizzillo ARL-TR-3498 April 2005... Armor Plate Surface Roughness Measurements Brian Stanton, William Coburn and Thomas J. Pizzillo Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate...October 2004 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Armor Plate Surface Roughness Measurements 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  8. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE AERODYNAMIC ROUGHNESS LENGTH AND THE ROUGHNESS DENSITY IN CASES OF LOW ROUGHNESS DENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents measurements of roughness length performed in a wind tunnel for low roughness density. The experiments were performed with both compact and porous obstacles (clusters), in order to simulate the behavior of sparsely vegetated surfaces.

  9. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Associated ROS

    PubMed Central

    Zeeshan, Hafiz Maher Ali; Lee, Geum Hwa; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a fascinating network of tubules through which secretory and transmembrane proteins enter unfolded and exit as either folded or misfolded proteins, after which they are directed either toward other organelles or to degradation, respectively. The ER redox environment dictates the fate of entering proteins, and the level of redox signaling mediators modulates the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Accumulating evidence suggests the interrelation of ER stress and ROS with redox signaling mediators such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin (ERO)-1, glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disuphide (GSSG), NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR), and calcium. Here, we reviewed persistent ER stress and protein misfolding-initiated ROS cascades and their significant roles in the pathogenesis of multiple human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, inflammation, ischemia, and kidney and liver diseases. PMID:26950115

  10. Engine roughness control means

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, M.; Doi, N.; Yoshioka, S.; Okimoto, H.; Veda, K.

    1987-08-04

    This patent describes a control system for a vehicle engine comprising engine condition detecting means for detecting an engine operating condition and producing an engine condition signal representing the engine operating condition, engine combustion control means for controlling a condition of combustion in the engine; and a control factor storage means for storing control factors for controlling the engine combustion. A modifying means connect the comparator means to receive the output signal and to modify the control factor from the storage means by the output of the comparator means so that the combustion control means is controlled by the modified control factor in a direction that the engine vibrations are suppressed. A reference signal changes means connected with the engine condition detecting means to change the reference roughness signal in accordance with the engine operating condition so that the reference signal is decreased when the engine is in idling operation.

  11. Sch proteins are localized on endoplasmic reticulum membranes and are redistributed after tyrosine kinase receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Lotti, L V; Lanfrancone, L; Migliaccio, E; Zompetta, C; Pelicci, G; Salcini, A E; Falini, B; Pelicci, P G; Torrisi, M R

    1996-01-01

    The intracellular localization of Shc proteins was analyzed by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy in normal cells and cells expressing the epidermal growth factor receptor or the EGFR/erbB2 chimera. In unstimulated cells, the immunolabeling was localized in the central perinuclear area of the cell and mostly associated with the cytosolic side of rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Upon epidermal growth factor treatment and receptor tyrosine kinase activation, the immunolabeling became peripheral and was found to be associated with the cytosolic surface of the plasma membrane and endocytic structures, such as coated pits and endosomes, and with the peripheral cytosol. Receptor activation in cells expressing phosphorylation-defective mutants of Shc and erbB-2 kinase showed that receptor autophosphorylation, but not Shc phosphorylation, is required for redistribution of Shc proteins. The rough endoplasmic reticulum localization of Shc proteins in unstimulated cells and their massive recruitment to the plasma membrane, endocytic structures, and peripheral cytosol following receptor tyrosine kinase activation could account for multiple putative functions of the adaptor protein. PMID:8628261

  12. Roughness characteristics of natural channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Harry Hawthorne

    1967-01-01

    Color photographs and descriptive data are presented for 50 stream channels for which roughness coefficients have been determined. All hydraulic computations involving flow in open channels require an evaluation of the roughness characteristics of the channel. In the absence of a satisfactory quantitative procedure this evaluation remains chiefly an art. The ability to evaluate roughness coefficients must be developed through experience. One means of gaining this experience is by examining and becoming acquainted with the appearance of some typical channels whose roughness coefficients are known. The photographs and data contained in this report represent a wide range of channel conditions. Familiarity with the appearance, geometry, and roughness characteristics of these channels will improve the engineer's ability to select roughness coefficients for other channels .

  13. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulev, Assen; Roussev, Ilia; Karpuzov, Simeon; Stoilov, Georgi; Ignatova, Detelina; See, Constantin von; Mitov, Gergo

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  14. Surface roughness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Thomas G.

    1994-10-01

    The Optics Division is currently in the research phase of producing grazing-incidence mirrors to be used in x-ray detector applications. The traditional method of construction involves labor-intensive glass grinding. This also culminates in a relatively heavy mirror. For lower resolution applications, the mirrors may be of a replicated design which involves milling a mandrel as a negative of the final shape and electroplating the cylindrical mirror onto it. The mirror is then separated from the mandrel by cooling. The mandrel will shrink more than the 'shell' (mirror) allowing it to be pulled from the mandrel. Ulmer (2) describes this technique and its variations in more detail. To date, several mirrors have been tested at MSFC by the Optical Fabrication Branch by focusing x-ray energy onto a detector with limited success. Little is known about the surface roughness of the actual mirror. Hence, the attempt to gather data on these surfaces. The test involves profiling the surface of a sample, replicating the surface as described above, and then profiling the replicated surface.

  15. Obesity and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stresses

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Yamini B.; Pandey, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    In obesity, the adipose cells behave as inflammatory source and result to low grade inflammation. This systemic inflammation along with oxidative stress is a silent killer and damages other vital organs also. High metabolic process, induced due to high nutritional intake, results to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondrial stress. This review describes the triggering factor and basic mechanism behind the obesity mediated these stresses in relation to inflammation. Efforts have been made to describe the effect-response cycle between adipocytes and non-adipocyte cells with reference to metabolic syndrome (MS). PMID:22891067

  16. Generalizing roughness: experiments with flow-oriented roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisani, Sebastiano

    2015-04-01

    Surface texture analysis applied to High Resolution Digital Terrain Models (HRDTMs) improves the capability to characterize fine-scale morphology and permits the derivation of useful morphometric indexes. An important indicator to be taken into account in surface texture analysis is surface roughness, which can have a discriminant role in the detection of different geomorphic processes and factors. The evaluation of surface roughness is generally performed considering it as an isotropic surface parameter (e.g., Cavalli, 2008; Grohmann, 2011). However, surface texture has often an anisotropic character, which means that surface roughness could change according to the considered direction. In some applications, for example involving surface flow processes, the anisotropy of roughness should be taken into account (e.g., Trevisani, 2012; Smith, 2014). Accordingly, we test the application of a flow-oriented directional measure of roughness, computed considering surface gravity-driven flow. For the calculation of flow-oriented roughness we use both classical variogram-based roughness (e.g., Herzfeld,1996; Atkinson, 2000) as well as an ad-hoc developed robust modification of variogram (i.e. MAD, Trevisani, 2014). The presented approach, based on a D8 algorithm, shows the potential impact of considering directionality in the calculation of roughness indexes. The use of flow-oriented roughness could improve the definition of effective proxies of impedance to flow. Preliminary results on the integration of directional roughness operators with morphometric-based models, are promising and can be extended to more complex approaches. Atkinson, P.M., Lewis, P., 2000. Geostatistical classification for remote sensing: an introduction. Computers & Geosciences 26, 361-371. Cavalli, M. & Marchi, L. 2008, "Characterization of the surface morphology of an alpine alluvial fan using airborne LiDAR", Natural Hazards and Earth System Science, vol. 8, no. 2, pp. 323-333. Grohmann, C

  17. Review of Hydraulic Roughness Scales in the Fully Rough Regime

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Bowden and Davison 11 to be used with the 1978 ITTC perfor - mance prediction line for ship resistance. This coefficient is a function of the mean...con- siderations, along with a lack of accurate hull roughness measure- ments, led the ITTC Specialist Committee on Powering Perfor - mance Prediction...roughness length. For the two layer approach, the wall layer model is patched to the outer layer model by modifying the k boundary condition in the k− model

  18. Nodal endoplasmic reticulum, a specialized form of endoplasmic reticulum found in gravity-sensing root tip columella cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, H. Q.; Staehelin, L. A.

    2001-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of columella root cap cells has been postulated to play a role in gravity sensing. We have re-examined the ultrastructure of columella cells in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) root tips preserved by high-pressure freezing/freeze-substitution techniques to gain more precise information about the organization of the ER in such cells. The most notable findings are: the identification of a specialized form of ER, termed "nodal ER," which is found exclusively in columella cells; the demonstration that the bulk of the ER is organized in the form of a tubular network that is confined to a peripheral layer under the plasma membrane; and the discovery that this ER-rich peripheral region excludes Golgi stacks, vacuoles, and amyloplasts but not mitochondria. Nodal ER domains consist of an approximately 100-nm-diameter central rod composed of oblong subunits to which usually seven sheets of rough ER are attached along their margins. These domains form patches at the interface between the peripheral ER network and the ER-free central region of the cells, and they occupy defined positions within central and flanking columella cells. Over one-half of the nodal ER domains are located along the outer tangential walls of the flanking cells. Cytochalasin D and latrunculin A cause an increase in size and a decrease in numbers of nodal ER domains. We postulate that the nodal ER membranes locally modulate the gravisensing signals produced by the sedimenting amyloplasts, and that the confinement of all ER membranes to the cell periphery serves to enhance the sedimentability of the amyloplasts in the central region of columella cells.

  19. Does surface roughness amplify wetting?

    SciTech Connect

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-11-14

    Any solid surface is intrinsically rough on the microscopic scale. In this paper, we study the effect of this roughness on the wetting properties of hydrophilic substrates. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to the well-known Wenzel's law, predict that surface roughness should amplify the wetting properties of such adsorbents. We use a fundamental measure density functional theory to demonstrate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., wetting is hindered. Based on three independent analyses we show that microscopic surface corrugation increases the wetting temperature or even makes the surface hydrophobic. Since for macroscopically corrugated surfaces the solid texture does indeed amplify wetting there must exist a crossover between two length-scale regimes that are distinguished by opposite response on surface roughening. This demonstrates how deceptive can be efforts to extend the thermodynamical laws beyond their macroscopic territory.

  20. Measuring Roughnesses Of Optical Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulter, Daniel R.; Al-Jumaily, Gahnim A.; Raouf, Nasrat A.; Anderson, Mark S.

    1994-01-01

    Report discusses use of scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy to measure roughnesses of optical surfaces. These techniques offer greater spatial resolution than other techniques. Report notes scanning tunneling microscopes and atomic force microscopes resolve down to 1 nm.

  1. Radar-aeolian roughness project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Dobrovolskis, A.; Gaddis, L.; Iversen, J. D.; Lancaster, N.; Leach, Rodman N.; Rasnussen, K.; Saunders, S.; Vanzyl, J.; Wall, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to establish an empirical relationship between measurements of radar, aeolian, and surface roughness on a variety of natural surfaces and to understand the underlying physical causes. This relationship will form the basis for developing a predictive equation to derive aeolian roughness from radar backscatter. Results are given from investigations carried out in 1989 on the principal elements of the project, with separate sections on field studies, radar data analysis, laboratory simulations, and development of theory for planetary applications.

  2. An endoplasmic reticulum-specific cyclophilin.

    PubMed Central

    Hasel, K W; Glass, J R; Godbout, M; Sutcliffe, J G

    1991-01-01

    Cyclophilin is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that is inhibited by the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A. A degenerate oligonucleotide based on a conserved cyclophilin sequence was used to isolate cDNA clones representing a ubiquitously expressed mRNA from mice and humans. This mRNA encodes a novel 20-kDa protein, CPH2, that shares 64% sequence identity with cyclophilin. Bacterially expressed CPH2 binds cyclosporin A and is a cyclosporin A-inhibitable peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase. Cell fractionation of rat liver followed by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis indicated that CPH2 is not cytosolic but rather is located exclusively in the endoplasmic reticulum. These results suggest that cyclosporin A mediates its effect on cells through more than one cyclophilin and that cyclosporin A-induced misfolding of T-cell membrane proteins normally mediated by CPH2 plays a role in immunosuppression. Images PMID:1710767

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum: ER stress regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Roberto; Gutierrez, Tomás; Paredes, Felipe; Gatica, Damián; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Parra, Valentina; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates an adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR) that facilitates cellular repair, however, under prolonged ER stress, the UPR can ultimately trigger apoptosis thereby terminating damaged cells. The molecular mechanisms responsible for execution of the cell death program are relatively well characterized, but the metabolic events taking place during the adaptive phase of ER stress remain largely undefined. Here we discuss emerging evidence regarding the metabolic changes that occur during the onset of ER stress and how ER influences mitochondrial function through mechanisms involving calcium transfer, thereby facilitating cellular adaptation. Finally, we highlight how dysregulation of ER–mitochondrial calcium homeostasis during prolonged ER stress is emerging as a novel mechanism implicated in the onset of metabolic disorders. PMID:22064245

  4. Endoplasmic-Reticulum Calcium Depletion and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mekahli, Djalila; Bultynck, Geert; Parys, Jan B.; De Smedt, Humbert; Missiaen, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an intracellular Ca2+ store not only sets up cytosolic Ca2+ signals, but, among other functions, also assembles and folds newly synthesized proteins. Alterations in ER homeostasis, including severe Ca2+ depletion, are an upstream event in the pathophysiology of many diseases. On the one hand, insufficient release of activator Ca2+ may no longer sustain essential cell functions. On the other hand, loss of luminal Ca2+ causes ER stress and activates an unfolded protein response, which, depending on the duration and severity of the stress, can reestablish normal ER function or lead to cell death. We will review these various diseases by mainly focusing on the mechanisms that cause ER Ca2+ depletion. PMID:21441595

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response in Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yueh; Kanehara, Kazue

    2017-01-01

    Roots are the frontier of plant body to perceive underground environmental change. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response represents circumvention of cellular stress caused by various environmental changes; however, a limited number of studies are available on the ER stress responses in roots. Here, we report the tunicamycin (TM) -induced ER stress response in Arabidopsis roots by monitoring expression patterns of immunoglobulin-binding protein 3 (BiP3), a representative marker for the response. Roots promptly responded to the TM-induced ER stress through the induction of similar sets of ER stress-responsive genes. However, not all cells responded uniformly to the TM-induced ER stress in roots, as BiP3 was highly expressed in root tips, an outer layer in elongation zone, and an inner layer in mature zone of roots. We suggest that ER stress response in roots has tissue specificity. PMID:28298914

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress and Endocrine Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ariyasu, Daisuke; Yoshida, Hiderou; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2017-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the organelle where secretory and membrane proteins are synthesized and folded. Unfolded proteins that are retained within the ER can cause ER stress. Eukaryotic cells have a defense system called the “unfolded protein response” (UPR), which protects cells from ER stress. Cells undergo apoptosis when ER stress exceeds the capacity of the UPR, which has been revealed to cause human diseases. Although neurodegenerative diseases are well-known ER stress-related diseases, it has been discovered that endocrine diseases are also related to ER stress. In this review, we focus on ER stress-related human endocrine disorders. In addition to diabetes mellitus, which is well characterized, several relatively rare genetic disorders such as familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI), Wolfram syndrome, and isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD2) are discussed in this article. PMID:28208663

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Ethanol Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fanmuyi; Luo, Jia

    2015-10-14

    Ethanol abuse affects virtually all organ systems and the central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to excessive ethanol exposure. Ethanol exposure causes profound damages to both the adult and developing brain. Prenatal ethanol exposure induces fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) which is associated with mental retardation and other behavioral deficits. A number of potential mechanisms have been proposed for ethanol-induced brain damage; these include the promotion of neuroinflammation, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, and thiamine deficiency. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) regulates posttranslational protein processing and transport. The accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen triggers ER stress and induces unfolded protein response (UPR) which are mediated by three transmembrane ER signaling proteins: pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). UPR is initiated to protect cells from overwhelming ER protein loading. However, sustained ER stress may result in cell death. ER stress has been implied in various CNS injuries, including brain ischemia, traumatic brain injury, and aging-associated neurodegeneration, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Parkinson's disease (PD). However, effects of ethanol on ER stress in the CNS receive less attention. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the study of ER stress in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. We also examine the potential mechanisms underlying ethanol-mediated ER stress and the interaction among ER stress, oxidative stress and autophagy in the context of ethanol neurotoxicity.

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Regulates Adipocyte Resistin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lefterova, Martina I.; Mullican, Shannon E.; Tomaru, Takuya; Qatanani, Mohammed; Schupp, Michael; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Resistin is a secreted polypeptide that impairs glucose metabolism and, in rodents, is derived exclusively from adipocytes. In murine obesity, resistin circulates at elevated levels but its gene expression in adipose tissue is paradoxically reduced. The mechanism behind the downregulation of resistin mRNA is poorly understood. We investigated whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is characteristic of obese adipose tissue, regulates resistin expression in cultured mouse adipocytes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The effects of endoplasmic stress inducers on resistin mRNA and secreted protein levels were examined in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, focusing on the expression and genomic binding of transcriptional regulators of resistin. The association between downregulated resistin mRNA and induction of ER stress was also investigated in the adipose tissue of mice fed a high-fat diet. RESULTS ER stress reduced resistin mRNA in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The effects of ER stress were transcriptional because of downregulation of CAAT/enhancer binding protein-α and peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ transcriptional activators and upregulation of the transcriptional repressor CAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein-10 (CHOP10). Resistin protein was also substantially downregulated, showing a close correspondence with mRNA levels in 3T3-L1 adipocytes as well as in the fat pads of obese mice. CONCLUSIONS ER stress is a potent regulator of resistin, suggesting that ER stress may underlie the local downregulation of resistin mRNA and protein in fat in murine obesity. The paradoxical increase in plasma may be because of various systemic abnormalities associated with obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:19491212

  9. EpCAM associates with endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2) in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gadalla, Salah-Eldin; Öjemalm, Karin; Vasquez, Patricia Lara; Nilsson, Ingmarie; Ericsson, Christer; Zhao, Jian; Nistér, Monica

    2013-09-20

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is an epithelial and cancer cell "marker" and there is a cumulative and growing evidence of its signaling role. Its importance has been recognized as part of the breast cancer stem cell phenotype, the tumorigenic breast cancer stem cell is EpCAM(+). In spite of its complex functions in normal cell development and cancer, relatively little is known about EpCAM-interacting proteins. We used breast cancer cell lines and performed EpCAM co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry in search for novel potentially interacting proteins. The endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2) was found to co-precipitate with EpCAM and to co-localize in the cytoplasm/ER and the plasma membrane. ERAP2 is a proteolytic enzyme set in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it plays a central role in the trimming of peptides for presentation by MHC class I molecules. Expression of EpCAM and ERAP2 in vitro in the presence of dog pancreas rough microsomes (ER vesicles) confirmed N-linked glycosylation, processing in ER and the size of EpCAM. The association between ERAP2 and EpCAM is a unique and novel finding that provides new ideas on EpCAM processing and on how antigen presentation may be regulated in cancer.

  10. Development of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress during Experimental Oxalate Nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Motin, Yu G; Lepilov, A V; Bgatova, N P; Zharikov, A Yu; Motina, N V; Lapii, G A; Lushnikova, E L; Nepomnyashchikh, L M

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and ultrastructural study of the kidney was performed in rats with oxalate nephrolithiasis. Specific features of endoplasmic reticulum stress were evaluated during nephrolithiasis and treatment with α-tocopherol. We observed the signs of endoplasmic reticulum stress with activation of proapoptotic pathways and injury to the cell lining in nephron tubules and collecting ducts. Ultrastructural changes were found in the organelles, nuclei, and cell membranes of epitheliocytes. A relationship was revealed between endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative damage, which developed at the early state of lithogenesis.

  11. Mutations in the SPTLC1 protein cause mitochondrial structural abnormalities and endoplasmic reticulum stress in lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Myers, Simon J; Malladi, Chandra S; Hyland, Ryan A; Bautista, Tara; Boadle, Ross; Robinson, Phillip J; Nicholson, Garth A

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase long chain subunit 1 (SPTLC1) cause the typical length-dependent axonal degeneration hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 (HSN1). Transmission electron microscopy studies on SPTLC1 mutant lymphoblasts derived from patients revealed specific structural abnormalities of mitochondria. Swollen mitochondria with abnormal cristae were clustered around the nucleus, with some mitochondria being wrapped in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. Total mitochondrial counts revealed a significant change in mitochondrial numbers between healthy and diseased lymphocytes but did not reveal any change in length to width ratios nor were there any changes to cellular function. However, there was a notable change in ER homeostasis, as assessed using key ER stress markers, BiP and ERO1-Lα, displaying reduced protein expression. The observations suggest that SPTLC1 mutations cause mitochondrial abnormalities and ER stress in HSN1 cells.

  12. In vitro studies on the translocation of acid phosphatase into the endoplasmic reticulum of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Krebs, H O; Hoffschulte, H K; Müller, M

    1989-05-01

    We demonstrate here the in vitro translocation of yeast acid phosphatase into rough endoplasmic reticulum. The precursor of the repressible acid phosphatase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae encoded by the PHO5 gene, was synthesized in a yeast lysate programmed with in vitro transcribed PHO5 mRNA. In the presence of yeast rough microsomes up to 16% of the acid phosphatase synthesized was found to be translocated into the microsomes, as judged by proteinase resistance, and fully core-glycosylated. The translocation efficiency however, decreased to 3% if yeast rough microsomes were added after synthesis of acid phosphatase had been terminated. When a wheat-germ extract was used for in vitro synthesis, the precursor of acid phosphatase was translocated into canine pancreatic rough microsomes and thereby core-glycosylated in a signal-recognition-particle-dependent manner. Replacing canine with yeast rough microsomes in the wheat-germ translation system, however, resulted in a significant decrease in the ability to translocate and glycosylate the precursor. Translocation and glycosylation were partially restored by a high-salt extract prepared from yeast ribosomes. The results presented here suggest that yeast-specific factors are needed to translocate and glycosylate acid phosphatase efficiently in vitro.

  13. Roughness effects in uncompensated antiferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Charilaou, M.; Hellman, F.

    2015-02-28

    Monte Carlo simulations show that roughness in uncompensated antiferromagnets decreases not just the surface magnetization but also the net magnetization and particularly strongly affects the temperature dependence. In films with step-type roughness, each step creates a new compensation front that decreases the global net magnetization. The saturation magnetization decreases non-monotonically with increasing roughness and does not scale with the surface area. Roughness in the form of surface vacancies changes the temperature-dependence of the magnetization; when only one surface has vacancies, the saturation magnetization will decrease linearly with surface occupancy, whereas when both surfaces have vacancies, the magnetization is negative and exhibits a compensation point at finite temperature, which can be tuned by controlling the occupancy. Roughness also affects the spin-texture of the surfaces due to long-range dipolar interactions and generates non-collinear spin configurations that could be used in devices to produce locally modified exchange bias. These results explain the strongly reduced magnetization found in magnetometry experiments and furthers our understanding of the temperature-dependence of exchange bias.

  14. Reconstitution of Glucosylceramide Flip-Flop across Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Chalat, Madhavan; Menon, Indu; Turan, Zeynep; Menon, Anant K.

    2012-01-01

    Most glycosphingolipids are synthesized by the sequential addition of monosaccharides to glucosylceramide (GlcCer) in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus. Because GlcCer is synthesized on the cytoplasmic face of Golgi membranes, it must be flipped to the non-cytoplasmic face by a lipid flippase in order to nucleate glycosphingolipid synthesis. Halter et al. (Halter, D., Neumann, S., van Dijk, S. M., Wolthoorn, J., de Mazière, A. M., Vieira, O. V., Mattjus, P., Klumperman, J., van Meer, G., and Sprong, H. (2007) Pre- and post-Golgi translocation of glucosylceramide in glycosphingolipid synthesis. J. Cell Biol. 179, 101–115) proposed that this essential flipping step is accomplished via a complex trafficking itinerary; GlcCer is moved from the cytoplasmic face of the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by FAPP2, a cytoplasmic lipid transfer protein, flipped across the ER membrane, then delivered to the lumen of the Golgi complex by vesicular transport. We now report biochemical reconstitution studies to analyze GlcCer flipping at the ER. Using proteoliposomes reconstituted from Triton X-100-solubilized rat liver ER membrane proteins, we demonstrate rapid (t½ < 20 s), ATP-independent flip-flop of N-(6-((7-nitro-2–1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino)hexanoyl)-d-glucosyl-β1–1′-sphingosine, a fluorescent GlcCer analog. Further studies involving protein modification, biochemical fractionation, and analyses of flip-flop in proteoliposomes reconstituted with ER membrane proteins from yeast indicate that GlcCer translocation is facilitated by well characterized ER phospholipid flippases that remain to be identified at the molecular level. By reason of their abundance and membrane bending activity, we considered that the ER reticulons and the related Yop1 protein could function as phospholipid-GlcCer flippases. Direct tests showed that these proteins have no flippase activity. PMID:22427661

  15. Robust Prediction of Hydraulic Roughness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    floodplain hydraulics, in particular hydraulic roughness, is critical for flood control concerns; however, diversity of vegetation type and...or particular flood return inter- val analyses. Field Assessment. Field assessment methods refer to those that do not rely on direct mea- surement or...material (riprap) Form Roughness Calculators Brownlie ( 1983 ) Lab, Field H, S, d50, σg 0.082 < R < 55.8 ft (0.025 < R < 17 m), 2.9 × 10-4 < d50

  16. Topology theory on rough sets.

    PubMed

    Wu, QingE; Wang, Tuo; Huang, YongXuan; Li, JiSheng

    2008-02-01

    For further studying the theories and applications of rough sets (RS), this paper proposes a new theory on RS, which mainly includes topological space, topological properties, homeomorphism, and its properties on RS by some new definitions and theorems given. The relationship between partition and countable open covering is discussed, and some applications based on the topological rough space and its topological properties are introduced. Moreover, some perspectives for future research are given. Throughout this paper, the advancements of the new theory on RS and topological algebra not only represent an important theoretical value but also exhibit significant applications of RS and topology.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes EBV lytic replication

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gwen Marie; Raghuwanshi, Sandeep K.; Rowe, David T.; Wadowsky, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers a homeostatic cellular response in mammalian cells to ensure efficient folding, sorting, and processing of client proteins. In lytic-permissive lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), pulse exposure to the chemical ER-stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) followed by recovery resulted in the activation of the EBV immediate-early (BRLF1, BZLF1), early (BMRF1), and late (gp350) genes, gp350 surface expression, and virus release. The protein phosphatase 1 a (PP1a)–specific phosphatase inhibitor Salubrinal (SAL) synergized with TG to induce EBV lytic genes; however, TG treatment alone was sufficient to activate EBV lytic replication. SAL showed ER-stress–dependent and –independent antiviral effects, preventing virus release in human LCLs and abrogating gp350 expression in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)–treated B95-8 cells. TG resulted in sustained BCL6 but not BLIMP1 or CD138 expression, which is consistent with maintenance of a germinal center B-cell, rather than plasma-cell, phenotype. Microarray analysis identified candidate genes governing lytic replication in LCLs undergoing ER stress. PMID:21849482

  18. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  19. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  20. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  1. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  2. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply...

  3. Light Scattering from Rough Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-17

    us (V. Ruiz Cortes) was supported by a CONACYT and CICESE scholarship. 5. REFERENCES I.-K.A. O’Donnell and E.R. Mdndez, "Experimental study of...Calculated variation of scattenng for increasing roughness. The angle of incidence is 800. The solid line is (DAJA45-90-C-0026). VRC thanks CONACYT and for a

  4. Plant Communities of Rough Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Linda

    A unit of study on plants grown in the Navajo community of Rough Rock, Arizona, is presented in sketches providing the common Navajo name for the plant, a literal English translation, the English name of the plant, and the Latin name. A brief description of each plant includes where the plant grows, how the Navajos use the plant, and the color and…

  5. Nox NADPH Oxidases and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Thaís L.S.; Abrahão, Thalita B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Understanding isoform- and context-specific subcellular Nox reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase compartmentalization allows relevant functional inferences. This review addresses the interplay between Nox NADPH oxidases and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an increasingly evident player in redox pathophysiology given its role in redox protein folding and stress responses. Recent Advances: Catalytic/regulatory transmembrane subunits are synthesized in the ER and their processing includes folding, N-glycosylation, heme insertion, p22phox heterodimerization, as shown for phagocyte Nox2. Dual oxidase (Duox) maturation also involves the regulation by ER-resident Duoxa2. The ER is the activation site for some isoforms, typically Nox4, but potentially other isoforms. Such location influences redox/Nox-mediated calcium signaling regulation via ER targets, such as sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). Growing evidence suggests that Noxes are integral signaling elements of the unfolded protein response during ER stress, with Nox4 playing a dual prosurvival/proapoptotic role in this setting, whereas Nox2 enhances proapoptotic signaling. ER chaperones such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) closely interact with Noxes. PDI supports growth factor-dependent Nox1 activation and mRNA expression, as well as migration in smooth muscle cells, and PDI overexpression induces acute spontaneous Nox activation. Critical Issues: Mechanisms of PDI effects include possible support of complex formation and RhoGTPase activation. In phagocytes, PDI supports phagocytosis, Nox activation, and redox-dependent interactions with p47phox. Together, the results implicate PDI as possible Nox organizer. Future Directions: We propose that convergence between Noxes and ER may have evolutive roots given ER-related functional contexts, which paved Nox evolution, namely calcium signaling and pathogen killing. Overall, the interplay between

  6. Elemental Abundances from Very Low Abundance HII Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skillman, Evan D.; Terlevich, Roberto J.; Terlevich, Elena

    1992-12-01

    In 1987 we initiated a program to mitigate the deficiency of known low metallicity galaxies. Following our discoveries of very low abundance H II regions in nearby dwarf galaxies (Skillman et al. 1988, 1989a,b), we used the IDS on the INT to to collect spectra of dwarf galaxies in the Second Byurakan Survey (SBS) of UV excess galaxies. Our survey of over 40 SBS galaxies was completed in January 1990 and we have identified roughly one dozen very low metallicity H II galaxies. Now, with a significant sample of these galaxies, several observational programs are possible; foremost of these is the measurement of the primordial helium abundance (eg., Pagel et al. 1992). We report here on observations from March 1991 and 1992 using the ISIS spectrograph on the WHT to obtain very high quality spectra of 8 of these newly discovered metal-poor galaxies. The ISIS double spectrograph allows simultaneous observations of the blue (3600 - 5100 Angstroms) and red (6300 - 6800 Angstroms). Thus, He, N, O, Ne and S abundances can be derived with relatively small observational uncertainties. We compare our new observations with those in the literature. Our preliminary analysis indicates a slightly larger scatter in He/H at low O/H than had been seen previously. The small scatter may have been due simply to the paucity of observations at low metallicity. References: Pagel, B.E.J., Simonson, E.A., Terlevich, R.J., & Edmunds, M.G. 1992, MNRAS, 255, 325 Skillman, E.D., Kennicutt, R.C., & Hodge, P.W. 1989a, ApJ, 347, 875 Skillman, E.D., Melnick, J., Terlevich, R., & Moles, M. 1988, A&A, 196, 31 Skillman, E.D., Terlevich, R., & Melnick, J. 1989b, MNRAS, 240, 563

  7. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes.

  8. Noise of sliding rough contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bot, Alain

    2017-01-01

    This article is a discussion about the origin of friction noise produced when rubbing solids having rough surfaces. We show that noise emerges from numerous impacts into the contact between antagonist asperities of surfaces. Prediction of sound sources reduces to a statistical problem of contact mechanics. On the other hand, contact is also responsible of dissipation of vibration. This leads to the paradoxical result that the noise may not be proportional to the number of sources.

  9. Sensing roughness and polish direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, M. L.; Olesen, A. S.; Larsen, H. E.; Stubager, J.; Hanson, S. G.; Pedersen, T. F.; Pedersen, H. C.

    2016-04-01

    As a part of the work carried out on a project supported by the Danish council for technology and innovation, we have investigated the option of smoothing standard CNC machined surfaces. In the process of constructing optical prototypes, involving custom-designed optics, the development cost and time consumption can become relatively large numbers in a research budget. Machining the optical surfaces directly is expensive and time consuming. Alternatively, a more standardized and cheaper machining method can be used, but then the object needs to be manually polished. During the polishing process the operator needs information about the RMS-value of the surface roughness and the current direction of the scratches introduces by the polishing process. The RMS-value indicates to the operator how far he is from the final finish, and the scratch orientation is often specified by the customer in order to avoid complications during the casting process. In this work we present a method for measuring the RMS-values of the surface roughness while simultaneously determining the polishing direction. We are mainly interested in the RMS-values in the range from 0 - 100 nm, which corresponds to the finish categories of A1, A2 and A3. Based on simple intensity measurements we estimates the RMS-value of the surface roughness, and by using a sectioned annual photo-detector to collect the scattered light we can determine the direction of polishing and distinguish light scattered from random structures and light scattered from scratches.

  10. Endoplasmic motility spectral characteristics in plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avsievich, T. I.; Ghaleb, K. E. S.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2015-03-01

    Spectral Fourier analysis of experimentally acquired velocity time dependencies, V(t), of shuttle endoplasmic motility in an isolated strand of plasmodium of slime mold Physarum Polycephalum has been realized. V(t) registration was performed in normal conditions and after the treatment by respiration inhibitors, which lead to a complete cessation of endoplasmic motion in the strand. Spectral analysis of the velocity time dependences of the endoplasm allows obtaining two distinct harmonic components in the spectra. Their ratio appeared to be constant in all cases, ν2/ν1=1.97±0.17. After the inhibitors are washed out respiratory system becomes normal, gradually restoring the activity of both harmonic oscillatory sources with time. Simulated velocity time dependences correspond to experimental data with good accuracy.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and its effects on renal tubular cells apoptosis in ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Guo, Min; Jiang, Wei; Dong, Hui; Han, Yafei; An, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Jisheng

    2016-06-01

    Ischemia is the most frequent cause of acute kidney injury (AKI), which is characterized by apoptosis of renal tubular cell. A common result of ischemia in AKI is dysfunction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which causes the protein-folding capacity to lag behind the protein-folding load. The abundance of misfolded proteins stressed the ER and results in induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR). While the UPR is an adaptive response, over time it can result in apoptosis when cells are unable to recover quickly. Recent research suggests that ER stress is a major factor in renal tubular cell apoptosis resulting from ischemic AKI. Thus, ER stress may be an important new progression factor in the pathology of ischemic AKI. In this article, we review UPR signaling, describe pathology and pathophysiology mechanisms of ischemic AKI, and highlight the dual function of ER stress on renal tubular cell apoptosis.

  12. Fractal study and simulation of fracture roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Bodvarsson, G.S. )

    1990-05-01

    This study examines the roughness profiles of the surfaces of fractures and faults by using concepts from fractal geometry. Relationships between fractal characteristics of profiles and isotropic surfaces are analytically developed and a deterministic representation of the roughness is examined.

  13. Intelligent Information Retrieval Using Rough Set Approximations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Padmini

    1989-01-01

    Describes rough sets theory and discusses the advantages it offers for information retrieval, including the implicit inclusion of Boolean logic, term weighting, ranked retrieval output, and relevance feedback. Rough set formalism is compared to Boolean, vector, and fuzzy models of information retrieval and a small scale evaluation of rough sets is…

  14. Spherical wave reflection in layered media with rough interfaces: Three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Samuel; Cordioli, Julio; Guillon, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    In the context of sediment characterization, layer interface roughnesses may be responsible for sound-speed profile measurement uncertainties. To study the roughness influence, a three-dimensional (3D) modeling of a layered seafloor with rough interfaces is necessary. Although roughness scattering has an abundant literature, 3D modeling of spherical wave reflection on rough interfaces is generally limited to a single interface (using Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral) or computationally expensive techniques (finite difference or finite element method). In this work, it is demonstrated that the wave reflection over a layered medium with irregular interfaces can be modeled as a sum of integrals over each interface. The main approximations of the method are the tangent-plane approximation, the Born approximation (multiple reflection between interfaces are neglected) and flat-interface approximation for the transmitted waves into the sediment. The integration over layer interfaces results in a method with reasonable computation cost.

  15. Abundances in Przybylski's star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowley, C. R.; Ryabchikova, T.; Kupka, F.; Bord, D. J.; Mathys, G.; Bidelman, W. P.

    2000-09-01

    We have derived abundances for 54 elements in the extreme roAp star HD101065. ESO spectra with a resolution of about 80000, and S/N of 200 or more were employed. The adopted model has Teff=6600K, and log(g)=4.2. Because of the increased line opacity and consequent low gas pressure, convection plays no significant role in the temperature structure. Lighter elemental abundances through the iron group scatter about standard abundance distribution (SAD) (solar) values. Iron and nickel are about one order of magnitude deficient while cobalt is enhanced by 1.5dex. Heavier elements, including the lanthanides, generally follow the solar pattern but enhanced by 3 to 4dex. Odd-Z elements are generally less abundant than their even-Z neighbours. With a few exceptions (e.g. Yb), the abundance pattern among the heavy elements is remarkably coherent, and resembles a displaced solar distribution.

  16. Subpatch roughness in earthquake rupture investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielke, O.; Mai, P. M.

    2016-03-01

    Fault geometric complexities exhibit fractal characteristics over a wide range of spatial scales (<µm to > km) and strongly affect the rupture process at corresponding scales. Numerical rupture simulations provide a framework to quantitatively investigate the relationship between a fault's roughness and its seismic characteristics. Fault discretization, however, introduces an artificial lower limit to roughness. Individual fault patches are planar and subpatch roughness—roughness at spatial scales below fault patch size—is not incorporated. Does negligence of subpatch roughness measurably affect the outcome of earthquake rupture simulations? We approach this question with a numerical parameter space investigation and demonstrate that subpatch roughness significantly modifies the slip-strain relationship—a fundamental aspect of dislocation theory. Faults with subpatch roughness induce less strain than their planar-fault equivalents at distances beyond the length of a slipping fault. We further provide regression functions that characterize the stochastic effect subpatch roughness.

  17. Continuous network of endoplasmic reticulum in cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, M; Slater, N T; Fein, A; Schmidek, A; Reese, T S

    1994-01-01

    Purkinje neurons in rat cerebellar slices injected with an oil drop saturated with 1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate [DiIC16(3) or DiI] to label the endoplasmic reticulum were observed by confocal microscopy. DiI spread throughout the cell body and dendrites and into the axon. DiI spreading is due to diffusion in a continuous bilayer and is not due to membrane trafficking because it also spreads in fixed neurons. DiI stained such features of the endoplasmic reticulum as densities at branch points, reticular networks in the cell body and dendrites, nuclear envelope, spines, and aggregates formed during anoxia nuclear envelope, spines, and aggregates formed during anoxia in low extracellular Ca2+. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, where optical conditions provide more detail, DiI labeled a clearly delineated network of endoplasmic reticulum in the cell body. We conclude that there is a continuous compartment of endoplasmic reticulum extending from the cell body throughout the dendrites. This compartment may coordinate and integrate neuronal functions. Images PMID:7519781

  18. Genetic and molecular interactions of the Erv41p-Erv46p complex involved in transport between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Leah M; Tong, Amy Hin Yan; Boone, Charles; Jensen, Ole N; Otte, Stefan

    2006-11-15

    Erv41p and Erv46p are integral membrane proteins conserved across species. They were originally identified as abundant constituents of COPII-coated vesicles, and form a complex which cycles between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex. Yeast strains lacking these proteins are viable but display subtle secretory phenotypes. In order to obtain information about possible biological roles of this protein complex in endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi transport, we employed the Synthetic Genetic Array approach to screen for synthetic genetic interactions with the erv46 null mutation. We identified synthetic interactions with vma12, vma21, vma22 and vps1 deletion mutations. The vma21Delta mutation exacerbates transport defects caused by the erv46Delta mutation. Unexpectedly, yeast strains lacking Vma21p fail to sort the endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi v-SNARE, Bos1p, efficiently into COPII vesicles, yet these vesicles are fully fusion competent. In addition, we set out to identify, by a biochemical approach, proteins interacting with the Erv41p-Erv46p complex. We report a strong interaction between the Erv41p-Erv46p complex and endoplasmic reticulum glucosidase II. Strains lacking a cycling Erv41p-Erv46p complex display a mild glycoprotein processing defect.

  19. Sulfatase modifying factor 1 trafficking through the cells: from endoplasmic reticulum to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Zito, Ester; Buono, Mario; Pepe, Stefano; Settembre, Carmine; Annunziata, Ida; Surace, Enrico Maria; Dierks, Thomas; Monti, Maria; Cozzolino, Marianna; Pucci, Piero; Ballabio, Andrea; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2007-05-16

    Sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) is the gene mutated in multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) that encodes the formylglycine-generating enzyme, an essential activator of all the sulfatases. SUMF1 is a glycosylated enzyme that is resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), although it is also secreted. Here, we demonstrate that upon secretion, SUMF1 can be taken up from the medium by several cell lines. Furthermore, the in vivo engineering of mice liver to produce SUMF1 shows its secretion into the blood serum and its uptake into different tissues. Additionally, we show that non-glycosylated forms of SUMF1 can still be secreted, while only the glycosylated SUMF1 enters cells, via a receptor-mediated mechanism. Surprisingly, following its uptake, SUMF1 shuttles from the plasma membrane to the ER, a route that has to date only been well characterized for some of the toxins. Remarkably, once taken up and relocalized into the ER, SUMF1 is still active, enhancing the sulfatase activities in both cultured cells and mice tissues.

  20. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  1. Top consumer abundance influences lake methane efflux.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Shawn P; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Syväranta, Jari; Jones, Roger I

    2015-11-04

    Lakes are important habitats for biogeochemical cycling of carbon. The organization and structure of aquatic communities influences the biogeochemical interactions between lakes and the atmosphere. Understanding how trophic structure regulates ecosystem functions and influences greenhouse gas efflux from lakes is critical to understanding global carbon cycling and climate change. With a whole-lake experiment in which a previously fishless lake was divided into two treatment basins where fish abundance was manipulated, we show how a trophic cascade from fish to microbes affects methane efflux to the atmosphere. Here, fish exert high grazing pressure and remove nearly all zooplankton. This reduction in zooplankton density increases the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria, which in turn reduce CH4 efflux rates by roughly 10 times. Given that globally there are millions of lakes emitting methane, an important greenhouse gas, our findings that aquatic trophic interactions significantly influence the biogeochemical cycle of methane has important implications.

  2. Roughness Length Variability over Heterogeneous Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    System ( COAMPS ) model fields for selected times during Tropical Storm Fay. Figure 42. Contoured roughness length from (a) COAMPS and 16.5-m wind...passage of Tropical Storm Fay on 18–21 August 2008. Spatial and temporal variations in roughness lengths for a period of one year are compared to...the same height in the tropical storm case, for wind speeds exceeding 20 ms-1, evidence is presented that indicates roughness lengths are related to

  3. Turbulent Flow over Rough Turbine Airfoils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-08-01

    SUBJECT TERMS (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) FIELD GROUP SUB. GR. Turbine blades ’ vanes ; surface roughness...turbulent boundary layer over rough turbine vanes or blades is developed. A new formulation of the mixing length model, expressed in the velocity-space...A-163 005 TURBULENT FLOW OVER ROUGH TURBINE AIRFOILS (U) OHIO 1/ STATE UNIV RESEARCH FOUNDATION COLUMBUS L S HAN AUG B5 OSURF-76357/?i4467 AFWL-TR-95

  4. Simplified Approach to Predicting Rough Surface Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Stripf, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Turbine vane heat transfer predictions are given for smooth and rough vanes where the experimental data show transition moving forward on the vane as the surface roughness physical height increases. Consiste nt with smooth vane heat transfer, the transition moves forward for a fixed roughness height as the Reynolds number increases. Comparison s are presented with published experimental data. Some of the data ar e for a regular roughness geometry with a range of roughness heights, Reynolds numbers, and inlet turbulence intensities. The approach ta ken in this analysis is to treat the roughness in a statistical sense , consistent with what would be obtained from blades measured after e xposure to actual engine environments. An approach is given to determ ine the equivalent sand grain roughness from the statistics of the re gular geometry. This approach is guided by the experimental data. A roughness transition criterion is developed, and comparisons are made with experimental data over the entire range of experimental test co nditions. Additional comparisons are made with experimental heat tran sfer data, where the roughness geometries are both regular as well a s statistical. Using the developed analysis, heat transfer calculatio ns are presented for the second stage vane of a high pressure turbine at hypothetical engine conditions.

  5. Simplified Approach to Predicting Rough Surface Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Stripf, M.

    2009-01-01

    Turbine vane heat transfer predictions are given for smooth and rough vanes where the experimental data show transition moving forward on the vane as the surface roughness physical height increases. Consistent with smooth vane heat transfer, the transition moves forward for a fixed roughness height as the Reynolds number increases. Comparisons are presented with published experimental data. Some of the data are for a regular roughness geometry with a range of roughness heights, Reynolds numbers, and inlet turbulence intensities. The approach taken in this analysis is to treat the roughness in a statistical sense, consistent with what would be obtained from blades measured after exposure to actual engine environments. An approach is given to determine the equivalent sand grain roughness from the statistics of the regular geometry. This approach is guided by the experimental data. A roughness transition criterion is developed, and comparisons are made with experimental data over the entire range of experimental test conditions. Additional comparisons are made with experimental heat transfer data, where the roughness geometries are both regular and statistical. Using the developed analysis, heat transfer calculations are presented for the second stage vane of a high pressure turbine at hypothetical engine conditions.

  6. Rough set models of Physarum machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancerz, Krzysztof; Schumann, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we consider transition system models of behaviour of Physarum machines in terms of rough set theory. A Physarum machine, a biological computing device implemented in the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum (true slime mould), is a natural transition system. In the behaviour of Physarum machines, one can notice some ambiguity in Physarum motions that influences exact anticipation of states of machines in time. To model this ambiguity, we propose to use rough set models created over transition systems. Rough sets are an appropriate tool to deal with rough (ambiguous, imprecise) concepts in the universe of discourse.

  7. Mitochondrial Dysregulation Secondary to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Autosomal Dominant Tubulointerstitial Kidney Disease – UMOD (ADTKD-UMOD)

    PubMed Central

    Kemter, Elisabeth; Fröhlich, Thomas; Arnold, Georg J.; Wolf , Eckhard; Wanke, Rüdiger

    2017-01-01

    ‘Autosomal dominant tubulointerstitial kidney disease – UMOD’ (ADTKD-UMOD) is caused by impaired maturation and secretion of mutant uromodulin (UMOD) in thick ascending limb of Henle loop (TAL) cells, resulting in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR). To gain insight into pathophysiology, we analysed proteome profiles of TAL-enriched outer renal medulla samples from ADTKD-UMOD and control mice by quantitative LC-MS/MS. In total, 212 differentially abundant proteins were identified. Numerous ER proteins, including BiP (HSPA5), phosphorylated eIF2α (EIF2S1), ATF4, ATF6 and CHOP (DDIT3), were increased abundant, consistent with UPR. The abundance of hypoxia-inducible proteins with stress survival functions, i.e. HYOU1, TXNDC5 and ERO1L, was also increased. TAL cells in ADTKD-UMOD showed a decreased proportion of mitochondria and reduced abundance of multiple mitochondrial proteins, associated with disturbed post-translational processing and activation of the mitochondrial transcription factor NRF1. Impaired fission of organelles, as suggested by reduced abundance of FIS1, may be another reason for disturbed biogenesis of mitochondria and peroxisomes. Reduced amounts of numerous proteins of the OXPHOS and citrate cycle pathways, and activation of the LKB1-AMPK-pathway, a sensor pathway of cellular energy deficits, suggest impaired energy homeostasis. In conclusion, our study revealed secondary mitochondrial dysfunction in ADTKD-UMOD. PMID:28220896

  8. Reaction of sorghum lines to zonate leaf spot and rough leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abundant, frequent rains, along with humid and cloudy conditions during the early part of the 2015 growing season, provided conducive conditions for an unusually severe outbreak of zonate leaf spot and rough leaf spot in a block of sorghum lines at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research Farm, Burleson Coun...

  9. Membrane biogenesis during B cell differentiation: most endoplasmic reticulum proteins are expressed coordinately

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The induction of high-rate protein secretion entails increased biogenesis of secretory apparatus organelles. We examined the biogenesis of the secretory apparatus in the B cell line CH12 because it can be induced in vitro to secrete immunoglobulin (Ig). Upon stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), CH12 cells increased secretion of IgM 12-fold. This induced secretion was accompanied by preferential expansion of the ER and the Golgi complex. Three parameters of the rough ER changed: its area and volume increased 3.3- and 3.7-fold, respectively, and the density of membrane-bound ribosomes increased 3.5-fold. Similarly, the area of the Golgi stack increased 3.3-fold, and its volume increased 4.1-fold. These changes provide sufficient biosynthetic capacity to account for the increased secretory activity of CH12. Despite the large increase in IgM synthesis, and because of the expansion of the ER, the concentration of IgM within the ER changed less than twofold during the differentiation process. During the amplification of the rough ER, the expression of resident proteins changed according to one of two patterns. The majority (75%) of rough microsomal (RM) proteins increased in proportion to the increase in rough ER size. Included in this group were both lumenal proteins such as Ig binding protein (BiP), and membrane proteins such as ribophorins I and II. In addition, the expression of a minority (approximately 9%) of RM polypeptides increased preferentially, such that their abundance within the RM of secreting CH12 cells was increased. Thus, the expansion of ER during CH12 differentiation involves preferential increases in the abundance of a few resident proteins, superimposed upon proportional increases in most ER proteins. PMID:2335560

  10. A Data Preprocessing Algorithm for Classification Model Based On Rough Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang-wei, Li; Yian-fang, Qi

    Aimed to solve the limitation of abundant data to constructing classification modeling in data mining, the paper proposed a novel effective preprocessing algorithm based on rough sets. Firstly, we construct the relation Information System using original data sets. Secondly, make use of attribute reduction theory of Rough sets to produce the Core of Information System. Core is the most important and necessary information which cannot reduce in original Information System. So it can get a same effect as original data sets to data analysis, and can construct classification modeling using it. Thirdly, construct indiscernibility matrix using reduced Information System, and finally, get the classification of original data sets. Compared to existing techniques, the developed algorithm enjoy following advantages: (1) avoiding the abundant data in follow-up data processing, and (2) avoiding large amount of computation in whole data mining process. (3) The results become more effective because of introducing the attributes reducing theory of Rough Sets.

  11. Chlamydiae Assemble a Pathogen Synapse to Hijack the Host Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Dumoux, Maud; Clare, Daniel K; Saibil, Helen R; Hayward, Richard D

    2012-01-01

    Chlamydiae are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens that replicate within a specialized membrane-bound compartment, termed an ‘inclusion’. The inclusion membrane is a critical host–pathogen interface, yet the extent of its interaction with cellular organelles and the origin of this membrane remain poorly defined. Here we show that the host endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is specifically recruited to the inclusion, and that key rough ER (rER) proteins are enriched on and translocated into the inclusion. rER recruitment is a Chlamydia-orchestrated process that occurs independently of host trafficking. Generation of infectious progeny requires an intact ER, since ER vacuolation early during infection stalls inclusion development, whereas disruption post ER recruitment bursts the inclusion. Electron tomography and immunolabelling of Chlamydia-infected cells reveal ‘pathogen synapses’ at which ordered arrays of chlamydial type III secretion complexes connect to the inclusion membrane only at rER contact sites. Our data show a supramolecular assembly involved in pathogen hijack of a key host organelle. PMID:22901061

  12. The endoplasmic reticulum stress response: A link with tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Cui, Yongyong; Zhao, Deming; Barrow, Paul Andrew; Zhou, Xiangmei

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the worldwide. The endoplasmic-reticulum stress (ERS) response constitutes a cellular process that is triggered by mycobacterial infection that disturbs the folding of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced to suspend the synthesis of early proteins and reduce the accumulation of unfolded- or misfolded proteins in the ER restoring normal physiological cell function. Prolonged or uncontrolled ERS leads to the activation of three signaling pathways (IRE1, PERK and ATF6) which directs the cell towards apoptosis. The absence of this process facilitates spread of the mycobacteria within the body. We summarize here recent advances in understanding the signaling pathway diversity governing ERS in relation to TB.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: implications for inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Arthur; Martínez-Naves, Eduardo; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview of the emerging role of cellular stress responses in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent findings The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a primitive cellular pathway that is engaged when responding to endoplasmic reticulum stress and regulates autophagy. Highly secretory cells such as Paneth cells and goblet cells in the intestines are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum stress and are exceedingly dependent upon a properly functioning UPR to maintain cellular viability and homeostasis. Primary genetic abnormalities within the components of the UPR (e.g. XBP1, ARG2, ORMDL3), genes that encode proteins reliant upon a robust secretory pathway (e.g. MUC2, HLAB27) and environmental factors that create disturbances in the UPR (e.g. microbial products and inflammatory cytokines) are important factors in the primary development and/or perpetuation of intestinal inflammation. Summary Endoplasmic reticulum stress is an important new pathway involved in the development of intestinal inflammation associated with IBD and likely other intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:20495455

  14. Effect of roughness on imaging and characterizing rough crack-like defect using ultrasonic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2012-05-01

    All naturally occurring crack-like defects in solid structures are rough to some degree, which can affect defect inspection and characterization. Based on the simulated array data for various rough cracks and the total focusing method imaging algorithm, the effect of roughness on defect imaging and characterization was discussed. The array data was simulated by using the forward model combining with scattering matrices for various rough cracks. The scattering matrix describes the scattering field of a scatterer from all possible incident and scattering directions. It is shown that roughness can be either beneficial or detrimental to the detectability of a crack-like defect, depending on the defect characteristics such as length, roughness, correlation length, orientation angle, and array inspection configuration. It is also shown that roughness can cause the underestimation of length of rough crack-like defects by using the image-based approach.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: a potential target for therapy.

    PubMed

    Montague, Karli; Malik, Bilal; Gray, Anna L; La Spada, Albert R; Hanna, Michael G; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Greensmith, Linda

    2014-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked degenerative motor neuron disease caused by an abnormal expansion in the polyglutamine encoding CAG repeat of the androgen receptor gene. There is evidence implicating endoplasmic reticulum stress in the development and progression of neurodegenerative disease, including polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease and in motor neuron disease, where cellular stress disrupts functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to induction of the unfolded protein response. We examined whether endoplasmic reticulum stress is also involved in the pathogenesis of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice that carry 100 pathogenic polyglutamine repeats in the androgen receptor, and develop a late-onset neuromuscular phenotype with motor neuron degeneration, were studied. We observed a disturbance in endoplasmic reticulum-associated calcium homeostasis in cultured embryonic motor neurons from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice, which was accompanied by increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress reduced the endoplasmic reticulum-associated cell death pathway. Examination of spinal cord motor neurons of pathogenic mice at different disease stages revealed elevated expression of markers for endoplasmic reticulum stress, confirming an increase in this stress response in vivo. Importantly, the most significant increase was detected presymptomatically, suggesting that endoplasmic reticulum stress may play an early and possibly causal role in disease pathogenesis. Our results therefore indicate that the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway could potentially be a therapeutic target for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and related polyglutamine diseases.

  16. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin; Malijevský, Alexandr

    2015-09-14

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel’s law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves.

  17. Roughness configuration matters for aeolian sediment flux

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The parameterisation of surface roughness effects on aeolian sediment transport is a key source of uncertainty in wind erosion models. Roughness effects are typically represented by bulk drag-partitioning schemes that scale the threshold friction velocity (u*t) for soil entrainment by the ratio of s...

  18. 7 CFR 51.1873 - Slightly rough.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946... Standards for Fresh Tomatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1873 Slightly rough. Slightly rough means that the tomato...

  19. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, Martin; Malijevský, Alexandr; Lísal, Martin

    2015-09-01

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel's law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves.

  20. Hydrodynamics and Roughness of Irregular Boundaries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    principle component analysis (PCA) similar to that used by Preston (2009) for ship- mounted multibeam data. Several variables derived from the...complex boundaries as well as characterization of acoustic and optical processes. Turbulent processes at the seabed are at the foundation of littoral...nearshore hydrodynamics, turbulence over rough beds influences optical and acoustic properties. Bed roughness also directly affects acoustic propagation in

  1. Specular Reflection from Rough Surfaces Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasuda, Kensei; Kim, Alvin; Cho, Hayley; Timofejev, Timofej; Walecki, Wojciech J.; Klep, James; Edelson, Amy S.; Walecki, Abigail S.; Walecki, Eve S.; Walecki, Peter S.

    2016-01-01

    In his beautiful paper, Hasan Fakhruddin reported observations of mirror-like reflections in the rough surface of a ground glass plate. Similar effects have been recently employed for metrology of the roughness of optical diffusers used in modern light emitting device illumination systems. We report the observations of specular reflection in…

  2. Modeling surface roughness scattering in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moors, Kristof; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim

    2015-09-28

    Ando's model provides a rigorous quantum-mechanical framework for electron-surface roughness scattering, based on the detailed roughness structure. We apply this method to metallic nanowires and improve the model introducing surface roughness distribution functions on a finite domain with analytical expressions for the average surface roughness matrix elements. This approach is valid for any roughness size and extends beyond the commonly used Prange-Nee approximation. The resistivity scaling is obtained from the self-consistent relaxation time solution of the Boltzmann transport equation and is compared to Prange-Nee's approach and other known methods. The results show that a substantial drop in resistivity can be obtained for certain diameters by achieving a large momentum gap between Fermi level states with positive and negative momentum in the transport direction.

