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Sample records for abundant rough endoplasmic

  1. Protein Translocation across the Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Mandon, Elisabet C.; Trueman, Steven F.; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum is a major site of protein biosynthesis in all eukaryotic cells, serving as the entry point for the secretory pathway and as the initial integration site for the majority of cellular integral membrane proteins. The core components of the protein translocation machinery have been identified, and high-resolution structures of the targeting components and the transport channel have been obtained. Research in this area is now focused on obtaining a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of protein translocation and membrane protein integration. PMID:23251026

  2. Terasaki Spiral Ramps in the Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Jemal; Huber, Greg; Valencia, Dulce María

    2014-10-01

    We present a model describing the morphology as well as the assembly of "Terasaki ramps," the recently discovered helicoidal connections linking adjacent sheets of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The fundamental unit is a localized symmetric double-ramped "parking garage" formed by two separated gently pitched, approximately helicoidal, ramps of opposite chiralities. This geometry is stabilized by a short-range repulsive interaction between ramps associated with bending energy which opposes the long-range attraction associated with tension. The ramp inner boundaries are themselves stabilized by the condensation of membrane-shaping proteins along their length. A mechanism for parking garage self-assembly is proposed involving the nucleation of dipoles at the center of tubular three-way junctions within the smooth ER. Our predictions are compared with the experimental data.

  3. Terasaki spiral ramps in the rough endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Guven, Jemal; Huber, Greg; Valencia, Dulce María

    2014-10-31

    We present a model describing the morphology as well as the assembly of "Terasaki ramps," the recently discovered helicoidal connections linking adjacent sheets of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The fundamental unit is a localized symmetric double-ramped "parking garage" formed by two separated gently pitched, approximately helicoidal, ramps of opposite chiralities. This geometry is stabilized by a short-range repulsive interaction between ramps associated with bending energy which opposes the long-range attraction associated with tension. The ramp inner boundaries are themselves stabilized by the condensation of membrane-shaping proteins along their length. A mechanism for parking garage self-assembly is proposed involving the nucleation of dipoles at the center of tubular three-way junctions within the smooth ER. Our predictions are compared with the experimental data.

  4. Effect of praseodymium on drug metabolism in rat liver smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Arvela, P; von Lehmann, B; Grajewski, O; Oberdisse, E

    1980-07-15

    A small i.v. dose (3 mg/kg) of a light lanthanon, praseodymium, impairs the drug metabolizing capacity of both the smooth and rough fractions of rat liver endoplasmic reticulum. This decrease in the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes and in the amount of cytochromes P-450 and b5 is more pronounced in the rough endoplasmic reticulum fraction.

  5. Changes in ribbon synapses and rough endoplasmic reticulum of rat utricular macular hair cells in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    This study combined ultrastructural and statistical methods to learn the effects of weightlessness on rat utricular maculae. A principle aim was to determine whether weightlessness chiefly affects ribbon synapses of type II cells, since the cells communicate predominantly with branches of primary vestibular afferent endings. Maculae were microdissected from flight and ground control rat inner ears collected on day 13 of a 14-day spaceflight (F13), landing day (R0) and day 14 postflight (R14) and were prepared for ultrastructural study. Ribbon synapses were counted in hair cells examined in a Zeiss 902 transmission electron microscope. Significance of synaptic mean differences was determined for all hair cells contained within 100 section series, and for a subset of complete hair cells, using SuperANOVA software. The synaptic mean for all type II hair cells of F13 flight rats increased by 100%, and that for complete cells by 200%. Type I cells were less affected, with synaptic mean differences statistically insignificant in complete cells. Synapse deletion began within 8 h upon return to Earth. Additionally, hair cell laminated rough endoplasmic reticulum of flight rats was reversibly disorganized on R0. Results support the thesis that synapses in type II hair cells are uniquely affected by altered gravity. Type II hair cells may be chiefly sensors of gravitational and type I cells of translational linear accelerations.

  6. Quantitative organellar proteomics analysis of rough endoplasmic reticulum from normal and acute pancreatitis rat pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuequn; Sans, Maria Dolors; Strahler, John R.; Karnovsky, Alla; Ernst, Stephen A.; Michailidis, George; Andrews, Philip C.; Williams, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) is a central organelle for synthesizing and processing digestive enzymes and alteration of ER functions may participate in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP). To comprehensively characterize the normal and diseased RER subproteome, this study quantitatively compared the protein compositions of pancreatic RER between normal and AP animals using isobaric tags (iTRAQ) and 2D LC-MALDI-MS/MS. A total of 469 unique proteins were revealed from four independent experiments using two different AP models. These proteins belong to a large number of functional categories including ribosomal proteins, translocon subunits, chaperones, secretory proteins, and glyco- and lipid-processing enzymes. 37 RER proteins (25 unique in arginine-induced, 6 unique in caerulein-induced and 6 common in both models of AP) showed significant changes during AP including translational regulators and digestive enzymes whereas only mild changes were found in some ER chaperones. The six proteins common to both AP models including a decrease in pancreatic triacylglycerol lipase precursor, Erp27, and prolyl 4-hydroxylase beta polypeptide as well as a dramatic increase in fibrinogen alpha, beta and gamma chains. These results suggest that the early stages of AP involve changes of multiple RER proteins that may affect the synthesis and processing of digestive enzymes. PMID:19954227

  7. Distinct mechanisms controlling rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum contacts with mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peter T C; Garcin, Pierre O; Fu, Min; Masoudi, Matthew; St-Pierre, Pascal; Panté, Nelly; Nabi, Ivan R

    2015-08-01

    Gp78 (also known as AMFR), an endoplasmic-reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) E3 ubiquitin ligase, localizes to mitochondria-associated ER and targets the mitofusin (Mfn1 and Mfn2) mitochondrial fusion proteins for degradation. Gp78 is also the cell surface receptor for autocrine motility factor (AMF), which prevents Gp78-dependent mitofusin degradation. Gp78 ubiquitin ligase activity promotes ER-mitochondria association and ER-mitochondria Ca(2+) coupling, processes that are reversed by AMF. Electron microscopy of HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cancer cells identified both smooth ER (SER; ∼8 nm) and wider (∼50-60 nm) rough ER (RER)-mitochondria contacts. Both short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of Gp78 (shGp78) and AMF treatment selectively reduced the extent of RER-mitochondria contacts without impacting on SER--mitochondria contacts. Concomitant small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of Mfn1 increased SER-mitochondria contacts in both control and shGp78 cells, whereas knockdown of Mfn2 increased RER-mitochondria contacts selectively in shGp78 HT-1080 cells. The mitofusins therefore inhibit ER-mitochondria interaction. Regulation of close SER-mitochondria contacts by Mfn1 and of RER-mitochondria contacts by AMF-sensitive Gp78-mediated degradation of Mfn2 define new mechanisms that regulate ER-mitochondria interactions.

  8. Analysis of a novel double-barreled anion channel from rat liver rough endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Morier, N; Sauvé, R

    1994-01-01

    The presence of anionic channels in stripped rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes isolated from rat hepatocytes was investigated by fusing microsomes from these membranes to a planar lipid bilayer. Several types of anion-selective channels were observed including a voltage-gated Cl- channel, the activity of which appeared in bursts characterized by transitions among three distinct conductance levels of 0 pS (0 level), 160 pS (O1 level), and 320 pS (O2 level), respectively, in 450 mM (cis) 50 mM (trans) KCl conditions. A chi 2 analysis on current records where interburst silent periods were omitted showed that the relative probability of current levels 0 (baseline), O1, and O2 followed a binomial statistic. However, measurements of the conditional probabilities W(level 0 at tau/level O2 at 0) and W(level O2 at tau/level 0 at 0) provided clear evidence of direct transitions between the current levels 0 and O2 without any detectable transitions to the intermediate level O1. It was concluded on the basis of these results that the observed channel was controlled by at least two distinct gating processes, namely 1) a voltage-dependent activation mechanism in which the entire system behaves as two independent monomeric channels of 160 pS with each channel characterized by a simple Open-Closed kinetic, and 2) a slow voltage-dependent process that accounts for both the appearance of silent periods between bursts of channel activity and the transitions between the current levels 0 and O2. Finally, an analysis of the relative probability for the system to be in levels 0, O1, and O2 showed that our results are more compatible with a model in which all the states resulting from the superposition of the two independent monomeric channels have access at different rates to a common inactivated state than with a model where a simple Open-Closed main gate either occludes or exposes simultaneously two independent 160-pS monomers. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 6 PMID:7524709

  9. Progressive Depletion of Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum in Epithelial Cells of the Small Intestine in Monosodium Glutamate Mice Model of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Nakadate, Kazuhiko; Motojima, Kento; Hirakawa, Tomoya; Tanaka-Nakadate, Sawako

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obesity is a known risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about pathological changes in the small intestine associated with chronic obesity. This study investigated cellular and subcellular level changes in the small intestine of obese mice. In this study, a mouse model of obesity was established by early postnatal administration of monosodium glutamate. Changes in body weight were monitored, and pathological changes in the small intestine were evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining and light and electron microscopy. Consequently, obese mice were significantly heavier compared with controls from 9 weeks of age. Villi in the small intestine of obese mice were elongated and thinned. There was reduced hematoxylin staining in the epithelium of the small intestine of obese mice. Electron microscopy revealed a significant decrease in and shortening of rough endoplasmic reticulum in epithelial cells of the small intestine of obese mice compared with normal mice. The decrease in rough endoplasmic reticulum in the small intestine epithelial cells of obese mice indicates that obesity starting in childhood influences various functions of the small intestine, such as protein synthesis, and could impair both the defense mechanism against invasion of pathogenic microbes and nutritional absorption. PMID:27437400

  10. Progressive Depletion of Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum in Epithelial Cells of the Small Intestine in Monosodium Glutamate Mice Model of Obesity.

    PubMed

    Nakadate, Kazuhiko; Motojima, Kento; Hirakawa, Tomoya; Tanaka-Nakadate, Sawako

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obesity is a known risk factor for metabolic syndrome. However, little is known about pathological changes in the small intestine associated with chronic obesity. This study investigated cellular and subcellular level changes in the small intestine of obese mice. In this study, a mouse model of obesity was established by early postnatal administration of monosodium glutamate. Changes in body weight were monitored, and pathological changes in the small intestine were evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining and light and electron microscopy. Consequently, obese mice were significantly heavier compared with controls from 9 weeks of age. Villi in the small intestine of obese mice were elongated and thinned. There was reduced hematoxylin staining in the epithelium of the small intestine of obese mice. Electron microscopy revealed a significant decrease in and shortening of rough endoplasmic reticulum in epithelial cells of the small intestine of obese mice compared with normal mice. The decrease in rough endoplasmic reticulum in the small intestine epithelial cells of obese mice indicates that obesity starting in childhood influences various functions of the small intestine, such as protein synthesis, and could impair both the defense mechanism against invasion of pathogenic microbes and nutritional absorption.

  11. Mutations blocking the transport of the influenza virus hemagglutinin between the rough endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed Central

    Schuy, W; Will, C; Kuroda, K; Scholtissek, C; Garten, W; Klenk, H D

    1986-01-01

    Mutants ts1 and ts227 of fowl plague virus have a temperature-sensitive defect in the transport of the hemagglutinin from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus. The primary structure of the hemagglutinin of the mutants and of a number of revertants derived from them has been analysed by nucleotide sequencing. The transport block of the hemagglutinin of ts227 can be attributed to a single amino acid exchange. It involves the replacement of aspartic acid at position 457 by asparagine thereby introducing a new glycosylation site which appears to be located in a cryptic position in the lower part of the hemagglutinin stalk. Attachment of carbohydrate to this site is temperature-dependent. At permissive temperature only a small fraction of the monomers (approximately 30%) is glycosylated in this position, whereas at nonpermissive temperature this is the case with all subunits. The data suggest that under the latter conditions the new oligosaccharide interferes by steric hindrance with the trimerization of the hemagglutinin. The hemagglutinin of ts1 has an essential amino acid exchange at position 275 where serine is replaced by glycine. This substitution may increase the flexibility of the molecule in the hinge region between the globular domain and the stalk. The exchange of a conserved glutamic acid residue at position 398 that is involved in the interaction between different monomers contributes also to the structural instability of the ts1 hemagglutinin. These observations support the notion that the transport of the hemagglutinin from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus depends on trimer assembly. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:3024963

  12. Subcellular distribution of small GTP binding proteins in pancreas: Identification of small GTP binding proteins in the rough endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, S.K. )

    1990-02-01

    Subfractionation of a canine pancreatic homogenate was performed by several differential centrifugation steps, which gave rise to fractions with distinct marker profiles. Specific binding of guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-({sup 35}S)thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S)) was assayed in each fraction. Enrichment of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding was greatest in the interfacial smooth microsomal fraction, expected to contain Golgi and other smooth vesicles. There was also marked enrichment in the rough microsomal fraction. Electron microscopy and marker protein analysis revealed the rough microsomes (RMs) to be highly purified rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). The distribution of small (low molecular weight) GTP binding proteins was examined by a ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP blot-overlay assay. Several apparent GTP binding proteins of molecular masses 22-25 kDa were detected in various subcellular fractions. In particular, at least two such proteins were found in the Golgi-enriched and RM fractions, suggesting that these small GTP binding proteins were localized to the Golgi and RER. To more precisely localize these proteins to the RER, native RMs and RMs stripped of ribosomes by puromycin/high salt were subjected to isopycnic centrifugation. The total GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding, as well as the small GTP binding proteins detected by the ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP blot overlay, distributed into fractions of high sucrose density, as did the RER marker ribophorin I. Consistent with a RER localization, when the RMS were stripped of ribosomes and subjected to isopycnic centrifugation, the total GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding and the small GTP binding proteins detected in the blot-overlay assay shifted to fractions of lighter sucrose density along with the RER marker.

  13. Biochemical and structural characterization of an endoplasmic reticulum-localized late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Rie; Furuki, Takao; Shimizu, Tempei; Takezawa, Daisuke; Kikawada, Takahiro; Sakurai, Minoru; Sugawara, Yasutake

    2014-11-28

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate to high levels in seeds during late maturation, are associated with desiccation tolerance. A member of the LEA protein family was found in cultured cells of the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha; preculture treatment of these cells with 0.5M sucrose medium led to their acquisition of desiccation tolerance. We characterized this preculture-induced LEA protein, designated as MpLEA1. MpLEA1 is predominantly hydrophilic with a few hydrophobic residues that may represent its putative signal peptide. The protein also contains a putative endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention sequence, HEEL, at the C-terminus. Microscopic observations indicated that GFP-fused MpLEA1 was mainly localized in the ER. The recombinant protein MpLEA1 is intrinsically disordered in solution. On drying, MpLEA1 shifted predominantly toward α-helices from random coils. Such changes in conformation are a typical feature of the group 3 LEA proteins. Recombinant MpLEA1 prevented the aggregation of α-casein during desiccation-rehydration events, suggesting that MpLEA1 exerts anti-aggregation activity against desiccation-sensitive proteins by functioning as a "molecular shield". Moreover, the anti-aggregation activity of MpLEA1 was ten times greater than that of BSA or insect LEA proteins, which are known to prevent aggregation on drying. Here, we show that an ER-localized LEA protein, MpLEA1, possesses biochemical and structural features specific to group 3 LEA proteins. PMID:25450698

  14. Rough endoplasmic reticulum and fine intracytoplasmic filaments in articular cartilage chondrocytes of young rabbits; a stereological morphometric study using transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Paukkonen, K; Helminen, H J

    1987-01-01

    Articular cartilage of eight young NZW rabbits was investigated by electron microscopy. A simple and rapid stereological method was designed for quantifying the synthetic activity of the chondrocytes in the different zones of uncalcified articular cartilage by measuring the amount of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) on electron micrographs. The surface area of RER per unit volume of chondrocyte cytoplasm, of cartilage, and per chondrocyte, were determined. In addition the volume density, and mean diameter, of RER cisternae were computed. The surface area of RER was least in the superficial zone (402 micron 2) and largest in the deep zone (879 micron 2) chondrocytes. The RER surface area per unit volume of tissue was, however, significantly (P less than 0.05) greater in the superficial zone (12.8 X 10(-2) micron2/micron3) than in the deep zone (8.5 X 10(-2) micron2/micron3) of the articular cartilage. Percentages of chondrocytes displaying masses of intracytoplasmic fine filaments were also registered. 8.5% of the chondrocytes in the superficial, 48.8% in the middle, and 53.5% in the deep zone contained intracytoplasmic fine filaments. Chondrocytes containing filaments are probably degenerating cells. They contained diminished amounts of RER. The altered nutritional status in the deeper zones of the cartilage might have caused these changes in the cells. The formation of the calcified zone of the cartilage in the young rabbits, contributing to the cessation of the nutritional supply of chondrocytes from the subchondral bone marrow spaces, may have affected the process. Since the proportion of RER can be regarded as indicating the synthetic activity, and that of filaments as indicating the degree of degeneration, these parameters can be used in the evaluation of the functional status of the uncalcified articular cartilage chondrocytes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:3654375

  15. Rough endoplasmic reticulum trafficking errors by different classes of mutant dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) cause dominant negative effects in both dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentin dysplasia by entrapping normal DSPP.

    PubMed

    von Marschall, Zofia; Mok, Seeun; Phillips, Matthew D; McKnight, Dianalee A; Fisher, Larry W

    2012-06-01

    Families with nonsyndromic dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and the milder, dentin dysplasia (DD), have mutations in one allele of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene. Because loss of a single Dspp allele in mice (and likely, humans) causes no dental phenotype, the mechanism(s) underling the dominant negative effects were investigated. DSPP mutations occur in three classes. (The first class, the mid-leader missense mutation, Y6D, was not investigated in this report.) All other 5′ mutations of DSPP result in changes/loss in the first three amino acids (isoleucine-proline-valine [IPV]) of mature DSPP or, for the A15V missense mutation, some retention of the hydrophobic leader sequence. All of this second class of mutations caused mutant DSPP to be retained in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) of transfected HEK293 cells. Trafficking out of the rER by coexpressed normal DSPP was reduced in a dose-responsive manner, probably due to formation of Ca2+-dependent complexes with the retained mutant DSPP. IPV-like sequences begin many secreted Ca2+-binding proteins, and changing the third amino acid to the charged aspartate (D) in three other acidic proteins also caused increased rER accumulation. Both the leader-retaining A15V and the long string of hydrophobic amino acids resulting from all known frameshift mutations within the 3′-encoded Ca2+-binding repeat domain (third class of mutations) caused retention by association of the mutant proteins with rER membranes. More 5′ frameshift mutations result in longer mutant hydrophobic domains, but the milder phenotype, DD, probably due to lower effectiveness of the remaining, shorter Ca2+-binding domain in capturing normal DSPP protein within the rER. This study presents evidence of a shared underlying mechanism of capturing of normal DSPP by two different classes of DSPP mutations and offers an explanation for the mild (DD-II) versus severe (DGI-II and III) nonsyndromic dentin phenotypes. Evidence is also

  16. Cholesterol and steroid synthesizing smooth endoplasmic reticulum of adrenocortical cells contains high levels of proteins associated with the translocation channel.

    PubMed

    Black, Virginia H; Sanjay, Archana; van Leyen, Klaus; Lauring, Brett; Kreibich, Gert

    2005-10-01

    Steroid-secreting cells are characterized by abundant smooth endoplasmic reticulum whose membranes contain many enzymes involved in sterol and steroid synthesis. Yet they have relatively little morphologically identifiable rough endoplasmic reticulum, presumably required for synthesis and maintenance of the smooth membranes. In this study, we demonstrate that adrenal smooth microsomal subfractions enriched in smooth endoplasmic reticulum membranes contain high levels of translocation apparatus and oligosaccharyltransferase complex proteins, previously thought confined to rough endoplasmic reticulum. We further demonstrate that these smooth microsomal subfractions are capable of effecting cotranslational translocation, signal peptide cleavage, and N-glycosylation of newly synthesized polypeptides. This shifts the paradigm for distinction between smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum. Confocal microscopy revealed the proteins to be distributed throughout the abundant tubular endoplasmic reticulum in these cells, which is predominantly smooth surfaced. We hypothesize that the broadly distributed translocon and oligosaccharyltransferase proteins participate in local synthesis and/or quality control of membrane proteins involved in cholesterol and steroid metabolism in a sterol-dependent and hormonally regulated manner.

  17. BIOGENESIS OF ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Dallner, Gustav; Siekevitz, Philip; Palade, George E.

    1966-01-01

    The development of the endoplasmic reticulum of rat hepatocytes was studied during a period of rapid cell differentiation, i.e., from 3 days before to 8 days after birth. Before birth, the ER increases in volume, remaining predominantly rough surfaced; after birth, the increase continues but affects mainly the smooth-surfaced part of the system. These changes are reflected in variations of the RNA/protein and PLP/protein ratios of microsomal fractions: the first decreases, while the second increases, with age. The analysis of microsomal membranes and of microsomal lipids indicates that the PLP/protein ratio, the distribution of phospholipids, and the rate of P32 incorporation into these phospholipids show little variation over the period examined and are comparable to values found in adult liver. Fatty acid composition of total phosphatides undergoes, however, drastic changes after birth. During the period of rapid ER development in vivo incorporation of leucine-C14 and glycerol-C14 into the proteins and lipids of microsomal membranes is higher in the rough-than in the smooth-surfaced microsomes, for the first hours after the injection of the label; later on (∼10 hr) the situation is reversed. These results strongly suggest that new membrane is synthesized in the rough ER and subsequently transferred to the smooth ER. PMID:5966178

  18. The protein translocation machinery of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Walter, P; Gilmore, R; Müller, M; Blobel, G

    1982-12-24

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum (r.e.r.) has been postulated to possess a single translation-coupled translocation system (in multiple copies) that effects signal sequence-mediated translocation of all secretory and lysosomal proteins and integration of all integral membrane proteins whose port of entry is the rough endoplasmic reticulum (G. Blobel 1980 Proc. natn. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 77, 1496-1500). Two proteins have been isolated that are components of the r.e.r. translocation system. Their properties and function in protein translocation across and integration into membranes are discussed. PMID:6131460

  19. Membrane protein insertion into the endoplasmic reticulum--another channel tunnel?

    PubMed

    High, S

    1992-08-01

    The synthesis of biological membranes requires the insertion of proteins into a lipid bilayer. The rough endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells is a principal site of membrane biogenesis. The insertion of proteins into the membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum is mediated by a resident proteinaceous machinery. Over the last five years several different experimental approaches have provided information about the components of the machinery and how it may function.

  20. Isolation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Fractions from Mammary Epithelial Tissue.

    PubMed

    Chanat, Eric; Le Parc, Annabelle; Lahouassa, Hichem; Badaoui, Bouabid

    2016-06-01

    In the mammary glands of lactating animals, the mammary epithelial cells that surround the lumen of the acini produce and secrete copious amounts of milk. Functional differentiation of these mammary epithelial cells depends on the development of high-efficiency secretory pathways, notably for protein and lipid secretion. Protein secretion is a fundamental process common to all animal cells that involves a subset of cellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. In contrast, en masse secretion of triglycerides and cholesterol esters in the form of milk fat globules is a unique feature of the mammary epithelial cell. Cytoplasmic lipid droplets, the intracellular precursors of milk fat globules, originate from the endoplasmic reticulum, as do most milk-specific proteins. This organelle is therefore pivotal in the biogenesis of milk components. Fractionation of the cell into its subcellular parts is an approach that has proven very powerful for understanding organelle function and for studying the specific role of an organelle in a given cell activity. Here we describe a method for the purification of both smooth and rough microsomes, the membrane-bound endoplasmic reticulum fragments that form from endoplasmic reticulum domains when cells are broken up, from mammary gland tissue at lactation.

  1. [Endoplasmic reticulum stress response in osteogenesis].

    PubMed

    Saito, Atsushi; Imaizumi, Kazunori

    2013-11-01

    Various cellular conditions such as synthesis of abundant proteins, expressions of mutant proteins and oxidative stress lead to accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen. This type of stress is called ER stress. The excessive ER stress causes cellular damages followed by apoptosis. When ER stress occurs, cells are activated ER stress response (unfolded protein response) to avoid cellular damages. Recently, it has been clear that ER stress response plays crucial roles not only in cell survival after ER stress but also in regulating various cellular functions and tissue formations. In particular, ER stress and ER stress response regulate protein quality control, secretory protein production, and smooth secretion of proteins in the cells such as osteoblasts which synthesize and secrete enormous matrix proteins.

  2. The Gp78 ubiquitin ligase: probing endoplasmic reticulum complexity.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, Pascal; Nabi, Ivan R

    2012-02-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been classically divided, based on electron microscopy analysis, into parallel ribosome-studded rough ER sheets and a tubular smooth ER network. Recent studies have identified molecular constituents of the ER, the reticulons and DP1, that drive ER tubule formation and whose expression determines expression of ER sheets and tubules and thereby rough and smooth ER. However, segregation of the ER into only two domains remains simplistic and multiple functionally distinct ER domains necessarily exist. In this review, we will discuss the sub-organization of the ER in different domains focusing on the localization and role of the gp78 ubiquitin ligase in the mitochondria-associated smooth ER and on the evidence for a quality control ERAD domain.

  3. The Gp78 ubiquitin ligase: probing endoplasmic reticulum complexity.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, Pascal; Nabi, Ivan R

    2012-02-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been classically divided, based on electron microscopy analysis, into parallel ribosome-studded rough ER sheets and a tubular smooth ER network. Recent studies have identified molecular constituents of the ER, the reticulons and DP1, that drive ER tubule formation and whose expression determines expression of ER sheets and tubules and thereby rough and smooth ER. However, segregation of the ER into only two domains remains simplistic and multiple functionally distinct ER domains necessarily exist. In this review, we will discuss the sub-organization of the ER in different domains focusing on the localization and role of the gp78 ubiquitin ligase in the mitochondria-associated smooth ER and on the evidence for a quality control ERAD domain. PMID:22045301

  4. Roughness and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, T. R.

    2014-01-01

    A function map is used to locate applications of roughness in separation-velocity space. The importance of roughness in contact mechanics is demonstrated and versions of the plasticity index are introduced and compared. Case studies of roughness and function are presented from tribology and the life sciences. Tribological examples are taken from the automotive industry and include the manufacture of vehicle bodies, and drive train tribology, particularly cylinder liner, cam and gearbox friction and wear. From the life sciences, problems of prosthetic fixation and tribology are shown to depend on roughness. The interaction of haptics and surface finish is described and illustrated. A number of other areas of application are listed. Finally the likely future importance of structured surfaces is discussed.

  5. Interaction of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Goetz, J G; Nabi, I R

    2006-06-01

    The ER (endoplasmic reticulum) is composed of multiple domains including the nuclear envelope, ribosome-studded rough ER and the SER (smooth ER). The SER can also be functionally segregated into domains that regulate ER-Golgi traffic (transitional ER), ERAD (ER-associated degradation), sterol and lipid biosynthesis and calcium sequestration. The last two, as well as apoptosis, are critically regulated by the close association of the SER with mitochondria. Studies with AMFR (autocrine motility factor receptor) have defined an SER domain whose integrity and mitochondrial association can be modulated by ilimaquinone as well as by free cytosolic calcium levels in the normal physiological range. AMFR is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets its ligand directly to the SER via a caveolae/raft-dependent pathway. In the present review, we will address the relationship between the calcium-dependent morphology and mitochondrial association of the SER and its various functional roles in the cell.

  6. Interaction of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Goetz, J G; Nabi, I R

    2006-06-01

    The ER (endoplasmic reticulum) is composed of multiple domains including the nuclear envelope, ribosome-studded rough ER and the SER (smooth ER). The SER can also be functionally segregated into domains that regulate ER-Golgi traffic (transitional ER), ERAD (ER-associated degradation), sterol and lipid biosynthesis and calcium sequestration. The last two, as well as apoptosis, are critically regulated by the close association of the SER with mitochondria. Studies with AMFR (autocrine motility factor receptor) have defined an SER domain whose integrity and mitochondrial association can be modulated by ilimaquinone as well as by free cytosolic calcium levels in the normal physiological range. AMFR is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets its ligand directly to the SER via a caveolae/raft-dependent pathway. In the present review, we will address the relationship between the calcium-dependent morphology and mitochondrial association of the SER and its various functional roles in the cell. PMID:16709164

  7. Studies on the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Keith R.; Machado, Raul D.

    1960-01-01

    Cells of onion and garlic root tips were examined under the electron and phase contrast microscopes after fixation in KMnO4. Special attention was focused on the distribution and behavior of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during the several phases of mitosis. Slender profiles, recognized as sections through thin lamellar units of the ER (most prominent in KMnO4-fixed material), are distributed more or less uniformly in the cytoplasm of interphase cells and show occasional continuity with the nuclear envelope. In late prophase the nuclear envelope breaks down and its remnants plus cytoplasmic elements of the ER, which are morphologically identical, surround the spindle in a zone from which mitochondria, etc., are excluded. During metaphase these ER elements persist and concentrate as two separate systems in the polar caps or zones of the spindle. At about this same time they begin to proliferate and to invade the ends of the spindle. The invading lamellar units form drape-like partitions between the anaphase chromosomes. In late anaphase, their advancing margins reach the middle zone of the spindle and begin to fray out. Finally, in telophase, while elements of the ER in the poles of the spindle coalesce around the chromosomes to form the new envelope, the advancing edges of those in the middle zone reticulate at the level of the equator to form a close lattice of tubular elements. Within this, which is identified as the phragmoplast, the earliest signs of the cell plate appear in the form of small vesicles. These subsequently grow and fuse to complete the separation of the two protoplasts. Other morphological units apparently participating in mitosis are described. Speculation is provided on the equal division or not of the nuclear envelope and the contribution the envelope fragments make to the ER of the new cell. PMID:14434278

  8. Random rough surface photofabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brissonneau, Vincent; Escoubas, Ludovic; Flory, François; Berginc, Gérard

    2011-10-01

    Random rough surfaces are of primary interest for their optical properties: reducing reflection at the interface or obtaining specific scattering diagram for example. Thus controlling surface statistics during the fabrication process paves the way to original and specific behaviors of reflected optical waves. We detail an experimental method allowing the fabrication of random rough surfaces showing tuned statistical properties. A two-step photoresist exposure process was developed. In order to initiate photoresist polymerization, an energy threshold needs to be reached by light exposure. This energy is brought by a uniform exposure equipment comprising UV-LEDs. This pre-exposure is studied by varying parameters such as optical power and exposure time. The second step consists in an exposure based on the Gray method.1 The speckle pattern of an enlarged scattered laser beam is used to insolate the photoresist. A specific photofabrication bench using an argon ion laser was implemented. Parameters such as exposure time and distances between optical components are discussed. Then, we describe how we modify the speckle-based exposure bench to include a spatial light modulator (SLM). The SLM used is a micromirror matrix known as Digital Micromirror Device (DMD) which allows spatial modulation by displaying binary images. Thus, the spatial beam shape can be tuned and so the speckle pattern on the photoresist is modified. As the photoresist photofabricated surface is correlated to the speckle pattern used to insolate, the roughness parameters can be adjusted.

  9. Potassium fluxes across the endoplasmic reticulum and their role in endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kuum, Malle; Veksler, Vladimir; Kaasik, Allen

    2015-07-01

    There are a number of known and suspected channels and exchangers in the endoplasmic reticulum that may participate in potassium flux across its membrane. They include trimeric intracellular cation channels permeable for potassium, ATP-sensitive potassium channels, calcium-activated potassium channels and the potassium-hydrogen exchanger. Apart from trimeric intracellular cation channels, which are specific to the endoplasmic reticulum, other potassium channels are also expressed in the plasma membrane and/or mitochondria, and their specific role in the endoplasmic reticulum has not yet been fully established. In addition to these potassium-selective channels, the ryanodine receptor and, potentially, the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor are permeable to potassium ions. Also, the role of potassium fluxes across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane has remained elusive. It has been proposed that their main role is to balance the charge movement that occurs during calcium release and uptake from or to the endoplasmic reticulum. This review aims to summarize current knowledge on endoplasmic reticulum potassium channels and fluxes and their potential role in endoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake and release.

  10. Rough and Tumble Play 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Frances

    2009-01-01

    Many people fear that play-fighting or rough and tumble play is the same as real fighting. There is also a fear that this rough play will become real fighting if allowed to continue. Most of all, parents and teachers fear that during the course of rough and tumble play a child may be hurt. To provide for and allow children to play rough without…

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases: biochemistry, physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi

    2013-09-01

    The human endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase (ERAP) 1 and 2 proteins were initially identified as homologues of human placental leucine aminopeptidase/insulin-regulated aminopeptidase. They are categorized as a unique class of proteases based on their subcellular localization on the luminal side of the endoplasmic reticulum. ERAPs play an important role in the N-terminal processing of the antigenic precursors that are presented on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. ERAPs are also implicated in the regulation of a wide variety of physiological phenomena and pathogenic conditions. In this review, the current knowledge on ERAPs is summarized.

  12. Pavement roughness and skid properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Road roughness and roadway safety as it relates to both surface and air transportation are discussed. The role of road roughness in vehicle ride, the measurement of roughness, the evaluation of riding confort, and the effect of grooving pavements are discussed. The effects of differential pavement friction on the response of cars in skidding maneuvers is discussed.

  13. Determination of Joint Roughness Coefficients Using Roughness Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyun-Sic; Kang, Seong-Seung; Jang, Bo-An

    2014-11-01

    This study used precisely digitized standard roughness profiles to determine roughness parameters such as statistical and 2D discontinuity roughness, and fractal dimensions. Our methods were based on the relationship between the joint roughness coefficient (JRC) values and roughness parameters calculated using power law equations. Statistical and 2D roughness parameters, and fractal dimensions correlated well with JRC values, and had correlation coefficients of over 0.96. However, all of these relationships have a 4th profile (JRC 6-8) that deviates by more than ±5 % from the JRC values given in the standard roughness profiles. This indicates that this profile is statistically different than the others. We suggest that fractal dimensions should be measured within the entire range of the divider, instead of merely measuring values within a suitable range. Normalized intercept values also correlated with the JRC values, similarly to the fractal dimension values discussed above. The root mean square first derivative values, roughness profile indexes, 2D roughness parameter, and fractal dimension values decreased as the sampling interval increased. However, the structure function values increased very rapidly with increasing sampling intervals. This indicates that the roughness parameters are not independent of the sampling interval, and that the different relationships between the JRC values and these roughness parameters are dependent on the sampling interval.

  14. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE AERODYNAMIC ROUGHNESS LENGTH AND THE ROUGHNESS DENSITY IN CASES OF LOW ROUGHNESS DENSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents measurements of roughness length performed in a wind tunnel for low roughness density. The experiments were performed with both compact and porous obstacles (clusters), in order to simulate the behavior of sparsely vegetated surfaces.

  15. Peptidyl prolyl cis-trans-isomerase activity associated with the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, S; Freedman, R B

    1994-01-01

    Peptidyl prolyl cis-trans-isomerase (PPI) activity was detected in microsomal fractions from bovine and rat liver. Extensive washing, proteinase and sonication treatments indicated that although some of this activity was due to adsorbed cytosolic enzymes, there was also an active but latent microsomal PPI activity. Density-gradient subfractionation indicated that activity was associated with vesicles derived from both the rough and the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER), suggesting that the activity was located within the ER lumen. The luminal PPI activity was inhibited by cyclosporin A and was active towards an unfolded protein substrate as well as towards the standard peptide substrate. PMID:8010971

  16. Optical roughness measurements on specially designed roughness standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danzl, R.; Helmli, F.; Rubert, P.; Prantl, M.

    2008-09-01

    The measurement of surface texture is one of the most common and important ways to judge the quality of a technical surface. In order to verify whether a metrology device is able to measure certain types of roughness accurately, various roughness standards with calibrated roughness values are available. While almost all roughness standards produced so far have been designed for tactile systems we demonstrate how the optical metrology device InfiniteFocus can be applied to special roughness standards that have been artificially roughened. Experiments are performed on standards with periodic structure and the results of the optical system are compared to the calibrated values obtained by tactile systems with different tip radius. Additionally the profile-based measurements are compared to area-based measurements conform to a recently developed ISO standard draft. Finally roughness measurements on real surfaces are presented.

  17. Roughness characteristics of natural channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Harry Hawthorne

    1967-01-01

    Color photographs and descriptive data are presented for 50 stream channels for which roughness coefficients have been determined. All hydraulic computations involving flow in open channels require an evaluation of the roughness characteristics of the channel. In the absence of a satisfactory quantitative procedure this evaluation remains chiefly an art. The ability to evaluate roughness coefficients must be developed through experience. One means of gaining this experience is by examining and becoming acquainted with the appearance of some typical channels whose roughness coefficients are known. The photographs and data contained in this report represent a wide range of channel conditions. Familiarity with the appearance, geometry, and roughness characteristics of these channels will improve the engineer's ability to select roughness coefficients for other channels .

  18. Surface roughness measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Thomas G.

    1994-01-01

    The Optics Division is currently in the research phase of producing grazing-incidence mirrors to be used in x-ray detector applications. The traditional method of construction involves labor-intensive glass grinding. This also culminates in a relatively heavy mirror. For lower resolution applications, the mirrors may be of a replicated design which involves milling a mandrel as a negative of the final shape and electroplating the cylindrical mirror onto it. The mirror is then separated from the mandrel by cooling. The mandrel will shrink more than the 'shell' (mirror) allowing it to be pulled from the mandrel. Ulmer (2) describes this technique and its variations in more detail. To date, several mirrors have been tested at MSFC by the Optical Fabrication Branch by focusing x-ray energy onto a detector with limited success. Little is known about the surface roughness of the actual mirror. Hence, the attempt to gather data on these surfaces. The test involves profiling the surface of a sample, replicating the surface as described above, and then profiling the replicated surface.

  19. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulev, Assen; Roussev, Ilia; Karpuzov, Simeon; Stoilov, Georgi; Ignatova, Detelina; See, Constantin von; Mitov, Gergo

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  20. Quantitative proteomic survey of endoplasmic reticulum in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Song, Yanping; Jiang, Ying; Ying, Wantao; Gong, Yan; Yan, Yujuan; Yang, Dong; Ma, Jie; Xue, Xiaofang; Zhong, Fan; Wu, Songfeng; Hao, Yunwei; Sun, Aihua; Li, Tao; Sun, Wei; Wei, Handong; Zhu, Yunping; Qian, Xiaohong; He, Fuchu

    2010-03-01

    To gain a better understanding of the critical function of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in liver, we carried out a proteomic survey of mouse liver ER. The ER proteome was profiled with a new three-dimensional, gel-based strategy. From 6152 and 6935 MS spectra, 903 and 1042 proteins were identified with at least two peptides matches at 95% confidence in the rough (r) and smooth (s) ER, respectively. Comparison of the rER and sER proteomes showed that calcium-binding proteins are significantly enriched in the sER suggesting that the ion-binding function of the ER is compartmentalized. Comparison of the rat and mouse ER proteomes showed that 662 proteins were common to both, comprising 53.5% and 49.3% of those proteomes, respectively. We proposed that these proteins were stably expressed proteins that were essential for the maintenance of ER function. GO annotation with a hypergeometric model proved this hypothesis. Unexpectedly, 210 unknown proteins and some proteins previously reported to occur in the cytosol were highly enriched in the ER. This study provides a reference map for the ER proteome of liver. Identification of new ER proteins will enhance our current understanding of the ER and also suggest new functions for this organelle.

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Associated ROS

    PubMed Central

    Zeeshan, Hafiz Maher Ali; Lee, Geum Hwa; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a fascinating network of tubules through which secretory and transmembrane proteins enter unfolded and exit as either folded or misfolded proteins, after which they are directed either toward other organelles or to degradation, respectively. The ER redox environment dictates the fate of entering proteins, and the level of redox signaling mediators modulates the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Accumulating evidence suggests the interrelation of ER stress and ROS with redox signaling mediators such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin (ERO)-1, glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disuphide (GSSG), NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR), and calcium. Here, we reviewed persistent ER stress and protein misfolding-initiated ROS cascades and their significant roles in the pathogenesis of multiple human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, inflammation, ischemia, and kidney and liver diseases. PMID:26950115

  2. Does surface roughness amplify wetting?

    SciTech Connect

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-11-14

    Any solid surface is intrinsically rough on the microscopic scale. In this paper, we study the effect of this roughness on the wetting properties of hydrophilic substrates. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to the well-known Wenzel's law, predict that surface roughness should amplify the wetting properties of such adsorbents. We use a fundamental measure density functional theory to demonstrate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., wetting is hindered. Based on three independent analyses we show that microscopic surface corrugation increases the wetting temperature or even makes the surface hydrophobic. Since for macroscopically corrugated surfaces the solid texture does indeed amplify wetting there must exist a crossover between two length-scale regimes that are distinguished by opposite response on surface roughening. This demonstrates how deceptive can be efforts to extend the thermodynamical laws beyond their macroscopic territory.

  3. Radar-aeolian roughness project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Dobrovolskis, A.; Gaddis, L.; Iversen, J. D.; Lancaster, N.; Leach, Rodman N.; Rasnussen, K.; Saunders, S.; Vanzyl, J.; Wall, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective is to establish an empirical relationship between measurements of radar, aeolian, and surface roughness on a variety of natural surfaces and to understand the underlying physical causes. This relationship will form the basis for developing a predictive equation to derive aeolian roughness from radar backscatter. Results are given from investigations carried out in 1989 on the principal elements of the project, with separate sections on field studies, radar data analysis, laboratory simulations, and development of theory for planetary applications.

  4. Obesity and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stresses

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Yamini B.; Pandey, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    In obesity, the adipose cells behave as inflammatory source and result to low grade inflammation. This systemic inflammation along with oxidative stress is a silent killer and damages other vital organs also. High metabolic process, induced due to high nutritional intake, results to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondrial stress. This review describes the triggering factor and basic mechanism behind the obesity mediated these stresses in relation to inflammation. Efforts have been made to describe the effect-response cycle between adipocytes and non-adipocyte cells with reference to metabolic syndrome (MS). PMID:22891067

  5. Roughness of Hawaiian volcanic terrains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Aisha R.; Anderson, F. Scott; Mouginis-Mark, Peter J.; Haldemann, Albert F. C.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Foster, James

    2008-12-01

    We performed analyses of topographic variation (surface roughness) using a new 2-D mapping method which shows that understanding the relationship between data resolution, Hurst exponent, y intercept, RMS deviation, and cell size is important for assessing surface processes. We use this new method to assess flows at six field sites in Kilauea caldera, Hawaii, using three data sets at different resolutions, TOPSAR (10 m/pixel), airborne lidar (1 m/pixel), and tripod-mounted lidar (0.02-0.03 m/pixel). The flows studied include ponded pahoehoe flows, compound pahoehoe flows, and jumbled, slabby pahoehoe. The 2-D quantification of surface roughness for the Kilauea lava flows indicates that features formed during emplacement and modification of the flows exhibit statistically distinct roughness signatures. The 2-D method provides a tool for unit mapping based on surface roughness. Key findings indicate that the new 2-D method provides more robust results than 1-D methods for surface roughness because of larger 2-D sample sizes and the removal of 1-D directional bias leading to a reduction in error. Furthermore, data set resolution relative to the scale of the features under study is important to consider when designing a 2-D surface roughness study. Future applications to topographic data sets from Mars will provide information on flow emplacement conditions and spatial and temporal evolution of volcanic provinces on Mars.

  6. Wetting and Roughness: Pattern Formation in a Rough Fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlavan, A. A.; Cueto-Felgueroso, L.; McKinley, G. H.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Wetting phenomena are inherently multiscale; owing to the complex nature of porous and fractured media, immiscible flows in this setting continue to challenge our microscopic and macroscopic descriptions. To gain some insight into the interplay between wettability and roughness of the medium, here we study experimentally the immiscible displacement of one fluid by another in a Hele-Shaw cell (two glass plates separated by a thin gap) with rough surfaces. We use a radial Hele-Shaw cell and saturate it with highly viscous silicone oil; we then inject a less viscous liquid at the center of the cell. Displacement of a more viscous liquid by a less viscous one leads to a hydrodynamic instability, known as viscous fingering. Wettability of the medium, however, has a profound influence on the displacement patterns and can lead to a complete suppression of the viscous fingering instability. Roughness, on the other hand, amplifies the wettability of the medium, making a wetting surface even more wetting and a non-wetting surface even more non-wetting. Roughness can also lead to contact-line pinning and intermittent avalanche-like behavior in the flow. We study the interplay between roughness and wettability of the medium by isolating each effect. We then propose a phase diagram that classifies the different displacement patterns, elucidating the underlying physics at play across scales.

  7. Roughness effects in uncompensated antiferromagnets

    SciTech Connect

    Charilaou, M.; Hellman, F.

    2015-02-28

    Monte Carlo simulations show that roughness in uncompensated antiferromagnets decreases not just the surface magnetization but also the net magnetization and particularly strongly affects the temperature dependence. In films with step-type roughness, each step creates a new compensation front that decreases the global net magnetization. The saturation magnetization decreases non-monotonically with increasing roughness and does not scale with the surface area. Roughness in the form of surface vacancies changes the temperature-dependence of the magnetization; when only one surface has vacancies, the saturation magnetization will decrease linearly with surface occupancy, whereas when both surfaces have vacancies, the magnetization is negative and exhibits a compensation point at finite temperature, which can be tuned by controlling the occupancy. Roughness also affects the spin-texture of the surfaces due to long-range dipolar interactions and generates non-collinear spin configurations that could be used in devices to produce locally modified exchange bias. These results explain the strongly reduced magnetization found in magnetometry experiments and furthers our understanding of the temperature-dependence of exchange bias.

  8. Quantitative Proteomic Analyses of Human Cytomegalovirus-Induced Restructuring of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondrial Contacts at Late Times of Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aiping; Williamson, Chad D.; Wong, Daniel S.; Bullough, Matthew D.; Brown, Kristy J.; Hathout, Yetrib; Colberg-Poley, Anamaris M.

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial contacts, known as mitochondria-associated membranes, regulate important cellular functions including calcium signaling, bioenergetics, and apoptosis. Human cytomegalovirus is a medically important herpesvirus whose growth increases energy demand and depends upon continued cell survival. To gain insight into how human cytomegalovirus infection affects endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial contacts, we undertook quantitative proteomics of mitochondria-associated membranes using differential stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture strategy and liquid chromatography-tandem MS analysis. This is the first reported quantitative proteomic analyses of a suborganelle during permissive human cytomegalovirus infection. Human fibroblasts were uninfected or human cytomegalovirus-infected for 72 h. Heavy mitochondria-associated membranes were isolated from paired unlabeled, uninfected cells and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture-labeled, infected cells and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem MS analysis. The results were verified by a reverse labeling experiment. Human cytomegalovirus infection dramatically altered endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial contacts by late times. Notable is the increased abundance of several fundamental networks in the mitochondria-associated membrane fraction of human cytomegalovirus-infected fibroblasts. Chaperones, including HSP60 and BiP, which is required for human cytomegalovirus assembly, were prominently increased at endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial contacts after infection. Minimal translational and translocation machineries were also associated with endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial contacts and increased after human cytomegalovirus infection as were glucose regulated protein 75 and the voltage dependent anion channel, which can form an endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial calcium signaling complex. Surprisingly, mitochondrial metabolic enzymes and cytosolic

  9. Roughness Perception in Virtual Textures.

    PubMed

    Unger, B; Hollis, R; Klatzky, R

    2011-01-01

    Haptic devices allow the production of virtual textured surfaces for psychophysical experiments. Some studies have shown inconsistencies between virtual and real textures with respect to their psychophysical functions for roughness, leading to speculation that virtual textures differ in some way from real ones. We have determined the psychophysical function for roughness using textures rendered with a high-fidelity magnetic levitation haptic device. A constraint surface algorithm was used to simulate the motion of a spherical probe over trapezoidal gratings and randomly dithered cones. The shape of the psychophysical functions for roughness is consistent between subjects but varies with changes in texture and probe geometry. For dithered cones, inverted "U"-shaped functions were found nearly identical, in maxima and curvature, to those in the literature for real textures with similar geometry. PMID:26963163

  10. Recent Studies of Runway Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Garland; Hall, Albert W.

    1965-01-01

    Recent studies of NASA research related to aircraft operating problems on rough runways are presented. Some of these investigations were conducted cooperatively with the airport operators, with the Federal Aviation Agency, and with the U.S. Air Force. The studies show that criteria based on power spectral levels of runway-profile data are not sufficient to define acceptable levels of runway roughness from the piloting viewpoint. Because of the large variation in response characteristics between various types of aircraft, a runway may be acceptable for some aircraft and unacceptable for others. A criterion for roughness, therefore, should be expressed in terms of aircraft response - preferably, cockpit acceleration. A criterion suggested is that the maximum vertical acceleration in the cockpit should not exceed +/- 0.4 g for sections of the runway where precise aircraft control is required.

  11. Nodal endoplasmic reticulum, a specialized form of endoplasmic reticulum found in gravity-sensing root tip columella cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, H. Q.; Staehelin, L. A.

    2001-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of columella root cap cells has been postulated to play a role in gravity sensing. We have re-examined the ultrastructure of columella cells in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) root tips preserved by high-pressure freezing/freeze-substitution techniques to gain more precise information about the organization of the ER in such cells. The most notable findings are: the identification of a specialized form of ER, termed "nodal ER," which is found exclusively in columella cells; the demonstration that the bulk of the ER is organized in the form of a tubular network that is confined to a peripheral layer under the plasma membrane; and the discovery that this ER-rich peripheral region excludes Golgi stacks, vacuoles, and amyloplasts but not mitochondria. Nodal ER domains consist of an approximately 100-nm-diameter central rod composed of oblong subunits to which usually seven sheets of rough ER are attached along their margins. These domains form patches at the interface between the peripheral ER network and the ER-free central region of the cells, and they occupy defined positions within central and flanking columella cells. Over one-half of the nodal ER domains are located along the outer tangential walls of the flanking cells. Cytochalasin D and latrunculin A cause an increase in size and a decrease in numbers of nodal ER domains. We postulate that the nodal ER membranes locally modulate the gravisensing signals produced by the sedimenting amyloplasts, and that the confinement of all ER membranes to the cell periphery serves to enhance the sedimentability of the amyloplasts in the central region of columella cells.

  12. Membrane Protein Insertion at the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Sichen; Hegde, Ramanujan S.

    2014-01-01

    Integral membrane proteins of the cell surface and most intracellular compartments of eukaryotic cells are assembled at the endoplasmic reticulum. Two highly conserved and parallel pathways mediate membrane protein targeting to and insertion into this organelle. The classical cotranslational pathway, utilized by most membrane proteins, involves targeting by the signal recognition particle followed by insertion via the Sec61 translocon. A more specialized posttranslational pathway, employed by many tail-anchored membrane proteins, is composed of entirely different factors centered around a cytosolic ATPase termed TRC40 or Get3. Both of these pathways overcome the same biophysical challenges of ferrying hydrophobic cargo through an aqueous milieu, selectively delivering it to one among several intracellular membranes and asymmetrically integrating its transmembrane domain(s) into the lipid bilayer. Here, we review the conceptual and mechanistic themes underlying these core membrane protein insertion pathways, the complexities that challenge our understanding, and future directions to over-come these obstacles. PMID:21801011

  13. Endoplasmic-Reticulum Calcium Depletion and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mekahli, Djalila; Bultynck, Geert; Parys, Jan B.; De Smedt, Humbert; Missiaen, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an intracellular Ca2+ store not only sets up cytosolic Ca2+ signals, but, among other functions, also assembles and folds newly synthesized proteins. Alterations in ER homeostasis, including severe Ca2+ depletion, are an upstream event in the pathophysiology of many diseases. On the one hand, insufficient release of activator Ca2+ may no longer sustain essential cell functions. On the other hand, loss of luminal Ca2+ causes ER stress and activates an unfolded protein response, which, depending on the duration and severity of the stress, can reestablish normal ER function or lead to cell death. We will review these various diseases by mainly focusing on the mechanisms that cause ER Ca2+ depletion. PMID:21441595

  14. Endoplasmic reticulum stress responses in plants.

    PubMed

    Howell, Stephen H

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is of considerable interest to plant biologists because it occurs in plants subjected to adverse environmental conditions. ER stress responses mitigate the damage caused by stress and confer levels of stress tolerance to plants. ER stress is activated by misfolded proteins that accumulate in the ER under adverse environmental conditions. Under these conditions, the demand for protein folding exceeds the capacity of the system, which sets off the unfolded protein response (UPR). Two arms of the UPR signaling pathway have been described in plants: one that involves two ER membrane-associated transcription factors (bZIP17 and bZIP28) and another that involves a dual protein kinase (RNA-splicing factor IRE1) and its target RNA (bZIP60). Under mild or short-term stress conditions, signaling from IRE1 activates autophagy, a cell survival response. But under severe or chronic stress conditions, ER stress can lead to cell death.

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum: ER stress regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Roberto; Gutierrez, Tomás; Paredes, Felipe; Gatica, Damián; Rodriguez, Andrea E; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Parra, Valentina; Quest, Andrew F G; Rothermel, Beverly A; Lavandero, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates an adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR) that facilitates cellular repair, however, under prolonged ER stress, the UPR can ultimately trigger apoptosis thereby terminating damaged cells. The molecular mechanisms responsible for execution of the cell death program are relatively well characterized, but the metabolic events taking place during the adaptive phase of ER stress remain largely undefined. Here we discuss emerging evidence regarding the metabolic changes that occur during the onset of ER stress and how ER influences mitochondrial function through mechanisms involving calcium transfer, thereby facilitating cellular adaptation. Finally, we highlight how dysregulation of ER-mitochondrial calcium homeostasis during prolonged ER stress is emerging as a novel mechanism implicated in the onset of metabolic disorders. PMID:22064245

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Back, Sung Hoon; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the functional importance of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an organelle that performs folding, modification, and trafficking of secretory and membrane proteins to the Golgi compartment, the maintenance of ER homeostasis in insulin-secreting β-cells is very important. When ER homeostasis is disrupted, the ER generates adaptive signaling pathways, called the unfolded protein response (UPR), to maintain homeostasis of this organelle. However, if homeostasis fails to be restored, the ER initiates death signaling pathways. New observations suggest that both chronic hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia, known as important causative factors of type 2 diabetes (T2D), disrupt ER homeostasis to induce unresolvable UPR activation and β-cell death. This review examines how the UPR pathways, induced by high glucose and free fatty acids (FFAs), interact to disrupt ER function and cause β-cell dysfunction and death. PMID:22443930

  17. Nonvesicular Lipid Transfer from the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Lev, Sima

    2012-01-01

    The transport of lipids from their synthesis site at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to different target membranes could be mediated by both vesicular and nonvesicular transport mechanisms. Nonvesicular lipid transport appears to be the major transport route of certain lipid species, and could be mediated by either spontaneous lipid transport or by lipid-transfer proteins (LTPs). Although nonvesicular lipid transport has been extensively studied for more than four decades, its underlying mechanism, advantage and regulation, have not been fully explored. In particular, the function of LTPs and their involvement in intracellular lipid movement remain largely controversial. In this article, we describe the pathways by which lipids are synthesized at the ER and delivered to different cellular membranes, and discuss the role of LTPs in lipid transport both in vitro and in intact cells. PMID:23028121

  18. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Ethanol Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fanmuyi; Luo, Jia

    2015-10-14

    Ethanol abuse affects virtually all organ systems and the central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to excessive ethanol exposure. Ethanol exposure causes profound damages to both the adult and developing brain. Prenatal ethanol exposure induces fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) which is associated with mental retardation and other behavioral deficits. A number of potential mechanisms have been proposed for ethanol-induced brain damage; these include the promotion of neuroinflammation, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, and thiamine deficiency. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) regulates posttranslational protein processing and transport. The accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen triggers ER stress and induces unfolded protein response (UPR) which are mediated by three transmembrane ER signaling proteins: pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). UPR is initiated to protect cells from overwhelming ER protein loading. However, sustained ER stress may result in cell death. ER stress has been implied in various CNS injuries, including brain ischemia, traumatic brain injury, and aging-associated neurodegeneration, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Parkinson's disease (PD). However, effects of ethanol on ER stress in the CNS receive less attention. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the study of ER stress in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. We also examine the potential mechanisms underlying ethanol-mediated ER stress and the interaction among ER stress, oxidative stress and autophagy in the context of ethanol neurotoxicity.

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Ethanol Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fanmuyi; Luo, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol abuse affects virtually all organ systems and the central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to excessive ethanol exposure. Ethanol exposure causes profound damages to both the adult and developing brain. Prenatal ethanol exposure induces fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) which is associated with mental retardation and other behavioral deficits. A number of potential mechanisms have been proposed for ethanol-induced brain damage; these include the promotion of neuroinflammation, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, and thiamine deficiency. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) regulates posttranslational protein processing and transport. The accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen triggers ER stress and induces unfolded protein response (UPR) which are mediated by three transmembrane ER signaling proteins: pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). UPR is initiated to protect cells from overwhelming ER protein loading. However, sustained ER stress may result in cell death. ER stress has been implied in various CNS injuries, including brain ischemia, traumatic brain injury, and aging-associated neurodegeneration, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Huntington’s disease (HD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, effects of ethanol on ER stress in the CNS receive less attention. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the study of ER stress in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. We also examine the potential mechanisms underlying ethanol-mediated ER stress and the interaction among ER stress, oxidative stress and autophagy in the context of ethanol neurotoxicity. PMID:26473940

  20. Plant Communities of Rough Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Linda

    A unit of study on plants grown in the Navajo community of Rough Rock, Arizona, is presented in sketches providing the common Navajo name for the plant, a literal English translation, the English name of the plant, and the Latin name. A brief description of each plant includes where the plant grows, how the Navajos use the plant, and the color and…

  1. Community School at Rough Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Donald A.; Schwartz, Henrietta

    The objective of the evaluation of Rough Rock Demonstration School (RRDS) on the Navajo Reservation was to examine, in terms of its own stated objectives, the school's organizational and social system as a whole. Chapters in the 1969 evaluation report are "What We Did and Why,""The Schools That Were Compared,""Community Relationships,""The…

  2. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  3. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  4. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply...

  5. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  6. 31 CFR 592.310 - Rough diamond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Rough diamond. 592.310 Section 592.310... ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ROUGH DIAMONDS CONTROL REGULATIONS General Definitions § 592.310 Rough diamond. The term rough diamond means any diamond that is unworked or simply sawn,...

  7. Application of Rough Sets to Information Retrieval.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miyamoto, Sadaaki

    1998-01-01

    Develops a method of rough retrieval, an application of the rough set theory to information retrieval. The aim is to: (1) show that rough sets are naturally applied to information retrieval in which categorized information structure is used; and (2) show that a fuzzy retrieval scheme is induced from the rough retrieval. (AEF)

  8. Intrinsic membrane glycoproteins with cytosol-oriented sugars in the endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Abeijon, C.; Hirschberg, C.B.

    1988-02-01

    The authors have examined the topography of N-acetylglucosamine-terminating glycoproteins in membranes from rat liver smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum (SER and RER). It was found that some of these glycoproteins are intrinsic membrane proteins with their sugars facing the cytosolic rather than the luminal side. This conclusion was reached by using vesicles from the SER and RER that were sealed and of the same topographical orientation as in vivo. These vesicles were incubated with UDP-(/sup 14/C)galactose (which does not enter the vesicles) and saturating amounts of soluble galactosyltransferase from milk, an enzyme that does not penetrate the lumen of the vesicles and that specifically adds galactose to terminal N-acetylglucosamine in a ..beta..1-4 linkage. Radioactive galactose was mainly transferred to SER proteins of apparent molecular mass 56 and 110 kDa and to a lesser extent RER and SER proteins of apparent molecular mass 46 and 72 kDa. These proteins are intrinsic membrane proteins, based on the inability of sodium carbonate at pH 11.5 to remove them from the membranes. Studies with peptide N-glycosidase F and chemical ..beta..-elimination showed that the 56-kDa protein of the SER vesicles contained terminal N-acetylglucosamine in an O-linkage to the protein. The above results suggest that some sugars of glycoproteins in the endoplasmic reticulum may attain their final orientation in the membrane by mechanisms yet to be determined.

  9. Role of p97 and Syntaxin 5 in the Assembly of Transitional Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Line; Bergeron, John J.M.; Lavoie, Christine; Hendriks, Rob; Gushue, Jennifer; Fazel, Ali; Pelletier, Amélie; Morré, D. James; Subramaniam, V. Nathan; Hong, Wanjin; Paiement, Jacques

    2000-01-01

    Transitional endoplasmic reticulum (tER) consists of confluent rough and smooth endoplasmic reticulum (ER) domains. In a cell-free incubation system, low-density microsomes (1.17 g cc−1) isolated from rat liver homogenates reconstitute tER by Mg2+GTP- and Mg2+ATP-hydrolysis–dependent membrane fusion. The ATPases associated with different cellular activities protein p97 has been identified as the relevant ATPase. The ATP depletion by hexokinase or treatment with either N-ethylmaleimide or anti-p97 prevented assembly of the smooth ER domain of tER. High-salt washing of low-density microsomes inhibited assembly of the smooth ER domain of tER, whereas the readdition of purified p97 with associated p47 promoted reconstitution. The t-SNARE syntaxin 5 was observed within the smooth ER domain of tER, and antisyntaxin 5 abrogated formation of this same membrane compartment. Thus, p97 and syntaxin 5 regulate assembly of the smooth ER domain of tER and hence one of the earliest membrane differentiated components of the secretory pathway. PMID:10930451

  10. A functional equivalent of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi in axons for secretion of locally synthesized proteins

    PubMed Central

    Merianda, Tanuja T.; Lin, Andrew C.; Lam, Joyce S.Y.; Vuppalanchi, Deepika; Willis, Dianna E.; Karin, Norman; Holt, Christine E.; Twiss, Jeffery L.

    2013-01-01

    Subcellular localization of protein synthesis provides a means to regulate the protein composition in far reaches of a cell. This localized protein synthesis gives neuronal processes autonomy to rapidly respond to extracellular stimuli. Locally synthesized axonal proteins enable neurons to respond to guidance cues and can help to initiate regeneration after injury. Most studies of axonal mRNA translation have concentrated on cytoplasmic proteins. While ultrastructural studies suggest that axons do not have rough endoplasmic reticulum or Golgi apparatus, mRNAs for transmembrane and secreted proteins localize to axons. Here, we show that growing axons with protein synthetic activity contain ER and Golgi components needed for classical protein synthesis and secretion. Isolated axons have the capacity to traffic locally synthesized proteins into secretory pathways and inhibition of Golgi function attenuates translation-dependent axonal growth responses. Finally, the capacity for secreting locally synthesized proteins in axons appears to be increased by injury. PMID:19022387

  11. Taking organelles apart, putting them back together and creating new ones: lessons from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Christine; Roy, Line; Lanoix, Joël; Taheri, Mariam; Young, Robin; Thibault, Geneviève; Farah, Carol Abi; Leclerc, Nicole; Paiement, Jacques

    2011-06-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a highly dynamic organelle. It is composed of four subcompartments including nuclear envelope (NE), rough ER (rER), smooth ER (sER) and transitional ER (tER). The subcompartments are interconnected, can fragment and dissociate and are able to reassemble again. They coordinate with cell function by way of protein regulators in the surrounding cytosol. The activity of the many associated molecular machines of the ER as well as the fluid nature of the limiting membrane of the ER contribute extensively to the dynamics of the ER. This review examines the properties of the ER that permit its isolation and purification and the physiological conditions that permit reconstitution both in vitro and in vivo in normal and in disease conditions.

