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Sample records for abundant serum proteins

  1. Distinctive serum protein profiles involving abundant proteins in lung cancer patients based upon antibody microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei-Min; Kuick, Rork; Orchekowski, Randal P; Misek, David E; Qiu, Ji; Greenberg, Alissa K; Rom, William N; Brenner, Dean E; Omenn, Gilbert S; Haab, Brian B; Hanash, Samir M

    2005-01-01

    Background Cancer serum protein profiling by mass spectrometry has uncovered mass profiles that are potentially diagnostic for several common types of cancer. However, direct mass spectrometric profiling has a limited dynamic range and difficulties in providing the identification of the distinctive proteins. We hypothesized that distinctive profiles may result from the differential expression of relatively abundant serum proteins associated with the host response. Methods Eighty-four antibodies, targeting a wide range of serum proteins, were spotted onto nitrocellulose-coated microscope slides. The abundances of the corresponding proteins were measured in 80 serum samples, from 24 newly diagnosed subjects with lung cancer, 24 healthy controls, and 32 subjects with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Two-color rolling-circle amplification was used to measure protein abundance. Results Seven of the 84 antibodies gave a significant difference (p < 0.01) for the lung cancer patients as compared to healthy controls, as well as compared to COPD patients. Proteins that exhibited higher abundances in the lung cancer samples relative to the control samples included C-reactive protein (CRP; a 13.3 fold increase), serum amyloid A (SAA; a 2.0 fold increase), mucin 1 and α-1-antitrypsin (1.4 fold increases). The increased expression levels of CRP and SAA were validated by Western blot analysis. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to construct Diagonal Linear Discriminant Analysis (DLDA) classifiers. At a cutoff where all 56 of the non-tumor samples were correctly classified, 15/24 lung tumor patient sera were correctly classified. Conclusion Our results suggest that a distinctive serum protein profile involving abundant proteins may be observed in lung cancer patients relative to healthy subjects or patients with chronic disease and may have utility as part of strategies for detecting lung cancer. PMID:16117833

  2. A comparison of depletion versus equalization for reducing high-abundance proteins in human serum.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Carolina; Santos, Hugo M; Ruíz-Romero, Cristina; Blanco, Francisco J; Capelo-Martínez, José-Luis

    2011-11-01

    In this work three methods to diminish the content of most highly abundant proteins in human serum have been studied and compared. Protein depletion with ACN or DTT and protein equalization with the ProteoMiner(™) (PM) have been assessed by 1-D gel electrophoresis and MS. After treatment 5, 18 and 9 major proteins within the 20 most abundant proteins in serum were identified for the ACN, DTT and PM methods, respectively. The ACN method was efficient for depleting high molecular weight proteins, over 75 KDa, resulting in 10±4% (n=3) of the total protein content remaining in the depleted serum. In addition, 75% of the proteins belonging to the group of the 20 most abundant proteins were not detected, making this depletion strategy a cheap alternative to expensive commercial tools regularly used for removing high abundance proteins from serum. The ACN extract was found rich in apolipoproteins. The dithithreitol method promotes the precipitation of proteins rich in disulfide bonds, mainly albumin, with 73±7% (n=3) of the total protein content remaining in the depleted serum, which was found rich in immunoglobulins. The PM method compresses the dynamic range of the serum proteins, rendering an extract containing 16±2% (n=3) of the total initial protein content. The extract was found to be rich in both apolipoproteins and immunoglobulins. As a general rule the DTT and PM methods provide a compression of the dynamic range of serum protein concentrations while the ACN method allows an effective depletion of the protein fraction above 72 KDa.

  3. Identification of low-abundance proteins in serum via the isolation of HSP72 complexes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masako; Shiota, Masayuki; Nakao, Takafumi; Uemura, Ryo; Nishi, Satoshi; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Matsumoto, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Maki; Osada-Oka, Mayuko; Inagaki, Azusa; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Gi, Min; Izumi, Yasukatsu; Miura, Katsuyuki; Iwao, Hiroshi

    2016-03-16

    Heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) is an intracellular molecular chaperone that is overexpressed in tumor cells, and has also been detected in extracellular regions such as the blood. HSP72 forms complexes with peptides and proteins that are released from tumors. Accordingly, certain HSP72-binding proteins/peptides present in the blood of cancer patients may be derived from tumor cells. In this study, to effectively identify low-abundance proteins/peptides in the blood as tumor markers, we established a method for isolating HSP72-binding proteins/peptides from serum. Nine HSP72-specific monoclonal antibodies were conjugated to N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide-activated Sepharose beads (NHq) and used to isolate HSP72 complexes from serum samples. Precipitated proteins were then identified by LC-MS/MS analysis. Notably, this approach enabled the isolation of low-abundance proteins from serum without albumin removal. Moreover, by subjecting the serum samples of ten patients with multiple myeloma (MM) to NHq analysis, we identified 299 proteins present in MM HSP72 complexes, including 65 intracellular proteins. Among the intracellular proteins detected, 21 were present in all serum samples tested, while 11 were detected in both the conditioned media from cultured multiple myeloma cells and serum from MM patients. These results suggest that the NHq method can be applied to discover candidate tumor markers.

  4. Enrichment of low-abundance proteins from bovine and porcine serum samples for proteomic studies.

    PubMed

    Marco-Ramell, Anna; Bassols, Anna

    2010-12-01

    One of the main applications of serum proteomics is the identification of new biomarkers for animal disease or animal production. However, potential obstacles to these studies are the poor performance of affinity serum depletion methods based on human antigens when using animal samples, and loss of minor serum components bound to albumin and other proteins. In the present study, we have analyzed the efficiency and reproducibility of the ProteoMiner® beads with bovine and porcine serum samples, and compared to a traditional immunoaffinity-based albumin and IgG depletion system specific for human samples. The ProteoMiner kit is based on the use of a combinatorial peptide binding library and intends to enrich low-abundance proteins.

  5. Quantification of intermediate-abundance proteins in serum by multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry in a single-quadrupole ion trap.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shanhua; Shaler, Thomas A; Becker, Christopher H

    2006-08-15

    A method is presented to quantify intermediate-abundance proteins in human serum using a single-quadrupole linear ion trap mass spectrometer-in contrast, for example, to a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer. Stable-isotope-labeled (tryptic) peptides are spiked into digested protein samples as internal standards, aligned with the traditional isotope dilution approach. As a proof-of-concept experiment, four proteins of intermediate abundance were selected, coagulation factor V, adiponectin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and thyroxine binding globulin. Stable-isotope-labeled peptides were synthesized with one tryptic sequence from each of these proteins. The normal human serum concentration ranges of these proteins are from 1 to 30 microg/mL (or 20 to 650 pmol/mL). These labeled peptides and their endogenous counterparts were analyzed by LC-MS/MS using multiple reaction monitoring, a multiplexed form of the selected reaction monitoring technique. For these experiments, only one chromatographic dimension (on-line reversed-phase capillary column) was used. Improved limits of detection will result with multidimensional chromatographic methods utilizing more material per sample. Standard curves of the spiked calibrants were generated with concentrations ranging from 3 to 700 pmol/mL using both neat solutions and peptides spiked into the complex matrix of digested serum protein solution where ion suppression effects and interferences are common. Endogenous protein concentrations were determined by comparing MS/MS peak areas of the endogenous peptides to the isotopically labeled internal calibrants. The derived concentrations from a normal human serum pool (neglecting loss of material during sample processing) were 9.2, 110, 120, and 246 pmol/mL for coagulation factor V, adiponectin, CRP, and thyroxine binding globulin, respectively. These concentrations generally agree with the reported normal ranges for these proteins. As a measure of analytical reproducibility of this

  6. Protein Crystal Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    As the most abundant protein in the circulatory system albumin contributes 80% to colloid osmotic blood pressure. Albumin is also chiefly responsible for the maintenance of blood pH. It is located in every tissue and bodily secretion, with extracellular protein comprising 60% of total albumin. Perhaps the most outstanding property of albumin is its ability to bind reversibly to an incredible variety of ligands. It is widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry that the overall distribution, metabolism, and efficiency of many drugs are rendered ineffective because of their unusually high affinity for this abundant protein. An understanding of the chemistry of the various classes of pharmaceutical interactions with albumin can suggest new approaches to drug therapy and design. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter/New Century Pharmaceuticals

  7. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Horse Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Horse Serum Albumin crystals grown during the USML-1 (STS-50) mission's Protein Crystal Growth Glovebox Experiment. These crystals were grown using a vapor diffusion technique at 22 degrees C. The crystals were allowed to grow for nine days while in orbit. Crystals of 1.0 mm in length were produced. The most abundant blood serum protein, regulates blood pressure and transports ions, metabolites, and therapeutic drugs. Principal Investigator was Edward Meehan.

  8. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hemolysis Hyperimmunization Immunoelectrophoresis - blood Immunofixation blood test Liver disease Malignancy Malnutrition Nephrotic syndrome Rheumatoid arthritis Serum globulin electrophoresis Serum iron test Systemic lupus erythematosus ...

  9. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin. Contributes to many transport and regulatory processes and has multifunctional binding properties which range from various metals, to fatty acids, hormones, and a wide spectrum of therapeutic drugs. The most abundant protein of the circulatory system. It binds and transports an incredible variety of biological and pharmaceutical ligands throughout the blood stream. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Larry DeLucas.

  10. An approach to remove albumin for the proteomic analysis of low abundance biomarkers in human serum.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nuzhat; Barker, Gillian; Oliva, Karen; Garfin, David; Talmadge, Kenneth; Georgiou, Harry; Quinn, Michael; Rice, Greg

    2003-10-01

    Proteomic technologies are being used to discover and identify disease-associated biomarkers. The application of these technologies in the search for potential diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers in the serum of patients has been limited by the presence of highly abundant albumin and immunoglobulins that constitute approximately 60-97% of the total serum proteins. The purpose of the study was to evaluate whether treatment of human serum with Affi-Gel Blue alone or in combination with Protein A (Aurum serum protein mini kit, Bio-Rad) before two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis removed high abundance proteins to allow the visualization of low abundant proteins. Serum samples were treated with either Affi-Gel Blue or Aurum kit and then subjected to 2-DE using 11 cm, pH 4-7 isoelectric focussing strips for the first dimension and 10% sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for second dimension. Protein spots were visualized using a fluorescent protein dye (SYPRO Ruby, Bio-Rad). Comparison between treatment methods showed significant removal of albumin by both Affi-Gel Blue and Aurum kit and considerable differences in the protein profile of the gels after each treatment. Direct comparison between treatments revealed twenty-eight protein spots unique to Affi-Gel Blue while only two spots were unique after Aurum kit treatment. Unique spots in Affi-Gel Blue and Aurum kit treated serum were not visualized in untreated serum. Sixteen hours of Affi-Gel Blue treatment resulted in enhanced visualization of fifty-three protein spots by two-fold, thirty-one by five-fold, twelve by ten-fold and six by twenty-fold. In parallel after Aurum kit treatment two-, five-, ten- and twenty-fold enhancements of thirty, thirteen, eight and five protein spots, respectively, were observed. The pattern of increased visualization of protein spots with both treatment methods was similar. In conclusion, treatment of serum samples with Affi-Gel Blue or Aurum kit before

  11. Ablation of the Stimulatory G Protein α-Subunit in Renal Proximal Tubules Leads to Parathyroid Hormone-Resistance With Increased Renal Cyp24a1 mRNA Abundance and Reduced Serum 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; He, Qing; Aydin, Cumhur; Rubera, Isabelle; Tauc, Michel; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S; Marshansky, Vladimir; Jüppner, Harald; Bastepe, Murat

    2016-02-01

    PTH regulates serum calcium, phosphate, and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D) levels by acting on bone and kidney. In renal proximal tubules (PTs), PTH inhibits reabsorption of phosphate and stimulates the synthesis of 1,25(OH)2D. The PTH receptor couples to multiple G proteins. We here ablated the α-subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsα) in mouse PTs by using Cre recombinase driven by the promoter of type-2 sodium-glucose cotransporter (Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice). Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice were normophosphatemic but displayed, relative to controls, hypocalcemia (1.19 ±0.01 vs 1.23 ±0.01 mmol/L; P < .05), reduced serum 1,25(OH)2D (59.3 ±7.0 vs 102.5 ±12.2 pmol/L; P < .05), and elevated serum PTH (834 ±133 vs 438 ±59 pg/mL; P < .05). PTH-induced elevation in urinary cAMP excretion was blunted in Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice (2- vs 4-fold over baseline in controls; P < .05). Relative to baseline in controls, PTH-induced reduction in serum phosphate tended to be blunted in Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice (-0.39 ±0.33 vs -1.34 ±0.36 mg/dL; P = .07). Gsα(Sglt2KO) mice showed elevated renal vitamin D 24-hydroxylase and bone fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23) mRNA abundance (∼3.4- and ∼11-fold over controls, respectively; P < .05) and tended to have elevated serum FGF23 (829 ±76 vs 632 ±60 pg/mL in controls; P = .07). Heterozygous mice having constitutive ablation of the maternal Gsα allele (E1(m-/+)) (model of pseudohypoparathyroidism type-Ia), in which Gsα levels in PT are reduced, also exhibited elevated serum FGF23 (474 ±20 vs 374 ±27 pg/mL in controls; P < .05). Our findings indicate that Gsα is required in PTs for suppressing renal vitamin D 24-hydroxylase mRNA levels and for maintaining normal serum 1,25(OH)2D.

  12. Considerations when quantitating protein abundance by immunoblot.

    PubMed

    McDonough, Alicia A; Veiras, Luciana C; Minas, Jacqueline N; Ralph, Donna Lee

    2015-03-15

    The development of the immunoblot to detect and characterize a protein with an antisera, even in a crude mixture, was a breakthrough with wide-ranging and unpredictable applications across physiology and medicine. Initially, this technique was viewed as a tool for qualitative, not quantitative, analyses of proteins because of the high number of variables between sample preparation and detection with antibodies. Nonetheless, as the immunoblot method was streamlined and improved, investigators pushed it to quantitate protein abundance in unpurified samples as a function of treatment, genotype, or pathology. This short review, geared at investigators, reviewers, and critical readers, presents a set of issues that are of critical importance for quantitative analysis of protein abundance: 1) Consider whether tissue samples are of equivalent integrity and assess how handling between collection and assay influences the apparent relative abundance. 2) Establish the specificity of the antiserum for the protein of interest by providing clear images, molecular weight markers, positive and negative controls, and vendor details. 3) Provide convincing evidence for linearity of the detection system by assessing signal density as a function of sample loaded. 4) Recognize that loading control proteins are rarely in the same linear range of detection as the protein of interest; consider protein staining of the gel or blot. In summary, with careful attention to sample integrity, antibody specificity, linearity of the detection system, and acceptable loading controls, investigators can implement quantitative immunoblots to convincingly assess protein abundance in their samples.

  13. Label-free relative quantification method for low-abundance glycoproteins in human serum by micrOTOF-Q.

    PubMed

    Hao, Piliang; Ren, Yan; Xie, Yongming

    2009-06-01

    In this study, a label-free relative quantification strategy was developed for quantifying low-abundance glycoproteins in human serum. It included three steps: (1) immunodepletion of 12 high-abundance proteins, (2) enrichment of low-abundance glycoproteins by multi-lectin column, (3) relative quantification of them between different samples by micrOTOF-Q. We also evaluated the specificity and efficiency of immunodepletion, the accuracy of protein quantification and the possible influence of immunodepletion, glycoprotein enrichment, trypsin digestion and peptide ionization on quantification. In conclusion, the relative quantification method can be effectively applied to the screening of low-abundance biomarkers.

  14. Piezoelectric microcantilever serum protein detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capobianco, Joseph A.

    The development of a serum protein detector will provide opportunities for better screening of at-risk cancer patients, tighter surveillance of disease recurrence and better monitoring of treatment. An integrated system that can process clinical samples for a number of different types of biomarkers would be a useful tool in the early detection of cancer. Also, screening biomarkers such as antibodies in serum would provide clinicians with information regarding the patient's response to treatment. Therefore, the goal of this study is to develop a sensor which can be used for rapid, all-electrical, real-time, label-fee, in-situ, specific quantification of cancer markers, e.g., human epidermal receptor 2 (Her2) or antibodies, in serum. To achieve this end, piezoelectric microcantilever sensors (PEMS) were constructed using an 8 mum thick lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) freestanding film as the piezoelectric layer. The desired limit of detection is on the order of pg/mL. In order to achieve this goal the higher frequency lateral extension modes were used. Also, as the driving and sensing of the PEMS is electrical, the PEMS must be insulated in a manner that allows it to function in aqueous solutions. The insulation layer must also be compatible with standardized bioconjugation techniques. Finally, detection of both cancer antigens and antibodies in serum was carried out, and the results were compared to a standard commercialized protocol. PEMS have demonstrated the capability of detecting Her2 at a concentration of 5 pg/mL in diluted human serum (1:40) in less than 1 hour. The approach can be easily translated into the clinical setting because the sensitivity is more than sufficient for monitoring prognosis of breast cancer patients. In addition to Her2 detection, antibodies in serum were assayed in order to demonstrate the feasibility of monitoring the immune response for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) in patients on antibody therapies

  15. Proteomics characterization of abundant Golgi membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Bell, A W; Ward, M A; Blackstock, W P; Freeman, H N; Choudhary, J S; Lewis, A P; Chotai, D; Fazel, A; Gushue, J N; Paiement, J; Palcy, S; Chevet, E; Lafrenière-Roula, M; Solari, R; Thomas, D Y; Rowley, A; Bergeron, J J

    2001-02-16

    A mass spectrometric analysis of proteins partitioning into Triton X-114 from purified hepatic Golgi apparatus (84% purity by morphometry, 122-fold enrichment over the homogenate for the Golgi marker galactosyl transferase) led to the unambiguous identification of 81 proteins including a novel Golgi-associated protein of 34 kDa (GPP34). The membrane protein complement was resolved by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and subjected to a hierarchical approach using delayed extraction matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry characterization by peptide mass fingerprinting, tandem mass spectrometry to generate sequence tags, and Edman sequencing of proteins. Major membrane proteins corresponded to known Golgi residents, a Golgi lectin, anterograde cargo, and an abundance of trafficking proteins including KDEL receptors, p24 family members, SNAREs, Rabs, a single ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factor, and two SCAMPs. Analytical fractionation and gold immunolabeling of proteins in the purified Golgi fraction were used to assess the intra-Golgi and total cellular distribution of GPP34, two SNAREs, SCAMPs, and the trafficking proteins GBF1, BAP31, and alpha(2)P24 identified by the proteomics approach as well as the endoplasmic reticulum contaminant calnexin. Although GPP34 has never previously been identified as a protein, the localization of GPP34 to the Golgi complex, the conservation of GPP34 from yeast to humans, and the cytosolically exposed location of GPP34 predict a role for a novel coat protein in Golgi trafficking.

  16. Enrichment of low molecular weight serum proteins using acetonitrile precipitation for mass spectrometry based proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Kay, Richard; Barton, Chris; Ratcliffe, Lucy; Matharoo-Ball, Balwir; Brown, Pamela; Roberts, Jane; Teale, Phil; Creaser, Colin

    2008-10-01

    A rapid acetonitrile (ACN)-based extraction method has been developed that reproducibly depletes high abundance and high molecular weight proteins from serum prior to mass spectrometric analysis. A nanoflow liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC/MS/MS) multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method for 57 high to medium abundance serum proteins was used to characterise the ACN-depleted fraction after tryptic digestion. Of the 57 targeted proteins 29 were detected and albumin, the most abundant protein in serum and plasma, was identified as the 20th most abundant protein in the extract. The combination of ACN depletion and one-dimensional nano-LC/MS/MS enabled the detection of the low abundance serum protein, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), which has a serum concentration in the region of 100 ng/mL. One-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of the depleted serum showed no bands corresponding to proteins of molecular mass over 75 kDa after extraction, demonstrating the efficiency of the method for the depletion of high molecular weight proteins. Total protein analysis of the ACN extracts showed that approximately 99.6% of all protein is removed from the serum. The ACN-depletion strategy offers a viable alternative to the immunochemistry-based protein-depletion techniques commonly used for removing high abundance proteins from serum prior to MS-based proteomic analyses.

  17. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in legumes.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Marina; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan, and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirm the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions.

  18. Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in legumes

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Marina; Covarrubias, Alejandra A.

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to different external conditions that affect growth, development, and productivity. Water deficit is one of these adverse conditions caused by drought, salinity, and extreme temperatures. Plants have developed different responses to prevent, ameliorate or repair the damage inflicted by these stressful environments. One of these responses is the activation of a set of genes encoding a group of hydrophilic proteins that typically accumulate to high levels during seed dehydration, at the last stage of embryogenesis, hence named Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins. LEA proteins also accumulate in response to water limitation in vegetative tissues, and have been classified in seven groups based on their amino acid sequence similarity and on the presence of distinctive conserved motifs. These proteins are widely distributed in the plant kingdom, from ferns to angiosperms, suggesting a relevant role in the plant response to this unfavorable environmental condition. In this review, we analyzed the LEA proteins from those legumes whose complete genomes have been sequenced such as Phaseolus vulgaris, Glycine max, Medicago truncatula, Lotus japonicus, Cajanus cajan, and Cicer arietinum. Considering their distinctive motifs, LEA proteins from the different groups were identified, and their sequence analysis allowed the recognition of novel legume specific motifs. Moreover, we compile their transcript accumulation patterns based on publicly available data. In spite of the limited information on these proteins in legumes, the analysis and data compiled here confirm the high correlation between their accumulation and water deficit, reinforcing their functional relevance under this detrimental conditions. PMID:23805145

  19. Serum Protein Profile Alterations in Hemodialysis Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G A; Davies, R W; Choi, M W; Perkins, J; Turteltaub, K W; McCutchen-Maloney, S L; Langlois, R G; Curzi, M P; Trebes, J E; Fitch, J P; Dalmasso, E A; Colston, B W; Ying, Y; Chromy, B A

    2003-11-18

    Background: Serum protein profiling patterns can reflect the pathological state of a patient and therefore may be useful for clinical diagnostics. Here, we present results from a pilot study of proteomic expression patterns in hemodialysis patients designed to evaluate the range of serum proteomic alterations in this population. Methods: Surface-Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (SELDI-TOFMS) was used to analyze serum obtained from patients on periodic hemodialysis treatment and healthy controls. Serum samples from patients and controls were first fractionated into six eluants on a strong anion exchange column, followed by application to four array chemistries representing cation exchange, anion exchange, metal affinity and hydrophobic surfaces. A total of 144 SELDI-TOF-MS spectra were obtained from each serum sample. Results: The overall profiles of the patient and control samples were consistent and reproducible. However, 30 well-defined protein differences were observed; 15 proteins were elevated and 15 were decreased in patients compared to controls. Serum from one patient exhibited novel protein peaks suggesting possible additional changes due to a secondary disease process. Conclusion: SELDI-TOF-MS demonstrated dramatic serum protein profile differences between patients and controls. Similarity in protein profiles among dialysis patients suggests that patient physiological responses to end-stage renal disease and/or dialysis therapy have a major effect on serum protein profiles.

  20. Depletion of cells and abundant proteins from biological samples by enhanced dielectrophoresis✩

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, C.; Provine, J.; Davis, R.W.; Howe, R.T.

    2016-01-01

    Platforms that are sensitive and specific enough to assay low-abundance protein biomarkers, in a high throughput multiplex format, within a complex biological fluid specimen, are necessary to enable protein biomarker based diagnostics for diseases such as cancer. The signal from an assay for a low-abundance protein biomarker in a biological fluid sample like blood is typically buried in a background that arises from the presence of blood cells and from high-abundance proteins that make up 90% of the assayed protein mass. We present an automated on-chip platform for the depletion of cells and highly abundant serum proteins in blood. Our platform consists of two components, the first of which is a microfluidic mixer that mixes beads containing antibodies against the highly abundant proteins in the whole blood. This complex mixture (consisting of beads, cells, and serum proteins) is then injected into the second component of our microfluidic platform, which comprises a filter trench to capture all the cells and the beads. The size-based trapping of the cells and beads into the filter trench is significantly enhanced by leveraging additional negative dielectrophoretic forces to push the micron sized particles (cells and beads which have captured the highly abundant proteins) down into the trench, allowing the serum proteins of lower abundance to flow through. In general, dielectrophoresis using bare electrodes is incapable of producing forces beyond the low piconewton range that tend to be insufficient for separation applications. However, by using electrodes passivated with atomic layer deposition, we demonstrate the application of enhanced negative DEP electrodes together with size-based flltration induced by the filter trench, to deplete 100% of the micron sized particles in the mixture. PMID:26924893

  1. Screening serum hepatocellular carcinoma-associated proteins by SELDI-based protein spectrum analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jie-Feng; Liu, Yin-Kun; Zhou, Hai-Jun; Kang, Xiao-Nan; Huang, Cheng; He, Yi-Feng; Tang, Zhao-You; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To find out potential serum hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-associated proteins with low molecular weight and low abundance by SELDI-based serum protein spectra analysis, that will have much application in the diagnosis or differentiated diagnosis of HCC, as well as giving a better understanding of the mechanism of hepato-carcinogenesis. METHODS: Total serum samples were collected with informed consent from 81 HCC patients with HBV(+)/cirrhosis(+), 36 cirrhosis patients and 43 chronic hepatitis B patients. Serum protein fingerprint profiles were first generated by selected WCX2 protein chip capture integrating with SELDI-TOF-MS, then normalized and aligned by Ciphergen SELDI Software 3.1.1 with Biomarker Wizard. Comparative analysis of the intensity of corresponding protein fingerprint peaks in normalized protein spectra, some protein peaks with significant difference between HCC and cirrhosis or chronic hepatitis B were found. RESULTS: One hundred and twenty-eight serum protein peaks between 2000 and 30 000Da were identified under the condition of signal-to-noise > 5 and minimum threshold for cluster > 20%. Eighty-seven of these proteins were showed significant differences in intensity between HCC and cirrhosis (P < 0.05). Of the above differential proteins, 45 proteins had changes greater than two-fold, including 15 upregulated proteins and 30 downregulated proteins in HCC serum. Between HCC and chronic hepatitis B, 9 of 52 differential proteins (P < 0.05) had intensities of more than two-fold, including 2 upregulated proteins and 7 downregulated proteins in HCC serum. Between cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis B, 28 of 79 significant differential proteins (P < 0.05) changes greater than two-fold in intensity, including 17 upregulated proteins and 11 downregulated proteins in cirrhosis serum. For the analysis of these leading differential proteins in subtraction difference mode among three diseases, the five common downregulated proteins in HCC serum (M/Z 2870

  2. Digestion and depletion of abundant proteins improves proteomic coverage

    PubMed Central

    Fonslow, Bryan R.; Stein, Benjamin D.; Webb, Kristofor J.; Xu, Tao; Choi, Jeong; Park, Sung Kyu; Yates, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Two major challenges in proteomics are the large number of proteins and their broad dynamic range within the cell. We exploited the abundance-dependent Michaelis-Menten kinetics of trypsin digestion to selectively digest and deplete abundant proteins with a method we call DigDeAPr. We validated the depletion mechanism with known yeast protein abundances and observed greater than 3-fold improvement in low abundance human protein identification and quantitation metrics. This methodology should be broadly applicable to many organisms, proteases, and proteomic pipelines. PMID:23160281

  3. Proteomic evaluation of sheep serum proteins

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The applications of proteomic strategies to ovine medicine remain limited. The definition of serum proteome may be a good tool to identify useful protein biomarkers for recognising sub-clinical conditions and overt disease in sheep. Findings from bovine species are often directly translated for use in ovine medicine. In order to characterize normal protein patterns and improve knowledge of molecular species-specific characteristics, we generated a two-dimensional reference map of sheep serum. The possible application of this approach was tested by analysing serum protein patterns in ewes with mild broncho-pulmonary disease, which is very common in sheep and in the peripartum period which is a stressful time, with a high incidence of infectious and parasitic diseases. Results This study generated the first reference 2-DE maps of sheep serum. Overall, 250 protein spots were analyzed, and 138 identified. Compared with healthy sheep, serum protein profiles of animals with rhino-tracheo-bronchitis showed a significant decrease in protein spots identified as transthyretin, apolipoprotein A1 and a significant increase in spots identified as haptoglobin, endopin 1b and alpha1B glycoprotein. In the peripartum period, haptoglobin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, apolipoprotein A1 levels rose, while transthyretin content dropped. Conclusions This study describes applications of proteomics in putative biomarker discovery for early diagnosis as well as for monitoring the physiological and metabolic situations critical for ovine welfare. PMID:22630135

  4. A differential protein solubility approach for the depletion of highly abundant proteins in plasma using ammonium sulfate.

    PubMed

    Bollineni, Ravi Chand; Guldvik, Ingrid J; Grönberg, Henrik; Wiklund, Fredrik; Mills, Ian G; Thiede, Bernd

    2015-12-21

    Depletion of highly abundant proteins is an approved step in blood plasma analysis by mass spectrometry (MS). In this study, we explored a precipitation and differential protein solubility approach as a fractionation strategy for abundant protein removal from plasma. Total proteins from plasma were precipitated with 90% saturated ammonium sulfate, followed by differential solubilization in 55% and 35% saturated ammonium sulfate solutions. Using a four hour liquid chromatography (LC) gradient and an LTQ-Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer, a total of 167 and 224 proteins were identified from the 55% and 35% ammonium sulfate fractions, whereas 235 proteins were found in the remaining protein fractions with at least two unique peptides. SDS-PAGE and exclusive total spectrum counts from LC-MS/MS analyses clearly showed that majority of the abundant plasma proteins were solubilized in 55% and 35% ammonium sulfate solutions, indicating that the remaining protein fraction is of potential interest for identification of less abundant plasma proteins. Serum albumin, serotransferrin, alpha-1-antitrypsin and transthyretin were the abundant proteins that were highly enriched in 55% ammonium sulfate fractions. Immunoglobulins, complement system proteins, and apolipoproteins were among other abundant plasma proteins that were enriched in 35% ammonium sulfate fractions. In the remaining protein fractions a total of 40 unique proteins were identified of which, 32 proteins were identified with at least 10 exclusive spectrum counts. According to PeptideAtlas, 9 of these 32 proteins were estimated to be present at low μg ml(-1) (0.12-1.9 μg ml(-1)) concentrations in the plasma, and 17 at low ng ml(-1) (0.1-55 ng ml(-1)) range.

  5. Evaluation of two high-abundance protein depletion kits and optimization of downstream isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Fanghua; Hou, Tieying; Huang, Dehong; Xue, Zhifeng; Liang, Dongyan; Li, Qiuming; Lin, Weimiao

    2015-11-01

    Disease biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes are most likely within an extremely low concentration range and are thus masked by the presence of high‑abundance proteins. Therefore, removing high‑abundance proteins is the main challenge for identifying disease biomarkers. In addition, the solution obtained from high‑abundance protein depletion kits contains a rich array of compounds, which interfere with isoelectric focusing (IEF). In the present study, the effect of two commercial kits was evaluated and the downstream IEF protocol was optimized. High‑resolution results could be obtained according to the following conditions: The ProteoPrep Blue Albumin and IgG Depletion kit depleted albumin and IgG; immobilized pH gradient strips (typically 18 cm) were rehydrated with sample buffer containing 250 µg serum proteins at 30 v for 6 h, 60 v for 6 h, 200 v for 2 h, 500 v for 2 h, 1,000 v for 2 h, 5,000 v for 2 h, 10,000 v for 2 h and then focusing at 10,000 v up to 110 k vhs. In addition, the protein spots identified by matrix‑assisted laser desorption ionization time‑of‑flight mass spectrometry demonstrated that all proteins had a low abundance. The present study not only provides a definite and effective method for removing high‑abundance proteins, but also provides a proper protocol (protocol C) for downstream IEF. The present study includes a comprehensive investigation of serum proteomics, which paves the way for serum protein research.

  6. Fundamental Constraints on the Abundances of Chemotaxis Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitbol, Anne-Florence; Wingreen, Ned S.

    2015-03-01

    Flagellated bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, perform directed motion in gradients of concentration of attractants and repellents in a process called chemotaxis. The E. coli chemotaxis signaling pathway is a model for signal transduction, but it has unique features. We demonstrate that the need for fast signaling necessitates high abundances of the proteins involved in this pathway. We show that further constraints on the abundances of chemotaxis proteins arise from the requirements of self-assembly, both of flagellar motors and of chemoreceptor arrays. All these constraints are specific to chemotaxis, and published data confirm that chemotaxis proteins tend to be more highly expressed than their homologs in other pathways. Employing a chemotaxis pathway model, we show that the gain of the pathway at the level of the response regulator CheY increases with overall chemotaxis protein abundances. This may explain why, at least in one E. coli strain, the abundance of all chemotaxis proteins is higher in media with lower nutrient content. We also demonstrate that the E. coli chemotaxis pathway is particularly robust to abundance variations of the motor protein FliM.

  7. Inactivation of anthracyclines by serum heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Brett A; Teesch, Lynn M; Buettner, Garry R; Britigan, Bradley E; Burns, C Patrick; Reszka, Krzysztof J

    2007-06-01

    We have previously shown that the anticancer agent doxorubicin undergoes oxidation and inactivation when exposed to myeloperoxidase-containing human leukemia HL-60 cells, or to isolated myeloperoxidase, in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and nitrite. In the current study we report that commercial fetal bovine serum (FBS) alone oxidizes doxorubicin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and that nitrite accelerates this oxidation. The efficacy of inactivation was dependent on the concentration of serum present; no reaction was observed when hydrogen peroxide or serum was omitted. Peroxidase activity assays, based on oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine, confirmed the presence of a peroxidase in the sera from several suppliers. The peroxidative activity was contained in the >10000 MW fraction. We also found that hemoglobin, a heme protein likely to be present in commercial FBS, is capable of oxidizing doxorubicin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and that nitrite further stimulates the reaction. In contrast to intact doxorubicin, the serum + hydrogen peroxide + nitrite treated drug appeared to be nontoxic for PC3 human prostate cancer cells. Together, this study shows that (pseudo)peroxidases present in sera catalyze oxidation of doxorubicin by hydrogen peroxide and that this diminishes the tumoricidal activity of the anthracycline, at least in in vitro settings. Finally, this study also points out that addition of H2O2 to media containing FBS will stimulate peroxidase-type of reactions, which may affect cytotoxic properties of studied compounds.

  8. Enrichment of low-abundance brain proteins by preparative electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Michael; Juranville, Jean François

    2003-02-15

    Detection of low-copy-number gene products is essential for the development of novel drugs, however, it represents a major drawback of proteomics and simultaneously a scientific challenge. We studied the enrichment of rat brain cytosolic proteins by preparative electrophoresis using the PrepCell apparatus. The electrophoresis was performed in the presence of 0.1% lithium dodecyl sulfate. The proteins eluted from the gel were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass specrometry. Lithium dodecyl sulfate was easily exchanged against agents compatible with isoelectric focusing. Low-abundance proteins, which had not been found before, including neuronal-specific and calcium-binding proteins, were detected. In particular, low-molecular-mass proteins, such as hippocalcin, visinin-like proteins, and 14-3-3 proteins were strongly enriched by preparative electrophoresis.

  9. Intact-Protein Analysis System for Discovery of Serum-Based Disease Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Hanash, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Profiling of serum and plasma proteins has substantial relevance to the discovery of circulating disease biomarkers. However, the extreme complexity and vast dynamic range of protein abundance in serum and plasma present a formidable challenge for protein analysis. Thus, integration of multiple technologies is required to achieve high-resolution and high-sensitivity proteomic analysis of serum or plasma. In this chapter, we describe an orthogonal multidimensional intact-protein analysis system (IPAS) (Wang et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 4:618–625, 2005) coupled with protein tagging (Faca et al., J Proteome Res 5:2009–2018, 2006) to profile the serum and plasma proteomes quantitatively, which we have applied in our biomarker discovery studies (Katayama et al., Genome Med 1:47, 2009; Faca et al., PLoS Med 5:e123, 2008; Zhang et al. Genome Biol 9:R93, 2008). PMID:21468941

  10. Intact-protein analysis system for discovery of serum-based disease biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Hanash, Samir

    2011-01-01

    Profiling of serum and plasma proteins has substantial relevance to the discovery of circulating disease biomarkers. However, the extreme complexity and vast dynamic range of protein abundance in serum and plasma present a formidable challenge for protein analysis. Thus, integration of multiple technologies is required to achieve high-resolution and high-sensitivity proteomic analysis of serum or plasma. In this chapter, we describe an orthogonal multidimensional intact-protein analysis system (IPAS) (Wang et al., Mol Cell Proteomics 4:618-625, 2005) coupled with protein tagging (Faca et al., J Proteome Res 5:2009-2018, 2006) to profile the serum and plasma proteomes quantitatively, which we have applied in our biomarker discovery studies (Katayama et al., Genome Med 1:47, 2009; Faca et al., PLoS Med 5:e123, 2008; Zhang et al. Genome Biol 9:R93, 2008).

  11. Monodispersity of magnetic immuno-nanoprobes enhances the detection sensitivity of low abundance biomarkers in one drop of serum.

    PubMed

    Capangpangan, Rey Y; dela Rosa, Mira Anne C; Obena, Rofeamor P; Chou, Yu-Jen; Tzou, Der-Lii; Shih, Shao-Ju; Chiang, Ming-Hsi; Lin, Chun-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2015-11-21

    To enhance the detection sensitivity of target clinical protein biomarkers, a simple and rapid nanoprobe-based immuno-affinity mass spectrometry assay employing biocompatible monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is reported herein. The MNPs were synthesized via a streamlined protocol that includes (a) fabrication of core MNPs using the thermal decomposition method to minimize aggregation, (b) surface protection by gold coating (MNP@Au) and surfactant coating using MNP@IGEPAL to improve hydrophilicity, and lastly, (c) oriented functionalization of antibodies to maximize immuno-affinity. The enrichment performances of the monodisperse MNPs for the C-reactive protein (CRP) serum biomarker were then evaluated and compared with aggregated magnetic nanoparticles synthesized from the conventional co-precipitation method (MNP(CP)). The detection sensitivity for CRP at an extremely low amount of serum sample (1 μL) was enhanced ∼19- and ∼15-fold when monodisperse MNP@Au and MNP@IGEPAL, respectively, were used. Furthermore, the detection sensitivity of CRP by this approach (1 ng mL(-1), S/N = 3) provided a 1000-fold sensitivity enhancement to the clinical cut-off (1 μg mL(-1)) of CRP. We supposed that these observed improvements are due to the enhanced nanoparticle dispersibility and size uniformity which eliminated completely other non-specific binding of high-abundance serum proteins. Most interestingly, the enrichment efficiency correlates more closely with the MNP dispersibility than the ligand density. Our investigation revealed the critical role of MNP dispersibility, as well as provided mechanistic insight into its impact on immunoaffinity enrichment and detection of CRP in one drop of serum sample. This strategy offers an essential advantage over the other methods by providing a simple and facile biofunctionalization protocol while maintaining excellent solvent dispersibility of MNPs.

  12. A wide range of protein isoforms in serum and plasma uncovered by a quantitative intact protein analysis system.

    PubMed

    Misek, David E; Kuick, Rork; Wang, Hong; Galchev, Vladimir; Deng, Bin; Zhao, Rong; Tra, John; Pisano, Michael R; Amunugama, Ravi; Allen, David; Walker, Angela K; Strahler, John R; Andrews, Philip; Omenn, Gilbert S; Hanash, Samir M

    2005-08-01

    We have implemented an orthogonal 3-D intact protein analysis system (IPAS) to quantitatively profile protein differences between human serum and plasma. Reference specimens consisting of pooled Caucasian-American serum, citrate-anticoagulated plasma, and EDTA-anticoagulated plasma were each depleted of six highly abundant proteins, concentrated, and labeled with a different Cy dye (Cy5, Cy3, or Cy2). A mixture consisting of each of the labeled samples was subjected to three dimensions of separation based on charge, hydrophobicity, and molecular mass. Differences in the abundance of proteins between each of the three samples were determined. More than 5000 bands were found to have greater than two-fold difference in intensity between any pair of labeled specimens by quantitative imaging. As expected, some of the differences in band intensities between serum and plasma were attributable to proteins related to coagulation. Interestingly, many proteins were identified in multiple fractions, each exhibiting different pI, hydrophobicity, or molecular mass. This is likely reflective of the expression of different protein isoforms or specific protein cleavage products, as illustrated by complement component 3 precursor and clusterin. IPAS provides a high resolution, high sensitivity, and quantitative approach for the analysis of serum and plasma proteins, and allows assessment of PTMs as a potential source of biomarkers.

  13. Protein haptenation by amoxicillin: high resolution mass spectrometry analysis and identification of target proteins in serum.

    PubMed

    Ariza, Adriana; Garzon, Davide; Abánades, Daniel R; de los Ríos, Vivian; Vistoli, Giulio; Torres, María J; Carini, Marina; Aldini, Giancarlo; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2012-12-21

    Allergy towards wide spectrum antibiotics such as amoxicillin (AX) is a major health problem. Protein haptenation by covalent conjugation of AX is considered a key process for the allergic response. However, the nature of the proteins involved has not been completely elucidated. Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant protein in plasma and is considered a major target for haptenation by drugs, including β-lactam antibiotics. Here we report a procedure for immunological detection of AX-protein adducts with antibodies recognizing the lateral chain of the AX molecule. With this approach we detected human serum proteins modified by AX in vitro and identified HSA, transferrin and immunoglobulins heavy and light chains as prominent AX-modified proteins. Since HSA was the major AX target, we characterized AX-HSA interaction using high resolution LTQ orbitrap MS. At 0.5mg/mL AX, we detected one main AX-HSA adduct involving residues Lys 190, 199 or 541, whereas higher AX concentrations elicited a more extensive modification. In molecular modeling studies Lys190 and Lys 199 were found the most reactive residues towards AX, with surrounding residues favoring adduct formation. These findings provide novel tools and insight for the study of protein haptenation and the mechanisms involved in AX-elicited allergic reactions.

  14. Abundant protein phosphorylation potentially regulates Arabidopsis anther development

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Juanying; Zhang, Zaibao; You, Chenjiang; Zhang, Xumin; Lu, Jianan; Ma, Hong

    2016-01-01

    As the male reproductive organ of flowering plants, the stamen consists of the anther and filament. Previous studies on stamen development mainly focused on single gene functions by genetic methods or gene expression changes using comparative transcriptomic approaches, especially in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, studies on Arabidopsis anther protein expression and post-translational modifications are still lacking. Here we report proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies on developing Arabidopsis anthers at stages 4–7 and 8–12. We identified 3908 high-confidence phosphorylation sites corresponding to 1637 phosphoproteins. Among the 1637 phosphoproteins, 493 were newly identified, with 952 phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide enrichment prior to LC-MS analysis facilitated the identification of low-abundance proteins and regulatory proteins, thereby increasing the coverage of proteomic analysis, and facilitated the analysis of more regulatory proteins. Thirty-nine serine and six threonine phosphorylation motifs were uncovered from the anther phosphoproteome and further analysis supports that phosphorylation of casein kinase II, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and 14-3-3 proteins is a key regulatory mechanism in anther development. Phosphorylated residues were preferentially located in variable protein regions among family members, but they were they were conserved across angiosperms in general. Moreover, phosphorylation might reduce activity of reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes and hamper brassinosteroid signaling in early anther development. Most of the novel phosphoproteins showed tissue-specific expression in the anther according to previous microarray data. This study provides a community resource with information on the abundance and phosphorylation status of thousands of proteins in developing anthers, contributing to understanding post-translational regulatory mechanisms during anther development. PMID:27531888

  15. Identification of serum protein biomarkers for utrophin based DMD therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guiraud, Simon; Edwards, Benjamin; Squire, Sarah E.; Babbs, Arran; Shah, Nandini; Berg, Adam; Chen, Huijia; Davies, Kay E.

    2017-01-01

    Despite promising therapeutic avenues, there is currently no effective treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a lethal monogenic disorder caused by the loss of the large cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. A highly promising approach to therapy, applicable to all DMD patients irrespective to their genetic defect, is to modulate utrophin, a functional paralogue of dystrophin, able to compensate for the primary defects of DMD restoring sarcolemmal stability. One of the major difficulties in assessing the effectiveness of therapeutic strategies is to define appropriate outcome measures. In the present study, we utilised an aptamer based proteomics approach to profile 1,310 proteins in plasma of wild-type, mdx and Fiona (mdx overexpressing utrophin) mice. Comparison of the C57 and mdx sera revealed 83 proteins with statistically significant >2 fold changes in dystrophic serum abundance. A large majority of previously described biomarkers (ANP32B, THBS4, CAMK2A/B/D, CYCS, CAPNI) were normalised towards wild-type levels in Fiona animals. This work also identified potential mdx markers specific to increased utrophin (DUS3, TPI1) and highlights novel mdx biomarkers (GITR, MYBPC1, HSP60, SIRT2, SMAD3, CNTN1). We define a panel of putative protein mdx biomarkers to evaluate utrophin based strategies which may help to accelerate their translation to the clinic. PMID:28252048

  16. Multiplexed microfluidic quantification of proteins in serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Nitin; Rajauria, Sukumar; Cleland, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    Rapid and low cost immunoassays targeting proteins in blood or other bodily fluids are highly sought after for point-of-care devices and early screening of patients. Immunoturbidimetric assays utilize latex particles functionalized with antibodies, with particle aggregation in the presence of the analyte detected by a change in absorbance. Using a high throughput micro-fluidic particle analyzer based solely on electrical signals (resistive pulse sensing), we are able to accurately quantify the degree of aggregation by analyzing the changes in the particle size distribution. Thus we study the aggregation of streptavidin (SAv) coated beads in the presence of biotinylated bovine serum albumin as a proof-of-principle assay and extract the binding capacity of the SAv beads from the dose-response curve. We also use our aggregation measurement platform to characterize a commercial C-reactive protein (CRP) immunoturbidimetric assay (hsCRP, Diazyme Inc.). We obtain a linear calibration curve as well as a better limit of detection of CRP than that obtained by absorbance measurements. By using different bead sizes functionalized with different antibodies, multiplexed analyte detection is also possible. We demonstrate this by combining the commercial anti-CRP functionalized beads (0.4 microns) with biotin coated beads (1.0 microns), and carry out the simultaneous detection of SAv and CRP in a single sample.

  17. Topology of Protein Interaction Network Shapes Protein Abundances and Strengths of Their Functional and Nonspecific Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, S.; Heo, M.; Shakhnovich, E.

    2011-03-08

    How do living cells achieve sufficient abundances of functional protein complexes while minimizing promiscuous nonfunctional interactions? Here we study this problem using a first-principle model of the cell whose phenotypic traits are directly determined from its genome through biophysical properties of protein structures and binding interactions in a crowded cellular environment. The model cell includes three independent prototypical pathways, whose topologies of protein-protein interaction (PPI) subnetworks are different, but whose contributions to the cell fitness are equal. Model cells evolve through genotypic mutations and phenotypic protein copy number variations. We found a strong relationship between evolved physical-chemical properties of protein interactions and their abundances due to a 'frustration' effect: Strengthening of functional interactions brings about hydrophobic interfaces, which make proteins prone to promiscuous binding. The balancing act is achieved by lowering concentrations of hub proteins while raising solubilities and abundances of functional monomers. On the basis of these principles we generated and analyzed a possible realization of the proteome-wide PPI network in yeast. In this simulation we found that high-throughput affinity capture-mass spectroscopy experiments can detect functional interactions with high fidelity only for high-abundance proteins while missing most interactions for low-abundance proteins.

  18. [Construction of a two-dimensional liquid chromatography separation system for high abundance proteins depletion in human plasma].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shaochun; Zhang, Xueyang; Gao, Mingxia; Yan, Guoquan; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2011-09-01

    High abundance proteins existing in human plasma severely impede the detection of low abundance proteins. This is one of the most difficult problems encountered in plasma proteomics research. We developed a two-dimensional liquid chromatography system with strong anion exchange chromatography-reversed-phase liquid chromatography (SAX-RPLC) for the extensive separation of plasma proteins and selective depletion of high abundance proteins. TSKgel SuperQ-5PW was selected as the first dimensional separation column for crude human plasma fractionation and Jupiter C4 column was selected as the second dimensional separation column. Separation gradients of the two-dimensional liquid chromatography system were optimized to ensure an extensive separation of plasma proteins. Ten peaks with high signal intensities ( >20 mAU) at 215 nm during the second dimensional separation were collected and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). As a result, 32 proteins, all of which were reported to be high abundance proteins in plasma, including human serum albumin (HSA), immunoglobulin G (IgG) and so on were successfully identified. This system provides an effective method for future depletion of more high abundance proteins and in-depth research in human plasma proteomics.

  19. Standards for total serum protein assays--a collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Doumas, B T

    1975-07-01

    We have studied the standardization of total serum protein assay with the biuret reaction. Standard solutions were prepared from lyophilized preparations of human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin, with corrections made for volatile material and ash contents. These solutions and a solution of crystalline albumin standard were analyzed with a new stable biuret reagent, to establish absorptivity values (values for the absorbance of a 1 g/liter final reaction mixture). The mean values obtained were 0.302, 0.292, and 0.290 for human serum albumin, bovine serum albumin, and the crystalline albumin, respectively. We believe that the established absorptivity value will improve the accuracy of serum protein determinations. We studied the linearity of the relation between color produced and protein concentration, with use of the solutions described above and a serum pool. The color adheres to Beer's law up to the highest concentration tested: 3 g/liter for HSA and BSA, and 2.8 g/liter for serum in the final reaction mixture. The new biuret reagent has been stable for one year at room temperature. We recommend the use of bovine serum albumin as a primary standard for serum protein assays. It is inexpensive, easily available, and exhibits the best linearity in the biuret reaction.

  20. Effects of serum, its protein and lipid extracts, and commercial serum proteins and lipid on the isolated frog heart.

    PubMed

    Singh, J; Hutton, T; Hussain, M; Waring, J J

    1991-01-01

    This study investigates the inotropic effects of serum, its protein and lipid extracts, and commercial serum proteins and lipid on the isolated, spontaneously-beating heart and superfused, hypodynamic ventricle of the frog. Serum taken from either man, horse, calf, frog, or rabbit evoked marked positive inotropic responses which were unaffected by cholinergic, serotonergic, and adrenergic receptor antagonists. Dialysed serum (dialisand) and void volume fractions from Sephadex G200-120 columns corresponding to large molecular weight constituents evoked marked positive inotropic responses. When serum was separated into fractions containing either proteins or lipids/lipoproteins by high-density ultracentrifugation or activated charcoal, both extracts evoked marked positive inotropic responses. Commercial serum globulins and serum containing a high proportion of immunoglobulins elicited large increases in contractile force, whereas serum albumin evoked a negative inotropic effect. Serum which was either boiled and/or treated with chymotrypsin to denature proteins also caused a marked increase in isometric twitch tension in the frog heart. Similar inotropic response was obtained with fractions of boiled serum eluted on columns of Sephadex G200-120. These fractions corresponded to molecular weight in the region of 60-70 kDa. However, the inotropic effect of boiled serum was abolished following pretreatment with lipase. Superfusion of frog hearts with commercial cardiolipin resulted in marked dose-dependent increases in contractile force. The results demonstrate the presence of at least two large molecular weight cardioactive principles in serum. These substances are comparable in size to constituents of serum proteins (e.g., globulins and immunoglobulins) and serum lipids/lipoproteins (e.g., cardiolipin) and may serve as physiological regulators of cardiac function.

  1. Differential bicodon usage in lowly and highly abundant proteins

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Degeneracy in the genetic code implies that different codons can encode the same amino acid. Usage preference of synonymous codons has been observed in all domains of life. There is much evidence suggesting that this bias has a major role on protein elongation rate, contributing to differential expression and to co-translational folding. In addition to codon usage bias, other preference variations have been observed such as codon pairs. In this paper, I report that codon pairs have significant different frequency usage for coding either lowly or highly abundant proteins. These usage preferences cannot be explained by the frequency usage of the single codons. The statistical analysis of coding sequences of nine organisms reveals that in many cases bicodon preferences are shared between related organisms. Furthermore, it is observed that misfolding in the drug-transport protein, encoded by MDR1 gene, is better explained by a big change in the pause propensity due to the synonymous bicodon variant, rather than by a relatively small change in codon usage. These findings suggest that codon pair usage can be a more powerful framework to understand translation elongation rate, protein folding efficiency, and to improve protocols to optimize heterologous gene expression. PMID:28289571

  2. The measurement of total serum proteins by the Biuret method.

    PubMed

    Lubran, M M

    1978-01-01

    The biuret reaction for proteins provides a simple and precise method for measuring serum proteins; Beer's law is obeyed to at least 10 g per dl. Several stable biuret reagents are available. Hemoglobin is the only important cause of interference which cannot be minimized by use of a sample blank. The mechanism of the biuret reaction is described and attention is drawn to the heterogeneity of the serum proteins and to the use of a certified albumin standard.

  3. KINETICS OF AMINO ACID INCORPORATION INTO SERUM PROTEINS

    PubMed Central

    Green, H.; Anker, H. S.

    1955-01-01

    1. The effect of varying body temperature on the rate of amino acid incorporation into serum protein does not give support to the idea that the rate of this process is adjusted in vivo to restore those protein molecules destroyed by thermal denaturation. The experimentally observed Q10 was about 3.9. 2. When amino acids are injected into the blood of animals in a steady state of serum protein turnover, a period of time elapses before these amino acids can be found in the serum proteins. This has been called transit time. At a given temperature (31°) it is the same in rabbits, turtles, and Limulus (1 hour). In rabbits and turtles it has a Q10 of 3.2. It appears to be specifically related to the process of synthesis (or release) of serum proteins. 3. It was not possible to affect the transit time or the incorporation rate by the administration of amino acid analogues. PMID:13221773

  4. Candida albicans Shaving to Profile Human Serum Proteins on Hyphal Surface

    PubMed Central

    Marín, Elvira; Parra-Giraldo, Claudia M.; Hernández-Haro, Carolina; Hernáez, María L.; Nombela, César; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a human opportunistic fungus and it is responsible for a wide variety of infections, either superficial or systemic. C. albicans is a polymorphic fungus and its ability to switch between yeast and hyphae is essential for its virulence. Once C. albicans obtains access to the human body, the host serum constitutes a complex environment of interaction with C. albicans cell surface in bloodstream. To draw a comprehensive picture of this relevant step in host-pathogen interaction during invasive candidiasis, we have optimized a gel-free shaving proteomic strategy to identify both, human serum proteins coating C. albicans cells and fungi surface proteins simultaneously. This approach was carried out with normal serum (NS) and heat inactivated serum (HIS). We identified 214 human and 372 C. albicans unique proteins. Proteins identified in C. albicans included 147 which were described as located at the cell surface and 52 that were described as immunogenic. Interestingly, among these C. albicans proteins, we identified 23 GPI-anchored proteins, Gpd2 and Pra1, which are involved in complement system evasion and 7 other proteins that are able to attach plasminogen to C. albicans surface (Adh1, Eno1, Fba1, Pgk1, Tdh3, Tef1, and Tsa1). Furthermore, 12 proteins identified at the C. albicans hyphae surface induced with 10% human serum were not detected in other hypha-induced conditions. The most abundant human proteins identified are involved in complement and coagulation pathways. Remarkably, with this strategy, all main proteins belonging to complement cascades were identified on the C. albicans surface. Moreover, we identified immunoglobulins, cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic proteins such as apolipoproteins and others. Additionally, we identified more inhibitors of complement and coagulation pathways, some of them serpin proteins (serine protease inhibitors), in HIS vs. NS. On the other hand, we detected a higher amount of C3 at the C. albicans surface in

  5. Zeptosens' protein microarrays: a novel high performance microarray platform for low abundance protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Michael; Schick, Eginhard; Bopp, Martin A; Schneider, Michael J; Oroszlan, Peter; Ehrat, Markus

    2002-04-01

    Protein microarrays are considered an enabling technology, which will significantly expand the scope of current protein expression and protein interaction analysis. Current technologies, such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in combination with mass spectrometry, allowing the identification of biologically relevant proteins, have a high resolving power, but also considerable limitations. As was demonstrated by Gygi et al. (Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 2000,97, 9390-9395), most spots in 2-DE, observed from whole cell extracts, are from high abundance proteins, whereas low abundance proteins, such as signaling molecules or kinases, are only poorly represented. Protein microarrays are expected to significantly expedite the discovery of new markers and targets of pharmaceutical interest, and to have the potential for high-throughput applications. Key factors to reach this goal are: high read-out sensitivity for quantification also of low abundance proteins, functional analysis of proteins, short assay analysis times, ease of handling and the ability to integrate a variety of different targets and new assays. Zeptosens has developed a revolutionary new bioanalytical system based on the proprietary planar waveguide technology which allows us to perform multiplexed, quantitative biomolecular interaction analysis with highest sensitivity in a microarray format upon utilizing the specific advantages of the evanescent field fluorescence detection. The analytical system, comprising an ultrasensitive fluorescence reader and microarray chips with integrated microfluidics, enables the user to generate a multitude of high fidelity data in applications such as protein expression profiling or investigating protein-protein interactions. In this paper, the important factors for developing high performance protein microarray systems, especially for targeting low abundant messengers of relevant biological information, will be discussed and the performance of the system will

  6. Identification of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) protein putative interactors using phage display.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Lloyd, Taylor D; Schäfermeyer, Kim R; Kumar, Santosh; Downie, Allan Bruce

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana seeds without functional SEED MATURATION PROTEIN1 (SMP1), a boiling soluble protein predicted to be of intrinsic disorder, presumed to be a LATE EMBRYOGENESIS ABUNDANT (LEA) family protein based on sequence homology, do not enter secondary dormancy after 3 days at 40 °C. We hypothesized that SMP1 may protect a heat labile protein involved in the promotion of secondary dormancy. Recombinant SMP1 and GmPM28, its soybean (Glycine max), LEA4 homologue, protected the labile GLUCOSE-6-PHOSPHATE DEHYROGENASE enzyme from heat stress, as did a known protectant, Bovine Serum Albumin, whether the LEA protein was in solution or attached to the bottom of microtiter plates. Maintenance of a biological function for both recombinant LEA proteins when immobilized encouraged a biopanning approach to screen for potential protein interactors. Phage display with two Arabidopsis seed, T7 phage, cDNA libraries, normalized for transcripts present in the mature, dehydrated, 12-, 24-, or 36-h imbibed seeds, were used in biopans against recombinant SMP1 and GmPM28. Phage titer increased considerably over four rounds of biopanning for both LEA proteins, but not for BSA, at both 25 and at 41 °C, regardless of the library used. The prevalence of multiple, independent clones encoding portions of specific proteins repeatedly retrieved from different libraries, temperatures and baits, provides evidence suggesting these LEA proteins are discriminating which proteins they protect, a novel finding. The identification of putative LEA-interacting proteins provides targets for reverse genetic approaches to further dissect the induction of secondary dormancy in seeds in response to heat stress.