  3. Specular Reflection from Rough Surfaces Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Kensei; Kim, Alvin; Cho, Hayley; Timofejev, Timofej; Walecki, Wojciech J.; Klep, James; Edelson, Amy S.; Walecki, Abigail S.; Walecki, Eve S.; Walecki, Peter S.

    2016-10-01

    In his beautiful paper, Hasan Fakhruddin reported observations of mirror-like reflections in the rough surface of a ground glass plate. Similar effects have been recently employed for metrology of the roughness of optical diffusers used in modern light emitting device illumination systems. We report the observations of specular reflection in nontransparent rough surfaces at oblique angles, where roughness was treated as a variable. We present a simple trigonometry-based model explaining the observed phenomenon, which we experimentally validated using aluminum surfaces that have controlled roughness. The reported demonstration requires no special equipment, other than cellphone cameras, dielectric or metal plate, and sandpaper, and serves as an introduction to wave optics. This activity can be used to get further insight into everyday applications of wave optics for students already familiar with wave optics fundamentals.

  4. Anisotropy in the wetting of rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; He, Bo; Lee, Junghoon; Patankar, Neelesh A

    2005-01-15

    Surface roughness amplifies the water-repellency of hydrophobic materials. If the roughness geometry is, on average, isotropic then the shape of a sessile drop is almost spherical and the apparent contact angle of the drop on the rough surface is nearly uniform along the contact line. If the roughness geometry is not isotropic, e.g., parallel grooves, then the apparent contact angle is no longer uniform along the contact line. The apparent contact angles observed perpendicular and parallel to the direction of the grooves are different. A better understanding of this problem is critical in designing rough superhydrophobic surfaces. The primary objective of this work is to determine the mechanism of anisotropic wetting and to propose a methodology to quantify the apparent contact angles and the drop shape. We report a theoretical and an experimental study of wetting of surfaces with parallel groove geometry.

  5. Proteomics characterization of abundant Golgi membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Bell, A W; Ward, M A; Blackstock, W P; Freeman, H N; Choudhary, J S; Lewis, A P; Chotai, D; Fazel, A; Gushue, J N; Paiement, J; Palcy, S; Chevet, E; Lafrenière-Roula, M; Solari, R; Thomas, D Y; Rowley, A; Bergeron, J J

    2001-02-16

    A mass spectrometric analysis of proteins partitioning into Triton X-114 from purified hepatic Golgi apparatus (84% purity by morphometry, 122-fold enrichment over the homogenate for the Golgi marker galactosyl transferase) led to the unambiguous identification of 81 proteins including a novel Golgi-associated protein of 34 kDa (GPP34). The membrane protein complement was resolved by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to a hierarchical approach using delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry characterization by peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry to generate sequence tags, and Edman sequencing of proteins. Major membrane proteins corresponded to known Golgi residents, a Golgi lectin, anterograde cargo, and an abundance of trafficking proteins including KDEL receptors, p24 family members, SNAREs, Rabs, a single ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factor, and two SCAMPs. Analytical fractionation and gold immunolabeling of proteins in the purified Golgi fraction were used to assess the intra-Golgi and total cellular distribution of GPP34, two SNAREs, SCAMPs, and the trafficking proteins GBF1, BAP31, and alpha(2)P24 identified by the proteomics approach as well as the endoplasmic reticulum contaminant calnexin. Although GPP34 has never previously been identified as a protein, the localization of GPP34 to the Golgi complex, the conservation of GPP34 from yeast to humans, and the cytosolically exposed location of GPP34 predict a role for a novel coat protein in Golgi trafficking.

  6. Segregation of the polypeptide translocation apparatus to regions of the endoplasmic reticulum containing ribophorins and ribosomes. I. Functional tests on rat liver microsomal subfractions

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    A preparation of rat liver microsomes containing 70% of the total cellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes was subfractionated by isopycnic density centrifugation. Twelve subfractions of different ribosome content ranging in density from 1.06 to 1.29 were obtained and analyzed with respect to marker enzymes, RNA, and protein content, as well as the capacity of these membranes to bind 80S ribosomes in vitro. After removal of native polysomes from these microsomal subfractions by puromycin in a buffer of high ionic strength their capacity to rebind 80S ribosomes approached levels found in the corresponding native membranes before ribosome stripping. This indicates that in vitro rebinding of ribosomes occurs to the same sites occupied in the cell by membrane-bound polysomes. Microsomes in the microsomal subfractions were also tested for their capacity to effect the translocation of nascent secretory proteins into the microsomal lumen utilizing a rabbit reticulocyte translation system programmed with mRNA coding for the precursor of human placental lactogen. Membranes from microsomes with the higher isopycnic density and a high ribosome content showed the highest translocation activity, whereas membranes derived from smooth microsomes had only a very low translocation activity. These results indicate the membranes of the rough and smooth portions of the endoplasmic reticulum are functionally differentiated so that sites for ribosome binding and the translocation of nascent polypeptides are segregated to the rough domain of the organelle. PMID:6501423

  7. Effects of surface roughness on shear viscosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, Michail; Frank, Michael; Drikakis, Dimitris

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates the effect of surface roughness on fluid viscosity using molecular dynamics simulations. The three-dimensional model consists of liquid argon flowing between two solid walls whose surface roughness was modeled using fractal theory. In tandem with previously published experimental work, our results show that, while the viscosity in smooth channels remains constant across the channel width, in the presence of surface roughness it increases close to the walls. The increase of the boundary viscosity is further accentuated by an increase in the depth of surface roughness. We attribute this behavior to the increased momentum transfer at the boundary, a result of the irregular distribution of fluid particles near rough surfaces. Furthermore, although the viscosity in smooth channels has previously been shown to be independent of the strength of the solid-liquid interaction, here we show that in the presence of surface roughness, the boundary viscosity increases with the solid's wettability. The paper concludes with an analytical description of the viscosity as a function of the distance from the channel walls, the walls' surface roughness, and the solid's wetting properties. The relation can potentially be used to adjust the fluid dynamics equations for a more accurate description of microfluidic systems.

  8. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Guojing; Gullickson, Eric M.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  9. Ammonia abundances in comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.; Engel, L.

    The emission band strengths of the NH2 bands of Comets Halley, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Borrelly were measured to determine the NH2 column densities for the comets. Production rates obtained using the Haser and vectorial models are in agreement within the observational errors, suggesting that a simple two-step decay model may be used to approximate the NH2 distribution in a comet's coma. Ammonia-to-water abundance ratios from 0.01 to 0.4 percent were found for the four comets. The ratio in Comet Halley is found to be Q(NH3)/Q(H2O) = 0.002 + or - 0.001. No significant difference in the ammonia abundance was found before or after perihelion in Comet Halley.

  10. Relationships between topographic roughness and aeolian processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Lancaster, N.; Gaddis, L.; Rasmussen, K. R.; White, B. R.; Saunders, R. S.; Wall, S.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; Iversen, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction between winds and desert surfaces has important implications for sediment transport on Earth, Mars, and Venus, and for understanding the relationships between radar backscatter and aerodynamic roughness as part of the NASA Shuttle Imaging radar (SIR-C) Mission. Here, researchers report results from measurements of boundary layer wind profiles and surface roughness at sites in Death Valley and discuss their implications. The sites included a flat to undulating gravel and sand reg, alluvial fans, and a playa. Estimates of average particle size composition of Death Valley sites and arithmetic mean values of aerodynamic roughness are given in tabular form.

  11. Three-tier rough superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuanzhi; Yuan, Longyan; Hu, Bin; Zhou, Jun

    2015-08-07

    A three-tier rough superhydrophobic surface was fabricated by growing hydrophobic modified (fluorinated silane) zinc oxide (ZnO)/copper oxide (CuO) hetero-hierarchical structures on silicon (Si) micro-pillar arrays. Compared with the other three control samples with a less rough tier, the three-tier surface exhibits the best water repellency with the largest contact angle 161° and the lowest sliding angle 0.5°. It also shows a robust Cassie state which enables the water to flow with a speed over 2 m s(-1). In addition, it could prevent itself from being wetted by the droplet with low surface tension (mixed water and ethanol 1:1 in volume) which reveals a flow speed of 0.6 m s(-1) (dropped from the height of 2 cm). All these features prove that adding another rough tier on a two-tier rough surface could futher improve its water-repellent properties.

  12. The Surface Roughness of Terrains on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deal, K. S.; Arvidson, R. E.; Neumann, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    The RMS roughness measurements produced by Neumann et al. from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data provide unique information about surface height variations at an effective length scale of < 75 m. Roughness at this scale is important not only for landing site safety considerations, but also for assessment of landscape evolution, which depends on emplacement mechanisms and erosional/depositional processes. Here we present an examination of the global surface roughness map with discussion of terrain types and potential formation and/or alteration mechanisms. Spatially coherent terrain types were identified based on inspection of the roughness map. These terrains were further characterized through analysis of morphology and geology using MOLA topography, MOC wide-angle, and MOC narrow-angle images as well as the geologic maps produced by Scott & Tanaka and Greeley & Guest. All of these data were used to explore potential formation and modification processes.

  13. Ellipsometric analysis for surface roughness and texture.

    PubMed

    Nee, S M

    1988-07-15

    A 2-D symmetric model is incorporated into the calculation of the ellipsometric parameters Psi and Delta for surface roughness and texture characterization based on the effective medium theory. The least-squares fits of the experimental data at a 5-microm IR wavelength for rough fused silica samples at multiple angles of incidence give the standard deviations of Psi and Delta of about twice the instrumental errors. The effective thickness and the depolarization factor obtained by ellipsometry agree with the roughness and average height-to-halfwidth ratio of voids obtained by stylus profilometry. The surface texture can be characterized by the fit depolarization factors set. The excellent agreement between theory and experiments indicates that ellipsometry can be a promising nondestructive technique for rough-surface evaluation.

  14. Three-tier rough superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yuanzhi; Yuan, Longyan; Hu, Bin; Zhou, Jun

    2015-08-01

    A three-tier rough superhydrophobic surface was fabricated by growing hydrophobic modified (fluorinated silane) zinc oxide (ZnO)/copper oxide (CuO) hetero-hierarchical structures on silicon (Si) micro-pillar arrays. Compared with the other three control samples with a less rough tier, the three-tier surface exhibits the best water repellency with the largest contact angle 161° and the lowest sliding angle 0.5°. It also shows a robust Cassie state which enables the water to flow with a speed over 2 m s-1. In addition, it could prevent itself from being wetted by the droplet with low surface tension (mixed water and ethanol 1:1 in volume) which reveals a flow speed of 0.6 m s-1 (dropped from the height of 2 cm). All these features prove that adding another rough tier on a two-tier rough surface could futher improve its water-repellent properties.

  15. Mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum choreography: structure and signaling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Paola; Pozzan, Tullio

    2007-10-01

    Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) have different roles in living cells but they interact both physically and functionally. A key aspect of the mitochondria-ER relationship is the modulation of Ca(2+) signaling during cell activation, which thus affects a variety of physiological processes. We focus here on the molecular aspects that control the dynamics of the organelle-organelle interaction and their relationship with Ca(2+) signals, also discussing the consequences that these phenomena have, not only for cell physiology but also in the control of cell death.

  16. How supercontinents and superoceans affect seafloor roughness.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Joanne M; Müller, R Dietmar; Roest, Walter R; Wessel, Paul; Smith, Walter H F

    2008-12-18

    Seafloor roughness varies considerably across the world's ocean basins and is fundamental to controlling the circulation and mixing of heat in the ocean and dissipating eddy kinetic energy. Models derived from analyses of active mid-ocean ridges suggest that ocean floor roughness depends on seafloor spreading rates, with rougher basement forming below a half-spreading rate threshold of 30-35 mm yr(-1) (refs 4, 5), as well as on the local interaction of mid-ocean ridges with mantle plumes or cold-spots. Here we present a global analysis of marine gravity-derived roughness, sediment thickness, seafloor isochrons and palaeo-spreading rates of Cretaceous to Cenozoic ridge flanks. Our analysis reveals that, after eliminating effects related to spreading rate and sediment thickness, residual roughness anomalies of 5-20 mGal remain over large swaths of ocean floor. We found that the roughness as a function of palaeo-spreading directions and isochron orientations indicates that most of the observed excess roughness is not related to spreading obliquity, as this effect is restricted to relatively rare occurrences of very high obliquity angles (>45 degrees ). Cretaceous Atlantic ocean floor, formed over mantle previously overlain by the Pangaea supercontinent, displays anomalously low roughness away from mantle plumes and is independent of spreading rates. We attribute this observation to a sub-Pangaean supercontinental mantle temperature anomaly leading to slightly thicker than normal Late Jurassic and Cretaceous Atlantic crust, reduced brittle fracturing and smoother basement relief. In contrast, ocean crust formed above Pacific superswells, probably reflecting metasomatized lithosphere underlain by mantle at only slightly elevated temperatures, is not associated with basement roughness anomalies. These results highlight a fundamental difference in the nature of large-scale mantle upwellings below supercontinents and superoceans, and their impact on oceanic crustal

  17. Geoacoustic Physical Modeling: Volume-Roughness Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    important break by showing its relationship to the angle of repose , a fundamental feature of granular sediments (such as sands)[Ivakin, 2005...significant considering the fact that the slope of roughness at sub-cm scales at SAX99 site is large and can be close to both angle of repose and...roughness interactions and should be very pronounced at near- and sub-critical grazing angles . For example, the very first theoretical considerations

  18. Anatomy of the Ocean Surface Roughness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    with Theory,” J. Phys. Oceanogr. 13, 1505-1518, 1983. Tang, S. and O.H. Shemdin , “Measurement of High Frequency Waves Using a Wave Follower ,” J...SAR 45 Paul A. Hwang 228-688-4708 Ocean surface roughness can be decomposed into an ambient component, surface wave geometric contribution (the mean...square slope), and breaking wave contribution (the breaking roughness). Only the last two components can be attributed to local wind conditions for

  19. Role of surface roughness in superlubricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartaglino, U.; Samoilov, V. N.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2006-05-01

    We study the sliding of elastic solids in adhesive contact with flat and rough interfaces. We consider the dependence of the sliding friction on the elastic modulus of the solids. For elastically hard solids with planar surfaces with incommensurate surface structures we observe extremely low friction (superlubricity), which very abruptly increases as the elastic modulus decreases. We show that even a relatively small surface roughness may completely kill the superlubricity state.

  20. Role of surface roughness in superlubricity.

    PubMed

    Tartaglino, U; Samoilov, V N; Persson, B N J

    2006-05-03

    We study the sliding of elastic solids in adhesive contact with flat and rough interfaces. We consider the dependence of the sliding friction on the elastic modulus of the solids. For elastically hard solids with planar surfaces with incommensurate surface structures we observe extremely low friction (superlubricity), which very abruptly increases as the elastic modulus decreases. We show that even a relatively small surface roughness may completely kill the superlubricity state.

  1. Investigating the Surface Roughness of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susorney, H. C. M.; Barnouin, O. S.; Ernst, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Mercury Laser Altimeter (MLA) on the MErcury, Surface, Space ENviorment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft has acquired high-resolution topographic measurements of Mercury's northern hemisphere. These measurements permit the quantification of surface roughness on Mercury over baselines between 500 m and 200 km. In contrast to previous studies of Mercury's surface roughness, which have employed median differential surface slope, we calculate surface roughness as the root mean square (RMS) deviation of the difference in height. If the topography is self-affine or fractal, a power law can be fit to the RMS deviation as a function of baseline length. The exponent of this fit is called the Hurst exponent. This Hurst exponent describes whether or not a surface is self-affine, which occurs when processes produce a surface roughness that is inherently random. The surface roughness of Mercury's northern hemisphere reflects the observed bimodal nature of Mercury: the northern smooth plains have lower roughness values than the rougher heavily cratered terrain and intercrater plains. The relationship between RMS height and baseline length on Mercury shows two fractal sections, one between lengths of 500 m and 1 km, and another between lengths of 1 km and 20 km. We also find that the northern rise is indistinguishable from the surrounding smooth plains across all measured baselines, implying that the rise did not alter its surface topography at the baselines used in this study. Craters that host radar-bright deposits have similar roughness values to craters that do not host such deposits. Finally, fresh crater ejecta within the smooth plains have similar roughness values (particularly at the 1 km baseline) to the intercrater plains, supporting the interpretation that the intercrater plains may result from the modification of volcanic plains via cratering.

  2. Rough surface reconstruction for ultrasonic NDE simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Wonjae; Shi, Fan; Lowe, Michael J. S.; Skelton, Elizabeth A.; Craster, Richard V.

    2014-02-18

    The reflection of ultrasound from rough surfaces is an important topic for the NDE of safety-critical components, such as pressure-containing components in power stations. The specular reflection from a rough surface of a defect is normally lower than it would be from a flat surface, so it is typical to apply a safety factor in order that justification cases for inspection planning are conservative. The study of the statistics of the rough surfaces that might be expected in candidate defects according to materials and loading, and the reflections from them, can be useful to develop arguments for realistic safety factors. This paper presents a study of real rough crack surfaces that are representative of the potential defects in pressure-containing power plant. Two-dimensional (area) values of the height of the roughness have been measured and their statistics analysed. Then a means to reconstruct model cases with similar statistics, so as to enable the creation of multiple realistic realizations of the surfaces, has been investigated, using random field theory. Rough surfaces are reconstructed, based on a real surface, and results for these two-dimensional descriptions of the original surface have been compared with those from the conventional model based on a one-dimensional correlation coefficient function. In addition, ultrasonic reflections from them are simulated using a finite element method.

  3. Influence of surface roughness on dispersion forces.

    PubMed

    Svetovoy, V B; Palasantzas, G

    2015-02-01

    Surface roughness occurs in a wide variety of processes where it is both difficult to avoid and control. When two bodies are separated by a small distance the roughness starts to play an important role in the interaction between the bodies, their adhesion, and friction. Control of this short-distance interaction is crucial for micro and nanoelectromechanical devices, microfluidics, and for micro and nanotechnology. An important short-distance interaction is the dispersion forces, which are omnipresent due to their quantum origin. These forces between flat bodies can be described by the Lifshitz theory that takes into account the actual optical properties of interacting materials. However, this theory cannot describe rough bodies. The problem is complicated by the nonadditivity of the dispersion forces. Evaluation of the roughness effect becomes extremely difficult when roughness is comparable with the distance between bodies. In this paper we review the current state of the problem. Introduction for non-experts to physical origin of the dispersion forces is given in the paper. Critical experiments demonstrating the nonadditivity of the forces and strong influence of roughness on the interaction between bodies are reviewed. We also describe existing theoretical approaches to the problem. Recent advances in understanding the role of high asperities on the forces at distances close to contact are emphasized. Finally, some opinions about currently unsolved problems are also presented.

  4. Dentine roughness after different surface treatments.

    PubMed

    Mohsen, M M; Shabka, A A

    1993-01-01

    Surface roughness is one of the most influential criteria affecting the durability and strength of the adhesive restorative materials to the dentine. This study was carried out to investigate the roughness of the dentine surface after some of the modalities proposed for its treatment prior to application of the DBA. Dentine surface roughness of the sixty teeth divided into 12 groups were tested where the dentine surfaces were denuded and were brought to a similar 600 grit surface roughness then different treatments were carried out using H2O2, CO2 gas laser at 30 and 48 J/cm2 energy densities, EDTA and polyacrylic acid treatments. The dentine surface roughness was determined using a profilometer and the results were digitized and plotted using an AUTO-CAD software and Rolland plotter to compare the effects of the different treatments on the dentine surface roughness of the tested samples. Results revealed that the laser treatment left smooth dentine surface and added further evidences to the simplicity and reliability of the conventional use of EDTA and the polyacrylic acid according to the type of adhesive to be used.

  5. Cells preferentially grow on rough substrates.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Francesco; Tirinato, Luca; Battista, Edmondo; Causa, Filippo; Liberale, Carlo; di Fabrizio, Enzo M; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2010-10-01

    Substrate nanotopography affects cell adhesion and proliferation and is fundamental to the rational design of bio-adhesives, to tissue engineering and to the development of assays for in-vitro screening. Cell behavior on rough substrates is still elusive, and the results presented in the open literature remain controversial. Here, the proliferation of cells on electrochemically etched silicon substrates with different roughness and nearly similar surface energy was studied over three days with confocal and atomic force microscopy. The surface profile of the substrates is a self-affine fractal with a roughness R(a) growing with the etching time from approximately 2 to 100 nm and a fractal dimension D ranging between about 2 (nominally flat surface) and 2.6. For four cell types, the number of adhering cells and their proliferation rates exhibited a maximum on moderately rough (R(a) approximately 10-45 nm) nearly Brownian (D approximately 2.5) substrates. The observed cell behavior was satisfactorily interpreted within the theory of adhesion to randomly rough solids. These findings demonstrated the importance of nanogeometry in cell stable adhesion and growth, suggesting that moderately rough substrates with large fractal dimension could selectively boost cell proliferation.

  6. Regulation and Quality Control of Adiponectin Assembly by Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone ERp44*

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, Lutz; Radjainia, Mazdak; Xu, Cheng; Harris, Paul W. R.; Bashiri, Ghader; Goldstone, David C.; Brimble, Margaret A.; Wang, Yu; Mitra, Alok K.

    2015-01-01

    Adiponectin, a collagenous hormone secreted abundantly from adipocytes, possesses potent antidiabetic and anti-inflammatory properties. Mediated by the conserved Cys39 located in the variable region of the N terminus, the trimeric (low molecular weight (LMW)) adiponectin subunit assembles into different higher order complexes, e.g. hexamers (middle molecular weight (MMW)) and 12–18-mers (high molecular weight (HMW)), the latter being mostly responsible for the insulin-sensitizing activity of adiponectin. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone ERp44 retains adiponectin in the early secretory compartment and tightly controls the oxidative state of Cys39 and the oligomerization of adiponectin. Using cellular and in vitro assays, we show that ERp44 specifically recognizes the LMW and MMW forms but not the HMW form. Our binding assays with short peptide mimetics of adiponectin suggest that ERp44 intercepts and converts the pool of fully oxidized LMW and MMW adiponectin, but not the HMW form, into reduced trimeric precursors. These ERp44-bound precursors in the cis-Golgi may be transported back to the ER and released to enhance the population of adiponectin intermediates with appropriate oxidative state for HMW assembly, thereby underpinning the process of ERp44 quality control. PMID:26060250

  7. Microgravity induces proteomics changes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial protection

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Bryan J.; Thompson, J. Will; Dubois, Laura G.; Kommaddi, Reddy P.; Foster, Matthew W.; Mishra, Rajashree; Shenoy, Sudha K.; Shibata, Yoichiro; Kidane, Yared H.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Carnell, Lisa S.; Bowles, Dawn E.

    2016-01-01

    On Earth, biological systems have evolved in response to environmental stressors, interactions dictated by physical forces that include gravity. The absence of gravity is an extreme stressor and the impact of its absence on biological systems is ill-defined. Astronauts who have spent extended time under conditions of minimal gravity (microgravity) experience an array of biological alterations, including perturbations in cardiovascular function. We hypothesized that physiological perturbations in cardiac function in microgravity may be a consequence of alterations in molecular and organellar dynamics within the cellular milieu of cardiomyocytes. We used a combination of mass spectrometry-based approaches to compare the relative abundance and turnover rates of 848 and 196 proteins, respectively, in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes exposed to simulated microgravity or normal gravity. Gene functional enrichment analysis of these data suggested that the protein content and function of the mitochondria, ribosomes, and endoplasmic reticulum were differentially modulated in microgravity. We confirmed experimentally that in microgravity protein synthesis was decreased while apoptosis, cell viability, and protein degradation were largely unaffected. These data support our conclusion that in microgravity cardiomyocytes attempt to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis at the expense of protein synthesis. The overall response to this stress may culminate in cardiac muscle atrophy. PMID:27670941

  8. Characterization of an Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Silaffin Kinase from the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana*

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Vonda; Poulsen, Nicole; Kröger, Nils

    2010-01-01

    The formation of SiO2-based cell walls by diatoms (a large group of unicellular microalgae) is a well established model system for the study of molecular mechanisms of biological mineral morphogenesis (biomineralization). Diatom biomineralization involves highly phosphorylated proteins (silaffins and silacidins), analogous to other biomineralization systems, which also depend on diverse sets of phosphoproteins (e.g. mammalian teeth and bone, mollusk shells, and sponge silica). The phosphate moieties on biomineralization proteins play an essential role in mineral formation, yet the kinases catalyzing the phosphorylation of these proteins have remained poorly characterized. Recent functional genomics studies on the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana have revealed >100 proteins potentially involved in diatom silica formation. Here we have characterized the biochemical properties and biological function of one of these proteins, tpSTK1. Multiple tpSTK1-like proteins are encoded in diatom genomes, all of which exhibit low but significant sequence similarity to kinases from other organisms. We show that tpSTK1 has serine/threonine kinase activity capable of phosphorylating silaffins but not silacidins. Cell biological and biochemical analysis demonstrated that tpSTK1 is an abundant component of the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum. The present study provides the first molecular structure of a kinase that appears to catalyze phosphorylation of biomineral forming proteins in vivo. PMID:19889629

  9. Rkr1/Ltn1 Ubiquitin Ligase-mediated Degradation of Translationally Stalled Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteins.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Justin J; Geigges, Marco; Gibson, Ryan T; Fults, Eric S; Buchanan, Bryce W; Sachs, Nadine; Schink, Andrea; Kreft, Stefan G; Rubenstein, Eric M

    2015-07-24

    Aberrant nonstop proteins arise from translation of mRNA molecules beyond the coding sequence into the 3'-untranslated region. If a stop codon is not encountered, translation continues into the poly(A) tail, resulting in C-terminal appendage of a polylysine tract and a terminally stalled ribosome. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ubiquitin ligase Rkr1/Ltn1 has been implicated in the proteasomal degradation of soluble cytosolic nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. Rkr1 is essential for cellular fitness under conditions associated with increased prevalence of nonstop proteins. Mutation of the mammalian homolog causes significant neurological pathology, suggesting broad physiological significance of ribosome-associated quality control. It is not known whether and how soluble or transmembrane nonstop and translationally stalled proteins targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are detected and degraded. We generated and characterized model soluble and transmembrane ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. We found that these proteins are indeed subject to proteasomal degradation. We tested three candidate ubiquitin ligases (Rkr1 and ER-associated Doa10 and Hrd1) for roles in regulating abundance of these proteins. Our results indicate that Rkr1 plays the primary role in targeting the tested model ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins for degradation. These data expand the catalog of Rkr1 substrates and highlight a previously unappreciated role for this ubiquitin ligase at the ER membrane.

  10. Rkr1/Ltn1 Ubiquitin Ligase-mediated Degradation of Translationally Stalled Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Justin J.; Geigges, Marco; Gibson, Ryan T.; Fults, Eric S.; Buchanan, Bryce W.; Sachs, Nadine; Schink, Andrea; Kreft, Stefan G.; Rubenstein, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant nonstop proteins arise from translation of mRNA molecules beyond the coding sequence into the 3′-untranslated region. If a stop codon is not encountered, translation continues into the poly(A) tail, resulting in C-terminal appendage of a polylysine tract and a terminally stalled ribosome. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ubiquitin ligase Rkr1/Ltn1 has been implicated in the proteasomal degradation of soluble cytosolic nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. Rkr1 is essential for cellular fitness under conditions associated with increased prevalence of nonstop proteins. Mutation of the mammalian homolog causes significant neurological pathology, suggesting broad physiological significance of ribosome-associated quality control. It is not known whether and how soluble or transmembrane nonstop and translationally stalled proteins targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are detected and degraded. We generated and characterized model soluble and transmembrane ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. We found that these proteins are indeed subject to proteasomal degradation. We tested three candidate ubiquitin ligases (Rkr1 and ER-associated Doa10 and Hrd1) for roles in regulating abundance of these proteins. Our results indicate that Rkr1 plays the primary role in targeting the tested model ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins for degradation. These data expand the catalog of Rkr1 substrates and highlight a previously unappreciated role for this ubiquitin ligase at the ER membrane. PMID:26055716

  11. Androgen Mediated Regulation of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation and its Effects on Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erzurumlu, Yalcin; Ballar, Petek

    2017-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises thirty percent of the newly translated proteins in eukaryotic cells. The quality control mechanism within the ER distinguishes between properly and improperly folded proteins and ensures that unwanted proteins are retained in the ER and subsequently degraded through ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Besides cleaning of misfolded proteins ERAD is also important for physiological processes by regulating the abundance of normal proteins of the ER. Thus it is important to unreveal the regulation patterns of ERAD. Here, we describe that ERAD pathway is regulated by androgen, where its inhibitor SVIP was downregulated, all other ERAD genes were upregulated. Consistently, androgen treatment increased the degradation rate of ERAD substrates. Using several independent techniques, we showed that this regulation is through androgen receptor transactivation. ERAD genes found to be upregulated in prostate cancer tissues and silencing expression of Hrd1, SVIP, and gp78 reduced the in vitro migration and malignant transformation of LNCaP cells. Our data suggests that expression levels of ERAD components are regulated by androgens, that promotes ERAD proteolytic activity, which is positively related with prostate tumorigenesis. PMID:28091582

  12. Cannabidiol protects oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from inflammation-induced apoptosis by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Mecha, M; Torrao, A S; Mestre, L; Carrillo-Salinas, F J; Mechoulam, R; Guaza, C

    2012-06-28

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is the most abundant cannabinoid in Cannabis sativa that has no psychoactive properties. CBD has been approved to treat inflammation, pain and spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), of which demyelination and oligodendrocyte loss are hallmarks. Thus, we investigated the protective effects of CBD against the damage to oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) mediated by the immune system. Doses of 1 μM CBD protect OPCs from oxidative stress by decreasing the production of reactive oxygen species. CBD also protects OPCs from apoptosis induced by LPS/IFNγ through the decrease of caspase 3 induction via mechanisms that do not involve CB1, CB2, TRPV1 or PPARγ receptors. Tunicamycin-induced OPC death was attenuated by CBD, suggesting a role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the mode of action of CBD. This protection against ER stress-induced apoptosis was associated with reduced phosphorylation of eiF2α, one of the initiators of the ER stress pathway. Indeed, CBD diminished the phosphorylation of PKR and eiF2α induced by LPS/IFNγ. The pro-survival effects of CBD in OPCs were accompanied by decreases in the expression of ER apoptotic effectors (CHOP, Bax and caspase 12), and increased expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. These findings suggest that attenuation of the ER stress pathway is involved in the 'oligoprotective' effects of CBD during inflammation.

  13. Cannabidiol protects oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from inflammation-induced apoptosis by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Mecha, M; Torrao, A S; Mestre, L; Carrillo-Salinas, F J; Mechoulam, R; Guaza, C

    2012-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is the most abundant cannabinoid in Cannabis sativa that has no psychoactive properties. CBD has been approved to treat inflammation, pain and spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), of which demyelination and oligodendrocyte loss are hallmarks. Thus, we investigated the protective effects of CBD against the damage to oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) mediated by the immune system. Doses of 1 μM CBD protect OPCs from oxidative stress by decreasing the production of reactive oxygen species. CBD also protects OPCs from apoptosis induced by LPS/IFNγ through the decrease of caspase 3 induction via mechanisms that do not involve CB1, CB2, TRPV1 or PPARγ receptors. Tunicamycin-induced OPC death was attenuated by CBD, suggesting a role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the mode of action of CBD. This protection against ER stress-induced apoptosis was associated with reduced phosphorylation of eiF2α, one of the initiators of the ER stress pathway. Indeed, CBD diminished the phosphorylation of PKR and eiF2α induced by LPS/IFNγ. The pro-survival effects of CBD in OPCs were accompanied by decreases in the expression of ER apoptotic effectors (CHOP, Bax and caspase 12), and increased expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. These findings suggest that attenuation of the ER stress pathway is involved in the ‘oligoprotective' effects of CBD during inflammation. PMID:22739983

  14. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  15. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum crosstalk in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Giovanni; Kawamata, Hibiki

    2016-06-01

    Physical and functional interactions between mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are crucial for cell life. These two organelles are intimately connected and collaborate to essential processes, such as calcium homeostasis and phospholipid biosynthesis. The connections between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum occur through structures named mitochondria associated membranes (MAMs), which contain lipid rafts and a large number of proteins, many of which serve multiple functions at different cellular sites. Growing evidence strongly suggests that alterations of ER-mitochondria interactions are involved in neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a devastating and rapidly fatal motor neuron disease. Mutations in proteins that participate in ER-mitochondria interactions and MAM functions are increasingly being associated with genetic forms of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. This evidence strongly suggests that, rather than considering the two organelles separately, a better understanding of the disease process can derive from studying the alterations in their crosstalk. In this review we discuss normal and pathological ER-mitochondria interactions and the evidence that link them to ALS.

  16. Molecular Characterization of Endoplasmic Reticulum Oxidoreductin 1 from Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minchul; Ryou, Hee-Joo; Yun, Eun-Young; Goo, Tae-Won

    2015-01-01

    We isolated a complementary DNA (cDNA) clone encoding endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1 (bERO1, a specific oxidant of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)) from Bombyx mori. This protein has a putative open reading frame (ORF) of 489 amino acids and a predicted size of 57.4 kDa. Although bERO1 protein shares less than 57% amino acid sequence homology with other reported ERO1s, it contains two conserved redox active motifs, a Cys-X-X-X-X-Cys motif of N-terminal and Cys-X-X-Cys-X-X-Cys motif of C-terminal. Both motifs are typically present in ERO1 protein family members. The bEro1 mRNA expression was highest in posterior silk gland on the sixth day of the 5th instar larvae. Expression of bEro1 mRNA also markedly increased during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by stimulation with antimycin, calcium ionophore A23187, dithiothreitol, H2O2, monencin, and tunicamycin. In addition, expression levels of bEro1 exactly coincided with that of bPdi. This is the first result suggesting that bERO1 plays an essential role in ER quality control through the combined activities of bERO1 and bPDI as a catalyst of protein folding in the ER and sustaining cellular redox homeostasis. PMID:26556347

  17. Ricin A chain reaches the endoplasmic reticulum after endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Qiong; Zhan Jinbiao . E-mail: jzhan2k@zju.edu.cn; Chen Xinhong; Zheng Shu

    2006-05-12

    Ricin is a potent ribosome inactivating protein and now has been widely used for synthesis of immunotoxins. To target ribosome in the mammalian cytosol, ricin must firstly retrograde transport from the endomembrane system to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where the ricin A chain (RTA) is recognized by ER components that facilitate its membrane translocation to the cytosol. In the study, the fusion gene of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-RTA was expressed with the pET-28a (+) system in Escherichia coli under the control of a T7 promoter. The fusion protein showed a green fluorescence. The recombinant protein can be purified by metal chelated affinity chromatography on a column of NTA. The rabbit anti-GFP antibody can recognize the fusion protein of EGFP-RTA just like the EGFP protein. The cytotoxicity of EGFP-RTA and RTA was evaluated by the MTT assay in HeLa and HEP-G2 cells following fluid-phase endocytosis. The fusion protein had a similar cytotoxicity of RTA. After endocytosis, the subcellular location of the fusion protein can be observed with the laser scanning confocal microscopy and the immuno-gold labeling Electro Microscopy. This study provided important evidence by a visualized way to prove that RTA does reach the endoplasmic reticulum.

  18. Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein Quality Control Failure in Myelin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Vera G.; Touvier, Thierry; D'Antonio, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Reaching the correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the proper function of a protein. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the organelle where secreted and transmembrane proteins are synthesized and folded. To guarantee high fidelity of protein synthesis and maturation in the ER, cells have evolved ER-protein quality control (ERQC) systems, which assist protein folding and promptly degrade aberrant gene products. Only correctly folded proteins that pass ERQC checkpoints are allowed to exit the ER and reach their final destination. Misfolded glycoproteins are detected and targeted for degradation by the proteasome in a process known as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). The excess of unstructured proteins in the ER triggers an adaptive signal transduction pathway, called unfolded protein response (UPR), which in turn potentiates ERQC activities in order to reduce the levels of aberrant molecules. When the situation cannot be restored, the UPR drives cells to apoptosis. Myelin-forming cells of the central and peripheral nervous system (oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells) synthesize a large amount of myelin proteins and lipids and therefore are particularly susceptible to ERQC failure. Indeed, deficits in ERQC and activation of ER stress/UPR have been implicated in several myelin disorders, such as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher and Krabbe leucodystrophies, vanishing white matter disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. Here we discuss recent evidence underlying the importance of proper ERQC functions in genetic disorders of myelinating glia. PMID:28101003

  19. Sigma-1 receptors (sigma(1) binding sites) form raft-like microdomains and target lipid droplets on the endoplasmic reticulum: roles in endoplasmic reticulum lipid compartmentalization and export.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2003-08-01

    The brain sigma-1 receptors can bind neurosteroids and psychotropic drugs, including neuroleptics and cocaine and are implicated in schizophrenia, depression, and drug dependence. In this study, we found that sigma-1 receptors specifically target lipid storage sites (lipid droplets) on the endoplasmic reticulum by forming a distinct class of lipid microdomains. Both endogenously expressing sigma-1 receptors and transfected C-terminally enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP)-tagged sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1R-EYFP) target unique "ring-like" structures associated with endoplasmic reticulum reticular networks in NG108-15 cells. The ring-like structures contain neutral lipids and are enlarged by the oleate treatment, indicating that they are endoplasmic reticulum-associated lipid droplets (ER-LDs). sigma-1 receptors colocalize with caveolin-2, a cholesterol-binding protein in lipid rafts on the ER-LDs, but not with adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP), a cytosolic lipid droplet (c-LD)-specific protein. When the double-arginine ER retention signal on the N terminus of sigma-1 receptors is truncated, sigma-1 receptors no longer exist on ER-LDs, but predominantly target c-LDs, which contain ADRP. sigma-1 receptors on ER-LDs form detergent-resistant raft-like lipid microdomains, the buoyancy of which is different from that of plasma membrane lipid rafts. (+)-Pentazocine causes sigma-1 receptors to disappear from the microdomains. N-Terminally EYFP-tagged sigma-1 receptors (EYFP-Sig-1R) failed to target ER-LDs. EYFP-Sig-1R-transfected cells showed an unrestricted distribution of neutral lipids all over the endoplasmic reticulum network, decreases in c-LDs and cholesterol in plasma membranes, and the bulbous aggregation of endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, sigma-1 receptors are unique endoplasmic reticulum proteins that regulate the compartmentalization of lipids on the endoplasmic reticulum and their export from the endoplasmic reticulum to plasma membrane and c-LDs.

  20. Birbeck granule-like "organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum" resulting from the expression of a cytoplasmic YFP-tagged langerin.

    PubMed

    Lenormand, Cédric; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Cinquin, Bertrand; Bardin, Sabine; Bausinger, Huguette; Angénieux, Catherine; Eckly, Anita; Proamer, Fabienne; Wall, David; Lich, Ben; Tourne, Sylvie; Hanau, Daniel; Schwab, Yannick; Salamero, Jean; de la Salle, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Langerin is required for the biogenesis of Birbeck granules (BGs), the characteristic organelles of Langerhans cells. We previously used a Langerin-YFP fusion protein having a C-terminal luminal YFP tag to dynamically decipher the molecular and cellular processes which accompany the traffic of Langerin. In order to elucidate the interactions of Langerin with its trafficking effectors and their structural impact on the biogenesis of BGs, we generated a YFP-Langerin chimera with an N-terminal, cytosolic YFP tag. This latter fusion protein induced the formation of YFP-positive large puncta. Live cell imaging coupled to a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching approach showed that this coalescence of proteins in newly formed compartments was static. In contrast, the YFP-positive structures present in the pericentriolar region of cells expressing Langerin-YFP chimera, displayed fluorescent recovery characteristics compatible with active membrane exchanges. Using correlative light-electron microscopy we showed that the coalescent structures represented highly organized stacks of membranes with a pentalaminar architecture typical of BGs. Continuities between these organelles and the rough endoplasmic reticulum allowed us to identify the stacks of membranes as a form of "Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum" (OSER), with distinct molecular and physiological properties. The involvement of homotypic interactions between cytoplasmic YFP molecules was demonstrated using an A206K variant of YFP, which restored most of the Langerin traffic and BG characteristics observed in Langerhans cells. Mutation of the carbohydrate recognition domain also blocked the formation of OSER. Hence, a "double-lock" mechanism governs the behavior of YFP-Langerin, where asymmetric homodimerization of the YFP tag and homotypic interactions between the lectin domains of Langerin molecules participate in its retention and the subsequent formation of BG-like OSER. These observations confirm that

  1. Nongenomic STAT5-dependent effects on Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum structure and function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason E; Yang, Yang-Ming; Liang, Feng-Xia; Gough, Daniel J; Levy, David E; Sehgal, Pravin B

    2012-03-01

    We report unexpected nongenomic functions of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5 species in the cytoplasm aimed at preserving the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus and rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in vascular cells. Immunoimaging and green fluorescent protein-tagged-STAT5a protein localization studies showed the constitutive association of nonphosphorylated STAT5a, and to a lesser extent STAT5b, with the Golgi apparatus and of STAT5a with centrosomes in human pulmonary arterial endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Acute knockdown of STAT5a/b species using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), including in the presence of an mRNA synthesis inhibitor (5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole), produced a dramatic phenotype within 1 day, consisting of dilatation and fragmentation of Golgi cisternae, a marked tubule-to-cyst change in the ER, increased accumulation of reticulon-4 (RTN4)/Nogo-B and atlastin-3 (ATL3) at cyst-zone boundaries, cystic separation of the outer and inner nuclear membranes, accompanied by scalloped/lunate distortion of the nucleus, with accumulation of RTN4 on convex sides of distorted nuclei. These cells showed inhibition of vesicular stomatitis virus G protein glycoprotein trafficking, mitochondrial fragmentation, and reduced mitochondrial function. STAT5a/b(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts also showed altered ER/Golgi dynamics. RTN4 knockdown using siRNA did not affect development of the cystic phenotype; ATL3 siRNA led to effacement of cyst-zone boundaries. In magnetic-bead cross-immunopanning assays, ATL3 bound both STAT5a and STAT5b. Remarkably, this novel cystic ER/lunate nucleus phenotype was characteristic of vascular cells in arterial lesions of idiopathic pulmonary hypertension, an unrelentingly fatal human disease. These data provide evidence of a STAT-family protein regulating the structure of a cytoplasmic organelle and implicate this mechanism in the pathogenesis of a human disease.

  2. Oxygen abundance and convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van't Veer, C.; Cayrel, R.

    The triplet IR lines of O I near 777 nm are computed with the Kurucz's code, modified to accept several convection models. The program has been run with the MLT algorithm, with l/H = 1.25 and 0.5, and with the Canuto-Mazzitelli and Canuto-Goldman-Mazzitelli approaches, on a metal-poor turnoff-star model atmosphere with Teff=6200 K, log g = 4.3, [Fe/H]= -1.5. The results show that the differences in equivalent widths for the 4 cases do not exceed 2 per cent (0.3 mA). The convection treatment is therefore not an issue for the oxygen abundance derived from the permitted lines.

  3. Surface roughness measurement with laser triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Fuzhong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Tian, Chaoping

    2016-09-01

    A surface roughness measurement method is introduced in the paper, which is based on laser triangulation and digital image processing technique. In the measuring system, we use the line-structured light as light source, microscope lens and high-accuracy CCD sensor as displacement sensor as well. In addition, the working angle corresponding to the optimal sensitivity is considered in the optical structure design to improve the measuring accuracy. Through necessary image processing operation for the light strip image, such as center-line extraction with the barycenter algorithm, Gaussian filtering, the value of roughness is calculated. A standard planing surface is measured experimentally with the proposed method and the stylus method (Mitutoyo SJ-410) respectively. The profilograms of surface appearance are greatly similar in the shape and the amplitude to two methods. Also, the roughness statistics values are close. The results indicate that the laser triangulation with the line-structured light can be applied to measure the surface roughness with the advantages of rapid measurement and visualized display of surface roughness profile.

  4. Brightness versus roughness: a multiscale approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigerelle, M.; Marteau, J.; Paulin, C.

    2015-03-01

    A link between roughness and brightness is sought for brass specimens that were superfinished, sandblasted and brushed. Only the blasting conditions are varied in order to get different roughness and brightness. First, a relation between roughness and brightness is sought for specimens that were superfinished and sandblasted. The best relation is obtained using the mean height of the motifs, calculated using a low-pass filter and cut-off length equal to 30 μm, with a logarithmic-logarithmic model. Then, the same type of relation is determined after superfinishing sandblasting and brushing. The core material volume Vmc, computed using a high-pass filter with a cut-off length of 60 μm and a linear-logarithmic relationship, gives the best results. A relation between roughness and brightness that is common to both the pre-brushing state and post-brushing state is identified: the best roughness parameter is the arithmetic mean deviation Sa using a high-pass filter with a cut-off of 15 μm, with a logarithmic-logarithmic relationship. Finally, it is shown that the use of these filtering conditions enables us to verify the model of Beckmann and Spizzichino for the examined specimens. This scale corresponds to the end of the fractal regime and is close to the end of the signal correlation.

  5. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  6. Identifying Changes in Snowpack Surface Roughness Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassnacht, S. R.; Corrao, M. V.; Deems, J. S.; Stednick, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    The flow of air over a surface is influenced by its roughness. The surface of a snowpack is smooth relative to the underlying ground surface. The relative roughness of the snowpack surface changes directionally, spatially, and temporally, due to deposition, erosion, and melt. To examine these changes in snowpack surface roughness at the microtopographic scale for a Northern Colorado site, the surface was photographed using a darker-coloured roughness board that was inserted into the snowpack so that a black (board) versus white (snow) contrast existed along the entire length of the board. The board was 1-m long and was inserted 11 times at 10-cm intervals to create a 1-m by 1-m mesh. The orientation of the boards was rotated 90 degrees to provide finer resolution data in perpendicular directions. For the 1-m boards, the pixel resolution was approximately 0.4 mm. To measure the snow grain scale, a crystal card was photographed and yielded a pixel resolution of approximately 0.1 mm. Incorporating image processing issues such as image contrast and brightness, the digital images were translated into individual lines. These lines were used to compute semi- variograms in log-log space, from which the magnitude of semi-variance, the fractal dimensions, and the scale break were computed. The semi-variogram characteristics were used to illustrate directional, spatial, and temporal changes in snowpack surface roughness.

  7. Cell Death and Survival Through the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondrial Axis

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Sagua, R.; Rodriguez, A.E.; Kuzmicic, J.; Gutierrez, T.; Lopez-Crisosto, C.; Quiroga, C.; Díaz-Elizondo, J.; Chiong, M.; Gillette, T.G.; Rothermel, B.A.; Lavandero, S.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum has a central role in biosynthesis of a variety of proteins and lipids. Mitochondria generate ATP, synthesize and process numerous metabolites, and are key regulators of cell death. The architectures of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria change continually via the process of membrane fusion, fission, elongation, degradation, and renewal. These structural changes correlate with important changes in organellar function. Both organelles are capable of moving along the cytoskeleton, thus changing their cellular distribution. Numerous studies have demonstrated coordination and communication between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. A focal point for these interactions is a zone of close contact between them known as the mitochondrial–associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM), which serves as a signaling juncture that facilitates calcium and lipid transfer between organelles. Here we review the emerging data on how communication between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria can modulate organelle function and determine cellular fate. PMID:23228132

  8. From endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria: absence of the Arabidopsis ATP antiporter endoplasmic Reticulum Adenylate Transporter1 perturbs photorespiration.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christiane; Plocharski, Bartolome; Haferkamp, Ilka; Leroch, Michaela; Ewald, Ralph; Bauwe, Hermann; Riemer, Jan; Herrmann, Johannes M; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2013-07-01

    The carrier Endoplasmic Reticulum Adenylate Transporter1 (ER-ANT1) resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and acts as an ATP/ADP antiporter. Mutant plants lacking ER-ANT1 exhibit a dwarf phenotype and their seeds contain reduced protein and lipid contents. In this study, we describe a further surprising metabolic peculiarity of the er-ant1 mutants. Interestingly, Gly levels in leaves are immensely enhanced (26×) when compared with that of wild-type plants. Gly accumulation is caused by significantly decreased mitochondrial glycine decarboxylase (GDC) activity. Reduced GDC activity in mutant plants was attributed to oxidative posttranslational protein modification induced by elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). GDC activity is crucial for photorespiration; accordingly, morphological and physiological defects in er-ant1 plants were nearly completely abolished by application of high environmental CO(2) concentrations. The latter observation demonstrates that the absence of ER-ANT1 activity mainly affects photorespiration (maybe solely GDC), whereas basic cellular metabolism remains largely unchanged. Since ER-ANT1 homologs are restricted to higher plants, it is tempting to speculate that this carrier fulfils a plant-specific function directly or indirectly controlling cellular ROS production. The observation that ER-ANT1 activity is associated with cellular ROS levels reveals an unexpected and critical physiological connection between the ER and other organelles in plants.

  9. The effects of fine-scale substratum roughness on diatom community structure in estuarine biofilms.

    PubMed

    Sweat, L Holly; Johnson, Kevin B

    2013-09-01

    Benthic diatoms are a major component of biofilms that form on surfaces submerged in marine environments. Roughness of the underlying substratum affects the settlement of both diatoms and subsequent macrofouling colonizers. This study reports the effects of roughness on estuarine diatom communities established in situ in the Indian River Lagoon, FL, USA. Natural communities were established on acrylic panels with a range of surface roughnesses. Smoother substrata exhibited higher cell density, species richness, and diversity. Twenty-three of 58 species were found either exclusively or more abundantly on the smooth surfaces compared to one or both roughened treatments. The results suggest a greater ability of benthic diatoms to recruit and colonize smooth surfaces, which is probably explained by a higher degree of contact between the cells and the surface.

  10. Optical Roughness Measurements Of Industrial Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilsinn, David; Vorburger, Theodore; Cao, Lin-Xiang; Giauque, Charles; Scire, Fredric; Teague, E. Clayton

    1986-10-01

    This paper reviews our efforts to develop the theory and instrumentation needed to measure surface roughness of manufactured surfaces by optical scattering methods. We are addressing three key problems: developing a valid and sufficient optical scattering theory for this roughness range, applying appropriate mathematical inversion techniques so that practical roughness parameters can be calculated from scattering distributions, and finally evaluating a compact commercial instrument for a wide variety of problems. Recent results from our group suggest that the simple phase screen approximation model of optical scattering validly describes light scattering from machined metal surfaces with a predominant surface lay in the 0.01 pm R to 3.0 pm R range. A model for scattering in the entire farr-field hemisphere and obsera vations on our r approach to the inverse problem is given.

  11. Discrete Roughness Transition for Hypersonic Flight Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of discrete roughness and the correlations developed to predict the onset of boundary layer transition on hypersonic flight vehicles are discussed. The paper is organized by hypersonic vehicle applications characterized in a general sense by the boundary layer: slender with hypersonic conditions at the edge of the boundary layer, moderately blunt with supersonic, and blunt with subsonic. This paper is intended to be a review of recent discrete roughness transition work completed at NASA Langley Research Center in support of agency flight test programs. First, a review is provided of discrete roughness wind tunnel data and the resulting correlations that were developed. Then, results obtained from flight vehicles, in particular the recently flown Hyper-X and Shuttle missions, are discussed and compared to the ground-based correlations.

  12. Faster magnetic walls in rough wires.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Yoshinobu; Thiaville, André; Miltat, Jacques

    2003-08-01

    In some magnetic devices that have been proposed, the information is transmitted along a magnetic wire of submicrometre width by domain wall (DW) motion. The speed of the device is obviously linked to the DW velocity, and measured values up to 1 km x s(-1) have been reported in moderate fields. Although such velocities were already reached in orthoferrite crystal films with a high anisotropy, the surprise came from their observation in the low-anisotropy permalloy. We have studied, by numerical simulation, the DW propagation in such samples, and observed a very counter-intuitive behaviour. For perfect samples (no edge roughness), the calculated velocity increased with field up to a threshold, beyond which it abruptly decreased--a well-known phenomenon. However, for rough strip edges, the velocity breakdown was found to be suppressed. We explain this phenomenon, and propose that roughness should rather be engineered than avoided when fabricating nanostructures for DW propagation.

  13. Surface roughness evolution of nanocomposite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Turkin, A. A.; Pei, Y. T.; Shaha, K. P.; Chen, C. Q.; Vainshtein, D. I.; Hosson, J. Th. M. de

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of dynamic roughening and smoothening mechanisms of thin films grown with pulsed-dc magnetron sputtering is presented. The roughness evolution has been described by a linear stochastic equation, which contains the second- and fourth-order gradient terms. Dynamic smoothening of the growing interface is explained by ballistic effects resulting from impingements of ions to the growing thin film. These ballistic effects are sensitive to the flux and energy of impinging ions. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental data, and it is concluded that the thin film roughness can be further controlled by adjusting waveform, frequency, and width of dc pulses.

  14. Roughness measurement of paper using speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, Abdiel; Pladellorens, Josep; Cusola, Oriol; Caum, Jesus

    2011-09-01

    We present a method of measure of the roughness of the paper based on the analysis of a speckle pattern on the surface. Images of speckle over the surface of paper are captured by means of a simple configuration using a laser, beam expander, and a camera charge-coupled device (CCD). Then we use the normalized covariance function of the fields, leaving the surface to find the roughness. We compare the results obtained with the results obtained with a confocal microscope and the Bendtsen method that is a standard of the paper industry. This method can be considered as a noncontact surface profiling method that can be used online.

  15. A measuring system for surface roughness parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinhong; Wang, Yunkai; Zhang, Xianfeng

    2006-11-01

    We designed a measurement and control system which can measure the surface roughness parameters with a Single Chip Micyoco (SCM) as its kernel. It uses an inductive transducer to pick up the data. The instrumental structure and the working principle are also introduced in this paper. The integrated hardware and software systems have been designed and improved. The prototype model was calibrated and the instrumental precision was analysed according to the measured data. In this system the surface roughness parameters can automatically be measured and controlled, such as data processing, determination of the reference line, disposal of the surface profile informations, display and print of the results etc.

  16. Rough and Steep Terrain Lunar Surface Mobility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian

    2005-01-01

    In the summer of 2004, the NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate conducted an open call for projects relevant to human and robotic exploration of the Earth-Moon and Mars systems. A project entitled 'Rough and Steep Terrain Lunar Surface Mobility' was submitted by JPL and accepted by NASA. The principal investigator of this project describes the robotic vehicle being developed for this effort, which includes six 'wheels-on-legs' so that it can roll efficiently on relatively smooth terrain but walk (using locked wheels as footpads) when "the going gets rough".

  17. ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C.

    2012-03-28

    Surface roughness values for the areas surrounding the H, D and N-Area meteorological towers were computed from archived 2010 meteorological data. These 15-minute-averaged data were measured with cup anemometers and bidirectional wind vanes (bivanes) 61 m above the surface. The results of the roughness calculation using the standard deviation of elevation angle {sigma}{sub E}, and applying the simple formula based on tree canopy height, gave consistent estimates for roughness around the H-Area tower in the range of 1.76 to 1.86 m (95% confidence interval) with a mean value of 1.81 m. Application of the {sigma}{sub E} method for the 61-m level at D and N-Areas gave mean values of 1.71 and 1.81 with confidence ranges of 1.62-1.81 and 1.73-1.88 meters, respectively. Roughness results are azimuth dependent, and thus are presented as averages over compass sectors spanning 22.5 degrees. Calculated values were compared to other methods of determining roughness, including the standard deviation of the azimuth direction, {sigma}{sub A}, and standard deviation of the wind speed, {sigma}{sub U}. Additional data was obtained from a sonic anemometer at 61-m on the H-Area tower during a period of a few weeks in 2010. Results from the sonic anemometer support our use of {sigma}{sub E} to calculate roughness. Based on the H-Area tower results, a surface roughness of 1.8 m using is recommended for use in dispersion modeling applications that consider the impacts of a contaminant release to individuals along the Site boundary. The canopy surrounding the H-Area tower is relatively uniform (i.e., little variance in roughness by upwind direction), and data supplied by the U.S. Forest Service at Savannah River show that the canopy height and composition surrounding the H-Area tower is reasonably representative of forested areas throughout the SRS reservation. For dispersion modeling analyses requiring assessments of a co-located worker within the respective operations area, recommended

  18. Surface roughness effects in elastohydrodynamic contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, J. H.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    Surface roughness effects in full-film EHL contacts were studied. A flow factor modification to the Reynolds equation was applied to piezoviscous-elastic line contacts. Results for ensemble-averaged film shape, pressure distribution, and other mechanical quantities were obtained. Asperities elongated in the flow direction by a factor exceeding two decreased both film shape and pressure extrema at constant load; isotropic or transverse asperities increased these extrema. The largest effects are displayed by traction, which increased by over 5% for isotropic or transverse asperities and by slightly less for longitudinal roughness.

  19. Venus surface roughness and Magellan stereo data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurice, Kelly E.; Leberl, Franz W.; Norikane, L.; Hensley, Scott

    1994-01-01

    Presented are results of some studies to develop tools useful for the analysis of Venus surface shape and its roughness. Actual work was focused on Maxwell Montes. The analyses employ data acquired by means of NASA's Magellan satellite. The work is primarily concerned with deriving measurements of the Venusian surface using Magellan stereo SAR. Roughness was considered by means of a theoretical analyses based on digital elevation models (DEM's), on single Magellan radar images combined with radiometer data, and on the use of multiple overlapping Magellan radar images from cycles 1, 2, and 3, again combined with collateral radiometer data.