  12. Mutations in the SPTLC1 protein cause mitochondrial structural abnormalities and endoplasmic reticulum stress in lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Myers, Simon J; Malladi, Chandra S; Hyland, Ryan A; Bautista, Tara; Boadle, Ross; Robinson, Phillip J; Nicholson, Garth A

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase long chain subunit 1 (SPTLC1) cause the typical length-dependent axonal degeneration hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 (HSN1). Transmission electron microscopy studies on SPTLC1 mutant lymphoblasts derived from patients revealed specific structural abnormalities of mitochondria. Swollen mitochondria with abnormal cristae were clustered around the nucleus, with some mitochondria being wrapped in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. Total mitochondrial counts revealed a significant change in mitochondrial numbers between healthy and diseased lymphocytes but did not reveal any change in length to width ratios nor were there any changes to cellular function. However, there was a notable change in ER homeostasis, as assessed using key ER stress markers, BiP and ERO1-Lα, displaying reduced protein expression. The observations suggest that SPTLC1 mutations cause mitochondrial abnormalities and ER stress in HSN1 cells. PMID:24673574

  13. Inhibition of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Improves Mouse Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin Yu; Diao, Yun Fei; Kim, Hong Rye; Jin, Dong Il

    2012-01-01

    X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1) is an important regulator of a subset of genes during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. In the current study, we analyzed endogenous XBP-1 expression and localization, with a view to determining the effects of ER stress on the developmental competency of preimplantation embryos in mice. Fluorescence staining revealed that functional XBP-1 is localized on mature oocyte spindles and abundant in the nucleus at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage. However, in preimplantation embryos, XBP-1 was solely detected in the cytoplasm at the one-cell stage. The density of XBP-1 was higher in the nucleus than the cytoplasm at the two-cell, four-cell, eight-cell, morula, and blastocyst stages. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis confirmed active XBP-1 mRNA splicing at all preimplantation embryo stages, except the one-cell stage. Tunicamycin (TM), an ER stress inducer used as a positive control, promoted an increase in the density of nuclear XBP-1 at the one-cell and two-cell stages. Similarly, culture medium supplemented with 25 mM sorbitol displayed a remarkable increase active XBP-1 expression in the nuclei of 1-cell and 2-cell embryos. Conversely, high concentrations of TM or sorbitol led to reduced nuclear XBP-1 density and significant ER stress-induced apoptosis. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), a known inhibitor of ER stress, improved the rate of two-cell embryo development to blastocysts by attenuating the expression of active XBP-1 protein in the nucleus at the two-cell stage. Our data collectively suggest that endogenous XBP-1 plays a role in normal preimplantation embryonic development. Moreover, XBP-1 splicing is activated to generate a functional form in mouse preimplantation embryos during culture stress. TUDCA inhibits hyperosmolar-induced ER stress as well as ER stress-induced apoptosis during mouse preimplantation embryo development. PMID:22808162

  14. Rough Clustering for Cancer Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herawan, Tutut

    Cancer is becoming a leading cause of death among people in the whole world. It is confirmed that the early detection and accurate diagnosis of this disease can ensure a long survival of the patients. Expert systems and machine learning techniques are gaining popularity in this field because of the effective classification and high diagnostic capability. This paper presents the application of rough set theory for clustering two cancer datasets. These datasets are taken from UCI ML repository. The method is based on MDA technique proposed by [11]. To select a clustering attribute, the maximal degree of the rough attributes dependencies in categorical-valued information systems is used. Further, we use a divide-and-conquer method to partition/cluster the objects. The results show that MDA technique can be used to cluster to the data. Further, we present clusters visualization using two dimensional plot. The plot results provide user friendly navigation to understand the cluster obtained.

  15. Sensing roughness and polish direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, M. L.; Olesen, A. S.; Larsen, H. E.; Stubager, J.; Hanson, S. G.; Pedersen, T. F.; Pedersen, H. C.

    2016-04-01

    As a part of the work carried out on a project supported by the Danish council for technology and innovation, we have investigated the option of smoothing standard CNC machined surfaces. In the process of constructing optical prototypes, involving custom-designed optics, the development cost and time consumption can become relatively large numbers in a research budget. Machining the optical surfaces directly is expensive and time consuming. Alternatively, a more standardized and cheaper machining method can be used, but then the object needs to be manually polished. During the polishing process the operator needs information about the RMS-value of the surface roughness and the current direction of the scratches introduces by the polishing process. The RMS-value indicates to the operator how far he is from the final finish, and the scratch orientation is often specified by the customer in order to avoid complications during the casting process. In this work we present a method for measuring the RMS-values of the surface roughness while simultaneously determining the polishing direction. We are mainly interested in the RMS-values in the range from 0 - 100 nm, which corresponds to the finish categories of A1, A2 and A3. Based on simple intensity measurements we estimates the RMS-value of the surface roughness, and by using a sectioned annual photo-detector to collect the scattered light we can determine the direction of polishing and distinguish light scattered from random structures and light scattered from scratches.

  16. Activation of autophagy by unfolded proteins during endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaochen; Srivastava, Renu; Howell, Stephen H; Bassham, Diane C

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is defined as the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, and is caused by conditions such as heat or agents that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress, including tunicamycin and dithiothreitol. Autophagy, a major pathway for degradation of macromolecules in the vacuole, is activated by these stress agents in a manner dependent on inositol-requiring enzyme 1b (IRE1b), and delivers endoplasmic reticulum fragments to the vacuole for degradation. In this study, we examined the mechanism for activation of autophagy during endoplasmic reticulum stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. The chemical chaperones sodium 4-phenylbutyrate and tauroursodeoxycholic acid were found to reduce tunicamycin- or dithiothreitol-induced autophagy, but not autophagy caused by unrelated stresses. Similarly, over-expression of BINDING IMMUNOGLOBULIN PROTEIN (BIP), encoding a heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) molecular chaperone, reduced autophagy. Autophagy activated by heat stress was also found to be partially dependent on IRE1b and to be inhibited by sodium 4-phenylbutyrate, suggesting that heat-induced autophagy is due to accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression in Arabidopsis of the misfolded protein mimics zeolin or a mutated form of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY*) also induced autophagy in an IRE1b-dependent manner. Moreover, zeolin and CPY* partially co-localized with the autophagic body marker GFP-ATG8e, indicating delivery to the vacuole by autophagy. We conclude that accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum is a trigger for autophagy under conditions that cause endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:26616142

  17. Mechanisms resulting in accreted ice roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanin, Alan J.; Chua, Kiat

    1992-01-01

    Icing tests conducted on rotating cylinders in the BF Goodrich's Icing Research Facility indicate that a regular, deterministic, icing roughness pattern is typical. The roughness pattern is similar to kernels of corn on a cob for cylinders of diameter typical of a cob. An analysis is undertaken to determine the mechanisms which result in this roughness to ascertain surface scale and amplitude of roughness. Since roughness and the resulting augmentation of the convected heat transfer coefficient has been determined to most strongly control the accreted ice in ice prediction codes, the ability to predict a priori, location, amplitude and surface scale of roughness would greatly augment the capabilities of current ice accretion models.

  18. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ulianich, Luca; Insabato, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is a common gynecologic malignancy often diagnosed at early stage. In spite of a huge advance in our understanding of EC biology, therapeutic modalities do not have significantly changed over the past 40 years. A restricted number of genes have been reported to be mutated in EC, mediating cell proliferation and invasiveness. However, besides these alterations, few other groups and ourselves recently identified the activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) and GRP78 increase following endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as mechanisms favoring growth and invasion of EC cells. Here, a concise update on currently available data in the field is presented, analyzing the crosstalk between the UPR and the main signaling pathways regulating EC cell proliferation and survival. It is evident that this is a rapidly expanding and promising issue. However, more data are very likely to yield a better understanding on the mechanisms through which EC cells can survive the low oxygen and glucose tumor microenvironment. In this perspective, the UPR and, particularly, GRP78 might constitute a novel target for the treatment of EC in combination with traditional adjuvant therapy. PMID:25593927

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in periimplantation embryos.

    PubMed

    Michalak, Marek; Gye, Myung Chan

    2015-03-01

    Stress coping mechanisms are critical to minimize or overcome damage caused by ever changing environmental conditions. They are designed to promote cell survival. The unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway is mobilized in response to the accumulation of unfolded proteins, ultimately in order to regain endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis. Various elements of coping responses to ER stress including Perk, Ask1, Bip, Chop, Gadd34, Ire1, Atf4, Atf6, and Xbp1 have been identified and were found to be inducible in oocytes and preimplantation embryos, suggesting that, as a normal part of the cellular adaptive mechanism, these coping responses, including the UPR, play a pivotal role in the development of preimplantation embryos. As such, the UPR-associated molecules and pathways may become useful markers for the potential diagnosis of stress conditions for preimplantation embryos. After implantation, ER stress-induced coping responses become physiologically important for a normal decidual response, placentation, and early organogenesis. Attenuation of ER stress coping responses by tauroursodeoxycholate and salubrinal was effective for prevention of cell death of cultured embryos. Further elucidation of new and relevant ER stress coping responses in periimplantation embryos might contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the regulation of normal development of embryonic development and potentiation of embryonic development in vitro. PMID:25874167

  20. Shaping the endoplasmic reticulum in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ferencz, Csilla-Maria; Guigas, Gernot; Veres, Andreas; Neumann, Brigitte; Stemmann, Olaf; Weiss, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    Organelles in eukaryotic cells often have complex shapes that deviate significantly from simple spheres. A prime example is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that forms an extensive network of membrane tubules in many mammalian cell types and in reconstitution assays in vitro. Despite the successful hunt for molecular determinants of ER shape we are still far from having a comprehensive understanding of ER network morphogenesis. Here, we have studied the hitherto neglected influence of the host substrate when reconstituting ER networks in vitro as compared to ER networks in vivo. In culture cells we observed cytoplasm-spanning ER networks with tubules being connected almost exclusively by three-way junctions and segment lengths being narrowly distributed around a mean length of about 1μm. In contrast, networks reconstituted from purified ER microsomes on flat glass or gel substrates of varying stiffness showed significantly broader length distributions with an up to fourfold larger mean length. Self-assembly of ER microsomes on small oil droplets, however, yielded networks that resembled more closely the native ER network of mammalian cells. We conclude from these observations that the ER microsomes' inherent self-assembly capacity is sufficient to support network formation with a native geometry if the influence of the host substrate's surface chemistry becomes negligible. We hypothesize that under these conditions the networks' preference for three-way junctions follows from creating 'starfish-shaped' vesicles when ER microsomes with a protein-induced spontaneous curvature undergo fusion. PMID:27287725

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Genome Damage, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dicks, Naomi; Gutierrez, Karina; Michalak, Marek; Bordignon, Vilceu; Agellon, Luis B.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been linked to many diseases, including cancer. A large body of work has focused on the activation of the ER stress response in cancer cells to facilitate their survival and tumor growth; however, there are some studies suggesting that the ER stress response can also mitigate cancer progression. Despite these contradictions, it is clear that the ER stress response is closely associated with cancer biology. The ER stress response classically encompasses activation of three separate pathways, which are collectively categorized the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR has been extensively studied in various cancers and appears to confer a selective advantage to tumor cells to facilitate their enhanced growth and resistance to anti-cancer agents. It has also been shown that ER stress induces chromatin changes, which can also facilitate cell survival. Chromatin remodeling has been linked with many cancers through repression of tumor suppressor and apoptosis genes. Interplay between the classic UPR and genome damage repair mechanisms may have important implications in the transformation process of normal cells into cancer cells. PMID:25692096

  2. Intelligent Information Retrieval Using Rough Set Approximations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Srinivasan, Padmini

    1989-01-01

    Describes rough sets theory and discusses the advantages it offers for information retrieval, including the implicit inclusion of Boolean logic, term weighting, ranked retrieval output, and relevance feedback. Rough set formalism is compared to Boolean, vector, and fuzzy models of information retrieval and a small scale evaluation of rough sets is…

  3. Electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Moran; Kang, Qinjun

    2008-01-01

    We present a numerical framework to model the electrokinetic transport in microchannels with random roughness. The three-dimensional microstructure of the rough channel is generated by a random generation-growth method with three statistical parameters to control the number density, the total volume fraction, and the anisotropy characteristics of roughness elements. The governing equations for the electrokinetic transport are solved by a high-efficiency lattice Poisson?Boltzmann method in complex geometries. The effects from the geometric characteristics of roughness on the electrokinetic transport in microchannels are therefore modeled and analyzed. For a given total roughness volume fraction, a higher number density leads to a lower fluctuation because of the random factors. The electroosmotic flow rate increases with the roughness number density nearly logarithmically for a given volume fraction of roughness but decreases with the volume fraction for a given roughness number density. When both the volume fraction and the number density of roughness are given, the electroosmotic flow rate is enhanced by the increase of the characteristic length along the external electric field direction but is reduced by that in the direction across the channel. For a given microstructure of the rough microchannel, the electroosmotic flow rate decreases with the Debye length. It is found that the shape resistance of roughness is responsible for the flow rate reduction in the rough channel compared to the smooth channel even for very thin double layers, and hence plays an important role in microchannel electroosmotic flows.

  4. Nox NADPH Oxidases and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Thaís L.S.; Abrahão, Thalita B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Understanding isoform- and context-specific subcellular Nox reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase compartmentalization allows relevant functional inferences. This review addresses the interplay between Nox NADPH oxidases and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an increasingly evident player in redox pathophysiology given its role in redox protein folding and stress responses. Recent Advances: Catalytic/regulatory transmembrane subunits are synthesized in the ER and their processing includes folding, N-glycosylation, heme insertion, p22phox heterodimerization, as shown for phagocyte Nox2. Dual oxidase (Duox) maturation also involves the regulation by ER-resident Duoxa2. The ER is the activation site for some isoforms, typically Nox4, but potentially other isoforms. Such location influences redox/Nox-mediated calcium signaling regulation via ER targets, such as sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). Growing evidence suggests that Noxes are integral signaling elements of the unfolded protein response during ER stress, with Nox4 playing a dual prosurvival/proapoptotic role in this setting, whereas Nox2 enhances proapoptotic signaling. ER chaperones such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) closely interact with Noxes. PDI supports growth factor-dependent Nox1 activation and mRNA expression, as well as migration in smooth muscle cells, and PDI overexpression induces acute spontaneous Nox activation. Critical Issues: Mechanisms of PDI effects include possible support of complex formation and RhoGTPase activation. In phagocytes, PDI supports phagocytosis, Nox activation, and redox-dependent interactions with p47phox. Together, the results implicate PDI as possible Nox organizer. Future Directions: We propose that convergence between Noxes and ER may have evolutive roots given ER-related functional contexts, which paved Nox evolution, namely calcium signaling and pathogen killing. Overall, the interplay between

  5. Extensive wetting due to roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.; Michael, J.R.; Eisenmann, E.T. . Center for Solder Science and Technology)

    1995-01-01

    Typically, a small mass of eutectic Sn-Pb solder wets a copper surface and flows radially outward to form a hemispherical shape with a contact angle of approx. 15--20 deg. When a similar mass of solder wets and thick electroless copper coated substrate, rapid radial flow commences and surprising new effects occur. Thick coats of electroless copper have a nodular surface structure and spreading on it does not subside until all solder is consumed. When the nodular structure is wetted by solder a coastline'' with many nearby islands'' are defined. Photos of regions at the wetting front were taken in the backscatter imaging mode of an SEM. These images show that solder wets the valleys between the surface nodules forming a delicate, lacy arrangement. The geometry of this coastal'' solder structure is described as fractal-like having a dimension D = 1.38 making it similar to drying fronts and cloud configurations. The importance of surface roughness in wetting phenomena is discussed in the light of an extensive history on the subject. It is shown that for spontaneous flow, assisted by roughness, the surface geometry must consist of local angles that are larger than the equilibrium contact angle. Kinetics of the wetting process are demonstrated by image analysis of wetted area taken from videotaped experiments. These experimental kinetics are shown to be similar in form to flow in open channel capillaries.

  6. Calibration of surface roughness standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmann, R.; Nicolet, A.; Meli, F.; Picotto, G. B.; Matus, M.; Carcedo, L.; Hemming, B.; Ganioglu, O.; De Chiffre, L.; Saraiva, F.; Bergstrand, S.; Zelenika, S.; Tonmueanwai, A.; Tsai, C.-L.; Shihua, W.; Kruger, O.; de Souza, M. M.; Salgado, J. A.; Ramotowski, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The key comparison EURAMET.L-K8.2013 on roughness was carried out in the framework of a EURAMET project starting in 2013 and ending in 2015. It involved the participation of 17 National Metrology Institutes from Europe, Asia, South America and Africa representing four regional metrology organisations. Five surface texture standards of different type were circulated and on each of the standards several roughness parameters according to the standard ISO 4287 had to be determined. 32 out of 395 individual results were not consistent with the reference value. After some corrective actions the number of inconsistent results could be reduced to 20, which correspond to about 5% of the total and can statistically be expected. In addition to the material standards, two softgauges were circulated, which allow to test the software of the instruments used in the comparison. The comparison results help to support the calibraton and measurement capabilities (CMCs) of the laboratories involved in the CIPM MRA. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCL, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. Role of syntaxin 18 in the organization of endoplasmic reticulum subdomains.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Takayuki; Aoki, Takehiro; Arasaki, Kohei; Hirose, Hidenori; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Samata, Rie; Hauri, Hans-Peter; Arimitsu, Nagisa; Tagaya, Mitsuo; Tani, Katsuko

    2009-05-15

    The presence of subdomains in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) enables this organelle to perform a variety of functions, yet the mechanisms underlying their organization are poorly understood. In the present study, we show that syntaxin 18, a SNAP (soluble NSF attachment protein) receptor localized in the ER, is important for the organization of two ER subdomains, smooth/rough ER membranes and ER exit sites. Knockdown of syntaxin 18 caused a global change in ER membrane architecture, leading to the segregation of the smooth and rough ER. Furthermore, the organization of ER exit sites was markedly changed concomitantly with dispersion of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment and the Golgi complex. These morphological changes in the ER were substantially recovered by treatment of syntaxin-18-depleted cells with brefeldin A, a reagent that stimulates retrograde membrane flow to the ER. These results suggest that syntaxin 18 has an important role in ER subdomain organization by mediating the fusion of retrograde membrane carriers with the ER membrane.

  8. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes.

  9. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes. PMID:25143584

  10. Spherical wave reflection in layered media with rough interfaces: Three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Samuel; Cordioli, Julio; Guillon, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    In the context of sediment characterization, layer interface roughnesses may be responsible for sound-speed profile measurement uncertainties. To study the roughness influence, a three-dimensional (3D) modeling of a layered seafloor with rough interfaces is necessary. Although roughness scattering has an abundant literature, 3D modeling of spherical wave reflection on rough interfaces is generally limited to a single interface (using Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral) or computationally expensive techniques (finite difference or finite element method). In this work, it is demonstrated that the wave reflection over a layered medium with irregular interfaces can be modeled as a sum of integrals over each interface. The main approximations of the method are the tangent-plane approximation, the Born approximation (multiple reflection between interfaces are neglected) and flat-interface approximation for the transmitted waves into the sediment. The integration over layer interfaces results in a method with reasonable computation cost.

  11. Spherical wave reflection in layered media with rough interfaces: Three-dimensional modeling.

    PubMed

    Pinson, Samuel; Cordioli, Julio; Guillon, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    In the context of sediment characterization, layer interface roughnesses may be responsible for sound-speed profile measurement uncertainties. To study the roughness influence, a three-dimensional (3D) modeling of a layered seafloor with rough interfaces is necessary. Although roughness scattering has an abundant literature, 3D modeling of spherical wave reflection on rough interfaces is generally limited to a single interface (using Kirchhoff-Helmholtz integral) or computationally expensive techniques (finite difference or finite element method). In this work, it is demonstrated that the wave reflection over a layered medium with irregular interfaces can be modeled as a sum of integrals over each interface. The main approximations of the method are the tangent-plane approximation, the Born approximation (multiple reflection between interfaces are neglected) and flat-interface approximation for the transmitted waves into the sediment. The integration over layer interfaces results in a method with reasonable computation cost. PMID:27586741

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Malhi, Harmeet; Kaufman, Randal J

    2011-04-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated upon the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are sensed by the binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP)/glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78). The accumulation of unfolded proteins sequesters BiP so it dissociates from three ER-transmembrane transducers leading to their activation. These transducers are inositol requiring (IRE) 1α, PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), and activating transcription factor (ATF) 6α. PERK phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) resulting in global mRNA translation attenuation, and concurrently selectively increases the translation of several mRNAs, including the transcription factor ATF4, and its downstream target CHOP. IRE1α has kinase and endoribonuclease (RNase) activities. IRE1α autophosphorylation activates the RNase activity to splice XBP1 mRNA, to produce the active transcription factor sXBP1. IRE1α activation also recruits and activates the stress kinase JNK. ATF6α transits to the Golgi compartment where it is cleaved by intramembrane proteolysis to generate a soluble active transcription factor. These UPR pathways act in concert to increase ER content, expand the ER protein folding capacity, degrade misfolded proteins, and reduce the load of new proteins entering the ER. All of these are geared toward adaptation to resolve the protein folding defect. Faced with persistent ER stress, adaptation starts to fail and apoptosis occurs, possibly mediated through calcium perturbations, reactive oxygen species, and the proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP. The UPR is activated in several liver diseases; including obesity associated fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, and alcohol-induced liver injury, all of which are associated with steatosis, raising the possibility that ER stress-dependent alteration in lipid homeostasis is the mechanism that underlies the steatosis. Hepatocyte apoptosis is a pathogenic event in several liver

  13. Endoplasmic motility spectral characteristics in plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avsievich, T. I.; Ghaleb, K. E. S.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2015-03-01

    Spectral Fourier analysis of experimentally acquired velocity time dependencies, V(t), of shuttle endoplasmic motility in an isolated strand of plasmodium of slime mold Physarum Polycephalum has been realized. V(t) registration was performed in normal conditions and after the treatment by respiration inhibitors, which lead to a complete cessation of endoplasmic motion in the strand. Spectral analysis of the velocity time dependences of the endoplasm allows obtaining two distinct harmonic components in the spectra. Their ratio appeared to be constant in all cases, ν2/ν1=1.97±0.17. After the inhibitors are washed out respiratory system becomes normal, gradually restoring the activity of both harmonic oscillatory sources with time. Simulated velocity time dependences correspond to experimental data with good accuracy.

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation and Lipid Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Julian; Huang, Edmond Y; Olzmann, James A

    2016-07-17

    The endoplasmic reticulum is the port of entry for proteins into the secretory pathway and the site of synthesis for several important lipids, including cholesterol, triacylglycerol, and phospholipids. Protein production within the endoplasmic reticulum is tightly regulated by a cohort of resident machinery that coordinates the folding, modification, and deployment of secreted and integral membrane proteins. Proteins failing to attain their native conformation are degraded through the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway via a series of tightly coupled steps: substrate recognition, dislocation, and ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal destruction. The same ERAD machinery also controls the flux through various metabolic pathways by coupling the turnover of metabolic enzymes to the levels of key metabolites. We review the current understanding and biological significance of ERAD-mediated regulation of lipid metabolism in mammalian cells. PMID:27296502

  15. Presenilin 2 Modulates Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondria Coupling by Tuning the Antagonistic Effect of Mitofusin 2.

    PubMed

    Filadi, Riccardo; Greotti, Elisa; Turacchio, Gabriele; Luini, Alberto; Pozzan, Tullio; Pizzo, Paola

    2016-06-01

    Communication between organelles plays key roles in cell biology. In particular, physical and functional coupling of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria is crucial for regulation of various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here, we demonstrate that Presenilin 2 (PS2), mutations in which underlie familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD), promotes ER-mitochondria coupling only in the presence of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2). PS2 is not necessary for the antagonistic effect of Mfn2 on organelle coupling, although its abundance can tune it. The two proteins physically interact, whereas their homologues Mfn1 and PS1 are dispensable for this interplay. Moreover, PS2 mutants associated with FAD are more effective than the wild-type form in modulating ER-mitochondria tethering because their binding to Mfn2 in mitochondria-associated membranes is favored. We propose a revised model for ER-mitochondria interaction to account for these findings and discuss possible implications for FAD pathogenesis. PMID:27239030

  16. Influence of surface roughness on gecko adhesion.

    PubMed

    Huber, Gerrit; Gorb, Stanislav N; Hosoda, Naoe; Spolenak, Ralph; Arzt, Eduard

    2007-07-01

    In this study we show the influence of surface roughness on gecko adhesion on both the nano- and macroscales. We present experimental data for the force necessary to pull off single spatulae from hard rough substrates and also detail observations on living geckos clinging to various surfaces. Both experiments consistently show that the effective adhesion shows a minimum for a root mean square roughness ranging from 100 to 300nm.

  17. Rough set models of Physarum machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancerz, Krzysztof; Schumann, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we consider transition system models of behaviour of Physarum machines in terms of rough set theory. A Physarum machine, a biological computing device implemented in the plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum (true slime mould), is a natural transition system. In the behaviour of Physarum machines, one can notice some ambiguity in Physarum motions that influences exact anticipation of states of machines in time. To model this ambiguity, we propose to use rough set models created over transition systems. Rough sets are an appropriate tool to deal with rough (ambiguous, imprecise) concepts in the universe of discourse.

  18. Simplified Approach to Predicting Rough Surface Transition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Stripf, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Turbine vane heat transfer predictions are given for smooth and rough vanes where the experimental data show transition moving forward on the vane as the surface roughness physical height increases. Consiste nt with smooth vane heat transfer, the transition moves forward for a fixed roughness height as the Reynolds number increases. Comparison s are presented with published experimental data. Some of the data ar e for a regular roughness geometry with a range of roughness heights, Reynolds numbers, and inlet turbulence intensities. The approach ta ken in this analysis is to treat the roughness in a statistical sense , consistent with what would be obtained from blades measured after e xposure to actual engine environments. An approach is given to determ ine the equivalent sand grain roughness from the statistics of the re gular geometry. This approach is guided by the experimental data. A roughness transition criterion is developed, and comparisons are made with experimental data over the entire range of experimental test co nditions. Additional comparisons are made with experimental heat tran sfer data, where the roughness geometries are both regular as well a s statistical. Using the developed analysis, heat transfer calculatio ns are presented for the second stage vane of a high pressure turbine at hypothetical engine conditions.

  19. Solar abundance of osmium

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    The abundance parameter, log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance (by numbers of atoms with respect to hydrogen), has been derived for three lines of osmium by a method of spectrum synthesis. An apparent discordance of the derived abundance with that found from the carbonaceous chondrites is probably to be attributed primarily to errors in the f-values, and blending with unknown contributors. PMID:16592314

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and proteasomal system in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Karademir, Betul; Corek, Ceyda; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal

    2015-11-01

    Protein processing including folding, unfolding and degradation is involved in the mechanisms of many diseases. Unfolded protein response and/or endoplasmic reticulum stress are accepted to be the first steps which should be completed via protein degradation. In this direction, proteasomal system and autophagy play important role as the degradation pathways and controlled via complex mechanisms. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disease which is also known as the most catastrophic one. Mutation of many different genes are involved in the pathogenesis such as superoxide dismutase 1, chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 and ubiquilin 2. These genes are mainly related to the antioxidant defense systems, endoplasmic reticulum stress related proteins and also protein aggregation, degradation pathways and therefore mutation of these genes cause related disorders.This review focused on the role of protein processing via endoplasmic reticulum and proteasomal system in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis which are the main players in the pathology. In this direction, dysfunction of endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation and related cell death mechanisms that are autophagy/apoptosis have been detailed.

  1. Rheological properties of living cytoplasm: endoplasm of Physarum plasmodium.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Wong, T Z; Allen, R D

    1983-10-01

    Magnetic sphere viscoelastometry, video microscopy, and the Kamiya double chamber method (Kamiya, N., 1940, Science [Wash. DC], 92:462-463.) have been combined in an optical and rheological investigation of the living endoplasm of Physarum polycephalum. The rheological properties examined were yield stress, viscosity (as a function of shear), and elasticity. These parameters were evaluated in directions perpendicular; (X) and parallel (Y) to the plasmodial vein. Known magnetic forces were used for measurements in the X direction, while the falling ball technique was used in the Y direction (Cygan, D.A., and B. Caswell, 1971, Trans. Soc. Rheol. 15:663-683; MacLean-Fletcher, S.D., and T.D. Pollard, 1980, J. Cell Biol., 85:414-428). Approximate yield stresses were calculated in the X and Y directions of 0.58 and 1.05 dyn/cm2, respectively. Apparent viscosities measured in the two directions (eta x and eta y) were found to fluctuate with time. The fluctuations in eta x and eta y were shown, statistically, to occur independently of each other. Frequency correlation with dynamoplasmograms indicated that these fluctuations probably occur independently of the streaming cycle. Viscosity was found to be a complex function of shear, indicating that the endoplasm is non-Newtonian. Plots of shear stress vs. rate of shear both parallel and perpendicular to the vein, showed that endoplasm is not a shear thinning material. These experiments have shown that living endoplasm of Physarum is an anisotropic viscoelastic fluid with a yield stress. The endoplasm appears not to be a homogeneous material, but to be composed of heterogeneous domains. PMID:6619187

  2. Global distribution of microbial abundance and biomass in subseafloor sediment

    PubMed Central

    Kallmeyer, Jens; Pockalny, Robert; Adhikari, Rishi Ram; Smith, David C.; D’Hondt, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The global geographic distribution of subseafloor sedimentary microbes and the cause(s) of that distribution are largely unexplored. Here, we show that total microbial cell abundance in subseafloor sediment varies between sites by ca. five orders of magnitude. This variation is strongly correlated with mean sedimentation rate and distance from land. Based on these correlations, we estimate global subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance to be 2.9⋅1029 cells [corresponding to 4.1 petagram (Pg) C and ∼0.6% of Earth’s total living biomass]. This estimate of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance is roughly equal to previous estimates of total microbial abundance in seawater and total microbial abundance in soil. It is much lower than previous estimates of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance. In consequence, we estimate Earth’s total number of microbes and total living biomass to be, respectively, 50–78% and 10–45% lower than previous estimates. PMID:22927371

  3. Specular Reflection from Rough Surfaces Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasuda, Kensei; Kim, Alvin; Cho, Hayley; Timofejev, Timofej; Walecki, Wojciech J.; Klep, James; Edelson, Amy S.; Walecki, Abigail S.; Walecki, Eve S.; Walecki, Peter S.

    2016-01-01

    In his beautiful paper, Hasan Fakhruddin reported observations of mirror-like reflections in the rough surface of a ground glass plate. Similar effects have been recently employed for metrology of the roughness of optical diffusers used in modern light emitting device illumination systems. We report the observations of specular reflection in…

  4. Computational Methods for Rough Classification and Discovery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, D. A.; Guan, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    Rough set theory is a new mathematical tool to deal with vagueness and uncertainty. Computational methods are presented for using rough sets to identify classes in datasets, finding dependencies in relations, and discovering rules which are hidden in databases. The methods are illustrated with a running example from a database of car test results.…

  5. Roughness configuration matters for aeolian sediment flux

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The parameterisation of surface roughness effects on aeolian sediment transport is a key source of uncertainty in wind erosion models. Roughness effects are typically represented by bulk drag-partitioning schemes that scale the threshold friction velocity (u*t) for soil entrainment by the ratio of s...

  6. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Svoboda, Martin; Lísal, Martin; Malijevský, Alexandr

    2015-09-14

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel’s law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves.

  7. Reaction of sorghum lines to zonate leaf spot and rough leaf spot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abundant, frequent rains, along with humid and cloudy conditions during the early part of the 2015 growing season, provided conducive conditions for an unusually severe outbreak of zonate leaf spot and rough leaf spot in a block of sorghum lines at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research Farm, Burleson Coun...

  8. Specular Reflection from Rough Surfaces Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Kensei; Kim, Alvin; Cho, Hayley; Timofejev, Timofej; Walecki, Wojciech J.; Klep, James; Edelson, Amy S.; Walecki, Abigail S.; Walecki, Eve S.; Walecki, Peter S.

    2016-10-01

    In his beautiful paper, Hasan Fakhruddin reported observations of mirror-like reflections in the rough surface of a ground glass plate. Similar effects have been recently employed for metrology of the roughness of optical diffusers used in modern light emitting device illumination systems. We report the observations of specular reflection in nontransparent rough surfaces at oblique angles, where roughness was treated as a variable. We present a simple trigonometry-based model explaining the observed phenomenon, which we experimentally validated using aluminum surfaces that have controlled roughness. The reported demonstration requires no special equipment, other than cellphone cameras, dielectric or metal plate, and sandpaper, and serves as an introduction to wave optics. This activity can be used to get further insight into everyday applications of wave optics for students already familiar with wave optics fundamentals.

  9. Modeling surface roughness scattering in metallic nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Moors, Kristof; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim

    2015-09-28

    Ando's model provides a rigorous quantum-mechanical framework for electron-surface roughness scattering, based on the detailed roughness structure. We apply this method to metallic nanowires and improve the model introducing surface roughness distribution functions on a finite domain with analytical expressions for the average surface roughness matrix elements. This approach is valid for any roughness size and extends beyond the commonly used Prange-Nee approximation. The resistivity scaling is obtained from the self-consistent relaxation time solution of the Boltzmann transport equation and is compared to Prange-Nee's approach and other known methods. The results show that a substantial drop in resistivity can be obtained for certain diameters by achieving a large momentum gap between Fermi level states with positive and negative momentum in the transport direction.

  10. Measurement and prediction of rough wall effects on friction factor - Uniform roughness results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaggs, W. F.; Taylor, Robert P.; Coleman, Hugh W.

    The results of an experimental investigation of the effects of surface roughness on turbulent pipe flow friction factors are presented and compared with predictions from a previously published discrete element roughness model. Friction factor data were acquired over a pipe Reynolds number range from 10,000 to 600,000 for nine different uniformly rough surfaces. These surfaces covered a range of roughness element sizes, spacings and shapes. Predictions from the discrete element roughness model were in very good agreement with the data.

  11. On the roughness measurement on knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Sami Abdel; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Battaglia, Santina; Affatato, Saverio

    2015-01-01

    The majority of total knee replacements currently implanted present an articulation composed of two metal parts, femoral and tibial components, between which there is a polyethylene insert serving as a bearing surface. The finishing surface of the metal components is a very important factor in minimizing the polyethylene wear rate and, later, the gradual production of metal and plastic debris. Considering the role of surface roughness on volumetric wear rates, the purpose of this study is to develop a protocol for the roughness characterization of total knee prosthesis (TKP) metal components, taking into consideration a limited number of points on each surface. Six mobile TKP of different sizes (three size 2 and three size 6) were tested on a knee joint simulator to compare the wear behavior of each group. After 2 million cycles the weight loss by the polyethylene inserts was measured with gravimetric method and the surface roughness of the metallic components was assessed in terms of average surface roughness, Ra, skewness, Rsk, and total roughness, Rt. Roughness measurement involved 29 points on each femoral condyle and 26 points on each metal tibial plate. The data collected has shown an increased roughness upon wear testing for both the investigated TKP sizes. No statistical differences were observed between the two groups for both the parameters Ra, Rsk, and Rt. The surface of all metallic components became more negatively skewed, indicating diminishing peaks. The various parameters were correlated to the volumetric loss using a linear regression analysis. PMID:25588764

  12. Heat transfer to rough turbine blading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarada, Fathi Hasan Ali

    1987-12-01

    The project arose from an industrial interest in the quantification of the effects of external surface roughness on the temperatures, both local and means, of internally cooled gas turbine blades, with a view to estimating the possible changes in operating life. Such roughness may occur due to the process involved in the production of the blades or during operation in hostile environments. A dual theoretical and experimental approach was employed to better understand and predict the complex mechanisms influencing the boundary-layer heat transfer on turbine blade surfaces. In order to quantify typical blade roughness levels, a blade roughness survey was undertaken as a pre-cursor to the experimental investigations. The experimental component consisted of heat transfer measurements to one rotor blade and two nozzle guide vanes, with different levels and types of external surface roughness, and with and without significant free-stream turbulence intensity, using two heat transfer measurement techniques. The (dominant) theoretical component comprised the derivation of a low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model, supplemented by an algebraic stress model, for rough curved boundary layer flow, and the development of topographical models of stochastic surface roughness. Computer programs were written to implement the theoretical models developed, and extensive validation tests were conducted with reference to published data sets.

  13. Turbulent flow in smooth and rough pipes.

    PubMed

    Allen, J J; Shockling, M A; Kunkel, G J; Smits, A J

    2007-03-15

    Recent experiments at Princeton University have revealed aspects of smooth pipe flow behaviour that suggest a more complex scaling than previously noted. In particular, the pressure gradient results yield a new friction factor relationship for smooth pipes, and the velocity profiles indicate the presence of a power-law region near the wall and, for Reynolds numbers greater than about 400x103 (R+>9x103), a logarithmic region further out. New experiments on a rough pipe with a honed surface finish with krms/D=19.4x10-6, over a Reynolds number range of 57x103-21x106, show that in the transitionally rough regime this surface follows an inflectional friction factor relationship rather than the monotonic relationship given in the Moody diagram. Outer-layer scaling of the mean velocity data and streamwise turbulence intensities for the rough pipe show excellent collapse and provide strong support for Townsend's outer-layer similarity hypothesis for rough-walled flows. The streamwise rough-wall spectra also agree well with the corresponding smooth-wall data. The pipe exhibited smooth behaviour for ks+ < or =3.5, which supports the suggestion that the original smooth pipe was indeed hydraulically smooth for ReD< or =24x106. The relationship between the velocity shift, DeltaU/utau, and the roughness Reynolds number, ks+, has been used to generalize the form of the transition from smooth to fully rough flow for an arbitrary relative roughness krms/D. These predictions apply for honed pipes when the separation of pipe diameter to roughness height is large, and they differ significantly from the traditional Moody curves.

  14. Top consumer abundance influences lake methane efflux

    PubMed Central

    Devlin, Shawn P.; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Syväranta, Jari; Jones, Roger I.

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are important habitats for biogeochemical cycling of carbon. The organization and structure of aquatic communities influences the biogeochemical interactions between lakes and the atmosphere. Understanding how trophic structure regulates ecosystem functions and influences greenhouse gas efflux from lakes is critical to understanding global carbon cycling and climate change. With a whole-lake experiment in which a previously fishless lake was divided into two treatment basins where fish abundance was manipulated, we show how a trophic cascade from fish to microbes affects methane efflux to the atmosphere. Here, fish exert high grazing pressure and remove nearly all zooplankton. This reduction in zooplankton density increases the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria, which in turn reduce CH4 efflux rates by roughly 10 times. Given that globally there are millions of lakes emitting methane, an important greenhouse gas, our findings that aquatic trophic interactions significantly influence the biogeochemical cycle of methane has important implications. PMID:26531291

  15. Top consumer abundance influences lake methane efflux.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Shawn P; Saarenheimo, Jatta; Syväranta, Jari; Jones, Roger I

    2015-01-01

    Lakes are important habitats for biogeochemical cycling of carbon. The organization and structure of aquatic communities influences the biogeochemical interactions between lakes and the atmosphere. Understanding how trophic structure regulates ecosystem functions and influences greenhouse gas efflux from lakes is critical to understanding global carbon cycling and climate change. With a whole-lake experiment in which a previously fishless lake was divided into two treatment basins where fish abundance was manipulated, we show how a trophic cascade from fish to microbes affects methane efflux to the atmosphere. Here, fish exert high grazing pressure and remove nearly all zooplankton. This reduction in zooplankton density increases the abundance of methanotrophic bacteria, which in turn reduce CH4 efflux rates by roughly 10 times. Given that globally there are millions of lakes emitting methane, an important greenhouse gas, our findings that aquatic trophic interactions significantly influence the biogeochemical cycle of methane has important implications. PMID:26531291

  16. Understanding EUV mask blank surface roughness induced LWR and associated roughness requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Pei-Yang; Zhang, Guojing; Gullickson, Eric M.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Benk, Markus P.

    2015-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) mask multi-layer (ML) blank surface roughness specification historically comes from blank defect inspection tool requirement. Later, new concerns on ML surface roughness induced wafer pattern line width roughness (LWR) arise. In this paper, we have studied wafer level pattern LWR as a function of EUVL mask surface roughness via High-NA Actinic Reticle Review Tool. We found that the blank surface roughness induced LWR at current blank roughness level is in the order of 0.5nm 3σ for NA=0.42 at the best focus. At defocus of ±40nm, the corresponding LWR will be 0.2nm higher. Further reducing EUVL mask blank surface roughness will increase the blank cost with limited benefit in improving the pattern LWR, provided that the intrinsic resist LWR is in the order of 1nm and above.

  17. Quantitative Proteomics and Lipidomics Analysis of Endoplasmic Reticulum of Macrophage Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Saquib, Najmuddin Mohd; Jamwal, Shilpa; Midha, Mukul Kumar; Verma, Hirdya Narain; Manivel, Venkatasamy

    2015-01-01

    Even though endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress associated with mycobacterial infection has been well studied, the molecular basis of ER as a crucial organelle to determine the fate of Mtb is yet to be established. Here, we have studied the ability of Mtb to manipulate the ultrastructural architecture of macrophage ER and found that the ER-phenotypes associated with virulent (H37Rv) and avirulent (H37Ra) strains were different: a rough ER (RER) with the former against a smooth ER (SER) with the later. Further, the functional attributes of these changes were probed by MS-based quantitative proteomics (133 ER proteins) and lipidomics (8 phospholipids). Our omics approaches not only revealed the host pathogen cross-talk but also emphasized how precisely Mtb uses proteins and lipids in combination to give rise to characteristic ER-phenotypes. H37Ra-infected macrophages increased the cytosolic Ca2+ levels by attenuating the ATP2A2 protein and simultaneous induction of PC/PE expression to facilitate apoptosis. However, H37Rv inhibited apoptosis and further controlled the expression of EST-1 and AMRP proteins to disturb cholesterol homeostasis resulting in sustained infection. This approach offers the potential to decipher the specific roles of ER in understanding the cell biology of mycobacterial infection with special reference to the impact of host response. PMID:25785198

  18. Regulation of polysome assembly on the endoplasmic reticulum by a coiled-coil protein, p180.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Tomonori; Kaneko, Keiko; Sata, Tetsutaro; Hattori, Shunji; Ogawa-Goto, Kiyoko

    2012-04-01

    A coiled-coil microtubule-bundling protein, p180, was originally identified as one of the ribosome receptor candidates on the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is highly expressed in secretory tissues. Recently, we reported that p180 plays crucial roles in upregulating collagen biosynthesis, mainly by facilitating ribosome association on the ER. Here, we provide evidence that p180 is required to form translationally active polysome/translocon complexes on the ER. Assembly of highly-developed polysomes on the ER was severely perturbed upon loss of p180. p180 associates with polysome/translocon complexes through multiple contact sites: it was coimmunoprecipitated with the translocon complex independently of ribosomes, while it can also bind to ribosomal large subunit specifically. The responsible domain of p180 for membrane polysome assembly was identified in the C-terminal coiled-coil region. The degree of ribosome occupation of collagen and fibronectin mRNAs was regulated in response to increased traffic demands. This effect appears to be exerted in a manner specific for a specified set of mRNAs. Collectively, our data suggest that p180 is required to form translationally active polysome/translocon complexes on the ER membrane, and plays a pivotal role in highly efficient biosynthesis on the ER membrane through facilitating polysome formation in professional secretory cells.

  19. Numerical Schemes for Rough Parabolic Equations

    SciTech Connect

    Deya, Aurelien

    2012-04-15

    This paper is devoted to the study of numerical approximation schemes for a class of parabolic equations on (0,1) perturbed by a non-linear rough signal. It is the continuation of Deya (Electron. J. Probab. 16:1489-1518, 2011) and Deya et al. (Probab. Theory Relat. Fields, to appear), where the existence and uniqueness of a solution has been established. The approach combines rough paths methods with standard considerations on discretizing stochastic PDEs. The results apply to a geometric 2-rough path, which covers the case of the multidimensional fractional Brownian motion with Hurst index H>1/3.

  20. Relationships between topographic roughness and aeolian processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Lancaster, N.; Gaddis, L.; Rasmussen, K. R.; White, B. R.; Saunders, R. S.; Wall, S.; Dobrovolskis, Anthony R.; Iversen, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction between winds and desert surfaces has important implications for sediment transport on Earth, Mars, and Venus, and for understanding the relationships between radar backscatter and aerodynamic roughness as part of the NASA Shuttle Imaging radar (SIR-C) Mission. Here, researchers report results from measurements of boundary layer wind profiles and surface roughness at sites in Death Valley and discuss their implications. The sites included a flat to undulating gravel and sand reg, alluvial fans, and a playa. Estimates of average particle size composition of Death Valley sites and arithmetic mean values of aerodynamic roughness are given in tabular form.

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum quality control in cancer: friend or foe

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hana; Bhattacharya, Asmita; Qi, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Quality control systems in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) mediated by unfolded protein response (UPR) and endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation (ERAD) ensure cellular function and organismal survival. Recent studies have suggested that ER quality-control systems in cancer cells may serve as a double-edged sword that aids progression as well as prevention of tumor growth in a context-dependent manner. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the complex relationship between ER proteostasis and cancer pathology, with a focus on the two most conserved ER quality-control mechanisms – the IRE1α-XBP1 pathway of the UPR and SEL1L-HRD1 complex of the ERAD. PMID:25794824

  2. From endoplasmic-reticulum stress to the inflammatory response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kezhong; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2009-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is responsible for much of a cell’s protein synthesis and folding, but it also has an important role in sensing cellular stress. Recently, it has been shown that the endoplasmic reticulum mediates a specific set of intracellular signalling pathways in response to the accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins, and these pathways are collectively known as the unfolded-protein response. New observations suggest that the unfolded-protein response can initiate inflammation, and the coupling of these responses in specialized cells and tissues is now thought to be fundamental in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. The knowledge gained from this emerging field will aid in the development of therapies for modulating cellular stress and inflammation. PMID:18650916

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in mouse decidua during early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiao-Wei; Yan, Jia-Qi; Dou, Hai-Ting; Liu, Jie; Liu, Li; Zhao, Meng-Long; Liang, Xiao-Huan; Yang, Zeng-Ming

    2016-10-15

    Unfolded or misfolded protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum lumen leads to endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress). Although it is known that ER stress is crucial for mammalian reproduction, little is known about its physiological significance and underlying mechanism during decidualization. Here we show that Ire-Xbp1 signal transduction pathway of unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated in decidual cells. The process of decidualization is compromised by ER stress inhibitor tauroursodeoxycholic acid sodium (TUDCA) and Ire specific inhibitor STF-083010 both in vivo and in vitro. A high concentration of ER stress inducer tunicamycin (TM) suppresses stromal cells proliferation and decidualization, while a lower concentration is beneficial. We further show that ER stress induces DNA damage and polyploidization in stromal cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the GRP78/Ire1/Xbp1 signaling pathway of ER stress-UPR is activated and involved in mouse decidualization.

  4. OXYGEN ABUNDANCES IN CEPHEIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, R. E.; Andrievsky, S. M.; Korotin, S. N.; Kovtyukh, V. V. E-mail: serkor@skyline.od.ua E-mail: scan@deneb1.odessa.ua

    2013-07-01

    Oxygen abundances in later-type stars, and intermediate-mass stars in particular, are usually determined from the [O I] line at 630.0 nm, and to a lesser extent, from the O I triplet at 615.7 nm. The near-IR triplets at 777.4 nm and 844.6 nm are strong in these stars and generally do not suffer from severe blending with other species. However, these latter two triplets suffer from strong non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) effects and thus see limited use in abundance analyses. In this paper, we derive oxygen abundances in a large sample of Cepheids using the near-IR triplets from an NLTE analysis, and compare those abundances to values derived from a local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) analysis of the [O I] 630.0 nm line and the O I 615.7 nm triplet as well as LTE abundances for the 777.4 nm triplet. All of these lines suffer from line strength problems making them sensitive to either measurement complications (weak lines) or to line saturation difficulties (strong lines). Upon this realization, the LTE results for the [O I] lines and the O I 615.7 nm triplet are in adequate agreement with the abundance from the NLTE analysis of the near-IR triplets.

  5. Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, Ulysses J.; Meyer, David M.

    2001-06-01

    We evaluate the stellar abundances often used to represent the total (gas plus dust) composition of the interstellar medium. Published abundances for B stars, young later type (F and G) stars, and the Sun are compared to the modeled dust-phase and measured gas-phase compositions of the interstellar medium. This study uses abundances for the five most populous elements in dust grains-C, O, Mg, Si, and Fe-and the cosmically abundant element, N. We find that B stars have metal abundances that are too low to be considered valid representations of the interstellar medium. The commonly invoked interstellar standard that is two-thirds of the solar composition is also rejected by recent observations. Young (<=2 Gyr) F and G disk stars and the Sun, however, cannot be ruled out as reliable proxies for the total interstellar composition. If their abundances are valid representations of the interstellar medium, then the apparent underabundance of carbon with respect to that required by dust models, i.e., the carbon crisis, is substantially eased.

  6. Surface roughness effects on bidirectional reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T. F.; Hering, R. G.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of surface roughness effects on bidirectional reflectance of metallic surfaces is presented. A facility capable of irradiating a sample from normal to grazing incidence and recording plane of incidence bidirectional reflectance measurements was developed. Samples consisting of glass, aluminum alloy, and stainless steel materials were selected for examination. Samples were roughened using standard grinding techniques and coated with a radiatively opaque layer of pure aluminum. Mechanical surface roughness parameters, rms heights and rms slopes, evaluated from digitized surface profile measurements are less than 1.0 micrometers and 0.28, respectively. Rough surface specular, bidirectional, and directional reflectance measurements for selected values of polar angle of incidence and wavelength of incident energy within the spectral range of 1 to 14 micrometers are reported. The Beckmann bidirectional reflectance model is compared with reflectance measurements to establish its usefulness in describing the magnitude and spatial distribution of energy reflected from rough surfaces.

  7. Surface roughness effects on bidirectional reflectance.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, T. F.; Hering, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of surface roughness effects on bidirectional reflectance of metallic surfaces is presented. Samples consisting of glass, aluminum alloy, and stainless steel materials were roughened using standard grinding techniques and coated with a radiatively opaque layer of pure aluminum. Surface roughness parameters, rms height and rms slope, were evaluated from digitized surface profile measurements and are less than 1.0 micron, and 0.28, respectively. Rough-surface specular, bidirectional, and directional reflectance measurements for selected values of polar angle and wavelength of incident energy within the range from 10 to 80 deg and from 1 to 14 microns, respectively, are reported. The influence of surface roughness is discussed in terms of rms height and rms slope.

  8. Effect of Surface Roughness on Hydrodynamic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, B. C.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical analysis on the performance of hydrodynamic oil bearings is made considering surface roughness effect. The hydrodynamic as well as asperity contact load is found. The contact pressure was calculated with the assumption that the surface height distribution was Gaussian. The average Reynolds equation of partially lubricated surface was used to calculate hydrodynamic load. An analytical expression for average gap was found and was introduced to modify the average Reynolds equation. The resulting boundary value problem was then solved numerically by finite difference methods using the method of successive over relaxation. The pressure distribution and hydrodynamic load capacity of plane slider and journal bearings were calculated for various design data. The effects of attitude and roughness of surface on the bearing performance were shown. The results are compared with similar available solution of rough surface bearings. It is shown that: (1) the contribution of contact load is not significant; and (2) the hydrodynamic and contact load increase with surface roughness.

  9. Surface Roughness, Optical Shadowing, and Radar Backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, M. K.; Campbell, B. A.

    1996-03-01

    The topography of natural surfaces at scales of a few meters or less is commonly referred to as roughness. These variations in height and slope, their magnitude, and the changes in structure as a function of scale length are of fundamental importance to interpretation of geologic emplacement regimes and subsequent modification. For most planetary studies and many terrestrial situations, no in situ observations of the ground are available, and remote sensing data are used to infer the nature of the terrain. For optical, infrared, and microwave measurements, surface roughness and its scale-dependence have a large impact on the brightness, polarization, angular scattering properties, and wavelength-dependence of reflected energy. The link between surface roughness and specific remote sensing properties for many types of observations, however, remains elusive. We focus here on the nature of roughness and its scale-dependence for terrestrial rocky surfaces, and the effect of such changes on optical shadowing and radar backscatter.

  10. Simplified models for mask roughness induced LER

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2011-02-21

    The ITRS requires < 1.2nm line-edge roughness (LER) for the 22nm half-pitch node. Currently, we can consistently achieve only about 3nm LER. Further progress requires understanding the principle causes of LER. Much work has already been done on how both the resist and LER on the mask effect the final printed LER. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which system-level effects such as mask surface roughness, illumination conditions, and defocus couple to speckle at the image plane, and factor into LER limits. Presently, mask-roughness induced LER is studied via full 2D aerial image modeling and subsequent analysis of the resulting image. This method is time consuming and cumbersome. It is, therefore, the goal of this research to develop a useful 'rule-of-thumb' analytic model for mask roughness induced LER to expedite learning and understanding.

  11. Permeability of self-affine rough fractures

    PubMed

    Drazer; Koplik

    2000-12-01

    The permeability of two-dimensional fractures with self-affine fractal roughness is studied via analytic arguments and numerical simulations. The limit where the roughness amplitude is small compared with average fracture aperture is analyzed by a perturbation method, while in the opposite case of narrow aperture, we use heuristic arguments based on lubrication theory. Numerical simulations, using the lattice Boltzmann method, are used to examine the complete range of aperture sizes, and confirm the analytic arguments. PMID:11138092

  12. How supercontinents and superoceans affect seafloor roughness.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Joanne M; Müller, R Dietmar; Roest, Walter R; Wessel, Paul; Smith, Walter H F

    2008-12-18

    Seafloor roughness varies considerably across the world's ocean basins and is fundamental to controlling the circulation and mixing of heat in the ocean and dissipating eddy kinetic energy. Models derived from analyses of active mid-ocean ridges suggest that ocean floor roughness depends on seafloor spreading rates, with rougher basement forming below a half-spreading rate threshold of 30-35 mm yr(-1) (refs 4, 5), as well as on the local interaction of mid-ocean ridges with mantle plumes or cold-spots. Here we present a global analysis of marine gravity-derived roughness, sediment thickness, seafloor isochrons and palaeo-spreading rates of Cretaceous to Cenozoic ridge flanks. Our analysis reveals that, after eliminating effects related to spreading rate and sediment thickness, residual roughness anomalies of 5-20 mGal remain over large swaths of ocean floor. We found that the roughness as a function of palaeo-spreading directions and isochron orientations indicates that most of the observed excess roughness is not related to spreading obliquity, as this effect is restricted to relatively rare occurrences of very high obliquity angles (>45 degrees ). Cretaceous Atlantic ocean floor, formed over mantle previously overlain by the Pangaea supercontinent, displays anomalously low roughness away from mantle plumes and is independent of spreading rates. We attribute this observation to a sub-Pangaean supercontinental mantle temperature anomaly leading to slightly thicker than normal Late Jurassic and Cretaceous Atlantic crust, reduced brittle fracturing and smoother basement relief. In contrast, ocean crust formed above Pacific superswells, probably reflecting metasomatized lithosphere underlain by mantle at only slightly elevated temperatures, is not associated with basement roughness anomalies. These results highlight a fundamental difference in the nature of large-scale mantle upwellings below supercontinents and superoceans, and their impact on oceanic crustal

  13. Effective roughness in meso-scale modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Joakim R.

    2010-05-01

    Effective roughness in meso-scale modeling. J.R. Nielsen, E. Dellwik, A. Hahmann, A. Sogachev, C.B. Hasager, Wind Energy Division, Risø DTU National Laboratory, Denmark Accurate estimation of effective roughness lengths for use in meso-scale models in heterogeneous terrain requires assessment of highly non-linear processes. These non-linear effects are often neglected in meso-scale modeling where, typically, a simple logarithmic average or a dominant vegetation type provide crude estimates of the aggregated aerodynamical roughness length in each grid cell. Although the parameterizations are computationally efficient, improvements are needed since some regional-scale sensitivity studies indicate that grid cell roughnesses strongly influence model predictions (i.e. Hasager and Jensen, 1999). Effective roughness parameterizations can be provided through the use of microscale flow models, which simulate the he local scale effect of orography and roughness changes. Results from two linearized micro-scale models and a k-ω model (Sogachev and Panferov, 2006) are presented for an idealized terrain with roughness changes. Furthermore, sensitivity experiments are performed within the meso-scale model WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) using the standard Community Noah Land Surface model. The same experiment will be performed with a new modified version with multi-physics options (Niu et al.,submitted 2009). The analysis is carried out using different roughness aggregation techniques in WRF and the influence on scalar fluxes such as temperature, humidity and CO2 is investigated. Based on the WRF sensitivity analysis and the results of micro-scale modeling, the potential improvement of using micro-scale models for parameterization of sub-grid scale variability is evaluated.

  14. How supercontinents and superoceans affect seafloor roughness.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Joanne M; Müller, R Dietmar; Roest, Walter R; Wessel, Paul; Smith, Walter H F

    2008-12-18

    Seafloor roughness varies considerably across the world's ocean basins and is fundamental to controlling the circulation and mixing of heat in the ocean and dissipating eddy kinetic energy. Models derived from analyses of active mid-ocean ridges suggest that ocean floor roughness depends on seafloor spreading rates, with rougher basement forming below a half-spreading rate threshold of 30-35 mm yr(-1) (refs 4, 5), as well as on the local interaction of mid-ocean ridges with mantle plumes or cold-spots. Here we present a global analysis of marine gravity-derived roughness, sediment thickness, seafloor isochrons and palaeo-spreading rates of Cretaceous to Cenozoic ridge flanks. Our analysis reveals that, after eliminating effects related to spreading rate and sediment thickness, residual roughness anomalies of 5-20 mGal remain over large swaths of ocean floor. We found that the roughness as a function of palaeo-spreading directions and isochron orientations indicates that most of the observed excess roughness is not related to spreading obliquity, as this effect is restricted to relatively rare occurrences of very high obliquity angles (>45 degrees ). Cretaceous Atlantic ocean floor, formed over mantle previously overlain by the Pangaea supercontinent, displays anomalously low roughness away from mantle plumes and is independent of spreading rates. We attribute this observation to a sub-Pangaean supercontinental mantle temperature anomaly leading to slightly thicker than normal Late Jurassic and Cretaceous Atlantic crust, reduced brittle fracturing and smoother basement relief. In contrast, ocean crust formed above Pacific superswells, probably reflecting metasomatized lithosphere underlain by mantle at only slightly elevated temperatures, is not associated with basement roughness anomalies. These results highlight a fundamental difference in the nature of large-scale mantle upwellings below supercontinents and superoceans, and their impact on oceanic crustal

  15. Cells preferentially grow on rough substrates.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Francesco; Tirinato, Luca; Battista, Edmondo; Causa, Filippo; Liberale, Carlo; di Fabrizio, Enzo M; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2010-10-01

    Substrate nanotopography affects cell adhesion and proliferation and is fundamental to the rational design of bio-adhesives, to tissue engineering and to the development of assays for in-vitro screening. Cell behavior on rough substrates is still elusive, and the results presented in the open literature remain controversial. Here, the proliferation of cells on electrochemically etched silicon substrates with different roughness and nearly similar surface energy was studied over three days with confocal and atomic force microscopy. The surface profile of the substrates is a self-affine fractal with a roughness R(a) growing with the etching time from approximately 2 to 100 nm and a fractal dimension D ranging between about 2 (nominally flat surface) and 2.6. For four cell types, the number of adhering cells and their proliferation rates exhibited a maximum on moderately rough (R(a) approximately 10-45 nm) nearly Brownian (D approximately 2.5) substrates. The observed cell behavior was satisfactorily interpreted within the theory of adhesion to randomly rough solids. These findings demonstrated the importance of nanogeometry in cell stable adhesion and growth, suggesting that moderately rough substrates with large fractal dimension could selectively boost cell proliferation. PMID:20637503

  16. Rough surface reconstruction for ultrasonic NDE simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Wonjae; Shi, Fan; Lowe, Michael J. S.; Skelton, Elizabeth A.; Craster, Richard V.

    2014-02-18

    The reflection of ultrasound from rough surfaces is an important topic for the NDE of safety-critical components, such as pressure-containing components in power stations. The specular reflection from a rough surface of a defect is normally lower than it would be from a flat surface, so it is typical to apply a safety factor in order that justification cases for inspection planning are conservative. The study of the statistics of the rough surfaces that might be expected in candidate defects according to materials and loading, and the reflections from them, can be useful to develop arguments for realistic safety factors. This paper presents a study of real rough crack surfaces that are representative of the potential defects in pressure-containing power plant. Two-dimensional (area) values of the height of the roughness have been measured and their statistics analysed. Then a means to reconstruct model cases with similar statistics, so as to enable the creation of multiple realistic realizations of the surfaces, has been investigated, using random field theory. Rough surfaces are reconstructed, based on a real surface, and results for these two-dimensional descriptions of the original surface have been compared with those from the conventional model based on a one-dimensional correlation coefficient function. In addition, ultrasonic reflections from them are simulated using a finite element method.

  17. Solar abundance of platinum

    PubMed Central

    Burger, Harry; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1975-01-01

    Three lines of neutral platinum, located at λ 2997.98 Å, λ 3064.71 Å, and λ 3301.86 Å have been used to determine the solar platinum abundance by the method of spectral synthesis. On the scale, log A(H) = 12.00, the thus-derived solar platinum abundance is 1.75 ± 0.10, in fair accord with Cameron's value of log A(Pt) = 1.69 derived by Mason from carbonaceous chondrites and calculated on the assumption that log A(Si) = 7.55 in the sun. PMID:16592278

  18. The work budget of rough faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Patrick J.; Ashley Griffith, W.

    2014-12-01

    Faults in nature have measurable roughness at many scales and are not planar as generally idealized. We utilize the boundary element method to model the geomechanical response of synthetic rough faults in an isotropic, linear elastic continuum to external tectonic loading in terms of the work budget. Faults are generated with known fractal roughness parameters, including the root mean square slope (β), a measure of roughness amplitude, and the Hurst exponent (H), a measure of geometric self-similarity. Energy within the fault models is partitioned into external work (Wext), internal elastic strain energy (Wint), gravitational work (Wgrav), frictional work (Wfric), and seismic energy (Wseis). Results confirm that Wext, or work done on the external model boundaries, is smallest for a perfectly planar fault, and steadily increases with increasing β. This pattern is also observed in Wint, the energy expended in deforming the host rock. The opposite is true for gravitational work, or work done against gravity in uplifting host rock, as well as with frictional work, or energy dissipated with frictional slip on the fault, and Wseis, or seismic energy released during slip events. Effects of variation in H are not as large as for β, but Wgrav, Wfric, and Wseis increase with increasing H, with Wint and Wext decreasing across the same range. Remarkably, however, for a narrow range of roughness amplitudes which are commonly observed along natural faults, the total work of the system remains approximately constant, while slightly larger than the total work of a planar fault. Faults evolve toward the most mechanically efficient configuration; therefore we argue that this range of roughness amplitudes may represent an energy barrier, preventing faults from removing asperities and evolving to smooth, planar discontinuities. A similar conclusion is drawn from simulations at relatively shallow depths, with results showing that shallower faults have larger energy barriers, and can

  19. Effect of roughness on water flow through a single rough fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Z.; Zhou, Z.; WANG, J.; Guo, Q.; Dou, Z.