  7. Bacillus anthracis Overcomes an Amino Acid Auxotrophy by Cleaving Host Serum Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Terwilliger, Austen; Swick, Michelle C.; Pflughoeft, Kathryn J.; Pomerantsev, Andrei; Lyons, C. Rick; Koehler, Theresa M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria sustain an infection by acquiring nutrients from the host to support replication. The host sequesters these nutrients as a growth-restricting strategy, a concept termed “nutritional immunity.” Historically, the study of nutritional immunity has centered on iron uptake because many bacteria target hemoglobin, an abundant circulating protein, as an iron source. Left unresolved are the mechanisms that bacteria use to attain other nutrients from host sources, including amino acids. We employed a novel medium designed to mimic the chemical composition of human serum, and we show here that Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax disease, proteolyzes human hemoglobin to liberate essential amino acids which enhance its growth. This property can be traced to the actions of InhA1, a secreted metalloprotease, and extends to at least three other serum proteins, including serum albumin. The results suggest that we must also consider proteolysis of key host proteins to be a way for bacterial pathogens to attain essential nutrients, and we provide an experimental framework to determine the host and bacterial factors involved in this process. IMPORTANCE The mechanisms by which bacterial pathogens acquire nutrients during infection are poorly understood. Here we used a novel defined medium that approximates the chemical composition of human blood serum, blood serum mimic (BSM), to better model the nutritional environment that pathogens encounter during bacteremia. Removing essential amino acids from BSM revealed that two of the most abundant proteins in blood—hemoglobin and serum albumin—can satiate the amino acid requirement for Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of anthrax. We further demonstrate that hemoglobin is proteolyzed by the secreted protease InhA1. These studies highlight that common blood proteins can be a nutrient source for bacteria. They also challenge the historical view that hemoglobin is solely an iron source for

  8. Serum CRP protein as a differential marker in cancer.

    PubMed

    Juan, Hu; Qijun, Wang; Junlan, Liu

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) in cancer patients and compare with those of immune disease patients and healthy individuals for discriminatory analysis. For this purpose, automatic systems for special protein analysis (Type: Drcon Diognostica Tarbox) was used to measure serum CRP concentrations in 276 cancer patients (Group A), 110 immune disease patients (Group B), 161 phlogistic patients (Group C), and 125 age-matched healthy individuals (Group D). Our data show that serum CRP concentrations in Group A were significantly higher than those in Groups B and D, whereas CRP concentrations in Group B were higher than those in Group D. The differences of serum CRP concentrations between Groups A and B as well as between Groups B and D were significant (P < 0.01). We, therefore, concluded that the measurement of serum CRP concentrations was a fast and accurate method to distinguish between cancer and immune disease patients.

  9. Transporting testosterone and its dimers by serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Chanphai, P; Vesper, A R; Bekale, L; Bérubé, G; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2015-12-01

    A substantial part of steroids is bound to serum proteins in vivo. We report the association of testosterone and it aliphatic dimer (alip) and aromatic dimer (arom) with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution at physiological pH. Multiple spectroscopic methods, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and molecular modeling were used to characterize steroid-protein binding and protein aggregation process. Spectroscopic analysis showed that steroids bind protein via hydrophobic, hydrophilic and H-bonding interactions. HSA forms more stable complexes than BSA. The binding affinity of steroid-protein adducts is testosterone>dimer-aromatic>dimer-aliphatic. Transmission electron microscopy showed major changes in protein morphology as steroid-protein complexation occurred with increase in the diameter of the protein aggregate indicating encapsulation of steroids by serum proteins. Modeling showed the presence of H-bonding stabilized testosterone-protein complexes with the free binding energy of -12.95 for HSA and -11.55 kcal/mol for BSA, indicating that the interaction process is spontaneous at room temperature. Steroid complexation induced more perturbations of BSA conformation than HSA.

  10. Detection of serum proteins by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using Blue Sepharose CL-6B-containing stacking gels.

    PubMed

    Muratsubaki, Haruhiro; Satake, Kaoru; Yamamoto, Yasuhisa; Enomoto, Keiichiro

    2002-08-15

    Analysis of serum proteins by native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is difficult because albumin is abundant in serum and interferes with the resolution of other proteins, especially alpha-antitrypsin which has mobility that is very similar to that of albumin. We present here a method in which serum proteins are separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis using stacking gels containing Blue Sepharose CL-6B, which has a high affinity for albumin, lipoproteins, kinases, and pyridine-nucleotide-dependent oxidoreductases. During electrophoresis, proteins that bind to Blue Sepharose CL-6B stay in the stacking gel and do not migrate into the separating gel. As a consequence, certain proteins, including alpha(1)-antitrypsin, can be detected as clear bands. This method overcomes the requirement for fractionation of serum samples prior to electrophoresis to remove albumin and allows the simultaneous analysis of many samples.

  11. Interaction of Serum Proteins with Surface of Hemodialysis Fiber Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrin, Rehana; Shirako, Yuji; Kishimoto, Kikuo; Ikai, Atsushi

    2012-08-01

    The poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-covered hydrophilic surface of hollow-fiber membranes (fiber membrane, hereafter) for hemodialysis was mechanically probed using modified tips on an atomic force microscope (AFM) with covalent crosslinkers and several types of serum protein. The retraction part of many of the force extension (F-E) curves obtained with AFM tips coated with serum albumin had a long and smooth extension up to 200-300 nm indicating forced elongation of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) chains. When fibrinogen-coated tips were used, long extension F-E curves up to 500 nm with multiple peaks were obtained in addition to smooth curves most likely reflecting the unfolding of fibrinogen molecules. The results indicated that individual polymer chains had a significant affinity toward serum proteins. The adhesion frequency of tips coated with serum proteins was lower on the poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) surface than on the uncoated hydrophobic polysulfone surface.

  12. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, G.K.

    1997-04-29

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described. 11 figs.

  13. Erythropoietin binding protein from mammalian serum

    DOEpatents

    Clemons, Gisela K.

    1997-01-01

    Purified mammalian erythropoietin binding-protein is disclosed, and its isolation, identification, characterization, purification, and immunoassay are described. The erythropoietin binding protein can be used for regulation of erythropoiesis by regulating levels and half-life of erythropoietin. A diagnostic kit for determination of level of erythropoietin binding protein is also described.

  14. Rarity gives a charm: evaluation of trace proteins in plasma and serum.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Julia Tait; Hayes, Timothy K; Carrick, Kevin; Hammond, David J

    2005-06-01

    Since plasma potentially contacts every cell as it circulates through the body, it may carry clues both to diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is commonly expected that the growing ability to detect and characterize trace proteins will result in discovery of novel therapeutics and biomarkers; however, the familiar, super-abundant plasma proteins remain a fundamental stumbling block. Furthermore, robust validation of proteomic data is a sometimes overlooked but always necessary component for the eventual development of clinical reagents. This review surveys some of the uses of typical and atypical low-abundance proteins, current analytical methods, existing impediments to discovery, and some innovations that are overcoming the challenges to evaluation of trace proteins in plasma and serum.

  15. Comparative serum protein binding of anthracycline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Chassany, O; Urien, S; Claudepierre, P; Bastian, G; Tillement, J P

    1996-01-01

    The binding of doxorubicin, iododoxorubicin, daunorubicin, epirubicin, pirarubicin, zorubicin, aclarubicin, and mitoxantrone to 600 microM human serum albumin and 50 microM alpha 1-acid glycoprotein was studied by ultrafiltration at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4. Anthracycline concentrations (total and free) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorometric detection. Binding to albumin (600 microM) varied from 61% (daunorubicin) to 94% (iododoxorubicin). The binding to alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (50 microM) was more variable, ranging from 31% (epirubicin) to 64% (zorubicin), and was essentially related to the hydrophobicity of the derivatives. Simulations showed that the total serum binding varied over a broad range from 71% (doxorubicin) to 96% (iododoxorubicin). We recently reported that the binding to lipoproteins of a series of eight anthracycline analogues could be ascribed to chemicophysical determinants of lipophilicity [2]. The present study was conducted to evaluate in vitro the contribution of albumin and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein to the total serum binding of these drugs.

  16. A new aspect of serum protein binding of tolbutamide.

    PubMed

    Ayanoğlu, G; Uihlein, M; Grigoleit, H G

    1986-02-01

    Tolbutamide is known to bind highly to serum proteins. Quite different values have, however, been reported for binding, ranging from 80 to 99 percent. In this study, in vivo and in vitro binding of increasing concentrations of tolbutamide to human serum proteins were evaluated. In vitro studies were done serum from three healthy males and for in vivo studies serum samples from eight healthy males who had received 1,000 mg tolbutamide were used. Protein binding was determined by equilibrium dialysis, using DIANORM system. Tolbutamide concentrations were determined by HPLC method of Uihlein and Hack. The results suggest that there is an increase in percent tolbutamide bound with increasing concentrations of tolbutamide. Generally, an inverse relationship between the total concentration of a drug in serum and its bound fraction is observed. Our findings seem to be contrary to this, at least within the concentration range studied. There exist at least two binding sites on albumin with different affinities for tolbutamide and most probably, at low concentrations, the drug binds mainly to the high affinity sites, whereas at higher concentrations additional drug will bind to the lower affinity sites leading to the observed increase in fraction bound with concentration. In conclusion it may be said that serum protein binding is a much more complicated phenomenon than generally stated and that the normal observations are only true for some ideal compounds where only one site of adsorption has to be taken into account.

  17. Grizzly bear corticosteroid binding globulin: Cloning and serum protein expression.

    PubMed

    Chow, Brian A; Hamilton, Jason; Alsop, Derek; Cattet, Marc R L; Stenhouse, Gordon; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2010-06-01

    Serum corticosteroid levels are routinely measured as markers of stress in wild animals. However, corticosteroid levels rise rapidly in response to the acute stress of capture and restraint for sampling, limiting its use as an indicator of chronic stress. We hypothesized that serum corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), the primary transport protein for corticosteroids in circulation, may be a better marker of the stress status prior to capture in grizzly bears (Ursus arctos). To test this, a full-length CBG cDNA was cloned and sequenced from grizzly bear testis and polyclonal antibodies were generated for detection of this protein in bear sera. The deduced nucleotide and protein sequences were 1218 bp and 405 amino acids, respectively. Multiple sequence alignments showed that grizzly bear CBG (gbCBG) was 90% and 83% identical to the dog CBG nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. The affinity purified rabbit gbCBG antiserum detected grizzly bear but not human CBG. There were no sex differences in serum total cortisol concentration, while CBG expression was significantly higher in adult females compared to males. Serum cortisol levels were significantly higher in bears captured by leg-hold snare compared to those captured by remote drug delivery from helicopter. However, serum CBG expression between these two groups did not differ significantly. Overall, serum CBG levels may be a better marker of chronic stress, especially because this protein is not modulated by the stress of capture and restraint in grizzly bears.

  18. Biologically active protein fragments containing specific binding regions of serum albumin or related proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    In accordance with the present invention, biologically active protein fragments can be constructed which contain only those specific portions of the serum albumin family of proteins such as regions known as subdomains IIA and IIIA which are primarily responsible for the binding properties of the serum albumins. The artificial serums that can be prepared from these biologically active protein fragments are advantageous in that they can be produced much more easily than serums containing the whole albumin, yet still retain all or most of the original binding potential of the full albumin proteins. In addition, since the protein fragment serums of the present invention can be made from non-natural sources using conventional recombinant DNA techniques, they are far safer than serums containing natural albumin because they do not carry the potentially harmful viruses and other contaminants that will be found in the natural substances.

  19. Fabrication of diverse pH-sensitive functional mesoporous silica for selective removal or depletion of highly abundant proteins from biological samples.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaojiao; Lan, Jingfeng; Li, Huihui; Liu, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Haixia

    2017-01-01

    In proteomic studies, poor detection of low abundant proteins is a major problem due to the presence of highly abundant proteins. Therefore, the specific removal or depletion of highly abundant proteins prior to analysis is necessary. In response to this problem, a series of pH-sensitive functional mesoporous silica materials composed of 2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate and methacrylic acid units were designed and synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization. These functional mesoporous silica materials were characterized and their ability for adsorption and separation of proteins was evaluated. Possessing a pH-sensitive feature, the synthesized functional materials showed selective adsorption of some proteins in aqueous or buffer solutions at certain pH values. The specific removal of a particular protein from a mixed protein solution was subsequently studied. The analytical results confirmed that all the target proteins (bovine serum albumin, ovalbumin, and lysozyme) can be removed by the proposed materials from a five-protein mixture in a single operation. Finally, the practical application of this approach was also evaluated by the selective removal of certain proteins from real biological samples. The results revealed that the maximum removal efficiencies of ovalbumin and lysozyme from egg white sample were obtained as 99% and 92%, respectively, while the maximum removal efficiency of human serum albumin from human serum sample was about 80% by the proposed method. It suggested that this treatment process reduced the complexity of real biological samples and facilitated the identification of hidden proteins in chromatograms.

  20. Abundant storage protein depletion from tuber proteins using ethanol precipitation method: Suitability to proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Min; Gupta, Ravi; Kim, Sun Hyung; Wang, Yiming; Rakwal, Randeep; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Kim, Sun Tae

    2015-05-01

    High-abundance proteins (HAPs) hamper in-depth proteome study necessitating development of a HAPs depletion method. Here, we report a novel ethanol precipitation method (EPM) for HAPs depletion from total tuber proteins. Ethanol showed a dose-dependent effect on depletion of sporamin from sweet potato and patatin from potato tubers, respectively. The 50% ethanol was an optimal concentration. 2DE analysis of EPM-prepared sweet potato proteins also revealed enrichment of storage proteins (SPs) in ethanol supernatant (ES) resulting in detection of new low-abundance proteins in ethanol pellet (EP), compared to total fraction. The ES fraction showed even higher trypsin inhibitor activity than total proteins, further showing the efficacy of EPM in enrichment of sporamin in ES fraction. Application of this method was demonstrated for comparative proteomics of two sweet potato cultivars (Hwang-geum and Ho-bac) and purification of SP (sporamin) in its native form, as examples. Comparative proteomics identified many cultivar specific protein spots and selected spots were confidently assigned for their protein identity using MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis. Overall, the EPM is simple, reproducible, and economical for depletion of SPs and is suitable for downstream proteomics study. This study opens a door for its potential application to other tuber crops or fruits rich in carbohydrates.

  1. [Modification of placenta blood serum proteins under low temperature effect].

    PubMed

    Fal'ko, O V; Zemlianskikh, N G; Lipina, O V; Prokopiuk, O S

    2013-01-01

    Changes in environmental physical and chemical factors upon freeze-thawing and low temperature storage of biological samples can result in impairments of protein structures. This work specifies spontaneous and diamide-induced protein aggregations of placenta blood serum stored at -20 degrees and -196 degrees C during 2 years with SDS-PAGE. It was shown that storage of placenta blood serum at low temperatures did not cause any quantitative and qualitative changes in fraction distribution of proteins denatured with SDS in comparison to the native samples which were not frozen. Application of beta-mercaptoethanol revealed that placenta blood serum proteins upon freeze-thawing did not form spontaneous aggregates linked by disulphide bridges. Oxidation of amino acid sulfhydryl groups induced by diamide and accompanied by high molecular aggregate formation proved to be a quite effective way for indirect estimation of structural changes in protein upon low temperature effects. In samples thawed after low temperature storage the protein aggregation with 4 microM diamide was significantly higher than in native serum. These discrepancies between native and frozen-thawed samples are stipulated by impairments of protein structure under low temperature and increased in accessibility of reactive SH-groups of proteins for oxidation with diamide. Structural changes in placenta blood serum proteins, which caused by low temperatures and revealed by elevated sensibility to diamide-induced aggregate formation, did not depend on temperature (-20 degrees and -196 degrees C) and storage terms (2 years and 3 weeks). They reflect protein reaction to freeze-thawing processes and could be sequence of ice crystal formation which takes place in unprotected media.

  2. Targeted quantification of low ng/mL level proteins in human serum without immunoaffinity depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Sun, Xuefei; Gao, Yuqian; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Zhao, Rui; He, Jintang; Moore, Ronald J.; Kagan, Jacob; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Liu, Alvin Y.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-07-05

    We recently reported an antibody-free targeted protein quantification strategy, termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM) for achieving significantly enhanced sensitivity using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry. Integrating PRISM with front-end IgY14 immunoaffinity depletion, sensitive detection of targeted proteins at 50-100 pg/mL levels in human blood plasma/serum was demonstrated. However, immunoaffinity depletion is often associated with undesired losses of target proteins of interest. Herein we report further evaluation of PRISM-SRM quantification of low-abundance serum proteins without immunoaffinity depletion and the multiplexing potential of this technique. Limits of quantification (LOQs) at low ng/mL levels with a median CV of ~12% were achieved for proteins spiked into human female serum using as little as 2 µL serum. PRISM-SRM provided up to ~1000-fold improvement in the LOQ when compared to conventional SRM measurements. Multiplexing capability of PRISM-SRM was also evaluated by two sets of serum samples with 6 and 21 target peptides spiked at the low attomole/µL levels. The results from SRM measurements for pooled or post-concatenated samples were comparable to those obtained from individual peptide fractions in terms of signal-to-noise ratios and SRM peak area ratios of light to heavy peptides. PRISM-SRM was applied to measure several ng/mL-level endogenous plasma proteins, including prostate-specific antigen, in clinical patient sera where correlation coefficients > 0.99 were observed between the results from PRISM-SRM and ELISA assays. Our results demonstrate that PRISM-SRM can be successfully used for quantification of low-abundance endogenous proteins in highly complex samples. Moderate throughput (50 samples/week) can be achieved by applying the post-concatenation or fraction multiplexing strategies. We anticipate broad applications for targeted PRISM

  3. Development of gel-filter method for high enrichment of low-molecular weight proteins from serum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lingsheng; Zhai, Linhui; Li, Yanchang; Li, Ning; Zhang, Chengpu; Ping, Lingyan; Chang, Lei; Wu, Junzhu; Li, Xiangping; Shi, Deshun; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The human serum proteome has been extensively screened for biomarkers. However, the large dynamic range of protein concentrations in serum and the presence of highly abundant and large molecular weight proteins, make identification and detection changes in the amount of low-molecular weight proteins (LMW, molecular weight ≤ 30kDa) difficult. Here, we developed a gel-filter method including four layers of different concentration of tricine SDS-PAGE-based gels to block high-molecular weight proteins and enrich LMW proteins. By utilizing this method, we identified 1,576 proteins (n = 2) from 10 μL serum. Among them, 559 (n = 2) proteins belonged to LMW proteins. Furthermore, this gel-filter method could identify 67.4% and 39.8% more LMW proteins than that in representative methods of glycine SDS-PAGE and optimized-DS, respectively. By utilizing SILAC-AQUA approach with labeled recombinant protein as internal standard, the recovery rate for GST spiked in serum during the treatment of gel-filter, optimized-DS, and ProteoMiner was 33.1 ± 0.01%, 18.7 ± 0.01% and 9.6 ± 0.03%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the gel-filter method offers a rapid, highly reproducible and efficient approach for screening biomarkers from serum through proteomic analyses.

  4. Highly abundant defense proteins in human sweat as revealed by targeted proteomics and label free quantification mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Csősz, Éva; Emri, Gabriella; Kalló, Gergő; Tsaprailis, George; Tőzsér, József

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The healthy human skin with its effective antimicrobial defense system forms an efficient barrier against invading pathogens. There is evidence suggesting that the composition of this chemical barrier varies between diseases, making the easily-collected sweat an ideal candidate for biomarker discoveries. OBJECTIVE Our aim was to provide information about the normal composition of the sweat, and to study the chemical barrier found at the surface of skin. METHODS Sweat samples from healthy individuals were collected during sauna bathing, and the global protein panel was analyzed by label-free mass spectrometry. SRM-based targeted proteomic methods were designed and stable isotope labeled reference peptides were used for method validation. RESULTS 95 sweat proteins were identified, 20 of them were novel proteins. It was shown that dermcidin is the most abundant sweat protein, and along with apolipoprotein D, clusterin, prolactin inducible protein and serum albumin, they make up 91% of secreted sweat proteins. The roles of these highly abundant proteins were reviewed; all of which have protective functions, highlighting the importance of sweat glands in composing the first line of innate immune defense system, and maintaining the epidermal barrier integrity. CONCLUSION Our findings in regards to the proteins forming the chemical barrier of the skin as determined by label free quantification and targeted proteomics methods are in accordance with previous studies, and can be further used as a starting point for non-invasive sweat biomarker research. PMID:26307449

  5. Mass spectrometry in cancer biomarker research: a case for immunodepletion of abundant blood-derived proteins from clinical tissue specimens

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, DaRue A; Johann, Donald J; Wei, Bih-Rong; Ye, Xiaoying; Chan, King C; Nissley, Dwight V; Simpson, R Mark; Citrin, Deborah E; Mackall, Crystal L; Linehan, W Marston; Blonder, Josip

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of clinically relevant cancer biomarkers using mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has proven difficult, primarily because of the enormous dynamic range of blood-derived protein concentrations and the fact that the 22 most abundant blood-derived proteins constitute approximately 99% of the total plasma protein mass. Immunodepletion of clinical body fluid specimens (e.g., serum/plasma) for the removal of highly abundant proteins is a reasonable and reproducible solution. Often overlooked, clinical tissue specimens also contain a formidable amount of highly abundant blood-derived proteins present in tissue-embedded networks of blood/lymph capillaries and interstitial fluid. Hence, the dynamic range impediment to biomarker discovery remains a formidable obstacle, regardless of clinical sample type (solid tissue and/or body fluid). Thus, we optimized and applied simultaneous immunodepletion of blood-derived proteins from solid tissue and peripheral blood, using clear cell renal cell carcinoma as a model disease. Integrative analysis of data from this approach and genomic data obtained from the same type of tumor revealed concordant key pathways and protein targets germane to clear cell renal cell carcinoma. This includes the activation of the lipogenic pathway characterized by increased expression of adipophilin (PLIN2) along with 'cadherin switching', a phenomenon indicative of transcriptional reprogramming linked to renal epithelial dedifferentiation. We also applied immunodepletion of abundant blood-derived proteins to various tissue types (e.g., adipose tissue and breast tissue) showing unambiguously that the removal of abundant blood-derived proteins represents a powerful tool for the reproducible profiling of tissue proteomes. Herein, we show that the removal of abundant blood-derived proteins from solid tissue specimens is of equal importance to depletion of body fluids and recommend its routine use in the context of biological discovery and

  6. Changes in serum protein profiles of chickens with tibial dyschondroplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in serum protein profiles were analyzed to identify biomarkers associated with a poultry leg problem named tibial dyschondroplasia (TD) that can cause lameness. We used a bead-based affinity matrix containing a combinatorial library of hexapeptides (ProteoMinerTM) to deplete high abundan...

  7. Amyloid-related serum component (protein ASC) IN LEPROSY PATIENTS.

    PubMed Central

    Kronvall, G; Husby, G; Samuel, D; Bjune, G; Wheate, H

    1975-01-01

    The presence of amyloid-related serum component, protein ASC, in serum samples from 63 leprosy patients was investigated. Protein ASC was detected in 38% of the patients. A correlation to the disease spectrum of leprosy was apparent: polar lepromatous cases, 64% positive; borderline lepromatous, 50%; borderline tuberculoid, 36%; subpolar tuberculoid, 17%; and polar tuberculoid, negative. Antibody activity against the a antigen of Mycobacterium leprae was also determined, showing a similar correlation to the disease spectrum. Serum samples from 23 apparently healthy Ethiopians serving as controls showed a protein ASC incidence of 22%. This figure is significantly higher than the frequency found by others among healthy Norwegian blood donors. Immunoglobulin M levels among patients were elevated in the borderline lepromatous and poplar lepromatous groups. The three tuberculoid groups did not differ in this respect from the control group but were all elevated as compared to a normal Caucasian serum pool. Although raised immunoglobulin M levels seemed to parallel increased frequencies of protein ASC in the patient groups as well as in controls, this correlation might be only secondary to a primary derangement in T-cell function. PMID:804451

  8. Beer consumption and changes in stability of human serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Gorinstein, S; Caspi, A; Goshev, I; Moncheva, S; Zemser, M; Weisz, M; Libman, I; Lerner, H T; Trakhtenberg, S; Martín-Belloso, O

    2001-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of beer consumption (BC) on the functional and structural properties of human serum proteins (HSP). Thirty-eight volunteers (after coronary bypass) were divided into two groups: experimental (EG) and control (CG). Nineteen volunteers of the EG consumed 330 mL per day of beer (about 20 g of alcohol) for 30 consecutive days. The CG volunteers consumed mineral water instead of beer. Blood samples were collected from EG and CG patients before and after the experiment. Albumin (Alb), globulin (Glo), and methanol-precipitable proteins (MPP) from human serum were denatured with 8 M urea. Fluorescence and electrophoresis were employed in order to elucidate urea-induced conformational changes and structural behavior of proteins. The measured fluorescence emission spectra were used to estimate the stability of native and denatured protein fractions before and after BC. It was found that before BC the fractions most stable to urea denaturation were Glo, Alb, and MPP fractions. After BC in most of the beer-consuming patients (EG) some changes in native and denatured protein fractions were detected: a tendency to lower stability and minor structural deviations. These qualitative changes were more profound in MPP than in Alb and Glo. Thus, Glo is more resistible to alcohol influence than Alb, which in turn is more resistible than MPP. No serum protein changes were detected in patients of CG.

  9. Serum protein mediators of dementia and aging proper

    PubMed Central

    Royall, Donald R.; Al-Rubaye, Safa; Bishnoi, Ram; Palmer, Raymond F.

    2016-01-01

    The latent variable “δ” (for “dementia”) appears to be uniquely responsible for the dementing aspects of cognitive impairment. Age, depressive symptoms, gender and the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele are independently associated with δ. In this analysis, we explore serum proteins as potential mediators of age's specific association with δ in a large, ethnically diverse longitudinal cohort, the Texas Alzheimer's Research and Care Consortium (TARCC). 22 serum proteins were recognized as partial mediators of age's association with δ. These include Insulin-like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 2 (IGF-BP2), which we had previously associated with age-specific cognitive change, and both Pancreatic Polypeptide (PP) and von Willebrand Factor (vWF), previously associated with δ. Nine other δ-related proteins were not confirmed by this ethnicity adjusted analysis. Our findings suggest that age's association with the disabling fraction of cognitive performance is partially mediated by serum proteins, somatomedins and hormones. Those proteins may offer targets for the specific treatment of age-related effects on dementia severity and conversion risk. PMID:27922822

  10. [Electrophoretic studies of serum protein fractions in horses with laminitis].

    PubMed

    Edinger, H; Miller, I; Stanek, C; Gemeiner, M

    1992-10-01

    The spectrum of serum proteins was evaluated in 46 horses affected with spontaneous laminitis and correlations between the severity of the disease and changes of the protein pattern were analyzed. The investigation was made in two groups; group A consisted of 21 horses of various breeds (warmblood, thoroughbred, standardbred) and group B of 25 ponys. Each group was subdivided according to the severity of the disease, using the OBEL-grade (OG) classification system. Serum proteins were separated by different one- and two-dimensional electrophoretic methods. Sera analysed by cellulose acetate electrophoresis showed a significant difference in the alpha 1-globulin fraction between OG II and OG IV affected horses. An increasing severity of the disease was correlated with a decrease of the alpha 1-globulins. The other protein fractions didn't show a uniform tendency. In group B there was a significant difference in the alpha 1-globulin fractions of OG II and OG III and in the beta 2-globulin fractions of OG I and OG II affected ponys. The acute phase proteins C3c, C4, Hp and fibronectin could be determined in a preliminary study in horse serum using the cross-reactivity of antibodies against the homologous human proteins.

  11. Sensing Small Changes in Protein Abundance: Stimulation of Caco-2 Cells by Human Whey Proteins.

    PubMed

    Cundiff, Judy K; McConnell, Elizabeth J; Lohe, Kimberly J; Maria, Sarah D; McMahon, Robert J; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-04

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic approaches have largely facilitated our systemic understanding of cellular processes and biological functions. Cutoffs in protein expression fold changes (FCs) are often arbitrarily determined in MS-based quantification with no demonstrable determination of small magnitude changes in protein expression. Therefore, many biological insights may remain veiled due to high FC cutoffs. Herein, we employ the intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) line Caco-2 as a model system to demonstrate the dynamicity of tandem-mass-tag (TMT) labeling over a range of 5-40% changes in protein abundance, with the variance controls of ± 5% FC for around 95% of TMT ratios when sampling 9-12 biological replicates. We further applied this procedure to examine the temporal proteome of Caco-2 cells upon exposure to human whey proteins (WP). Pathway assessments predict subtle effects due to WP in moderating xenobiotic metabolism, promoting proliferation and various other cellular functions in differentiating enterocyte-like Caco-2 cells. This demonstration of a sensitive MS approach may open up new perspectives in the system-wide exploration of elusive or transient biological effects by facilitating scrutiny of narrow windows of proteome abundance changes. Furthermore, we anticipate this study will encourage more investigations of WP on infant gastrointestinal tract development.

  12. Natural variability in abundance of prevalent soybean proteins.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2010-12-01

    Soybean is an inexpensive source of protein for humans and animals. Genetic modifications (GMO) to soybean have become inevitable on two fronts, both quality and yield will need to improve to meet increasing global demand. To ensure the safety of the crop for consumers it is important to determine the natural variation in seed protein constituents as well as any unintended changes that may occur in the GMO as a result of genetic modification. Understanding the natural variation of seed proteins in wild and cultivated soybeans that have been used in conventional soybean breeding programs is critical for determining unintended protein expression in GMO soybeans. In recent years, proteomic technologies have been used as an effective analytical tool for examining modifications of protein profiles. We have standardized and applied these technologies to determine and quantify the spectrum of proteins present in soybean seed. We used two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for the separation, quantification, and identification of different classes of soybean seed proteins. We have observed significant variations in different classes of proteins, including storage, allergen and anti-nutritional protein profiles, between non-GMO cultivated and wild soybean varieties. This information is useful for scientists and regulatory agencies to determine whether the unintended expression of proteins found in transgenic soybean is within the range of natural variation.

  13. Seminal fluid proteins differ in abundance between genetic lineages of honeybees.

    PubMed

    Baer, Boris; Zareie, Reza; Paynter, Ellen; Poland, Veronica; Millar, A Harvey

    2012-10-22

    Seminal fluid is transferred to the females' reproductive tract as part of the ejaculate and contains highly complex molecular machinery that is of central importance for male and female reproductive success. Interspecific studies suggest rapid evolutionary changes in the sequences of some seminal fluid proteins and also highlight the importance of specific seminal fluid proteins for sperm function and paternity success. Much less work has been conducted to study if variation in the steady-state abundance of seminal fluid proteins occurs within a species, which could provide a foundation for future selection to act upon. Here we used a unique breeding program of the honeybee Apis mellifera to provide evidence for quantified differences in seminal fluid protein abundances between three genetic lineages that have been bred for ~20 generations. We found the same subset of seminal fluid proteins to be present in all lines, but protein abundance or protein modification state varied significantly for 16% of the protein spots investigated. Protein spots with changed abundances were identified using mass spectrometry, with the abundance of a number documented from other species to be correlated with male fertility, reproductive success or immune-competence. We conclude that significant alterations in the abundance or modification state of specific proteins in seminal fluid can be linked to different genotypes in honeybees.

  14. Chronic Manganism: Preliminary Observations on Glucose Tolerance and Serum Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hassanein, M.; Ghaleb, H. A.; Haroun, E. A.; Hegazy, M. R.; Khayyal, M. A. H.

    1966-01-01

    An intravenous glucose tolerance test was carried out in 11 patients with chronic manganese poisoning. Prolonged reactionary hypoglycaemia was observed. The underlying mechanism is discussed. It may be due to a disturbance of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. In seven of these patients total serum proteins were estimated and were separated electrophoretically. The albumin: globulin ratios were lower in patients than in controls. There were significant reductions in serum albumin concentrations and increases in concentrations of α1 and β globulins. PMID:5904101

  15. Reference measurement procedure development for C-reactive protein in human serum.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Eric L; Bunk, David M

    2009-10-15

    This paper describes the development of a reference measurement procedure to quantify human C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum using affinity techniques prior to tryptic digestion and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) for the certification of reference materials in clinically relevant ranges. The absence of a suitable internal standard for the CRP measurement, necessary to eliminate potential measurement bias in both the affinity purification and trypsin digestion steps, was addressed using the method of standard addition. The standard addition quantification approach was combined with affinity purification, using an anti-CRP monoclonal antibody conjugated to polystyrene beads, trypsin digestion of the purified protein, and LC-MS/MS analysis of CRP tryptic peptides. The effectiveness of intact protein affinity purification was evaluated through the measurement of CRP in several serum-based CRP control materials, yielding levels that were comparable to their expected mean concentration values. Quantitative results were confirmed with an external calibration approach. This study demonstrates the feasibility of affinity purification with LC-MS/MS for the reference measurement procedure development of low abundance serum protein analytes.

  16. Serum proteins are extracted along with monolayer cells in plasticware and interfere with protein analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xin; Meng, Yuling; Kalkanis, Steven N.

    2016-01-01

    Washing and lysing monolayer cells directly from cell culture plasticware is a commonly used method for protein extraction. We found that multiple protein bands were enriched in samples with low cell numbers from the 6-well plate cultures. These proteins contributed to the overestimation of cell proteins and led to the uneven protein loading in Western blotting analysis. In Coomassie blue stained SDS-PAGE gels, the main enriched protein band is about 69 kDa and it makes up 13.6% of total protein from 104 U251n cells. Analyzed by mass spectrometry, we identified two of the enriched proteins: bovine serum albumin and bovine serum transferrin. We further observed that serum proteins could be extracted from other cell culture plates, dishes and flasks even after washing the cells 3 times with PBS. A total of 2.3 mg of protein was collected from a single well of the 6-well plate. A trace amount of the protein band was still visible after washing the cells 5 times with PBS. Thus, serum proteins should be considered if extracting proteins from plasticware, especially for samples with low cell numbers. PMID:27631018

  17. Identification of Differentially Abundant Proteins of Edwardsiella ictaluri during Iron Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Dumpala, Pradeep R.; Peterson, Brian C.; Lawrence, Mark L.; Karsi, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe intracellular bacterium that causes enteric septicemia in channel catfish. Iron is an essential inorganic nutrient of bacteria and is crucial for bacterial invasion. Reduced availability of iron by the host may cause significant stress for bacterial pathogens and is considered a signal that leads to significant alteration in virulence gene expression. However, the precise effect of iron-restriction on E. ictaluri protein abundance is unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify differentially abundant proteins of E. ictaluri during in vitro iron-restricted conditions. We applied two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) for determining differentially abundant proteins and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/TOF MS) for protein identification. Gene ontology and pathway-based functional modeling of differentially abundant proteins was also conducted. A total of 50 unique differentially abundant proteins at a minimum of 2-fold (p ≤ 0.05) difference in abundance due to iron-restriction were detected. The numbers of up- and down-regulated proteins were 37 and 13, respectively. We noted several proteins, including EsrB, LamB, MalM, MalE, FdaA, and TonB-dependent heme/hemoglobin receptor family proteins responded to iron restriction in E. ictaluri. PMID:26168192

  18. Standardisation of the quantitation of serum amyloid A protein (SAA) in human serum.

    PubMed

    Godenir, N L; Jeenah, M S; Coetzee, G A; Van der Westhuyzen, D R; Strachan, A F; De Beer, F C

    1985-11-07

    An adequate method for standardising the quantitation of serum amyloid A protein (SAA) in human serum was developed. Acute phase high density lipoprotein3 (HDL3) was used as a standard. The concentration of the SAA in the standard was determined by the use of purified SAA. After protein determination, various concentrations of purified SAA were run on SDS-polyacrylamide gel together with the HDL3 standard containing an unknown amount of SAA amongst the apolipoproteins. From the standard curve obtained by pyridine extraction (Coomassie blue colour yield at A605 nm) the concentration of SAA in the HDL3 standard was determined. An established immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for SAA was standardised with the HDL3. SAA concentrations in normal and acute phase sera were determined.

  19. Genomic analysis of membrane protein families: abundance and conserved motifs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Engelman, Donald M; Gerstein, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Background Polytopic membrane proteins can be related to each other on the basis of the number of transmembrane helices and sequence similarities. Building on the Pfam classification of protein domain families, and using transmembrane-helix prediction and sequence-similarity searching, we identified a total of 526 well-characterized membrane protein families in 26 recently sequenced genomes. To this we added a clustering of a number of predicted but unclassified membrane proteins, resulting in a total of 637 membrane protein families. Results Analysis of the occurrence and composition of these families revealed several interesting trends. The number of assigned membrane protein domains has an approximately linear relationship to the total number of open reading frames (ORFs) in 26 genomes studied. Caenorhabditis elegans is an apparent outlier, because of its high representation of seven-span transmembrane (7-TM) chemoreceptor families. In all genomes, including that of C. elegans, the number of distinct membrane protein families has a logarithmic relation to the number of ORFs. Glycine, proline, and tyrosine locations tend to be conserved in transmembrane regions within families, whereas isoleucine, valine, and methionine locations are relatively mutable. Analysis of motifs in putative transmembrane helices reveals that GxxxG and GxxxxxxG (which can be written GG4 and GG7, respectively; see Materials and methods) are among the most prevalent. This was noted in earlier studies; we now find these motifs are particularly well conserved in families, however, especially those corresponding to transporters, symporters, and channels. Conclusions We carried out a genome-wide analysis on patterns of the classified polytopic membrane protein families and analyzed the distribution of conserved amino acids and motifs in the transmembrane helix regions in these families. PMID:12372142

  20. Hexapeptide libraries for enhanced protein PTM identification and relative abundance profiling in whole human saliva.

    PubMed

    Bandhakavi, Sricharan; Van Riper, Susan K; Tawfik, Pierre N; Stone, Matthew D; Haddad, Tufia; Rhodus, Nelson L; Carlis, John V; Griffin, Timothy J

    2011-03-04

    Dynamic range compression (DRC) by hexapeptide libraries increases MS/MS-based identification of lower-abundance proteins in complex mixtures. However, two unanswered questions impede fully realizing DRC's potential in shotgun proteomics. First, does DRC enhance identification of post-translationally modified proteins? Second, can DRC be incorporated into a workflow enabling relative protein abundance profiling? We sought to answer both questions analyzing human whole saliva. Addressing question one, we coupled DRC with covalent glycopeptide enrichment and MS/MS. With DRC we identified ∼2 times more N-linked glycoproteins and their glycosylation sites than without DRC, dramatically increasing the known salivary glycoprotein catalog. Addressing question two, we compared differentially stable isotope-labeled saliva samples pooled from healthy and metastatic breast cancer women using a multidimensional peptide fractionation-based workflow, analyzing in parallel one sample portion with DRC and one portion without. Our workflow categorizes proteins with higher absolute abundance, whose relative abundance ratios are altered by DRC, from proteins of lower absolute abundance detected only after DRC. Within each of these salivary protein categories, we identified novel abundance changes putatively associated with breast cancer, demonstrating feasibility and benefits of DRC for relative abundance profiling. Collectively, our results bring us closer to realizing the full potential of DRC for proteomic studies.

  1. Serum protein adsorption and excretion pathways of metal nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vinluan, Rodrigo D; Zheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    While the synthesis of metal nanoparticles (NPs) with fascinating optical and electronic properties have progressed dramatically and their potential biomedical applications were also well demonstrated in the past decade, translation of metal NPs into the clinical practice still remains a challenge due to their severe accumulation in the body. Herein, we give a brief review on size-dependent material properties of metal NPs and their potential biomedical applications, followed by a summary of how structural parameters such as size, shape and charge influence their interactions with serum protein adsorption, cellular uptake and excretion pathways. Finally, the future challenges in minimizing serum protein adsorption and expediting clinical translation of metal NPs were also discussed. PMID:26377047

  2. Cockroach larval-specific protein, a tyrosine-rich serum protein.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, R C; Kunkel, J G

    1983-12-10

    Larval-specific protein (LSP) is the most abundant protein in the hemolymph of cockroaches shortly before molting, but is rapidly cleared from the hemolymph during the molt (Kunkel, J. G., and Lawler, D. M. (1974) Comp. Biochem. Physiol. 47B, 697-710). Blatta orientalis LSP was purified by sedimentation in preparative sucrose gradients followed by 2-hydroxypropylamino-cellulose anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration on a column of Bio-Gel A-1.5m. The amino acid composition of LSP includes 16.3 mol % tyrosine and 4.9 mol % phenylalanine, but virtually no cysteine and little methionine. The following physical properties were determined for LSP: R8 = 68.3 A, 8(20),w = 17.8, and V = 0.723. From these values an Mr = 507,900 was calculated. In electron micrographs, LSP appears as rectangular particles of 121 by 134 A. In disc polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, native LSP exhibits a single band, but in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, LSP is resolved into a doublet of closely spaced bands of Mr = 88,100 and 84,400 present in a ratio of 1.38:1. These data indicate that native B. orientalis LSP is a hexamer of subunits averaging approximately Mr = 86,000. Crossed immunoelectrophoresis of Blattella germanica larval serum indicates that LSP in that species is a hexamer composed of a random assortment of two subunits of different charge in the ratio 1.25:1. The amino acid composition and physical properties of LSP suggest that LSP may be the hemimetabolous analogue of the tyrosine- and phenylalanine-rich storage proteins of holometabolous insects.

  3. Serum proteins of Canada goose (Branta canadensis) subspecies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, R.P.; Sulkin, S.T.; Henny, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    Serum proteins from nine subspecies of Canada Geese (Brunta canadensis) were analyzed through the use of column and slab acrylamide electrophoresis. Variation was minimal within a subspecies, although all the subspecies were closely related. B. c. leucopareia appeared to be the most distinct subspecies, while maxima and moffitti were the most similar. Our preliminary findings suggest that the electrophoresis techniques are sensitive enough to identify some of the subspecies; however, baseline data from breeding ranges of all subspecies are required.

  4. Specific Changes of Serum Proteins in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenwen; Wan, Xinhua; Liu, Bin; Rong, Xianfang; Zhu, Lei; Li, Pingping; Li, Jiang; Wang, Ling; Cui, Liying; Wang, Xiaoliang

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify and validate protein change in the serum from PD patients. We used serum samples from 21 PD patients and 20 age-matched normal people as control to conduct a comparative proteomic study. We performed 2-DE and analyzed the differentially expressed protein spots by LC-MS/MS. In PD group 13 spots were shown to be differentially expressed compared to control group. They were identified as 6 proteins. Among these, 3 proteins were confirmed by Western blot analysis. It showed that the frequency of fibrinogen γ-chain (FGG) appeared 70% in PD, which could not be detected in control group. The protein of inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor heavy chain H4 (ITI-H4) was found to exist two forms in serum. The full size (120 kDa) of the protein was increased and the fragmented ITI-H4 (35 kDa) was decreased in PD group. The ratio of full size ITI-H4 to fragmented ITI-H4 in PD patients was 3.85±0.29-fold higher than in control group. Furthermore, fragmented Apo A-IV (∼26 kDa) was mainly detected in control group, while it was rare to be found in PD group. Above findings might be useful for diagnosis of PD. When the expressions of FGG and 120 kDa ITI-H4 are increase, as well as ∼26 kDa Apo A-IV disappear would provide strong evidence for PD. PMID:24769800

  5. Protein abundance changes of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in different sugar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hong; Niu, Chen; Liu, Bin; Wei, JianPing; Wang, HuXuan; Yuan, YaHong; Yue, TianLi

    2016-09-16

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a yeast which can cause spoilage in the concentrated juice industries. It exhibits resistance to high sugar concentrations but genome- and proteome-wide studies on Z. rouxii in response to high sugar concentrations have been poorly investigated. Herein, by using a 2-D electrophoresis based workflow, the proteome of a wild strain of Z. rouxii under different sugar concentrations has been analyzed. Proteins were extracted, quantified, and subjected to 2-DE analysis in the pH range 4-7. Differences in growth (lag phase), protein content (13.97-19.23mg/g cell dry weight) and number of resolved spots (196-296) were found between sugar concentrations. ANOVA test showed that 168 spots were different, and 47 spots, corresponding to 40 unique gene products have been identified. These protein species are involved in carbohydrate and energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, response to stimulus, protein transport and vesicle organization, cell morphogenesis regulation, transcription and translation, nucleotide metabolism, amino-sugar nucleotide-sugar pathways, oxidoreductases balancing, and ribosome biogenesis. The present study provides important information about how Z. rouxii acts to cope with high sugar concentration at molecular levels, which might enhance our global understanding of Z. rouxii's high sugar-tolerance trait.

  6. Interactions of apomorphine with serum and tissue proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.V.; Velagapudi, R.B.; McLean, A.M.; Wilcox, R.E.

    1985-05-01

    Physical and covalent interactions of apomorphine with serum and tissue proteins could influence the drug's disposition and pharmacological activities in mammals. Ultrafiltration, equilibrium dialysis, and ultraviolet spectrophotometric methods have been used to study the reversible binding of apomorphine to bovine, human, rat, and swine plasma proteins. The degree of binding was generally greater than 90%, but variations were noted in some instances on the basis of drug concentrations and pH over the range of 6.8-7.8. Incubation of (8,9-/sup 3/H2)apomorphine with bovine serum albumin led to retention of radioactivity and a stoichiometrically controlled released of tritium which arose from the reaction of an electrophilic drug oxidation product and protein, producing drug-protein conjugates. In vitro experiments with mouse striatal brain preparations indicated parallel covalent binding reactions. In vivo experiments in mice indicated accumulation of radioactivity in brain regions and other tissues following daily injections of (8,9-/sup 3/H2)apomorphine for 14 days. The physical and covalent interactions of apomorphine with mammalian tissue proteins could be the cause of longer disposition half-lives in mammals than those previously reported. The covalent interactions, in particular, may be important in elucidating the mechanism of apomorphine-induced behavioral effects in mice.

  7. Tuning the serum persistence of human serum albumin domain III:diabody fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kenanova, Vania E.; Olafsen, Tove; Salazar, Felix B.; Williams, Lawrence E.; Knowles, Scott; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    The long circulation persistence of human serum albumin (HSA) is enabled by its domain III (DIII) interaction with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). A protein scaffold based on HSA DIII was designed. To modify the serum half life of the scaffold, residues H535, H510, and H464 were individually mutated to alanine. HSA DIII wild type (WT) and variants were fused to the anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) T84.66 diabody (Db), radiolabeled with 124I and injected into xenografted athymic mice for serial PET/CT imaging. All proteins targeted the CEA-positive tumor. The mean residence times (MRT) of the proteins, calculated by quantifying blood activity from the PET images, were: Db-DIII WT (56.7 h), H535A (25 h), H510A (20 h), H464A (17 h), compared with Db (2.9 h). Biodistribution confirmed the order of blood clearance from slow to fast: Db-DIII WT > H535A > H510A > H464A > Db with 4.0, 2.0, 1.8, 1.6 and 0.08 %ID/g of remaining blood activity at 51 h, respectively. This study demonstrates that attenuating the DIII–FcRn interaction provides a way of controlling the pharmacokinetics of the entire Db-DIII fusion protein without compromising tumor targeting. H464 appears to be most crucial for FcRn binding (greatest reduction in MRT), followed by H510 and H535. By mutating the DIII scaffold, we can dial serum kinetics for imaging or therapy applications. PMID:20802234

  8. Two novel heat-soluble protein families abundantly expressed in an anhydrobiotic tardigrade.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayami; Tanaka, Sae; Yamaguchi, Shiho; Kuwahara, Hirokazu; Takamura, Chizuko; Imajoh-Ohmi, Shinobu; Horikawa, Daiki D; Toyoda, Atsushi; Katayama, Toshiaki; Arakawa, Kazuharu; Fujiyama, Asao; Kubo, Takeo; Kunieda, Takekazu

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades are able to tolerate almost complete dehydration by reversibly switching to an ametabolic state. This ability is called anhydrobiosis. In the anhydrobiotic state, tardigrades can withstand various extreme environments including space, but their molecular basis remains largely unknown. Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are heat-soluble proteins and can prevent protein-aggregation in dehydrated conditions in other anhydrobiotic organisms, but their relevance to tardigrade anhydrobiosis is not clarified. In this study, we focused on the heat-soluble property characteristic of LEA proteins and conducted heat-soluble proteomics using an anhydrobiotic tardigrade. Our heat-soluble proteomics identified five abundant heat-soluble proteins. All of them showed no sequence similarity with LEA proteins and formed two novel protein families with distinct subcellular localizations. We named them Cytoplasmic Abundant Heat Soluble (CAHS) and Secretory Abundant Heat Soluble (SAHS) protein families, according to their localization. Both protein families were conserved among tardigrades, but not found in other phyla. Although CAHS protein was intrinsically unstructured and SAHS protein was rich in β-structure in the hydrated condition, proteins in both families changed their conformation to an α-helical structure in water-deficient conditions as LEA proteins do. Two conserved repeats of 19-mer motifs in CAHS proteins were capable to form amphiphilic stripes in α-helices, suggesting their roles as molecular shield in water-deficient condition, though charge distribution pattern in α-helices were different between CAHS and LEA proteins. Tardigrades might have evolved novel protein families with a heat-soluble property and this study revealed a novel repertoire of major heat-soluble proteins in these anhydrobiotic animals.

  9. Photo selective protein immobilization using bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wan-Joong; Kim, Ansoon; Huh, Chul; Park, Chan Woo; Ah, Chil Seong; Kim, Bong Kyu; Yang, Jong-Heon; Chung, Kwang Hyo; Choi, Yo Han; Hong, Jongcheol; Sung, Gun Yong

    2012-11-01

    A simple and selective technique which immobilizes protein onto a solid substrate by using UV illumination has been developed. In protein immobilization, a Bovine serum albumin (BSA) performed bifunctional role as a cross-linker between substrate and proteins and as a blocker inhibiting a nonspecific protein adsorption. A new photo-induced protein immobilization process has been investigated at each step by fluorescence microscopy, ellipsometry, and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. A UV photomask has been used to induce selective protein immobilization on target regions of the surface of the SiO2 substrates under UV illumination with negligible nonspecific binding. The UV illumination also showed improved photostability than the conventional methods which employed bifunctional photo-crosslinker molecules of photo-reactive diazirine. This new UV illumination-based photo-addressable protein immobilization provides a new approach for developing novel protein microarrays for multiplexed sensing as well as other types of bio-immobilization in biomedical devices and biotechnologies.

  10. Oxidative modification of serum proteins in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Adamczyk-Sowa, Monika; Galiniak, Sabina; Mucha, Sebastian; Pierzchala, Krystyna; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2013-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been demonstrated to involve oxidative stress and augmented glycoxidation. In this study, several markers of protein oxidative damage and glycoxidation have been compared in 14 relapsing remittent in MS (RRMS) patients without immunomodifying treatment, 10 patients in clinical relapse, and clinically stable patient groups treated with interferon β 1a (18) , β 1b (19) and glatiramer acetate (GA; 6) in relation to healthy subjects (12). The glycophore content was increased in RRSM patients without treatment and in patients treated with GA. The level of advanced protein oxidation products (AOPP) was increased in RRSM patients without treatment and in patients with clinical relapse. The level of protein carbonyls was elevated in RRSM patients without treatment and in patients treated with interferon β 1b. The levels of dityrosine level and N'-formylkynureine were elevated in RRSM patients without treatment while serum protein thiol groups were decreased in RRSM patients in clinical relapse as well as RRMS patients treated with interferon β 1a. Several markers of protein modification showed correlation with the C-reactive protein level and white blood cell count, suggesting that oxidative protein modifications are linked to the inflammatory processes in MS. Results of this study confirm the occurrence of protein oxidative and glycoxidative damage in MS and show that spectrophotometric and fluorimetric markers of this damage, especially the AOPP level, may be useful in monitoring oxidative stress in the course of therapy of MS.

  11. Few serum proteins mediate APOE’s association with dementia

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The latent variable “δ” (for “dementia”) appears to be uniquely responsible for the dementing aspects of cognitive impairment. Age, depression, gender and the apolipoprotein E (APOE) e4 allele are independently associated with δ. In this analysis, we explore serum proteins as potential mediators of APOE’s specific association with δ in a large, ethnically diverse longitudinal cohort, the Texas Alzheimer’s Research and Care Consortium (TARCC). APOE was associated only with C-Reactive Protein (CRP), Adiponectin (APN) and Amphiregulin (AREG), although the latter two’s associations did not survive Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. All three proteins were associated with δ and had weak potential mediation effects on APOE’s association with that construct. Our findings suggest that APOE’s association with cognitive performance is specific to δ and partially mediated by serum inflammatory proteins. The majority of APOE’s significant unadjusted effect on δ is unexplained. It may instead arise from direct central nervous system effects, possibly on native intelligence. If so, then APOE may exert a life-long influence over δ and therefore all-cause dementia risk. PMID:28291794

  12. Serum heat inactivation affects protein corona composition and nanoparticle uptake.

    PubMed

    Lesniak, Anna; Campbell, Abigail; Monopoli, Marco P; Lynch, Iseult; Salvati, Anna; Dawson, Kenneth A

    2010-12-01

    Nanoparticles are of an appropriate size to interact with cells, and are likely to use a range of cellular machinery for internalisation and trafficking to various sub-cellular compartments. It is now understood that once in contact with biological fluids, the nanoparticle surface gets covered by a highly specific layer of proteins, forming the nanoparticle protein corona. This protein layer is stable for times longer than the typical time scale of nanoparticle import, and thus can impact on particle uptake and trafficking inside the cells. In this work, the effect of the corona composition on nanoparticle uptake has been investigated, by studying the impact of serum heat inactivation and complement depletion on the load of nanoparticles accumulated inside the cell. For the same material and nanoparticle size, cellular uptake was found to be significantly different when the nanoparticles were dispersed in medium where the serum was heat inactivated or not heat inactivated, even for non-specialized cells, suggesting that different sera can lead to different nanoparticle doses. The fact that uptake was correlated with the amount of protein bound into the nanoparticle corona suggests the need for commonly agreed dispersion protocols for in vitro nanoparticle-cell studies.

  13. Identification of novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by aptamer-based serum proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Coenen-Stass, Anna M. L.; McClorey, Graham; Manzano, Raquel; Betts, Corinne A.; Blain, Alison; Saleh, Amer F.; Gait, Michael J.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wood, Matthew J. A.; Roberts, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    There is currently an urgent need for biomarkers that can be used to monitor the efficacy of experimental therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) in clinical trials. Identification of novel protein biomarkers has been limited due to the massive complexity of the serum proteome and the presence of a small number of very highly abundant proteins. Here we have utilised an aptamer-based proteomics approach to profile 1,129 proteins in the serum of wild-type and mdx (dystrophin deficient) mice. The serum levels of 96 proteins were found to be significantly altered (P < 0.001, q < 0.01) in mdx mice. Additionally, systemic treatment with a peptide-antisense oligonucleotide conjugate designed to induce Dmd exon skipping and recover dystrophin protein expression caused many of the differentially abundant serum proteins to be restored towards wild-type levels. Results for five leading candidate protein biomarkers (Pgam1, Tnni3, Camk2b, Cycs and Adamts5) were validated by ELISA in the mouse samples. Furthermore, ADAMTS5 was found to be significantly elevated in human DMD patient serum. This study has identified multiple novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in the serum of the mdx mouse with potential utility in DMD patients. PMID:26594036

  14. Identification of novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in a mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy by aptamer-based serum proteomics.

    PubMed

    Coenen-Stass, Anna M L; McClorey, Graham; Manzano, Raquel; Betts, Corinne A; Blain, Alison; Saleh, Amer F; Gait, Michael J; Lochmüller, Hanns; Wood, Matthew J A; Roberts, Thomas C

    2015-11-23

    There is currently an urgent need for biomarkers that can be used to monitor the efficacy of experimental therapies for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) in clinical trials. Identification of novel protein biomarkers has been limited due to the massive complexity of the serum proteome and the presence of a small number of very highly abundant proteins. Here we have utilised an aptamer-based proteomics approach to profile 1,129 proteins in the serum of wild-type and mdx (dystrophin deficient) mice. The serum levels of 96 proteins were found to be significantly altered (P < 0.001, q < 0.01) in mdx mice. Additionally, systemic treatment with a peptide-antisense oligonucleotide conjugate designed to induce Dmd exon skipping and recover dystrophin protein expression caused many of the differentially abundant serum proteins to be restored towards wild-type levels. Results for five leading candidate protein biomarkers (Pgam1, Tnni3, Camk2b, Cycs and Adamts5) were validated by ELISA in the mouse samples. Furthermore, ADAMTS5 was found to be significantly elevated in human DMD patient serum. This study has identified multiple novel, therapy-responsive protein biomarkers in the serum of the mdx mouse with potential utility in DMD patients.