  20. Laws of Flow in Rough Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikuradse, J

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation is made of the turbulent flow of water in pipes with various degrees of relative roughness. The pipes range in size from 25 to 100 millimeters in diameter and from 1800 to 7050 millimeters in length. Flow velocities permitted Reynolds numbers from about 10 (sup. 4) to 10 (sup. 6). The laws of resistance and velocity distributions were obtained as a function of relative roughness and Reynolds number. Mixing length, as described by Prandtl's mixing-length formula, is discussed in relation to the experimental results.

  1. Evaluation of Dry, Rough Vacuum Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This document provides information on the testing and evaluation of thirteen dry rough vacuum pumps of various designs and from various manufacturers. Several types of rough vacuum pumps were evaluated, including scroll, roots, and diaphragm pumps. Tests included long term testing, speed curve generation, voltage variance, vibrations emissions and susceptibility, electromagnetic interference emissions and susceptibility, static leak rate, exhaust restriction, response/recovery time tests, and a contamination analysis for scroll pumps. Parameters were found for operation with helium, which often is not provided from the manufacturer

  2. Roughness Perception of Haptically Displayed Fractal Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Michael A.; Cutkosky, Mark R.; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Surface profiles were generated by a fractal algorithm and haptically rendered on a force feedback joystick, Subjects were asked to use the joystick to explore pairs of surfaces and report to the experimenter which of the surfaces they felt was rougher. Surfaces were characterized by their root mean square (RMS) amplitude and their fractal dimension. The most important factor affecting the perceived roughness of the fractal surfaces was the RMS amplitude of the surface. When comparing surfaces of fractal dimension 1.2-1.35 it was found that the fractal dimension was negatively correlated with perceived roughness.

  3. General laws of X-ray reflection from rough surfaces: II. Conformal roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, I. V.

    2012-07-01

    Is shown that, if the expansions of the Debye-Waller formulas for the reflection and total scattering coefficients in the roughness height σ are limited to terms of order σ2, these expressions are valid for any layered inhomogeneous medium with conformal (depth-periodic) roughness and for any distribution function of the roughness heights if the roughness correlation length along the surface is sufficiently large. The advantages of measuring the total reflection coefficient, which characterizes the total intensity of radiation (both specularly reflected and diffusively scattered) directed by a rough surface back into vacuum, for solving the inverse problem of X-ray reflectometry (i.e., the reconstruction of the permittivity profile from a measured reflection curve) are discussed.

  4. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of EUVE spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics (ASCA) data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. Findings are that: (1) ASCA and EUVE spectra are both dominated by a region at 6 x 10(exp 6) K. (2) The high energy cut-off of the ASCA spectrum is consistent with emission from the highest ionization stages of EUVE, namely Fe XXIV. (3) EUVE requires a continuous emission measure distribution with more than two temperatures. (4) The ASCA spectra are of such high statistical significance that systematic uncertainties dominate, including atomic physics issues and calibration issues. (5) While the ASCA spectral fits achieve lower Chi(exp 2 with two-temperature fits, the EUVE-derived emission measure distribution models are also consistent with the spectra. (6) The Fe/H ratio obtained from the ASCA fit is within 20 % of the Fe/H abundance obtained from the summed spectra of Capella over 5 EUVE pointings, as well as the 1996 EUVE data. This result confirms our claims that quasi-continua composed of weak emission lines in the short wavelength spectrometer of EUVE are not major contributors to the measured Capella continuum. Other abundance ratios are also determined from the ASCA data, using models derived with EUVE. Si, Si, and Mg appear to be close to solar photospheric values, while the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined

  5. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  6. Stacked endoplasmic reticulum sheets are connected by helicoidal membrane motifs

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Mark; Shemesh, Tom; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Klemm, Robin W.; Schalek, Richard; Hayworth, Kenneth J.; Hand, Arthur R.; Yankova, Maya; Huber, Greg; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Rapoport, Tom A.; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) often forms stacked membrane sheets, an arrangement that is likely required to accommodate a maximum of membrane-bound polysomes for secretory protein synthesis. How sheets are stacked is unknown. Here, we used novel staining and automated ultra-thin sectioning electron microscopy methods to analyze stacked ER sheets in neuronal cells and secretory salivary gland cells of mice. Our results show that stacked ER sheets form a continuous membrane system in which the sheets are connected by twisted membrane surfaces with helical edges of left- or right-handedness. The three-dimensional structure of tightly stacked ER sheets resembles a parking garage, in which the different levels are connected by helicoidal ramps. A theoretical model explains the experimental observations and indicates that the structure corresponds to a minimum of elastic energy of sheet edges and surfaces. The structure allows the dense packing of ER sheets in the restricted space of a cell. PMID:23870120

  7. Stacked endoplasmic reticulum sheets are connected by helicoidal membrane motifs.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Mark; Shemesh, Tom; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Klemm, Robin W; Schalek, Richard; Hayworth, Kenneth J; Hand, Arthur R; Yankova, Maya; Huber, Greg; Lichtman, Jeff W; Rapoport, Tom A; Kozlov, Michael M

    2013-07-18

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) often forms stacked membrane sheets, an arrangement that is likely required to accommodate a maximum of membrane-bound polysomes for secretory protein synthesis. How sheets are stacked is unknown. Here, we used improved staining and automated ultrathin sectioning electron microscopy methods to analyze stacked ER sheets in neuronal cells and secretory salivary gland cells of mice. Our results show that stacked ER sheets form a continuous membrane system in which the sheets are connected by twisted membrane surfaces with helical edges of left- or right-handedness. The three-dimensional structure of tightly stacked ER sheets resembles a parking garage, in which the different levels are connected by helicoidal ramps. A theoretical model explains the experimental observations and indicates that the structure corresponds to a minimum of elastic energy of sheet edges and surfaces. The structure allows the dense packing of ER sheets in the restricted space of a cell.

  8. Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium, Stress and Cell-to-Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Theodora

    2014-01-01

    Darier's Disease (DD) is caused by mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ ATPase ATP2A2 (protein SERCA2). Current treatment modalities are ineffective for many patients. This report shows that impaired SERCA2 function, both in DD keratinocytes and in normal keratinocytes treated with the SERCA2-inhibitor thapsigargin, depletes ER Ca2+ stores, leading to constitutive ER stress and increased sensitivity to ER stressors. ER stress, in turn, leads to abnormal cell-to-cell adhesion via impaired redistribution of desmoplakin, desmoglein 3, desmocollin 3 and E-cadherin to the plasma membrane. This report illustrates how ER Ca2+ depletion and the resulting ER stress are central to the pathogenesis of the disease. Additionally, the authors introduce a possible new therapeutic agent, Miglustat. PMID:24924761

  9. Interplay of endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yu; Arikkath, Jyothi; Yang, Lu; Guo, Ming-Lei; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Buch, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    The common underlying feature of most neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD), prion diseases, Parkinson disease (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) involves accumulation of misfolded proteins leading to initiation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and stimulation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Additionally, ER stress more recently has been implicated in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Autophagy plays an essential role in the clearance of aggregated toxic proteins and degradation of the damaged organelles. There is evidence that autophagy ameliorates ER stress by eliminating accumulated misfolded proteins. Both abnormal UPR and impaired autophagy have been implicated as a causative mechanism in the development of various neurodegenerative diseases. This review highlights recent advances in the field on the role of ER stress and autophagy in AD, prion diseases, PD, ALS and HAND with the involvement of key signaling pathways in these processes and implications for future development of therapeutic strategies.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: The cause and solution to Huntington's disease?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuwei; Chadwick, Sarah R; Lajoie, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of misfolded proteins is a hallmark of many human diseases, including several incurable neurological disorders, such as Huntington's disease (HD). In HD, expansion of a polyglutamine stretch within the first exon of the Huntingtin protein (Htt) leads to Htt misfolding, aberrant protein aggregation, and progressive appearance of disease symptoms. Several studies in various organisms (from yeast to humans) have identified the accumulation of misfolded secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress) as a crucial determinant of cellular toxicity in HD. In this review, we highlight the recent research linking HD to ER stress. We also discuss how the modulation of signaling pathways responsible for coping with misfolded protein accumulation in the ER may constitute attractive methods to reduce toxicity and identify new therapeutic targets for treatment of HD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:ER stress.

  11. Plant Endoplasmic Reticulum-Plasma Membrane Contact Sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengwei; Hawes, Chris; Hussey, Patrick J

    2017-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) acts as a superhighway with multiple sideroads that connects the different membrane compartments including the ER to the plasma membrane (PM). ER-PM contact sites (EPCSs) are a common feature in eukaryotic organisms, but have not been studied well in plants owing to the lack of molecular markers and to the difficulty in resolving the EPCS structure using conventional microscopy. Recently, however, plant protein complexes required for linking the ER and PM have been identified. This is a further step towards understanding the structure and function of plant EPCSs. We highlight some recent studies in this field and suggest several hypotheses that relate to the possible function of EPCSs in plants.

  12. Trichoplein/mitostatin regulates endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria juxtaposition.

    PubMed

    Cerqua, Cristina; Anesti, Vassiliki; Pyakurel, Aswin; Liu, Dan; Naon, Deborah; Wiche, Gerhard; Baffa, Raffaele; Dimmer, Kai S; Scorrano, Luca

    2010-11-01

    Trichoplein/mitostatin (TpMs) is a keratin-binding protein that partly colocalizes with mitochondria and is often downregulated in epithelial cancers, but its function remains unclear. In this study, we report that TpMs regulates the tethering between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in a Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2)-dependent manner. Subcellular fractionation and immunostaining show that TpMs is present at the interface between mitochondria and ER. The expression of TpMs leads to mitochondrial fragmentation and loosens tethering with ER, whereas its silencing has opposite effects. Functionally, the reduced tethering by TpMs inhibits apoptosis by Ca(2+)-dependent stimuli that require ER-mitochondria juxtaposition. Biochemical and genetic evidence support a model in which TpMs requires Mfn2 to modulate mitochondrial shape and tethering. Thus, TpMs is a new regulator of mitochondria-ER juxtaposition.

  13. WLS retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum during Wnt secretion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia; Chia, Joanne; Canning, Claire Ann; Jones, C Michael; Bard, Frédéric A; Virshup, David M

    2014-05-12

    Wnts are transported to the cell surface by the integral membrane protein WLS (also known as Wntless, Evi, and GPR177). Previous studies of WLS trafficking have emphasized WLS movement from the Golgi to the plasma membrane (PM) and then back to the Golgi via retromer-mediated endocytic recycling. We find that endogenous WLS binds Wnts in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cycles to the PM, and then returns to the ER through the Golgi. We identify an ER-targeting sequence at the carboxyl terminus of native WLS that is critical for ER retrograde recycling and contributes to Wnt secretory function. Golgi-to-ER recycling of WLS requires the COPI regulator ARF as well as ERGIC2, an ER-Golgi intermediate compartment protein that is also required for the retrograde trafficking of the KDEL receptor and certain toxins. ERGIC2 is required for efficient Wnt secretion. ER retrieval is an integral part of the WLS transport cycle.

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in diabetes: New insights of clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Lenin, Raji; Monickaraj, Finny

    2010-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a cellular compartment responsible for multiple important cellular functions including the biosynthesis and folding of newly synthesized proteins destined for secretion, such as insulin. A myriad of pathological and physiological factors perturb ER function and cause dysregulation of ER homeostasis, leading to ER stress. Accumulating evidence suggests that ER stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes, contributing to pancreatic β-cell loss and insulin resistance. ER stress may also link obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. In this review, we address the transition from physiology to pathology, namely how and why the physiological UPR evolves to a proapoptotic ER stress response in diabetes and its complications. Special attention was given to elucidate how ER stress could explain some of the 'clinical paradoxes' such as secondary sulfonylurea failure, initial worsening of retinopathy during tight glycemic control, insulin resistance induced by protease inhibitors and other clinically relevant observations.

  15. Stress Responses from the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hironori; Nishitoh, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic organelle that is essential for multiple cellular functions. During cellular stress conditions, including nutrient deprivation and dysregulation of protein synthesis, unfolded/misfolded proteins accumulate in the ER lumen, resulting in activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR also contributes to the regulation of various intracellular signaling pathways such as calcium signaling and lipid signaling. More recently, the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM), which is a site of close contact between the ER and mitochondria, has been shown to function as a platform for various intracellular stress responses including apoptotic signaling, inflammatory signaling, the autophagic response, and the UPR. Interestingly, in cancer, these signaling pathways from the ER are often dysregulated, contributing to cancer cell metabolism. Thus, the signaling pathway from the ER may be a novel therapeutic target for various cancers. In this review, we discuss recent research on the roles of stress responses from the ER, including the MAM. PMID:25941664

  16. Assembly of MHC class I molecules within the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinan; Williams, David B

    2006-01-01

    MHC class I molecules bind cytosolically derived peptides within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and present them at the cell surface to cytotoxic T cells. A major focus of our laboratory has been to understand the functions of the diverse proteins involved in the intracellular assembly of MHC class I molecules. These include the molecular chaperones calnexin and calreticulin, which enhance the proper folding and subunit assembly of class I molecules and also retain assembly intermediates within the ER; ERp57, a thiol oxidoreductase that promotes heavy chain disulfide formation and proper assembly of the peptide loading complex; tapasin, which recruits class I molecules to the TAP peptide transporter and enhances the loading of high affinity peptide ligands; and Bap31, which is involved in clustering assembled class I molecules at ER exit sites for export along the secretory pathway. This review describes our contributions to elucidating the functions of these proteins; the combined effort of many dedicated students and postdoctoral fellows.

  17. Pharmacological Modulators of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Tae Woo; Choi, Kyung Mook

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the principal organelle responsible for correct protein folding, a step in protein synthesis that is critical for the functional conformation of proteins. ER stress is a primary feature of secretory cells and is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous human diseases, such as certain neurodegenerative and cardiometabolic disorders. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a defense mechanism to attenuate ER stress and maintain the homeostasis of the organism. Two major degradation systems, including the proteasome and autophagy, are involved in this defense system. If ER stress overwhelms the capacity of the cell’s defense mechanisms, apoptotic death may result. This review is focused on the various pharmacological modulators that can protect cells from damage induced by ER stress. The possible mechanisms for cytoprotection are also discussed. PMID:26840310

  18. Maternal obesity alters endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis in offspring pancreas.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Jumpei; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Cordero, Paul; Li, Jiawei; Nguyen, Vi; Carter, Rebeca; Kapur, Sabrina R; Pombo, Joaquim; Poston, Lucilla; Taylor, Paul D; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Oben, Jude A

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty pancreas disease (NAFPD) is increasing in parallel with obesity rates. Stress-related alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), such as the unfolded protein response (UPR), are associated with obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate ER imbalance in the pancreas of a mice model of adult and perinatal diet-induced obesity. Twenty female C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control (Con) or obesogenic (Ob) diets prior to and during pregnancy and lactation. Their offspring were weaned onto Con or Ob diets up to 6 months post-partum. Then, after sacrifice, plasma biochemical analyses, gene expression, and protein concentrations were measured in pancreata. Offspring of Ob-fed mice had significantly increased body weight (p < 0.001) and plasma leptin (p < 0.001) and decreased insulin (p < 0.01) levels. Maternal obesogenic diet decreased the total and phosphorylated Eif2α and increased spliced X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1). Pancreatic gene expression of downstream regulators of UPR (EDEM, homocysteine-responsive endoplasmic reticulum-resident (HERP), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP)) and autophagy-related proteins (LC3BI/LC3BII) were differently disrupted by obesogenic feeding in both mothers and offspring (from p < 0.1 to p < 0.001). Maternal obesity and Ob feeding in their offspring alter UPR in NAFPD, with involvement of proapoptotic and autophagy-related markers. Upstream and downstream regulators of PERK, IRE1α, and ATF6 pathways were affected differently following the obesogenic insults.

  19. The ATPase cycle of the endoplasmic chaperone Grp94.

    PubMed

    Frey, Stephan; Leskovar, Adriane; Reinstein, Jochen; Buchner, Johannes

    2007-12-07

    Grp94, the Hsp90 paralog of the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a crucial role in protein secretion. Like cytoplasmic Hsp90, Grp94 is regulated by nucleotide binding to its N-terminal domain. However, the question of whether Grp94 hydrolyzes ATP was controversial. This sets Grp94 apart from other members of the Hsp90 family where a slow but specific turnover of ATP has been unambiguously established. In this study we aimed at analyzing the nucleotide binding properties and the potential ATPase activity of Grp94. We show here that Grp94 has an ATPase activity comparable with that of yeast Hsp90 with a k(cat) of 0.36 min(-1) at 25 degrees C. Kinetic and equilibrium constants of the partial reactions of the ATPase cycle were determined using transient kinetic methods. Nucleotide binding appears to be tighter compared with other Hsp90s investigated, with dissociation constants (K(D)) of approximately 4 microm for ADP, ATP, and AMP-PCP. Interestingly, all nucleotides and inhibitors (radicicol, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) studied here bind with similar rate constants for association (0.2-0.3 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)). Furthermore, there is a marked difference from cytosolic Hsp90s in that after binding, the ATP molecule does not seem to become trapped by conformational changes in Grp94. Grp94 stays predominantly in the open state concerning the nucleotide-binding pocket as evidenced by kinetic analyses. Thus, Grp94 shows mechanistically important differences in the interaction with adenosine nucleotides, but the basic hydrolysis reaction seems to be conserved between cytosolic and endoplasmic members of the Hsp90 family.

  20. 14 CFR 25.1517 - Rough air speed, VRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rough air speed, VRA. 25.1517 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1517 Rough air speed, VRA. A rough air speed, VRA, for use as the recommended turbulence... rough air encounters will not cause the overspeed warning to operate too frequently. In the absence of...

  1. Surface roughness modulations by submesoscale currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascle, Nicolas; Chapron, Bertrand; Nouguier, Frederic; Ponte, Aurelien; Mouche, Alexis; Molemaker, Jeroen

    2016-04-01

    At times, high resolution images of sea surface roughness can provide stunning details of submesoscale upper ocean dynamics. As interpreted, transformations of short scale wind waves by horizontal current gradients are responsible for those spectacular observations. Here we present two major advances towards the quantitative interpretation of those observations. First, we show that surface roughness variations mainly trace two particular characteristics of the current gradient tensor, the divergence and the strain in the wind direction. Local vorticity and shear in the wind direction should not affect short scale roughness distribution and would not be detectable. Second, we discuss the effect of the viewing direction using sets of quasi-simultaneous sun glitter images, taken from different satellites to provide different viewing configurations. We show that upwind and crosswind viewing observations can be markedly different. As further confirmed with idealized numerical simulations, this anisotropy well traces surface current strain area, while more isotropic contrasts likely trace areas dominated by surface divergence conditions. These findings suggest the potential to directly observe surface currents at submesoscale by using surface roughness observations at multiple azimuth viewing angles. They also pave the way towards a better understanding of the coupling between ocean, waves and atmosphere at high resolution.

  2. Measurement and Correlation of Ice Accretion Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Hentschel, Daniel B.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements were taken of the roughness characteristics of ice accreted on NACA 0012 airfoils in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Tests were conducted with size scaled, using models with chords of 26.7, 53.3, and 80.0 cm, and with liquid-water content scaled, both according to previously-tested scaling methods. The width of the smooth zone which forms on either side of the leading edge of the airfoil and the diameter of the roughness elements are presented in non-dimensional form as functions of the accumulation parameter. The smooth-zone width was found to decrease with increasing accumulation parameter. The roughness-element diameter increased with accumulation parameter until a plateau was reached. This maximum diameter was about 0.06 times twice the model leading-edge radius. Neither smooth-zone width nor element diameter were affected by a change in freezing fraction from 0.2 to 0.4. Both roughness characteristics appeared to scale with model size and with liquid-water content.

  3. Thermal smoothing of rough surfaces in vacuo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahl, G.

    1986-01-01

    The derivation of equations governing the smoothing of rough surfaces, based on Mullins' (1957, 1960, and 1963) theories of thermal grooving and of capillarity-governed solid surface morphology is presented. As an example, the smoothing of a one-dimensional sine-shaped surface is discussed.

  4. Particle Sliding on a Rough Incline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    We study a particle sliding on a rough inclined plane as an example of a mechanical problem with nonholonomic constraint. The particle is launched in an arbitrary direction so that its motion has both a horizontal and a "vertical" (i.e., up- and downhill) direction. The friction force acts along the instantaneous velocity, so that the horizontal…

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress regulates rat mandibular cartilage thinning under compressive mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Huang; Zhang, Xiang-Yu; Wu, Tuo-Jiang; Cheng, Wei; Liu, Xin; Jiang, Ting-Ting; Wen, Juan; Li, Jie; Ma, Qiao-Ling; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2013-06-21

    Compressive mechanical stress-induced cartilage thinning has been characterized as a key step in the progression of temporomandibular joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying this loss have not been thoroughly studied. Here, we used an established animal model for loading compressive mechanical stress to induce cartilage thinning in vivo. The mechanically stressed mandibular chondrocytes were then isolated to screen potential candidates using a proteomics approach. A total of 28 proteins were identified that were directly or indirectly associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, including protein disulfide-isomerase, calreticulin, translationally controlled tumor protein, and peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerase protein. The altered expression of these candidates was validated at both the mRNA and protein levels. The induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress by mechanical stress loading was confirmed by the activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, the elevation of the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) level, and the expansion of endoplasmic reticulum membranes. More importantly, the use of a selective inhibitor to block endoplasmic reticulum stress in vivo reduced the apoptosis observed at the early stages of mechanical stress loading and inhibited the proliferation observed at the later stages of mechanical stress loading. Accordingly, the use of the inhibitor significantly restored cartilage thinning. Taken together, these results demonstrated that endoplasmic reticulum stress is significantly activated in mechanical stress-induced mandibular cartilage thinning and, more importantly, that endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition alleviates this loss, suggesting a novel pharmaceutical strategy for the treatment of mechanical stress-induced temporomandibular joint diseases.

  6. Turbulent boundary layer over roughness transition with variation in spanwise roughness length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerweel, Jerry; Tomas, Jasper; Eisma, Jerke; Pourquie, Mathieu; Elsinga, Gerrit; Jonker, Harm

    2016-11-01

    Both large-eddy simulations (LES) and water-tunnel experiments, using simultaneous stereoscopic PIV and LIF were done to investigate pollutant dispersion in a region where the surface changes from rural to urban roughness. This consists of rectangular obstacles where we vary the spanwise aspect ratio of the obstacles. A line source of passive tracer was placed upstream of the roughness transition. The objectives of the study are: (i) to determine the influence of the aspect ratio on the roughness-transition flow, and (ii) to determine the dominant mechanisms of pollutant removal from street canyons in the transition region. It is found that for a spanwise aspect ratio of 2 the drag induced by the roughness is largest of all considered cases, which is caused by a large-scale secondary flow. In the roughness transition the vertical advective pollutant flux is the main ventilation mechanism in the first three streets. Furthermore, by means of linear stochastic estimation the mean flow structure is identied that is responsible for exchange of the fluid between the roughness obstacles and the outer part of the boundary layer. Furthermore, it is found that the vertical length scale of this structure increases with increasing aspect ratio of the obstacles in the roughness region.

  7. Capella: Structure and Abundances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickhouse, Nancy S.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the analysis of ASCA spectra of the cool star binary system Capella. This project has also required the analysis of simultaneous EUVE data. The ASCA spectrum of Capella could not be fit with standard models; by imposing models based on strong lines observed with EUVE, a problem wavelength region was identified. Correcting the problem required calculations of atomic collision strengths of higher principal quantum number than had ever been calculated, resulting in a paper in process by Liedahl and Brickhouse. With these new models applied to the ASCA spectrum, better fits were obtained. While solar abundance ratios are generally consistent with the ASCA data, the ratio of Ne/Fe is three to four times lower than solar photospheric values. Whether there is a general First Ionization Potential (FIP) effect or a specific neon anomaly cannot be determined from these data. Detailed discussion has been provided to NASA in the most recent annual report (1997). Two poster presentations have been made regarding modeling requirements. A substantial paper is in the final revision form, following review by six co-authors. The results of this work have wide implications, since the newly calculated emission lines almost certainly contribute to other problems in fitting not only other stellar spectra, but also composite supernova remnants, galaxies, and cooling flow clusters of galaxies. Furthermore, Liedahl and Brickhouse have identified other species for which lines of a similar nature (high principal quantum number) will contribute significant flux. For moderate resolution X-ray spectra, lines left out of the models in relatively isolated bands, will be attributed to continuum flux by spectral fitting engines, causing errors in line-to-continuum ratios. Thus addressing the general theoretical problem is of crucial importance.

  8. The neutral surface layer above rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedman, Ann-Sofi; Sahlee, Erik

    2014-05-01

    It is generally accepted that turbulent fluxes (momentum and scalar fluxes) are approx. constant with height above horizontal surfaces with low roughness. But what will happen when the roughness sub-layer is large as found over cities, forests and rough seas? In a study of the kinematic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, Högström, Hunt and Smedman, 2002, it was demonstrated that a model with detached eddies from above the surface layer impinging on to the surface (Hunt and Morison, 2000) could explain some of the observed features in the neutral atmospheric boundary layer. Thus the detached eddy model proved successful in explaining the dynamic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, especially the shape of the spectra of the wind components and scalars and corresponding fluxes. Here we make the hypothesis that the detached-eddy model can also be used to explain the experimental results related to the 3-dimensional turbulence structure above rough surfaces. Measurements are taken both over land (grass and forest) and over sea (Baltic Sea and hurricane Fabian in the Atlantic) above the roughness sub-layer. Analysis of the turbulence structure shows a striking similarity between the different sites. Hunt, J.C.R and Morrison, J.F., 2000: Eddy structure in turbulent boundary layers, Euro. J. Mech. B-Fluids, 19, 673-694. Högström, U., Hunt, J.C.R., and Smedman, A., 2002: Theory and measurements for turbulence spectra and variances in the atmospheric neutral surface layer, Bound.-Layer Meteorol., 103,101-124.

  9. Contact angle hysteresis on randomly rough surfaces: a computational study.

    PubMed

    David, Robert; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2013-04-09

    Wetting is important in many applications, and the solid surfaces being wet invariably feature some amount of surface roughness. A free energy-based computational simulation is used to study the effect of roughness on wetting and especially contact angle hysteresis. On randomly rough, self-affine surfaces, it is found that hysteresis depends primarily on the value of the Wenzel roughness parameter r, increasing in proportion with r - 1. Micrometer-level roughness causes hysteresis of a few degrees.

  10. Spectral characteristics of sign-alternating self-oscillatory endoplasm mobility in a myxomycete plasmodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avsievich, T. I.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    The results of a short time Fourier transform of the time dependences of the self-oscillatory endoplasm velocity in an isolated strand of the Physarum polycephalum plasmodium recorded using a sign-sensitive laser Doppler microscope are described. Unlike the mode recording an absolute velocity, a sign-sensitive mode makes it possible to detect the pairs of equidistant harmonic components in the time dependence spectra of endoplasm movement. The resulting frequency and amplitude values are used to construct a model adequately describing the alternating endoplasm mobility.

  11. Measuring Solar Abundances with Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussack, K.; Gough, D.

    2009-12-01

    The revision of the photospheric abundances proferred by Asplund et al. (2005) has rendered opacity theory inconsistent with the seismologically determined opacity through the Sun. This highlights the need for a direct seismological measurement of solar abundances. Here we describe the technique used to measure abundances with seismology, examine our ability to detect differences between solar models using this technique, and discuss its application in the Sun.

  12. Subpixellar roughness effects on Mars thermal inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudin, D.; Delacourt, C.; Allemand, P.

    2011-12-01

    Thermal inertia is an important derived variable from thermal infrared remote sensing, since it depends on physical properties of the studied surface, including density (ρ), heat capacity (c), and bulk thermal conductivity (λ). For example, due to its stronger heat capacity, water has a greater thermal inertia compared to rocks, and thus, moisture on Earth can be derived from thermal inertia. On Mars, thermal conductivity is believed to be strongly linked with grainsize. Consequently, thermal inertia is widely used for the study of surface processes. Physically, thermal inertia is defined as the ratio of thermal flux variation (ΔΦ) to surface temperature variation (ΔT), on a sinusoidal forcing, and can be re-write as follow : I=ΔΦ/ΔT=√(λ.ρ.c) To retrieve thermal inertia from thermal infrared pictures, a model is needed : the variation of surface temperature during the day is modelled for different values of thermal inertia and then compared to remote sensing temperature. Additional parameters, like atmospheric dust concentration or sun angles are set to predict the brightness temperature, as seen by the satellite. These models do not account well for infrapixellar roughness. However, surface geometry is responsible of a few effects : - Shadowing of part of the surface makes the sun incoming flux spatially and temporally variable. - The interreflexion between two opposite surface makes the local flux weaker. Consequently, a rough surface is heated during a shorter time, compared with a smooth one, but the effect is strongly non-linear. In this study, we designed a radiative and conductive code to test these effects, taking into account a 2D roughness surface state. By modelling the heat fluxes on several geometries, we retrieved the surface temperature evolution, compared to smooth geometry. Here, the key parameters are the geometry, the height of the roughness and the physical parameters of the soil (emissivity, albedo, thermal conductivity and heat

  13. Combinatorial Block Copolymer Ordering on Tunable Rough

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni M. M.; Yager K.; Sharma, A.; Karim, A.

    2012-05-01

    Morphology control of block copolymer (BCP) thin films through substrate interaction via controlled roughness parameters is of significant interest for numerous high-tech applications ranging from solar cells to high-density storage media. While effects of substrate surface energy (SE) and roughness (R) on BCP morphology have been individually investigated, their synergistic effects have not been explored in any systematic manner. Interestingly, orientation response of BCP to changes in SE can be similar to what can be accomplished with variations in R. Here we present a novel approach for orienting lamellar BCP films of poly(styrene)-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PS-PMMA) on spin-coated xerogel (a dried gel of silica nanoparticle network) substrate with simultaneously tunable surface energy, {gamma}{sub s} {approx} 29-53 mJ/m{sup 2}, by UVO exposure and roughness, R{sub rms} {approx} 0.5-30 nm, by sol-gel processing steps of regulating the catalyst concentration and sol aging time. As in previous BCP orientation studies on 20 nm diameter monodisperse silica nanoparticle coated surface, we find a similar but broadened oscillatory BCP orientation behavior with film thickness due to the random rather than periodic rough surfaces. We also find that higher random roughness amplitude is not the necessary criteria for obtaining a vertical orientation of BCP lamellae. Rather, a high surface fractal dimension (D{sub f} > 2.4) of the rough substrate in conjunction with an optimal substrate surface energy {gamma}{sub s} 29 mJ/m{sup 2} results in 100% vertically oriented lamellar microdomains. The AFM measured film surface microstructure correlates well with the internal 3D BCP film structure probed by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) and rotational small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). In contrast to tunable self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-coated substrates, the xerogel films are very durable and retain their chemical properties over period of

  14. Neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors undergo cognate ligand chaperoning in the endoplasmic reticulum by endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Eshaq, Randa S.; Meshul, Charles K.; Moore, Cynthia; Hood, Rebecca L.; Leidenheimer, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Dysfunction of these receptors is associated with various psychiatric/neurological disorders and drugs targeting this receptor are widely used therapeutic agents. Both the efficacy and plasticity of GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission depends on the number of surface GABAA receptors. An understudied aspect of receptor cell surface expression is the post-translational regulation of receptor biogenesis within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that exogenous GABA can act as a ligand chaperone of recombinant GABAA receptors in the early secretory pathway leading us to now investigate whether endogenous GABA facilitates the biogenesis of GABAA receptors in primary cerebral cortical cultures. In immunofluorescence labeling experiments, we have determined that neurons expressing surface GABAA receptors contain both GABA and its degradative enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T). Treatment of neurons with GABA-T inhibitors, a treatment known to increase intracellular GABA levels, decreases the interaction of the receptor with the ER quality control protein calnexin, concomittantly increasing receptor forward-trafficking and plasma membrane insertion. The effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction is not due to the activation of surface GABAA or GABAB receptors. Consistent with our hypothesis that GABA acts as a cognate ligand chaperone in the ER, immunogold-labeling of rodent brain slices reveals the presence of GABA within the rough ER. The density of this labeling is similar to that present in mitochondria, the organelle in which GABA is degraded. Lastly, the effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction was prevented by pretreatment with a GABA transporter inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that endogenous GABA acts in the rough ER as a cognate ligand chaperone to facilitate the biogenesis of neuronal GABAA receptors. PMID

  15. Tactile perception of the roughness of the end of a tool: what role does tool handle roughness play?

    PubMed

    Zampini, Massimiliano; Mawhinney, Sara; Spence, Charles

    2006-06-12

    We investigated whether the perceived roughness of the end of a tool is influenced by the texture of the handle used to hold it. Participants rated the roughness of the ends (caps) of a series of tools by rubbing them along their forearm, and indicated the perceived roughness of the tool's cap by means of an anchored visual scale. The caps of the tools had one of eight different levels of roughness varying from very smooth (sample 1) to very rough (sample 8). The participants held the tool handle in one hand while rubbing the cap of the tool against their contralateral forearm. The tool handle was either smooth (similar in smoothness to sample 1) or else very rough (matched in roughness to sample 8). Overall, participants were remarkably good at ignoring the roughness of the tool's handle when discriminating the roughness of the tool's cap. Nevertheless, the roughness of the tool handle was shown to modulate roughness judgments concerning the tool cap under certain conditions: in particular, tool caps at the rougher end of the scale (6 and 7) were rated as being significantly less rough when the participants held tools with a rough handle than when they held tools with a smooth handle. Our results therefore demonstrate a small but significant effect of the roughness of the handle of a tool on the perceived roughness of its cap.

  16. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in acrolein-induced endothelial activation

    SciTech Connect

    Haberzettl, Petra; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and an endogenous product of lipid peroxidation. It is also generated during the metabolism of several drugs and amino acids. In this study, we examined the effects of acrolein on endothelial cells. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with 2 to 10 {mu}M acrolein led to an increase in the phosphorylation of eIF-2{alpha} within 10 to 30 min of exposure. This was followed by alternate splicing of XBP-1 mRNA and an increase in the expression of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone genes Grp78 and Herp. Within 2-4 h of treatment, acrolein also increased the abundance and the nuclear transport of the transcription factors ATF3, AFT4, and CHOP. Acrolein-induced increase in ATF3 was prevented by treating the cells with the chemical chaperone - phenylbutyric acid (PBA). Treatment with acrolein increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and JNK. The increase in JNK phosphorylation was prevented by PBA. Acrolein treatment led to activation and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF-{kappa}B and an increase in TNF-{alpha}, IL-6 and IL-8, but not MCP-1, mRNA. Increased expression of cytokine genes and NF-{kappa}B activation were not observed in cells treated with PBA. These findings suggest that exposure to acrolein induces ER stress and triggers the unfolded protein response and that NF-{kappa}B activation and stimulation of cytokine production by acrolein could be attributed, in part, to ER stress. Chemical chaperones of protein-folding may be useful in treating toxicological and pathological states associated with excessive acrolein exposure or production.

  17. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy reduces blood pressure and hypothalamic endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice.

    PubMed

    McGavigan, Anne K; Henseler, Zachariah M; Garibay, Darline; Butler, Scott D; Jayasinghe, Sisitha; Ley, Ruth E; Davisson, Robin L; Cummings, Bethany P

    2017-03-01

    Bariatric surgery, such as vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), causes remarkable improvements in cardiometabolic health, including hypertension remission. However, the mechanisms responsible remain undefined and poorly studied. Therefore, we developed and validated the first murine model of VSG that recapitulates the blood pressure-lowering effect of VSG using gold-standard radiotelemetry technology. We used this model to investigate several potential mechanisms, including body mass, brain endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling and brain inflammatory signaling, which are all critical contributors to the pathogenesis of obesity-associated hypertension. Mice fed on a high-fat diet underwent sham or VSG surgery and radiotelemeter implantation. Sham mice were fed ad libitum or were food restricted to match their body mass to VSG-operated mice to determine the role of body mass in the ability of VSG to lower blood pressure. Blood pressure was then measured in freely moving unstressed mice by radiotelemetry. VSG decreased energy intake, body mass and fat mass. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was reduced in VSG-operated mice compared with both sham-operated groups. VSG-induced reductions in MAP were accompanied by a body mass-independent decrease in hypothalamic ER stress, hypothalamic inflammation and sympathetic nervous system tone. Assessment of gut microbial populations revealed VSG-induced increases in the relative abundance of Gammaproteobacteria and Enterococcus, and decreases in Adlercreutzia These results suggest that VSG reduces blood pressure, but this is only partly due to the reduction in body weight. VSG-induced reductions in blood pressure may be driven by a decrease in hypothalamic ER stress and inflammatory signaling, and shifts in gut microbial populations.

  18. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy reduces blood pressure and hypothalamic endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice

    PubMed Central

    McGavigan, Anne K.; Henseler, Zachariah M.; Garibay, Darline; Butler, Scott D.; Jayasinghe, Sisitha; Ley, Ruth E.; Davisson, Robin L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bariatric surgery, such as vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG), causes remarkable improvements in cardiometabolic health, including hypertension remission. However, the mechanisms responsible remain undefined and poorly studied. Therefore, we developed and validated the first murine model of VSG that recapitulates the blood pressure-lowering effect of VSG using gold-standard radiotelemetry technology. We used this model to investigate several potential mechanisms, including body mass, brain endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signaling and brain inflammatory signaling, which are all critical contributors to the pathogenesis of obesity-associated hypertension. Mice fed on a high-fat diet underwent sham or VSG surgery and radiotelemeter implantation. Sham mice were fed ad libitum or were food restricted to match their body mass to VSG-operated mice to determine the role of body mass in the ability of VSG to lower blood pressure. Blood pressure was then measured in freely moving unstressed mice by radiotelemetry. VSG decreased energy intake, body mass and fat mass. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) was reduced in VSG-operated mice compared with both sham-operated groups. VSG-induced reductions in MAP were accompanied by a body mass-independent decrease in hypothalamic ER stress, hypothalamic inflammation and sympathetic nervous system tone. Assessment of gut microbial populations revealed VSG-induced increases in the relative abundance of Gammaproteobacteria and Enterococcus, and decreases in Adlercreutzia. These results suggest that VSG reduces blood pressure, but this is only partly due to the reduction in body weight. VSG-induced reductions in blood pressure may be driven by a decrease in hypothalamic ER stress and inflammatory signaling, and shifts in gut microbial populations. PMID:28093508

  19. Replicated mask surface roughness effects on EUV lithographic pattering and line edge roughness

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Mochi, Iacopo; Salmassi, Farhad; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Anderson, Erik H.

    2011-03-11

    To quantify the roughness contributions to speckle, a programmed roughness substrate was fabricated with a number of areas having different roughness magnitudes. The substrate was then multilayer coated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface maps were collected before and after multilayer deposition. At-wavelength reflectance and total integrated scattering measurements were also completed. Angle resolved scattering based power spectral densities are directly compared to the AFM based power spectra. We show that AFM overpredicts the roughness in the picometer measurements range. The mask was then imaged at-wavelength for the direct characterization of the aerial image speckle using the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT). Modeling was used to test the effectiveness of the different metrologies in predicting the measured aerial-image speckle. AIT measured contrast values are 25% or more than the calculated image contrast values obtained using the measured rms roughness input. The extent to which the various metrologies can be utilized for specifying tolerable roughness limits on EUV masks is still to be determined. Further modeling and measurements are being planned.

  20. Simulation studies on sputtering in rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenmotsu, T.; Yamamura, Y.; Muramoto, T.; Hirotani, N.

    2005-01-01

    The influence of a surface roughness on sputtering is studied using a Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT. In order to estimate this influence in ACAT calculation, the ACAT code is modified. The two-dimensional fractal surface model is applied to the ACAT code and a surface binding energy of a target material is estimated by a many-body tight-binding potential. Simulation results calculated with the modified ACAT are compared with experimental data and the standard planar ACAT on sputtering yields of a Mo surface irradiated with 2 keV D+ ions. The modified ACAT code predicts well experimental data from rough surfaces compared with the standard planar ACAT code.

  1. Thin layer solar drying of rough rice

    SciTech Connect

    Zaman, M.A.; Bala, B.K. )

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents a set of simple empirical equations for natural air flow solar drying of rough rice in mixed-mode type dryer, box-type dryer and open floor drying system. The moisture contents predicted by the equations were in good agreement with the observed values. The effect of drying air temperature on the drying rate constants for these three cases were found to be insignificant. The equilibrium moisture content appeared to be the most important variable controlling the drying rate. The highest drying rate was observed in case of mixed-mode dryer. The drying rate of box dryer was next to that of mixed-mode dryer. This study shows that the introduction of solar dryer for drying of rough rice is highly recommended in Bangladesh.

  2. Surface Roughness Reduction on Divinylbenzene Foam Shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Jon; Karnes, John; Motta, Brian; Petta, Nicole

    2009-11-01

    Inertial fusion energy targets for the Naval Research Laboratory's High Average Power Laser Program require millimeter-scale, low density foam capsules with a gas permeation barrier and an outer surface roughness less than 50 nm RMS. Divinylbenzene (DVB) foam is a candidate for the capsule wall material, but its porous, open celled surface has been both too rough and difficult to seal. To overcome this difficulty we have repurposed a previously reported dual stage initiator emulsion microencapsulation method, adding an additional step that enhances the surface of the foam capsules. Using both low and high temperature initiators allows the DVB foam to gel in the low temperature stage and a water soluble monomer to be added and polymerized during the high temperature stage without breaking down the emulsion. This method forms a submicron skin that covers the open celled DVB foam surface, resulting in a superior substrate for gas permeation barrier deposition.

  3. A model for rough wall turbulent heating and skin friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finson, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    A Reynolds stress model for turbulent boundary layers on rough walls is used to investigate the effects of roughness character and compressibility. The flow around roughness elements is treated as form drag. A method is presented for deriving the required roughness shape and spacing from profiometer surface measurements. Calculations based on the model compare satisfactorily with low speed data on roughness character and hypersonic measurements with grit roughness. The computer model is exercised systematically over a wide range of parameters to derive a practical scaling law for the equivalent roughness. In contrast to previous correlations, for most roughness element shapes the effective roughness does not show a pronounced maximum as the element spacing decreases. The effect of roughness tends to be reduced with increasing edge Mach number, primarily due to decreasing density in the vicinity of the roughness elements. It is further shown that the required roughness Reynolds number for fully rough behavior increases with increasing Mach number, explaining the small roughness effects observed in some hypersonic tests.

  4. Radiative Transfer Model for Contaminated Rough Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    transfer, reflectance, rough surface, BRDF, Kramers- Kronig , penetration depth, fill factor, infrared, LWIR, MWIR, absorption coefficient, scattering...can be obtained from the absorption coefficient via Equation 6 (below) and the real part may be obtained via Kramers- Kronig (KK) analysis,18 n = KK(k...expanded reference library with more than one reference spectrum per material. Kramers- Kronig Relations: The Kramers- Kronig relationship is a

  5. Sparseness and Roughness of Foreign Exchange Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandewalle, N.; Ausloos, M.

    An accurate multiaffine analysis of 23 foreign currency exchange rates has been performed. The roughness exponent H1 which characterizes the excursion of the exchange rate has been numerically measured. The degree of intermittency C1 has been also estimated. In the (H1,C1) phase diagram, the currency exchange rates are dispersed in a wide region around the Brownian motion value (H1=0.5,C1=0) and have a significantly intermittent component (C1≠0).

  6. Toll-like receptor 4-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to endothelial dysfunction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impairment of vasodilator action of insulin is associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated as one of the mechanisms for pathophysiology of various cardiometabolic syndromes, including insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. ...

  7. The endoplasmic reticulum stress transducer OASIS is involved in the terminal differentiation of goblet cells in the large intestine.

    PubMed

    Asada, Rie; Saito, Atsushi; Kawasaki, Noritaka; Kanemoto, Soshi; Iwamoto, Hideo; Oki, Mami; Miyagi, Hidetaka; Izumi, Soutarou; Imaizumi, Kazunori

    2012-03-09

    OASIS is a basic leucine zipper transmembrane transcription factor localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that is cleaved in its transmembrane region in response to ER stress. This novel ER stress transducer has been demonstrated to express in osteoblasts and astrocytes and promote terminal maturation of these cells. Additionally, OASIS is highly expressed in goblet cells of the large intestine. In this study, we investigated the roles of OASIS in goblet cell differentiation in the large intestine. To analyze the functions of OASIS in goblet cells, we examined morphological changes and the expression of goblet cell differentiation markers in the large intestine of Oasis(-/-) mice. By disrupting the Oasis gene, the number of goblet cells and production of mucus were decreased in the large intestine. Oasis(-/-) goblet cells showed abnormal morphology of mucous vesicles and rough ER. The expression levels of mature goblet cell markers were lower, and conversely those of early goblet cell markers were higher in Oasis(-/-) mice, indicating that differentiation from early to mature goblet cells is impaired in Oasis(-/-) mice. To determine the association of OASIS with other factors involved in goblet cell differentiation, in vitro experiments using a cell culture model were performed. We found that OASIS was activated in response to mild ER stress that is induced in differentiating goblet cells. Knockdown of the Oasis transcript perturbed goblet cell terminal differentiation. Together, our data indicate that OASIS plays crucial roles in promoting the differentiation of early goblet cells to mature goblet cells in the large intestine.

  8. Polypeptide and phospholipid composition of the membrane of rat liver peroxisomes: comparison with endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial membranes

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Membranes were isolated from highly purified peroxisomes, mitochondria, and rough and smooth microsomes of rat liver by the one-step Na2CO3 procedure described in the accompanying paper (1982, J. Cell Biol. 93:97-102). The polypeptide compositions of these membranes were determined by SDS PAGE and found to be greatly dissimilar. The peroxisomal membrane contains 12% of the peroxisomal protein and consists of three major polypeptides (21,700, 67,700 and 69,700 daltons) as well as some minor polypeptides. The major peroxisomal membrane proteins as well as most of the minor ones are absent from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Conversely, most ER proteins are absent from peroxisomes. By electron microscopy, purified peroxisomal membranes are approximately 6.8 nm thick and have a typical trilaminar appearance. The phospholipid/protein ratio of peroxisomal membranes is approximately 200 nmol/mg; the principal phospholipids are phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine as in ER and mitochondrial membranes. In contrast to the mitochondria, peroxisomal membranes contain no cardiolipin. All the membranes investigated contain a polypeptide band with a molecular mass of approximately 15,000 daltons. Whether this represents an exceptional common membrane protein or a coincidence is unknown. The implications of these results for the biogenesis of peroxisomes are discussed. PMID:7068748

  9. ROUGHNESS ANALYSIS OF VARIOUSLY POLISHED NIOBIUM SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeill, G.; Reece, C.

    2008-01-01

    Niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities have gained widespread use in accelerator systems. It has been shown that surface roughness is a determining factor in the cavities’ effi ciency and maximum accelerating potential achievable through this technology. Irregularities in the surface can lead to spot heating, undesirable local electrical fi eld enhancement and electron multipacting. Surface quality is typically ensured through the use of acid etching in a Buffered Chemical Polish (BCP) bath and electropolishing (EP). In this study, the effects of these techniques on surface morphology have been investigated in depth. The surface of niobium samples polished using different combinations of these techniques has been characterized through atomic force microscopy (AFM) and stylus profi lometry across a range of length scales. The surface morphology was analyzed using spectral techniques to determine roughness and characteristic dimensions. Experimentation has shown that this method is a valuable tool that provides quantitative information about surface roughness at different length scales. It has demonstrated that light BCP pretreatment and lower electrolyte temperature favors a smoother electropolish. These results will allow for the design of a superior polishing process for niobium SRF cavities and therefore increased accelerator operating effi ciency and power.

  10. Wenzel Wetting on Slippery Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stogin, Birgitt; Dai, Xianming; Wong, Tak-Sing

    2015-11-01

    Liquid repellency is an important surface property used in a wide range of applications including self-cleaning, anti-icing, anti-biofouling, and condensation heat transfer, and is characterized by apparent contact angle (θ*) and contact angle hysteresis (Δθ*). The Wenzel equation (1936) predicts θ* of liquids in the Wenzel state, and is one of the most fundamental equations in the wetting field. However, droplets in the Wenzel state on conventional rough surfaces exhibit large Δθ* , making it difficult to experimentally verify the model with precision. As a result, precise verification of the Wenzel wetting model has remained an open scientific question for the past 79 years. Here we introduce a new class of liquid-infused surfaces called slippery rough surfaces -- surfaces with significantly reduced Δθ* compared to conventional rough surfaces--and use them to experimentally assess the Wenzel equation with the highest precision to date. We acknowledge the funding support by National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award #: 1351462 and Office of Navy Research MURI Award #: N00014-12-1-0875. Stogin acknowledges the support from the NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (Grant No. DGE1255832).

  11. Roughness coefficients for stream channels in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldridge, B.N.; Garrett, J.M.

    1973-01-01

           n in which V = mean cross-sectional velocity of flow, in feet per second; R = hydraulic radius at a cross section, which is the cross-sectional area divided by the wetter perimeter, in feet; Se = energy slope; and n = coefficient of roughness. Many research studies have been made to determine "n" values for open-channel flow (Carter and others, 1963). Guidelines for selecting coefficient of roughness for stream channels are given in most of the literature of stream-channel hydraulics, but few of the data relate directly to streams of Arizona, The U.S> Geological Survey, at the request of the Arizona Highway Department, assembled the color photographs and tables of the Manning "n" values in this report to aid highway engineers in the selection of roughness coefficients for Arizona streams. Most of the photographs show channel reaches for which values of "n" have been assigned by experienced Survey personnel; a few photographs are included for reaches where "n" values have been verified. Verified "n" values are computed from a known discharge and measured channel geometry. Selected photographs of stream channels for which "n" values have been verified are included in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1849 (Barnes, 1967); stereoscopic slides of Barnes' (1967) photographs and additional photographs can be inspected at U.S> Geological Survey offices in: 2555 E. First Street, Tucson; and 5017 Federal Building, 230 N. First Avenue, Phoenix.

  12. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers of the boundary layers, absolute instability resulting in vortex shedding downstream, is likely to weaken at supersonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for a rectangular or cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation is present.

  13. Soil Surface Roughness through Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquis, A. M.; Saa-Requejo, A.; Valencia, J. L.; Moratiel, R.; Paz-Gonzalez, A.; Agro-Environmental Modeling

    2011-12-01

    Soil erosion is a complex phenomenon involving the detachment and transport of soil particles, storage and runoff of rainwater, and infiltration. The relative magnitude and importance of these processes depends on several factors being one of them surface micro-topography, usually quantified trough soil surface roughness (SSR). SSR greatly affects surface sealing and runoff generation, yet little information is available about the effect of roughness on the spatial distribution of runoff and on flow concentration. The methods commonly used to measure SSR involve measuring point elevation using a pin roughness meter or laser, both of which are labor intensive and expensive. Lately a simple and inexpensive technique based on percentage of shadow in soil surface image has been developed to determine SSR in the field in order to obtain measurement for wide spread application. One of the first steps in this technique is image de-noising and thresholding to estimate the percentage of black pixels in the studied area. In this work, a series of soil surface images have been analyzed applying several de-noising wavelet analysis and thresholding algorithms to study the variation in percentage of shadows and the shadows size distribution. Funding provided by Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN) through project no. AGL2010- 21501/AGR and by Xunta de Galicia through project no INCITE08PXIB1621 are greatly appreciated.

  14. Flow over a Biomimetic Surface Roughness Microgeometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke Lang, Amy; Hidalgo, Pablo; Westcott, Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Certain species of sharks (e.g. shortfin mako and common hammerhead) have a skin structure that could result in a bristling of their denticles (scales) during increased swimming speeds (Bechert, D. W., Bruse, M., Hage, W. and Meyer, R. 2000, Fluid mechanics of biological surfaces and their technological application. Naturwissenschaften 80:157-171). This unique surface geometry results in a three-dimensional array of cavities* (d-type roughness geometry) forming within the surface and has been given the acronym MAKO (Micro-roughness Array for Kinematic Optimization). Possible mechanisms leading to drag reduction over the shark's body by this unique roughness geometry include separation control thereby reducing pressure drag, skin friction reduction (via the `micro-air bearing' effect first proposed by Bushnell (AIAA 83-0227)), as well as possible transition delay in the boundary layer. Initial work is confined to scaling up the geometry from 0.2 mm on the shark skin to 2 cm, with a scaling down in characteristic velocity from 10 - 20 m/s to 10 - 20 cm/s for laminar flow boundary layer water tunnel studies. Support for this research by NSF SGER grant CTS-0630489 and a University of Alabama RAC grant is gratefully acknowledged. * Patent pending.

  15. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0203 TITLE: The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease PRINCIPAL...1 July 2015- 30 June 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease 5a...We hypothesize that ER stress induced by glucose in diabetes promotes diabetic CKD through CRT stimulation of TGF-beta-dependent calcium/NFAT

  16. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0203 TITLE: The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease PRINCIPAL...COVERED 07/01/2014-06/30/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease 5a...NUMBER(S) 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We hypothesize that ER stress induced by glucose in diabetes promotes diabetic CKD through CRT stimulation

  17. Different Effects of Roughness (Granularity) and Hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirtcliffe, Neil; McHale, Glen; Hamlett, Christopher; Newton, Michael

    2010-05-01

    With thanks to Stefan Doerr and Jorge Mataix-Solera for their invitation Superhydrophobicity is an interesting effect that appears to be simple on the outset; increased surface area from roughness increases interfacial area and therefore energy loss or gain. More extreme roughness prevents total wetting, resulting in gas pockets present at the surface and a drastic change in the properties of the system. Increases in complexity of the system, by adding porosity (granularity), allowing the structures to move, varying the shape of the roughness or the composition of the liquid used often has unexpected effects. Here we will consider a few of these related to complex topography. Overhanging features are commonly used in test samples as they perform better in some tests than simple roughness. It has been shown to be a prerequisite for superoleophobic surfaces as it allows liquids to be suspended for contact angles considerably below 90°. It also allows trapping of gas in lower layers even if the first layer is flooded. This is important in soils as a fixed bed of granules behaves just like a surface with overhanging roughness. Using simple geometry it is possible to predict at what contact angle penetration will occur. Plants have some structured superhydrophobic surfaces and we have shown that some use them in conjunction with other structured surfaces to control water flows. This allows some plants to survive in difficult environments and shows us how subtly different structures interact completely differently with water. Long fibres can either cause water droplets to roll over a plant surface or halt it in its tracks. Implications of this in soils include predicting when particles will adhere more strongly to water drops and why organic fibrous material may play a greater role in the behaviour of water in soils than may be expected from the amount present. The garden snail uses a biosurfactant that is very effective at wetting surfaces and can crawl over most

  18. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Plays a Key Role in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lupachyk, Sergey; Watcho, Pierre; Stavniichuk, Roman; Shevalye, Hanna; Obrosova, Irina G.

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress resulting from abnormal folding of newly synthesized proteins impairs metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and gene expression, and it is a key mechanism of cell injury. Endoplasmic reticulum stress plays an important role in cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and diabetes. We evaluated the role for this phenomenon in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Endoplasmic reticulum stress manifest in upregulation of multiple components of unfolded protein response was identified in neural tissues (sciatic nerve, spinal cord) of streptozotocin diabetic rats and mice. A chemical chaperone, trimethylamine oxide, administered for 12 weeks after induction of diabetes (110 mg⋅kg−1⋅d−1, a prevention paradigm) attenuated endoplasmic reticulum stress, peripheral nerve dysfunction, intraepidermal nerve fiber loss, and sciatic nerve and spinal cord oxidative-nitrative stress in streptozotocin diabetic rats. Similar effects on diabetes-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and peripheral nerve dysfunction were observed with a structurally unrelated chemical chaperone, 4-phenylbutyric acid (100 mg⋅kg−1⋅d−1, intraperitoneal). CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP)−/− mice made diabetic with streptozotocin displayed less severe sciatic nerve oxidative-nitrative stress and peripheral neuropathy than the wild-type (C57Bl6/J) mice. Neither chemical chaperones nor CHOP gene deficiency reduced diabetic hyperglycemia. Our findings reveal an important role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and identify a potential new therapeutic target. PMID:23364451

  19. Reduction of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ levels favors plasma membrane surface exposure of calreticulin.