    2015-12-01

    A single fracture (SF) usually has rough surfaces with points of contact. Though relative roughness was considered in quantifying flow through a single rough fracture (SRF) previously, additional factors such as the distribution of rough elements and bending degree of streamlines are rarely considered before. Semi-empirical friction factor (f) and discharge per unit width (q) equations are first deduced based on the consideration of relative roughness, roughness elements distribution and streamline reattachment length in this study. A horizontal SRF model is set up and a series of experiments and simulations are performed. Main conclusions are drawn: recirculation of streamlines occurred in the rough element and its intensity increases with the entering angle of the streamlines into the element and Reynolds number (Re); streamlines are discontinuously distributed when asperity height is large, leading to departure from Darcy's law (non-linear flow); the non-linearity of flow increases with the asperity height and Re; the relative roughness for not affecting water flow through a SRF should be much less than 0.033, a benchmark value commonly used previously for neglecting the roughness effect; the revised f and q equations under laminar flow through a SRF are shown to be better than previously proposed equations.

  20. Surface characteristics of Venus derived from Pioneer Venus altimetry, roughness, and reflectivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Head, J. W.; Peterfreund, A. R.; Garvin, J. B.

    1985-07-01

    The three primary data sets for the Pioneer Venus orbiter radar experiment (topography, roughness, and reflectivity) contain important information about the geological and textural characteristics of the surface of Venus. The authors have subdivided the range of roughness and reflectivity values into three categories as follows: roughness, in degrees rms slope: relatively smooth (1° - 2.5°), transitional from smooth to rough (2.5° - 5°), and relatively rough (>5°); and Fresnel reflectivity: surface dominated by soil or porous material (<0.1), surfaces dominated by rock material (0.1 - 0.2), and surfaces with a significant percentage of anomalously high dielectric material (>0.2). The authors have analyzed each of these data sets and their relationships to each other in order to define areas of the surface that are characterized by distinctive properties (e.g., rough rocky surfaces, smooth soil surfaces). They then describe the abundance and areal distribution of such areas and locally calibrate the geological significance of some of the surface types by examining high-resolution images from spacecraft and earth-based observatories.

  1. Abundances of light elements.

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, B E

    1993-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of abundances of light elements and their relevance to cosmological nucleosynthesis are briefly reviewed. The simplest model, based on standard cosmology and particle physics and assuming homogeneous baryon density at the relevant times, continues to stand up well. PMID:11607388

  2. Hypersonic viscous flow over large roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2011-06-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  3. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers, spontaneous absolute instability accompanying by sustained vortex shedding downstream of the roughness is likely to take place at subsonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for both a rectangular and a cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation from the top face of the roughness is observed, despite the presence of flow unsteadiness for the smaller post-shock Mach number case.

  4. Identifying Changes in Snowpack Surface Roughness Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fassnacht, S. R.; Corrao, M. V.; Deems, J. S.; Stednick, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    The flow of air over a surface is influenced by its roughness. The surface of a snowpack is smooth relative to the underlying ground surface. The relative roughness of the snowpack surface changes directionally, spatially, and temporally, due to deposition, erosion, and melt. To examine these changes in snowpack surface roughness at the microtopographic scale for a Northern Colorado site, the surface was photographed using a darker-coloured roughness board that was inserted into the snowpack so that a black (board) versus white (snow) contrast existed along the entire length of the board. The board was 1-m long and was inserted 11 times at 10-cm intervals to create a 1-m by 1-m mesh. The orientation of the boards was rotated 90 degrees to provide finer resolution data in perpendicular directions. For the 1-m boards, the pixel resolution was approximately 0.4 mm. To measure the snow grain scale, a crystal card was photographed and yielded a pixel resolution of approximately 0.1 mm. Incorporating image processing issues such as image contrast and brightness, the digital images were translated into individual lines. These lines were used to compute semi- variograms in log-log space, from which the magnitude of semi-variance, the fractal dimensions, and the scale break were computed. The semi-variogram characteristics were used to illustrate directional, spatial, and temporal changes in snowpack surface roughness.

  5. Oxidative Stress Contributes to Autophagy Induction in Response to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[W

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Crespo, José L.

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes. PMID:25143584

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Glycoprotein Quality Control Regulates CD1d Assembly and CD1d-mediated Antigen Presentation*

    PubMed Central

    Kunte, Amit; Zhang, Wei; Paduraru, Crina; Veerapen, Natacha; Cox, Liam R.; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Cresswell, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The non-classical major histocompatibility complex (MHC) homologue CD1d presents lipid antigens to innate-like lymphocytes called natural-killer T (NKT) cells. These cells, by virtue of their broad cytokine repertoire, shape innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we have assessed the role of endoplasmic reticulum glycoprotein quality control in CD1d assembly and function, specifically the role of a key component of the quality control machinery, the enzyme UDP glucose glycoprotein glucosyltransferase (UGT1). We observe that in UGT1-deficient cells, CD1d associates prematurely with β2-microglobulin (β2m) and is able to rapidly exit the endoplasmic reticulum. At least some of these CD1d-β2m heterodimers are shorter-lived and can be rescued by provision of a defined exogenous antigen, α-galactosylceramide. Importantly, we show that in UGT1-deficient cells the CD1d-β2m heterodimers have altered antigenicity despite the fact that their cell surface levels are unchanged. We propose that UGT1 serves as a quality control checkpoint during CD1d assembly and further suggest that UGT1-mediated quality control can shape the lipid repertoire of newly synthesized CD1d. The quality control process may play a role in ensuring stability of exported CD1d-β2m complexes, in facilitating presentation of low abundance high affinity antigens, or in preventing deleterious responses to self lipids. PMID:23615906

  7. Discrete Roughness Transition for Hypersonic Flight Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    The importance of discrete roughness and the correlations developed to predict the onset of boundary layer transition on hypersonic flight vehicles are discussed. The paper is organized by hypersonic vehicle applications characterized in a general sense by the boundary layer: slender with hypersonic conditions at the edge of the boundary layer, moderately blunt with supersonic, and blunt with subsonic. This paper is intended to be a review of recent discrete roughness transition work completed at NASA Langley Research Center in support of agency flight test programs. First, a review is provided of discrete roughness wind tunnel data and the resulting correlations that were developed. Then, results obtained from flight vehicles, in particular the recently flown Hyper-X and Shuttle missions, are discussed and compared to the ground-based correlations.

  8. Wetting on rough self-affine surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palasantzas, George

    1995-05-01

    In this paper, we present a general investigation of the effective potential for complete wetting on self-affine rough surfaces. The roughness effect is investigated by means of the height-height correlation model in Fourier space ~(1+aξ2q2)-1-H. The parameters H and ξ are, respectively, the roughness exponent and the substrate in-plane correlation length. It is observed that the effect of H on the free interface profile is significant for ξ>ξ) regime is characterized by a power-law scaling ~Y-2.

  9. One step at a time: endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation

    PubMed Central

    Vembar, Shruthi S.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is monitored by ER quality control (ERQC) mechanisms. Proteins that pass ERQC criteria traffic to their final destinations through the secretory pathway, whereas non-native and unassembled subunits of multimeric proteins are degraded by the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. During ERAD, molecular chaperones and associated factors recognize and target substrates for retrotranslocation to the cytoplasm, where they are degraded by the ubiquitin–proteasome machinery. The discovery of diseases that are associated with ERAD substrates highlights the importance of this pathway. Here, we summarize our current understanding of each step during ERAD, with emphasis on the factors that catalyse distinct activities. PMID:19002207

  10. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and the Inflammatory Basis of Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2010-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the major site in the cell for protein folding and trafficking and is central to many cellular functions. Failure of the ER's adaptive capacity results in activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which intersects with many different inflammatory and stress signaling pathways. These pathways are also critical in chronic metabolic diseases such as obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. The ER and related signaling networks are emerging as a potential site for the intersection of inflammation and metabolic disease. PMID:20303879

  11. Evaluation of Dry, Rough Vacuum Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Brian

    2006-01-01

    This document provides information on the testing and evaluation of thirteen dry rough vacuum pumps of various designs and from various manufacturers. Several types of rough vacuum pumps were evaluated, including scroll, roots, and diaphragm pumps. Tests included long term testing, speed curve generation, voltage variance, vibrations emissions and susceptibility, electromagnetic interference emissions and susceptibility, static leak rate, exhaust restriction, response/recovery time tests, and a contamination analysis for scroll pumps. Parameters were found for operation with helium, which often is not provided from the manufacturer

  12. Surface roughness evolution of nanocomposite thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Turkin, A. A.; Pei, Y. T.; Shaha, K. P.; Chen, C. Q.; Vainshtein, D. I.; Hosson, J. Th. M. de

    2009-01-01

    An analysis of dynamic roughening and smoothening mechanisms of thin films grown with pulsed-dc magnetron sputtering is presented. The roughness evolution has been described by a linear stochastic equation, which contains the second- and fourth-order gradient terms. Dynamic smoothening of the growing interface is explained by ballistic effects resulting from impingements of ions to the growing thin film. These ballistic effects are sensitive to the flux and energy of impinging ions. The predictions of the model are compared with experimental data, and it is concluded that the thin film roughness can be further controlled by adjusting waveform, frequency, and width of dc pulses.

  13. ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, C.

    2012-03-28

    Surface roughness values for the areas surrounding the H, D and N-Area meteorological towers were computed from archived 2010 meteorological data. These 15-minute-averaged data were measured with cup anemometers and bidirectional wind vanes (bivanes) 61 m above the surface. The results of the roughness calculation using the standard deviation of elevation angle {sigma}{sub E}, and applying the simple formula based on tree canopy height, gave consistent estimates for roughness around the H-Area tower in the range of 1.76 to 1.86 m (95% confidence interval) with a mean value of 1.81 m. Application of the {sigma}{sub E} method for the 61-m level at D and N-Areas gave mean values of 1.71 and 1.81 with confidence ranges of 1.62-1.81 and 1.73-1.88 meters, respectively. Roughness results are azimuth dependent, and thus are presented as averages over compass sectors spanning 22.5 degrees. Calculated values were compared to other methods of determining roughness, including the standard deviation of the azimuth direction, {sigma}{sub A}, and standard deviation of the wind speed, {sigma}{sub U}. Additional data was obtained from a sonic anemometer at 61-m on the H-Area tower during a period of a few weeks in 2010. Results from the sonic anemometer support our use of {sigma}{sub E} to calculate roughness. Based on the H-Area tower results, a surface roughness of 1.8 m using is recommended for use in dispersion modeling applications that consider the impacts of a contaminant release to individuals along the Site boundary. The canopy surrounding the H-Area tower is relatively uniform (i.e., little variance in roughness by upwind direction), and data supplied by the U.S. Forest Service at Savannah River show that the canopy height and composition surrounding the H-Area tower is reasonably representative of forested areas throughout the SRS reservation. For dispersion modeling analyses requiring assessments of a co-located worker within the respective operations area, recommended

  14. Surface roughness effects in elastohydrodynamic contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, J. H.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    Surface roughness effects in full-film EHL contacts were studied. A flow factor modification to the Reynolds equation was applied to piezoviscous-elastic line contacts. Results for ensemble-averaged film shape, pressure distribution, and other mechanical quantities were obtained. Asperities elongated in the flow direction by a factor exceeding two decreased both film shape and pressure extrema at constant load; isotropic or transverse asperities increased these extrema. The largest effects are displayed by traction, which increased by over 5% for isotropic or transverse asperities and by slightly less for longitudinal roughness.

  15. Laws of Flow in Rough Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikuradse, J

    1950-01-01

    An experimental investigation is made of the turbulent flow of water in pipes with various degrees of relative roughness. The pipes range in size from 25 to 100 millimeters in diameter and from 1800 to 7050 millimeters in length. Flow velocities permitted Reynolds numbers from about 10 (sup. 4) to 10 (sup. 6). The laws of resistance and velocity distributions were obtained as a function of relative roughness and Reynolds number. Mixing length, as described by Prandtl's mixing-length formula, is discussed in relation to the experimental results.

  16. Venus surface roughness and Magellan stereo data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maurice, Kelly E.; Leberl, Franz W.; Norikane, L.; Hensley, Scott

    1994-01-01

    Presented are results of some studies to develop tools useful for the analysis of Venus surface shape and its roughness. Actual work was focused on Maxwell Montes. The analyses employ data acquired by means of NASA's Magellan satellite. The work is primarily concerned with deriving measurements of the Venusian surface using Magellan stereo SAR. Roughness was considered by means of a theoretical analyses based on digital elevation models (DEM's), on single Magellan radar images combined with radiometer data, and on the use of multiple overlapping Magellan radar images from cycles 1, 2, and 3, again combined with collateral radiometer data.

  17. Fused silica fine grinding with low roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Lei; Gu, Yongqiang; Wu, Di

    2014-08-01

    Lithography-optics is one of the most complex optical systems. The fine grinding process is the most important step before polishing. Roughness and sub-surface damage (SSD) are essential outputs of fine grinding. We demonstrate the method that use fix abrasive cup tool with CNC grinding machine to complete the fine grinding process, even instead of lapping process. And experiment sample roughness can reach 23.40nm rms and Ra 18.554nm. The SSD estimate is about 2 μm which is also smaller than commercial lapping process. The fine grinding output can satisfy the lithography optic fabrication demands and efficiently reduce the polishing time.

  18. Roughness Perception of Haptically Displayed Fractal Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, Michael A.; Cutkosky, Mark R.; Lau, Sonie (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Surface profiles were generated by a fractal algorithm and haptically rendered on a force feedback joystick, Subjects were asked to use the joystick to explore pairs of surfaces and report to the experimenter which of the surfaces they felt was rougher. Surfaces were characterized by their root mean square (RMS) amplitude and their fractal dimension. The most important factor affecting the perceived roughness of the fractal surfaces was the RMS amplitude of the surface. When comparing surfaces of fractal dimension 1.2-1.35 it was found that the fractal dimension was negatively correlated with perceived roughness.

  19. Tritium Pumps for ITER Roughing System

    SciTech Connect

    Antipenkov, Alexander; Day, Christian; Mack, August; Wagner, Robert; Laesser, Rainer

    2005-07-15

    The ITER roughing system provides for both the initial pump-down of the vessel itself and the regular pump-out of the batch-regenerating cryopumps. This system must have a large pumping speed and cope with the radioactive gas tritium at the same time. The present paper shall highlight the results of the ITER roughing train optimization, discuss the modification of a Roots pump for tritium, and present the results of a ferrofluidic seal test and the first tests of a tailor-made tritium-proof Roots pump with inactive gases.

  20. Solar abundance of iridium

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Stephen; Aller, Lawrence H.

    1976-01-01

    By a method of spectrum synthesis, which yields log gfA, where g is the statistical weight of the lower level, f is the oscillator strength, and A is the abundance, an attempt is made to deduce the solar iridium abundance from one relatively unblended, but fairly weak IrI line, λ 3220.78 Å. If the Corliss-Bozman f-value for this line is adopted, we find log A(Ir) = 0.82 on the scale log A(H) = 12.00. The discordance with the value found from carbonaceous chondrites may arise from faulty f-values or from difficulties arising from line blending in this far ultraviolet domain of the solar spectrum. PMID:16578735

  1. Identification of Novel Tau Interactions with Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteins in Alzheimer’s Disease Brain

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Shelby; Bell, Michelle; Lyons, Danielle N.; Ingram, Alexandria; Chen, Jing; Gensel, John C.; Zhu, Haining; Nelson, Peter T.; Abisambra, Jose F.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is pathologically characterized by the formation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal tau tangles. We recently identified that tau associates with proteins known to participate in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD); consequently, ERAD becomes dysfunctional and causes neurotoxicity. We hypothesized that tau associates with other ER proteins, and that this association could also lead to cellular dysfunction in AD. Portions of human AD and non-demented age matched control brains were fractionated to obtain microsomes, from which tau was co-immunoprecipitated. Samples from both conditions containing tau and its associated proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry. In total, we identified 91 ER proteins that co-immunoprecipitated with tau; 15.4% were common between AD and control brains, and 42.9% only in the AD samples. The remainder, 41.8% of the proteins, was only seen in the control brain samples. We identified a variety of previously unreported interactions between tau and ER proteins. These proteins participate in over sixteen functional categories, the most abundant being involved in RNA translation. We then determined that association of tau with these ER proteins was different between the AD and control samples. We found that tau associated equally with the ribosomal protein L28 but more robustly with the ribosomal protein P0. These data suggest that the differential association between tau and ER proteins in disease could reveal the pathogenic processes by which tau induces cellular dysfunction. PMID:26402096

  2. HIF-2α dependent lipid storage promotes endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Bo; Ackerman, Daniel; Sanchez, Danielle J.; Li, Bo; Ochocki, Joshua D.; Grazioli, Alison; Bobrovnikova-Marjon, Ekaterina; Diehl, J. Alan; Keith, Brian; Simon, M. Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Two hallmarks of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) are constitutive hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) signaling and abundant intracellular lipid droplets (LDs). However, regulation of lipid storage and its role in ccRCC are incompletely understood. Transcriptional profiling of primary ccRCC samples revealed that expression of the LD coat protein gene PLIN2 was elevated in tumors and correlated with HIF-2α, but not HIF-1α, activation. HIF-2α dependent PLIN2 expression promoted lipid storage, proliferation, and viability in xenograft tumors. Mechanistically, lipid storage maintained integrity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which is functionally and physically associated with LDs. Specifically, PLIN2 dependent lipid storage suppressed cytotoxic ER stress responses that otherwise result from elevated protein synthetic activity characteristic of ccRCC cells. Thus, in addition to promoting ccRCC proliferation and anabolic metabolism, HIF-2α modulates lipid storage to sustain ER homeostasis, particularly under conditions of nutrient and oxygen limitation, thereby promoting tumor cell survival. PMID:25829424

  3. Cannabidiol protects oligodendrocyte progenitor cells from inflammation-induced apoptosis by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Mecha, M; Torrao, A S; Mestre, L; Carrillo-Salinas, F J; Mechoulam, R; Guaza, C

    2012-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is the most abundant cannabinoid in Cannabis sativa that has no psychoactive properties. CBD has been approved to treat inflammation, pain and spasticity associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), of which demyelination and oligodendrocyte loss are hallmarks. Thus, we investigated the protective effects of CBD against the damage to oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) mediated by the immune system. Doses of 1 μM CBD protect OPCs from oxidative stress by decreasing the production of reactive oxygen species. CBD also protects OPCs from apoptosis induced by LPS/IFNγ through the decrease of caspase 3 induction via mechanisms that do not involve CB1, CB2, TRPV1 or PPARγ receptors. Tunicamycin-induced OPC death was attenuated by CBD, suggesting a role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the mode of action of CBD. This protection against ER stress-induced apoptosis was associated with reduced phosphorylation of eiF2α, one of the initiators of the ER stress pathway. Indeed, CBD diminished the phosphorylation of PKR and eiF2α induced by LPS/IFNγ. The pro-survival effects of CBD in OPCs were accompanied by decreases in the expression of ER apoptotic effectors (CHOP, Bax and caspase 12), and increased expression of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. These findings suggest that attenuation of the ER stress pathway is involved in the ‘oligoprotective' effects of CBD during inflammation. PMID:22739983

  4. Microgravity induces proteomics changes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial protection

    PubMed Central

    Feger, Bryan J.; Thompson, J. Will; Dubois, Laura G.; Kommaddi, Reddy P.; Foster, Matthew W.; Mishra, Rajashree; Shenoy, Sudha K.; Shibata, Yoichiro; Kidane, Yared H.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Carnell, Lisa S.; Bowles, Dawn E.

    2016-01-01

    On Earth, biological systems have evolved in response to environmental stressors, interactions dictated by physical forces that include gravity. The absence of gravity is an extreme stressor and the impact of its absence on biological systems is ill-defined. Astronauts who have spent extended time under conditions of minimal gravity (microgravity) experience an array of biological alterations, including perturbations in cardiovascular function. We hypothesized that physiological perturbations in cardiac function in microgravity may be a consequence of alterations in molecular and organellar dynamics within the cellular milieu of cardiomyocytes. We used a combination of mass spectrometry-based approaches to compare the relative abundance and turnover rates of 848 and 196 proteins, respectively, in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes exposed to simulated microgravity or normal gravity. Gene functional enrichment analysis of these data suggested that the protein content and function of the mitochondria, ribosomes, and endoplasmic reticulum were differentially modulated in microgravity. We confirmed experimentally that in microgravity protein synthesis was decreased while apoptosis, cell viability, and protein degradation were largely unaffected. These data support our conclusion that in microgravity cardiomyocytes attempt to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis at the expense of protein synthesis. The overall response to this stress may culminate in cardiac muscle atrophy. PMID:27670941

  5. Infusion of glucose and lipids at physiological rates causes acute endoplasmic reticulum stress in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Boden, Guenther; Song, Weiwei; Duan, Xunbao; Cheung, Peter; Kresge, Karen; Barrero, Carlos; Merali, Salim

    2011-07-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has recently been implicated as a cause for obesity-related insulin resistance; however, what causes ER stress in obesity has remained uncertain. Here, we have tested the hypothesis that macronutrients can cause acute (ER) stress in rat liver. Examined were the effects of intravenously infused glucose and/or lipids on proximal ER stress sensor activation (PERK, eIF2-α, ATF4, Xbox protein 1 (XBP1s)), unfolded protein response (UPR) proteins (GRP78, calnexin, calreticulin, protein disulphide isomerase (PDI), stress kinases (JNK, p38 MAPK) and insulin signaling (insulin/receptor substrate (IRS) 1/2 associated phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)) in rat liver. Glucose and/or lipid infusions, ranging from 23.8 to 69.5 kJ/4 h (equivalent to between ~17% and ~50% of normal daily energy intake), activated the proximal ER stress sensor PERK and ATF6 increased the protein abundance of calnexin, calreticulin and PDI and increased two GRP78 isoforms. Glucose and glucose plus lipid infusions induced comparable degrees of ER stress, but only infusions containing lipid activated stress kinases (JNK and p38 MAPK) and inhibited insulin signaling (PI3K). In summary, physiologic amounts of both glucose and lipids acutely increased ER stress in livers 12-h fasted rats and dependent on the presence of fat, caused insulin resistance. We conclude that this type of acute ER stress is likely to occur during normal daily nutrient intake.

  6. Measurement and Correlation of Ice Accretion Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, David N.; Hentschel, Daniel B.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements were taken of the roughness characteristics of ice accreted on NACA 0012 airfoils in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT). Tests were conducted with size scaled, using models with chords of 26.7, 53.3, and 80.0 cm, and with liquid-water content scaled, both according to previously-tested scaling methods. The width of the smooth zone which forms on either side of the leading edge of the airfoil and the diameter of the roughness elements are presented in non-dimensional form as functions of the accumulation parameter. The smooth-zone width was found to decrease with increasing accumulation parameter. The roughness-element diameter increased with accumulation parameter until a plateau was reached. This maximum diameter was about 0.06 times twice the model leading-edge radius. Neither smooth-zone width nor element diameter were affected by a change in freezing fraction from 0.2 to 0.4. Both roughness characteristics appeared to scale with model size and with liquid-water content.

  7. Thermal smoothing of rough surfaces in vacuo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahl, G.

    1986-01-01

    The derivation of equations governing the smoothing of rough surfaces, based on Mullins' (1957, 1960, and 1963) theories of thermal grooving and of capillarity-governed solid surface morphology is presented. As an example, the smoothing of a one-dimensional sine-shaped surface is discussed.

  8. Surface roughness scattering in multisubband accumulation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Han; Reich, K. V.; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation layers with very large concentrations of electrons where many subbands are filled became recently available due to ionic liquid and other new methods of gating. The low-temperature mobility in such layers is limited by the surface roughness scattering. However, theories of roughness scattering so far dealt only with the small-density single subband two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Here we develop a theory of roughness-scattering limited mobility for the multisubband large concentration case. We show that with growing 2D electron concentration n the surface dimensionless conductivity σ /(2 e2/h ) first decreases as ∝n-6 /5 and then saturates as ˜(d aB/Δ2)≫1 , where d and Δ are the characteristic length and height of the surface roughness and aB is the effective Bohr radius. This means that in spite of the shrinkage of the 2DEG thickness and the related increase of the scattering rate the 2DEG remains a good metal.

  9. Surface roughness modulations by submesoscale currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rascle, Nicolas; Chapron, Bertrand; Nouguier, Frederic; Ponte, Aurelien; Mouche, Alexis; Molemaker, Jeroen

    2016-04-01

    At times, high resolution images of sea surface roughness can provide stunning details of submesoscale upper ocean dynamics. As interpreted, transformations of short scale wind waves by horizontal current gradients are responsible for those spectacular observations. Here we present two major advances towards the quantitative interpretation of those observations. First, we show that surface roughness variations mainly trace two particular characteristics of the current gradient tensor, the divergence and the strain in the wind direction. Local vorticity and shear in the wind direction should not affect short scale roughness distribution and would not be detectable. Second, we discuss the effect of the viewing direction using sets of quasi-simultaneous sun glitter images, taken from different satellites to provide different viewing configurations. We show that upwind and crosswind viewing observations can be markedly different. As further confirmed with idealized numerical simulations, this anisotropy well traces surface current strain area, while more isotropic contrasts likely trace areas dominated by surface divergence conditions. These findings suggest the potential to directly observe surface currents at submesoscale by using surface roughness observations at multiple azimuth viewing angles. They also pave the way towards a better understanding of the coupling between ocean, waves and atmosphere at high resolution.

  10. Particle Sliding on a Rough Incline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurcher, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    We study a particle sliding on a rough inclined plane as an example of a mechanical problem with nonholonomic constraint. The particle is launched in an arbitrary direction so that its motion has both a horizontal and a "vertical" (i.e., up- and downhill) direction. The friction force acts along the instantaneous velocity, so that the horizontal…

  11. The Cdc48 machine in endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Dieter H; Stolz, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    The AAA-type ATPase Cdc48 (named p97/VCP in mammals) is a molecular machine in all eukaryotic cells that transforms ATP hydrolysis into mechanic power to unfold and pull proteins against physical forces, which make up a protein's structure and hold it in place. From the many cellular processes, Cdc48 is involved in, its function in endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation (ERAD) is understood best. This quality control process for proteins of the secretory pathway scans protein folding and discovers misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the organelle, destined for folding of these proteins and their further delivery to their site of action. Misfolded lumenal and membrane proteins of the ER are detected by chaperones and lectins and retro-translocated out of the ER for degradation. Here the Cdc48 machinery, recruited to the ER membrane, takes over. After polyubiquitylation of the protein substrate, Cdc48 together with its dimeric co-factor complex Ufd1-Npl4 pulls the misfolded protein out and away from the ER membrane and delivers it to down-stream components for degradation by a cytosolic proteinase machine, the proteasome. The known details of the Cdc48-Ufd1-Npl4 motor complex triggered process are subject of this review article. PMID:21945179

  12. Ricin A chain reaches the endoplasmic reticulum after endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Qiong; Zhan Jinbiao . E-mail: jzhan2k@zju.edu.cn; Chen Xinhong; Zheng Shu

    2006-05-12

    Ricin is a potent ribosome inactivating protein and now has been widely used for synthesis of immunotoxins. To target ribosome in the mammalian cytosol, ricin must firstly retrograde transport from the endomembrane system to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where the ricin A chain (RTA) is recognized by ER components that facilitate its membrane translocation to the cytosol. In the study, the fusion gene of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-RTA was expressed with the pET-28a (+) system in Escherichia coli under the control of a T7 promoter. The fusion protein showed a green fluorescence. The recombinant protein can be purified by metal chelated affinity chromatography on a column of NTA. The rabbit anti-GFP antibody can recognize the fusion protein of EGFP-RTA just like the EGFP protein. The cytotoxicity of EGFP-RTA and RTA was evaluated by the MTT assay in HeLa and HEP-G2 cells following fluid-phase endocytosis. The fusion protein had a similar cytotoxicity of RTA. After endocytosis, the subcellular location of the fusion protein can be observed with the laser scanning confocal microscopy and the immuno-gold labeling Electro Microscopy. This study provided important evidence by a visualized way to prove that RTA does reach the endoplasmic reticulum.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium pumps and cancer cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Papp, Béla; Brouland, Jean-Philippe; Arbabian, Atousa; Gélébart, Pascal; Kovács, Tünde; Bobe, Régis; Enouf, Jocelyne; Varin-Blank, Nadine; Apáti, Agota

    2012-03-05

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a major intracellular calcium storage pool and a multifunctional organelle that accomplishes several calcium-dependent functions involved in many homeostatic and signaling mechanisms. Calcium is accumulated in the ER by Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase (SERCA)-type calcium pumps. SERCA activity can determine ER calcium content available for intra-ER functions and for calcium release into the cytosol, and can shape the spatiotemporal characteristics of calcium signals. SERCA function therefore constitutes an important nodal point in the regulation of cellular calcium homeostasis and signaling, and can exert important effects on cell growth, differentiation and survival. In several cell types such as cells of hematopoietic origin, mammary, gastric and colonic epithelium, SERCA2 and SERCA3-type calcium pumps are simultaneously expressed, and SERCA3 expression levels undergo significant changes during cell differentiation, activation or immortalization. In addition, SERCA3 expression is decreased or lost in several tumor types when compared to the corresponding normal tissue. These observations indicate that ER calcium homeostasis is remodeled during cell differentiation, and may present defects due to decreased SERCA3 expression in tumors. Modulation of the state of differentiation of the ER reflected by SERCA3 expression constitutes an interesting new aspect of cell differentiation and tumor biology.

  14. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum crosstalk in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Giovanni; Kawamata, Hibiki

    2016-06-01

    Physical and functional interactions between mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are crucial for cell life. These two organelles are intimately connected and collaborate to essential processes, such as calcium homeostasis and phospholipid biosynthesis. The connections between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum occur through structures named mitochondria associated membranes (MAMs), which contain lipid rafts and a large number of proteins, many of which serve multiple functions at different cellular sites. Growing evidence strongly suggests that alterations of ER-mitochondria interactions are involved in neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a devastating and rapidly fatal motor neuron disease. Mutations in proteins that participate in ER-mitochondria interactions and MAM functions are increasingly being associated with genetic forms of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. This evidence strongly suggests that, rather than considering the two organelles separately, a better understanding of the disease process can derive from studying the alterations in their crosstalk. In this review we discuss normal and pathological ER-mitochondria interactions and the evidence that link them to ALS.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Endoplasmic Reticulum Oxidoreductin 1 from Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Seo, Minchul; Ryou, Hee-Joo; Yun, Eun-Young; Goo, Tae-Won

    2015-01-01

    We isolated a complementary DNA (cDNA) clone encoding endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1 (bERO1, a specific oxidant of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)) from Bombyx mori. This protein has a putative open reading frame (ORF) of 489 amino acids and a predicted size of 57.4 kDa. Although bERO1 protein shares less than 57% amino acid sequence homology with other reported ERO1s, it contains two conserved redox active motifs, a Cys-X-X-X-X-Cys motif of N-terminal and Cys-X-X-Cys-X-X-Cys motif of C-terminal. Both motifs are typically present in ERO1 protein family members. The bEro1 mRNA expression was highest in posterior silk gland on the sixth day of the 5th instar larvae. Expression of bEro1 mRNA also markedly increased during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by stimulation with antimycin, calcium ionophore A23187, dithiothreitol, H₂O₂, monencin, and tunicamycin. In addition, expression levels of bEro1 exactly coincided with that of bPdi. This is the first result suggesting that bERO1 plays an essential role in ER quality control through the combined activities of bERO1 and bPDI as a catalyst of protein folding in the ER and sustaining cellular redox homeostasis. PMID:26556347

  16. [Involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress in solid organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Pallet, Nicolas; Bouvier, Nicolas; Beaune, Philippe; Legendre, Christophe; Anglicheau, Dany; Thervet, Eric

    2010-04-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a situation caused by the accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, triggering an evolutionary conserved adaptive response termed the unfolded protein response. When adaptation fails, excessive and prolonged ER stress triggers cell suicide. Important roles for ER-initiated cell death pathways have been recognized for several diseases, including diabetes, hypoxia, ischemia/reperfusion injury, neurodegenerative and heart diseases. The implication of the ER stress is not well recognized in solid organ transplantation, but increasing evidence suggests its implication in mediating allograft injury. The purpose of this review is to summarize the mechanisms of ER stress and to discuss its implication during tissue injury in solid organ transplantation. The possible implications of the ER stress in the modifications of cell functional properties and phenotypic changes are also discussed beyond the scope of adaptation and cell death. Increasing the understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of acute and chronic allograft damages could lead to the development of new biomarkers and to the discovery of new therapeutic strategies to prevent the initiation of graft dysfunction or to promote the tissue regeneration after injury. PMID:20412745

  17. XBP1 Regulates the Biosynthetic Capacity of the Mammary Gland During Lactation by Controlling Epithelial Expansion and Endoplasmic Reticulum Formation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kristen R; Giesy, Sarah L; Long, Qiaoming; Krumm, Christopher S; Harvatine, Kevin J; Boisclair, Yves R

    2016-01-01

    Cells composing the mammary secretory compartment have evolved a high capacity to secrete not only proteins but also triglycerides and carbohydrates. This feature is illustrated by the mouse, which can secrete nearly twice its own weight in milk proteins, triglycerides and lactose over a short 20-day lactation. The coordination of synthesis and export of products in other secretory cells is orchestrated in part by the transcription factor X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1). To assess the role of XBP1 in mammary epithelial cells (MEC), we studied floxed XBP1 female mice lacking (wild type; WT) or expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the ovine β-lactoglobulin promoter (ΔXBP1(MEC)). Pregnant ΔXBP1(MEC) females had morphologically normal mammary development and gave birth to the same number of pups as WT mice. Their litters, however, suffered a weight gain deficit by lactation day 3 (L3)3 that grew to 80% by L14. ΔXBP1(MEC) dams had only modest changes in milk composition (-21% protein, +24% triglyceride) and in the expression of associated genes in isolated MEC. By L5, WT glands were fully occupied by dilated alveoli, whereas ΔXBP1(MEC) glands contained fewer, mostly unfilled alveoli and retained a prominent adipocyte population. The smaller epithelial compartment in ΔXBP1(MEC) glands was explained by lower MEC proliferation and increased apoptosis. Finally, endoplasmic reticulum ribbons were less abundant in ΔXBP1(MEC) at pregnancy day 18 and failed to increase in abundance by L5. Collectively, these results show that XBP1 is required for MEC population expansion during lactation and its ability to develop an elaborate endoplasmic reticulum compartment. PMID:26562262

  18. Birbeck granule-like "organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum" resulting from the expression of a cytoplasmic YFP-tagged langerin.

    PubMed

    Lenormand, Cédric; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Cinquin, Bertrand; Bardin, Sabine; Bausinger, Huguette; Angénieux, Catherine; Eckly, Anita; Proamer, Fabienne; Wall, David; Lich, Ben; Tourne, Sylvie; Hanau, Daniel; Schwab, Yannick; Salamero, Jean; de la Salle, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Langerin is required for the biogenesis of Birbeck granules (BGs), the characteristic organelles of Langerhans cells. We previously used a Langerin-YFP fusion protein having a C-terminal luminal YFP tag to dynamically decipher the molecular and cellular processes which accompany the traffic of Langerin. In order to elucidate the interactions of Langerin with its trafficking effectors and their structural impact on the biogenesis of BGs, we generated a YFP-Langerin chimera with an N-terminal, cytosolic YFP tag. This latter fusion protein induced the formation of YFP-positive large puncta. Live cell imaging coupled to a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching approach showed that this coalescence of proteins in newly formed compartments was static. In contrast, the YFP-positive structures present in the pericentriolar region of cells expressing Langerin-YFP chimera, displayed fluorescent recovery characteristics compatible with active membrane exchanges. Using correlative light-electron microscopy we showed that the coalescent structures represented highly organized stacks of membranes with a pentalaminar architecture typical of BGs. Continuities between these organelles and the rough endoplasmic reticulum allowed us to identify the stacks of membranes as a form of "Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum" (OSER), with distinct molecular and physiological properties. The involvement of homotypic interactions between cytoplasmic YFP molecules was demonstrated using an A206K variant of YFP, which restored most of the Langerin traffic and BG characteristics observed in Langerhans cells. Mutation of the carbohydrate recognition domain also blocked the formation of OSER. Hence, a "double-lock" mechanism governs the behavior of YFP-Langerin, where asymmetric homodimerization of the YFP tag and homotypic interactions between the lectin domains of Langerin molecules participate in its retention and the subsequent formation of BG-like OSER. These observations confirm that

  19. Tear Film Interferometry and Corneal Surface Roughness

    PubMed Central

    King-Smith, P. Ewen; Kimball, Samuel H.; Nichols, Jason J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Previous studies of optical interference from the whole thickness of the precorneal tear film showed much lower contrast than from the pre–contact lens tear film. It is hypothesized that the recorded low contrast is related to roughness of the corneal surface compared with the smooth contact lens surface. This hypothesis is tested, and characteristics of this roughness are studied. Methods. Reflectance spectra were recorded from 20 healthy individuals using a silicon-based sensor used in previous studies (wavelength range, 562–1030 nm) and an indium-gallium-arsenide (InGaAs) sensor responding at longer wavelengths (912–1712 nm). Interference from the whole thickness of the precorneal tear film caused oscillations in the reflectance spectra. Results. Spectral oscillations recorded with the InGaAs sensor were found to decay as a Gaussian function of wave number (1/wavelength). This is consistent with a rough corneal surface, whose distribution of surface height is also a Gaussian function. Contrast of spectral oscillations for the InGaAs sensor was, on average, approximately four times greater than that for the silicon sensor. Conclusions. For the Gaussian roughness model based on InGaAs spectra, the corneal surface was characterized by a surface height SD of 0.129 μm. Spectral oscillations recorded with a silicon-based camera can have higher contrast than expected from this Gaussian roughness model, indicating some reflectance from a smoother or more compact surface. The results also indicate that InGaAs cameras could provide whole-thickness interference images of higher contrast than silicon-based cameras. PMID:24692127

  20. The neutral surface layer above rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedman, Ann-Sofi; Sahlee, Erik

    2014-05-01

    It is generally accepted that turbulent fluxes (momentum and scalar fluxes) are approx. constant with height above horizontal surfaces with low roughness. But what will happen when the roughness sub-layer is large as found over cities, forests and rough seas? In a study of the kinematic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, Högström, Hunt and Smedman, 2002, it was demonstrated that a model with detached eddies from above the surface layer impinging on to the surface (Hunt and Morison, 2000) could explain some of the observed features in the neutral atmospheric boundary layer. Thus the detached eddy model proved successful in explaining the dynamic structure of the near neutral atmospheric surface layer, especially the shape of the spectra of the wind components and scalars and corresponding fluxes. Here we make the hypothesis that the detached-eddy model can also be used to explain the experimental results related to the 3-dimensional turbulence structure above rough surfaces. Measurements are taken both over land (grass and forest) and over sea (Baltic Sea and hurricane Fabian in the Atlantic) above the roughness sub-layer. Analysis of the turbulence structure shows a striking similarity between the different sites. Hunt, J.C.R and Morrison, J.F., 2000: Eddy structure in turbulent boundary layers, Euro. J. Mech. B-Fluids, 19, 673-694. Högström, U., Hunt, J.C.R., and Smedman, A., 2002: Theory and measurements for turbulence spectra and variances in the atmospheric neutral surface layer, Bound.-Layer Meteorol., 103,101-124.

  1. Exocyst Sec10 is Involved in Basolateral Protein Translation and Translocation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soo Young; Fogelgren, Ben; Zuo, Xiaofeng; Huang, Liwei; McKenna, Sarah; Lingappa, Vishwanath R.; Lipschutz, Joshua H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein translation and translocation at the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) are the first steps in the secretory pathway. The translocon through which newly-made proteins are translocated into or across the RER membrane, consists of three main subunits, Sec61α, β, and γ. Sec61β facilitates translocation, and we and others showed that the highly-conserved eight protein exocyst complex interacts with Sec61β. We also showed that the exocyst was involved in basolateral, and not apical, protein synthesis and delivery. Recently, however, exocyst involvement in apical protein delivery was reported. Furthermore, we showed that the exocyst was necessary for formation of primary cilia, organelles found on the apical surface. Methods GST pulldown was performed on lysate of renal tubule cells to investigate biochemical interactions. Cell-free assays consisting of cell-free extracts from rabbit reticulocytes, pancreatic ER microsomal membranes, transcripts of cDNA from apical and basolateral proteins, ATP/GTP, amino acids, and 35S-methionine for protein detection, were used to investigate the role of the exocyst in synthesis of polarized proteins. P32-orthophosphate and immunoprecipitation with antibody against Sec61β was used to investigate the Sec61β phosphorylation in exocyst Sec10-overexpressing cells. Results Sec10 biochemically interacts with Sec61β using GST pulldown. Using cell-free assays, there is enhanced recruitment to ER membranes following exocyst depletion and basolateral VSVG protein translation, compared to apical HA protein translation. Finally, Sec10 overexpression increases Sec61β phosphorylation. Conclusion These data confirm that the exocyst is preferentially involved in basolateral protein translation and translocation, and may well act through the phosphorylation of Sec61β. PMID:23037926

  2. Nongenomic STAT5-dependent effects on Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum structure and function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jason E; Yang, Yang-Ming; Liang, Feng-Xia; Gough, Daniel J; Levy, David E; Sehgal, Pravin B

    2012-03-01

    We report unexpected nongenomic functions of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5 species in the cytoplasm aimed at preserving the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus and rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in vascular cells. Immunoimaging and green fluorescent protein-tagged-STAT5a protein localization studies showed the constitutive association of nonphosphorylated STAT5a, and to a lesser extent STAT5b, with the Golgi apparatus and of STAT5a with centrosomes in human pulmonary arterial endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Acute knockdown of STAT5a/b species using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), including in the presence of an mRNA synthesis inhibitor (5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole), produced a dramatic phenotype within 1 day, consisting of dilatation and fragmentation of Golgi cisternae, a marked tubule-to-cyst change in the ER, increased accumulation of reticulon-4 (RTN4)/Nogo-B and atlastin-3 (ATL3) at cyst-zone boundaries, cystic separation of the outer and inner nuclear membranes, accompanied by scalloped/lunate distortion of the nucleus, with accumulation of RTN4 on convex sides of distorted nuclei. These cells showed inhibition of vesicular stomatitis virus G protein glycoprotein trafficking, mitochondrial fragmentation, and reduced mitochondrial function. STAT5a/b(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts also showed altered ER/Golgi dynamics. RTN4 knockdown using siRNA did not affect development of the cystic phenotype; ATL3 siRNA led to effacement of cyst-zone boundaries. In magnetic-bead cross-immunopanning assays, ATL3 bound both STAT5a and STAT5b. Remarkably, this novel cystic ER/lunate nucleus phenotype was characteristic of vascular cells in arterial lesions of idiopathic pulmonary hypertension, an unrelentingly fatal human disease. These data provide evidence of a STAT-family protein regulating the structure of a cytoplasmic organelle and implicate this mechanism in the pathogenesis of a human disease.

  3. Multifunctional roles for the protein translocation machinery in RNA anchoring to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Jagannathan, Sujatha; Hsu, Jack C-C; Reid, David W; Chen, Qiang; Thompson, Will J; Moseley, Arthur M; Nicchitta, Christopher V

    2014-09-12

    Signal sequence-encoding mRNAs undergo translation-dependent localization to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and at the ER are anchored via translation on Sec61-bound ribosomes. Recent investigations into the composition and membrane association characteristics of ER-associated mRNAs have, however, revealed both ribosome-dependent (indirect) and ribosome-independent (direct) modes of mRNA association with the ER. These findings raise important questions regarding our understanding of how mRNAs are selected, localized, and anchored to the ER. Using semi-intact tissue culture cells, we performed a polysome solubilization screen and identified conditions that distinguish polysomes engaged in the translation of distinct cohorts of mRNAs. To gain insight into the molecular basis of direct mRNA anchoring to the ER, we performed RNA-protein UV photocross-linking studies in rough microsomes and demonstrate that numerous ER integral membrane proteins display RNA binding activity. Quantitative proteomic analyses of HeLa cytosolic and ER-bound polysome fractions identified translocon components as selective polysome-interacting proteins. Notably, the Sec61 complex was highly enriched in polysomes engaged in the translation of endomembrane organelle proteins, whereas translocon accessory proteins, such as ribophorin I, were present in all subpopulations of ER-associated polysomes. Analyses of the protein composition of oligo(dT)-selected UV photocross-linked ER protein-RNA adducts identified Sec61α,β and ribophorin I as ER-poly(A) mRNA-binding proteins, suggesting unexpected roles for the protein translocation and modification machinery in mRNA anchoring to the ER. In summary, we propose that multiple mechanisms of mRNA and ribosome association with ER operate to enable an mRNA transcriptome-wide function for the ER in protein synthesis.

  4. Proteomic analysis of the transitional endoplasmic reticulum in hepatocellular carcinoma: an organelle perspective on cancer.

    PubMed

    Roy, Line; Laboissière, Sylvie; Abdou, Eman; Thibault, Geneviève; Hamel, Nathalie; Taheri, Maryam; Boismenu, Daniel; Lanoix, Joël; Kearney, Robert E; Paiement, Jacques

    2010-09-01

    The transitional endoplasmic reticulum (tER) is composed of both rough and smooth ER membranes and thus participates in functions attributed to both these two subcellular compartments. In this paper we have compared the protein composition of tER isolated from dissected liver tumor nodules of aflatoxin B1-treated rats with that of tER from control liver. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS), peptide counts and immunoblot validation were used to identify and determine the relative expression level of proteins. Inhibitors of apoptosis (i.e. PGRMC1, tripeptidyl peptidase II), proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis (i.e. nucleophosmin, nucleolin), proteins involved in translation (i.e. eEF-2, and subunits of eIF-3), proteins involved in ubiquitin metabolism (i.e. proteasome subunits, USP10) and proteins involved in membrane traffic (i.e. SEC13-like 1, SEC23B, dynactin 1) were found overexpressed in tumor tER. Transcription factors (i.e. Pur-beta, BTF3) and molecular targets for C-Myc and NF-kappa B were observed overexpressed in tER from tumor nodules. Down-regulated proteins included cytochrome P450 proteins and enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism and in steroid metabolism. Unexpectedly expression of the protein folding machinery (i.e. calreticulin) and proteins of the MHC class I peptide-loading complex did not change. Proteins of unknown function were detected in association with the tER and the novel proteins showing differential expression are potential new tumor markers. In many cases differential expression of proteins in tumor tER was comparable to that of corresponding genes reported in the Oncomine human database. Thus the molecular profile of tumor tER is different and this may confer survival advantage to tumor cells in cancer.

  5. Cell death and survival through the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial axis.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Sagua, R; Rodriguez, A E; Kuzmicic, J; Gutierrez, T; Lopez-Crisosto, C; Quiroga, C; Díaz-Elizondo, J; Chiong, M; Gillette, T G; Rothermel, B A; Lavandero, S

    2013-02-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum has a central role in biosynthesis of a variety of proteins and lipids. Mitochondria generate ATP, synthesize and process numerous metabolites, and are key regulators of cell death. The architectures of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria change continually via the process of membrane fusion, fission, elongation, degradation, and renewal. These structural changes correlate with important changes in organellar function. Both organelles are capable of moving along the cytoskeleton, thus changing their cellular distribution. Numerous studies have demonstrated coordination and communication between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. A focal point for these interactions is a zone of close contact between them known as the mitochondrial-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM), which serves as a signaling juncture that facilitates calcium and lipid transfer between organelles. Here we review the emerging data on how communication between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria can modulate organelle function and determine cellular fate.

  6. Cell Death and Survival Through the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondrial Axis

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Sagua, R.; Rodriguez, A.E.; Kuzmicic, J.; Gutierrez, T.; Lopez-Crisosto, C.; Quiroga, C.; Díaz-Elizondo, J.; Chiong, M.; Gillette, T.G.; Rothermel, B.A.; Lavandero, S.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum has a central role in biosynthesis of a variety of proteins and lipids. Mitochondria generate ATP, synthesize and process numerous metabolites, and are key regulators of cell death. The architectures of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria change continually via the process of membrane fusion, fission, elongation, degradation, and renewal. These structural changes correlate with important changes in organellar function. Both organelles are capable of moving along the cytoskeleton, thus changing their cellular distribution. Numerous studies have demonstrated coordination and communication between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. A focal point for these interactions is a zone of close contact between them known as the mitochondrial–associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM), which serves as a signaling juncture that facilitates calcium and lipid transfer between organelles. Here we review the emerging data on how communication between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria can modulate organelle function and determine cellular fate. PMID:23228132

  7. Cell death and survival through the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial axis.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Sagua, R; Rodriguez, A E; Kuzmicic, J; Gutierrez, T; Lopez-Crisosto, C; Quiroga, C; Díaz-Elizondo, J; Chiong, M; Gillette, T G; Rothermel, B A; Lavandero, S

    2013-02-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum has a central role in biosynthesis of a variety of proteins and lipids. Mitochondria generate ATP, synthesize and process numerous metabolites, and are key regulators of cell death. The architectures of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria change continually via the process of membrane fusion, fission, elongation, degradation, and renewal. These structural changes correlate with important changes in organellar function. Both organelles are capable of moving along the cytoskeleton, thus changing their cellular distribution. Numerous studies have demonstrated coordination and communication between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. A focal point for these interactions is a zone of close contact between them known as the mitochondrial-associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM), which serves as a signaling juncture that facilitates calcium and lipid transfer between organelles. Here we review the emerging data on how communication between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria can modulate organelle function and determine cellular fate. PMID:23228132

  8. Physically-based Ice Thickness and Surface Roughness Retrievals over Rough Deformed Sea Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Li; Gaiser, Peter; Allard, Richard; Posey, Pamela; Hebert, David; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline; Polashenski, Christopher; Claffey, Keran

    2016-04-01

    The observations of sea ice thickness and ice surface roughness are critical for our understanding of the state of the changing Arctic. Currently, the Radar and/or LiDAR data of sea ice freeboard are used to infer sea ice thickness via isostasy. The underlying assumption is that the LiDAR signal returns at the air/snow interface and radar signal at the snow/ice interface. The elevations of these interfaces are determined based on LiDAR/Radar return waveforms. However, the commonly used threshold-based surface detection techniques are empirical in nature and work well only over level/smooth sea ice. Rough sea ice surfaces can modify the return waveforms, resulting in significant Electromagnetic (EM) bias in the estimated surface elevations, and thus large errors in the ice thickness retrievals. To understand and quantify such sea ice surface roughness effects, a combined EM rough surface and volume scattering model was developed to simulate radar returns from the rough sea ice 'layer cake' structure. A waveform matching technique was also developed to fit observed waveforms to a physically-based waveform model and subsequently correct the roughness induced EM bias in the estimated freeboard. This new EM Bias Corrected (EMBC) algorithm was able to better retrieve surface elevations and estimate the surface roughness parameter simultaneously. Both the ice thickness and surface roughness retrievals are validated using in-situ data. For the surface roughness retrievals, we applied this EMBC algorithm to co-incident LiDAR/Radar measurements collected during a Cryosat-2 under-flight by the NASA IceBridge missions. Results show that not only does the waveform model fit very well to the measured radar waveform, but also the roughness parameters derived independently from the LiDAR and radar data agree very well for both level and deformed sea ice. For sea ice thickness retrievals, validation based on in-situ data from the coordinated CRREL/NRL field campaign demonstrates

  9. Abundance of field galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Karachentsev, Igor; Makarov, Dmitry; Nasonova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    We present new measurements of the abundance of galaxies with a given circular velocity in the Local Volume: a region centred on the Milky Way Galaxy and extending to distance ˜10 Mpc. The sample of ˜750 mostly dwarf galaxies provides a unique opportunity to study the abundance and properties of galaxies down to absolute magnitudes MB ≈ -10 and virial masses M_vir= 109{ M_{⊙}}. We find that the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model gives remarkably accurate estimates for the velocity function of galaxies with circular velocities V ≳ 70 kms-1 and corresponding virial masses M_vir≳ 5× 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, but it badly fails by overpredicting ˜5 times the abundance of large dwarfs with velocities V = 30-40 kms-1. The warm dark matter (WDM) models cannot explain the data either, regardless of mass of WDM particle. Just as in previous observational studies, we find a shallow asymptotic slope dN/dlog V ∝ Vα, α ≈ -1 of the velocity function, which is inconsistent with the standard ΛCDM model that predicts the slope α = -3. Though reminiscent to the known overabundance of satellite problem, the overabundance of field galaxies is a much more difficult problem. For the standard ΛCDM model to survive, in the 10 Mpc radius of the Milky Way there should be 1000 not yet detected galaxies with virial mass M_vir≈ 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, extremely low surface brightness and no detectable H I gas. So far none of this type of galaxies have been discovered.

  10. The Pathogen-Occupied Vacuoles of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma marginale Interact with the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Truchan, Hilary K; Cockburn, Chelsea L; Hebert, Kathryn S; Magunda, Forgivemore; Noh, Susan M; Carlyon, Jason A

    2016-01-01

    The genus Anaplasma consists of tick-transmitted obligate intracellular bacteria that invade white or red blood cells to cause debilitating and potentially fatal infections. A. phagocytophilum, a human and veterinary pathogen, infects neutrophils to cause granulocytic anaplasmosis. A. marginale invades bovine erythrocytes. Evidence suggests that both species may also infect endothelial cells in vivo. In mammalian and arthropod host cells, A. phagocytophilum and A. marginale reside in host cell derived pathogen-occupied vacuoles (POVs). While it was recently demonstrated that the A. phagocytophilum-occupied vacuole (ApV) intercepts membrane traffic from the trans-Golgi network, it is unclear if it or the A. marginale-occupied vacuole (AmV) interacts with other secretory organelles. Here, we demonstrate that the ApV and AmV extensively interact with the host endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in endothelial, myeloid, and/or tick cells. ER lumen markers, calreticulin, and protein disulfide isomerase, and the ER membrane marker, derlin-1, were pronouncedly recruited to the peripheries of both POVs. ApV association with the ER initiated early and continued throughout the infection cycle. Both the ApV and AmV interacted with the rough ER and smooth ER. However, only derlin-1-positive rough ER derived vesicles were delivered into the ApV lumen where they localized with intravacuolar bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy identified multiple ER-POV membrane contact sites on the cytosolic faces of both species' vacuoles that corresponded to areas on the vacuoles' lumenal faces where intravacuolar Anaplasma organisms closely associated. A. phagocytophilum is known to hijack Rab10, a GTPase that regulates ER dynamics and morphology. Yet, ApV-ER interactions were unhindered in cells in which Rab10 had been knocked down, demonstrating that the GTPase is dispensable for the bacterium to parasitize the ER. These data establish the ApV and AmV as pathogen-host interfaces that directly

  11. The Pathogen-Occupied Vacuoles of Anaplasma phagocytophilum and Anaplasma marginale Interact with the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Truchan, Hilary K.; Cockburn, Chelsea L.; Hebert, Kathryn S.; Magunda, Forgivemore; Noh, Susan M.; Carlyon, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    The genus Anaplasma consists of tick-transmitted obligate intracellular bacteria that invade white or red blood cells to cause debilitating and potentially fatal infections. A. phagocytophilum, a human and veterinary pathogen, infects neutrophils to cause granulocytic anaplasmosis. A. marginale invades bovine erythrocytes. Evidence suggests that both species may also infect endothelial cells in vivo. In mammalian and arthropod host cells, A. phagocytophilum and A. marginale reside in host cell derived pathogen-occupied vacuoles (POVs). While it was recently demonstrated that the A. phagocytophilum-occupied vacuole (ApV) intercepts membrane traffic from the trans-Golgi network, it is unclear if it or the A. marginale-occupied vacuole (AmV) interacts with other secretory organelles. Here, we demonstrate that the ApV and AmV extensively interact with the host endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in endothelial, myeloid, and/or tick cells. ER lumen markers, calreticulin, and protein disulfide isomerase, and the ER membrane marker, derlin-1, were pronouncedly recruited to the peripheries of both POVs. ApV association with the ER initiated early and continued throughout the infection cycle. Both the ApV and AmV interacted with the rough ER and smooth ER. However, only derlin-1-positive rough ER derived vesicles were delivered into the ApV lumen where they localized with intravacuolar bacteria. Transmission electron microscopy identified multiple ER-POV membrane contact sites on the cytosolic faces of both species' vacuoles that corresponded to areas on the vacuoles' lumenal faces where intravacuolar Anaplasma organisms closely associated. A. phagocytophilum is known to hijack Rab10, a GTPase that regulates ER dynamics and morphology. Yet, ApV-ER interactions were unhindered in cells in which Rab10 had been knocked down, demonstrating that the GTPase is dispensable for the bacterium to parasitize the ER. These data establish the ApV and AmV as pathogen-host interfaces that directly

  12. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Reyes, José Luis

    2011-01-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families, each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility. PMID:21447997

  13. Chemical abundance of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan; Wehinger, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Observations of NH2, (OI) and molecular ion spectra in comets represent virtually all of the volatile fraction of a comet nucleus. Their study leads to the N2, NH3, H2O, CO2, CO content of the nucleus, and thus to important constraints on models of comet formation and chemical processing in the primitive solar nebula. The observations of Comet Halley provide the opportunity for the first comprehensive determination of the abundances in a comet nucleus. The carbon isotope abundance ratio 12 C/13 C = 65 plus or minus 8 has been determined for Comet Halley from resolved rotational line structure in the CN B-X (0,0) band. The ratio is approximately 30 pct lower than the solar system value, 89, indicating either an enhancement of 13CN or a depletion of 12CN in the comet. Scenarios consistent with the observed carbon isotope ratio are: (1) formation of the comet at the periphery of the solar nebula in a fractionation-enriched 13CN region, or hidden from 12CN enrichment sources, and (2) capture of an interestellar comet. Long-slit charge coupled device (CCD) spectra obtained at the time of the spacecraft encounter of Comet Halley have also been analyzed. Scale lengths, production rates and column densities of CH, CN, C2 and NH2 were determined.

  14. Flare Plasma Iron Abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Brian R.; Dan, Chau; Jain, Rajmal; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    The equivalent width of the iron-line complex at 6.7 keV seen in flare X-ray spectra suggests that the iron abundance of the hottest plasma at temperatures >approx.10 MK may sometimes be significantly lower than the nominal coronal abundance of four times the photospheric value that is commonly assumed. This conclusion is based on X-ray spectral observations of several flares seen in common with the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) and the Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) on the second Indian geostationary satellite, GSAT-2. The implications of this will be discussed as it relates to the origin of the hot flare plasma - either plasma already in the corona that is directly heated during the flare energy release process or chromospheric plasma that is heated by flare-accelerated particles and driven up into the corona. Other possible explanations of lower-than-expected equivalent widths of the iron-line complex will also be discussed.

  15. Variability in roughness measurements for vegetated rivers near base flow, in England and Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hare, Matthew T.; McGahey, Caroline; Bissett, Nicola; Cailes, Claire; Henville, Paul; Scarlett, Peter

    2010-05-01

    SummaryThe aim of this study was to reduce uncertainty in roughness information for in-stream vegetation. This in turn reduces the uncertainty in estimating water levels in channels where aquatic vegetation is present. Roughness plays an essential role in water level estimation as it reduces the discharge capacity through energy expenditure on boundary generated turbulence as well as through physical blockages by vegetation. Apart from the hydrology analysis for determining the inflow to the river system, the largest source of uncertainty for estimating water levels in channels is roughness ( Latapie, 2003; Mc Gahey, 2006). Of the different roughness types, vegetation roughness includes the greatest natural variability (e.g. Defra/EA, 2003a; Sellin and Van Beesten, 2004). The hypothesis that measures of plant growth can explain variation in roughness for vegetated channels was tested. Presented here is a snapshot of roughness measures made in vegetated channels at the height of the growing season. One source of variability in roughness values was quantified which is the regional difference in roughness values attributable to differences in aquatic plant growth. This work focused on sites dominated by either submerged Ranunculus spp. (water crowfoot) or the emergent Sparganium erectum (branched bur-reed). These two taxa are among the most common higher aquatic plants in UK rivers. Rivers were sampled from the Scottish border in the north to the south coast of England. Sites (36) were chosen carefully to provide a very wide range of growing conditions. Both roughness, as Manning's n, and plant growth varied substantially between sites. At S. erectum sites mean Manning's n was 0.125 ± 0.04 standard error (s.e.) and at Ranunculus spp. sites mean Manning's n was 0.124 ± 0.017 s.e. For all sites it was possible to reduce uncertainty by attributing variability in Manning's n to standing crop. A plant index, combining three measures of abundance, explained 70% of the

  16. Boltzmann active walkers and rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochy, R. D.; Kayser, D. R.; Aberle, L. K.; Lam, L.

    1993-06-01

    An active walker model (AWM) was recently proposed by Freimuth and Lam for the generation of various filamentary patterns. In an AWM, the walker changes the landscape as it walks, and its steps are in turn influenced by the changing landscape. The landscape so obtained is a rough surface. In this paper, the properties of such a rough surface (with average height conserved) generated by a Boltzmann active walker in 1 + 1 dimensions is investigated in detail. The scaling properties of the surface thickness σ T is found to belong to a new class quite different from other types of fractal surfaces. For example, σ T is independent of the system size L, but is a function of the “temperature” T. Soliton propagation is found when T = 0.

  17. Rough primes and rough conversations: evidence for a modality-specific basis to mental metaphors

    PubMed Central

    Denke, Claudia; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Rotte, Michael

    2014-01-01

    How does our brain organize knowledge? Traditional theories assume that our knowledge is represented abstractly in an amodal conceptual network of formal logic symbols. The theory of embodied cognition challenges this view and argues that conceptual representations that constitute our knowledge are grounded in sensory and motor experiences. We tested this hypothesis by examining how the concept of social coordination is grounded metaphorically in the tactile sensation of roughness. Participants experienced rough or smooth touch before being asked to judge an ambiguous social interaction. Results revealed that rough touch made social interactions appear more difficult and adversarial, consistent with the rough metaphor. This impact of tactile cues on social impressions was accompanied by a network including primary and secondary somatosensory cortices, amygdala, hippocampus and inferior prefrontal cortex. Thus, the roughness of tactile stimulation affected metaphor-relevant (but not metaphor-irrelevant) behavioral and neural responses. Receiving touch from a rough object seems to trigger the application of associated ontological concepts (or scaffolds) even for unrelated people and situations (but not to unrelated or more general feelings). Since this priming was based on somatosensory brain areas, our results provide support for the theory that sensorimotor grounding is intrinsic to cognitive processes. PMID:24097375

  18. Replicated mask surface roughness effects on EUV lithographic pattering and line edge roughness

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Mochi, Iacopo; Salmassi, Farhad; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Anderson, Erik H.