  15. Compound Pollen Protein Nutrient Increases Serum Albumin in Cirrhotic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hong Bo; Kong, Ming; Chen, Gong; Zhao, Jun; Shi, Hong Lin; Chen, Yu; Rowan, Frank G

    2010-01-01

    Background Malnutrition, especially protein-calorie malnutrition, is common in patients with liver cirrhosis. When in the status of malnutrition, the complications increase, liver function deteriorates, and the prognosis of patients with liver cirrhosis worsens. Hence, nutritional support and treatment is essential in patients with liver cirrhosis. Previous studies suggested that compound nutrition based on pollen can improve liver function, and can be a basic nutrient for patients with liver cirrhosis. However, the nutritional support based on pollen for malnutrition of cirrhotic patients needs to be further evaluated. In this study, we investigated the nutritional support of Noveliver, a new compound pollen protein nutrient, in the cirrhotic rats induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4). Methods The cirrhotic rats induced by CCl4 were treated with Noveliver in different doses, and treated with a regular compound pollen nutrient, untreated cirrhotic rats and normal rats were used as controls. Serum albumin were measured before and after the nutritional treatment in each group. At the same time, liver function, cytokines and pathological changes were also determined. Results In the second week of nutritional treatment, the levels of serum albumin in normal control group, low dose noveliver group, high dose noveliver group, compound protein pollen group and spontaneous recovery group were 35.67 ± 1.42, 33.07 ± 1.27, 32.27 ± 1.50, 30.53 ± 0.25, 24.53 ± 3.56 (g/L), respectively, the differences among the groups were significant (F = 14.007, P = 0.000); The levels of serum albumin in low dose Noveliver group, high dose Noveliver group and the compound protein pollen group were higher than that in the spontaneous recovery group (P = 0.000, 0.001, 0.003, respectively). In the second week of nutritional treatment, the serum levels of HGF in normal control group, low dose Noveliver group, high dose Noveliver group, compound protein pollen group and spontaneous recovery

  16. The Acute-Phase Proteins Serum Amyloid A and C Reactive Protein in Transudates and Exudates

    PubMed Central

    Okino, Alessandra M.; Bürger, Cristiani; Cardoso, Jefferson R.; Lavado, Edson L.; Lotufo, Paulo A.; Campa, Ana

    2006-01-01

    The distinction between exudates and transudates is very important in the patient management. Here we evaluate whether the acute-phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA), in comparison with C reactive protein (CRP) and total protein (TP), can be useful in this discrimination. CRP, SAA, and TP were determined in 36 exudate samples (27 pleural and 9 ascitic) and in 12 transudates (9 pleural and 3 ascitic). CRP, SAA, and TP were measured. SAA present in the exudate corresponded to 10% of the amount found in serum, that is, the exudate/serum ratio (E/S) was 0.10 ± 0.13. For comparison, the exudate/serum ratio for CRP and TP was 0.39 ± 0.37 and 0.68 ± 0.15, respectively. There was a strong positive correlation between serum and exudate SAA concentration (r = 0.764;p < 0.0001). The concentration of SAA in transudates was low and did not overlap with that found in exudates (0.02-0.21 versus 0.8–360.5 g/mL). SAA in pleural and ascitic exudates results mainly from leakage of the serum protein via the inflamed membrane. A comparison of the E/S ratio of SAA and CRP points SAA as a very good marker in discriminating between exudates and transudates. PMID:16864904

  17. Preparation of protein imprinted materials by hierarchical imprinting techniques and application in selective depletion of albumin from human serum

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinxiang; Deng, Qiliang; Tao, Dingyin; Yang, Kaiguang; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-01-01

    Hierarchical imprinting was developed to prepare the protein imprinted materials, as the artificial antibody, for the selective depletion of HSA from the human serum proteome. Porcine serum albumin (PSA) was employed as the dummy template for the fabrication of the recognition sites. To demonstrate the advantages of the hierarchical imprinting, molecularly imprinted polymers prepared by hierarchical imprinting technique (h-MIPs) were compared with those obtained by bulk imprinting (b-MIPs), in terms of the binding capacity, adsorption kinetics, selectivity and synthesis reproducibility. The binding capacity of h-MIPs could reach 12 mg g−1. And saturation binding could be reached in less than 20 min for the h-MIPs. In the protein mixture, h-MIPs exhibit excellent selectivity for PSA, with imprinting factors as about 3.6, much higher than those for non-template proteins. For the proteomic application, the identified protein group number in serum treated by h-MIPs was increased to 422, which is 21% higher than that obtained from the original serum, meanwhile the identified protein group number for the Albumin Removal kit was only 376. The results demonstrate that protein imprinted polymers prepared by hierarchical imprinting technique, might become the artificial antibodies for the selective depletion of high abundance proteins in proteome study. PMID:24976158

  18. Preparation of protein imprinted materials by hierarchical imprinting techniques and application in selective depletion of albumin from human serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinxiang; Deng, Qiliang; Tao, Dingyin; Yang, Kaiguang; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-06-01

    Hierarchical imprinting was developed to prepare the protein imprinted materials, as the artificial antibody, for the selective depletion of HSA from the human serum proteome. Porcine serum albumin (PSA) was employed as the dummy template for the fabrication of the recognition sites. To demonstrate the advantages of the hierarchical imprinting, molecularly imprinted polymers prepared by hierarchical imprinting technique (h-MIPs) were compared with those obtained by bulk imprinting (b-MIPs), in terms of the binding capacity, adsorption kinetics, selectivity and synthesis reproducibility. The binding capacity of h-MIPs could reach 12 mg g-1. And saturation binding could be reached in less than 20 min for the h-MIPs. In the protein mixture, h-MIPs exhibit excellent selectivity for PSA, with imprinting factors as about 3.6, much higher than those for non-template proteins. For the proteomic application, the identified protein group number in serum treated by h-MIPs was increased to 422, which is 21% higher than that obtained from the original serum, meanwhile the identified protein group number for the Albumin Removal kit was only 376. The results demonstrate that protein imprinted polymers prepared by hierarchical imprinting technique, might become the artificial antibodies for the selective depletion of high abundance proteins in proteome study.

  19. Assessment of the natural variation of low abundant metabolic proteins in soybean seeds using proteomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we investigated the distribution of the low abundant proteins that are involved in soybean seed development in four wild and twelve cultivated soybean genotypes. We found proteomic variation of these proteins within and...

  20. System wide analyses have underestimated protein abundances and the importance of transcription in mammals.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingyi Jessica; Bickel, Peter J; Biggin, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Large scale surveys in mammalian tissue culture cells suggest that the protein expressed at the median abundance is present at 8,000-16,000 molecules per cell and that differences in mRNA expression between genes explain only 10-40% of the differences in protein levels. We find, however, that these surveys have significantly underestimated protein abundances and the relative importance of transcription. Using individual measurements for 61 housekeeping proteins to rescale whole proteome data from Schwanhausser et al. (2011), we find that the median protein detected is expressed at 170,000 molecules per cell and that our corrected protein abundance estimates show a higher correlation with mRNA abundances than do the uncorrected protein data. In addition, we estimated the impact of further errors in mRNA and protein abundances using direct experimental measurements of these errors. The resulting analysis suggests that mRNA levels explain at least 56% of the differences in protein abundance for the 4,212 genes detected by Schwanhausser et al. (2011), though because one major source of error could not be estimated the true percent contribution should be higher. We also employed a second, independent strategy to determine the contribution of mRNA levels to protein expression. We show that the variance in translation rates directly measured by ribosome profiling is only 12% of that inferred by Schwanhausser et al. (2011), and that the measured and inferred translation rates correlate poorly (R(2) = 0.13). Based on this, our second strategy suggests that mRNA levels explain ∼81% of the variance in protein levels. We also determined the percent contributions of transcription, RNA degradation, translation and protein degradation to the variance in protein abundances using both of our strategies. While the magnitudes of the two estimates vary, they both suggest that transcription plays a more important role than the earlier studies implied and translation a much smaller

  1. Population genetic studies in the Balkans. I. Serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Scheil, H G; Scheffrahn, W; Schmidt, H D; Huckenbeck, W; Efremovska, L; Xirotiris, N

    2001-09-01

    Within a study of the genetics of Southeastern European populations seven serum protein polymorphisms (AMY2, BF, C3, CP, GC, HPA, TF) were examined in three samples of Aromuns (Albania: the village of Andon Poci, province Gjirocaster, Republic of Macedonia: Stip region, Romania: the village Kogalniceanu, province Dobruja) and four reference samples (Albanians: Tirana, Romanians: Constanta and Ploiesti as well as Greeks (Northeastern Greece)). The Aromun samples from Albania and Romania form one separate cluster and the reference samples together with the Aromuns from Macedonia (Stip region) form a second one.

  2. Sodium-pump gene-expression, protein abundance and enzyme activity in isolated nephron segments of the aging rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Scherzer, Pnina; Gal-Moscovici, Anca; Sheikh-Hamad, David; Popovtzer, Mordecai M

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with alteration in renal tubular functions, including sodium handling and concentrating ability. Na-K-ATPase plays a key role in driving tubular transport, and we hypothesized that decreased concentrating ability of the aging kidney is due in part to downregulation of Na-K-ATPase. In this study, we evaluated Na and K balance, aldosterone levels, and Na-K-ATPase gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in aging rat kidney. Na-K-ATPase activity (assayed microfluorometrically), mRNA (RT-PCR), and protein abundance (immunoblotting) were quantitated in the following isolated nephron segments: PCT, PST, MTAL, DCT, and CCD from 2, 8, 15, and 24 month-old-rats. In the course of aging, creatinine clearance decreased from 0.48 ± 0.02 mL/min/100 g BW to 0.28 ± 0.06 (P < 0.001) and aldosterone decreased from 23.6 ± 0.8 ng/dL to 13.2 ± 0.6 (P < 0.001). Serum Na+ and K+ increased by 4.0% and 22.5%, respectively. Na-K-ATPase activity, mRNA, and protein abundance of the α1 subunit displayed similar trends in all assayed segments; increasing in PCT and PST; decreasing in MTAL and DCT; increasing in CCD: in PCT they increased by 40%, 75%, and 250%, respectively; while in PST they increased by 80%, 50%, and 100%, respectively (P < 0.001). In MTAL they declined by 36%, 24%, and 34%, respectively, and in DCT by 38%, 59%, and 60%, respectively (P < 0.001). They were higher in CCD by 110%, 115%, and 246%, respectively (P < 0.001). Rats maintained Na/K balance; however with a steady state elevated serum K+. These results reveal quantitative changes in axial distribution of Na-K-ATPase at the level of gene expression, protein abundance, and activity in the nephrons of aging animals and may explain, in part, the pathophysiology of the senescent kidney. PMID:26056060

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Age Specific Variation in the Abundance of Human Female Parotid Salivary Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ambatipudi, Kiran S.; Lu, Bingwen; Hagen, Fred K; Melvin, James E.; Yates, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Human saliva is a protein-rich, easily accessible source of potential local and systemic biomarkers to monitor changes that occur under pathological conditions; however little is known about the changes in abundance associated with normal aging. In this study, we performed a comprehensive proteomic profiling of pooled saliva collected from the parotid glands of healthy female subjects, divided into two age groups 1 and 2 (20–30 and 55–65 years old, respectively). Hydrophobic charge interaction chromatography was used to separate high from low abundant proteins prior to characterization of the parotid saliva using multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). Collectively, 532 proteins were identified in the two age groups. Of these proteins, 266 were identified exclusively in one age group, while 266 proteins were common to both groups. The majority of the proteins identified in the two age groups belonged to the defense and immune response category. Of note, several defense related proteins (e.g. lysozyme, lactoferrin and histatin-1) were significantly more abundant in group 2 as determined by G-test. Selected representative mass spectrometric findings were validated by western blot analysis. Our study reports the first quantitative analysis of differentially regulated proteins in ductal saliva collected from young and older female subjects. This study supports the use of high-throughput proteomics as a robust discovery tool. Such results provide a foundation for future studies to identify specific salivary proteins which may be linked to age-related diseases specific to women. PMID:19764810

  4. Low abundance of mitochondrial DNA changes mitochondrial status and renders cells resistant to serum starvation and sodium nitroprusside insult.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Ryul; Heo, Hye Jin; Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Song, In Sung; Ko, Kyung Soo; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Kim, Nari; Han, Jin

    2015-07-01

    Mutation or depletion of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause severe mitochondrial malfunction, originating from the mitochondrion itself, or from the crosstalk between nuclei and mitochondria. However, the changes that would occur if the amount of mtDNA is diminished are less known. Thus, we generated rat myoblast H9c2 cells containing lower amounts of mtDNA via ethidium bromide and uridine supplementation. After confirming the depletion of mtDNA by quantitative PCR and gel electrophoresis analysis, we investigated the changes in mitochondrial physical parameters by using flow cytometry. We also evaluated the resistance of these cells to serum starvation and sodium nitroprusside. H9c2 cells with diminished mtDNA contents showed decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, mass, free calcium, and zinc ion contents as compared to naïve H9c2 cells. Furthermore, cytosolic and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species levels were significantly higher in mtDNA-lowered H9c2 cells than in the naïve cells. Although the oxygen consumption rate and cell proliferation were decreased, mtDNA-lowered H9c2 cells were more resistant to serum deprivation and nitroprusside insults than the naïve H9c2 cells. Taken together, we conclude that the low abundance of mtDNA cause changes in cellular status, such as changes in reactive oxygen species, calcium, and zinc ion levels inducing resistance to stress.

  5. Unmasking Heavily O-Glycosylated Serum Proteins Using Perchloric Acid: Identification of Serum Proteoglycan 4 and Protease C1 Inhibitor as Molecular Indicators for Screening of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Siang; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Ashrafzadeh, Ali; Fadzli, Farhana; Harun, Faizah; Rahmat, Kartini; Hoong, See Mee; Abdul-Rahman, Puteri Shafinaz; Hashim, Onn Haji

    2016-01-01

    Heavily glycosylated mucin glycopeptides such as CA 27.29 and CA 15–3 are currently being used as biomarkers for detection and monitoring of breast cancer. However, they are not well detected at the early stages of the cancer. In the present study, perchloric acid (PCA) was used to enhance detection of mucin-type O-glycosylated proteins in the serum in an attempt to identify new biomarkers for early stage breast cancer. Sensitivity and specificity of an earlier developed sandwich enzyme-linked lectin assay were significantly improved with the use of serum PCA isolates. When a pilot case-control study was performed using the serum PCA isolates of normal participants (n = 105) and patients with stage 0 (n = 31) and stage I (n = 48) breast cancer, higher levels of total O-glycosylated proteins in sera of both groups of early stage breast cancer patients compared to the normal control women were demonstrated. Further analysis by gel-based proteomics detected significant inverse altered abundance of proteoglycan 4 and plasma protease C1 inhibitor in both the early stages of breast cancer patients compared to the controls. Our data suggests that the ratio of serum proteoglycan 4 to protease C1 inhibitor may be used for screening of early breast cancer although this requires further validation in clinically representative populations. PMID:26890881

  6. Specific serum protein levels in women using intrauterine contraceptive device.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, D; Kríz, J; Cídl, K

    1980-01-01

    The report is concerned with the levels of 17 specific serum proteins in 46 women using plastic nonmedicated intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) Dana-Super. Blood samplings were carried out three times: just before the IUCD introduction, 30 and 54 weeks after the insertion of IUCD. The following proteins except haptoglobin were quantitatively determined by radial immunodiffusion: prealbumin, albumin, orosomucoid, alpha 1-antitrypsin, ceruloplasmin, alpha 2HS-glycoprotein, alpha 2-macroglobulin, hemopexin, C3-component, transferrin, beta 2-glycoprotein I, C-reactive protein and immunoglobulins IgG, IgA, IgM and IgD. Moderately increased values were found for alpha 2HS-glycoprotein and beta 2-glycoprotein I in sera taken 30 weeks after the insertion of IUCD. AT the same time the augmentation of alpha 1-antitrypsin was established. This might be evoked by the raised protease activity in biological fluids of genital region. The raise in consequence of IUCD application of transferrin and the decrease of haptoglobin at the first postinsertion examination and the decrease of hemopexin and albumin at the second may be associated with higher menstrual bleeding followed by iron deficiency. All other proteins as well as the acute phase proteins showed only minor if any differences as compared with the corresponding start values. Similarly, there is no evidence of a systemic immunoglobulin response to IUCD use.

  7. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Frank W.; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-02-01

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or several genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power. Consequently, many eQTL are probably missed, especially those with smaller effects. Furthermore, most studies use messenger RNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics reported unexpected differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green fluorescent protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high versus low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci that we detected were clustered in `hotspots' that influence multiple proteins, and some hotspots were found to influence more than half of the proteins that we examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell

  8. Choice of dietary protein of vegetarians and omnivores is reflected in their hair protein 13C and 15N abundance.

    PubMed

    Petzke, Klaus J; Boeing, Heiner; Metges, Cornelia C

    2005-01-01

    Stable isotopic (15N, 13C) composition of tissues depends on isotopic pattern of food sources. We investigated whether the isotopic compositions of human hair protein and amino acids reflect the habitual dietary protein intake. Hair samples were analyzed from 100 omnivores (selected randomly out of the 1987-1988 German nutrition survey VERA), and from 15 ovo-lacto-vegetarians (OLV), and from 6 vegans recruited separately. Hair bulk and amino acid specific isotopic compositions were analyzed by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (EA/IRMS and GC/C/IRMS, respectively) and the results were correlated with data of the 7 day dietary records. Hair bulk 15N and 13C abundances clearly reflect the particular eating habits. Vegans can be distinguished from OLV and both are significantly distinct from omnivores in both 15N and 13C abundances. 15N and 13C abundances rose with a higher proportion of animal to total protein intake (PAPI). Individual proportions of animal protein consumption (IPAP) were calculated using isotopic abundances and a linear regression model using animal protein consumption data of vegans (PAPI = 0) and omnivores (mean PAPI = 0.639). IPAP values positively correlated with the intake of protein, meat, meat products, and animal protein. Distinct patterns for hair amino acid specific 15N and 13C abundances were measured but with lower resolution between food preference groups compared with bulk values. In conclusion, hair 13C and 15N values both reflected the extent of animal protein consumption. Bulk isotopic abundance of hair can be tested for future use in the validation of dietary assessment methods.

  9. Embryo culture in teratological surveillance and serum proteins in development. Progress report, 1979-1980

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, N.W.

    1980-07-01

    Research progress for the period 1979-1980 is reported. The feasibility of using rat embryo cultures to test the teratogenic activity of serum was studied. The mechanisms regulating the synthesis of serum proteins were investigated. (ACR)

  10. Natural Genetic Variation Influences Protein Abundances in C. elegans Developmental Signalling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kapil Dev; Roschitzki, Bernd; Snoek, L. Basten; Grossmann, Jonas; Zheng, Xue; Elvin, Mark; Kamkina, Polina; Schrimpf, Sabine P.; Poulin, Gino B.; Kammenga, Jan E.; Hengartner, Michael O.

    2016-01-01

    Complex traits, including common disease-related traits, are affected by many different genes that function in multiple pathways and networks. The apoptosis, MAPK, Notch, and Wnt signalling pathways play important roles in development and disease progression. At the moment we have a poor understanding of how allelic variation affects gene expression in these pathways at the level of translation. Here we report the effect of natural genetic variation on transcript and protein abundance involved in developmental signalling pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans. We used selected reaction monitoring to analyse proteins from the abovementioned four pathways in a set of recombinant inbred lines (RILs) generated from the wild-type strains N2 (Bristol) and CB4856 (Hawaii) to enable quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. About half of the cases from the 44 genes tested showed a statistically significant change in protein abundance between various strains, most of these were however very weak (below 1.3-fold change). We detected a distant QTL on the left arm of chromosome II that affected protein abundance of the phosphatidylserine receptor protein PSR-1, and two separate QTLs that influenced embryonic and ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis on chromosome IV. Our results demonstrate that natural variation in C. elegans is sufficient to cause significant changes in signalling pathways both at the gene expression (transcript and protein abundance) and phenotypic levels. PMID:26985669

  11. Visualization and Dissemination of Multidimensional Proteomics Data Comparing Protein Abundance During Caenorhabditis elegans Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffle, Michael; Merrihew, Gennifer E.; Jaschob, Daniel; Sharma, Vagisha; Davis, Trisha N.; Noble, William S.; MacCoss, Michael J.

    2015-11-01

    Regulation of protein abundance is a critical aspect of cellular function, organism development, and aging. Alternative splicing may give rise to multiple possible proteoforms of gene products where the abundance of each proteoform is independently regulated. Understanding how the abundances of these distinct gene products change is essential to understanding the underlying mechanisms of many biological processes. Bottom-up proteomics mass spectrometry techniques may be used to estimate protein abundance indirectly by sequencing and quantifying peptides that are later mapped to proteins based on sequence. However, quantifying the abundance of distinct gene products is routinely confounded by peptides that map to multiple possible proteoforms. In this work, we describe a technique that may be used to help mitigate the effects of confounding ambiguous peptides and multiple proteoforms when quantifying proteins. We have applied this technique to visualize the distribution of distinct gene products for the whole proteome across 11 developmental stages of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. The result is a large multidimensional dataset for which web-based tools were developed for visualizing how translated gene products change during development and identifying possible proteoforms. The underlying instrument raw files and tandem mass spectra may also be downloaded. The data resource is freely available on the web at http://www.yeastrc.org/wormpes/.

  12. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution.

    PubMed

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-05-25

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions.

  13. Abundance and Temperature Dependency of Protein-Protein Interaction Revealed by Interface Structure Analysis and Stability Evolution

    PubMed Central

    He, Yi-Ming; Ma, Bin-Guang

    2016-01-01

    Protein complexes are major forms of protein-protein interactions and implement essential biological functions. The subunit interface in a protein complex is related to its thermostability. Though the roles of interface properties in thermal adaptation have been investigated for protein complexes, the relationship between the interface size and the expression level of the subunits remains unknown. In the present work, we studied this relationship and found a positive correlation in thermophiles rather than mesophiles. Moreover, we found that the protein interaction strength in complexes is not only temperature-dependent but also abundance-dependent. The underlying mechanism for the observed correlation was explored by simulating the evolution of protein interface stability, which highlights the avoidance of misinteraction. Our findings make more complete the picture of the mechanisms for protein complex thermal adaptation and provide new insights into the principles of protein-protein interactions. PMID:27220911

  14. Mapping Protein Abundance Patterns in the Brain Using Voxelation Combined with Liquid Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2009-01-01

    Voxelation creates expression atlases by high-throughput analysis of spatially registered cubes or voxels harvested from the brain. The modality independence of voxelation allows a variety of bioanalytical techniques to be used to map abundance. Protein expression patterns in the brain can be obtained using liquid chromatography (LC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS). Here we describe the methodology of voxelation as it pertains particularly to LC-MS proteomic analysis: sample preparation, instrumental set up and analysis, peptide identification and protein relative abundance quantitation. We also briefly describe some of the advantages, limitations and insights into the brain that can be obtained using combined proteomic and transcriptomic maps. PMID:19654045

  15. Mapping protein abundance patterns in the brain using voxelation combined with liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.; Smith, Desmond J.

    2010-02-01

    Voxelation creates expression atlases by high-throughput analysis of spatially registered cubes or voxels harvested from the brain. The modality independence of voxelation allows a variety of bioanalytical techniques to be used to map abundance. Protein expression patterns in the brain can be obtained using liquid chromatography (LC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS). Here we describe the methodology of voxelation as it pertains particularly to LC-MS proteomic analysis: sample preparation, instrumental set up and analysis, peptide identification and protein relative abundance quantitation. We also briefly describe some of the advantages, limitations and insights into the brain that can be obtained using combined proteomic and transcriptomic maps

  16. Differential abundance of egg white proteins in laying hens treated with corticosterone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jimin; Choi, Yang-Ho

    2014-12-24

    Stressful environments can affect not only egg production and quality but also gene and protein abundance in the ovary and oviduct in laying hens. The oviductal magnum of laying hens is the organ responsible for the synthesis and secretion of egg white proteins. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of dietary corticosterone as a stress model on the abundance of proteins in the egg white and of mRNA and proteins in the magnum in laying hens. After a 14-day acclimation, 40 laying hens were divided into two groups which were provided for the next 14 days with either control (Control) or corticosterone (Stress) diet containing at 30 mg/kg. Corticosterone treatment resulted in increased feed intake (P ≤ 0.05) and decreased egg production. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) with MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS using eggs obtained on days 0 and 5 revealed differential abundance of egg white proteins by Stress: transiently expressed in neural precursors (TENP), hemopexin (HPX), IgY-Fcυ3-4, and extracellular fatty acid-binding protein (Ex-FABP) were decreased while ovoinhibitor and ovalbumin-related protein X (OVAX) were increased on days 5 vs 0 (P ≤ 0.05). Expression of mRNAs and proteins was also significantly modulated in the magnum of hens in Stress on day 14 (P ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, the current study provides the first evidence showing that dietary corticosterone modulates protein abundance in the egg white in laying hens, and it suggests that environmental stress can differentially modify expression of egg white proteins in laying hens.

  17. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E.; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D.; Chrisler, William B.; Markillie, Lye M.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Sorger, Peter K.; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H. Steven

    2016-01-01

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components—16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators—of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling. PMID:27405981

  18. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tujin; Niepel, Mario; McDermott, Jason E; Gao, Yuqian; Nicora, Carrie D; Chrisler, William B; Markillie, Lye M; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Smith, Richard D; Rodland, Karin D; Sorger, Peter K; Qian, Wei-Jun; Wiley, H Steven

    2016-07-12

    Various genetic mutations associated with cancer are known to alter cell signaling, but it is not clear whether they dysregulate signaling pathways by altering the abundance of pathway proteins. Using a combination of RNA sequencing and ultrasensitive targeted proteomics, we defined the primary components-16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators-of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells and then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and breast cancer cell lines as well as fibroblasts. We found that core pathway proteins were present at very similar concentrations across all cell types, with a variance similar to that of proteins previously shown to display conserved abundances across species. In contrast, EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were present at highly variable concentrations. The absolute abundance of most core proteins was between 50,000 and 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower amounts (2000 to 5000 copies per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3000 and 10,000 occupied EGFRs, consistent with the idea that adaptors limit signaling. Our results suggest that the relative stoichiometry of core MAPK pathway proteins is very similar across different cell types, with cell-specific differences mostly restricted to variable amounts of feedback regulators and receptors. The low abundance of adaptors relative to EGFR could be responsible for previous observations that only a fraction of total cell surface EGFR is capable of rapid endocytosis, high-affinity binding, and mitogenic signaling.

  19. Interaction of Tissue Engineering Substrates with Serum Proteins and Its Influence on Human Primary Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Tamilselvan; Niegelhell, Katrin; Nagaraj, Chandran; Reishofer, David; Spirk, Stefan; Olschewski, Andrea; Stana Kleinschek, Karin; Kargl, Rupert

    2017-02-13

    Polymer-based biomaterials particularly polycaprolactone (PCL) are one of the most promising substrates for tissue engineering. The surface chemistry of these materials plays a major role since it governs protein adsorption, cell adhesion, viability, degradation, and biocompatibility in the first place. This study correlates the interaction of the most abundant serum proteins (albumin, immunoglobulins, fibrinogen) with the surface properties of PCL and its influence on the morphology and metabolic activity of primary human arterial endothelial cells that are seeded on the materials. Prior to that, thin films of PCL are manufactured by spin-coating and characterized in detail. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), a multiparameter surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy instrument (MP-SPR), wettability data, and atomic force microscopy are combined to elucidate the pH-dependent protein adsorption on the PCL substrates. Primary endothelial cells are cultured on the protein modified polymer, and conclusions are drawn on the significant impact of type and form of proteins coatings on cell morphology and metabolic activity.

  20. Purification and Characterization of Abundant Secreted Protein in Suspension-Cultured Pumpkin Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Esaka, Muneharu; Enoki, Keiko; Kouchi, Bonko; Sasaki, Takuji

    1990-01-01

    The abundant secreted protein with molecular weight of 32,000 was purified from the culture medium of suspension-cultured pumpkin (Cucurbita sp.) cells. Two steps, ammonium sulfate fractionation and Sepharose 6B column chromatography, were sufficient for purification to homogeneity. Antibodies against the pure protein were used to show that a protein of the same size is made by callus cells. There is considerable homology between the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of this secreted protein and chitinase isolated from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) or bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:16667554

  1. Moving towards harmonized reporting of serum and urine protein electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    During the last decade, surveys by questionnaire in Canada, Australia and New Zealand revealed wide variation in reporting practices by laboratories and individual practitioners in the interpretation of serum and urine protein electrophoresis (PE). Such variation has potential to adversely impact patient outcomes if report structure is inconsistent or if the messaging is incorrectly perceived by the receiving physician. Concerted efforts have been initiated to promote harmonization in the use of interpretative comments. The primary goal is to add value through clear communication with requesting physicians in the interest of quality patient care. Resistance to a harmonized approach largely reflects longstanding personal reporting habits and preferences but change can be more readily embraced if the new system is intuitive, easy to use and saves time in reporting.

  2. Abundant expression of Dec1/stra13/sharp2 in colon carcinoma: its antagonizing role in serum deprivation-induced apoptosis and selective inhibition of procaspase activation.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuxin; Zhang, He; Xie, Mingxing; Hu, Maowen; Ge, Shujun; Yang, Dongfang; Wan, Yinsheng; Yan, Bingfang

    2002-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are intimately associated with developmental events such as cell differentiation and lineage commitment. The HLH domain in the bHLH motif is responsible for dimerization, whereas the basic region mediates DNA binding. Based on sequence alignment and domain analysis, differentially expressed in chondrocytes/stimulated with retinoic acid/split and hairy-related proteins (DEC/STRA/SHARPs) represent a new class of bHLH proteins. The present study describes the functional characterization of DEC1. Subtractive experiments and blotting analyses demonstrated that DEC1 was highly expressed in colon carcinomas, but not in the adjacent normal tissues. Several cell cycle blockers markedly induced DEC1 expression. Stable transfectants with a tetracycline-inducible construct demonstrated that DEC1 caused proliferation inhibition, antagonized serum deprivation-induced apoptosis and selectively inhibited the activation of procaspases. These activities were highly correlated with the abundance of tetracycline-induced DEC1. Stable transfectants expressing a mutant DEC1 (lacking the DNA-binding domain) exhibited neither proliferation inhibition nor apoptotic antagonism, which suggests that DNA binding is required for these actions. Enzymic assays and immunoblotting analyses demonstrated that induction of DEC1 by tetracycline significantly decreased the activation of procaspases 3, 7 and 9 but not procaspase 8. The selective suppression on the activation of procaspases 3, 7 and 9 over procaspase 8 suggests that DEC1-mediated anti-apoptosis is achieved by blocking apoptotic pathways initiated via the mitochondria. The results functionally distinguish DEC1 from other bHLH proteins and directly link this factor to oncogenesis. PMID:12119049

  3. Using antibody arrays to measure protein abundance and glycosylation: considerations for optimal performance

    PubMed Central

    Haab, Brian B.; Partyka, Katie; Cao, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Antibody arrays provide a valuable method of obtaining multiple protein measurements from low volumes of biological samples. Antibody arrays can be designed to target not only core protein abundances (relative or absolute abundances, depending on the availability of standards for calibration), but also protein post-translational modifications, provided antibodies or other affinity reagents are available to detect the modifications. Glycosylation is a common modification that has important and diverse functions, both in normal and disease biology. The methods for measuring glycan levels on multiple, specific proteins using antibody arrays and glycan-binding reagents have made significant progress. Here we describe practical approaches to develop, optimize and use antibody array assays to determine both protein abundances and glycosylation states. We cover the use of low-volume arrays to reduce sample consumption and a new way to improve the binding strength of particular glycan-binding reagents through multimerization. These methods could be useful for a wide range of biological studies in which glycosylation may be changing or affect protein function. PMID:24510592

  4. Identification of abundant proteins and potential allergens in Culicoides nubeculosus salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A D; Heesom, K J; Mawby, W J; Mellor, P S; Russell, C L

    2008-03-15

    IgE-mediated type 1 hypersensitivity reactions to the bites of insects are a common cause of skin disease in horses. Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is most frequently associated with bites of Culicoides spp. and occurs in all parts of the world where horses and Culicoides coexist. The main allergens that cause IBH are probably some of the abundant proteins in the saliva of Culicoides associated with blood feeding. Western blots of Culicoides proteins separated by 1D gel-electrophoresis detected strong IgE responses in all horses with IBH to antigens in protein extracts from wild caught Culicoides, but only weak responses to salivary antigens from captive bred C. nubeculosus which may reflect important differences among allergens from different species of Culicoides or differences between thorax and salivary gland antigens. 2D electrophoresis and mass spectrometry were used to identify several of the abundant proteins in the saliva of C. nubeculosus. These included maltase, members of the D7 family, and several small, basic proteins associated with blood feeding. The most frequently detected IgE-binding proteins were in a group of proteins with pI>8.5 and mass 40-50kDa. Mass spectrometry identified two of these allergenic proteins as similar to hyaluronidase and a heavily glycosylated protein of unknown function that have previously been identified in salivary glands of C. sonorensis.

  5. Using antibody arrays to measure protein abundance and glycosylation: considerations for optimal performance.

    PubMed

    Haab, Brian B; Partyka, Katie; Cao, Zheng

    2013-09-24

    Antibody arrays provide a valuable method for obtaining multiple protein measurements from small volumes of biological samples. Antibody arrays can be designed to target not only core protein abundances (relative or absolute abundances, depending on the availability of standards for calibration), but also posttranslational modifications, provided antibodies or other affinity reagents are available to detect them. Glycosylation is a common modification that has important and diverse functions in both normal and disease biology. Significant progress has been made in developing methods for measuring glycan levels on multiple specific proteins using antibody arrays and glycan-binding reagents. This unit describes practical approaches for developing, optimizing, and using antibody array assays to determine both protein abundance and glycosylation state. Low-volume arrays can be used to reduce sample consumption, and a new way to improve the binding strength of particular glycan-binding reagents through multimerization is discussed. These methods can be useful for a wide range of biological studies in which glycosylation may change and/or affect protein function.

  6. Fatty acid-binding site environments of serum vitamin D-binding protein and albumin are different

    PubMed Central

    Swamy, Narasimha; Ray, Rahul

    2008-01-01

    Vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) and albumin (ALB) are abundant serum proteins and both possess high-affinity binding for saturated and unsaturated fatty acids. However, certain differences exist. We surmised that in cases where serum albumin level is low, DBP presumably can act as a transporter of fatty acids. To explore this possibility we synthesized several alkylating derivatives of 14C-palmitic acid to probe the fatty acid binding pockets of DBP and ALB. We observed that N-ethyl-5-phenylisooxazolium-3′-sulfonate-ester (WRK ester) of 14C-palmitic acid specifically labeled DBP; but p-nitrophenyl- and N-hydroxysuccinimidyl-esters failed to do so. However, p-nitrophenyl ester of 14C-palmitic acid specifically labeled bovine ALB, indicating that the micro-environment of the fatty acid-binding domains of DBP and ALB may be different; and DBP may not replace ALB as a transporter of fatty acids. PMID:18374965

  7. Modified spectral count index (mSCI) for estimation of protein abundance by protein relative identification possibility (RIPpro): a new proteomic technological parameter.

    PubMed

    Sun, Aihua; Zhang, Jiyang; Wang, Chunping; Yang, Dong; Wei, Handong; Zhu, Yunping; Jiang, Ying; He, Fuchu

    2009-11-01

    Peptides Count (SC) was widely used for protein abundance estimation in proteomics. On the basis of that, Mann and co-workers corrected the SC by dividing spectrum counts by the number of observable peptides per protein and named it PAI. Here we present modified spectral count index (mSCI) for protein abundance estimation, which was defined as the number of observed peptides divided by protein relative identification possibility (RIPpro). RIPpro was derived from 6788 mRNA and protein expression data (collected from human liver samples) and related to proteins' three physical and chemical properties (MW/pI/Hp). For 46 proteins in mouse neuro2a cells, mSCI shows a linear relationship with the actual protein concentration, similar or better than PAI abundance. Also, multiple linear regressions were performed to quantitative assess several factors' impact on the mRNA/protein abundance correlation. Our results shown that the primary factor affecting protein levels was mRNA abundance (32-37%), followed by variability in protein measurement, MW and protein turnover (7-12%,7-9% and 2-3%, respectively). Interestingly, we found that the concordance between mRNA transcripts and protein expression was not consistent among all protein functional categories. This correlation was lower for signaling proteins as compared to metabolism genes. It was determined that RIPpro was the primary factor affecting signaling protein abundance (23% on average), followed by mRNA abundance (17%). In contrast, only 5% (on average) of the variability of metabolic protein abundance was explained by RIPpro, much lower than mRNA abundance (40%). These results provide the impetus for further investigation of the biological significance of mechanisms regulating the mRNA/protein abundance correlation and provide additional insight into the relative importance of the technological parameter (RIPpro) in mRNA/protein correlation research.

  8. Comparison of functional properties of 34% and 80% whey protein and milk serum protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Luck, P J; Vardhanabhuti, B; Yong, Y H; Laundon, T; Barbano, D M; Foegeding, E A

    2013-09-01

    This study compared the functional properties of serum protein concentrate (SPC) with whey protein concentrate (WPC) made from the same milk and with commercial WPC. The experimental SPC and WPC were produced at 34% or 80% protein from the same lot of milk. Protein contents of WPC and SPC were comparable; however, fat content was much lower in SPC compared with WPC and commercial WPC. The effect of drying methods (freeze vs. spray drying) was studied for 34% WPC and SPC. Few differences due to drying method were found in turbidity and gelation; however, drying method made a large difference in foam formation for WPC but not SPC. Between pH 3 and 7, SPC was found to have lower turbidity than WPC; however, protein solubility was similar between SPC and WPC. Foaming and gelation properties of SPC were better than those of WPC. Differences in functional properties may be explained by differences in composition and extent of denaturation or aggregation.

  9. [Oxidative modification of serum proteins in rats exposed to nonsymmetric dimethylhydrazine poisoning].

    PubMed

    Kulmagambetov, I R; Muravleva, L E; Koĭkov, V V

    2009-01-01

    Studies of serum proteins modifications both spontaneous and catalyzed by metals in rats under single exposure to nonsymmetric dimethylhydrazine revealed reliable, significant increase in oxidative destruction of proteins. That proves deep peroxidative syndrome in the experimental animals.

  10. Two chitinase-like proteins abundantly accumulated in latex of mulberry show insecticidal activity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant latex is the cytoplasm of highly specialized cells known as laticifers, and is thought to have a critical role in defense against herbivorous insects. Proteins abundantly accumulated in latex might therefore be involved in the defense system. Results We purified latex abundant protein a and b (LA-a and LA-b) from mulberry (Morus sp.) and analyzed their properties. LA-a and LA-b have molecular masses of approximately 50 and 46 kDa, respectively, and are abundant in the soluble fraction of latex. Western blotting analysis suggested that they share sequence similarity with each other. The sequences of LA-a and LA-b, as determined by Edman degradation, showed chitin-binding domains of plant chitinases at the N termini. These proteins showed small but significant chitinase and chitosanase activities. Lectin RCA120 indicated that, unlike common plant chitinases, LA-a and LA-b are glycosylated. LA-a and LA-b showed insecticidal activities when fed to larvae of the model insect Drosophila melanogaster. Conclusions Our results suggest that the two LA proteins have a crucial role in defense against herbivorous insects, possibly by hydrolyzing their chitin. PMID:20109180

  11. Conservation of protein abundance patterns reveals the regulatory architecture of the EGFR-MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, T.; Niepel, M.; McDermott, J. E.; Gao, Y.; Nicora, C. D.; Chrisler, W. B.; Markillie, L. M.; Petyuk, V. A.; Smith, R. D.; Rodland, K. D.; Sorger, P. K.; Qian, W. -J.; Wiley, H. S.

    2016-07-12

    It is not known whether cancer cells generally show quantitative differences in the expression of signaling pathway proteins that could dysregulate signal transduction. To explore this issue, we first defined the primary components of the EGF-MAPK pathway in normal human mammary epithelial cells, identifying 16 core proteins and 10 feedback regulators. We then quantified their absolute abundance across a panel of normal and cancer cell lines. We found that core pathway proteins were expressed at very similar levels across all cell types. In contrast, the EGFR and transcriptionally controlled feedback regulators were expressed at highly variable levels. The absolute abundance of most core pathway proteins was between 50,000- 70,000 copies per cell, but the adaptors SOS1, SOS2, and GAB1 were found at far lower levels (2,000-5,000 per cell). MAPK signaling showed saturation in all cells between 3,000-10,000 occupied EGFR, consistent with the idea that low adaptor levels limit signaling. Our results suggest that the core MAPK pathway is essentially invariant across different cell types, with cell- specific differences in signaling likely due to variable levels of feedback regulators. The low abundance of adaptors relative to the EGFR could be responsible for previous observation of saturable signaling, endocytosis, and high affinity EGFR.

  12. Trans-splicing Into Highly Abundant Albumin Transcripts for Production of Therapeutic Proteins In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Mansfield, S Gary; Cote, Colette A; Jiang, Ping Du; Weng, Ke; Amar, Marcelo JA; Brewer, Bryan H; Remaley, Alan T; McGarrity, Gerard J; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A; Puttaraju, M

    2008-01-01

    Spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing has emerged as an exciting mode of RNA therapy. Here we describe a novel trans-splicing strategy, which targets highly abundant pre-mRNAs, to produce therapeutic proteins in vivo. First, we used a pre-trans-splicing molecule (PTM) that mediated trans-splicing of human apolipoprotein A-I (hapoA-I) into the highly abundant mouse albumin exon 1. Hydrodynamic tail vein injection of the hapoA-I PTM plasmid in mice followed by analysis of the chimeric transcripts and protein, confirmed accurate and efficient trans-splicing into albumin pre-mRNA and production of hapoA-I protein. The versatility of this approach was demonstrated by producing functional human papillomavirus type-16 E7 (HPV16-E7) single-chain antibody in C57BL/6 mice and functional factor VIII (FVIII) and phenotypic correction in hemophilia A mice. Altogether, these studies demonstrate that trans-splicing to highly abundant albumin transcripts can be used as a general platform to produce therapeutic proteins in vivo. PMID:19066600

  13. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease.

  14. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease. PMID:27453073

  15. [THE POSSIBILITIES OF APPLICATION OF TECHNOLOGY PROTEIN MICROARRAY (MICROCHIPS) FOR ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN COMPOSITION OF BLOOD SERUM].

    PubMed

    Gumanova, N G; Klimushina, M V; Metelskaya, V A; Boitsov, S A

    2015-10-01

    The microchip technology represents convenient and relatively economic tool of analyzing specific biomarkers with the purpose to diagnose diseases, to evaluate effectiveness of therapy and to investigate signaling pathways. To analyze protein composition of blood serum certain types of finished microchips which were not applied previously on the territory of Russia. The detection from 2% to 5% out of matrix of chips depending on their variety was managed without preliminary depletion of serum (removal of proteins of major fractions). Hence, partial protein composition of blood serum can be analyzed with microchips even without preliminary removal of proteins of major fractions.

  16. Tissue and serum samples of patients with papillary thyroid cancer with and without benign background demonstrate different altered expression of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Abdullah, Mardiaty Iryani; Lee, Ching Chin; Mat Junit, Sarni; Ng, Khoon Leong

    2016-01-01

    Background Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) is mainly diagnosed using fine-needle aspiration biopsy. This most common form of well-differentiated thyroid cancer occurs with or without a background of benign thyroid goiter (BTG). Methods In the present study, a gel-based proteomics analysis was performed to analyse the expression of proteins in tissue and serum samples of PTC patients with (PTCb; n = 6) and without a history of BTG (PTCa; n = 8) relative to patients with BTG (n = 20). This was followed by confirmation of the levels of proteins which showed significant altered abundances of more than two-fold difference (p < 0.01) in the tissue and serum samples of the same subjects using ELISA. Results The data of our study showed that PTCa and PTCb distinguish themselves from BTG in the types of tissue and serum proteins of altered abundance. While higher levels of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) and heat shock 70 kDa protein were associated with PTCa, lower levels of A1AT, protein disulfide isomerase and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 N seemed apparent in the PTCb. In case of the serum proteins, higher abundances of A1AT and alpha 1-beta glycoprotein were detected in PTCa, while PTCb was associated with enhanced apolipoprotein A-IV and alpha 2-HS glycoprotein (AHSG). The different altered expression of tissue and serum A1AT as well as serum AHSG between PTCa and PTCb patients were also validated by ELISA. Discussion The distinctive altered abundances of the tissue and serum proteins form preliminary indications that PTCa and PTCb are two distinct cancers of the thyroid that are etiologically and mechanistically different although it is currently not possible to rule out that they may also be due other reasons such as the different stages of the malignant disease. These proteins stand to have a potential use as tissue or serum biomarkers to discriminate the three different thyroid neoplasms although this requires further validation in clinically representative

  17. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins: versatile players in the plant adaptation to water limiting environments.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Luis Reyes, José; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2011-04-01

    Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins accumulate at the onset of seed desiccation and in response to water deficit in vegetative plant tissues. The typical LEA proteins are highly hydrophilic and intrinsically unstructured. They have been classified in different families; each one showing distinctive conserved motifs. In this manuscript we present and discuss some of the recent findings regarding their role in plant adaptation to water deficit, as well as those concerning to their possible function, and how it can be related to their intrinsic structural flexibility.

  18. Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana: structural properties and protective abilities during desiccation.

    PubMed

    Boswell, Leaf C; Menze, Michael A; Hand, Steven C

    2014-01-01

    Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are highly hydrophilic, and their expression is associated with desiccation tolerance in both plants and animals. Here we show that two LEA proteins from embryos of Artemia franciscana, AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m, are intrinsically disordered in solution but upon desiccation gain secondary structure, as measured by circular dichroism. Trifluoroethanol and sodium dodecyl sulfate are both shown to induce α-helical structure in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. Bioinformatic predictions of secondary-structure content for both proteins correspond most closely to conformations measured in the dry state. Because some LEA proteins afford protection to desiccation-sensitive proteins during drying and subsequent rehydration, we tested for this capacity in AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m. The protective capacities vary, depending on the target enzyme. For the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, neither AfrLEA2 nor AfrLEA3m, with or without trehalose present, was able to afford protection better than that provided by bovine serum albumin (BSA) under the same conditions. However, for another cytoplasmic enzyme, phosphofructokinase, both AfrLEA2 and AfrLEA3m in the presence of trehalose were able to afford protection far greater than that provided by BSA with trehalose. Finally, for the mitochondrial enzyme citrate synthase, 400-μg/mL AfrLEA3m without trehalose provided significantly more protection than the same concentration of either AfrLEA2 or BSA.

  19. Depletion of abundant plant RuBisCO protein using the protamine sulfate precipitation method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu Ji; Lee, Hye Min; Wang, Yiming; Wu, Jingni; Kim, Sang Gon; Kang, Kyu Young; Park, Ki Hun; Kim, Yong Chul; Choi, In Soo; Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep; Kim, Sun Tae

    2013-07-01

    Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) is the most abundant plant leaf protein, hampering deep analysis of the leaf proteome. Here, we describe a novel protamine sulfate precipitation (PSP) method for the depletion of RuBisCO. For this purpose, soybean leaf total proteins were extracted using Tris-Mg/NP-40 extraction buffer. Obtained clear supernatant was subjected to the PSP method, followed by 13% SDS-PAGE analysis of total, PS-supernatant and -precipitation derived protein samples. In a dose-dependent experiment, 0.1% w/v PS was found to be sufficient for precipitating RuBisCO large and small subunits (LSU and SSU). Western blot analysis confirmed no detection of RuBisCO LSU in the PS-supernatant proteins. Application of this method to Arabidopsis, rice, and maize leaf proteins revealed results similar to soybean. Furthermore, 2DE analyses of PS-treated soybean leaf displayed enriched protein profile for the protein sample derived from the PS-supernatant than total proteins. Some enriched 2D spots were subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis and were successfully assigned for their protein identity. Hence, the PSP method is: (i) simple, fast, economical, and reproducible for RuBisCO precipitation from the plant leaf sample; (ii) applicable to both dicot and monocot plants; and (iii) suitable for downstream proteomics analysis.

  20. Global Analysis of Condition-specific Subcellular Protein Distribution and Abundance*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sunhee; Smith, Jennifer J.; von Haller, Priska D.; Dilworth, David J.; Sitko, Katherine A.; Miller, Leslie R.; Saleem, Ramsey A.; Goodlett, David R.; Aitchison, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular control of protein activities by modulation of their abundance or compartmentalization is not easily measured on a large scale. We developed and applied a method to globally interrogate these processes that is widely useful for systems-level analyses of dynamic cellular responses in many cell types. The approach involves subcellular fractionation followed by comprehensive proteomic analysis of the fractions, which is enabled by a data-independent acquisition mass spectrometry approach that samples every available mass to charge channel systematically to maximize sensitivity. Next, various fraction-enrichment ratios are measured for all detected proteins across different environmental conditions and used to group proteins into clusters reflecting changes in compartmentalization and relative conditional abundance. Application of the approach to characterize the response of yeast proteins to fatty acid exposure revealed dynamics of peroxisomes and novel dynamics of MCC/eisosomes, specialized plasma membrane domains comprised of membrane compartment occupied by Can1 (MCC) and eisosome subdomains. It also led to the identification of Fat3, a fatty acid transport protein of the plasma membrane, previously annotated as Ykl187. PMID:23349476

  1. Serum protein capillary electrophoresis and measurement of acute phase proteins in a captive cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) population.

    PubMed

    Depauw, Sarah; Delanghe, Joris; Whitehouse-Tedd, Katherine; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Christensen, Michelle; Hesta, Myriam; Tugirimana, Pierrot; Budd, Jane; Dermauw, Veronique; Janssens, Geert P J

    2014-09-01

    Renal and gastrointestinal pathologies are widespread in the captive cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) population but are often diagnosed at a late stage, because diagnostic tools are limited to the evaluation of clinical signs or general blood examination. Presently, no data are available on serum proteins and acute-phase proteins in cheetahs during health or disease, although they might be important to improve health monitoring. This study aimed to quantify serum proteins by capillary electrophoresis in 80 serum samples from captive cheetahs, categorized according to health status and disease type. Moreover, serum amyloid A concentrations were measured via a turbidimetric immunoassay validated in domestic cats, whereas haptoglobin and C-reactive protein were determined by non-species-specific functional tests. Cheetahs classified as healthy had serum protein and acute phase protein concentrations within reference ranges for healthy domestic cats. In contrast, unhealthy cheetahs had higher (P < 0.001) serum amyloid A, alpha2-globulin, and haptoglobin concentrations compared with the healthy subgroup. Moreover, serum amyloid A (P = 0.020), alpha2-globulin (P < 0.001) and haptoglobin (P = 0.001) concentrations in cheetahs suffering from chronic kidney disease were significantly greater compared to the reportedly healthy cheetahs. Our study indicates that serum proteins in the cheetah can be analyzed by routine capillary electrophoresis, whereas acute-phase proteins can be measured using available immunoassays or non-species-specific techniques, which are also likely to be applicable in other exotic felids. Moreover, results suggest that serum amyloid A and haptoglobin are important acute-phase proteins in the diseased cheetah and highlight the need to evaluate their role as early-onset markers for disease.

  2. Intake of Meat Proteins Substantially Increased the Relative Abundance of Genus Lactobacillus in Rat Feces.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingying; Lin, Xisha; Li, He; Li, Yingqiu; Shi, Xuebin; Zhao, Fan; Xu, Xinglian; Li, Chunbao; Zhou, Guanghong

    2016-01-01

    Diet has been shown to have a critical influence on gut bacteria and host health, and high levels of red meat in diet have been shown to increase colonic DNA damage and thus be harmful to gut health. However, previous studies focused more on the effects of meat than of meat proteins. In order to investigate whether intake of meat proteins affects the composition and metabolic activities of gut microbiota, feces were collected from growing rats that were fed with either meat proteins (from beef, pork or fish) or non-meat proteins (casein or soy) for 14 days. The resulting composition of gut microbiota was profiled by sequencing the V4-V5 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA genes and the short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) were analyzed using gas chromatography. The composition of gut microbiota and SCFA levels were significantly different between the five diet groups. At a recommended dose of 20% protein in the diet, meat protein-fed rats had a higher relative abundance of the beneficial genus Lactobacillus, but lower levels of SCFAs and SCFA-producing bacteria including Fusobacterium, Bacteroides and Prevotella, compared with the soy protein-fed group. Further work is needed on the regulatory pathways linking dietary protein intake to gut microbiota.

  3. Serum protein determination by high-performance gel-permeation chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, K; Masuko, M; Mineta, M; Yoshikawa, K; Yamauchi, K; Hirano, M; Katsumata, N; Tanaka, T

    1997-08-15

    A general high-performance gel-permeation chromatography (HPGPC) method was developed to determine protein in human serum with improved sensitivity and speed. The optimum UV wavelength for protein detection was found to be 210 nm, by comparing the protein values obtained by varying the UV wavelength of the HPLC detection system with the protein values obtained from spectrophotometric protein assays, i.e., the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) method and the biuret method. The analysis time was less than 1 min. Since this HPGPC serum protein assay method is simple and rapid, it is expected to be particularly well adapted for use in clinical laboratories.

  4. A Systems Approach to Elucidate Heterosis of Protein Abundances in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Blein-Nicolas, Mélisande; Albertin, Warren; da Silva, Telma; Valot, Benoît; Balliau, Thierry; Masneuf-Pomarède, Isabelle; Bely, Marina; Marullo, Philippe; Sicard, Delphine; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Zivy, Michel

    2015-08-01

    Heterosis is a universal phenomenon that has major implications in evolution and is of tremendous agro-economic value. To study the molecular manifestations of heterosis and to find factors that maximize its strength, we implemented a large-scale proteomic experiment in yeast. We analyzed the inheritance of 1,396 proteins in 55 inter- and intraspecific hybrids obtained from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. uvarum that were grown in grape juice at two temperatures. We showed that the proportion of heterotic proteins was highly variable depending on the parental strain and on the temperature considered. For intraspecific hybrids, this proportion was higher at nonoptimal temperature. Unexpectedly, heterosis for protein abundance was strongly biased toward positive values in interspecific hybrids but not in intraspecific hybrids. Computer modeling showed that this observation could be accounted for by assuming concave relationships between protein abundances and their controlling factors, in line with the metabolic model of heterosis. These results point to nonlinear processes that could play a central role in heterosis.

  5. Protein abundance of clinically relevant multidrug transporters along the entire length of the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Drozdzik, Marek; Gröer, Christian; Penski, Jette; Lapczuk, Joanna; Ostrowski, Marek; Lai, Yurong; Prasad, Bhagwat; Unadkat, Jashvant D; Siegmund, Werner; Oswald, Stefan

    2014-10-06

    Intestinal transporters are crucial determinants in the oral absorption of many drugs. We therefore studied the mRNA expression (N = 33) and absolute protein content (N = 10) of clinically relevant transporters in healthy epithelium of the duodenum, the proximal and distal jejunum and ileum, and the ascending, transversal, descending, and sigmoidal colon of six organ donors (24-54 years). In the small intestine, the abundance of nearly all studied proteins ranged between 0.2 and 1.6 pmol/mg with the exception of those of OCT3 (<0.1 pmol/mg) and PEPT1 (2.6-4.9 pmol/mg) that accounted for ∼50% of all measured transporters. OATP1A2 was not detected in any intestinal segment. ABCB1, ABCG2, PEPT1, and ASBT were significantly more abundant in jejunum and ileum than in colon. In contrast to this, the level of expression of ABCC2, ABCC3, and OCT3 was found to be highest in colon. Site-dependent differences in the levels of gene and protein expression were observed for ABCB1 and ASBT. Significant correlations between mRNA and protein levels have been found for ABCG2, ASBT, OCT3, and PEPT1 in the small intestine. Our data provide further physiological pieces of the puzzle required to predict intestinal drug absorption in humans.

  6. Iron dextran treatment does not induce serum protein carbonyls in the newborn pig.

    PubMed

    Caperna, T J; Shannon, A E; Blomberg, L A; Garrett, W M; Ramsay, T G

    2012-01-01

    Oxidation of serum proteins can lead to carbonyl formation that alters their function and is often associated with stress-related diseases. As it is recommended that all pigs reared in modern production facilities be given supplemental iron at birth to prevent anemia, and metals can catalyze the carbonylation of proteins, the primary objective of this study was to determine whether standard iron dextran treatment was associated with enhanced serum protein oxidation in newborn piglets. Piglets were treated with 100 mg of iron dextran intramuscularly either on the day of birth, or on the third day after birth. Blood samples were collected from piglets 48 or 96 h after treatment and serum was harvested. For quantification, serum protein carbonyls were converted to hydrazones with dinitrophenyl hydrazine and analyzed spectrophotometrically. To identify and determine relative distribution of carbonylated proteins, serum protein carbonyls were derivatized with biotin hydrazide, separated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, stained with avidin-fluorescein and identified by mass spectrometry. The standard iron dextran treatment was associated with no increase in total oxidized proteins if given either on the first or third day of life. In addition, with a few noted exceptions, the overall distribution and identification of oxidized proteins were similar between control and iron dextran-treated pigs. These results indicate that while iron dextran treatment is associated with a marked increase in circulating iron, it does not appear to specifically induce the oxidation of serum proteins.

  7. May the Thyroid Gland and Thyroperoxidase Participate in Nitrosylation of Serum Proteins and Sporadic Parkinson's Disease?

    PubMed Central

    García-Moreno, José-Manuel; Martín de Pablos, Angel; Chacón, José

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The research group has detected nitrosative stress and a singular version of nitrosylated serum α-synuclein in serum of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. Dysfunction of the thyroid gland has been proposed to be linked to this disease. The aim of the study was to know if the thyroid gland is involved in idiopathic PD and nitrosative stress. We studied 50 patients (early and advanced disease patients), 35 controls, and 6 subjects with thyroidectomy. Clinical characteristics, serum thyroperoxidase levels, and 3-nitrotyrosine proteins were analyzed. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting methods were employed. The findings indicated that the prevalence of two thyroid dysfunctions (hyper- or hypothyroidism) was not found to be different in patients relative to controls. However, the levels of the enzyme thyroperoxidase were found to be elevated in early disease patients (p<0.006), not in advanced disease subjects, and these levels were negatively correlated with serum 3-nitrotyrosine proteins (p<0.05), the indicators of nitrosative stress. The thyroidectomized subjects showed very low levels of serum 3-nitrotyrosine proteins (78% reduction vs. controls) and, among these proteins, the nitrosylated serum α-synuclein was nearly absent. These observations lead to the hypothesis that the thyroid gland and thyroperoxidase participate in nitrosylation of serum proteins and they could influence Parkinsonian nitrosative stress as well as nitrosylation of serum α-synuclein, a potentially pathogenic factor. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2143–2148. PMID:25125346

  8. Identification of Central Nervous System Proteins in Human Blood Serum and Plasma.

    PubMed

    Miroshnichenko, Yu V; Petushkova, N A; Teryaeva, N B; Lisitsa, A V; Zgoda, V G; Belyaev, A Yu; Potapov, A A

    2015-11-01

    Mass-spectrometric identification of proteins in human blood plasma and serum was performed by comparing mass-spectra of fragmented peptides using Swiss-Prot and UniProtKB databases of amino acid sequences. After choosing the appropriate identification conditions we found that combination of spectrum search parameters are optimal for identification of CNS proteins. In the studied plasma and serum samples, 9 proteins involved into pathological processes in the nervous tissue were identified; 7 of them were identified in both plasma and serum.