    PubMed

    Tufi, R; Panaretakis, T; Bianchi, K; Criollo, A; Fazi, B; Di Sano, F; Tesniere, A; Kepp, O; Paterlini-Brechot, P; Zitvogel, L; Piacentini, M; Szabadkai, G; Kroemer, G

    2008-02-01

    Some chemotherapeutic agents can elicit apoptotic cancer cell death, thereby activating an anticancer immune response that influences therapeutic outcome. We previously reported that anthracyclins are particularly efficient in inducing immunogenic cell death, correlating with the pre-apoptotic exposure of calreticulin (CRT) on the plasma membrane surface of anthracyclin-treated tumor cells. Here, we investigated the role of cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis on CRT exposure. A neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) failed to expose CRT in response to anthracyclin treatment. This defect in CRT exposure could be overcome by the overexpression of Reticulon-1C, a manipulation that led to a decrease in the Ca(2+) concentration within the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. The combination of Reticulon-1C expression and anthracyclin treatment yielded more pronounced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) depletion than either of the two manipulations alone. Chelation of intracellular (and endoplasmic reticulum) Ca(2+), targeted expression of the ligand-binding domain of the IP(3) receptor and inhibition of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pump reduced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) load and promoted pre-apoptotic CRT exposure on the cell surface, in SH-SY5Y and HeLa cells. These results provide evidence that endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) levels control the exposure of CRT.

  20. Apoptosis, autophagy & endoplasmic reticulum stress in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Demirtas, Levent; Guclu, Aydin; Erdur, Fatih Mehmet; Akbas, Emin Murat; Ozcicek, Adalet; Onk, Didem; Turkmen, Kultigin

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing secondary to increased consumption of food and decreased physical activity worldwide. Hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance and hypertrophy of pancreatic beta cells occur in the early phase of diabetes. However, with the progression of diabetes, dysfunction and loss of beta cells occur in both types 1 and 2 DM. Programmed cell death also named apoptosis is found to be associated with diabetes, and apoptosis of beta cells might be the main mechanism of relative insulin deficiency in DM. Autophagic cell death and apoptosis are not entirely distinct programmed cell death mechanisms and share many of the regulator proteins. These processes can occur in both physiologic and pathologic conditions including DM. Besides these two important pathways, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) also acts as a cell sensor to monitor and maintain cellular homeostasis. ER stress has been found to be associated with autophagy and apoptosis. This review was aimed to describe the interactions between apoptosis, autophagy and ER stress pathways in DM. PMID:28256459

  1. Chlorpyrifos induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Reyna, Luciana; Flores-Martín, Jésica; Ridano, Magali E; Panzetta-Dutari, Graciela M; Genti-Raimondi, Susana

    2017-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an organophosphorous pesticide widely used in agricultural, industrial, and household applications. We have previously shown that JEG-3 cells are able to attenuate the oxidative stress induced by CPF through the adaptive activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Considering that there is a relationship between oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER), herein we investigated whether CPF also induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells. Cells were exposed to 50μM or 100μM CPF during 24h in conditions where cell viability was not altered. Western blot and PCR assays were used to explore the protein and mRNA levels of ER stress biomarkers, respectively. CPF induced an increase of the typical ER stress-related proteins, such as GRP78/BiP and IRE1α, a sensor for the unfolded protein response, as well as in phospho-eIF2α and XBP1 mRNA splicing. Additionally, CPF led to a decrease in p53 protein expression. The downregulation of p53 levels induced by CPF was partially blocked when cells were exposed to CPF in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Altogether, these findings point out that CPF induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells; however these cells are able to attenuate it downregulating the levels of the pro-apoptotic protein p53.

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Interacts With Inflammation in Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cao, Stewart Siyan; Luo, Katherine L; Shi, Lynn

    2016-02-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a critical organelle for normal cell function and homeostasis. Disturbance in the protein folding process in the ER, termed ER stress, leads to the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR) that encompasses a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways. The UPR can either restore ER homeostasis or activate pro-apoptotic pathways depending on the type of insults, intensity and duration of the stress, and cell types. ER stress and the UPR have recently been linked to inflammation in a variety of human pathologies including autoimmune, infectious, neurodegenerative, and metabolic disorders. In the cell, ER stress and inflammatory signaling share extensive regulators and effectors in a broad spectrum of biological processes. In spite of different etiologies, the two signaling pathways have been shown to form a vicious cycle in exacerbating cellular dysfunction and causing apoptosis in many cells and tissues. However, the interaction between ER stress and inflammation in many of these diseases remains poorly understood. Further understanding of the biochemistry, cell biology, and physiology may enable the development of novel therapies that spontaneously target these pathogenic pathways.

  3. Protein quality control, retention, and degradation at the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Benyair, Ron; Ron, Efrat; Lederkremer, Gerardo Z

    2011-01-01

    In order to maintain proper cellular functions, all living cells, from bacteria to mammalian cells, must carry out a rigorous quality control process in which nascent and newly synthesized proteins are examined. An important role of this process is to protect cells against pathological accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has evolved as a staging ground for secretory protein synthesis with distinct sites for entry, quality control, and exit. In the ER, most proteins are N-glycosylated, a posttranslational modification that defines the quality control pathway that the protein will undergo. The folding state of glycoproteins is revealed by specific modifications of their N-glycans. Regardless of size and posttranslational modifications, the folding states of all proteins must be identified as unfolded, properly folded, or terminally misfolded and accordingly subjected to ER retention and continued folding attempts, export and maturation, or retrotranslocation to the cytosol for degradation. These processes involve specialized machineries that utilize molecular chaperones, protein- and N-glycan-modifying enzymes, and lectins for protein folding and quality control and ubiquitination and degradation machineries for disposal. All these machineries are regulated by a signaling pathway, the unfolded protein response, which upregulates ER functions when under the stress of high protein load. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms that are implicated and discuss recent data that underline the importance of compartmentalization in the segregation of the various functions of the ER for their correct function.

  4. Proteostasis: bad news and good news from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Noack, Julia; Brambilla Pisoni, Giorgia; Molinari, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an intracellular compartment dedicated to the synthesis and maturation of secretory and membrane proteins, totalling about 30% of the total eukaryotic cells proteome. The capacity to produce correctly folded polypeptides and to transport them to their correct intra- or extracellular destinations relies on proteostasis networks that regulate and balance the activity of protein folding, quality control, transport and degradation machineries. Nutrient and environmental changes, pathogen infection aging and, more relevant for the topics discussed in this review, mutations that impair attainment of the correct 3D structure of nascent polypeptide chains may compromise the activity of the proteostasis networks with devastating consequences on cells, organs and organisms' homeostasis. Here we present a review of mechanisms regulating folding and quality control of proteins expressed in the ER, and we describe the protein degradation and the ER stress pathways activated by the expression of misfolded proteins in the ER lumen. Finally, we highlight select examples of proteopathies (also known as conformational disorders or protein misfolding diseases) caused by protein misfolding in the ER and/or affecting cellular proteostasis and therapeutic interventions that might alleviate or cure the disease symptoms.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress response in yeast and humans

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haoxi; Ng, Benjamin S. H.; Thibault, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Stress pathways monitor intracellular systems and deploy a range of regulatory mechanisms in response to stress. One of the best-characterized pathways, the UPR (unfolded protein response), is an intracellular signal transduction pathway that monitors ER (endoplasmic reticulum) homoeostasis. Its activation is required to alleviate the effects of ER stress and is highly conserved from yeast to human. Although metazoans have three UPR outputs, yeast cells rely exclusively on the Ire1 (inositol-requiring enzyme-1) pathway, which is conserved in all Eukaryotes. In general, the UPR program activates hundreds of genes to alleviate ER stress but it can lead to apoptosis if the system fails to restore homoeostasis. In this review, we summarize the major advances in understanding the response to ER stress in Sc (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), Sp (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and humans. The contribution of solved protein structures to a better understanding of the UPR pathway is discussed. Finally, we cover the interplay of ER stress in the development of diseases. PMID:24909749

  6. Naltrexone attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Moslehi, A; Nabavizadeh, F; Nabavizadeh, Fatemeh; Dehpour, A R; Dehpou, A R; Tavanga, S M; Hassanzadeh, G; Zekri, A; Nahrevanian, H; Sohanaki, H

    2014-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress provides abnormalities in insulin action, inflammatory responses, lipoprotein B100 degradation and hepatic lipogenesis. Excess accumulation of triglyceride in hepatocytes may also lead to disorders such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Opioid peptides are involved in triglyceride and cholesterol dysregulation, inflammation and cell death. In this study, we evaluated Naltrexone effects on ER stress induced liver injury. To do so, C57/BL6 mice received saline, DMSO and Naltrexone, as control groups. ER stress was induced by tunicamycin (TM) injection. Naltrexone was given before TM administration. Liver blood flow and biochemical serum analysis were measured. Histopathological evaluations, TNF-α measurement and Real-time RT-PCR were also performed. TM challenge provokes steatosis, cellular ballooning and lobular inflammation which significantly reduced in Naltrexone treated animals. ALT, AST and TNF-α increased in the TM group and improved in the Naltrexone plus TM group. Triglyceride and cholesterol levels decreased in TM treated mice with no increase in Naltrexone treated animals. In the Naltrexone plus TM group, gene expression of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase3 significantly lowered compared with the TM group. In this study, we found that Naltrexone had a notable alleviating role in ER stress induced steatosis and liver injury.

  7. Protein Bodies in Leaves Exchange Contents through the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Saberianfar, Reza; Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Joensuu, Jussi J.; Kohalmi, Susanne E.; Menassa, Rima

    2016-01-01

    Protein bodies (PBs) are organelles found in seeds whose main function is the storage of proteins that are used during germination for sustaining growth. PBs can also be induced to form in leaves when foreign proteins are produced at high levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and when fused to one of three tags: Zera®, elastin-like polypeptides (ELP), or hydrophobin-I (HFBI). In this study, we investigate the differences between ELP, HFBI and Zera PB formation, packing, and communication. Our results confirm the ER origin of all three fusion-tag-induced PBs. We show that secretory pathway proteins can be sequestered into all types of PBs but with different patterns, and that different fusion tags can target a specific protein to different PBs. Zera PBs are mobile and dependent on actomyosin motility similar to ELP and HFBI PBs. We show in vivo trafficking of proteins between PBs using GFP photoconversion. We also show that protein trafficking between ELP or HFBI PBs is faster and proteins travel further when compared to Zera PBs. Our results indicate that fusion-tag-induced PBs do not represent terminally stored cytosolic organelles, but that they form in, and remain part of the ER, and dynamically communicate with each other via the ER. We hypothesize that the previously documented PB mobility along the actin cytoskeleton is associated with ER movement rather than independent streaming of detached organelles. PMID:27242885

  8. Small GTPases and Brucella entry into the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    de Bolle, Xavier; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-12-01

    A key determinant for intracellular pathogenic bacteria to ensure their virulence within host cells is their ability to bypass the endocytic pathway and to reach a safe niche of replication. In the case of Brucella, the bacterium targets the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) to create a replicating niche called the BCV (Brucella-containing vacuole). The ER is a suitable strategic place for pathogenic Brucella. Indeed, bacteria can be hidden from host cell defences to persist within the host, and they can take advantage of the membrane reservoir delivered by the ER to replicate. Interaction with the ER leads to the presence on the BCV of the GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and the small GTPase Rab2 known to be located on secretory vesicles that traffic between the ER and the Golgi apparatus. GAPDH and the small GTPase Rab2 controls Brucella replication at late times post-infection. A specific interaction between the human small GTPase Rab2 and a Brucella spp. protein named RicA was identified. Altered kinetics of intracellular trafficking and faster proliferation of the Brucella abortus ΔricA mutant was observed compared with the wild-type strain. RicA is the first reported effector with a proposed function for B. abortus.

  9. The Role of the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Peroxisome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Lazar; Lam, Sheung Kwan; Schekman, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisomes are essential cellular organelles involved in lipid metabolism. Patients affected by severe peroxisome biogenesis disorders rarely survive their first year. Genetic screens in several model organisms have identified more than 30 PEX genes that are required for the formation of functional peroxisomes. Despite significant work on the PEX genes, the biogenic origin of peroxisomes remains controversial. For at least two decades, the prevailing model postulated that peroxisomes propagate by growth and fission of preexisting peroxisomes. In this review, we focus on the recent evidence supporting a new, semiautonomous model of peroxisomal biogenesis. According to this model, peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the peroxisome by a vesicular budding, targeting, and fusion process while peroxisomal matrix proteins are imported into the organelle by an autonomous, posttranslational mechanism. We highlight the contradictory conclusions reached to answer the question of how PMPs are inserted into the ER. We then review what we know and what still remains to be elucidated about the mechanism of PMP exit from the ER and the contribution of preperoxisomal vesicles to mature peroxisomes. Finally, we discuss discrepancies in our understanding of de novo peroxisome biogenesis in wild-type cells. We anticipate that resolving these key issues will lead to a more complete picture of peroxisome biogenesis. PMID:23637287

  10. Microtubules and the endoplasmic reticulum are highly interdependent structures

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The interrelationships of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), microtubules, and intermediate filaments were studied in the peripheral regions of thin, spread fibroblasts, epithelial, and vascular endothelial cells in culture. We combined a fluorescent dye staining technique to localize the ER with immunofluorescence to localize microtubules or intermediate filaments in the same cell. Microtubules and the ER are sparse in the lamellipodia, but intermediate filaments are usually completely absent. These relationships indicate that microtubules and the ER advance into the lamellipodia before intermediate filaments. We observed that microtubules and tubules of the ER have nearly identical distributions in lamellipodia, where new extensions of both are taking place. We perturbed microtubules by nocodazole, cold temperature, or hypotonic shock, and observed the effects on the ER distribution. On the basis of our observations in untreated cells and our experiments with microtubule perturbation, we conclude that microtubules and the ER are highly interdependent in two ways: (a) polymerization of individual microtubules and extension of individual ER tubules occur together at the level of resolution of the fluorescence microscope, and (b) depolymerization of microtubules does not disrupt the ER network in the short term (15 min), but prolonged absence of microtubules (2 h) leads to a slow retraction of the ER network towards the cell center, indicating that over longer periods of time, the extended state of the entire ER network requires the microtubule system. PMID:3533956

  11. Apoptosis, autophagy & endoplasmic reticulum stress in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Demirtas, Levent; Guclu, Aydin; Erdur, Fatih Mehmet; Akbas, Emin Murat; Ozcicek, Adalet; Onk, Didem; Turkmen, Kultigin

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing secondary to increased consumption of food and decreased physical activity worldwide. Hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance and hypertrophy of pancreatic beta cells occur in the early phase of diabetes. However, with the progression of diabetes, dysfunction and loss of beta cells occur in both types 1 and 2 DM. Programmed cell death also named apoptosis is found to be associated with diabetes, and apoptosis of beta cells might be the main mechanism of relative insulin deficiency in DM. Autophagic cell death and apoptosis are not entirely distinct programmed cell death mechanisms and share many of the regulator proteins. These processes can occur in both physiologic and pathologic conditions including DM. Besides these two important pathways, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) also acts as a cell sensor to monitor and maintain cellular homeostasis. ER stress has been found to be associated with autophagy and apoptosis. This review was aimed to describe the interactions between apoptosis, autophagy and ER stress pathways in DM.

  12. Arachidonoyl-Specific Diacylglycerol Kinase ε and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Tomoyuki; Matsui, Hirooki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Iseki, Ken; Kawamae, Kaneyuki; Goto, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises an interconnected membrane network, which is made up of lipid bilayer and associated proteins. This organelle plays a central role in the protein synthesis and sorting. In addition, it represents the synthetic machinery of phospholipids, the major constituents of the biological membrane. In this process, phosphatidic acid (PA) serves as a precursor of all phospholipids, suggesting that PA synthetic activity is closely associated with the ER function. One enzyme responsible for PA synthesis is diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) that phosphorylates diacylglycerol (DG) to PA. DGK is composed of a family of enzymes with distinct features assigned to each isozyme in terms of structure, enzymology, and subcellular localization. Of DGKs, DGKε uniquely exhibits substrate specificity toward arachidonate-containing DG and is shown to reside in the ER. Arachidonic acid, a precursor of bioactive eicosanoids, is usually acylated at the sn-2 position of phospholipids, being especially enriched in phosphoinositide. In this review, we focus on arachidonoyl-specific DGKε with respect to the historical context, molecular basis of the substrate specificity and ER-targeting, and functional implications in the ER. PMID:27917381

  13. Coordination of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Signaling During Maize Seed Development

    SciTech Connect

    Boston, Rebecca S.

    2010-11-20

    Seed storage reserves represent one of the most important sources of renewable fixed carbon and nitrogen found in nature. Seeds are well-adapted for diverting metabolic resources to synthesize storage proteins as well as enzymes and structural proteins needed for their transport and packaging into membrane bound storage protein bodies. Our underlying hypothesis is that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response provides the critical cellular control of metabolic flux required for optimal accumulation of storage reserves in seeds. This highly conserved response is a cellular mechanism to monitor the protein folding environment of the ER and restore homeostasis in the presence of unfolded or misfolded proteins. In seeds, deposition of storage proteins in protein bodies is a highly specialized process that takes place even in the presence of mutant proteins that no longer fold and package properly. The capacity of the ER to deposit these aberrant proteins in protein bodies during a period that extends several weeks provides an excellent model for deconvoluting the ER stress response of plants. We have focused in this project on the means by which the ER senses and responds to functional perturbations and the underlying intracellular communication that occurs among biosynthetic, trafficking and degradative pathways for proteins during seed development.

  14. Methods to Study PTEN in Mitochondria and Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Missiroli, Sonia; Morganti, Claudia; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Although PTEN has been widely described as a nuclear and cytosolic protein, in the last 2 years, alternative organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), pure mitochondria, and mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), have been recognized as pivotal targets of PTEN activity.Here, we describe different methods that have been used to highlight PTEN subcellular localization.First, a protocol to extract nuclear and cytosolic fractions has been described to assess the "canonical" PTEN localization. Moreover, we describe a protocol for mitochondria isolation with proteinase K (PK) to further discriminate whether PTEN associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) or resides within the mitochondria. Finally, we focus our attention on a subcellular fractionation protocol of cells that permits the isolation of MAMs containing unique regions of ER membranes attached to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and mitochondria without contamination from other organelles. In addition to biochemical fractionations, immunostaining can be used to determine the subcellular localization of proteins; thus, a detailed protocol to obtain good immunofluorescence (IF) is described. The employment of these methodological approaches could facilitate the identification of different PTEN localizations in several physiopathological contexts.

  15. Endoplasmic-reticulum-mediated microtubule alignment governs cytoplasmic streaming.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kenji; Mamane, Alexandre; Sasaki, Tohru; Sato, Kohta; Takagi, Jun; Niwayama, Ritsuya; Hufnagel, Lars; Shimamoto, Yuta; Joanny, Jean-François; Uchida, Seiichi; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2017-04-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming refers to a collective movement of cytoplasm observed in many cell types. The mechanism of meiotic cytoplasmic streaming (MeiCS) in Caenorhabditis elegans zygotes is puzzling as the direction of the flow is not predefined by cell polarity and occasionally reverses. Here, we demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network structure is required for the collective flow. Using a combination of RNAi, microscopy and image processing of C. elegans zygotes, we devise a theoretical model, which reproduces and predicts the emergence and reversal of the flow. We propose a positive-feedback mechanism, where a local flow generated along a microtubule is transmitted to neighbouring regions through the ER. This, in turn, aligns microtubules over a broader area to self-organize the collective flow. The proposed model could be applicable to various cytoplasmic streaming phenomena in the absence of predefined polarity. The increased mobility of cortical granules by MeiCS correlates with the efficient exocytosis of the granules to protect the zygotes from osmotic and mechanical stresses.

  16. Association of Legionella pneumophila with the macrophage endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, M S; Isberg, R R

    1995-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila replicates within a membrane-bounded compartment that is studded with ribosomes. In this study we investigated whether these ribosomes originate from the cytoplasmic pool or are associated with host endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopic localization studies of ER proteins in macrophages infected with L. pneumophila indicated that the bacteria reside in a compartment surrounded by ER. An L. pneumophila mutant that grows slowly in macrophages was slow to associate with host ER, providing genetic evidence in support of the hypothesis that this specialized vacuole is required for intracellular bacterial growth. Ultrastructural studies, in which the ER luminal protein BiP was labeled by immunoperoxidase cytochemistry, revealed that L. pneumophila replication vacuoles resemble nascent autophagosomes. Furthermore, short-term amino acid starvation of macrophages, which stimulated host autophagosomes. Furthermore, short-term amino acid starvation of macrophages, which stimulated host autophagy, increased association of the bacteria with the ER and enhanced bacterial growth. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that L. pneumophila exploits the autophagy machinery of macrophages to establish an intracellular niche favorable for replication. PMID:7642298

  17. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy.

    PubMed

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Hübner, Christian A; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-06-18

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication. Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements and autophagy has an important role in this process. However, its underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unexplained. Here we show that members of the FAM134 reticulon protein family are ER-resident receptors that bind to autophagy modifiers LC3 and GABARAP, and facilitate ER degradation by autophagy ('ER-phagy'). Downregulation of FAM134B protein in human cells causes an expansion of the ER, while FAM134B overexpression results in ER fragmentation and lysosomal degradation. Mutant FAM134B proteins that cause sensory neuropathy in humans are unable to act as ER-phagy receptors. Consistently, disruption of Fam134b in mice causes expansion of the ER, inhibits ER turnover, sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptotic cell death and leads to degeneration of sensory neurons. Therefore, selective ER-phagy via FAM134 proteins is indispensable for mammalian cell homeostasis and controls ER morphology and turnover in mice and humans.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum localization and activity of maize auxin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Seo, Hyesu; Park, Woong June; Hawes, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is a major growth hormone in plants and the first plant hormone to be discovered and studied. Active research over >60 years has shed light on many of the molecular mechanisms of its action including transport, perception, signal transduction, and a variety of biosynthetic pathways in various species, tissues, and developmental stages. The complexity and redundancy of the auxin biosynthetic network and enzymes involved raises the question of how such a system, producing such a potent agent as auxin, can be appropriately controlled at all. Here it is shown that maize auxin biosynthesis takes place in microsomal as well as cytosolic cellular fractions from maize seedlings. Most interestingly, a set of enzymes shown to be involved in auxin biosynthesis via their activity and/or mutant phenotypes and catalysing adjacent steps in YUCCA-dependent biosynthesis are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Positioning of auxin biosynthetic enzymes at the ER could be necessary to bring auxin biosynthesis in closer proximity to ER-localized factors for transport, conjugation, and signalling, and allow for an additional level of regulation by subcellular compartmentation of auxin action. Furthermore, it might provide a link to ethylene action and be a factor in hormonal cross-talk as all five ethylene receptors are ER localized.

  19. Aging induced endoplasmic reticulum stress alters sleep and sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Marishka K; Chan, May T; Zimmerman, John E; Pack, Allan I; Jackson, Nicholas E; Naidoo, Nirinjini

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in the quality, quantity, and architecture of baseline and recovery sleep have been shown to occur during aging. Sleep deprivation induces endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress and upregulates a protective signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response. The effectiveness of the adaptive unfolded protein response is diminished by age. Previously, we showed that endogenous chaperone levels altered recovery sleep in Drosophila melanogaster. We now report that acute administration of the chemical chaperone sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) reduces ER stress and ameliorates age-associated sleep changes in Drosophila. PBA consolidates both baseline and recovery sleep in aging flies. The behavioral modifications of PBA are linked to its suppression of ER stress. PBA decreased splicing of X-box binding protein 1 and upregulation of phosphorylated elongation initiation factor 2 α, in flies that were subjected to sleep deprivation. We also demonstrate that directly activating ER stress in young flies fragments baseline sleep and alters recovery sleep. Alleviating prolonged or sustained ER stress during aging contributes to sleep consolidation and improves recovery sleep or sleep debt discharge.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide, endoplasmic reticulum stress and alcohol mediated neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    George, Akash K; Behera, Jyotirmaya; Kelly, Kimberly E; Zhai, Yuankun; Tyagi, Neetu

    2017-02-14

    Alcohol is one of the most socially accepted addictive drugs in modern society. Its abuse affects virtually all organ systems with the central nervous system (CNS) being particularly vulnerable to excessive alcohol exposure. Alcohol exposure also causes profound damage to both the adult and developing brain. Excessive alcohol consumption induces numerous pathophysiological stress responses, one of which is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. Potential mechanisms that trigger the alcohol induced ER stress response are either directly or indirectly related to alcohol metabolism, which include toxic levels of acetaldehyde and homocysteine, oxidative stress and abnormal epigenetic modifications. Growing evidence suggests that H2S is the most recently recognized gasotransmitter with tremendous physiological protective functions against oxidative stress induced neurotoxicity. In this review we address the alcohol induced oxidative stress mediated ER stress and the role of H2S in its mitigation in the context of alcohol neurotoxicity. Interruption of ER stress triggers is anticipated to have therapeutic benefits for alcohol mediated diseases and disorders.

  1. Heme oxygenase-1 comes back to endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hong Pyo; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Back, Sung Hun; Chung, Su Wol; Woo, Je Moon; Son, Yong; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Although multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. {yields} HO-1 expression at ER is induced by a diverse set of conditions that cause ER stressors. {yields} CO may induce HO-1 expression in human ECs by activating Nrf2 through PERK phosphorylation in a positive-feedback manner. {yields} ER-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress is discussed. -- Abstract: Originally identified as a rate-limiting enzyme for heme catabolism, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has expanded its roles in anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis and anti-proliferation for the last decade. Regulation of protein activity by location is well appreciated. Even though multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. In this review we discuss the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress.

  2. Terasaki Ramps in the Endoplasmic Reticulum: Structure, Function and Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Greg; Guven, Jemal; Valencia, Dulce-Maria

    2015-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has long been considered an exceedingly important and complex cellular organelle in eukaryotes (like you). It is a membrane structure, part folded lamellae, part tubular network, that both envelopes the nucleus and threads its way outward, all the way to the cell's periphery. Despite the elegant mechanics of bilayer membranes offered by the work of Helfrich and Canham, as far as the ER is concerned, theory has mostly sat on the sidelines. However, refined imaging of the ER has recently revealed beautiful and subtle geometrical forms - simple geometries, from the mathematical point of view - which some have called a ``parking garage for ribosomes.'' I'll review the discovery and physics of Terasaki ramps and discuss their relation to cell-biological questions, such as ER and nuclear-membrane re-organization during mitosis. Rather than being a footnote in a textbook on differential geometry, these structures suggest answers to a number of the ER's structure-function problems.

  3. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturbs fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways have been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and others. In this review, we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress-induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial signaling events, which further induce or exacerbate ER stress. PMID:25120434

  4. The Mammalian Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation System

    PubMed Central

    Olzmann, James A.; Kopito, Ron R.; Christianson, John C.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the site of synthesis for nearly one-third of the eukaryotic proteome and is accordingly endowed with specialized machinery to ensure that proteins deployed to the distal secretory pathway are correctly folded and assembled into native oligomeric complexes. Proteins failing to meet this conformational standard are degraded by ER-associated degradation (ERAD), a complex process through which folding-defective proteins are selected and ultimately degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. ERAD proceeds through four tightly coupled steps involving substrate selection, dislocation across the ER membrane, covalent conjugation with polyubiquitin, and proteasomal degradation. The ERAD machinery shows a modular organization with central ER membrane-embedded ubiquitin ligases linking components responsible for recognition in the ER lumen to the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the cytoplasm. The core ERAD machinery is highly conserved among eukaryotes and much of our basic understanding of ERAD organization has been derived from genetic and biochemical studies of yeast. In this article we discuss how the core ERAD machinery is organized in mammalian cells. PMID:23232094

  5. PERK-opathies: An Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mechanism Underlying Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Bell, Michelle C; Meier, Shelby E; Ingram, Alexandria L; Abisambra, Jose F

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) plays a vital role in maintaining cell homeostasis as a consequence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. However, prolonged UPR activity leads to cell death. This time-dependent dual functionality of the UPR represents the adaptive and cytotoxic pathways that result from ER stress. Chronic UPR activation in systemic and neurodegenerative diseases has been identified as an early sign of cellular dyshomeostasis. The Protein Kinase R-like ER Kinase (PERK) pathway is one of three major branches in the UPR, and it is the only one to modulate protein synthesis as an adaptive response. The specific identification of prolonged PERK activity has been correlated with the progression of disorders such as diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer, suggesting that PERK plays a role in the pathology of these disorders. For the first time, the term "PERK-opathies" is used to group these diseases in which PERK mediates detriment to the cell culminating in chronic disorders. This article reviews the literature documenting links between systemic disorders with the UPR, but with a specific emphasis on the PERK pathway. Then, articles reporting links between the UPR, and more specifically PERK, and neurodegenerative disorders are presented. Finally, a therapeutic perspective is discussed, where PERK interventions could be potential remedies for cellular dysfunction in chronic neurodegenerative disorders.

  6. Plasma membrane-cytoskeleton-endoplasmic reticulum complexes in neurons and astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lencesova, Lubomira; O'Neill, Andrea; Resneck, Wendy G; Bloch, Robert J; Blaustein, Mordecai P

    2004-01-23

    The possibility that certain integral plasma membrane (PM) proteins involved in Ca(2+) homeostasis form junctional units with adjacent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in neurons and glia was explored using immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry. Rat brain membranes were solubilized with the mild, non-ionic detergent, IGEPAL CA-630. Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger type 1 (NCX1), a key PM Ca(2+) transporter, was immunoprecipitated from the detergent-soluble fraction. Several abundant PM proteins co-immunoprecipitated with NCX1, including the alpha2 and alpha3 isoforms of the Na(+) pump catalytic (alpha) subunit, and the alpha2 subunit of the dihydropyridine receptor. The adaptor protein, ankyrin 2 (Ank 2), and the cytoskeletal proteins, alpha-fodrin and beta-spectrin, also selectively co-immunoprecipitated with NCX1, as did the ER proteins, Ca(2+) pump type 2 (SERCA 2), and inositol-trisphosphate receptor type 1 (IP(3)R-1). In contrast, a number of other abundant PMs, adaptors, and cytoskeletal proteins did not co-immunoprecipitate with NCX1, including the Na(+) pump alpha1 isoform, PM Ca(2+) pump type 1 (PMCA1), beta-fodrin, and Ank 3. In reciprocal experiments, immunoprecipitation with antibodies to the Na(+) pump alpha2 and alpha3 isoforms, but not alpha1, co-immunoprecipitated NCX1; the antibodies to alpha1 did, however, co-immunoprecipitate PMCA1. Antibodies to Ank 2, alpha-fodrin, beta-spectrin and IP(3)R-1 all co-immunoprecipitated NCX1. Immunocytochemistry revealed partial co-localization of beta-spectrin with NCX1, Na(+) pump alpha3, and IP(3)R-1 in neurons and of alpha-fodrin with NCX1 and SERCA2 in astrocytes. The data support the idea that in neurons and glia PM microdomains containing NCX1 and Na(+) pumps with alpha2 or alpha3 subunits form Ca(2+) signaling complexes with underlying ER containing SERCA2 and IP(3)R-1. These PM and ER components appear to be linked through the cytoskeletal spectrin network, to which they are probably tethered by Ank 2.

  7. Characterization of nuclear membranes and endoplasmic reticulum isolated from plant tissue

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Nuclei, nuclear membranes and rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) were isolated from onion root tips and stems. Structural preservation and purity of the fractions was determined by electron microscopic and biochemical methods. Gross compositional data (protein, phospholipid, nonpolar lipids, sterols, RNA, DNA), phospholipid and fatty acid patterns, enzyme activities (ATPases, ADPase, IDPase, glucose-6- phosphatase, 5'-nucleotidase, acid phosphatase, and NADH- and NADPH- cytochrome C reductases), and cytochrome contents were determined. A stable, high salt-resistant attachment of some DNA with the nuclear membrane was observed as well as the association of some RNA with high salt-treated nuclear and rER membranes. The phospholipid pattern was identical for both nuclear and rER membranes and showed a predominance of lecithin (about 60%) and phosphatidyl ethanolamine (20-24%). Special care was necessary to minimize lipid degradation by phospholipases during isolations. Nonpolar lipids, mostly sterols and triglycerides, accounted for 35-45% of the membrane lipids. Sterol contents were relatively high in both membrane fractions (molar ratios of sterols to phospholipids ranged from 0.12 to 0.43). Sitosterol accounted for about 80% of the total sterols. Palmitic, oleic, and linoleic acids were the most prevalent acids in membrane-bound lipids as well as in storage lipids and occurred in similar proportions in phospholipids, triglycerides and free fatty acids of the membrane. About 80% of the fatty acids in membrane phospholipids and triglycerides were unsaturated. A cytochrome of the b5 type was characterized in these membranes, but P-450-like cytochromes could not be detected. Both NADH and NADPH-cytochrome c reductases were found in nuclear and rER membranes and appeared to be enriched in rER membranes. Among the phosphatases, Mg2+-ATPase and, to lesser extents, ADPase, IDPase and acid phosphatase activities occurred in the fractions, but significant amounts of

  8. Influence of surface roughness on the adhesion of elastic films.

    PubMed

    Palasantzas, G; De Hosson, J Th M

    2003-02-01

    It is shown that a self-affine roughness at the junction of an elastic film and a hard solid substrate influences considerably the adhesion of the elastic film, especially for small roughness exponents H (H<0.5) and/or large long wavelength roughness ratios w/xi with w being the rms roughness amplitude and xi being the in-plane roughness correlation length. Analytical calculations of the local surface slope allows an estimate of the roughness effects on the adhesion energy more precisely than those presented in earlier works (especially for roughness exponents H<0.5). For weak surface roughness the elastic energy contribution is significant on the film effective surface energy deltagamma(eff) and on pull-off force for elastic modulus E in the range of GPa. Moreover, in the case of partial contact an estimation of the pull-off force shows that it strongly decreases with reducing contact area due to surface.

  9. Effective field model of roughness in magnetic nano-structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lepadatu, Serban

    2015-12-28

    An effective field model is introduced here within the micromagnetics formulation, to study roughness in magnetic structures, by considering sub-exchange length roughness levels as a perturbation on a smooth structure. This allows the roughness contribution to be separated, which is found to give rise to an effective configurational anisotropy for both edge and surface roughness, and accurately model its effects with fine control over the roughness depth without the explicit need to refine the computational cell size to accommodate the roughness profile. The model is validated by comparisons with directly roughened structures for a series of magnetization switching and domain wall velocity simulations and found to be in excellent agreement for roughness levels up to the exchange length. The model is further applied to vortex domain wall velocity simulations with surface roughness, which is shown to significantly modify domain wall movement and result in dynamic pinning and stochastic creep effects.

  10. Modeling roughness effects in turbulent boundary layers using elliptic relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Jacob; de Simone, Alejandro; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Jimenez, Javier

    2010-11-01

    We present results from the efforts towards modeling roughness in turbulent boundary layers using elliptic relaxation. This scheme, included in the v^2-f model and first formulated by Durbin (1993, JFM, vol. 249, p.465) for smooth-walls, uses an elliptic partial differential equation to incorporate near-wall turbulence anisotropy and non-local pressure-strain effects. The use of the elliptic PDE is extended to model roughness effects in various transitionally-rough and fully-rough boundary layers consisting of a uniform and sparse distribution of cylinders for which experimental data is available. The roughness effects are incorporated through the elliptic PDE by including the length and time scales that the roughness imposes upon the flow, which the experiment has shown to be constant within the rough-walls. Further modeling of roughness effects is considered by altering the source terms in the elliptic PDE.

  11. 7 CFR 51.776 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Definitions § 51.776 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin may be slightly thick but not excessively thick, materially ridged or grooved. “Slightly thick” means that the...

  12. 7 CFR 51.776 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Definitions § 51.776 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin may be slightly thick but not excessively thick, materially ridged or grooved. “Slightly thick” means that the...

  13. Effect of surface morphology on drag and roughness sublayer in flows over regular roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, Marco; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2014-11-01

    The effects of systematically varied roughness morphology on bulk drag and on the spatial structure of turbulent boundary layers are examined by performing a series of wind tunnel experiments. In this study, rough surfaces consisting of regularly and uniformly distributed LEGO™ bricks are employed. Twelve different patterns are adopted in order to methodically examine the individual effects of frontal solidity (λF, frontal area of the roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area) and plan solidity (λP, plan area of roughness elements per unit wall-parallel area), on both the bulk drag and the turbulence structure. A floating element friction balance based on Krogstad & Efros (2010) was designed and manufactured to measure the drag generated by the different surfaces. In parallel, high resolution planar and stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was applied to investigate the flow features. This talk will focus on the effects of each solidity parameter on the bulk drag and attempt to relate the observed trends to the flow structures in the roughness sublayer. Currently at City University London.

  14. Rough Evaluation Structure: Application of Rough Set Theory to Generate Simple Rules for Inconsistent Preference Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrmann, Andreas; Nagai, Yoshimitsu; Yoshida, Osamu; Ishizu, Syohei

    Since management decision-making becomes complex and preferences of the decision-maker frequently becomes inconsistent, multi-attribute decision-making problems were studied. To represent inconsistent preference relation, the concept of evaluation structure was introduced. We can generate simple rules to represent inconsistent preference relation by the evaluation structures. Further rough set theory for the preference relation was studied and the concept of approximation was introduced. One of our main aims of this paper is to introduce a concept of rough evaluation structure for representing inconsistent preference relation. We apply rough set theory to the evaluation structure, and develop a method for generating simple rules for inconsistent preference relations. In this paper, we introduce concepts of totally ordered information system, similarity class of preference relation, upper and lower approximation of preference relations. We also show the properties of rough evaluation structure and provide a simple example. As an application of rough evaluation structure, we analyze questionnaire survey of customer preferences about audio players.

  15. The abundance of O(2+) in the Jovian magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagenal, F.; Shemansky, D. E.; Mcnutt, R. L., Jr.; Schreier, R.; Eviatar, A.

    1992-01-01

    From a synthesis of data from the Plasma-Science and Ultraviolet-Science instruments on Voyager 1 a radial profile is presented of O(2+) abundance between 4.9 and 42 Jovian radii. A sharp rise is noted in O(2+) mixing ratio near 7.5 Jovian radii, coincident with a sharp rise in effective electron temperature at the outer boundary of the Io plasma torus. Beyond 8.5 Jovian radii the O(2+) mixing ratio is found to be roughly constant which indicates freezing of the ionization prevailing at the outer edge of the hot torus.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi intermediate compartment protein 3 knockdown suppresses lung cancer through endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Chang, Seung-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Kim, Sanghwa; Park, Sungjin; Lee, Ah Young; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Lee, Somin; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Jongsun; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-10-04

    Trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus is elevated in cancer cells. Therefore, proteins of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) attract significant attention as targets for cancer treatment. Enhanced cancer cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by ERGICs correlates with poor-prognosis of lung cancer. This prompted us to assess whether knockdown of ERGIC3 may decrease lung cancer growth. To test the hypothesis, the effects of ERGIC3 short hairpin RNA (shERGIC3) on ER stress-induced cell death and lung tumorigenesis were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of ERGIC3 led to ER stress-induced autophagic cell death and suppression of proliferation in the A549 human lung cancer cell-line. Moreover, non-invasive aerosol-delivery of shERGIC3 using the biocompatible carrier glycerol propoxylate triacrylate and spermine (GPT-SPE) inhibited lung tumorigenesis in the K-rasLA1 murine model of lung cancer. Our data suggest that suppression of ERGIC3 could provide a framework for the development of effective lung cancer therapies.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi intermediate compartment protein 3 knockdown suppresses lung cancer through endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Chang, Seung-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Kim, Sanghwa; Park, Sungjin; Lee, Ah Young; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Lee, Somin; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Jongsun; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus is elevated in cancer cells. Therefore, proteins of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) attract significant attention as targets for cancer treatment. Enhanced cancer cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by ERGICs correlates with poor-prognosis of lung cancer. This prompted us to assess whether knockdown of ERGIC3 may decrease lung cancer growth. To test the hypothesis, the effects of ERGIC3 short hairpin RNA (shERGIC3) on ER stress-induced cell death and lung tumorigenesis were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of ERGIC3 led to ER stress-induced autophagic cell death and suppression of proliferation in the A549 human lung cancer cell-line. Moreover, non-invasive aerosol-delivery of shERGIC3 using the biocompatible carrier glycerol propoxylate triacrylate and spermine (GPT-SPE) inhibited lung tumorigenesis in the K-rasLA1 murine model of lung cancer. Our data suggest that suppression of ERGIC3 could provide a framework for the development of effective lung cancer therapies. PMID:27588471

  18. CDIP1-BAP31 complex transduces apoptotic signals from endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria under endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Namba, Takushi; Tian, Fang; Chu, Kiki; Hwang, So-Young; Yoon, Kyoung Wan; Byun, Sanguine; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Mandinova, Anna; Lee, Sam W

    2013-10-31

    Resolved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is essential for intracellular homeostatic balance, but unsettled ER stress can lead to apoptosis. Here, we show that a proapoptotic p53 target, CDIP1, acts as a key signal transducer of ER-stress-mediated apoptosis. We identify B-cell-receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31) as an interacting partner of CDIP1. Upon ER stress, CDIP1 is induced and enhances an association with BAP31 at the ER membrane. We also show that CDIP1 binding to BAP31 is required for BAP31 cleavage upon ER stress and for BAP31-Bcl-2 association. The recruitment of Bcl-2 to the BAP31-CDIP1 complex, as well as CDIP1-dependent truncated Bid (tBid) and caspase-8 activation, contributes to BAX oligomerization. Genetic knockout of CDIP1 in mice leads to impaired response to ER-stress-mediated apoptosis. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the CDIP1/BAP31-mediated regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway represents a mechanism for establishing an ER-mitochondrial crosstalk for ER-stress-mediated apoptosis signaling.

  19. Albedo over rough snow and ice surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhermitte, Stef; Abermann, Jakob; Kinnard, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Surface albedo determines the shortwave radiation balance, arguably the largest energy balance component of snow and ice surfaces. Consequently, incorporation of the spatio-temporal variability of albedo is essential when assessing the surface energy balance of snow and ice surfaces. This can be done by using ground-based measurements or albedo data derived from remote sensing, or by modelling albedo based on radiative transfer models or empirically based parameterizations. One decisive factor when incorporating albedo data is the representativeness of surface albedo, certainly over rough surfaces where albedo measurements at a specific location (i.e., apparent albedo) can differ strongly from the material albedo or the true albedo (i.e., effective albedo) depending on the position of the sun/sensor and the surface roughness. This stresses the need for a comprehensive understanding of the effect of surface roughness on albedo and its impact when using albedo data for validation of remote sensing imagery, interpretation of automated weather station (AWS) radiation data or incorporation in energy balance models. To assess the effect of surface roughness on albedo an intra-surface radiative transfer (ISRT) model was combined with albedo measurements on a penitente field on Glaciar Tapado in the semi-arid Andes of Northern Chile. The ISRT model shows albedo reductions between 0.06 and 0.35 relative to flat surfaces with a uniform material albedo. The magnitude of these reductions primarily depends on the penitente geometry, but the shape and spatial variability of the material albedo also play a major role. Secondly, the ISRT model was used to reveal the effect of using apparent albedo to infer the effective albedo over a rough surface. This effect is especially strong for narrow penitentes, resulting in sampling biases up to ±0.05. The sampling biases are more pronounced when the sensor is low above the surface, but remain relatively constant throughout the day

  20. Interplay Between the Oxidoreductase PDIA6 and microRNA-322 Controls the Response to Disrupted Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Groenendyk, Jody; Peng, Zhenling; Dudek, Elzbieta; Fan, Xiao; Mizianty, Marcin J.; Dufey, Estefanie; Urra, Hery; Sepulveda, Denisse; Rojas-Rivera, Diego; Lim, Yunki; Kim, Do Han; Baretta, Kayla; Srikanth, Sonal; Gwack, Yousang; Ahnn, Joohong; Kaufman, Randal J.; Lee, Sun-Kyung; Hetz, Claudio; Kurgan, Lukasz; Michalak, Marek

    2016-01-01

    The disruption of the energy or nutrient balance triggers endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, a process that mobilizes various strategies, collectively called the unfolded protein response (UPR), which reestablish homeostasis of the ER and cell. Activation of the UPR stress sensor IRE1α (inositol-requiring enzyme 1α) stimulates its endoribonuclease activity, leading to the generation of the mRNA encoding the transcription factor XBP1 (X-box binding protein 1), which regulates the transcription of genes encoding factors involved in controlling the quality and folding of proteins. We found that the activity of IRE1α was regulated by the ER oxidoreductase PDIA6 (protein disulfide isomerase A6) and the microRNA miR-322 in response to disruption of ER Ca2+ homeostasis. PDIA6 interacted with IRE1α and enhanced IRE1α activity as monitored by phosphorylation of IRE1α and XBP1 mRNA splicing, but PDIA6 did not substantially affect the activity of other pathways that mediate responses to ER stress. ER Ca2+ depletion and activation of store operated Ca2+ entry reduced the abundance of the microRNA miR-322, which increased PDIA6 mRNA stability and consequently IRE1α activity during the ER stress response. In vivo experiments with mice and worms showed that the induction of ER stress correlated with decreased miR-322 abundance, increased PDIA6 mRNA abundance, or both. Together these findings demonstrated that ER Ca2+, PDIA6, IRE1α, and miR-322 function in a dynamic feedback loop modulating the UPR under conditions of disrupted ER Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:24917591

  1. Speckle pattern texture analysis method to measure surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, I.; Sadovoy, A.; Doronin, A.; Meglinski, I.

    2013-02-01

    Speckle pattern texture analysis method is applied to measure surface roughness of human skin. The method is based on analyzing of a gray level co-occurrence matrix occurred from a speckle image of a rough surface. Paper with different surface roughness is used as a skin phantom. The roughness is controlled by profilometry measurements. The developed methodology could find wide application in dermatology and tissue diagnostics.

  2. Quantifying surface roughness over debris covered ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quincey, Duncan; Rounce, David; Ross, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic roughness length (z0) remains a major uncertainty when determining turbulent heat fluxes over glacier surfaces, and can vary by an order of magnitude even within a small area and through the melt season. Defining z0 over debris-covered ice is particularly complex, because the surface may comprise clasts of greatly varying size, and the broader-scale surface relief can be similarly heterogeneous. Several recent studies have used Structure from Motion to data model debris-covered surfaces at the centimetric scale and calculate z0 based on measurements of surface microtopography. However, few have validated these measurements with independent vertical wind profile measurements, or considered how the measurements vary over a range of different surface types or scales of analysis. Here, we present the results of a field investigation conducted on the debris covered Khumbu Glacier during the post-monsoon season of 2015. We focus on two sites. The first is characterised by gravels and cobbles supported by a fine sandy matrix. The second comprises cobbles and boulders separated by voids. Vertical profiles of wind speed measured over both sites enable us to derive measurements of aerodynamic roughness that are similar in magnitude, with z0 at the second site exceeding that at the first by < 1 cm. During our observation period, snow covered the second site for three days, but the impact on z0 is small, implying that roughness is predominantly determined by major rock size obstacles rather than the general form of the surface. To complement these aerodynamic measurements we also conducted a Structure from Motion survey across each patch and calculated z0 using microtopographic methods published in a range of recent studies. We compare the outputs of each of these algorithms with each other and with the aerodynamic measurements, assess how they perform over a range of scales, and evaluate the validity of using microtopographic methods where aerodynamic measurements

  3. Parametric Flow Visualization of Dynamic Roughness Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakkali, Vinay

    The ever growing need in the aircraft industry to enhance the performance of a flight vehicle has led to active areas of research which focus on the control of the local boundary layer by both passive and active methods. An effective flow control mechanism can improve the performance of a flight vehicle in various ways, one of which is eliminating boundary layer separation. To be effective the mechanism not only needs to control the boundary layer as desired, but also use less energy than the resulting energy savings. In this study, the effectiveness of an active flow control technique known as dynamic roughness (DR) has been explored to eliminate the laminar separation bubble near the leading edge and also to eliminate the stall on a NACA 0012 airfoil wing. As opposed to static roughness, dynamic roughness utilizes small time-dependent deforming elements or humps with displacement amplitudes that are on the order of the local boundary layer height to energize the local boundary layer. DR is primarily characterized by the maximum amplitude and operating frequency. A flow visualization study was conducted on a 2D NACA 0012 airfoil model at different angles of attack, and also varying the Reynolds number and DR actuation frequency with fixed maximum DR amplitude. The experimental results from this study suggests that DR is an effective method of reattaching a totally separated boundary layer. In addition, this study discusses some of the fundamental physics behind the working of DR and proposes some non-dimensional terms that may help to explain the driving force behind the mechanism.

  4. Laser scattering properties of rough spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-ping; Wu, Jian

    2007-12-01

    An approximate model is developed to study the properties of laser scattering from a rough spherical surface based on a random facet model and the electromagnetic scattering theory. For actual spheres, for instance oilcan, its lateral correlation length is much longer than the incident laser wavelength, and its surface distribution is usually isotropic and conforms to Gaussian distribution. Hence, it is feasible to deal with scattering of the rough spherical surface with the random facet model. First, power scattered into a detective system can be denoted for every facet with the scattering model of a coarse plane corresponded to the isotropic Gaussian statistics. Second, total power received by the detective system should correspond to incoherent addition of power scattered into a far-field detector system by all facets. Here, an incident shadow function has been taken into account to exclude the contribution of the facets not being illuminated. Likewise, a scattering shadow function is introduced to exclude the contribution of the scattered light blocked by undulations of spherical surface. An unfolded factor has been taken into account in this model, too. Finally, to verify this model, the angular distribution of the scattering intensity in far field is calculated and analyzed under different cases. The results show that the scattering intensity is stronger in the backward than in other directions if the spherical surface is smooth, but if the spherical surface is rough to some extent, the incident laser power will be scattered to other direction and there is faint scattered intensity in forward direction concomitantly. We can use these properties to make remote sensing for spherical objects.

  5. Direct Formation of Vaccinia Virus Membranes from the Endoplasmic Reticulum in the Absence of the Newly Characterized L2-Interacting Protein A30.5

    PubMed Central

    Maruri-Avidal, Liliana; Weisberg, Andrea S.

    2013-01-01

    Crescents consisting of a single lipoprotein membrane with an external protein scaffold comprise the initial structural elements of poxvirus morphogenesis. Crescents enlarge to form spherical immature virions, which enclose viroplasm consisting of proteins destined to form the cores of mature virions. Previous studies suggest that the L2 protein participates in the recruitment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived membranes to form immature virions within assembly sites of cytoplasmic factories. Here we show that L2 interacts with the previously uncharacterized 42-amino-acid A30.5 protein. An open reading frame similar in size to the one encoding A30.5 is at the same genome location in representatives of all chordopoxvirus genera. A30.5 has a putative transmembrane domain and colocalized with markers of the endoplasmic reticulum and with L2. By constructing a complementing cell line expressing A30.5, we isolated a deletion mutant virus that exhibits a defect in morphogenesis in normal cells. Large electron-dense cytoplasmic inclusions and clusters of scaffold protein-coated membranes that resemble crescents and immature virions devoid of viroplasm were seen in place of normal structures. Crescent-shaped membranes were continuous with the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and oriented with the convex scaffold protein-coated side facing the lumen, while clusters of completed spherical immature-virion-like forms were trapped within the expanded lumen. Immature-virion-like structures were more abundant in infected RK-13 cells than in BS-C-1 or HeLa cells, in which cytoplasmic inclusions were decorated with scaffold protein-coated membrane arcs. We suggest that the outer surface of the poxvirus virion is derived from the luminal side of the ER membrane. PMID:24027302

  6. Polarimetric thermal emission from rough surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. T.; Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T.; Staelin, D. H.; Yueh, S. H.; Nghiem, S. V.; Kwok, R.; Oneill, K.; Lohanick, A.

    1993-01-01

    Recent theoretical works have suggested the potential of passive polarimetry in the remote sensing of geophysical media. It was shown that the third Stokes parameter U of the thermal emission may become larger for azimuthally asymmetric fields of observation. In order to investigate the potential applicability of passive polarimetry to the remote sensing of ocean surface, measurements of the polarimetric thermal emission from a sinusoidal water surface and a numerical study of the polarimetric thermal emission from randomly rough ocean surfaces were performed. Measurements of sinusoidal water surface thermal emission were performed using a sinusoidal water surface which was created by placing a thin sheet of fiberglass with a sinusoidal profile in two dimensions extended infinitely in the third dimension onto a water surface. The theory of thermal emission from a 'two-layer' periodic surface is derived and the exact solution is performed using both the extended boundary condition method (EBC) and the method of moments (MOM). The theoretical predictions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental results once the effects of the radiometer antenna pattern are included and the contribution of background noise to the measurements is modeled. The experimental results show that the U parameter indicates the direction of periodicity of the water surface and can approach values of up to 30 K for the surface observed. Next, a numerical study of polarimetric thermal emission from randomly rough surfaces was performed. A Monte Carlo technique utilizing an exact method for calculating thermal emission was chosen for the study to avoid any of the limitations of the commonly used approximate methods in rough surface scattering. In this Monte Carlo technique, a set of finite rough surface profiles in two dimensions with desired statistics was generated and extended periodically. The polarimetric thermal emission from each surface of the set was then calculated using

  7. Robust surface roughness indices and morphological interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisani, Sebastiano; Rocca, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Geostatistical-based image/surface texture indices based on variogram (Atkison and Lewis, 2000; Herzfeld and Higginson, 1996; Trevisani et al., 2012) and on its robust variant MAD (median absolute differences, Trevisani and Rocca, 2015) offer powerful tools for the analysis and interpretation of surface morphology (potentially not limited to solid earth). In particular, the proposed robust index (Trevisani and Rocca, 2015) with its implementation based on local kernels permits the derivation of a wide set of robust and customizable geomorphometric indices capable to outline specific aspects of surface texture. The stability of MAD in presence of signal noise and abrupt changes in spatial variability is well suited for the analysis of high-resolution digital terrain models. Moreover, the implementation of MAD by means of a pixel-centered perspective based on local kernels, with some analogies to the local binary pattern approach (Lucieer and Stein, 2005; Ojala et al., 2002), permits to create custom roughness indices capable to outline different aspects of surface roughness (Grohmann et al., 2011; Smith, 2015). In the proposed poster, some potentialities of the new indices in the context of geomorphometry and landscape analysis will be presented. At same time, challenges and future developments related to the proposed indices will be outlined. Atkinson, P.M., Lewis, P., 2000. Geostatistical classification for remote sensing: an introduction. Computers & Geosciences 26, 361-371. Grohmann, C.H., Smith, M.J., Riccomini, C., 2011. Multiscale Analysis of Topographic Surface Roughness in the Midland Valley, Scotland. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 49, 1220-1213. Herzfeld, U.C., Higginson, C.A., 1996. Automated geostatistical seafloor classification - Principles, parameters, feature vectors, and discrimination criteria. Computers and Geosciences, 22 (1), pp. 35-52. Lucieer, A., Stein, A., 2005. Texture-based landform segmentation of LiDAR imagery

  8. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-01-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  9. Ammonia abundances in four comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S. C.; Engel, L.

    1991-02-01

    NH2 emission band strengths were measured in four comets and the NH2 column densities were determined in order to measure the ammonia content of the comets. The mean ammonia/water abundance ratio derived for the four comets is found to be 0.13 + or - 0.06 percent, with no significant variation among the comets. The uniformity of this abundance attests to a remarkable degree of chemical homogeneity over large scales in the comet-forming region of the primordial solar nebula, and contrasts with the CO abundance variations found previously in comets. The N2 and NH3 abundances indicate a condensation temperature in the range 20-160 K, consistent with virtually all comet formation hypotheses.

  10. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-05-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  11. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  12. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  13. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  14. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  15. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  16. Moisture diffusivity of rough rice under infrared radiation drying

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To design efficient infrared (IR) dryers for rough rice, it is important to understand the drying behavior of rough rice under IR heating. The objective of this study was to determine the moisture diffusivity of rough rice under IR heating followed by cooling. The effects of initial moisture content...

  17. Analysis of Pad Surface Roughness on Copper Chemical Mechanical Planarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Yoshiyuki; Hirao, Takashi; Kinoshita, Masaharu

    2008-04-01

    For Cu high removal rate (RR) chemical mechanical planarization (CMP), the effect of pad surface roughness on Cu RR was investigated. Because surface roughness measured by the stylus profiler and the laser microscope (optical) profiler includes various topographies, it is difficult to conclude which effective roughness parameter affects Cu RR. Accordingly, the measured surface roughness was classified into two types of roughness scales. One is the topography by pores, and the other one is the micro roughness caused by conditioner. These were divided by a wavelength of surface profile. In this result, a stylus profile could not precisely trace two types of roughness scales. On the other hand, an optical magnification of 400 could trace the change in topography by micropores. And an optical magnification of 1000 could trace the change in micro roughness caused by conditioning. In the evaluation of Cu RR and the classified roughness, micro roughness measured by the optical magnification of 1000 was strongly correlated with Cu RR. It is concluded that Cu RR is affected by micro roughness caused by conditioner, and also its roughness is necessary to be measured by an optical profiler at high magnification.