    2011-03-11

    To quantify the roughness contributions to speckle, a programmed roughness substrate was fabricated with a number of areas having different roughness magnitudes. The substrate was then multilayer coated. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) surface maps were collected before and after multilayer deposition. At-wavelength reflectance and total integrated scattering measurements were also completed. Angle resolved scattering based power spectral densities are directly compared to the AFM based power spectra. We show that AFM overpredicts the roughness in the picometer measurements range. The mask was then imaged at-wavelength for the direct characterization of the aerial image speckle using the SEMATECH Berkeley Actinic Inspection Tool (AIT). Modeling was used to test the effectiveness of the different metrologies in predicting the measured aerial-image speckle. AIT measured contrast values are 25% or more than the calculated image contrast values obtained using the measured rms roughness input. The extent to which the various metrologies can be utilized for specifying tolerable roughness limits on EUV masks is still to be determined. Further modeling and measurements are being planned.

  19. Rough primes and rough conversations: evidence for a modality-specific basis to mental metaphors.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Michael; Denke, Claudia; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Rotte, Michael

    2014-11-01

    How does our brain organize knowledge? Traditional theories assume that our knowledge is represented abstractly in an amodal conceptual network of formal logic symbols. The theory of embodied cognition challenges this view and argues that conceptual representations that constitute our knowledge are grounded in sensory and motor experiences. We tested this hypothesis by examining how the concept of social coordination is grounded metaphorically in the tactile sensation of roughness. Participants experienced rough or smooth touch before being asked to judge an ambiguous social interaction. Results revealed that rough touch made social interactions appear more difficult and adversarial, consistent with the rough metaphor. This impact of tactile cues on social impressions was accompanied by a network including primary and secondary somatosensory cortices, amygdala, hippocampus and inferior prefrontal cortex. Thus, the roughness of tactile stimulation affected metaphor-relevant (but not metaphor-irrelevant) behavioral and neural responses. Receiving touch from a rough object seems to trigger the application of associated ontological concepts (or scaffolds) even for unrelated people and situations (but not to unrelated or more general feelings). Since this priming was based on somatosensory brain areas, our results provide support for the theory that sensorimotor grounding is intrinsic to cognitive processes.

  20. ROUGHNESS ANALYSIS OF VARIOUSLY POLISHED NIOBIUM SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeill, G.; Reece, C.

    2008-01-01

    Niobium superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities have gained widespread use in accelerator systems. It has been shown that surface roughness is a determining factor in the cavities’ effi ciency and maximum accelerating potential achievable through this technology. Irregularities in the surface can lead to spot heating, undesirable local electrical fi eld enhancement and electron multipacting. Surface quality is typically ensured through the use of acid etching in a Buffered Chemical Polish (BCP) bath and electropolishing (EP). In this study, the effects of these techniques on surface morphology have been investigated in depth. The surface of niobium samples polished using different combinations of these techniques has been characterized through atomic force microscopy (AFM) and stylus profi lometry across a range of length scales. The surface morphology was analyzed using spectral techniques to determine roughness and characteristic dimensions. Experimentation has shown that this method is a valuable tool that provides quantitative information about surface roughness at different length scales. It has demonstrated that light BCP pretreatment and lower electrolyte temperature favors a smoother electropolish. These results will allow for the design of a superior polishing process for niobium SRF cavities and therefore increased accelerator operating effi ciency and power.

  1. Hypersonic Viscous Flow Over Large Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Chau-Lyan; Choudhari, Meelan M.

    2009-01-01

    Viscous flow over discrete or distributed surface roughness has great implications for hypersonic flight due to aerothermodynamic considerations related to laminar-turbulent transition. Current prediction capability is greatly hampered by the limited knowledge base for such flows. To help fill that gap, numerical computations are used to investigate the intricate flow physics involved. An unstructured mesh, compressible Navier-Stokes code based on the space-time conservation element, solution element (CESE) method is used to perform time-accurate Navier-Stokes calculations for two roughness shapes investigated in wind tunnel experiments at NASA Langley Research Center. It was found through 2D parametric study that at subcritical Reynolds numbers of the boundary layers, absolute instability resulting in vortex shedding downstream, is likely to weaken at supersonic free-stream conditions. On the other hand, convective instability may be the dominant mechanism for supersonic boundary layers. Three-dimensional calculations for a rectangular or cylindrical roughness element at post-shock Mach numbers of 4.1 and 6.5 also confirm that no self-sustained vortex generation is present.

  2. Radiative transfer model for contaminated rough slabs.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, François; Douté, Sylvain; Schmidt, Frédéric; Schmitt, Bernard

    2015-11-01

    We present a semi-analytical model to simulate the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of a rough slab layer containing impurities. This model has been optimized for fast computation in order to analyze massive hyperspectral data by a Bayesian approach. We designed it for planetary surface ice studies but it could be used for other purposes. It estimates the bidirectional reflectance of a rough slab of material containing inclusions, overlaying an optically thick media (semi-infinite media or stratified media, for instance granular material). The inclusions are assumed to be close to spherical and constituted of any type of material other than the ice matrix. It can be any other type of ice, mineral, or even bubbles defined by their optical constants. We assume a low roughness and we consider the geometrical optics conditions. This model is thus applicable for inclusions larger than the considered wavelength. The scattering on the inclusions is assumed to be isotropic. This model has a fast computation implementation and thus is suitable for high-resolution hyperspectral data analysis. PMID:26560577

  3. Flow over a Biomimetic Surface Roughness Microgeometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warncke Lang, Amy; Hidalgo, Pablo; Westcott, Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Certain species of sharks (e.g. shortfin mako and common hammerhead) have a skin structure that could result in a bristling of their denticles (scales) during increased swimming speeds (Bechert, D. W., Bruse, M., Hage, W. and Meyer, R. 2000, Fluid mechanics of biological surfaces and their technological application. Naturwissenschaften 80:157-171). This unique surface geometry results in a three-dimensional array of cavities* (d-type roughness geometry) forming within the surface and has been given the acronym MAKO (Micro-roughness Array for Kinematic Optimization). Possible mechanisms leading to drag reduction over the shark's body by this unique roughness geometry include separation control thereby reducing pressure drag, skin friction reduction (via the `micro-air bearing' effect first proposed by Bushnell (AIAA 83-0227)), as well as possible transition delay in the boundary layer. Initial work is confined to scaling up the geometry from 0.2 mm on the shark skin to 2 cm, with a scaling down in characteristic velocity from 10 - 20 m/s to 10 - 20 cm/s for laminar flow boundary layer water tunnel studies. Support for this research by NSF SGER grant CTS-0630489 and a University of Alabama RAC grant is gratefully acknowledged. * Patent pending.

  4. Roughness coefficients for stream channels in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldridge, B.N.; Garrett, J.M.

    1973-01-01

           n in which V = mean cross-sectional velocity of flow, in feet per second; R = hydraulic radius at a cross section, which is the cross-sectional area divided by the wetter perimeter, in feet; Se = energy slope; and n = coefficient of roughness. Many research studies have been made to determine "n" values for open-channel flow (Carter and others, 1963). Guidelines for selecting coefficient of roughness for stream channels are given in most of the literature of stream-channel hydraulics, but few of the data relate directly to streams of Arizona, The U.S> Geological Survey, at the request of the Arizona Highway Department, assembled the color photographs and tables of the Manning "n" values in this report to aid highway engineers in the selection of roughness coefficients for Arizona streams. Most of the photographs show channel reaches for which values of "n" have been assigned by experienced Survey personnel; a few photographs are included for reaches where "n" values have been verified. Verified "n" values are computed from a known discharge and measured channel geometry. Selected photographs of stream channels for which "n" values have been verified are included in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 1849 (Barnes, 1967); stereoscopic slides of Barnes' (1967) photographs and additional photographs can be inspected at U.S> Geological Survey offices in: 2555 E. First Street, Tucson; and 5017 Federal Building, 230 N. First Avenue, Phoenix.

  5. Soil Surface Roughness through Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarquis, A. M.; Saa-Requejo, A.; Valencia, J. L.; Moratiel, R.; Paz-Gonzalez, A.; Agro-Environmental Modeling

    2011-12-01

    Soil erosion is a complex phenomenon involving the detachment and transport of soil particles, storage and runoff of rainwater, and infiltration. The relative magnitude and importance of these processes depends on several factors being one of them surface micro-topography, usually quantified trough soil surface roughness (SSR). SSR greatly affects surface sealing and runoff generation, yet little information is available about the effect of roughness on the spatial distribution of runoff and on flow concentration. The methods commonly used to measure SSR involve measuring point elevation using a pin roughness meter or laser, both of which are labor intensive and expensive. Lately a simple and inexpensive technique based on percentage of shadow in soil surface image has been developed to determine SSR in the field in order to obtain measurement for wide spread application. One of the first steps in this technique is image de-noising and thresholding to estimate the percentage of black pixels in the studied area. In this work, a series of soil surface images have been analyzed applying several de-noising wavelet analysis and thresholding algorithms to study the variation in percentage of shadows and the shadows size distribution. Funding provided by Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN) through project no. AGL2010- 21501/AGR and by Xunta de Galicia through project no INCITE08PXIB1621 are greatly appreciated.

  6. Adsorption of Polymers on Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, Abishek; Kuppa, Vikram

    2014-03-01

    Most of the surfaces encountered in nature display irregularity and self-similarity at certain length scales. Such real surfaces can be mimicked via fractal surfaces using an algorithm that produces random surfaces. The problem of polymer chains adsorbed on smooth surfaces has been well understood whereas adsorption on rough surfaces still remains unclear due to the complexity involved in equilibration and sampling of molecules in such systems. The enthalpic interactions between the monomers and the entropic penalty arising due to adsorption on rough surfaces are significantly different from smooth surfaces. In this study, we investigate the adsorption of freely rotating polymer chains on fractal surfaces by Monte-Carlo molecular simulations. Random fractal surfaces are generated using the diamond-square algorithm for different values of the Hurst parameter. Properties like monomer-surface interaction, density profiles, chain orientation profiles and distribution of adsorbed chain fractions are investigated. We also demonstrate the significant effect of fractal dimension on adsorption of polymers on rough surfaces.

  7. A model for rough wall turbulent heating and skin friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finson, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    A Reynolds stress model for turbulent boundary layers on rough walls is used to investigate the effects of roughness character and compressibility. The flow around roughness elements is treated as form drag. A method is presented for deriving the required roughness shape and spacing from profiometer surface measurements. Calculations based on the model compare satisfactorily with low speed data on roughness character and hypersonic measurements with grit roughness. The computer model is exercised systematically over a wide range of parameters to derive a practical scaling law for the equivalent roughness. In contrast to previous correlations, for most roughness element shapes the effective roughness does not show a pronounced maximum as the element spacing decreases. The effect of roughness tends to be reduced with increasing edge Mach number, primarily due to decreasing density in the vicinity of the roughness elements. It is further shown that the required roughness Reynolds number for fully rough behavior increases with increasing Mach number, explaining the small roughness effects observed in some hypersonic tests.

  8. Endothelin-1-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress in disease.

    PubMed

    Jain, Arjun

    2013-08-01

    The accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) represents a cellular stress induced by multiple stimuli and pathologic conditions. Recent evidence implicates endothelin-1 (ET-1) in the induction of placental ER stress in pregnancy disorders. ER stress has previously also been implicated in various other disease states, including neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases, as has ET-1 in the pathophysiology of these conditions. However, to date, there has been no investigation of the link between ET-1 and the induction of ER stress in these disease states. Based on recent evidence and mechanistic insight into the role of ET-1 in the induction of placental ER stress, the following review attempts to outline the broader implications of ET-1-induced ER stress, as well as strategies for therapeutic intervention based around ET-1. PMID:23740603

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases in the pathogenesis of ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Kenna, Tony J; Robinson, Philip C; Haroon, Nigil

    2015-09-01

    There has been significant progress in our understanding of the pathogenesis of AS. The advent of genome-wide association studies has increased the known loci associated with AS to more than 40. The endoplasmic reticulum resident aminopeptidases (ERAP) 1 and 2 were identified in this manner and are of particular interest. There appears to be a genetic as well as a functional interaction of ERAP1 and 2 with HLA-B27 based on the known functions of these molecules. Recent studies on the structure, immunological effects and the peptide-trimming properties of ERAP 1 and 2 have helped to provide insight into their pathogenic potential in AS. In this review, we explore the role of ERAP 1 and 2 in the pathogenesis of AS.

  10. An adaptable standard for protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, R Luke; Powers, Evan T; Buxbaum, Joel N; Kelly, Jeffery W; Balch, William E

    2007-11-16

    To provide an integrated view of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) function in protein export, we have described the interdependence of protein folding energetics and the adaptable biology of cellular protein folding and transport through the exocytic pathway. A simplified treatment of the protein homeostasis network and a formalism for how this network of competing pathways interprets protein folding kinetics and thermodynamics provides a framework for understanding cellular protein trafficking. We illustrate how folding and misfolding energetics, in concert with the adjustable biological capacities of the folding, degradation, and export pathways, collectively dictate an adaptable standard for protein export from the ER. A model of folding for export (FoldEx) establishes that no single feature dictates folding and transport efficiency. Instead, a network view provides insight into the basis for cellular diversity, disease origins, and protein homeostasis, and predicts strategies for restoring protein homeostasis in protein-misfolding diseases.

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Skeletal Muscle Homeostasis and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rayavarapu, Sree; Coley, William

    2013-01-01

    Our appreciation of the role of endoplasmic reticulum(ER) stress pathways in both skeletal muscle homeostasis and the progression of muscle diseases is gaining momentum. This review provides insight into ER stress mechanisms during physiologic and pathological disturbances in skeletal muscle. The role of ER stress in the response to dietary alterations and acute stressors, including its role in autoimmune and genetic muscle disorders, has been described. Recent studies identifying ER stress markers in diseased skeletal muscle are noted. The emerging evidence for ER–mitochondrial interplay in skeletal muscle and its importance during chronic ER stress in activation of both inflammatory and cell death pathways (autophagy, necrosis, and apoptosis) have been discussed. Thus, understanding the ER stress–related molecular pathways underlying physiologic and pathological phenotypes in healthy and diseased skeletal muscle should lead to novel therapeutic targets for muscle disease. PMID:22410828

  12. Sphingolipid Homeostasis in the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Breslow, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a diverse group of lipids that have essential cellular roles as structural components of membranes and as potent signaling molecules. In recent years, a detailed picture has emerged of the basic biochemistry of sphingolipids—from their initial synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), to their elaboration into complex glycosphingolipids, to their turnover and degradation. However, our understanding of how sphingolipid metabolism is regulated in response to metabolic demand and physiologic cues remains incomplete. Here I discuss new insights into the mechanisms that ensure sphingolipid homeostasis, with an emphasis on the ER as a critical regulatory site in sphingolipid metabolism. In particular, Orm family proteins have recently emerged as key ER-localized mediators of sphingolipid homeostasis. A detailed understanding of how cells sense and control sphingolipid production promises to provide key insights into membrane function in health and disease. PMID:23545423

  13. Stacked endoplasmic reticulum sheets are connected by helicoidal membrane motifs

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Mark; Shemesh, Tom; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Klemm, Robin W.; Schalek, Richard; Hayworth, Kenneth J.; Hand, Arthur R.; Yankova, Maya; Huber, Greg; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Rapoport, Tom A.; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) often forms stacked membrane sheets, an arrangement that is likely required to accommodate a maximum of membrane-bound polysomes for secretory protein synthesis. How sheets are stacked is unknown. Here, we used novel staining and automated ultra-thin sectioning electron microscopy methods to analyze stacked ER sheets in neuronal cells and secretory salivary gland cells of mice. Our results show that stacked ER sheets form a continuous membrane system in which the sheets are connected by twisted membrane surfaces with helical edges of left- or right-handedness. The three-dimensional structure of tightly stacked ER sheets resembles a parking garage, in which the different levels are connected by helicoidal ramps. A theoretical model explains the experimental observations and indicates that the structure corresponds to a minimum of elastic energy of sheet edges and surfaces. The structure allows the dense packing of ER sheets in the restricted space of a cell. PMID:23870120

  14. The endoplasmic reticulum: structure, function and response to cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Dianne S; Blower, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a large, dynamic structure that serves many roles in the cell including calcium storage, protein synthesis and lipid metabolism. The diverse functions of the ER are performed by distinct domains; consisting of tubules, sheets and the nuclear envelope. Several proteins that contribute to the overall architecture and dynamics of the ER have been identified, but many questions remain as to how the ER changes shape in response to cellular cues, cell type, cell cycle state and during development of the organism. Here we discuss what is known about the dynamics of the ER, what questions remain, and how coordinated responses add to the layers of regulation in this dynamic organelle. PMID:26433683

  15. Pharmacological Modulators of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Tae Woo; Choi, Kyung Mook

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the principal organelle responsible for correct protein folding, a step in protein synthesis that is critical for the functional conformation of proteins. ER stress is a primary feature of secretory cells and is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous human diseases, such as certain neurodegenerative and cardiometabolic disorders. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a defense mechanism to attenuate ER stress and maintain the homeostasis of the organism. Two major degradation systems, including the proteasome and autophagy, are involved in this defense system. If ER stress overwhelms the capacity of the cell’s defense mechanisms, apoptotic death may result. This review is focused on the various pharmacological modulators that can protect cells from damage induced by ER stress. The possible mechanisms for cytoprotection are also discussed. PMID:26840310

  16. The plant endoplasmic reticulum: a cell-wide web.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, Imogen A; Frigerio, Lorenzo; Tolley, Nicholas; Hawes, Chris

    2009-10-15

    The ER (endoplasmic reticulum) in higher plants forms a pleomorphic web of membrane tubules and small cisternae that pervade the cytoplasm, but in particular form a polygonal network at the cortex of the cell which may be anchored to the plasma membrane. The network is associated with the actin cytoskeleton and demonstrates extensive mobility, which is most likely to be dependent on myosin motors. The ER is characterized by a number of domains which may be associated with specific functions such as protein storage, or with direct interaction with other organelles such as the Golgi apparatus, peroxisomes and plastids. In the present review we discuss the nature of the network, the role of shape-forming molecules such as the recently described reticulon family of proteins and the function of some of the major domains within the ER network.

  17. Abundances in Sagittarius Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonifacio, P.; Zaggia, S.; Sbordone, L.; Santin, P.; Monaco, L.; Monai, S.; Molaro, P.; Marconi, G.; Girardi, L.; Ferraro, F.; di Marcantonio, P.; Caffau, E.; Bellazzini, M.

    The Sagittarius dwarf spheroidal is a very complex galaxy, which has undergone prolonged star formation. From the very first high resolution chemical analysis of Sgr stars, conducted using spectra obtained during the commissioning of UVES at VLT, it was clear that the star had undergone a high level of chemical processing, at variance with most of the other Local Group dwarf spheroidals. Thanks to FLAMES at VLT we now have accurate metallicities and abundances of alpha-chain elements for about 150 stars, which provide the first reliable metallicity distribution for this galaxy. Besides the already known high metallicity tail the existence of a metal-poor population has also been highlighted, although an assessment of the fraction of Sgr stars which belong to this population requires a larger sample. From our data it is also obvious that Sagittarius is a nucleated galaxy and that the centre of the nucleus coincides with M54, as already shown by Monaco et al.

  18. Hepatic glycogen synthesis in the fetal mouse: An ultrastructural, morphometric, and autoradiographic investigation of the relationship between the smooth endoplasmic reticulum and glycogen

    SciTech Connect

    Breslin, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Fetal rodent hepatocytes undergo a rapid and significant accumulation of glycogen prior to birth. The distinct association of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) with glycogen during glycogen synthesis documented in the adult hepatocyte has not been clearly demonstrated in the fetus. The experiments described in this dissertation tested the hypothesis that SER is present and functions in the synthesis of fetal hepatic glycogen. Biochemical analysis, light microscopic (LM) histochemistry and electron microscope (EM) morphometry demonstrated that fetal hepatic glycogen synthesis began on day 15, with maximum accumulation occurring between days 17-19. Glycogen accumulation began in a small population of cells. Both the number of cells containing glycogen and the quantity of glycogen per cell increased as glycogen accumulated. Smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) was observed on day 14 of gestation and throughout fetal hepatic glycogen synthesis, primarily as dilated ribosome-free terminal extensions of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), frequently associated with glycogen. SER was in close proximity to isolated particles of glycogen and at the periphery of large compact glycogen deposits. Morphometry demonstrated that the membrane surface of SER in the average fetal hepatocyte increased as glycogen accumulated through day 18 and dropped significantly as glycogen levels peaked on day 19. Parallel alterations in RER membrane surface, indicated overall increases in ER membrane surface. Autoradiography following administration of {sup 3}H-galactose demonstrated that newly synthesized glycogen was deposited near profiles of SER at day 16 and at day 18; however, at day 18 the majority of label was uniformly distributed over glycogen remote from profiles of SER.

  19. Fault zone roughness controls slip stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbord, Christopher; Nielsen, Stefan; De Paola, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Fault roughness is an important control factor in the mechanical behaviour of fault zones, in particular the frictional slip stability and subsequent earthquake nucleation. Despite this, there is little experimental quantification as to the effects of varying roughness upon rate- and state-dependant friction (RSF). Utilising a triaxial deformation apparatus and a novel adaptation of the direct shear methodology to simulate initially bare faults in Westerly Granite, we performed a series of velocity step frictional sliding experiments. Initial root mean square roughnesses (Sq) was varied in the range 6x10-7 - 2.4x10-5 m. We also investigated the effects upon slip stability of normal stress variation in the range σn = 30 - 200 MPa, and slip velocity between 0.1 - 10 μm s-1. A transition from stable sliding to unstable slip (manifested by stick-slip and slow slip events) was observed, depending on the parameter combination, thus covering the full spectrum of fault slip behaviours. At low normal stress (σn = 30MPa) smooth faults (Sq< 1x10-6 m) are conditional unstable (stress drops on slow slip events upon velocity increase), with strongly velocity weakening friction. When normal stress is increased to intermediate values (σn = 100 - 150 MPa), smooth faults (Sq< 1x10-6 m) are fully unstable and generate seismic stick-slip behaviour. However at higher normal stress (σn = 200 MPa) a transition from unstable to stable sliding is observed for smooth faults, which is not expected using RSF stability criteria. At all conditions sliding is stable for rough faults (Sq> 1x10-6 m). We find that instability can develop when the ratio of fault to critical stiffness kf kc > 10, or, alternatively, even when a - b > 0 at σn = 150MPa, suggesting that bare surfaces may not strictly obey the R+S stability condition. Additionally we present white light interferometry and SEM analysis of experimentally deformed samples which provide information about the distribution and physical

  20. Autophagy modulates endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death in podocytes: a protective role.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Chi; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Chien-An; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress occurs in a variety of patho-physiological mechanisms and there has been great interest in managing this pathway for the treatment of clinical diseases. Autophagy is closely interconnected with endoplasmic reticulum stress to counteract the possible injurious effects related with the impairment of protein folding. Studies have shown that glomerular podocytes exhibit high rate of autophagy to maintain as terminally differentiated cells. In this study, podocytes were exposed to tunicamycin and thapsigargin to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress. Thapsigargin/tunicamycin treatment induced a significant increase in endoplasmic reticulum stress and of cell death, represented by higher GADD153 and GRP78 expression and propidium iodide flow cytometry, respectively. However, thapsigargin/tunicamycin stimulation also enhanced autophagy development, demonstrated by monodansylcadaverine assay and LC3 conversion. To evaluate the regulatory effects of autophagy on endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death, rapamycin (Rap) or 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was added to enhance or inhibit autophagosome formation. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death was decreased at 6 h, but was not reduced at 24 h after Rap+TG or Rap+TM treatment. In contrast, endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death increased at 6 and 24 h after 3-MA+TG or 3-MA+TM treatment. Our study demonstrated that thapsigargin/tunicamycin treatment induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which resulted in podocytes death. Autophagy, which counteracted the induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, was simultaneously enhanced. The salvational role of autophagy was supported by adding Rap/3-MA to mechanistically regulate the expression of autophagy and autophagosome formation. In summary, autophagy helps the podocytes from cell death and may contribute to sustain the longevity as a highly differentiated cell lineage.

  1. Autophagy modulates endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death in podocytes: A protective role

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Chi; Chang, Jer-Ming; Chen, Chien-An

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress occurs in a variety of patho-physiological mechanisms and there has been great interest in managing this pathway for the treatment of clinical diseases. Autophagy is closely interconnected with endoplasmic reticulum stress to counteract the possible injurious effects related with the impairment of protein folding. Studies have shown that glomerular podocytes exhibit high rate of autophagy to maintain as terminally differentiated cells. In this study, podocytes were exposed to tunicamycin and thapsigargin to induce endoplasmic reticulum stress. Thapsigargin/tunicamycin treatment induced a significant increase in endoplasmic reticulum stress and of cell death, represented by higher GADD153 and GRP78 expression and propidium iodide flow cytometry, respectively. However, thapsigargin/tunicamycin stimulation also enhanced autophagy development, demonstrated by monodansylcadaverine assay and LC3 conversion. To evaluate the regulatory effects of autophagy on endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death, rapamycin (Rap) or 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was added to enhance or inhibit autophagosome formation. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death was decreased at 6 h, but was not reduced at 24 h after Rap+TG or Rap+TM treatment. In contrast, endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced cell death increased at 6 and 24 h after 3-MA+TG or 3-MA+TM treatment. Our study demonstrated that thapsigargin/tunicamycin treatment induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which resulted in podocytes death. Autophagy, which counteracted the induced endoplasmic reticulum stress, was simultaneously enhanced. The salvational role of autophagy was supported by adding Rap/3-MA to mechanistically regulate the expression of autophagy and autophagosome formation. In summary, autophagy helps the podocytes from cell death and may contribute to sustain the longevity as a highly differentiated cell lineage. PMID:25322957

  2. Study of turbulent boundary layers over rough surfaces with emphasis n the effects of roughness character and Mach number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finson, M. L.

    1982-02-01

    A Reynolds stress model for turbulent boundary layers on rough walls is used to investigate the effects of roughness character and compressibility. The flow around roughness elements is treated as form drag. A method is presented for deriving the required roughness shape and spacing from profilometer surface measurements. Calculations based on the model compare satisfactorily with low speed data on roughness character and hypersonic measurements with grit roughness. The computer model is exercised systematically over a wide range of parameters to derive a practical scaling law for the equivalent roughness. In contrast to previous correlations, for most roughness element shapes the effective roughness is not predicted to show a pronounced maximum as the element spacing decreases. The effect of roughness tends to be reduced with increasing edge Mach number, primarily due to decreasing density in the vicinity of the roughness elements. It is further shown that the required roughness Reynolds number for fully rough behavior increases with increasing Mach number, explaining the small roughness effects observed in some hypersonic tests.

  3. Spectral characteristics of sign-alternating self-oscillatory endoplasm mobility in a myxomycete plasmodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avsievich, T. I.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    The results of a short time Fourier transform of the time dependences of the self-oscillatory endoplasm velocity in an isolated strand of the Physarum polycephalum plasmodium recorded using a sign-sensitive laser Doppler microscope are described. Unlike the mode recording an absolute velocity, a sign-sensitive mode makes it possible to detect the pairs of equidistant harmonic components in the time dependence spectra of endoplasm movement. The resulting frequency and amplitude values are used to construct a model adequately describing the alternating endoplasm mobility.

  4. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T. J.; Podosek, F. A.; Johnson, M. L.; Burnett, D. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of actinide and light REE (LREE) abundances and of phosphate abundances in equilibrated ordinary chondrites were obtained and were used to define the Pu abundance in the solar system and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. The results were also used to compare directly the Pu/U ratio with the earlier obtained ratio determined indirectly, as (Pu/Nd)x(Nd/U), assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. The data, combined with high-accuracy isotope-dilution data from the literature, show that the degree of gram-scale variability of the Th, U, and LREE abundances for equilibrated ordinary chondrites is a factor of 2-3 for absolute abundances and up to 50 percent for relative abundances. The observed variations are interpreted as reflecting the differences in the compositions and/or proportions of solar nebula components accreted to ordinary chondrite parent bodies.

  5. Rough Evaluation Structure: Application of Rough Set Theory to Generate Simple Rules for Inconsistent Preference Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrmann, Andreas; Nagai, Yoshimitsu; Yoshida, Osamu; Ishizu, Syohei

    Since management decision-making becomes complex and preferences of the decision-maker frequently becomes inconsistent, multi-attribute decision-making problems were studied. To represent inconsistent preference relation, the concept of evaluation structure was introduced. We can generate simple rules to represent inconsistent preference relation by the evaluation structures. Further rough set theory for the preference relation was studied and the concept of approximation was introduced. One of our main aims of this paper is to introduce a concept of rough evaluation structure for representing inconsistent preference relation. We apply rough set theory to the evaluation structure, and develop a method for generating simple rules for inconsistent preference relations. In this paper, we introduce concepts of totally ordered information system, similarity class of preference relation, upper and lower approximation of preference relations. We also show the properties of rough evaluation structure and provide a simple example. As an application of rough evaluation structure, we analyze questionnaire survey of customer preferences about audio players.

  6. Roughness characterization of the galling of metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubert, C.; Marteau, J.; Deltombe, R.; Chen, Y. M.; Bigerelle, M.

    2014-09-01

    Several kinds of tests exist to characterize the galling of metals, such as that specified in ASTM Standard G98. While the testing procedure is accurate and robust, the analysis of the specimen's surfaces (area=1.2 cm) for the determination of the critical pressure of galling remains subject to operator judgment. Based on the surface's topography analyses, we propose a methodology to express the probability of galling according to the macroscopic pressure load. After performing galling tests on 304L stainless steel, a two-step segmentation of the S q parameter (root mean square of surface amplitude) computed from local roughness maps (100 μ m× 100 μ m) enables us to distinguish two tribological processes. The first step represents the abrasive wear (erosion) and the second one the adhesive wear (galling). The total areas of both regions are highly relevant to quantify galling and erosion processes. Then, a one-parameter phenomenological model is proposed to objectively determine the evolution of non-galled relative area A e versus the pressure load P, with high accuracy ({{A}e}=100/(1+a{{P}2}) with a={{0.54}+/- 0.07}× {{10}-3} M P{{a}-2} and with {{R}2}=0.98). From this model, the critical pressure of galling is found to be equal to 43MPa. The {{S}5 V} roughness parameter (the five deepest valleys in the galled region's surface) is the most relevant roughness parameter for the quantification of damages in the ‘galling region’. The significant valleys’ depths increase from 10 μm-250 μm when the pressure increases from 11-350 MPa, according to a power law ({{S}5 V}=4.2{{P}0.75}, with {{R}2}=0.93).

  7. Parametric Flow Visualization of Dynamic Roughness Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakkali, Vinay

    The ever growing need in the aircraft industry to enhance the performance of a flight vehicle has led to active areas of research which focus on the control of the local boundary layer by both passive and active methods. An effective flow control mechanism can improve the performance of a flight vehicle in various ways, one of which is eliminating boundary layer separation. To be effective the mechanism not only needs to control the boundary layer as desired, but also use less energy than the resulting energy savings. In this study, the effectiveness of an active flow control technique known as dynamic roughness (DR) has been explored to eliminate the laminar separation bubble near the leading edge and also to eliminate the stall on a NACA 0012 airfoil wing. As opposed to static roughness, dynamic roughness utilizes small time-dependent deforming elements or humps with displacement amplitudes that are on the order of the local boundary layer height to energize the local boundary layer. DR is primarily characterized by the maximum amplitude and operating frequency. A flow visualization study was conducted on a 2D NACA 0012 airfoil model at different angles of attack, and also varying the Reynolds number and DR actuation frequency with fixed maximum DR amplitude. The experimental results from this study suggests that DR is an effective method of reattaching a totally separated boundary layer. In addition, this study discusses some of the fundamental physics behind the working of DR and proposes some non-dimensional terms that may help to explain the driving force behind the mechanism.

  8. 7 CFR 51.776 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Definitions § 51.776 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin may be slightly thick but not excessively thick, materially ridged or grooved. “Slightly thick” means that the...

  9. The application of differential roughness to mitigate friction and wear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebeck, Alan O.

    1991-01-01

    By definition, differential roughness occurs where the surface roughness of one region is distinctly different from that of an adjacent region. Differential roughness may occur on a sliding surface when the structure of an area of the surface is modified relative to the original material. Differential roughness may be used to effect a film thickness change so as to cause hydrodynamic or hydrostatic lubrication effects just as if the surfaces were machined. The advantage of differential roughness is that the effective offset of film thickness continues to exist even if there is gross wear. One can effect film thickness changes which are smaller than can be made directly. Furthermore, asperity tip load support is the same over both the high roughness and small roughness regions. The potential uses for differential roughness are seals, bearings, and pumps. Some examples are presented.

  10. 7 CFR 51.776 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Definitions § 51.776 Slightly rough texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin may be slightly thick but not excessively thick, materially ridged or grooved. “Slightly thick” means that the...

  11. Effective field model of roughness in magnetic nano-structures

    SciTech Connect

    Lepadatu, Serban

    2015-12-28

    An effective field model is introduced here within the micromagnetics formulation, to study roughness in magnetic structures, by considering sub-exchange length roughness levels as a perturbation on a smooth structure. This allows the roughness contribution to be separated, which is found to give rise to an effective configurational anisotropy for both edge and surface roughness, and accurately model its effects with fine control over the roughness depth without the explicit need to refine the computational cell size to accommodate the roughness profile. The model is validated by comparisons with directly roughened structures for a series of magnetization switching and domain wall velocity simulations and found to be in excellent agreement for roughness levels up to the exchange length. The model is further applied to vortex domain wall velocity simulations with surface roughness, which is shown to significantly modify domain wall movement and result in dynamic pinning and stochastic creep effects.

  12. Robust surface roughness indices and morphological interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisani, Sebastiano; Rocca, Michele

    2016-04-01

    Geostatistical-based image/surface texture indices based on variogram (Atkison and Lewis, 2000; Herzfeld and Higginson, 1996; Trevisani et al., 2012) and on its robust variant MAD (median absolute differences, Trevisani and Rocca, 2015) offer powerful tools for the analysis and interpretation of surface morphology (potentially not limited to solid earth). In particular, the proposed robust index (Trevisani and Rocca, 2015) with its implementation based on local kernels permits the derivation of a wide set of robust and customizable geomorphometric indices capable to outline specific aspects of surface texture. The stability of MAD in presence of signal noise and abrupt changes in spatial variability is well suited for the analysis of high-resolution digital terrain models. Moreover, the implementation of MAD by means of a pixel-centered perspective based on local kernels, with some analogies to the local binary pattern approach (Lucieer and Stein, 2005; Ojala et al., 2002), permits to create custom roughness indices capable to outline different aspects of surface roughness (Grohmann et al., 2011; Smith, 2015). In the proposed poster, some potentialities of the new indices in the context of geomorphometry and landscape analysis will be presented. At same time, challenges and future developments related to the proposed indices will be outlined. Atkinson, P.M., Lewis, P., 2000. Geostatistical classification for remote sensing: an introduction. Computers & Geosciences 26, 361-371. Grohmann, C.H., Smith, M.J., Riccomini, C., 2011. Multiscale Analysis of Topographic Surface Roughness in the Midland Valley, Scotland. IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing 49, 1220-1213. Herzfeld, U.C., Higginson, C.A., 1996. Automated geostatistical seafloor classification - Principles, parameters, feature vectors, and discrimination criteria. Computers and Geosciences, 22 (1), pp. 35-52. Lucieer, A., Stein, A., 2005. Texture-based landform segmentation of LiDAR imagery

  13. Detection and modeling of rough component envelopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peacock, Matthew; Dluzniak, Richard; Thompson, William

    1995-08-01

    This paper describes an imaging technique for the determination of rough component envelopes of cast and forged components. The paper includes several image acquisition methods currently used in this area but concentrates in detail on the method known as the light stripe method. Results presented show the advantages of the light stripe method to obtain a fast and accurate 3D description of the cast and forged components. The research is part of a larger project on intelligent manufacturing systems and is being conducted at the CIM Centre, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia.

  14. Neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) type A receptors undergo cognate ligand chaperoning in the endoplasmic reticulum by endogenous GABA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ping; Eshaq, Randa S.; Meshul, Charles K.; Moore, Cynthia; Hood, Rebecca L.; Leidenheimer, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    GABAA receptors mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Dysfunction of these receptors is associated with various psychiatric/neurological disorders and drugs targeting this receptor are widely used therapeutic agents. Both the efficacy and plasticity of GABAA receptor-mediated neurotransmission depends on the number of surface GABAA receptors. An understudied aspect of receptor cell surface expression is the post-translational regulation of receptor biogenesis within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have previously shown that exogenous GABA can act as a ligand chaperone of recombinant GABAA receptors in the early secretory pathway leading us to now investigate whether endogenous GABA facilitates the biogenesis of GABAA receptors in primary cerebral cortical cultures. In immunofluorescence labeling experiments, we have determined that neurons expressing surface GABAA receptors contain both GABA and its degradative enzyme GABA transaminase (GABA-T). Treatment of neurons with GABA-T inhibitors, a treatment known to increase intracellular GABA levels, decreases the interaction of the receptor with the ER quality control protein calnexin, concomittantly increasing receptor forward-trafficking and plasma membrane insertion. The effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction is not due to the activation of surface GABAA or GABAB receptors. Consistent with our hypothesis that GABA acts as a cognate ligand chaperone in the ER, immunogold-labeling of rodent brain slices reveals the presence of GABA within the rough ER. The density of this labeling is similar to that present in mitochondria, the organelle in which GABA is degraded. Lastly, the effect of GABA-T inhibition on the receptor/calnexin interaction was prevented by pretreatment with a GABA transporter inhibitor. Together, these data indicate that endogenous GABA acts in the rough ER as a cognate ligand chaperone to facilitate the biogenesis of neuronal GABAA receptors. PMID

  15. Speckle pattern texture analysis method to measure surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, I.; Sadovoy, A.; Doronin, A.; Meglinski, I.

    2013-02-01

    Speckle pattern texture analysis method is applied to measure surface roughness of human skin. The method is based on analyzing of a gray level co-occurrence matrix occurred from a speckle image of a rough surface. Paper with different surface roughness is used as a skin phantom. The roughness is controlled by profilometry measurements. The developed methodology could find wide application in dermatology and tissue diagnostics.

  16. HIV-1 Protein Nef Inhibits Activity of ATP-binding Cassette Transporter A1 by Targeting Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Calnexin*

    PubMed Central

    Jennelle, Lucas; Hunegnaw, Ruth; Dubrovsky, Larisa; Pushkarsky, Tatiana; Fitzgerald, Michael L.; Sviridov, Dmitri; Popratiloff, Anastas; Brichacek, Beda; Bukrinsky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    HIV-infected patients are at increased risk of developing atherosclerosis, in part due to an altered high density lipoprotein profile exacerbated by down-modulation and impairment of ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) activity by the HIV-1 protein Nef. However, the mechanisms of this Nef effect remain unknown. Here, we show that Nef interacts with an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone calnexin, which regulates folding and maturation of glycosylated proteins. Nef disrupted interaction between calnexin and ABCA1 but increased affinity and enhanced interaction of calnexin with HIV-1 gp160. The Nef mutant that did not bind to calnexin did not affect the calnexin-ABCA1 interaction. Interaction with calnexin was essential for functionality of ABCA1, as knockdown of calnexin blocked the ABCA1 exit from the endoplasmic reticulum, reduced ABCA1 abundance, and inhibited cholesterol efflux; the same effects were observed after Nef overexpression. However, the effects of calnexin knockdown and Nef on cholesterol efflux were not additive; in fact, the combined effect of these two factors together did not differ significantly from the effect of calnexin knockdown alone. Interestingly, gp160 and ABCA1 interacted with calnexin differently; although gp160 binding to calnexin was dependent on glycosylation, glycosylation was of little importance for the interaction between ABCA1 and calnexin. Thus, Nef regulates the activity of calnexin to stimulate its interaction with gp160 at the expense of ABCA1. This study identifies a mechanism for Nef-dependent inactivation of ABCA1 and dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism. PMID:25170080

  17. Unexpected Deposition Patterns of Recombinant Proteins in Post-Endoplasmic Reticulum Compartments of Wheat Endosperm1

    PubMed Central

    Arcalis, Elsa; Marcel, Sylvain; Altmann, Friedrich; Kolarich, Daniel; Drakakaki, Georgia; Fischer, Rainer; Christou, Paul; Stoger, Eva

    2004-01-01

    Protein transport within cereal endosperm cells is complicated by the abundance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-derived and vacuolar protein bodies. For wheat storage proteins, two major transport routes run from the ER to the vacuole, one bypassing and one passing through the Golgi. Proteins traveling along each route converge at the vacuole and form aggregates. To determine the impact of this trafficking system on the fate of recombinant proteins expressed in wheat endosperm, we used confocal and electron microscopy to investigate the fate of three recombinant proteins containing different targeting information. KDEL-tagged recombinant human serum albumin, which is retrieved to the ER lumen in leaf cells, was deposited in prolamin aggregates within the vacuole of endosperm cells, most likely following the bulk of endogenous glutenins. Recombinant fungal phytase, a glycoprotein designed for secretion, was delivered to the same compartment, with no trace of the molecule in the apoplast. Glycan analysis revealed that this protein had passed through the Golgi. The localization of human serum albumin and phytase was compared to that of recombinant legumin, which contains structural targeting information directing it to the vacuole. Uniquely, legumin accumulated in the globulin inclusion bodies at the periphery of the prolamin bodies, suggesting a different mode of transport and/or aggregation. Our results demonstrate that recombinant proteins are deposited in an unexpected pattern within wheat endosperm cells, probably because of the unique storage properties of this tissue. Our data also confirm that recombinant proteins are invaluable tools for the analysis of protein trafficking in cereals. PMID:15489278

  18. Overexpression of BiP in tobacco alleviates endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed Central

    Leborgne-Castel, N; Jelitto-Van Dooren, E P; Crofts, A J; Denecke, J

    1999-01-01

    To study the role of the lumenal binding protein (BiP) in the transport and secretion of proteins, we have produced plants with altered BiP levels. Transgenic plants overexpressing BiP showed dramatically increased BiP mRNA levels but only a modest increase in BiP protein levels. The presence of degradation products in BiP overproducers suggests a regulatory mechanism that increases protein turnover when BiP is abundant. Antisense inhibition of BiP synthesis was not successful, demonstrating that even a minor reduction in the basal BiP level is deleterious to cell viability. Overexpression of BiP leads to downregulation of the basal transcript levels of endogenous BiP genes and greatly reduces the unfolded protein response. The data confirm that BiP transcription is regulated via a feedback mechanism that involves monitoring of BiP protein levels. To test BiP activity in vivo, we designed a functional assay, using the secretory protein alpha-amylase and a cytosolic enzyme as a control for cell viability. During tunicamycin treatment, an overall reduction of alpha-amylase synthesis was observed when compared with the cytosolic marker. We show that the tunicamycin effect is due to the depletion of BiP in the endoplasmic reticulum because coexpressed BiP alone is able to restore efficient alpha-amylase synthesis. This is a novel assay to monitor BiP activity in promoting secretory protein synthesis in vivo. PMID:10072404

  19. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in acrolein-induced endothelial activation

    SciTech Connect

    Haberzettl, Petra; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2009-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and an endogenous product of lipid peroxidation. It is also generated during the metabolism of several drugs and amino acids. In this study, we examined the effects of acrolein on endothelial cells. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with 2 to 10 {mu}M acrolein led to an increase in the phosphorylation of eIF-2{alpha} within 10 to 30 min of exposure. This was followed by alternate splicing of XBP-1 mRNA and an increase in the expression of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone genes Grp78 and Herp. Within 2-4 h of treatment, acrolein also increased the abundance and the nuclear transport of the transcription factors ATF3, AFT4, and CHOP. Acrolein-induced increase in ATF3 was prevented by treating the cells with the chemical chaperone - phenylbutyric acid (PBA). Treatment with acrolein increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and JNK. The increase in JNK phosphorylation was prevented by PBA. Acrolein treatment led to activation and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF-{kappa}B and an increase in TNF-{alpha}, IL-6 and IL-8, but not MCP-1, mRNA. Increased expression of cytokine genes and NF-{kappa}B activation were not observed in cells treated with PBA. These findings suggest that exposure to acrolein induces ER stress and triggers the unfolded protein response and that NF-{kappa}B activation and stimulation of cytokine production by acrolein could be attributed, in part, to ER stress. Chemical chaperones of protein-folding may be useful in treating toxicological and pathological states associated with excessive acrolein exposure or production.

  20. ROLE OF ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM STRESS IN ACROLEIN-INDUCED ENDOTHELIAL ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Haberzettl, Petra; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Srivastava, Sanjay; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2010-01-01

    Acrolein is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant and an endogenous product of lipid peroxidation. It is also generated during the metabolism of several drugs and amino acids. In this study, we examined the effects of acrolein on endothelial cells. Treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with 2 to 10 μM acrolein led to an increase in the phosphorylation of eIF-2α within 10 to 30 min of exposure. This was followed by alternate splicing of XBP-1 mRNA and an increase in the expression of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone genes Grp78 and Herp. Within 2–4 h of treatment, acrolein also increased the abundance and the nuclear transport of the transcription factors ATF3, AFT4, and CHOP. Acrolein-induced increase in ATF3 was prevented by treating the cells with the chemical chaperone – phenylbutryic acid (PBA). Treatment with acrolein increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and JNK. The increase in JNK phosphorylation was prevented by PBA. Acrolein treatment led to the activation and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor NF-κB and an increase in TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8, but not MCP-1, mRNA. Increased synthesis of cytokine genes and NF-κB activation were not observed in cells treated with PBA. These findings suggest that exposure to acrolein induces ER stress and triggers the unfolded protein response and that NF-κB activation and stimulation of cytokine production by acrolein could be attributed, in part, to ER stress. Chemical chaperones of protein-folding may be useful in treating toxicological and pathological states associated with excessive acrolein exposure or production. PMID:18951912

  1. Uncovering a Dual Regulatory Role for Caspases During Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-induced Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Anania, Veronica G.; Yu, Kebing; Gnad, Florian; Pferdehirt, Rebecca R.; Li, Han; Ma, Taylur P.; Jeon, Diana; Fortelny, Nikolaus; Forrest, William; Ashkenazi, Avi; Overall, Christopher M.; Lill, Jennie R.

    2016-01-01

    Many diseases are associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which results from an accumulation of misfolded proteins. This triggers an adaptive response called the “unfolded protein response” (UPR), and prolonged exposure to ER stress leads to cell death. Caspases are reported to play a critical role in ER stress-induced cell death but the underlying mechanisms by which they exert their effect continue to remain elusive. To understand the role caspases play during ER stress, a systems level approach integrating analysis of the transcriptome, proteome, and proteolytic substrate profile was employed. This quantitative analysis revealed transcriptional profiles for most human genes, provided information on protein abundance for 4476 proteins, and identified 445 caspase substrates. Based on these data sets many caspase substrates were shown to be downregulated at the protein level during ER stress suggesting caspase activity inhibits their cellular function. Additionally, RNA sequencing revealed a role for caspases in regulation of ER stress-induced transcriptional pathways and gene set enrichment analysis showed expression of multiple gene targets of essential transcription factors to be upregulated during ER stress upon inhibition of caspases. Furthermore, these transcription factors were degraded in a caspase-dependent manner during ER stress. These results indicate that caspases play a dual role in regulating the cellular response to ER stress through both post-translational and transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. Moreover, this study provides unique insight into progression of the unfolded protein response into cell death, which may help identify therapeutic strategies to treat ER stress-related diseases. PMID:27125827

  2. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  3. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  4. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  5. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  6. 7 CFR 868.201 - Definition of rough rice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definition of rough rice. 868.201 Section 868.201... FOR CERTAIN AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES United States Standards for Rough Rice Terms Defined § 868.201 Definition of rough rice. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) which consists of 50 percent or more of paddy kernels...

  7. 14 CFR 25.1517 - Rough air speed, VRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rough air speed, VRA. 25.1517 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1517 Rough air speed, VRA. A rough air speed, VRA, for use as the recommended turbulence... specified in § 25.335(d); and (3) Is sufficiently less than VMO to ensure that likely speed variation...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1517 - Rough air speed, VRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rough air speed, VRA. 25.1517 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1517 Rough air speed, VRA. A rough air speed, VRA, for use as the recommended turbulence... specified in § 25.335(d); and (3) Is sufficiently less than VMO to ensure that likely speed variation...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1517 - Rough air speed, VRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rough air speed, VRA. 25.1517 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1517 Rough air speed, VRA. A rough air speed, VRA, for use as the recommended turbulence... specified in § 25.335(d); and (3) Is sufficiently less than VMO to ensure that likely speed variation...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1517 - Rough air speed, VRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rough air speed, VRA. 25.1517 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1517 Rough air speed, VRA. A rough air speed, VRA, for use as the recommended turbulence... specified in § 25.335(d); and (3) Is sufficiently less than VMO to ensure that likely speed variation...

  11. 14 CFR 25.1517 - Rough air speed, VRA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rough air speed, VRA. 25.1517 Section 25... Limitations § 25.1517 Rough air speed, VRA. A rough air speed, VRA, for use as the recommended turbulence... specified in § 25.335(d); and (3) Is sufficiently less than VMO to ensure that likely speed variation...

  12. PHASE CONTRAST OBSERVATIONS OF THE ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM IN LIVING TISSUE CULTURES

    PubMed Central

    Rose, George G.; Pomerat, C. M.

    1960-01-01

    Cells from three human sources (two malignant and one fetal) were observed through phase contrast microscopy to contain unusual cytoplasmic images. These were photographed and are discussed as representing the endoplasmic reticulum in the living cell. PMID:13743266

  13. Toll-like receptor 4-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to endothelial dysfunction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impairment of vasodilator action of insulin is associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated as one of the mechanisms for pathophysiology of various cardiometabolic syndromes, including insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. ...

  14. Enhancement of procollagen biosynthesis by p180 through augmented ribosome association on the endoplasmic reticulum in response to stimulated secretion.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Tomonori; Tanaka, Keisuke; Kaneko, Keiko; Taga, Yuki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Irie, Shinkichi; Hattori, Shunji; Ogawa-Goto, Kiyoko

    2010-09-24

    A coiled-coil microtubule-bundling protein, p180, was originally reported as a ribosome-binding protein on the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is highly expressed in secretory tissues. Recently, we reported a novel role for p180 in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) expansion following stimulated collagen secretion. Here, we show that p180 plays a key role in procollagen biosynthesis and secretion in diploid fibroblasts. Depletion of p180 caused marked reductions of secreted collagens without significant loss of the ER membrane or mRNA. Metabolic labeling experiments revealed that the procollagen biosynthetic activity was markedly affected following p180 depletion. Moreover, loss of p180 perturbs ascorbate-stimulated de novo biosynthesis mainly in the membrane fraction with a preferential secretion defect of large proteins. At the EM level, one of the most prominent morphological features of p180-depleted cells was insufficient ribosome association on the ER membranes. In contrast, the ER of control cells was studded with numerous ribosomes, which were further enhanced by ascorbate. Similarly biochemical analysis confirmed that levels of membrane-bound ribosomes were altered in a p180-dependent manner. Taken together, our data suggest that p180 plays crucial roles in enhancing collagen biosynthesis at the entry site of the secretory compartments by a novel mechanism that mainly involves facilitating ribosome association on the ER. PMID:20647306

  15. Rail roughness and rolling noise in tramways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiacchiari, L.; Thompson, DJ; Squicciarini, G.; Ntotsios, E.; Loprencipe, G.

    2016-09-01

    Companies which manage railway networks have to cope continually with the problem of operating safety and maintenance intervention issues related to rail surface irregularities. A lot of experience has been gained in recent years in railway applications but the case of tramways is quite different; in this field there are no specific criteria to define any intervention on rail surface restoration. This paper shows measurements carried out on some stretches of a tram network with the CAT equipment (Corrugation Analysis Trolley) for the principal purpose of detecting different states of degradation of the rails and identifying a level of deterioration to be associated with the need for maintenance through rail grinding. The measured roughness is used as an input parameter into prediction models for both rolling noise and ground vibration to show the potential effect that high levels of roughness can have in urban environment. Rolling noise predictions are also compared with noise measurements to illustrate the applicability of the modelling approach. Particular attention is given to the way the contact filter needs to be modelled in the specific case of trams that generally operate at low speed. Finally an empirical approach to assess vibration levels in buildings is presented.

  16. A rough set approach to speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhigang

    1992-09-01

    Speech recognition is a very difficult classification problem due to the variations in loudness, speed, and tone of voice. In the last 40 years, many methodologies have been developed to solve this problem, but most lack learning ability and depend fully on the knowledge of human experts. Systems of this kind are hard to develop and difficult to maintain and upgrade. A study was conducted to investigate the feasibility of using a machine learning approach in solving speech recognition problems. The system is based on rough set theory. It first generates a set of decision rules using a set of reference words called training samples, and then uses the decision rules to recognize new words. The main feature of this system is that, under the supervision of human experts, the machine learns and applies knowledge on its own to the designated tasks. The main advantages of this system over a traditional system are its simplicity and adaptiveness, which suggest that it may have significant potential in practical applications of computer speech recognition. Furthermore, the studies presented demonstrate the potential application of rough-set based learning systems in solving other important pattern classification problems, such as character recognition, system fault detection, and trainable robotic control.

  17. Roughness tolerances for Cherenkov telescope mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayabaly, K.; Spiga, D.; Canestrari, R.; Bonnoli, G.; Lavagna, M.; Pareschi, G.

    2015-09-01

    The Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) is a forthcoming international ground-based observatory for very high-energy gamma rays. Its goal is to reach sensitivity five to ten times better than existing Cherenkov telescopes such as VERITAS, H.E.S.S. or MAGIC and extend the range of observation to energies down to few tens of GeV and beyond 100 TeV. To achieve this goal, an array of about 100 telescopes is required, meaning a total reflective surface of several thousands of square meters. Thence, the optimal technology used for CTA mirrors' manufacture should be both low-cost (~1000 euros/m2) and allow high optical performances over the 300-550 nm wavelength range. More exactly, a reflectivity higher than 85% and a PSF (Point Spread Function) diameter smaller than 1 mrad. Surface roughness can significantly contribute to PSF broadening and limit telescope performances. Fortunately, manufacturing techniques for mirrors are now available to keep the optical scattering well below the geometrically-predictable effect of figure errors. This paper determines first order surface finish tolerances based on a surface microroughness characterization campaign, using Phase Shift Interferometry. That allows us to compute the roughness contribution to Cherenkov telescope PSF. This study is performed for diverse mirror candidates (MAGIC-I and II, ASTRI, MST) varying in manufacture technologies, selected coating materials and taking into account the degradation over time due to environmental hazards.

  18. Avalanche dynamics on a rough inclined plane.

    PubMed

    Börzsönyi, Tamás; Halsey, Thomas C; Ecke, Robert E

    2008-07-01

    The avalanche behavior of gravitationally forced granular layers on a rough inclined plane is investigated experimentally for different materials and for a variety of grain shapes ranging from spherical beads to highly anisotropic particles with dendritic shape. We measure the front velocity, area, and height of many avalanches and correlate the motion with the area and height. We also measure the avalanche profiles for several example cases. As the shape irregularity of the grains is increased, there is a dramatic qualitative change in avalanche properties. For rough nonspherical grains, avalanches are faster, bigger, and overturning in the sense that individual particles have down-slope speeds u p that exceed the front speed uf as compared with avalanches of spherical glass beads that are quantitatively slower and smaller and where particles always travel slower than the front speed. There is a linear increase of three quantities: (i) dimensionless avalanche height, (ii) ratio of particle to front speed, and (iii) the growth rate of avalanche speed with increasing avalanche size with increasing tan theta r where theta r is the bulk angle of repose, or with increasing beta P, the slope of the depth averaged flow rule, where both theta r and beta P reflect the grain shape irregularity. These relations provide a tool for predicting important dynamical properties of avalanches as a function of grain shape irregularity. A relatively simple depth-averaged theoretical description captures some important elements of the avalanche motion, notably the existence of two regimes of this motion.

  19. Placental endoplasmic reticulum stress and acidosis: relevant aspects in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jawerbaum, Alicia

    2016-10-01

    In this issue, Yung and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4040-2 ) report endoplasmic reticulum stress in the placenta of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus. With the use of a trophoblast-like cell line, these authors identify putative mechanisms involved in, and treatments to prevent the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Here, the relevance and possible implications of these findings and areas for further research are discussed. PMID:27379669

  20. Placental endoplasmic reticulum stress and acidosis: relevant aspects in gestational diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jawerbaum, Alicia

    2016-10-01

    In this issue, Yung and colleagues (doi: 10.1007/s00125-016-4040-2 ) report endoplasmic reticulum stress in the placenta of patients with gestational diabetes mellitus. With the use of a trophoblast-like cell line, these authors identify putative mechanisms involved in, and treatments to prevent the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Here, the relevance and possible implications of these findings and areas for further research are discussed.

  1. Determinant for endoplasmic reticulum retention in the luminal domain of the human cytomegalovirus US3 glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungwook; Park, Boyoun; Ahn, Kwangseog

    2003-02-01

    US3 of human cytomegalovirus is an endoplasmic reticulum resident transmembrane glycoprotein that binds to major histocompatibility complex class I molecules and prevents their departure. The endoplasmic reticulum retention signal of the US3 protein is contained in the luminal domain of the protein. To define the endoplasmic reticulum retention sequence in more detail, we have generated a series of deletion and point mutants of the US3 protein. By analyzing the rate of intracellular transport and immunolocalization of the mutants, we have identified Ser58, Glu63, and Lys64 as crucial for retention, suggesting that the retention signal of the US3 protein has a complex spatial arrangement and does not comprise a contiguous sequence of amino acids. We also show that a modified US3 protein with a mutation in any of these amino acids maintains its ability to bind class I molecules; however, such mutated proteins are no longer retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and are not able to block the cell surface expression of class I molecules. These findings indicate that the properties that allow the US3 glycoprotein to be localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and bind major histocompatibility complex class I molecules are located in different parts of the molecule and that the ability of US3 to block antigen presentation is due solely to its ability to retain class I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:12525649

  2. Abundance coefficients, a new method for measuring microorganism relative abundance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forester, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new method of measuring the relative abundance of microorganisms by using a set of interrelated coefficients, termed 'abundance coefficients' or 'AC', is proposed. These coefficients provide a means of recording abundance for geometric density categories, and each density measurement represents an approximation of the Poisson parameter ??t. The AC is the natural logarithm of a 'characteristic value,' which is a particular number for each geometric density category. The 'characteristic values' are based upon a probabilistic error statement derived from the Poisson formula, and they present evidence for separation of the geometric category boundaries by e = 2.71828. The proposed AC provide a means for recording species abundance in a manner suitable for arithmetic manipulation, for population structure studies, and for the determination of practical limits for defining the presence or absence of a species. Further, these coefficients provide for both intrasample and intersample abundance comparisons. ?? 1977 Plenum Publishing Corporation.

  3. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in drug-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Foufelle, Fabienne; Fromenty, Bernard

    2016-02-01

    Drug-induced toxicity is a key issue for public health because some side effects can be severe and life-threatening. These adverse effects can also be a major concern for the pharmaceutical companies since significant toxicity can lead to the interruption of clinical trials, or the withdrawal of the incriminated drugs from the market. Recent studies suggested that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress could be an important event involved in drug liability, in addition to other key mechanisms such as mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Indeed, drug-induced ER stress could lead to several deleterious effects within cells and tissues including accumulation of lipids, cell death, cytolysis, and inflammation. After recalling important information regarding drug-induced adverse reactions and ER stress in diverse pathophysiological situations, this review summarizes the main data pertaining to drug-induced ER stress and its potential involvement in different adverse effects. Drugs presented in this review are for instance acetaminophen (APAP), arsenic trioxide and other anticancer drugs, diclofenac, and different antiretroviral compounds. We also included data on tunicamycin (an antibiotic not used in human medicine because of its toxicity) and thapsigargin (a toxic compound of the Mediterranean plant Thapsia garganica) since both molecules are commonly used as prototypical toxins to induce ER stress in cellular and animal models. PMID:26977301

  4. Proper symmetric and asymmetric endoplasmic reticulum partitioning requires astral microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Jeremy T.; Schoborg, Todd A.; Bergman, Zane J.; Riggs, Blake; Rusan, Nasser M.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate partitioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during cell division are largely unknown. Previous studies have mostly addressed ER partitioning in cultured cells, which may not recapitulate physiological processes that are critical in developing, intact tissues. We have addressed this by analysing ER partitioning in asymmetrically dividing stem cells, in which precise segregation of cellular components is essential for proper development and tissue architecture. We show that in Drosophila neural stem cells, called neuroblasts, the ER asymmetrically partitioned to centrosomes early in mitosis. This correlated closely with the asymmetric nucleation of astral microtubules (MTs) by centrosomes, suggesting that astral MT association may be required for ER partitioning by centrosomes. Consistent with this, the ER also associated with astral MTs in meiotic Drosophila spermatocytes and during syncytial embryonic divisions. Disruption of centrosomes in each of these cell types led to improper ER partitioning, demonstrating the critical role for centrosomes and associated astral MTs in this process. Importantly, we show that the ER also associated with astral MTs in cultured human cells, suggesting that this centrosome/astral MT-based partitioning mechanism is conserved across animal species. PMID:26289801

  5. Protein Bodies in Leaves Exchange Contents through the Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Saberianfar, Reza; Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Joensuu, Jussi J; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Menassa, Rima

    2016-01-01

    Protein bodies (PBs) are organelles found in seeds whose main function is the storage of proteins that are used during germination for sustaining growth. PBs can also be induced to form in leaves when foreign proteins are produced at high levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and when fused to one of three tags: Zera®, elastin-like polypeptides (ELP), or hydrophobin-I (HFBI). In this study, we investigate the differences between ELP, HFBI and Zera PB formation, packing, and communication. Our results confirm the ER origin of all three fusion-tag-induced PBs. We show that secretory pathway proteins can be sequestered into all types of PBs but with different patterns, and that different fusion tags can target a specific protein to different PBs. Zera PBs are mobile and dependent on actomyosin motility similar to ELP and HFBI PBs. We show in vivo trafficking of proteins between PBs using GFP photoconversion. We also show that protein trafficking between ELP or HFBI PBs is faster and proteins travel further when compared to Zera PBs. Our results indicate that fusion-tag-induced PBs do not represent terminally stored cytosolic organelles, but that they form in, and remain part of the ER, and dynamically communicate with each other via the ER. We hypothesize that the previously documented PB mobility along the actin cytoskeleton is associated with ER movement rather than independent streaming of detached organelles. PMID:27242885

  6. Prognosis of oocytes showing aggregation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Ebner, Thomas; Moser, Marianne; Shebl, Omar; Sommerguber, Michael; Tews, Gernot

    2008-01-01

    Few cytoplasmic dysmorphisms of oocytes have been reported to negatively influence the further fate of the ova. One such anomaly, namely the central aggregation of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER), has recently been associated with suboptimal outcome in a limited number of patients. In order to increase prognostic value, it was decided to prospectively screen all intracytoplasmic sperm injection patients within 1 year for eggs showing aggregations of SER. In addition, all deliveries (obstetric and neonatal data) were analysed. Occurrence of SER cluster was related to duration (P < 0.001) and dosage (P < 0.01) of the stimulation. Fertilization (58.9%) and blastulation rate (44.0%) were lower (P < 0.01) in affected ova compared with unaffected counterparts (77.4 and 87.8%, respectively). Pregnancies in women with affected gametes were accompanied by a higher incidence of obstetric problems (P < 0.01) leading to a non-significant trend towards earlier delivery and significantly reduced birthweight (P < 0.05). It is strongly recommended to avoid transfer of embryos/blastocysts derived from SER cluster-positive gametes. Patients have to be informed that even transfer of sibling oocytes without this anomaly involves a higher risk of detrimental outcome.