  9. Identification of tumor-associated autoantigens for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer in serum using high density protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Babel, Ingrid; Barderas, Rodrigo; Díaz-Uriarte, Ramón; Martínez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge Luis; Sánchez-Carbayo, Marta; Casal, J Ignacio

    2009-10-01

    There is a mounting evidence of the existence of autoantibodies associated to cancer progression. Antibodies are the target of choice for serum screening because of their stability and suitability for sensitive immunoassays. By using commercial protein microarrays containing 8000 human proteins, we examined 20 sera from colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and healthy subjects to identify autoantibody patterns and associated antigens. Forty-three proteins were differentially recognized by tumoral and reference sera (p value <0.04) in the protein microarrays. Five immunoreactive antigens, PIM1, MAPKAPK3, STK4, SRC, and FGFR4, showed the highest prevalence in cancer samples, whereas ACVR2B was more abundant in normal sera. Three of them, PIM1, MAPKAPK3, and ACVR2B, were used for further validation. A significant increase in the expression level of these antigens on CRC cell lines and colonic mucosa was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. A diagnostic ELISA based on the combination of MAPKAPK3 and ACVR2B proteins yielded specificity and sensitivity values of 73.9 and 83.3% (area under the curve, 0.85), respectively, for CRC discrimination after using an independent sample set containing 94 sera representative of different stages of progression and control subjects. In summary, these studies confirmed the presence of specific autoantibodies for CRC and revealed new individual markers of disease (PIM1, MAPKAPK3, and ACVR2B) with the potential to diagnose CRC with higher specificity and sensitivity than previously reported serum biomarkers.

  10. Inheritance patterns of enzymes and serum proteins of mallard-black duck hybrids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, R.P.; Meritt, D.W.; Block, S.B.; Cole, M.A.; Sulkin, S.T.; Lee, F.B.; Henny, C.J.

    1984-01-01

    From 1974 to 1976, a breeding program was used to produce hybrids of black ducks and mallards for the evaluation of inheritance patterns of serum proteins and serum, liver and muscle enzymes. In addition to the crosses designed to produce hybrids, a series of matings in 1975 and 1976 were designed to evaluate inheritance patterns of a hybrid with either a black duck or mallard. At the F1 level, hybrids were easily distinguished using serum proteins. However, once a hybrid was crossed back to either a mallard or black duck, only 12?23% of the progeny were distinguishable from black ducks or mallards using serum proteins and 23?39% using esterases. Muscle, serum and liver enzymes were similar between the two species.

  11. Inheritance patterns of enzymes and serum proteins of mallard-black duck hybrids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morgan, R.P.; Meritt, D.W.; Block, S.B.; Cole, M.

    1984-01-01

    From 1974 to 1976, a breeding program was used to produce hybrids of black ducks and mallards for the evaluation of inheritance patterns of serum proteins and serum, liver and muscle enzymes. In addition to the crosses designed to produce hybrids, a series of matings in 1975 and 1976 were designed to evaluate inheritance patterns of a hybrid with either a black duck or mallard. At the F1 level, hybrids were easily distinguished using serum proteins. However, once a hybrid was crossed back to either a mallard or black duck, only 12-23% of the progeny were distinguishable from black ducks or mallards using serum proteins and 23-39% using esterases. Muscle, serum and liver enzymes were similar between the two species.

  12. Effect of water salinity on total protein and electrophoretic pattern of serum proteins of grass carp, Ctenopharyngodon idella

    PubMed Central

    Peyghan, Rahim; Khadjeh, Gholam Hosain; Enayati, Ala

    2014-01-01

    In this study the effects of water salinity on serum total protein and its components in grass carp were investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of salinity tolerance of fish on total serum protein level and its components as an indicator of liver and kidney activity. One hundred and twenty grass carp were divided into four groups, randomly. The first three groups were reared in concentration of 4, 8 and 12 g L-1 of salt solution, respectively, and the fourth group was reared in freshwater and served as control. After 3 weeks, blood samples were collected and after harvesting the blood serum, serum total protein and protein components were measured with Biuret and electrophoresis methods, respectively. Results showed that mean value of serum total protein in the control and three salinities groups were 2.75, 3.28, 2.90 and 3.13 g dL-1, respectively. Five fractions of serum protein were electrophoretically observed as: albumin (Alb), alpha-1 globulin (α1-glu), alpha-2 globulin (α2-glu), beta globulin (β-glu) and gamma globulin (γ-glu). There were not any significant differences between the average mean of serum total protein of experimental and control groups (p > 0.05). However, Alb, α1-glu and β-glu levels in the experimental groups were significantly higher than in the control group (p < 0.05). The average of α2-glu and γ-glu revealed no significant difference between the experimental groups (p > 0.05). In conclusion, our results showed that increasing water salinity could have a significant effect on Alb, α1-glu and β-glu levels but not on total serum protein in grass carp. PMID:25568723

  13. Assessment of Label-Free Quantification in Discovery Proteomics and Impact of Technological Factors and Natural Variability of Protein Abundance.

    PubMed

    Al Shweiki, Mhd Rami; Mönchgesang, Susann; Majovsky, Petra; Thieme, Domenika; Trutschel, Diana; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang

    2017-04-07

    We evaluated the state of label-free discovery proteomics focusing especially on technological contributions and contributions of naturally occurring differences in protein abundance to the intersample variability in protein abundance estimates in this highly peptide-centric technology. First, the performance of popular quantitative proteomics software, Proteome Discoverer, Scaffold, MaxQuant, and Progenesis QIP, was benchmarked using their default parameters and some modified settings. Beyond this, the intersample variability in protein abundance estimates was decomposed into variability introduced by the entire technology itself and variable protein amounts inherent to individual plants of the Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 accession. The technical component was considerably higher than the biological intersample variability, suggesting an effect on the degree and validity of reported biological changes in protein abundance. Surprisingly, the biological variability, protein abundance estimates, and protein fold changes were recorded differently by the software used to quantify the proteins, warranting caution in the comparison of discovery proteomics results. As expected, ∼99% of the proteome was invariant in the isogenic plants in the absence of environmental factors; however, few proteins showed substantial quantitative variability. This naturally occurring variation between individual organisms can have an impact on the causality of reported protein fold changes.

  14. Investigating protein haptenation mechanisms of skin sensitisers using human serum albumin as a model protein.

    PubMed

    Aleksic, Maja; Pease, Camilla K; Basketter, David A; Panico, Maria; Morris, Howard R; Dell, Anne

    2007-06-01

    Covalent modification of skin proteins by electrophiles is a key event in the induction of skin sensitisation but not skin irritation although the exact nature of the binding mechanisms has not been determined empirically for the vast majority of sensitisers. It is also unknown whether immunologically relevant protein targets exist in the skin contributing to effecting skin sensitisation. To determine the haptenation mechanism(s) and spectra of amino acid reactivity in an intact protein for two sensitisers expected to react by different mechanisms, human serum albumin (HSA) was chosen as a model protein. The aim of this work was also to verify for selected non-sensitisers and irritants that no protein haptenation occurs even under forcing conditions. HSA was incubated with chemicals and the resulting complexes were digested with trypsin and analysed deploying matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and nano-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. The data confirmed that different residues (lysine, cysteine, histidine and tyrosine) are covalently modified in a highly selective and differential manner by the sensitisers 2,4-dinitro-1-chlorobenzene and phenyl salicylate. Additionally, non-sensitisers 2,4-dichloro-1-nitrobenzene, butyl paraben and benzaldehyde and irritants benzalkonium chloride and sodium dodecyl sulphate did not covalently modify HSA under any conditions. The data indicate that covalent haptenation is a prerequisite of skin sensitisation but not irritation. The data also suggest that protein modifications are targeted to certain amino acids residing in chemical microenvironments conducive to reactivity within an intact protein. Deriving such information is relevant to our understanding of antigen formation in the immunobiology of skin sensitisation and in the development of in vitro protein haptenation assays.

  15. Anodic-stripping voltammetric immunoassay for ultrasensitive detection of low-abundance proteins using quantum dot aggregated hollow microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Tang, Dianping; Goryacheva, Irina Yu; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar

    2013-02-11

    A new anodic-stripping voltammetric immunoassay protocol for detection of IgG1, as a model protein, was designed by using CdS quantum dot (QD) layer-by-layer assembled hollow microspheres (QDHMS) as molecular tags. Initially, monoclonal anti-human IgG1 specific antibodies were anchored on amorphous magnetic beads preferably selective to capture F(ab) of IgG1 analyte from the sample. For detection, monoclonal anti-human IgG1 (F(c)-specific) antibodies were covalently coupled to the synthesized QDHMS. In a sandwich-type immunoassay format, subsequent anodic-stripping voltammetric detection of cadmium released under acidic conditions from the coupled QDs was conducted at an in situ prepared mercury film electrode. The immunoassay combines highly efficient magnetic separation with signal amplification by the multilayered QD labels. The dynamic concentration range spanned from 1.0 fg mL(-1) to 1.0 μg mL(-1) of IgG1 with a detection limit of 0.1 fg mL(-1). The electrochemical immunoassay showed good reproducibility, selectivity, and stability. The analysis of clinical serum specimens revealed good accordance with the results obtained by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The new immunoassay is promising for enzyme-free, and cost-effective analysis of low-abundance biomarkers.

  16. Low-abundant protein extraction from complex protein sample using a novel continuous aqueous two-phase systems device.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Villegas, Patricia; Espitia-Saloma, Edith; Rito-Palomares, Marco; Aguilar, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    The present work describes the application of a novel continuous aqueous two-phase system prototype for the recovery of biomolecules. The prototype is an alternative platform for protein recovery and α-amylase from soybean extracts was used as a model system. The system was selected as an example of low-abundant protein present in complex mixtures. Compared with batch systems, continuous operation in this prototype seems to increase partition coefficient with higher recovery efficiencies. Processing time is reduced at least three times in the continuous system when compared to batch mode, while hold up (volumetric quantity of the opposing phase in a determined phase sample) decreases with decreasing phases flow. Furthermore, similar partition coefficient (Kp > 4) with a higher top phase enzyme recovery (81%) is also obtained in this system probably due to better contact surface between phases, compared with that obtained in batch (79%). A continuous aqueous two-phase system process with purification factor 40-fold higher than batch experiments was achieved. These preliminary results exhibit the potential of continuous systems for the recovery of low-abundant proteins from complex mixtures. The promising performance of this prototype can raise the attention of the industry for the adoption of aqueous two-phase system processes.

  17. Cold-Regulated Cereal Chloroplast Late Embryogenesis Abundant-Like Proteins. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analyses

    PubMed Central

    NDong, Christian; Danyluk, Jean; Wilson, Kenneth E.; Pocock, Tessa; Huner, Norman P.A.; Sarhan, Fathey

    2002-01-01

    Cold acclimation and freezing tolerance are the result of complex interaction between low temperature, light, and photosystem II (PSII) excitation pressure. Previous results have shown that expression of the Wcs19 gene is correlated with PSII excitation pressure measured in vivo as the relative reduction state of PSII. Using cDNA library screening and data mining, we have identified three different groups of proteins, late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) 3-L1, LEA3-L2, and LEA3-L3, sharing identities with WCS19. These groups represent a new class of proteins in cereals related to group 3 LEA proteins. They share important characteristics such as a sorting signal that is predicted to target them to either the chloroplast or mitochondria and a C-terminal sequence that may be involved in oligomerization. The results of subcellular fractionation, immunolocalization by electron microscopy and the analyses of target sequences within the Wcs19 gene are consistent with the localization of WCS19 within the chloroplast stroma of wheat (Triticum aestivum) and rye (Secale cereale). Western analysis showed that the accumulation of chloroplastic LEA3-L2 proteins is correlated with the capacity of different wheat and rye cultivars to develop freezing tolerance. Arabidopsis was transformed with the Wcs19 gene and the transgenic plants showed a significant increase in their freezing tolerance. This increase was only evident in cold-acclimated plants. The putative function of this protein in the enhancement of freezing tolerance is discussed. PMID:12114590

  18. Dissecting DNA damage response pathways by analyzing protein localization and abundance changes during DNA replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Tkach, Johnny M.; Yimit, Askar; Lee, Anna Y.; Riffle, Michael; Costanzo, Michael; Jaschob, Daniel; Hendry, Jason A.; Ou, Jiongwen; Moffat, Jason; Boone, Charles; Davis, Trisha N.; Nislow, Corey; Brown, Grant W.

    2012-01-01

    Re-localization of proteins is a hallmark of the DNA damage response. We use high-throughput microscopic screening of the yeast GFP fusion collection to develop a systems-level view of protein re-organization following drug-induced DNA replication stress. Changes in protein localization and abundance reveal drug-specific patterns of functional enrichments. Classification of proteins by sub-cellular destination allows the identification of pathways that respond to replication stress. We analyzed pairwise combinations of GFP fusions and gene deletion mutants to define and order two novel DNA damage responses. In the first, Cmr1 forms subnuclear foci that are regulated by the histone deacetylase Hos2 and are distinct from the typical Rad52 repair foci. In a second example, we find that the checkpoint kinases Mec1/Tel1 and the translation regulator Asc1 regulate P-body formation. This method identifies response pathways that were not detected in genetic and protein interaction screens, and can be readily applied to any form of chemical or genetic stress to reveal cellular response pathways. PMID:22842922

  19. Discrepancy between mRNA and protein abundance: insight from information retrieval process in computers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Degeng

    2008-12-01

    Discrepancy between the abundance of cognate protein and RNA molecules is frequently observed. A theoretical understanding of this discrepancy remains elusive, and it is frequently described as surprises and/or technical difficulties in the literature. Protein and RNA represent different steps of the multi-stepped cellular genetic information flow process, in which they are dynamically produced and degraded. This paper explores a comparison with a similar process in computers-multi-step information flow from storage level to the execution level. Functional similarities can be found in almost every facet of the retrieval process. Firstly, common architecture is shared, as the ribonome (RNA space) and the proteome (protein space) are functionally similar to the computer primary memory and the computer cache memory, respectively. Secondly, the retrieval process functions, in both systems, to support the operation of dynamic networks-biochemical regulatory networks in cells and, in computers, the virtual networks (of CPU instructions) that the CPU travels through while executing computer programs. Moreover, many regulatory techniques are implemented in computers at each step of the information retrieval process, with a goal of optimizing system performance. Cellular counterparts can be easily identified for these regulatory techniques. In other words, this comparative study attempted to utilize theoretical insight from computer system design principles as catalysis to sketch an integrative view of the gene expression process, that is, how it functions to ensure efficient operation of the overall cellular regulatory network. In context of this bird's-eye view, discrepancy between protein and RNA abundance became a logical observation one would expect. It was suggested that this discrepancy, when interpreted in the context of system operation, serves as a potential source of information to decipher regulatory logics underneath biochemical network operation.

  20. Abundantly and rarely expressed Lhc protein genes exhibit distinct regulation patterns in plants.

    PubMed

    Klimmek, Frank; Sjödin, Andreas; Noutsos, Christos; Leister, Dario; Jansson, Stefan

    2006-03-01

    We have analyzed gene regulation of the Lhc supergene family in poplar (Populus spp.) and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using digital expression profiling. Multivariate analysis of the tissue-specific, environmental, and developmental Lhc expression patterns in Arabidopsis and poplar was employed to characterize four rarely expressed Lhc genes, Lhca5, Lhca6, Lhcb7, and Lhcb4.3. Those genes have high expression levels under different conditions and in different tissues than the abundantly expressed Lhca1 to 4 and Lhcb1 to 6 genes that code for the 10 major types of higher plant light-harvesting proteins. However, in some of the datasets analyzed, the Lhcb4 and Lhcb6 genes as well as an Arabidopsis gene not present in poplar (Lhcb2.3) exhibited minor differences to the main cooperative Lhc gene expression pattern. The pattern of the rarely expressed Lhc genes was always found to be more similar to that of PsbS and the various light-harvesting-like genes, which might indicate distinct physiological functions for the rarely and abundantly expressed Lhc proteins. The previously undetected Lhcb7 gene encodes a novel plant Lhcb-type protein that possibly contains an additional, fourth, transmembrane N-terminal helix with a highly conserved motif. As the Lhcb4.3 gene seems to be present only in Eurosid species and as its regulation pattern varies significantly from that of Lhcb4.1 and Lhcb4.2, we conclude it to encode a distinct Lhc protein type, Lhcb8.

  1. TAZ Protein Accumulation Is Negatively Regulated by YAP Abundance in Mammalian Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Finch-Edmondson, Megan L.; Strauss, Robyn P.; Passman, Adam M.; Sudol, Marius; Yeoh, George C.; Callus, Bernard A.

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian Hippo signaling pathway regulates cell growth and survival and is frequently dysregulated in cancer. YAP and TAZ are transcriptional coactivators that function as effectors of this signaling pathway. Aberrant YAP and TAZ activity is reported in several human cancers, and normally the expression and nuclear localization of these proteins is tightly regulated. We sought to establish whether a direct relationship exists between YAP and TAZ. Using knockdown and overexpression experiments we show YAP inversely regulates the abundance of TAZ protein by proteasomal degradation. Interestingly this phenomenon was uni-directional since TAZ expression did not affect YAP abundance. Structure/function analyses suggest that YAP-induced TAZ degradation is a consequence of YAP-targeted gene transcription involving TEAD factors. Subsequent investigation of known regulators of TAZ degradation using specific inhibitors revealed a role for heat shock protein 90 and glycogen synthase kinase 3 but not casein kinase 1 nor LATS in YAP-mediated TAZ loss. Importantly, this phenomenon is conserved from mouse to human; however, interestingly, different YAP isoforms varied in their ability to degrade TAZ. Since shRNA-mediated TAZ depletion in HeLa and D645 cells caused apoptotic cell death, we propose that isoform-specific YAP-mediated TAZ degradation may contribute to the contradicting roles reported for YAP overexpression. This study identifies a novel mechanism of TAZ regulation by YAP, which has significant implications for our understanding of Hippo pathway regulation, YAP-isoform specific signaling, and the role of these proteins in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. PMID:26432639

  2. A rapid method for depletion of Rubisco from soybean (Glycine max) leaf for proteomic analysis of lower abundance proteins.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Natarajan, Savithiry S

    2009-12-01

    2-DE analysis of complex plant proteomes has limited dynamic resolution because only abundant proteins can be detected. Proteomic assessment of the low abundance proteins within leaf tissue is difficult when it is comprised of 30-50% of the CO(2) fixation enzyme Rubisco. Resolution can be improved through depletion of Rubisco using fractionation techniques based upon different physiological or biochemical principles. We have developed a fast and simple fractionation technique using 10 mM Ca(2+) and 10 mM phytate to precipitate Rubisco from soybean leaf soluble protein extract. This method is not only rapid, but also inexpensive, and capable of removing 85% of the extremely abundant Rubisco enzyme from soybean leaf soluble protein extract. This method allowed for roughly 230 previously inconspicuous protein spots in soybean leaf to be more easily detectable (3-fold increase in vol%) using fluorescent detection and allowed 28 phosphorylated proteins previously undetected, to be isolated and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS.

  3. Automated Simultaneous Determination of Serum Total Protein and Globulin.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    biuret reaction while the serum globulin is determined by the reaction of globulins with copper in the presence of sulfuric and acetic acids to form...colored metalloprotein complexes. A major advantage of the proposed combined procedure is that the latter reaction is not influenced by the tryptophan

  4. Serum protein fractionation using supported molecular matrix electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weijie; Matsuno, Yu-ki; Kameyama, Akihiko

    2013-08-01

    Supported molecular matrix electrophoresis (SMME), in which a hydrophilic polymer such as PVA serves as a support within a porous PVDF membrane, was recently developed. This method is similar to cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis but differs in the compatibility to glycan analysis of the separated bands. In this report, we describe the first instance of the application of SMME to human serum fractionation, and demonstrate the differences with serum fractionation by cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis. The SMME membrane exhibited almost no EOF during electrophoresis, unlike the cellulose acetate membrane, but afforded comparative results for serum fractionation. The visualization of each fraction was achieved by conventional staining with dye such as Direct Blue-71, and objective quantification was obtained by densitometry after inducing membrane transparency with 1-nonene. Immunostaining was also achieved. Moreover, mass spectrometric analysis of both N-linked and O-linked glycans from the separated bands was demonstrated. Serum fractionation and glycan profiling of each fraction using SMME will enable novel insights into the relationships between various glycosylation profiles and disease states.

  5. Investigation of SnSPR1, a novel and abundant surface protein of Sarcocystis neurona merozoites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deqing; Howe, Daniel K

    2008-04-15

    An expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing project has produced over 15,000 partial cDNA sequences from the equine pathogen Sarcocystis neurona. While many of the sequences are clear homologues of previously characterized genes, a significant number of the S. neurona ESTs do not exhibit similarity to anything in the extensive sequence databases that have been generated. In an effort to characterize parasite proteins that are novel to S. neurona, a seemingly unique gene was selected for further investigation based on its abundant representation in the collection of ESTs and the predicted presence of a signal peptide and glycolipid anchor addition on the encoded protein. The gene was expressed in E. coli, and monospecific polyclonal antiserum against the recombinant protein was produced by immunization of a rabbit. Characterization of the native protein in S. neurona merozoites and schizonts revealed that it is a low molecular weight surface protein that is expressed throughout intracellular development of the parasite. The protein was designated Surface Protein 1 (SPR1) to reflect its display on the outer surface of merozoites and to distinguish it from the ubiquitous SAG/SRS surface antigens of the heteroxenous Coccidia. Interestingly, infection assays in the presence of the polyclonal antiserum suggested that SnSPR1 plays some role in attachment and/or invasion of host cells by S. neurona merozoites. The work described herein represents a general template for selecting and characterizing the various unidentified gene sequences that are plentiful in the EST databases for S. neurona and other apicomplexans. Furthermore, this study illustrates the value of investigating these novel sequences since it can offer new candidates for diagnostic or vaccine development while also providing greater insight into the biology of these parasites.

  6. Spatial Mapping of Protein Abundances in the Mouse Brain by Voxelation Integrated with High-Throughput Liquid Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Petyuk, Vladislav A; Qian, Weijun; Chin, Mark H; Wang, Haixing H; Livesay, Eric A; Monroe, Matthew E; Adkins, Joshua N; Jaitly, Navdeep; Anderson, David J; Camp, David G; Smith, Desmond J; Smith, Richard D

    2007-01-25

    Temporally and spatially resolved mapping of protein abundance patterns within the mammalian brain is of significant interest for understanding brain function and molecular etiologies of neurodegenerative diseases; however, such imaging efforts have been greatly challenged by complexity of the proteome, throughput and sensitivity of applied analytical methodologies, and accurate quantitation of protein abundances across the brain. Here, we describe a methodology for comprehensive spatial proteome mapping that addresses these challenges by employing voxelation integrated with automated microscale sample processing, high-throughput LC system coupled with high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer and a “universal” stable isotope labeled reference sample approach for robust quantitation. We applied this methodology as a proof-of-concept trial for the analysis of protein distribution within a single coronal slice of a C57BL/6J mouse brain. For relative quantitation of the protein abundances across the slice, an 18O-isotopically labeled reference sample, derived from a whole control coronal slice from another mouse, was spiked into each voxel sample and stable isotopic intensity ratios were used to obtain measures of relative protein abundances. In total, we generated maps of protein abundance patterns for 1,028 proteins. The significant agreement of the protein distributions with previously reported data supports the validity of this methodology, which opens new opportunities for studying the spatial brain proteome and its dynamics during the course of disease progression and other important biological and associated health aspects in a discovery-driven fashion.

  7. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins regulate the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhixiong; Meng, Xianzhang; Cai, Ying; Liang, Hong; Nagarajan, Lalitha; Brandt, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    The LIM domain-binding protein Ldb1 is an essential cofactor of LIM-homeodomain (LIM-HD) and LIM-only (LMO) proteins in development. The stoichiometry of Ldb1, LIM-HD, and LMO proteins is tightly controlled in the cell and is likely a critical determinant of their biological actions. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBPs) were recently shown to interact with Ldb1 and are also important in developmental programs. We establish here that two mammalian SSBPs, SSBP2 and SSBP3, contribute to an erythroid DNA-binding complex that contains the transcription factors Tal1 and GATA-1, the LIM domain protein Lmo2, and Ldb1 and binds a bipartite E-box-GATA DNA sequence motif. In addition, SSBP2 was found to augment transcription of the Protein 4.2 (P4.2) gene, a direct target of the E-box-GATA-binding complex, in an Ldb1-dependent manner and to increase endogenous Ldb1 and Lmo2 protein levels, E-box-GATA DNA-binding activity, and P4.2 and β-globin expression in erythroid progenitors. Finally, SSBP2 was demonstrated to inhibit Ldb1 and Lmo2 interaction with the E3 ubiquitin ligase RLIM, prevent RLIM-mediated Ldb1 ubiquitination, and protect Ldb1 and Lmo2 from proteasomal degradation. These results define a novel biochemical function for SSBPs in regulating the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins. PMID:17437998

  8. Late embryogenesis abundant proteins protect human hepatoma cells during acute desiccation.

    PubMed

    Li, Shumin; Chakraborty, Nilay; Borcar, Apurva; Menze, Michael A; Toner, Mehmet; Hand, Steven C

    2012-12-18

    Expression of late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins is highly correlated with desiccation tolerance in anhydrobiotic animals, selected land plants, and bacteria. Genes encoding two LEA proteins, one localized to the cytoplasm/nucleus (AfrLEA2) and one targeted to mitochondria (AfrLEA3m), were stably transfected into human HepG2 cells. A trehalose transporter was used for intracellular loading of this disaccharide. Cells were rapidly and uniformly desiccated to low water content (<0.12 g H(2)O/g dry weight) with a recently developed spin-drying technique. Immediately on rehydration, control cells without LEA proteins or trehalose exhibited 0% membrane integrity, compared with 98% in cells loaded with trehalose and expressing AfrLEA2 or AfrLEA3m; surprisingly, AfrLEA3m without trehalose conferred 94% protection. Cell proliferation across 7 d showed an 18-fold increase for cells dried with AfrLEA3m and trehalose, compared with 27-fold for nondried controls. LEA proteins dramatically enhance desiccation tolerance in mammalian cells and offer the opportunity for engineering biostability in the dried state.

  9. [Disc electrophoretic characteristics of the serum proteins of "Vitalact"-type "humanized" milk].

    PubMed

    Kalashnikova, L P

    1977-01-01

    Disc-electrophoreograms in the polyacrylamide gel of the cow milk serumal proteins show 11 peaks belonging to immune globulins, the poteose-peptone fraction, the serum-globulin, alpha-lactoalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin and to glucoproteids. Under a high-temperature treatment of humanized milk (105 degrees----10 minutes) a significant denaturation of the serumal proteins, re-distribution and a fall in the amount of proteinic fractions were noted. Beta-lactoglobulins and immune globulins are most sensitive. With disc-eletrophoresis in the polyacrylamide gel of the human milk serumal proteins the densitograms distinctly demonstrate the presence of peaks that correspond to immunoglobulins, proteose-peptones, serum-albumins, alpha-lacto-albumins in the absence of the beta-lactoglobulins fraction. The cited data allow the method of disc-electrophoresis in the polyacrylamide gel to be employed for improving the fractional composition of the serumal proteins in the nutrients intended for nurslings and infants of the first year of life.

  10. Pursuing "zero" protein adsorption of poly(carboxybetaine) from undiluted blood serum and plasma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Xue, Hong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Jinli; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2009-10-06

    Human blood serum and plasma pose significant challenges to blood-contacting devices and implanted materials because of their high nonspecific adsorption onto surfaces. In this work, we investigated nonspecific protein adsorption from single protein solutions and complex media such as undiluted human blood serum and plasma onto poly(carboxybetaine acrylamide) (polyCBAA)-grafted surfaces at different temperatures. The polyCBAA grafting was done via atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) with varying film thicknesses. The objective is to create a surface that experiences "zero" protein adsorption from complex undiluted human blood serum and plasma. Results show that protein adsorption from undiluted human blood serum, plasma, and aged serum on the polyCBAA-grafted surface is undetectable at both 25 and 37 degrees C by a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. This was achieved with a film thickness of approximately 21 nm. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the polyCBAA surfaces after antibody immobilization maintain undetectable protein adsorption from undiluted human blood serum. This is the first time that an effective nonfouling material suitable for applications in complex blood media has been demonstrated.

  11. Abundance of Plasma Antioxidant Proteins Confers Tolerance to Acute Hypobaric Hypoxia Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Padhy, Gayatri; Sethy, Niroj Kumar; Ganju, Lilly

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Padhy, Gayatri, Niroj Kumar Sethy, Lilly Ganju, and Kalpana Bhargava. Abundance of plasma antioxidant proteins confers tolerance to acute hypobaric hypoxia exposure. High Alt Med Biol 14:289–297, 2013—Systematic identification of molecular signatures for hypobaric hypoxia can aid in better understanding of human adaptation to high altitude. In an attempt to identify proteins promoting hypoxia tolerance during acute exposure to high altitude, we screened and identified hypoxia tolerant and susceptible rats based on hyperventilation time to a simulated altitude of 32,000 ft (9754 m). The hypoxia tolerance was further validated by estimating 8-isoprotane levels and protein carbonyls, which revealed that hypoxia tolerant rats possessed significant lower plasma levels as compared to susceptible rats. We used a comparative plasma proteome profiling approach using 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) combined with MALDI TOF/TOF for both groups, along with an hypoxic control group. This resulted in the identification of 19 differentially expressed proteins. Seven proteins (TTR, GPx-3, PON1, Rab-3D, CLC11, CRP, and Hp) were upregulated in hypoxia tolerant rats, while apolipoprotein A-I (APOA1) was upregulated in hypoxia susceptible rats. We further confirmed the consistent higher expression levels of three antioxidant proteins (PON1, TTR, and GPx-3) in hypoxia-tolerant animals using ELISA and immunoblotting. Collectively, these proteomics-based results highlight the role of antioxidant enzymes in conferring hypoxia tolerance during acute hypobaric hypoxia. The expression of these antioxidant enzymes could be used as putative biomarkers for screening altitude adaptation as well as aiding in better management of altered oxygen pathophysiologies. PMID:24067188

  12. Accumulation of Group 3 Late Embryogenesis Abundant Proteins in Zea mays Embryos 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomann, Estela B.; Sollinger, John; White, Constance; Rivin, Carol J.

    1992-01-01

    Several different types of proteins that are modulated by abscisic acid (ABA) accumulate in developing embryos of maize (Zea mays L.). Some of these proteins are specific to the developing seed, such as the storage globulin, GLB1, whereas others are involved in general responses to water deficit. Here we describe a maize protein family of this second type, a Group 3 late embryogenesis abundant (MLG3). Like other proteins of this class, MLG3 polypeptides are ABA-responsive. They are found in maturing seeds and in dehydrating plant tissues. Antigenically related proteins are found in other cereals. To distinguish the regulation of developmentally programmed ABA responses from those that are environmentally induced, we compared the ontological pattern and accumulation requirements of MLG3 polypeptides with those we previously described for GLB1. GLB1 accumulation begins early in the maturation phase and specifically requires high levels of ABA and the participation of the Viviparous-1 (Vp1) gene product. Vp1 is required for other ABA-modulated events in maize seed development as well. In experiments using vp1 mutants and mutants deficient in ABA synthesis (vp5 mutation), we show that MLG3 accumulation also is dependent upon ABA, but it shows striking differences from GLB1. MLG3 accumulates much later in embryogenesis, coincident with the onset of dehydration. In contrast to GLB1, MLG3 proteins can be induced by de novo ABA synthesis in response to culturing in high osmoticum. Unlike GLB1, MLG3 has no specific requirement for the Vp1 gene product. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8 PMID:16668930

  13. Complementary mass spectrometric techniques for the quantification of the protein corona: a case study on gold nanoparticles and human serum proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Iglesias, Nerea; Bettmer, Jörg

    2015-08-01

    Once nanoparticles enter a biological system, it is known that their surface is instantly covered by the biomolecules present with preference to proteins. This protein corona has been a subject of numerous studies in order to reveal its composition. Besides that, growing interest exists in its quantitative determination in order to gain a deeper insight into the nature of these nanoparticle-protein bioconjugates. Only a few analytical methods are available nowadays, so the aim of this study is to provide a reliable and alternative methodology for the quantification of the protein corona. The suggested approach is based on the assumption that the total protein content within the corona can be correlated to its sulfur concentration due to the presence of cysteine and methionine as sulfur-containing amino acids. Once the most abundant proteins had been identified with the use of gel electrophoresis with subsequent peptide analysis by electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS), the isolated nanoparticle-protein conjugates were subjected to total analysis of sulfur and the corresponding metal being present in the nanoparticles by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The concept is exemplarily demonstrated on citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles (GNPs) incubated with human serum. Two different purification procedures were tested in order to isolate the sought bioconjugates. 26 most abundant proteins could be identified and an average of approximately 40 S atoms per protein was calculated and used for further studies. ICP-MS analyses of S/Au ratios served for the quantification of the protein corona revealing an absolute number of proteins bound to the incubated GNPs. Two main results could be obtained for this specific system under the chosen experimental conditions: the number of proteins per GNP decreased with their size from 10 nm to 60 nm and the obtained values suggested that the protein corona in this specific case was

  14. Serum Protein Profile at Remission Can Accurately Assess Therapeutic Outcomes and Survival for Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ghamande, Sharad A.; Bush, Stephen; Ferris, Daron; Zhi, Wenbo; He, Mingfang; Wang, Meiyao; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Miller, Eric; Hopkins, Diane; Macfee, Michael; Guan, Ruili; Tang, Jinhai; She, Jin-Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomarkers play critical roles in early detection, diagnosis and monitoring of therapeutic outcome and recurrence of cancer. Previous biomarker research on ovarian cancer (OC) has mostly focused on the discovery and validation of diagnostic biomarkers. The primary purpose of this study is to identify serum biomarkers for prognosis and therapeutic outcomes of ovarian cancer. Experimental Design Forty serum proteins were analyzed in 70 serum samples from healthy controls (HC) and 101 serum samples from serous OC patients at three different disease phases: post diagnosis (PD), remission (RM) and recurrence (RC). The utility of serum proteins as OC biomarkers was evaluated using a variety of statistical methods including survival analysis. Results Ten serum proteins (PDGF-AB/BB, PDGF-AA, CRP, sFas, CA125, SAA, sTNFRII, sIL-6R, IGFBP6 and MDC) have individually good area-under-the-curve (AUC) values (AUC = 0.69–0.86) and more than 10 three-marker combinations have excellent AUC values (0.91–0.93) in distinguishing active cancer samples (PD & RC) from HC. The mean serum protein levels for RM samples are usually intermediate between HC and OC patients with active cancer (PD & RC). Most importantly, five proteins (sICAM1, RANTES, sgp130, sTNFR-II and sVCAM1) measured at remission can classify, individually and in combination, serous OC patients into two subsets with significantly different overall survival (best HR = 17, p<10−3). Conclusion We identified five serum proteins which, when measured at remission, can accurately predict the overall survival of serous OC patients, suggesting that they may be useful for monitoring the therapeutic outcomes for ovarian cancer. PMID:24244307

  15. Twelve serum protein profiles in children with acute nonbacterial gastroenterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Wiermannová, D; Wiedermann, D; Kadlcáková, E

    1978-01-01

    In thirty children hospitalized with acute benign, short-duration gastroenterocolitis, no obligate pathogens were isolated from stools. Five bleedings were established from each patient in order to obtain the protein profiles of albumin, orosomucoid, haptoglobin, alpha2-macroglobulin, ceruloplasmin, transferrin, C3-component, C-reactive protein, immunglobulins IgG, IgA, IgM and IgD. The proteins were quantitated by the single radial immunodiffusion method. The initial drop in some of the proteins followed may be related to general protein loss, negative nitrogen balance or hemodilution. The absence of a significant increase in all the investigated immunoglobulin classes contrasted with remarkable increase in haptoglobin and orosomucoid, both reaching normal levels in late convalescence. C-reactive protein could be demonstrated in half of the children showing early normalization with disappearance of clinical symptoms. In contrast to ceruloplasmin and C3- component, alpha2-macroglobulin was not involved in the acute phase protein reaction.

  16. The influence of protein fractions and electrolyte imbalance on refractive index of serum in patients with multiple myeloma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plotnikova, L.; Polyanichko, A.; Kobeleva, M.; Uspenskaya, M.; Garifullin, A.; Voloshin, S.

    2017-01-01

    Refractometric analysis is very rapid, accurate and simple method of analysis measuring refractive index of biological liquids such as serum, plasma, spinal fluid, urine. This method can be used for definition total protein and solids concentrations in serum. The value of refractive index depends on all substances in serum including proteins, lipids as well as low molecular weight compounds, for example ions of different metals. Refractometric analysis shows strong correlations between protein concentrations in serum of patients with multiple myeloma and its(serum) refractive index which depends on protein concentration and doesn’t depends on electrolyte disbalance.

  17. Effect of different iron loads on serum and tissue biochemical parameters and liver hepcidin mRNA abundance of neonatal piglets.

    PubMed

    Lia, Mengyun; Yin, Qingqiang; Dang, Xiaowei; Chang, Juan; Zuo, Ruiyu; Zheng, Qiuhong

    2011-12-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential and important trace element for animals. In order to study its metabolism and relationship with hepcidin, piglet models of Fe-deficiency and Fe-overload were established by intramuscular injection with different doses of Fe-dextran (150 mg Fe/ml) within 1 week of age. Twelve piglets were divided into three groups of four animals: deficiency, regular and overload group, receiving 0 ml, 1 ml and 6 ml Fe-dextran, respectively. The piglets were euthanised at the age of 7 days for analysis. The results showed that the Fe-concentrations in liver, spleen and serum of piglets in the overload group were higher than in the regular and deficiency groups (p < 0.05). In the overload group, several serum biochemical parameters, e.g. globulin, total bilirubin, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL), malondialdehyde, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), peroxidase and xanthine oxidase were higher, while alkaline phosphatase (AKP) and triglycerides were lower, compared with the regular group (p < 0.05). The serum concentrations of AKP, total bilirubin and peroxidase in the deficiency group were lower, while HDL and GPx were higher, compared with the regular group (p < 0.05). Hepcidin mRNA abundance was 131 times lower in the liver of piglets with Fe-deficiency, and 7 times higher in the overloaded group than that in the regular group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, Fe-overload and deficiency would influence Fe-metabolism, serum biochemical indexes, oxidation state and hepcidin mRNA abundance in piglet liver.

  18. Serum retinol-binding protein-induced endothelial inflammation is mediated through the activation of toll-like receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Du, Mei; Martin, Ashley; Hays, Franklin; Johnson, Jennifer; Farjo, Rafal A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Elevation of serum retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) induces inflammation in primary human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRECs) via a retinol-independent mechanism; thus, it may play a causative role in the development and progression of vascular lesions in diabetic retinopathy (DR). Since HRECs do not express the classical RBP4 receptor, stimulated by retinoic acid gene 6 (STRA6), this study focuses on identifying the endothelial cell receptor and signaling that mediate RBP4-induced inflammation. Methods HRECs were treated with a toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) small molecule inhibitor (Cli95, also known as TAK-242), TLR4 neutralizing antibody, or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitors before treatment with purified recombinant RBP4. The HREC inflammatory response was quantified by in vitro leukostasis assays, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). To understand how the serum binding partner for RBP4, transthyretin (TTR), may affect RBP4 activity, we also measured RBP4 and TTR levels in serum and retinal lysates from RBP4-Tg and wild-type mice. Results TLR4 inhibition significantly reduced RBP4-induced expression of pro-inflammatory proteins and in vitro leukostasis. RBP4 treatment significantly increased phosphoactivation of p38 and c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK). The p38 inhibitor (SB203580) attenuated RBP4-stimulated vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) production, while the JNK inhibitor (SP600125) reduced RBP4-stimulated sICAM-1, endothelial cell selectin (E-selectin), and MCP-1 production. The MAPK inhibitors only showed partial (50–70%) suppression of the RBP4-stimulated proinflammatory response. Moreover, TLR4 inhibition did not decrease RBP4-induced MAPK phosphoactivation, suggesting that RBP4-mediated MAPK activation is TLR4 independent and occurs through a secondary unknown

  19. Comparative protein profiling of serum and plasma using an antibody suspension bead array approach.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Jochen M; Igel, Ulrika; Kato, Bernet S; Nicholson, George; Karpe, Fredrik; Uhlén, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter

    2010-02-01

    In the pursuit towards a systematic analysis of human diseases, array-based approaches within antibody proteomics offer high-throughput strategies to discover protein biomarkers in serum and plasma. To investigate the influence of sample preparation on such discovery attempts, we report on a systematic effort to compare serum and plasma protein profiles determined with an antibody suspension bead array. The intensity levels were used to define protein profiles and no significant differences between serum and plasma were observed for 79% of the 174 antibodies (targeting 156 proteins). By excluding 36 antibodies giving rise to differential intensity levels, cluster analysis revealed donor-specific rather than preparation-dependent grouping. With a cohort from a clinically relevant medical condition, the metabolic syndrome, the influence of the sample type on a multiplexed biomarker discovery approach was further investigated. Independent comparisons of protein profiles in serum and plasma revealed an antibody targeting ADAMTSL-4, a protein that would qualify to be studied further in association with the condition. In general, the preparation type had an impact on the results of the applied antibody suspension bead array, and while the technical variability was equal, plasma offered a greater biological variability and allowed to give rise to more discoveries than serum.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH SERUM PROTEINS BY USING HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Hage, David S.; Anguizola, Jeanethe; Barnaby, Omar; Jackson, Abby; Yoo, Michelle J.; Papastavros, Efthimia; Pfaunmiller, Erika; Sobansky, Matt; Tong, Zenghan

    2011-01-01

    The binding of drugs with serum proteins can affect the activity, distribution, rate of excretion, and toxicity of pharmaceutical agents in the body. One tool that can be used to quickly analyze and characterize these interactions is high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC). This review shows how HPAC can be used to study drug-protein binding and describes the various applications of this approach when examining drug interactions with serum proteins. Methods for determining binding constants, characterizing binding sites, examining drug-drug interactions, and studying drug-protein dissociation rates will be discussed. Applications that illustrate the use of HPAC with serum binding agents such as human serum albumin, α1-acid glycoprotein, and lipoproteins will be presented. Recent developments will also be examined, such as new methods for immobilizing serum proteins in HPAC columns, the utilization of HPAC as a tool in personalized medicine, and HPAC methods for the high-throughput screening and characterization of drug-protein binding. PMID:21395530

  1. Evaluation of serum protein-based arrival formula and serum protein supplement (Gammulin) on growth, morbidity, and mortality of stressed (transport and cold) male dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Pineda, A; Ballou, M A; Campbell, J M; Cardoso, F C; Drackley, J K

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies with calves and other species have provided evidence that blood serum-derived proteins and fructooligosaccharides (FOS) may benefit intestinal health. We assessed the effects of supplementing products containing serum proteins as a component of arrival fluid support or serum proteins plus FOS (in addition to additional solids, minerals, and vitamins) in an early life dietary supplement on performance, morbidity, and mortality of stressed (transport, cold) male calves. Male Holstein calves (n=93) <1 wk old were stratified by arrival body weight (BW) and plasma protein concentration, and then randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatment groups in a 2×2 factorial arrangement of one-time administration of fluid support [either control electrolyte solution (E) or the serum protein-containing arrival formula (AF)] and 14d of either no supplementation (NG) or supplementation with Gammulin (G; APC Inc., Ankeny, IA), which contains serum proteins and FOS in addition to other solids, minerals, and vitamins. Upon arrival at the research facility, calves were orally administered either AF or E. At the next feeding, half of the calves from each fluid support treatment received either milk replacer (20% crude protein, 20% fat) or the same milk replacer supplemented with G (50g/d during the first 14d). Starter and water were freely available. Feed offered and refused was recorded daily. Calf health was assessed by daily assignment of fecal and respiratory scores. Stature measures and BW were determined weekly. Blood samples were obtained at d 0 (before treatments), 2, 7, 14, and 28. Calves were weaned at d 42 and remained in the experiment until d 56. After 2 wk of treatments, calves previously fed AF had greater body length (66.6 vs. 66.0cm), intakes of dry matter (38.7 vs. 23.5g/d) and crude protein (9.2 vs. 5.6g/d) from starter, and cortisol concentration in blood (17.0 vs. 13.9 ng/mL) than calves fed E. Supplementation with G resulted in greater BW gain during the

  2. Different mechanical loading protocols influence serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels in young healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, A; Kersting, U G; Helling, S; Dargel, J; Maurer, J; Thevis, M; Brüggemann, G-P

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether a relationship between the loading mode of physical activity and serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) concentration exists and whether the lymphatic system contributes to COMP release into the serum. Serum COMP levels were determined in healthy male subjects before, after and at 18 further time points within 7 h at four separate experimental days with four different loading interventions. The loading intervention included high impact running exercise, slow but deep knee bends, and lymphatic drainage of 30 min duration, respectively, and a resting protocol. The serum COMP levels were measured using a commercially available quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. An increase (p < 0.001) in serum COMP concentration was detected immediately after 30 min running exercise. Slow but deep knee bends did not cause any significant changes in serum COMP levels. Lymphatic drainage also had no effect on the serum COMP concentration. After 30 min of complete rest the serum COMP level was significantly (p = 0.008) reduced. The elevation of COMP serum concentration seems to depend on the loading mode of the physical activity and to reflect the extrusion of COMP fragments from the impact loaded articular cartilage or synovial fluid.

  3. A conserved abundant cytoplasmic long noncoding RNA modulates repression by Pumilio proteins in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Tichon, Ailone; Gil, Noa; Lubelsky, Yoav; Havkin Solomon, Tal; Lemze, Doron; Itzkovitz, Shalev; Stern-Ginossar, Noam; Ulitsky, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) genes are encoded in the human genome, and hundreds of them are evolutionarily conserved, but their functions and modes of action remain largely obscure. Particularly enigmatic lncRNAs are those that are exported to the cytoplasm, including NORAD—an abundant and highly conserved cytoplasmic lncRNA. Here we show that most of the sequence of NORAD is comprised of repetitive units that together contain at least 17 functional binding sites for the two mammalian Pumilio homologues. Through binding to PUM1 and PUM2, NORAD modulates the mRNA levels of their targets, which are enriched for genes involved in chromosome segregation during cell division. Our results suggest that some cytoplasmic lncRNAs function by modulating the activities of RNA-binding proteins, an activity which positions them at key junctions of cellular signalling pathways. PMID:27406171

  4. Enhanced Detection of Low-Abundance Human Plasma Proteins by Integrating Polyethylene Glycol Fractionation and Immunoaffinity Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haipeng; Yu, Jia; Qiao, Rui; Zhou, Mi; Yang, Yongtao; Zhou, Jian; Xie, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The enormous depth complexity of the human plasma proteome poses a significant challenge for current mass spectrometry-based proteomic technologies in terms of detecting low-level proteins in plasma, which is essential for successful biomarker discovery efforts. Typically, a single-step analytical approach cannot reduce this intrinsic complexity. Current simplex immunodepletion techniques offer limited capacity for detecting low-abundance proteins, and integrated strategies are thus desirable. In this respect, we developed an improved strategy for analyzing the human plasma proteome by integrating polyethylene glycol (PEG) fractionation with immunoaffinity depletion. PEG fractionation of plasma proteins is simple, rapid, efficient, and compatible with a downstream immunodepletion step. Compared with immunodepletion alone, our integrated strategy substantially improved the proteome coverage afforded by PEG fractionation. Coupling this new protocol with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, 135 proteins with reported normal concentrations below 100 ng/mL were confidently identified as common low-abundance proteins. A side-by-side comparison indicated that our integrated strategy was increased by average 43.0% in the identification rate of low-abundance proteins, relying on an average 65.8% increase of the corresponding unique peptides. Further investigation demonstrated that this combined strategy could effectively alleviate the signal-suppressive effects of the major high-abundance proteins by affinity depletion, especially with moderate-abundance proteins after incorporating PEG fractionation, thereby greatly enhancing the detection of low-abundance proteins. In sum, the newly developed strategy of incorporating PEG fractionation to immunodepletion methods can potentially aid in the discovery of plasma biomarkers of therapeutic and clinical interest. PMID:27832179

  5. The use of proteomics in identifying differentially expressed serum proteins in humans with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sundsten, Tea; Eberhardson, Michael; Göransson, Michael; Bergsten, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to optimize protocols for finding and identifying serum proteins that are differentially expressed in persons with normal glucose tolerance (NGT) compared to individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Serum from persons with NGT and persons with T2DM was profiled using ProteinChip arrays and time-of-flight mass spectra were generated by surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS). Results Mass spectra from NGT- and T2DM-groups were compared. Fifteen proteins ranging from 5 to 79 kDa were differentially expressed (p < 0.05). Five of these proteins showed decreased and ten showed increased serum levels in individuals with T2DM. To be able to identify the proteins, the complexity of the sample was reduced by fractionation approaches. Subsequently, the purified fractions containing biomarkers were separated by one-dimensional SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) in two identical lanes. Protein bands of the first lane were excised and subjected to passive elution to recapture the biomarkers on ProteinChip arrays. The corresponding bands of the second lane were subjected to peptide-mass fingerprinting (PMF). Using this approach four of the differentially expressed proteins were identified as apolipoprotein C3 (9.4 kDa), transthyretin (13.9 kDa), albumin (66 kDa) and transferrin (79 kDa). Whereas apolipoprotein C3 and transthyretin were up-regulated, albumin and transferrin were down-regulated in T2DM. Conclusion Protocols for protein profiling by SELDI-TOF MS and protein identification by fractionation, SDS-PAGE and PMF were optimized for serum from humans with T2DM. With these protocols differentially expressed proteins were discovered and identified when serum from NGT- and T2DM-individuals was analyzed. PMID:17163994

  6. Glycosylated serum protein level as a screening and diagnostic test for gestational diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, F J; Harbert, G M; Paulsen, E P; Thiagarajah, S

    1986-09-01

    Glycosylated serum protein assay was examined as an alternative to standard glucose screening and glucose tolerance testing. In a comparison of two groups of gravid women having abnormal 1-hour 50 gm glucose screening tests, there was no difference in glycosylated protein level in the group with abnormal glucose tolerance test results (9.4% +/- 2.0%, mean +/- SD; n = 8) versus normal results (9.2% +/- 1.07%, mean +/- SD; n = 11). Furthermore, correlation of glycosylated serum protein level with glucose screening test results was poor (r = 0.185, p = 0.23, n = 17). Glycosylated serum protein assay is not useful in detecting mild metabolic aberrations associated with gestational diabetes.

  7. A study of the uterine protein variations during the estrus cycle in the cow: a comparison with the serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Alavi-Shoushtari, S M; Asri-Rezai, S; Abshenas, J

    2006-11-01

    To investigate uterine protein changes during the estrus cycle in the bovine, 115 pluriparous genital tracts and blood samples were collected from the abattoir in Urmia. Genital tracts were considered healthy based on gross examination of the uterus and uterine histopathological findings. The phase of the estrus cycle was determined by the examination of the structures present on the ovaries and the uterine tonicity. Of the collected samples, 24 were pro-estrus, 21 estrus, 24 met-estrus and 46 diestrus. The uterus was incised and uterine fluid was collected by gentle scraping of the uterine mucosa with a curette. The total protein concentration, protein profiles (on agarose gel electrophoresis) in the uterine fluid were evaluated and compared with those of the serum. Total protein, alpha1, alpha2, beta1 and beta2 globulin values in the uterus were significantly higher than those of the serum (P<0.05), while, the albumin, gamma1 and gamma2 globulin values in the serum were higher than those of the uterus throughout the cycle. During pro-estrus, uterine fluid beta2 (1.96 g/dl) and serum gamma1 (1.07 g/dl) and gamma2 (1.27 g/dl) globulins were higher than those in the other phases of the cycle. During estrus, serum total protein was lower than the other phases (4.92 g/dl), which was considered to be due to a reduction in serum alpha1 (0.25 g/dl), gamma1 (0.65 g/dl) and gamma2 (0.64 g/dl) globulins in this phase. In met-estrus uterine fluid beta1 globulin was in the lowest (1.19 g/dl) and serum gamma2 globulin at a high level (1.24 g/dl). It was concluded that uterine proteins as well as serum proteins fluctuate during the estrus cycle and, except for the albumin and gamma globulins, its protein content is higher than the serum. During the follicular phase of the cycle uterine alpha globulins are higher than those in other phases, with an elevation in beta1 and a reduction in beta2 and gamma globulin values during estrus, which may reflect the preparation of the uterus

  8. Comparison of composition and sensory properties of 80% whey protein and milk serum protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Evans, J; Zulewska, J; Newbold, M; Drake, M A; Barbano, D M

    2010-05-01

    Milk serum protein concentrates (SPC) are proteins found in cheese whey that are removed directly from milk. Because SPC are not exposed to the cheese-making process, enzymatic or chemical reactions that can lead to off-flavors are reduced. The objectives of this study were to identify and compare the composition, flavor, and volatile components of 80% protein SPC and whey protein concentrates (WPC). Each pair of 80% SPC and WPC was manufactured from the same lot of milk and this was replicated 3 times. At each replication, spray-dried product from each protein source was collected. Commercial 80% WPC were also collected from several manufacturers for sensory and volatile analyses. A trained sensory panel documented the sensory profiles of the rehydrated powders. Volatile components were extracted by solid-phase microextraction and solvent extraction followed by solvent-assisted flavor evaporation with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry. Consumer acceptance testing of acidified 6% protein beverages made with 80% SPC and WPC produced in the pilot plant and with WPC from commercial sources was conducted. The SPC was lower in fat and had a higher pH than the WPC produced in the pilot plant or commercial WPC. Few sensory differences were found between the rehydrated SPC and WPC manufactured in this study, but their flavor profiles were distinct from the flavor of rehydrated commercial WPC. The pilot-plant WPC had higher concentrations of lipid oxidation products compared with SPC, which may be related to the higher fat content of WPC. There was a large difference in appearance between 80% SPC and WPC: solutions of SPC were clear and those of WPC were opaque. Concentrations of lipid oxidation products in commercial WPC were generally higher than those in pilot-plant SPC or WPC. Sensory profiles of the peach-flavored protein beverage included cereal, free fatty acid, and soapy flavors and bitter taste in beverages made from pilot

  9. Quantitative analysis of low-abundance serological proteins with peptide affinity-based enrichment and pseudo-multiple reaction monitoring by hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Hoe; Ahn, Yeong Hee; Ji, Eun Sun; Lee, Ju Yeon; Kim, Jin Young; An, Hyun Joo; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-07-02

    Multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) is commonly used for the quantitative analysis of proteins during mass pectrometry (MS), and has excellent specificity and sensitivity for an analyte in a complex sample. In this study, a pseudo-MRM method for the quantitative analysis of low-abundance serological proteins was developed using hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (hybrid Q-TOF) MS and peptide affinity-based enrichment. First, a pseudo-MRM-based analysis using hybrid Q-TOF MS was performed for synthetic peptides selected as targets and spiked into tryptic digests of human serum. By integrating multiple transition signals corresponding to fragment ions in the full scan MS/MS spectrum of a precursor ion of the target peptide, a pseudo-MRM MS analysis of the target peptide showed an increased signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio and sensitivity, as well as an improved reproducibility. The pseudo-MRM method was then used for the quantitative analysis of the tryptic peptides of two low-abundance serological proteins, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) and tissue-type protein tyrosine phosphatase kappa (PTPκ), which were prepared with peptide affinity-based enrichment from human serum. Finally, this method was used to detect femtomolar amounts of target peptides derived from TIMP1 and PTPκ, with good coefficients of variation (CV 2.7% and 9.8%, respectively), using a few microliters of human serum from colorectal cancer patients. The results suggest that pseudo-MRM using hybrid Q-TOF MS, combined with peptide affinity-based enrichment, could become a promising alternative for the quantitative analysis of low-abundance target proteins of interest in complex serum samples that avoids protein depletion.

  10. Probing thyroglobulin in undiluted human serum based on pattern recognition and competitive adsorption of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ran; Huang, Shuai; Li, Jing; Chae, Junseok

    2014-10-01

    Thyroglobulin (Tg) is a sensitive indicator of persistent or recurrent differentiated thyroid cancer of follicular cell origin. Detection of Tg in human serum is challenging as bio-receptors, such as anti-Tg, used in immunoassay have relatively weak binding affinity. We engineer sensing surfaces using the competitive adsorption of proteins, termed the Vroman Effect. Coupled with Surface Plasmon Resonance, the "cross-responsive" interactions of Tg on the engineered surfaces produce uniquely distinguishable multiple signature patterns, which are discriminated using Linear Discriminant Analysis. Tg-spiked samples, down to 2 ng/ml Tg in undiluted human serum, are sensitively and selectively discriminated from the control (undiluted human serum).

  11. Association of androgen with gender difference in serum adipocyte fatty acid binding protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiang; Ma, Xiaojing; Pan, Xiaoping; Luo, Yuqi; Xu, Yiting; Xiong, Qin; Bao, Yuqian; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Clinical investigations have indicated women have higher levels of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (A-FABP) than men. The present study aimed to identify factors related to gender difference in serum A-FABP levels. A total of 507 participants (194 men, 132 premenopausal women, and 181 postmenopausal women) were enrolled in the present study. Serum A-FABP levels increased in the order from men to premenopausal women to postmenopausal women in both body mass index categories (<25.0 and ≥25.0 kg/m2; all P < 0.05). Multiple stepwise regression analyses showed that after adjustment for factors related to serum A-FABP levels, the trunk fat mass was an independent and positive factor of serum A-FABP levels. For men, total testosterone was associated independently and inversely with serum A-FABP levels. For pre- and postmenopausal women, bioavailable testosterone and total testosterone were independent and positive factors associated with serum A-FABP levels, respectively. The present study demonstrated that the androgen was correlated with the serum A-FABP levels negatively in men, but positively in women. With these effects on the fat content, especially trunk fat, androgen might contribute to the gender difference in serum A-FABP levels. PMID:27270834

  12. Absence of serum growth hormone binding protein in patients with growth hormone receptor deficiency (Laron dwarfism)

    SciTech Connect

    Daughaday, W.H.; Trivedi, B.

    1987-07-01

    It has recently been recognized that human serum contains a protein that specifically binds human growth hormone (hGH). This protein has the same restricted specificity for hGH as the membrane-bound GH receptor. To determine whether the GH-binding protein is a derivative of, or otherwise related to, the GH receptor, the authors have examined the serum of three patients with Laron-type dwarfism, a condition in which GH refractoriness has been attributed to a defect in the GH receptor. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled hGH incubated with serum has been measured after gel filtration of the serum through an Ultrogel AcA 44 minicolumn. Results are expressed as percent of specifically bound /sup 125/I-hGH and as specific binding relative to that of a reference serum after correction is made for endogenous GH. The mean +/- SEM of specific binding of sera from eight normal adults (26-46 years of age) was 21.6 +/- 0.45%, and the relative specific binding was 101.1 +/- 8.6%. Sera from 11 normal children had lower specific binding of 12.5 +/- 1.95% and relative specific binding of 56.6 +/- 9.1%. Sera from three children with Laron-type dwarfism lacked any demonstrable GH binding, whereas sera from 10 other children with other types of nonpituitary short stature had normal relative specific binding. They suggest that the serum GH-binding protein is a soluble derivative of the GH receptor. Measurement of the serum GH-binding protein may permit recognition of other abnormalities of the GH receptor.