  18. Roughness Effects on Wall-Bounded Turbulent Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Karen

    2013-11-01

    The importance of surface roughness is well known for wall-bounded flows. Roughness typically increases drag in turbulent boundary layers due to pressure forces on the roughness elements. While rough-wall flows are ubiquitous in engineering practice, the issues of modeling the roughness in computations and accurately predicting the increase in frictional drag remain elusive goals. In this talk, the effect of roughness on the mean flow, turbulence statistics, and turbulence structure will be discussed. In particular, rough-wall flows will be examined in light of Townsend's Reynolds number similarity hypothesis, which states that the turbulent motions in the outer layer are independent of surface roughness when the Reynolds number is sufficiently high. Additionally, the presentation will include recent work on the estimation of frictional drag due to surface roughness. Detailed experiments have been performed in the transitionally rough and fully rough regimes. This research is part of an effort to determine the relevant predictive scales based solely on the roughness topography. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  19. Global Distribution of Microbial Abundance and Biomass in Subseafloor Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallmeyer, J.; Pockalny, R. A.; Adhikari, R. R.; Smith, D. C.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Previously published cell counts were mostly from ocean margins and the eastern equatorial Pacific. Cell counts from these environments are generally similar from site to site and decrease logarithmically with sediment depth, although there can be sharp peaks of high cell densities in zones of anaerobic methane-oxidation. Recent counts from the South Pacific Gyre and the North Pacific Gyre are several orders of magnitude lower and show a more rapid decrease with depth than all previously published datasets. With these new data available, total microbial cell abundance in subseafloor sediment varies between sites by ca. five orders of magnitude. The differences between cell counts from ocean margins and upwelling areas and cell counts from oceanic gyres raise three questions. First, how does the abundance of microbes in subseafloor sediment vary throughout the world ocean? Second, what property or properties are likely to control that variation? Third, how does this variation affect estimates of total subseafloor sedimentary biomass and Earth's total biomass? To address these questions, we compiled our cell counts from the South Pacific Gyre, the North Pacific Gyre and the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean with previously published counts and parameterized the cell distribution at each site and determined two parameters, (i) cell concentration at 1 mbsf and (ii) rate of decrease in cell counts with depth. Both parameters are strongly correlated with mean sedimentation rate and distance to shore. Based on these correlations, we estimate global subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance to be 2.9*1029 cells (corresponding to 4.1 Pg C and ~0.6% of Earth's total living biomass). This estimate of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance is roughly equal to previous estimates of total microbial abundance in seawater and total microbial abundance in soil. It is much lower than previous estimates of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance. In consequence, we estimate

  20. Rough faults, distributed weakening, and off-fault deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, W. Ashley; Nielsen, Stefan; di Toro, Giulio; Smith, Steven A. F.

    2010-08-01

    We report systematic spatial variations in fault rocks along nonplanar strike-slip faults cross-cutting the Lake Edison Granodiorite, Sierra Nevada, California (Sierran wavy fault) and Lobbia outcrops of the Adamello Batholith in the Italian Alps (Lobbia wavy fault). In the case of the Sierran fault, pseudotachylyte formed at contractional fault bends, where it is found as thin (1-2 mm) fault-parallel veins. Epidote and chlorite developed in the same seismic context as the pseudotachylyte and are especially abundant in extensional fault bends. We argue that the presence of fluids, as illustrated by this example, does not necessarily preclude the development of frictional melt. In the case of the Lobbia fault, pseudotachylyte thickness varies along the length of the fault, but the pseudotachylyte veins thicken and pool in extensional bends. We conduct a quantitative analysis of fault roughness, microcrack distribution, stress, and friction along the Lobbia fault. Numerical modeling results show that opening in extensional bends and localized thermal weakening in contractional bends counteract resistance encountered by fault waviness, resulting in an overall weaker fault than suggested by the corresponding static friction coefficient. The models also predict static stress redistribution around bends in the faults which is consistent with distribution of microcracks, indicating significant elastic and inelastic strain energy is dissipated into the wall rocks due to nonplanar fault geometry. Together these observations suggest that damage and energy dissipation occurs along the entire nonplanar fault during slip, rather than being confined to the region close to the dynamically propagating crack tip.

  1. Sertraline induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Xuan, Jiekun; Couch, Letha; Iyer, Advait; Wu, Yuanfeng; Li, Quan-Zhen; Guo, Lei

    2014-08-01

    Sertraline is used for the treatment of depression, and is also used for the treatment of panic, obsessive-compulsive, and post-traumatic stress disorders. Previously, we have demonstrated that sertraline caused hepatic cytotoxicity, with mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis being underlying mechanisms. In this study, we used microarray and other biochemical and molecular analyses to identify endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as a novel molecular mechanism. HepG2 cells were exposed to sertraline and subjected to whole genome gene expression microarray analysis. Pathway analysis revealed that ER stress is among the significantly affected biological changes. We confirmed the increased expression of ER stress makers by real-time PCR and Western blots. The expression of typical ER stress markers such as PERK, IRE1α, and CHOP was significantly increased. To study better ER stress-mediated drug-induced liver toxicity; we established in vitro systems for monitoring ER stress quantitatively and efficiently, using Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) and secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as ER stress reporters. These in vitro systems were validated using well-known ER stress inducers. In these two reporter assays, sertraline inhibited the secretion of Gluc and SEAP. Moreover, we demonstrated that sertraline-induced apoptosis was coupled to ER stress and that the apoptotic effect was attenuated by 4-phenylbutyrate, a potent ER stress inhibitor. In addition, we showed that the MAP4K4-JNK signaling pathway contributed to the process of sertraline-induced ER stress. In summary, we demonstrated that ER stress is a mechanism of sertraline-induced liver toxicity.

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Is Chronically Activated in Chronic Pancreatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Garg, Sushil K.; Dixit, Ajay K.; Dudeja, Vikas; Dawra, Rajinder K.; Saluja, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has now been recognized as a pathogenic event in many chronic diseases. However, ER stress has not been studied in CP, although pancreatic acinar cells seem to be especially vulnerable to ER dysfunction because of their dependence on high ER volume and functionality. Here, we aim to investigate ER stress in CP, study its pathogenesis in relation to trypsinogen activation (widely regarded as the key event of pancreatitis), and explore its mechanism, time course, and downstream consequences during pancreatic injury. CP was induced in mice by repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on caerulein hyperstimulation. ER stress leads to activation of unfolded protein response components that were measured in CP and AP. We show sustained up-regulation of unfolded protein response components ATF4, CHOP, GRP78, and XBP1 in CP. Overexpression of GRP78 and ATF4 in human CP confirmed the experimental findings. We used novel trypsinogen-7 knock-out mice (T−/−), which lack intra-acinar trypsinogen activation, to clarify the relationship of ER stress to intra-acinar trypsinogen activation in pancreatic injury. Comparable activation of ER stress was seen in wild type and T−/− mice. Induction of ER stress occurred through pathologic calcium signaling very early in the course of pancreatic injury. Our results establish that ER stress is chronically activated in CP and is induced early in pancreatic injury through pathologic calcium signaling independent of trypsinogen activation. ER stress may be an important pathogenic mechanism in pancreatitis that needs to be explored in future studies. PMID:25077966

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is chronically activated in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sah, Raghuwansh P; Garg, Sushil K; Dixit, Ajay K; Dudeja, Vikas; Dawra, Rajinder K; Saluja, Ashok K

    2014-10-03

    The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has now been recognized as a pathogenic event in many chronic diseases. However, ER stress has not been studied in CP, although pancreatic acinar cells seem to be especially vulnerable to ER dysfunction because of their dependence on high ER volume and functionality. Here, we aim to investigate ER stress in CP, study its pathogenesis in relation to trypsinogen activation (widely regarded as the key event of pancreatitis), and explore its mechanism, time course, and downstream consequences during pancreatic injury. CP was induced in mice by repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on caerulein hyperstimulation. ER stress leads to activation of unfolded protein response components that were measured in CP and AP. We show sustained up-regulation of unfolded protein response components ATF4, CHOP, GRP78, and XBP1 in CP. Overexpression of GRP78 and ATF4 in human CP confirmed the experimental findings. We used novel trypsinogen-7 knock-out mice (T(-/-)), which lack intra-acinar trypsinogen activation, to clarify the relationship of ER stress to intra-acinar trypsinogen activation in pancreatic injury. Comparable activation of ER stress was seen in wild type and T(-/-) mice. Induction of ER stress occurred through pathologic calcium signaling very early in the course of pancreatic injury. Our results establish that ER stress is chronically activated in CP and is induced early in pancreatic injury through pathologic calcium signaling independent of trypsinogen activation. ER stress may be an important pathogenic mechanism in pancreatitis that needs to be explored in future studies.

  4. Mitofusin 2 ablation increases endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling.

    PubMed

    Filadi, Riccardo; Greotti, Elisa; Turacchio, Gabriele; Luini, Alberto; Pozzan, Tullio; Pizzo, Paola

    2015-04-28

    The organization and mutual interactions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria modulate key aspects of cell pathophysiology. Several proteins have been suggested to be involved in keeping ER and mitochondria at a correct distance. Among them, in mammalian cells, mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), located on both the outer mitochondrial membrane and the ER surface, has been proposed to be a physical tether between the two organelles, forming homotypic interactions and heterocomplexes with its homolog Mfn1. Recently, this widely accepted model has been challenged using quantitative EM analysis. Using a multiplicity of morphological, biochemical, functional, and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that Mfn2 ablation increases the structural and functional ER-mitochondria coupling. In particular, we show that in different cell types Mfn2 ablation or silencing increases the close contacts between the two organelles and strengthens the efficacy of inositol trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca(2+) transfer from the ER to mitochondria, sensitizing cells to a mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload-dependent death. We also show that the previously reported discrepancy between electron and fluorescence microscopy data on ER-mitochondria proximity in Mfn2-ablated cells is only apparent. By using a different type of morphological analysis of fluorescent images that takes into account (and corrects for) the gross modifications in mitochondrial shape resulting from Mfn2 ablation, we demonstrate that an increased proximity between the organelles is also observed by confocal microscopy when Mfn2 levels are reduced. Based on these results, we propose a new model for ER-mitochondria juxtaposition in which Mfn2 works as a tethering antagonist preventing an excessive, potentially toxic, proximity between the two organelles.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress activation during total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hocker, Austin D; Boileau, Ryan M; Lantz, Brick A; Jewett, Brian A; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Dreyer, Hans C

    2013-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most common remediation for knee pain from osteoarthritis (OA) and is performed 650,000 annually in the U.S. A tourniquet is commonly used during TKA which causes ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) to the lower limb but the effects of I/R on muscle are not fully understood. Previous reports suggest upregulation of cell stress and catabolism and downregulation of markers of cap-dependent translation during and after TKA. I/R has also been shown to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and induce the unfolded protein response (UPR). We hypothesized that the UPR would be activated in response to ER stress during TKA. We obtained muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis at baseline, before TKA; at maximal ischemia, prior to tourniquet deflation; and during reperfusion in the operating room. Phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and AKT decreased during ischemia (−28%, P < 0.05; −20%, P < 0.05, respectively) along with an increase in eIF2α phosphorylation (64%, P < 0.05) suggesting decreased translation initiation. Cleaved ATF6 protein increased in ischemia (39%, P = 0.056) but returned to baseline during reperfusion. CASP3 activation increased during reperfusion compared to baseline (23%, P < 0.05). XBP1 splicing assays revealed an increase in spliced transcript during ischemia (31%, P < 0.05) which diminished during reperfusion. These results suggest that in response to I/R during TKA all three branches of the ER stress response are activated. PMID:24159375

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: key promoter of rosacea pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2014-12-01

    Recent scientific interest in the pathogenesis of rosacea focuses on abnormally high facial skin levels of cathelicidin and the trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein 5 (KLK5) that cleaves the cathelicidin precursor protein into the bioactive fragment LL-37, which exerts crucial proinflammatory, angiogenic and antimicrobial activities. Furthermore, increased expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been identified in rosacea skin supporting the participation of the innate immune system. Notably, TLRs are expressed on sensory neurons and increase neuronal excitability linking TLR signalling to the transmission of neuroinflammatory responses. It is the intention of this viewpoint to present a unifying concept that links all known clinical trigger factors of rosacea such as UV irradiation, heat, skin irritants and special foods to one converging point: enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress via upregulation of transcription factor ATF4 increases TLR2 expression, resulting in enhanced production of cathelicidin and KLK5 mediating downstream proinflammatory, angiogenic and antimicrobial signalling. The presented concept identifies rosacea trigger factors as environmental stressors that enhance the skin's ER stress response. Exaggerated cutaneous ER stress that stimulates the TLR2-driven inflammatory response may involve sebocytes, keratinocytes, monocyte-macrophages and sensory cutaneous neurons. Finally, all antirosacea drugs are proposed to attenuate the ER stress signalling cascade at some point. Overstimulated ER stress signalling may have evolutionarily evolved as a compensatory mechanism to balance impaired vitamin D-driven LL-37-mediated antimicrobial defenses due to lower exposure of UV-B irradiation of the northern Celtic population.

  7. Calcium trafficking integrates endoplasmic reticulum function with mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Randal J.; Malhotra, Jyoti D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis is central to all cellular functions and has been studied for decades. Calcium acts as a critical second messenger for both extracellular and intracellular signaling and is fundamental in cell life and death decisions [1]. The calcium gradient in the cell is coupled with an inherent ability of the divalent cation to reversibly bind multiple target biological molecules to generate an extremely versatile signaling system [2]. Calcium signals are used by the cell to control diverse processes as development, neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction, metabolism, autophagy and cell death. “Cellular calcium overload” is detrimental to cellular health, resulting in massive activation of proteases and phospholipases leading to cell death [3]. Historically, cell death associated with calcium ion perturbations has been primarily recognized as necrosis. Recent evidence clearly associate changes in calcium ion concentrations with more sophisticated forms of cellular demise, including apoptosis [4] [5] [6] [7]. Although the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) serves as the primary calcium store in the metazoan cell, dynamic calcium release to the cytosol, mitochondria, nuclei and other organelles orchestrate diverse coordinated responses. Most evidence supports that calcium transport from the ER to mitochondria plays a significant role in regulating cellular bioenergetics, production of reactive oxygen species, induction of autophagy and apoptosis. Recently, molecular identities that mediate calcium traffic between the ER and mitochondria have been discovered [8] [9] [10]. The next questions are how they are regulated for exquisite tight control of ER – mitochondrial calcium dynamics. This review attempts to summarize recent advances in the role of calcium in regulation of ER and mitochondrial function. PMID:24690484

  8. Chlorine Abundances in Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Z. G.; Pilachowski, C. A.; Hinkle, K.

    2016-12-01

    Chlorine abundances are reported in 15 evolved giants and 1 M dwarf in the solar neighborhood. The Cl abundance was measured using the vibration-rotation 1-0 P8 line of H35Cl at 3.69851 μm. The high-resolution L-band spectra were observed using the Phoenix infrared spectrometer on the Kitt Peak Mayall 4 m telescope. The average [35Cl/Fe] abundance in stars with -0.72 < [Fe/H] < 0.20 is [35Cl/Fe] = (-0.10 ± 0.15) dex. The mean difference between the [35Cl/Fe] ratios measured in our stars and chemical evolution model values is (0.16 ± 0.15) dex. The [35Cl/Ca] ratio has an offset of ˜0.35 dex above model predictions, suggesting that chemical evolution models are underproducing Cl at the high metallicity range. Abundances of C, N, O, Si, and Ca were also measured in our spectral region and are consistent with F and G dwarfs. The Cl versus O abundances from our sample match Cl abundances measured in planetary nebula and H ii regions. In one star where both H35Cl and H37Cl could be measured, a 35Cl/37Cl isotope ratio of 2.2 ± 0.4 was found, consistent with values found in the Galactic ISM and predicted chemical evolution models.

  9. Ultrasonic wall loss monitoring of rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajdacsi, Attila; Cegla, Frederic

    2015-03-01

    Permanently installed ultrasonic thickness monitoring techniques have been shown to be capable of achieving below 100 nanometre standard deviation repeatability under laboratory conditions, far exceeding that of conventional manual ultrasonic inspection techniques. However, it has also been shown that uneven surface conditions that reflect the ultrasonic waves (internal wall roughness) may limit the accuracy of monitoring in practice. Previous studies have reported the uncertainty of ultrasonic measurements taken on different independent realisations of rough surfaces with the same statistical properties. While this is indicative of potential uncertainties, it is important to recognise that real life defect growth (such as corrosion) does not occur in independent instances, but it manifests itself by small random perturbations of the same under-lying surface. Furthermore, in real life applications the accuracy of trend prediction is often more important than thickness accuracy. This paper therefore introduces a new model for simulating the evolution of gradual backwall morphology changes (as would be encountered due to corrosion processes). This model is used to simulate ultrasonic signals for a large number of changing backwall surfaces. The thickness and thickness trend is then extracted from these signals using a number of common signal processing methods. The mean thickness slope and uncertainty in the extracted slope is then evaluated and compared to the actual values. A new signal processing method is also proposed, which is shown to be an order of magnitude more accurate in estimating wall loss trends than any other evaluated method.

  10. Ordered roughness effects on NACA 0026 airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harun, Z.; Abbas, A. A.; Dheyaa, R. Mohammed; Ghazali, M. I.

    2016-10-01

    The effects of highly-ordered rough surface - riblets, applied onto the surface of a NACA 0026 airfoil, are investigated experimentally using wind tunnel. The riblets are arranged in directionally converging - diverging pattern with dimensions of height, h = 1 mm, pitch or spacing, s = 1 mm, yaw angle α = 0o and 10o The airfoil with external geometry of 500 mm span, 600 mm chord and 156 mm thickness has been built using mostly woods and aluminium. Turbulence quantities are collected using hotwire anemometry. Hotwire measurements show that flows past converging and diverging pattern inherit similar patterns in the near-wall region for both mean velocity and turbulence intensities profiles. The mean velocity profiles in logarithmic regions for both flows past converging and diverging riblet pattern are lower than that with yaw angle α = 0o. Converging riblets cause the boundary layer to thicken and the flow with yaw angle α = 0o produces the thinnest boundary layer. Both the converging and diverging riblets cause pronounced outer peaks in the turbulence intensities profiles. Most importantly, flows past converging and diverging pattern experience 30% skin friction reductions. Higher order statistics show that riblet surfaces produce similar effects due to adverse pressure gradient. It is concluded that a small strip of different ordered roughness features applied at a leading edge of an airfoil can change the turbulence characteristics dramatically.

  11. How Tongue Size and Roughness Affect Lapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, M. J.; Hay, K. M.

    2012-10-01

    The biomechanics of domestic cat lapping (Felis catus) and domestic dog lapping (Canis familiaris) is currently under debate. Lapping mechanics in vertebrates with incomplete cheeks, such as cats and dogs, is a balance of inertia and the force of gravity likely optimized for ingestion and physical necessities. Physiology dictates vertebrate mass, which dictates vertebrate tongue size, which dictates lapping mechanics to achieve optimum liquid ingestion; with either touch lapping, scooping, or a hybrid lapping method. The physics of this optimized system then determines how high a column of liquid can be raised before it collapses due to gravity, and therefore, lapping frequency. Through tongue roughness model variation experiments it was found that pore-scale geometrical roughness does not appear to affect lapping or liquid uptake. Through tongue size model variation experiments it was found that there is a critical tongue radius in the range of 25 mm to 35 mm above which touch lapping is no longer an efficient way to uptake liquid. Vertebrates with incomplete cheeks may use a touch lapping method to ingest water if their tongue radius is less than this critical radius and use an alternative ingestion method if their tongue radius is larger.

  12. Rail roughness and rolling noise in tramways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiacchiari, L.; Thompson, DJ; Squicciarini, G.; Ntotsios, E.; Loprencipe, G.

    2016-09-01

    Companies which manage railway networks have to cope continually with the problem of operating safety and maintenance intervention issues related to rail surface irregularities. A lot of experience has been gained in recent years in railway applications but the case of tramways is quite different; in this field there are no specific criteria to define any intervention on rail surface restoration. This paper shows measurements carried out on some stretches of a tram network with the CAT equipment (Corrugation Analysis Trolley) for the principal purpose of detecting different states of degradation of the rails and identifying a level of deterioration to be associated with the need for maintenance through rail grinding. The measured roughness is used as an input parameter into prediction models for both rolling noise and ground vibration to show the potential effect that high levels of roughness can have in urban environment. Rolling noise predictions are also compared with noise measurements to illustrate the applicability of the modelling approach. Particular attention is given to the way the contact filter needs to be modelled in the specific case of trams that generally operate at low speed. Finally an empirical approach to assess vibration levels in buildings is presented.

  13. Enhancing capillary rise on a rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Melissa; Wexler, Jason; Jacobi, Ian; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    Liquid-infused surfaces have been proposed as a robust alternative to traditional air-cushioned superhydrophobic surfaces. However, if these surfaces are held vertically the lubricating oil can drain from the surface, and cause the surface to lose its novel properties. To examine this failure mode, we measure the drainage from a surface with model roughness that is scaled-up to allow for detailed measurements. We confirm that the bulk fluid drains from the surface until it reaches the level of the capillary rise height, although the detailed dynamics vary even in simple surface geometries. We then test different substrate architectures to explore how the roughness can be designed to retain greater amounts of oil. Supported under MRSEC NSF DMR 0819860 (PI: Prof. N. Phuan Ong) REU Site Grant: NSF DMR-1156422 (PI: Prof. Mikko Haataja), PREM CSUN Prime # NSF 1205734 and ONR MURI Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (Program Manager Dr. Ki-Han Kim).

  14. Inspecting wood surface roughness using computer vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xuezeng

    1995-01-01

    Wood surface roughness is one of the important indexes of manufactured wood products. This paper presents an attempt to develop a new method to evaluate manufactured wood surface roughness through the utilization of imaging processing and pattern recognition techniques. In this paper a collimated plane of light or a laser is directed onto the inspected wood surface at a sharp angle of incidence. An optics system that consists of lens focuses the image of the surface onto the objective of a CCD camera, the CCD camera captures the image of the surface and using a CA6300 board digitizes the image. The digitized image is transmitted into a microcomputer. Through the use of the methodology presented in this paper, the computer filters the noise and wood anatomical grain and gives an evaluation of the nature of the manufactured wood surface. The preliminary results indicated that the method has the advantages of non-contact, 3D, high-speed. This method can be used in classification and in- time measurement of manufactured wood products.

  15. Avalanche dynamics on a rough inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Halsey, Thomas C; Ecke, Robert E

    2008-07-01

    The avalanche behavior of gravitationally forced granular layers on a rough inclined plane is investigated experimentally for different materials and for a variety of grain shapes ranging from spherical beads to highly anisotropic particles with dendritic shape. We measure the front velocity, area, and height of many avalanches and correlate the motion with the area and height. We also measure the avalanche profiles for several example cases. As the shape irregularity of the grains is increased, there is a dramatic qualitative change in avalanche properties. For rough nonspherical grains, avalanches are faster, bigger, and overturning in the sense that individual particles have down-slope speeds u p that exceed the front speed uf as compared with avalanches of spherical glass beads that are quantitatively slower and smaller and where particles always travel slower than the front speed. There is a linear increase of three quantities: (i) dimensionless avalanche height, (ii) ratio of particle to front speed, and (iii) the growth rate of avalanche speed with increasing avalanche size with increasing tan theta r where theta r is the bulk angle of repose, or with increasing beta P, the slope of the depth averaged flow rule, where both theta r and beta P reflect the grain shape irregularity. These relations provide a tool for predicting important dynamical properties of avalanches as a function of grain shape irregularity. A relatively simple depth-averaged theoretical description captures some important elements of the avalanche motion, notably the existence of two regimes of this motion.

  16. Soil surface roughness characterization for microwave remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzahn, P.; Rieke-Zapp, D.; Ludwig, R.

    2012-04-01

    With this poster we present a simple and efficient method to measure soil surface roughness in an agricultural environment. Micro scale soil surface roughness is a crucial parameter in many environmental applications. In recent studies it is strongly recognized that soil surface roughness significantly influences the backscatter of agricultural surface, especially on bare fields. Indeed, while different roughness indices depend on their measurement length, no satisfying roughness parametrization and measurement technique has been found yet, introducing large uncertainty in the interpretation of the radar backscattering. In this study, we introduce a photogrammetric system which consists of a customized consumer grade Canon EOS 5d camera and a reference frame providing ground control points. With the system one can generate digital surface models (DSM) with a minimum size of 1 x 2.5 m2, extendable to any desired size, with a ground x,y- resolution of 2 mm. Using this approach, we generated a set of DSM with sizes ranging from 2.5 m2 to 22 m2, acquired over different roughness conditions representing ploughed, harrowed as well as crusted fields on different test sites. For roughness characterization we calculated in microwave remote sensing common roughness indices such as the RMS- height s and the autocorrelation length l. In an extensive statistical investigation we show the behavior of the roughness indices for different acquisition sizes of the proposed method. Results indicate, compared to results from profiles generated out of the dataset, that using a three dimensional measuring device, the calculated roughness indices are more robust in their estimation. In addition, a strong directional dependency of the proposed roughness indices was observed which could be related to the orientation of the seedbed rows to the acqusition direction. In a geostatistical analysis, we decomposed the acquired roughness indices into different scales, yielding a roughness quantity

  17. mRNA Targeting to Endoplasmic Reticulum Precedes Ago Protein Interaction and MicroRNA (miRNA)-mediated Translation Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Barman, Bahnisikha; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N

    2015-10-09

    MicroRNA (miRNA) binds to the 3'-UTR of its target mRNAs to repress protein synthesis. Extensive research was done to understand the mechanism of miRNA-mediated repression in animal cells. Considering the progress in understanding the mechanism, information about the subcellular sites of miRNA-mediated repression is surprisingly limited. In this study, using an inducible expression system for an miRNA target message, we have delineated how a target mRNA passes through polysome association and Ago2 interaction steps on rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before the miRNA-mediated repression sets in. From this study, de novo formed target mRNA localization to the ER-bound polysomes manifested as the earliest event, which is followed by Ago2 micro-ribonucleoprotein binding, and translation repression of target message. Compartmentalization of this process to rough ER membrane ensures enrichment of miRNA-targeted messages and micro-ribonucleoprotein components on ER upon reaching a steady state.

  18. Effect of truncated cone roughness element density on hydrodynamic drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womack, Kristofer; Schultz, Michael; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-11-01

    An experimental study was conducted on rough-wall, turbulent boundary layer flow. Varying planform densities of truncated cone roughness elements were investigated. Element densities studied ranged from 10% to 57%. Detailed turbulent boundary layer velocity statistics were recorded with a two-component LDV system on a three-axis traverse. Hydrodynamic roughness length (z0) and skin-friction coefficient (Cf) were determined and compared with the estimates from existing roughness element drag prediction models including Macdonald et al. (1998) and Yang et al. (2015). The roughness elements used in this work model idealized barnacles, so implications of this data set for ship powering are considered. Office of Naval Research.

  19. Skin friction measurements of mathematically generated roughness in the transitionally- to fully-rough regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, Julio; Schultz, Michael; Flack, Karen

    2016-11-01

    Engineering systems are affected by surface roughness which cause an increase in drag leading to significant performance penalties. One important question is how to predict frictional drag purely based upon surface topography. Although significant progress has been made in recent years, this has proven to be challenging. The present work takes a systematic approach by generating surface roughness in which surfaces parameters, such as rms , skewness, can be controlled. Surfaces were produced using the random Fourier modes method with enforced power-law spectral slopes. The surfaces were manufactured using high resolution 3D-printing. In this study three surfaces with constant amplitude and varying slope, P, were investigated (P = - 0 . 5 , - 1 . 0 , - 1 . 5). Skin-friction measurements were conducted in a high Reynolds number turbulent channel flow facility, covering a wide range of Reynolds numbers, from hydraulic-smooth to fully-rough regimes. Results show that some long wavelength roughness scales do not contribute significantly to the frictional drag, thus highlighting the need for filtering in the calculation of surface statistics. Upon high-pass filtering, it was found that krms is highly correlated with the measured ks.

  20. Filamin depletion blocks endoplasmic spreading and destabilizes force-bearing adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Christopher D.; Gauthier, Nils C.; Biais, Nicolas; Lazar, Andre M.; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Yu, Cheng-Han; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Cell motility is an essential process that depends on a coherent, cross-linked actin cytoskeleton that physically coordinates the actions of numerous structural and signaling molecules. The actin cross-linking protein, filamin (Fln), has been implicated in the support of three-dimensional cortical actin networks capable of both maintaining cellular integrity and withstanding large forces. Although numerous studies have examined cells lacking one of the multiple Fln isoforms, compensatory mechanisms can mask novel phenotypes only observable by further Fln depletion. Indeed, shRNA-mediated knockdown of FlnA in FlnB–/– mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) causes a novel endoplasmic spreading deficiency as detected by endoplasmic reticulum markers. Microtubule (MT) extension rates are also decreased but not by peripheral actin flow, because this is also decreased in the Fln-depleted system. Additionally, Fln-depleted MEFs exhibit decreased adhesion stability that appears in increased ruffling of the cell edge, reduced adhesion size, transient traction forces, and decreased stress fibers. FlnA–/– MEFs, but not FlnB–/– MEFs, also show a moderate defect in endoplasm spreading, characterized by initial extension followed by abrupt retractions and stress fiber fracture. FlnA localizes to actin linkages surrounding the endoplasm, adhesions, and stress fibers. Thus we suggest that Flns have a major role in the maintenance of actin-based mechanical linkages that enable endoplasmic spreading and MT extension as well as sustained traction forces and mature focal adhesions. PMID:21325628

  1. Alginate Oligosaccharide Prevents Acute Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity by Suppressing Oxidative Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun-Jie; Ma, Lei-Lei; Shi, Hong-Tao; Zhu, Jian-Bing; Wu, Jian; Ding, Zhi-Wen; An, Yi; Zou, Yun-Zeng; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly potent chemotherapeutic agent, but its usage is limited by dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative stress and activated endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. Alginate oligosaccharide (AOS) is a non-immunogenic, non-toxic and biodegradable polymer, with anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-endoplasmic reticulum stress properties. The present study examined whether AOS pretreatment could protect against acute DOX cardiotoxicity, and the underlying mechanisms focused on oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. We found that AOS pretreatment markedly increased the survival rate of mice insulted with DOX, improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction and attenuated DOX-induced myocardial apoptosis. AOS pretreatment mitigated DOX-induced cardiac oxidative stress, as shown by the decreased expressions of gp91 (phox) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Moreover, AOS pretreatment significantly decreased the expression of Caspase-12, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) (markers for endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis) and Bax (a downstream molecule of CHOP), while up-regulating the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Taken together, these findings identify AOS as a potent compound that prevents acute DOX cardiotoxicity, at least in part, by suppression of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. PMID:27999379

  2. Influence of surface roughness on nonlinear flow behaviors in 3D self-affine rough fractures: Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Chen, Yi-Feng; Ma, Guo-Wei; Zhou, Jia-Qing; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the impacts of surface roughness on the nonlinear fluid flow through three-dimensional (3D) self-affine rock fractures, whose original surface roughness is decomposed into primary roughness (i.e. the large-scale waviness of the fracture morphology) and secondary roughness (i.e. the small-scale unevenness) with a wavelet analysis technique. A 3D Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is adopted to predict the flow physics in rock fractures numerically created with and without consideration of the secondary roughness, respectively. The simulation results show that the primary roughness mostly controls the pressure distribution and fracture flow paths at a large scale, whereas the secondary roughness determines the nonlinear properties of the fluid flow at a local scale. As the pressure gradient increases, the secondary roughness enhances the local complexity of velocity distribution by generating and expanding the eddy flow and back flow regions in the vicinity of asperities. It was found that the Forchheimer's law characterizes well the nonlinear flow behavior in fractures of varying roughness. The inertial effects induced by the primary roughness differ only marginally in fractures with the roughness exponent varying from 0.5 to 0.8, and it is the secondary roughness that significantly enhances the nonlinear flow and leads to earlier onset of nonlinearity. Further examined were the effects of surface roughness on the transmissivity, hydraulic aperture and the tortuosity of flow paths, demonstrating again the dominant role of the secondary roughness, especially for the apparent transmissivity and the equivalent hydraulic aperture at high pressure gradient or high Reynolds number. The results may enhance our understanding of the role of surface roughness in the nonlinear flow behaviors in natural rock fractures.

  3. Adjustment of roughness sublayer in turbulent flows over two-dimensional idealised roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HO, Yat-Kiu; LIU, Chun-Ho

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) immediately above the urban canopy is the roughness sublayer (RSL). In this layer, flows and turbulence are strongly affected by the roughness elements beneath, e.g. building obstacles. The wind flows over urban areas could be represented by conventional logarithmic law of the wall (log-law) in the neutrally stratified ABL. However, in the RSL region, the vertical wind profile deviates from that predicted from log-law and the effect could be extended from ground level up to several canopy heights. As a result, the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) fails and an additional length scale is required to describe the flows. The key aim of this study is to introduce a simple wind profile model which accounts for the effect of the RSL in neutral stratification using wind tunnel experiments. Profile measurements of wind speeds and turbulence quantities over various two-dimensional (2D) idealised roughness elements are carried out in an open-circuit wind tunnel with test section of size 560 mm (width) × 560 mm (height) × 6 m (length). The separation between the roughness elements is varied systematically so that ten different types of surface forms are adopted. The velocity measurements are obtained by hot-wire anemometry using X-probe design (for UW- measurements) with a constant temperature anemometer. For each configuration, eight vertical profiles are collected over the canopy, including solid boundaries and cavities of the roughness elements. Firstly, we compute the measurement results using conventional MOST to determine different roughness parameters. Afterwards, we derive the RSL height from the Reynolds stress profiles. Since the profiles taken from different locations of the canopy are eventually converged with increasing height, we use this 'congregated height' to define the RSL height. Next, we introduce an alternative function, i.e. power-law function, instead of MOST, to describe the velocity profile in attempt to

  4. The Abundance of Iron-Peak Elements and the Dust Composition in eta Carinae: Manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, M. A.; Melendez, M.; Hartman, H.; Gull, T. R.; Lodders, K.

    2010-01-01

    We study the chemical abundances of the Strontium Filament found in the ejecta of (eta) Carinae. In particular, we derive the abundances of iron-peak elements front spectra of their singly ionized ions present in the optical/IR spectra. In this paper we analyze the spectrum of Mn II using a new non-LTE model for this system. In constructing this models we carried out theoretical calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients. We find that relative to Ni the gas phase abundance ratio of Mn is roughly solar, similar to the Cr abundance but in contrast to the large enhancements in the abundances of Sc and Ti. NVe interpret this result as an indication of non-equilibrium condensation in the ejecta of (eta) Carinae.

  5. A plasma membrane-type Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase of 120 kilodaltons on the endoplasmic reticulum from carrot (Daucus carota) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.H.; Ratterman, D.M.; Sze, H. )

    1993-06-01

    Cytosolic Ca[sup 2+] levels are regulated in part by Ca[sup 2+]-pumping ATPases that export Ca[sup 2+] from the cytoplasm; The types and properties of Ca[sup 2+] pumps in plants are not well understood. The kinetic properties of a 120-kD phosphoenzyme (PE) intermediate formed during the reaction cycle of a Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase from suspension-cultured carrot (Daucus carota) cells are characterized. Only one Ca[sup 2+]-dependent phosphoprotein was formed when carrot membrane vesicles were incubated with [[gamma]-[sup 32]P]ATP. Formation of this 120-kD phosphoprotein was inhibited by vanadate, enhanced by La[sup 3+], and decreased by hydroxylamine, confirming its identification as an intermediate of a phosphorylated-type Ca[sup 2+]-translocating ATPase. The 120-kD Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase was most abundant in endoplasmic reticulum-enriched fractions, in which the Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase was estimated to be 0.1% of membrane protein. Direct quantitation of Ca[sup 2+]-dependent phosphoprotein was used to examine the kinetics of PE formation. PE formation exhibited a K[sub m] for Ca[sup 2+] of 1 to 2 [mu]m and a K[sub m] for ATP of 67 nm. Relative affinities of substrates, determined by competition experiments, were 0.075 [mu]m for ATP, 1 [mu]m for ADP, 100 [mu]m for ITP, and 250 [mu]m for GTP. Thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid, specific inhibitors of animal sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase, had no effect on PE formation; erythrosin B inhibited with 50% inhibition at <0.1 [mu]m. Calmodulin (1 [mu]m) stimulated PE formation by 25%. The results indicate that the carrot 120-kD Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase is similar but not identical to animal plasma membrane-type Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase and yet is located on endomembranes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum. This type of Ca[sup 2+] pump may reside on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum, thought to play a major role in anchoring the cytoskeleton and in facilitating secretion. 34 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Light depolarization in off-specular reflection on submicro rough metal surfaces with imperfectly random roughness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linsheng; Li, Xuefeng; Nonaka, Kazuhiro

    2015-02-01

    Depolarization at a rough surface relates to its roughness and irregularity (e.g., sags and crests) besides the material property. However, there is still lack of general theory to clearly describe the relationship between depolarization ratios and surface conditions, and one important reason is that the mechanism of depolarization relates to geometric parameters such as microcosmic height/particle distributions of sub-micro to nm levels. To study the mechanism in more detail, a compact laser instrument is developed, and depolarization information of a linearly polarized incident light is used for analyzing the roughness, during which a He-Ne laser source (λ = 632.8 nm) is used. Three nickel specimens with RMS roughness (Rq) less than λ/4 are fabricated and tested. Six different areas in each specimen are characterized in detail using an AFM. Rq are in the range of 34.1-155.0 nm, and the heights are non-Gaussian distribution in the first specimen and near-Gaussian distribution in the others. Off-specular inspection is carried out exactly on these 18 characterized areas, and results show that the cross-polarization ratios match quite well with Rq values of the first sample that has Rq ≤ λ/10 (or Rt ≤ λ), while they match well with maximum height, Rt, values of the other two that have Rt > λ (the maximum derivation is 11%). In addition, since this instrument is simple, portable, stable, and low-cost, it has great potential for practical online roughness testing after a linear calibration.

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Homeostasis in Reproductive Physiology and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Guzel, Elif; Arlier, Sefa; Guzeloglu-Kayisli, Ozlem; Tabak, Mehmet Selcuk; Ekiz, Tugba; Semerci, Nihan; Larsen, Kellie; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles Joseph; Kayisli, Umit Ali

    2017-04-08

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), comprises 60% of the total cell membrane and interacts directly or indirectly with several cell organelles i.e., Golgi bodies, mitochondria and proteasomes. The ER is usually associated with large numbers of attached ribosomes. During evolution, ER developed as the specific cellular site of synthesis, folding, modification and trafficking of secretory and cell-surface proteins. The ER is also the major intracellular calcium storage compartment that maintains cellular calcium homeostasis. During the production of functionally effective proteins, several ER-specific molecular steps sense quantity and quality of synthesized proteins as well as proper folding into their native structures. During this process, excess accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the ER lumen results in ER stress, the homeostatic coping mechanism that activates an ER-specific adaptation program, (the unfolded protein response; UPR) to increase ER-associated degradation of structurally and/or functionally defective proteins, thus sustaining ER homeostasis. Impaired ER homeostasis results in aberrant cellular responses, contributing to the pathogenesis of various diseases. Both female and male reproductive tissues undergo highly dynamic cellular, molecular and genetic changes such as oogenesis and spermatogenesis starting in prenatal life, mainly controlled by sex-steroids but also cytokines and growth factors throughout reproductive life. These reproductive changes require ER to provide extensive protein synthesis, folding, maturation and then their trafficking to appropriate cellular location as well as destroying unfolded/misfolded proteins via activating ER-associated degradation mediated proteasomes. Many studies have now shown roles for ER stress/UPR signaling cascades in the endometrial menstrual cycle, ovarian folliculogenesis and oocyte maturation, spermatogenesis, fertilization, pre-implantation embryo development and pregnancy and parturition

  8. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  9. Contact angle measurement on rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Meiron, Tammar S; Marmur, Abraham; Saguy, I Sam

    2004-06-15

    A new method for the measurement of apparent contact angles at the global energy minimum on real surfaces has been developed. The method consists of vibrating the surface, taking top-view pictures of the drop, monitoring the drop roundness, and calculating the contact angle from the drop diameter and weight. The use of the new method has been demonstrated for various rough surfaces, all having the same surface chemistry. In order to establish the optimal vibration conditions, the proper ranges for the system parameters (i.e., drop volume, vibration time, frequency of vibration, and amplitude of vibration) were determined. The reliability of the method has been demonstrated by the fact that the ideal contact angles of all surfaces, as calculated from the Wenzel equation using the measured apparent contact angles, came out to be practically identical. This ideal contact angle has been compared with three methods of calculation from values of advancing and receding contact angles.

  10. Theory of adhesion: role of surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Persson, B N J; Scaraggi, M

    2014-09-28

    We discuss how surface roughness influences the adhesion between elastic solids. We introduce a Tabor number which depends on the length scale or magnification, and which gives information about the nature of the adhesion at different length scales. We consider two limiting cases relevant for (a) elastically hard solids with weak (or long ranged) adhesive interaction (DMT-limit) and (b) elastically soft solids with strong (or short ranged) adhesive interaction (JKR-limit). For the former cases we study the nature of the adhesion using different adhesive force laws (F ∼ u(-n), n = 1.5-4, where u is the wall-wall separation). In general, adhesion may switch from DMT-like at short length scales to JKR-like at large (macroscopic) length scale. We compare the theory predictions to results of exact numerical simulations and find good agreement between theory and simulation results.

  11. Theory of adhesion: Role of surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.; Scaraggi, M.

    2014-09-01

    We discuss how surface roughness influences the adhesion between elastic solids. We introduce a Tabor number which depends on the length scale or magnification, and which gives information about the nature of the adhesion at different length scales. We consider two limiting cases relevant for (a) elastically hard solids with weak (or long ranged) adhesive interaction (DMT-limit) and (b) elastically soft solids with strong (or short ranged) adhesive interaction (JKR-limit). For the former cases we study the nature of the adhesion using different adhesive force laws (F ˜ u-n, n = 1.5-4, where u is the wall-wall separation). In general, adhesion may switch from DMT-like at short length scales to JKR-like at large (macroscopic) length scale. We compare the theory predictions to results of exact numerical simulations and find good agreement between theory and simulation results.

  12. Manning's roughness coefficient for Illinois streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soong, David T.; Prater, Crystal D.; Halfar, Teresa M.; Wobig, Loren A.

    2012-01-01

    Manning's roughness coefficients for 43 natural and constructed streams in Illinois are reported and displayed on a U.S. Geological Survey Web site. At a majority of the sites, discharge and stage were measured, and corresponding Manning's coefficients—the n-values—were determined at more than one river discharge. The n-values discussed in this report are computed from data representing the stream reach studied and, therefore, are reachwise values. Presentation of the resulting n-values takes a visual-comparison approach similar to the previously published Barnes report (1967), in which photographs of channel conditions, description of the site, and the resulting n-values are organized for each site. The Web site where the data can be accessed and are displayed is at URL http://il.water.usgs.gov/proj/nvalues/.

  13. Rough differential equations with unbounded drift term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, S.; Scheutzow, M.

    2017-01-01

    We study controlled differential equations driven by a rough path (in the sense of T. Lyons) with an additional, possibly unbounded drift term. We show that the equation induces a solution flow if the drift grows at most linearly. Furthermore, we show that the semiflow exists assuming only appropriate one-sided growth conditions. We provide bounds for both the flow and the semiflow. Applied to stochastic analysis, our results imply strong completeness and the existence of a stochastic (semi)flow for a large class of stochastic differential equations. If the driving process is Gaussian, we can further deduce (essentially) sharp tail estimates for the (semi)flow and a Freidlin-Wentzell-type large deviation result.

  14. Robust Abundance Estimation in Animal Abundance Surveys with Imperfect Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of animal abundance are central to the conservation and management of living natural resources. However, detection uncertainty complicates the sampling process of many species. One sampling method employed to deal with this problem is depletion (or removal) surveys in whi...

  15. Enhanced thermoelectric performance of rough silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz; Liang, Wenjie; Garnett, Erik C; Najarian, Mark; Majumdar, Arun; Yang, Peidong

    2008-01-10

    Approximately 90 per cent of the world's power is generated by heat engines that use fossil fuel combustion as a heat source and typically operate at 30-40 per cent efficiency, such that roughly 15 terawatts of heat is lost to the environment. Thermoelectric modules could potentially convert part of this low-grade waste heat to electricity. Their efficiency depends on the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of their material components, which is a function of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and absolute temperature. Over the past five decades it has been challenging to increase ZT > 1, since the parameters of ZT are generally interdependent. While nanostructured thermoelectric materials can increase ZT > 1 (refs 2-4), the materials (Bi, Te, Pb, Sb, and Ag) and processes used are not often easy to scale to practically useful dimensions. Here we report the electrochemical synthesis of large-area, wafer-scale arrays of rough Si nanowires that are 20-300 nm in diameter. These nanowires have Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity values that are the same as doped bulk Si, but those with diameters of about 50 nm exhibit 100-fold reduction in thermal conductivity, yielding ZT = 0.6 at room temperature. For such nanowires, the lattice contribution to thermal conductivity approaches the amorphous limit for Si, which cannot be explained by current theories. Although bulk Si is a poor thermoelectric material, by greatly reducing thermal conductivity without much affecting the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity, Si nanowire arrays show promise as high-performance, scalable thermoelectric materials.

  16. The solar abundance of beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    The solar abundance of beryllium is deduced from high-resolution Kitt Peak observations of the 3130.43- and 3131.08-A lines of Be II interpreted by the method of spectrum synthesis. The results are in good agreement with those previously obtained by Grevesse (1968) and by Hauge and Engvold (1968) and indicate that in the photospheric layers, beryllium is depleted below the chondritic value by a factor of about two. It is found that the beryllium abundance is equal to logN(Be)/N(H) + 12 = 1.08 plus or minus 0.05.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused by aggregate-prone proteins containing homopolymeric amino acids.

    PubMed

    Uchio, Naohiro; Oma, Yoko; Toriumi, Kazuya; Sasagawa, Noboru; Tanida, Isei; Fujita, Eriko; Kouroku, Yoriko; Kuroda, Reiko; Momoi, Takashi; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2007-11-01

    Many human proteins have homopolymeric amino acid (HPAA) tracts, but their physiological functions or cellular effects are not well understood. Previously, we expressed 20 HPAAs in mammalian cells and showed characteristic intracellular localization, in that hydrophobic HPAAs aggregated strongly and caused high cytotoxicity in proportion to their hydrophobicity. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of these aggregate-prone hydrophobic HPAAs, assuming that the ubiquitin proteasome system is impaired in the same manner as other well-known aggregate-prone polyglutamine-containing proteins. Some highly hydrophobic HPAAs caused a deficiency in the ubiquitin proteasome system and excess endoplasmic reticulum stress, leading to apoptosis. These results indicate that the property of causing excess endoplasmic reticulum stress by proteasome impairment may contribute to the strong cytotoxicity of highly hydrophobic HPAAs, and proteasome impairment and the resulting excess endoplasmic reticulum stress is not a common cytotoxic effect of aggregate-prone proteins such as polyglutamine.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum targeting and glycosylation of hybrid proteins in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Iturriaga, G; Jefferson, R A; Bevan, M W

    1989-01-01

    The correct compartmentation of proteins to the endomembrane system, mitochondria, or chloroplasts requires an amino-terminal signal peptide. The major tuber protein of potato, patatin, has a signal peptide in common with many other plant storage proteins. When the putative signal peptide of patatin was fused to the bacterial reporter protein beta-glucuronidase, the fusion proteins were translocated to the endoplasmic reticulum in planta and in vitro. In addition, translocated beta-glucuronidase was modified by glycosylation, and the signal peptide was correctly processed. In the presence of an inhibitor of glycosylation, tunicamycin, the enzymatically active form of beta-glucuronidase was assembled in the endoplasmic reticulum. This is the first report of targeting a cytoplasmic protein to the endoplasmic reticulum of plants using a signal peptide. PMID:2535509

  19. Cloning of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) from Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, S. C.; Meleshkevitch, E. A.; Mandal, P. K.; Boudko, D. Y.; Ahearn, G. A.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported on calcium transport mechanisms in American lobster, Homarus americanus, using 45Ca2+ coupled with vesicle preparations of hepatopancreatic endoplasmic reticulum. The active transport of calcium across membranes bordering calcium-sequestering stores such as sarcoplasmic or endoplasmic reticulum is catalyzed by membrane-spanning proteins, the sarco-endoplasmic Ca2+-ATPases (SERCAs). In the study described here we used advanced bioinformatics and molecular techniques to clone SERCA from the economically important Caribbean spiny lobster, Panulirus argus. We report the complete cloning of a full-length SERCA from P. argus antenna cDNA (GenBank accession number AY702617). This cDNA has a 1020-amino acid residue open reading frame which is 90% identical to published sequences of other crustacean SERCA proteins. Our data support the hypothesis that one crustacean and three vertebrate genes controlling calcium transport were derived from a common ancestral gene. PMID:18825387

  20. Gel-Free/Label-Free Proteomic Analysis of Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteins in Soybean Root Tips under Flooding and Drought Stresses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-07-01

    Soybean is a widely cultivated crop; however, it is sensitive to flooding and drought stresses. The adverse environmental cues cause the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress due to accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins. To investigate the mechanisms in response to flooding and drought stresses, ER proteomics was performed in soybean root tips. The enzyme activity of NADH cytochrome c reductase was two-fold higher in the ER than other fractions, indicating that the ER was isolated with high purity. Protein abundance of ribosomal proteins was decreased under both stresses compared to control condition; however, the percentage of increased ribosomes was two-fold higher in flooding compared to drought. The ER proteins related to protein glycosylation and signaling were in response to both stresses. Compared to control condition, calnexin was decreased under both stresses; however, protein disulfide isomerase-like proteins and heat shock proteins were markedly decreased under flooding and drought conditions, respectively. Furthermore, fewer glycoproteins and higher levels of cytosolic calcium were identified under both stresses compared to control condition. These results suggest that reduced accumulation of glycoproteins in response to both stresses might be due to dysfunction of protein folding through calnexin/calreticulin cycle. Additionally, the increased cytosolic calcium levels induced by flooding and drought stresses might disturb the ER environment for proper protein folding in soybean root tips.

  1. Characterization of a novel HMG-CoA lyase enzyme with a dual location in endoplasmic reticulum and cytosol.

    PubMed

    Arnedo, María; Menao, Sebastián; Puisac, Beatriz; Teresa-Rodrigo, María E; Gil-Rodríguez, María C; López-Viñas, Eduardo; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Casals, Nuria; Casale, César H; Hegardt, Fausto G; Pié, Juan

    2012-10-01

    A novel lyase activity enzyme is characterized for the first time: HMG-CoA lyase-like1 (er-cHL), which is a close homolog of mitochondrial HMG-CoA lyase (mHL). Initial data show that there are nine mature transcripts for the novel gene HMGCLL1, although none of them has all its exons. The most abundant transcript is called "variant b," and it lacks exons 2 and 3. Moreover, a three-dimensional model of the novel enzyme is proposed. Colocalization studies show a dual location of the er-cHL in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and cytosol, but not in mitochondria or peroxisomes. Furthermore, the dissociation experiment suggests that it is a nonendoplasmic reticulum integral membrane protein. The kinetic parameters of er-cHL indicate that it has a lower V(max) and a higher substrate affinity than mHL. Protein expression and lyase activity were found in several tissues, and were particularly strong in lung and kidney. The occurrence of er-cHL in brain is surprising, as mHL has not been found there. Although mHL activity is clearly associated with energy metabolism, the results suggest that er-cHL is more closely related to another metabolic function, mostly at the pulmonary and brain level.

  2. PHOSPHATIDIC ACID PHOSPHOHYDROLASE1 and 2 Regulate Phospholipid Synthesis at the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Eastmond, Peter J.; Quettier, Anne-Laure; Kroon, Johan T.M.; Craddock, Christian; Adams, Nicolette; Slabas, Antoni R.

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipid biosynthesis is essential for the construction of most eukaryotic cell membranes, but how this process is regulated in plants remains poorly understood. Here, we show that in Arabidopsis thaliana, two Mg2+-dependent phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolases called PAH1 and PAH2 act redundantly to repress phospholipid biosynthesis at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Leaves from pah1 pah2 double mutants contain ~1.8-fold more phospholipid than the wild type and exhibit gross changes in ER morphology, which are consistent with massive membrane overexpansion. The net rate of incorporation of [methyl-14C]choline into phosphatidylcholine (PC) is ~1.8-fold greater in the double mutant, and the transcript abundance of several key genes that encode enzymes involved in phospholipid synthesis is increased. In particular, we show that PHOSPHORYLETHANOLAMINE N-METHYLTRANSFERASE1 (PEAMT1) is upregulated at the level of transcription in pah1 pah2 leaves. PEAMT catalyzes the first committed step of choline synthesis in Arabidopsis and defines a variant pathway for PC synthesis not found in yeasts or mammals. Our data suggest that PAH1/2 play a regulatory role in phospholipid synthesis that is analogous to that described in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, the target enzymes differ, and key components of the signal transduction pathway do not appear to be conserved. PMID:20699392

  3. Transgenic Overexpression of 14-3-3 Zeta Protects Hippocampus against Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Status Epilepticus In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Gary P.; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M.; McKiernan, Ross C.; Engel, Tobias; Tzivion, Guri; Henshall, David C.

    2013-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins are ubiquitous molecular chaperones that are abundantly expressed in the brain where they regulate cell functions including metabolism, the cell cycle and apoptosis. Brain levels of several 14-3-3 isoforms are altered in diseases of the nervous system, including epilepsy. The 14-3-3 zeta (ζ) isoform has been linked to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function in neurons, with reduced levels provoking ER stress and increasing vulnerability to excitotoxic injury. Here we report that transgenic overexpression of 14-3-3ζ in mice results in selective changes to the unfolded protein response pathway in the hippocampus, including down-regulation of glucose-regulated proteins 78 and 94, activating transcription factors 4 and 6, and Xbp1 splicing. No differences were found between wild-type mice and transgenic mice for levels of other 14-3-3 isoforms or various other 14-3-3 binding proteins. 14-3-3ζ overexpressing mice were potently protected against cell death caused by intracerebroventricular injection of the ER stressor tunicamycin. 14-3-3ζ overexpressing mice were also potently protected against neuronal death caused by prolonged seizures. These studies demonstrate that increased 14-3-3ζ levels protect against ER stress and seizure-damage despite down-regulation of the unfolded protein response. Delivery of 14-3-3ζ may protect against pathologic changes resulting from prolonged or repeated seizures or where injuries provoke ER stress. PMID:23359526

  4. Tapetosomes in Brassica Tapetum Accumulate Endoplasmic Reticulum–Derived Flavonoids and Alkanes for Delivery to the Pollen Surface[W

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Kai; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2007-01-01

    Tapetosomes are abundant organelles in tapetum cells during the active stage of pollen maturation in Brassicaceae species. They possess endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–derived vesicles and oleosin-coated lipid droplets, but their overall composition and function have not been established. In situ localization analyses of developing Brassica napus anthers revealed flavonoids present exclusively in tapetum cells, first in an ER network along with flavonoid-3′-hydroxylase and then in ER-derived tapetosomes. Flavonoids were absent in the cytosol, elaioplasts, vacuoles, and nuclei. Subcellular fractionation of developing anthers localized both flavonoids and alkanes in tapetosomes. Subtapetosome fractionation localized flavonoids in ER-derived vesicles, and alkanes and oleosins in lipid droplets. After tapetum cell death, flavonoids, alkanes, and oleosins were located on mature pollen. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants tt12 and tt19 devoid of a flavonoid transporter, flavonoids were present in the cytosol in reduced amounts but absent in tapetosomes and were subsequently located on mature pollen. tt4, tt12, and tt19 pollen was more susceptible than wild-type pollen to UV-B irradiation on subsequent germination. Thus, tapetosomes accumulate ER-derived flavonoids, alkanes, and oleosins for discharge to the pollen surface upon cell death. This tapetosome-originated pollen coat protects the haploidic pollen from UV light damage and water loss and aids water uptake. PMID:17307923

  5. Tapetosomes in Brassica tapetum accumulate endoplasmic reticulum-derived flavonoids and alkanes for delivery to the pollen surface.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Kai; Huang, Anthony H C

    2007-02-01

    Tapetosomes are abundant organelles in tapetum cells during the active stage of pollen maturation in Brassicaceae species. They possess endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived vesicles and oleosin-coated lipid droplets, but their overall composition and function have not been established. In situ localization analyses of developing Brassica napus anthers revealed flavonoids present exclusively in tapetum cells, first in an ER network along with flavonoid-3'-hydroxylase and then in ER-derived tapetosomes. Flavonoids were absent in the cytosol, elaioplasts, vacuoles, and nuclei. Subcellular fractionation of developing anthers localized both flavonoids and alkanes in tapetosomes. Subtapetosome fractionation localized flavonoids in ER-derived vesicles, and alkanes and oleosins in lipid droplets. After tapetum cell death, flavonoids, alkanes, and oleosins were located on mature pollen. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants tt12 and tt19 devoid of a flavonoid transporter, flavonoids were present in the cytosol in reduced amounts but absent in tapetosomes and were subsequently located on mature pollen. tt4, tt12, and tt19 pollen was more susceptible than wild-type pollen to UV-B irradiation on subsequent germination. Thus, tapetosomes accumulate ER-derived flavonoids, alkanes, and oleosins for discharge to the pollen surface upon cell death. This tapetosome-originated pollen coat protects the haploidic pollen from UV light damage and water loss and aids water uptake.

  6. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  7. The density of the cell sap and endoplasm of Nitellopsis and Chara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.