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress, diabetes mellitus, and tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liu; Xie, Hong; Liu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is characterized by the accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins in the ER lumen. Unfolded and misfolded protein accumulation interferes with the ER function and triggers ER stress response. Thus, ER stress response, also called unfolded protein response (UPR), is an adaptive process that controls the protein amount in the ER lumen and the downstream protein demand. In normal conditions, the role of ER stress is to maintain ER homeostasis, restore ER function, and protect stressed cells from apoptosis, by coordinating gene expression, protein synthesis, and accelerating protein degradation through several molecular pathways. However, prolonged ER stress response plays a paradoxical role, which leads to cell damage, apoptosis, and concomitant tissue injuries. A number of tissue alterations are involved with diabetes mellitus progress and its comorbidities via ER stress. However, certain pharmacological agents affecting ER stress have been identified. In this review, we summarized the relationship between ER stress and insulin resistance development. Moreover, we aim to explain how ER stress influences type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) development. In addition, we reviewed the literature on ER stress and UPR in three kinds of tissue injuries induced by T2DM. Finally, a retrospective analysis of the effects of anti-diabetes medications on ER stress is presented.

  8. Naltrexone attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Moslehi, A; Nabavizadeh, F; Nabavizadeh, Fatemeh; Dehpour, A R; Dehpou, A R; Tavanga, S M; Hassanzadeh, G; Zekri, A; Nahrevanian, H; Sohanaki, H

    2014-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress provides abnormalities in insulin action, inflammatory responses, lipoprotein B100 degradation and hepatic lipogenesis. Excess accumulation of triglyceride in hepatocytes may also lead to disorders such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Opioid peptides are involved in triglyceride and cholesterol dysregulation, inflammation and cell death. In this study, we evaluated Naltrexone effects on ER stress induced liver injury. To do so, C57/BL6 mice received saline, DMSO and Naltrexone, as control groups. ER stress was induced by tunicamycin (TM) injection. Naltrexone was given before TM administration. Liver blood flow and biochemical serum analysis were measured. Histopathological evaluations, TNF-α measurement and Real-time RT-PCR were also performed. TM challenge provokes steatosis, cellular ballooning and lobular inflammation which significantly reduced in Naltrexone treated animals. ALT, AST and TNF-α increased in the TM group and improved in the Naltrexone plus TM group. Triglyceride and cholesterol levels decreased in TM treated mice with no increase in Naltrexone treated animals. In the Naltrexone plus TM group, gene expression of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase3 significantly lowered compared with the TM group. In this study, we found that Naltrexone had a notable alleviating role in ER stress induced steatosis and liver injury.

  9. Improvement of chemotherapeutic drug efficacy by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Mihailidou, Chrysovalantou; Chatzistamou, Ioulia; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G; Kiaris, Hippokratis

    2015-04-01

    Tunicamycin (TUN), an inhibitor of protein glycosylation and therefore a potent stimulator of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, has been used to improve anticancer drug efficacy, but the underlying mechanism remains obscure. In this study, we show that acute administration of TUN in mice induces the unfolded protein response and suppresses the levels of P21, a cell cycle regulator with anti-apoptotic activity. The inhibition of P21 after ER stress appears to be C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP)-dependent because in CHOP-deficient mice, TUN not only failed to suppress, but rather induced the expression of P21. Results of promoter-activity reporter assays using human cancer cells and mouse fibroblasts indicated that the regulation of P21 by CHOP operates at the level of transcription and involves direct binding of CHOP transcription factor to the P21 promoter. The results of cell viability and clonogenic assays indicate that ER-stress-related suppression of P21 expression potentiates caspase activation and sensitizes cells to doxorubicin treatment, while administration of TUN to mice increases the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer therapy for HepG2 liver and A549 lung cancers.

  10. Heme oxygenase-1 comes back to endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hong Pyo; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Back, Sung Hun; Chung, Su Wol; Woo, Je Moon; Son, Yong; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Although multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. {yields} HO-1 expression at ER is induced by a diverse set of conditions that cause ER stressors. {yields} CO may induce HO-1 expression in human ECs by activating Nrf2 through PERK phosphorylation in a positive-feedback manner. {yields} ER-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress is discussed. -- Abstract: Originally identified as a rate-limiting enzyme for heme catabolism, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has expanded its roles in anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis and anti-proliferation for the last decade. Regulation of protein activity by location is well appreciated. Even though multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. In this review we discuss the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress.

  11. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturbs fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways have been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and others. In this review, we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress-induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial signaling events, which further induce or exacerbate ER stress. PMID:25120434

  12. Coordination of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Signaling During Maize Seed Development

    SciTech Connect

    Boston, Rebecca S.

    2010-11-20

    Seed storage reserves represent one of the most important sources of renewable fixed carbon and nitrogen found in nature. Seeds are well-adapted for diverting metabolic resources to synthesize storage proteins as well as enzymes and structural proteins needed for their transport and packaging into membrane bound storage protein bodies. Our underlying hypothesis is that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response provides the critical cellular control of metabolic flux required for optimal accumulation of storage reserves in seeds. This highly conserved response is a cellular mechanism to monitor the protein folding environment of the ER and restore homeostasis in the presence of unfolded or misfolded proteins. In seeds, deposition of storage proteins in protein bodies is a highly specialized process that takes place even in the presence of mutant proteins that no longer fold and package properly. The capacity of the ER to deposit these aberrant proteins in protein bodies during a period that extends several weeks provides an excellent model for deconvoluting the ER stress response of plants. We have focused in this project on the means by which the ER senses and responds to functional perturbations and the underlying intracellular communication that occurs among biosynthetic, trafficking and degradative pathways for proteins during seed development.

  13. Paclitaxel inhibits selenoprotein S expression and attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hong-Shuang; Yu, Pei-Pei; Sun, Ying; Wang, Dan-Feng; Deng, Xiao-Fen; Bao, Yong-Li; Song, Jun; Sun, Lu-Guo; Song, Zhen-Bo; Li, Yu-Xin

    2016-06-01

    The primary effect of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response or unfolded protein response (UPR) is to reduce the load of unfolded protein and promote survival. However, prolonged and severe ER stress leads to tissue injury and serious diseases. Thus, it is important to identify drugs that can attenuate ER stress for the treatment of diseases. Natural products continue to provide lead compounds for drug discovery and front‑line pharmacotherapy for people worldwide. Previous studies have indicated that selenoprotein S (SelS) is a sensitive and ideal maker of ER stress. In the present study, a firefly luciferase reporter driven by the SelS gene promoter was used to screen for natural compounds capable of attenuating ER stress. From this, paclitaxel (PTX) was identified to efficiently inhibit the promoter activity of the SelS gene, and further results revealed that PTX significantly inhibited the tunicamycin‑induced upregulation of SelS at the mRNA and protein levels in HepG2 and HEK293T cells. In addition, PTX was able to efficiently inhibit the expression of the ER stress marker, glucose‑regulated protein 78, in ER stress, indicating that PTX may reverse ER stress. Taken together, these results suggest that PTX is able to inhibit SelS expression during ER stress and attenuate ER stress. PMID:27109260

  14. Involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress response in orofacial inflammatory pain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eun Sun; Bae, Jin Young; Kim, Tae Heon; Kim, Yun Sook; Suk, Kyoungho; Bae, Yong Chul

    2014-12-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in many neurological diseases and inflammatory responses. Inflammatory mediators induce neuronal damage and trigger the neuropathic or inflammatory pain. But there is very little data on the role of the ER stress response in pain mechanisms. In this study, we explored whether the ER stress response is involved in orofacial inflammatory pain by using a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-injected rat model. The thermal pain hypersensitivity increased significantly after CFA injection. We found that the protein and mRNA levels of ER stress response genes, GRP78/Bip and p-eIF2α, increased significantly in trigeminal ganglion (TG) of CFA-injected rats compared to control animals. In immunofluorescence analysis, a significant increase of GRP78 and p-eIF2α immunopositive neurons was observed in CFA-injected TG compared to control TG. When we administered an ER stress modulator, salubrinal, CFA-induced thermal pain hypersensitivity was temporally reduced. Thus, our study suggests that ER stress responses in TG neurons contribute to CFA-induced inflammatory pain, and may comprise an important molecular mechanism underlying the orofacial inflammatory pain pathway. PMID:25548537

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in adipose tissue augments lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Bogdanovic, Elena; Kraus, Nicole; Patsouris, David; Diao, Li; Wang, Vivian; Abdullahi, Abdikarim; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an organelle important for protein synthesis and folding, lipid synthesis and Ca(2+) homoeostasis. Consequently, ER stress or dysfunction affects numerous cellular processes and has been implicated as a contributing factor in several pathophysiological conditions. Tunicamycin induces ER stress in various cell types in vitro as well as in vivo. In mice, a hallmark of tunicamycin administration is the development of fatty livers within 24-48 hrs accompanied by hepatic ER stress. We hypothesized that tunicamycin would induce ER stress in adipose tissue that would lead to increased lipolysis and subsequently to fatty infiltration of the liver and hepatomegaly. Our results show that intraperitoneal administration of tunicamycin rapidly induced an ER stress response in adipose tissue that correlated with increased circulating free fatty acids (FFAs) and glycerol along with decreased adipose tissue mass and lipid droplet size. Furthermore, we found that in addition to fatty infiltration of the liver as well as hepatomegaly, lipid accumulation was also present in the heart, skeletal muscle and kidney. To corroborate our findings to a clinical setting, we examined adipose tissue from burned patients where increases in lipolysis and the development of fatty livers have been well documented. We found that burned patients displayed significant ER stress within adipose tissue and that ER stress augments lipolysis in cultured human adipocytes. Our results indicate a possible role for ER stress induced lipolysis in adipose tissue as an underlying mechanism contributing to increases in circulating FFAs and fatty infiltration into other organs.

  16. The Endoplasmic Reticulum and the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Jyoti D.; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2009-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the site where proteins enter the secretory pathway. Proteins are translocated into the ER lumen in an unfolded state and require protein chaperones and catalysts of protein folding to attain their final appropriate conformation. A sensitive surveillance mechanism exists to prevent misfolded proteins from transiting the secretory pathway and ensures that persistently misfolded proteins are directed towards a degradative pathway. In addition, those processes that prevent accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER lumen are highly regulated by an intracellular signaling pathway known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR provides a mechanism by which cells can rapidly adapt to alterations in client protein-folding load in the ER lumen by expanding the capacity for protein folding. In addition, a variety of insults that disrupt protein folding in the ER lumen also activate the UPR. These include changes in intralumenal calcium, altered glycosylation, nutrient deprivation, pathogen infection, expression of folding-defective proteins, and changes in redox status. Persistent protein misfolding initiates apoptotic cascades that are now known to play fundamental roles in the pathogenesis of multiple human diseases including diabetes, atherosclerosis and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:18023214

  17. Diverse roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress sensors in bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Pillich, Helena; Loose, Maria; Zimmer, Klaus-Peter; Chakraborty, Trinad

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial infection often leads to cellular damage, primarily marked by loss of cellular integrity and cell death. However, in recent years, it is being increasingly recognized that, in individual cells, there are graded responses collectively termed cell-autonomous defense mechanisms that induce cellular processes designed to limit cell damage, enable repair, and eliminate bacteria. Many of these responses are triggered not by detection of a particular bacterial effector or ligand but rather by their effects on key cellular processes and changes in homeostasis induced by microbial effectors when recognized. These in turn lead to a decrease in essential cellular functions such as protein translation or mitochondrial respiration and the induction of innate immune responses that may be specific to the cellular deficit induced. These processes are often associated with specific cell compartments, e.g., the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Under non-infection conditions, these systems are generally involved in sensing cellular stress and in inducing and orchestrating the subsequent cellular response. Thus, perturbations of ER homeostasis result in accumulation of unfolded proteins which are detected by ER stress sensors in order to restore the normal condition. The ER is also important during bacterial infection, and bacterial effectors that activate the ER stress sensors have been discovered. Increasing evidence now indicate that bacteria have evolved strategies to differentially activate different arms of ER stress sensors resulting in specific host cell response. In this review, we will describe the mechanisms used by bacteria to activate the ER stress sensors and discuss their role during infection.

  18. Chlamydiae interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum: contact, function and consequences.

    PubMed

    Derré, Isabelle

    2015-07-01

    Chlamydiae and chlamydiae-related organisms are obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens. They reside in a membrane-bound compartment termed the inclusion and have evolved sophisticated mechanisms to interact with cellular organelles. This review focuses on the nature, the function(s) and the consequences of chlamydiae-inclusion interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The inclusion membrane establishes very close contact with the ER at specific sites termed ER-inclusion membrane contact sites (MCSs). These MCSs are constituted of a specific set of factors, including the C. trachomatis effector protein IncD and the host cell proteins CERT and VAPA/B. Because CERT and VAPA/B have a demonstrated role in the non-vesicular trafficking of lipids between the ER and the Golgi, it was proposed that Chlamydia establish MCSs with the ER to acquire host lipids. However, the recruitment of additional factors to ER-inclusion MCSs, such as the ER calcium sensor STIM1, may suggest additional functions unrelated to lipid acquisition. Finally, chlamydiae interaction with the ER appears to induce the ER stress response, but this response is quickly dampened by chlamydiae to promote host cell survival. PMID:25930206

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum localization and activity of maize auxin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Seo, Hyesu; Park, Woong June; Hawes, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is a major growth hormone in plants and the first plant hormone to be discovered and studied. Active research over >60 years has shed light on many of the molecular mechanisms of its action including transport, perception, signal transduction, and a variety of biosynthetic pathways in various species, tissues, and developmental stages. The complexity and redundancy of the auxin biosynthetic network and enzymes involved raises the question of how such a system, producing such a potent agent as auxin, can be appropriately controlled at all. Here it is shown that maize auxin biosynthesis takes place in microsomal as well as cytosolic cellular fractions from maize seedlings. Most interestingly, a set of enzymes shown to be involved in auxin biosynthesis via their activity and/or mutant phenotypes and catalysing adjacent steps in YUCCA-dependent biosynthesis are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Positioning of auxin biosynthetic enzymes at the ER could be necessary to bring auxin biosynthesis in closer proximity to ER-localized factors for transport, conjugation, and signalling, and allow for an additional level of regulation by subcellular compartmentation of auxin action. Furthermore, it might provide a link to ethylene action and be a factor in hormonal cross-talk as all five ethylene receptors are ER localized.

  20. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy.

    PubMed

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Hübner, Christian A; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-06-18

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication. Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements and autophagy has an important role in this process. However, its underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unexplained. Here we show that members of the FAM134 reticulon protein family are ER-resident receptors that bind to autophagy modifiers LC3 and GABARAP, and facilitate ER degradation by autophagy ('ER-phagy'). Downregulation of FAM134B protein in human cells causes an expansion of the ER, while FAM134B overexpression results in ER fragmentation and lysosomal degradation. Mutant FAM134B proteins that cause sensory neuropathy in humans are unable to act as ER-phagy receptors. Consistently, disruption of Fam134b in mice causes expansion of the ER, inhibits ER turnover, sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptotic cell death and leads to degeneration of sensory neurons. Therefore, selective ER-phagy via FAM134 proteins is indispensable for mammalian cell homeostasis and controls ER morphology and turnover in mice and humans.

  1. LDL–cholesterol transport to the endoplasmic reticulum: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Pfisterer, Simon G.; Peränen, Johan; Ikonen, Elina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review In this article, we summarize the present information related to the export of LDL-derived cholesterol from late endosomes, with a focus on Nieman-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) cholesterol delivery toward the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We review data suggesting that several pathways may operate in parallel, including membrane transport routes and membrane contact sites (MCSs). Recent findings There is increasing appreciation that MCSs provide an important mechanism for intermembrane lipid transfer. In late endosome–ER contacts, three protein bridges involving oxysterol binding protein related protein (ORP)1L-vesicle associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)D3-VAP and ORP5-NPC1 proteins have been reported. How much they contribute to the flux of LDL–cholesterol to the ER is currently open. Studies for lipid transfer via MCSs have been most advanced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recently, a new sterol-binding protein family conserved between yeast and man was identified. Its members localize at MCSs and were named lipid transfer protein anchored at membrane contact sites (Lam) proteins. In yeast, sterol transfer between the ER and the yeast lysosome may be facilitated by a Lam protein. Summary Increasing insights into the role of MCSs in directional sterol delivery between membranes propose that they might provide routes for LDL–cholesterol transfer to the ER. Future work should reveal which specific contacts may operate for this, and how they are controlled by cholesterol homeostatic machineries. PMID:27054443

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Beta Cells and Development of Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Sonya G.; Burcin, Mark; Gromada, Jesper; Urano, Fumihiko

    2009-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a cellular compartment responsible for multiple important cellular functions including the biosynthesis and folding of newly synthesized proteins destined for secretion, such as insulin. A myriad of pathological and physiological factors perturb ER function and cause dysregulation of ER homeostasis, leading to ER stress. ER stress elicits a signaling cascade to mitigate stress, the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). As long as the UPR can relieve stress, cells can produce the proper amount of proteins and maintain ER homeostasis. If the UPR, however, fails to maintain ER homeostasis, cells will undergo apoptosis. Activation of the UPR is critical to the survival of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells with high secretory protein production. Any disruption of ER homeostasis in β-cells can lead to cell death and contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes. There are several models of ER stress-mediated diabetes. In this review, we outline the underlying molecular mechanisms of ER stress-mediated β-cell dysfunction and death during the progression of diabetes. PMID:19665428

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress regulation in hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Miharada, Kenichi

    2016-08-01

    Adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) reside in bone marrow and are maintained in a dormant state within a special microenvironment, their so-called "niche". Detaching from the niche induces cell cycle progression, resulting in a reduction of the reconstitution capacity of HSCs. In contrast, fetal liver HSCs actively divide without losing their stem cell potentials. Thus, it has been unclear what types of cellular responses and metabolic changes occur in growing HSCs. We previously discovered that HSCs express relatively low levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone proteins governing protein folding, making HSCs vulnerable to an elevation of stress signals caused by accumulation of un-/misfolded proteins (ER stress) upon in vitro culture. Interestingly, fetal liver HSCs do not show ER stress elevation despite unchanged levels of chaperone proteins. Our latest studies utilizing multiple mouse models revealed that in the fetal liver bile acids as chemical chaperones play a key role supporting the protein folding which results in the suppression of ER stress induction. These findings highlight the importance of ER stress regulations in hematopoiesis. PMID:27599423

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress response in yeast and humans

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haoxi; Ng, Benjamin S. H.; Thibault, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Stress pathways monitor intracellular systems and deploy a range of regulatory mechanisms in response to stress. One of the best-characterized pathways, the UPR (unfolded protein response), is an intracellular signal transduction pathway that monitors ER (endoplasmic reticulum) homoeostasis. Its activation is required to alleviate the effects of ER stress and is highly conserved from yeast to human. Although metazoans have three UPR outputs, yeast cells rely exclusively on the Ire1 (inositol-requiring enzyme-1) pathway, which is conserved in all Eukaryotes. In general, the UPR program activates hundreds of genes to alleviate ER stress but it can lead to apoptosis if the system fails to restore homoeostasis. In this review, we summarize the major advances in understanding the response to ER stress in Sc (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), Sp (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and humans. The contribution of solved protein structures to a better understanding of the UPR pathway is discussed. Finally, we cover the interplay of ER stress in the development of diseases. PMID:24909749

  5. Protein Bodies in Leaves Exchange Contents through the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Saberianfar, Reza; Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Joensuu, Jussi J.; Kohalmi, Susanne E.; Menassa, Rima

    2016-01-01

    Protein bodies (PBs) are organelles found in seeds whose main function is the storage of proteins that are used during germination for sustaining growth. PBs can also be induced to form in leaves when foreign proteins are produced at high levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and when fused to one of three tags: Zera®, elastin-like polypeptides (ELP), or hydrophobin-I (HFBI). In this study, we investigate the differences between ELP, HFBI and Zera PB formation, packing, and communication. Our results confirm the ER origin of all three fusion-tag-induced PBs. We show that secretory pathway proteins can be sequestered into all types of PBs but with different patterns, and that different fusion tags can target a specific protein to different PBs. Zera PBs are mobile and dependent on actomyosin motility similar to ELP and HFBI PBs. We show in vivo trafficking of proteins between PBs using GFP photoconversion. We also show that protein trafficking between ELP or HFBI PBs is faster and proteins travel further when compared to Zera PBs. Our results indicate that fusion-tag-induced PBs do not represent terminally stored cytosolic organelles, but that they form in, and remain part of the ER, and dynamically communicate with each other via the ER. We hypothesize that the previously documented PB mobility along the actin cytoskeleton is associated with ER movement rather than independent streaming of detached organelles. PMID:27242885

  6. Calreticulin: non-endoplasmic reticulum functions in physiology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Leslie I.; Eggleton, Paul; Sweetwyne, Mariya T.; Van Duyn, Lauren B.; Greives, Matthew R.; Naylor, Sara-Megumi; Michalak, Marek; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.

    2010-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT), when localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), has important functions in directing proper conformation of proteins and glycoproteins, as well as in homeostatic control of cytosolic and ER calcium levels. There is also steadily accumulating evidence for diverse roles for CRT localized outside the ER, including data suggesting important roles for CRT localized to the outer cell surface of a variety of cell types, in the cytosol, and in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Furthermore, the addition of exogenous CRT rescues numerous CRT-driven functions, such as adhesion, migration, phagocytosis, and immunoregulatory functions of CRT-null cells. Recent studies show that topically applied CRT has diverse and profound biological effects that enhance cutaneous wound healing in animal models. This evidence for extracellular bioactivities of CRT has provided new insights into this classically ER-resident protein, despite a lack of knowledge of how CRT exits from the ER to the cell surface or how it is released into the extracellular milieu. Nonetheless, it has become clear that CRT is a multicompartmental protein that regulates a wide array of cellular responses important in physiological and pathological processes, such as wound healing, the immune response, fibrosis, and cancer.—Gold, L. I., Eggleton, P., Sweetwyne, M. T., Van Duyn, L. B., Greives, M. R., Naylor, S.-M., Michalak, M., Murphy-Ullrich, J. E. Calreticulin: non-endoplamic reticulum functions in physiology and disease. PMID:19940256

  7. Proper symmetric and asymmetric endoplasmic reticulum partitioning requires astral microtubules.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Jeremy T; Schoborg, Todd A; Bergman, Zane J; Riggs, Blake; Rusan, Nasser M

    2015-08-01

    Mechanisms that regulate partitioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during cell division are largely unknown. Previous studies have mostly addressed ER partitioning in cultured cells, which may not recapitulate physiological processes that are critical in developing, intact tissues. We have addressed this by analysing ER partitioning in asymmetrically dividing stem cells, in which precise segregation of cellular components is essential for proper development and tissue architecture. We show that in Drosophila neural stem cells, called neuroblasts, the ER asymmetrically partitioned to centrosomes early in mitosis. This correlated closely with the asymmetric nucleation of astral microtubules (MTs) by centrosomes, suggesting that astral MT association may be required for ER partitioning by centrosomes. Consistent with this, the ER also associated with astral MTs in meiotic Drosophila spermatocytes and during syncytial embryonic divisions. Disruption of centrosomes in each of these cell types led to improper ER partitioning, demonstrating the critical role for centrosomes and associated astral MTs in this process. Importantly, we show that the ER also associated with astral MTs in cultured human cells, suggesting that this centrosome/astral MT-based partitioning mechanism is conserved across animal species. PMID:26289801

  8. Chemical chaperones mitigate experimental asthma by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Makhija, Lokesh; Krishnan, Veda; Rehman, Rakhshinda; Chakraborty, Samarpana; Maity, Shuvadeep; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Chakraborty, Kausik; Ghosh, Balaram; Agrawal, Anurag

    2014-05-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and consequent unfolded protein response (UPR) are important in inflammation but have been poorly explored in asthma. We used a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation (AAI) with features of asthma to understand the role of ER stress and to explore potential therapeutic effects of inhaled chemical chaperones, which are small molecules that can promote protein folding and diminish UPR. UPR markers were initially measured on alternate days during a 7-day daily allergen challenge model. UPR markers increased within 24 hours after the first allergen challenge and peaked by the third challenge, before AAI was fully established (from the fifth challenge onward). Three chemical chaperones-glycerol, trehalose, and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO)-were initially administered during allergen challenge (preventive regimen). TMAO, the most effective of these chemical chaperones and 4-phenylbutyric acid, a chemical chaperone currently in clinical trials, were further tested for potential therapeutic activities after AAI was established (therapeutic regimen). Chemical chaperones showed a dose-dependent reduction in UPR markers, airway inflammation, and remodeling in both regimens. Our results indicate an early and important role of the ER stress pathway in asthma pathogenesis and show therapeutic potential for chemical chaperones.

  9. Terasaki Ramps in the Endoplasmic Reticulum: Structure, Function and Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Greg; Guven, Jemal; Valencia, Dulce-Maria

    2015-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has long been considered an exceedingly important and complex cellular organelle in eukaryotes (like you). It is a membrane structure, part folded lamellae, part tubular network, that both envelopes the nucleus and threads its way outward, all the way to the cell's periphery. Despite the elegant mechanics of bilayer membranes offered by the work of Helfrich and Canham, as far as the ER is concerned, theory has mostly sat on the sidelines. However, refined imaging of the ER has recently revealed beautiful and subtle geometrical forms - simple geometries, from the mathematical point of view - which some have called a ``parking garage for ribosomes.'' I'll review the discovery and physics of Terasaki ramps and discuss their relation to cell-biological questions, such as ER and nuclear-membrane re-organization during mitosis. Rather than being a footnote in a textbook on differential geometry, these structures suggest answers to a number of the ER's structure-function problems.

  10. Low molecular weight Abeta induces collapse of endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Lai, Cora Sau-Wan; Preisler, Julie; Baum, Larry; Lee, Daniel Hong-Seng; Ng, Ho-Keung; Hugon, Jacques; So, Kwok-Fai; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2009-05-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic multifunction organelle that is responsible for Ca(2+) homeostasis, protein folding, post-translational modification, protein degradation, and transportation of nascent proteins. Disruption of ER architecture might affect the normal physiology of the cell. In yeast, expansion of the ER is observed under unfolded protein response (UPR) and subsequently induces autophagy initiated from the ER. Here, we found that soluble low molecular weight of Abeta disrupted the anchoring between ER and microtubules (MT) and induced collapse of ER. In addition, it decreased the stability of MT. Subsequently, low molecular weight Abeta triggered autophagy and enhanced lysosomal degradation, as shown by electron microscopy and live-cell imaging. Dysfunction of ER can be further proved in postmortem AD brain and transgenic mice bearing APP Swedish mutation by immunohistochemical analysis of calreticulin. Treatment with Taxol, a MT-stabilizing agent, could partially inhibit collapse of the ER and induction of autophagy. The results show that Abeta-induced disruption of MT can affect the architecture of the ER. Collapse/aggregation of the ER may play an important role in Abeta peptide-triggered neurodegenerative processes.

  11. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response in Orofacial Inflammatory Pain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eun Sun; Bae, Jin Young; Kim, Tae Heon; Kim, Yun Sook; Suk, Kyoungho

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in many neurological diseases and inflammatory responses. Inflammatory mediators induce neuronal damage and trigger the neuropathic or inflammatory pain. But there is very little data on the role of the ER stress response in pain mechanisms. In this study, we explored whether the ER stress response is involved in orofacial inflammatory pain by using a complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-injected rat model. The thermal pain hypersensitivity increased significantly after CFA injection. We found that the protein and mRNA levels of ER stress response genes, GRP78/Bip and p-eIF2α, increased significantly in trigeminal ganglion (TG) of CFA-injected rats compared to control animals. In immunofluorescence analysis, a significant increase of GRP78 and p-eIF2α immunopositive neurons was observed in CFA-injected TG compared to control TG. When we administered an ER stress modulator, salubrinal, CFA-induced thermal pain hypersensitivity was temporally reduced. Thus, our study suggests that ER stress responses in TG neurons contribute to CFA-induced inflammatory pain, and may comprise an important molecular mechanism underlying the orofacial inflammatory pain pathway. PMID:25548537

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Regulates Epidermal Barrier Response and Desmosomal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Celli, Anna; Crumrine, Debra; Meyer, Jason M.; Mauro, Theodora M.

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ fluxes direct keratinocyte differentiation, cell-to-cell adhesion, migration, and epidermal barrier homeostasis. We previously showed that intracellular Ca2+ stores constitute a major portion of the calcium gradient especially in the stratum granulosum. Loss of the calcium gradient triggers epidermal barrier homeostatic responses. In this report, using unfixed ex vivo epidermis and human epidermal equivalents we show that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ is released in response to barrier perturbation, and that this release constitutes the major shift in epidermal Ca2+ seen after barrier perturbation. We find that ER Ca2+ release correlates with a transient increase in extracellular Ca2+. Lastly, we show that ER calcium release resulting from barrier perturbation triggers transient desmosomal remodeling, seen as an increase in extracellular space and a loss of the desmosomal intercellular midline. Topical application of thapsigargin, which inhibits the ER Ca2+ ATPase activity without compromising barrier integrity, also leads to desmosomal remodeling and loss of the midline structure. These experiments establish the ER Ca2+ store as a master regulator of the Ca2+ gradient response to epidermal barrier perturbation, and suggest that ER Ca2+ homeostasis also modulates normal desmosomal reorganization, both at rest and after acute barrier perturbation. PMID:27255610

  13. The endoplasmic reticulum: a social network in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Doyle, Caitlin; Qi, Xingyun; Zheng, Huanquan

    2012-11-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an interconnected network comprised of ribosome-studded sheets and smooth tubules. The ER plays crucial roles in the biosynthesis and transport of proteins and lipids, and in calcium (Ca(2+) ) regulation in compartmentalized eukaryotic cells including plant cells. To support its well-segregated functions, the shape of the ER undergoes notable changes in response to both developmental cues and outside influences. In this review, we will discuss recent findings on molecular mechanisms underlying the unique morphology and dynamics of the ER, and the importance of the interconnected ER network in cell polarity. In animal and yeast cells, two family proteins, the reticulons and DP1/Yop1, are required for shaping high-curvature ER tubules, while members of the atlastin family of dynamin-like GTPases are involved in the fusion of ER tubules to make an interconnected ER network. In plant cells, recent data also indicate that the reticulons are involved in shaping ER tubules, while RHD3, a plant member of the atlastin GTPases, is required for the generation of an interconnected ER network. We will also summarize the current knowledge on how the ER interacts with other membrane-bound organelles, with a focus on how the ER and Golgi interplay in plant cells. PMID:23046093

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Interacts With Inflammation in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Stewart Siyan; Luo, Katherine L.; Shi, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum is a critical organelle for normal cell function and homeostasis. Disturbed protein folding process in the ER, termed ER stress, leads to the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR) that encompasses a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways. The UPR can either restore ER homeostasis or activate pro-apoptotic pathways depending on specific insults, intensity and duration of the stress, and cell types. ER stress and the UPR have recently been linked to inflammation in a variety of human pathologies including autoimmune diseases, infection, neurodegenerative disease, and metabolic disorders. In the cell, ER stress and inflammatory signaling share extensive regulators and effectors in a broad spectrum of biological processes. In spite of different etiologies, the two signaling pathways were shown to form a vicious cycle in exacerbating cellular dysfunction and causing apoptosis in many cells and tissues. However, the interaction between ER stress and inflammation in many of these diseases remains elusive. Further understanding of those issues may enable the development of novel therapies that spontaneously target these pathogenic pathways. PMID:26201832

  15. The Role of the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Peroxisome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Lazar; Lam, Sheung Kwan; Schekman, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisomes are essential cellular organelles involved in lipid metabolism. Patients affected by severe peroxisome biogenesis disorders rarely survive their first year. Genetic screens in several model organisms have identified more than 30 PEX genes that are required for the formation of functional peroxisomes. Despite significant work on the PEX genes, the biogenic origin of peroxisomes remains controversial. For at least two decades, the prevailing model postulated that peroxisomes propagate by growth and fission of preexisting peroxisomes. In this review, we focus on the recent evidence supporting a new, semiautonomous model of peroxisomal biogenesis. According to this model, peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the peroxisome by a vesicular budding, targeting, and fusion process while peroxisomal matrix proteins are imported into the organelle by an autonomous, posttranslational mechanism. We highlight the contradictory conclusions reached to answer the question of how PMPs are inserted into the ER. We then review what we know and what still remains to be elucidated about the mechanism of PMP exit from the ER and the contribution of preperoxisomal vesicles to mature peroxisomes. Finally, we discuss discrepancies in our understanding of de novo peroxisome biogenesis in wild-type cells. We anticipate that resolving these key issues will lead to a more complete picture of peroxisome biogenesis. PMID:23637287

  16. Endoplasmic reticulum localization and activity of maize auxin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Seo, Hyesu; Park, Woong June; Hawes, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is a major growth hormone in plants and the first plant hormone to be discovered and studied. Active research over >60 years has shed light on many of the molecular mechanisms of its action including transport, perception, signal transduction, and a variety of biosynthetic pathways in various species, tissues, and developmental stages. The complexity and redundancy of the auxin biosynthetic network and enzymes involved raises the question of how such a system, producing such a potent agent as auxin, can be appropriately controlled at all. Here it is shown that maize auxin biosynthesis takes place in microsomal as well as cytosolic cellular fractions from maize seedlings. Most interestingly, a set of enzymes shown to be involved in auxin biosynthesis via their activity and/or mutant phenotypes and catalysing adjacent steps in YUCCA-dependent biosynthesis are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Positioning of auxin biosynthetic enzymes at the ER could be necessary to bring auxin biosynthesis in closer proximity to ER-localized factors for transport, conjugation, and signalling, and allow for an additional level of regulation by subcellular compartmentation of auxin action. Furthermore, it might provide a link to ethylene action and be a factor in hormonal cross-talk as all five ethylene receptors are ER localized. PMID:26139824

  17. Probing Endoplasmic Reticulum Dynamics using Fluorescence Imaging and Photobleaching Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, Lindsey; Snapp, Erik

    2013-01-01

    This UNIT describes approaches and tools for studying the dynamics and organization of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes and proteins in living cells using commercially available widefield and confocal laser scanning microscopes (CLSM). It has been long appreciated that the ER plays a number of key roles in secretory protein biogenesis, calcium regulation, and lipid synthesis. However, study of these processes has been often restricted to biochemical assays that average the behaviors of millions of lysed cells or to imaging static fixed cells. Now, with new fluorescent protein reporter tools, highly sensitive commercial microscopes, and photobleaching techniques, it is possible to interrogate the behaviors of ER proteins, membranes, and stress pathways in single cells with exquisite spatial and temporal resolution. The ER presents a unique set of imaging challenges including the high mobility of ER membranes, a diverse range of dynamic ER structures, and the influence of post-translational modifications on fluorescent protein reporters. Solutions to these challenges are described and considerations for performing photobleaching assays, especially Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleaching (FRAP) and Fluorescence Loss in Photobleaching (FLIP) for ER proteins will be discussed. In addition, ER reporters and ER-specific pharmacologic compounds are presented with a focus on misfolded secretory protein stress and the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). PMID:24510787

  18. Characteristics of surface roughness associated with leading edge ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, Jaiwon

    1994-01-01

    Detailed size measurements of surface roughness associated with leading edge ice accretions are presented to provide information on characteristics of roughness and trends of roughness development with various icing parameters. Data was obtained from icing tests conducted in the Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) using a NACA 0012 airfoil. Measurements include diameters, heights, and spacing of roughness elements along with chordwise icing limits. Results confirm the existence of smooth and rough ice zones and that the boundary between the two zones (surface roughness transition region) moves upstream towards stagnation region with time. The height of roughness grows as the air temperature and the liquid water content increase, however, the airspeed has little effect on the roughness height. Results also show that the roughness in the surface roughness transition region grows during a very early stage of accretion but reaches a critical height and then remains fairly constant. Results also indicate that a uniformly distributed roughness model is only valid at a very initial stage of the ice accretion process.

  19. Topography-based flow-directional roughness: potential and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trevisani, Sebastiano; Cavalli, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Surface texture analysis applied to high-resolution digital terrain models (HRDTMs) is a promising approach for extracting useful fine-scale morphological information. Surface roughness, considered here as a synonym of surface texture, can have a discriminant role in the detection of different geomorphic processes and factors. Very often, the local morphology presents, at different scales, anisotropic characteristics that could be taken into account when calculating or measuring surface roughness. The high morphological detail of HRDTMs permits the description of different aspects of surface roughness, beyond an evaluation limited to isotropic measures of surface roughness. The generalization of the concept of roughness implies the need to refer to a family of specific roughness indices capable of capturing specific multiscale and anisotropic aspects of surface morphology. An interesting set of roughness indices is represented by directional measures of roughness that can be meaningful in the context of analyzed and modeled flow processes. Accordingly, we test the application of a flow-oriented directional measure of roughness based on the geostatistical bivariate index MAD (median of absolute directional differences), which is computed considering surface gravity-driven flow direction. MAD is derived from a modification of a variogram and is specifically designed for the geomorphometric analysis of HRDTMs. The presented approach shows the potential impact of considering directionality in the calculation of roughness indices. The results demonstrate that the use of flow-directional roughness can improve geomorphometric modeling (e.g., sediment connectivity and surface texture modeling) and the interpretation of landscape morphology.

  20. Adjustment of roughness sublayer in turbulent flows over two-dimensional idealised roughness elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HO, Yat-Kiu; LIU, Chun-Ho

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) immediately above the urban canopy is the roughness sublayer (RSL). In this layer, flows and turbulence are strongly affected by the roughness elements beneath, e.g. building obstacles. The wind flows over urban areas could be represented by conventional logarithmic law of the wall (log-law) in the neutrally stratified ABL. However, in the RSL region, the vertical wind profile deviates from that predicted from log-law and the effect could be extended from ground level up to several canopy heights. As a result, the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory (MOST) fails and an additional length scale is required to describe the flows. The key aim of this study is to introduce a simple wind profile model which accounts for the effect of the RSL in neutral stratification using wind tunnel experiments. Profile measurements of wind speeds and turbulence quantities over various two-dimensional (2D) idealised roughness elements are carried out in an open-circuit wind tunnel with test section of size 560 mm (width) × 560 mm (height) × 6 m (length). The separation between the roughness elements is varied systematically so that ten different types of surface forms are adopted. The velocity measurements are obtained by hot-wire anemometry using X-probe design (for UW- measurements) with a constant temperature anemometer. For each configuration, eight vertical profiles are collected over the canopy, including solid boundaries and cavities of the roughness elements. Firstly, we compute the measurement results using conventional MOST to determine different roughness parameters. Afterwards, we derive the RSL height from the Reynolds stress profiles. Since the profiles taken from different locations of the canopy are eventually converged with increasing height, we use this 'congregated height' to define the RSL height. Next, we introduce an alternative function, i.e. power-law function, instead of MOST, to describe the velocity profile in attempt to

  1. Roughness Induced Transition in a Supersonic Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, Ponnampalam; Kergerise, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used to investigate the transition induced by threedimensional isolated roughness elements in a supersonic boundary layer at a free stream Mach number of 3.5. Simulations are performed for two different configurations: one is a square planform roughness and the other is a diamond planform roughness. The mean-flow calculations show that the roughness induces counter rotating streamwise vortices downstream of the roughness. These vortices persist for a long distance downstream and lift the low momentum fluid from the near wall region and place it near the outer part of the boundary layer. This forms highly inflectional boundary layer profiles. These observations agree with recent experimental observations. The receptivity calculations showed that the amplitudes of the mass-flux fluctuations near the neutral point for the diamond shape roughness are the same as the amplitude of the acoustic disturbances. They are three times smaller for the square shape roughness.

  2. Influence of surface roughness on nonlinear flow behaviors in 3D self-affine rough fractures: Lattice Boltzmann simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Min; Chen, Yi-Feng; Ma, Guo-Wei; Zhou, Jia-Qing; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the impacts of surface roughness on the nonlinear fluid flow through three-dimensional (3D) self-affine rock fractures, whose original surface roughness is decomposed into primary roughness (i.e. the large-scale waviness of the fracture morphology) and secondary roughness (i.e. the small-scale unevenness) with a wavelet analysis technique. A 3D Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is adopted to predict the flow physics in rock fractures numerically created with and without consideration of the secondary roughness, respectively. The simulation results show that the primary roughness mostly controls the pressure distribution and fracture flow paths at a large scale, whereas the secondary roughness determines the nonlinear properties of the fluid flow at a local scale. As the pressure gradient increases, the secondary roughness enhances the local complexity of velocity distribution by generating and expanding the eddy flow and back flow regions in the vicinity of asperities. It was found that the Forchheimer's law characterizes well the nonlinear flow behavior in fractures of varying roughness. The inertial effects induced by the primary roughness differ only marginally in fractures with the roughness exponent varying from 0.5 to 0.8, and it is the secondary roughness that significantly enhances the nonlinear flow and leads to earlier onset of nonlinearity. Further examined were the effects of surface roughness on the transmissivity, hydraulic aperture and the tortuosity of flow paths, demonstrating again the dominant role of the secondary roughness, especially for the apparent transmissivity and the equivalent hydraulic aperture at high pressure gradient or high Reynolds number. The results may enhance our understanding of the role of surface roughness in the nonlinear flow behaviors in natural rock fractures.

  3. Light depolarization in off-specular reflection on submicro rough metal surfaces with imperfectly random roughness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linsheng; Li, Xuefeng; Nonaka, Kazuhiro

    2015-02-01

    Depolarization at a rough surface relates to its roughness and irregularity (e.g., sags and crests) besides the material property. However, there is still lack of general theory to clearly describe the relationship between depolarization ratios and surface conditions, and one important reason is that the mechanism of depolarization relates to geometric parameters such as microcosmic height/particle distributions of sub-micro to nm levels. To study the mechanism in more detail, a compact laser instrument is developed, and depolarization information of a linearly polarized incident light is used for analyzing the roughness, during which a He-Ne laser source (λ = 632.8 nm) is used. Three nickel specimens with RMS roughness (Rq) less than λ/4 are fabricated and tested. Six different areas in each specimen are characterized in detail using an AFM. Rq are in the range of 34.1-155.0 nm, and the heights are non-Gaussian distribution in the first specimen and near-Gaussian distribution in the others. Off-specular inspection is carried out exactly on these 18 characterized areas, and results show that the cross-polarization ratios match quite well with Rq values of the first sample that has Rq ≤ λ/10 (or Rt ≤ λ), while they match well with maximum height, Rt, values of the other two that have Rt > λ (the maximum derivation is 11%). In addition, since this instrument is simple, portable, stable, and low-cost, it has great potential for practical online roughness testing after a linear calibration.

  4. Theory of adhesion: Role of surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, B. N. J.; Scaraggi, M.

    2014-09-01

    We discuss how surface roughness influences the adhesion between elastic solids. We introduce a Tabor number which depends on the length scale or magnification, and which gives information about the nature of the adhesion at different length scales. We consider two limiting cases relevant for (a) elastically hard solids with weak (or long ranged) adhesive interaction (DMT-limit) and (b) elastically soft solids with strong (or short ranged) adhesive interaction (JKR-limit). For the former cases we study the nature of the adhesion using different adhesive force laws (F ˜ u-n, n = 1.5-4, where u is the wall-wall separation). In general, adhesion may switch from DMT-like at short length scales to JKR-like at large (macroscopic) length scale. We compare the theory predictions to results of exact numerical simulations and find good agreement between theory and simulation results.

  5. Enhanced Thermoelectric Performance in Rough Silicon Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Renkun; Hochbaum, Allon I.; Diaz Delgado, Raul; Liang, Wenjie; Garnett, Erik C.; Najarian, Mark; Majumdar, Arun; Yang, Peidong

    2008-03-01

    Due to the disparity between electron (<10 nm) and phonon ( ˜100 nm) mean free paths in silicon, nanostructured Si could effectively block phonon transport by boundary scattering while maintaining electron transport, thereby enhancing thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT. Here we report the wafer-scale electrochemical synthesis and thermoelectric characterization of rough Si nanowires with enhanced ZT, relative to the bulk material. Single nanowire measurements show that their electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient are similar to those of bulk Si with similar dopant concentration. Thin nanowires, however, exhibit a 100-fold reduction in thermal conductivity (k), yielding a large ZT = 0.6 at room temperature. Although bulk Si is a poor thermoelectric material, Si nanowire arrays show promise as high-performance, scalable thermoelectric materials.

  6. Bounds for convection between rough boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goluskin, David; Doering, Charles R.

    2016-10-01

    We consider Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection in a layer of fluid between rough no-slip boundaries where the top and bottom boundary heights are functions of the horizontal coordinates with square-integrable gradients. We use the background method to derive an upper bound on mean heat flux across the layer for all admissible boundary geometries. This flux, normalized by the temperature difference between the boundaries, can grow with the Rayleigh number ($Ra$) no faster than ${\\cal O}(Ra^{1/2})$ as $Ra \\rightarrow \\infty$. Our analysis yields a family of similar bounds, depending on how various estimates are tuned, but every version depends explicitly on the boundary geometry. In one version the coefficient of the ${\\cal O}(Ra^{1/2})$ leading term is $0.242 + 2.925\\Vert\

  7. Manning's roughness coefficient for Illinois streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soong, David T.; Prater, Crystal D.; Halfar, Teresa M.; Wobig, Loren A.

    2012-01-01

    Manning's roughness coefficients for 43 natural and constructed streams in Illinois are reported and displayed on a U.S. Geological Survey Web site. At a majority of the sites, discharge and stage were measured, and corresponding Manning's coefficients—the n-values—were determined at more than one river discharge. The n-values discussed in this report are computed from data representing the stream reach studied and, therefore, are reachwise values. Presentation of the resulting n-values takes a visual-comparison approach similar to the previously published Barnes report (1967), in which photographs of channel conditions, description of the site, and the resulting n-values are organized for each site. The Web site where the data can be accessed and are displayed is at URL http://il.water.usgs.gov/proj/nvalues/.

  8. Intermittency and rough-pipe turbulence.

    PubMed

    Mehrafarin, Mohammad; Pourtolami, Nima

    2008-05-01

    Recently, by analyzing the measurement data of Nikuradze [NACA Tech. Memo No. 1292 (1950)], it has been proposed [N. Goldenfeld, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 044503 (2006)] that the friction factor, f , of rough-pipe flow obeys a scaling law in the turbulent regime. Here, we provide a phenomenological scaling argument to explain this law and demonstrate how intermittency modifies the scaling form, thereby relating f to the intermittency exponent, eta . By statistically analyzing the measurement data of f , we infer a satisfactory estimate for eta ( approximately 0.02) , the inclusion of which is shown to improve the data-collapse curve. This provides empirical evidence for intermittency other than the direct measurement of velocity fluctuations.

  9. Effects of Roughness on Scatterometry Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foldyna, M.; Germer, T. A.; Bergner, B. C.

    2011-11-01

    We used azimuthally-resolved spectroscopic Mueller matrix ellipsometry to study a periodic silicon line structure with and without artificially-generated line edge roughness (LER). Grating profiles were determined from multiple azimuthal configurations, focusing the incident beam into a 60 μm spot. We used rigorous numerical modeling, taking into account the finite numerical aperture and determining the profile shape using a four trapezoid model for the line profile. Data obtained from the perturbed and unperturbed gratings were fit using the same model, and the resulting root-mean-square error (RMSE) values were compared. The comparison shows an increase in RMSE values for the perturbed grating that can be attributed to the effects of LER.

  10. Surface roughness of anodized titanium coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Chinn, Douglas Alan

    2010-10-01

    Samples of grade five 6Al4V titanium alloy were coated with two commercial fluoropolymer anodizations (Tiodize and Canadize) and compared. Neither coating demonstrates significant outgassing. The coatings show very similar elemental analysis, except for the presence of lead in the Canadize coating, which may account for its lower surface friction in humid environments. Surface roughness has been compared by SEM, contact profilometry, optical profilometry, power spectral density and bidirectional scattering distribution function (BSDF). The Tiodize film is slightly smoother by all measurement methods, but the Canadize film shows slightly less scatter at all angles of incidence. Both films exhibited initial friction coefficients of 0.2 to 0.4, increasing to 0.4 to 0.8 after 1000 cycles of sliding due to wear of the coating and ball. The coatings are very similar and should behave identically in most applications.

  11. Biosynthesis of cytochrome P-450 on membrane-bound ribosomes and its subsequent incorporation into rough and smooth microsomes in rat hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Intracellular sites of synthesis of cytochrome P-450 and the subsequent incorporation of it into membrane structures of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in rat hepatocytes have been studied using an antibody monospecific for phenobarbital-inducible cytochrome P-450. The cytochrome is synthesized mainly on the "tightly bound" type of membrane-bound ribosomes whose release from the membrane requires treatment with puromycin in a high salt buffer (500 mM KCI, 5mM MgCl2, and 50 mM Tris-HCL [pH 7.5]). Subsequently the cytochrome is incorporated directly into the rough ER membranes with its major part exposed to the outer surface to the membrane and accessible to proteolytic enzymes added externally. The newly synthesized molecules, which appeared first in the rough membrane, are translocated to the smooth membrane, and are then distributed evenly between the two types of microsomeal membranes in approximately 1 h. Administration of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein biosynthesis, did not significantly inhibit the transfer of the enzyme from the rough to the smooth ER. It is suggested, therefore, that the translocation of the newly synthesized cythochrome P-450 between the rough and smooth microsomes is mainly due to the lateral movement of the molecules in the plane of the membranes rather than to the attachment and detachment of the ribosomes on the microsomal membranes after the ribosomal cycle for protein synthesis. PMID:457773

  12. Enhanced thermoelectric performance of rough silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Hochbaum, Allon I; Chen, Renkun; Delgado, Raul Diaz; Liang, Wenjie; Garnett, Erik C; Najarian, Mark; Majumdar, Arun; Yang, Peidong

    2008-01-10

    Approximately 90 per cent of the world's power is generated by heat engines that use fossil fuel combustion as a heat source and typically operate at 30-40 per cent efficiency, such that roughly 15 terawatts of heat is lost to the environment. Thermoelectric modules could potentially convert part of this low-grade waste heat to electricity. Their efficiency depends on the thermoelectric figure of merit ZT of their material components, which is a function of the Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity and absolute temperature. Over the past five decades it has been challenging to increase ZT > 1, since the parameters of ZT are generally interdependent. While nanostructured thermoelectric materials can increase ZT > 1 (refs 2-4), the materials (Bi, Te, Pb, Sb, and Ag) and processes used are not often easy to scale to practically useful dimensions. Here we report the electrochemical synthesis of large-area, wafer-scale arrays of rough Si nanowires that are 20-300 nm in diameter. These nanowires have Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity values that are the same as doped bulk Si, but those with diameters of about 50 nm exhibit 100-fold reduction in thermal conductivity, yielding ZT = 0.6 at room temperature. For such nanowires, the lattice contribution to thermal conductivity approaches the amorphous limit for Si, which cannot be explained by current theories. Although bulk Si is a poor thermoelectric material, by greatly reducing thermal conductivity without much affecting the Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity, Si nanowire arrays show promise as high-performance, scalable thermoelectric materials.

  13. Erratum: Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofia, U. J.; Meyer, D. M.

    2001-09-01

    In the Letter ``Interstellar Abundance Standards Revisited'' by U. J. Sofia and D. M. Meyer (ApJ, 554, L221 [2001]), Table 2 and its footnotes contain several typographical errors. The corrected table is shown below. We note that the solar reference standard now implies a positive abundance of nitrogen in halo dust.

  14. Aluminium induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated cell death in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line is independent of p53.

    PubMed

    Mustafa Rizvi, Syed Husain; Parveen, Arshiya; Verma, Anoop K; Ahmad, Iqbal; Arshad, Md; Mahdi, Abbas Ali

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium (Al) is the third most abundant element in the earth's crust and its compounds are used in the form of house hold utensils, medicines and in antiperspirant etc. Increasing number of evidences suggest the involvement of Al+3 ions in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Here, we have attempted to investigate the role of Al in endoplasmic reticulum stress and the regulation of p53 during neuronal apoptosis using neuroblastoma cell line. We observed that Al caused oxidative stress by increasing ROS production and intracellular calcium levels together with depletion of intracellular GSH levels. We also studied modulation of key pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and found significant alterations in the levels of Nrf2, NQO1, pAKT, p21, Bax, Bcl2, Aβ1-40 and Cyt c together with increase in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress related proteins like CHOP and caspase 12. However, with respect to the role of p53, we observed downregulation of its transcript as well as protein levels while analysis of its ubiquitination status revealed no significant changes. Not only did Al increase the activities of caspase 9, caspase 12 and caspase 3, but, by the use of peptide inhibitors of specific and pan-caspases, we observed significant protection against neuronal cell death upon inhibition of caspase 12, demonstrating the prominent role of endoplasmic reticulum stress generated responses in Al toxicity. Overall our findings suggest that Al induces ER stress and ROS generation which compromises the antioxidant defenses of neuronal cells thereby promoting neuronal apoptosis in p53 independent pathway.

  15. Aluminium Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mediated Cell Death in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cell Line Is Independent of p53

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa Rizvi, Syed Husain; Parveen, Arshiya; Verma, Anoop K.; Ahmad, Iqbal; Arshad, Md; Mahdi, Abbas Ali

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium (Al) is the third most abundant element in the earth’s crust and its compounds are used in the form of house hold utensils, medicines and in antiperspirant etc. Increasing number of evidences suggest the involvement of Al+3 ions in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease. Here, we have attempted to investigate the role of Al in endoplasmic reticulum stress and the regulation of p53 during neuronal apoptosis using neuroblastoma cell line. We observed that Al caused oxidative stress by increasing ROS production and intracellular calcium levels together with depletion of intracellular GSH levels. We also studied modulation of key pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and found significant alterations in the levels of Nrf2, NQO1, pAKT, p21, Bax, Bcl2, Aβ1-40 and Cyt c together with increase in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress related proteins like CHOP and caspase 12. However, with respect to the role of p53, we observed downregulation of its transcript as well as protein levels while analysis of its ubiquitination status revealed no significant changes. Not only did Al increase the activities of caspase 9, caspase 12 and caspase 3, but, by the use of peptide inhibitors of specific and pan-caspases, we observed significant protection against neuronal cell death upon inhibition of caspase 12, demonstrating the prominent role of endoplasmic reticulum stress generated responses in Al toxicity. Overall our findings suggest that Al induces ER stress and ROS generation which compromises the antioxidant defenses of neuronal cells thereby promoting neuronal apoptosis in p53 independent pathway. PMID:24878590

  16. Aluminium induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated cell death in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line is independent of p53.

    PubMed

    Mustafa Rizvi, Syed Husain; Parveen, Arshiya; Verma, Anoop K; Ahmad, Iqbal; Arshad, Md; Mahdi, Abbas Ali

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium (Al) is the third most abundant element in the earth's crust and its compounds are used in the form of house hold utensils, medicines and in antiperspirant etc. Increasing number of evidences suggest the involvement of Al+3 ions in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease. Here, we have attempted to investigate the role of Al in endoplasmic reticulum stress and the regulation of p53 during neuronal apoptosis using neuroblastoma cell line. We observed that Al caused oxidative stress by increasing ROS production and intracellular calcium levels together with depletion of intracellular GSH levels. We also studied modulation of key pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and found significant alterations in the levels of Nrf2, NQO1, pAKT, p21, Bax, Bcl2, Aβ1-40 and Cyt c together with increase in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress related proteins like CHOP and caspase 12. However, with respect to the role of p53, we observed downregulation of its transcript as well as protein levels while analysis of its ubiquitination status revealed no significant changes. Not only did Al increase the activities of caspase 9, caspase 12 and caspase 3, but, by the use of peptide inhibitors of specific and pan-caspases, we observed significant protection against neuronal cell death upon inhibition of caspase 12, demonstrating the prominent role of endoplasmic reticulum stress generated responses in Al toxicity. Overall our findings suggest that Al induces ER stress and ROS generation which compromises the antioxidant defenses of neuronal cells thereby promoting neuronal apoptosis in p53 independent pathway. PMID:24878590

  17. Sel1L is indispensable for mammalian endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation, endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis, and survival

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shengyi; Shi, Guojun; Han, Xuemei; Francisco, Adam B.; Ji, Yewei; Mendonça, Nuno; Liu, Xiaojing; Locasale, Jason W.; Simpson, Kenneth W.; Duhamel, Gerald E.; Kersten, Sander; Yates, John R.; Long, Qiaoming; Qi, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Suppressor/Enhancer of Lin-12-like (Sel1L) is an adaptor protein for the E3 ligase hydroxymethylglutaryl reductase degradation protein 1 (Hrd1) involved in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). Sel1L’s physiological importance in mammalian ERAD, however, remains to be established. Here, using the inducible Sel1L knockout mouse and cell models, we show that Sel1L is indispensable for Hrd1 stability, ER homeostasis, and survival. Acute loss of Sel1L leads to premature death in adult mice within 3 wk with profound pancreatic atrophy. Contrary to current belief, our data show that mammalian Sel1L is required for Hrd1 stability and ERAD function both in vitro and in vivo. Sel1L deficiency disturbs ER homeostasis, activates ER stress, attenuates translation, and promotes cell death. Serendipitously, using a biochemical approach coupled with mass spectrometry, we found that Sel1L deficiency causes the aggregation of both small and large ribosomal subunits. Thus, Sel1L is an indispensable component of the mammalian Hrd1 ERAD complex and ER homeostasis, which is essential for protein translation, pancreatic function, and cellular and organismal survival. PMID:24453213

  18. Reduced Endoplasmic Reticulum Luminal Calcium Links Saturated Fatty Acid-Mediated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Cell Death in Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yuren; Wang, Dong; Gentile, Christopher L.; Pagliassotti, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic exposure to elevated free fatty acids, in particular long chain saturated fatty acids, provokes endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and cell death in a number of cell types. The perturbations to the ER that instigate ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein in response to fatty acids in hepatocytes have not been identified. The present study employed H4IIE liver cells and primary rat hepatocytes to examine the hypothesis that saturated fatty acids induce ER stress via effects on ER luminal calcium stores. Exposure of H4IIE liver cells and primary hepatocytes to palmitate and stearate reduced thapsigargin-sensitive calcium stores and biochemical markers of ER stress over similar time courses (6h). These changes preceded cell death, which was only observed at later time points (16h). Co-incubation with oleate prevented the reduction in calcium stores, induction of ER stress markers and cell death observed in response to palmitate. Inclusion of calcium chelators, BAPTA-AM or EGTA, reduced palmitate- and stearate-mediated enrichment of cytochrome c in post-mitochondrial supernatant fractions and cell death. These data suggest that redistribution of ER luminal calcium contributes to long chain saturated fatty acid-mediated ER stress and cell death. PMID:19444596

  19. Mean flow scaling in transitionally-rough turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Michael P.; Flack, Karen A.

    2008-11-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the flow over several mildly-rough surfaces are presented. Three fine-grit sandpaper surfaces and two commercial ship bottom paints were tested over a large Reynolds number range (Reθ = 2,600 -- 30,000) in order to document the roughness function (δU^+) behavior in the transitionally-rough flow regime. In all cases the root-mean-square roughness height was a very small fraction of the boundary layer thickness (krms/δ<1/1,100). The results indicate that the mean velocity profiles for the rough surfaces agree with smooth-wall profiles using outer scaling. However, some significant differences in the behavior of δU^+ in the transitionally-rough flow regime are noted among the five rough surfaces. For example, the roughness functions for the sandpaper surfaces show reasonable agreement with the results of Nikuradse for uniform sand, while the paint surfaces do not. These results, along with others from the literature, will be used to illustrate how surface topography may give rise to the differences that are observed in roughness functions for the transitionally-rough regime.

  20. The abundances of neon, sulfur, and argon in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. C.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Aller, L. H.; Geballe, T. R.; Baas, F.

    1981-01-01

    New infrared observations of Ne II, Ar III, and S IV are used in optical observations of other ionization states of the considered elements to evaluate the abundances of neon, argon, and sulfur in 18 planetary nebulae. Attention is also given to one or more of the infrared lines in 18 other nebulae. It is pointed out that S IV was detected in approximately 90% of the observed objects, while Ar III was found in about 80%, and Ne II in roughly one-third. It is noted that optical observations typically include only a limited region of the nebula, while the infrared measurements frequently involve integration over the entire nebular image.