  13. Ubiquitous Autofragmentation of Fluorescent Proteins Creates Abundant Defective Ribosomal Products (DRiPs) for Immunosurveillance*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jiajie; Gibbs, James S.; Hickman, Heather D.; Cush, Stephanie S.; Bennink, Jack R.; Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2015-01-01

    broadly, given the wide use of fluorescent proteins, their ubiquitous and abundant fragmentation must be considered when interpreting experiments using these extremely useful probes. PMID:25971973

  14. Conjugation of biogenic and synthetic polyamines with serum proteins: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Chanphai, P; Thomas, T J; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-11-01

    We have reviewed the conjugation of biogenic polyamines spermine (spm), spermidine (spmd) and synthetic polyamines 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane.4HCl (BE-333) and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane.5HCl (BE-3333) with human serum albumin (HSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA) and milk beta-lactoglobulin (b-LG) in aqueous solution at physiological pH. The results of multiple spectroscopic methods and molecular modeling were analysed here and correlations between polyamine binding mode and protein structural changes were estabilished. Polyamine-protein bindings are mainly via hydrophilic and H-bonding contacts. BSA forms more stable conjugates than HSA and b-LG. Biogenic polyamines form more stable complexes than synthetic polyamines except in the case of b-LG, where the protein shows more hydrophobic character than HSA and BSA. The loading efficacies were 40-52%. Modeling showed the presence of several H-bonding systems, which stabilized polyamine-protein conjugates. Polyamine conjugation induced major alterations of serum protein conformations. The potential application of serum proteins in delivery of polyamines is evaluated here.

  15. Protein-Specific Differential Glycosylation of Immunoglobulins in Serum of Ovarian Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Ruhaak, L Renee; Kim, Kyoungmi; Stroble, Carol; Taylor, Sandra L; Hong, Qiuting; Miyamoto, Suzanne; Lebrilla, Carlito B; Leiserowitz, Gary

    2016-03-04

    Previous studies indicated that glycans in serum may serve as biomarkers for diagnosis of ovarian cancer; however, it was unclear to which proteins these glycans belong. We hypothesize that protein-specific glycosylation profiles of the glycans may be more informative of ovarian cancer and can provide insight into biological mechanisms underlying glycan aberration in serum of diseased individuals. Serum samples from women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC, n = 84) and matched healthy controls (n = 84) were obtained from the Gynecologic Oncology Group. Immunoglobulin (IgG, IgA, and IgM) concentrations and glycosylation profiles were quantified using multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry. Differential and classification analyses were performed to identify aberrant protein-specific glycopeptides using a training set. All findings were validated in an independent test set. Multiple glycopeptides from immunoglubins IgA, IgG, and IgM were found to be differentially expressed in serum of EOC patients compared with controls. The protein-specific glycosylation profiles showed their potential in the diagnosis of EOC. In particular, IgG-specific glycosylation profiles are the most powerful in discriminating between EOC case and controls. Additional studies of protein- and site-specific glycosylation profiles of immunoglobulins and other proteins will allow further elaboration on the characteristics of biological functionality and causality of the differential glycosylation in ovarian cancer and thus ultimately lead to increased sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis.

  16. THE EFFECT OF PURE PROTEIN SOLUTIONS AND OF BLOOD SERUM ON THE DIFFUSIBILITY OF CALCIUM.

    PubMed

    Loeb, R F

    1926-06-20

    1. A comparative study has been made of the diffusibility of calcium in solutions of crystalline egg albumin, serum globulin, and human blood serum. 2. In all three of these solutions, at pH 7.4, molal Ca concentrations within the membrane are greater than the calcium concentrations in the outside solutions, quite in accordance with the Donnan theory. 3. At pH 7.4, the ratio of See PDF for Structure varies directly with the protein concentration whether the solution be one of egg albumin, serum globulin, or blood serum. This is also in accordance with the Donnan theory. 4. On the acid side of the isoelectric point of the proteins, the concentration of Ca outside becomes greater than the concentration in the solution of blood serum or pure protein, as is demanded by the Donnan theory. 5. The magnitude of the Ca ratios on the alkaline and acid sides of the isoelectric points is probably the resultant of the Donnan equilibrium and the formation of complex Ca-protein ions. Northrop and Kunitz have shown the probability of the existence of such ions in the case of Zn(++), K(+), and Li(+), where satisfactory electrodes have been developed for E.M.F. measurements.

  17. Liquid-vapor interfacial tension of blood plasma, serum and purified protein constituents thereof.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Anandi; Wilson, Arwen; Sturgeon, Jacqueline; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Vogler, Erwin A

    2005-06-01

    A systematic study of water-air (liquid-vapor, LV) interfacial tension gamma(lv) of blood plasma and serum derived from four different mammalian species (human, bovine, ovine and equine) reveals nearly identical concentration-dependence (dgamma(lv)/dlnC(B); where C(B) is plasma/serum dilution expressed in v/v concentration units). Comparison of results to a previously-published survey of purified human-blood proteins further reveals that dgamma(lv)/dlnC(B) of plasma and serum is surprisingly similar to that of purified protein constituents. It is thus concluded that any combination of blood-protein constituents will be substantially similar because dgamma(lv)/dlnC(B) of individual proteins are very similar. Experimental results are further interpreted in terms of a recently-developed theory emphasizing the controlling role of water in protein adsorption. Accordingly, the LV interphase saturates with protein adsorbed from bulk solution at a fixed weight-volume concentration ( approximately 436 mg/mL) independent of protein identity or mixture. As a direct consequence, dgamma(lv)/dlnC(B) of purified proteins closely resembles that of mixed solutions and does not depend on the relative proportions of individual proteins comprising a mixture. Thus variations in the plasma proteome between species are not reflected in dgamma(lv)/dlnC(B) nor is serum different from plasma in this regard, despite being depleted of coagulation proteins (e.g. fibrinogen). A comparison of pendant-drop and Wilhelmy-balance tensiometry as tools for assessing protein gamma(lv) shows that measurement conditions employed in the typical Wilhelmy plate approach fails to achieve the steady-state adsorption state that is accessible to pendant-drop tensiometry.

  18. Discovery and fine mapping of serum protein loci through transethnic meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Franceschini, Nora; van Rooij, Frank J A; Prins, Bram P; Feitosa, Mary F; Karakas, Mahir; Eckfeldt, John H; Folsom, Aaron R; Kopp, Jeffrey; Vaez, Ahmad; Andrews, Jeanette S; Baumert, Jens; Boraska, Vesna; Broer, Linda; Hayward, Caroline; Ngwa, Julius S; Okada, Yukinori; Polasek, Ozren; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wang, Ying A; Del Greco M, Fabiola; Glazer, Nicole L; Kapur, Karen; Kema, Ido P; Lopez, Lorna M; Schillert, Arne; Smith, Albert V; Winkler, Cheryl A; Zgaga, Lina; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bergmann, Sven; Boban, Mladen; Bochud, Murielle; Chen, Y D; Davies, Gail; Dehghan, Abbas; Ding, Jingzhong; Doering, Angela; Durda, J Peter; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franco, Oscar H; Franke, Lude; Gunjaca, Grog; Hofman, Albert; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Kolcic, Ivana; Kraja, Aldi; Kubo, Michiaki; Lackner, Karl J; Launer, Lenore; Loehr, Laura R; Li, Guo; Meisinger, Christa; Nakamura, Yusuke; Schwienbacher, Christine; Starr, John M; Takahashi, Atsushi; Torlak, Vesela; Uitterlinden, André G; Vitart, Veronique; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wild, Philipp S; Kirin, Mirna; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zhang, Qunyuan; Ziegler, Andreas; Blankenberg, Stefan; Boerwinkle, Eric; Borecki, Ingrid B; Campbell, Harry; Deary, Ian J; Frayling, Timothy M; Gieger, Christian; Harris, Tamara B; Hicks, Andrew A; Koenig, Wolfgang; O' Donnell, Christopher J; Fox, Caroline S; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Reiner, Alex P; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; Snieder, Harold; Tanaka, Toshihiro; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wright, Alan F; Wu, Qingyu; Liu, Yongmei; Jenny, Nancy S; North, Kari E; Felix, Janine F; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Cupples, L Adrienne; Perry, John R B; Morris, Andrew P

    2012-10-05

    Many disorders are associated with altered serum protein concentrations, including malnutrition, cancer, and cardiovascular, kidney, and inflammatory diseases. Although these protein concentrations are highly heritable, relatively little is known about their underlying genetic determinants. Through transethnic meta-analysis of European-ancestry and Japanese genome-wide association studies, we identified six loci at genome-wide significance (p < 5 × 10(-8)) for serum albumin (HPN-SCN1B, GCKR-FNDC4, SERPINF2-WDR81, TNFRSF11A-ZCCHC2, FRMD5-WDR76, and RPS11-FCGRT, in up to 53,190 European-ancestry and 9,380 Japanese individuals) and three loci for total protein (TNFRS13B, 6q21.3, and ELL2, in up to 25,539 European-ancestry and 10,168 Japanese individuals). We observed little evidence of heterogeneity in allelic effects at these loci between groups of European and Japanese ancestry but obtained substantial improvements in the resolution of fine mapping of potential causal variants by leveraging transethnic differences in the distribution of linkage disequilibrium. We demonstrated a functional role for the most strongly associated serum albumin locus, HPN, for which Hpn knockout mice manifest low plasma albumin concentrations. Other loci associated with serum albumin harbor genes related to ribosome function, protein translation, and proteasomal degradation, whereas those associated with serum total protein include genes related to immune function. Our results highlight the advantages of transethnic meta-analysis for the discovery and fine mapping of complex trait loci and have provided initial insights into the underlying genetic architecture of serum protein concentrations and their association with human disease.

  19. Suppression of severe lesions, myonecrosis and hemorrhage, caused by Protobothrops flavoviridis venom with its serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Chijiwa, Takahito; So, Shuhei; Hattori, Shosaku; Yoshida, Aichi; Oda-Ueda, Naoko; Ohno, Motonori

    2013-12-15

    Protobothrops flavoviridis serum proteins precipitated with ammonium sulfate were chromatographed on a DEAE-Toyopearl 650M column at pH 7.5 with stepwise increase or with linear gradient of NaCl concentration. Peaks 3 and 4 serum proteins, obtained by linear gradient elution and named Fr(de3) and Fr(de4), contained Habu serum factors (HSF) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) inhibitors (PfPLI), respectively. The serum proteins eluted at 0.2 M NaCl by stepwise elution, named Fr(0.2NaCl), effectively suppressed myonecrosis and hemorrhage caused by P. flavoviridis venom in rat or mouse thigh muscles. The Fr(0.2NaCl) were fractionated by HPLC and the fractions, after SDS-PAGE, underwent far-western blot analysis with PLA2 ([Asp(49)]PLA2) and BPI ([Lys(49)]PLA2) as the probes. Four PfPLIs, namely, PfαPLI-A, PfαPLI-B, PfγPLI-A and PfγPLI-B, were identified together with their selective binding specificities to PLA2 species. In addition, a new 9 kDa protein, which is specifically bound to BPI, was found. Suppression of P. flavoviridis venom-induced severe lesions, such as myonecrosis, hemorrhage and edema, with its serum proteins was histopathologically observed in the present work for the first time. The cooperative use of P. flavoviridis antivenom and its serum proteins as medication for P. flavoviridis snake bites is discussed.

  20. Faecal eosinophil cationic protein and serum immunoglobulin E in relation to infant feeding practices.

    PubMed

    Hua, Man-Chin; Chen, Chien-Chang; Liao, Sui-Ling; Yao, Tsung-Chieh; Tsai, Ming-Han; Lai, Shen-Hao; Chiu, Chih-Yung; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Huang, Jing-Long

    2017-03-01

    Background To date, the effects of exclusive breastfeeding duration and timing of solid food introduction on allergy prevention are unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of variable feeding practices on intestinal inflammation in infants using faecal eosinophil cationic protein as a surrogate marker and to assess whether faecal eosinophil cationic protein is associated with serum immunoglobulin E. Methods Subjects ( n = 206) were enrolled from the Prediction of Allergies in Taiwanese CHildren (PATCH) birth cohort study. Stool samples were collected at 6 and 12 months for determining eosinophil cationic protein, and blood was collected for determining total and allergen-specific immunoglobulin E at 12 months. We compared these biomarkers between infants with variable exclusive breastfeeding duration and infants introduced to solid foods at various periods. The association between faecal eosinophil cationic protein, total serum immunoglobulin E and specific immunoglobulin E was also analysed. Results Faecal eosinophil cationic protein was significantly higher in exclusively breastfed infants compared with formula-fed infants and infants who were not exclusively breastfed at 6 months of age ( P < 0.05). At 12 months, infants who were introduced to solid foods at 5-6 months had the lowest faecal eosinophil cationic protein compared with those who were introduced at earlier and later periods. There was no significant association between faecal eosinophil cationic protein and serum immunoglobulin E. Conclusion We found that breastfeeding exclusively for >6 months did not reduce serum immunoglobulin E, but rather increased intestinal inflammation. Faecal eosinophil cationic protein was not associated with total serum immunoglobulin E and specific immunoglobulin E and might not be a useful indictor of immunoglobulin E sensitization in infancy.

  1. Supplemental barley protein and casein similarly affect serum lipids in hypercholesterolemic women and men.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, David J A; Srichaikul, Korbua; Wong, Julia M W; Kendall, Cyril W C; Bashyam, Balachandran; Vidgen, Edward; Lamarche, Benoicirct; Rao, A Venketeshwer; Jones, Peter J H; Josse, Robert G; Jackson, Chung-Ja C; Ng, Vivian; Leong, Tracy; Leiter, Lawrence A

    2010-09-01

    High-protein diets have been advocated for weight loss and the treatment of diabetes. Yet animal protein sources are often high in saturated fat and cholesterol. Vegetable protein sources, by contrast, are low in saturated fat and without associated cholesterol. We have therefore assessed the effect on serum lipids of raising the protein intake by 5% using a cereal protein, barley protein, as part of a standard therapeutic diet. Twenty-three hypercholesterolemic men and postmenopausal women completed a randomized crossover study comparing a bread enriched with either barley protein or calcium caseinate [30 g protein, 8374 kJ (2000 kcal)] taken separately as two 1-mo treatment phases with a minimum 2-wk washout. Body weight and diet history were collected weekly during each treatment. Fasting blood samples were obtained at wk 0, 2, and 4. Palatability, satiety, and compliance were similar for both the barley protein- and casein-enriched breads, with no differences between the treatments in effects on serum LDL cholesterol or C-reactive protein, measures of oxidative stress, or blood pressure. Nevertheless, because no adverse effects were observed on cardiovascular risk factors, barley protein remains an additional option for raising the protein content of the diet.

  2. Breast Cancer Resistance Protein Abundance, but Not mRNA Expression, Correlates With Estrone-3-Sulfate Transport in Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Harwood, Matthew D; Neuhoff, Sibylle; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Warhurst, Geoffrey

    2016-04-01

    Transporter mRNA and protein expression data are used to extrapolate in vitro transporter kinetics to in vivo drug disposition predictions. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) possesses broad substrate specificity; therefore, understanding BCRP expression-activity relationships are necessary for the translation to in vivo. Bidirectional transport of estrone-3-sulfate (E-3-S), a BCRP probe, was evaluated with respect to relative BCRP mRNA expression and absolute protein abundance in 10- and 29-day cultured Caco-2 cells. BCRP mRNA expression was quantified by real-time PCR against a housekeeper gene, Cyclophilin A. The BCRP protein abundance in total membrane fractions was quantified by targeted proteomics, and [(3)H]-E-3-S bidirectional transport was determined in the presence or absence of Ko143, a potent BCRP inhibitor. BCRP mRNA expression was 1.5-fold higher in 29- versus 10-day cultured cells (n = 3), whereas a 2.4-fold lower (p < 0.001) BCRP protein abundance was observed in 29- versus 10-day cultured cells (1.28 ± 0.33 and 3.06 ± 0.22 fmol/μg protein, n = 6, respectively). This correlated to a 2.45-fold lower (p < 0.01) efflux ratio for E-3-S in 29- versus 10-day cultured cells (8.97 ± 2.51 and 3.32 ± 0.66, n = 6, respectively). Caco-2 cell BCRP protein abundance, but not mRNA levels, correlates with BCRP activity, suggesting that extrapolation strategies incorporating BCRP protein abundance-activity relationships may be more successful.

  3. Phenotype and allele frequencies of some serum protein polymorphisms in populations of the Balkans.

    PubMed

    Scheil, H G; Schmidt, H D; Efremovska, L; Mikerezi, I; Huckenbeck, W

    2004-12-01

    Within a study of the genetics of Southeastern European populations seven serum protein polymorphisms (AMY2, BF, C3, CP, GC, HPA, TF) were examined in two samples of Aromuns and one reference sample (Musequiar-Aromuns from Dukasi in Albania, Moskopolian-Aromuns from Krusevo, Republic of Macedonia, and Macedonians from Skopje). The neighbor joining tree as well as the principal component analysis show results which do not correspond well to the geographic and historic background. This indicates that in the present case the serum protein polymorphisms give no clearly defined information about the relationships between the Balkan populations and to the origin of Aromuns.

  4. [Virucidal activity of disinfectants. Influence of the serum protein upon the virucidal activity of disinfectants].

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Matsuda, S; Kobayashi, M

    2000-08-01

    Five disinfectants were tested for virucidal activity on three DNA viruses and three RNA viruses in the presence or absence of serum protein. Disinfectants of the aldehyde and halogen groups had a virucidal activity on human herpes virus, bovine rhabdo virus, human immunodeficiency virus, human adeno virus, porcine parvo virus, and polio virus. Disinfectants of the invert and amphoteric soap groups, and biganide group had a destructive effect on RNA and DNA viruses possessing an envelope. The presence of serum protein exerted great influence upon the virucidal activity of disinfectants of the invert and amphoteric soap groups.

  5. The role of serum proteins in Staphylococcus aureus adhesion to ethylene glycol coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Swen; Yu, Wenqi; Nega, Mulugeta; Chu, Ya-Yun; Zorn, Stefan; Zhang, Fajun; Götz, Friedrich; Schreiber, Frank

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial adhesion on implants is a first step in the development of chronic foreign body associated infections. Finding strategies to minimize bacterial adhesion may contribute to minimize such infections. It is known that surfaces with oligo-ethylene-glycol (EG3OMe) or poly-ethylene-glycol (PEG2k) terminations decrease unspecific protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion. However, little is known about the influence of serum and its components on bacterial adhesion. We therefore prepared two coatings on gold surface with HS-(CH2)11EG3OMe (EG3OMe) and PEG2k-thiol and studied the role of bovine serum albumin (BSA), γ-globulins, and serum on Staphylococcus aureus adhesion. While BSA and lysozyme showed no adherence even when applied at very high concentrations (100 mg/ml), γ-globulins adsorbed already from 10 mg/ml on. The adsorption of γ-globulins was, however, significantly decreased when it was mixed with BSA in a ratio of 3:1, as it is in the serum. Pretreatment of EG3OMe and PEG2k coatings with γ-globulins or serum strongly promoted adherence of S. aureus when resuspended in buffer, suggesting that γ-globulins play a pivotal role in promoting S. aureus adhesion by its IgG binding proteins; the finding that a spa-deletion mutant, lacking the IgG binding protein A, showed decreased adherence corroborated this. Similarly, when S. aureus was pretreated with serum or γ-globulins its adherence was also significantly decreased. Our findings show that particularly γ-globulins bind to the coated surfaces thus mediating adherence of S. aureus via its protein A. As pretreatment of S. aureus with serum or γ-globulins significantly decreased adherence, treatment of patients with γ-globulins before implant surgery might lower the risk of implant-associated infections.

  6. Universal stress protein Rv2624c alters abundance of arginine and enhances intracellular survival by ATP binding in mycobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Qiong; Hu, Xinling; Shi, Dawei; Zhang, Yan; Sun, Meihao; Wang, Jianwei; Mi, Kaixia; Zhu, Guofeng

    2016-01-01

    The universal stress protein family is a family of stress-induced proteins. Universal stress proteins affect latency and antibiotic resistance in mycobacteria. Here, we showed that Mycobacterium smegmatis overexpressing M. tuberculosis universal stress protein Rv2624c exhibits increased survival in human monocyte THP-1 cells. Transcriptome analysis suggested that Rv2624c affects histidine metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism. LC-MS/MS analysis showed that Rv2624c affects the abundance of arginine, a modulator of both mycobacteria and infected THP-1 cells. Biochemical analysis showed that Rv2624c is a nucleotide-binding universal stress protein, and an Rv2624c mutant incapable of binding ATP abrogated the growth advantage in THP-1 cells. Rv2624c may therefore modulate metabolic pathways in an ATP-dependent manner, changing the abundance of arginine and thus increasing survival in THP-1 cells. PMID:27762279

  7. Serum immune-related proteins are differentially expressed during hibernation in the American black bear.

    PubMed

    Chow, Brian A; Donahue, Seth W; Vaughan, Michael R; McConkey, Brendan; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2013-01-01

    Hibernation is an adaptation to conserve energy in the face of extreme environmental conditions and low food availability that has risen in several animal phyla. This phenomenon is characterized by reduced metabolic rate (∼25% of the active basal metabolic rate in hibernating bears) and energy demand, while other physiological adjustments are far from clear. The profiling of the serum proteome of the American black bear (Ursus americanus) may reveal specific proteins that are differentially modulated by hibernation, and provide insight into the remarkable physiological adaptations that characterize ursid hibernation. In this study, we used differential gel electrophoresis (DIGE) analysis, liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry, and subsequent MASCOT analysis of the mass spectra to identify candidate proteins that are differentially expressed during hibernation in captive black bears. Seventy serum proteins were identified as changing by ±1.5 fold or more, out of which 34 proteins increased expression during hibernation. The majority of identified proteins are involved in immune system processes. These included α2-macroglobulin, complement components C1s and C4, immunoglobulin μ and J chains, clusterin, haptoglobin, C4b binding protein, kininogen 1, α2-HS-glycoprotein, and apoplipoproteins A-I and A-IV. Differential expression of a subset of these proteins identified by proteomic analysis was also confirmed by immunodetection. We propose that the observed serum protein changes contribute to the maintenance of the hibernation phenotype and health, including increased capacities for bone maintenance and wound healing during hibernation in bears.

  8. Serum monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 is a biomarker in patients with diabetes and periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Preethi; Srikanth, Padma; Seshadri, Krishna G.; Barani, Ramya; Samanta, Maitreya

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The role of serum Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 (MCP-1) as a biomarker of periodontitis is well documented; however, its role in diabetic patients with periodontitis is unknown. Aim: This study was conducted to determine the presence and concentration of serum MCP-1 in diabetic patients with and without periodontitis and correlate it glycemic status with periodontitis. Materials and Methods: Adult diabetic patients were enrolled and grouped into group I, II, and III based on their glycemic status and serum MCP-1 estimated by ELISA. Linear regression and correlation tests were performed using R statistical software, Medcalc software to observe correlation between the serum MCP-1 and glycated hemoglobin level among different groups. Results: Serum samples obtained from 37 patients tested positive for MCP-1. Mean serum MCP-1 concentration was highest (482.3 pg/ml) in group III, lowest (149.3 pg/ml) in group I, and intermediate 398.8 pg/ml in group II. Correlation and regression analysis was done between HbA1c and serum MCP-1. A significant positive correlation (P < 0.001) was observed. Serum MCP-1 increased by 37.278 pg/ml for every 1% rise in HbA1c, and the levels were raised in group II and group III than in group I irrespective of their glycemic status. With an HbA1c range of 6.5-6.9% (group II), the serum MCP-1 values cluster around 380-410 pg/ml. Elevated levels of serum MCP-1 (>500 pg/ml) in three subjects corresponded to HbA1c values more than 12.2% (group III). Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first study to document serum MCP-1 levels in diabetic patients with periodontitis. Glycemic status influences serum MCP-1, and lack of glycemic control contributes to increased serum MCP-1 levels. Serum MCP-1 may thus serve as a biomarker of inflammation and disease progression in diabetes with periodontitis. PMID:25143907

  9. Canine cancer screening via ultraviolet absorbance and fluorescence spectroscopy of serum proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Bryan D.; Geist, Brian L.; Spillman, William B., Jr.; Robertson, John L.

    2007-11-01

    A cost-effective optical cancer screening and monitoring technique was demonstrated in a pilot study of canine serum samples and was patented for commercialization. Compared to conventional blood chemistry analysis methods, more accurate estimations of the concentrations of albumin, globulins, and hemoglobin in serum were obtained by fitting the near UV absorbance and photoluminescence spectra of diluted serum as a linear combination of component reference spectra. Tracking these serum proteins over the course of treatment helped to monitor patient immune response to carcinoma and therapy. For cancer screening, 70% of dogs with clinical presentation of cancer displayed suppressed serum hemoglobin levels (below 20 mg/dL) in combination with atypical serum protein compositions, that is, albumin levels outside of a safe range (from 4 to 8 g/dL) and globulin levels above or below a more normal range (from 1.7 to 3.7 g/dL). Of the dogs that met these criteria, only 20% were given a false positive label by this cancer screening test.

  10. Simultaneous quantification of Myelin Basic Protein and Tau proteins in cerebrospinal fluid and serum of Multiple Sclerosis patients using nanoimmunosensor.

    PubMed

    Derkus, Burak; Acar Bozkurt, Pinar; Tulu, Metin; Emregul, Kaan C; Yucesan, Canan; Emregul, Emel

    2017-03-15

    This study was aimed at the development of an immunosensor for the simultaneous quantification of Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) and Tau proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum, obtained from Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients. The newly developed GO/pPG/anti-MBP/anti-Tau nanoimmunosensor has been established by immobilization of MBP and Tau antibodies. The newly developed nanoimmunosensor was tested, optimized and characterized using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The developed nanoimmunosensor was seen to have detection limits of 0.30nM for MBP and 0.15nM for Tau proteins which were sufficient for the levels to be analysed in neuro-clinic. The clinical study performed using CSF and serum of MS patients showed that the designed nanoimmunosensor was capable of detecting the proteins properly, that were essentially proven by ELISA.

  11. Comparison of Serum Protein Electrophoresis Values in Wild and Captive Whooping Cranes ( Grus americana ).

    PubMed

    Hausmann, Jennifer C; Cray, Carolyn; Hartup, Barry K

    2015-09-01

    Protein electrophoresis of serum samples from endangered, wild whooping cranes ( Grus americana ) was performed to help assess the health of the only self-sustaining, migratory population in North America. Serum samples from wild adult cranes (n = 22) were taken at Aransas National Wildlife Refuge, Texas, USA during winter. Wild juvenile cranes (n = 26) were sampled at Wood Buffalo National Park, Northwest Territories, Canada, in midsummer. All captive crane samples were acquired from the International Crane Foundation, Baraboo, WI, USA. Captive adult cranes (n = 30) were sampled during annual examinations, and archived serum samples from captive juvenile cranes (n = 19) were selected to match the estimated age of wild juveniles. Wild juveniles had significantly lower concentrations of all protein fractions than wild adults, except for prealbumin and γ globulins. All protein fraction concentrations for wild juveniles were significantly lower compared with captive juveniles, except for prealbumin and γ globulins, which were higher. Wild adults had significantly greater γ globulin concentrations than captive adults. Captive juveniles had significantly lower prealbumin and albumin concentrations and albumin : globulin ratios than captive adults. The higher γ globulin concentrations in wild versus captive cranes are likely because of increased antigenic exposure and immune stimulation. Protein fraction concentrations vary significantly with age and natural history in this species. Reference intervals for serum protein electrophoresis results from captive adult whooping cranes are provided in this study.

  12. COPD assessment test score and serum C-reactive protein levels in stable COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hyung Koo; Kim, Kang; Lee, Hyun; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Koh, Won-Jung; Park, Hye Yun

    2016-01-01

    Background An eight-item questionnaire of the COPD assessment test (CAT) is widely used to quantify the impact of COPD on the patient’s health status. C-reactive protein (CRP) is associated with disease severity and adverse health outcomes of patients with COPD. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between CAT score and serum CRP levels in stable COPD patients. Methods We evaluated the medical records of 226 patients with CAT and serum CRP measured within a week at Samsung Medical Center between October 2013 and October 2015. Results Serum CRP levels had a significantly positive relationship with CAT score (Spearman’s r=0.20, P=0.003). Patients with elevated serum CRP levels (>0.3 mg/dL) were significantly more likely to have CAT scores of ≥14. The adjusted odds ratio for elevated serum CRP levels in total CAT score was 1.06 (95% confidence interval, 1.02–1.09). Among CAT components, cough (adjusted P=0.005), phlegm (adjusted P=0.001), breathlessness going up hills/stairs (adjusted P=0.005), low confidence leaving home (adjusted P=0.002), and feeling low in energy (adjusted P=0.019) were independently associated with elevated serum CRP levels. Conclusion In stable COPD patients, serum CRP levels were independently associated with total CAT score and CAT components related to respiratory symptoms, confidence leaving home, and energy. PMID:27994452

  13. Fluorescent protein-based detection of unconjugated bilirubin in newborn serum

    PubMed Central

    Iwatani, Sota; Nakamura, Hajime; Kurokawa, Daisuke; Yamana, Keiji; Nishida, Kosuke; Fukushima, Sachiyo; Koda, Tsubasa; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Nishio, Hisahide; Iijima, Kazumoto; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Morioka, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Increased serum levels of unconjugated bilirubin are associated with the development of brain damage in newborns. In current clinical settings, there are no methods for directly determining serum levels of unconjugated bilirubin. UnaG, a fluorescent protein from Japanese eel muscle that specifically binds to unconjugated bilirubin was used in this study. Linear regression analysis was carried out to compare unconjugated bilirubin levels measured by UnaG and conventional bilirubin oxidase methods. Unconjugated bilirubin levels in the serum of newborns who were untreated or treated with phototherapy were compared. Effects of interfering factors in the serum (conjugated bilirubin, hemoglobin, and lipid) on unconjugated bilirubin concentration measured by the UnaG method were also evaluated. Unconjugated bilirubin levels measured by the UnaG method were highly correlated with those determined by the bilirubin oxidase assay. Unconjugated bilirubin levels determined by bilirubin oxidase and UnaG assays were similar in serum samples containing conjugated bilirubin. The performance of the UnaG assay was unaffected by phototherapy and the presence of serum hemoglobin and lipid emulsion. These results demonstrate the clinical applicability of the UnaG method for direct measurement of unconjugated bilirubin levels in newborn serum. PMID:27324682

  14. Isomer-Specific Binding Affinity of Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) to Serum Proteins.

    PubMed

    Beesoon, Sanjay; Martin, Jonathan W

    2015-05-05

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) are among the most prominent contaminants in human serum, and these were historically manufactured as technical mixtures of linear and branched isomers. The isomers display unique pharmacokinetics in humans and in animal models, but molecular mechanisms underlying isomer-specific PFOS and PFOA disposition have not previously been studied. Here, ultrafiltration devices were used to examine (i) the dissociation constants (Kd) of individual PFOS and PFOA isomers with human serum albumin (HSA) and (ii) relative binding affinity of isomers in technical mixtures spiked to whole calf serum and human serum. Measurement of HSA Kd's demonstrated that linear PFOS (Kd=8(±4)×10(-8) M) was much more tightly bound than branched PFOS isomers (Kd range from 8(±1)×10(-5) M to 4(±2)×10(-4) M). Similarly, linear PFOA (Kd=1(±0.9)×10(-4) M) was more strongly bound to HSA compared to branched PFOA isomers (Kd range from 4(±2)×10(-4) M to 3(±2)×10(-4) M). The higher binding affinities of linear PFOS and PFOA to total serum protein were confirmed when both calf serum and human serum were spiked with technical mixtures. Overall, these data provide a mechanistic explanation for the longer biological half-life of PFOS in humans, compared to PFOA, and for the higher transplacental transfer efficiencies and renal clearance of branched PFOS and PFOA isomers, compared to the respective linear isomer.

  15. Chickpea protein hydrolysate as a substitute for serum in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Vioque, Javier; Pedroche, Justo; Alaiz, Manuel; Yust, María M.; Megías, Cristina; Millán, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    The growth of mammalian cells in vitro requires the use of rich culture media that are prepared by combining serum with specific nutrient formulations. Serum, the most expensive component of culture media, provides a complex mixture of growth factors and nutrients. Protein hydrolysates that can support in vitro cell growth and eliminate or reduce the need to use serum have been obtained from different sources. Here we describe the use of two food grade proteases to produce a chickpea protein hydrolysate that has been added to cell culture medium in order to determine whether it can be used as a substitute for serum. Medium containing the hydrolysate has been tested using two human cells lines: the monocytic THP-1 cell line which grows in suspension, and the epithelial Caco-2 cell line which grows as a monolayer. The chickpea protein hydrolysate was a good substitute for serum in the first case, but did not allow growth of Caco-2 cells. Supplementation of culture media with this inexpensive and safe hydrolysate would greatly reduce the cost of cell culture. PMID:19003183

  16. Serum levels of bone Gla-protein in inhabitants exposed to environmental cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Kido, T.; Honda, R.; Tsuritani, I.; Ishizaki, M.; Yamada, Y.; Nakagawa, H.; Nogawa, K.; Dohi, Y. )

    1991-01-01

    Serum levels of bone Gla-protein (BGP)--the vitamin K-dependent CA2(+)-binding protein--were evaluated in 76 cadmium (Cd)-exposed subjects with renal tubular dysfunction (32 men, 44 women) and 133 nonexposed subjects (53 men, 80 women). Serum BGP levels were higher in the Cd-exposed subjects than in nonexposed subjects. Significant correlations between BGP and each index measured by bone microdensitometry (MD), serum alkaline phosphatase activity, and Cd in blood and urine were found. For all of the Cd-exposed and nonexposed men and women, BGP showed a significant standard partial regression coefficient (multiple regression analysis) with the metacarpal index (MCI), which was one of the MD indicators. Bone Gla-protein also correlated significantly with urinary beta 2-microglobulin in the men and with serum creatinine in the women. Serum BGP values strongly reflect the degree of bone damage and also reflect, although less strongly, the degree of renal damage induced by exposure to Cd.

  17. Fish protein decreases serum cholesterol in rats by inhibition of cholesterol and bile acid absorption.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Ryota; Fukunaga, Kenji; Arai, Hirofumi; Kanda, Seiji; Nishiyama, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Munehiro

    2011-05-01

    Fish protein has been shown to decrease serum cholesterol content by inhibiting absorption of cholesterol and bile acid in laboratory animals, though the mechanism underlying this effect is not yet fully understood. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism underlying the inhibition of cholesterol and bile acid absorption following fish protein intake. Male Wistar rats were divided into 2 dietary groups of 7 rats each, 1 group receiving a diet consisting of 20% casein and the other receiving a diet consisting of 10% casein and 10% fish protein. Both experimental diets also contained 0.5% cholesterol and 0.1% sodium cholate. After the rats had been on their respective diets for 4 wk, their serum and liver cholesterol contents and fecal cholesterol, bile acid, and nitrogen excretion contents were measured. Fish protein consumption decreased serum and liver cholesterol content and increased fecal cholesterol and bile acid excretion and simultaneously increased fecal nitrogen excretion. In addition, fish protein hydrolyzate prepared by in vitro digestion had lower micellar solubility of cholesterol and higher binding capacity for bile acids compared with casein hydrolyzate. These results suggest that the hypocholesterolemic effect of fish protein is mediated by increased fecal cholesterol and bile acid excretion, which is due to the digestion products of fish protein having reduced micellar solubility of cholesterol and increased bile acid binding capacity.

  18. 13C Natural Abundance in Serum Retinol Acts as a Biomarker for Increases in Dietary Provitamin A

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Julie A; Valentine, Ashley R; Hull, Angela K; Tanumihardjo, Sherry A

    2009-01-01

    The natural isotopic composition of 13C and 12C in tissues is largely determined by the diet. Sources of provitamin A carotenoids (e.g., vegetables) typically have a lower 13C to 12C ratio (13C:12C) than preformed vitamin A sources (i.e., dairy and meat) from corn-fed animals, which are prevalent in the US. The 13C:12C of serum retinol (13C:12C-retinol) was evaluated as a biomarker for vegetable intake in a 3-mo dietary intervention designed to promote weight-loss by increased vegetable consumption or reduced calorie and fat intake. Subjects were 21–50 y of age with a BMI between 30–40 kg/m2 and were enrolled from one geographic area in the US. The high vegetable group (n = 20) was encouraged to increase daily vegetable and fruit consumption to 0.95 liter vegetables and 0.24–0.35 liter fruits. The caloric reduction group (n = 17) was encouraged to lower caloric intake by 500 kcal and consume ≤25% kcal from fat daily. Provided meals supplied 75–100% vegetable and fruit goals and 50–67% kcal and fat g per day. Carotenoid supplementation was discontinued by subjects during the study. Serum retinol and provitamin A carotenoid concentrations; intake of preformed vitamin A, provitamin A, and fat; and body weight, fat mass, and lean mass were analyzed for correlations to 13C:12C-retinol. 13C:12C-Retinol decreased in the vegetable group after intervention (P = 0.050) and the correlation with provitamin A intake was approaching significance (P = 0.079). 13C:12C-Retinol did not change in the caloric reduction group (P = 0.43). 13C:12C-Retinol changes with the vitamin A source in the diet and can be used as a biomarker for increases in dietary provitamin A vegetable intake. PMID:19116317

  19. [Diagnosis of central nervous system diseases. Multivariate analysis of the serum-cerebrospinal fluid- protein relation].

    PubMed

    Neu, I S; Pelka, R B; Fateh-Moghadam, A

    1983-09-22

    In a population comprising 197 patients serum and CSF proteins were assayed using the radial immunodiffusion technique devised by Mancini. Multiple discriminant analysis was applied to investigate whether the measured CSF/serum protein relations and their ratios could be regarded as an indicator of specific neurologic diseases. One significant finding was that the slope angle alpha of the regression line between the serum/CSF relation and molecular weight may represent an important indicative parameter. A small angle is suggestive of enhanced permeability of the blood-brain barrier, a large angle of a correspondingly lowered permeability. Further, the analyses demonstrated that the combined use several predictors can markedly improve differential diagnosis. The study also demonstrates the potential of a statistical analytic technique that is still rarely applied in medicine.

  20. Serum hyaluronic acid predicts protein-energy malnutrition in chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Hiroki; Enomoto, Hirayuki; Yoh, Kazunori; Iwata, Yoshinori; Hasegawa, Kunihiro; Nakano, Chikage; Takata, Ryo; Kishino, Kyohei; Shimono, Yoshihiro; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Nishimura, Takashi; Aizawa, Nobuhiro; Ikeda, Naoto; Takashima, Tomoyuki; Ishii, Akio; Iijima, Hiroko; Nishiguchi, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Serum hyaluronic acid (HA) is a well-established marker of fibrosis in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD). However, the relationship between serum HA level and protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) in patients with CLD is an unknown. We aimed to examine the relationship between serum HA level and PEM in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) compared with the relationships of other serum markers of fibrosis. A total of 298 CHC subjects were analyzed. We defined patients with serum albumin level of ≤3.5 g/dL and nonprotein respiratory quotient <0.85 using indirect calorimetry as having PEM. We investigated the effect of serum HA level on the presence of PEM. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was performed for calculating the area under the ROC (AUROC) for serum HA level, platelet count, aspartate aminotransferase (AST) to platelet ratio index, FIB-4 index, AST to alanine aminotransferase ratio, and Forns index for the presence of PEM. The median serum HA level in this study was 148.0 ng/mL (range: 9.0–6340.0 ng/mL). In terms of the degree of liver function (chronic hepatitis, Child-Pugh A, B, and C), the analyzed patients were well stratified according to serum HA level (overall significance, P < 0.0001). The median value (range) of serum HA level in patients with PEM (n = 61) was 389.0 ng/mL (43.6–6340.0 ng/mL) and that in patients without PEM (n = 237) was 103.0 ng/mL (9.0–783.0 ng/mL) (P < 0.0001). Among 6 fibrosis markers, serum HA level yielded the highest AUROC with a level of 0.849 at an optimal cut-off value of 151.0 ng/mL (sensitivity 93.4%; specificity 62.0%; P < 0.0001). In the multivariate analysis, serum HA level was found to be a significant prognostic factor related to the presence of PEM (P = 0.0001). In conclusion, serum HA level can be a useful predictor of PEM in patients with CHC. PMID:27311000

  1. Selective precipitation of haptoglobin and alpha2-macroglobulin from human serum using Alocasia macrorhiza tuber protein.

    PubMed

    Nayak, B Shivananda; Ulloor, N Jagadish; Shivaraj, B

    2002-12-01

    Treatment of human serum with ammonium sulfate fraction (0-50%) of Alocasia macrorhiza tuber extract resulted in precipitation at neutral pH. The precipitate was dissolved at pH 10.5 and chromatographed on Sephadex G-100 column. Two protein peaks were resolved. While the first peak represented alpha2-macroglobulin and haptoglobin, the second peak accounted for specific Alocasia protein. Incidentally the Alocasia protein was shown to be responsible for selective and specific precipitation of alpha2-macroglobulin and haptoglobin from serum. Thus the plant protein in its pure form or in crude stage could be used for the rapid isolation of two of the prominent alpha2-globulins.

  2. The presence of antibodies to oxidative modified proteins in serum from polycystic ovary syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Palacio, J R; Iborra, A; Ulcova-Gallova, Z; Badia, R; Martínez, P

    2006-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affects 5–10% of women of reproductive age. Free radicals, as a product of oxidative stress, impair cells and tissue properties related to human fertility. These free radicals, together with the oxidized molecules, may have a cytotoxic or deleterious effects on sperm and oocytes, on early embryo development or on the endometrium. Aldehyde-modified proteins are highly immunogenic and circulating autoantibodies to new epitopes, such as malondialdehyde (MDA), may affect the reproductive system. Autoantibodies or elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in serum are often associated with inflammatory response. The purpose of this work is to investigate whether PCOS women show increased levels of oxidized proteins (protein–MDA) and anti-endometrial antibodies (AEA) in their sera, compared with control patients, and to determine whether AEA specificity is related to oxidized protein derivatives. Sera from 31 women [10 patients with PCOS (PCOS group) and 21 women with male factor of infertility (control group)] were chosen from patients attending for infertility. Anti-endometrial antibodies were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with an endometrial cell line (RL-95). Antibodies against MDA modified human serum albumin (HSA–MDA) were also determined by ELISA. Oxidized proteins (protein–MDA) in serum were determined by a colorimetric assay. Patients with PCOS have significantly higher levels of AEA and anti-HSA–MDA, as well as oxidized proteins (protein–MDA) in serum than control patients. For the first time, we describe an autoimmune response in PCOS patients, in terms of AEA. The evidence of protein–MDA in the serum of these patients, together with the increased antibody reactivity to MDA-modified proteins (HSA–MDA) in vitro, supports the conclusion that oxidative stress may be one of the important causes for abnormal endometrial environment with poor embryo receptivity in PCOS patients. PMID:16634794

  3. Revision of the biodistribution of uranyl in serum: is fetuin-A the major protein target?

    PubMed

    Basset, Christian; Averseng, Olivier; Ferron, Pierre-Jean; Richaud, Nicolas; Hagège, Agnès; Pible, Olivier; Vidaud, Claude

    2013-05-20

    Uranium is a natural actinide present as uranyl U(VI) species in aqueous environments. Its toxicity is considered to be chemical rather than radiotoxicological. Whatever the route of entry, uranyl reaches the blood, is partly eliminated via the kidneys, and accumulated in the bones. In serum, its speciation mainly involves carbonate and proteins. Direct identification of labile uranyl-protein complexes is extremely difficult because of the complexity of this matrix. Thus, until now the biodistribution of the metal in serum has not been described, and therefore, little is known about the metal transport mechanisms leading to bone accumulation. A rapid screening method based on a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique was used to determine the apparent affinities for U(VI) of the major serum proteins. A first biodistribution of uranyl was obtained by ranking the proteins according to the criteria of both their serum concentrations and affinities for this metal. Despite its moderate concentration in serum, fetuin-A (FETUA) was shown to exhibit an apparent affinity within the 30 nM range and to carry more than 80% of the metal. This protein involved in bone mineralization aroused interest in characterizing the U(VI) and FETUA interaction. Using complementary chromatographic and spectroscopic approaches, we demonstrated that the protein can bind 3 U(VI) at different binding sites exhibiting Kd from ∼30 nM to 10 μM. Some structural modifications and functional properties of FETUA upon uranyl complexation were also controlled. To our knowledge, this article presents the first identification of a uranyl carrier involved in bone metabolism along with the characterization of its metal binding sites.

  4. Screening differential expression of serum proteins in AFP-negative HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma using iTRAQ -MALDI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    He, X; Wang, Y; Zhang, W; Li, H; Luo, R; Zhou, Y; Li, C; Liao, M; Huang, H; Lv, X; Xie, Z; He, M

    2013-09-20

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is serious condition associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Therefore is an urgent need to develop novel noninvasive techniques for early diagnosis, particularly for patients with AFP-negative [AFP(-)] HCC. In this study, iTRAQ-MALDI-MS/MS was used to identify differentially expressed proteins in AFP(-) HBV-related HCC compared with non-cancerous hepatitis B virus (HBV) and healthy controls subjects.Serum was obtained from 18 patients with AFP(-) HBV-related HCC, 18 matched patients with HBV without HCC and 18 healthy control subjects. High abundance proteins were removed from serum and the differentially expressed proteins from the three groups were screened out using iTRAQ-MALDI-MS/MS. The Gene Ontology (GO) function and the interaction networks of differentially expressed proteins were then analyzed. A total of 24 expressed differential proteins associated with AFP(-) HBV-related HCC were screened out, 15 proteins were up-regulated and 9 down-regulated. The most common molecular function of the 24 differentially expressed proteins was enzyme inhibition. Interaction network of the 24 differentially expressed proteins showed that 14 proteins (C5, KNG1, FN1, LRG1, HRG, SERPINC1, CRP, APOB, SAA1, APCS, C4BPA, CFI, CFB and GSN) were central to the functional network. The expression levels of the GSN protein were down-regulated in AFP(-) HBV-related HCC subjects compared with healthy controls and the HBV group (p<0.01), consistent with the iTRAQ results.The 14 proteins from the serum of AFP(-) HBV-related HCC appeared at the fulcrum of the functional network and were differentially expressed compare to HBV and healthy controls suggesting a possible association with HCC progression. Keywords: HCC, AFP Negative, iTRAQ, GSN.

  5. Screening differential expression of serum proteins in AFP-negative HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma using iTRAQ -MALDI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    He, X; Wang, Y; Zhang, W; Li, H; Luo, R; Zhou, Y; Liao, C Li M; Huang, H; Lv, X; Xie, Z; He, M

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) is serious condition associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Therefore is an urgent need to develop novel noninvasive techniques for early diagnosis, particularly for patients with AFP-negative [AFP(-)] HCC. In this study, iTRAQ-MALDI-MS/MS was used to identify differentially expressed proteins in AFP(-) HBV-related HCC compared with non-cancerous hepatitis B virus (HBV) and healthy controls subjects.Serum was obtained from 18 patients with AFP(-) HBV-related HCC, 18 matched patients with HBV without HCC and 18 healthy control subjects. High abundance proteins were removed from serum and the differentially expressed proteins from the three groups were screened out using iTRAQ-MALDI-MS/MS. The Gene Ontology (GO) function and the interaction networks of differentially expressed proteins were then analyzed. A total of 24 expressed differential proteins associated with AFP(-) HBV-related HCC were screened out, 15 proteins were up-regulated and 9 down-regulated. The most common molecular function of the 24 differentially expressed proteins was enzyme inhibition. Interaction network of the 24 differentially expressed proteins showed that 14 proteins (C5, KNG1, FN1, LRG1, HRG, SERPINC1, CRP, APOB, SAA1, APCS, C4BPA, CFI, CFB and GSN) were central to the functional network. The expression levels of the GSN protein were down-regulated in AFP(-) HBV-related HCC subjects compared with healthy controls and the HBV group (p<0.01), consistent with the iTRAQ results.The 14 proteins from the serum of AFP(-) HBV-related HCC appeared at the fulcrum of the functional network and were differentially expressed compare to HBV and healthy controls suggesting a possible association with HCC progression.

  6. Identification and isolation of cDNA clones encoding the abundant secreted proteins in the saliva proteome of Culicoides nubeculosus.

    PubMed

    Russell, C L; Heesom, K J; Arthur, C J; Helps, C R; Mellor, P S; Day, M J; Torsteinsdottir, S; Björnsdóttir, T S; Wilson, A D

    2009-06-01

    Culicoides spp. are vectors of several infectious diseases of veterinary importance and a major cause of allergy in horses and other livestock. Their saliva contains a number of proteins which enable blood feeding, enhance disease transmission and act as allergens. We report the construction of a novel cDNA library from Culicoides nubeculosus linked to the analysis of abundant salivary gland proteins by mass spectrometry. Fifty-four novel proteins sequences are described including those of the enzymes maltase, hyaluronidase and two serine proteases demonstrated to be present in Culicoides salivary glands, as well as several members of the D7 family and protease inhibitors with putative anticoagulant activity. In addition, several families of abundant proteins with unknown function were identified including some of the major candidate allergens that cause insect bite hypersensitivity in horses.

  7. Regulation of the Abundance of Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF50 Protein by Oncoprotein MDM2

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Chen, Lee-Wen; Shih, Ying-Ju; Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung; Chang, Pey-Jium

    2016-01-01

    The switch between latency and the lytic cycle of Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is controlled by the expression of virally encoded ORF50 protein. Thus far, the regulatory mechanism underlying the protein stability of ORF50 is unknown. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that a protein abundance regulatory signal (PARS) at the ORF50 C-terminal region modulates its protein abundance. The PARS region consists of PARS-I (aa 490–535) and PARS-II (aa 590–650), and mutations in either component result in abundant expression of ORF50. Here, we show that ORF50 protein is polyubiquitinated and its abundance is controlled through the proteasomal degradation pathway. The PARS-I motif mainly functions as a nuclear localization signal in the control of ORF50 abundance, whereas the PARS-II motif is required for the binding of ubiquitin enzymes in the nucleus. We find that human oncoprotein MDM2, an ubiquitin E3 ligase, is capable of interacting with ORF50 and promoting ORF50 degradation in cells. The interaction domains between both proteins are mapped to the PARS region of ORF50 and the N-terminal 220-aa region of MDM2. Additionally, we identify lysine residues at positions 152 and 154 in the N-terminal domain of ORF50 critically involved in MDM2-mediated downregulation of ORF50 levels. Within KSHV-infected cells, the levels of MDM2 were greatly reduced during viral lytic cycle and genetic knockdown of MDM2 in these cells favored the enhancement of ORF50 expression, supporting that MDM2 is a negative regulator of ORF50 expression. Collectively, the study elucidates the regulatory mechanism of ORF50 stability and implicates that MDM2 may have a significant role in the maintenance of viral latency by lowering basal level of ORF50. PMID:27698494

  8. Regulation of the Abundance of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus ORF50 Protein by Oncoprotein MDM2.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Wang, Shie-Shan; Chen, Lee-Wen; Shih, Ying-Ju; Chang, Li-Kwan; Liu, Shih-Tung; Chang, Pey-Jium

    2016-10-01

    The switch between latency and the lytic cycle of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is controlled by the expression of virally encoded ORF50 protein. Thus far, the regulatory mechanism underlying the protein stability of ORF50 is unknown. Our earlier studies have demonstrated that a protein abundance regulatory signal (PARS) at the ORF50 C-terminal region modulates its protein abundance. The PARS region consists of PARS-I (aa 490-535) and PARS-II (aa 590-650), and mutations in either component result in abundant expression of ORF50. Here, we show that ORF50 protein is polyubiquitinated and its abundance is controlled through the proteasomal degradation pathway. The PARS-I motif mainly functions as a nuclear localization signal in the control of ORF50 abundance, whereas the PARS-II motif is required for the binding of ubiquitin enzymes in the nucleus. We find that human oncoprotein MDM2, an ubiquitin E3 ligase, is capable of interacting with ORF50 and promoting ORF50 degradation in cells. The interaction domains between both proteins are mapped to the PARS region of ORF50 and the N-terminal 220-aa region of MDM2. Additionally, we identify lysine residues at positions 152 and 154 in the N-terminal domain of ORF50 critically involved in MDM2-mediated downregulation of ORF50 levels. Within KSHV-infected cells, the levels of MDM2 were greatly reduced during viral lytic cycle and genetic knockdown of MDM2 in these cells favored the enhancement of ORF50 expression, supporting that MDM2 is a negative regulator of ORF50 expression. Collectively, the study elucidates the regulatory mechanism of ORF50 stability and implicates that MDM2 may have a significant role in the maintenance of viral latency by lowering basal level of ORF50.

  9. The association between serum C-reactive protein and macronutrients and antioxidants intake in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Kooshki, A; Samadipour, E; Akbarzadeh, R

    2015-01-01

    Background:Despite the high levels of inflammation in hemodialysis patients and the effects of diet on systemic inflammation, such as the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, few studies have evaluated the relationship of macronutrients and antioxidants intake with serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Therefore, this study assessed the relationship between serum high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) with macronutrients and antioxidants intake and serum albumin. Methods:This cross-sectional study used census sampling to select 75 hemodialysis patients (35 men and 40 women) who attended the hemodialysis department of Vaseie Hospital of Sabzevar, Iran. After obtaining the written consent, all the patients were interviewed and dietary data was collected by using a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire including 160 food items. Diet analysis was performed with Nutritionist IV. Before being connected to the dialysis machine, 5 cc fasting blood samples were obtained from all participants and serum hs-CRP and albumin levels were measured. All the statistical analyses were conducted with SPSS -for Windows, version 16.0. Results:The patients’ mean body mass index was 20.09 ± 3.27 kg/ m2. The participants’ intake of antioxidants and all macronutrients, except for carbohydrates and proteins, was less than the standard levels. Moreover, the hs-CRP had significant inverse relationships with serum albumin (P=0.0001) and vitamin E and C intakes but was not significant. Also, a significant relationship was observed between hs-CRP levels and the intake of energy (P=0.002) and protein (P=0.0001). Conclusion:Our findings indicated hs-CRP levels of hemodialysis patients to have significant inverse relationships with serum albumin and vitamin E and C intakes but was not significant. Also, a significant relationship was observed between hs-CRP levels and the intake of energy and protein.

  10. Serum protein changes in immune and nonimmune pigeons infected with various strains of Trichomonas gallinae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.; Herman, C.M.

    1970-01-01

    Serum protein changes were studied in immune and nonimmune pigeons infected with three different strains of Trichomonas gallinae. Strain I (nonvirulent) produced no change in the relative concentration of serum components. Strains II (oral canker) and III (Jones' Barn) produced decreases in albumin and alpha globulins, and increases in beta and gamma globulins between the 7th and 20th days post infection. Birds infected with strain II began to return to normal by the 20th day, while all those infected with strain III were dead between 10 and 14 days post infection. Two serum protein patterns resulted from infection of immune birds with the Jones' Barn strain. One showed no change in relative protein concentrations and no tissue invasion by the parasite while the other was similar to that seen in nonimmune birds infected with a strain producing oral canker. These also showed evidence of tissue invasion by the parasite. It was concluded that tissue invasion was necessary to evoke a quantitative change in serum protein concentrations.

  11. High Throughput Quantitative Analysis of Serum Proteins Using Glycopeptide Capture and Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hui; Yi, Eugene C.; Li, Xiao-jun; Mallick, Parag; Kelly-Spratt, Karen S.; Masselon, Christophe D.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Kemp, Christopher J.; Aebersold, Reudi

    2005-02-01

    It is expected that the composition of the serum proteome can provide valuable information about the state of the human body in health and disease and that this information can be extracted via quantitative proteomic measurements. Suitable proteomic techniques need to be sensitive, reproducible, and robust to detect potential biomarkers below the level of highly expressed proteins, generate data sets that are comparable between experiments and laboratories, and have high throughput to support statistical studies. Here we report a method for high throughput quantitative analysis of serum proteins. It consists of the selective isolation of peptides that are N-linked glycosylated in the intact protein, the analysis of these now deglycosylated peptides by liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and the comparative analysis of the resulting patterns. By focusing selectively on a few formerly N-linked glycopeptides per serum protein, the complexity of the analyte sample is significantly reduced and the sensitivity and throughput of serum proteome analysis are increased compared with the analysis of total tryptic peptides from unfractionated samples. We provide data that document the performance of the method and show that sera from untreated normal mice and genetically identical mice with carcinogen-induced skin cancer can be unambiguously discriminated using unsupervised clustering of the resulting peptide patterns. We further identify, by tandem mass spectrometry, some of the peptides that were consistently elevated in cancer mice compared with their control littermates.

  12. Iron Dextran treatment does not induce serum protein carbonyls in the newborn pig

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oxidation of serum proteins can lead to carbonyl formation which alters their function and is often associated with stress-related diseases. Since it is recommended that all pigs reared in modern production facilities be given supplemental iron at birth to prevent anemia, and metals can catalyze th...

  13. Determination of serum proteins in the presence of dextran by means of the biuret reaction.

    PubMed

    Gregor, A; Kostrzewska, E; Godorowska, W

    1977-02-01

    264 biuret reagents for total protein determination in serum containing dextran were investigated. The usefulness of the method is dependent on proper ratio of the components of the reagent: concentrations of NaOH and copper sulphate, and the ratio of sodium-potassium tartrate to copper sulphate.