    1991-01-01

    We measured the densities of the cell sap, endoplasm and cell wall of Nitellopsis obtusa and Chara corallina using interference microscopy, refractometry, immersion refractometry, equilibrium sedimentation and chemical microanalysis techniques. These values are important for the determination of many rheological properties of the cytoplasm as well as for understanding buoyancy regulation, dispersal mechanisms and how cells respond to gravity. The average densities of the cell sap, endoplasm and cell wall are 1,006.9, 1,016.7 and 1,371 kg m-3 for Nitellopsis and 1,005.0, 1,013.9, and 1,355.3 kg m-3 for Chara.

  8. Sec24 phosphorylation regulates autophagosome abundance during nutrient deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Saralin; Wang, Juan; Zhu, Ming; Stahmer, Kyle; Lakshminarayan, Ramya; Ghassemian, Majid; Jiang, Yu; Miller, Elizabeth A; Ferro-Novick, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-derived COPII coated vesicles constitutively transport secretory cargo to the Golgi. However, during starvation-induced stress, COPII vesicles have been implicated as a membrane source for autophagosomes, distinct organelles that engulf cellular components for degradation by macroautophagy (hereafter called autophagy). How cells regulate core trafficking machinery to fulfill dramatically different cellular roles in response to environmental cues is unknown. Here we show that phosphorylation of conserved amino acids on the membrane-distal surface of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae COPII cargo adaptor, Sec24, reprograms COPII vesicles for autophagy. We also show casein kinase 1 (Hrr25) is a key kinase that phosphorylates this regulatory surface. During autophagy, Sec24 phosphorylation regulates autophagosome number and its interaction with the C-terminus of Atg9, a component of the autophagy machinery required for autophagosome initiation. We propose that the acute need to produce autophagosomes during starvation drives the interaction of Sec24 with Atg9 to increase autophagosome abundance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21167.001 PMID:27855785

  9. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001). The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959) and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965) open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992), and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993). However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001). The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004) is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004) emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004) also suggest that our attention

  10. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T.J.; Podosek, F.A.; Johnson, M.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of 244Pu fission Xe, U, Th, and light REE (LREE) abundances, along with modal petrographic determinations of phosphate abundances, were carried out on equilibrated ordinary chondrites in order to define better the solar system Pu abundance and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. Our data permit comparison of the directly measured Pu/ U ratio with that determined indirectly as (Pu/Nd) ?? (Nd/U) assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. Except for Guaren??a, and perhaps H chondrites in general, Pu concentrations are similar to that determined previously for St. Se??verin, although less precise because of higher trapped Xe contents. Trapped 130Xe 136Xe ratios appear to vary from meteorite to meteorite, but, relative to AVCC, all are similar in the sense of having less of the interstellar heavy Xe found in carbonaceous chondrite acid residues. The Pu/U and Pu/Nd ratios are consistent with previous data for St. Se??verin, but both tend to be slightly higher than those inferred from previous data on Angra dos Reis. Although significant variations exist, the distribution of our Th/U ratios, along with other precise isotope dilution data for ordinary chondrites, is rather symmetric about the CI chondrite value; however, actinide/(LREE) ratios are systematically lower than the CI value. Variations in actinide or LREE absolute and relative abundances are interpreted as reflecting differences in the proportions and/or compositions of more primitive components (chondrules and CAI materials?) incorporated into different regions of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The observed variations of Th/U, Nd/U, or Ce/U suggest that measurements of Pu/U on any single equilibrated ordinary chondrite specimen, such as St. Se??verin, should statistically be within ??20-30% of the average solar system value, although it is also clear that anomalous samples exist. ?? 1990.

  11. Numerical simulation of pulsatile flow in rough pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Cheng; Monty, Jason; Ooi, Andrew; Illingworth, Simon; Marusic, Ivan; Skvortsov, Alex

    2016-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation (DNS) of pulsatile turbulent pipe flow is carried out over three-dimensional sinusoidal surfaces mimicking surface roughness. The simulations are performed at a mean Reynolds number of Reτ 540 (based on friction velocity, uτ, and pipe radii, δ) and at various roughness profiles following the study of Chan et al., where the size of the roughness (roughness semi-amplitude height h+ and wavelength λ+) is increased geometrically while maintaining the height-to-wavelength ratio of the sinusoidal roughness element. Results from the pulsatile simulations are compared with non-pulsatile simulations to investigate the effects of pulsation on the Hama roughness function, ΔU+ . Other turbulence statistics including mean turbulence intensities, Reynolds stresses and energy spectra are analysed. In addition, instantaneous phase (eg. at maximum and minimum flow velocities) and phase-averaged flow structures are presented and discussed.

  12. Wind-tunnel studies of roughness effects in gas dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, P. T.; Fryer-Taylor, R. E. J.; Hall, D. J.

    A programme of work has been carried out using wind-tunnel modelling to investigate the effect of surface roughness on dense-gas dispersion from ground-level sources where the roughness height is large compared with the cloud depth. Neutrally buoyant gas releases were included as control experiments. The results are compared with results of a 1:100 scale simulation of dispersion in high roughness conducted by CPP Inc. for the American Petroleum Institute (API). For surface roughness lengths, z0, smaller than about 0.5 cm (0.5 m full scale), dispersion is shown to be well described by a Gaussian plume model. Plume width and depth increase with z0 and are simple functions of distance from the source. For larger roughness, dispersion depends on the arrangement of the roughness elements, plume width, σy, can be restricted by channelling and plume depth, σz, becomes sensitive to run conditions.

  13. Surface roughness effects on aluminium-based ultraviolet plasmonic nanolasers

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Yi-Cheng; Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chou, Yu-Hsun; Chou, Bo-Tsun; Hong, Kuo-Bin; Shih, Jheng-Hong; Lin, Sheng-Di; Lu, Tien-Chang; Lin, Tzy-Rong

    2017-01-01

    We systematically investigate the effects of surface roughness on the characteristics of ultraviolet zinc oxide plasmonic nanolasers fabricated on aluminium films with two different degrees of surface roughness. We demonstrate that the effective dielectric functions of aluminium interfaces with distinct roughness can be analysed from reflectivity measurements. By considering the scattering losses, including Rayleigh scattering, electron scattering, and grain boundary scattering, we adopt the modified Drude-Lorentz model to describe the scattering effect caused by surface roughness and obtain the effective dielectric functions of different Al samples. The sample with higher surface roughness induces more electron scattering and light scattering for SPP modes, leading to a higher threshold gain for the plasmonic nanolaser. By considering the pumping efficiency, our theoretical analysis shows that diminishing the detrimental optical losses caused by the roughness of the metallic interface could effectively lower (~33.1%) the pumping threshold of the plasmonic nanolasers, which is consistent with the experimental results. PMID:28045127

  14. Extreme ultraviolet mask substrate surface roughness effects on lithography patterning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Salmassi, Farhad; Mochi, Iacopo; Gullikson, Eric; Goldberg, Kenneth; Anderson, Erik

    2010-06-21

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography exposure systems, mask substrate roughness induced scatter contributes to LER at the image plane. In this paper, the impact of mask substrate roughness on image plane speckle is explicitly evaluated. A programmed roughness mask was used to study the correlation between mask roughness metrics and wafer plane aerial image inspection. We find that the roughness measurements by top surface topography profile do not provide complete information on the scatter related speckle that leads to LER at the image plane. We suggest at wavelength characterization by imaging and/or scatter measurements into different frequencies as an alternative for a more comprehensive metrology of the mask substrate/multilayer roughness effects.

  15. Surface roughness effects on aluminium-based ultraviolet plasmonic nanolasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yi-Cheng; Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chou, Yu-Hsun; Chou, Bo-Tsun; Hong, Kuo-Bin; Shih, Jheng-Hong; Lin, Sheng-Di; Lu, Tien-Chang; Lin, Tzy-Rong

    2017-01-01

    We systematically investigate the effects of surface roughness on the characteristics of ultraviolet zinc oxide plasmonic nanolasers fabricated on aluminium films with two different degrees of surface roughness. We demonstrate that the effective dielectric functions of aluminium interfaces with distinct roughness can be analysed from reflectivity measurements. By considering the scattering losses, including Rayleigh scattering, electron scattering, and grain boundary scattering, we adopt the modified Drude-Lorentz model to describe the scattering effect caused by surface roughness and obtain the effective dielectric functions of different Al samples. The sample with higher surface roughness induces more electron scattering and light scattering for SPP modes, leading to a higher threshold gain for the plasmonic nanolaser. By considering the pumping efficiency, our theoretical analysis shows that diminishing the detrimental optical losses caused by the roughness of the metallic interface could effectively lower (~33.1%) the pumping threshold of the plasmonic nanolasers, which is consistent with the experimental results.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress sensor protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) protects against pressure overload-induced heart failure and lung remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Kwak, Dongmin; Lu, Zhongbing; Xu, Xin; Fassett, John; Wang, Huan; Wei, Yidong; Cavener, Douglas R; Hu, Xinli; Hall, Jennifer; Bache, Robert J; Chen, Yingjie

    2014-10-01

    Studies have reported that development of congestive heart failure is associated with increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Double stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is a major transducer of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and directly phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, resulting in translational attenuation. However, the physiological effect of PERK on congestive heart failure development is unknown. To study the effect of PERK on ventricular structure and function, we generated inducible cardiac-specific PERK knockout mice. Under unstressed conditions, cardiac PERK knockout had no effect on left ventricular mass, or its ratio to body weight, cardiomyocyte size, fibrosis, or left ventricular function. However, in response to chronic transverse aortic constriction, PERK knockout mice exhibited decreased ejection fraction, increased left ventricular fibrosis, enhanced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and exacerbated lung remodeling in comparison with wild-type mice. PERK knockout also dramatically attenuated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in response to aortic constriction. Our findings suggest that PERK is required to protect the heart from pressure overload-induced congestive heart failure.

  17. Spectral quantification of Southern Baltic seabed roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szefler, K.; Tegowski, J.; Nowak, J.

    2012-12-01

    The work presents the fast and efficient tool for seafloor classification, where scales and shapes of geomorphological forms were taken into account. The precise bathymetry and seafloor texture was developed with multibeam echosounder at six different areas of size up to 10 by 20 km. This areas demonstrate typical geomorphological seafloor features of bottom relief at the southern Baltic Sea coastal waters. The acoustical measurements were accompanied by geological sampling and video inspection. High resolution mosaic maps were obtained as a result of multi-survey measurements with maximal spatial resolution of 0.05m. Such accuracy of the measurements allows to observe small geomorphologic forms as ripplemarks or pebbles. The most investigated polygons have bottom relief of polygenetic origin with relicts of periglacial forms together with contemporary forms of marine origin. In the studied areas different forms of sand accumulation were found, beginning with small ripplemarks ending at big sandy waves. In the seabed erosion zones the bottom surface is rough and varied with clearly formed embankments, abrasive platforms, inselbergs and stony gravely abrasive pavements on the bottom surface. Such geomorphic diversity of the bottom surface has allowed for development of consistent geomorphological classification system based mainly on spectral properties of seafloor roughness. Each analysed area was divided into squares (200 by 200 m) with an overlap between adjacent subareas of 75% a square size. Next, subdivided areas were spectrally transformed using a two dimensional fast Fourier transform (2D FFT). The spectral parameters as maximal value of spectral density function, spectral exponent and strength, spectral moments, mean frequency, spectral width and skewness for each characteristic type of bottom surface were determined relaying on the calculated 2D spectra. Moreover, other features characterised the corrugated surface as fractal dimension, radius of

  18. Backscatter from a periodic rough surface at near grazing incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, A. K.; Shamansky, H. T.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of periodic surface roughness on the radar cross section (RCS) was studied. The surface roughness was formed by a small sinusoidal variation in a planar surface. RCS measurements were obtained for two different sinusoidal variations near grazing incidence for both principle polarizations. Significant grating lobes were observed in the measurements which directly correspond to the roughness characteristics. A physical optics solution was generated and compared to the measurements with reasonable agreement.

  19. Deduction of static surface roughness from complex excess attenuation.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Andrew; Attenborough, Keith; Taherzadeh, Shahram

    2011-03-01

    Data for complex excess attenuation have been used to determine the effective surface admittance and hence characteristic roughness size of a surface comprising a random distribution of semi-cylindrical rods on an acoustically hard plane. The inversion for roughness size is based on a simplified boss model. The technique is shown to be effective to within 4%, up to a threshold roughness packing density of 32%, above which the interaction between scattering elements appears to exceed that allowed by the model.

  20. Influence of metal roughness on SPR sensor performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sajal; Prajapati, Y. K.; Singh, V.

    2017-01-01

    Roughness of the nano-layer greatly affects the sensor performance. This study is done to quantify the effect of roughness on the sensor performance experimentally. It is seen that the increased thickness of the top metal layer degrades the sensor performance i.e. sensitivity and detection accuracy. The roughness effect on the surface is seen by varying the thickness of intermediate and top metal layers separately. It is seen that 2-5 nm thick intermediate layer and 50 nm thick top layer provides better performance of sensor. Also, mathematical equations are included for the sake of theoretical analysis which indicates the effect of surface roughness on the sensor performance.

  1. Heat Transfer Variation on Protuberances and Surface Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Robert C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine the effect of surface irregularities on local convective heat transfer, the variation in heat transfer coefficients on small (2-6 mm diam) hemispherical roughness elements on a flat plate has been studied in a wind funnel using IR techniques. Heat transfer enhancement was observed to vary over the roughness elements with the maximum heat transfer on the upstream face. This heat transfer enhancement increased strongly with roughness size and velocity when there was a laminar boundary layer on the plate. For a turbulent boundary layer, the heat transfer enhancement was relatively constant with velocity, but did increase with element size. When multiple roughness elements were studied, no influence of adjacent roughness elements on heat transfer was observed if the roughness separation was greater than approximately one roughness element radius. As roughness separation was reduced, less variation in heat transfer was observed on the downstream elements. Implications of the observed roughness enhanced heat transfer on ice accretion modeling are discussed.

  2. Thermodynamics of capillary adhesion between rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    de Boer, M P; de Boer, P C T

    2007-07-01

    According to the Dupré equation, the work of adhesion is equal to the surface energy difference in the separated versus the joined materials minus an interfacial energy term. However, if a liquid is at the interface between two solid materials, evaporation or condensation takes place under equilibrium conditions. The resulting matter exchange is accompanied by heat flow, and can reduce or increase the work of adhesion. Accounting for the energies requires an open-system control volume analysis based on the first law of thermodynamics. Depending on whether evaporation or condensation occurs during separation, a work term that is negative or positive must be added to the surface energy term to calculate the work of adhesion. We develop and apply this energy balance to several different interface geometries and compare the work of adhesion to the surface energy created. The model geometries include a sphere on a flat with limiting approximations and also with an exact solution, a circular disc, and a combination of these representing a rough interface. For the sphere on a flat, the work of adhesion is one half the surface energy created if equilibrium is maintained during the pull-off process.

  3. Mechanistic simulation of line-edge roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biafore, John J.; Smith, Mark D.; Robertson, Stewart A.; Graves, Trey

    2007-03-01

    Physically-based photoresist models, such as those in PROLITH, have been very successful in describing photolithography from a continuum standpoint. These models allow engineers to accurately predict the final resist CD on the wafer and to analyze process robustness. However, as the critical dimension continues to shrink, yield-limiting phenomena are observed that are related to the molecular nature and reaction kinetics of photoresist materials. An example of these phenomena is line-edge roughness (LER). In this paper, the origin of LER is hypothesized to be caused by fluctuations occurring in the initial position of the reactants, fluctuations during the exposure process (shot noise) and fluctuations occurring during thermally-induced reaction-diffusion (post-exposure bake). We have developed a lattice-based mechanistic simulator to better understand the stochastic nature of reactant initial position, the exposure step, the importance of the discrete nature of the reactants, the coupling to the deprotection kinetics and the deep complexity evident in the diffusion-limited acid-quencher reaction.

  4. Adhesive contact of randomly rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastewka, Lars; Robbins, Mark

    2012-02-01

    The contact area, stiffness and adhesion between rigid, randomly rough surfaces and elastic substrates is studied using molecular statics and continuum simulations. The surfaces are self-affine with Hurst exponent 0.3 to 0.8 and different short λs and long λL wavelength cutoffs. The rms surface slope and the range and strength of the adhesive potential are also varied. For parameters typical of most solids, the effect of adhesion decreases as the ratio λL/λs increases. In particular, the pull-off force decreases to zero and the area of contact Ac becomes linear in the applied load L. A simple scaling argument is developed that describes the increase in the ratio Ac/L with increasing adhesion and a corresponding increase in the contact stiffness [1]. The argument also predicts a crossover to finite contact area at zero load when surfaces are exceptionally smooth or the ratio of surface tension to bulk modulus is unusually large, as for elastomers. Results that test this prediction will be presented and related to the Maugis-Dugdale [2] theories for individual asperities and the more recent scaling theory of Persson [3]. [1] Akarapu, Sharp, Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 204301 (2011) [2] Maugis, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 150, 243 (1992) [3] Persson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 75420 (2006)

  5. Capillary trapping on a rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wexler, Jason; Jacobi, Ian; Chow, Melissa; Stone, Howard

    2014-11-01

    Recent research has shown that rough or patterned surfaces infused with a lubricating liquid can display superhydrophobic properties. However, if such a surface is exposed to external flow, the shear induced by the outer fluid can drain the lubricating layer, causing regions of the surface to transition to a hydrophilic Wenzel state. In addition, the high specific gravity of lubricating liquids means that this loss can be driven by gravity alone, in the absence of flow. We examine the shear- and gravity-driven failure modes of liquid-infused patterned surfaces experimentally, and develop a unified model to predict the dynamics of drainage via these two types of forcing. We find that the dynamic evolution of the two drainage mechanisms takes on a single functional form. Under the influence of gravity, we show that a finite length of the surface will remain filled indefinitely; this is a variant of the familiar capillary rise height. Under the influence of external shear, the steady-state liquid retention depends on the outer flow velocity field. This work was supported under ONR MURI Grants N00014-12-1-0875 and N00014-12-1-0962 (Program Manager Dr. Ki-Han Kim).

  6. Intrusion detection using rough set classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lian-hua; Zhang, Guan-hua; Zhang, Jie; Bai, Ying-cai

    2004-09-01

    Recently machine learning-based intrusion detection approaches have been subjected to extensive researches because they can detect both misuse and anomaly. In this paper, rough set classification (RSC), a modern learning algorithm, is used to rank the features extracted for detecting intrusions and generate intrusion detection models. Feature ranking is a very critical step when building the model. RSC performs feature ranking before generating rules, and converts the feature ranking to minimal hitting set problem addressed by using genetic algorithm (GA). This is done in classical approaches using Support Vector Machine (SVM) by executing many iterations, each of which removes one useless feature. Compared with those methods, our method can avoid many iterations. In addition, a hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed to increase the convergence speed and decrease the training time of RSC. The models generated by RSC take the form of "IF-THEN" rules, which have the advantage of explication. Tests and comparison of RSC with SVM on DARPA benchmark data showed that for Probe and DoS attacks both RSC and SVM yielded highly accurate results (greater than 99% accuracy on testing set).

  7. Terahertz NDE for metallic surface roughness evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasi, Robert F.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2006-03-01

    Metallic surface roughness in a nominally smooth surface is a potential indication of material degradation or damage. When the surface is coated or covered with an opaque dielectric material, such as paint or insulation, then inspecting for surface changes becomes almost impossible. Terahertz NDE is a method capable of penetrating the coating and inspecting the metallic surface. The terahertz frequency regime is between 100 GHz and 10 THz and has a free space wavelength of 300 micrometers at 1 THz. Pulsed terahertz radiation, can be generated and detected using optical excitation of biased semiconductors with femtosecond laser pulses. The resulting time domain signal is 320 picoseconds in duration. In this application, samples are inspected with a commercial terahertz NDE system that scans the sample and generates a set of time-domain signals that are a function of the signal reflected from the metallic surface. Post processing is then performed in the time and frequency domains to generate C-scan type images that show scattering effects due to surface non-uniformity.

  8. Terahertz NDE for Metallic Surface Roughness Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Anastasi, Robert F.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic surface roughness in a nominally smooth surface is a potential indication of material degradation or damage. When the surface is coated or covered with an opaque dielectric material, such as paint or insulation, then inspecting for surface changes becomes almost impossible. Terahertz NDE is a method capable of penetrating the coating and inspecting the metallic surface. The terahertz frequency regime is between 100 GHz and 10 THz and has a free space wavelength of 300 micrometers at 1 THz. Pulsed terahertz radiation, can be generated and detected using optical excitation of biased semiconductors with femtosecond laser pulses. The resulting time domain signal is 320 picoseconds in duration. In this application, samples are inspected with a commercial terahertz NDE system that scans the sample and generates a set of time-domain signals that are a function of the backscatter from the metallic surface. Post processing is then performed in the time and frequency domains to generate C-scan type images that show scattering effects due to surface non-uniformity.

  9. [Describing language of spectra and rough set].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bo; Hu, Zhan-yi; Zhao, Yong-heng

    2002-06-01

    It is the traditional way to analyze spectra by experiences in astronomical field. And until now there has never been a suitable theoretical frame to describe spectra, which is may be owing to small spectra datasets that astronomers can get by low-level instruments. With the high-speed development of telescopes, especially on behalf of LAMOST, a large telescope which can collect more than 20,000 spectra in an observing night, spectra datasets are becoming larger and larger very fast. Facing these voluminous datasets, the traditional spectra-processing way simply depending on experiences becomes unfit. In this paper, we develop a brand-new language--describing language of spectra (DLS) to describe spectra of celestial bodies by defining BE (Basic element). And based on DLS, we introduce the method of RSDA (Rough set and data analysis), which is a technique of data mining. By RSDA we extract some rules of stellar spectra, and this experiment can be regarded as an application of DLS.

  10. Element abundances at high redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, David M.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.

    1989-01-01

    Abundances of Si(+), S(+), Cr(+), Mn(+), Fe(_), and Zn(+) are considered for two absorption-line systems in the spectrum of the QSO PKS 0528 - 250. Zinc and sulfur are underabundant, relative to H, by a factor of 10 compared to their solar and Galactic interstellar abundances. The silicon-, chromium-, iron-, and nickel-to-hydrogen ratios are less than the solar values and comparable to the local interstellar ratios. A straightforward interpretation is that nucleosynthesis in these high-redshift systems has led to only about one-tenth as much heavy production as in the gas clouds around the sun, and that the amount of the observed underabundances attributable to grain depletion is small. The dust-to-gas ratio in these clouds is less than 8 percent of the Galactic value.

  11. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1994-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution software X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred since the last report, submitted two months early, in April 1994, to facilitate evaluation of the first year's progress for contract renewal. Hence this report covers the period 15 April 1994 - 15 December 1994. A list of publications resulting from this research is included.

  12. Aerodynamic Properties of Rough Surfaces with High Aspect-Ratio Roughness Elements: Effect of Aspect Ratio and Arrangements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadique, Jasim; Yang, Xiang I. A.; Meneveau, Charles; Mittal, Rajat

    2016-12-01

    We examine the effect of varying roughness-element aspect ratio on the mean velocity distributions of turbulent flow over arrays of rectangular-prism-shaped elements. Large-eddy simulations (LES) in conjunction with a sharp-interface immersed boundary method are used to simulate spatially-growing turbulent boundary layers over these rough surfaces. Arrays of aligned and staggered rectangular roughness elements with aspect ratio >1 are considered. First the temporally- and spatially-averaged velocity profiles are used to illustrate the aspect-ratio effects. For aligned prisms, the roughness length (z_o ) and the friction velocity (u_* ) increase initially with an increase in the roughness-element aspect ratio, until the values reach a plateau at a particular aspect ratio. The exact value of this aspect ratio depends on the coverage density. Further increase in the aspect ratio changes neither z_o , u_* nor the bulk flow above the roughness elements. For the staggered cases, z_o and u_* continue to increase for the surface coverage density and the aspect ratios investigated. To model the flow response to variations in roughness aspect ratio, we turn to a previously developed phenomenological volumetric sheltering model (Yang et al., in J Fluid Mech 789:127-165, 2016), which was intended for low to moderate aspect-ratio roughness elements. Here, we extend this model to account for high aspect-ratio roughness elements. We find that for aligned cases, the model predicts strong mutual sheltering among the roughness elements, while the effect is much weaker for staggered cases. The model-predicted z_o and u_* agree well with the LES results. Results show that the model, which takes explicit account of the mutual sheltering effects, provides a rapid and reliable prediction method of roughness effects in turbulent boundary-layer flows over arrays of rectangular-prism roughness elements.

  13. The CALIFA survey: Oxygen abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Aff001

    We present here the last results we obtained on the spatial resolved analysis of the ionized gas of disk-dominated galaxies based on CALIFA data. CALIFA is an ongoing IFS survey of galaxies in the Local Univese (0.005 < z < 0.03) that has already obtained spectroscopic information up to ~2.5r e with a spatial resolution better than ~1 kpc for a total number of an statiscal sample of galaxies of different morphological types, covering the CM-diagram up to Mr<-18 mag. With nearly 2000 spectra obtained for each galaxy, CALIFA offer one of the best IFU data to study the starformation histories and chemical enrichment of galaxies. In this article we focus on the main results based on the analysis of the oxygen abundances based on the study of ionized gas in H ii regions and individual spaxels, and their relations with the global properties of galaxies. In summary we have found that: (1) the -Z relation does not present a secondary relation with the star-formation rate, when the abundance is measured at the effective radius; (2) the oxygen abundance present a strong correlation with the stellar surface density (Σ-Z relation); (3) the oxygen abundance profiles present three well defined regimes, (a) an overall negative radial gradient, between 0.5-2 r e , with a characteristic slope of α O/H ~-0.1 dex/r e , (b) an universal flatenning beyond >2r e and (c) an inner drop at <0.5r e which presence depends on the mass. All these results indicates that disk-galaxies present an overall inside-out growth, although with clear deviations from this simple scenario.

  14. The solar abundance of thulium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of one relatively unblended line of the solar spectrum, namely, the 3131.258-A line of Tm II, which yields a thulium abundance of 0.80 plus or minus 0.10 with the Corliss and Bozman (1962) f-value. The uncertainty of this figure is discussed in conjunction with the contradictory findings of some other investigators. The need for further detailed study of the lanthanides by the method of spectrum synthesis is pointed out.

  15. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Cartilage Pathophysiology; Contributing Factors to Apoptosis and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexandria; Oxford, Alexandra E.; Tawara, Ken; Jorcyk, Cheryl L.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2017-01-01

    Chondrocytes of the growth plate undergo apoptosis during the process of endochondral ossification, as well as during the progression of osteoarthritis. Although the regulation of this process is not completely understood, alterations in the precisely orchestrated programmed cell death during development can have catastrophic results, as exemplified by several chondrodystrophies which are frequently accompanied by early onset osteoarthritis. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie chondrocyte apoptosis during endochondral ossification in the growth plate has the potential to impact the development of therapeutic applications for chondrodystrophies and associated early onset osteoarthritis. In recent years, several chondrodysplasias and collagenopathies have been recognized as protein-folding diseases that lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress, endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation, and the unfolded protein response. Under conditions of prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress in which the protein folding load outweighs the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum, cellular dysfunction and death often occur. However, unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling is also required for the normal maturation of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Understanding how UPR signaling may contribute to cartilage pathophysiology is an essential step toward therapeutic modulation of skeletal disorders that lead to osteoarthritis. PMID:28335520

  17. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Cartilage Pathophysiology; Contributing Factors to Apoptosis and Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alexandria; Oxford, Alexandra E; Tawara, Ken; Jorcyk, Cheryl L; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2017-03-20

    Chondrocytes of the growth plate undergo apoptosis during the process of endochondral ossification, as well as during the progression of osteoarthritis. Although the regulation of this process is not completely understood, alterations in the precisely orchestrated programmed cell death during development can have catastrophic results, as exemplified by several chondrodystrophies which are frequently accompanied by early onset osteoarthritis. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie chondrocyte apoptosis during endochondral ossification in the growth plate has the potential to impact the development of therapeutic applications for chondrodystrophies and associated early onset osteoarthritis. In recent years, several chondrodysplasias and collagenopathies have been recognized as protein-folding diseases that lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress, endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation, and the unfolded protein response. Under conditions of prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress in which the protein folding load outweighs the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum, cellular dysfunction and death often occur. However, unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling is also required for the normal maturation of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Understanding how UPR signaling may contribute to cartilage pathophysiology is an essential step toward therapeutic modulation of skeletal disorders that lead to osteoarthritis.

  18. Influence of Nanoscale Surface Roughness on Colloidal Force Measurements.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Jayasuriya, Sunil; Manke, Charles W; Mao, Guangzhao

    2015-09-29

    Forces between colloidal particles determine the performances of many industrial processes and products. Colloidal force measurements conducted between a colloidal particle AFM probe and particles immobilized on a flat substrate are valuable in selecting appropriate surfactants for colloidal stabilization. One of the features of inorganic fillers and extenders is the prevalence of rough surfaces-even the polymer latex particles, often used as model colloidal systems including the current study, have rough surfaces albeit at a much smaller scale. Surface roughness is frequently cited as the reason for disparity between experimental observations and theoretical treatment but seldom verified by direct evidence. This work reports the effect of nanoscale surface roughness on colloidal force measurements carried out in the presence of surfactants. We applied a heating method to reduce the mean surface roughness of commercial latex particles from 30 to 1 nm. We conducted force measurements using the two types of particles at various salt and surfactant concentrations. The surfactants used were pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether, Pluronic F108, and a styrene/acrylic copolymer, Joncryl 60. In the absence of the surfactant, nanometer surface roughness affects colloidal forces only in high salt conditions when the Debye length becomes smaller than the surface roughness. The adhesion is stronger between colloids with higher surface roughness and requires a higher surfactant concentration to be eliminated. The effect of surface roughness on colloidal forces was also investigated as a function of the adsorbed surfactant layer structure characterized by AFM indentation and dynamic light scattering. We found that when the layer thickness exceeds the surface roughness, the colloidal adhesion is less influenced by surfactant concentration variation. This study demonstrates that surface roughness at the nanoscale can influence colloidal forces significantly and should be taken

  19. Subglacial roughness of the former Barents Sea ice sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudlaugsson, E.; Humbert, A.; Winsborrow, M.; Andreassen, K.

    2013-12-01

    The roughness of a glacier bed has high importance for the estimation of the sliding velocity and can also provide valuable insights into the dynamics and history of ice sheets, depending on scale. Measurement of basal properties in present-day ice sheets is restricted to ground-penetrating radar and seismics, with surveys retrieving relatively coarse data sets. Deglaciated areas, like the Barents Sea, can be surveyed by shipborne 2-D and 3-D seismics and multibeam sonar and provide the possibility of studying the basal roughness of former ice sheets and ice streams with high resolution. Here, for the first time, we quantify the subglacial roughness of the former Barents Sea ice sheet by estimating the spectral roughness of the basal topography. We also make deductions about the past flow directions by investigating how the roughness varies along a 2-D line as the orientation of the line changes. Lastly, we investigate how the estimated basal roughness is affected by the resolution of the basal topography data set by comparing the spectral roughness along a cross section using various sampling intervals. We find that the roughness typically varies on a similar scale as for other previously marine-inundated areas in West Antarctica, with subglacial troughs having very low roughness, consistent with fast ice flow and high rates of basal erosion. The resolution of the data set seems to be of minor importance when comparing roughness indices calculated with a fixed profile length. A strong dependence on track orientation is shown for all wavelengths, with profiles having higher roughness across former flow directions than along them.

  20. The Abundance of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar absorption lines of F I at 951 and 954 Angstroms to derive the abundance of fluorine toward the star HD 164816. The nucleosynthetic source(s) of fluorine are still a matter of debate - the present day abundance of fluorine can potentially constrain models for pulsationally driven dredge-up in asymptotic giant branch stars. An accurate measure for the depletion behavior of fluorine will determine whether it may be detectable in QSO absorption line systems - an unambiguous detection of fluorine at suitably high redshifts would provide the best evidence to date for the neutrino process in massive stars. Furthermore, due to its extreme reactivity, measurement of the gas-phase interstellar fluorine abundance is important for models of grain chemistry. Despite the importance of measuring the interstellar fluorine abundance, at the time of our proposal only one previous detection has been made due to the low relative abundance of fluorine, the lack of lines outside the far-UV, and the blending of the available F I transitions with lines of Hz. The star HD 164816 is associated with the Lagoon nebula (M8), and at a distance of approximately 1.5 kpc probes both distant and local gas. Beginning April 8th, 2004 FUSE FP-Split observations of the star HD 164816 were obtained for this program. This data became available in the FUSE data archive May 21, 2004, and these observations were then downloaded and we began our analysis. Our analysis procedure has involved (1) fitting stellar models to the FUSE spectra, (2) using the multiple lines of Hz and N I at other wavelengths in the FUSE bandpass to derive column densities for the lines of H2 and N I which are blended with the F I features at 951 and 954 angstroms (3) the measurement of the column densities of F I and the species O I and C1 I which are important species for the dis-entangling of dust and nucleosynthetic effects. As discussed in

  1. Wear and surface roughness of bovine enamel submitted to bleaching.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia; Azevedo, Juliana Felippi David E Góes De; Francisconi, Paulo Afonso Silveira; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Mondelli, José

    2009-01-01

    The present study evaluated surface roughness and wear of bovine enamel following three different bleaching techniques and simulated brushing. Initial surface roughness (Ra) was evaluated and teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10): Group 1, control; Group 2, 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) activated by a hybrid light; Group 3, 35% HP activated by a halogen light; and Group 4, 16% carbamide peroxide. After bleaching, surface roughness was measured and teeth were subjected to 100,000 cycles of simulated brushing. After brushing, the final roughness and wear was determined. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences among groups comparing initial and postbleaching roughness. After brushing, significant differences were found between the control and experimental groups. Group 4 showed a significant increase in roughness values compared with Group 2. The control group showed significantly less wear than other groups. Bleaching techniques promoted increased roughness and wear of bovine enamel, when submitted to simulated brushing. Tooth enamel after bleaching can present a larger alteration in the amount of roughness due to brushing.

  2. Rough surface interferometry at 10.6 microm.

    PubMed

    Kwon, O; Wyant, J C; Hayslett, C R

    1980-06-01

    An IR Twyman-Green interferometer is described. It uses a cw CO(2) laser as a light source operating at a 10.6-microm wavelength. Theoretical analysis and experimental measurements of the relationship between the contrast of the interference fringes and the rms roughness of test surfaces are discussed. Interferometric testing results and special alignment methods are shown for rough surface optics.

  3. High Reynolds number rough-wall turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Squire, Dougal; Morrill-Winter, Caleb; Schultz, Michael; Hutchins, Nicholas; Klewicki, Joseph; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    In his review of turbulent flows over rough-walls, Jimenez (2004) concludes that there are gaps in the current database of relevant experiments. The author calls for measurements in which δ / k and k+ are both large--low blockage, fully-rough flow--and where δ / k is large and k+ is small--low blockage, transitionally-rough flow--to help clarify ongoing questions regarding the physics of rough-wall-bounded flows. The present contribution details results from a large set of measurements carried out above sandpaper in the Melbourne Wind Tunnel. The campaign spans 45 rough-wall measurements using single and multiple-wire hot-wire anemometry sensors and particle image velocimetry. A floating element drag balance is employed to obtain the rough-wall skin friction force. The data span 20 rough-wall structural features. Generally, the data indicate similarity in the outer-layer of smooth- and fully-rough wall-bounded flows.

  4. 7 CFR 51.776 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... inch (15.9 mm), on a central cross section, on a grapefruit 41/8 inches (104.8 mm) in diameter. ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Slightly rough texture. 51.776 Section 51.776... texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin may be slightly thick but not excessively...

  5. Rough Play: One of the Most Challenging Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Frances M.

    2011-01-01

    Most children engage in rough play, and research demonstrates its physical, social, emotional, and cognitive value. Early childhood education settings have the responsibility to provide children with what best serves their developmental needs. One of the best ways teachers can support rough play is by modeling it for children. When adults model…

  6. Numerical and experimental investigation of microchannel flows with rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lilly, T. C.; Duncan, J. A.; Nothnagel, S. L.; Gimelshein, S. F.; Gimelshein, N. E.; Ketsdever, A. D.; Wysong, I. J.

    2007-10-01

    A conical surface roughness model applicable to particle simulations has been developed. The model has been experimentally validated for channel flows using helium and nitrogen gases at Reynolds numbers from 0.01 to 10 based on inlet conditions. To efficiently simulate gas-surface interaction, molecular collisions with the actual rough surface are simulated by collisions with a randomly positioned conical hole having a fixed opening angle. This model requires only one surface parameter, average surface roughness angle. This model has also been linked to the Cercignani-Lampis scattering kernel as a required reference for use in deterministic kinetic solvers. Experiments were conducted on transitional flows through a 150μm tall, 1cm wide, 1.5cm long microchannel where the mean free path is on the order of the roughness size. The channel walls were made of silicon with: (i) polished smooth surfaces, (ii) regular triangular roughness, and (iii) regular square roughness with characteristic roughness scales of <1μm, 11μm, and 29μm, respectively. For the triangular roughness, mass flow reductions ranged from 6% at the higher stagnation pressures tested to 25% at the lower stagnation pressures tested when compared to the smooth channel.

  7. Data Mining Using Extensions of the Rough Set Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingras, P. J.; Yao, Y. Y.

    1998-01-01

    Examines basic issues of data mining using the theory of rough sets, a recent proposal for generalizing classical set theory. Demonstrates that a generalized rough set model can be used for generating rules from incomplete databases. Discusses the importance of rule extraction from incomplete databases in data mining. (AEF)

  8. The psychophysics of roughness applied to dysphonic voice.

    PubMed

    Eddins, David A; Kopf, Lisa M; Shrivastav, Rahul

    2015-12-01

    Roughness is a sound quality that has been related to the amplitude modulation characteristics of the acoustic stimulus. Roughness also is considered one of the primary elements of voice quality associated with natural variations across normal voices and is a salient feature of many dysphonic voices. It is known that the roughness of tonal stimuli is dependent on the frequency and depth of amplitude modulation and on the carrier frequency. Here, it is determined if similar dependencies exist for voiced speech stimuli. Knowledge of such dependencies can lead to a better understanding of the acoustic characteristics of vocal roughness along the continuum of normal to dysphonic and may facilitate computational estimates of vocal roughness. Synthetic vowel stimuli were modeled after talkers selected from the Satloff/Heman-Ackah disordered voice database. To parametrically control amplitude modulation frequency and depth, synthesized stimuli had minimal amplitude fluctuations, and amplitude modulation was superimposed with the desired frequency and depth. Perceptual roughness judgments depended on amplitude modulation frequency and depth in a manner that closely matched data from tonal carriers. The dependence of perceived roughness on amplitude modulation frequency and depth closely matched the roughness of sinusoidal carriers as reported by Fastl and Zwicker [(2007) Psychoacoustics: Facts and Models, 3rd ed. (Springer, New York)].

  9. Ice Roughness in Short Duration SLD Icing Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Stephen T.; Reed, Dana; Vargas, Mario; Kreeger, Richard E.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Ice accretion codes depend on models of roughness parameters to account for the enhanced heat transfer during the ice accretion process. While mitigating supercooled large droplet (SLD or Appendix O) icing is a significant concern for manufacturers seeking future vehicle certification due to the pending regulation, historical ice roughness studies have been performed using Appendix C icing clouds which exhibit mean volumetric diameters (MVD) much smaller than SLD clouds. Further, the historical studies of roughness focused on extracting parametric representations of ice roughness using multiple images of roughness elements. In this study, the ice roughness developed on a 21-in. NACA 0012 at 0deg angle of attack exposed to short duration SLD icing events was measured in the Icing Research Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The MVD's used in the study ranged from 100 micrometer to 200 micrometers, in a 67 m/s flow, with liquid water contents of either 0.6 gm/cubic meters or 0.75 gm/cubic meters. The ice surfaces were measured using a Romer Absolute Arm laser scanning system. The roughness associated with each surface point cloud was measured using the two-dimensional self-organizing map approach developed by McClain and Kreeger (2013) resulting in statistical descriptions of the ice roughness.

  10. Estimating aerodynamic resistance of rough surfaces from angular reflectance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Current wind erosion and dust emission models neglect the heterogeneous nature of surface roughness and its geometric anisotropic effect on aerodynamic resistance, and over-estimate the erodible area by assuming it is not covered by roughness elements. We address these shortfalls with a new model wh...

  11. Improvement in storage stability of infrared dried rough rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop infrared drying (IRD) method to improve the stability of physicochemical properties of rough rice during storage. The effect of IRD on the physicochemical properties of stored rough rice was compared with that of hot air drying (HAD) and ambient air drying ...

  12. Determination of roughness coefficients for streams in Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jarrett, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Most hydraulic calculations of flow in channels and overbank areas require an evaluation of flow resistance, generally expressed as Manning 's roughness coefficient. The degree of roughness depends on many factors. The report summarizes and relates several methods of estimating roughness and presents additional channel-roughness verification data on higher-gradient streams with slopes greater than 0.002. A procedure is outlined that enables the user to systematically evaluate the factors affecting natural, agricultural, and urban channel and overbank roughness. Two prediction equations are presented to aid in the calculation of coefficients for natural stable channels in which roughness changes dramatically with depth of flow. Roughness coefficients can be determined from low-to-high flow conditions as long as the channel remains fairly stable, sediment concentrations are not so great as to result in mudflows or debris flows, and stream slopes are less than 0.05. Because of extreme turbulence, large energy losses, and hence large roughness coefficients, flow in high-gradient, cobble- and boulder-bed mountain streams generally is subcritical. (USGS)

  13. Turbulent Boundary Layers on a Systematically Varied Rough Wall

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    Aeronaut. Sci. 21, 91 1954. 47I. P. Castro, “Rough-wall boundary layers: Mean flow universality,” J. Fluid Mech. 585, 469 2007. 48P. S. Granville ...Properties of d- and k-type roughness in turbulent channel flow,” Phys. Fluids 19, 125101 2007. 50D. H. Wood and R. A. Antonia, “Measurements in a

  14. Influence of Surface Roughness on Polymer Drag Reduction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-30

    paint (High Build Semi-Gloss 97-130, Aquapon ) with glass bead grit. The particles were tightly packed producing a sand grain type roughness. Based on the... Aquapon High Build Semi-Gloss Epoxy 97-130) with glass bead grit blown into the epoxy. The particles were tightly packed giving an average roughness height

  15. Mask roughness induced LER: a rule of thumb -- paper

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2010-03-12

    Much work has already been done on how both the resist and line-edge roughness (LER) on the mask affect the final printed LER. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which system-level effects such as mask surface roughness, illumination conditions, and defocus couple to speckle at the image plane, and currently factor into LER limits. Here, we propose a 'rule-of-thumb' simplified solution that provides a fast and powerful method to obtain mask roughness induced LER. We present modeling data on an older generation mask with a roughness of 230 pm as well as the ultimate target roughness of 50 pm. Moreover, we consider feature sizes of 50 nm and 22 nm, and show that as a function of correlation length, the LER peaks at the condition that the correlation length is approximately equal to the resolution of the imaging optic.

  16. On universality of scaling law describing roughness of triple line.

    PubMed

    Bormashenko, Edward; Musin, Albina; Whyman, Gene; Barkay, Zahava; Zinigrad, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The fine structure of the three-phase (triple) line was studied for different liquids, various topographies of micro-rough substrates and various wetting regimes. Wetting of porous and pillar-based micro-scaled polymer surfaces was investigated. The triple line was visualized with the environmental scanning electron microscope and scanning electron microscope for the "frozen" triple lines. The value of the roughness exponent ζ for water (ice)/rough polymer systems was located within 0.55-0.63. For epoxy glue/rough polymer systems somewhat lower values of the exponent, 0.42 < ζ < 0.54, were established. The obtained values of ζ were close for the Cassie and Wenzel wetting regimes, different liquids, and different substrates' topographies. Thus, the above values of the exponent are to a great extent universal. The switch of the exponent, when the roughness size approaches to the correlation length of the defects, is also universal.

  17. Effect of surface roughness on the microwave emission from soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Schmugge, T. J.; Newton, R. W.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of surface roughness on the brightness temperature of a moist terrain was studied through the modification of Fresnel reflection coefficient and using the radiative transfer equation. The modification involves introduction of a single parameter to characterize the roughness. It is shown that this parameter depends on both the surface height variance and the horizontal scale of the roughness. Model calculations are in good quantitative agreement with the observed dependence of the brightness temperature on the moisture content in the surface layer. Data from truck mounted and airborne radiometers are presented for comparison. The results indicate that the roughness effects are greatest for wet soils where the difference between smooth and rough surfaces can be as great as 50K.

  18. An intermittency model for predicting roughness induced transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xuan; Durbin, Paul

    2014-11-01

    An extended model for roughness-induced transition is proposed based on an intermittency transport equation for RANS modeling formulated in local variables. To predict roughness effects in the fully turbulent boundary layer, published boundary conditions for k and ω are used, which depend on the equivalent sand grain roughness height, and account for the effective displacement of wall distance origin. Similarly in our approach, wall distance in the transition model for smooth surfaces is modified by an effective origin, which depends on roughness. Flat plate test cases are computed to show that the proposed model is able to predict the transition onset in agreement with a data correlation of transition location versus roughness height, Reynolds number, and inlet turbulence intensity. Experimental data for a turbine cascade are compared with the predicted results to validate the applicability of the proposed model. Supported by NSF Award Number 1228195.

  19. Determining Surface Roughness in Urban Areas Using Lidar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Donald

    2009-01-01

    An automated procedure has been developed to derive relevant factors, which can increase the ability to produce objective, repeatable methods for determining aerodynamic surface roughness. Aerodynamic surface roughness is used for many applications, like atmospheric dispersive models and wind-damage models. For this technique, existing lidar data was used that was originally collected for terrain analysis, and demonstrated that surface roughness values can be automatically derived, and then subsequently utilized in disaster-management and homeland security models. The developed lidar-processing algorithm effectively distinguishes buildings from trees and characterizes their size, density, orientation, and spacing (see figure); all of these variables are parameters that are required to calculate the estimated surface roughness for a specified area. By using this algorithm, aerodynamic surface roughness values in urban areas can then be extracted automatically. The user can also adjust the algorithm for local conditions and lidar characteristics, like summer/winter vegetation and dense/sparse lidar point spacing. Additionally, the user can also survey variations in surface roughness that occurs due to wind direction; for example, during a hurricane, when wind direction can change dramatically, this variable can be extremely significant. In its current state, the algorithm calculates an estimated surface roughness for a square kilometer area; techniques using the lidar data to calculate the surface roughness for a point, whereby only roughness elements that are upstream from the point of interest are used and the wind direction is a vital concern, are being investigated. This technological advancement will improve the reliability and accuracy of models that use and incorporate surface roughness.

  20. Clouds Versus Carbon: Predicting Vegetation Roughness by Maximizing Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Lola M.

    2004-01-01

    Surface roughness is one of the dominant vegetation properties that affects land surface exchange of energy, water, carbon, and momentum with the overlying atmosphere. We hypothesize that the canopy structure of terrestrial vegetation adapts optimally to climate by maximizing productivity, leading to an optimum surface roughness. An optimum should exist because increasing values of surface roughness cause increased surface exchange, leading to increased supply of carbon dioxide for photosynthesis. At the same time, increased roughness enhances evapotranspiration and cloud cover, thereby reducing the supply of photosynthetically active radiation. We demonstrate the optimum through sensitivity simulations using a coupled dynamic vegetation-climate model for present day conditions, in which we vary the value of surface roughness for vegetated surfaces. We find that the maximum in productivity occurs at a roughness length of 2 meters, a value commonly used to describe the roughness of today's forested surfaces. The sensitivity simulations also illustrate the strong climatic impacts of vegetation roughness on the energy and water balances over land: with increasing vegetation roughness, solar radiation is reduced by up to 20 W/sq m in the global land mean, causing shifts in the energy partitioning and leading to general cooling of the surface by 1.5 K. We conclude that the roughness of vegetated surfaces can be understood as a reflection of optimum adaptation, and it is associated with substantial changes in the surface energy and water balances over land. The role of the cloud feedback in shaping the optimum underlines the importance of an integrated perspective that views vegetation and its adaptive nature as an integrated component of the Earth system.

  1. Surface Roughness from Point Clouds - A Multi-Scale Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milenković, Milutin; Ressl, Camillo; Hollaus, Markus; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2013-04-01

    Roughness is a physical parameter of surfaces which should include the surface complexity in geophysical models. In hydrodynamic modeling, e.g., roughness should estimate the resistance caused by the surface on the flow, or in remote sensing, how the signal is scattered. Roughness needs to be estimated as a parameter of the model. This has been identified as main source of the uncertainties in model prediction, mainly due to the errors that follow a traditional roughness estimation, e.g. from surface profiles, or by a visual interpretation and manual delineation from aerial photos. Currently, roughness estimation is shifting towards point clouds of surfaces, which primarily come from laser scanning and image matching techniques. However, those data sets are also not free of errors and may affect roughness estimation. Our study focusses on the estimation of roughness indices from different point clouds, and the uncertainties that follow such a procedure. The analysis is performed on a graveled surface of a river bed in Eastern Austria, using point clouds acquired by a triangulating laser scanner (Minolta Vivid 910), photogrammetry (DSLR camera), and terrestrial laser scanner (Riegl FWF scanner). To enable their comparison, all the point clouds are transformed to a superior coordinate system. Then, different roughness indices are calculated and compared at different scales, including stochastic and features-based indices like RMS of elevation, std.dev., Peak to Valley height, openness. The analysis is additionally supported with the spectral signatures (frequency domain) of the different point clouds. The selected techniques provide point clouds of different resolution (0.1-10cm) and coverage (0.3-10m), which also justifies the multi-scale roughness analysis. By doing this, it becomes possible to differentiate between the measurement errors and the roughness of the object at the resolutions of the point clouds. Parts of this study have been funded by the project

  2. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-09

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  3. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-01

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  4. The solar abundance of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevesse, N.

    2009-07-01

    With Martin Asplund (Max Planck Institute of Astrophysics, Garching) and Jacques Sauval (Observatoire Royal de Belgique, Brussels) I recently published detailed reviews on the solar chemical composition ({Asplund et al. 2005}, {Grevesse et al. 2007}). A new one, with Pat Scott (Stockholm University) as additional co-author, will appear in Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics ({Asplund et al. 2009}). Here we briefly analyze recent works on the solar abundance of Oxygen and recommend a value of 8.70 in the usual astronomical scale.

  5. Characteristics of endoplasmic reticulum-derived transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated vesicles that mediate protein transport from the ER to Golgi membranes in perforated yeast. These vesicles, which form de novo during in vitro incubations, carry lumenal and membrane proteins that include core-glycosylated pro-alpha-factor, Bet1, Sec22, and Bos1, but not ER-resident Kar2 or Sec61 proteins. Thus, lumenal and membrane proteins in the ER are sorted prior to transport vesicle scission. Inhibition of Ypt1p-function, which prevents newly formed vesicles from docking to cis-Golgi membranes, was used to block transport. Vesicles that accumulate are competent for fusion with cis-Golgi membranes, but not with ER membranes, and thus are functionally committed to vectorial transport. A 900-fold enrichment was developed using differential centrifugation and a series of velocity and equilibrium density gradients. Electron microscopic analysis shows a uniform population of 60 nm vesicles that lack peripheral protein coats. Quantitative Western blot analysis indicates that protein markers of cytosol and cellular membranes are depleted throughout the purification, whereas the synaptobrevin-like Bet1, Sec22, and Bos1 proteins are highly enriched. Uncoated ER-derived transport vesicles (ERV) contain twelve major proteins that associate tightly with the membrane. The ERV proteins may represent abundant cargo and additional targeting molecules. PMID:8063853

  6. Influence of Coronal Abundance Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurman, Joseph (Technical Monitor); DeLuca, Edward

    2005-01-01

    During the final year of this program we concentrated on understanding the how to constrain the models with the best available observations. Work on developing accurate temperature and density diagnostics fkom TRACE and CDS together with constrained fits of non-potential force free fields will be extremely useful in the guiding the next generation of coronal models. The program has produced three fully operation numerical codes that model multi-species of ions in coronal loops: Static models and constant flow models. The time dependent numerical models have not been completed. We have extended the steady flow investigations to study the effect these flows have on coronal structure as observed with TRACE. Coronal observations derive from heavy-ion emission; thus, we focus on the extent to which flow may modify coronal abundances by examining the heavy-ion abundance stratification within long-lived loops. We discuss the magnitudes of the physical effects modeled and compare simulated results with TRACE observations. These results can have a profound effect on the interpretation of TRACE observations.

  7. Abundances in Hot Evolved Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Klaus; Rauch, Thomas; Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2009-05-01

    The hydrogen-deficiency in extremely hot post-AGB stars of spectral class PG1159 is probably caused by a (very) late helium-shell flash or a AGB final thermal pulse that consumes the hydrogen envelope, exposing the usually-hidden intershell region. Thus, the photospheric element abundances of these stars allow us to draw conclusions about details of nuclear burning and mixing processes in the precursor AGB stars. We compare predicted element abundances to those determined by quantitative spectral analyses performed with advanced non-LTE model atmospheres. A good qualitative and quantitative agreement is found for many species (He, C, N, O, Ne, F, Si, Ar) but discrepancies for others (P, S, Fe) point at shortcomings in stellar evolution models for AGB stars. Almost all of the chemical trace elements in these hot stars can only be identified in the UV spectral range. The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope played a crucial role for this research.

  8. Investigations of Surface Roughness Effects on Turbulent Flow and Heat Transfer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    roughnesses (transverse ribs, for example) and (2) the so-called "distributed-type" roughnesses ( sandgrain roughness ...sides smooth. He studied the effects of roughness size, shape and density on the flow resistance using well-defined roughness elements and sandgrains . He...Nikuradse for sand-roughened pipes through definition of an equivalent sandgrain roughness . The equivalent sandgrain roughness , ks, of a surface was

  9. Polarimetric scattering behavior of rough dielectric materials at terahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digiovanni, David Anthony

    Technologies in the terahertz region of the spectrum are finding increased usage in areas such as communications, remote sensing, and imaging, For example, driven by the promise of greater data transfer rates, free-space communication that traditionally operate in the radio and microwave bands are being developed at terahertz frequencies. Successful transition of communication systems to higher frequencies, particularly for systems located in indoor or urban environments, will require a thorough understanding of the reflection, transmission, absorption, and scattering behavior of a wide variety of materials and surface types. Scattering properties of rough surfaces have been studied extensively at radio and microwave frequencies, however, such properties have only recently become of interest at higher frequencies. The goal of this thesis was to develop a better understanding of electromagnetic scattering from dielectric rough surfaces at millimeter wavelengths and terahertz frequencies. This goal was achieved by measuring the polarimetric scattering behavior of dielectric materials and comparing the measured data to predictions made by rough surface scattering theory. The dielectric properties and the roughness of the samples were tailored in order to provide a controlled parameter space to investigate. Fully polarimetric radar imagery of the rough surfaces were acquired at 160 GHz, 240 GHz, and 1.55 THz. The backscattering measurements were collected as a function of polarization, incident angle, and frequency. The applicability of various rough surface scattering theories was determined for the different roughness regimes studied.

  10. Numerical Model Sensitivity to Heterogeneous Satellite Derived Vegetation Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Michael; Eastman, Joseph; Borak, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity of a mesoscale weather prediction model to a 1 km satellite-based vegetation roughness initialization is investigated for a domain within the south central United States. Three different roughness databases are employed: i) a control or standard lookup table roughness that is a function only of land cover type, ii) a spatially heterogeneous roughness database, specific to the domain, that was previously derived using a physically based procedure and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery, and iii) a MODIS climatologic roughness database that like (i) is a function only of land cover type, but possesses domain specific mean values from (ii). The model used is the Weather Research and Forecast Model (WRF) coupled to the Community Land Model within the Land Information System (LIS). For each simulation, a statistical comparison is made between modeled results and ground observations within a domain including Oklahoma, Eastern Arkansas, and Northwest Louisiana during a 4-day period within IHOP 2002. Sensitivity analysis compares the impact the three roughness initializations on time-series temperature, precipitation probability of detection (POD), average wind speed, boundary layer height, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Overall, the results indicate that, for the current investigation, replacement of the standard look-up table values with the satellite-derived values statistically improves model performance for most observed variables. Such natural roughness heterogeneity enhances the surface wind speed, PBL height and TKE production up to 10 percent, with a lesser effect over grassland, and greater effect over mixed land cover domains.

  11. Numerical prediction of rail roughness growth on tangent railway tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, J. C. O.

    2003-10-01

    Growth of railhead roughness (irregularities, waviness) is predicted through numerical simulation of dynamic train-track interaction on tangent track. The hypothesis is that wear is caused by longitudinal slip due to driven wheelsets, and that wear is proportional to the longitudinal frictional power in the contact patch. Emanating from an initial roughness spectrum corresponding to a new or a recent ground rail, an initial roughness profile is determined. Wheel-rail contact forces, creepages and wear for one wheelset passage are calculated in relation to location along a discretely supported track model. The calculated wear is scaled by a chosen number of wheelset passages, and is then added to the initial roughness profile. Field observations of rail corrugation on a Dutch track are used to validate the simulation model. Results from the simulations predict a large roughness growth rate for wavelengths around 30-40 mm. The large growth in this wavelength interval is explained by a low track receptance near the sleepers around the pinned-pinned resonance frequency, in combination with a large number of driven passenger wheelset passages at uniform speed. The agreement between simulations and field measurements is good with respect to dominating roughness wavelength and annual wear rate. Remedies for reducing roughness growth are discussed.