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: key promoter of rosacea pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2014-12-01

    Recent scientific interest in the pathogenesis of rosacea focuses on abnormally high facial skin levels of cathelicidin and the trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein 5 (KLK5) that cleaves the cathelicidin precursor protein into the bioactive fragment LL-37, which exerts crucial proinflammatory, angiogenic and antimicrobial activities. Furthermore, increased expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been identified in rosacea skin supporting the participation of the innate immune system. Notably, TLRs are expressed on sensory neurons and increase neuronal excitability linking TLR signalling to the transmission of neuroinflammatory responses. It is the intention of this viewpoint to present a unifying concept that links all known clinical trigger factors of rosacea such as UV irradiation, heat, skin irritants and special foods to one converging point: enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress via upregulation of transcription factor ATF4 increases TLR2 expression, resulting in enhanced production of cathelicidin and KLK5 mediating downstream proinflammatory, angiogenic and antimicrobial signalling. The presented concept identifies rosacea trigger factors as environmental stressors that enhance the skin's ER stress response. Exaggerated cutaneous ER stress that stimulates the TLR2-driven inflammatory response may involve sebocytes, keratinocytes, monocyte-macrophages and sensory cutaneous neurons. Finally, all antirosacea drugs are proposed to attenuate the ER stress signalling cascade at some point. Overstimulated ER stress signalling may have evolutionarily evolved as a compensatory mechanism to balance impaired vitamin D-driven LL-37-mediated antimicrobial defenses due to lower exposure of UV-B irradiation of the northern Celtic population. PMID:25047092

  2. Mitofusin 2 ablation increases endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling.

    PubMed

    Filadi, Riccardo; Greotti, Elisa; Turacchio, Gabriele; Luini, Alberto; Pozzan, Tullio; Pizzo, Paola

    2015-04-28

    The organization and mutual interactions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria modulate key aspects of cell pathophysiology. Several proteins have been suggested to be involved in keeping ER and mitochondria at a correct distance. Among them, in mammalian cells, mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), located on both the outer mitochondrial membrane and the ER surface, has been proposed to be a physical tether between the two organelles, forming homotypic interactions and heterocomplexes with its homolog Mfn1. Recently, this widely accepted model has been challenged using quantitative EM analysis. Using a multiplicity of morphological, biochemical, functional, and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that Mfn2 ablation increases the structural and functional ER-mitochondria coupling. In particular, we show that in different cell types Mfn2 ablation or silencing increases the close contacts between the two organelles and strengthens the efficacy of inositol trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca(2+) transfer from the ER to mitochondria, sensitizing cells to a mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload-dependent death. We also show that the previously reported discrepancy between electron and fluorescence microscopy data on ER-mitochondria proximity in Mfn2-ablated cells is only apparent. By using a different type of morphological analysis of fluorescent images that takes into account (and corrects for) the gross modifications in mitochondrial shape resulting from Mfn2 ablation, we demonstrate that an increased proximity between the organelles is also observed by confocal microscopy when Mfn2 levels are reduced. Based on these results, we propose a new model for ER-mitochondria juxtaposition in which Mfn2 works as a tethering antagonist preventing an excessive, potentially toxic, proximity between the two organelles.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: key promoter of rosacea pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2014-12-01

    Recent scientific interest in the pathogenesis of rosacea focuses on abnormally high facial skin levels of cathelicidin and the trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein 5 (KLK5) that cleaves the cathelicidin precursor protein into the bioactive fragment LL-37, which exerts crucial proinflammatory, angiogenic and antimicrobial activities. Furthermore, increased expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been identified in rosacea skin supporting the participation of the innate immune system. Notably, TLRs are expressed on sensory neurons and increase neuronal excitability linking TLR signalling to the transmission of neuroinflammatory responses. It is the intention of this viewpoint to present a unifying concept that links all known clinical trigger factors of rosacea such as UV irradiation, heat, skin irritants and special foods to one converging point: enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress via upregulation of transcription factor ATF4 increases TLR2 expression, resulting in enhanced production of cathelicidin and KLK5 mediating downstream proinflammatory, angiogenic and antimicrobial signalling. The presented concept identifies rosacea trigger factors as environmental stressors that enhance the skin's ER stress response. Exaggerated cutaneous ER stress that stimulates the TLR2-driven inflammatory response may involve sebocytes, keratinocytes, monocyte-macrophages and sensory cutaneous neurons. Finally, all antirosacea drugs are proposed to attenuate the ER stress signalling cascade at some point. Overstimulated ER stress signalling may have evolutionarily evolved as a compensatory mechanism to balance impaired vitamin D-driven LL-37-mediated antimicrobial defenses due to lower exposure of UV-B irradiation of the northern Celtic population.

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Reorganization Is Regulated by Ionic Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Varadarajan, Shankar; Bampton, Edward T. W.; Pellecchia, Maurizio; Dinsdale, David; Willars, Gary B.; Cohen, Gerald M.

    2013-01-01

    Recently we described a new, evolutionarily conserved cellular stress response characterized by a reversible reorganization of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes that is distinct from canonical ER stress and the unfolded protein response (UPR). Apogossypol, a putative broad spectrum BCL-2 family antagonist, was the prototype compound used to induce this ER membrane reorganization. Following microarray analysis of cells treated with apogossypol, we used connectivity mapping to identify a wide range of structurally diverse chemicals from different pharmacological classes and established their ability to induce ER membrane reorganization. Such structural diversity suggests that the mechanisms initiating ER membrane reorganization are also diverse and a major objective of the present study was to identify potentially common features of these mechanisms. In order to explore this, we used hierarchical clustering of transcription profiles for a number of chemicals that induce membrane reorganization and discovered two distinct clusters. One cluster contained chemicals with known effects on Ca2+ homeostasis. Support for this was provided by the findings that ER membrane reorganization was induced by agents that either deplete ER Ca2+ (thapsigargin) or cause an alteration in cellular Ca2+ handling (calmodulin antagonists). Furthermore, overexpression of the ER luminal Ca2+ sensor, STIM1, also evoked ER membrane reorganization. Although perturbation of Ca2+ homeostasis was clearly one mechanism by which some agents induced ER membrane reorganization, influx of extracellular Na+ but not Ca2+ was required for ER membrane reorganization induced by apogossypol and the related BCL-2 family antagonist, TW37, in both human and yeast cells. Not only is this novel, non-canonical ER stress response evolutionary conserved but so also are aspects of the mechanism of formation of ER membrane aggregates. Thus perturbation of ionic homeostasis is important in the regulation of ER

  5. Melatonin and endoplasmic reticulum stress: relation to autophagy and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Anna; Ordóñez, Raquel; Reiter, Russel J; González-Gallego, Javier; Mauriz, José L

    2015-10-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic organelle that participates in a number of cellular functions by controlling lipid metabolism, calcium stores, and proteostasis. Under stressful situations, the ER environment is compromised, and protein maturation is impaired; this causes misfolded proteins to accumulate and a characteristic stress response named unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR protects cells from stress and contributes to cellular homeostasis re-establishment; however, during prolonged ER stress, UPR activation promotes cell death. ER stressors can modulate autophagy which in turn, depending of the situation, induces cell survival or death. Interactions of different autophagy- and apoptosis-related proteins and also common signaling pathways have been found, suggesting an interplay between these cellular processes, although their dynamic features are still unknown. A number of pathologies including metabolic, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases, cancer, inflammation, and viral infections are associated with ER stress, leading to a growing interest in targeting components of the UPR as a therapeutic strategy. Melatonin has a variety of antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor effects. As such, it modulates apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells, neurodegeneration and the development of liver diseases as well as other pathologies. Here, we review the effects of melatonin on the main ER stress mechanisms, focusing on its ability to regulate the autophagic and apoptotic processes. As the number of studies that have analyzed ER stress modulation by this indole remains limited, further research is necessary for a better understanding of the crosstalk between ER stress, autophagy, and apoptosis and to clearly delineate the mechanisms by which melatonin modulates these responses.

  6. Cortisol promotes endoplasmic glucose production via pyridine nucleotide redox.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zengmin; Mick, Gail J; Xie, Rongrong; Wang, Xudong; Xie, Xuemei; Li, Guimei; McCormick, Kenneth L

    2016-04-01

    Both increased adrenal and peripheral cortisol production, the latter governed by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1), contribute to the maintenance of fasting blood glucose. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the pyridine nucleotide redox state (NADP/NADPH) is dictated by the concentration of glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and the coordinated activities of two enzymes, hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PDH) and 11β-HSD1. However, luminal G6P may similarly serve as a substrate for hepatic glucose-6-phophatase (G6Pase). A tacit belief is that the G6P pool in the ER is equally accessible to both H6PDH and G6Pase. Based on our inhibition studies and kinetic analysis in isolated rat liver microsomes, these two aforesaid luminal enzymes do share the G6P pool in the ER, but not equally. Based on the kinetic modeling of G6P flux, the ER transporter for G6P (T1) preferentially delivers this substrate to G6Pase; hence, the luminal enzymes do not share G6P equally. Moreover, cortisol, acting through 11β-HSD1, begets a more reduced pyridine redox ratio. By altering this luminal redox ratio, G6P flux through H6PDH is restrained, allowing more G6P for the competing enzyme G6Pase. And, at low G6P concentrations in the ER lumen, which occur during fasting, this acute cortisol-induced redox adjustment promotes glucose production. This reproducible cortisol-driven mechanism has been heretofore unrecognized. PMID:26860459

  7. mRNA Targeting to Endoplasmic Reticulum Precedes Ago Protein Interaction and MicroRNA (miRNA)-mediated Translation Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Barman, Bahnisikha; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) binds to the 3'-UTR of its target mRNAs to repress protein synthesis. Extensive research was done to understand the mechanism of miRNA-mediated repression in animal cells. Considering the progress in understanding the mechanism, information about the subcellular sites of miRNA-mediated repression is surprisingly limited. In this study, using an inducible expression system for an miRNA target message, we have delineated how a target mRNA passes through polysome association and Ago2 interaction steps on rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before the miRNA-mediated repression sets in. From this study, de novo formed target mRNA localization to the ER-bound polysomes manifested as the earliest event, which is followed by Ago2 micro-ribonucleoprotein binding, and translation repression of target message. Compartmentalization of this process to rough ER membrane ensures enrichment of miRNA-targeted messages and micro-ribonucleoprotein components on ER upon reaching a steady state. PMID:26304123

  8. mRNA Targeting to Endoplasmic Reticulum Precedes Ago Protein Interaction and MicroRNA (miRNA)-mediated Translation Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Barman, Bahnisikha; Bhattacharyya, Suvendra N

    2015-10-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) binds to the 3'-UTR of its target mRNAs to repress protein synthesis. Extensive research was done to understand the mechanism of miRNA-mediated repression in animal cells. Considering the progress in understanding the mechanism, information about the subcellular sites of miRNA-mediated repression is surprisingly limited. In this study, using an inducible expression system for an miRNA target message, we have delineated how a target mRNA passes through polysome association and Ago2 interaction steps on rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before the miRNA-mediated repression sets in. From this study, de novo formed target mRNA localization to the ER-bound polysomes manifested as the earliest event, which is followed by Ago2 micro-ribonucleoprotein binding, and translation repression of target message. Compartmentalization of this process to rough ER membrane ensures enrichment of miRNA-targeted messages and micro-ribonucleoprotein components on ER upon reaching a steady state.

  9. Rough surface mitigates electron and gas emission

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A

    2004-09-03

    Heavy-ion beams impinging on surfaces near grazing incidence (to simulate the loss of halo ions) generate copious amounts of electrons and gas that can degrade the beam. We measured emission coefficients of {eta}{sub e} {le} 130 and {eta}{sub 0} {approx} 10{sup 4} respectively, with 1 MeV K{sup +} incident on stainless steel. Electron emission scales as {eta}{sub e} {proportional_to} 1/cos({theta}), where {theta} is the ion angle of incidence relative to normal. If we were to roughen a surface by blasting it with glass beads, then ions that were near grazing incidence (90{sup o}) on smooth surface would strike the rims of the micro-craters at angles closer to normal incidence. This should reduce the electron emission: the factor of 10 reduction, Fig. 1(a), implies an average angle of incidence of 62{sup o}. Gas desorption varies more slowly with {theta} (Fig. 1(b)) decreasing a factor of {approx}2, and along with the electron emission is independent of the angle of incidence on a rough surface. In a quadrupole magnet, electrons emitted by lost primary ions are trapped near the wall by the magnetic field, but grazing incidence ions can backscatter and strike the wall a second time at an azimuth where magnetic field lines intercept the beam. Then, electrons can exist throughout the beam (see the simulations of Cohen, HIF News 1-2/04). The SRIM (TRIM) Monte Carlo code predicts that 60-70% of 1 MeV K{sup +} ions backscatter when incident at 88-89{sup o} from normal on a smooth surface. The scattered ions are mostly within {approx}10{sup o} of the initial direction but a few scatter by up to 90{sup o}. Ion scattering decreases rapidly away from grazing incidence, Fig. 1(c ). At 62 deg. the predicted ion backscattering (from a rough surface) is 3%, down a factor of 20 from the peak, which should significantly reduce electrons in the beam from lost halo ions. These results are published in Phys. Rev. ST - Accelerators and Beams.

  10. Molecular characterisation of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase of Porcellio scaber and its expression in sternal epithelia during the moult cycle.

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, Monica; Weihrauch, Dirk; Towle, David W; Ziegler, Andreas

    2003-07-01

    The anterior sternal epithelial cells of the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber transport large amounts of calcium during the formation and resorption of intermittent calcium carbonate deposits. Recent investigations on epithelia involved in mineralisation processes suggest a role of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) in transcellular calcium transport. We present the first molecular characterisation of a SERCA within a crustacean mineralising epithelium. We cloned the SERCA from a cDNA library of the anterior sternal epithelium and used in situ hybridisation to compare the expression of the SERCA mRNA between three different moulting stages. The full-length SERCA cDNA has an open reading frame of 3006 nucleotides. The deduced 1002 amino-acid polypeptide has a predicted molecular mass of 109.7 kDa and 87% identity to the SERCA of Procambarus clarkii axial muscle isoform. In situ hybridisation confirmed expression within the anterior sternal epithelium and revealed an increase in SERCA mRNA abundance from the non-transporting, early premoult stage to the calcium transporting, late premoult and intramoult stage. The results support previous indications of a contribution by the smooth endoplasmic reticulum to transcellular calcium transport and suggest a transcriptional regulation of SERCA activity.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) trims MHC class I-presented peptides in vivo and plays an important role in immunodominance.

    PubMed

    York, Ian A; Brehm, Michael A; Zendzian, Sophia; Towne, Charles F; Rock, Kenneth L

    2006-06-13

    CD8(+) T cells respond to short peptides bound to MHC class I molecules. Although most antigenic proteins contain many sequences that could bind to MHC class I, few of these peptides actually stimulate CD8(+) T cell responses. Moreover, the T cell responses that are generated often follow a very reproducible hierarchy to different peptides for reasons that are poorly understood. We find that the loss of a single enzyme, endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1), in the antigen-processing pathway results in a marked shift in the hierarchy of immunodominance in viral infections, even when the responding T cells have the same T cell receptor repertoire. In mice, ERAP1 is the major enzyme that trims precursor peptides in the endoplasmic reticulum and, in this process, can generate or destroy antigenic peptides. Consequently, when ERAP1 is lost, the immune response to some viral peptides is reduced, to others increased, and to yet others unchanged. Therefore, many epitopes must be initially generated as precursors that are normally trimmed by ERAP1 before binding to MHC class I, whereas others are normally degraded by ERAP1 to lengths that are too short to bind to MHC class I. Moreover, peptide trimming and the resulting abundance of peptide-MHC complexes are dominant factors in establishing immunodominance.

  12. Extreme ultraviolet mask substrate surface roughness effects on lithography patterning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi; Naulleau, Patrick; Salmassi, Farhad; Mochi, Iacopo; Gullikson, Eric; Goldberg, Kenneth; Anderson, Erik

    2010-06-21

    In extreme ultraviolet lithography exposure systems, mask substrate roughness induced scatter contributes to LER at the image plane. In this paper, the impact of mask substrate roughness on image plane speckle is explicitly evaluated. A programmed roughness mask was used to study the correlation between mask roughness metrics and wafer plane aerial image inspection. We find that the roughness measurements by top surface topography profile do not provide complete information on the scatter related speckle that leads to LER at the image plane. We suggest at wavelength characterization by imaging and/or scatter measurements into different frequencies as an alternative for a more comprehensive metrology of the mask substrate/multilayer roughness effects.

  13. Global Distribution of Microbial Abundance and Biomass in Subseafloor Sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallmeyer, J.; Pockalny, R. A.; Adhikari, R. R.; Smith, D. C.; D'Hondt, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Previously published cell counts were mostly from ocean margins and the eastern equatorial Pacific. Cell counts from these environments are generally similar from site to site and decrease logarithmically with sediment depth, although there can be sharp peaks of high cell densities in zones of anaerobic methane-oxidation. Recent counts from the South Pacific Gyre and the North Pacific Gyre are several orders of magnitude lower and show a more rapid decrease with depth than all previously published datasets. With these new data available, total microbial cell abundance in subseafloor sediment varies between sites by ca. five orders of magnitude. The differences between cell counts from ocean margins and upwelling areas and cell counts from oceanic gyres raise three questions. First, how does the abundance of microbes in subseafloor sediment vary throughout the world ocean? Second, what property or properties are likely to control that variation? Third, how does this variation affect estimates of total subseafloor sedimentary biomass and Earth's total biomass? To address these questions, we compiled our cell counts from the South Pacific Gyre, the North Pacific Gyre and the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean with previously published counts and parameterized the cell distribution at each site and determined two parameters, (i) cell concentration at 1 mbsf and (ii) rate of decrease in cell counts with depth. Both parameters are strongly correlated with mean sedimentation rate and distance to shore. Based on these correlations, we estimate global subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance to be 2.9*1029 cells (corresponding to 4.1 Pg C and ~0.6% of Earth's total living biomass). This estimate of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance is roughly equal to previous estimates of total microbial abundance in seawater and total microbial abundance in soil. It is much lower than previous estimates of subseafloor sedimentary microbial abundance. In consequence, we estimate

  14. Incorporating Skew into RMS Surface Roughness Probability Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stahl, Mark T.; Stahl, H. Philip.

    2013-01-01

    The standard treatment of RMS surface roughness data is the application of a Gaussian probability distribution. This handling of surface roughness ignores the skew present in the surface and overestimates the most probable RMS of the surface, the mode. Using experimental data we confirm the Gaussian distribution overestimates the mode and application of an asymmetric distribution provides a better fit. Implementing the proposed asymmetric distribution into the optical manufacturing process would reduce the polishing time required to meet surface roughness specifications.

  15. Alternatively spliced forms of the P180 ribosome receptor differ in their ability to induce the proliferation of rough endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ji-Zhong; Leung, Euphemia; Holloway, Hilary; Krissansen, Geoffrey W

    2008-05-01

    Expression of the canine 180-kDa ribosome receptor p180 in yeast induces the synthesis of RER, and increases the mRNAs of secretory pathway proteins, and protein secretion. To assess whether p180 is a master regulator of cell secretion in mammalian cells, we stably expressed red fluorescent forms of the human p180 variants p180DeltaR (no tandem repeats), p180R (26 repeats), and full-length p180FR (54 repeats) containing different lengths of the tandem repeat ribosome-binding domain in rat pancreatic RINm5F islet beta-cells. All three fluorescent p180 variants localized exclusively to the RER. Cells transfected with p180R were filled with ribosome-studded karmellae, whereas p180DeltaR and p180FR transfectants contained only increased amounts of mostly smooth ER. Unlike in yeast, over-expression of p180R failed to increase the secretory pathway proteins calnexin, SEC61beta, and calreticulin, or ribosome biogenesis. The data suggest that alternative splicing of the p180 tandem repeat domain is a means of regulating the ribosome-binding activity of p180, and potentially the secretory activity of the cell. However, p180 is not a master regulator of mammalian cell secretion as it does not concomitantly trigger the synthesis of protein machinery required to enhance protein synthesis and cell secretion. PMID:18083570

  16. Intrusion detection using rough set classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lian-hua; Zhang, Guan-hua; Zhang, Jie; Bai, Ying-cai

    2004-09-01

    Recently machine learning-based intrusion detection approaches have been subjected to extensive researches because they can detect both misuse and anomaly. In this paper, rough set classification (RSC), a modern learning algorithm, is used to rank the features extracted for detecting intrusions and generate intrusion detection models. Feature ranking is a very critical step when building the model. RSC performs feature ranking before generating rules, and converts the feature ranking to minimal hitting set problem addressed by using genetic algorithm (GA). This is done in classical approaches using Support Vector Machine (SVM) by executing many iterations, each of which removes one useless feature. Compared with those methods, our method can avoid many iterations. In addition, a hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed to increase the convergence speed and decrease the training time of RSC. The models generated by RSC take the form of "IF-THEN" rules, which have the advantage of explication. Tests and comparison of RSC with SVM on DARPA benchmark data showed that for Probe and DoS attacks both RSC and SVM yielded highly accurate results (greater than 99% accuracy on testing set).

  17. Adhesive contact of randomly rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastewka, Lars; Robbins, Mark

    2012-02-01

    The contact area, stiffness and adhesion between rigid, randomly rough surfaces and elastic substrates is studied using molecular statics and continuum simulations. The surfaces are self-affine with Hurst exponent 0.3 to 0.8 and different short λs and long λL wavelength cutoffs. The rms surface slope and the range and strength of the adhesive potential are also varied. For parameters typical of most solids, the effect of adhesion decreases as the ratio λL/λs increases. In particular, the pull-off force decreases to zero and the area of contact Ac becomes linear in the applied load L. A simple scaling argument is developed that describes the increase in the ratio Ac/L with increasing adhesion and a corresponding increase in the contact stiffness [1]. The argument also predicts a crossover to finite contact area at zero load when surfaces are exceptionally smooth or the ratio of surface tension to bulk modulus is unusually large, as for elastomers. Results that test this prediction will be presented and related to the Maugis-Dugdale [2] theories for individual asperities and the more recent scaling theory of Persson [3]. [1] Akarapu, Sharp, Robbins, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 204301 (2011) [2] Maugis, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 150, 243 (1992) [3] Persson, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 75420 (2006)

  18. Neurons sense nanoscale roughness with nanometer sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, V; Maiorano, G; Rizzello, L; Sorce, B; Sabella, S; Cingolani, R; Pompa, P P

    2010-04-01

    The interaction between cells and nanostructured materials is attracting increasing interest, because of the possibility to open up novel concepts for the design of smart nanobiomaterials with active biological functionalities. In this frame we investigated the response of human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) to gold surfaces with different levels of nanoroughness. To achieve a precise control of the nanoroughness with nanometer resolution, we exploited a wet chemistry approach based on spontaneous galvanic displacement reaction. We demonstrated that neurons sense and actively respond to the surface nanotopography, with a surprising sensitivity to variations of few nanometers. We showed that focal adhesion complexes, which allow cellular sensing, are strongly affected by nanostructured surfaces, leading to a marked decrease in cell adhesion. Moreover, cells adherent on nanorough surfaces exhibit loss of neuron polarity, Golgi apparatus fragmentation, nuclear condensation, and actin cytoskeleton that is not functionally organized. Apoptosis/necrosis assays established that nanoscale features induce cell death by necrosis, with a trend directly related to roughness values. Finally, by seeding SH-SY5Y cells onto micropatterned flat and nanorough gold surfaces, we demonstrated the possibility to realize substrates with cytophilic or cytophobic behavior, simply by fine-tuning their surface topography at nanometer scale. Specific and functional adhesion of cells occurred only onto flat gold stripes, with a clear self-alignment of neurons, delivering a simple and elegant approach for the design and development of biomaterials with precise nanostructure-triggered biological responses.

  19. Terahertz NDE for Metallic Surface Roughness Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madaras, Eric I.; Anastasi, Robert F.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic surface roughness in a nominally smooth surface is a potential indication of material degradation or damage. When the surface is coated or covered with an opaque dielectric material, such as paint or insulation, then inspecting for surface changes becomes almost impossible. Terahertz NDE is a method capable of penetrating the coating and inspecting the metallic surface. The terahertz frequency regime is between 100 GHz and 10 THz and has a free space wavelength of 300 micrometers at 1 THz. Pulsed terahertz radiation, can be generated and detected using optical excitation of biased semiconductors with femtosecond laser pulses. The resulting time domain signal is 320 picoseconds in duration. In this application, samples are inspected with a commercial terahertz NDE system that scans the sample and generates a set of time-domain signals that are a function of the backscatter from the metallic surface. Post processing is then performed in the time and frequency domains to generate C-scan type images that show scattering effects due to surface non-uniformity.

  20. Endoplasmic filaments generate the motive force for rotational streaming in Nitella.

    PubMed

    Allen, N S

    1974-10-01

    The streaming endoplasm of characean cells has been shown to contain previously unreported endoplasmic filaments along which bending waves are observed under the light microscope using special techniques. The bending waves are similar to those propagated along sperm tails causing propulsion of sperm. In Nitella there is reason to believe that nearly all of the filaments are anchored in the cortex and that their beating propels the endoplasm in which they are suspended. This hypothesis is supported by calculations in which typical and average wave parameters have been inserted into the classical hydrodynamic equations derived for sperm tail bending waves. These calculations come within an order of magnitude of predicting the velocity of streaming and they show that waves of the character described, propagated along an estimated 52 m of endoplasmic filaments per cell, must generate a total motive force per cell within less than an order of magnitude of the forces measured experimentally by others. If we assume that undulating filaments produce the force driving the endoplasm, then the method described for measuring the motive force could lead to a lower than actual value for the motive force, since both centrifugation and vacuolar perfusion would reverse the orientation of some filaments. Observations of the initiation of particle translation in association with the filaments suggest that particle transport and wave propagation, which occur at the same velocity, may both be dependent on the same process. The possibility that some form of contractility provides the motive force for filament flection and particle transport is discussed.

  1. ENDOPLASMIC FILAMENTS GENERATE THE MOTIVE FORCE FOR ROTATIONAL STREAMING IN NITELLA

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Nina Strömgren

    1974-01-01

    The streaming endoplasm of characean cells has been shown to contain previously unreported endoplasmic filaments along which bending waves are observed under the light microscope using special techniques. The bending waves are similar to those propagated along sperm tails causing propulsion of sperm. In Nitella there is reason to believe that nearly all of the filaments are anchored in the cortex and that their beating propels the endoplasm in which they are suspended. This hypothesis is supported by calculations in which typical and average wave parameters have been inserted into the classical hydrodynamic equations derived for sperm tail bending waves. These calculations come within an order of magnitude of predicting the velocity of streaming and they show that waves of the character described, propagated along an estimated 52 m of endoplasmic filaments per cell, must generate a total motive force per cell within less than an order of magnitude of the forces measured experimentally by others. If we assume that undulating filaments produce the force driving the endoplasm, then the method described for measuring the motive force could lead to a lower than actual value for the motive force, since both centrifugation and vacuolar perfusion would reverse the orientation of some filaments. Observations of the initiation of particle translation in association with the filaments suggest that particle transport and wave propagation, which occur at the same velocity, may both be dependent on the same process. The possibility that some form of contractility provides the motive force for filament flection and particle transport is discussed. PMID:4608919

  2. Mineral Abundance Near Aristarchus Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Alison; Storrs, A.

    2007-12-01

    Mineral Abundance Near Aristarchus Crater Alison Bradford and Alex Storrs Towson University We analyze Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images to determine the abundance of minerals near Aristarchus crater. Following the calibration of Robinson et al. (2007) we present ratio maps of images obtained in August of 2005 showing the abundance of TiO2 and other minerals in this interesting area in the middle of Oceanus Procellarum. A prominent cleft (Schroter's Valley, presumably a collapsed lava tube) makes this region of special interest for analyzing the formation of mare basalts. Reference: Robinson, M.S., et al. (2007): "High resolution mapping of TiO2 abundances on the Moon using the Hubble Space Telescope", GRL 34, L13203

  3. The boron abundance of Procyon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemke, Michael; Lambert, David L.; Edvardsson, Bengt

    1993-01-01

    The B I 2496.8 A resonance line and HST/GHRS echelle spectra are used with model atmospheres and synthetic spectra to derive the B abundance of the F dwarfs Procyon (Alpha Canis Minoris), Theta Ursae Majoris, and Iota Pegasi. The B abundance of Theta UMa and Iota Peg is similar to that derived by Boesgaard and Heacox (1978) from the B II resonance line in spectra of A- and B-type stars. These two dwarfs show normal abundances of Li, Be, and B. Procyon, which is highly depleted in Li and Be, is depleted in B by a factor of at least 3. Comparison of the spectra of Procyon and the halo dwarf HD 140283 shows that the B abundance assigned by Duncan et al. (1992) to three halo dwarfs is not greatly overestimated as a result of contamination of the B I line by an unidentified line.

  4. The deadly connection between endoplasmic reticulum, Ca2+, protein synthesis, and the endoplasmic reticulum stress response in malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Guyla G.; White, Misti C.; Wu, Jian-He; Vallejo, Matthew; Grimaldi, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Background The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is involved in Ca2+ signaling and protein processing. Accumulation of unfolded proteins following ER Ca2+ depletion triggers the ER stress response (ERSR), which facilitates protein folding and removal of damaged proteins and can induce cell death. Unfolded proteins bind to chaperones, such as the glucose-regulated protein (GRP)78 and cause the release of GRP78-repressed proteins executing ERSR. Methods Several glioma cell lines and primary astrocytes were used to analyze ERSR using standard western blots, reverse transcription–PCR, viability assays, and single cell Ca2+ imaging. Results ERSR induction with thapsigargin results in a more intense ERSR associated with a larger loss of ER Ca2+, activation of ER-associated caspases (4/12) and caspase 3, and a higher rate of malignant glioma cell death than in normal glial cells. Malignant glioma cells have higher levels of protein synthesis and expression of the translocon (a component of the ribosomal complex, guiding protein entry in the ER), the activity of which is associated with the loss of ER Ca2+. Our experiments confirm increased expression of the translocon in malignant glioma cells. In addition, blockade of the ribosome-translocon complex with agents differently affecting translocon Ca2+ permeability causes opposite effects on ERSR deployment and death of malignant glioma cells. Conclusions Excessive ER Ca2+ loss due to translocon activity appears to be responsible for the enhancement of ERSR, leading to the death of glioma cells. The results reveal a characteristic of malignant glioma cells that could be exploited to develop new therapeutic strategies to treat incurable glial malignancies. PMID:24569545

  5. Scattering from rough thin films: discrete-dipole-approximation simulations.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Hannu; Lumme, Kari

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the wave-optical light scattering properties of deformed thin circular films of constant thickness using the discrete-dipole approximation. Effects on the intensity distribution of the scattered light due to different statistical roughness models, model dependent roughness parameters, and uncorrelated, random, small-scale porosity of the inhomogeneous medium are studied. The suitability of the discrete-dipole approximation for rough-surface scattering problems is evaluated by considering thin films as computationally feasible rough-surface analogs. The effects due to small-scale inhomogeneity of the scattering medium are compared with the analytic approximation by Maxwell Garnett, and the results are found to agree with the approximation.

  6. Roughness suppression via rapid current modulation on an Atom chip.

    PubMed

    Trebbia, J-B; Garrido Alzar, C L; Cornelussen, R; Westbrook, C I; Bouchoule, I

    2007-06-29

    We present a method to suppress the roughness of the potential of a wire-based, magnetic atom guide: modulating the wire current at a few tens of kHz, the potential roughness, which is proportional to the wire current, averages to zero. Using ultracold 87Rb clouds, we show experimentally that modulation reduces the roughness by at least a factor five without measurable heating or atom loss. This roughness suppression results in a dramatic reduction of the damping of center-of-mass oscillations.

  7. A Statistical Study for Optimum Surface Roughness and Engraving Depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasman, Şefika; Saklakoǧlu, I. Etem

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of scan times on surface roughness and engraving depth an experimental design was implemented to AISI H13 tool steed workpiece using fiber laser. For this purpose, an experimental design plan was constituted using full factorial design and results were evaluated for surface roughness and engraving depth. The results showed that the scan times and the scan speed significantly affect both surface roughness and engraving depth. In order to characterize the surface roughness and engraving depth, two linear regression models were constituted.

  8. Heat Transfer Variation on Protuberances and Surface Roughness Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Robert C.; Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine the effect of surface irregularities on local convective heat transfer, the variation in heat transfer coefficients on small (2-6 mm diam) hemispherical roughness elements on a flat plate has been studied in a wind funnel using IR techniques. Heat transfer enhancement was observed to vary over the roughness elements with the maximum heat transfer on the upstream face. This heat transfer enhancement increased strongly with roughness size and velocity when there was a laminar boundary layer on the plate. For a turbulent boundary layer, the heat transfer enhancement was relatively constant with velocity, but did increase with element size. When multiple roughness elements were studied, no influence of adjacent roughness elements on heat transfer was observed if the roughness separation was greater than approximately one roughness element radius. As roughness separation was reduced, less variation in heat transfer was observed on the downstream elements. Implications of the observed roughness enhanced heat transfer on ice accretion modeling are discussed.

  9. Prediction of Frictional Drag over Rough Walls using Surface Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flack, Karen; Schultz, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Although the frictional drag of rough-wall-bounded flows has been studied extensively, several practical questions remain largely unresolved. First, the relationship between the shape of the roughness function in transitionally-rough regime and the surface topography which gives rise to it are not well understood. Second, it is not completely clear which textural parameters best describe a rough surface in a hydraulic sense. Furthermore, the range of roughness wavelengths that influence the skin-friction is not well established. The focus of the present work is to attempt to address these questions with a systematic study of the skin-friction of fifteen rough surfaces that were generated by grit blasting. The hydrodynamic tests were carried out over a large Reynolds number range. Five surfaces were prepared by grit blasting with a single scale blast media. These underwent hydrodynamic testing and were subsequently blasted with secondary and tertiary scale media in order to investigate the role that the incorporation of additional roughness length scales plays in determining the shape of the roughness function and the resulting hydraulic length scale. The presentation will focus on the appropriate statistical scales for prediction of the roughness function. Spatial filtering prior to the calculation of surface statistics will also be discussed. Work supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  10. Dynamic evolution of interface roughness during friction and wear processes.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, K J; Bigerelle, M; Mathia, T G; Dubois, A; Dubar, L

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic evolution of surface roughness and influence of initial roughness (S(a) = 0.282-6.73 µm) during friction and wear processes has been analyzed experimentally. The mirror polished and rough surfaces (28 samples in total) have been prepared by surface polishing on Ti-6Al-4V and AISI 1045 samples. Friction and wear have been tested in classical sphere/plane configuration using linear reciprocating tribometer with very small displacement from 130 to 200 µm. After an initial period of rapid degradation, dynamic evolution of surface roughness converges to certain level specific to a given tribosystem. However, roughness at such dynamic interface is still increasing and analysis of initial roughness influence revealed that to certain extent, a rheology effect of interface can be observed and dynamic evolution of roughness will depend on initial condition and history of interface roughness evolution. Multiscale analysis shows that morphology created in wear process is composed from nano, micro, and macro scale roughness. Therefore, mechanical parts working under very severe contact conditions, like rotor/blade contact, screws, clutch, etc. with poor initial surface finishing are susceptible to have much shorter lifetime than a quality finished parts. PMID:23440686

  11. A plasma membrane-type Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase of 120 kilodaltons on the endoplasmic reticulum from carrot (Daucus carota) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.H.; Ratterman, D.M.; Sze, H. )

    1993-06-01

    Cytosolic Ca[sup 2+] levels are regulated in part by Ca[sup 2+]-pumping ATPases that export Ca[sup 2+] from the cytoplasm; The types and properties of Ca[sup 2+] pumps in plants are not well understood. The kinetic properties of a 120-kD phosphoenzyme (PE) intermediate formed during the reaction cycle of a Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase from suspension-cultured carrot (Daucus carota) cells are characterized. Only one Ca[sup 2+]-dependent phosphoprotein was formed when carrot membrane vesicles were incubated with [[gamma]-[sup 32]P]ATP. Formation of this 120-kD phosphoprotein was inhibited by vanadate, enhanced by La[sup 3+], and decreased by hydroxylamine, confirming its identification as an intermediate of a phosphorylated-type Ca[sup 2+]-translocating ATPase. The 120-kD Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase was most abundant in endoplasmic reticulum-enriched fractions, in which the Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase was estimated to be 0.1% of membrane protein. Direct quantitation of Ca[sup 2+]-dependent phosphoprotein was used to examine the kinetics of PE formation. PE formation exhibited a K[sub m] for Ca[sup 2+] of 1 to 2 [mu]m and a K[sub m] for ATP of 67 nm. Relative affinities of substrates, determined by competition experiments, were 0.075 [mu]m for ATP, 1 [mu]m for ADP, 100 [mu]m for ITP, and 250 [mu]m for GTP. Thapsigargin and cyclopiazonic acid, specific inhibitors of animal sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase, had no effect on PE formation; erythrosin B inhibited with 50% inhibition at <0.1 [mu]m. Calmodulin (1 [mu]m) stimulated PE formation by 25%. The results indicate that the carrot 120-kD Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase is similar but not identical to animal plasma membrane-type Ca[sup 2+]-ATPase and yet is located on endomembranes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum. This type of Ca[sup 2+] pump may reside on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum, thought to play a major role in anchoring the cytoskeleton and in facilitating secretion. 34 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Influence of Nanoscale Surface Roughness on Colloidal Force Measurements.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Jayasuriya, Sunil; Manke, Charles W; Mao, Guangzhao

    2015-09-29

    Forces between colloidal particles determine the performances of many industrial processes and products. Colloidal force measurements conducted between a colloidal particle AFM probe and particles immobilized on a flat substrate are valuable in selecting appropriate surfactants for colloidal stabilization. One of the features of inorganic fillers and extenders is the prevalence of rough surfaces-even the polymer latex particles, often used as model colloidal systems including the current study, have rough surfaces albeit at a much smaller scale. Surface roughness is frequently cited as the reason for disparity between experimental observations and theoretical treatment but seldom verified by direct evidence. This work reports the effect of nanoscale surface roughness on colloidal force measurements carried out in the presence of surfactants. We applied a heating method to reduce the mean surface roughness of commercial latex particles from 30 to 1 nm. We conducted force measurements using the two types of particles at various salt and surfactant concentrations. The surfactants used were pentaethylene glycol monododecyl ether, Pluronic F108, and a styrene/acrylic copolymer, Joncryl 60. In the absence of the surfactant, nanometer surface roughness affects colloidal forces only in high salt conditions when the Debye length becomes smaller than the surface roughness. The adhesion is stronger between colloids with higher surface roughness and requires a higher surfactant concentration to be eliminated. The effect of surface roughness on colloidal forces was also investigated as a function of the adsorbed surfactant layer structure characterized by AFM indentation and dynamic light scattering. We found that when the layer thickness exceeds the surface roughness, the colloidal adhesion is less influenced by surfactant concentration variation. This study demonstrates that surface roughness at the nanoscale can influence colloidal forces significantly and should be taken

  13. The Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2016-02-01

    Pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is a complex process involving several metabolic and signalling pathways. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that endoplasmic reticulum stress and associated apoptosis can be induced in the pathological conditions of atherosclerotic lesions and contribute to the disease progression. Notably, they may play a role in the development of vulnerable plaques that induce thrombosis and are therefore especially dangerous. Endoplasmic reticulum stress response is regulated by several signaling mechanisms that involve protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these molecules can be regarded as potential therapeutic targets to improve treatment of atherosclerosis. In this review we will discuss the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in atherosclerosis development in different cell types and summarize the current knowledge on potential therapeutic agents targeting molecules regulating these pathways and their possible use for anti-atherosclerotic therapy.

  14. Deubiquitination, a new player in Golgi to endoplasmic reticulum retrograde transport.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mickaël; Stutz, Françoise; Dargemont, Catherine

    2003-12-26

    Modification by ubiquitin plays a major role in a broad array of cellular functions. Although reversal of this process, deubiquitination, likely represents an important regulatory step contributing to cellular homeostasis, functions of deubiquitination enzymes still remain poorly characterized. We have previously shown that the ubiquitin protease Ubp3p requires a co-factor, Bre5p, to specifically deubiquitinate the coat protein complex II (COPII) subunit Sec23p, which is involved in anterograde transport between endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi compartments. In the present report, we show that disruption of BRE5 gene also led to a defect in the retrograde transport from the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum. Further analysis indicate that the COPI subunit beta'-COP represents another substrate of the Ubp3p.Bre5p complex. All together, our results indicate that the Ubp3p.Bre5p deubiquitination complex co-regulates anterograde and retrograde transports between endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi compartments.

  15. [Role of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions in intracellular calcium homeostasis and cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Jia, Hang-Huan; Xu, Man; Yu, Xiao-Jiang; Liu, Long-Zhu; Zang, Wei-Jin

    2016-08-25

    Calcium overload is one of the important mechanisms of cardiovascular disease. Endoplasmic reticulum is an important organelle which regulates intracellular calcium homeostasis by uptake, storage and mobilization of calcium. So it plays a critical role in regulation of intracellular calcium homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum, which is widely distributed in cytoplasm, has a large number of membrane junction sites. Recent studies have reported that these junction sites are distributed on plasma membrane and organelle membranes (mitochondria, lysosomes, Golgi apparatus, etc.), separately. They could form complexes to regulate calcium transport. In this review, we briefly outlined the recent research progresses of endoplasmic reticulum-plasma membrane junctions in intracellular calcium homeostasis and cardiovascular disease, which may offer a new strategy for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:27546511

  16. The Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is a complex process involving several metabolic and signalling pathways. Accumulating evidence demonstrates that endoplasmic reticulum stress and associated apoptosis can be induced in the pathological conditions of atherosclerotic lesions and contribute to the disease progression. Notably, they may play a role in the development of vulnerable plaques that induce thrombosis and are therefore especially dangerous. Endoplasmic reticulum stress response is regulated by several signaling mechanisms that involve protein kinases and transcription factors. Some of these molecules can be regarded as potential therapeutic targets to improve treatment of atherosclerosis. In this review we will discuss the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in atherosclerosis development in different cell types and summarize the current knowledge on potential therapeutic agents targeting molecules regulating these pathways and their possible use for anti-atherosclerotic therapy. PMID:26840309

  17. Oxidative Stress Induces Monocyte Necrosis with Enrichment of Cell-Bound Albumin and Overexpression of Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondrial Chaperones

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Haiping; Tian, Enbing; Liu, Chongdong; Wang, Qingtao; Deng, Haiteng

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, monocytes were treated with 5-azacytidine (azacytidine), gossypol or hydrogen peroxide to induce cell death through oxidative stress. A shift from apoptotic to necrotic cell death occurred when monocytes were treated with 100 µM azacytidine for more than 12 hours. Necrotic monocytes exhibited characteristics, including enrichment of cell-bound albumin and up-regulation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)- and mitochondrial-specific chaperones to protect mitochondrial integrity, which were not observed in other necrotic cells, including HUH-7, A2780, A549 and HOC1a. Our results show that the cell-bound albumin originates in the culture medium rather than from monocyte-derived hepatocytes, and that HSP60 is a potential binding partner of the cell-bound albumin. Proteomic analysis shows that HSP60 and protein disulfide isomerase are the most abundant up-regulated mitochondrial and ER-chaperones, and that both HSP60 and calreticulin are ubiquitinated in necrotic monocytes. In contrast, expression levels of the cytosolic chaperones HSP90 and HSP71 were down-regulated in the azacytidine-treated monocytes, concomitant with an increase in the levels of these chaperones in the cell culture medium. Collectively, our results demonstrates that chaperones from different organelles behave differently in necrotic monocytes, ER- and mitochondrial chaperones being retained and cytosolic and nuclear chaperones being released into the cell culture medium through the ruptured cell membrane. HSP60 may serve as a new target for development of myeloid leukemia treatment. PMID:23555724

  18. Oxidized lipids activate autophagy in a JNK-dependent manner by stimulating the endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    PubMed

    Haberzettl, Petra; Hill, Bradford G

    2013-01-01

    Excessive production of unsaturated aldehydes from oxidized lipoproteins and membrane lipids is a characteristic feature of cardiovascular disease. Our previous studies show that unsaturated lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes such as 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE) promote autophagy in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMC). In this study, we examined the mechanism by which HNE induces autophagy. Exposure of RASMC to HNE led to the modification of several proteins, most of which were identified by mass spectrometry and confocal microscopy to be localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). HNE stimulated the phosphorylation of PKR-like ER kinase and eukaryotic initiation factor 2α and increased heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) abundance. HNE treatment also increased LC3-II formation and the phosphorylation of JNK and p38. Pharmacological inhibition of JNK, but not p38, prevented HNE-induced HO-1 expression and LC3-II formation. Inhibition of JNK increased cell death in HNE-treated cells. Pretreatment with the chemical chaperone phenylbutryic acid prevented LC3-II formation as well as JNK phosphorylation and HO-1 induction. Taken together, these data suggest that autophagic responses triggered by unsaturated aldehydes could be attributed, in part, to ER stress, which stimulates autophagy by a JNK-dependent mechanism and promotes cell survival during oxidative stress.

  19. The Hsp110 Molecular Chaperone Stabilizes Apolipoprotein B from Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation (ERAD)*s

    PubMed Central

    Hrizo, Stacy L.; Gusarova, Viktoria; Habiel, David M.; Goeckeler, Jennifer L.; Fisher, Edward A.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B (apoB) is the most abundant protein in low density lipoproteins and plays key roles in cholesterol homeostasis. The co-translational degradation of apoB is controlled by fatty acid levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and is mediated by the proteasome. To define the mechanism of apoB degradation, we employed a cell-free system in which proteasome-dependent degradation is recapitulated with yeast cytosol, and we developed an apoB yeast expression system. We discovered that a yeast Hsp110, Sse1p, associates with and stabilizes apoB, which contrasts with data indicating that select Hsp70s and Hsp90s facilitate apoB degradation. However, the Ssb Hsp70 chaperones have no effect on apoB turnover. To determine whether our results are relevant in mammalian cells, Hsp110 was overexpressed in hepatocytes, and enhanced apoB secretion was observed. This study indicates that chaperones within distinct complexes can play unique roles during ER-associated degradation (ERAD), establishes a role for Sse1/Hsp110 in ERAD, and identifies Hsp110 as a target to lower cholesterol. PMID:17823116

  20. Gel-Free/Label-Free Proteomic Analysis of Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteins in Soybean Root Tips under Flooding and Drought Stresses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-07-01

    Soybean is a widely cultivated crop; however, it is sensitive to flooding and drought stresses. The adverse environmental cues cause the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress due to accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins. To investigate the mechanisms in response to flooding and drought stresses, ER proteomics was performed in soybean root tips. The enzyme activity of NADH cytochrome c reductase was two-fold higher in the ER than other fractions, indicating that the ER was isolated with high purity. Protein abundance of ribosomal proteins was decreased under both stresses compared to control condition; however, the percentage of increased ribosomes was two-fold higher in flooding compared to drought. The ER proteins related to protein glycosylation and signaling were in response to both stresses. Compared to control condition, calnexin was decreased under both stresses; however, protein disulfide isomerase-like proteins and heat shock proteins were markedly decreased under flooding and drought conditions, respectively. Furthermore, fewer glycoproteins and higher levels of cytosolic calcium were identified under both stresses compared to control condition. These results suggest that reduced accumulation of glycoproteins in response to both stresses might be due to dysfunction of protein folding through calnexin/calreticulin cycle. Additionally, the increased cytosolic calcium levels induced by flooding and drought stresses might disturb the ER environment for proper protein folding in soybean root tips. PMID:27224218

  1. Gel-Free/Label-Free Proteomic Analysis of Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteins in Soybean Root Tips under Flooding and Drought Stresses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-07-01

    Soybean is a widely cultivated crop; however, it is sensitive to flooding and drought stresses. The adverse environmental cues cause the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress due to accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins. To investigate the mechanisms in response to flooding and drought stresses, ER proteomics was performed in soybean root tips. The enzyme activity of NADH cytochrome c reductase was two-fold higher in the ER than other fractions, indicating that the ER was isolated with high purity. Protein abundance of ribosomal proteins was decreased under both stresses compared to control condition; however, the percentage of increased ribosomes was two-fold higher in flooding compared to drought. The ER proteins related to protein glycosylation and signaling were in response to both stresses. Compared to control condition, calnexin was decreased under both stresses; however, protein disulfide isomerase-like proteins and heat shock proteins were markedly decreased under flooding and drought conditions, respectively. Furthermore, fewer glycoproteins and higher levels of cytosolic calcium were identified under both stresses compared to control condition. These results suggest that reduced accumulation of glycoproteins in response to both stresses might be due to dysfunction of protein folding through calnexin/calreticulin cycle. Additionally, the increased cytosolic calcium levels induced by flooding and drought stresses might disturb the ER environment for proper protein folding in soybean root tips.

  2. Tapetosomes in Brassica Tapetum Accumulate Endoplasmic Reticulum–Derived Flavonoids and Alkanes for Delivery to the Pollen Surface[W

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Kai; Huang, Anthony H.C.

    2007-01-01

    Tapetosomes are abundant organelles in tapetum cells during the active stage of pollen maturation in Brassicaceae species. They possess endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–derived vesicles and oleosin-coated lipid droplets, but their overall composition and function have not been established. In situ localization analyses of developing Brassica napus anthers revealed flavonoids present exclusively in tapetum cells, first in an ER network along with flavonoid-3′-hydroxylase and then in ER-derived tapetosomes. Flavonoids were absent in the cytosol, elaioplasts, vacuoles, and nuclei. Subcellular fractionation of developing anthers localized both flavonoids and alkanes in tapetosomes. Subtapetosome fractionation localized flavonoids in ER-derived vesicles, and alkanes and oleosins in lipid droplets. After tapetum cell death, flavonoids, alkanes, and oleosins were located on mature pollen. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants tt12 and tt19 devoid of a flavonoid transporter, flavonoids were present in the cytosol in reduced amounts but absent in tapetosomes and were subsequently located on mature pollen. tt4, tt12, and tt19 pollen was more susceptible than wild-type pollen to UV-B irradiation on subsequent germination. Thus, tapetosomes accumulate ER-derived flavonoids, alkanes, and oleosins for discharge to the pollen surface upon cell death. This tapetosome-originated pollen coat protects the haploidic pollen from UV light damage and water loss and aids water uptake. PMID:17307923

  3. Capsaicin mediates apoptosis in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma NPC-TW 039 cells through mitochondrial depolarization and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Ip, S-W; Lan, S-H; Lu, H-F; Huang, A-C; Yang, J-S; Lin, J-P; Huang, H-Y; Lien, J-C; Ho, C-C; Chiu, C-F; Wood, Wg; Chung, J-G

    2012-06-01

    Capsaicin, a pungent compound found in hot chili peppers, has been reported to have antitumor activities in many human cancer cell lines, but the induction of precise apoptosis signaling pathway in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells is unclear. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of capsaicin-induced apoptosis in human NPC, NPC-TW 039, cells. Effects of capsaicin involved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, caspase-3 activation and mitochondrial depolarization. Capsaicin-induced cytotoxic effects (cell death) through G0/G1 phase arrest and induction of apoptosis of NPC-TW 039 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Capsaicin treatment triggered ER stress by promoting the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increasing levels of inositol-requiring 1 enzyme (IRE1), growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 153 (GADD153) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78). Other effects included an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+), loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), releases of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and activation of caspase-9 and -3. Furthermore, capsaicin induced increases in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and abundance of apoptosis-related protein levels. These results suggest that ER stress- and mitochondria-mediated cell death is involved in capsaicin-induced apoptosis in NPC-TW 039 cells. PMID:21859781

  4. Capsaicin mediates apoptosis in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma NPC-TW 039 cells through mitochondrial depolarization and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Ip, S-W; Lan, S-H; Lu, H-F; Huang, A-C; Yang, J-S; Lin, J-P; Huang, H-Y; Lien, J-C; Ho, C-C; Chiu, C-F; Wood, Wg; Chung, J-G

    2012-06-01

    Capsaicin, a pungent compound found in hot chili peppers, has been reported to have antitumor activities in many human cancer cell lines, but the induction of precise apoptosis signaling pathway in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells is unclear. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanisms of capsaicin-induced apoptosis in human NPC, NPC-TW 039, cells. Effects of capsaicin involved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, caspase-3 activation and mitochondrial depolarization. Capsaicin-induced cytotoxic effects (cell death) through G0/G1 phase arrest and induction of apoptosis of NPC-TW 039 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Capsaicin treatment triggered ER stress by promoting the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), increasing levels of inositol-requiring 1 enzyme (IRE1), growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 153 (GADD153) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78). Other effects included an increase in cytosolic Ca(2+), loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), releases of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and activation of caspase-9 and -3. Furthermore, capsaicin induced increases in the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 and abundance of apoptosis-related protein levels. These results suggest that ER stress- and mitochondria-mediated cell death is involved in capsaicin-induced apoptosis in NPC-TW 039 cells.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulium protein profiling of heat-stressed Jurkat cells by one dimensional electrophoresis and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiulian; Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Ma, Aiguo; Zhang, Hui; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2016-08-01

    Proteomic study on membrane-integrated proteins in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) fractions was performed. In this study, we examined the effects of heat stress on Jurkat cells. The ER fractions were highly purified by differential centrifugation with sodium carbonate washing and acetone methanol precipitations. The ER membrane proteins were separated by one dimensional electrophoresis (1-DE), and some of the protein bands changed their abundance by heat stress, 12 of the 14 bands containing 40 and 60 ribosomal proteins whose expression level were decreased, on the contrary, 2 of the 14 bands containing ubiquitin and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 3 were increased. Heat treatment of human Jurkat cells led to an increase in the phosphorylation of PERK and eIF2α within 30 min of exposure. This was followed by an increase in the expression of the GRP78. Protein ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the proteasome are important mechanisms regulating cell cycle, growth and differentiation, the result showed that heat stress enhanced ubiquitination modification of the microsomal proteins. The data of this study strongly suggest that heat treatment led to a significant reduction in protein expression and activated UPR, concomitant with protein hyperubiqutination in ER.

  6. The Abundance of Iron-Peak Elements and the Dust Composition in eta Carinae: Manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, M. A.; Melendez, M.; Hartman, H.; Gull, T. R.; Lodders, K.

    2010-01-01

    We study the chemical abundances of the Strontium Filament found in the ejecta of (eta) Carinae. In particular, we derive the abundances of iron-peak elements front spectra of their singly ionized ions present in the optical/IR spectra. In this paper we analyze the spectrum of Mn II using a new non-LTE model for this system. In constructing this models we carried out theoretical calculations of radiative transition rates and electron impact excitation rate coefficients. We find that relative to Ni the gas phase abundance ratio of Mn is roughly solar, similar to the Cr abundance but in contrast to the large enhancements in the abundances of Sc and Ti. NVe interpret this result as an indication of non-equilibrium condensation in the ejecta of (eta) Carinae.

  7. Sequential NO production by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum during induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Juanita; Bersier, Geraldine; Badin, Romina Aron; Cymeryng, Cora; Parodi, Armando; Boveris, Alberto

    2002-05-01

    Early stages of rat thymocyte apoptosis measured as annexin-V positive events and induced by methylprednisolone (MPS), etoposide, and thapsigargin, showed a sequential increase in nitric oxide (NO) production by mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Thapsigargin induced the highest NO production, a sevenfold increase as compared with untreated thymocytes, in mitochondrial and microsomal membranes. MPS and etoposide were equally effective in increasing NO production by mitochondrial membranes by a factor of 4-5, with only a slight increase in NO production by endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Western blot analysis of both types of membrane indicated that a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoenzyme is present in mitochondrial membranes and reacts with antibodies to i-NOS (type II), while reactivity to antibodies to e-NOS (type III) was restricted to endoplasmic reticulum. The participation of endoplasmic reticulum during apoptosis was further determined by alterations in UDP-Glucosyltransferase (UDP-GT) and NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase. Increased UDP-GT activity was observed after thapsigargin treatment, and no changes were found after treatment with etoposide or MPS. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase activity markedly decreased during apoptosis, being stronger after thapsigargin treatment. The latest stage of the apoptotic process was measured by caspase activities. Caspase 3 activity was markedly increased by the three apoptosis inducers; caspase 6 was only activated by MPS and etoposide, while caspase 8 was not activated by any of these inducers. It is clear that mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum are involved in thapsigargin induced thymocyte apoptosis. Meanwhile, other thymocyte apoptotic pathways, such as those induced by MPS or etoposide, seem to centrally involve mitochondria but not endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:12009851

  8. Sequential NO production by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum during induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Juanita; Bersier, Geraldine; Badin, Romina Aron; Cymeryng, Cora; Parodi, Armando; Boveris, Alberto

    2002-05-01

    Early stages of rat thymocyte apoptosis measured as annexin-V positive events and induced by methylprednisolone (MPS), etoposide, and thapsigargin, showed a sequential increase in nitric oxide (NO) production by mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Thapsigargin induced the highest NO production, a sevenfold increase as compared with untreated thymocytes, in mitochondrial and microsomal membranes. MPS and etoposide were equally effective in increasing NO production by mitochondrial membranes by a factor of 4-5, with only a slight increase in NO production by endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Western blot analysis of both types of membrane indicated that a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isoenzyme is present in mitochondrial membranes and reacts with antibodies to i-NOS (type II), while reactivity to antibodies to e-NOS (type III) was restricted to endoplasmic reticulum. The participation of endoplasmic reticulum during apoptosis was further determined by alterations in UDP-Glucosyltransferase (UDP-GT) and NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase. Increased UDP-GT activity was observed after thapsigargin treatment, and no changes were found after treatment with etoposide or MPS. NADPH cytochrome P450 reductase activity markedly decreased during apoptosis, being stronger after thapsigargin treatment. The latest stage of the apoptotic process was measured by caspase activities. Caspase 3 activity was markedly increased by the three apoptosis inducers; caspase 6 was only activated by MPS and etoposide, while caspase 8 was not activated by any of these inducers. It is clear that mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum are involved in thapsigargin induced thymocyte apoptosis. Meanwhile, other thymocyte apoptotic pathways, such as those induced by MPS or etoposide, seem to centrally involve mitochondria but not endoplasmic reticulum.

  9. Interactions between surface roughness and airflow turbulence affecting drying dynamics of rough porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghighi, Erfan; Kirchner, James; Or, Dani

    2016-04-01

    Evaporative drying of porous surfaces interacting with turbulent airflows is common in various industrial and natural applications. The intrinsic relief and roughness of natural porous surfaces are likely to influence the structure of interacting turbulent airflow boundary layers, and thus affect rates and patterns of heat and vapor fluxes from the surface. These links have been formalized in new mechanistic models that consider intermittent and localized turbulence-induced boundary layers, resulting in rich surface evaporation and energy exchange dynamics. The models were evaluated experimentally by systematically varying surface roughness elements in drying experiments of wavy and bluff-body covered sand surfaces in a wind tunnel. Thermal infrared signatures of localized evaporative fluxes as well as mean evaporative mass losses were recorded. The resulting patterns were in good agreement with model predictions for local and surface averaged turbulent exchange rates. Experimental and theoretical results suggest that evaporative water losses from wavy sand surfaces can be either enhanced or suppressed (relative to a flat surface), due to the complex interplay between the local boundary layer thickness and internal limitations on water flow to the evaporating surface. For sand surfaces covered by isolated cylindrical elements (bluff bodies), model predictions and measurements show persistent enhancement of evaporative fluxes from bluff-rough surfaces compared to a flat surface under similar conditions. This enhancement is attributed to the formation of vortices that thin the boundary layer over part of the interacting surface footprint. The implications of this study for interpreting and upscaling evapotranspiration rates from terrestrial surfaces will be discussed.

  10. Rough Play: One of the Most Challenging Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Frances M.

    2011-01-01

    Most children engage in rough play, and research demonstrates its physical, social, emotional, and cognitive value. Early childhood education settings have the responsibility to provide children with what best serves their developmental needs. One of the best ways teachers can support rough play is by modeling it for children. When adults model…

  11. Ice Roughness in Short Duration SLD Icing Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClain, Stephen T.; Reed, Dana; Vargas, Mario; Kreeger, Richard E.; Tsao, Jen-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Ice accretion codes depend on models of roughness parameters to account for the enhanced heat transfer during the ice accretion process. While mitigating supercooled large droplet (SLD or Appendix O) icing is a significant concern for manufacturers seeking future vehicle certification due to the pending regulation, historical ice roughness studies have been performed using Appendix C icing clouds which exhibit mean volumetric diameters (MVD) much smaller than SLD clouds. Further, the historical studies of roughness focused on extracting parametric representations of ice roughness using multiple images of roughness elements. In this study, the ice roughness developed on a 21-in. NACA 0012 at 0deg angle of attack exposed to short duration SLD icing events was measured in the Icing Research Tunnel at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The MVD's used in the study ranged from 100 micrometer to 200 micrometers, in a 67 m/s flow, with liquid water contents of either 0.6 gm/cubic meters or 0.75 gm/cubic meters. The ice surfaces were measured using a Romer Absolute Arm laser scanning system. The roughness associated with each surface point cloud was measured using the two-dimensional self-organizing map approach developed by McClain and Kreeger (2013) resulting in statistical descriptions of the ice roughness.

  12. Road roughness evaluation using in-pavement strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiming; Deng, Fodan; Huang, Ying; Bridgelall, Raj

    2015-11-01

    The international roughness index (IRI) is a characterization of road roughness or ride quality that transportation agencies most often report. The prevalent method of acquiring IRI data requires instrumented vehicles and technicians with specialized training to interpret the results. The extensive labor and high cost requirements associated with the existing approaches limit data collection to at most once per year for portions of the national highway system. Agencies characterize roughness only for some secondary roads but much less frequently, such as once every five years, resulting in outdated roughness information. This research developed a real-time roughness evaluation approach that links the output of durable in-pavement strain sensors to prevailing indices that summarize road roughness. Field experiments validated the high consistency of the approach by showing that it is within 3.3% of relative IRI estimates. After their installation and calibration during road construction, the ruggedized strain sensors will report road roughness continuously. Thus, the solution will provide agencies a real-time roughness monitoring solution over the remaining service life of road assets.

  13. Data Mining Using Extensions of the Rough Set Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingras, P. J.; Yao, Y. Y.

    1998-01-01

    Examines basic issues of data mining using the theory of rough sets, a recent proposal for generalizing classical set theory. Demonstrates that a generalized rough set model can be used for generating rules from incomplete databases. Discusses the importance of rule extraction from incomplete databases in data mining. (AEF)

  14. Improvement in storage stability of infrared dried rough rice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to develop infrared drying (IRD) method to improve the stability of physicochemical properties of rough rice during storage. The effect of IRD on the physicochemical properties of stored rough rice was compared with that of hot air drying (HAD) and ambient air drying ...

  15. The psychophysics of roughness applied to dysphonic voice.

    PubMed

    Eddins, David A; Kopf, Lisa M; Shrivastav, Rahul

    2015-12-01

    Roughness is a sound quality that has been related to the amplitude modulation characteristics of the acoustic stimulus. Roughness also is considered one of the primary elements of voice quality associated with natural variations across normal voices and is a salient feature of many dysphonic voices. It is known that the roughness of tonal stimuli is dependent on the frequency and depth of amplitude modulation and on the carrier frequency. Here, it is determined if similar dependencies exist for voiced speech stimuli. Knowledge of such dependencies can lead to a better understanding of the acoustic characteristics of vocal roughness along the continuum of normal to dysphonic and may facilitate computational estimates of vocal roughness. Synthetic vowel stimuli were modeled after talkers selected from the Satloff/Heman-Ackah disordered voice database. To parametrically control amplitude modulation frequency and depth, synthesized stimuli had minimal amplitude fluctuations, and amplitude modulation was superimposed with the desired frequency and depth. Perceptual roughness judgments depended on amplitude modulation frequency and depth in a manner that closely matched data from tonal carriers. The dependence of perceived roughness on amplitude modulation frequency and depth closely matched the roughness of sinusoidal carriers as reported by Fastl and Zwicker [(2007) Psychoacoustics: Facts and Models, 3rd ed. (Springer, New York)].

  16. Quantification of soil surface roughness evolution under simulated rainfall

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil surface roughness is commonly identified as one of the dominant factors governing runoff and interrill erosion. The objective of this study was to compare several existing soil surface roughness indices and to test the Revised Triangular Prism surface area Method (RTPM) as a new approach to cal...

  17. Rough surface improves stability of air- sounding balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scoggins, J. R.

    1965-01-01

    Aerodynamic stability of balloons used for measuring the intensity and direction of atmospheric winds at various elevations is improved by incorporating a rough surface on the balloons. The rough-surfaced balloon is useful for collecting wind profiles and other meteorological data.