  14. Lipid-mediated Wnt protein stabilization enables serum-free culture of human organ stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tüysüz, Nesrin; van Bloois, Louis; van den Brink, Stieneke; Begthel, Harry; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; Cruz, Luis J.; Hui, Lijian; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; de Jonge, Jeroen; Vries, Robert; Braakman, Eric; Mastrobattista, Enrico; Cornelissen, Jan J.; Clevers, Hans; ten Berge, Derk

    2017-01-01

    Wnt signalling proteins are essential for culture of human organ stem cells in organoids, but most Wnt protein formulations are poorly active in serum-free media. Here we show that purified Wnt3a protein is ineffective because it rapidly loses activity in culture media due to its hydrophobic nature, and its solubilization requires a detergent, CHAPS (3-[(3-cholamidopropyl) dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate), that interferes with stem cell self-renewal. By stabilizing the Wnt3a protein using phospholipids and cholesterol as carriers, we address both problems: Wnt activity remains stable in serum-free media, while non-toxic carriers allow the use of high Wnt concentrations. Stabilized Wnt3a supports strongly increased self-renewal of organ and embryonic stem cells and the serum-free establishment of human organoids from healthy and diseased intestine and liver. Moreover, the lipophilicity of Wnt3a protein greatly facilitates its purification. Our findings remove a major obstacle impeding clinical applications of adult stem cells and offer advantages for all cell culture uses of Wnt3a protein. PMID:28262686

  15. Combining subproteome enrichment and Rubisco depletion enables identification of low abundance proteins differentially regulated during plant defense.

    PubMed

    Widjaja, Ivy; Naumann, Kai; Roth, Udo; Wolf, Noreen; Mackey, David; Dangl, Jeffery L; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2009-01-01

    Transgenic Arabidopsis conditionally expressing the bacterial avrRpm1 type III effector under the control of a dexamethasone-responsive promoter were used for proteomics studies. This model system permits study of an individual effector without interference from additional bacterial components. Coupling of different prefractionation approaches to high resolution 2-DE facilitated the discovery of low abundance proteins - enabling the identification of proteins that have escaped detection in similar experiments. A total of 34 differentially regulated protein spots were identified. Four of these (a remorin, a protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C), an RNA-binding protein, and a C2-domain-containing protein) are potentially early signaling components in the interaction between AvrRpm1 and the cognate disease resistance gene product, resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola 1 (RPM1). For the remorin and RNA-binding protein, involvement of PTM and post-transcriptional regulation are implicated, respectively.

  16. A Multicenter Trial Defining a Serum Protein Signature Associated with Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gerdtsson, Anna S.; Malats, Núria; Säll, Anna; Real, Francisco X.; Porta, Miquel; Skoog, Petter; Persson, Helena; Wingren, Christer; Borrebaeck, Carl A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease with rapid tumor progression and poor prognosis. This study was motivated by the lack of sensitive and specific PDAC biomarkers and aimed to identify a diagnostic, serum protein signature for PDAC. Methods. To mimic a real life test situation, a multicenter trial comprising a serum sample cohort, including 338 patients with either PDAC or other pancreatic diseases (OPD) and controls with nonpancreatic conditions (NPC), was analyzed on 293-plex recombinant antibody microarrays targeting immunoregulatory and cancer-associated antigens. Results. Serum samples collected from different hospitals were analyzed and showed that (i) sampling from five different hospitals could not be identified as a preanalytical variable and (ii) a multiplexed biomarker signature could be identified, utilizing up to 10 serum markers that could discriminate PDAC from controls, with sensitivities and specificities in the 91–100% range. The first protein profiles associated with the location of the primary tumor in the pancreas could also be identified. Conclusions. The results demonstrate that robust enough serum signatures could be identified in a multicenter trial, potentially contributing to the development of a multiplexed biomarker immunoassay for improved PDAC diagnosis. PMID:26587286

  17. Clinical value of surfactant protein-A in serum and sputum for pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, H; Teng, G L; Gai, L Z; Yang, Y; Zhu, C J

    2013-10-24

    The aim of this study was to explore the diagnostic and differential diagnosis value of surfactant protein-A (SP-A) in the serum and sputum for pulmonary tuberculosis. A total of 101 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, 85 healthy volunteers, and 30 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients were divided into pulmonary tuberculosis group, healthy control group, and COPD group, respectively. SP-A was determined in the serum and sputum in the three groups by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of SP-A in serum was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the pulmonary tuberculosis group than in the healthy control and COPD groups. There were no differences in the SP-A expression in the sputum among the three groups. There was no significant effect of gender, age, tubercle bacillus antibodies, tuberculin purified protein derivative trial, leukocyte count, neutrophilic granulocyte, lymphocyte percentage, or lung cavities on SP-A levels in serum or sputum for the pulmonary tuberculosis group (P > 0.05). The detection of SP-A in serum and sputum was shown to be of great value for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis, and therefore merits further investigation.

  18. Protein and fat mobilization and associations with serum β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    van der Drift, S G A; Houweling, M; Schonewille, J T; Tielens, A G M; Jorritsma, R

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain information on variation between dairy cows in muscle and fat tissue mobilization around parturition and to study the association between protein and fat mobilization and serum β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA) concentrations (hyperketonemia) in this period. Thirty-four cows kept under similar conditions at a university dairy farm (no experimental treatments) were monitored from 4 wk before until 8 wk after calving. Mobilization of muscle protein was investigated by analysis of plasma 3-methylhistidine concentrations (3-MH, analyzed by a recently developed HPLC tandem mass spectrometry method) and ultrasound measurements of longissimus muscle thickness. Mobilization of fat tissue was monitored by serum nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations and ultrasound measurements of backfat thickness. Large variation was observed between cows in onset and duration of periparturient protein and fat mobilization. Plasma 3-MH concentrations and muscle thickness profiles indicated that protein mobilization started, on average, before parturition and continued until approximately wk 4 of lactation. Serum NEFA concentrations and backfat thickness profiles showed that fat mobilization occurred from parturition until the end of the study. Thus, muscle protein mobilization occurred in advance of fat mobilization in most cows from this study. We hypothesized that this might be due to a prepartum amino acid deficiency in the absence of negative energy balance. The incidence of hyperketonemia in this study was 16/34 = 47%. With the exception of 3 cows defined as having severe hyperketonemia, cows with lower 3-MH concentrations had higher serum BHBA concentrations. A possible explanation for this observation might be that higher mobilization of protein around calving might restrict ketone body production due to the higher availability of glucogenic precursors in the period of most severe negative energy balance and highest fat mobilization. The

  19. Seasonal trends in nesting leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea) serum proteins further verify capital breeding hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Justin R; Wyneken, Jeanette; Page-Karjian, Annie; Merrill, Anita; Miller, Debra L

    2014-01-01

    Serum protein concentrations provide insight into the nutritional and immune status of organisms. It has been suggested that some marine turtles are capital breeders that fast during the nesting season. In this study, we documented serum proteins in neophyte and remigrant nesting leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea). This allowed us to establish trends across the nesting season to determine whether these physiological parameters indicate if leatherbacks forage or fast while on nesting grounds. Using the biuret method and agarose gel electrophoresis, total serum protein (median = 5.0 g/dl) and protein fractions were quantified and include pre-albumin (median = 0.0 g/dl), albumin (median = 1.81 g/dl), α1-globulin (median = 0.90 g/dl), α2-globulin (median = 0.74 g/dl), total α-globulin (median = 1.64 g/dl), β-globulin (median = 0.56 g/dl), γ-globulin (median = 0.81 g/dl) and total globulin (median = 3.12 g/dl). The albumin:globulin ratio (median = 0.59) was also calculated. Confidence intervals (90%) were used to establish reference intervals. Total protein, albumin and total globulin concentrations declined in successive nesting events. Protein fractions declined at less significant rates or remained relatively constant during the nesting season. Here, we show that leatherbacks are most likely fasting during the nesting season. A minimal threshold of total serum protein concentrations of around 3.5-4.5 g/dl may physiologically signal the end of the season's nesting for individual leatherbacks. The results presented here lend further insight into the interaction between reproduction, fasting and energy reserves and will potentially improve the conservation and management of this imperiled species.

  20. Ambulation speed and corresponding mechanics are associated with changes in serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Denning, W Matt; Becker Pardo, Michael; Winward, Jason G; Hunter, Iain; Ridge, Sarah; Hopkins, J Ty; Reese, C Shane; Parcell, Allen C; Seeley, Matthew K

    2016-02-01

    Because serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been used to reflect articular cartilage condition, we aimed to identify walking and running mechanics that are associated with changes in serum COMP. Eighteen subjects (9 male, 9 female; age=23 ± 2 yrs.; mass=68.3 ± 9.6 kg; height=1.70 ± 0.08 m) completed 4000 steps on an instrumented treadmill on three separate days. Each day corresponded to a different ambulation speed: slow (preferred walking speed), medium (+50% of slow), and fast (+100% of slow). Synchronized ground reaction force and video data were collected to evaluate walking mechanics. Blood samples were collected pre-, post-, 30-minute post-, and 60-minute post-ambulation to determine serum COMP concentration at these times. Serum COMP increased 29%, 18%, and 5% immediately post ambulation for the fast, medium, and slow sessions (p<0.01). When the speeds were pooled, peak ankle inversion, knee extension, knee abduction, hip flexion, hip extension, and hip abduction moment, and knee flexion angle at impact explained 61.4% of total variance in COMP concentration change (p<0.001). These results indicate that (1) certain joint mechanics are associated with acute change in serum COMP due to ambulation, and (2) increased ambulation speed increases serum COMP concentration.

  1. Influence of colostral quality on serum proteins in dairy calves raised in smallholder farms in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kananub, Suppada; Rukkwamsuk, Theera; Arunvipas, Pipat

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the influence of colostral quality on serum proteins in calves. Samples were collected from visited farms in Kasetsart University Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Kamphaeng Saen and Nong Pho Animal Hospital. In total, 35 dairy farms contributed 80 dams and calves' samples. Colostrum samples from 80 dairy cows and blood samples from their calves were taken to evaluate colostral immunoglobulins (Ig) and immunoglobulin G (IgG), and calf serum protein and IgG. Total colostral Ig, colostral and serum IgG, and serum protein were measured by a colostrometer, single radial immunodiffusion, and refractrometer, respectively. Immunoglobulin G and serum protein concentrations increased in the 1st day after birth, and maximum concentrations were seen in the 2nd day and then decreased in the 7th and 14th days. Average ± SD total colostral IgG concentrations at calving date and at 1 and 2 days after calving were 93.85 ± 33.89, 37.11 ± 23.51, and 17.23 ± 9.4 mg/mL, respectively. The profile of total Ig and IgG concentrations in colostrum had a similar pattern, with the maximum concentrations obtained in calving date and rapidly decreased thereafter. Low IgG concentrations were seen in the 7th and 14th day after calving. The calves that were fed with high quality colostrum had higher serum protein at 1 day of age, 7.49 ± 1.01 g/dL, than calves fed with low quality colostrum, 6.40 ± 0.86 g/dL (P < 0.01). The increase in serum protein after first colostrum feeding of high and low quality colostrum was 1.55 ± 1.07 and 0.81 ± 0.69 g/dL, respectively (P = 0.02).

  2. Binding of labeled thyroxin analog to serum proteins evaluated after radioimmunoassay of free thyroxin

    SciTech Connect

    Arevalo, G.

    1989-03-01

    In ambulatory patients, assay of free thyroxin (FT4) in serum correlates well with thyroid status and with results obtained by equilibrium dialysis. The validity of FT4 results has been questioned mainly in euthyroid patients with altered concentrations of thyroid hormone-binding proteins, as in nonthyroidal illness, hereditary analbuminemia, familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia (FDH), and the presence of iodothyronine-binding antibodies. I present here a study of the binding of (/sup 125/I)T4-derivative to serum proteins in the supernate, which is ordinarily discarded after determination of FT4 by one-step radioimmunoassay with dextran-coated charcoal used to separate the free and bound fractions. The results are expressed as a ratio, with results for a normal serum pool as reference. The average ratio was high in hyperthyroid subjects, 1.26 (SD 0.12, n = 25), and in hypoalbuminemia, 1.20 (SD 0.10, n = 15), and low in FDH, 0.62 (SD 0.11, n = 9), and hypothyroid subjects, 0.90 (SD 0.06, n = 20). In normal individuals it was 0.98 (SD 0.05, n = 30). Determination of the analog-binding rate complements the FT4 result and allows for the recognition of cases with abnormal binding by serum proteins, without recourse to other tests recommended for thyroid-function studies.

  3. [Abnormal Serum Total Protein Measurement by Lipoprotein-X in an Infant with Biliary Atresia].

    PubMed

    Futatsugi, Akiko; Hidaka, Eiko; Kubota, Noriko; Nishijima, Fumie; Yoshizawa, Katsumi; Ishimine, Nau; Sugano, Mitsutoshi; Hori, Atsushi; Hidaka, Hiroya

    2015-11-01

    Lipoprotein-X (LP-X) in cholestatic jaundice causes abnormal reaction in assays for low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, but the effects on other test items are unknown. Here, we report an infant with biliary atresia showing abnormal reaction in total serum protein assay using the biuret method, and lipoprotein-X (LP-X) was then detected. In this 11-month-old female infant, jaundice was observed at 2 months old, and a diagnosis of biliary atresia was made. On biochemical tests at 12 months old, the total serum protein concentrations detected by the biuret method were very high, and the response curve and linearity of dilution were abnormal. LP-X was detected by agar electrophoresis. In addition and recovery experiments with normal serum fractionation of the patient's LP-X-rich lipoprotein fraction prepared by ultracentrifugation, normal γ-globulin fractionation showed an abnormal reaction by the biuret method. In infants with biliary atresia, we showed that the total serum protein assay by the biuret method was influenced by LP-X-rich lipoprotein, which may be caused by abnormal reaction of LP-X and γ-globulin. [Case Report].

  4. Characterization of interactions between polyphenolic compounds and human serum proteins by capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Andréa; Escuder-Gilabert, Laura; Lopes, Norberto P; Villanueva-Camañas, Rosa María; Sagrado, Salvador; Medina-Hernández, María José

    2008-05-01

    The interaction of ten natural polyphenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, apigenin, catechin, epicatechin, flavanone, flavone, quercetin, rutin, vicenin-2 and vitexin) with human serum albumin and mixtures of human serum albumin and α(1)-acid glycoprotein under near physiological conditions is studied by capillary electrophoresis-frontal analysis. Furthermore, the binding of these polyphenolic compounds to total plasmatic proteins is evaluated using ultrafiltration and capillary electrophoresis. In spite of the relatively small differences in the chemical structures of the compounds studied, large differences were observed in their binding behaviours to plasmatic proteins. The hydrophobicity, the presence/absence of some functional groups, steric hindrance and spatial arrangement seem to be key factors in the affinity of natural polyphenols towards plasmatic proteins.

  5. Assessment of 24-hours Aldosterone Administration on Protein Abundances in Fluorescence-Sorted Mouse Distal Renal Tubules by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Thomas B; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hoffert, Jason D; Jensen, Uffe B; Fenton, Robert A; Praetorius, Helle A; Knepper, Mark A; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims Aldosterone exerts multiple long-term effects in the distal renal tubules. The aim of this study was to establish a method for identifying proteins in these tubules that change in abundance by only 24-hours aldosterone administration. Methods Mice endogenously expressing green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in the connecting tubule and cortical collecting ducts were treated with a subcutaneous injection of 2.0 mg/kg aldosterone or vehicle (n=5), and sacrificed 24 hours later. Suspensions of single cells were obtained enzymatically, and eGFP positive cells were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Samples of 100 μg proteins were digested with trypsin and labeled with 8-plex iTRAQ reagents and processed for liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results FACS yielded 1.4 million cells per mouse. The LC-MS/MS spectra were matched to peptides by the SEQUEST search algorithm, which identified 3002 peptides corresponding to 506 unique proteins of which 20 significantly changed abundance 24-hours after aldosterone injection. Conclusion We find the method suitable and useful for studying hormonal effects on protein abundance in distal tubular segments. PMID:23428628

  6. Combined evaluation of a panel of protein and miRNA serum-exosome biomarkers for pancreatic cancer diagnosis increases sensitivity and specificity.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Bindhu; Yue, Shijing; Galli, Uwe; Rana, Sanyukta; Gross, Wolfgang; Müller, Miryam; Giese, Nathalia A; Kalthoff, Holger; Becker, Thomas; Büchler, Markus W; Zöller, Margot

    2015-06-01

    Late diagnosis contributes to pancreatic cancer (PaCa) dismal prognosis, urging for reliable, early detection. Serum-exosome protein and/or miRNA markers might be suitable candidates, which we controlled for patients with PaCa. Protein markers were selected according to expression in exosomes of PaCa cell line culture supernatants, but not healthy donors' serum-exosomes. miRNA was selected according to abundant recovery in microarrays of patients with PaCa, but not healthy donors' serum-exosomes and exosome-depleted serum. According to these preselections, serum-exosomes were tested by flow cytometry for the PaCa-initiating cell (PaCIC) markers CD44v6, Tspan8, EpCAM, MET and CD104. Serum-exosomes and exosome-depleted serum was tested for miR-1246, miR-4644, miR-3976 and miR-4306 recovery by qRT-PCR. The majority (95%) of patients with PaCa (131) and patients with nonPa-malignancies reacted with a panel of anti-CD44v6, -Tspan8, -EpCAM and -CD104. Serum-exosomes of healthy donors' and patients with nonmalignant diseases were not reactive. Recovery was tumor grading and staging independent including early stages. The selected miR-1246, miR-4644, miR-3976 and miR-4306 were significantly upregulated in 83% of PaCa serum-exosomes, but rarely in control groups. These miRNA were also elevated in exosome-depleted serum of patients with PaCa, but at a low level. Concomitant evaluation of PaCIC and miRNA serum-exosome marker panels significantly improved sensitivity (1.00, CI: 0.95-1) with a specificity of 0.80 (CI: 0.67-0.90) for PaCa versus all others groups and of 0.93 (CI: 0.81-0.98) excluding nonPa-malignancies. Thus, the concomitant evaluation of PaCIC and PaCa-related miRNA marker panels awaits retrospective analyses of larger cohorts, as it should allow for a highly sensitive, minimally-invasive PaCa diagnostics.

  7. Two different late embryogenesis abundant proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana contain specific domains that inhibit Escherichia coli growth.

    PubMed

    Campos, Francisco; Zamudio, Fernando; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2006-04-07

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins constitute a set of proteins widespread in the plant kingdom that show common physicochemical properties such as high hydrophilicity and high content of small amino acid residues such as glycine, alanine, and serine. Typically, these proteins accumulate in response to water deficit conditions imposed by the environment or during plant normal development. In this work, we show that the over-expression in Escherichia coli of proteins of the LEA 2 and the LEA 4 families from Arabidopsis thaliana leads to inhibition of bacterial growth and that this effect is dependent on discrete regions of the proteins. Our data indicate that their antimicrobial effect is achieved through their interaction with intracellular targets. The relevance of the cationic nature and the predicted structural organization of particular protein domains in this detrimental effect on the bacteria growth process is discussed.

  8. Immunonephelometry and radial immunodiffusion compared for measuring serum retinol-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Malvy, D J; Povéda, J D; Debruyne, M; Burtschy, B; Dostalova, L; Amédée-Manesme, O

    1993-01-01

    We compared a nephelometric method and a radial immunodiffusion (RID) assay for the measurement of retinol-binding protein in samples of serum from children with malignancies. The mean (+/- standard deviation) retinol-binding protein concentration as measured by the Behring Nephelometer was 31.0 +/- 15.6 mg/l; the mean by RID was 31.2 +/- 15.7 mg/l. This difference was not statistically significant by Student's t test (P = 0.6), and the correlation coefficient (r) was 0.87. Thus, the Behring Nephelometer method measures retinol-binding protein rapidly and as accurately as radial immunodiffusion.

  9. Cellular Binding of Anionic Nanoparticles is Inhibited by Serum Proteins Independent of Nanoparticle Composition.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Candace C; Kumar, Umesh; Payne, Christine K

    2013-09-01

    Nanoparticles used in biological applications encounter a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. Adsorption of these proteins on the nanoparticle surface results in the formation of a "protein corona," which can dominate the interaction of the nanoparticle with the cellular environment. The goal of this research was to determine how nanoparticle composition and surface modification affect the cellular binding of protein-nanoparticle complexes. We examined the cellular binding of a collection of commonly used anionic nanoparticles: quantum dots, colloidal gold nanoparticles, and low-density lipoprotein particles, in the presence and absence of extracellular proteins. These experiments have the advantage of comparing different nanoparticles under identical conditions. Using a combination of fluorescence and dark field microscopy, flow cytometry, and spectroscopy, we find that cellular binding of these anionic nanoparticles is inhibited by serum proteins independent of nanoparticle composition or surface modification. We expect these results will aid in the design of nanoparticles for in vivo applications.

  10. Increasing the X-ray diffraction power of protein crystals by dehydration: the case of bovine serum albumin and a survey of literature data.

    PubMed

    Russo Krauss, Irene; Sica, Filomena; Mattia, Carlo Andrea; Merlino, Antonello

    2012-01-01

    Serum albumin is one of the most widely studied proteins. It is the most abundant protein in plasma with a typical concentration of 5 g/100 mL and the principal transporter of fatty acids in plasma. While the crystal structures of human serum albumin (HSA) free and in complex with fatty acids, hemin, and local anesthetics have been characterized, no crystallographic models are available on bovine serum albumin (BSA), presumably because of the poor diffraction power of existing hexagonal BSA crystals. Here, the crystallization and diffraction data of a new BSA crystal form, obtained by the hanging drop method using MPEG 5K as precipitating agent, are presented. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 216.45 Å, b = 44.72 Å, c = 140.18 Å, β = 114.5°. Dehydration was found to increase the diffraction limit of BSA crystals from ~8 Å to 3.2 Å, probably by improving the packing of protein molecules in the crystal lattice. These results, together with a survey of more than 60 successful cases of protein crystal dehydration, confirm that it can be a useful procedure to be used in initial screening as a method of improving the diffraction limits of existing crystals.

  11. Analysis of protein oxidation in serum of fetal and newborn piglets and the influence of iron dextran on induction of protein carbonyls.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods were employed to evaluate serum biomarkers associated with protein oxidative stress and damage, to determine potential sources of metabolic stress in baby pigs. Protein carbonyls in serum were converted to dinitrophenyl (DNP) derivatives with DNP-hydrazine, precipitated with TCA, extracted i...

  12. Discovery and verification of serum differential expression proteins for pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiping; He, Xiao; Li, Hongtao; Zhou, Yi; Zang, Ning; Hu, Shuixiu; Zheng, Yanyan; He, Min

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is a chronic disease and has remained a severe threat to public health. Valuable biomarkers for improving the detection rate are crucial for controlling this disease. The purpose of this study was to discover potential biomarkers in sera from PTB patients compared with pneumonia patients and normal healthy controls. A total of 336 human serum specimens were enrolled in this study. Differentially expressed proteins were identified using iTRAQ method combining with MALDI-TOF-MS. Data was analyzed using relative bioinformatics methods. Potential biomarkers were further validated by IHC, ELISA and Western blot. As a result, 489 non-redundant proteins were identified in the sera, and 159 of which could be quantified by calculating their iTRAQ ratios. Compared to the controls, 26 differentially expressed proteins were recognized among PTB patients, including 16 overexpressed proteins and 10 downregulated proteins. Analysis of their functional interactions revealed that 12 proteins appeared in the center of the functional network. One of these key proteins, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), was found to be significantly elevated among PTB patients as compared with the controls examined by IHC, ELISA and Western blot. This result was consistent with the iTRAQ result. An independent blinded testing set to examine serum SHBG by ELISA achieved an accuracy of 78.74%, sensitivity of 75.6% and specificity of 91.5% in diagnosing PTB. In summary, iTRAQ in combination with MALDI-TOF-MS technology can efficiently screen differentially expressed proteins in sera from the PTB patients. SHBG is suggested to be a possible and novel serum biomarker for PTB.

  13. Ultrasensitive protein detection in blood serum using gold nanoparticle probes by single molecule spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiji; Wang, Chungang; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2009-07-01

    A one-step rapid and ultrasensitive immunoassay capable of detecting proteins in blood serum is developed using gold nanoprobes and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). In this approach we take advantage of the inherent photoluminescence property of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) to develop a fluorophore-free assay to observe binding entities by monitoring the diffusion of bound versus unbound molecules in a limited confocal volume. 40-nm GNPs conjugated separately with rabbit anti-IgG (Fc) and goat anti-IgG (Fab) when incubated in blood serum containing IgG forms a sandwich structure constituting dimers and oligomers that can be differentiated by to detect IgG in blood serum at a limit of detection (LOD) of 5 pg/ml. The novelty of integrating GNPs with FCS to develop a sensitive blood immunoassay brings single molecule methods one step closer to the clinic.

  14. Separation of Fc-binding serum proteins by preparative flat-bed isotachophoresis.

    PubMed

    Nicolaisen, E M; Brogren, C H

    1982-10-29

    Preparative flat-bed isotachophoresis with discrete spacers was applied as a single-step procedure to separate 2 Fc-dependent activities of normal chicken serum, i.e., (1) the ability to raise the titre of haemagglutinating allo-antisera which is due to a high molecular weight beta-globulin (HEF), (2) the ability to activate guinea pig complement components in mixed complement reaction. The results demonstrate that the 2 activities can be clearly separated, and HEF must therefore be different from the first complement factor in the chicken. Under the chosen conditions the molecule active in the mixed complement reaction is not stacked in contrast to other serum protein including HEF. The same technique with human serum shows that human Clq behaves in the same was as the chicken complement factor. This means that by selective unstacking, flat-bed isotachophoresis can be used as an efficient single-step purification method for human and chicken Clq.

  15. Associations between serum C-reactive protein and serum zinc, ferritin, and copper in Guatemalan school children.

    PubMed

    Bui, Vinh Q; Stein, Aryeh D; DiGirolamo, Ann M; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Flores-Ayala, Rafael C; Ramirez-Zea, Manuel; Grant, Frederick K; Villalpando, Salvador; Martorell, Reynaldo

    2012-08-01

    Inflammation affects trace nutrient concentrations, but research on copper and particularly in children is limited. We assessed associations between serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and zinc, iron, copper, and other biomarkers (alkaline phosphatase, hemoglobin, and albumin), in 634 healthy 6- to 11-year-old Guatemalan schoolchildren. CRP was measured by a standardized, high-sensitive method. For significant associations with CRP, we stratified nutrient concentrations across categories of CRP and compared concentrations above and below several CRP cutoff points (0.5, 1, 3, 5, and 10 mg/L), and then adjusted values using correction factors (ratios of geometric means of the nutrients in the low and high groups). Prevalence of serum zinc (<65 μg/dL0, ferritin (<15 μg/L), and copper (<90 μg/dL) deficiency were 21%, 2.1%, and 23.8%, respectively. Median (25th and 75th percentiles) CRP was 0.56 (0.26 and 1.54) mg/L. CRP concentration was positively associated with ferritin and copper concentrations (r = 0.23 and 0.29, respectively; P < 0.0001) but not with zinc and other biomarkers (P > 0.05). Regardless of CRP cutoffs, high (> cutoff) vs. low (≤ cutoff) CRP levels had higher ferritin and copper concentrations and lower prevalence of copper deficiency of <90 μg/dL (P < 0.05). Adjustment for inflammation had the greatest influence on recalculated prevalence for the CRP 0.5 mg/L cutoff. The low ferritin prevalence hardly changed (from 2.1% to 2.5%) while the low copper prevalence changed appreciably (from 23.8% to 31.2%). In conclusion, CRP was positively associated with ferritin and copper but not with zinc concentrations. Adjustment for inflammation had little effect on low ferritin prevalence, low to begin with, and a large impact on low copper prevalence. High-sensitive CRP methods and the use of very low CRP cutoffs may be more accurate than traditional CRP methods in the adjustment of serum copper concentrations for inflammation in healthy school children.

  16. Evaluation of steric exclusion chromatography on cryogel column for the separation of serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuan; Bai, Shu; Tao, Shi-Peng; Sun, Yan

    2014-03-14

    Steric exclusion chromatography (SXC) is a new mode of protein chromatography, in which large proteins are retained on hydrophilic stationary phase surface due to the steric exclusion of polyethylene glycol (PEG) in the mobile phase, and thereafter the retained proteins can be eluted by reducing PEG concentration. In this work, SXC was evaluated on a polyacrylamide cryogel monolith. Microscopic observation of γ-globulin precipitates on the gel surface in SXC was reported for the first time. Due to the compact packing of protein precipitates on the stationary phase surface, the dynamic retention capacity of the cryogel monolith for γ-globulin reached 20 mg/mL bed volume, much higher than those of cryogel beds in adsorption-based chromatography. The effect of molecular weight and concentration of PEG, solution pH and salt concentration on protein retention capacity was in agreement with the earlier work on SXC. Because the cryogel monoliths with interconnected macropores (10-100 μm) allow much easy flow-through of viscous PEG buffer, the SXC can be operated at low back pressure. Hence, the cryogel monoliths are more suitable for SXC than other monoliths of narrow pores reported previously. In the separation of bovine serum proteins, albumin was recovered in the breakthrough fraction with high purity, and globulin was over eight times concentrated in the elution pool. This work has, thus, demonstrated the rapid serum protein separation and concentration by SXC on the cryogel monolith columns.

  17. Measuring interactions between polydimethylsiloxane and serum proteins at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhengzheng; Hsieh, Wan-Ting; Baumgart, Tobias; Dmochowski, Ivan J

    2013-07-30

    The interaction between synthetic polymers and proteins at interfaces is relevant to basic science as well as a wide range of applications in biotechnology and medicine. One particularly common and important interface is the air-water interface (AWI). Due to the special energetics and dynamics of molecules at the AWI, the interplay between synthetic polymer and protein can be very different from that in bulk solution. In this paper, we applied the Langmuir-Blodgett technique and fluorescence microscopy to investigate how the compression state of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) film at the AWI affects the subsequent adsorption of serum protein [e.g., human serum albumin (HSA) or immunoglobulin G (IgG)] and the interaction between PDMS and protein. Of particular note is our observation of circular PDMS domains with micrometer diameters that form at the AWI in the highly compressed state of the surface film: proteins were shown to adsorb preferentially to the surface of these circular PDMS domains, accompanied by a greater than 4-fold increase in protein found in the interfacial film. The PDMS-only film and the PDMS-IgG composite film were transferred to cover glass, and platinum-carbon replicas of the transferred films were further characterized by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. We conclude that the structure of the PDMS film greatly affects the amount and distribution of protein at the interface.

  18. Recombinant protein production by the baculovirus-insect cell system in Basal media without serum supplementation.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Norikatsu; Yamaji, Hideki; Fukuda, Hideki

    2003-11-01

    The production of beta-galactosidase by Sf9 cells infected with recombinant Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcNPV) was investigated in shake-flask culture using two serum-free basal media: Grace's medium and TNM-FH (Grace's medium supplemented with lactalbumin hydrolysate and yeast extract). At the time of infection, cells grown in serum-supplemented TNM-FH were transferred into fresh basal media without adaptation. The absence of serum depressed the beta-galactosidase yield considerably in Grace's medium, but to a much lesser extent in TNM-FH, where it reached around 2/3 of the level obtained in TNM-FH supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS). While both lactalbumin hydrolysate and yeast extract promoted beta-galactosidase production, their removal by medium replacement on post-infection day 1 gave a beta-galactosidase yield nearly equal to that obtained in their continuous presence. Supplementation of basal media with phosphatidic acid (PA) from egg yolk lecithin, which has been shown to enhance cell growth and recombinant protein production in serum-free culture of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, was also effective in increasing beta-galactosidase yield. Elevating the multiplicity of infection (MOI) from 2 to 10 plaque-forming units per cell (pfu/cell) also resulted in an increase in product yield. These results provide information important to the development of cost-effective serum-free culture technology for use in large-scale production of recombinant proteins by the baculovirus-insect cell system.

  19. Mass spectrum analysis of serum biomarker proteins from patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Na; Wang, Jie; Yu, Yaqin; Shi, Jieping; Li, Xiaokun; Xu, Bin; Yu, Qiong

    2014-05-01

    Diagnosis of schizophrenia does not have a clear objective test at present, so we aimed to identify the potential biomarkers for the diagnosis of schizophrenia by comparison of serum protein profiling between first-episode schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. The combination of a magnetic bead separation system with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS) was used to analyze the serum protein spectra of 286 first-episode patients with schizophrenia, 41 chronic disease patients and 304 healthy controls. FlexAnlysis 3.0 and ClinProTools(TM) 2.1 software was used to establish a diagnostic model for schizophrenia. The results demonstrated that 10 fragmented peptides demonstrated an optimal discriminatory performance. Among these fragmented peptides, the peptide with m/z 1206.58 was identified as a fragment of fibrinopeptide A. Receiver operating characteristic analysis for m/z 1206.58 showed that the area under the curve was 0.981 for schizophrenia vs healthy controls, and 0.999 for schizophrenia vs other chronic disease controls. From our result, we consider that the analysis of serum protein spectrum using the magnetic bead separation system and MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS is an objective diagnostic tool. We conclude that fibrinopeptide A has the potential to be a biomarker for diagnosis of schizophrenia. This protein may also help to elucidate schizophrenia disease pathogenesis.

  20. Large-scale serum protein biomarker discovery in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hathout, Yetrib; Brody, Edward; Clemens, Paula R; Cripe, Linda; DeLisle, Robert Kirk; Furlong, Pat; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Hache, Lauren; Henricson, Erik; Hoffman, Eric P; Kobayashi, Yvonne Monique; Lorts, Angela; Mah, Jean K; McDonald, Craig; Mehler, Bob; Nelson, Sally; Nikrad, Malti; Singer, Britta; Steele, Fintan; Sterling, David; Sweeney, H Lee; Williams, Steve; Gold, Larry

    2015-06-09

    Serum biomarkers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) may provide deeper insights into disease pathogenesis, suggest new therapeutic approaches, serve as acute read-outs of drug effects, and be useful as surrogate outcome measures to predict later clinical benefit. In this study a large-scale biomarker discovery was performed on serum samples from patients with DMD and age-matched healthy volunteers using a modified aptamer-based proteomics technology. Levels of 1,125 proteins were quantified in serum samples from two independent DMD cohorts: cohort 1 (The Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy-Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center), 42 patients with DMD and 28 age-matched normal volunteers; and cohort 2 (The Cooperative International Neuromuscular Research Group, Duchenne Natural History Study), 51 patients with DMD and 17 age-matched normal volunteers. Forty-four proteins showed significant differences that were consistent in both cohorts when comparing DMD patients and healthy volunteers at a 1% false-discovery rate, a large number of significant protein changes for such a small study. These biomarkers can be classified by known cellular processes and by age-dependent changes in protein concentration. Our findings demonstrate both the utility of this unbiased biomarker discovery approach and suggest potential new diagnostic and therapeutic avenues for ameliorating the burden of DMD and, we hope, other rare and devastating diseases.

  1. Large-scale serum protein biomarker discovery in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hathout, Yetrib; Brody, Edward; Clemens, Paula R.; Cripe, Linda; DeLisle, Robert Kirk; Furlong, Pat; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Hache, Lauren; Henricson, Erik; Hoffman, Eric P.; Kobayashi, Yvonne Monique; Lorts, Angela; Mah, Jean K.; McDonald, Craig; Mehler, Bob; Nelson, Sally; Nikrad, Malti; Singer, Britta; Steele, Fintan; Sterling, David; Sweeney, H. Lee; Williams, Steve; Gold, Larry

    2015-01-01

    Serum biomarkers in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) may provide deeper insights into disease pathogenesis, suggest new therapeutic approaches, serve as acute read-outs of drug effects, and be useful as surrogate outcome measures to predict later clinical benefit. In this study a large-scale biomarker discovery was performed on serum samples from patients with DMD and age-matched healthy volunteers using a modified aptamer-based proteomics technology. Levels of 1,125 proteins were quantified in serum samples from two independent DMD cohorts: cohort 1 (The Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy–Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center), 42 patients with DMD and 28 age-matched normal volunteers; and cohort 2 (The Cooperative International Neuromuscular Research Group, Duchenne Natural History Study), 51 patients with DMD and 17 age-matched normal volunteers. Forty-four proteins showed significant differences that were consistent in both cohorts when comparing DMD patients and healthy volunteers at a 1% false-discovery rate, a large number of significant protein changes for such a small study. These biomarkers can be classified by known cellular processes and by age-dependent changes in protein concentration. Our findings demonstrate both the utility of this unbiased biomarker discovery approach and suggest potential new diagnostic and therapeutic avenues for ameliorating the burden of DMD and, we hope, other rare and devastating diseases. PMID:26039989

  2. Detection of Serum Protein Biomarkers for the Diagnosis and Staging of Hepatoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Li, Juan; Zhang, Junjie; Gao, Pengfei; Pei, Hang; Wang, Lei; Guo, Fei; Yu, Jiekai; Zheng, Shu; Wang, Jiaxiang

    2015-06-04

    The present study aimed to identify serum biomarkers for the detection of hepatoblastoma (HB). Serum samples were collected from 71 HB patients (stage I, n = 19; stage II, n = 19, stage III, n = 19; and stage IV, n = 14) and 23 age- and sex-matched healthy children. Differential expression of serum protein markers were screened using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS), and the target proteins were isolated and purified using HPLC and identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS), SEQUEST, and bioinformatics analysis. Differential protein expression was confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent analysis (ELISA). SELDI-TOF-MS screening identified a differentially expressed protein with an m/z of 9348 Da, which was subsequently identified as Apo A-I; its expression was significantly lower in the HB group as compared to the normal control group (1546.67 ± 757.81 vs. 3359.21 ± 999.36, respectively; p < 0.01). Although the expression level decreased with increasing disease stage, pair-wise comparison revealed significant differences in Apo A-I expression between the normal group and the HB subgroups (p < 0.01). ELISA verified the reduced expression of Apo A-I in the HB group. Taken together, these results suggest that Apo A-I may represent a serum protein biomarker of HB. Further studies will assess the value of using Apo A-I expression for HB diagnosis and staging.

  3. Solid-phase immunoradiometric assay for serum amyloid A protein using magnetisable cellulose particles.

    PubMed

    De Beer, F C; Dyck, R F; Pepys, M B

    1982-10-29

    An immunoradiometric assay for human serum amyloid A protein (SAA) was developed using magnetisable cellulose particles as the solid phase. Rabbit antiserum to to SAA was raised by immunization with SAA isolated from acute-phase serum by gel filtration in formic acid. The antiserum was rendered monospecific for SAA by solid-phase immunoabsorption with normal human serum, which contains only traces of SAA, and some was coupled covalently to the cellulose particles. Immunopurified anti-SAA antibodies were isolated from the monospecific anti-SAA serum by binding to, and elution from insolubilized acute-phase serum and were radiolabelled with 125I. The assay was calibrated with an acute phase serum which contained 6000 times more SAA than normal sera with the lowest detectable level of SAA, and an arbitrary value of 6000 U/l was assigned to this standard. Sera were tested in the native, undenatured state and there was no increase in SAA immunoreactivity following alkali treatment or heating. The assay range was from 1-2000 U/l so that all SAA levels above 6 U/l could be measured on a single (1:6) dilution of serum. The intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 11.7 and 15.0% respectively. Among 100 healthy normal subjects (50 male, 50 female) the median SAA level was 9 U/l, range less than 1-100, with 93% below 20 U/l and only 2% below the lower limit of sensitivity of the assay (1 U/l).

  4. Use of heterologous immunoassays for quantification of serum proteins: The case of canine C-reactive protein

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Prieto, Alberto; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Escribano, Damián; Martínez-Subiela, Silvia; Cerón, José J.

    2017-01-01

    The use of heterologous immunoassays containing antibodies raised against a different biological species for quantification of serum proteins is studied and discussed, taking as example the case of the use of a commercially available heterologous assay containing antibodies against human C-reactive protein (hCRP) for quantification of CRP in serum of dogs. This assay was adapted and validated for measurements of canine CRP (cCRP) and compared with three different homologous assays containing species-specific canine antibodies, which are currently commercially available for cCRP determination. Serum samples from healthy and diseased dogs (n = 44) were used. Analytical evaluation included precision, accuracy, limit of detection and lower limit of quantification for all assays. In the case of the heterologous assay also cross-reactivity of the antibody of the heterologous assay with cCRP was evaluated by a Western-Blot analysis giving a positive result. The heterologous assay showed similar results than the homologous assays in all the tests of the analytical evaluation that indicated that the assay was precise and accurate. Method comparison showed a high correlation between all assays (r≥0.9). The Bland-Altman test revealed that the heterologous assay showed a proportional error when compared with the homologous automated assays and a random error when compared with the point-of-care assay. All four CRP assays were able to detect higher CRP values in dogs with inflammatory conditions compared with healthy dogs. It is concluded that heterologous immunoassays could be used for quantification of serum proteins in different species, provided that the antibody has cross-reactivity with the protein to be measured and the assay give satisfactory results in the analytical validation tests. In addition, use of species-specific calibrators and an appropriate batch validation are recommended in these cases. PMID:28222144

  5. Use of heterologous immunoassays for quantification of serum proteins: The case of canine C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Prieto, Alberto; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta; Escribano, Damián; Martínez-Subiela, Silvia; Cerón, José J

    2017-01-01

    The use of heterologous immunoassays containing antibodies raised against a different biological species for quantification of serum proteins is studied and discussed, taking as example the case of the use of a commercially available heterologous assay containing antibodies against human C-reactive protein (hCRP) for quantification of CRP in serum of dogs. This assay was adapted and validated for measurements of canine CRP (cCRP) and compared with three different homologous assays containing species-specific canine antibodies, which are currently commercially available for cCRP determination. Serum samples from healthy and diseased dogs (n = 44) were used. Analytical evaluation included precision, accuracy, limit of detection and lower limit of quantification for all assays. In the case of the heterologous assay also cross-reactivity of the antibody of the heterologous assay with cCRP was evaluated by a Western-Blot analysis giving a positive result. The heterologous assay showed similar results than the homologous assays in all the tests of the analytical evaluation that indicated that the assay was precise and accurate. Method comparison showed a high correlation between all assays (r≥0.9). The Bland-Altman test revealed that the heterologous assay showed a proportional error when compared with the homologous automated assays and a random error when compared with the point-of-care assay. All four CRP assays were able to detect higher CRP values in dogs with inflammatory conditions compared with healthy dogs. It is concluded that heterologous immunoassays could be used for quantification of serum proteins in different species, provided that the antibody has cross-reactivity with the protein to be measured and the assay give satisfactory results in the analytical validation tests. In addition, use of species-specific calibrators and an appropriate batch validation are recommended in these cases.

  6. Region-Specific Protein Abundance Changes in the Brain of MPTP-induced Parkinson’s Disease Mouse Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu; Zhou, Jianying; Chin, Mark H; Schepmoes, Athena A; Petyuk, Vladislav A; Weitz, Karl K; Petritis, Brianne O; Monroe, Matthew E; Camp, David G; Wood, Stephen A; Melega, William P; Bigelow, Diana J; Smith, Desmond J; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D

    2010-02-15

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the nigrostriatal region of the brain; however, the neurodegeneration extends well beyond dopaminergic neurons. To gain a better understanding of the molecular changes relevant to PD, we applied two-dimensional LC-MS/MS to comparatively analyze the proteome changes in four brain regions (striatum, cerebellum, cortex, and the rest of brain) using a MPTP-induced PD mouse model with the objective to identify nigrostriatal-specific and other region-specific protein abundance changes. The combined analyses resulted in the identification of 4,895 non-redundant proteins with at least two unique peptides per protein. The relative abundance changes in each analyzed brain region were estimated based on the spectral count information. A total of 518 proteins were observed with significant MPTP-induced changes across different brain regions. 270 of these proteins were observed with specific changes occurring either only in the striatum and/or in the rest of the brain region that contains substantia nigra, suggesting that these proteins are associated with the underlying nigrostriatal pathways. Many of the proteins that exhibit significant abundance changes were associated with dopamine signaling, mitochondrial dysfunction, the ubiquitin system, calcium signaling, the oxidative stress response, and apoptosis. A set of proteins with either consistent change across all brain regions or with changes specific to the cortex and cerebellum regions were also detected. One of the interesting proteins is ubiquitin specific protease (USP9X), a deubiquination enzyme involved in the protection of proteins from degradation and promotion of the TGF-β pathway, which exhibited altered abundances in all brain regions. Western blot validation showed similar spatial changes, suggesting that USP9X is potentially associated with neurodegeneration. Together, this study for the first time presents an overall picture of

  7. Validation of an immunoturbidimetric method for determination of porcine serum C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Saco, Yolanda; Fraile, Lorenzo; Giménez, Mercè; Canalias, Francesca; Bassols, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Measurement of porcine C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum is an important tool for monitoring health and welfare in pigs. In this study, an immunoturbidimetric method from Olympus System Reagent (OSR 6147) used to measure human CRP in serum that employ a human traceable calibrator has been evaluated in porcine serum samples. Intra- and inter-assay imprecision were lower than that obtained with the porcine-specific commercially available ELISA. The expected difference in serum CRP between healthy and non-healthy pigs was detected. CRP values measured by the immunoturbidimetric method showed a good correlation with those obtained by ELISA, although differences in absolute CRP values were observed. When an in-house porcine standard was used a better agreement was obtained. In conclusion, the immunoturbidimetric method of Olympus can be used with porcine samples. The easier use of this method should facilitate the implementation of CRP serum determination for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in swine medicine. The results emphasize the need to establish species-specific standard and methods to decrease inter-laboratory discrepancies.

  8. Elevated serum interferon γ-induced protein 10 kDa is associated with TAFRO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iwaki, Noriko; Gion, Yuka; Kondo, Eisei; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Masunari, Taro; Moro, Hiroshi; Nikkuni, Koji; Takai, Kazue; Hagihara, Masao; Hashimoto, Yuko; Yokota, Kenji; Okamoto, Masataka; Nakao, Shinji; Yoshino, Tadashi; Sato, Yasuharu

    2017-02-13

    Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder. It is characterized by inflammatory symptoms, and interleukin (IL)-6 contributes to the disease pathogenesis. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) often drives hypercytokinemia in MCD, although the etiology of HHV-8-negative MCD is idiopathic (iMCD). A distinct subtype of iMCD that shares a constellation of clinical features including thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O) has been reported as TAFRO-iMCD, however the differences in cytokine profiles between TAFRO-iMCD and iMCD have not been established. We retrospectively compared levels of serum interferon γ-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA, interleukin (IL)-10, and other cytokines between 11 cases of TAFRO-iMCD, 6 cases of plasma cell type iMCD, and 21 healthy controls. During flare-ups, patients with TAFRO-iMCD had significantly higher serum IP-10 and tended to have lower PDGF-AA levels than the other 2 groups. In addition, serum IL-10, IL-23, and vascular endothelial growth factor-A were elevated in both TAFRO-iMCD and iMCD. Elevated serum IP-10 is associated with inflammatory diseases including infectious diseases. There was a strong correlation between high serum IP-10 and the presence of TAFRO-iMCD, suggesting that IP-10 might be involved in the pathogenesis of TAFRO-iMCD.

  9. Serum protein layers on parylene-C and silicon oxide: effect on cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Delivopoulos, Evangelos; Ouberai, Myriam M; Coffey, Paul D; Swann, Marcus J; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Welland, Mark E

    2015-02-01

    Among the range of materials used in bioengineering, parylene-C has been used in combination with silicon oxide and in presence of the serum proteins, in cell patterning. However, the structural properties of adsorbed serum proteins on these substrates still remain elusive. In this study, we use an optical biosensing technique to decipher the properties of fibronectin (Fn) and serum albumin adsorbed on parylene-C and silicon oxide substrates. Our results show the formation of layers with distinct structural and adhesive properties. Thin, dense layers are formed on parylene-C, whereas thicker, more diffuse layers are formed on silicon oxide. These results suggest that Fn acquires a compact structure on parylene-C and a more extended structure on silicon oxide. Nonetheless, parylene-C and silicon oxide substrates coated with Fn host cell populations that exhibit focal adhesion complexes and good cell attachment. Albumin adopts a deformed structure on parylene-C and a globular structure on silicon oxide, and does not support significant cell attachment on either surface. Interestingly, the co-incubation of Fn and albumin at the ratio found in serum, results in the preferential adsorption of albumin on parylene-C and Fn on silicon oxide. This finding is supported by the exclusive formation of focal adhesion complexes in differentiated mouse embryonic stem cells (CGR8), cultured on Fn/albumin coated silicon oxide, but not on parylene-C. The detailed information provided in this study on the distinct properties of layers of serum proteins on substrates such as parylene-C and silicon oxide is highly significant in developing methods for cell patterning.

  10. The relative protein abundance of UGT1A alternative splice variants as a key determinant of glucuronidation activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rouleau, Mélanie; Roberge, Joannie; Falardeau, Sarah-Ann; Villeneuve, Lyne; Guillemette, Chantal

    2013-04-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is one of the most significant components of the functional complexity of human UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes (UGTs), particularly for the UGT1A gene, which represents one of the best examples of a drug-metabolizing gene regulated by AS. Shorter UGT1A isoforms [isoform 2 (i2)] are deficient in glucuronic acid transferase activity but function as negative regulators of enzyme activity through protein-protein interaction. Their abundance, relative to active UGT1A enzymes, is expected to be a determinant of the global transferase activity of cells and tissues. Here we tested whether i2-mediated inhibition increases with greater abundance of the i2 protein relative to the isoform 1 (i1) enzyme, using the extrahepatic UGT1A7 as a model and a series of 23 human embryonic kidney 293 clonal cell lines expressing variable contents of i1 and i2 proteins. Upon normalization for i1, a significant reduction of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin glucuronide formation was observed for i1+i2 clones (mean of 53%) compared with the reference i1 cell line. In these clones, the i2 protein content varied greatly (38-263% relative to i1) and revealed two groups: 17 clones with i2 < i1 (60% ± 3%) and 6 clones with i2 ≥ i1 (153% ± 24%). The inhibition induced by i2 was more substantial for clones displaying i2 ≥ i1 (74.5%; P = 0.001) compared with those with i2 < i1 (45.5%). Coimmunoprecipitation supports a more substantial i1-i2 complex formation when i2 exceeds i1. We conclude that the relative abundance of regulatory i2 proteins has the potential to drastically alter the local drug metabolism in the cells, particularly when i2 surpasses the protein content of i1.

  11. Serum Proteomic Signature of Human Chagasic Patients for the Identification of Novel Potential Protein Biomarkers of Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jian-Jun; Zago, M. Paola; Nuñez, Sonia; Gupta, Shivali; Burgos, Federico Nuñez; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2012-01-01

    Chagas disease is initiated upon infection by Trypanosoma cruzi. Among the health consequences is a decline in heart function, and the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying this manifestation are not well understood. To explore the possible mechanisms, we employed IgY LC10 affinity chromatography in conjunction with ProteomeLab PF2D and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to resolve the proteome signature of high and low abundance serum proteins in chagasic patients. MALDI-TOF MS/MS analysis yielded 80 and 14 differentially expressed proteins associated with cardiomyopathy of chagasic and other etiologies, respectively. The extent of oxidative stress-induced carbonyl modifications of the differentially expressed proteins (n = 26) was increased and coupled with a depression of antioxidant proteins. Functional annotation of the top networks developed by ingenuity pathway analysis of proteome database identified dysregulation of inflammation/acute phase response signaling and lipid metabolism relevant to production of prostaglandins and arachidonic acid in chagasic patients. Overlay of the major networks identified prothrombin and plasminogen at a nodal position with connectivity to proteome signature indicative of heart disease (i.e., thrombosis, angiogenesis, vasodilatation of blood vessels or the aorta, and increased permeability of blood vessel and endothelial tubes), and inflammatory responses (e.g., platelet aggregation, complement activation, and phagocyte activation and migration). The detection of cardiac proteins (myosin light chain 2 and myosin heavy chain 11) and increased levels of vinculin and plasminogen provided a comprehensive set of biomarkers of cardiac muscle injury and development of clinical Chagas disease in human patients. These results provide an impetus for biomarker validation in large cohorts of clinically characterized chagasic patients. PMID:22543060

  12. Effects of adherence, activation and distinct serum proteins on the in vitro human monocyte maturation process.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Y; Griffith, R; Miller, P; Stevenson, G W; Lund, S; Kanapa, D J; Stevenson, H C

    1988-03-01

    Elutriator-purified human monocytes were cultured in a serum-free (SF) medium, and various serum proteins and functional activating agents were assessed for their effects on the in vitro maturation of human monocytes to macrophages. Following 3 days of suspension culture in Teflon labware, 60% of the monocytes were easily recovered. When varying concentrations of human AB serum (HuAB) were employed, human monocyte maturation progressed rapidly; the kinetics of this maturation process during cell suspension culture were very similar to the pattern observed following adherence culture. In contrast, when SF medium was employed, a marked retardation of the monocyte maturation process was observed; this could not be attributed to any changes in cell recovery and/or viability. Thus, cells could be maintained in their monocytoid form for 3 days when cultured in SF medium. When HuAB was added after 3 days of culture, human monocyte maturation into macrophages proceeded at a normal rate. We attempted to characterize certain of the serum protein(s) found in HuAB which promoted the monocyte maturation process. Human immunoglobulin G (IgG) was found to be the most potent serum protein in increasing 5'-N activity and decreasing peroxidase activity of suspension cultured monocytes. Immunoglobulin M (IgM) and albumin (Alb) were shown not to have significant monocyte maturation activity. Heat-treated human gamma globulin and IgG purified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were shown to have patterns identical with that of untreated HGG and IgG with regard to promoting monocyte maturation; F(ab')2 was not an active maturation promoter, indicating the need for an intact Fc portion of the IgG molecule. Fibrinogen and fibronectin also had maturation promoting activity. Finally, addition of the potent monocyte functional activators, muramyl dipeptide (MDP), polyriboinosinic:polyribocytidilic acid (Poly I:C), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) had no effect on the monocyte

  13. Method optimization for proteomic analysis of soybean leaf: Improvements in identification of new and low-abundance proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Rosilene Oliveira; de Almeida Soares, Eduardo; de Barros, Everaldo Gonçalves; Loureiro, Marcelo Ehlers

    2012-01-01

    The most critical step in any proteomic study is protein extraction and sample preparation. Better solubilization increases the separation and resolution of gels, allowing identification of a higher number of proteins and more accurate quantitation of differences in gene expression. Despite the existence of published results for the optimization of proteomic analyses of soybean seeds, no comparable data are available for proteomic studies of soybean leaf tissue. In this work we have tested the effects of modification of a TCA-acetone method on the resolution of 2-DE gels of leaves and roots of soybean. Better focusing was obtained when both mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol were used in the extraction buffer simultaneously. Increasing the number of washes of TCA precipitated protein with acetone, using a final wash with 80% ethanol and using sonication to ressuspend the pellet increased the number of detected proteins as well the resolution of the 2-DE gels. Using this approach we have constructed a soybean protein map. The major group of identified proteins corresponded to genes of unknown function. The second and third most abundant groups of proteins were composed of photosynthesis and metabolism related genes. The resulting protocol improved protein solubility and gel resolution allowing the identification of 122 soybean leaf proteins, 72 of which were not detected in other published soybean leaf 2-DE gel datasets, including a transcription factor and several signaling proteins. PMID:22802721

  14. Determination of retinol-binding protein in serum by kinetic immunonephelometry with polyethylene glycol pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Hallworth, M J; Calvin, J; Price, C P

    1984-11-01

    This work describes the use of polyethylene glycol as a pretreatment reagent to remove endogenous light scattering material from serum samples prior to automated immunonephelometric analysis on a centrifugal analyser. An assay system for retinol-binding protein is described, which allows rapid (10 minutes) quantitation of retinol-binding protein in serum samples with a detection limit of 5 mg/L and between-assay coefficients of variation ranging from 2.9% to 4.0%. The assay range is 5-80 mg/L and accuracy comparisons with a Mancini single radial immunodiffusion method yield a regression line y = 0.89 x + 0.52 (r = 0.98, n = 22). The problem of analyte precipitation associated with use of pretreatment regimes is discussed.