  12. Coupling between roughness and freestream acceleration in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Junlin; Piomelli, Ugo

    2015-11-01

    To explain various rough-wall flow responses to different types of free-stream conditions previously observed, we carried out a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer with freestream acceleration. Unlike the equilibrium (self-similar) accelerating scenario, where a strong acceleration leads to complete laminarization and lower friction, in the present non-equilibrium case the friction coefficient increases with acceleration, due to the faster near-wall acceleration than that of the freestream. At the same time, roughness reduces the near-wall time scale of the turbulence, preventing the acceleration from linearly stretching the near-wall eddies and freezing the turbulence intensity as in the smooth case. In addition, acceleration leads to similar decrease of mean-velocity logarithmic slope on rough and smooth walls; this allows a clear definition of the roughness function in a local sense. Interestingly, this roughness function correlates with the roughness Reynolds number in the same way as in self-similar or non-accelerating flows. This study may also help develop benchmark cases for evaluating rough-wall treatments for industrial turbulence models.

  13. Surface forces: Surface roughness in theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Drew F. Walsh, Rick B.; Craig, Vincent S. J.

    2014-04-28

    A method of incorporating surface roughness into theoretical calculations of surface forces is presented. The model contains two chief elements. First, surface roughness is represented as a probability distribution of surface heights around an average surface height. A roughness-averaged force is determined by taking an average of the classic flat-surface force, weighing all possible separation distances against the probability distributions of surface heights. Second the model adds a repulsive contact force due to the elastic contact of asperities. We derive a simple analytic expression for the contact force. The general impact of roughness is to amplify the long range behaviour of noncontact (DLVO) forces. The impact of the elastic contact force is to provide a repulsive wall which is felt at a separation between surfaces that scales with the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the surfaces. The model therefore provides a means of distinguishing between “true zero,” where the separation between the average centres of each surface is zero, and “apparent zero,” defined by the onset of the repulsive contact wall. A normal distribution may be assumed for the surface probability distribution, characterised by the RMS roughness measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Alternatively the probability distribution may be defined by the histogram of heights measured by AFM. Both methods of treating surface roughness are compared against the classic smooth surface calculation and experimental AFM measurement.

  14. Talbot effect of grating with fractal rough edges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Shuyun; Cui, Yuwei; Li, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Since the random edges of practically manufactured grating can be described by the self-affine fractal model, this paper investigates theoretically Fresnel diffraction of grating with rough edges on the basis of the self-affine fractal theory and discusses the variation of the Talbot image of grating with the rough parameters of edges. The amplitude gratings with different rough edges are produced with the help of the correlation function of the random distribution. Then, simulations of the diffraction intensity distributions of rough gratings are performed, and the modulation effect of speckles on Talbot image are shown. In order to explain the variation of the Talbot image of grating with rough edges, the theoretical analysis of the Talbot effect of grating with rough edges is given according to the statistic optics theory. The presented approximate analytic expression of the average diffraction intensity indicates the relationship between the diffraction and rough parameters of grating edges. The conclusions of this paper are useful for evaluating the Talbot image of practical grating.

  15. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jintao; Yi, Man; Zha, Longying; Chen, Siqiang; Li, Zhijia; Li, Cheng; Gong, Mingxing; Deng, Hong; Chu, Xinwei; Chen, Jiehua; Zhang, Zheqing; Mao, Limei; Sun, Suxia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells. Methods Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29) were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5–5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining), and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot. Results Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II), beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg)3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin

  16. Sediment transport in the presence of large reef bottom roughness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pomeroy, Andrew; Lowe, Ryan J.; Ghisalberti, Marco; Storlazzi, Curt; Symonds, Graham; Roelvink, Dano

    2017-01-01

    The presence of large bottom roughness, such as that formed by benthic organisms on coral reef flats, has important implications for the size, concentration, and transport of suspended sediment in coastal environments. A 3 week field study was conducted in approximately 1.5 m water depth on the reef flat at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to quantify the cross-reef hydrodynamics and suspended sediment dynamics over the large bottom roughness (∼20–40 cm) at the site. A logarithmic mean current profile consistently developed above the height of the roughness; however, the flow was substantially reduced below the height of the roughness (canopy region). Shear velocities inferred from the logarithmic profile and Reynolds stresses measured at the top of the roughness, which are traditionally used in predictive sediment transport formulations, were similar but much larger than that required to suspend the relatively coarse sediment present at the bed. Importantly, these stresses did not represent the stresses imparted on the sediment measured in suspension and are therefore not relevant to the description of suspended sediment transport in systems with large bottom roughness. Estimates of the bed shear stresses that accounted for the reduced near-bed flow in the presence of large roughness vastly improved the relationship between the predicted and observed grain sizes that were in suspension. Thus, the impact of roughness, not only on the overlying flow but also on bed stresses, must be accounted for to accurately estimate suspended sediment transport in regions with large bottom roughness, a common feature of many shallow coastal ecosystems.

  17. Optical waveguide end roughness in correlation to optical coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, Kevin; Riegel, Nick; Demars, Casey; Middlebrook, Christopher; Roggemann, Michael

    2012-01-01

    With the ever-increasing demand for board-to-board optical data communications, the correlation between waveguide surface end roughness and coupling losses must be thoroughly investigated. This study measures end roughness of siloxane polymer optical waveguides in terms of optical coupling losses. Siloxane Polymers from Dow Corning were used to fabricate 50 x 50 μm rectangular waveguides through photolithographic processes. Edge roughness was controlled through various grades of fiber-optic polishing films and then measured using interferometric microscopy (IFM). Controlled lab results are compared with industrial polishing techniques that are consistent with mass-production methods. Electromagnetic modeling revealed correlations between experimental and theoretical results.

  18. Boundary-layer receptivity of sound with roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saric, William S.; Hoos, Jon A.; Radeztsky, Ronald H.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of receptivity was carried out using an acoustical disturbance in the freestream. The receptivity was enhanced by using a uniform two-dimensional roughness strip (tape). The roughness strip generated the local adjustment in the flow needed to couple the long-wavelength sound wave with the short-wavelength T-S wave. The method proved to be highly sensitive, with slight changes in the forcing frequency or in the height of the 2D roughness element having a strong effect on the amplitude of the observed T-S wave.

  19. Reconstruction of scattering properties of rough air-dielectric boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. G.; Zhdanov, D. D.; Potemin, I. S.; Garbul, A. A.; Voloboy, A. G.; Galaktionov, V. A.; Kirilov, N.

    2016-10-01

    The article is devoted to elaboration of the method of reconstruction of rough surface scattering properties. The object with rough surface is made of transparent dielectric material. Typically these properties are described with bi-directional scattering distribution function (BSDF). Direct measurement of such function is either impossible or very expensive. The suggested solution provides physically reasonable method for the rough surface BSDF reconstruction. The method is based on Monte-Carlo ray tracing simulation for BSDF calculation. Optimization technique is further applied to correctly reconstruct the BSDF. The results of the BSDF reconstruction together with measurement results are presented in the article as well.

  20. Surface roughness scattering of electrons in bulk mosfets

    SciTech Connect

    Zuverink, Amanda Renee

    2015-11-01

    Surface-roughness scattering of electrons at the Si-SiO2 interface is a very important consideration when analyzing Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Scattering reduces the mobility of the electrons and degrades the device performance. 250-nm and 50-nm bulk MOSFETs were simulated with varying device parameters and mesh sizes in order to compare the effects of surface-roughness scattering in multiple devices. The simulation framework includes the ensemble Monte Carlo method used to solve the Boltzmann transport equation coupled with a successive over-relaxation method used to solve the two-dimensional Poisson's equation. Four methods for simulating the surface-roughness scattering of electrons were implemented on both devices and compared: the constant specularity parameter, the momentum-dependent specularity parameter, and the real-space-roughness method with both uniform and varying electric fields. The specularity parameter is the probability of an electron scattering speculariy from a rough surface. It can be chosen as a constant, characterizing partially diffuse scattering of all electrons from the surface the same way, or it can be momentum dependent, where the size of rms roughness and the normal component of the electron wave number determine the probability of electron-momentum randomization. The real-space rough surface method uses the rms roughness height and correlation length of an actual MOSFET to simulate a rough interface. Due to their charge, electrons scatter from the electric field and not directly from the surface. If the electric field is kept uniform, the electrons do not perceive the roughness and scatter as if from a at surface. However, if the field is allowed to vary, the electrons scatter from the varying electric field as they would in a MOSFET. These methods were implemented for both the 50-nm and 250-nm MOSFETs, and using the rms roughness heights and correlation lengths for real devices. The

  1. A rough earth scattering model for multipath prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, L. J.; Chestnut, P. C.

    1970-01-01

    The most important phenomena to be considered in a model of radio wave communication between earth satellites are scattering from the surface of the earth. A model is derived and implemented on a computer to predict the field received after reflection from a rough, spherical earth. The scattering integrals are computed numerically; the domain of integration is the appropriate region on the surface of the earth. Calculations have been performed at VHF frequencies and for terrain which could be described as marshy land. Rough surface scattering calculations must be performed over a spherical earth when satellites are involved. There is a definite dependence on the values of the roughness, and the correlation length.

  2. Research on pavement roughness based on the laser triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenxue; Ni, Zhibin; Hu, Xinhan; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    Pavement roughness is one of the most important factors for appraising highway construction. In this paper, we choose the laser triangulation to measure pavement roughness. The principle and configuration of laser triangulation are introduced. Based on this technology, the pavement roughness of a road surface is measured. The measurement results are given in this paper. The measurement range of this system is 50 μm. The measurement error of this technology is analyzed. This technology has an important significance to appraise the quality of highway after completion of the workload.

  3. Friction factors and roughness measurements of tubular mineral membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    René, F.; Leuliet, J. C.; Delplace, F.

    1993-08-01

    No direct measurement of the relative roughness is available for mineral porous media because of the low mechanical resistance of such materials. In this study a method for the experimental determination of the internal diameter and the equivalent roughness is proposed for different commercial membranes used in ultrafiltration and microfiltration processes. The use of classical friction factor correlations is also discussed. The main results are the estimation of the hydraulic diameter of tubular membranes and the use of a quadratic form in order to predict friction factors and the equivalent roughness with an accuracy better than 15%.

  4. Direct simulations of a rough-wall channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tomoaki

    Rough-wall turbulence arises in many applications. Besides, most walls should often be considered to be rough in the high Reynolds number limit. Our objective has been to understand turbulence modifications for their relevance to statistical closure models on the rough-wall boundary layer via Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). In this study, we performed the simulations of turbulent flow over rectangular-rib roughness, provided on one side of a plane in a channel, with the other side being smooth. The separation between ribs is large enough to reproduce k-type, or sand-grain roughness. The Reynolds number Retau of our representative DNS case is 460 based on the smooth-wall friction velocity and the channel half width. The roughness height h is estimated as 110 in wall units based on the rough-wall friction velocity. Our study consists of two main parts. First, a numerical issue due to mesh stretch is discussed. It was found that statistical data were noticeably affected by the numerical mesh highly stretched in both the streamwise and wall-normal directions. Truncation error analysis shows that the energy conserving scheme produces anti-diffusion error if mesh is stretched, or positive diffusion if narrowed. However, high frequencies in turbulent flow cause further adverse effect on statistics, if solely the lowest-order error is removed. An appropriate form of convection scheme that minimizes the mesh-stretch error is proposed and evaluated through numerical analyses. In the second part, the simulation results of the asymmetric channel flow are presented. The velocity profile and kinetic energy budget verify the presence of an equilibrium, logarithmic layer at y ≳ 2h. In the roughness sublayer, however, a significant turbulent energy flux was observed. Visualizations of vortical streaks, disrupted in all the three directions in the roughness sublayer, indicate that the three-dimensional flow structure of sand-grain roughness is replicated by the two

  5. Thermal Stability of Ice on Ceres with Rough Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul O.; Aharonson, Oded

    2015-11-01

    The dwarf planet Ceres may have an ice-rich crust, and subsurface ice exposed by impacts or endogenic activity would be subject to sublimation. The “bright spots” recently discovered by the Dawn mission on the illuminated surface of Ceres have prompted speculation regarding their possible icy composition and the youthful age this might imply. Furthermore, sublimation of ice at the surface or in the interior of Ceres could explain water vapor observed on more than one occasion in the exosphere. We investigated the possible distribution and lifetimes of water ice and other volatiles on Ceres using detailed thermal models, including realistic thermophysical properties and surface roughness.Topographic shadowing creates polar cold traps where a small, but non-negligible fraction (~0.4%) of Ceres' surface is perennially below the ~110 K criterion for 1 Gyr of H2O ice stability. These areas are found above 60° latitude. Other molecules (CH3OH, NH3, SO2, CO2) may be cold-trapped in smaller abundances. A model for the transport, gravitational escape and photoionization of H2O molecules suggests net accumulation in the cold traps. At latitudes 0° - 30°, ice is stable under solar illumination only briefly (~10-100 yr), unless it has high albedo and thermal inertia, in which case lifetimes of > 104 yr are possible.Buried ice is stable within a meter for > 1 Gyr at latitudes higher than ~50°. An illuminated polar cap of water ice would be stable within a few degrees of the poles only if it maintained a high albedo (> 0.5) at present obliquity. If the obliquity exceeded 5° in the geologically recent past, then a putative polar cap would have been erased. Finally, a small hemispheric asymmetry exists due to the timing of Ceres' perihelion passage, which would lead to a detectable enhancement of ice in the northern hemisphere if the orbital elements vary slowly relative to the ice accumulation rate. Our model results are potentially testable during the Dawn science

  6. αB-Crystallin R120G variant causes cardiac arrhythmias and alterations in the expression of Ca(2+) -handling proteins and endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qibin; Sanbe, Atsushi; Zhang, Xingwei; Liu, Jun-Ping; Minamisawa, Susumu

    2014-08-01

    Mutations of αB-crystallin (CryαB), a small heat shock protein abundantly expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscles, are known to cause desmin-related myopathies. The CryαB R120G allele has been linked to a familial desminopathy and, in transgenic mice, causes a sudden death at about 28 weeks of age. To investigate the mechanisms of the sudden cardiac arrest of CryαB R120G transgenic mice, we prepared protein samples from left ventricular tissues of two different age groups (10 and 28 weeks) and examined Ca(2+) -handling proteins. Expression of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) 2, phospholamban, ryanodine receptor 2 and calsequestrin 2 was significantly decreased in 28- versus 10-week-old CryαB R120G transgenic mice. In addition, low heart rate variability, including heart rate, total power and low frequency, was observed and continuous electrocardiogram monitoring revealed cardiac arrhythmias, such as ventricular tachycardia, atrioventricular block and atrial flutter, in 28-week-old CryαB R120G transgenic mice. In contrast, expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) degradation enhancing α-mannosidase-like protein, inositol requirement 1 and X-box binding protein 1 were increased significantly in 28- versus 10-week-old CryαBR120G transgenic mice, suggesting that the CryαBR120G transgenic mice exhibit increased ER stress compared with wild-type mice. Together, the data suggest that the CryαB R120G dominant variant induces ER stress and impairs Ca(2+) regulation, leading to ageing-related cardiac dysfunction, arrhythmias and decreased autonomic tone with shortened lifespan.

  7. Antcin K, an active triterpenoid from the fruiting bodies of basswood cultivated Antrodia cinnamomea, induces mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in human hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chiao-I.; Chu, Yung-Lin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Su, Yu-Cheng; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Liver cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in Taiwan as per the 2011 statistics and ranks fourth in cancer-related mortality in the world. Recent researches have shown that Antrodia cinnamomea, a Taiwan-specific medicinal mushroom, has biological activities, including hepatoprotection, anti-inflammation, antihepatitis B virus activity, and anticancer activity. In the present study, the antiproliferative activity and molecular mechanisms of antcin K, the most abundant ergostane triterpenoid from the fruiting bodies of basswood cultivated A. cinnamomea, were investigated using human hepatoma Hep 3B cells. The results showed that antcin K effectively reduced Hep 3B cells viability within 48 hours. Antcin K induced phosphatidylserine exposure, chromatin condensation, and DNA damage, but did not significantly increase autophagosome content or cause cell expansion and cell lysis. Thus, the principal mode of Hep 3B cells death induced by antcin K was apoptosis, rather than autophagy or necrosis. In-depth investigation of the molecular mechanisms revealed that antcin K first promoted reactive oxygen species generation and adenosine triphosphate depletion, leading to endoplasmic reticulum stress and resulting in mitochondrial membrane permeability changes. After losing the mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-independent and caspase-dependent apoptosis-related proteins were released, including HtrA2, apoptotic-induced factor, endonuclease G, and cytochrome c. Cytochrome c activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, and cut downstream protein PARP, ultimately leading to cell apoptosis. These results suggested that antcin K induced mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in human hepatoma cells. Coupled with these findings, antcin K has a potential to be a complementary agent in liver cancer therapy. PMID:26870680

  8. The Toxicity of a Novel Antifungal Compound Is Modulated by Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Protein Degradation Components

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Shriya; Krishnan, Karthik; Askew, David S.; Helynck, Olivier; Suzanne, Peggy; Lesnard, Aurélien; Rault, Sylvain; Zeidler, Ute; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In a search for new antifungal compounds, we screened a library of 4,454 chemicals for toxicity against the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. We identified sr7575, a molecule that inhibits growth of the evolutionary distant fungi A. fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae but lacks acute toxicity for mammalian cells. To gain insight into the mode of inhibition, sr7575 was screened against 4,885 S. cerevisiae mutants from the systematic collection of haploid deletion strains and 977 barcoded haploid DAmP (decreased abundance by mRNA perturbation) strains in which the function of essential genes was perturbed by the introduction of a drug resistance cassette downstream of the coding sequence region. Comparisons with previously published chemogenomic screens revealed that the set of mutants conferring sensitivity to sr7575 was strikingly narrow, affecting components of the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD) stress response and the ER membrane protein complex (EMC). ERAD-deficient mutants were hypersensitive to sr7575 in both S. cerevisiae and A. fumigatus, indicating a conserved mechanism of growth inhibition between yeast and filamentous fungi. Although the unfolded protein response (UPR) is linked to ERAD regulation, sr7575 did not trigger the UPR in A. fumigatus and UPR mutants showed no enhanced sensitivity to the compound. The data from this chemogenomic analysis demonstrate that sr7575 exerts its antifungal activity by disrupting ER protein quality control in a manner that requires ERAD intervention but bypasses the need for the canonical UPR. ER protein quality control is thus a specific vulnerability of fungal organisms that might be exploited for antifungal drug development. PMID:26666917

  9. Contributions of TRPV1, endovanilloids, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in lung cell death in vitro and lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Karen C.; Roberts, Jessica K.; Deering-Rice, Cassandra E.; Romero, Erin G.; Dull, Randal O.; Lee, Jeewoo; Yost, Garold S.

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous agonists of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) (endovanilloids) are implicated as mediators of lung injury during inflammation. This study tested the hypothesis that endovanilloids produced following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment activate TRPV1 and cause endoplasmic reticulum stress/GADD153 expression in lung cells, representing a mechanistic component of lung injury. The TRPV1 agonist nonivamide induced GADD153 expression and caused cytotoxicity in immortalized and primary human bronchial, bronchiolar/alveolar, and microvascular endothelial cells, proportional to TRPV1 mRNA expression. In CF-1 mice, Trpv1 mRNA was most abundant in the alveoli, and intratracheal nonivamide treatment promoted Gadd153 expression in the alveolar region. Treatment of CF-1 mice with LPS increased Gadd153 in the lung, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and lung wet-to-dry weight ratio. Cotreating mice with LPS and the TRPV1 antagonist LJO-328 reduced Gadd153 induction and LDH in BAL but did not inhibit increases in lung wet-to-dry ratio. In Trpv1−/− mice treated with LPS, Gadd153 induction and LDH in BAL were reduced relative to wild-type mice, and the wet-to-dry weight ratios of lungs from both wild-type and Trpv1−/− mice decreased. Organic extracts of blood collected from LPS-treated mice were more cytotoxic to TRPV1-overexpressing cells compared with BEAS-2B cells and extracts from control mice, however, most pure endovanilloids did not produce cytotoxicity in a characteristic TRPV1-dependent manner. Collectively, these data indicate a role for TRPV1, and endogenous TRPV1 agonists, in ER stress and cytotoxicity in lung cells but demonstrate that ER stress and cytotoxicity are not essential for pulmonary edema. PMID:21949157

  10. Solar-system abundances of the elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, E.; Ebihara, M.

    1982-01-01

    Elemental analyses of the Ogueil Cl meteorite and all previous Cl chondrite analyses were employed to develop a new solar system abundance table, including the standard deviation and number of analyses for each element. The table also comprises the abundances of radioactive and radiogenic nuclides at the present and 4.55 AE ago, as well as abundances by weight in a typical Cl chondrite. The new abundances were within 20% of those determined by Cameron (1982), except for 14 cases in the range 20-50%, and 5 over 50%. The solar abundances were compared with the Cl abundances, showing a total of only 7 disagreements. No significant discrepancies were detected in the major cosmochemical groups, and a smooth trend was found in the abundances of odd-A nuclides. The new set is interpreted as accurate to 10%, with the Cl chondrites matching the primordial solar system abundances to at most 10% deviation.

  11. Hematite Abundance Map at Echo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows the hematite abundance map for a portion of the Meridiani Planum rock outcrop near where the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity landed. It was acquired by the rover's miniature thermal emission spectrometer instrument from a spot called 'Echo.' Portions of the inner crater wall in this region appear rich in hematite (red). The sharp boundary from hematite-rich to hematite-poor (yellow and green) surfaces corresponds to a change in the surface texture and color. The hematite-rich surfaces have ripple-like forms suggesting wind transported hematite to these surfaces. The bounce marks produced during landing at the base of the slope on the left are low in hematite (blue). The hematite grains that originally covered the surface were pushed below the surface by the lander, exposing a soil that has less hematite.

  12. Valosin-containing Protein-interacting Membrane Protein (VIMP) Links the Endoplasmic Reticulum with Microtubules in Concert with Cytoskeleton-linking Membrane Protein (CLIMP)-63*

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Chikano; Kimura, Hana; Arasaki, Kohei; Matsushita, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Wakana, Yuichi; Inoue, Hiroki; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    The distribution and morphology of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in mammalian cells depend on both dynamic and static interactions of ER membrane proteins with microtubules (MTs). Cytoskeleton-linking membrane protein (CLIMP)-63 is exclusively localized in sheet-like ER membranes, typical structures of the rough ER, and plays a pivotal role in the static interaction with MTs. Our previous study showed that the 42-kDa ER-residing form of syntaxin 5 (Syn5L) regulates ER structure through the interactions with both CLIMP-63 and MTs. Here, we extend our previous study and show that the valosin-containing protein/p97-interacting membrane protein (VIMP)/SelS is also a member of the family of proteins that shape the ER by interacting with MTs. Depletion of VIMP causes the spreading of the ER to the cell periphery and affects an MT-dependent process on the ER. Although VIMP can interact with CLIMP-63 and Syn5L, it does not interact with MT-binding ER proteins (such as Reep1) that shape the tubular smooth ER, suggesting that different sets of MT-binding ER proteins are used to organize different ER subdomains. PMID:25008318

  13. Marius Hills: Surface Roughness from LROC and Mini-RF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, S.; Hawke, B. R.; Bussey, B.; Stopar, J. D.; Denevi, B.; Robinson, M.; Tran, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Team is collecting hundreds of high-resolution (0.5 m/pixel) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images of lunar volcanic constructs (domes, “cones”, and associated features) [1,2]. Marius Hills represents the largest concentration of volcanic features on the Moon and is a high-priority target for future exploration [3,4]. NAC images of this region provide new insights into the morphology and geology of specific features at the meter scale, including lava flow fronts, tectonic features, layers, and topography (using LROC stereo imagery) [2]. Here, we report initial results from Mini-RF and LROC collaborative studies of the Marius Hills. Mini-RF uses a hybrid polarimetric architecture to measure surface backscatter characteristics and can acquire data in one of two radar bands, S (12 cm) or X (4 cm) [5]. The spatial resolution of Mini-RF (15 m/pixel) enables correlation of features observed in NAC images to Mini-RF data. Mini-RF S-Band zoom-mode data and daughter products, such as circular polarization ratio (CPR), were directly compared to NAC images. Mini-RF S-Band radar images reveal enhanced radar backscatter associated with volcanic constructs in the Marius Hills region. Mini-RF data show that Marius Hills volcanic constructs have enhanced average CPR values (0.5-0.7) compared to the CPR values of the surrounding mare (~0.4). This result is consistent with the conclusions of [6], and implies that the lava flows comprising the domes in this region are blocky. To quantify the surface roughness [e.g., 6,7] block populations associated with specific geologic features in the Marius Hills region are being digitized from NAC images. Only blocks that can be unambiguously identified (>1 m diameter) are included in the digitization process, producing counts and size estimates of the block population. High block abundances occur mainly at the distal ends of lava flows. The average size of these blocks is 9 m, and 50% of observed

  14. Transport of cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the transport of newly synthesized cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in Chinese hamster ovary cells using a cell fractionation assay. We found that transport is dependent on metabolic energy, but that the maintenance of the high differential concentration of cholesterol in the plasma membrane is not an energy-requiring process. We have tested a variety of inhibitors for their effect on cholesterol transport and found that cytochalasin B, colchicine, monensin, cycloheximide, and NH4Cl did not have any effect. The cholesterol transport process shows a sharp temperature dependence; it ceases at 15 degrees C, whereas cholesterol synthesis continues. When synthesis occurs at 15 degrees C, the newly synthesized cholesterol accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum and in a low density, lipid-rich vesicle fraction. These results suggest that cholesterol is transported via a vesicular system. PMID:4040520

  15. CSB ablation induced apoptosis is mediated by increased endoplasmic reticulum stress response

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Manuela; Balzerano, Alessio; Arisi, Ivan; D’Onofrio, Mara; Brandi, Rossella; Bongiorni, Silvia; Brancorsini, Stefano; Frontini, Mattia; Proietti-De-Santis, Luca

    2017-01-01

    The DNA repair protein Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB) has been recently identified as a promising anticancer target. Suppression, by antisense technology, of this protein causes devastating effects on tumor cells viability, through a massive induction of apoptosis, while being non-toxic to non-transformed cells. To gain insights into the mechanisms underlying the pro-apoptotic effects observed after CSB ablation, global gene expression patterns were determined, to identify genes that were significantly differentially regulated as a function of CSB expression. Our findings revealed that response to endoplasmic reticulum stress and response to unfolded proteins were ranked top amongst the cellular processes affected by CSB suppression. The major components of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis pathway, including pro-apoptotic factors downstream of the ATF3-CHOP cascade, were dramatically up-regulated. Altogether our findings add new pieces to the understanding of CSB mechanisms of action and to the molecular basis of CS syndrome. PMID:28253359

  16. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Autophagic Cell Death via Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Disruption in Normal Lung Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chang, Seung-Hee; Park, Soo Jin; Lim, Joohyun; Lee, Jinkyu; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Kim, Jun-Sung; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are used in diverse fields including food, cosmetic, and medical industries. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) are widely used, but their effects on biological systems and mechanism of toxicity have not been elucidated fully. Here, we report the toxicological mechanism of TiO2-NP in cell organelles. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-) were exposed to 50 and 100 μg/mL TiO2-NP for 24 and 48 h. Our results showed that TiO2-NP induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the cells and disrupted the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAMs) and calcium ion balance, thereby increasing autophagy. In contrast, an inhibitor of ER stress, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), mitigated the cellular toxic response, suggesting that TiO2-NP promoted toxicity via ER stress. This novel mechanism of TiO2-NP toxicity in human bronchial epithelial cells suggests that further exhaustive research on the harmful effects of these nanoparticles in relevant organisms is needed for their safe application.

  17. 34. ROUGH GAS MAIN RUNNING SOUTHEAST FROM THE BOP SHOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. ROUGH GAS MAIN RUNNING SOUTHEAST FROM THE BOP SHOP TO THE DUAL VENTURI GAS WASHERS. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  18. Surface roughness measurement on a wing aircraft by speckle correlation.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Félix; Barrientos, Alberto

    2013-09-05

    The study of the damage of aeronautical materials is important because it may change the microscopic surface structure profiles. The modification of geometrical surface properties can cause small instabilities and then a displacement of the boundary layer. One of the irregularities we can often find is surface roughness. Due to an increase of roughness and other effects, there may be extra momentum losses in the boundary layer and a modification in the parasite drag. In this paper we present a speckle method for measuring the surface roughness on an actual unmanned aircraft wing. The results show an inhomogeneous roughness distribution on the wing, as expected according to the anisotropic influence of the winds over the entire wing geometry. A calculation of the uncertainty of the technique is given.

  19. 7 CFR 51.776 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin may be slightly thick but not excessively thick, materially ridged or grooved. “Slightly thick” means that the skin thickness does not average more than...

  20. Rough sets and near sets in medical imaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Hassanien, Aboul Ella; Abraham, Ajith; Peters, James F; Schaefer, Gerald; Henry, Christopher

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a review of the current literature on rough-set- and near-set-based approaches to solving various problems in medical imaging such as medical image segmentation, object extraction, and image classification. Rough set frameworks hybridized with other computational intelligence technologies that include neural networks, particle swarm optimization, support vector machines, and fuzzy sets are also presented. In addition, a brief introduction to near sets and near images with an application to MRI images is given. Near sets offer a generalization of traditional rough set theory and a promising approach to solving the medical image correspondence problem as well as an approach to classifying perceptual objects by means of features in solving medical imaging problems. Other generalizations of rough sets such as neighborhood systems, shadowed sets, and tolerance spaces are also briefly considered in solving a variety of medical imaging problems. Challenges to be addressed and future directions of research are identified and an extensive bibliography is also included.

  1. Wetting failure of hydrophilic surfaces promoted by surface roughness

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Peng; Wang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Wetting failure is of vital importance to many physical phenomena, such as industrial coating and drop emission. Here we show when and how the surface roughness promotes the destabilization of a moving contact line on a hydrophilic surface. Beyond the balance of the driving force and viscous resistance where a stable wetting interface is sustained, wetting failure occurs and is modified by the roughness of the surface. The promoting effect arises only when the wetting velocity is high enough to create a gas-liquid-solid composite interface in the vicinity of the moving contact line, and it is a function of the intrinsic contact angle and proportion of solid tops. We propose a model to explain splashes of rough solid spheres impacting into liquids. It reveals a novel concept that dynamic wetting on hydrophilic rough surfaces can be similar to that on hydrophobic surfaces, and brings a new way to design surfaces with specific wetting properties. PMID:24948390

  2. Controlling adhesion force by means of nanoscale surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Clasohm, Lucy Y; Rao, Akshata; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2011-08-16

    Control of adhesion is a crucial aspect in the design of microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical devices. To understand the dependence of adhesion on nanometer-scale surface roughness, a roughness gradient has been employed. Monomodal roughness gradients were fabricated by means of silica nanoparticles (diameter ∼12 nm) to produce substrates with varying nanoparticle density. Pull-off force measurements on the gradients were performed using (polyethylene) colloidal-probe microscopy under perfluorodecalin, in order to restrict interactions to van der Waals forces. The influence of normal load on pull-off forces was studied and the measured forces compared with existing Hamaker-approximation-based models. We observe that adhesion force reaches a minimum value at an optimum particle density on the gradient sample, where the mean particle spacing becomes comparable with the diameter of the contact area with the polyethylene sphere. We also observe that the effect on adhesion of increasing the normal load depends on the roughness of the surface.

  3. 7 CFR 51.776 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin may be slightly thick but not excessively thick, materially ridged or grooved. “Slightly thick” means that the skin thickness does not average more than...

  4. Surface Roughness Measurement on a Wing Aircraft by Speckle Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Félix; Barrientos, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The study of the damage of aeronautical materials is important because it may change the microscopic surface structure profiles. The modification of geometrical surface properties can cause small instabilities and then a displacement of the boundary layer. One of the irregularities we can often find is surface roughness. Due to an increase of roughness and other effects, there may be extra momentum losses in the boundary layer and a modification in the parasite drag. In this paper we present a speckle method for measuring the surface roughness on an actual unmanned aircraft wing. The results show an inhomogeneous roughness distribution on the wing, as expected according to the anisotropic influence of the winds over the entire wing geometry. A calculation of the uncertainty of the technique is given. PMID:24013488

  5. Current-induced surface roughness reduction in conducting thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Lin; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2017-03-01

    Thin film surface roughness is responsible for various materials reliability problems in microelectronics and nanofabrication technologies, which requires the development of surface roughness reduction strategies. Toward this end, we report modeling results that establish the electrical surface treatment of conducting thin films as a physical processing strategy for surface roughness reduction. We develop a continuum model of surface morphological evolution that accounts for the residual stress in the film, surface diffusional anisotropy and film texture, film's wetting of the layer that is deposited on, and surface electromigration. Supported by linear stability theory, self-consistent dynamical simulations based on the model demonstrate that the action over several hours of a sufficiently strong and properly directed electric field on a conducting thin film can reduce its surface roughness and lead to a smooth planar film surface. The modeling predictions are in agreement with experimental measurements on copper thin films deposited on silicon nitride layers.

  6. Spectral Analysis and Experimental Modeling of Ice Accretion Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, D. J.; Breuer, K. S.; Torres, B. E.; Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A self-consistent scheme for relating wind tunnel ice accretion roughness to the resulting enhancement of heat transfer is described. First, a spectral technique of quantitative analysis of early ice roughness images is reviewed. The image processing scheme uses a spectral estimation technique (SET) which extracts physically descriptive parameters by comparing scan lines from the experimentally-obtained accretion images to a prescribed test function. Analysis using this technique for both streamwise and spanwise directions of data from the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) are presented. An experimental technique is then presented for constructing physical roughness models suitable for wind tunnel testing that match the SET parameters extracted from the IRT images. The icing castings and modeled roughness are tested for enhancement of boundary layer heat transfer using infrared techniques in a "dry" wind tunnel.

  7. The Research of Tax Text Categorization based on Rough Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Xu, Guang; Xu, Qian; Zhang, Nan

    To solve the problem of effective of categorization of text data in taxation system, the paper analyses the text data and the size calculation of key issues first, then designs text categorization based on rough set model.

  8. Scatterometry modeling for gratings with roughness and irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Joerg; Hehl, Karl

    2016-03-01

    A rigorous electromagnetic simulation method for grating diffraction is presented that concurrently enables appropriate roughness and irregularity modeling. The approach will it make possible for example to overlay surface roughness and or line edge roughness (LER) to regular patterns. In this way, a unique tool is provided to model diffraction and scattering at the same time. It is based on a combination of modal methods such as the RCWA or C-method with near field stitching and subsequent near-to-far field propagation. This paves the way to an efficient and accurate modeling of large scattering areas. Fields of applications are the design of spectrographic gratings as well as optical scatterometry or kindred optical metrology techniques. Examples are provided both for 2D line/space patterns with sinusoidal and blaze profiles and 3D line/space patterns possessing LER and line width roughness (LWR). First ideas are derived how to determine LER and LWR from scatterometric measurements.

  9. Roughness and growth in a continuous fluid invasion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Inbal; Taitelbaum, Haim

    2004-10-01

    We have studied interface characteristics in a continuous fluid invasion model, first introduced by Cieplak and Robbins [Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 2042 (1988)]. In this model, the interface grows as a response to an applied quasistatic pressure, which induces various types of instabilities. We suggest a variant of the model, which differs from the original model by the order of instabilities treatment. This order represents the relative importance of the physical mechanisms involved in the system. This variant predicts the existence of a third, intermediate regime, in the behavior of the roughness exponent as a function of the wetting properties of the system. The gradual increase of the roughness exponent in this third regime can explain the scattered experimental data for the roughness exponent in the literature. The growth exponent in this model was found to be around zero, due to the initial rough interface.

  10. The roughness surface expressed by the mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macurova, Anna

    2010-07-01

    The work investigates the effect of some characteristics of a cut surface and studies roughness of the cutting process. There is elaborated theoretical information and new aspects on calculation of the theoretical values of the roughness of the cut surface for the chosen materials are formulated. In the area of the experimental investigation, results on characteristics of the chosen materials are formulated in this work. Obtained results are fundamental for the mathematical modulation and mathematical analysis for the investigated dependencies for the cut surfaces. The mathematical model also represents the specific dependencies of the technological process. The characteristics of the observed parameters are approximated by characteristics of the quasi-linear models. The solution of this model offers acceptable results. The mathematical models of the roughness of the cut surface are a mathematical description of the dependency of the maximum roughness of the cut surface of the feed represented by the differential equation and by the integral curves.

  11. Interface Roughness Evolution in Sputtered WSi2/Si Multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Wang,Y.; Zhou, H.; Zhou, L.; Headrick, R.; Macrander, A.; Ozcan, A.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the growth of WSi{sub 2} and Si amorphous thin films by dc magnetron sputtering. In situ synchrotron x-ray scattering with high temporal resolution has been employed to probe the surface and interface roughness during film deposition. It is found that the WSi{sub 2}/Si multilayer surface alternately roughens and smoothes during deposition; while the Si layer roughness monotonically, the WSi{sub 2} layer is observed to smooth out when deposited on an initially rough surface. Subsequent deposition of the next layer effectively freezes in the surface morphology of the previous layer in each case. Energetic neutrals and ions assisting the growth may play a role in inducing this pronounced alternating pattern in the roughness.

  12. Drop impact upon superhydrophobic surfaces with regular and hierarchical roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Cunjing; Hao, Pengfei; Zhang, Xiwen; He, Feng

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that roughness and morphologies of the textures play essential roles on the dynamics of water drop impacting onto superhydrophobic substrates. Particularly, significant reduction of contact time has greatly attracted people's attention. We experimentally investigate drop impact dynamics onto three types of superhydrophobic surfaces, consisting of regular micropillars, two-tier textures with nano/micro-scale roughness, and hierarchical textures with random roughness. It shows that the contact time is controlled by the Weber number and the roughness of the surface. Compared with drop impact on regular micropillared surfaces, the contact time can be finely reduced by increasing the Weber number on surfaces with two-tier textures, but can be remarkably reduced on surfaces with hierarchical textures resulting from the prompt splash and fragmentation of liquid lamellae. Our study may shed lights on textured materials fabrication, allowing a rapid drop detachment to realize broad applications.

  13. Effects of bleaching agents on surface roughness of filling materials.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Ljubisa; Jordan, Rainer Andreas; Glasser, Marie-Claire; Arnold, Wolfgang Hermann; Nebel, Jan; Tillmann, Wolfgang; Ostermann, Thomas; Zimmer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to use a non-tactile optical measurement system to assess the effects of three bleaching agents' concentrations on the surface roughness of dental restoration materials. Two composites (Grandio, Venus) and one glass ionomer cement (Ketac Fil Plus) were used in this in vitro study. Specimens were treated with three different bleaching agents (16% and 22% carbamide peroxide (Polanight) and 38% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Boost)). Surface roughness was measured with an optical profilometer (Infinite Focus G3) before and after the bleaching treatment. Surface roughness increased in all tested specimens after bleaching treatment (p<0.05). Our in vitro study showed that dental bleaching agents influenced the surface roughness of different restoration materials, and the restoration material itself was shown to have an impact on alteration susceptibility. There seemed to be no clinical relevance in case of an optimal finish.

  14. Ice friction: The effects of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kietzig, Anne-Marie; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G.; Englezos, Peter

    2009-07-15

    The effect of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity on ice friction is studied systematically over a wide range of temperature and sliding speeds using several metallic interfaces. Hydrophobicity in combination with controlled roughness at the nanoscale is achieved by femtosecond laser irradiation to mimic the lotus effect on the slider's surface. The controlled roughness significantly increases the coefficient of friction at low sliding speeds and temperatures well below the ice melting point. However, at temperatures close to the melting point and relatively higher speeds, roughness and hydrophobicity significantly decrease ice friction. This decrease in friction is mainly due to the suppression of capillary bridges in spite of the presence of surface asperities that facilitate their formation. Finally, grooves oriented in the sliding direction also significantly decrease friction in the low velocity range compared to scratches and grooves randomly distributed over a surface.

  15. GADD34 Keeps the mTOR Pathway Inactivated in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Related Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Holczer, Marianna; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Kapuy, Orsolya

    2016-01-01

    The balance of protein synthesis and proteolysis (i.e. proteostasis) is maintained by a complex regulatory network in which mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin serine/threonine kinase) pathway and unfolded protein response are prominent positive and negative actors. The interplay between the two systems has been revealed; however the mechanistic details of this crosstalk are largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the elements of crosstalk during endoplasmic reticulum stress and to verify the key role of GADD34 in the connection with the mTOR pathway. Here, we demonstrate that a transient activation of autophagy is present in endoplasmic reticulum stress provoked by thapsigargin or tunicamycin, which is turned into apoptotic cell death. The transient phase can be characterized by the elevation of the autophagic marker LC3II/I, by mTOR inactivation, AMP-activated protein kinase activation and increased GADD34 level. The switch from autophagy to apoptosis is accompanied with the appearance of apoptotic markers, mTOR reactivation, AMP-activated protein kinase inactivation and a decrease in GADD34. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine shortens the transient phase, while inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin or resveratrol prolongs it. Inhibition of GADD34 by guanabenz or transfection of the cells with siGADD34 results in down-regulation of autophagy-dependent survival and a quick activation of mTOR, followed by apoptotic cell death. The negative effect of GADD34 inhibition is diminished when guanabenz or siGADD34 treatment is combined with rapamycin or resveratrol addition. These data confirm that GADD34 constitutes a mechanistic link between endoplasmic reticulum stress and mTOR inactivation, therefore promotes cell survival during endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:27992581

  16. Glucose-6-phosphate Reduces Calcium Accumulation in Rat Brain Endoplasmic Reticulum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    low millimolar range. Most Ca2+ is sequestered within organelles , including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, mitochondria , and nucleus (Carafoli...G6P and thapsigargin caused generalized reduction in Ca2+ accumulation in remarkably similar patterns with no apparent gray matter regional...with glucose-6-phosphate (10 mM) or thapsigargin (1 µM), revealed very similar pattern of generalized reduction in 45Ca2+ accumulation in gray and

  17. α-Synuclein controls mitochondrial calcium homeostasis by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria interactions.

    PubMed

    Calì, Tito; Ottolini, Denis; Negro, Alessandro; Brini, Marisa

    2012-05-25

    α-Synuclein has a central role in Parkinson disease, but its physiological function and the mechanism leading to neuronal degeneration remain unknown. Because recent studies have highlighted a role for α-synuclein in regulating mitochondrial morphology and autophagic clearance, we investigated the effect of α-synuclein in HeLa cells on mitochondrial signaling properties focusing on Ca(2+) homeostasis, which controls essential bioenergetic functions. By using organelle-targeted Ca(2+)-sensitive aequorin probes, we demonstrated that α-synuclein positively affects Ca(2+) transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum to the mitochondria, augmenting the mitochondrial Ca(2+) transients elicited by agonists that induce endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release. This effect is not dependent on the intrinsic Ca(2+) uptake capacity of mitochondria, as measured in permeabilized cells, but correlates with an increase in the number of endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria interactions. This action specifically requires the presence of the C-terminal α-synuclein domain. Conversely, α-synuclein siRNA silencing markedly reduces mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, causing profound alterations in organelle morphology. The enhanced accumulation of α-synuclein into the cells causes the redistribution of α-synuclein to localized foci and, similarly to the silencing of α-synuclein, reduces the ability of mitochondria to accumulate Ca(2+). The absence of efficient Ca(2+) transfer from endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria results in augmented autophagy that, in the long range, could compromise cellular bioenergetics. Overall, these findings demonstrate a key role for α-synuclein in the regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis in physiological conditions. Elevated α-synuclein expression and/or eventually alteration of the aggregation properties cause the redistribution of the protein within the cell and the loss of modulation on mitochondrial function.

  18. Regulation of lipid metabolism via a connection between the endoplasmic reticulum and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michitaka

    2017-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles that store and supply lipids to regulate cellular lipid homeostasis. Fatty acids are packaged as triglyceride and cholesterol ester into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes to synthesize LDs. Cytosolic LDs move dynamically and interact with organelles, including other LDs. In this process, functional proteins for metabolism are also transferred to LDs. In this review, I focus on interactions between the ER and LDs related to lipid metabolism.

  19. Ultrafast glycerophospholipid-selective transbilayer motion mediated by a protein in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed

    Buton, X; Morrot, G; Fellmann, P; Seigneuret, M

    1996-03-22

    A relatively rapid transbilayer motion of phospholipids in the microsomal membrane seems to be required due to their asymmetric synthesis in the cytoplasmic leaflet. Marked discrepancies exist with regard to the rate and specificity of this flip-flop process. To reinvestigate this problem, we have used both spin-labeled and radioactively labeled long chain phospholipids with a new fast translocation assay. Identical results were obtained with both types of probes. Transbilayer motion of glycerophospholipids was found to be much more rapid than previously reported (half-time less than 25 s) and to occur identically for phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Such transport is nonvectorial and leads to a symmetric transbilayer distribution of phospholipids. In contrast, transverse diffusion of sphingomyelin was 1 order of magnitude slower. Phospholipid flip-flop appears to occur by a protein-mediated transport process displaying saturable and competitive behavior. Proteolysis, chemical modification, and competition experiments suggest that this transport process may be related to that previously described in the endoplasmic reticulum for short-chain phosphatidylcholine (Bishop, W. R., and Bell, R. M. (1985) Cell 42, 51-60). The relationship between phospholipid flip-flop and nonbilayer structures occurring in the endoplasmic reticulum was also investigated by 31P-NMR. Several conditions were found under which the 31P isotropic NMR signal previously attributed to nonbilayer structures is decreased or abolished, whereas transbilayer diffusion is unaffected, suggesting that the flip-flop process is independent of such structures. It is concluded that flip-flop in the endoplasmic reticulum is mediated by a bidirectional protein transporter with a high efficiency for glycerophospholipids and a low efficiency for sphingomyelin. In vivo, the activity of this transporter would be able to redistribute all changes in phospholipid composition due

  20. A possibility of avoiding surface roughness due to insects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortmann, F. X.

    1984-01-01

    Discussion of a method for eliminating turbulence caused by the formation of insect roughness upon the leading edges and fuselage, particularly in aircraft using BLC. The proposed technique foresees the use of elastic surfaces on which insect roughness cannot form. The operational characteristics of highly elastic rubber surface fastened to the wing leading edges and fuselage edges are examined. Some preliminary test results are presented. The technique is seen to be advantageous primarily for short-haul operations.

  1. Instability of a Supersonic Boundary-Layer with Localized Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marxen, Olaf; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2010-01-01

    A localized 3-D roughness causes boundary-layer separation and (weak) shocks. Most importantly, streamwise vortices occur which induce streamwise (low U, high T) streaks. Immersed boundary method (volume force) suitable to represent roughness element in DNS. Favorable comparison between bi-global stability theory and DNS for a "y-mode" Outlook: Understand the flow physics (investigate "z-modes" in DNS through sinuous spanwise forcing, study origin of the beat in DNS).

  2. Wind tunnel model surface gauge for measuring roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorburger, T. V.; Gilsinn, D. E.; Teague, E. C.; Giauque, C. H. W.; Scire, F. E.; Cao, L. X.

    1987-01-01

    The optical inspection of surface roughness research has proceeded along two different lines. First, research into a quantitative understanding of light scattering from metal surfaces and into the appropriate models to describe the surfaces themselves. Second, the development of a practical instrument for the measurement of rms roughness of high performance wind tunnel models with smooth finishes. The research is summarized, with emphasis on the second avenue of research.

  3. Scattering of Light and Surface Plasmon Polaritons from Rough Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-14

    AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2013-0049 TR-2013-0049 SCATTERING OF LIGHT AND SURFACE PLASMON POLARITONS FROM ROUGH SURFACES Alexei A...2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Scattering of Light and Surface Plasmon Polaritons from Rough Surfaces 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9453-08-C-0230 5b...of several properties of surface plasmon polaritons on structured surfaces are described, together with results for the scattering of surface plasmon

  4. Roughness parameters and surface deformation measured by coherence radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettl, Peter; Schmidt, Berthold E.; Schenk, M.; Laszlo, Ildiko; Haeusler, Gerd

    1998-09-01

    The 'coherence radar' was introduced as a method to measure the topology of optically rough surfaces. The basic principle is white light interferometry in individual speckles. We will discuss the potentials and limitations of the coherence radar to measure the microtopology, the roughness parameters, and the out of plane deformation of smooth and rough object surfaces. We have to distinguish objects with optically smooth (polished) surfaces and with optically rough surfaces. Measurements at polished surfaces with simple shapes (flats, spheres) are the domain of classical interferometry. We demonstrate new methods to evaluate white light interferograms and compare them to the standard Fourier evaluation. We achieve standard deviations of the measured signals of a few nanometers. We further demonstrate that we can determine the roughness parameters of a surface by the coherence radar. We use principally two approaches: with very high aperture the surface topology is laterally resolved. From the data we determine the roughness parameters according to standardized evaluation procedures, and compare them with mechanically acquired data. The second approach is by low aperture observation (unresolved topology). Here the coherence radar supplies a statistical distance signal from which we can determine the standard deviation of the surface height variations. We will further discuss a new method to measure the deformation of optically rough surfaces, based on the coherence radar. Unless than with standard speckle interferometry, the new method displays absolute deformation. For small out-of-plane deformation (correlated speckle), the potential sensitivity is in the nanometer regime. Large deformations (uncorrelated speckle) can be measured with an uncertainty equal to the surface roughness.

  5. Effects of enviromentally imposed roughness on airfoil performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1987-01-01

    The experimental evidence for the effects of rain, insects, and ice on airfoil performance are examined. The extent to which the available information can be incorporated in a calculation method in terms of change of shape and surface roughness is discussed. The methods described are based on the interactive boundary layer procedure of Cebeci or on the thin layer Navier Stokes procedure developed at NASA. Cases presented show that extensive flow separation occurs on the rough surfaces.

  6. Line edge roughness frequency analysis for SAQP process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Levi, Shimon; Ge, Adam; Zhou, Hua; Wang, Wenhui; Krishnan, Navaneetha; Chen, Yulu; Verduijn, Erik; Kim, Ryoung-han

    2016-03-01

    The line edge roughness (LER) and line width roughness (LWR) transfer in a self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) process is shown for the first time. Three LER characterization methods, including conventional standard deviation method, power spectral density (PSD) method and frequency domain 3-sigma method, are used in the analysis. The wiggling is also quantitatively characterized for each SAQP step with a wiggling factor. This work will benefit both process optimization and process monitoring.

  7. An Empirical Analysis of Rough Set Categorical Clustering Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Clustering a set of objects into homogeneous groups is a fundamental operation in data mining. Recently, many attentions have been put on categorical data clustering, where data objects are made up of non-numerical attributes. For categorical data clustering the rough set based approaches such as Maximum Dependency Attribute (MDA) and Maximum Significance Attribute (MSA) has outperformed their predecessor approaches like Bi-Clustering (BC), Total Roughness (TR) and Min-Min Roughness(MMR). This paper presents the limitations and issues of MDA and MSA techniques on special type of data sets where both techniques fails to select or faces difficulty in selecting their best clustering attribute. Therefore, this analysis motivates the need to come up with better and more generalize rough set theory approach that can cope the issues with MDA and MSA. Hence, an alternative technique named Maximum Indiscernible Attribute (MIA) for clustering categorical data using rough set indiscernible relations is proposed. The novelty of the proposed approach is that, unlike other rough set theory techniques, it uses the domain knowledge of the data set. It is based on the concept of indiscernibility relation combined with a number of clusters. To show the significance of proposed approach, the effect of number of clusters on rough accuracy, purity and entropy are described in the form of propositions. Moreover, ten different data sets from previously utilized research cases and UCI repository are used for experiments. The results produced in tabular and graphical forms shows that the proposed MIA technique provides better performance in selecting the clustering attribute in terms of purity, entropy, iterations, time, accuracy and rough accuracy. PMID:28068344

  8. Characterization of Ice Roughness Variations in Scaled Glaze Icing Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Stephen T.; Vargas, Mario; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Because of the significant influence of surface tension in governing the stability and breakdown of the liquid film in flooded stagnation regions of airfoils exposed to glaze icing conditions, the Weber number is expected to be a significant parameter governing the formation and evolution of ice roughness. To investigate the influence of the Weber number on roughness formation, 53.3-cm (21-in.) and 182.9-cm (72-in.) NACA 0012 airfoils were exposed to flow conditions with essentially the same Weber number and varying stagnation collection efficiency to illuminate similarities of the ice roughness created on the different airfoils. The airfoils were exposed to icing conditions in the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Following exposure to the icing event, the airfoils were then scanned using a ROMER Absolute Arm scanning system. The resulting point clouds were then analyzed using the self-organizing map approach of McClain and Kreeger (2013) to determine the spatial roughness variations along the surfaces of the iced airfoils. The roughness characteristics on each airfoil were then compared using the relative geometries of the airfoil. The results indicate that features of the ice shape and roughness such as glaze-ice plateau limits and maximum airfoil roughness were captured well by Weber number and collection efficiency scaling of glaze icing conditions. However, secondary ice roughness features relating the instability and waviness of the liquid film on the glaze-ice plateau surface are scaled based on physics that were not captured by the local collection efficiency variations.

  9. Surface Roughness Parameter Uncertainties on Radar Based Soil Moisture Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, A. T.; vanderVelde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Lang, R.; Su, Z.; Gish, T.

    2012-01-01

    Surface roughness variations are often assumed to be negligible for the retrieval of sol moisture. Although previous investigations have suggested that this assumption is reasonable for natural vegetation covers (i.e. Moran et al. 2002), in-situ measurements over plowed agricultural fields (i.e. Callens et al. 2006) have shown that the soil surface roughness can change considerably due to weathering induced by rain.

  10. Convective Enhancement of Icing Roughness Elements in Stagnation Region Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Michael T.; McClain, Stephen T.; Vargas, Mario; Broeren, Andy

    2015-01-01

    To improve existing ice accretion simulation codes, more data regarding ice roughness and its effects on convective heat transfer are required. To build on existing research on this topic, this study used the Vertical Icing Studies Tunnel (VIST) at NASA Glenn Research to model realistic ice roughness in the stagnation region of a NACA 0012 airfoil. Using the VIST, a test plate representing the leading 2% chord of the airfoil was subjected to flows of 7.62 m/s (25 ft/s), 12.19 m/s (40 ft/s), and 16.76 m/s (55 ft/s). The test plate was fitted with 3 surfaces, each with a different representation of ice roughness: 1) a control surface with no ice roughness, 2) a surface with ice roughness with element height scaled by 10x and streamwise rough zone width from the stagnation point scaled by 10x, and 3) a surface with ice roughness with element height scaled by 10x and streamwise rough zone width from the stagnation point scaled by 25x. Temperature data from the tests were recorded using an infrared camera and thermocouples imbedded in the test plate. From the temperature data, a convective heat transfer coefficient map was created for each case. Additional testing was also performed to validate the VIST's flow quality. These tests included five-hole probe and hot-wire probe velocity traces to provide flow visualization and to study boundary layer formation on the various test surfaces. The knowledge gained during the experiments will help improve ice accretion codes by providing heat transfer coefficient validation data and by providing flow visualization data helping understand current and future experiments performed in the VIST.

  11. Rough Solutions of Einstein Vacuum Equations in CMCSH Gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we consider very rough solutions to the Cauchy problem for the Einstein vacuum equations in CMC spatial harmonic gauge, and obtain the local well-posedness result in H s , s > 2. The novelty of our approach lies in that, without resorting to the standard paradifferential regularization over the rough, Einstein metric g, we manage to implement the commuting vector field approach to prove Strichartz estimate for geometric wave equation directly.

  12. Effects of environmentally imposed roughness on airfoil performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1987-01-01

    The experimental evidence for the effects of rain, insects, and ice on airfoil performance are examined. The extent to which the available information can be incorporated in a calculation method in terms of change of shape and surface roughness is discussed. The methods described are based on the interactive boundary procedure of Cebeci or on the thin layer Navier Stokes procedure developed at NASA. Cases presented show that extensive flow separation occurs on the rough surfaces.

  13. Goos-Hänchen shift for a rough metallic mirror.

    PubMed

    Merano, M; Götte, J B; Aiello, A; van Exter, M P; Woerdman, J P

    2009-06-22

    We investigate experimentally the dependence of the Goos-Hänchen shift on the surface properties of an air-metal interface. The shift depends on the microscopic roughness of the metal surface but it is insensitive to the large-scale variations associated with surface non-flatness. Both an effective medium model of roughness and the Rayleigh-Rice theory of scattering are used to interpret the observed phenomenon.