  18. Turbulent boundary layer flow over broad-banded roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawlak, Geno; Aghsaee, Payam; Mazrouei, Saeed; Leonardi, Stefano; Rajagopalan, Krishnakumar; Kobayashi, Marcelo

    2014-11-01

    The response of the boundary layer to a regular roughness is often parameterized in terms of the length scales defining the roughness. Difficulty arises in the case of broad-banded and highly irregular roughness distributions such as over coral reefs or urban canopies where the length scale that determines the response of the boundary layer is not clear. Here we use a spectral description for roughness to create idealized two-dimensional irregular roughness profiles, using square waves as a basis function. Laboratory experiments along with Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) are used to examine the hydrodynamic response to the broad-banded roughness and flow characteristics are related to geometric characteristics of the boundary. The simulations and experiments show that the nature of the flow over two-dimensional irregular walls can be determined as a function of the hydrodynamic origin, which, in turn, can be determined as a function of a mean cavity shape. Results are interpreted in terms of the spectral characteristics of the roughness. The contribution of the various spectral components to the total drag is analyzed for each case. The roughness spectrum influences the flow through the shape of the cavities on the wall and can provide some guidance in predicting the nature of the flow.

  19. Characteristics of density currents over regular and irregular rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaganagar, K.

    2013-12-01

    Direct numerical simulation is used as a tool to understand the effect of surface roughness on the propagation of density currents. Simulations have been performed for lock-exchange flow with gate separating the dense and the lighter fluid. As the lock is released the dense fluid collapses with the lighter fluid on the top, resulting in formation of horizontally evolving density current. The talk will focus on the fundamental differences between the propagation of the density current over regular and irregular rough surfaces. The flow statistics and the flow structures are discussed. The results have revealed the spacing between the roughness elements is an important factor in classifying the density currents. The empirical relations of the front velocity and location for the dense and sparse roughness have been evaluated in terms of the roughness height, spacing between the elements and the initial amount of lock fluid. DNS results for a dense current flowing over a (a) smooth and (b) rough bottom with egg-carton roughness elements in a regular configuration. In these simulations the lock-exchange box is located in the middle of the channel and has two gates which allow two dense currents to be generated, one moving to the right and one to the left side of the channel. Note how the dense current interface presents smaller structures when over a rough bottom (right).

  20. Roughness-induced critical phenomena in a turbulent flow.

    PubMed

    Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2006-02-01

    I present empirical evidence that turbulent flows are closely analogous to critical phenomena, from a reanalysis of friction factor measurements in rough pipes. The data collapse found here corresponds to Widom scaling near critical points, and implies that a full understanding of turbulence requires explicit accounting for boundary roughness.

  1. Counterintuitive MCNPX Results for Scintillator Surface Roughness Effect

    SciTech Connect

    2012-08-12

    We have reported on our recent MCNPX simulation results of energy deposition for a group of 8 scintillation detectors, coupled with various rough surface patterns. The MCNPX results generally favored the detectors with various rough surface patterns. The observed MCNPX results are not fully explained by this work.

  2. The density of the cell sap and endoplasm of Nitellopsis and Chara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.

    1991-01-01

    We measured the densities of the cell sap, endoplasm and cell wall of Nitellopsis obtusa and Chara corallina using interference microscopy, refractometry, immersion refractometry, equilibrium sedimentation and chemical microanalysis techniques. These values are important for the determination of many rheological properties of the cytoplasm as well as for understanding buoyancy regulation, dispersal mechanisms and how cells respond to gravity. The average densities of the cell sap, endoplasm and cell wall are 1,006.9, 1,016.7 and 1,371 kg m-3 for Nitellopsis and 1,005.0, 1,013.9, and 1,355.3 kg m-3 for Chara.

  3. Neuroprotective effects of atorvastatin against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury through the inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian-Wen; Hu, Zhi-Ping

    2015-08-01

    Cerebral ischemia triggers secondary ischemia/reperfusion injury and endoplasmic reticulum stress initiates cell apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the signaling pathway remains unclear. We hypothesize that the regulatory mechanisms are mediated by the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/eukaryotic initiation factor 2α in the endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathway. To verify this hypothesis, we occluded the middle cerebral artery in rats to establish focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion model. Results showed that the expression levels of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase and caspase-3, as well as the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, were increased after ischemia/reperfusion. Administration of atorvastatin decreased the expression of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, caspase-3 and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, reduced the infarct volume and improved ultrastructure in the rat brain. After salubrinal, the specific inhibitor of phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α was given into the rats intragastrically, the expression levels of caspase-3 and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α in the were decreased, a reduction of the infarct volume and less ultrastructural damage were observed than the untreated, ischemic brain. However, salubrinal had no impact on the expression of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase. Experimental findings indicate that atorvastatin inhibits endoplasmic reticulum stress and exerts neuroprotective effects. The underlying mechanisms of attenuating ischemia/reperfusion injury are associated with the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/eukaryotic initiation factor 2α/caspase-3 pathway. PMID:26487850

  4. Neuroprotective effects of atorvastatin against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury through the inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian-wen; Hu, Zhi-ping

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia triggers secondary ischemia/reperfusion injury and endoplasmic reticulum stress initiates cell apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of the signaling pathway remains unclear. We hypothesize that the regulatory mechanisms are mediated by the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/eukaryotic initiation factor 2α in the endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling pathway. To verify this hypothesis, we occluded the middle cerebral artery in rats to establish focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion model. Results showed that the expression levels of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase and caspase-3, as well as the phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, were increased after ischemia/reperfusion. Administration of atorvastatin decreased the expression of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, caspase-3 and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, reduced the infarct volume and improved ultrastructure in the rat brain. After salubrinal, the specific inhibitor of phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α was given into the rats intragastrically, the expression levels of caspase-3 and phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α in the were decreased, a reduction of the infarct volume and less ultrastructural damage were observed than the untreated, ischemic brain. However, salubrinal had no impact on the expression of protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase. Experimental findings indicate that atorvastatin inhibits endoplasmic reticulum stress and exerts neuroprotective effects. The underlying mechanisms of attenuating ischemia/reperfusion injury are associated with the protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase/eukaryotic initiation factor 2α/caspase-3 pathway. PMID:26487850

  5. Transport of estradiol-17β-glucuronide, estrone-3-sulfate and taurocholate across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane: evidence for different transport systems.

    PubMed

    Wlcek, Katrin; Hofstetter, Lia; Stieger, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Important reactions of drug metabolism, including UGT mediated glucuronidation and steroidsulfatase mediated hydrolysis of sulfates, take place in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes. Consequently, UGT generated glucuronides, like estradiol-17β-glucuronide, have to be translocated back into the cytoplasm to reach their site of excretion. Also steroidsulfatase substrates, including estrone-3-sulfate, have to cross the ER membrane to reach their site of hydrolysis. Based on their physicochemical properties such compounds are not favored for passive diffusion and therefore likely necessitate transport system(s) to cross the ER membrane in either direction. The current study aims to investigate the transport of taurocholate, estradiol-17β-glucuronide, and estrone-3-sulfate in smooth (SER) and rough (RER) endoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles isolated from Wistar and TR(-) rat liver. Time-dependent and bidirectional transport was demonstrated for taurocholate, showing higher uptake rates in SER than RER vesicles. For estradiol-17β-glucuronide a fast time-dependent efflux with similar efficiencies from SER and RER but no clear protein-mediated uptake was shown, indicating an asymmetric transport system for this substrate. Estrone-3-sulfate uptake was time-dependent and higher in SER than in RER vesicles. Inhibition of steroidsulfatase mediated estrone-3-sulfate hydrolysis decreased estrone-3-sulfate uptake but had no effect on taurocholate or estradiol-17β-glucuronide transport. Based on inhibition studies and transport characteristics, three different transport mechanisms are suggested to be involved in the transport of taurocholate, estrone-3-sulfate and estradiol-17β-glucuronide across the ER membrane.

  6. Transport of estradiol-17β-glucuronide, estrone-3-sulfate and taurocholate across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane: evidence for different transport systems☆

    PubMed Central

    Wlcek, Katrin; Hofstetter, Lia; Stieger, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Important reactions of drug metabolism, including UGT mediated glucuronidation and steroidsulfatase mediated hydrolysis of sulfates, take place in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of hepatocytes. Consequently, UGT generated glucuronides, like estradiol-17β-glucuronide, have to be translocated back into the cytoplasm to reach their site of excretion. Also steroidsulfatase substrates, including estrone-3-sulfate, have to cross the ER membrane to reach their site of hydrolysis. Based on their physicochemical properties such compounds are not favored for passive diffusion and therefore likely necessitate transport system(s) to cross the ER membrane in either direction. The current study aims to investigate the transport of taurocholate, estradiol-17β-glucuronide, and estrone-3-sulfate in smooth (SER) and rough (RER) endoplasmic reticulum membrane vesicles isolated from Wistar and TR− rat liver. Time-dependent and bidirectional transport was demonstrated for taurocholate, showing higher uptake rates in SER than RER vesicles. For estradiol-17β-glucuronide a fast time-dependent efflux with similar efficiencies from SER and RER but no clear protein-mediated uptake was shown, indicating an asymmetric transport system for this substrate. Estrone-3-sulfate uptake was time-dependent and higher in SER than in RER vesicles. Inhibition of steroidsulfatase mediated estrone-3-sulfate hydrolysis decreased estrone-3-sulfate uptake but had no effect on taurocholate or estradiol-17β-glucuronide transport. Based on inhibition studies and transport characteristics, three different transport mechanisms are suggested to be involved in the transport of taurocholate, estrone-3-sulfate and estradiol-17β-glucuronide across the ER membrane. PMID:24406246

  7. Loading-unloading hysteresis loop of randomly rough adhesive contacts.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Giuseppe; Pierro, Elena; Recchia, Giuseppina

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the loading and unloading behavior of soft solids in adhesive contact with randomly rough profiles. The roughness is assumed to be described by a self-affine fractal on a limited range of wave vectors. A spectral method is exploited to generate such randomly rough surfaces. The results are statistically averaged, and the calculated contact area and applied load are shown as a function of the penetration, for loading and unloading conditions. We found that the combination of adhesion forces and roughness leads to a hysteresis loading-unloading loop. This shows that energy can be lost simply as a consequence of roughness and van der Waals forces, as in this case a large number of local energy minima exist and the system may be trapped in metastable states. We numerically quantify the hysteretic loss and assess the influence of the surface statistical properties and the energy of adhesion on the hysteresis process.

  8. Computer simulation of RBS spectra from samples with surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinský, P.; Hnatowicz, V.; Macková, A.

    2016-03-01

    A fast code for the simulation of common RBS spectra including surface roughness effects has been written and tested on virtual samples comprising either a rough layer deposited on a smooth substrate or smooth layer deposited on a rough substrate and simulated at different geometries. The sample surface or interface relief has been described by a polyline and the simulated RBS spectrum has been obtained as the sum of many particular spectra from randomly chosen particle trajectories. The code includes several procedures generating virtual samples with random and regular (periodical) roughness. The shape of the RBS spectra has been found to change strongly with increasing sample roughness and an increasing angle of the incoming ion beam.

  9. Mask roughness induced LER: a rule of thumb -- paper

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany; Naulleau, Patrick

    2010-03-12

    Much work has already been done on how both the resist and line-edge roughness (LER) on the mask affect the final printed LER. What is poorly understood, however, is the extent to which system-level effects such as mask surface roughness, illumination conditions, and defocus couple to speckle at the image plane, and currently factor into LER limits. Here, we propose a 'rule-of-thumb' simplified solution that provides a fast and powerful method to obtain mask roughness induced LER. We present modeling data on an older generation mask with a roughness of 230 pm as well as the ultimate target roughness of 50 pm. Moreover, we consider feature sizes of 50 nm and 22 nm, and show that as a function of correlation length, the LER peaks at the condition that the correlation length is approximately equal to the resolution of the imaging optic.

  10. Effect of surface roughness on the microwave emission from soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Schmugge, T. J.; Newton, R. W.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of surface roughness on the brightness temperature of a moist terrain was studied through the modification of Fresnel reflection coefficient and using the radiative transfer equation. The modification involves introduction of a single parameter to characterize the roughness. It is shown that this parameter depends on both the surface height variance and the horizontal scale of the roughness. Model calculations are in good quantitative agreement with the observed dependence of the brightness temperature on the moisture content in the surface layer. Data from truck mounted and airborne radiometers are presented for comparison. The results indicate that the roughness effects are greatest for wet soils where the difference between smooth and rough surfaces can be as great as 50K.

  11. Scattering of light by molecules over a rough surface.

    PubMed

    Long, Maureen; Khine, Michelle; Kim, Arnold D

    2010-05-01

    We present a theory for the multiple scattering of light by obstacles situated over a rough surface. This problem is important for applications in biological and chemical sensors. To keep the formulation of this theory simple, we study scalar waves. This theory requires knowledge of the scattering operator (t-matrix) for each of the obstacles as well as the reflection operator for the rough surface. The scattering operator gives the field scattered by the obstacle due to an exciting field incident on the scatterer. The reflection operator gives the field reflected by the rough surface due to an exciting field incident on the rough surface. We apply this general theory for the special case of point scatterers and a slightly rough surface with homogeneous Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. We show examples that demonstrate the utility of this theory. PMID:20448766

  12. Maps of Lunar Topographic Roughness: Correlation with Geological Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreslavsky, M. A.; Head, J. W.; Neumann, G. A.; Zuber, M. T.; Smith, D. E.

    2012-12-01

    Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter LOLA [Smith et al. 2010 Space Sci. Rev. 150, 209] on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is accumulating high-precision lunar surface elevation measurements. This data set is an excellent source for mapping lunar topographic roughness [Rosenburg et al. 2011 JGR 116, E02001]. Such maps are useful in planetary geology for the following reasons. (1) Roughness maps provide a convenient one-glance synoptic overview of small-scale textures. (2) They help focus on typical background topography, while researcher's eyes usually pick prominent features. (3) Roughness maps utilize the exceptional along-orbit precision of laser altimeter data. In a series of roughness maps that we present here, we use the interquartile range of along-profile curvature at a given baseline as a measure of roughness. We use a progression of baselines starting from the double LOLA probing step: 0.12, 0.46, 0.92, 1.8 km. We also show some useful color composites combining these maps and showing the scale dependence of roughness. Available data allow roughness mapping at 8 pixels per degree resolution. The nature of the lunar roughness changes abruptly at sub-km scale. At 0.46 km baseline and longer, the most prominent feature on the roughness maps is the dichotomy between smooth maria and rough highlands. At 0.12 km baseline, the mare/highland boundary disappears; some mare surfaces are rougher and some are smoother than typical highlands. At this baseline the surface topography is controlled by regolith gardening and reflects small-scale resurfacing during the Copernican and Eratosthenian periods, while for longer baselines the topography is defined by bedrock geology and "remembers" Imbrian and earlier events. At short scales (0.12 km baseline) both the roughest and the smoothest terrains are related to Copernican-aged large impact craters. Craters themselves and their proximal ejecta are extremely rough; the roughest ejecta is separated from craters by prominent

  13. Loading-unloading hysteresis loop of randomly rough adhesive contacts.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Giuseppe; Pierro, Elena; Recchia, Giuseppina

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the loading and unloading behavior of soft solids in adhesive contact with randomly rough profiles. The roughness is assumed to be described by a self-affine fractal on a limited range of wave vectors. A spectral method is exploited to generate such randomly rough surfaces. The results are statistically averaged, and the calculated contact area and applied load are shown as a function of the penetration, for loading and unloading conditions. We found that the combination of adhesion forces and roughness leads to a hysteresis loading-unloading loop. This shows that energy can be lost simply as a consequence of roughness and van der Waals forces, as in this case a large number of local energy minima exist and the system may be trapped in metastable states. We numerically quantify the hysteretic loss and assess the influence of the surface statistical properties and the energy of adhesion on the hysteresis process. PMID:26764700

  14. OsHrd3 is necessary for maintaining the quality of endoplasmic reticulum-derived protein bodies in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Masaru; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2015-08-01

    Large amounts of seed storage proteins (SSPs) are produced in the maturing endosperm of rice seeds. Rice SSPs are synthesized as secretory proteins on the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and are transported and deposited into protein complexes called protein bodies (PB-I and PB-II). Due to the high production of SSPs, unfolded SSPs may be generated during this process. However, it was previously unclear how such unfolded proteins are selected among synthesized products and removed from the ER to maintain protein quality in the endosperm. Since Hrd3/SEL1L recognizes unfolded proteins in yeast and mammalian protein quality control systems, the role of OsHrd3 in protein quality control in rice endosperm was investigated. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that OsHrd3 interacts with components of the Hrd1 ubiquitin ligase complex such as OsOS-9 and OsHrd1 in rice protoplasts. Endosperm-specific suppression of OsHrd3 in transgenic rice reduced the levels of polyubiquitinated proteins and resulted in unfolded protein responses (UPRs) in the endosperm, suggesting that OsHrd3-mediated polyubiquitination plays an important role in ER quality control. It was found that a cysteine-rich 13kDa prolamin, RM1, was polyubiquitinated in wild-type (WT) seeds but not in OsHrd3 knockdown (KD) seeds. RM1 formed aberrant aggregates that were deposited abnormally in OsHrd3 KD seeds, resulting in deformed PB-I. Therefore, the quality of protein bodies is maintained by polyubiquitination of unfolded SSPs through the Hrd1 ubiquitin ligase system in rice endosperm. PMID:25977235

  15. OsHrd3 is necessary for maintaining the quality of endoplasmic reticulum-derived protein bodies in rice endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Masaru; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    Large amounts of seed storage proteins (SSPs) are produced in the maturing endosperm of rice seeds. Rice SSPs are synthesized as secretory proteins on the rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and are transported and deposited into protein complexes called protein bodies (PB-I and PB-II). Due to the high production of SSPs, unfolded SSPs may be generated during this process. However, it was previously unclear how such unfolded proteins are selected among synthesized products and removed from the ER to maintain protein quality in the endosperm. Since Hrd3/SEL1L recognizes unfolded proteins in yeast and mammalian protein quality control systems, the role of OsHrd3 in protein quality control in rice endosperm was investigated. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that OsHrd3 interacts with components of the Hrd1 ubiquitin ligase complex such as OsOS-9 and OsHrd1 in rice protoplasts. Endosperm-specific suppression of OsHrd3 in transgenic rice reduced the levels of polyubiquitinated proteins and resulted in unfolded protein responses (UPRs) in the endosperm, suggesting that OsHrd3-mediated polyubiquitination plays an important role in ER quality control. It was found that a cysteine-rich 13kDa prolamin, RM1, was polyubiquitinated in wild-type (WT) seeds but not in OsHrd3 knockdown (KD) seeds. RM1 formed aberrant aggregates that were deposited abnormally in OsHrd3 KD seeds, resulting in deformed PB-I. Therefore, the quality of protein bodies is maintained by polyubiquitination of unfolded SSPs through the Hrd1 ubiquitin ligase system in rice endosperm. PMID:25977235

  16. Nitrogen abundance in Comet Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyckoff, Susan; Tegler, Stephen C.; Engel, Lisa

    1991-01-01

    Data on the nitrogen-containing compounds that observed spectroscopically in the coma of Comet Halley are summarized, and the elemental abundance of nitrogen in the Comet Halley nucleus is derived. It is found that 90 percent of elemental nitrogen is in the dust fraction of the coma, while in the gas fraction, most of the nitrogen is contained in NH3 and CN. The elemental nitrogen abundance in the ice component of the nucleus was found to be deficient by a factor of about 75, relative to the solar photosphere, indicating that the chemical partitioning of N2 into NH3 and other nitrogen compounds during the evolution of the solar nebula cannot account completely for the low abundance ratio N2/NH3 = 0.1, observed in the comet. It is suggested that the low N2/NH3 ratio in Comet Halley may be explained simply by physical fractionation and/or thermal diffusion.

  17. Solar and stellar photospheric abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allende Prieto, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The determination of photospheric abundances in late-type stars from spectroscopic observations is a well-established field, built on solid theoretical foundations. Improving those foundations to refine the accuracy of the inferred abundances has proven challenging, but progress has been made. In parallel, developments on instrumentation, chiefly regarding multi-object spectroscopy, have been spectacular, and a number of projects are collecting large numbers of observations for stars across the Milky Way and nearby galaxies, promising important advances in our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution. After providing a brief description of the basic physics and input data involved in the analysis of stellar spectra, a review is made of the analysis steps, and the available tools to cope with large observational efforts. The paper closes with a quick overview of relevant ongoing and planned spectroscopic surveys, and highlights of recent research on photospheric abundances.

  18. Robust Abundance Estimation in Animal Abundance Surveys with Imperfect Detection

    EPA Science Inventory

    Surveys of animal abundance are central to the conservation and management of living natural resources. However, detection uncertainty complicates the sampling process of many species. One sampling method employed to deal with this problem is depletion (or removal) surveys in whi...

  19. Extending the Clapper-Yule model to rough printing supports.

    PubMed

    Hébert, Mathieu; Hersch, Roger David

    2005-09-01

    The Clapper-Yule model is the only classical spectral reflection model for halftone prints that takes explicitly into account both the multiple internal reflections between the print-air interface and the paper substrate and the lateral propagation of light within the paper bulk. However, the Clapper-Yule model assumes a planar interface and does not take into account the roughness of the print surface. In order to extend the Clapper-Yule model to rough printing supports (e.g., matte coated papers or calendered papers), we model the print surface as a set of randomly oriented microfacets. The influence of the shadowing effect is evaluated and incorporated into the model. By integrating over all incident angles and facet orientations, we are able to express the internal reflectance of the rough interface as a function of the rms facet slope. By considering also the rough interface transmittances both for the incident light and for the emerging light, we obtain a generalization of the Clapper-Yule model for rough interfaces. The comparison between the classical Clapper-Yule model and the model extended to rough surfaces shows that the influence of the surface roughness on the predicted reflectance factor is small. For high-quality papers such as coated and calendered papers, as well as for low-quality papers such as newsprint or copy papers, the influence of surface roughness is negligible, and the classical Clapper-Yule model can be used to predict the halftone-print reflectance factors. The influence of roughness becomes significant only for very rough and thick nondiffusing coatings.

  20. Roughness-Based Superhydrophobic Surfaces: Fundamentals and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patankar, Neelesh

    2011-11-01

    Superhydrophobicity of rough surfaces has attracted global interest through the past decade. There are naturally occurring instances of such surfaces, e.g., lotus leaves, which led to the popular term ``lotus effect.'' Numerous applications in wide ranging areas such as drag reduction, self-cleaning, heat exchangers, energy conversion, condensation, anti-icing, textile, desalination, etc., are being explored by researchers worldwide. The signature configuration for superhydrophobicity has been ``bead-like'' drops on rough surfaces that roll-off easily. This becomes possible if the liquid does not impale the roughness grooves, and if the contact angle hysteresis is low. Finding appropriate surface roughness is therefore necessary. A thermodynamic framework to enable analysis of this problem will be presented. It will be noted that the success of rough superhydrophobic substrates relies on the presence of gas pockets in the roughness grooves underneath the liquid. These gas pockets could be those of air from the surrounding environment. Current design strategies rely on the availability of air. However, if the rough substrates are fully submerged in the liquid then the trapped air in the roughness grooves may not be sustained. A design approach based on sustaining a vapor phase of the liquid itself in the roughness grooves, instead of relying on the presence of air, will be presented. The resulting surfaces, referred to as vapor stabilizing substrates, are deemed to be robust against wetting transition even if no air is present. Applications of this approach include low drag surfaces, nucleate boiling at dramatically low superheats, among others. The concept can be generalized to other transitions on the phase diagram, thus enabling the design of rough surfaces for phase manipulation in general.

  1. Determining Surface Roughness in Urban Areas Using Lidar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Donald

    2009-01-01

    An automated procedure has been developed to derive relevant factors, which can increase the ability to produce objective, repeatable methods for determining aerodynamic surface roughness. Aerodynamic surface roughness is used for many applications, like atmospheric dispersive models and wind-damage models. For this technique, existing lidar data was used that was originally collected for terrain analysis, and demonstrated that surface roughness values can be automatically derived, and then subsequently utilized in disaster-management and homeland security models. The developed lidar-processing algorithm effectively distinguishes buildings from trees and characterizes their size, density, orientation, and spacing (see figure); all of these variables are parameters that are required to calculate the estimated surface roughness for a specified area. By using this algorithm, aerodynamic surface roughness values in urban areas can then be extracted automatically. The user can also adjust the algorithm for local conditions and lidar characteristics, like summer/winter vegetation and dense/sparse lidar point spacing. Additionally, the user can also survey variations in surface roughness that occurs due to wind direction; for example, during a hurricane, when wind direction can change dramatically, this variable can be extremely significant. In its current state, the algorithm calculates an estimated surface roughness for a square kilometer area; techniques using the lidar data to calculate the surface roughness for a point, whereby only roughness elements that are upstream from the point of interest are used and the wind direction is a vital concern, are being investigated. This technological advancement will improve the reliability and accuracy of models that use and incorporate surface roughness.

  2. Clouds Versus Carbon: Predicting Vegetation Roughness by Maximizing Productivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Lola M.

    2004-01-01

    Surface roughness is one of the dominant vegetation properties that affects land surface exchange of energy, water, carbon, and momentum with the overlying atmosphere. We hypothesize that the canopy structure of terrestrial vegetation adapts optimally to climate by maximizing productivity, leading to an optimum surface roughness. An optimum should exist because increasing values of surface roughness cause increased surface exchange, leading to increased supply of carbon dioxide for photosynthesis. At the same time, increased roughness enhances evapotranspiration and cloud cover, thereby reducing the supply of photosynthetically active radiation. We demonstrate the optimum through sensitivity simulations using a coupled dynamic vegetation-climate model for present day conditions, in which we vary the value of surface roughness for vegetated surfaces. We find that the maximum in productivity occurs at a roughness length of 2 meters, a value commonly used to describe the roughness of today's forested surfaces. The sensitivity simulations also illustrate the strong climatic impacts of vegetation roughness on the energy and water balances over land: with increasing vegetation roughness, solar radiation is reduced by up to 20 W/sq m in the global land mean, causing shifts in the energy partitioning and leading to general cooling of the surface by 1.5 K. We conclude that the roughness of vegetated surfaces can be understood as a reflection of optimum adaptation, and it is associated with substantial changes in the surface energy and water balances over land. The role of the cloud feedback in shaping the optimum underlines the importance of an integrated perspective that views vegetation and its adaptive nature as an integrated component of the Earth system.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress sensor protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) protects against pressure overload-induced heart failure and lung remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Kwak, Dongmin; Lu, Zhongbing; Xu, Xin; Fassett, John; Wang, Huan; Wei, Yidong; Cavener, Douglas R; Hu, Xinli; Hall, Jennifer; Bache, Robert J; Chen, Yingjie

    2014-10-01

    Studies have reported that development of congestive heart failure is associated with increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Double stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is a major transducer of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and directly phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, resulting in translational attenuation. However, the physiological effect of PERK on congestive heart failure development is unknown. To study the effect of PERK on ventricular structure and function, we generated inducible cardiac-specific PERK knockout mice. Under unstressed conditions, cardiac PERK knockout had no effect on left ventricular mass, or its ratio to body weight, cardiomyocyte size, fibrosis, or left ventricular function. However, in response to chronic transverse aortic constriction, PERK knockout mice exhibited decreased ejection fraction, increased left ventricular fibrosis, enhanced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and exacerbated lung remodeling in comparison with wild-type mice. PERK knockout also dramatically attenuated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in response to aortic constriction. Our findings suggest that PERK is required to protect the heart from pressure overload-induced congestive heart failure.

  4. Coronal Abundances and Their Variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1996-01-01

    This contract supported the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study were a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This is the Final Report, summarizing the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the period of performance, June 1993 - December 1996.

  5. Chemical Abundances of Symbiotic Giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gałan, C.; Mikołajewska, J.; Hinkle, K. H.; Joyce, R. R.

    2015-12-01

    High resolution (R ˜ 50000), near-IR spectra were used to measure photospheric abundances of CNO and elements around the iron peak for 24 symbiotic giants. Spectrum synthesis was employed using local thermal equilibrium and hydrostatic model atmospheres. The metallicities are distributed in a wide range with maximum around [Fe/H] ˜-0.4 - - 0.3 dex. Enrichment in 14N indicates that all the sample giants have experienced the first dredge-up. The relative abundance of [Ti/Fe] is generally large in red symbiotic systems.

  6. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1994-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution soft x-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer (FCS) on the Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred during the first ten months of the contract, 15 Jun. 1993 to 15 Apr. 1994.

  7. The solar abundance of beryllium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    The solar abundance of beryllium is deduced from high-resolution Kitt Peak observations of the 3130.43- and 3131.08-A lines of Be II interpreted by the method of spectrum synthesis. The results are in good agreement with those previously obtained by Grevesse (1968) and by Hauge and Engvold (1968) and indicate that in the photospheric layers, beryllium is depleted below the chondritic value by a factor of about two. It is found that the beryllium abundance is equal to logN(Be)/N(H) + 12 = 1.08 plus or minus 0.05.

  8. SOLAR MODELS WITH REVISED ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, S. L.; Li, T. D.; Yang, W. M.; Li, L. H.

    2011-04-20

    We present new solar models in which we use the latest low abundances and further include the effects of rotation, magnetic fields, and extra-mixing processes. We assume that the extra-element mixing can be treated as a diffusion process, with the diffusion coefficient depending mainly on the solar internal configuration of rotation and magnetic fields. We find that such models can well reproduce the observed solar rotation profile in the radiative region. Furthermore, the proposed models can match the seismic constraints better than the standard solar models, also when these include the latest abundances, but neglect the effects of rotation and magnetic fields.

  9. Brain endoplasmic reticulum stress mechanistically distinguishes the saline-intake and hypertensive response to deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt.

    PubMed

    Jo, Fusakazu; Jo, Hiromi; Hilzendeger, Aline M; Thompson, Anthony P; Cassell, Martin D; Rutkowski, D Thomas; Davisson, Robin L; Grobe, Justin L; Sigmund, Curt D

    2015-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress has become an important mechanism in hypertension. We examined the role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in mediating the increased saline-intake and hypertensive effects in response to deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt. Intracerebroventricular delivery of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-reducing chemical chaperone tauroursodeoxycholic acid did not affect the magnitude of hypertension, but markedly decreased saline-intake in response to DOCA-salt. Increased saline-intake returned after tauroursodeoxycholic acid was terminated. Decreased saline-intake was also observed after intracerebroventricular infusion of 4-phenylbutyrate, another chemical chaperone. Immunoreactivity to CCAAT homologous binding protein, a marker of irremediable endoplasmic reticulum stress, was increased in the subfornical organ and supraoptic nucleus of DOCA-salt mice, but the signal was absent in control and CCAAT homologous binding protein-deficient mice. Electron microscopy revealed abnormalities in endoplasmic reticulum structure (decrease in membrane length, swollen membranes, and decreased ribosome numbers) in the subfornical organ consistent with endoplasmic reticulum stress. Subfornical organ-targeted adenoviral delivery of GRP78, a resident endoplasmic reticulum chaperone, decreased DOCA-salt-induced saline-intake. The increase in saline-intake in response to DOCA-salt was blunted in CCAAT homologous binding protein-deficient mice, but these mice exhibited a normal hypertensive response. We conclude that (1) brain endoplasmic reticulum stress mediates the saline-intake, but not blood pressure response to DOCA-salt, (2) DOCA-salt causes endoplasmic reticulum stress in the subfornical organ, which when attenuated by GRP78 blunts saline-intake, and (3) CCAAT homologous binding protein may play a functional role in DOCA-salt-induced saline-intake. The results suggest a mechanistic distinction between the importance of endoplasmic reticulum stress in

  10. THE SOLAR FLARE IRON ABUNDANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K. J. H.; Dennis, B. R. E-mail: Brian.R.Dennis@nasa.gov

    2012-03-20

    The abundance of iron is measured from emission line complexes at 6.65 keV (Fe line) and 8 keV (Fe/Ni line) in RHESSI X-ray spectra during solar flares. Spectra during long-duration flares with steady declines were selected, with an isothermal assumption and improved data analysis methods over previous work. Two spectral fitting models give comparable results, viz., an iron abundance that is lower than previous coronal values but higher than photospheric values. In the preferred method, the estimated Fe abundance is A(Fe) = 7.91 {+-} 0.10 (on a logarithmic scale, with A(H) = 12) or 2.6 {+-} 0.6 times the photospheric Fe abundance. Our estimate is based on a detailed analysis of 1898 spectra taken during 20 flares. No variation from flare to flare is indicated. This argues for a fractionation mechanism similar to quiet-Sun plasma. The new value of A(Fe) has important implications for radiation loss curves, which are estimated.

  11. Coupling between roughness and freestream acceleration in turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Junlin; Piomelli, Ugo

    2015-11-01

    To explain various rough-wall flow responses to different types of free-stream conditions previously observed, we carried out a direct numerical simulation of a spatially developing turbulent boundary layer with freestream acceleration. Unlike the equilibrium (self-similar) accelerating scenario, where a strong acceleration leads to complete laminarization and lower friction, in the present non-equilibrium case the friction coefficient increases with acceleration, due to the faster near-wall acceleration than that of the freestream. At the same time, roughness reduces the near-wall time scale of the turbulence, preventing the acceleration from linearly stretching the near-wall eddies and freezing the turbulence intensity as in the smooth case. In addition, acceleration leads to similar decrease of mean-velocity logarithmic slope on rough and smooth walls; this allows a clear definition of the roughness function in a local sense. Interestingly, this roughness function correlates with the roughness Reynolds number in the same way as in self-similar or non-accelerating flows. This study may also help develop benchmark cases for evaluating rough-wall treatments for industrial turbulence models.

  12. Numerical prediction of rail roughness growth on tangent railway tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, J. C. O.

    2003-10-01

    Growth of railhead roughness (irregularities, waviness) is predicted through numerical simulation of dynamic train-track interaction on tangent track. The hypothesis is that wear is caused by longitudinal slip due to driven wheelsets, and that wear is proportional to the longitudinal frictional power in the contact patch. Emanating from an initial roughness spectrum corresponding to a new or a recent ground rail, an initial roughness profile is determined. Wheel-rail contact forces, creepages and wear for one wheelset passage are calculated in relation to location along a discretely supported track model. The calculated wear is scaled by a chosen number of wheelset passages, and is then added to the initial roughness profile. Field observations of rail corrugation on a Dutch track are used to validate the simulation model. Results from the simulations predict a large roughness growth rate for wavelengths around 30-40 mm. The large growth in this wavelength interval is explained by a low track receptance near the sleepers around the pinned-pinned resonance frequency, in combination with a large number of driven passenger wheelset passages at uniform speed. The agreement between simulations and field measurements is good with respect to dominating roughness wavelength and annual wear rate. Remedies for reducing roughness growth are discussed.

  13. Numerical Model Sensitivity to Heterogeneous Satellite Derived Vegetation Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jasinski, Michael; Eastman, Joseph; Borak, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    The sensitivity of a mesoscale weather prediction model to a 1 km satellite-based vegetation roughness initialization is investigated for a domain within the south central United States. Three different roughness databases are employed: i) a control or standard lookup table roughness that is a function only of land cover type, ii) a spatially heterogeneous roughness database, specific to the domain, that was previously derived using a physically based procedure and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery, and iii) a MODIS climatologic roughness database that like (i) is a function only of land cover type, but possesses domain specific mean values from (ii). The model used is the Weather Research and Forecast Model (WRF) coupled to the Community Land Model within the Land Information System (LIS). For each simulation, a statistical comparison is made between modeled results and ground observations within a domain including Oklahoma, Eastern Arkansas, and Northwest Louisiana during a 4-day period within IHOP 2002. Sensitivity analysis compares the impact the three roughness initializations on time-series temperature, precipitation probability of detection (POD), average wind speed, boundary layer height, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). Overall, the results indicate that, for the current investigation, replacement of the standard look-up table values with the satellite-derived values statistically improves model performance for most observed variables. Such natural roughness heterogeneity enhances the surface wind speed, PBL height and TKE production up to 10 percent, with a lesser effect over grassland, and greater effect over mixed land cover domains.

  14. Surface forces: Surface roughness in theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Drew F. Walsh, Rick B.; Craig, Vincent S. J.

    2014-04-28

    A method of incorporating surface roughness into theoretical calculations of surface forces is presented. The model contains two chief elements. First, surface roughness is represented as a probability distribution of surface heights around an average surface height. A roughness-averaged force is determined by taking an average of the classic flat-surface force, weighing all possible separation distances against the probability distributions of surface heights. Second the model adds a repulsive contact force due to the elastic contact of asperities. We derive a simple analytic expression for the contact force. The general impact of roughness is to amplify the long range behaviour of noncontact (DLVO) forces. The impact of the elastic contact force is to provide a repulsive wall which is felt at a separation between surfaces that scales with the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness of the surfaces. The model therefore provides a means of distinguishing between “true zero,” where the separation between the average centres of each surface is zero, and “apparent zero,” defined by the onset of the repulsive contact wall. A normal distribution may be assumed for the surface probability distribution, characterised by the RMS roughness measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Alternatively the probability distribution may be defined by the histogram of heights measured by AFM. Both methods of treating surface roughness are compared against the classic smooth surface calculation and experimental AFM measurement.

  15. The role of surface roughness in the measurement of slipperiness.

    PubMed

    Chang, W R; Kim, I J; Manning, D P; Bunterngchit, Y

    2001-10-20

    Surface roughness has been shown to have substantial effects on the slip resistance between shoe heels and floor surfaces under various types of walking environments. This paper summarizes comprehensive views of the current understanding on the roles of surface roughness on the shoe and floor surfaces in the measurement of slipperiness and discusses promising directions for future research. Various techniques and instruments for surface roughness measurements and related roughness parameters are reviewed in depth. It is suggested that a stylus-type profilometer and a laser scanning confocal microscope are the preferred instruments for surface roughness measurements in the field and laboratory, respectively. The need for developing enhanced methods for reliably characterizing the slip resistance properties is highlighted. This could be based on the principal understanding of the nature of shoe and floor interface and surface analysis techniques for characterizing both surfaces of shoe and floor. Therefore, surface roughness on both shoe and floor surfaces should be measured and combined to arrive at the final assessment of slipperiness. While controversies around the friction measurement for slipperiness assessment still remain, surface roughness measurement may provide an objective alternative to overcoming the limitations of friction measurements.

  16. Chlorhexidine-induced apoptosis or necrosis in L929 fibroblasts: A role for endoplasmic reticulum stress

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, Gisele; Cardoso, Cristina R.B.; Larson, Roy E.; Silva, Joao S.; Rossi, Marcos A.

    2009-01-15

    Chlorhexidine (CHX), widely used as antiseptic and therapeutic agent in medicine and dentistry, has a toxic effect both in vivo and in vitro. The intrinsic mechanism underlying CHX-induced cytotoxicity in eukaryotic cells is, however, still unknown. A recent study from our laboratory has suggested that CHX may induce death in cultured L929 fibroblasts via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This hypothesis was further tested by means of light and electron microscopy, quantification of apoptosis and necrosis by flow cytometry, fluorescence visualization of the cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum, and evaluation of the expression of 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein 78 (Grp78), a marker of activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in cultured L929 fibroblasts. Our finding showing increased Grp 78 expression in CHX-treated cells and the results of flow cytometry, cytoskeleton and endoplasmic reticulum fluorescence visualization, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy allowed us to suggest that CHX elicits accumulation of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, which causes ER overload, resulting in ER stress and cell death either by necrosis or apoptosis. It must be pointed out, however, that this does not necessarily mean that ER stress is the only way that CHX kills L929 fibroblasts, but rather that ER stress is an important target or indicator of cell death induced by this drug.

  17. The unit membrane, the endoplasmic reticulum, and the nuclear pores are artefacts.

    PubMed

    Hillman, H; Sartory, P

    1977-01-01

    It is shown on the basis of solid geometry that the trilaminar appearance of membranes described by Robertson must be an artefact, although the membranes themselves are not. However, considerations of solid geometry as well as observations on living cells indicate that the endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear pores are artefacts resulting from preparation for electron microscopy. Suggestions for their genesis are proposed.

  18. Organization of the cortical endoplasmic reticulum in the squid giant axon.

    PubMed

    Metuzals, J; Chang, D; Hammar, K; Reese, T S

    1997-08-01

    The organization of the cortical endoplasmic reticulum in the squid giant axon was investigated by rapid freeze and freeze-substitution electron microscopy, thereby eliminating the effects of fixatives on this potentially labile structure. Juvenile squid, which have thinner Schwann sheaths, were used in order to achieve freezing deep enough to include the entire axonal cortex. The smooth endoplasmic reticulum is composed of subaxolemmal and deeper cisternae, tubules, tethers and vesicles. The subaxolemmal cisternae make junctional contacts with the axolemma which are characterized by filamentous-granular bridging structures approximately 3 nm in diameter. The subaxolemmal junctions with the axolemma resemble the coupling junctions between the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the T-tubules in muscle. Reconstruction of short series of sections showed that a number of the elements of the endoplasmic reticulum were continuous but numerous separate vesicles were present as well. The morphology of endoplasmic reticulum as described here suggests that it is a highly dynamic entity as well as a Ca2+ sequestering organelle.

  19. Modulation of active Ca2+ uptake by the islet-cell endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Colca, J R; Kotagal, N; Lacy, P E; McDaniel, M L

    1983-01-01

    The possible effects of calmodulin and cyclic AMP on active Ca2+ uptake by the islet-cell endoplasmic reticulum were investigated. Neither calmodulin nor cyclic AMP affected the rate of active Ca2+ uptake, or the steady-state filling capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum when measured in the absence of oxalate. Consistent with these results, calmodulin did not activate the Ca2+-stimulated ATPase activity associated with this cell fraction. During the course of these experiments., it was unexpectedly discovered that the rate of Ca2+ uptake, as well as the steady-state Ca2+ filling capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum, were markedly increased by unidentified factor(s) in the cytosol. This effect could be demonstrated by reconstitution of the membranes in cytosol, or by direct addition of fresh or dialysed cytosol to the Ca2+ uptake assays. The degree of activation by the cytosol indicates that the endoplasmic reticulum may play a prominent role in controlling beta-cell Ca2+ concentrations and that the unidentified activator(s) present in the cytosol may be involved in regulation of this function. PMID:6307286

  20. Abundance estimation and conservation biology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, J.D.; MacKenzie, D.I.

    2004-01-01

    Abundance is the state variable of interest in most population–level ecological research and in most programs involving management and conservation of animal populations. Abundance is the single parameter of interest in capture–recapture models for closed populations (e.g., Darroch, 1958; Otis et al., 1978; Chao, 2001). The initial capture–recapture models developed for partially (Darroch, 1959) and completely (Jolly, 1965; Seber, 1965) open populations represented efforts to relax the restrictive assumption of population closure for the purpose of estimating abundance. Subsequent emphases in capture–recapture work were on survival rate estimation in the 1970’s and 1980’s (e.g., Burnham et al., 1987; Lebreton et al.,1992), and on movement estimation in the 1990’s (Brownie et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 1993). However, from the mid–1990’s until the present time, capture–recapture investigators have expressed a renewed interest in abundance and related parameters (Pradel, 1996; Schwarz & Arnason, 1996; Schwarz, 2001). The focus of this session was abundance, and presentations covered topics ranging from estimation of abundance and rate of change in abundance, to inferences about the demographic processes underlying changes in abundance, to occupancy as a surrogate of abundance. The plenary paper by Link & Barker (2004) is provocative and very interesting, and it contains a number of important messages and suggestions. Link & Barker (2004) emphasize that the increasing complexity of capture–recapture models has resulted in large numbers of parameters and that a challenge to ecologists is to extract ecological signals from this complexity. They offer hierarchical models as a natural approach to inference in which traditional parameters are viewed as realizations of stochastic processes. These processes are governed by hyperparameters, and the inferential approach focuses on these hyperparameters. Link & Barker (2004) also suggest that our attention

  1. Actinide abundances in ordinary chondrites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagee, B.; Bernatowicz, T.J.; Podosek, F.A.; Johnson, M.L.; Burnett, D.S.; Tatsumoto, M.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of 244Pu fission Xe, U, Th, and light REE (LREE) abundances, along with modal petrographic determinations of phosphate abundances, were carried out on equilibrated ordinary chondrites in order to define better the solar system Pu abundance and to determine the degree of variation of actinide and LREE abundances. Our data permit comparison of the directly measured Pu/ U ratio with that determined indirectly as (Pu/Nd) ?? (Nd/U) assuming that Pu behaves chemically as a LREE. Except for Guaren??a, and perhaps H chondrites in general, Pu concentrations are similar to that determined previously for St. Se??verin, although less precise because of higher trapped Xe contents. Trapped 130Xe 136Xe ratios appear to vary from meteorite to meteorite, but, relative to AVCC, all are similar in the sense of having less of the interstellar heavy Xe found in carbonaceous chondrite acid residues. The Pu/U and Pu/Nd ratios are consistent with previous data for St. Se??verin, but both tend to be slightly higher than those inferred from previous data on Angra dos Reis. Although significant variations exist, the distribution of our Th/U ratios, along with other precise isotope dilution data for ordinary chondrites, is rather symmetric about the CI chondrite value; however, actinide/(LREE) ratios are systematically lower than the CI value. Variations in actinide or LREE absolute and relative abundances are interpreted as reflecting differences in the proportions and/or compositions of more primitive components (chondrules and CAI materials?) incorporated into different regions of the ordinary chondrite parent bodies. The observed variations of Th/U, Nd/U, or Ce/U suggest that measurements of Pu/U on any single equilibrated ordinary chondrite specimen, such as St. Se??verin, should statistically be within ??20-30% of the average solar system value, although it is also clear that anomalous samples exist. ?? 1990.

  2. Reconstruction of scattering properties of rough air-dielectric boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. G.; Zhdanov, D. D.; Potemin, I. S.; Garbul, A. A.; Voloboy, A. G.; Galaktionov, V. A.; Kirilov, N.

    2016-10-01

    The article is devoted to elaboration of the method of reconstruction of rough surface scattering properties. The object with rough surface is made of transparent dielectric material. Typically these properties are described with bi-directional scattering distribution function (BSDF). Direct measurement of such function is either impossible or very expensive. The suggested solution provides physically reasonable method for the rough surface BSDF reconstruction. The method is based on Monte-Carlo ray tracing simulation for BSDF calculation. Optimization technique is further applied to correctly reconstruct the BSDF. The results of the BSDF reconstruction together with measurement results are presented in the article as well.

  3. Surface roughness scattering of electrons in bulk mosfets

    SciTech Connect

    Zuverink, Amanda Renee

    2015-11-01

    Surface-roughness scattering of electrons at the Si-SiO2 interface is a very important consideration when analyzing Si metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Scattering reduces the mobility of the electrons and degrades the device performance. 250-nm and 50-nm bulk MOSFETs were simulated with varying device parameters and mesh sizes in order to compare the effects of surface-roughness scattering in multiple devices. The simulation framework includes the ensemble Monte Carlo method used to solve the Boltzmann transport equation coupled with a successive over-relaxation method used to solve the two-dimensional Poisson's equation. Four methods for simulating the surface-roughness scattering of electrons were implemented on both devices and compared: the constant specularity parameter, the momentum-dependent specularity parameter, and the real-space-roughness method with both uniform and varying electric fields. The specularity parameter is the probability of an electron scattering speculariy from a rough surface. It can be chosen as a constant, characterizing partially diffuse scattering of all electrons from the surface the same way, or it can be momentum dependent, where the size of rms roughness and the normal component of the electron wave number determine the probability of electron-momentum randomization. The real-space rough surface method uses the rms roughness height and correlation length of an actual MOSFET to simulate a rough interface. Due to their charge, electrons scatter from the electric field and not directly from the surface. If the electric field is kept uniform, the electrons do not perceive the roughness and scatter as if from a at surface. However, if the field is allowed to vary, the electrons scatter from the varying electric field as they would in a MOSFET. These methods were implemented for both the 50-nm and 250-nm MOSFETs, and using the rms roughness heights and correlation lengths for real devices. The

  4. Reconstruction of scattering properties of rough air-dielectric boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, V. G.; Zhdanov, D. D.; Potemin, I. S.; Garbul, A. A.; Voloboy, A. G.; Galaktionov, V. A.; Kirilov, N.

    2016-08-01

    The article is devoted to elaboration of the method of reconstruction of rough surface scattering properties. The object with rough surface is made of transparent dielectric material. Typically these properties are described with bi-directional scattering distribution function (BSDF). Direct measurement of such function is either impossible or very expensive. The suggested solution provides physically reasonable method for the rough surface BSDF reconstruction. The method is based on Monte-Carlo ray tracing simulation for BSDF calculation. Optimization technique is further applied to correctly reconstruct the BSDF. The results of the BSDF reconstruction together with measurement results are presented in the article as well.

  5. Research on pavement roughness based on the laser triangulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenxue; Ni, Zhibin; Hu, Xinhan; Lu, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    Pavement roughness is one of the most important factors for appraising highway construction. In this paper, we choose the laser triangulation to measure pavement roughness. The principle and configuration of laser triangulation are introduced. Based on this technology, the pavement roughness of a road surface is measured. The measurement results are given in this paper. The measurement range of this system is 50 μm. The measurement error of this technology is analyzed. This technology has an important significance to appraise the quality of highway after completion of the workload.

  6. A rough earth scattering model for multipath prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, L. J.; Chestnut, P. C.

    1970-01-01

    The most important phenomena to be considered in a model of radio wave communication between earth satellites are scattering from the surface of the earth. A model is derived and implemented on a computer to predict the field received after reflection from a rough, spherical earth. The scattering integrals are computed numerically; the domain of integration is the appropriate region on the surface of the earth. Calculations have been performed at VHF frequencies and for terrain which could be described as marshy land. Rough surface scattering calculations must be performed over a spherical earth when satellites are involved. There is a definite dependence on the values of the roughness, and the correlation length.

  7. Thermal Stability of Ice on Ceres with Rough Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul O.; Aharonson, Oded

    2015-11-01

    The dwarf planet Ceres may have an ice-rich crust, and subsurface ice exposed by impacts or endogenic activity would be subject to sublimation. The “bright spots” recently discovered by the Dawn mission on the illuminated surface of Ceres have prompted speculation regarding their possible icy composition and the youthful age this might imply. Furthermore, sublimation of ice at the surface or in the interior of Ceres could explain water vapor observed on more than one occasion in the exosphere. We investigated the possible distribution and lifetimes of water ice and other volatiles on Ceres using detailed thermal models, including realistic thermophysical properties and surface roughness.Topographic shadowing creates polar cold traps where a small, but non-negligible fraction (~0.4%) of Ceres' surface is perennially below the ~110 K criterion for 1 Gyr of H2O ice stability. These areas are found above 60° latitude. Other molecules (CH3OH, NH3, SO2, CO2) may be cold-trapped in smaller abundances. A model for the transport, gravitational escape and photoionization of H2O molecules suggests net accumulation in the cold traps. At latitudes 0° - 30°, ice is stable under solar illumination only briefly (~10-100 yr), unless it has high albedo and thermal inertia, in which case lifetimes of > 104 yr are possible.Buried ice is stable within a meter for > 1 Gyr at latitudes higher than ~50°. An illuminated polar cap of water ice would be stable within a few degrees of the poles only if it maintained a high albedo (> 0.5) at present obliquity. If the obliquity exceeded 5° in the geologically recent past, then a putative polar cap would have been erased. Finally, a small hemispheric asymmetry exists due to the timing of Ceres' perihelion passage, which would lead to a detectable enhancement of ice in the northern hemisphere if the orbital elements vary slowly relative to the ice accumulation rate. Our model results are potentially testable during the Dawn science

  8. Marius Hills: Surface Roughness from LROC and Mini-RF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, S.; Hawke, B. R.; Bussey, B.; Stopar, J. D.; Denevi, B.; Robinson, M.; Tran, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Team is collecting hundreds of high-resolution (0.5 m/pixel) Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) images of lunar volcanic constructs (domes, “cones”, and associated features) [1,2]. Marius Hills represents the largest concentration of volcanic features on the Moon and is a high-priority target for future exploration [3,4]. NAC images of this region provide new insights into the morphology and geology of specific features at the meter scale, including lava flow fronts, tectonic features, layers, and topography (using LROC stereo imagery) [2]. Here, we report initial results from Mini-RF and LROC collaborative studies of the Marius Hills. Mini-RF uses a hybrid polarimetric architecture to measure surface backscatter characteristics and can acquire data in one of two radar bands, S (12 cm) or X (4 cm) [5]. The spatial resolution of Mini-RF (15 m/pixel) enables correlation of features observed in NAC images to Mini-RF data. Mini-RF S-Band zoom-mode data and daughter products, such as circular polarization ratio (CPR), were directly compared to NAC images. Mini-RF S-Band radar images reveal enhanced radar backscatter associated with volcanic constructs in the Marius Hills region. Mini-RF data show that Marius Hills volcanic constructs have enhanced average CPR values (0.5-0.7) compared to the CPR values of the surrounding mare (~0.4). This result is consistent with the conclusions of [6], and implies that the lava flows comprising the domes in this region are blocky. To quantify the surface roughness [e.g., 6,7] block populations associated with specific geologic features in the Marius Hills region are being digitized from NAC images. Only blocks that can be unambiguously identified (>1 m diameter) are included in the digitization process, producing counts and size estimates of the block population. High block abundances occur mainly at the distal ends of lava flows. The average size of these blocks is 9 m, and 50% of observed

  9. The Research of Tax Text Categorization based on Rough Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bin; Xu, Guang; Xu, Qian; Zhang, Nan

    To solve the problem of effective of categorization of text data in taxation system, the paper analyses the text data and the size calculation of key issues first, then designs text categorization based on rough set model.

  10. In vivo surface roughness evolution of a stressed metallic implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Henry

    2016-10-01

    Implant-associated infection, a serious medical issue, is caused by the adhesion of bacteria to the surface of biomaterials; for this process the surface roughness is an important property. Surface nanotopography of medical implant devices can control the extent of bacterial attachment by modifying the surface morphology; to this end a model is introduced to facilitate the analysis of a nanoscale smooth surface subject to mechanical loading and in vivo corrosion. At nanometre scale rough surface promotes friction, hence reduces the mobility of the bacteria; this sessile environment expedites the biofilm growth. This manuscript derives the controlling equation for surface roughness evolution for metallic implant subject to in-plane stresses, and predicts the in vivo roughness changes within 6 h of continued mechanical loading at different stress level. This paper provides analytic tool and theoretical information for surface nanotopography of medical implant devices.

  11. Roughness and growth in a continuous fluid invasion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecht, Inbal; Taitelbaum, Haim

    2004-10-01

    We have studied interface characteristics in a continuous fluid invasion model, first introduced by Cieplak and Robbins [Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 2042 (1988)]. In this model, the interface grows as a response to an applied quasistatic pressure, which induces various types of instabilities. We suggest a variant of the model, which differs from the original model by the order of instabilities treatment. This order represents the relative importance of the physical mechanisms involved in the system. This variant predicts the existence of a third, intermediate regime, in the behavior of the roughness exponent as a function of the wetting properties of the system. The gradual increase of the roughness exponent in this third regime can explain the scattered experimental data for the roughness exponent in the literature. The growth exponent in this model was found to be around zero, due to the initial rough interface.

  12. 34. ROUGH GAS MAIN RUNNING SOUTHEAST FROM THE BOP SHOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. ROUGH GAS MAIN RUNNING SOUTHEAST FROM THE BOP SHOP TO THE DUAL VENTURI GAS WASHERS. - U.S. Steel Duquesne Works, Basic Oxygen Steelmaking Plant, Along Monongahela River, Duquesne, Allegheny County, PA

  13. Roughness of moving elastic lines: crack and wetting fronts.

    PubMed

    Katzav, E; Adda-Bedia, M; Ben Amar, M; Boudaoud, A

    2007-11-01

    We investigate propagating fronts in disordered media that belong to the universality class of wetting contact lines and planar tensile crack fronts. We derive from first principles their nonlinear equations of motion, using the generalized Griffith criterion for crack fronts and three standard mobility laws for contact lines. Then we study their roughness using the self-consistent expansion. When neglecting the irreversibility of fracture and wetting processes, we find a possible dynamic rough phase with a roughness exponent of zeta=1/2 and a dynamic exponent of z=2. When including the irreversibility, we conclude that the front propagation can become history dependent, and thus we consider the value zeta=1/2 as a lower bound for the roughness exponent. Interestingly, for propagating contact line in wetting, where irreversibility is weaker than in fracture, the experimental results are close to 0.5, while for fracture the reported values of 0.55-0.65 are higher.

  14. 7 CFR 51.776 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin may be slightly thick but not excessively thick, materially ridged or grooved. “Slightly thick” means that the skin thickness does not average more than...

  15. Ice friction: The effects of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kietzig, Anne-Marie; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G.; Englezos, Peter

    2009-07-15

    The effect of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity on ice friction is studied systematically over a wide range of temperature and sliding speeds using several metallic interfaces. Hydrophobicity in combination with controlled roughness at the nanoscale is achieved by femtosecond laser irradiation to mimic the lotus effect on the slider's surface. The controlled roughness significantly increases the coefficient of friction at low sliding speeds and temperatures well below the ice melting point. However, at temperatures close to the melting point and relatively higher speeds, roughness and hydrophobicity significantly decrease ice friction. This decrease in friction is mainly due to the suppression of capillary bridges in spite of the presence of surface asperities that facilitate their formation. Finally, grooves oriented in the sliding direction also significantly decrease friction in the low velocity range compared to scratches and grooves randomly distributed over a surface.

  16. Spectral Analysis and Experimental Modeling of Ice Accretion Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, D. J.; Breuer, K. S.; Torres, B. E.; Hansman, R. J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    A self-consistent scheme for relating wind tunnel ice accretion roughness to the resulting enhancement of heat transfer is described. First, a spectral technique of quantitative analysis of early ice roughness images is reviewed. The image processing scheme uses a spectral estimation technique (SET) which extracts physically descriptive parameters by comparing scan lines from the experimentally-obtained accretion images to a prescribed test function. Analysis using this technique for both streamwise and spanwise directions of data from the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) are presented. An experimental technique is then presented for constructing physical roughness models suitable for wind tunnel testing that match the SET parameters extracted from the IRT images. The icing castings and modeled roughness are tested for enhancement of boundary layer heat transfer using infrared techniques in a "dry" wind tunnel.

  17. Ice friction: The effects of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kietzig, Anne-Marie; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G.; Englezos, Peter

    2009-07-01

    The effect of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity on ice friction is studied systematically over a wide range of temperature and sliding speeds using several metallic interfaces. Hydrophobicity in combination with controlled roughness at the nanoscale is achieved by femtosecond laser irradiation to mimic the lotus effect on the slider's surface. The controlled roughness significantly increases the coefficient of friction at low sliding speeds and temperatures well below the ice melting point. However, at temperatures close to the melting point and relatively higher speeds, roughness and hydrophobicity significantly decrease ice friction. This decrease in friction is mainly due to the suppression of capillary bridges in spite of the presence of surface asperities that facilitate their formation. Finally, grooves oriented in the sliding direction also significantly decrease friction in the low velocity range compared to scratches and grooves randomly distributed over a surface.

  18. Chemical basis of rough and smooth variation in mycobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Belisle, J T; Brennan, P J

    1989-01-01

    Rough and smooth colony variants of Mycobacterium kansasii were compared with respect to surface glycolipid composition. Thin-layer chromatography of the native glycolipid antigens, gas chromatography of the constituent sugars, and in situ probing with an appropriate monoclonal antibody by colony dot blot enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunogold labeling demonstrated that all M. kansasii strains of smooth colony morphology contain on their surfaces the recently described trehalose-containing lipooligosaccharides, whereas all rough variants were devoid of such surface antigens. Yet all strains, rough and smooth, contained another glycolipid, the M. kansasii-specific phenolic glycolipid. Previous studies by others had shown that the rough forms of M. kansasii persist longer than smooth variants in experimentally infected mice. Therefore, this study may provide some insight into the question of the chemical basis of pathogenesis in certain mycobacteria. Images PMID:2722755

  19. Surface Roughness Measurement on a Wing Aircraft by Speckle Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Félix; Barrientos, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The study of the damage of aeronautical materials is important because it may change the microscopic surface structure profiles. The modification of geometrical surface properties can cause small instabilities and then a displacement of the boundary layer. One of the irregularities we can often find is surface roughness. Due to an increase of roughness and other effects, there may be extra momentum losses in the boundary layer and a modification in the parasite drag. In this paper we present a speckle method for measuring the surface roughness on an actual unmanned aircraft wing. The results show an inhomogeneous roughness distribution on the wing, as expected according to the anisotropic influence of the winds over the entire wing geometry. A calculation of the uncertainty of the technique is given. PMID:24013488

  20. Controlling adhesion force by means of nanoscale surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Shivaprakash N; Clasohm, Lucy Y; Rao, Akshata; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2011-08-16

    Control of adhesion is a crucial aspect in the design of microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical devices. To understand the dependence of adhesion on nanometer-scale surface roughness, a roughness gradient has been employed. Monomodal roughness gradients were fabricated by means of silica nanoparticles (diameter ∼12 nm) to produce substrates with varying nanoparticle density. Pull-off force measurements on the gradients were performed using (polyethylene) colloidal-probe microscopy under perfluorodecalin, in order to restrict interactions to van der Waals forces. The influence of normal load on pull-off forces was studied and the measured forces compared with existing Hamaker-approximation-based models. We observe that adhesion force reaches a minimum value at an optimum particle density on the gradient sample, where the mean particle spacing becomes comparable with the diameter of the contact area with the polyethylene sphere. We also observe that the effect on adhesion of increasing the normal load depends on the roughness of the surface.

  1. Wetting failure of hydrophilic surfaces promoted by surface roughness

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meng-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Peng; Wang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Wetting failure is of vital importance to many physical phenomena, such as industrial coating and drop emission. Here we show when and how the surface roughness promotes the destabilization of a moving contact line on a hydrophilic surface. Beyond the balance of the driving force and viscous resistance where a stable wetting interface is sustained, wetting failure occurs and is modified by the roughness of the surface. The promoting effect arises only when the wetting velocity is high enough to create a gas-liquid-solid composite interface in the vicinity of the moving contact line, and it is a function of the intrinsic contact angle and proportion of solid tops. We propose a model to explain splashes of rough solid spheres impacting into liquids. It reveals a novel concept that dynamic wetting on hydrophilic rough surfaces can be similar to that on hydrophobic surfaces, and brings a new way to design surfaces with specific wetting properties. PMID:24948390

  2. Surface roughness measurement on a wing aircraft by speckle correlation.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Félix; Barrientos, Alberto

    2013-09-05

    The study of the damage of aeronautical materials is important because it may change the microscopic surface structure profiles. The modification of geometrical surface properties can cause small instabilities and then a displacement of the boundary layer. One of the irregularities we can often find is surface roughness. Due to an increase of roughness and other effects, there may be extra momentum losses in the boundary layer and a modification in the parasite drag. In this paper we present a speckle method for measuring the surface roughness on an actual unmanned aircraft wing. The results show an inhomogeneous roughness distribution on the wing, as expected according to the anisotropic influence of the winds over the entire wing geometry. A calculation of the uncertainty of the technique is given.