  15. Elevation of serum surfactant protein-A with exacerbation in canine eosinophilic pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    SONE, Katsuhito; AKIYOSHI, Hideo; HAYASHI, Akiyoshi; OHASHI, Fumihito

    2015-01-01

    A 7-year-old female spayed Labrador Retriever was admitted to our hospital, because of cough with sputum. She was diagnosed as having canine eosinophilic pneumonia (CEP) based on blood eosinophilia, bronchial pattern and infiltrative shadow observed on thoracic radiography, bronchiolar obstruction and air-space consolidation predominantly affecting the right caudal lung lobe, as revealed by computed tomography (CT), predominant eosinophils in CT-guided fine needle aspiration and the clinical course. She exhibited a good response to steroid therapy, and the cough disappeared. The serum surfactant protein (SP)-A level increased with the aggravated symptom and decreased markedly with improvement compared with the C-reactive protein level and the number of eosinophils. We propose that serum SP-A level is a good biomarker in CEP. PMID:26300438

  16. Inflammatory Serum Proteins Are Severely Altered in Metastatic Gastric Adenocarcinoma Patients from the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Ashok; He, Mingfang; Xue, Jing; Wu, Jianzhong; Dun, Boying; Li, Gang; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Ji, Minghua; She, Jin-Xiong; Tang, Jinhai

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation is one of the major hallmarks of cancer. This study was designed to profile a panel of inflammatory mediators in gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) and to identify their potential differences separately in metastatic and non-metastatic patient subgroups. Methods Serum samples from 216 GA patients and 333 healthy controls from China were analyzed for six proteins using the Luminex multiplex assay. Results The serum levels for all the six proteins were significantly elevated in metastatic GA compared to non-metastatic GA. Two acute phase proteins (SAA and CRP) and a CXC chemokine (GRO) were significantly elevated in metastatic GA (p <0.01) but smaller changes were observed in non-metastatic GA compared to healthy controls. OPN is moderately increased in non-metastatic GA (2.05-fold) and more severely elevated in metastatic GA (3.34-fold). Surprisingly, soluble VCAM1 and AGP were significantly lower in both non-metastatic and metastatic GA patients compared to controls. Several individual proteins were shown to possess moderate diagnostic value for non-metastatic GA (AUC = 0.786, 0.833, 0.823 for OPN, sVCAM1 and AGP, respectively) and metastatic GA (AUC = 0.931, 0.720, 0.834 and 0.737 for OPN, sVCAM1, SAA and CRP, respectively). However, protein combinations further improve the diagnostic potential for both non-metastatic GA (best AUC = 0.946) and metastatic GA (best AUC = 0.963). The protein combination with best AUC value for both comparisons is OPN+sVCAM1+AGP+SAA. Conclusions These results suggest that several serum proteins are directly related to the severity of gastric cancer. Overall, stronger associations are observed with metastatic than non-metastatic GA as the protein changes are greater with the metastatic status. A combination of these serum proteins may serve as non-invasive markers to assess the severity status and stage of gastric cancer. PMID:25884401

  17. Effect of bleaching permeate from microfiltered skim milk on 80% serum protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Rachel E; Adams, Michael C; Drake, Maryanne; Barbano, David M

    2013-03-01

    Whey proteins that have been removed before the cheese-making process are referred to as "native" whey proteins or milk serum proteins. Because serum proteins isolated directly from milk are not exposed to the cheese-making process, they are free from functional or sensory effects arising from this process. Whey proteins used in food and beverage applications are largely derived from annatto-colored Cheddar cheese. Some of the annatto is left in the whey and this color is converted to a colorless compound by bleaching. The effect of bleaching serum proteins on flavor and functionality of spray-dried protein provides a platform to investigate the effect of bleaching free from the confounding effects of cheese manufacture. The objective of this study was to characterize and compare the sensory and functional properties of 80% milk serum protein concentrate (SPC80) produced from bleached and unbleached microfiltration (MF) permeate made from skim milk with and without added annatto color. Colored and uncolored MF permeates were bleached with benzoyl peroxide (BP) or hydrogen peroxide (HP), ultrafiltered, diafiltered, and spray-dried. The SPC80 from unbleached colored and uncolored MF permeates were manufactured as controls. All treatments were manufactured in triplicate. All SPC80 were evaluated by sensory testing, instrumental analyses, functionality, color, and proximate analysis. The HP-bleached SPC80 was higher in lipid oxidation compounds than BP-bleached or unbleached SPC80, specifically hexanal, heptanal, nonanal, decanal, and 2,3-octadienone. The HP treatments were higher in aroma intensity and cardboard and fatty flavors compared with the unbleached and BP-bleached SPC80. The SPC80 bleached with BP had lower concentrations of norbixin compared with SPC80 bleached with HP. Functionality testing demonstrated that HP treatments had more soluble protein after 10min of heating at 90°C and pH 4.6 and pH 7 compared with the no bleach and BP treatments, regardless

  18. Structural characteristics of green tea catechins for formation of protein carbonyl in human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Takeshi; Mori, Taiki; Ichikawa, Tatsuya; Kaku, Maiko; Kusaka, Koji; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Aihara, Yoshiyuki; Furuta, Takumi; Wakimoto, Toshiyuki; Kan, Toshiyuki; Nakayama, Tsutomu

    2010-07-15

    Catechins are polyphenolic antioxidants found in green tea leaves. Recent studies have reported that various polyphenolic compounds, including catechins, cause protein carbonyl formation in proteins via their pro-oxidant actions. In this study, we evaluate the formation of protein carbonyl in human serum albumin (HSA) by tea catechins and investigate the relationship between catechin chemical structure and its pro-oxidant property. To assess the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA, HSA was incubated with four individual catechins under physiological conditions to generate biotin-LC-hydrazide labeled protein carbonyls. Comparison of catechins using Western blotting revealed that the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA was higher for pyrogallol-type catechins than the corresponding catechol-type catechins. In addition, the formation of protein carbonyl was also found to be higher for the catechins having a galloyl group than the corresponding catechins lacking a galloyl group. The importance of the pyrogallol structural motif in the B-ring and the galloyl group was confirmed using methylated catechins and phenolic acids. These results indicate that the most important structural element contributing to the formation of protein carbonyl in HSA by tea catechins is the pyrogallol structural motif in the B-ring, followed by the galloyl group. The oxidation stability and binding affinity of tea catechins with proteins are responsible for the formation of protein carbonyl, and consequently the difference in these properties of each catechin may contribute to the magnitude of their biological activities.

  19. Binding of alkyl- and alkoxy-substituted simple phenolic compounds to human serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Shibata, T

    2000-01-01

    Wood creosote, primarily a mixture of simple alkyl- and/or alkoxy-substituted phenolic compounds with closely related structures, has long been used as an oral antidiarrheal agent. The use of wood creosote as a parenteral antidiarrheal agent was investigated, and for basic pharmacokinetic data we measured the extent of equilibrium binding of its six major constituent phenolic compounds to human serum proteins using an ultrafiltration method. The percent binding of these major constituent phenolic compounds, namely phenol, guaiacol, p-cresol, o-cresol, creosol and 4-ethylguaiacol, bound to 40-mg/ml human serum albumin was 15.5+/-0.9, 28.0+/-1.5, 37.2+/-0.7, 52.3+/-5.3, 36.8+/-2.0 and 56.7+/-2.4%, respectively, while percent binding to human serum (68 mg protein/ml) was 41.3+/-0.7, 42.6+/-0.5, 64.8+/-0.4, 70.1+/-1.6, 65.7+/-0.2 and 83.1+/-0.1% (mean +/- standard deviation, n = 4), respectively, when tested individually at a concentration of 500 micromol/l. Saturation of binding was not observed for the phenolic compounds up to a concentration of 50 mmol/l. Phenolic compounds with a lipophilic substituent showed higher percent binding to proteins than those without it. We conclude that simple phenolic compounds having alkyl- and/or alkoxy-substituents bind to serum proteins to a considerable extent and that the binding is hydrophobic and nonspecific.

  20. Monitoring drug-serum protein interactions for early ADME prediction through Surface Plasmon Resonance technology.

    PubMed

    Fabini, Edoardo; Danielson, U Helena

    2017-03-28

    Many molecules fail to reach the market due to poor pharmacokinetic (PK) properties, rendering the potential drug virtually unavailable for the primary target despite efficient administration to the body. PK properties of endogenous and exogenous compounds in mammals are dependent, among other factors, on their ability to interact with serum proteins. The extent of binding can greatly influence their ADME (adsorption, distribution, metabolism and execration) profile. Reliable and cost-effective bioavailability studies, early in the drug discovery process, can lead to an improvement of the success rate for compounds entering clinical trials. Optical biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection emerged as an efficient approach to obtain large amounts of information about the binding of small molecules to serum proteins. Simple, automated and fast assays provide a good throughput, versatility and highly informative data output, rendering the methodology particularly suited for early screening. The ability to provide basic information on PK can be easily coupled to structure-activity relationship analysis. In this review, features of the technology and its employment for the study of serum protein-small molecule interactions are presented and discussed.

  1. Parallel changes in serum proteins and diffusion tensor imaging in methamphetamine-associated psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Breen, Michael S.; Uhlmann, Anne; Ozcan, Sureyya; Chan, Man; Pinto, Dalila; Bahn, Sabine; Stein, Dan J.

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine-associated psychosis (MAP) involves widespread neurocognitive and molecular deficits, however accurate diagnosis remains challenging. Integrating relationships between biological markers, brain imaging and clinical parameters may provide an improved mechanistic understanding of MAP, that could in turn drive the development of better diagnostics and treatment approaches. We applied selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based proteomics, profiling 43 proteins in serum previously implicated in the etiology of major psychiatric disorders, and integrated these data with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and psychometric measurements from patients diagnosed with MAP (N = 12), methamphetamine dependence without psychosis (MA; N = 14) and healthy controls (N = 16). Protein analysis identified changes in APOC2 and APOH, which differed significantly in MAP compared to MA and controls. DTI analysis indicated widespread increases in mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity delineating extensive loss of white matter integrity and axon demyelination in MAP. Upon integration, several co-linear relationships between serum proteins and DTI measures reported in healthy controls were disrupted in MA and MAP groups; these involved areas of the brain critical for memory and social emotional processing. These findings suggest that serum proteomics and DTI are sensitive measures for detecting pathophysiological changes in MAP and describe a potential diagnostic fingerprint of the disorder. PMID:28252112

  2. Detergents as probes of hydrophobic binding cavities in serum albumin and other water-soluble proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Kragh-Hansen, U; Hellec, F; de Foresta, B; le Maire, M; Møller, J V

    2001-01-01

    As an extension of our studies on the interaction of detergents with membranes and membrane proteins, we have investigated their binding to water-soluble proteins. Anionic aliphatic compounds (dodecanoate and dodecylsulfate) were bound to serum albumin with high affinity at nine sites; related nonionic detergents (C12E8 and dodecylmaltoside) were bound at seven to eight sites, many in common with those of dodecanoate. The compounds were also bound in the hydrophobic cavity of beta-lactoglobulin, but not to ovalbumin. In addition to the generally recognized role of the Sudlow binding region II of serum albumin (localized at the IIIA subdomain) in fatty acid binding, quenching of the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan-214 by 7,8-dibromododecylmaltoside and 12-bromododecanoate also implicate the Sudlow binding region I (subdomain IIA) as a locus for binding of aliphatic compounds. Our data document the usefulness of dodecyl amphipathic compounds as probes of hydrophobic cavities in water-soluble proteins. In conjunction with recent x-ray diffraction analyses of fatty acid binding as the starting point we propose a new symmetrical binding model for the location of nine high-affinity sites on serum albumin for aliphatic compounds. PMID:11371462

  3. Binding of colchicine and thiocolchicoside to human serum proteins and blood cells.

    PubMed

    Sabouraud, A; Chappey, O; Dupin, T; Scherrmann, J M

    1994-08-01

    The binding of 3H-colchicine and its derivative 3H-thiocolchicoside to human serum, purified human proteins and blood cells was studied by equilibrium dialysis and centrifugation. Binding of colchicine and thiocolchicoside to human serum was 38.9 C +/- 4.7 and 12.8 C +/- 5.3%, respectively, essentially to albumin. Protein binding was not dependent on the concentration of either drug between 10(-10) and 10(-5)M. The binding of colchicine and thiocolchicoside to isolated erythrocytes (55 C +/- 5.6 and 16.5 C +/- 2.1%, respectively) decreased markedly in the presence of human serum proteins, i.e. in whole blood (38.7 C +/- 3.1 and 3.4 C +/- 0.8%). Binding of colchicine and thiocolchicoside to other blood cells was very low C < 3%). These binding properties in the blood compartment do not predispose colchicine and thiocolchicoside to be pharmacokinetically sensitive to binding displacement by drug interactions.

  4. Genetic differences in the serum proteome of horses, donkeys and mules are detectable by protein profiling.

    PubMed

    Henze, Andrea; Aumer, Franziska; Grabner, Arthur; Raila, Jens; Schweigert, Florian J

    2011-10-01

    Although horses and donkeys belong to the same genus, their genetic characteristics probably result in specific proteomes and post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins. Since PTM can alter protein properties, specific PTM may contribute to species-specific characteristics. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to analyse differences in serum protein profiles of horses and donkeys as well as mules, which combine the genetic backgrounds of both species. Additionally, changes in PTM of the protein transthyretin (TTR) were analysed. Serum protein profiles of each species (five animals per species) were determined using strong anion exchanger ProteinChips® (Bio-Rad, Munich, Germany) in combination with surface-enhanced laser desorption ionisation-time of flight MS. The PTM of TTR were analysed subsequently by immunoprecipitation in combination with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight MS. Protein profiling revealed species-specific differences in the proteome, with some protein peaks present in all three species as well as protein peaks that were unique for donkeys and mules, horses and mules or for horses alone. The molecular weight of TTR of horses and donkeys differed by 30 Da, and both species revealed several modified forms of TTR besides the native form. The mass spectra of mules represented a merging of TTR spectra of horses and donkeys. In summary, the present study indicated that there are substantial differences in the proteome of horses and donkeys. Additionally, the results probably indicate that the proteome of mules reveal a higher similarity to donkeys than to horses.

  5. Reciprocal Regulation of Aquaporin-2 Abundance and Degradation by Protein Kinase A and p38-MAP Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Nedvetsky, Pavel I.; Tabor, Vedrana; Tamma, Grazia; Beulshausen, Sven; Skroblin, Philipp; Kirschner, Aline; Mutig, Kerim; Boltzen, Mareike; Petrucci, Oscar; Vossenkämper, Anna; Wiesner, Burkhard; Bachmann, Sebastian; Rosenthal, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) modulates the water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) in the renal collecting duct to maintain homeostasis of body water. AVP binds to vasopressin V2 receptors (V2R), increasing cAMP, which promotes the redistribution of AQP2 from intracellular vesicles into the plasma membrane. cAMP also increases AQP2 transcription, but whether altered degradation also modulates AQP2 protein levels is not well understood. Here, elevation of cAMP increased AQP2 protein levels within 30 minutes in primary inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) cells, in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells ectopically expressing AQP2, and in mouse kidneys. Accelerated transcription or translation did not explain this increase in AQP2 abundance. In IMCD cells, cAMP inhibited p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38-MAPK) via activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Inhibition of p38-MAPK associated with decreased phosphorylation (serine 261) and polyubiquitination of AQP2, preventing proteasomal degradation. Our results demonstrate that AVP enhances AQP2 protein abundance by altering its proteasomal degradation through a PKA- and p38-MAPK–dependent pathway. PMID:20724536

  6. Eosinophil cationic protein serum levels and allergy in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed

    Conti, F; Magrini, L; Priori, R; Valesini, G; Bonini, S

    1996-02-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a syndrome of uncertain etiopathogenesis characterized by disabling fatigue associated with a variable number of somatic and/or neuropsychologic symptoms. In patients with CFS, several immunologic abnormalities can be detected, including a higher prevalance of allergy. The aim of this study was to determine whether CFS patients, well studied for their allergy profile, show signs of eosinophil activation, as detectable by the measurement in serum of eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) levels. In 35 consecutive CFS outpatients (diagnosis based on the Centers for Disease Control case definition), ECP was measured in serum by a competitive enzyme immunoassay (ECP-FEIA kit, Kabi Pharmacia Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden). Fourteen disease-free subjects with no history of CFS or allergy were selected as controls. ECP serum levels were significantly higher in CFS patients than in controls (18.0 +/- 11.3 micrograms/l vs 7.3 +/- 2.1 micrograms/l; P < 0.01). In the CFS population, the prevalence of RAST positivity to one or more allergens was 77%, while no control showed positive RAST. Twelve of the 14 CFS patients with increased ECP serum levels were RAST-positive. However, CFS RAST-positive patients had no significantly higher ECP serum levels than CFS RAST-negative patients (19.3 +/- 12.4 micrograms/l vs 13.6 +/- 3.7 micrograms/l; P = 0.4). This is the first report of increased serum levels of ECP in CFS. On the basis of the available data, it is discussed whether eosinophil activation has a pathogenetic role in CFS or is linked to the frequently associated allergic condition, or, finally, whether a common immunologic background may exist for both atopy and CFS.

  7. Serum fatty acid binding protein 4, free fatty acids and metabolic risk markers

    PubMed Central

    Karakas, Sidika E.; Almario, Rogelio U.; Kim, Kyoungmi

    2009-01-01

    Fatty acid binding protein (FABP) 4 chaperones free fatty acids (FFA) in the adipocytes during lipolysis. Serum FFA relates to Metabolic Syndrome (METS) and serum FABP4 is emerging as a novel risk marker. In 36 overweight/obese women, serum FABP4 and FFA were measured hourly during 5-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Insulin resistance was determined using frequently sampled intravenous GTT (FS-IVGTT). Serum lipids and inflammation markers were measured at fasting. During OGTT, serum FABP4 decreased by 40%, reaching its nadir at 3h (from 45.3±3.1 to 31.9±1.6 ng/mL) and stayed below the baseline at 5 h (35.9±2.2 ng/mL) (p < 0.0001 for both, compared to the baseline). Serum FFA decreased by 10 fold, reaching a nadir at 2h (from 0.611±0.033 to 0.067±0.004 mmol/L), then rebounded to 0.816±0.035 mmol/ L at 5h (p < 0.001 for both, compared to baseline). Both fasting-FABP4 and nadir-FABP4 correlated with obesity. Nadir-FABP4 correlated also with insulin resistance parameters from FS-IVGTT and with inflammation. Nadir-FFA, but not fasting-FFA, correlated with the METS-parameters. In conclusion, fasting-FABP4 related to metabolic risk markers more strongly than fasting-FFA. Nadir-FABP4 and nadir-FFA measured after glucose loading may provide better risk assessment than the fasting values. PMID:19394980

  8. Post-transcriptional regulation of ribosomal protein genes during serum starvation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ahamad, Jamaluddin; Ojha, Sandeep; Srivastava, Ankita; Bhattacharya, Alok; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2015-06-01

    Ribosome synthesis involves all three RNA polymerases which are co-ordinately regulated to produce equimolar amounts of rRNAs and ribosomal proteins (RPs). Unlike model organisms where transcription of rRNA and RP genes slows down during stress, in E. histolytica rDNA transcription continues but pre-rRNA processing slows down and unprocessed pre-rRNA accumulates during serum starvation. To investigate the regulation of RP genes under stress we measured transcription of six selected RP genes from the small- and large-ribosomal subunits (RPS6, RPS3, RPS19, RPL5, RPL26, RPL30) representing the early-, mid-, and late-stages of ribosomal assembly. Transcripts of these genes persisted in growth-stressed cells. Expression of luciferase reporter under the control of two RP genes (RPS19 and RPL30) was studied during serum starvation and upon serum replenishment. Although luciferase transcript levels remained unchanged during starvation, luciferase activity steadily declined to 7.8% and 15% of control cells, respectively. After serum replenishment the activity increased to normal levels, suggesting post-transcriptional regulation of these genes. Mutations in the sequence -2 to -9 upstream of AUG in the RPL30 gene resulted in the phenotype expected of post-transcriptional regulation. Transcription of luciferase reporter was unaffected in this mutant, and luciferase activity did not decline during serum starvation, showing that this sequence is required to repress translation of RPL30 mRNA, and mutations in this region relieve repression. Our data show that during serum starvation E. histolytica blocks ribosome biogenesis post-transcriptionally by inhibiting pre-rRNA processing on the one hand, and the translation of RP mRNAs on the other.

  9. Identification of (L)-fucose-binding proteins from the Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.) serum.

    PubMed

    Argayosa, Anacleto M; Lee, Yuan C

    2009-09-01

    Lectins are carbohydrate-binding proteins with many biological functions including cellular recognition and innate immunity. In this study, a major l-fucose-binding lectin from the serum of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus L.), designated as TFBP, was isolated by l-fucose-BSA Sepharose CL6B affinity chromatography. The SDS-PAGE (10%) analysis of TFBP revealed a major band of approximately 23 kDa with an N-terminal amino acid sequence of DQTETAGQQSXPQDIHAVLREL which did not give significant similarities to the protein databases using BLASTp searches. Ruthenium red staining indicate positive calcium-binding property of TFBP. The purified TFBP agglutinated human type O erythrocytes but not the type A and B fresh erythrocytes. Live Aeromonas hydrophila and Enterococcus faecalis cells were also agglutinated by the lectin. The fucose-binding proteins were detected in the soluble protein extracts from the gills, gut, head kidneys, liver, serum and spleen using a fucose-binding protein probe (l-fucose-BSA-horseradish peroxidase). The binding of TFBP with the l-fucose-BSA probe was inhibited by l-fucose but not by alpha-methyl-d-mannose.

  10. Human Serum Amyloid A3 (SAA3) Protein, Expressed as a Fusion Protein with SAA2, Binds the Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Takeshi; Ieguchi, Katsuaki; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Maru, Yoshiro

    2015-01-01

    Serum amyloid A3 (SAA3) possesses characteristics distinct from the other serum amyloid A isoforms, SAA1, SAA2, and SAA4. High density lipoprotein contains the latter three isoforms, but not SAA3. The expression of mouse SAA3 (mSAA3) is known to be up-regulated extrahepatically in inflammatory responses, and acts as an endogenous ligand for the toll-like receptor 4/MD-2 complex. We previously reported that mSAA3 plays an important role in facilitating tumor metastasis by attracting circulating tumor cells and enhancing hyperpermeability in the lungs. On the other hand, human SAA3 (hSAA3) has long been regarded as a pseudogene, which is in contrast to the abundant expression levels of the other isoforms. Although the nucleotide sequence of hSAA3 is very similar to that of the other SAAs, a single oligonucleotide insertion in exon 2 causes a frame-shift to generate a unique amino acid sequence. In the present study, we identified that hSAA3 was transcribed in the hSAA2-SAA3 fusion transcripts of several human cell lines. In the fusion transcript, hSAA2 exon 3 was connected to hSAA3 exon 1 or hSAA3 exon 2, located approximately 130kb downstream from hSAA2 exon 3 in the genome, which suggested that it is produced by alternative splicing. Furthermore, we succeeded in detecting and isolating hSAA3 protein for the first time by an immunoprecipitation-enzyme linked immune assay system using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies that recognize the hSAA3 unique amino acid sequence. We also demonstrated that hSAA3 bound oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor (oxLDL receptor, LOX-1) and elevated the phosphorylation of ERK, the intracellular MAP-kinase signaling protein. PMID:25738827

  11. Structural modification of serum vitamin D3-binding protein and immunosuppression in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R; Srinivasula, S M

    1995-11-01

    A serum glycoprotein, vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein), can be converted by beta-galactosidase of stimulated B lymphocytes and sialidase of T lymphocytes to a potent macrophage-activating factor (MAF), a protein with N-acetylgalactosamine as the remaining sugar moiety. Thus, Gc protein is a precursor for MAF. Treatment of purified Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generates an extremely high-titered MAF (GcMAF). When peripheral blood monocytes/macrophages of 46 HIV-infected patients were treated with GcMAF (100 pg/ml), the monocytes/macrophages of all patients were efficiently activated. However, the MAF precursor activity of plasma Gc protein was low in 16 (35%) of of these patients. Loss of the MAF precursor activity appeared to be due to deglycosylation of plasma Gc protein by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase found in the patient blood stream. Levels of plasma alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity in individual patients had an inverse correlation with the MAF precursor activity of their plasma Gc protein. Thus, precursor activity of Gc protein and alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity in patient blood can serve as diagnostic and prognostic indices.

  12. Serum antibodies against central nervous system proteins in human demyelinating disease.

    PubMed Central

    Newcombe, J; Gahan, S; Cuzner, M L

    1985-01-01

    An immunoblotting technique has been used to screen serum samples from patients with demyelinating disease for antibody directed against central nervous system proteins. Antibodies of the IgM, IgG and IgA class directed against one or more of the particulate fraction proteins tubulin, myelin basic protein, 69 K neurofilament protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, myelin associated glycoprotein or Wolfgram protein were present in 94, 54 and 47%, respectively, of multiple sclerosis sera examined. IgM antibodies against tubulin and myelin basic protein predominated. A similar antibody spectrum was seen in a significant proportion of sera from patients with optic neuritis, subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and motor neurone disease, in which primary or secondary demyelination occurs. Antibodies of all three classes directed against the 169 K and 220 K neurofilament proteins and against some unidentified proteins of human peripheral nerve, kidney, liver, spleen and skeletal muscle were detected in sera from healthy subjects and patients with neurological disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2579754

  13. Characterization and properties of steroid binding protein in Bufo arenarum serum.

    PubMed

    Fernández, S N; Mansilla-Whitacre, Z C; Miceli, D C

    1994-08-01

    Serum steroid binding properties of mature Bufo arenarum females were studied. Binding data obtained using charcoal adsorption assay and equilibrium dialysis methods indicates a single protein, named Bufo arenarum sex binding protein (Ba SBP), which binds 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), testosterone (T), and estradiol-17 beta (E2) with high affinity (10(-7) M-1 - 10(8) M-1) and fair capacity (10(-6) M). Scatchard plot analysis demonstrated the coexistence of two binding sites. Ba SBP has a sedimentation coefficient of 5.2 S in sucrose gradient centrifugation in low salt and under steady-state conditions. The specificity of this protein, determined by competitive binding experiments, is comparable to human SBP. DHT and T bind with higher affinity than E2. Estriol and estrone competed poorly, while diethylstilbestrol and C21 steroids did not compete. The binding capacity of this protein is under estrogenic control.

  14. Adsorption and adhesion of common serum proteins to nanotextured gallium nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bain, Lauren E.; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Bryan, Isaac; Collazo, Ramón; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-01-01

    As the broader effort towards device and material miniaturization progresses in all fields, it becomes increasingly important to understand the implications of working with functional structures that approach the size scale of molecules, particularly when considering biological systems. It is well known that thin films and nanostructures feature different optical, electrical, and mechanical properties from their bulk composites; however, interactions taking place at the interface between nanomaterials and their surroundings are less understood. Here, we explore interactions between common serum proteins - serum albumin, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin G - and a nanotextured gallium nitride surface. Atomic force microscopy with a carboxyl-terminated colloid tip is used to probe the `activity' of proteins adsorbed onto the surface, including both the accessibility of the terminal amine to the tip as well as the potential for protein extension. By evaluating the frequency of tip-protein interactions, we can establish differences in protein behaviour on the basis of both the surface roughness as well as morphology, providing an assessment of the role of surface texture in dictating protein-surface interactions. Unidirectional surface features - either the half-unit cell steppes of as-grown GaN or those produced by mechanical polishing - appear to promote protein accessibility, with a higher frequency of protein extension events taking place on these surfaces when compared with less ordered surface features. Development of a full understanding of the factors influencing surface-biomolecule interactions can pave the way for specific surface modification to tailor the bio-material interface, offering a new path for device optimization.As the broader effort towards device and material miniaturization progresses in all fields, it becomes increasingly important to understand the implications of working with functional structures that approach the size scale of molecules

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Outer Membrane Proteins from Salmonella Enteritidis Strains with Different Sensitivity to Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Bartłomiej; Krzyżewska, Eva; Kapczyńska, Katarzyna; Rybka, Jacek; Pawlak, Aleksandra; Korzekwa, Kamila; Klausa, Elżbieta; Bugla-Płoskońska, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Differential analysis of outer membrane composition of S. Enteritidis strains, resistant to 50% normal human serum (NHS) was performed in order to find factors influencing the resistance to higher concentrations of NHS. Ten S. Enteritidis clinical strains, resistant to 50% NHS, all producing very long lipopolysaccharide, were subjected to the challenge of 75% NHS. Five extreme strains: two resistant and three sensitive to 75% NHS, were chosen for the further analysis of outer membrane proteins composition. Substantial differences were found in the levels of particular outer membrane proteins between resistant and sensitive strains, i.e. outer membrane protease E (PgtE) was present mainly in resistant strains, while sensitive strains possessed a high level of flagellar hook-associated protein 2 (FliD) and significantly higher levels of outer membrane protein A (OmpA). PMID:27695090

  16. The interaction of human serum albumin with selected lanthanide and actinide ions: Binding affinities, protein unfolding and conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Ali, Manjoor; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Mukesh; Pandey, Badri N

    2016-04-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant soluble protein in blood plays critical roles in transportation of biomolecules and maintenance of osmotic pressure. In view of increasing applications of lanthanides- and actinides-based materials in nuclear energy, space, industries and medical applications, the risk of exposure with these metal ions is a growing concern for human health. In present study, binding interaction of actinides/lanthanides [thorium: Th(IV), uranium: U(VI), lanthanum: La(III), cerium: Ce(III) and (IV)] with HSA and its structural consequences have been investigated. Ultraviolet-visible, Fourier transform-infrared, Raman, Fluorescence and Circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques were applied to study the site of metal ions interaction, binding affinity determination and the effect of metal ions on protein unfolding and HSA conformation. Results showed that these metal ions interacted with carbonyl (CO..:)/amide(N..-H) groups and induced exposure of aromatic residues of HSA. The fluorescence analysis indicated that the actinide binding altered the microenvironment around Trp214 in the subdomain IIA. Binding affinity of U(VI) to HSA was slightly higher than that of Th(IV). Actinides and Ce(IV) altered the secondary conformation of HSA with a significant decrease of α-helix and an increase of β-sheet, turn and random coil structures, indicating a partial unfolding of HSA. A correlation was observed between metal ion's ability to alter HSA conformation and protein unfolding. Both cationic effects and coordination ability of metal ions seemed to determine the consequences of their interaction with HSA. Present study improves our understanding about the protein interaction of these heavy ions and their impact on its secondary structure. In addition, binding characteristics may have important implications for the development of rational antidote for the medical management of health effects of actinides and lanthanides.

  17. Determinants of the serum concentrations of low molecular weight proteins in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Kabanda, A; Jadoul, M; Pochet, J M; Lauwerys, R; van Ypersele de Strihou, C; Bernard, A

    1994-06-01

    Factors influencing the serum concentrations of low molecular weight proteins (LMWP) during long-term hemodialysis were studied in 112 patients undergoing dialysis for an average of 61.1 months (range 1 to 243). These patients were treated with AN69, cellulose acetate, cuprophan or polysulfone membranes. The following proteins were measured in serum before and after a four hour dialysis session: cystatin C (CYST C), beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2 m), Clara cell protein (CC16) and retinol-binding protein (RBP). Predialysis levels of the four proteins were markedly elevated. In simple regression analysis, pre-dialysis serum concentrations of beta 2 m and CC16 weakly correlated with the duration of dialysis treatment, but these relations completely disappeared when a stepwise regression analysis was performed using as predictors age, sex, residual diuresis, body weight loss (BWL), duration of hemodialysis and the type or ultrafiltration coefficient (UFC) of the membranes. The only significant determinants which emerged from this analysis were the residual diuresis and age which negatively correlated with CYST C, beta 2m and CC16 (residual diuresis only), and sex which influenced CYST C. During the dialysis session, the microproteins underwent changes that were related to their molecular radius, the membrane UFC and the BWL. After adjustment for the latter, high flux membranes (UFC > or = 15 ml/h.m2.mm Hg) allowed up to 50% of CYST C and 25% of beta 2m to be removed. No significant elimination of CC16 and RBP was evident. On the basis of these results, we estimated the effective pore radius of high flux membranes between 1.5 and 1.7 nm and that of low flux membranes as below 1.5 nm.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Adsorption and adhesion of common serum proteins to nanotextured gallium nitride.

    PubMed

    Bain, Lauren E; Hoffmann, Marc P; Bryan, Isaac; Collazo, Ramón; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-02-14

    As the broader effort towards device and material miniaturization progresses in all fields, it becomes increasingly important to understand the implications of working with functional structures that approach the size scale of molecules, particularly when considering biological systems. It is well known that thin films and nanostructures feature different optical, electrical, and mechanical properties from their bulk composites; however, interactions taking place at the interface between nanomaterials and their surroundings are less understood. Here, we explore interactions between common serum proteins - serum albumin, fibrinogen, and immunoglobulin G - and a nanotextured gallium nitride surface. Atomic force microscopy with a carboxyl-terminated colloid tip is used to probe the 'activity' of proteins adsorbed onto the surface, including both the accessibility of the terminal amine to the tip as well as the potential for protein extension. By evaluating the frequency of tip-protein interactions, we can establish differences in protein behaviour on the basis of both the surface roughness as well as morphology, providing an assessment of the role of surface texture in dictating protein-surface interactions. Unidirectional surface features - either the half-unit cell steppes of as-grown GaN or those produced by mechanical polishing - appear to promote protein accessibility, with a higher frequency of protein extension events taking place on these surfaces when compared with less ordered surface features. Development of a full understanding of the factors influencing surface-biomolecule interactions can pave the way for specific surface modification to tailor the bio-material interface, offering a new path for device optimization.

  19. Secretome profiling of highly virulent Mycobacterium bovis 04-303 strain reveals higher abundance of virulence-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Romero, Fernando; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Suárez-Güemes, Francisco; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Castañón-Arreola, Mauricio

    2016-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis is the causative agent of tuberculosis in farms, wildlife and causes sporadic disease in humans. Despite the high similitude in genome sequence between M. bovis strains, some strains like the wild boar 04-303 isolate show a highly virulent phenotype in animal models. Comparative studies will contribute to link protein expression with the virulence phenotype. In vitro, the 04-303 strain was more phagocytized by J774A.1 macrophages in comparison with 444 strain (a cow isolate with the same genotype) and BCG. The secretome of these strains showed a significant proportion of shared proteins (368 spots). Among the proteins only visualized in the secretome of the 04-303 strain, we identify the nine most abundant proteins by LC-MS/MS. The most relevant were EsxA and EsxB proteins, which are encoded in the RD1 region, deleted in BCG strains. These proteins are the major virulence factor of M. tuberculosis. The other proteins identified belong to functional categories of virulence, detoxification, and adaptation; lipid metabolism; and cell wall and cell processes. The relatively high proportion of proteins involved in the cell wall and cell process is consistent with the previously described variation among M. bovis genomes.

  20. Ultra sensitive affinity chromatography on avidin-functionalized PMMA microchip for low abundant post-translational modified protein enrichment.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hui; Murray, Kermit; Soper, Steven; Feng, June

    2012-02-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins play essential roles in cellular physiology and disease. The identification of protein substrates and detection of modification site helps understand PTM-mediated regulation in essential biological pathways and functions in various diseases. However, PTM proteins are typically present only at trace levels, making them difficult to identify in mass spectrometry based proteomics. In this paper, we report a novel and sensitive affinity chromatography on the avidin-functionalized poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microchip for enrichment of nanogram (ng) amount of PTMs. The chemical modification of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surfaces yield avidin-terminated PMMA surfaces after UV radiation and consecutive EDC mediated coupling (amide reaction). This functionalized PMMA micro-device was developed to identify and specifically trap biotinylated PTM proteins of low abundance from complex protein mixture. Here we selected carbonylated protein as a representative PTM to illustrate the wide application of this affinity microchip for any PTMs converted into a tractable tag after derivatization. The surface topography, surface functional group mapping and elemental composition changes after each modification step of the treatment process were systematically measured qualitatively and quantitatively by atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Quantitative study of biotinlated carbonylated protein capture recovery and elution efficiency of the device was also studied. We also envision that this subproteome enrichment micro-device can be assembled with other lab-on-a-chip components for follow-up protein analysis.

  1. Immunochemical quantitation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum and liver proteins of acetaminophen-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Pumford, N R; Hinson, J A; Potter, D W; Rowland, K L; Benson, R W; Roberts, D W

    1989-01-01

    Using a recently developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay specific for 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts we have quantitated the formation of these specific adducts in liver and serum protein of B6C3F1 male mice dosed with acetaminophen. Administration of acetaminophen at doses of 50, 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg to mice resulted in evidence of hepatotoxicity (increase in serum levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase) at 4 hr in the 300, 400 and 500 mg/kg treatment groups only. The formation of 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in liver protein was not observed in the groups receiving 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg doses, but was observed in the groups receiving doses above 300 mg/kg of acetaminophen. Greater levels of adduct formation were observed at the higher doses. 3-(Cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen protein adducts were also observed in serum of mice receiving hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen. After a 400 mg/kg dose of acetaminophen, 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in the liver protein reached peak levels 2 hr after dosing. By 12 hr the levels decreased to approximately 10% of the peak level. In contrast, 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum protein were delayed, reaching a sustained peak 6 to 12 hr after dosing. The dose-response correlation between the appearance of serum aminotransferases and 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in serum protein and the temporal correlation between the decrease in 3-(cystein-S-yl)acetaminophen adducts in liver protein and the appearance of adducts in serum protein are consistent with a hepatic origin of the adducts detected in serum protein.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Oxidative modification of blood serum proteins in multiple sclerosis after interferon or mitoxantrone treatment.

    PubMed

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Adamczyk-Sowa, Monika; Gajewska, Agnieszka; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2014-01-15

    This study was aimed at (i) comparison of the usefulness of serum protein oxidation parameters for assessment of oxidative stress (OS) in multiple sclerosis (MS), and (ii) comparison of OS in MS patients subject to various therapies. Elevated glycophore level was noted in relapsing-remitting (RRMS) patients without treatment and patients treated with interferons β1a and β1b (10.33±3.27, 8.02±2.22 and 8.56±2.45 vs control 5.27±0.73 fluorescence units (FU)/mg protein). Advanced oxidation protein products (295±135 vs 83±65nmol/mg protein), carbonyl groups (3.68±1.44nmol/mg protein vs 2.03±0.23nmol/mg protein), kynurenine (7.71±0.1.67 vs 5.5±0.63 FU/mg protein) and N'-formylkynurenine (7.69±0.7 vs 4.97±0.59 FU/mg protein) levels were increased, while thioredoxin level was decreased in RRMS patients without treatment (5.03±2.18 vs 10.83±2.75ng/ml) with respect to control. The level of OS was higher in untreated RRMS patients and in SPMS patients treated with mitoxantrone than in patients treated with interferon.

  3. Deglycosylation of serum vitamin D3-binding protein leads to immunosuppression in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, N; Naraparaju, V R; Asbell, S O

    1996-06-15

    Serum vitamin D3-binding protein (Gc protein) can be converted by beta-galactosidase of B cells and sialidase of T cells to a potent macrophage activating factor, a protein with N-acetylgalactosamine as the remaining sugar moiety. Thus, Gc protein is the precursor of the macrophage activating factor (MAF). Treatment of Gc protein with immobilized beta-galactosidase and sialidase generates an extremely high titered MAF, Gc-MAF. When peripheral blood monocytes/macrophages of 52 patients bearing various types of cancer were incubated with 100 pg/ml of GcMAF, the monocytes/macrophages of all patients were efficiently activated. However, the MAF precursor activity of patient plasma Gc protein was found to be severely reduced in about 25% of this patient population. About 45% of the patients had moderately reduced MAF precursor activities. Loss of the precursor activity was found to be due to deglycosylation of plasma Gc protein by alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase detected in the patient's bloodstream. The source of the enzyme appeared to be cancerous cells. Radiation therapy decreased plasma alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity with concomitant increase of precursor activity. This implies that radiation therapy decreases the number of cancerous cells capable of secreting alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase. Both alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity and MAF precursor activity of Gc protein in patient bloodstream can serve as diagnostic and prognostic indices.

  4. Application of an improved proteomics method for abundant protein cleanup: molecular and genomic mechanisms study in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yixiang; Gao, Peng; Xing, Zhuo; Jin, Shumei; Chen, Zhide; Liu, Lantao; Constantino, Nasie; Wang, Xinwang; Shi, Weibing; Yuan, Joshua S; Dai, Susie Y

    2013-11-01

    High abundance proteins like ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (Rubisco) impose a consistent challenge for the whole proteome characterization using shot-gun proteomics. To address this challenge, we developed and evaluated Polyethyleneimine Assisted Rubisco Cleanup (PARC) as a new method by combining both abundant protein removal and fractionation. The new approach was applied to a plant insect interaction study to validate the platform and investigate mechanisms for plant defense against herbivorous insects. Our results indicated that PARC can effectively remove Rubisco, improve the protein identification, and discover almost three times more differentially regulated proteins. The significantly enhanced shot-gun proteomics performance was translated into in-depth proteomic and molecular mechanisms for plant insect interaction, where carbon re-distribution was used to play an essential role. Moreover, the transcriptomic validation also confirmed the reliability of PARC analysis. Finally, functional studies were carried out for two differentially regulated genes as revealed by PARC analysis. Insect resistance was induced by over-expressing either jacalin-like or cupin-like genes in rice. The results further highlighted that PARC can serve as an effective strategy for proteomics analysis and gene discovery.

  5. Serum levels of protein oxidation products in patients with nickel allergy.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, Sebastiano; Ricciardi, Luisa; Minciullo, Paola Lucia; Cristani, Mariateresa; Saitta, Salvatore; Chirafisi, Joselita; Spatari, Giovanna; Santoro, Giusy; Saija, Antonella

    2009-01-01

    Nickel sensitization can not only induce allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), but also can induce an overlapping disease referred to as "systemic nickel allergy syndrome" (SNAS), characterized by urticaria/angioedema and gastrointestinal symptoms correlated to the ingestion of nickel-containing foods. This study was designed to determine if oxidative stress occurs in patients with nickel allergy. Thirty-one female patients (mean age 31.26 + 13.04 years, range 16-64 years) with confirmed nickel CD underwent oral nickel challenge because of clinically suspected SNAS; serum concentrations of protein carbonyl groups (PCGs) and nitrosylated proteins (NPs; biomarkers of oxidative stress) were measured before and after oral nickel challenge as well as in healthy female controls. Twenty-three of these 31 patients were diagnosed with SNAS because they had a positive reaction to the oral nickel challenge, and 8 patients had no reaction and therefore were classified as patients with contact nickel allergy only. Although both nickel-allergic patients and controls presented similar serum levels of PCGs, NP values in nickel-allergic patients appeared higher than in controls and tended to decrease after the challenge; furthermore, serum levels of NPs in patients affected by SNAS were higher (although not significantly) than in patients with nickel ACD only. The involvement of specific biomarkers of oxidative stress such as NPs and the lack of involvement of other biomarkers such as PCGs may help to better understand the alteration of the redox homeostasis occurring in nickel ACD and particularly in SNAS.

  6. Structure and evolutionary origin of the gene encoding a human serum mannose-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, M E; Brickell, P M; Craig, R K; Summerfield, J A

    1989-01-01

    The N-terminal sequence of the major human serum mannose-binding protein (MBP1) was shown to be identical at all positions determined with the amino acid sequence predicted from a cDNA clone of a human liver MBP mRNA. An oligonucleotide corresponding to part of the sequence of this cDNA clone was used to isolate a cosmid genomic clone containing a homologous gene. The intron/exon structure of this gene was found to closely resemble that of the gene encoding a rat liver MBP (MBP A). The nucleotide sequence of the exons differed in several places from that of the human cDNA clone published by Ezekowitz, Day & Herman [(1988) J. Exp. Med. 167, 1034-1046]. The MBP molecule comprises a signal peptide, a cysteine-rich domain, a collagen-like domain, a 'neck' region and a carbohydrate-binding domain. Each domain is encoded by a separate exon. This genomic organization lends support to the hypothesis that the gene arose during evolution by a process of exon shuffling. Several consensus sequences that may be involved in controlling the expression of human serum MBP have been identified in the promoter region of the gene. The consensus sequences are consistent with the suggestion that this mammalian serum lectin is regulated as an acute-phase protein synthesized by the liver. PMID:2590164

  7. Profiles of fourteen specific serum proteins in children with recurrent scarlet fever.

    PubMed

    Wiedermann, D; Widermannová, D; Kadlcáková, E

    1979-01-01

    Venous blood samples were obtained from 42 children hospitalized for the recurrent episode of scarlet fever: immediately after admission and toward the end of one week's hospitalisation, after a three-week period and at a later control after four months. The 14 specific proteins were simultaneously quantitated in the serum specimens using radial immunodiffusion on antibodyagar plates. Antistreptolysin O titres were also determined and compared with the corresponding immunoglobulin levels. However, the titres showed only minor differences in various stages of illness the course of which was mild and without complications. Serum levels of prealbumin, albumin, alpha2HS-glycoproetin, transferrin and beta 2-glycoprotein I were found decreased at the acute clinical stage. Of the "negative acute phase reactants" prealbumin proved to be the most expressive one. Of a triad of "positive reactants" the largest relative increments showed haptoglobin, its increase was twofold of orosomucoid and that threefold of ceruloplasmin. C-reactive protein was increased almost in two thirds of patients on admission, but normalized in all cases about the end of the first week of penicillin therapy. No significant changes were found for alpha 2-macroglobulin. We could demonstrate significant rise and fall of IgD concentration in serum together with IgG, IgA, and IgM, all manifested the peak values already after one week's hospitalisation. In the recurrent episode of scarlet fever IgA showed significantly minor increments compared with the first illness.

  8. Methionine sulfoxides in serum proteins as potential clinical biomarkers of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Satoko; Kodera, Yoshio; Saito, Tatsuya; Fujimoto, Kazumi; Momozono, Akari; Hayashi, Akinori; Kamata, Yuji; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the pathophysiology of a variety of diseases, and circulating biomarkers of its severity remains a topic of great interest for researchers. Our peptidomic strategy enables accurate and reproducible analysis of circulating proteins/peptides with or without post-translational modifications. Conventional wisdom holds that hydrophobic methionines exposed to an aqueous environment or experimental handling procedures are vulnerable to oxidation. However, we show that the mass spectra intensity ratio of oxidized to non-oxidized methionine residues in serum tryptic proteins can be accurately quantified using a single drop of human serum and give stable and reproducible results. Our data demonstrate that two methionine residues in serum albumin (Met-111 and Met-147) are highly oxidized to methionine sulfoxide in patients with diabetes and renal failure and in healthy smokers versus non-smoker controls. This label-free mass spectrometry approach to quantify redox changes in methionine residues should facilitate the identification of additional circulating biomarkers suitable for predicting the development or progression of human diseases. PMID:27929071

  9. Isolation of human C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P component.

    PubMed

    De Beer, F C; Pepys, M B

    1982-01-01

    Procedures are described for the isolation in high yield of consistent, highly purified preparations of human C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid P component (SAP). CRP was obtained from malignant ascitic and pleural fluids by calcium-dependent affinity chromatography on pneumococcal C-polysaccharide covalently coupled to cyanogen bromide-activated Sepharose. It was then gel filtered on Ultrogel AcA44 (acrylamide-agarose beads) in the presence of calcium ions, combining molecular sieve chromatography with removal of contaminating SAP by its affinity of agarose. Residual trace contaminants were removed by immunoabsorption with anti-normal human serum and anti-SAP antibodies insolubilised on Sepharose and/or by absorption with Sepharose-Con A to remove glycoproteins and Blue-Sepharose to remove albumin. After a final gel filtration step on Sephacryl S-300 35-45% of the initial CRP was recovered in pure form according to biochemical and immunochemical criteria. SAP was isolated from normal serum by calcium-dependent affinity chromatography on unsubstituted Sepharose beads, followed by solid-phase immunoabsorption of contaminants and finally gel filtration on Sephacryl S-300. At least 50% of the SAP in the starting material was recovered in pure form according to biochemical and immunochemical criteria. Ready availability of such preparations facilitates biochemical, biophysical and particularly biological studies of these plasma proteins.

  10. Serum protein concentration in low-dose total body irradiation of normal and malnourished rats.

    PubMed

    Viana, W C M; Lambertz, D; Borges, E S; Neto, A M O; Lambertz, K M F T; Amaral, A

    2016-12-01

    Among the radiotherapeutics' modalities, total body irradiation (TBI) is used as treatment for certain hematological, oncological and immunological diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effects of low-dose TBI on plasma concentration of total protein and albumin using prematurely and undernourished rats as animal model. For this, four groups with 9 animals each were formed: Normal nourished (N); Malnourished (M); Irradiated Normal nourished (IN); Irradiated Malnourished (IM). At the age of 28 days, rats of the IN and IM groups underwent total body gamma irradiation with a source of cobalt-60. Total protein and Albumin in the blood serum was quantified by colorimetry. This research indicates that procedures involving low-dose total body irradiation in children have repercussions in the reduction in body-mass as well as in the plasma levels of total protein and albumin. Our findings reinforce the periodic monitoring of total serum protein and albumin levels as an important tool in long-term follow-up of pediatric patients in treatments associated to total body irradiation.

  11. [Research on detecting concentration of serum protein based on resonance Rayleigh scattering].

    PubMed

    Wang, Gao; Feng, Qiao-Ling; Xue, Zhong-Jin; Li, Yang-Jun; Zhou, Han-Chang

    2013-03-01

    The resonance Rayleigh scattering spectral detection system was designed based on the 2, 9, 16, 23-tetracarboxylate-phthalocyanine zinc and protein system. In the system, excitation light source is 405 nm wide band gap semiconductor lasers, and monochromator is 475 nm narrow-band band-pass filter, and the detector is low-noise and high-gain photoelectric amplifier based on blue-ray enhanced photodiode. Experiment shows that, the solution's strong absorption wavelength is near 420 nm. Under the action of incentive light, resonance Rayleigh scattering is generated at the resonant wavelength, and the scattering intensity is proportional to the protein content. The system uses 2, 9, 16, 23-tetracarboxylate as the spectrum probe to determine the concentration of serum proteins by resonance Rayleigh scattering method. Its linear detection range is 10 - 50 mg.mL-1, and its detection limit is 0. 001 mg.mL-1. The newly developed device for detecting concentration of the serum protein has the advantages of small size, low cost, low power consumption, and being easy to use.

  12. Detection of the tau protein in human serum by a sensitive four-electrode electrochemical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Scarlet Xiaoyan; Acha, Desiree; Shah, Ajit J; Hills, Frank; Roitt, Ivan; Demosthenous, Andreas; Bayford, Richard H

    2017-06-15

    This study presents a novel approach based on a four-electrode electrochemical biosensor for the detection of tau protein - one of the possible markers for the prediction of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The biosensor is based on the formation of stable antibody-antigen complexes on gold microband electrodes covered with a layer of a self-assembled monolayer and protein G. Antibodies were immobilized on the gold electrode surface in an optimal orientation by protein G interaction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to analyze impedance change, which revealed a linear response with increasing tau concentrations. The assay is fast (<1h for incubation and measurement) and very sensitive. The limit of quantification for the full-length 2N4R tau protein is 0.03pM, a value unaltered when the assay was processed in bovine serum albumin or human serum. This technology could be adapted for the detection of other biomarkers to provide a multiple assay to identify AD progression in a point of care setting.

  13. Simultaneous analysis of multiple serum proteins adhering to the surface of medical grade polydimethylsiloxane elastomers.

    PubMed

    Backovic, Aleksandar; Wolfram, Dolores; Del-Frari, Barbara; Piza, Hildegunde; Huber, Lukas A; Wick, Georg

    2007-12-01

    Although polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS, silicone) elastomers are presumed to be chemically inert and of negligible toxicity, they induce a prompt acute inflammatory response with subsequent fibrotic reactions. Since local inflammatory and fibrotic side effects are associated with the proteinaceous film on the surface of silicone implants, the process of protein adherence to silicone is of practical medical relevance, and interesting from theoretical, clinical and biotechnological perspectives. It is hypothesized that the systemic side effects resembling rheumatoid and other connective tissue diseases may be triggered by local immunological changes, but this functional relationship has yet to be defined. Because the proteinaceous film on the surface of silicone has been identified as a key player in the activation of host defense mechanisms, we propose a test system based on a proteomics screen to simultaneously identify proteins adsorbed from serum to the surface of silicone. Herein, we describe protein adsorption kinetics on the surface of silicone implants, correlate the adhesion properties of serum proteins with the occurrence of adverse reactions to silicone, and successfully discriminate their signature on the silicone surface in a blinded study of patients suffering from fibrotic reactions (as determined by Baker scale) to silicone implants.

  14. Strong anion exchange liquid chromatographic separation of protein amino acids for natural 13C-abundance determination by isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Abaye, Daniel A; Morrison, Douglas J; Preston, Tom

    2011-02-15

    Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and the analysis of their (13)C abundances is greatly simplified by the use of liquid chromatography (LC) systems coupled with isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) compared with gas chromatography (GC)-based methods. To date, various cation exchange chromatography columns have been employed for amino acid separation. Here, we report strong anion exchange chromatography (SAX) coupled to IRMS with a Liquiface interface for amino acid δ(13)C determination. Mixtures of underivatised amino acids (0.1-0.5 mM) and hydrolysates of representative proteins (prawns and bovine serum albumin) were resolved by LC/IRMS using a SAX column and inorganic eluents. Background inorganic carbon content was minimised through careful preparation of alkaline reagents and use of a pre-injector on-line carbonate removal device. SAX chromatography completely resolved 11 of the 16 expected protein amino acids following acid hydrolysis in underivatised form. Basic and neutral amino acids were resolved with 35 mM NaOH in isocratic mode. Elution of the aromatic and acidic amino acids required a higher hydroxide concentration (180 mM) and a counterion (NO 3-, 5-25 mM). The total run time was 70 min. The average δ(13)C precision of baseline-resolved peaks was 0.75‰ (range 0.04 to 1.06‰). SAX is a viable alternative to cation chromatography, especially where analysis of basic amino acids is important. The technology shows promise for (13)C amino acid analysis in ecology, archaeology, forensic science, nutrition and protein metabolism.

  15. Regulation of inflammation-primed activation of macrophages by two serum factors, vitamin D3-binding protein and albumin.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, N; Kumashiro, R; Yamamoto, M; Willett, N P; Lindsay, D D

    1993-01-01

    A very small amount (0.0005 to 0.001%) of an ammonium sulfate [50% saturated (NH4)2SO4]-precipitable protein fraction of alpha 2-globulin efficiently supported inflammation-primed activation of macrophages. This fraction contains vitamin D3-binding protein essential for macrophage activation. Comparative macrophage activation studies with fetal calf serum, alpha 2-globulin fraction, 50% (NH4)2SO4 precipitate, and purified bovine vitamin D3-binding protein revealed that fetal calf serum and alpha 2-globulin fraction appear to contain an inhibitor for macrophage activation while ammonium sulfate precipitate contains no inhibitor. This inhibitor was found to be serum albumin. When bovine serum albumin (25 micrograms/ml) was added to a medium supplemented with 0.0005 to 0.05% (NH4)2SO4 precipitate or 1 to 10 ng of vitamin D3-binding protein per ml, activation of macrophages was inhibited. PMID:8225612

  16. Carbon nanotubes-assisted polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for enhanced separation of human serum proteins and application in liverish diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fubin; Wang, Yanan; Hu, Xinfang; Shao, Na; Na, Na; Delanghe, Joris R; Ouyang, Jin

    2010-11-01

    The application of pore-gradient polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PG-PAGE) incorporated with carbon nanotube modified by Triton X-100 and carboxylation so as to improve the separation of human serum proteins is reported. The novel PG-PAGE was made by adding water-soluble single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) when preparing the polyacrylamide gel. Significant improvements in separation of complement C3 protein and haptoglobin (Hp) in human serum were achieved. It was estimated that the interactions between the hydrophilic groups on the proteins and the surface of the CNTs result in different adsorption kinetics of complement C3 and Hp subtype on the nanoparticles incorporated in the gel, thus enhancing the separation of the two proteins in serum. This new CNT matrix-assisted PG-PAGE method for enhanced separation of complement C3 and Hp in human serum was successfully applied to distinguish the samples from liverish patients and healthy people.

  17. Genome analysis of Excretory/Secretory proteins in Taenia solium reveals their Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR).

    PubMed

    Gomez, Sandra; Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Palafox-Fonseca, Hector; Cantu-Robles, Vito Adrian; Soberón, Xavier; Sciutto, Edda; Fragoso, Gladis; Bobes, Raúl J; Laclette, Juan P; Yauner, Luis del Pozo; Ochoa-Leyva, Adrián

    2015-05-19

    Excretory/Secretory (ES) proteins play an important role in the host-parasite interactions. Experimental identification of ES proteins is time-consuming and expensive. Alternative bioinformatics approaches are cost-effective and can be used to prioritize the experimental analysis of therapeutic targets for parasitic diseases. Here we predicted and functionally annotated the ES proteins in T. solium genome using an integration of bioinformatics tools. Additionally, we developed a novel measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of T. solium secretome using sequence length and number of antigenic regions of ES proteins. This measurement was formalized as the Abundance of Antigenic Regions (AAR) value. AAR value for secretome showed a similar value to that obtained for a set of experimentally determined antigenic proteins and was different to the calculated value for the non-ES proteins of T. solium genome. Furthermore, we calculated the AAR values for known helminth secretomes and they were similar to that obtained for T. solium. The results reveal the utility of AAR value as a novel genomic measurement to evaluate the potential antigenicity of secretomes. This comprehensive analysis of T. solium secretome provides functional information for future experimental studies, including the identification of novel ES proteins of therapeutic, diagnosis and immunological interest.

  18. Determination of accurate protein monoisotopic mass with the most abundant mass measurable using high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Fen; Chang, C Allen; Lin, Yu-Hsuan; Tsay, Yeou-Guang

    2013-09-01

    While recent developments in mass spectrometry enable direct evaluation of monoisotopic masses (M(mi)) of smaller compounds, protein M(mi) is mostly determined based on its relationship to average mass (Mav). Here, we propose an alternative approach to determining protein M(mi) based on its correlation with the most abundant mass (M(ma)) measurable using high-resolution mass spectrometry. To test this supposition, we first empirically calculated M(mi) and M(ma) of 6158 Escherichia coli proteins, which helped serendipitously uncover a linear correlation between these two protein masses. With the relationship characterized, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was employed to measure M(ma) of protein samples in its ion cluster with the highest signal in the mass spectrum. Generally, our method produces a short series of likely M(mi) in 1-Da steps, and the probability of each likely M(mi) is assigned statistically. It is remarkable that the mass error of this M(mi) is as miniscule as a few parts per million, indicating that our method is capable of determining protein M(mi) with high accuracy. Benefitting from the outstanding performance of modern mass spectrometry, our approach is a significant improvement over others and should be of great utility in the rapid assessment of protein primary structures.

  19. Identification in Pea Seed Mitochondria of a Late-Embryogenesis Abundant Protein Able to Protect Enzymes from Drying1

    PubMed Central

    Grelet, Johann; Benamar, Abdelilah; Teyssier, Emeline; Avelange-Macherel, Marie-Hélène; Grunwald, Didier; Macherel, David

    2005-01-01

    Late-embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are hydrophilic proteins that accumulate to a high level in desiccation-tolerant tissues and are thus prominent in seeds. They are expected to play a protective role during dehydration; however, functional evidence is scarce. We identified a LEA protein of group 3 (PsLEAm) that was localized within the matrix space of pea (Pisum sativum) seed mitochondria. PsLEAm revealed typical LEA features such as high hydrophilicity and repeated motifs, except for the N-terminal transit peptide. Most of the highly charged protein was predicted to fold into amphiphilic α-helixes. PsLEAm was expressed during late seed development and remained in the dry seed and throughout germination. Application of the stress hormone abscisic acid was found to reinduce the expression of PsLEAm transcripts during germination. PsLEAm could not be detected in vegetative tissues; however, its expression could be reinduced in leaves by severe water stress. The recombinant PsLEAm was shown to protect two mitochondrial matrix enzymes, fumarase and rhodanese, during drying in an in vitro assay. The overall results constitute, to our knowledge, the first characterization of a LEA protein in mitochondria and experimental evidence for a beneficial role of a LEA protein with respect to proteins during desiccation. PMID:15618423

  20. Serum antibodies to cow's milk proteins in pediatric inflammatory bowel disease: Crohn's disease vs. ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Lerner, A; Rossi, T M; Park, B; Albini, B; Lebenthal, E

    1989-01-01

    Serum antibodies to five cow's milk proteins, alpha-casein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), beta-lactoglobulin A and B (BLG-a, BLG-b) and alpha-lactalbumin (ALA) were investigated in young patients with inflammatory bowel disease, 56 with Crohn's disease (CD), 24 with ulcerative colitis (UC). IgG antibodies against BSA and BLG-a and -b were higher in Crohn's disease patients as compared to those with ulcerative colitis and controls. The IgG anti-BSA were higher in the group of CD patients with higher score of disease activity. Additionally, IgA antibodies to alpha-casein were higher in CD and UC compared to control. These findings may be due to increased uptake of dietary antigens or enhanced immunological response occurring in CD patients.