  14. Sterol carrier protein-2 localization in endoplasmic reticulum and role in phospholipid formation.

    PubMed

    Starodub, O; Jolly, C A; Atshaves, B P; Roths, J B; Murphy, E J; Kier, A B; Schroeder, F

    2000-10-01

    Although sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2; also called nonspecific lipid transfer protein) binds fatty acids and fatty acyl-CoAs, its role in fatty acid metabolism is not fully understood. L-cell fibroblasts stably expressing SCP-2 were used to resolve the relationship between SCP-2 intracellular location and fatty acid transacylation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Indirect immunofluorescence double labeling and laser scanning confocal microscopy detected SCP-2 in peroxisomes > endoplasmic reticulum > mitochondria > lysosomes. SCP-2 enhanced incorporation of exogenous [(3)H]oleic acid into phospholipids and triacylglycerols of overexpressing cells 1.6- and 2.5-fold, respectively, stimulated microsomal incorporation of [1-(14)C]oleoyl-CoA into phosphatidic acid in vitro 13-fold, and exhibited higher specificity for unsaturated versus saturated fatty acyl-CoA. SCP-2 enhanced the rate-limiting step in microsomal phosphatidic acid biosynthesis mediated by glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. SCP-2 also enhanced microsomal acyl-chain remodeling of phosphatidylethanolamine up to fivefold and phosphatidylserine twofold, depending on the specific fatty acyl-CoA, but had no effect on other phospholipid classes. In summary, these results were consistent with a role for SCP-2 in phospholipid synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum.

  15. Effects of HIV-1 Nef on retrograde transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Johannes, Ludger; Pezo, Valérie; Mallard, Frédéric; Tenza, Danièle; Wiltz, Aimée; Saint-Pol, Agnès; Helft, Julie; Antony, Claude; Benaroch, Philippe

    2003-05-01

    HIV-1 Nef protein down-regulates several important immunoreceptors through interactions with components of the intracellular sorting machinery. Nef expression is also known to induce modifications of the endocytic pathway. Here, we analyzed the effects of Nef on retrograde transport, from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum using Shiga toxin B-subunit (STxB). Nef expression inhibited access of STxB to the endoplasmic reticulum, but did not modify the surface expression level of STxB receptor, Gb3, nor its internalization rate as measured with a newly developed assay. Mutation of the myristoylation site or of a di-leucine motif of Nef involved in the interaction with the clathrin adaptor complexes AP1 and AP2 abolished the inhibition of retrograde transport. In contrast, mutations of Nef motifs known to interact with PACS-1, beta COP or a subunit of the v-ATPase did not modify the inhibitory activity of Nef on retrograde transport. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that Nef was present in clusters located on endosomal or Golgi membranes together with internalized STxB. Furthermore, in strongly Nef-expressing cells, STxB accumulated in endosomal structures that labeled with AP1. Our observations show that Nef perturbs retrograde transport between the early endosome and the endoplasmic reticulum. The potential transport steps targeted by Nef are discussed.

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: a novel mechanism and therapeutic target for cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei-qing; Chen, Zhe; Chen, Lin-xi

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum is a principal organelle responsible for folding, post-translational modifications and transport of secretory, luminal and membrane proteins, thus palys an important rale in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) is a condition that is accelerated by accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins after endoplasmic reticulum environment disturbance, triggered by a variety of physiological and pathological factors, such as nutrient deprivation, altered glycosylation, calcium depletion, oxidative stress, DNA damage and energy disturbance, etc. ERS may initiate the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore cellular homeostasis or lead to apoptosis. Numerous studies have clarified the link between ERS and cardiovascular diseases. This review focuses on ERS-associated molecular mechanisms that participate in physiological and pathophysiological processes of heart and blood vessels. In addition, a number of drugs that regulate ERS was introduced, which may be used to treat cardiovascular diseases. This review may open new avenues for studying the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and discovering novel drugs targeting ERS. PMID:26838072

  17. Characterization of Ca2+ Transport in Purified Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Vesicles from Lepidium sativum L. Roots

    PubMed Central

    Buckhout, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of Ca2+ transport into endoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from roots of Lepidium sativum L. cv Krause have been investigated. The concentration of free Ca2+ and ATP needed for half-maximal activity were 2.5 and 73 micromolar, respectively, and the enzyme obeyed Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics. The pH maximum occurred at 7.5 and the activity was greatly reduced at either pH 7.0 or 8.0. The Ca2+-dependent modulation protein, calmodulin, was tested for its effect on Ca2+ transport into endoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Although the phenothiazine inhibitors chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, and trifluoperazine all inhibited Ca2+ transport activity with a half-maximal effect at approximately 35 micromolar, authentic bovine brain calmodulin did not alter the activity at concentrations of 0.5 to 8 micrograms per milliliter. Calmodulin also showed no influence on the time-dependent accumulation of Ca2+ into vesicles. The membranes did not contain endogenously bound calmodulin since washing with (ethylenebis[oxyethylenenitrile])tetraacetic acid or fluphenazine, treatments which disrupt calmodulin binding, did not alter Ca2+ transport activity. The inhibition of Ca2+ transport by phenothiazine drugs was likely related to their nonspecific interaction with the membrane. Thus, there was no indication that calmodulin regulated Ca2+ uptake into root endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:16663981

  18. Cytoplasmic Nucleation and Atypical Branching Nucleation Generate Endoplasmic Microtubules in Physcomitrella patens[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nakaoka, Yuki; Kimura, Akatsuki; Tani, Tomomi; Goshima, Gohta

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism underlying microtubule (MT) generation in plants has been primarily studied using the cortical MT array, in which fixed-angled branching nucleation and katanin-dependent MT severing predominate. However, little is known about MT generation in the endoplasm. Here, we explored the mechanism of endoplasmic MT generation in protonemal cells of Physcomitrella patens. We developed an assay that utilizes flow cell and oblique illumination fluorescence microscopy, which allowed visualization and quantification of individual MT dynamics. MT severing was infrequently observed, and disruption of katanin did not severely affect MT generation. Branching nucleation was observed, but it showed markedly variable branch angles and was occasionally accompanied by the transport of nucleated MTs. Cytoplasmic nucleation at seemingly random locations was most frequently observed and predominated when depolymerized MTs were regrown. The MT nucleator γ-tubulin was detected at the majority of the nucleation sites, at which a single MT was generated in random directions. When γ-tubulin was knocked down, MT generation was significantly delayed in the regrowth assay. However, nucleation occurred at a normal frequency in steady state, suggesting the presence of a γ-tubulin-independent backup mechanism. Thus, endoplasmic MTs in this cell type are generated in a less ordered manner, showing a broader spectrum of nucleation mechanisms in plants. PMID:25616870

  19. Caspase-12 is involved in stretch-induced apoptosis mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Jianing; Chen, Shulan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Lijuan; Liu, Guirong; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Wenxin; Zhang, Caixia; Wang, Shuangyu; Yuan, Xiao

    2016-04-01

    It is well recognized that mandibular growth, which is caused by a variety of functional appliances, is considered to be the result of both neuromuscular and skeletal adaptations. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that apoptosis plays an important role in the adaptation of skeletal muscle function. However, the underlying mechanism of apoptosis that is induced by stretch continues to be incompletely understood. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), a newly defined signaling pathway, initiates apoptosis. This study seeks to determine if caspase-12 is involved in stretch-induced apoptosis mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress in myoblast and its underlying mechanism. Apoptosis was assessed by Hochest staining, DAPI staining and annexin V binding and PI staining. ER chaperones, such as GRP78, CHOP and caspase-12, were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Furthermore, caspase-12 inhibitor was used to value the mechanism of the caspase-12 pathway. Apoptosis of myoblast, which is subjected to cyclic stretch, was observed in a time-dependent manner. We found that GRP78 mRNA and protein were significantly increased and CHOP and caspase-12 were activated in myoblast that was exposed to cyclic stretch. Caspase-12 inhibition reduced stretch-induced apoptosis, and caspase-12 activated caspase-3 to induce apoptosis. We concluded that caspase-12 played an important role in stretch-induced apoptosis that is associated by endoplasmic reticulum stress by activating caspase-3.

  20. Mammalian vesicle trafficking proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Hay, J C; Hirling, H; Scheller, R H

    1996-03-08

    Vesicle traffic propagates and maintains distinct subcellular compartments and routes secretory products from their site of synthesis to their final destinations. As a basis for the specificity of vesicular transport reactions, each step in the secretory pathway appears to be handled by a distinct set of evolutionarily conserved proteins. Mammalian proteins responsible for vesicle trafficking at early steps in the secretory pathway are not well understood. In this report, we describe rat sec22 (rsec22) and rat bet1 (rbet1), mammalian sequence homologs of yeast proteins identified as mediators of endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi protein transport. rsec22 and rbet1 were expressed widely in mammalian tissues, as anticipated for proteins involved in fundamental membrane trafficking reactions. Recombinant rsec22 and rbet1 proteins behaved as integral membrane components of 28 and 18 kDa, respectively, consistent with their primary structures, which contain a predicted transmembrane domain at or near the carboxyl terminus. Recombinant rsec22 and rbet1 had distinct subcellular localizations, with rsec22 residing on endoplasmic reticulum membranes and rbet1 found on Golgi membranes. Studies with brefeldin A and nocodazole indicated that rbet1 function might involve interaction with or retention in the intermediate compartment. The distinct localizations of rsec22 and rbet1 may reflect their participation in opposite directions of membrane flow between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus.

  1. Multipoint contact modeling of nanoparticle manipulation on rough surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri, M.; Faraji, J.; Kharazmi, M.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based 2-D pushing of nano/microparticles investigated on rough substrate by assuming a multipoint contact model. First, a new contact model was extracted and presented based on the geometrical profiles of Rumpf, Rabinovich and George models and the contact mechanics theories of JKR and Schwartz, to model the adhesion forces and the deformations in the multipoint contact of rough surfaces. The geometry of a rough surface was defined by two main parameters of asperity height (size of roughness) and asperity wavelength (compactness of asperities distribution). Then, the dynamic behaviors of nano/microparticles with radiuses in range of 50-500 nm studied during their pushing on rough substrate with a hexagonal or square arrangement of asperities. Dynamic behavior of particles were simulated and compared by assuming multipoint and single-point contact schemes. The simulation results show that the assumption of multipoint contact has a considerable influence on determining the critical manipulation force. Additionally, the assumption of smooth surfaces or single-point contact leads to large error in the obtained results. According to the results of previous research, it anticipated that a particles with the radius less than about 550 nm start to slide on smooth substrate; but by using multipoint contact model, the predicted behavior changed, and particles with radii of smaller than 400 nm begin to slide on rough substrate for different height of asperities, at first.

  2. Modeling of surface roughness effects on glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Yamaguchi, Keiko; Berkowitz, Brian M.; Potapczuk, Mark

    1990-01-01

    A series of experimental investigations focused on studying the cause and effect of roughness on accreting glaze ice surfaces were conducted. Detailed microvideo observations were made of glaze ice accretions on 1 to 4 inch diameter cylinders in three icing wind tunnels (the Data Products of New England six inch test facility, the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel, and the B. F. Goodrich Ice Protection Research Facility). Infrared thermal video recordings were made of accreting ice surfaces in the Goodrich facility. Distinct zones of surface water behavior were observed; a smooth wet zone in the stagnation region with a uniform water film; a rough zone where surface tension effects caused coalescence of surface water into stationary beads; a horn zone where roughness elements grow into horn shapes; a runback zone where surface water ran back as rivulets; and a dry zone where rime feathers formed. The location of the transition from the smooth to the rough zone was found to migrate with time towards the stagnation point. The behavior of the transition appeared to be controlled by boundary layer transition and bead formation mechanisms at the interface between the smooth and rough zones. Regions of wet ice growth and enhanced heat transfer were clearly visible in the infrared video recordings of glaze ice surfaces. A simple multi-zone modification to the current glaze ice accretion model was proposed to include spatial variability in surface roughness.

  3. Vorticity Generation by Rough Walls in 2D Decaying Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gábor; Jánosi, Imre M.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present Lattice Boltzmann simulations of a decaying vortex array in a 2D rectangular domain, which is bounded by a random rough wall from one side. In order to separate the effects of the collisions with the rough wall, the opposite (smooth) rigid wall is placed at a larger distance from the center of the vortex array. Periodic boundary condition is imposed in the perpendicular direction. Well defined random roughness is generated by the widely studied Wolf-Villain surface growth algorithm. The main finding is that collisions with a rough wall generate excess vorticity compared with a smooth boundary, while the kinetic energy decreases monotonously. A proper measure is the integrated excess enstrophy, which exhibits an apparent maximum at an "optimal" roughness range. Numerical values of the excess enstrophy are very sensitive to a particular configuration (wall shape and vortex lattice randomization), however the "optimal" roughness exhibits surface features of similar characteristic sizes than that of the decaying vortices.

  4. Contrasts Between Momentum and Scalar Exchanges Over Very Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bou-Zeid, Elie; Li, Qi

    2016-11-01

    Understanding of the physical processes modulating transport of momentum and scalars over very rough walls is essential in a large range of engineering and environmental applications. Since passive scalars are advected with the flow, broad similarity is expected between momentum and scalar transport. However, unlike momentum, which is dominated by form drag over very rough walls, scalar transport must occur through the viscous exchanges at the solid-fluid interface, which might result in transport dissimilarity. To examine these similarities and differences of momentum and passive scalar exchanges over large three-dimensional roughness elements, a suite of large-eddy simulations is conducted. The turbulent components of the transport of momentum and scalars within the canopy and roughness sublayers are found to be similar. However, strong dissimilarity is noted between the dispersive fluxes. The dispersive components are also found to be a significant fraction of the total fluxes within and below the roughness sublayer. Increasing frontal density induces a general transition in the flow from a rough boundary layer type to a mixed-layer-like type, which is found to have contrasting effects on momentum and scalar transport. This study was funded by the US National Science Foundation's Sustainability Research Network Cooperative Agreement number 1444758 and Water Sustainability and Climate program Grant Number CBET-1058027.

  5. Gliding swifts attain laminar flow over rough wings.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1-2% of chord length on the upper surface--10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration--similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance.

  6. Surface roughness of flat and curved optical surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, M. C.; Reddy, Bandi Jagannadha; Jagannath, H.; Perera, M.; Venkateswarlu, P.

    1989-01-01

    Surface roughness measurement has several applications. Even a few A roughness will cause scattered light in optical systems. Smooth surfaces are required in a wide variety of instruments. For example, the outputs of the high power lasers are limited by the surface roughness of mirrors and windows. Similarly, the information storage capacity of magnetic media is limited by the roughness of the surface. Roughness reduces the resolving power of optics and distorts images. The performance of certain thin film components in electronic industries is affected by the roughness on the film surface. X-ray astronomical telescopes require smooth curved surfaces. To improve the surface quality, super sensitive detection methods are required. Wide ranging measurement techniques are developed based on interferometry, electron microscopy, C-rays, ellipsometry, light scattering, and using mechanical stylus, etc. Though there are several techniques available for measurement and evaluation of the surfaces, no single technique is fully adequate. Also, the technique used should be nondestructive and highly sensitive. So, an optical heterodyne profilometer was fabricated. Its current sensitivity is much better than 10A rms. It is a noncontact and nondestructive technique. The instrument can be operated even by unskilled personnel for routine measurements.

  7. Counterintuitive MCNPX Results for Scintillator Surface Roughness Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ding; Guss, Paul

    2012-10-01

    We performed a number of comparative MCNPX simulations of gamma energy depositions of scintillation crystals with smooth and rough surfaces. In the study, nine surface patterns (8 micro-roughness + 1 smooth) were coupled with eight common scintillation crystals for a total of 72 possible combinations. Although this was a preliminary study, the outcome was counterintuitive; results generally favored surfaces with micro-roughness over a conventional smooth surface as measured in terms of average energy depositions. The advantage gained through surface roughness is less significant for CdSe and LaCl3, but is most significant for the common NaI and the glass-like SiO2 scintillators. Based on the results of the 64 rough-surface coupled MCNPX simulations, 57 of the 64 (~89%) simulations showed some improvement in energy deposition. The mean improvement in energy deposition was 2.52%. The maximum improvement was about 8.75%, which was achieved when roughening the surface of a SiO2 scintillator using a micro cutting pattern. Further, for a conventional NaI scintillator, MCNPX results suggest that any roughness pattern would improve the energy deposition, with an average improvement of 3.83%. Although the likely causes remain unclear, we intend to focus on presenting simulation results instead of offering a sound explanation of the underlying physics.

  8. Surface abundances of ON stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, F.; Simón-Díaz, S.; Palacios, A.; Howarth, I.; Georgy, C.; Walborn, N. R.; Bouret, J.-C.; Barbá, R.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Massive stars burn hydrogen through the CNO cycle during most of their evolution. When mixing is efficient or when mass transfer in binary systems occurs, chemically processed material is observed at the surface of O and B stars. Aims: ON stars show stronger lines of nitrogen than morphologically normal counterparts. Whether this corresponds to the presence of material processed through the CNO cycle is not known. Our goal is to answer this question. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of a sample of ON stars with atmosphere models. We determined the fundamental parameters as well as the He, C, N, and O surface abundances. We also measured the projected rotational velocities. We compared the properties of the ON stars to those of normal O stars. Results: We show that ON stars are usually rich in helium. Their CNO surface abundances are fully consistent with predictions of nucleosynthesis. ON stars are more chemically evolved and rotate - on average - faster than normal O stars. Evolutionary models including rotation cannot account for the extreme enrichment observed among ON main sequence stars. Some ON stars are members of binary systems, but others are single stars as indicated by stable radial velocities. Mass transfer is therefore not a simple explanation for the observed chemical properties. Conclusions: We conclude that ON stars show extreme chemical enrichment at their surface, consistent with nucleosynthesis through the CNO cycle. Its origin is not clear at present. Based on observations obtained 1) at the Anglo-Australian Telescope; 2) at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT), which is operated by the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada, the Institut National des Science de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) of France, and the University of Hawaii; 3) at the ESO/La Silla Observatory under programs 081.D-2008, 083.D-0589, 086.D-0997; 4) the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated on the island of La

  9. Observing chemical abundances in comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delsemme, A. H.

    1981-01-01

    The atomic resonance lines of the major elements were observed in the atmospheres of a few comets, by using vacuum ultraviolet spectrographs on board rockets or orbiting observatories. Dust-to-gas ratios were also deduced for two comets through a Finson-Probstein's analysis of their dust-tail isophotes. The geometric albedo of the dust for the phase angle alpha of the observations is not accurately known but, the dust-to-gas ratio is not overly sensitive to the actual value of this albedo. Infrared observations of the dust head of some comets show that the bulk of cometary dust must be silicates, although a minor component (5-10 percent) of carbon compounds is rather likely, because of poor dielectric properties of the grains. This interpretation is confirmed by the fact that interplanetary dust probably of cometary origin, that was collected in the stratosphere by NASA-U2 Spacecraft, is chondritic in nature. Metal abundances in the head of a sungrazing comet support the chondritic hypothesis.

  10. Electromagnetic Scattering by an Exponentially Distributed Rough Surface with the Introduction of a Rough Surface Generation Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    60 3. Summary .................. ....................... 73 Part B . I. The Generation of Random Rough Surfaces (Background) 74 2. The RCS Program...A.1: Solution of Integrals from Appendix A ...... ... 108 Appendix B : A Closed Form Solution for the First Series of the Exponential Characteristic...of a surface represented by Pyati’s exponential jpdf using somewhat traditional rough surface scattering theory. Part B involves the development of an

  11. Wetting and scanning force microscopy on rough polymer surfaces: Wenzel's roughness factor and the thermodynamic contact angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamusewitz, H.; Possart, W.

    The influence of the surface roughness of polypropylene on the contact angle hysteresis is investigated by means of ethylene glycol drops in order to estimate the true Young's equilibrium contact angle. A new relationship between the contact angle hysteresis and Wenzel's contact angle is derived. In addition, the determination of Wenzel's roughness factor by means of scanning force microscopy opens an alternative way to obtaining Young's equilibrium contact angle without any surface manipulation. The experimental results presented verify this new approach.

  12. Surface Roughness and Snow Accumulation in East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scambos, T. A.; Vornberger, P. L.; Bohlander, J. A.; Das, I.; Klinger, M.; Pope, A.; Lenaerts, J.; Fahnestock, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    A complex relationship exists between snow accumulation (e.g., net surface mass balance) and meter-scale surface roughness as represented by sastrugi and erosional structures over the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS). The morphology of the ice sheet at this scale is a result of a complex interaction between katabatic winds, synoptic storms, and the slope of the surface, all driving local patterns of snow accretion and sublimation. In megadune regions, the accumulation, surface slope, and surface roughness are highly correlated with slope. Smooth glazed surfaces are present on the steeper leeward wind-faces, and much rougher snow-accreting megadunes are present on the windward (depositional) slope. However, the highest elevation areas near the ridge crest of the EAIS (above ~3200 m) have a converse relationship between roughness and accumulation. Here, very low wind ridge crest areas are smooth and have higher accumulation than adjacent, slightly steeper regions that exhibit a slight increase in roughness. Below the main regions of megadunes (<~2000 m) wind glaze areas gradually become rougher as wind scouring and erosion dominate locally steeper regions. In coastal areas (<~1000), roughness is highly variable, and is tied to frequent synoptic storm deposition. We compare roughness data derived from MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) and Landsat 8 acquisitions with available wind and accumulation data from climate model results and field measurements. Roughness is determined by sunlight scattering relative to viewing geometry (MISR) or from the amplitude of textural characteristics tied to surface sastrugi (Landsat 8). Both are validated by comparison with meter-scale images (WorldView-1) and field observations. MISR roughness mapping shows persistent qualitative patterns of surface roughness across the EAIS, but an absolute roughness scale mapping is difficult to generate because of complex viewing, illumination, and bi-directional reflectance variations

  13. TLS - a tool for channel bed surface roughness determination?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baewert, Henning; Morche, David

    2013-04-01

    Channel bed surface roughness has a significant influence on flow characteristics of a stream. Since decades roughness coefficient determination is an integral part of fluvial geomorphological research. The methods used to directly measure channel bed roughness often require an exact knowledge of grain size distributions of a given stream reach. In some cases this method is impractical, especially for large catchments and systems involving a large degree of form roughness. In this context, the determination of bed surface roughness using Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) provides new possibilities. The application of laser scanning has been increasingly used recently for channel morphology research (Heritage & Hetherington 2007, Milan et al. 2007, Hodge et al. 2009). However, the use of TLS data to quantify bed surface roughness leads to new methodological problems. One of these problems is known as the 'Shading Effect'. Because of this, portions of the channel surface situated behind a large obstacle cannot be surveyed. Hence, the first goal of this study is to determine the minimum number of scanning positions to accurately characterize channel bed roughness. For roughness calculation, the investigation area is divided into an orthogonal grid. The question about this is: Which grid cell size should be chosen? In general, the cell size is defined by the largest particle in the test area. This requires sediment sampling and leads to additional field work. To avoid this, this study further assesses the importance of grid cell size on bed roughness calculation. The ultimate goal of this study is to improve the application of TLS for roughness calculation in gravel-bed rivers. For this purpose several channel reaches in two different study sites were surveyed with an ILRIS 36D. One investigation area is situated in the Reintal valley located in the northern limestone Alps (Wettersteingebirge) Bavaria/Germany. The other one is situated in the proglacial area of the

  14. When the going gets rough – studying the effect of surface roughness on the adhesive abilities of tree frogs

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Niall; Endlein, Thomas; Pham, Jonathan T; Riehle, Mathis

    2016-01-01

    Tree frogs need to adhere to surfaces of various roughnesses in their natural habitats; these include bark, leaves and rocks. Rough surfaces can alter the effectiveness of their toe pads, due to factors such as a change of real contact area and abrasion of the pad epithelium. Here, we tested the effect of surface roughness on the attachment abilities of the tree frog Litoria caerulea. This was done by testing shear and adhesive forces on artificial surfaces with controlled roughness, both on single toe pads and whole animal scales. It was shown that frogs can stick 2–3 times better on small scale roughnesses (3–6 µm asperities), producing higher adhesive and frictional forces, but relatively poorly on the larger scale roughnesses tested (58.5–562.5 µm asperities). Our experiments suggested that, on such surfaces, the pads secrete insufficient fluid to fill the space under the pad, leaving air pockets that would significantly reduce the Laplace pressure component of capillarity. Therefore, we measured how well the adhesive toe pad would conform to spherical asperities of known sizes using interference reflection microscopy. Based on experiments where the conformation of the pad to individual asperities was examined microscopically, our calculations indicate that the pad epithelium has a low elastic modulus, making it highly deformable. PMID:28144558

  15. When the going gets rough - studying the effect of surface roughness on the adhesive abilities of tree frogs.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Niall; Endlein, Thomas; Pham, Jonathan T; Riehle, Mathis; Barnes, W Jon P

    2016-01-01

    Tree frogs need to adhere to surfaces of various roughnesses in their natural habitats; these include bark, leaves and rocks. Rough surfaces can alter the effectiveness of their toe pads, due to factors such as a change of real contact area and abrasion of the pad epithelium. Here, we tested the effect of surface roughness on the attachment abilities of the tree frog Litoria caerulea. This was done by testing shear and adhesive forces on artificial surfaces with controlled roughness, both on single toe pads and whole animal scales. It was shown that frogs can stick 2-3 times better on small scale roughnesses (3-6 µm asperities), producing higher adhesive and frictional forces, but relatively poorly on the larger scale roughnesses tested (58.5-562.5 µm asperities). Our experiments suggested that, on such surfaces, the pads secrete insufficient fluid to fill the space under the pad, leaving air pockets that would significantly reduce the Laplace pressure component of capillarity. Therefore, we measured how well the adhesive toe pad would conform to spherical asperities of known sizes using interference reflection microscopy. Based on experiments where the conformation of the pad to individual asperities was examined microscopically, our calculations indicate that the pad epithelium has a low elastic modulus, making it highly deformable.

  16. Statistical model for the abundance of deuterated ammonia in interstellar space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyman, Gunnar

    2016-04-01

    The elemental abundance of deuterium to normal hydrogen in the universe is on the order of 10-5. A random distribution would therefore give a ratio of triply deuterated ammonia, ND3, to NH3 of 10-15. Observations indicate an ND3 to NH3 ratio of roughly 10-3, implying enrichment of triply deuterated ammonia by about twelve orders of magnitude. A simple model, based on the elemental abundances of N, D and H, is developed and solved analytically. At zero temperature the expressions are particularly simple. Effects of finite temperature are included through the partition functions of the isotopologues. It is found that the effect of finite temperature is modest in the temperature range 10-100 K. The results of the model are in good agreement with the observed abundances so local thermal equilibrium may therefore be a reasonable approximation and thus also be an explanation for the apparent enrichment of deuterated isotopologues.

  17. Effect of surface roughness on characteristics of spherical shock waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Paul W; Mcfarland, Donald R

    1955-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted on a small-scale test layout in which direct observation of the shock wave movement with time could be made in order to determine the effects of surface roughness on the characteristics of spherical shock waves. Data were obtained with 15-gram pentolite charges at four heights of burst, both for a smooth surface and for a surface completely covered with pyramid-shaped roughness elements. The observations resulted in determinations of shock peak overpressure and Mach stem height as a function of distance for each test. Comparison of the smooth-surface data with those obtained for the extremely rough condition showed a small net effort of roughness on the shock peak overpressures at the surface for all burst heights, the effect being to lower the overpressures. The effect of surface roughness on the Mach stem formation and growth was to delay the formation at the greatest charge height and to lower the height of the Mach stem for all heights.Comparison of the free-air shock peak overpressures with larger scale data showed good similarity of the overpressure-distance relationships. The data did not fit a geometrical similarity parameter for the path of the triple point at different heights of burst suggested by other investigators. A simple similarity parameter (relating the horizontal distance to the theoretical point of Mach formation) was found which showed only a small influence of burst height on the path of the triple point. While the data presented provide knowledge of the effect of many surface-roughness elements on the overall shock characteristics, the data do not provide insight into the details of the air-flow characteristics along the surface, nor the relative contribution of individual roughness elements to the results obtained.

  18. Effects of plaque lengths on stent surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Syaifudin, Achmad; Takeda, Ryo; Sasaki, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of the stent surface influence the effectiveness of vascular disease treatment after stent deployment. During the expanding process, the stent acquires high-level deformation that could alter either its microstructure or the magnitude of surface roughness. This paper constructed a finite element simulation to observe the changes in surface roughness during the stenting process. Structural transient dynamic analysis was performed using ANSYS, to identify the deformation after the stent is placed in a blood vessel. Two types of bare metal stents are studied: a Palmaz type and a Sinusoidal type. The relationship between plaque length and the changes in surface roughness was investigated by utilizing three different length of plaque; plaque length longer than the stent, shorter than the stent and the same length as the stent. In order to reduce computational time, 3D cyclical and translational symmetry was implemented into the FE model. The material models used was defined as a multilinear isotropic for stent and hyperelastic for the balloon, plaque and vessel wall. The correlation between the plastic deformation and the changes in surface roughness was obtained by intermittent pure tensile test using specimen whose chemical composition was similar to that of actual stent material. As the plastic strain is achieved from FE simulation, the surface roughness can be assessed thoroughly. The study found that the plaque size relative to stent length significantly influenced the critical changes in surface roughness. It was found that the length of stent which is equal to the plaque length was preferable due to the fact that it generated only moderate change in surface roughness. This effect was less influential to the Sinusoidal stent.

  19. Measurement and modeling of rough surface effects on terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, S. C.; Schecklman, S.; Kniffin, G. P.; Zurk, L. M.; Chen, A.

    2010-02-01

    Recent improvements in sensing technology have driven new research areas within the terahertz (THz) portion of the electromagnetic (EM) spectrum. While there are several promising THz applications, several outstanding technical challenges need to be addressed before robust systems can be deployed. A particularly compelling application is the potential use of THz reflection spectroscopy for stand-off detection of drugs and explosives. A primary challenge for this application is to have sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to allow spectroscopic identification of the target material, and surface roughness can have an impact on identification. However, scattering from a rough surface may be observed at all angles, suggesting diffuse returns can be used in robust imaging of non-cooperative targets. Furthermore, the scattering physics can also distort the reflection spectra, complicating classification algorithms. In this work, rough surface scattering effects were first isolated by measuring diffuse scattering for gold-coated sandpaper of varying roughness. Secondly, we measured scattering returns from a rough sample with a spectral signature, namely α-lactose monohydrate mixed with Teflon and pressed with sandpaper to introduce controlled roughness. For both the specular and diffuse reflection measurements, the application of traditional spectroscopy techniques provided the ability to resolve the 0.54 THz absorption peak. These results are compared with results from a smooth surface. Implications of the results on the ability to detect explosives with THz reflection spectroscopy are presented and discussed. In addition, the Small Perturbation Method (SPM) is employed to predict backscatter from lactose with a small amount of roughness.

  20. Thermodynamic modeling of contact angles on rough, heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Long, J; Hyder, M N; Huang, R Y M; Chen, P

    2005-12-30

    Theoretical modelling for contact angle hysteresis carried out to date has been mostly limited to several idealized surface configurations, either rough or heterogeneous surfaces. This paper presents a preliminary study on the thermodynamics of contact angles on rough and heterogeneous surfaces by employing the principle of minimum free energy and the concept of liquid front. Based on a two-dimensional regular model surface, a set of relations were obtained, which correlate advancing, receding and system equilibrium contact angles to surface topography, roughness and heterogeneity. It was found that system equilibrium contact angles (theta(ES)) can be expressed as a function of surface roughness factor (delta) and the Cassie contact angle (theta(C)): costheta(ES) = deltacostheta(C). This expression can be reduced to the classical Wenzel equation.: theta(ES) = theta(W) for rough but homogeneous surfaces, and the classical Cassie equation theta(ES) = theta(C) for heterogeneous but smooth surfaces. A non-dimensional parameter called surface feature factor (omega) was proposed to classify surfaces into three categories (types): roughness-dominated, heterogeneity-dominated and mixed-rough-heterogeneous. The prediction of advancing and receding contact angles of a surface is dependent on which category the surface belongs to. The thermodynamic analysis of contact angle hysteresis was further extended from the regular model surface to irregular surfaces; consistent results were obtained. The current model not only agrees well with the models previously studied by other researchers for idealized surfaces, but also explores more possibilities to explain the reported experimental results/observations that most existing theories could not explain.

  1. Intelligent System Development Using a Rough Sets Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Gray T.; Shelton, Robert O.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the potential of the rough sets technique for developing intelligent models of complex systems from limited information. Rough sets a simple but promising technology to extract easily understood rules from data. The rough set methodology has been shown to perform well when used with a large set of exemplars, but its performance with sparse data sets is less certain. The difficulty is that rules will be developed based on just a few examples, each of which might have a large amount of noise associated with them. The question then becomes, what is the probability of a useful rule being developed from such limited information? One nice feature of rough sets is that in unusual situations, the technique can give an answer of 'I don't know'. That is, if a case arises that is different from the cases the rough set rules were developed on, the methodology can recognize this and alert human operators of it. It can also be trained to do this when the desired action is unknown because conflicting examples apply to the same set of inputs. This summer's project was to look at combining rough set theory with statistical theory to develop confidence limits in rules developed by rough sets. Often it is important not to make a certain type of mistake (e.g., false positives or false negatives), so the rules must be biased toward preventing a catastrophic error, rather than giving the most likely course of action. A method to determine the best course of action in the light of such constraints was examined. The resulting technique was tested with files containing electrical power line 'signatures' from the space shuttle and with decompression sickness data.

  2. Lunar terrain mapping and relative-roughness analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rowan, Lawrence C.; McCauley, John F.; Holm, Esther A.

    1971-01-01

    Terrain maps of the equatorial zone (long 70° E.-70° W. and lat 10° N-10° S.) were prepared at scales of 1:2,000,000 and 1:1,000,000 to classify lunar terrain with respect to roughness and to provide a basis for selecting sites for Surveyor and Apollo landings as well as for Ranger and Lunar Orbiter photographs. The techniques that were developed as a result of this effort can be applied to future planetary exploration. By using the best available earth-based observational data and photographs 1:1,000,000-scale and U.S. Geological Survey lunar geologic maps and U.S. Air Force Aeronautical Chart and Information Center LAC charts, lunar terrain was described by qualitative and quantitative methods and divided into four fundamental classes: maria, terrae, craters, and linear features. Some 35 subdivisions were defined and mapped throughout the equatorial zone, and, in addition, most of the map units were illustrated by photographs. The terrain types were analyzed quantitatively to characterize and order their relative-roughness characteristics. Approximately 150,000 east-west slope measurements made by a photometric technique (photoclinometry) in 51 sample areas indicate that algebraic slope-frequency distributions are Gaussian, and so arithmetic means and standard deviations accurately describe the distribution functions. The algebraic slope-component frequency distributions are particularly useful for rapidly determining relative roughness of terrain. The statistical parameters that best describe relative roughness are the absolute arithmetic mean, the algebraic standard deviation, and the percentage of slope reversal. Statistically derived relative-relief parameters are desirable supplementary measures of relative roughness in the terrae. Extrapolation of relative roughness for the maria was demonstrated using Ranger VII slope-component data and regional maria slope data, as well as the data reported here. It appears that, for some morphologically homogeneous

  3. Ecogenomics and potential biogeochemical impacts of globally abundant ocean viruses.

    PubMed

    Roux, Simon; Brum, Jennifer R; Dutilh, Bas E; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Duhaime, Melissa B; Loy, Alexander; Poulos, Bonnie T; Solonenko, Natalie; Lara, Elena; Poulain, Julie; Pesant, Stéphane; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Cruaud, Corinne; Alberti, Adriana; Duarte, Carlos M; Gasol, Josep M; Vaqué, Dolors; Bork, Peer; Acinas, Silvia G; Wincker, Patrick; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2016-09-29

    Ocean microbes drive biogeochemical cycling on a global scale. However, this cycling is constrained by viruses that affect community composition, metabolic activity, and evolutionary trajectories. Owing to challenges with the sampling and cultivation of viruses, genome-level viral diversity remains poorly described and grossly understudied, with less than 1% of observed surface-ocean viruses known. Here we assemble complete genomes and large genomic fragments from both surface- and deep-ocean viruses sampled during the Tara Oceans and Malaspina research expeditions, and analyse the resulting 'global ocean virome' dataset to present a global map of abundant, double-stranded DNA viruses complete with genomic and ecological contexts. A total of 15,222 epipelagic and mesopelagic viral populations were identified, comprising 867 viral clusters (defined as approximately genus-level groups). This roughly triples the number of known ocean viral populations and doubles the number of candidate bacterial and archaeal virus genera, providing a near-complete sampling of epipelagic communities at both the population and viral-cluster level. We found that 38 of the 867 viral clusters were locally or globally abundant, together accounting for nearly half of the viral populations in any global ocean virome sample. While two-thirds of these clusters represent newly described viruses lacking any cultivated representative, most could be computationally linked to dominant, ecologically relevant microbial hosts. Moreover, we identified 243 viral-encoded auxiliary metabolic genes, of which only 95 were previously known. Deeper analyses of four of these auxiliary metabolic genes (dsrC, soxYZ, P-II (also known as glnB) and amoC) revealed that abundant viruses may directly manipulate sulfur and nitrogen cycling throughout the epipelagic ocean. This viral catalog and functional analyses provide a necessary foundation for the meaningful integration of viruses into ecosystem models where they

  4. Ecogenomics and potential biogeochemical impacts of globally abundant ocean viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-09-01

    Ocean microbes drive biogeochemical cycling on a global scale. However, this cycling is constrained by viruses that affect community composition, metabolic activity, and evolutionary trajectories. Owing to challenges with the sampling and cultivation of viruses, genome-level viral diversity remains poorly described and grossly understudied, with less than 1% of observed surface-ocean viruses known. Here we assemble complete genomes and large genomic fragments from both surface- and deep-ocean viruses sampled during the Tara Oceans and Malaspina research expeditions, and analyse the resulting ‘global ocean virome’ dataset to present a global map of abundant, double-stranded DNA viruses complete with genomic and ecological contexts. A total of 15,222 epipelagic and mesopelagic viral populations were identified, comprising 867 viral clusters (defined as approximately genus-level groups). This roughly triples the number of known ocean viral populations and doubles the number of candidate bacterial and archaeal virus genera, providing a near-complete sampling of epipelagic communities at both the population and viral-cluster level. We found that 38 of the 867 viral clusters were locally or globally abundant, together accounting for nearly half of the viral populations in any global ocean virome sample. While two-thirds of these clusters represent newly described viruses lacking any cultivated representative, most could be computationally linked to dominant, ecologically relevant microbial hosts. Moreover, we identified 243 viral-encoded auxiliary metabolic genes, of which only 95 were previously known. Deeper analyses of four of these auxiliary metabolic genes (dsrC, soxYZ, P-II (also known as glnB) and amoC) revealed that abundant viruses may directly manipulate sulfur and nitrogen cycling throughout the epipelagic ocean. This viral catalog and functional analyses provide a necessary foundation for the meaningful integration of viruses into ecosystem models where

  5. Prediction of protein interaction hot spots using rough set-based multiple criteria linear programming.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ruoying; Zhang, Zhiwang; Wu, Di; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Xinyang; Wang, Yong; Shi, Yong

    2011-01-21

    Protein-protein interactions are fundamentally important in many biological processes and it is in pressing need to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. Mutagenesis studies have found that only a small fraction of surface residues, known as hot spots, are responsible for the physical binding in protein complexes. However, revealing hot spots by mutagenesis experiments are usually time consuming and expensive. In order to complement the experimental efforts, we propose a new computational approach in this paper to predict hot spots. Our method, Rough Set-based Multiple Criteria Linear Programming (RS-MCLP), integrates rough sets theory and multiple criteria linear programming to choose dominant features and computationally predict hot spots. Our approach is benchmarked by a dataset of 904 alanine-mutated residues and the results show that our RS-MCLP method performs better than other methods, e.g., MCLP, Decision Tree, Bayes Net, and the existing HotSprint database. In addition, we reveal several biological insights based on our analysis. We find that four features (the change of accessible surface area, percentage of the change of accessible surface area, size of a residue, and atomic contacts) are critical in predicting hot spots. Furthermore, we find that three residues (Tyr, Trp, and Phe) are abundant in hot spots through analyzing the distribution of amino acids.

  6. Development of channel organization and roughness following sediment pulses in single-thread, gravel bed rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madej, Mary Ann

    2001-01-01

    Large, episodic inputs of coarse sediment (sediment pulses) in forested, mountain streams may result in changes in the size and arrangement of bed forms and in channel roughness. A conceptual model of channel organization delineates trajectories of response to sediment pulses for many types of gravel bed channels. Channels exhibited self-organizing behavior to various degrees based on channel gradient, presence of large in-channel wood or other forcing elements, the size of the sediment pulse, and the number of bed-mobilizing flows since disturbance. Typical channel changes following a sediment pulse were initial decreases in water depth, in variability of bed elevations, and in the regularity of bed form spacing. Trajectories of change subsequently showed increased average water depth, more variable and complex bed topography, and increased uniformity of bed form spacing. Bed form spacing in streams with abundant forcing elements developed at a shorter spatial scale (two to five channel widths) than in streams without such forcing mechanisms (five to 10 channel widths). Channel roughness increased as bed forms developed.

  7. The Rough-Toothed Dolphin, Steno bredanensis, in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea: A Relict Population?

    PubMed

    Kerem, D; Goffman, O; Elasar, M; Hadar, N; Scheinin, A; Lewis, T

    Only recently included among the cetacean species thought to regularly occur in the Mediterranean, the rough-toothed dolphin (Steno bredanensis) is an obscure and enigmatic member of this ensemble. Preliminary genetic evidence strongly indicates an Atlantic origin, yet the Mediterranean distribution for this species is conspicuously detached from the Atlantic, with all authenticated records during the last three decades being east of the Sicilian Channel and most within the bounds of the Levantine Basin. These dolphins are apparently a small, relict population, probably the remnant of a larger one, contiguous with that in the Atlantic and nowadays entrapped in the easternmost and warmest province. Abundance data are lacking for the species in the Mediterranean. Configuring acoustic detection software to recognise the apparently idiosyncratic vocalisations of rough-toothed dolphins in past and future acoustic recordings may prove useful for potential acoustic monitoring. Evidence accumulated so far, though scant, points to seasonal occupation of shallow coastal waters. Vulnerability to entanglement in gill-nets, contaminants in the region, and the occurrence of mass strandings (possibly in response to anthropogenic noise), are major conservation concerns for the population in the Mediterranean Sea.

  8. Site-specific retention of colloids at rough rock surfaces.

    PubMed

    Darbha, Gopala Krishna; Fischer, Cornelius; Luetzenkirchen, Johannes; Schäfer, Thorsten

    2012-09-04

    The spatial deposition of polystyrene latex colloids (d = 1 μm) at rough mineral and rock surfaces was investigated quantitatively as a function of Eu(III) concentration. Granodiorite samples from Grimsel test site (GTS), Switzerland, were used as collector surfaces for sorption experiments. At a scan area of 300 × 300 μm(2), the surface roughness (rms roughness, Rq) range was 100-2000 nm, including roughness contribution from asperities of several tens of nanometers in height to the sample topography. Although, an increase in both roughness and [Eu(III)] resulted in enhanced colloid deposition on granodiorite surfaces, surface roughness governs colloid deposition mainly at low Eu(III) concentrations (≤5 × 10(-7) M). Highest deposition efficiency on granodiorite has been found at walls of intergranular pores at surface sections with roughness Rq = 500-2000 nm. An about 2 orders of magnitude lower colloid deposition has been observed at granodiorite sections with low surface roughness (Rq < 500 nm), such as large and smooth feldspar or quartz crystal surface sections as well as intragranular pores. The site-specific deposition of colloids at intergranular pores is induced by small scale protrusions (mean height = 0.5 ± 0.3 μm). These protrusions diminish locally the overall DLVO interaction energy at the interface. The protrusions prevent further rolling over the surface by increasing the hydrodynamic drag required for detachment. Moreover, colloid sorption is favored at surface sections with high density of small protrusions (density (D) = 2.6 ± 0.55 μm(-1), asperity diameter (φ) = 0.6 ± 0.2 μm, height (h) = 0.4 ± 0.1 μm) in contrast to surface sections with larger asperities and lower asperity density (D = 1.2 ± 0.6 μm(-1), φ = 1.4 ± 0.4 μm, h = 0.6 ± 0.2 μm). The study elucidates the importance to include surface roughness parameters into predictive colloid-borne contaminant migration calculations.

  9. Effects of Nanoscale Surface Roughness on Colloid Detachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmuson, J. A.; Johnson, W. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in colloid transport science have demonstrated the importance of surface roughness on colloid attachment; however, few studies have investigated the influence of nano-scale roughness on colloid detachment. This study explores the effects of flow perturbations on a variety of mineral surfaces, as well as NaOH treated (i.e. rough, Figure 1a) and untreated (i.e. smooth, Figure 1b) surfaces for colloids of various sizes attached in an impinging jet system under flowing and stagnant conditions. These experiments showed minimal detachment from the roughened surfaces (treated glass) and significant detachment from the smooth surfaces (untreated glass and mica). A correlation between residence time and attachment irreversibility was also revealed, indicating that the particles that spent the longest time attached to the surface developed the strongest adhesion. The representative surface-heterogeneity model developed by Pazmino et al. (2014) was used to conduct detachment simulations under similar geochemical and flow conditions. While simulated results show qualitative agreement with experimental results, they tend to over-predict detachment, highlighting differences among simulated versus real surfaces, which may be related to surface roughness. These results suggest that more sophisticated models that incorporate surface roughness and time-based adhesion are needed to accurately predict colloid detachment in environmental systems.

  10. Controlling cellular activity by manipulating silicone surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Babu R; Brook, Michael A; Smith, Terry; Zhao, Shigui; Chen, Yang; Sheardown, Heather; D'souza, Renita; Rochev, Yuri

    2010-07-01

    Silicone elastomers exhibit a broad range of beneficial properties that are exploited in biomaterials. In some cases, however, problems can arise at silicone elastomer interfaces. With breast implants, for example, the fibrous capsule that forms at the silicone interface can undergo contracture, which can lead to the need for revision surgery. The relationship between surface topography and wound healing--which could impact on the degree of contracture--has not been examined in detail. To address this, we prepared silicone elastomer samples with rms surface roughnesses varying from 88 to 650 nm and examined the growth of 3T3 fibroblasts on these surfaces. The PicoGreen assay demonstrated that fibroblast growth decreased with increases in surface roughness. Relatively smooth (approximately 88 nm) PDMS samples had ca. twice as much fibroblast DNA per unit area than the 'bumpy' (approximately 378 nm) and very rough (approximately 604 and approximately 650 nm) PDMS samples. While the PDMS sample with roughness of approximately 650 nm had significantly fewer fibroblasts at 24h than the TCP control, fibroblasts on the smooth silicone surprisingly reached confluence much more rapidly than on TCP, the gold standard for cell culture. Thus, increasing the surface roughness at the sub-micron scale could be a strategy worthy of consideration to help mitigate fibroblast growth and control fibrous capsule formation on silicone elastomer implants.

  11. Electromagnetic scattering and depolarization across rough surfaces: Full wave analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, Ezekiel; Huang, Guorong; Lee, Bom Son

    1995-05-01

    Full wave solutions are derived for vertically and horizontally polarized waves diffusely scattered across an interface that is two-dimensionally rough separating two different propagating media. Since the normal to the rough surface is not restricted to the reference plane of incidence, the waves are depolarized upon scattering; and the single scattered radiation fields are expressed as integrals of a surface element transmission scattering matrix that also accounts for coupling between the vertically and horizontally polarized waves. The integrations are over the rough surface area as well as the complete two-dimensional wave spectra of the radiation fields. The full wave solutions satisfy the duality and reciprocity relationships in electromagnetic theory, and the surface element scattering matrix is invariant to coordinate transformations. It is shown that in the high-frequency limit the full wave solutions reduce to the physical optics solutions, while in the low-frequency limit (for small mean square heights and slopes) the full wave solutions reduce to Rice's (1951) small perturbation solutions. Thus, the full wave solution accounts for specular point scattering as well as diffuse, Bragg-type scattering in a unified, self-consistent manner. It is therefore not necessary to use hybrid, perturbation and physical optics approaches (based on two-scale models of composite surfaces with large and small roughness scales) to determine the like- and cross-polarized fields scattered across the rough surface.

  12. Surface roughness monitoring by singular spectrum analysis of vibration signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García Plaza, E.; Núñez López, P. J.

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed two methods for enhanced surface roughness (Ra) monitoring based on the application of singular spectrum analysis (SSA) to vibrations signals generated in workpiece-cutting tool interaction in CNC finish turning operations i.e., the individual analysis of principal components (I-SSA), and the grouping analysis of correlated principal components (G-SSA). Singular spectrum analysis is a non-parametric technique of time series analysis that decomposes a signal into a set of independent additive time series referred to as principal components. A number of experiments with different cutting conditions were performed to assess surface roughness monitoring using both of these methods. The results show that singular spectrum analysis of vibration signal processing discriminated the frequency ranges effective for predicting surface roughness. Grouping analysis of correlated principal components (G-SSA) proved to be the most efficient method for monitoring surface roughness, with optimum prediction and reliability results at a lower analytical-computational cost. Finally, the results show that singular spectrum analysis is an ideal method for analyzing vibration signals applied to the on-line monitoring of surface roughness.

  13. Internal interfaces over a step change in wall roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hearst, R. Jason; Hanson, Ronald E.; Ganapathisubramani, Bharathram

    2016-11-01

    When flow encounters a step change in wall roughness, an internal boundary layer is formed near the wall. This internal layer grows with streamwise position and eventually dominates the entire boundary layer, returning it to equilibrium with the new boundary condition. It is well established that a canonical turbulent boundary layer is populated by patches of high and low velocity, referred to as uniform momentum zones (UMZs). The UMZs are separated by shear events. In this study, the characteristics of UMZs are examined as the flow transitions from one wall condition to another. Planar particle image velocimetry measurements were performed over both a rough-to-smooth (R ->S) and a smooth-to-rough (S ->R) step change in wall roughness. For the flow over a R ->S change, the maximum wall normal position of the high momentum UMZs that populate the outer region of the boundary layer moves outward towards the free-stream, while the low momentum UMZs that are situated near the wall move closer to the wall. The talk will discuss the implication of these results as well as the results for the flow over a S ->R step change in wall roughness. ERC (Grant No. 277472), EPSRC (Grant No. EP/I037717/1), NSERC (post-doctoral fellowships).

  14. Simulation Study of the Flow Boundary Condition for Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Gang; Robbins, Mark O.

    2001-03-01

    In order to solve a flow problem with the continuum Navier-Stokes equation, a boundary condition must be assumed. In most cases, a no-slip condition is used, i.e. the velocity of the fluid is set equal to that of a bounding solid at their interface. Deviations from this condition can be quantified by a slip length S that represents the additional width of fluid that would be needed to accomodate any velocity difference at the interface. Previous simulations with atomically flat surfaces show that S can be very large in certain limits. (P. A. Thompson and M. O. Robbins, Phys. Rev. A, 41), 6830(1990). ( J.-L. Barrat and L. Bocquet, Phys. Rev. Lett., 82), 4671(1999). A dramatic divergence with S as shear rate increases has also been seen.( P. A. Thompson and S. M. Troian, Nature, 389), 360(1997) We have extended these simulations to surfaces with random roughness, steps, and angled facets typical of twin boundaries. In all cases, S decreases rapidly as the roughness increases. When peak-to-peak roughness is only two atomic diameters, values of S have dropped from more than 20 diameters to only one or two. In addition, the non-linear regime where S diverges with shear rate is supressed by surface roughness. These results suggest that the experimental behavior of atomically flat surfaces such as mica may be very different than that of more typical rough surfaces.

  15. Time Series Vegetation Aerodynamic Roughness Fields Estimated from MODIS Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borak, Jordan S.; Jasinski, Michael F.; Crago, Richard D.

    2005-01-01

    Most land surface models used today require estimates of aerodynamic roughness length in order to characterize momentum transfer between the surface and atmosphere. The most common method of prescribing roughness is through the use of empirical look-up tables based solely on land cover class. Theoretical approaches that employ satellite-based estimates of canopy density present an attractive alternative to current look-up table approaches based on vegetation cover type that do not account for within-class variability and are oftentimes simplistic with respect to temporal variability. The current research applies Raupach s formulation of momentum aerodynamic roughness to MODIS data on a regional scale in order to estimate seasonally variable roughness and zero-plane displacement height fields using bulk land cover parameters estimated by [Jasinski, M.F., Borak, J., Crago, R., 2005. Bulk surface momentum parameters for satellite-derived vegetation fields. Agric. For. Meteorol. 133, 55-68]. Results indicate promising advances over look-up approaches with respect to characterization of vegetation roughness variability in land surface and atmospheric circulation models.

  16. Simple model of surface roughness for binary collision sputtering simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Sloan J.; Hobler, Gerhard; Maciążek, Dawid; Postawa, Zbigniew

    2017-02-01

    It has been shown that surface roughness can strongly influence the sputtering yield - especially at glancing incidence angles where the inclusion of surface roughness leads to an increase in sputtering yields. In this work, we propose a simple one-parameter model (the "density gradient model") which imitates surface roughness effects. In the model, the target's atomic density is assumed to vary linearly between the actual material density and zero. The layer width is the sole model parameter. The model has been implemented in the binary collision simulator IMSIL and has been evaluated against various geometric surface models for 5 keV Ga ions impinging an amorphous Si target. To aid the construction of a realistic rough surface topography, we have performed MD simulations of sequential 5 keV Ga impacts on an initially crystalline Si target. We show that our new model effectively reproduces the sputtering yield, with only minor variations in the energy and angular distributions of sputtered particles. The success of the density gradient model is attributed to a reduction of the reflection coefficient - leading to increased sputtering yields, similar in effect to surface roughness.

  17. Scaling law governing the roughness of the swash edge line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashenko, E.; Musin, A.; Grynyov, R.

    2014-09-01

    The paper is devoted to the analysis of the shape of the swash edge line. Formation of the swash boundary is treated as an interfacial phenomenon. The simplest quantitative characteristic of the roughness of interface is its width w, defined as the root-mean-square fluctuation around the average position. For rough interfaces, the scaling with size of the system L is observed in the form w(L)~Lζ. The concept of scaling supplies a simple framework for classifying interfaces. It is suggested that the fine structure of the swash boundary results from the combined action of the pinning force applied by random defects of the beach and elasticity of distorted swash boundary. The roughness of the swash front was studied at the Mediterranean Sea coast for uprush and backwash flows. Value of exponent ζ for receding swash front line was 0.64 +/- 0.02, when in the case of advancing swash the value 0.73 +/- 0.03 was calculated. The scaling exponent established for the receding phase of the swash is very close to the values of the exponent established for the roughness of the triple line for water droplets deposited on rough surfaces, crack propagation front in Plexiglas, and for the motion of a magnetic domain walls.

  18. Interaction of fast charges with a rough metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Keenan; Zhang, Ying-Ying; Mišković, Z. L.; Song, Yuan-Hong; Wang, You-Nian

    2015-09-01

    We use the Green function formulation of a dielectric response formalism to study the dynamic polarization of a rough metal surface by a single charged particle and by a pair of charged particles that move parallel to the surface. While the surface roughness is treated nonperturbatively, the plasmon excitation of the metal electron gas is described locally. We find that the magnitudes of both the image potential and the stopping power of a single particle are increased by the increasing roughness and decreasing correlation length of the surface. On the other hand, both the long-range wake potential of a single charged particle and the interaction potential between two particles are weakly affected by the surface roughness. However, the strongest effects of the surface roughness are seen in the correlated stopping power of two charged particles, giving rise to oscillations in the dependence of the stopping ratio on their distance, both when the interparticle axis is perpendicular to their direction of motion and when the wake-related oscillations are damped by adiabatic suppression of plasmon excitations at low particle speeds.

  19. Progress Towards an LES Wall Model Including Unresolved Roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craft, Kyle; Redman, Andrew; Aikens, Kurt

    2015-11-01

    Wall models used in large eddy simulations (LES) are often based on theories for hydraulically smooth walls. While this is reasonable for many applications, there are also many where the impact of surface roughness is important. A previously developed wall model has been used primarily for jet engine aeroacoustics. However, jet simulations have not accurately captured thick initial shear layers found in some experimental data. This may partly be due to nozzle wall roughness used in the experiments to promote turbulent boundary layers. As a result, the wall model is extended to include the effects of unresolved wall roughness through appropriate alterations to the log-law. The methodology is tested for incompressible flat plate boundary layers with different surface roughness. Correct trends are noted for the impact of surface roughness on the velocity profile. However, velocity deficit profiles and the Reynolds stresses do not collapse as well as expected. Possible reasons for the discrepancies as well as future work will be presented. This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation grant number ACI-1053575. Computational resources on TACC Stampede were provided under XSEDE allocation ENG150001.

  20. The Effect of Surface Irregularities on Wing Drag. 3; Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, Manley J.

    1938-01-01

    Tests have been made in the N.A.C.A. 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel of the drag caused by roughness on the surface of an airfoil of N.A.C.A. 23012 section and 5-foot chord. The tests were made at speeds from 80 t o 500 miles per hour at lift coefficients from 0 to 0.30. For conditions corresponding to high-speed flight, the increase in the drag was 30 percent of the profile drag of the smooth airfoil for the roughness produced by spray painting and 63 percent for the roughness produced. by 0.0037-inch carborundum grains. About one-half the drag increase was caused by the roughness on the forward one-fourth of the airfoil. Sandpapering the painted surface with No. 400 sandpaper made it sufficiently smooth that the drag was no greater than when the surface was polished. In the lower part of the range investigated the drag due to roughness increased rapidly with Reynolds Number.