  3. 7 CFR 51.776 - Slightly rough texture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... texture. Slightly rough texture means that the skin may be slightly thick but not excessively thick, materially ridged or grooved. “Slightly thick” means that the skin thickness does not average more than...

  4. Scatterometry modeling for gratings with roughness and irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, Joerg; Hehl, Karl

    2016-03-01

    A rigorous electromagnetic simulation method for grating diffraction is presented that concurrently enables appropriate roughness and irregularity modeling. The approach will it make possible for example to overlay surface roughness and or line edge roughness (LER) to regular patterns. In this way, a unique tool is provided to model diffraction and scattering at the same time. It is based on a combination of modal methods such as the RCWA or C-method with near field stitching and subsequent near-to-far field propagation. This paves the way to an efficient and accurate modeling of large scattering areas. Fields of applications are the design of spectrographic gratings as well as optical scatterometry or kindred optical metrology techniques. Examples are provided both for 2D line/space patterns with sinusoidal and blaze profiles and 3D line/space patterns possessing LER and line width roughness (LWR). First ideas are derived how to determine LER and LWR from scatterometric measurements.

  5. Analysis of Surface Roughness at Overlapping Laser Shock Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, F. Z.; Zhang, Z. D.; Zhou, J. Z.; Lu, J. Z.; Zhang, Y. K.

    2016-02-01

    The overlapping effects on surface roughness are studied when samples are treated by laser shock peening (LSP). Surface roughness of overlapped circular laser spot is calculated by ISO 25178 height parameters. The usually used overlapping styles namely isosceles-right-triangle-style (AAP) and equilateral-triangle-style (AAA) are carefully investigated when the overlapping degree in x-axis (ηx) is below 50%. Surface roughness of isosceles-right-triangle-style attains its minimum value at ηx of 29.3%, and attains its maximum value at ηx of 43.6%. Surface roughness of equilateral-triangle-style attains its minimum value at ηx of 42.3%, and attains its maximum value at ηx of 32%. Experimental results are well consistent with theoretical analysis.

  6. Coronal abundances and their variation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saba, Julia L. R.

    1994-01-01

    This contract supports the investigation of elemental abundances in the solar corona, principally through analysis of high-resolution software X-ray spectra from the Flat Crystal Spectrometer on NASA's Solar Maximum Mission. The goals of the study are a characterization of the mean values of relative abundances of elements accessible in the FCS data, and information on the extent and circumstances of their variability. This report is a summation of the data analysis and reporting activities which occurred since the last report, submitted two months early, in April 1994, to facilitate evaluation of the first year's progress for contract renewal. Hence this report covers the period 15 April 1994 - 15 December 1994. A list of publications resulting from this research is included.

  7. Abundant type 10 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in the hippocampus of mouse Alzheimer's disease model.

    PubMed

    He, Xue Ying; Wen, Guang Yeong; Merz, George; Lin, Dawei; Yang, Ying Zi; Mehta, Penkaj; Schulz, Horst; Yang, Song Yu

    2002-02-28

    A full-length cDNA of mouse type 10 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17 beta-HSD10) was cloned from brain, representing the accurate nucleotide sequence information that rendered possible an accurate deduction of the amino acid sequence of the wild-type enzyme. A comparison of sequences and three-dimensional models of this enzyme revealed that structures previously reported by other groups carry either a truncated or mutated amino-terminal sequence. Fusion of the first 11 residues of the wild-type enzyme to the green fluorescent protein directed the reporter protein into mitochondria. Thus, the N-terminus was identified as a mitochondrial targeting signal that accounts for the intracellular localization of the mouse enzyme. This enzyme is normally associated with mitochondria, not with the endoplasmic reticulum as suggested by its trivial name 'endoplasmic reticulum-associated amyloid-beta biding protein (ERAB)'. After its C-terminal region was used to raise rabbit anti-17 betaHSD10 antibodies, immunogold electron microscopy showed that an abundance of this enzyme could be found in hippocampal synaptic mitochondria of betaAPP transgenic mice, but not in normal controls. High levels of this enzyme may disrupt steroid hormone homeostasis in synapses and contribute to synapse loss in the hippocampus of the mouse Alzheimer's disease model. PMID:11869808

  8. The solar abundance of thulium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, J. E.; Aller, L. H.

    1974-01-01

    Consideration of one relatively unblended line of the solar spectrum, namely, the 3131.258-A line of Tm II, which yields a thulium abundance of 0.80 plus or minus 0.10 with the Corliss and Bozman (1962) f-value. The uncertainty of this figure is discussed in conjunction with the contradictory findings of some other investigators. The need for further detailed study of the lanthanides by the method of spectrum synthesis is pointed out.

  9. Fatal pox infection in a rough-legged hawk.

    PubMed

    Pearson, G L; Pass, D A; Beggs, E C

    1975-04-01

    Natural pox infection occurred in a free-living rough-legged hawk (Buteo lagopus) in northeastern North Dakota. Gross, histological and electron microscopic findings were typical of pox infection, and characteristic lesions developed in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) but not in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) following inoculation with case material. Death of the rough-legged hawk was attributed to starvation rsulting from inability to capture prey and to blood loss from foot lesions. PMID:167207

  10. Wind tunnel model surface gauge for measuring roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vorburger, T. V.; Gilsinn, D. E.; Teague, E. C.; Giauque, C. H. W.; Scire, F. E.; Cao, L. X.

    1987-01-01

    The optical inspection of surface roughness research has proceeded along two different lines. First, research into a quantitative understanding of light scattering from metal surfaces and into the appropriate models to describe the surfaces themselves. Second, the development of a practical instrument for the measurement of rms roughness of high performance wind tunnel models with smooth finishes. The research is summarized, with emphasis on the second avenue of research.

  11. Convective Enhancement of Icing Roughness Elements in Stagnation Region Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, Michael T.; McClain, Stephen T.; Vargas, Mario; Broeren, Andy

    2015-01-01

    To improve existing ice accretion simulation codes, more data regarding ice roughness and its effects on convective heat transfer are required. To build on existing research on this topic, this study used the Vertical Icing Studies Tunnel (VIST) at NASA Glenn Research to model realistic ice roughness in the stagnation region of a NACA 0012 airfoil. Using the VIST, a test plate representing the leading 2% chord of the airfoil was subjected to flows of 7.62 m/s (25 ft/s), 12.19 m/s (40 ft/s), and 16.76 m/s (55 ft/s). The test plate was fitted with 3 surfaces, each with a different representation of ice roughness: 1) a control surface with no ice roughness, 2) a surface with ice roughness with element height scaled by 10x and streamwise rough zone width from the stagnation point scaled by 10x, and 3) a surface with ice roughness with element height scaled by 10x and streamwise rough zone width from the stagnation point scaled by 25x. Temperature data from the tests were recorded using an infrared camera and thermocouples imbedded in the test plate. From the temperature data, a convective heat transfer coefficient map was created for each case. Additional testing was also performed to validate the VIST's flow quality. These tests included five-hole probe and hot-wire probe velocity traces to provide flow visualization and to study boundary layer formation on the various test surfaces. The knowledge gained during the experiments will help improve ice accretion codes by providing heat transfer coefficient validation data and by providing flow visualization data helping understand current and future experiments performed in the VIST.

  12. Surface roughness and wear of resin cements after toothbrush abrasion.

    PubMed

    Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Ordoñéz-Aguilera, Juan Fernando; Maenosono, Rafael Massunari; Volú, Fernanda Lessa Amaral; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2015-01-01

    Increased surface roughness and wear of resin cements may cause failure of indirect restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the surface roughness change and the vertical wear of four resin cements subjected to mechanical toothbrushing abrasion. Ten rectangular specimens (15 × 5 × 4 mm) were fabricated according to manufacturer instructions for each group (n = 10): Nexus 3, Kerr (NX3); RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE (ARC); RelyX U100, 3M ESPE (U100); and Variolink II, Ivoclar/Vivadent (VL2). Initial roughness (Ra, µm) was obtained through 5 readings with a roughness meter. Specimens were then subjected to toothbrushing abrasion (100,000 cycles), and further evaluation was conducted for final roughness. Vertical wear (µm) was quantified by 3 readings of the real profile between control and brushed surfaces. Data were subjected to analysis of variance, followed by Tukey's test (p < 0.05). The Pearson correlation test was performed between the surface roughness change and wear (p < 0.05). The mean values of initial/final roughness (Ra, µm)/wear (µm) were as follows: NX3 (0.078/0.127/23.175); ARC (0.086/0.246/20.263); U100 (0.296/0.589/16.952); and VL2 (0.313/0.512/22.876). Toothbrushing abrasion increased surface roughness and wear of all resin cements tested, although no correlation was found between those variables. Vertical wear was similar among groups; however, it was considered high and may lead to gap formation in indirect restorations.

  13. Fatal pox infection in a rough-legged hawk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, G.L.; Pass, D.A.; Beggs, E.C.

    1975-01-01

    Natural pox infection occurred in a free-living rough-legged hawk (Buteo lagopus) in northeastern North Dakota. Gross, histological and electron microscopic findings were typical of pox infection, and characteristic lesions developed in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) but not in great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) following inoculation with case material. Death of the rough-legged hawk was attributed to starvation resulting from inability to capture prey and to blood loss from foot lesions.

  14. A possibility of avoiding surface roughness due to insects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wortmann, F. X.

    1984-01-01

    Discussion of a method for eliminating turbulence caused by the formation of insect roughness upon the leading edges and fuselage, particularly in aircraft using BLC. The proposed technique foresees the use of elastic surfaces on which insect roughness cannot form. The operational characteristics of highly elastic rubber surface fastened to the wing leading edges and fuselage edges are examined. Some preliminary test results are presented. The technique is seen to be advantageous primarily for short-haul operations.

  15. Instability of a Supersonic Boundary-Layer with Localized Roughness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marxen, Olaf; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2010-01-01

    A localized 3-D roughness causes boundary-layer separation and (weak) shocks. Most importantly, streamwise vortices occur which induce streamwise (low U, high T) streaks. Immersed boundary method (volume force) suitable to represent roughness element in DNS. Favorable comparison between bi-global stability theory and DNS for a "y-mode" Outlook: Understand the flow physics (investigate "z-modes" in DNS through sinuous spanwise forcing, study origin of the beat in DNS).

  16. Effects of enviromentally imposed roughness on airfoil performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1987-01-01

    The experimental evidence for the effects of rain, insects, and ice on airfoil performance are examined. The extent to which the available information can be incorporated in a calculation method in terms of change of shape and surface roughness is discussed. The methods described are based on the interactive boundary layer procedure of Cebeci or on the thin layer Navier Stokes procedure developed at NASA. Cases presented show that extensive flow separation occurs on the rough surfaces.

  17. Surface Roughness Parameter Uncertainties on Radar Based Soil Moisture Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, A. T.; vanderVelde, R.; O'Neill, P. E.; Lang, R.; Su, Z.; Gish, T.

    2012-01-01

    Surface roughness variations are often assumed to be negligible for the retrieval of sol moisture. Although previous investigations have suggested that this assumption is reasonable for natural vegetation covers (i.e. Moran et al. 2002), in-situ measurements over plowed agricultural fields (i.e. Callens et al. 2006) have shown that the soil surface roughness can change considerably due to weathering induced by rain.

  18. Surface roughness and wear of resin cements after toothbrush abrasion.

    PubMed

    Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi; Ordoñéz-Aguilera, Juan Fernando; Maenosono, Rafael Massunari; Volú, Fernanda Lessa Amaral; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2015-01-01

    Increased surface roughness and wear of resin cements may cause failure of indirect restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate quantitatively the surface roughness change and the vertical wear of four resin cements subjected to mechanical toothbrushing abrasion. Ten rectangular specimens (15 × 5 × 4 mm) were fabricated according to manufacturer instructions for each group (n = 10): Nexus 3, Kerr (NX3); RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE (ARC); RelyX U100, 3M ESPE (U100); and Variolink II, Ivoclar/Vivadent (VL2). Initial roughness (Ra, µm) was obtained through 5 readings with a roughness meter. Specimens were then subjected to toothbrushing abrasion (100,000 cycles), and further evaluation was conducted for final roughness. Vertical wear (µm) was quantified by 3 readings of the real profile between control and brushed surfaces. Data were subjected to analysis of variance, followed by Tukey's test (p < 0.05). The Pearson correlation test was performed between the surface roughness change and wear (p < 0.05). The mean values of initial/final roughness (Ra, µm)/wear (µm) were as follows: NX3 (0.078/0.127/23.175); ARC (0.086/0.246/20.263); U100 (0.296/0.589/16.952); and VL2 (0.313/0.512/22.876). Toothbrushing abrasion increased surface roughness and wear of all resin cements tested, although no correlation was found between those variables. Vertical wear was similar among groups; however, it was considered high and may lead to gap formation in indirect restorations. PMID:25466330

  19. The influence of surface treatment on the implant roughness pattern

    PubMed Central

    ROSA, Marcio Borges; ALBREKTSSON, Tomas; FRANCISCHONE, Carlos Eduardo; SCHWARTZ FILHO, Humberto Osvaldo; WENNERBERG, Ann

    2012-01-01

    An important parameter for the clinical success of dental implants is the formation of direct contact between the implant and surrounding bone, whose quality is directly influenced by the implant surface roughness. A screw-shaped design and a surface with an average roughness of Sa of 1-2 µm showed a better result. The combination of blasting and etching has been a commonly used surface treatment technique. The versatility of this type of treatment allows for a wide variation in the procedures in order to obtain the desired roughness. Objectives To compare the roughness values and morphological characteristics of 04 brands of implants, using the same type of surface treatment. In addition, to compare the results among brands, in order to assess whether the type of treatment determines the values and the characteristics of implant surface roughness. Material and methods Three implants were purchased directly from each selected company in the market, i.e., 03 Brazilian companies (Biomet 3i of Brazil, Neodent and Titaniumfix) and 01 Korean company (Oneplant). The quantitative or numerical characterization of the roughness was performed using an interferometer. The qualitative analysis of the surface topography obtained with the treatment was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy images. Results The evaluated implants showed a significant variation in roughness values: Sa for Oneplant was 1.01 µm; Titaniumfix reached 0.90 µm; implants from Neodent 0.67 µm, and Biomet 3i of Brazil 0.53 µm. Moreover, the SEM images showed very different patterns for the surfaces examined. Conclusions The surface treatment alone is not able to determine the roughness values and characteristics. PMID:23138742

  20. Chlorine Abundances in Martian Meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogard, D.D.; Garrison, D.H.; Park, J.

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine measurements made in martian surface rocks by robotic spacecraft typically give Chlorine (Cl) abundances of approximately 0.1-0.8%. In contrast, Cl abundances in martian meteorites appear lower, although data is limited, and martian nakhlites were also subjected to Cl contamination by Mars surface brines. Chlorine abundances reported by one lab for whole rock (WR) samples of Shergotty, ALH77005, and EET79001 range 108-14 ppm, whereas Cl in nakhlites range 73-1900 ppm. Measurements of Cl in various martian weathering phases of nakhlites varied 0.04-4.7% and reveal significant concentration of Cl by martian brines Martian meteorites contain much lower Chlorine than those measured in martian surface rocks and give further confirmation that Cl in these surface rocks was introduced by brines and weathering. It has been argued that Cl is twice as effective as water in lowering the melting point and promoting melting at shallower martian depths, and that significant Cl in the shergottite source region would negate any need for significant water. However, this conclusion was based on experiments that utilized Cl concentrations more analogous to martian surface rocks than to shergottite meteorites, and may not be applicable to shergottites.

  1. The Bliss of Motor Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Latash, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Motor control is an area of natural science exploring how the nervous system interacts with other body parts and the environment to produce purposeful, coordinated actions. A central problem of motor control – the problem of motor redundancy – was formulated by Nikolai Bernstein as the problem of elimination of redundant degrees-of-freedom. Traditionally, this problem has been addressed using optimization methods based on a variety of cost functions. This review draws attention to a body of recent findings suggesting that the problem has been formulated incorrectly. An alternative view has been suggested as the principle of abundance, which considers the apparently redundant degrees-of-freedom as useful and even vital for many aspects of motor behavior. Over the past ten years, dozens of publications have provided support for this view based on the ideas of synergic control, computational apparatus of the uncontrolled manifold hypothesis, and the equilibrium-point (referent configuration) hypothesis. In particular, large amounts of “good variance” – variance in the space of elements that has no effect on the overall performance – have been documented across a variety of natural actions. “Good variance” helps an abundant system to deal with secondary tasks and unexpected perturbations; its amount shows adaptive modulation across a variety of conditions. These data support the view that there is no problem of motor redundancy; there is bliss of motor abundance. PMID:22246105

  2. Modeling of surface roughness effects on glaze ice accretion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Yamaguchi, Keiko; Berkowitz, Brian M.; Potapczuk, Mark

    1990-01-01

    A series of experimental investigations focused on studying the cause and effect of roughness on accreting glaze ice surfaces were conducted. Detailed microvideo observations were made of glaze ice accretions on 1 to 4 inch diameter cylinders in three icing wind tunnels (the Data Products of New England six inch test facility, the NASA Lewis Icing Research Tunnel, and the B. F. Goodrich Ice Protection Research Facility). Infrared thermal video recordings were made of accreting ice surfaces in the Goodrich facility. Distinct zones of surface water behavior were observed; a smooth wet zone in the stagnation region with a uniform water film; a rough zone where surface tension effects caused coalescence of surface water into stationary beads; a horn zone where roughness elements grow into horn shapes; a runback zone where surface water ran back as rivulets; and a dry zone where rime feathers formed. The location of the transition from the smooth to the rough zone was found to migrate with time towards the stagnation point. The behavior of the transition appeared to be controlled by boundary layer transition and bead formation mechanisms at the interface between the smooth and rough zones. Regions of wet ice growth and enhanced heat transfer were clearly visible in the infrared video recordings of glaze ice surfaces. A simple multi-zone modification to the current glaze ice accretion model was proposed to include spatial variability in surface roughness.

  3. Degree of ice particle surface roughness inferred from polarimetric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hioki, Souichiro; Yang, Ping; Baum, Bryan A.; Platnick, Steven; Meyer, Kerry G.; King, Michael D.; Riedi, Jerome

    2016-06-01

    The degree of surface roughness of ice particles within thick, cold ice clouds is inferred from multi-directional, multi-spectral satellite polarimetric observations over oceans, assuming a column-aggregate particle habit. An improved roughness inference scheme is employed that provides a more noise-resilient roughness estimate than the conventional best-fit approach. The improvements include the introduction of a quantitative roughness parameter based on empirical orthogonal function analysis and proper treatment of polarization due to atmospheric scattering above clouds. A global 1-month data sample supports the use of a severely roughened ice habit to simulate the polarized reflectivity associated with ice clouds over ocean. The density distribution of the roughness parameter inferred from the global 1-month data sample and further analyses of a few case studies demonstrate the significant variability of ice cloud single-scattering properties. However, the present theoretical results do not agree with observations in the tropics. In the extratropics, the roughness parameter is inferred but 74 % of the sample is out of the expected parameter range. Potential improvements are discussed to enhance the depiction of the natural variability on a global scale.

  4. Roughness, resistance, and dispersion: Relationships in small streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noss, Christian; Lorke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Although relationships between roughness, flow, and transport processes in rivers and streams have been investigated for several decades, the prediction of flow resistance and longitudinal dispersion in small streams is still challenging. Major uncertainties in existing approaches for quantifying flow resistance and longitudinal dispersion at the reach scale arise from limitations in the characterization of riverbed roughness. In this study, we characterized the riverbed roughness in small moderate-gradient streams (0.1-0.5% bed slope) and investigated its effects on flow resistance and dispersion. We analyzed high-resolution transect-based measurements of stream depth and width, which resolved the complete roughness spectrum with scales ranging from the micro to the reach scale. Independently measured flow resistance and dispersion coefficients were mainly affected by roughness at spatial scales between the median grain size and the stream width, i.e., by roughness between the micro- and the mesoscale. We also compared our flow resistance measurements with calculations using various flow resistance equations. Flow resistance in our study streams was well approximated by the equations that were developed for high gradient streams (>1%) and it was overestimated by approaches developed for sand-bed streams with a smooth riverbed or ripple bed. This article was corrected on 10 MAY 2016. See the end of the full text for details.

  5. Wall roughness effect on gas dynamics in supersonic ejector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronson, K. E.; Brezgin, D. V.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the numerical simulations results in order to figure out the influence of the wall surface roughness on gas-dynamic processes inside the supersonic ejector. For these purposes two commercial CFD-solvers (Star-CCM+ and Fluent) were used. A detailed comparative study of the built-in tools and approaches in both CFD-packages for evaluation of surface roughness effects on the logarithmic law velocity distribution inside the boundary layer is carried out. Influence of ejector surface roughness is compared with the influence of the backpressure. It is found out that either increasing the backpressure behind the ejector or increasing the surface roughness height, the appearance section of a pressure shock is displaced upstream (closer to the primary nozzle). The numerical simulations results of the ejector with rough walls in both CFD-solvers are well quantitative agreed between each other in terms of the mass flow rates and are well qualitative consistent in terms of the local flow parameters distribution. It is found out that in case of exceeding the "critical roughness height" for the given geometry and boundary conditions, the ejector switches to the "off-design" mode and its performance is significantly reduced.

  6. Gliding swifts attain laminar flow over rough wings.

    PubMed

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1-2% of chord length on the upper surface--10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration--similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance. PMID:24964089

  7. F-Granulation Generalized Rough Entropy and Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Sankar K.

    2012-12-01

    Role of f-granulation in handling uncertainty in machine intelligence and its significance as a facet of natural computation are discussed. Its modeling through judicious integration of rough and fuzzy sets is explained. Several tasks like case generation, clustering, classification and segmentation are described in rough-fuzzy framework demonstrating the role of f-granulation and the resulting merits. A definition of generalized rough sets is given considering both the set and granules as crisp and/or fuzzy. Based on that new entropy measures are defined using exponential and logarithmic gain functions. The superiority of rough-fuzzy integration, in terms of performance and computation time, is illustrated for the tasks of case mining in large data sets, segmenting brain MR images, and classifying remotely sensed images as examples. Neighbourhood rough sets are capable of better dimensionality reduction. The effect of fuzzy-granules and generalizations in rough sets is demonstrated for image segmentation. The article includes some of the results published elsewhere.

  8. Counterintuitive MCNPX Results for Scintillator Surface Roughness Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ding; Guss, Paul

    2012-10-01

    We performed a number of comparative MCNPX simulations of gamma energy depositions of scintillation crystals with smooth and rough surfaces. In the study, nine surface patterns (8 micro-roughness + 1 smooth) were coupled with eight common scintillation crystals for a total of 72 possible combinations. Although this was a preliminary study, the outcome was counterintuitive; results generally favored surfaces with micro-roughness over a conventional smooth surface as measured in terms of average energy depositions. The advantage gained through surface roughness is less significant for CdSe and LaCl3, but is most significant for the common NaI and the glass-like SiO2 scintillators. Based on the results of the 64 rough-surface coupled MCNPX simulations, 57 of the 64 (~89%) simulations showed some improvement in energy deposition. The mean improvement in energy deposition was 2.52%. The maximum improvement was about 8.75%, which was achieved when roughening the surface of a SiO2 scintillator using a micro cutting pattern. Further, for a conventional NaI scintillator, MCNPX results suggest that any roughness pattern would improve the energy deposition, with an average improvement of 3.83%. Although the likely causes remain unclear, we intend to focus on presenting simulation results instead of offering a sound explanation of the underlying physics.

  9. Influence of particle surface roughness on creeping granular motion.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Li-Tsung; Chang, Wei-Ching; Hsiau, Shu-San

    2016-07-01

    A core is formed at the center of a quasi-two-dimensional rotating drum filled more than half with granular material. The core rotates slightly faster than the drum (precession) and decreases in radius over time (erosion) due to the granular creeping motion that occurs below the freely flowing layer. This paper focuses on the effect of the surface roughness of particles on core dynamics, core precession, and core erosion. Two different surface roughness of glass particles having the same diameter were used in the experiments. The surface structures of the particles were quantitatively compared by measuring the coefficients of friction and using a simple image contrast method. The experiments were performed with five different filling levels in a 50-cm-diameter rotating drum. According to the results, core precession and core erosion are both dependent on the particle surface roughness. Core precession becomes weaker and erosion becomes stronger when using particles having a rough surface in the experiments. To explain the physics of core dynamics, the particles' surface roughness effect on the freely flowing layer and the creeping motion region were also investigated. The granular bed velocity field, maximum flowing layer depth δ, shear rate in the flowing layer γ[over ̇], and the creeping region decay constant y_{0} were also calculated in this paper. The effect of the particles' surface roughness on these physical variables well illustrates the physics of core dynamics and creeping granular motion.

  10. Gliding Swifts Attain Laminar Flow over Rough Wings

    PubMed Central

    Lentink, David; de Kat, Roeland

    2014-01-01

    Swifts are among the most aerodynamically refined gliding birds. However, the overlapping vanes and protruding shafts of their primary feathers make swift wings remarkably rough for their size. Wing roughness height is 1–2% of chord length on the upper surface—10,000 times rougher than sailplane wings. Sailplanes depend on extreme wing smoothness to increase the area of laminar flow on the wing surface and minimize drag for extended glides. To understand why the swift does not rely on smooth wings, we used a stethoscope to map laminar flow over preserved wings in a low-turbulence wind tunnel. By combining laminar area, lift, and drag measurements, we show that average area of laminar flow on swift wings is 69% (n = 3; std 13%) of their total area during glides that maximize flight distance and duration—similar to high-performance sailplanes. Our aerodynamic analysis indicates that swifts attain laminar flow over their rough wings because their wing size is comparable to the distance the air travels (after a roughness-induced perturbation) before it transitions from laminar to turbulent. To interpret the function of swift wing roughness, we simulated its effect on smooth model wings using physical models. This manipulation shows that laminar flow is reduced and drag increased at high speeds. At the speeds at which swifts cruise, however, swift-like roughness prolongs laminar flow and reduces drag. This feature gives small birds with rudimentary wings an edge during the evolution of glide performance. PMID:24964089

  11. Influence of particle surface roughness on creeping granular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Li-Tsung; Chang, Wei-Ching; Hsiau, Shu-San

    2016-07-01

    A core is formed at the center of a quasi-two-dimensional rotating drum filled more than half with granular material. The core rotates slightly faster than the drum (precession) and decreases in radius over time (erosion) due to the granular creeping motion that occurs below the freely flowing layer. This paper focuses on the effect of the surface roughness of particles on core dynamics, core precession, and core erosion. Two different surface roughness of glass particles having the same diameter were used in the experiments. The surface structures of the particles were quantitatively compared by measuring the coefficients of friction and using a simple image contrast method. The experiments were performed with five different filling levels in a 50-cm-diameter rotating drum. According to the results, core precession and core erosion are both dependent on the particle surface roughness. Core precession becomes weaker and erosion becomes stronger when using particles having a rough surface in the experiments. To explain the physics of core dynamics, the particles' surface roughness effect on the freely flowing layer and the creeping motion region were also investigated. The granular bed velocity field, maximum flowing layer depth δ , shear rate in the flowing layer γ ˙, and the creeping region decay constant y0 were also calculated in this paper. The effect of the particles' surface roughness on these physical variables well illustrates the physics of core dynamics and creeping granular motion.

  12. Influence of particle surface roughness on creeping granular motion.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Li-Tsung; Chang, Wei-Ching; Hsiau, Shu-San

    2016-07-01

    A core is formed at the center of a quasi-two-dimensional rotating drum filled more than half with granular material. The core rotates slightly faster than the drum (precession) and decreases in radius over time (erosion) due to the granular creeping motion that occurs below the freely flowing layer. This paper focuses on the effect of the surface roughness of particles on core dynamics, core precession, and core erosion. Two different surface roughness of glass particles having the same diameter were used in the experiments. The surface structures of the particles were quantitatively compared by measuring the coefficients of friction and using a simple image contrast method. The experiments were performed with five different filling levels in a 50-cm-diameter rotating drum. According to the results, core precession and core erosion are both dependent on the particle surface roughness. Core precession becomes weaker and erosion becomes stronger when using particles having a rough surface in the experiments. To explain the physics of core dynamics, the particles' surface roughness effect on the freely flowing layer and the creeping motion region were also investigated. The granular bed velocity field, maximum flowing layer depth δ, shear rate in the flowing layer γ[over ̇], and the creeping region decay constant y_{0} were also calculated in this paper. The effect of the particles' surface roughness on these physical variables well illustrates the physics of core dynamics and creeping granular motion. PMID:27575202

  13. Ground-motion signature of dynamic ruptures on rough faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, P. Martin; Galis, Martin; Thingbaijam, Kiran K. S.; Vyas, Jagdish C.

    2016-04-01

    Natural earthquakes occur on faults characterized by large-scale segmentation and small-scale roughness. This multi-scale geometrical complexity controls the dynamic rupture process, and hence strongly affects the radiated seismic waves and near-field shaking. For a fault system with given segmentation, the question arises what are the conditions for producing large-magnitude multi-segment ruptures, as opposed to smaller single-segment events. Similarly, for variable degrees of roughness, ruptures may be arrested prematurely or may break the entire fault. In addition, fault roughness induces rupture incoherence that determines the level of high-frequency radiation. Using HPC-enabled dynamic-rupture simulations, we generate physically self-consistent rough-fault earthquake scenarios (M~6.8) and their associated near-source seismic radiation. Because these computations are too expensive to be conducted routinely for simulation-based seismic hazard assessment, we thrive to develop an effective pseudo-dynamic source characterization that produces (almost) the same ground-motion characteristics. Therefore, we examine how variable degrees of fault roughness affect rupture properties and the seismic wavefield, and develop a planar-fault kinematic source representation that emulates the observed dynamic behaviour. We propose an effective workflow for improved pseudo-dynamic source modelling that incorporates rough-fault effects and its associated high-frequency radiation in broadband ground-motion computation for simulation-based seismic hazard assessment.

  14. A comparison of intrinsic endoplasmic reticulum membrane proteins in maturing seeds and germinated seedlings of castor bean.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, D B; Al-Marayati, S; González, E

    1982-01-01

    The intrinsic membrane proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum from endosperm of maturing and germinated seedlings of castor bean (Ricinus communis) were studied. Preparations were simultaneously subjected to two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. At least 30 separate proteins were distinguished by staining the gels with Coomassie R-250. The characteristic protein profiles obtained from 0.2 m KCl-washed membranes of each endoplasmic reticulum source are highly reproducible. Of these proteins, three to six that were present in maturing seed were found also in germinating seedlings. In general, the majority of membrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum of maturing seed were of a higher molecular weight than those from germinated seedlings.

  15. Soil roughness, slope and surface storage relationship for impervious areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borselli, Lorenzo; Torri, Dino

    2010-11-01

    SummaryThe study of the relationships between surface roughness, local slope gradient and maximum volume of water storage in surface depressions is a fundamental element in the development of hydrological models to be used in soil and water conservation strategies. Good estimates of the maximum volume of water storage are important for runoff assessment during rainfall events. Some attempts to link surface storage to parameters such as indices of surface roughness and, more rarely, local gradient have been proposed by several authors with empirical equations often conflicting between them and usually based on a narrow range of slope gradients. This suggests care in selecting any of the proposed equations or models and invites one to verify the existence of more realistic experimental relationships, based on physical models of the surfaces and valid for a larger range of gradients. The aim of this study is to develop such a relation for predicting/estimating the maximum volume of water that a soil surface, with given roughness characteristics and local slope gradient, can store. Experimental work has been carried out in order to reproduce reliable rough surfaces able to maintain the following properties during the experimental activity: (a) impervious surface to avoid biased storage determination; (b) stable, un-erodible surfaces to avoid changes of retention volume during tests; (c) absence of hydrophobic behaviour. To meet the conditions a-c we generate physical surfaces with various roughness magnitude using plasticine (emulsion of non-expansible clay and oil). The plasticine surface, reproducing surfaces of arable soils, was then wetted and dirtied with a very fine timber sawdust. This reduced the natural hydrophobic behaviour of the plasticine to an undetectable value. Storage experiments were conducted with plasticine rough surfaces on top of large rigid polystyrene plates inclined at different slope gradient: 2%, 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%. Roughness data collected on

  16. The Abundance of Interstellar Fluorine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauroesch, James T.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this program was to obtain FUSE observations of the interstellar absorption lines of F I at 951 and 954 Angstroms to derive the abundance of fluorine toward the star HD 164816. The nucleosynthetic source(s) of fluorine are still a matter of debate - the present day abundance of fluorine can potentially constrain models for pulsationally driven dredge-up in asymptotic giant branch stars. An accurate measure for the depletion behavior of fluorine will determine whether it may be detectable in QSO absorption line systems - an unambiguous detection of fluorine at suitably high redshifts would provide the best evidence to date for the neutrino process in massive stars. Furthermore, due to its extreme reactivity, measurement of the gas-phase interstellar fluorine abundance is important for models of grain chemistry. Despite the importance of measuring the interstellar fluorine abundance, at the time of our proposal only one previous detection has been made due to the low relative abundance of fluorine, the lack of lines outside the far-UV, and the blending of the available F I transitions with lines of Hz. The star HD 164816 is associated with the Lagoon nebula (M8), and at a distance of approximately 1.5 kpc probes both distant and local gas. Beginning April 8th, 2004 FUSE FP-Split observations of the star HD 164816 were obtained for this program. This data became available in the FUSE data archive May 21, 2004, and these observations were then downloaded and we began our analysis. Our analysis procedure has involved (1) fitting stellar models to the FUSE spectra, (2) using the multiple lines of Hz and N I at other wavelengths in the FUSE bandpass to derive column densities for the lines of H2 and N I which are blended with the F I features at 951 and 954 angstroms (3) the measurement of the column densities of F I and the species O I and C1 I which are important species for the dis-entangling of dust and nucleosynthetic effects. As discussed in

  17. Characteristics of endoplasmic reticulum-derived transport vesicles

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    We have isolated vesicles that mediate protein transport from the ER to Golgi membranes in perforated yeast. These vesicles, which form de novo during in vitro incubations, carry lumenal and membrane proteins that include core-glycosylated pro-alpha-factor, Bet1, Sec22, and Bos1, but not ER-resident Kar2 or Sec61 proteins. Thus, lumenal and membrane proteins in the ER are sorted prior to transport vesicle scission. Inhibition of Ypt1p-function, which prevents newly formed vesicles from docking to cis-Golgi membranes, was used to block transport. Vesicles that accumulate are competent for fusion with cis-Golgi membranes, but not with ER membranes, and thus are functionally committed to vectorial transport. A 900-fold enrichment was developed using differential centrifugation and a series of velocity and equilibrium density gradients. Electron microscopic analysis shows a uniform population of 60 nm vesicles that lack peripheral protein coats. Quantitative Western blot analysis indicates that protein markers of cytosol and cellular membranes are depleted throughout the purification, whereas the synaptobrevin-like Bet1, Sec22, and Bos1 proteins are highly enriched. Uncoated ER-derived transport vesicles (ERV) contain twelve major proteins that associate tightly with the membrane. The ERV proteins may represent abundant cargo and additional targeting molecules. PMID:8063853

  18. Measurement and modeling of rough surface effects on terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, S. C.; Schecklman, S.; Kniffin, G. P.; Zurk, L. M.; Chen, A.

    2010-02-01

    Recent improvements in sensing technology have driven new research areas within the terahertz (THz) portion of the electromagnetic (EM) spectrum. While there are several promising THz applications, several outstanding technical challenges need to be addressed before robust systems can be deployed. A particularly compelling application is the potential use of THz reflection spectroscopy for stand-off detection of drugs and explosives. A primary challenge for this application is to have sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to allow spectroscopic identification of the target material, and surface roughness can have an impact on identification. However, scattering from a rough surface may be observed at all angles, suggesting diffuse returns can be used in robust imaging of non-cooperative targets. Furthermore, the scattering physics can also distort the reflection spectra, complicating classification algorithms. In this work, rough surface scattering effects were first isolated by measuring diffuse scattering for gold-coated sandpaper of varying roughness. Secondly, we measured scattering returns from a rough sample with a spectral signature, namely α-lactose monohydrate mixed with Teflon and pressed with sandpaper to introduce controlled roughness. For both the specular and diffuse reflection measurements, the application of traditional spectroscopy techniques provided the ability to resolve the 0.54 THz absorption peak. These results are compared with results from a smooth surface. Implications of the results on the ability to detect explosives with THz reflection spectroscopy are presented and discussed. In addition, the Small Perturbation Method (SPM) is employed to predict backscatter from lactose with a small amount of roughness.

  19. Effect of Acidic Agents on Surface Roughness of Dental Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Hengtrakool, Chanothai; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2011-01-01

    Background: An increase in surface roughness of ceramics may decrease strength and affect the clinical success of ceramic restorations. However, little is known about the effect of acidic agents on ceramic restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness of dental ceramics after being immersed in acidic agents. Methods: Eighty-three ceramic disk specimens (12.0 mm in diameter and 2.0 mm in thickness) were made from four types of ceramics (VMK 95, Vitadur Alpha, IPS Empress Esthetic, and IPS e.max Ceram). Baseline data of surface roughness were recorded by profilometer. The specimens were then immersed in acidic agents (citrate buffer solution, pineapple juice and green mango juice) and deionized water (control) at 37°C for 168 hours. One group was immersed in 4% acetic acid at 80°C for 168 hours. After immersion, surface roughness was evaluated by a profilometer at intervals of 24, 96, and 168 hours. Surface characteristics of specimens were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were analyzed using two-way repeated ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons (α = 0.05). Results: For all studied ceramics, all surface roughness parameters were significantly increased after 168 hours immersion in all acidic agents (P < 0.05). After 168 hours in 4% acetic acid, there were significant differences for all roughness parameters from other acidic agents of all evaluated ceramics. Among all studied ceramics, Vitadur Alpha showed significantly the greatest values of all surface roughness parameters after immersion in 4% acetic acid (P < 0.001). SEM photomicrographs also presented surface destruction of ceramics in varying degrees. Conclusion: Acidic agents used in this study negatively affected the surface of ceramic materials. This should be considered when restoring the eroded tooth with ceramic restorations in patients who have a high risk of erosive conditions. PMID:22132009

  20. Intelligent System Development Using a Rough Sets Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Gray T.; Shelton, Robert O.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to examine the potential of the rough sets technique for developing intelligent models of complex systems from limited information. Rough sets a simple but promising technology to extract easily understood rules from data. The rough set methodology has been shown to perform well when used with a large set of exemplars, but its performance with sparse data sets is less certain. The difficulty is that rules will be developed based on just a few examples, each of which might have a large amount of noise associated with them. The question then becomes, what is the probability of a useful rule being developed from such limited information? One nice feature of rough sets is that in unusual situations, the technique can give an answer of 'I don't know'. That is, if a case arises that is different from the cases the rough set rules were developed on, the methodology can recognize this and alert human operators of it. It can also be trained to do this when the desired action is unknown because conflicting examples apply to the same set of inputs. This summer's project was to look at combining rough set theory with statistical theory to develop confidence limits in rules developed by rough sets. Often it is important not to make a certain type of mistake (e.g., false positives or false negatives), so the rules must be biased toward preventing a catastrophic error, rather than giving the most likely course of action. A method to determine the best course of action in the light of such constraints was examined. The resulting technique was tested with files containing electrical power line 'signatures' from the space shuttle and with decompression sickness data.

  1. Cytoprotective role of the fatty acid binding protein 4 against oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kajimoto, Kazuaki; Minami, Yoshitaka; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-01-01

    The fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4), one of the most abundant proteins in adipocytes, has been reported to have a proinflammatory function in macrophages. However, the physiological role of FABP4, which is constitutively expressed in adipocytes, has not been fully elucidated. Previously, we demonstrated that FABP4 was involved in the regulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In this study, we examined the effects of FABP4 silencing on the oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. We found that the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 8-nitro-cyclic GMP levels were significantly elevated in the differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes transfected with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against Fabp4, although the intracellular levels or enzyme activities of antioxidants including reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione S-transferase A4 (GSTA4) were not altered. An in vitro evaluation using the recombinant protein revealed that FABP4 itself functions as a scavenger protein against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). FABP4-knockdown resulted in a significant lowering of cell viability of 3T3-L1 adipocytes against H2O2 treatment. Moreover, four kinds of markers related to the ER stress response including the endoplasmic reticulum to nucleus signaling 1 (Ern1), the signal sequence receptor α (Ssr1), the ORM1-like 3 (Ormdl3), and the spliced X-box binding protein 1 (Xbp1s), were all elevated as the result of the knockdown of FABP4. Consequently, FABP4 might have a new role as an antioxidant protein against H2O2 and contribute to cytoprotection against oxidative and ER stress in adipocytes.

  2. αB-Crystallin R120G variant causes cardiac arrhythmias and alterations in the expression of Ca(2+) -handling proteins and endoplasmic reticulum stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qibin; Sanbe, Atsushi; Zhang, Xingwei; Liu, Jun-Ping; Minamisawa, Susumu

    2014-08-01

    Mutations of αB-crystallin (CryαB), a small heat shock protein abundantly expressed in cardiac and skeletal muscles, are known to cause desmin-related myopathies. The CryαB R120G allele has been linked to a familial desminopathy and, in transgenic mice, causes a sudden death at about 28 weeks of age. To investigate the mechanisms of the sudden cardiac arrest of CryαB R120G transgenic mice, we prepared protein samples from left ventricular tissues of two different age groups (10 and 28 weeks) and examined Ca(2+) -handling proteins. Expression of sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA) 2, phospholamban, ryanodine receptor 2 and calsequestrin 2 was significantly decreased in 28- versus 10-week-old CryαB R120G transgenic mice. In addition, low heart rate variability, including heart rate, total power and low frequency, was observed and continuous electrocardiogram monitoring revealed cardiac arrhythmias, such as ventricular tachycardia, atrioventricular block and atrial flutter, in 28-week-old CryαB R120G transgenic mice. In contrast, expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) degradation enhancing α-mannosidase-like protein, inositol requirement 1 and X-box binding protein 1 were increased significantly in 28- versus 10-week-old CryαBR120G transgenic mice, suggesting that the CryαBR120G transgenic mice exhibit increased ER stress compared with wild-type mice. Together, the data suggest that the CryαB R120G dominant variant induces ER stress and impairs Ca(2+) regulation, leading to ageing-related cardiac dysfunction, arrhythmias and decreased autonomic tone with shortened lifespan.

  3. The solar abundance of Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevesse, N.

    2009-07-01

    With Martin Asplund (Max Planck Institute of Astrophysics, Garching) and Jacques Sauval (Observatoire Royal de Belgique, Brussels) I recently published detailed reviews on the solar chemical composition ({Asplund et al. 2005}, {Grevesse et al. 2007}). A new one, with Pat Scott (Stockholm University) as additional co-author, will appear in Annual Review of Astronomy and Astrophysics ({Asplund et al. 2009}). Here we briefly analyze recent works on the solar abundance of Oxygen and recommend a value of 8.70 in the usual astronomical scale.

  4. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-01

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  5. Abundance measurements in stellar environments

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, F.

    2014-05-09

    Most of what we know about stars, and systems of stars, is derived from the analysis of their electromagnetic radiation. This lesson is an attempt to describe to Physicists, without any Astrophysical background, the framework to understand the present status of abundance determination in stellar environments and its limit. These notes are dedicated to the recently passed, November 21, 2013, Prof. Dimitri Mihalas who spent his life confuting the 19th century positivist philosopher Auguste Comte who stated that we shall not at all be able to determine the chemical composition of stars.

  6. Discrete Roughness Effects on High-Speed Boundary Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Prahladh Satyanarayanan

    This dissertation studies the effects of a discrete roughness element on a high-speed boundary layer using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) on unstructured grids. Flow past a cylindrical roughness element placed perpendicular to the flow and a hemispherical bump is studied. A compressible linear stability theory (LST) solver for parallel flows is developed based on the algorithm by Malik and validated for a range of Mach numbers ranging from incompressible to Mach 10. The evolution of the perturbations from DNS is validated with the linear stability solver making the DNS algorithm suitable to study transition problems. Flow past a cylindrical roughness element at Mach 8.12 is simulated using DNS and the velocity profiles in the symmetry and wall---parallel planes are compared to the experiments of Bathel et al.. The flow remains steady and laminar, and does not transition. Overall, good agreement is observed between DNS and experiments, thus validating our algorithm to study effect of roughness on high-speed flows. However, differences are observed in the separation region upstream and recirculation region downstream of the roughness. The DNS results are used to quantify possible uncertainties in the measurement technique as suggested by Danehy [20]. The effect of upstream injection (5% of the free-stream velocity) is also simulated to quantify its effects on the velocity profiles to mimic the injection of NO into air in the experiment. While the boundary layer thickness of the flow increases downstream of the injection location, its effect on the velocity profiles is small when the profiles are scaled with the boundary layer thickness. Flow past a hemispherical bump at Mach 3.37, 5.26 and 8.23 are simulated using DNS with the flow conditions matching the experiments of Danehy et al. to understand the different flow features associated with the flow and the physical mechanism that causes the flow to transition to turbulence. It is observed that the Mach 3.37 and

  7. The Toxicity of a Novel Antifungal Compound Is Modulated by Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Protein Degradation Components

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Shriya; Krishnan, Karthik; Askew, David S.; Helynck, Olivier; Suzanne, Peggy; Lesnard, Aurélien; Rault, Sylvain; Zeidler, Ute; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In a search for new antifungal compounds, we screened a library of 4,454 chemicals for toxicity against the human fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. We identified sr7575, a molecule that inhibits growth of the evolutionary distant fungi A. fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, Candida albicans, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae but lacks acute toxicity for mammalian cells. To gain insight into the mode of inhibition, sr7575 was screened against 4,885 S. cerevisiae mutants from the systematic collection of haploid deletion strains and 977 barcoded haploid DAmP (decreased abundance by mRNA perturbation) strains in which the function of essential genes was perturbed by the introduction of a drug resistance cassette downstream of the coding sequence region. Comparisons with previously published chemogenomic screens revealed that the set of mutants conferring sensitivity to sr7575 was strikingly narrow, affecting components of the endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation (ERAD) stress response and the ER membrane protein complex (EMC). ERAD-deficient mutants were hypersensitive to sr7575 in both S. cerevisiae and A. fumigatus, indicating a conserved mechanism of growth inhibition between yeast and filamentous fungi. Although the unfolded protein response (UPR) is linked to ERAD regulation, sr7575 did not trigger the UPR in A. fumigatus and UPR mutants showed no enhanced sensitivity to the compound. The data from this chemogenomic analysis demonstrate that sr7575 exerts its antifungal activity by disrupting ER protein quality control in a manner that requires ERAD intervention but bypasses the need for the canonical UPR. ER protein quality control is thus a specific vulnerability of fungal organisms that might be exploited for antifungal drug development. PMID:26666917

  8. Valosin-containing protein-interacting membrane protein (VIMP) links the endoplasmic reticulum with microtubules in concert with cytoskeleton-linking membrane protein (CLIMP)-63.

    PubMed

    Noda, Chikano; Kimura, Hana; Arasaki, Kohei; Matsushita, Mitsuru; Yamamoto, Akitsugu; Wakana, Yuichi; Inoue, Hiroki; Tagaya, Mitsuo

    2014-08-29

    The distribution and morphology of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in mammalian cells depend on both dynamic and static interactions of ER membrane proteins with microtubules (MTs). Cytoskeleton-linking membrane protein (CLIMP)-63 is exclusively localized in sheet-like ER membranes, typical structures of the rough ER, and plays a pivotal role in the static interaction with MTs. Our previous study showed that the 42-kDa ER-residing form of syntaxin 5 (Syn5L) regulates ER structure through the interactions with both CLIMP-63 and MTs. Here, we extend our previous study and show that the valosin-containing protein/p97-interacting membrane protein (VIMP)/SelS is also a member of the family of proteins that shape the ER by interacting with MTs. Depletion of VIMP causes the spreading of the ER to the cell periphery and affects an MT-dependent process on the ER. Although VIMP can interact with CLIMP-63 and Syn5L, it does not interact with MT-binding ER proteins (such as Reep1) that shape the tubular smooth ER, suggesting that different sets of MT-binding ER proteins are used to organize different ER subdomains.

  9. Opaque1 Encodes a Myosin XI Motor Protein That Is Required for Endoplasmic Reticulum Motility and Protein Body Formation in Maize Endosperm[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guifeng; Wang, Fang; Wang, Gang; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhong, Mingyu; Zhang, Jin; Lin, Dianbin; Tang, Yuanping; Xu, Zhengkai; Song, Rentao

    2012-01-01

    Myosins are encoded by multigene families and are involved in many basic biological processes. However, their functions in plants remain poorly understood. Here, we report the functional characterization of maize (Zea mays) opaque1 (o1), which encodes a myosin XI protein. o1 is a classic maize seed mutant with an opaque endosperm phenotype but a normal zein protein content. Compared with the wild type, o1 endosperm cells display dilated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) structures and an increased number of smaller, misshapen protein bodies. The O1 gene was isolated by map-based cloning and was shown to encode a member of the plant myosin XI family (myosin XI-I). In endosperm cells, the O1 protein is associated with rough ER and protein bodies. Overexpression of the O1 tail domain (the C-terminal 644 amino acids) significantly inhibited ER streaming in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) cells. Yeast two-hybrid analysis suggested an association between O1 and the ER through a heat shock protein 70–interacting protein. In summary, this study indicated that O1 influences protein body biogenesis by affecting ER morphology and motility, ultimately affecting endosperm texture. PMID:22892319

  10. Power distribution system diagnosis with uncertainty information based on rough sets and clouds model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiuye; Zhang, Huaguang

    2006-11-01

    During the distribution system fault period, usually the explosive growth signals including fuzziness and randomness are too redundant to make right decision for the dispatcher. The volume of data with a few uncertainties overwhelms classic information systems in the distribution control center and exacerbates the existing knowledge acquisition process of expert systems. So intelligent methods must be developed to aid users in maintaining and using this abundance of information effectively. An important issue in distribution fault diagnosis system (DFDS) is to allow the discovered knowledge to be as close as possible to natural languages to satisfy user needs with tractability, and to offer DFDS robustness. At this junction, the paper describes a systematic approach for detecting superfluous data. The approach therefore could offer user both the opportunity to learn about the data and to validate the extracted knowledge. It is considered as a "white box" rather than a "black box" like in the case of neural network. The cloud theory is introduced and the mathematical description of cloud has effectively integrated the fuzziness and randomness of linguistic terms in a unified way. Based on it, a method of knowledge representation in DFDS is developed which bridges the gap between quantitative knowledge and qualitative knowledge. In relation to classical rough set, the cloud-rough method can deal with the uncertainty of the attribute and make a soft discretization for continuous ones (such as the current and the voltage). A novel approach, including discretization, attribute reduction, rule reliability computation and equipment reliability computation, is presented. The data redundancy is greatly reduced based on an integrated use of cloud theory and rough set theory. Illustrated with a power distribution DFDS shows the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed approach.

  11. Site-specific retention of colloids at rough rock surfaces.

    PubMed

    Darbha, Gopala Krishna; Fischer, Cornelius; Luetzenkirchen, Johannes; Schäfer, Thorsten

    2012-09-01

    The spatial deposition of polystyrene latex colloids (d = 1 μm) at rough mineral and rock surfaces was investigated quantitatively as a function of Eu(III) concentration. Granodiorite samples from Grimsel test site (GTS), Switzerland, were used as collector surfaces for sorption experiments. At a scan area of 300 × 300 μm(2), the surface roughness (rms roughness, Rq) range was 100-2000 nm, including roughness contribution from asperities of several tens of nanometers in height to the sample topography. Although, an increase in both roughness and [Eu(III)] resulted in enhanced colloid deposition on granodiorite surfaces, surface roughness governs colloid deposition mainly at low Eu(III) concentrations (≤5 × 10(-7) M). Highest deposition efficiency on granodiorite has been found at walls of intergranular pores at surface sections with roughness Rq = 500-2000 nm. An about 2 orders of magnitude lower colloid deposition has been observed at granodiorite sections with low surface roughness (Rq < 500 nm), such as large and smooth feldspar or quartz crystal surface sections as well as intragranular pores. The site-specific deposition of colloids at intergranular pores is induced by small scale protrusions (mean height = 0.5 ± 0.3 μm). These protrusions diminish locally the overall DLVO interaction energy at the interface. The protrusions prevent further rolling over the surface by increasing the hydrodynamic drag required for detachment. Moreover, colloid sorption is favored at surface sections with high density of small protrusions (density (D) = 2.6 ± 0.55 μm(-1), asperity diameter (φ) = 0.6 ± 0.2 μm, height (h) = 0.4 ± 0.1 μm) in contrast to surface sections with larger asperities and lower asperity density (D = 1.2 ± 0.6 μm(-1), φ = 1.4 ± 0.4 μm, h = 0.6 ± 0.2 μm). The study elucidates the importance to include surface roughness parameters into predictive colloid-borne contaminant migration calculations.

  12. Site-specific retention of colloids at rough rock surfaces.

    PubMed

    Darbha, Gopala Krishna; Fischer, Cornelius; Luetzenkirchen, Johannes; Schäfer, Thorsten

    2012-09-01

    The spatial deposition of polystyrene latex colloids (d = 1 μm) at rough mineral and rock surfaces was investigated quantitatively as a function of Eu(III) concentration. Granodiorite samples from Grimsel test site (GTS), Switzerland, were used as collector surfaces for sorption experiments. At a scan area of 300 × 300 μm(2), the surface roughness (rms roughness, Rq) range was 100-2000 nm, including roughness contribution from asperities of several tens of nanometers in height to the sample topography. Although, an increase in both roughness and [Eu(III)] resulted in enhanced colloid deposition on granodiorite surfaces, surface roughness governs colloid deposition mainly at low Eu(III) concentrations (≤5 × 10(-7) M). Highest deposition efficiency on granodiorite has been found at walls of intergranular pores at surface sections with roughness Rq = 500-2000 nm. An about 2 orders of magnitude lower colloid deposition has been observed at granodiorite sections with low surface roughness (Rq < 500 nm), such as large and smooth feldspar or quartz crystal surface sections as well as intragranular pores. The site-specific deposition of colloids at intergranular pores is induced by small scale protrusions (mean height = 0.5 ± 0.3 μm). These protrusions diminish locally the overall DLVO interaction energy at the interface. The protrusions prevent further rolling over the surface by increasing the hydrodynamic drag required for detachment. Moreover, colloid sorption is favored at surface sections with high density of small protrusions (density (D) = 2.6 ± 0.55 μm(-1), asperity diameter (φ) = 0.6 ± 0.2 μm, height (h) = 0.4 ± 0.1 μm) in contrast to surface sections with larger asperities and lower asperity density (D = 1.2 ± 0.6 μm(-1), φ = 1.4 ± 0.4 μm, h = 0.6 ± 0.2 μm). The study elucidates the importance to include surface roughness parameters into predictive colloid-borne contaminant migration calculations. PMID:22861645

  13. Development of channel organization and roughness following sediment pulses in single-thread, gravel bed rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madej, Mary Ann

    2001-01-01

    Large, episodic inputs of coarse sediment (sediment pulses) in forested, mountain streams may result in changes in the size and arrangement of bed forms and in channel roughness. A conceptual model of channel organization delineates trajectories of response to sediment pulses for many types of gravel bed channels. Channels exhibited self-organizing behavior to various degrees based on channel gradient, presence of large in-channel wood or other forcing elements, the size of the sediment pulse, and the number of bed-mobilizing flows since disturbance. Typical channel changes following a sediment pulse were initial decreases in water depth, in variability of bed elevations, and in the regularity of bed form spacing. Trajectories of change subsequently showed increased average water depth, more variable and complex bed topography, and increased uniformity of bed form spacing. Bed form spacing in streams with abundant forcing elements developed at a shorter spatial scale (two to five channel widths) than in streams without such forcing mechanisms (five to 10 channel widths). Channel roughness increased as bed forms developed.

  14. Modeling of toxin-antibody interaction and toxin transport toward the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Skakauskas, Vladas; Katauskis, Pranas

    2016-01-01

    A model for toxin-antibody interaction and toxin trafficking towards the endoplasmic-reticulum is presented. Antibody and toxin (ricin) initially are delivered outside the cell. The model involves: the pinocytotic (cellular drinking) and receptor-mediated toxin internalization modes from the extracellular into the intracellular domain, its exocytotic excretion from the cytosol back to the extracellular medium, the intact toxin retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum, the anterograde toxin movement outward from the cell across the plasma membrane, the lysosomal toxin degradation, and the toxin clearance (removal from the system) flux. The model consists of a set of coupled PDEs. Using an averaging procedure, the model is reduced to a system of coupled ODEs. Both PDEs and ODEs systems are solved numerically. Numerical results are illustrated by figures and discussed.

  15. Protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum as a non-equilibrium phase transition.

    PubMed

    Budrikis, Zoe; Costantini, Giulio; La Porta, Caterina A M; Zapperi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Several neurological disorders are associated with the aggregation of aberrant proteins, often localized in intracellular organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we study protein aggregation kinetics by mean-field reactions and three dimensional Monte carlo simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation of linear polymers in a confined space, representing the endoplasmic reticulum. By tuning the rates of protein production and degradation, we show that the system undergoes a non-equilibrium phase transition from a physiological phase with little or no polymer accumulation to a pathological phase characterized by persistent polymerization. A combination of external factors accumulating during the lifetime of a patient can thus slightly modify the phase transition control parameters, tipping the balance from a long symptomless lag phase to an accelerated pathological development. The model can be successfully used to interpret experimental data on amyloid-β clearance from the central nervous system. PMID:24722051

  16. Protein accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum as a non-equilibrium phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Budrikis, Zoe; Costantini, Giulio; La Porta, Caterina A. M.; Zapperi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Several neurological disorders are associated with the aggregation of aberrant proteins, often localized in intracellular organelles such as the endoplasmic reticulum. Here we study protein aggregation kinetics by mean-field reactions and three dimensional Monte carlo simulations of diffusion-limited aggregation of linear polymers in a confined space, representing the endoplasmic reticulum. By tuning the rates of protein production and degradation, we show that the system undergoes a non-equilibrium phase transition from a physiological phase with little or no polymer accumulation to a pathological phase characterized by persistent polymerization. A combination of external factors accumulating during the lifetime of a patient can thus slightly modify the phase transition control parameters, tipping the balance from a long symptomless lag phase to an accelerated pathological development. The model can be successfully used to interpret experimental data on amyloid-β clearance from the central nervous system. PMID:24722051

  17. Transport of cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the transport of newly synthesized cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in Chinese hamster ovary cells using a cell fractionation assay. We found that transport is dependent on metabolic energy, but that the maintenance of the high differential concentration of cholesterol in the plasma membrane is not an energy-requiring process. We have tested a variety of inhibitors for their effect on cholesterol transport and found that cytochalasin B, colchicine, monensin, cycloheximide, and NH4Cl did not have any effect. The cholesterol transport process shows a sharp temperature dependence; it ceases at 15 degrees C, whereas cholesterol synthesis continues. When synthesis occurs at 15 degrees C, the newly synthesized cholesterol accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum and in a low density, lipid-rich vesicle fraction. These results suggest that cholesterol is transported via a vesicular system. PMID:4040520

  18. Simulation Study of the Flow Boundary Condition for Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Gang; Robbins, Mark O.

    2001-03-01

    In order to solve a flow problem with the continuum Navier-Stokes equation, a boundary condition must be assumed. In most cases, a no-slip condition is used, i.e. the velocity of the fluid is set equal to that of a bounding solid at their interface. Deviations from this condition can be quantified by a slip length S that represents the additional width of fluid that would be needed to accomodate any velocity difference at the interface. Previous simulations with atomically flat surfaces show that S can be very large in certain limits. (P. A. Thompson and M. O. Robbins, Phys. Rev. A, 41), 6830(1990). ( J.-L. Barrat and L. Bocquet, Phys. Rev. Lett., 82), 4671(1999). A dramatic divergence with S as shear rate increases has also been seen.( P. A. Thompson and S. M. Troian, Nature, 389), 360(1997) We have extended these simulations to surfaces with random roughness, steps, and angled facets typical of twin boundaries. In all cases, S decreases rapidly as the roughness increases. When peak-to-peak roughness is only two atomic diameters, values of S have dropped from more than 20 diameters to only one or two. In addition, the non-linear regime where S diverges with shear rate is supressed by surface roughness. These results suggest that the experimental behavior of atomically flat surfaces such as mica may be very different than that of more typical rough surfaces.

  19. Effect of Surface Roughness on Optical Heating of Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auinger, M.; Ebbinghaus, P.; Blümich, A.; Erbe, A.

    2014-01-01

    Heating by absorption of light is a commonly used technique to ensure a fast temperature increase of metallic samples. The rate of heating when using optical heating depends critically on the absorption of light by a sample. Here, the reflection and scattering of light from UV to IR by surfaces with different roughness of iron-based alloy samples (Fe, 1 wt-% Cr) is investigated. A combination of ellipsometric and optical scattering measurements is used to derive a simplified parametrisation which can be used to obtain the absorption of light from random rough metal surfaces, as prepared through conventional grinding and polishing techniques. By modelling the ellipsometric data of the flattest sample, the pseudodielectric function of the base material is derived. Describing an increased roughness by a Maxwell-Garnett model does not yield a reflectivity which follows the experimentally observed sum of scattered and reflected intensities. Therefore, a simple approach is introduced, based on multiple reflections, where the number of reflections depends on the surface roughness. This approach describes the data well, and is subsequently used to estimate the fraction of absorbed energy. Using numerical modelling, the effect on the heating rate is investigated. A numerical example is analysed, which shows that slight changes in roughness may result in big differences of the energy input into a metallic sample, with consequences on the achieved temperatures. Though the model oversimplifies reality, it provides a physically intuitive approach to estimate trends.

  20. Thermal conductivity of silicon nanowire arrays with controlled roughness

    SciTech Connect

    Feser, JP; Sadhu, JS; Azeredo, BP; Hsu, KH; Ma, J; Kim, J; Seong, M; Fang, NX; Li, XL; Ferreira, PM; Sinha, S; Cahill, DG

    2012-12-01

    A two-step metal assisted chemical etching technique is used to systematically vary the sidewall roughness of Si nanowires in vertically aligned arrays. The thermal conductivities of nanowire arrays are studied using time domain thermoreflectance and compared to their high-resolution transmission electron microscopy determined roughness. The thermal conductivity of nanowires with small roughness is close to a theoretical prediction based on an upper limit of the mean-free-paths of phonons given by the nanowire diameter. The thermal conductivity of nanowires with large roughness is found to be significantly below this prediction. Raman spectroscopy reveals that nanowires with large roughness also display significant broadening of the one-phonon peak; the broadening correlates well with the reduction in thermal conductivity. The origin of this broadening is not yet understood, as it is inconsistent with phonon confinement models, but could derive from microstructural changes that affect both the optical phonons observed in Raman scattering and the acoustic phonons that are important for heat conduction. (C) 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4767456