  1. Fish protein intake induces fast-muscle hypertrophy and reduces liver lipids and serum glucose levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, Fuminori; Mizushige, Takafumi; Uozumi, Keisuke; Hayamizu, Kohsuke; Han, Li; Tsuji, Tomoko; Kishida, Taro

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, fish protein was proven to reduce serum lipids and body fat accumulation by skeletal muscle hypertrophy and enhancing basal energy expenditure in rats. In the present study, we examined the precise effects of fish protein intake on different skeletal muscle fiber types and metabolic gene expression of the muscle. Fish protein increased fast-twitch muscle weight, reduced liver triglycerides and serum glucose levels, compared with the casein diet after 6 or 8 weeks of feeding. Furthermore, fish protein upregulated the gene expressions of a fast-twitch muscle-type marker and a glucose transporter in the muscle. These results suggest that fish protein induces fast-muscle hypertrophy, and the enhancement of basal energy expenditure by muscle hypertrophy and the increase in muscle glucose uptake reduced liver lipids and serum glucose levels. The present results also imply that fish protein intake causes a slow-to-fast shift in muscle fiber type.

  2. Effects of EPA and DHA on lipid droplet accumulation and mRNA abundance of PAT proteins in caprine monocytes.

    PubMed

    Lecchi, Cristina; Invernizzi, Guido; Agazzi, Alessandro; Modina, Silvia; Sartorelli, Paola; Savoini, Giovanni; Ceciliani, Fabrizio

    2013-04-01

    The present study investigated the in vitro effects on caprine monocytes of two ω-3 PUFAs, namely eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on lipid droplet formation, an emerging process of fundamental importance in innate immunity regulation. The mRNA abundance of PAT protein family (PLIN1, PLIN2 and PLIN3), involved in the formation and trafficking of the droplets, was also assessed. The effects of EPA and DHA on monocyte apoptosis were studied as well. The number of lipid droplets per cell was found to be dependent on both type and concentration of fatty acid. ω-3 PUFAs upregulated PLIN3 and PLIN2 gene expression, as well as apoptosis rate. The present findings suggest that PUFA might modify innate immune functions of goat monocytes by interfering with the formation of lipid droplets and by upregulating proteins belonging to PAT protein family.

  3. The nuclear RNA binding protein RBP33 influences mRNA and spliced leader RNA abundance in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Cirovic, Olivera; Trikin, Roman; Hoffmann, Anneliese; Doiron, Nicholas; Jakob, Martin; Ochsenreiter, Torsten

    2017-03-01

    RNA recognition motif (RRM) containing proteins are important regulators of gene expression in trypanosomes. Here we expand our current knowledge on the exclusively nuclear localized RRM domain containing protein RBP33 of Trypanosoma brucei. Overexpression of RBP33 leads to a quick growth arrest in G2/M in bloodstream form cells likely due to an overall mRNA- and spliced leader abundance decrease while the ribosomal RNAs remain unaffected. The recombinant RBP33 binds to poly(A) and random sequence RNA in vitro confirming its role as a RNA binding protein. Finally super-resolution microscopy detects RBP33 in small punctae throughout the nucleus and surrounding the nucleolus, however the signal is depleted inside the nucleolus.

  4. Exploiting the multiplexing capabilities of tandem mass tags for high-throughput estimation of cellular protein abundances by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ahrné, Erik; Martinez-Segura, Amalia; Syed, Afzal Pasha; Vina-Vilaseca, Arnau; Gruber, Andreas J; Marguerat, Samuel; Schmidt, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    The generation of dynamic models of biological processes critically depends on the determination of precise cellular concentrations of biomolecules. Measurements of system-wide absolute protein levels are particularly valuable information in systems biology. Recently, mass spectrometry based proteomics approaches have been developed to estimate protein concentrations on a proteome-wide scale. However, for very complex proteomes, fractionation steps are required, increasing samples number and instrument analysis time. As a result, the number of full proteomes that can be routinely analyzed is limited. Here we combined absolute quantification strategies with the multiplexing capabilities of isobaric tandem mass tags to determine cellular protein abundances in a high throughput and proteome-wide scale even for highly complex biological systems, such as a whole human cell line. We generated two independent data sets to demonstrate the power of the approach regarding sample throughput, dynamic range, quantitative precision and accuracy as well as proteome coverage in comparison to existing mass spectrometry based strategies.

  5. Elevated serum interferon γ-induced protein 10 kDa is associated with TAFRO syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Noriko; Gion, Yuka; Kondo, Eisei; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Masunari, Taro; Moro, Hiroshi; Nikkuni, Koji; Takai, Kazue; Hagihara, Masao; Hashimoto, Yuko; Yokota, Kenji; Okamoto, Masataka; Nakao, Shinji; Yoshino, Tadashi; Sato, Yasuharu

    2017-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a heterogeneous lymphoproliferative disorder. It is characterized by inflammatory symptoms, and interleukin (IL)-6 contributes to the disease pathogenesis. Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) often drives hypercytokinemia in MCD, although the etiology of HHV-8-negative MCD is idiopathic (iMCD). A distinct subtype of iMCD that shares a constellation of clinical features including thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O) has been reported as TAFRO-iMCD, however the differences in cytokine profiles between TAFRO-iMCD and iMCD have not been established. We retrospectively compared levels of serum interferon γ-induced protein 10 kDa (IP-10), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA, interleukin (IL)-10, and other cytokines between 11 cases of TAFRO-iMCD, 6 cases of plasma cell type iMCD, and 21 healthy controls. During flare-ups, patients with TAFRO-iMCD had significantly higher serum IP-10 and tended to have lower PDGF-AA levels than the other 2 groups. In addition, serum IL-10, IL-23, and vascular endothelial growth factor-A were elevated in both TAFRO-iMCD and iMCD. Elevated serum IP-10 is associated with inflammatory diseases including infectious diseases. There was a strong correlation between high serum IP-10 and the presence of TAFRO-iMCD, suggesting that IP-10 might be involved in the pathogenesis of TAFRO-iMCD. PMID:28205564

  6. Serum vitamin D, vitamin D binding protein, and lung cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Anic, Gabriella M.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Mondul, Alison M.; Männistö, Satu; Albanes, Demetrius

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Vitamin D may prolong cancer survival by inhibiting tumor progression and metastasis, however, there are limited epidemiologic studies regarding the association between circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and lung cancer survival. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between serum 25(OH)D and lung cancer specific survival and to evaluate whether vitamin D binding protein (DBP) concentration modified this association. Materials and Methods 25(OH)D and DBP were measured in fasting serum samples from 500 male lung cancer cases in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for lung cancer related death according to quartiles of season-specific 25(OH)D, DBP, and the molar ratio of 25(OH)D:DBP, a proxy for free circulating 25(OH)D. Results Comparing highest to lowest quartiles, serum 25(OH)D (HR=1.18; 95% CI: 0.89–1.56) and DBP (HR=0.95; 95% CI: 0.71–1.26) were not associated with lung cancer survival and DBP concentration did not modify the association with 25(OH)D (p for interaction=0.56). There was suggestion of an association between higher serum 25(OH)D and better survival from adenocarcinoma (HR=0.64; 95% CI: 0.17–2.45) and small cell carcinoma (HR=0.55; 95% CI: 0.21–1.45), but these estimates were based on a relatively small number of cases. Conclusion Serum 25(OH)D was not associated with overall lung cancer survival regardless of DBP concentration, however, these findings should be examined in other studies that include women and subjects with higher 25(OH)D levels. PMID:25456734

  7. Carvacrol attenuates serum levels of total protein, phospholipase A2 and histamine in asthmatic guinea pig

    PubMed Central

    Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Jalali, Sedigheh; Yahyazadeh, Negin; Boskabady, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pharmacological effects of carvacrol such as its anti-inflammatory activities have been shows. In this study the effects of carvacrol on serum levels of total protein (TP), phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and histamine in sensitized guinea pigs was evaluated. Materials and Methods: Sensitized guinea pigs were given drinking water alone (group S), drinking water containing three concentrations of carvacrol (40, 80 and 160 µg/ml) or dexamethasone. Serum levels of TP, PLA2 and histamine were examined I all sensitized groups as well as a non-sensitized control group (n=6 for each group). Results: In sensitized animals, serum levels of TP, PLA2 and histamine were significantly increased compared to control animals (p<0.05 to p<0.001). Significant reduction in TP, PLA2 and histamine levels were observed in treated groups with the two higher concentrations of carvacrol but dexamethasone treatment only decreased serum level of PLA2 (p<0.05 to p<0.001). Although the effect of the lowest concentration of the extract was less than that of dexamethasone (p<0.05 for TP and p<0.001 for PLA2), the effects of the two higher concentrations on PLA2 were similar to dexamethasone and on TP (p<0.01) and histamine (p<0.001) were higher than those of dexamethasone. Conclusion: These results showed that carvacrol reduced serum levels of TP, PLA2 and histamine in sensitized guinea pigs which may indicate an anti-inflammatory effect of this agent in inflammatory disorders such as asthma. PMID:28078244

  8. Pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats: role of serum protein binding and tissue distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, W.K.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the role of serum protein binding and tissue distribution in the non-linear pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats. The first phase of the research was an attempt to elucidate the causes of intersubject differences in serum protein binding of warfarin in rats. It was found that the distribution of S-warfarin between blood and liver, kidneys, muscle, or fatty tissue was non-linear. Based on the tissue distribution data obtained, a physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model was developed to describe the time course of S-warfarin concentrations in the serum and tissues of rats. The proposed model was able to display the dose-dependent pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rats. Namely a lower clearance and a smaller apparent volume of distribution with increasing dose, which appear to be due to the presence of capacity-limited, high-affinity binding sites for warfarin in various tissues. To determine if the binding of warfarin to the high-affinity binding sites in the liver of rats is reversible, concentrations of S-warfarin in the liver and serum of rats were monitored for a very long time after an intravenous injection of a 1 mg/kg dose. In another study in rats, non-radioactive warfarin was found to be able to displace tissue-bound C/sup 14/-warfarin which was administered about 200 hours before the i.v. injection of the non-radioactive warfarin, showing that the binding of warfarin to the high-affinity binding sites in the body is persistent and reversible.

  9. Matrix Gla protein (MGP) promoter polymorphic variants and its serum level in stenosis of coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mohammad; Roustazadeh, Abazar; Amirfarhangi, Abdollah; Kazemi, Bahram

    2014-03-01

    Although the role of matrix Gla protein (MGP) is not completely known but, its expression within subendothelial macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells is suggested to be involved in vascular calcification. In this study, we investigated the associations between the serum MGP levels and the MGP promoter high minor allele frequency (MAF) variants with the development of stenosis in coronary arteries. Moreover, we evaluated the allele changes within predicted transcription factor elements with bioinformatics tools. 182 subjects were recruited from who underwent coronary angiography. The MGP promoter rs1800801, rs1800802 and rs1800799 genotypes and haplotypes were detected by ARMS-RFLP PCR techniques. The serum MGP concentration was measured using ELISA method. Jaspar profiles were used for scoring the polymorphic variations within the transcription factor elements. The genotype and two-allelic haplotype distributions were not significant between the patient and control groups (P > 0.05). The serum MGP levels had not significant differences between the genotypes (P > 0.1) and haplotypes (P > 0.4). Based on the prediction studies, we did not observe significant differences between the polymorphic scores in the predicted elements (P > 0.05). We concluded that the genotype and haplotype distributions of the MGP promoter high-MAF polymorphisms, as confirmed in the prediction studies and the serum MGP level are not significantly associated with the coronary artery disease. Based on the study results, the MGP protein did not play an important role in the development of stenosis of coronary arteries.

  10. Interaction of Silver Nanoparticles with Serum Proteins Affects Their Antimicrobial Activity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Ben Thomas, Midhun; Thomas, Rony; Raichur, Ashok M.

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is a global threat for human society. There exist recorded data that silver was used as an antimicrobial agent by the ancient Greeks and Romans during the 8th century. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are of potential interest because of their effective antibacterial and antiviral activities, with minimal cytotoxic effects on the cells. However, very few reports have shown the usage of AgNPs for antibacterial therapy in vivo. In this study, we deciphered the importance of the chosen methods for synthesis and capping of AgNPs for their improved activity in vivo. The interaction of AgNPs with serum albumin has a significant effect on their antibacterial activity. It was observed that uncapped AgNPs exhibited no antibacterial activity in the presence of serum proteins, due to the interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA), which was confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy. However, capped AgNPs [with citrate or poly(vinylpyrrolidone)] exhibited antibacterial properties due to minimized interactions with serum proteins. The damage in the bacterial membrane was assessed by flow cytometry, which also showed that only capped AgNPs exhibited antibacterial properties, even in the presence of BSA. In order to understand the in vivo relevance of the antibacterial activities of different AgNPs, a murine salmonellosis model was used. It was conclusively proved that AgNPs capped with citrate or PVP exhibited significant antibacterial activities in vivo against Salmonella infection compared to uncapped AgNPs. These results clearly demonstrate the importance of capping agents and the synthesis method for AgNPs in their use as antimicrobial agents for therapeutic purposes. PMID:23877702

  11. Surface chemistry and serum type both determine the nanoparticle-protein corona

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Daniela; Caracciolo, Giulio; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; La Barbera, Giorgia; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.; Laganà, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The protein corona that forms around nanoparticles in vivo is a critical factor that affects their physiological response. The potential to manipulate nanoparticle characteristics such that either proteins advantageous for delivery are recruited and/or detrimental proteins are avoided offers exciting possibilities for improving drug delivery. In this work, we used nanoliquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry to characterize the corona of five lipid formulations after incubation in mouse and human plasma with the hope of providing data that may contribute to a better understanding of the role played by both the nanoparticle properties and the physiological environment in recruiting specific proteins to the corona. Notably, we showed that minor changes in the lipid composition might critically affect the protein corona composition demonstrating that the surface chemistry and arrangement of lipid functional groups are key players that regulate the liposome-protein interactions. Notably, we provided evidence that the protein corona that forms around liposomes is strongly affected by the physiological environment, i.e., the serum type. These results are likely to suggest that the translation of novel pharmaceutical formulations from animal models to the clinic must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. PMID:25731725

  12. About the structural role of disulfide bridges in serum albumins: evidence from protein simulated unfolding.

    PubMed

    Paris, Guillaume; Kraszewski, Sebastian; Ramseyer, Christophe; Enescu, Mironel

    2012-11-01

    The role of the 17 disulfide (S-S) bridges in preserving the native conformation of human serum albumin (HSA) is investigated by performing classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on protein structures with intact and, respectively, reduced S-S bridges. The thermal unfolding simulations predict a clear destabilization of the protein secondary structure upon reduction of the S-S bridges as well as a significant distortion of the tertiary structure that is revealed by the changes in the protein native contacts fraction. The effect of the S-S bridges reduction on the protein compactness was tested by calculating Gibbs free energy profiles with respect to the protein gyration radius. The theoretical results obtained using the OPLS-AA and the AMBER ff03 force fields are in agreement with the available experimental data. Beyond the validation of the simulation method, the results here reported provide new insights into the mechanism of the protein reductive/oxidative unfolding/folding processes. It is predicted that in the native conformation of the protein, the thiol (-SH) groups belonging to the same reduced S-S bridge are located in potential wells that maintain them in contact. The -SH pairs can be dispatched by specific conformational transitions of the peptide chain located in the neighborhood of the cysteine residues.

  13. Interaction of bovine serum albumin protein with self assembled monolayer of mercaptoundecanoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poonia, Monika; Agarwal, Hitesh; Manjuladevi, V.; Gupta, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    Detection of proteins and other biomolecules in liquid phase is the essence for the design of a biosensor. The sensitivity of a sensor can be enhanced by the appropriate functionalization of the sensing area so as to establish the molecular specific interaction. In the present work, we have studied the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein with a chemically functionalized surface using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The gold-coated quartz crystals (AT-cut/5 MHz) were functionalized by forming self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 11-Mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA). The adsorption characteristics of BSA onto SAM of MUA on quartz crystal are reported. BSA showed the highest affinity for SAM of MUA as compared to pure gold surface. The SAM of MUA provides carboxylated surface which enhances not only the adsorption of the BSA protein but also a very stable BSA-MUA complex in the liquid phase.

  14. Selective detection of protein homologues in serum using an OmpG nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Fahie, Monifa A.; Yang, Bib; Mullis, Martin; Holden, Matthew A.; Chen, Min

    2016-01-01

    Outer membrane protein G is a monomeric β-barrel porin that has seven flexible loops on its extracellular side. Conformational changes of these labile loops induce gating spikes in current recordings that we exploited as the prime sensing element for protein detection. The gating characteristics - open probability, frequency and current decrease - provide rich information for analyte identification. Here, we show that two antibiotin antibodies each induced a distinct gating pattern, which allowed them to be readily detected and simultaneously discriminated by a single OmpG nanopore in the presence of fetal bovine serum. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of directly profiling proteins in real-world samples with minimal or no sample pretreatment. PMID:26451707

  15. Isolation and characterization of multiple abundant lipid transfer protein isoforms in developing sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ah Mi; Lee, Saet Buyl; Cho, Sung Ho; Hwang, Inhwan; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Suh, Mi Chung

    2008-02-01

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum) is an important oilseed crop; approximately 50% of the seed dry weight is storage oil. In a previous report, developing sesame seed expressed sequence tags (ESTs) revealed that ESTs encoding lipid transfer protein (LTPs) were one of the most abundant groups of sesame ESTs. LTP functions in the transfer of wax or cutin monomers and in the defense response against pathogen attack. To study the biological role of the abundant LTP isoforms in developing seeds, 122 ESTs out of 3328 sesame ESTs were analyzed against Arabidopsis and rice proteome databases. LTP fraction, which was partially purified from developing sesame seeds, actively transferred fluorescent phospholipids and bound to fatty acids. Full-length cDNAs of five out of 21 LTP isoforms were isolated and named SiLTP1-SiLTP5. The predicted amino acid sequences of the five SiLTPs harbor typical characteristics of LTPs, including conserved arrangement of cysteine residues. Northern blot analysis revealed that the five SiLTP isoforms were most abundantly expressed in developing seeds, but were also detected in flower tissues. Also, SiLTP3 and SiLTP4 transcripts were expressed in leaves and seed-pot walls, respectively. In addition, SiLTP2 and SiLTP4 transcripts were significantly induced in 6-day-old sesame seedlings by application of NaCl, mannitol, and abscisic acid (ABA). Transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion constructs in Arabidopsis protoplasts revealed that SiLTP1 and SiLTP2 were secreted by different pathways. Taken together, the abundant LTPs in developing sesame seeds are involved in lipid transfer into the extracellular matrix. Possible biological roles of SiLTPs related to organ-specific expression and abiotic stresses are discussed.

  16. Pro-Inflammatory Flagellin Proteins of Prevalent Motile Commensal Bacteria Are Variably Abundant in the Intestinal Microbiome of Elderly Humans

    PubMed Central

    Neville, B. Anne; Sheridan, Paul O.; Harris, Hugh M. B.; Coughlan, Simone; Flint, Harry J.; Duncan, Sylvia H.; Jeffery, Ian B.; Claesson, Marcus J.; Ross, R. Paul; Scott, Karen P.; O'Toole, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Some Eubacterium and Roseburia species are among the most prevalent motile bacteria present in the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults. These flagellate species contribute “cell motility” category genes to the intestinal microbiome and flagellin proteins to the intestinal proteome. We reviewed and revised the annotation of motility genes in the genomes of six Eubacterium and Roseburia species that occur in the human intestinal microbiota and examined their respective locus organization by comparative genomics. Motility gene order was generally conserved across these loci. Five of these species harbored multiple genes for predicted flagellins. Flagellin proteins were isolated from R. inulinivorans strain A2-194 and from E. rectale strains A1-86 and M104/1. The amino-termini sequences of the R. inulinivorans and E. rectale A1-86 proteins were almost identical. These protein preparations stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human intestinal epithelial cell lines, suggesting that these flagellins were pro-inflammatory. Flagellins from the other four species were predicted to be pro-inflammatory on the basis of alignment to the consensus sequence of pro-inflammatory flagellins from the β- and γ- proteobacteria. Many fliC genes were deduced to be under the control of σ28. The relative abundance of the target Eubacterium and Roseburia species varied across shotgun metagenomes from 27 elderly individuals. Genes involved in the flagellum biogenesis pathways of these species were variably abundant in these metagenomes, suggesting that the current depth of coverage used for metagenomic sequencing (3.13–4.79 Gb total sequence in our study) insufficiently captures the functional diversity of genomes present at low (≤1%) relative abundance. E. rectale and R. inulinivorans thus appear to synthesize complex flagella composed of flagellin proteins that stimulate IL-8 production. A greater depth of sequencing, improved evenness of sequencing and improved

  17. Uses of phage display in agriculture: sequence analysis and comparative modeling of late embryogenesis abundant client proteins suggest protein-nucleic acid binding functionality.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Rekha; Downie, A Bruce; Payne, Christina M

    2013-01-01

    A group of intrinsically disordered, hydrophilic proteins-Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins-has been linked to survival in plants and animals in periods of stress, putatively through safeguarding enzymatic function and prevention of aggregation in times of dehydration/heat. Yet despite decades of effort, the molecular-level mechanisms defining this protective function remain unknown. A recent effort to understand LEA functionality began with the unique application of phage display, wherein phage display and biopanning over recombinant Seed Maturation Protein homologs from Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max were used to retrieve client proteins at two different temperatures, with one intended to represent heat stress. From this previous study, we identified 21 client proteins for which clones were recovered, sometimes repeatedly. Here, we use sequence analysis and homology modeling of the client proteins to ascertain common sequence and structural properties that may contribute to binding affinity with the protective LEA protein. Our methods uncover what appears to be a predilection for protein-nucleic acid interactions among LEA client proteins, which is suggestive of subcellular residence. The results from this initial computational study will guide future efforts to uncover the protein protective mechanisms during heat stress, potentially leading to phage-display-directed evolution of synthetic LEA molecules.

  18. Reaction of ozone with protein tryptophans: band III, serum albumin, and cytochrome C.

    PubMed

    Mudd, J B; Dawson, P J; Tseng, S; Liu, F P

    1997-02-15

    Treatment of red cell ghosts with ozone inhibited both AChE (marking the outside of the membrane) and G3PDH (marking the inside of the membrane). There was no change in tryptophan fluorescence of the ghosts after the ozone treatment. Band 3 protein was isolated from the ozone-treated ghosts. The protein was digested with trypsin to obtain water soluble peptides from the cytoplasmic N-terminal tail and the interhelical loops. Fluorescent peptides included GWVIHPLGLR from the outer loop between helices 7 and 8, and peptide WMEAAR from the N-terminal cytoplasmic tail. Neither one of these peptides was oxidized by ozone. This was true whether or not the ghosts were sealed. We conclude that the position of these tryptophans either in the membrane structure, or because of binding to other proteins in the cytoplasmic tail, protects them from oxidation by ozone. Treatment of horse heart cytochrome c with ozone did not change the absorbance spectrum in the heme region or the tryptophan absorbing region. HPLC of the ozone-treated cytochrome c showed that cytochrome c was being modified, indicated by a change in the elution time. Treatment of cytochrome c with ozone did not change the activity in the NADH-cytochrome c reductase assay. Digestion of the ozone-treated cytochrome c with trypsin gave peptides which demonstrated normal fluorescence. (Cytochrome c has abnormally low fluorescence, which is not changed by ozone exposure.) The peptides were separated by HPLC. The fluorescence of the tryptophan-containing peptide (GITWK) was not decreased by treatment of the cytochrome c by ozone. Amino acid analysis of the ozone-treated cytochrome c indicated that methionine was oxidized. We conclude that tryptophan in cytochrome c is protected from oxidation by ozone because of the interaction with the porphyrin ring. Bovine serum albumin and human serum albumin were treated with ozone. There was a monotonic decrease in tryptophan fluorescence in both cases. Digestion of BSA with

  19. Modifications and oxidation of lipids and proteins in human serum detected by thermochemiluminescence.

    PubMed

    Shnizer, Sergei; Kagan, Tamara; Lanir, Amos; Maor, Irit; Reznick, Abraham Z

    2003-01-01

    Detection of electronically excited species (EES) in body fluids may constitute an important diagnostic tool in various pathologies. Examples of such products are triplet excited carbonyls (TEC), which can be a source for photon emission in the 400-550 nm range. The aim of the present study was to determine the actual contribution of lipid and protein components (protein carbonyls) to photon emission generated by thermochemiluminescence (TCL) during the heating of biological fluids. In this study, a new TCL Photometer device, designed by Lumitest Ltd, Israel, was used. Samples were heated to a constant temperature of 80 +/- 0.5 degrees C for 280 s and photon emission was measured at several time points. In order to compare the results of TCL measurements to conventional methods of detecting lipid and protein oxidation, each examined sample was also heated in a waterbath at 80 degrees C for 10-280 s. Lipid and protein oxidation were subsequently measured using conventional methods. The TCL of four polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with three to six double bonds was measured. The elevation of the PUFA TCL amplitude correlated with the increase in the number of double bonds of PUFA. A correlation between the increase in TCL intensity and protein carbonyl generation in bovine serum albumin (BSA) was also observed. In the venous blood serum, our study showed that an increase of TCL intensity during heating reflected the cleavage of TEC of lipid origin. Our study suggests that biological molecules such as proteins, lipids and other molecules, which may become unstable during heating, are capable of generating EES. We demonstrated that a TCL curve can be used as a kinetic model for measuring oxidative processes, which reflects modifications of different molecules involved in the oxidative stress phenomena.

  20. Effect of serum monoclonal protein concentration on haemostasis in patients with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Heyu; Li, Huijun; Li, Dengju

    2015-07-01

    Abnormalities in haemostasis are often detected in patients with multiple myeloma and the fundamental factors that lead to these abnormities are worthy of exploration. The objective of this study was to investigate bleeding diathesis and coagulopathy in different multiple myeloma types or stages and assess how paraprotein concentration contributes to differences in these conditions. Haemostasis screening tests and serum monoclonal protein (M protein) concentration were retrospectively analysed in 101 patients newly diagnosed with multiple myeloma from January 2012 to April 2014. No significant differences were found between bleeding diathesis and types or International Staging System (ISS) stages of multiple myeloma; however, prolonged thrombin time (TT) was found in most of patients (77.7%) and was positively related to light-chain concentration (P ≤ 0.01). Prolonged prothrombin time (PT) was more obvious in IgA and IgG-type multiple myeloma than in the light-chain type (P ≤ 0.01). With increased clinical staging, PT remarkably increased (P ≤ 0.01). M protein concentration was significantly higher in patients with prolonged PT than in those with normal PT (P ≤ 0.01). The D-dimer mean was significantly higher than normal (>0.5 μg/ml) (P ≤ 0.01). Fibrinogen was negatively related to M protein levels (P ≤ 0.01); however, there was no correlation between activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and multiple myeloma stages or types, M protein levels and serum light-chain concentration (P ≥ 0.05). Patients with light-chain type multiple myeloma were more likely to have prolonged TT than patients with other types. M protein levels had an obvious effect on PT. Prolonged PT was more common in IgA and IgG-type multiple myeloma. Abnormal haemostasis test results are not always accompanied by clinically apparent haemostatic complications.

  1. Diversity, abundance, and sex-specific expression of chemosensory proteins in the reproductive organs of the locust Locusta migratoria manilensis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xian-Hong; Ban, Li-Ping; Iovinella, Immacolata; Zhao, Li-Jing; Gao, Qian; Felicioli, Antonio; Sagona, Simona; Pieraccini, Giuseppe; Pelosi, Paolo; Zhang, Long; Dani, Francesca Romana

    2013-01-01

    Chemosensory proteins (CSPs) are small soluble proteins often associated with chemosensory organs in insects but include members involved in other functions, such as pheromone delivery and development. Although the CSPs of the sensory organs have been extensively studied, little is known on their functions in other parts of the body. A first screening of the available databases has identified 70 sequences encoding CSPs in the oriental locust Locusta migratoria manilensis. Applying proteomic analysis, we have identified 17 of them abundantly expressed in the female reproductive organs, but only one (CSP91) in male organs. Bacterially expressed CSP91 binds fatty acids with a specificity for oleic and linoleic acid, as well as medium-length alcohols and esters. The same acids have been detected as the main gas chromatographic peaks in the dichloromethane extracts of reproductive organs of both sexes. The abundance and the number of CSPs in female reproductive organs indicates important roles for these proteins. We cannot exclude that different functions can be associated with each of the 17 CSPs, including delivery of semiochemicals, solubilization of hormones, direct control of development, or other unknown tasks.

  2. An Odorant-Binding Protein Is Abundantly Expressed in the Nose and in the Seminal Fluid of the Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Niccolini, Alberto; Serra, Andrea; Gazzano, Angelo; Scaloni, Andrea; Pelosi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    We have purified an abundant lipocalin from the seminal fluid of the rabbit, which shows significant similarity with the sub-class of pheromone carriers “urinary” and “salivary” and presents an N-terminal sequence identical with that of an odorant-binding protein (rabOBP3) expressed in the nasal tissue of the same species. This protein is synthesised in the prostate and found in the seminal fluid, but not in sperm cells. The same protein is also expressed in the nasal epithelium of both sexes, but is completely absent in female reproductive organs. It presents four cysteines, among which two are arranged to form a disulphide bridge, and is glycosylated. This is the first report of an OBP identified at the protein level in the seminal fluid of a vertebrate species. The protein purified from seminal fluid is bound to some organic chemicals whose structure is currently under investigation. We reasonably speculate that, like urinary and salivary proteins reported in other species of mammals, this lipocalin performs a dual role, as carrier of semiochemicals in the seminal fluid and as detector of chemical signals in the nose. PMID:25391153

  3. Immunoprecipitation of Serum Albumin with Protein A-Sepharose: A Biochemistry Laboratory Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohinski, Robert C.

    2000-11-01

    An exercise has been designed and optimized to acquaint students with the simple yet powerful technique of immunoprecipitation. Protein A-Sepharose (PA-S) is used as a solid-phase precipitant to recover bovine serum albumin (BSA, the antigen) recognized by anti-BSA antibody (Ab). The high degree of binding specificity between antigen and antibody is illustrated by recovery of BSA from a complex mixture of proteins obtained from wheat germ and chicken breast. Various controls are included for a thorough data analysis. The solid phase of Ag/Ab/PA-S is recovered by centrifugation, thoroughly washed, and treated to dissociate the BSA antigen. Samples are examined by discontinuous denaturing gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with Coomassie blue staining. The supernatants, containing proteins that are not precipitated, are also analyzed. Antigenic cross-reactivity, ranging from strong to none, is demonstrated in a second part by using serum albumins from seven different sources. Systems can be set up, shaken, and prepared for electrophoresis in a single lab period with time for laboratory lecture and discussion about antibody structure and function, antibody-based methods in general, and immunoprecipitation in particular.

  4. Serum-free culture alters the quantity and protein composition of neuroblastoma-derived extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinghuan; Lee, Yi; Johansson, Henrik J; Mäger, Imre; Vader, Pieter; Nordin, Joel Z; Wiklander, Oscar P B; Lehtiö, Janne; Wood, Matthew J A; Andaloussi, Samir El

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a significant role in cell-cell communication in numerous physiological processes and pathological conditions, and offer promise as novel biomarkers and therapeutic agents for genetic diseases. Many recent studies have described different molecular mechanisms that contribute to EV biogenesis and release from cells. However, little is known about how external stimuli such as cell culture conditions can affect the quantity and content of EVs. While N2a neuroblastoma cells cultured in serum-free (OptiMEM) conditions did not result in EVs with significant biophysical or size differences compared with cells cultured in serum-containing (pre-spun) conditions, the quantity of isolated EVs was greatly increased. Moreover, the expression levels of certain vesicular proteins (e.g. small GTPases, G-protein complexes, mRNA processing proteins and splicing factors), some of which were previously reported to be involved in EV biogenesis, were found to be differentially expressed in EVs under different culture conditions. These data, therefore, contribute to the understanding of how extracellular factors and intracellular molecular pathways affect the composition and release of EVs.

  5. Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae protein E binds vitronectin and is important for serum resistance.

    PubMed

    Hallström, Teresia; Blom, Anna M; Zipfel, Peter F; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2009-08-15

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) commonly causes local disease in the upper and lower respiratory tract and has recently been shown to interfere with both the classical and alternative pathways of complement activation. The terminal pathway of the complement system is regulated by vitronectin that is a component of both plasma and the extracellular matrix. In this study, we identify protein E (PE; 16 kDa), which is a recently characterized ubiquitous outer membrane protein, as a vitronectin-binding protein of NTHi. A PE-deficient NTHi mutant had a markedly reduced survival in serum compared with the PE-expressing isogenic NTHi wild type. Moreover, the PE-deficient mutant showed a significantly decreased binding to both soluble and immobilized vitronectin. In parallel, PE-expressing Escherichia coli bound soluble vitronectin and adhered to immobilized vitronectin compared with controls. Surface plasmon resonance technology revealed a K(D) of 0.4 microM for the interaction between recombinant PE and immobilized vitronectin. Moreover, the PE-dependent vitronectin-binding site was located at the heparin-binding domains of vitronectin and the major vitronectin-binding domain was found in the central core of PE (aa 84-108). Importantly, vitronectin bound to the surface of NTHi 3655 reduced membrane attack complex-induced hemolysis. In contrast to incubation with normal human serum, NTHi 3655 showed a reduced survival in vitronectin-depleted human serum, thus demonstrating that vitronectin mediates a protective role at the bacterial surface. Our findings show that PE, by binding vitronectin, may play an important role in NTHi pathogenesis.

  6. Effects of heat stress on proliferation, protein turnover, and abundance of heat shock protein messenger ribonucleic acid in cultured porcine muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed

    Kamanga-Sollo, E; Pampusch, M S; White, M E; Hathaway, M R; Dayton, W R

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that heat stress (HS) negatively affects growth rate in swine. Although reduced feed intake undoubtedly plays a significant role in this reduction, studies in laboratory animals and other nonswine species indicate muscle growth also is affected by HS-related alterations in muscle physiology. Evidence is now emerging that heat shock proteins (Hsp), produced in response to HS and other types of cellular stress, may play an important role in regulating the rate and efficiency of muscle growth. Because muscle satellite cells play a crucial role in postnatal muscle growth, the effects of HS on rates of satellite cell proliferation, protein synthesis, and protein degradation play an important role in determining the rate and extent of muscle growth. Consequently, in the current study we have examined the effects of mild HS (40.5°C for 48 h) on the rates of proliferation, protein synthesis, and protein degradation and on quantities of Hsp90, Hsp70, and Hsp25/27 mRNA and protein in cultured porcine muscle satellite cells (PSC). Mild HS of PSC cultures resulted in 2.5-, 1.4-, and 6.5-fold increases (P < 0.05) in the abundance of Hsp90, Hsp70, and Hsp25/27 mRNA, respectively, relative to control cultures. Abundance of Hsp 90, 70, and 25/27 proteins was also increased in HS PSC cultures compared with those in control cultures. Proliferation rates in HS PSC cultures were 35% less (P < 0.05) than those in control cultures. Protein synthesis rates in HS-fused PSC cultures were 85% greater (P < 0.05) than those in control cultures, and protein degradation rates in HS-fused PSC were 23% less (P < 0.05) than those in control cultures. In light of the crucial role satellite cells play in postnatal muscle growth, the HS-induced changes we have observed in rates of proliferation, protein turnover, and abundance of Hsp mRNA and Hsp protein in PSC cultures indicate that mild HS affects the physiology of PSC in ways that could affect muscle growth in swine.

  7. Conformation of a group 2 late embryogenesis abundant protein from soybean. Evidence of poly (L-proline)-type II structure.

    PubMed

    Soulages, Jose L; Kim, Kangmin; Arrese, Estela L; Walters, Christina; Cushman, John C

    2003-03-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are members of a large group of hydrophilic, glycine-rich proteins found in plants, algae, fungi, and bacteria known collectively as hydrophilins that are preferentially expressed in response to dehydration or hyperosmotic stress. Group 2 LEA (dehydrins or responsive to abscisic acid) proteins are postulated to stabilize macromolecules against damage by freezing, dehydration, ionic, or osmotic stress. However, the structural and physicochemical properties of group 2 LEA proteins that account for such functions remain unknown. We have analyzed the structural properties of a recombinant form of a soybean (Glycine max) group 2 LEA (rGmDHN1). Differential scanning calorimetry of purified rGmDHN1 demonstrated that the protein does not display a cooperative unfolding transition upon heating. Ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy revealed that the protein is in a largely hydrated and unstructured conformation in solution. However, ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism measurements collected at different temperatures showed that the protein exists in equilibrium between two extended conformational states: unordered and left-handed extended helical or poly (L-proline)-type II structures. It is estimated that 27% of the residues of rGmDHN1 adopt or poly (L-proline)-type II-like helical conformation at 12 degrees C. The content of extended helix gradually decreases to 15% as the temperature is increased to 80 degrees C. Studies of the conformation of the protein in solution in the presence of liposomes, trifluoroethanol, and sodium dodecyl sulfate indicated that rGmDHN1 has a very low intrinsic ability to adopt alpha-helical structure and to interact with phospholipid bilayers through amphipathic alpha-helices. The ability of the protein to remain in a highly extended conformation at low temperatures could constitute the basis of the functional role of GmDHN1 in the prevention of freezing, desiccation

  8. Serum beta-lipoprotein and other specific protein concentrations in patients with immunocytoma.

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, G; Lynch, S R; Bezwoda, W R; Gilich, G C

    1976-01-01

    Serum beta-lipoprotein and other specific protein concentrations were measured in 56 patients suffering from multiple myelomatosis, "benign" paraproteinaemia or Waldenström's macroglobulinaemia and in 56 control subjects. The mean level of B-lipoprotein in untreated patients with multiple myelomatosis and macroglobulinaemia was significantly lower than that of the controls. Patients who responded to chemotherapy showed a rapid return to normal of the beta-lipoprotein concentration, while the level remained unchanged in most of those who did not. PMID:180062

  9. Laser nephelometric measurement of seven serum proteins compared with radial immunodiffusion.

    PubMed

    Guiguet, M; Padieu, P; Mack, G; Dalebroux, M

    1983-04-01

    Quantification of immunoglobulins IgG, IgA, IgM, C3 complement, siderophilin, alpha 2-macroglobulin and haptoglobin in serum by a Behring laser nephelometer coupled with a date processing apparatus was compared with values obtained by the radial immunodiffusion method of Mancini. The precision was not improved by the use of the laser nephelometer as compared to Mancini radial immunodiffusion, but within run precision was better than that among runs for both methods. The analytical recovery studies for laser nephelometry showed a close concordance between the theoretical and measured values for all proteins. The two techniques were also compared by means of correlation studies.

  10. Interference of dextran in biuret-type assays of serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, Joris R; Hamers, Nicole; Taes, Youri E; Libeer, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    Dextran interference in biuret-type assays of total serum proteins was investigated in a Belgian National External Quality Assurance Survey with 256 participants. In vitro supplementation of therapeutic (10% Gentran 70) dextran concentrations showed a broadly varying (from 0 to 20%) negative interference. The analytical interference was found to depend on both the sodium hydroxide and tartrate concentrations in the reagent formulation. The dry chemistry biuret method was not affected by the dextran interference. In a number of cases, the effects observed may be of clinical importance. Both clinicians and laboratory staff should be aware of the persistence of this analytical problem.

  11. STUDIES ON THE BLOOD PROTEINS : I. THE SERUM GLOBULINS IN BACTERIAL INFECTION AND IMMUNITY.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, S H; Meyer, K F

    1916-11-01

    The progress of an infection is usually associated with marked changes in the serum proteins. There may be an increase in the percentage of the total protein during some stage of the infection, and there is usually a change in the albumin-globulin ratio with an increase in the total globulins. This rise may antedate the development of any resistance by a considerable period of time. The non-protein constituents of the blood show fluctuations with a tendency to rise as the infection progresses. The process of immunization is in almost all instances associated with a definite increase in the globulins of the blood, and in some cases with a complete inversion of the normal albumin-globulin ratio. This may be produced both by living and dead organisms and by bacterial endotoxins. Massive doses usually result in an upset which shows no tendency to right itself during the period of observation. A rise in the globulins has been shown to occur long before the animal develops immune bodies in any appreciable concentration; and where the globulin curve and antibody curve appear to parallel one another, it can be shown by a careful analysis of both curves that there is a definite lack of correspondence at various periods of the experiment. Animals possessing a basic immunity show a more rapid rise in the globulin curve following inoculation. There is no parallelism between the leukocytic reaction and the globulin reaction. During periods of leukopenia the globulins may be as high as during the period of a leukocytosis. Bacterial endotoxins produce as striking an increase in the serum globulins as do living and killed bacteria. This would seem to indicate that a bacterial invasion of the organism is not absolutely essential for the globulin changes, and that the toxogenic factor in infection and immunity must play a part in the production of the changes noted. Inflammatory irritants injected intraperitoneally also result in a globulin increase. In this case the changes

  12. Albumin-coated SPIONs: an experimental and theoretical evaluation of protein conformation, binding affinity and competition with serum proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Siming; Perálvarez-Marín, Alex; Minelli, Caterina; Faraudo, Jordi; Roig, Anna; Laromaine, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The variety of nanoparticles (NPs) used in biological applications is increasing and the study of their interaction with biological media is becoming more important. Proteins are commonly the first biomolecules that NPs encounter when they interact with biological systems either in vitro or in vivo. Among NPs, super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) show great promise for medicine. In this work, we study in detail the formation, composition, and structure of a monolayer of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on SPIONs. We determine, both by molecular simulations and experimentally, that ten molecules of BSA form a monolayer around the outside of the SPIONs and their binding strength to the SPIONs is about 3.5 × 10-4 M, ten times higher than the adsorption of fetal bovine serum (FBS) on the same SPIONs. We elucidate a strong electrostatic interaction between BSA and the SPIONs, although the secondary structure of the protein is not affected. We present data that supports the strong binding of the BSA monolayer on SPIONs and the properties of the BSA layer as a protein-resistant coating. We believe that a complete understanding of the behavior and morphology of BSA-SPIONs and how the protein interacts with SPIONs is crucial for improving NP surface design and expanding the potential applications of SPIONs in nanomedicine.The variety of nanoparticles (NPs) used in biological applications is increasing and the study of their interaction with biological media is becoming more important. Proteins are commonly the first biomolecules that NPs encounter when they interact with biological systems either in vitro or in vivo. Among NPs, super-paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) show great promise for medicine. In this work, we study in detail the formation, composition, and structure of a monolayer of bovine serum albumin (BSA) on SPIONs. We determine, both by molecular simulations and experimentally, that ten molecules of BSA form a monolayer around the

  13. Reference intervals for total protein concentration, serum protein fractions, and albumin/globulin ratios in clinically healthy dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Alberghina, Daniela; Giannetto, Claudia; Vazzana, Irene; Ferrantelli, Vincenzo; Piccione, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to evaluate total serum protein concentration measured by the biuret reaction as well as albumin and globulin protein fractions determined by agarose gel electrophoresis. These data were used to establish reference intervals in dairy cows of different ages. Blood was collected from 111 clinically healthy Modicana dairy cows by means of jugular venipuncture. Reference intervals (mean ± standard deviation) were determined for total protein (67.54 ± 11.53 g/l), albumin (31.86 ± 4.60 g/l), α(1)-globulin (5.77 ± 2.20 g/l), α(2)-globulin (5.84 ± 1.90 g/l), β-globulin (7.46 ± 1.94 g/l), and γ-globulin (16.73 ± 4.54 g/l) concentrations as well as for albumin/globulin (A/G) ratio (0.88 ± 0.43). Values from 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, and 6-year-old cows were compared statistically. One-way analysis of variance showed age-related differences for α-globulin and β-globulin fractions only. The results of the current study provide reference intervals for total protein concentration as well as albumin and globulin protein fractions in 2- to 6-year-old dairy cows.

  14. Serum protein response and renal failure in canine Babesia annae infection.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Angel Tomas; Guitian, Francisco Javier; Pallas, Estrella; Gestal, Juan Jesus; Olmeda, Sonia; Goethert, Heidi; Telford, Sam; Spielman, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Babesia annae piroplasms have recently been recognised as a cause of infection and disease among dogs in Europe. The pathogenesis and clinical implications of this emerging disease remain poorly understood. We conducted this study to describe the electrophoretic profiles associated with the infection and to determine if B. annae associated azotaemia is caused by renal failure. We examined by microscopy 2,979 canine blood samples submitted to a diagnostic laboratory in NW Spain between September 2001 and April 2002. Small ring-shaped piroplasms were detected in blood smears of 87 samples and the identity of 58 of these presumptive cases were confirmed by PCR. This group of 58 infected dogs and a reference group of 15 healthy non-infected dogs were our study population. For all the dogs, serum protein response to -albumin, alpha-1 globulin, alpha-2 globulin, beta globulin and gamma globulin- was measured by capillary electrophoresis. The response of infected and non-infected dogs was compared and within infected dogs, the response of those with azotaemia (19) was compared with that of non-azotaemic dogs (39). Infected dogs presented a significant elevation of total proteins and all the different globulin fractions, and significantly lower levels of albumin compared to non-infected dogs. Among infected dogs, those presenting azotaemia had significantly lower concentrations of total proteins, albumin, beta and gamma globulins, and significantly higher values of alpha-2 globulin. Specific gravity was below the threshold of 1,025 for all dogs with azotaemia for which a urine sample was available (7) suggesting that azotaemia, in these dogs was of renal origin. Azotaemic dogs had higher concentrations of cholesterol and triglycerides, probably as a result of a liver compensatory response to the loss of proteins. We conclude that serum protein response in B. annae infected dogs corresponds to the pattern of a haemolytic syndrome with intense inflammatory reaction and that

  15. The influences of ambient temperature and crude protein levels on performance and serum biochemical parameters in broilers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q W; Feng, J H; Chao, Z; Chen, Y; Wei, L M; Wang, F; Sun, R P; Zhang, M H

    2016-04-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of ambient temperature, crude protein levels and their interaction on performance and serum biochemical parameters of broiler chickens. A total of 216 Arbor Acre broiler chickens (108 males and 108 females) were used in a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement and randomly reared at two temperatures (normal temperature: 23 °C; daily cyclic high temperature: 28-32 °C) and fed on three diets with different crude protein levels (153.3, 183.3 or 213.3 g/kg, with constant essential amino acids) from 28 to 42 days of age. Daily cyclic high ambient temperature decreased final body weight, average daily weight gain, average daily feed intake and serum total protein contents (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p = 0.008 respectively), but increased feed/gain, mortality, respiratory rate, rectal temperature, serum uric acid contents and serum creatine kinase activity (p = 0.008, p = 0.003, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p = 0.003 respectively), irrespective of crude protein levels. At the ambient temperature, reducing crude protein levels resulted in an increase in feed/gain (p < 0.001), but a decrease in serum total protein and uric acid contents. Only serum creatine kinase activity in broiler chickens was interacted by daily cyclic high ambient temperature and dietary crude protein levels (p = 0.003). These results indicated that daily cyclic high ambient temperature had a great effect on performance and serum biochemical parameters in broiler chickens, whereas dietary crude protein levels affected them partially.

  16. Direct Correlation between Motile Behavior and Protein Abundance in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Sébastien; Frankel, Nicholas W.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how stochastic molecular fluctuations affect cell behavior requires the quantification of both behavior and protein numbers in the same cells. Here, we combine automated microscopy with in situ hydrogel polymerization to measure single-cell protein expression after tracking swimming behavior. We characterized the distribution of non-genetic phenotypic diversity in Escherichia coli motility, which affects single-cell exploration. By expressing fluorescently tagged chemotaxis proteins (CheR and CheB) at different levels, we quantitatively mapped motile phenotype (tumble bias) to protein numbers using thousands of single-cell measurements. Our results disagreed with established models until we incorporated the role of CheB in receptor deamidation and the slow fluctuations in receptor methylation. Beyond refining models, our central finding is that changes in numbers of CheR and CheB affect the population mean tumble bias and its variance independently. Therefore, it is possible to adjust the degree of phenotypic diversity of a population by adjusting the global level of expression of CheR and CheB while keeping their ratio constant, which, as shown in previous studies, confers functional robustness to the system. Since genetic control of protein expression is heritable, our results suggest that non-genetic diversity in motile behavior is selectable, supporting earlier hypotheses that such diversity confers a selective advantage. PMID:27599206

  17. Serum Galectin-9 and Galectin-3-Binding Protein in Acute Dengue Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuan-Ting; Liu, Yao-Hua; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lin, Chun-Yu; Huang, Chung-Hao; Yen, Meng-Chi; Kuo, Po-Lin

    2016-05-27

    Dengue fever is a serious threat for public health and induces various inflammatory cytokines and mediators, including galectins and glycoproteins. Diverse immune responses and immunological pathways are induced in different phases of dengue fever progression. However, the status of serum galectins and glycoproteins is not fully determined. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum concentration and potential interaction of soluble galectin-1, galectin-3, galectin-9, galectin-3 binding protein (galectin-3BP), glycoprotein 130 (gp130), and E-, L-, and P-selectin in patients with dengue fever in acute febrile phase. In this study, 317 febrile patients (187 dengue patients, 150 non-dengue patients that included 48 patients with bacterial infection and 102 patients with other febrile illness) who presented to the emergency department and 20 healthy controls were enrolled. Our results showed the levels of galectin-9 and galectin-3BP were significantly higher in dengue patients than those in healthy controls. Lower serum levels of galectin-1, galectin-3, and E-, L-, and P-selectin in dengue patients were detected compared to bacteria-infected patients, but not to healthy controls. In addition, strong correlation between galectin-9 and galectin-3BP was observed in dengue patients. In summary, our study suggested galectin-9 and galectin-3BP might be critical inflammatory mediators in acute dengue virus infection.

  18. Serum protein N-glycans profiling for the discovery of potential biomarkers for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cuiying; Schmilovitz-Weiss, Hemda; Liu, Xue-en; Pappo, Orit; Halpern, Marisa; Sulkes, Jaqueline; Braun, Marius; Cohen, Maya; Barak, Nir; Tur-Kaspa, Ran; Vanhooren, Valerie; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Libert, Claude; Contreras, Roland; Ben-Ari, Ziv

    2009-02-01

    The hepatic histology in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease can vary from isolated hepatic steatosis to steatohepatitis can progress to cirrhosis and liver-related death. The aim was to evaluate the use of blood serum N-glycan fingerprinting as a tool for differential diagnosis of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis from steatosis. A group of 47 patients with NAFLD was diagnosed by clinical laboratory analysis and ultrasonography, and was studied histologically using the Brunt's scoring system. The control group included 13 healthy individuals. N-glycan profiles of serum proteins were determined by DNA sequencer-based carbohydrate analytical profiling. We have found that the concentrations of two glycans (NGA2F and NA2) and their logarithm ratio of NGA2F versus NA2 (named GlycoNashTest) were associated with the degree of NASH-related fibrosis, but had no correlation with the grade of inflammation nor steatosis severity. When used to screen NAFLD patients, GlycoNashTest could identify advanced NASH-related fibrosis (F3-F4) with the diagnosis sensitivity of 89.5% and specificity of 71.4%. The serum N-glycan profile is a promising noninvasive method for detecting NASH or NASH-related fibrosis in NAFLD patients, which could be a valuable supplement to other markers currently used in diagnosis of NASH.

  19. Serum-stable quantum dot--protein hybrid nanocapsules for optical bio-imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jeong Yu; Nam, Dong Heon; Oh, Mi Hwa; Kim, Youngsun; Choi, Hyung Seok; Jeon, Duk Young; Beum Park, Chan; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2014-05-01

    We introduce shell cross-linked protein/quantum dot (QD) hybrid nanocapsules as a serum-stable systemic delivery nanocarrier for tumor-targeted in vivo bio-imaging applications. Highly luminescent, heavy-metal-free Cu0.3InS2/ZnS (CIS/ZnS) core-shell QDs are synthesized and mixed with amine-reactive six-armed poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) in dichloromethane. Emulsification in an aqueous solution containing human serum albumin (HSA) results in shell cross-linked nanocapsules incorporating CIS/ZnS QDs, exhibiting high luminescence and excellent dispersion stability in a serum-containing medium. Folic acid is introduced as a tumor-targeting ligand. The feasibility of tumor-targeted in vivo bio-imaging is demonstrated by measuring the fluorescence intensity of several major organs and tumor tissue after an intravenous tail vein injection of the nanocapsules into nude mice. The cytotoxicity of the QD-loaded HSA-PEG nanocapsules is also examined in several types of cells. Our results show that the cellular uptake of the QDs is critical for cytotoxicity. Moreover, a significantly lower level of cell death is observed in the CIS/ZnS QDs compared to nanocapsules loaded with cadmium-based QDs. This study suggests that the systemic tumor targeting of heavy-metal-free QDs using shell cross-linked HSA-PEG hybrid nanocapsules is a promising route for in vivo tumor diagnosis with reduced non-specific toxicity.

  20. Differential expression profiling of serum proteins and metabolites for biomarker discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sushmita Mimi; Anderle, Markus; Lin, Hua; Becker, Christopher H.

    2004-11-01

    A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) proteomics and metabolomics platform is presented for quantitative differential expression analysis. Proteome profiles obtained from 1.5 [mu]L of human serum show ~5000 de-isotoped and quantifiable molecular ions. Approximately 1500 metabolites are observed from 100 [mu]L of serum. Quantification is based on reproducible sample preparation and linear signal intensity as a function of concentration. The platform is validated using human serum, but is generally applicable to all biological fluids and tissues. The median coefficient of variation (CV) for ~5000 proteomic and ~1500 metabolomic molecular ions is approximately 25%. For the case of C-reactive protein, results agree with quantification by immunoassay. The independent contributions of two sources of variance, namely sample preparation and LC-MS analysis, are respectively quantified as 20.4 and 15.1% for the proteome, and 19.5 and 13.5% for the metabolome, for median CV values. Furthermore, biological diversity for ~20 healthy individuals is estimated by measuring the variance of ~6500 proteomic and metabolomic molecular ions in sera for each sample; the median CV is 22.3% for the proteome and 16.7% for the metabolome. Finally, quantitative differential expression profiling is applied to a clinical study comparing healthy individuals and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients.

  1. Relationship of serum osteoprotegerin levels with coronary artery disease severity, left ventricular hypertrophy and C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Eun-Jung; Lee, Won-Young; Kim, Se-Yeon; Kim, Byung-Jin; Sung, Ki-Chul; Kim, Bum-Su; Kang, Jin-Ho; Oh, Ki-Won; Oh, Eun-Sook; Baek, Ki-Hyun; Kang, Moo-Ii; Woo, Hee-Yeon; Park, Hyo-Soon; Kim, Sun-Woo; Lee, Man-Ho; Park, Jung-Roe

    2005-03-01

    OPG (osteoprotegerin) is an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis and recent work suggests it has a role in atherosclerosis. Therefore we measured serum OPG levels in patients with coronary artery disease, compared the serum OPG levels among the different groups according to the number of stenotic vessels and determined whether there was any correlation with aortic calcification, LV (left ventricular) mass index and serum CRP (C-reactive protein) levels. Subjects (n=100; mean age, 57 years) who underwent coronary angiograms were enrolled. Blood pressure, body mass index, fasting blood glucose, lipid profiles and CRP levels were measured and the LV mass indices were calculated using ECGs. Serum OPG levels were measured by ELISA. The presence of calcification in the aortic notch was checked by a chest X-ray. The subjects were divided into four groups according to the number of stenotic vessels. The mean serum OPG levels increased significantly as the number of stenotic vessels increased, and the mean serum OPG levels were higher in the group with three-vessel disease compared with the groups with no- or one-vessel disease. The mean serum CRP level was significantly higher in the group with three-vessel disease compared with the groups with no-, one- and two-vessel disease. Age and LV mass index showed significant positive correlations with serum OPG levels, although significance was lost after an adjustment for age. Serum CRP levels were positively correlated with serum OPG levels even after an adjustment for age. There were no differences in serum OPG levels according to the presence of fasting hyperglycaemia or aortic calcification. In conclusion, serum OPG level was related to the severity of stenotic coronary arteries and serum CRP levels. LV mass indices showed no significant correlation with OPG levels. The precise mechanism for the role of OPG in atherosclerosis needs to be investigated further.

  2. The importance of selecting a proper biological milieu for protein corona analysis in vitro: Human plasma versus human serum.

    PubMed

    Mirshafiee, Vahid; Kim, Raehyun; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Kraft, Mary L

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) exposure to biological fluids in the body results in protein binding to the NP surface, which forms a protein coating that is called the "protein corona". To simplify studies of protein-NP interactions and protein corona formation, NPs are incubated with biological solutions, such as human serum or human plasma, and the effects of this exposure are characterized in vitro. Yet, how NP exposure to these two different biological milieus affects protein corona composition and cell response has not been investigated. Here, we explore the differences between the protein coronas that form when NPs are incubated in human serum versus human plasma. NP characterization indicated that NPs that were exposed to human plasma had higher amounts of proteins bound to their surfaces, and were slightly larger in size than those exposed to human serum. In addition, significant differences in corona composition were also detected with gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry, where a higher fraction of coagulation proteins and complement factors were found on the plasma-exposed NPs. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that the uptake of plasma-exposed NPs was higher than that of serum-exposed NPs by RAW 264.7 macrophage immune cells, but not by NIH 3T3 fibroblast cells. This difference is likely due to the elevated amounts of opsonins, such as fibrinogen, on the surfaces of the NPs exposed to plasma, but not serum, because these components trigger NP internalization by immune cells. As the human plasma better mimics the composition of the in vivo environment, namely blood, in vitro protein corona studies should employ human plasma, and not human serum, so the biological phenomena that is observed is more similar to that occurring in vivo.

  3. Effects of estradiol on ischemic factor-induced astrocyte swelling and AQP4 protein abundance.

    PubMed

    Rutkowsky, Jennifer M; Wallace, Breanna K; Wise, Phyllis M; O'Donnell, Martha E

    2011-07-01

    In the early hours of ischemic stroke, cerebral edema forms as Na, Cl, and water are secreted across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and astrocytes swell. We have shown previously that ischemic factors, including hypoxia, aglycemia, and arginine vasopressin (AVP), stimulate BBB Na-K-Cl cotransporter (NKCC) and Na/H exchanger (NHE) activities and that inhibiting NKCC and/or NHE by intravenous bumetanide and/or HOE-642 reduces edema and infarct in a rat model of ischemic stroke. Estradiol also reduces edema and infarct in this model and abolishes ischemic factor stimulation of BBB NKCC and NHE. There is evidence that NKCC and NHE also participate in ischemia-induced swelling of astrocytes. However, little is known about estradiol effects on astrocyte cell volume. In this study, we evaluated the effects of AVP (100 nM), hypoxia (7.5% O(2)), aglycemia, hypoxia (2%)/aglycemia [oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD)], and estradiol (1-100 nM) on astrocyte cell volume using 3-O-methyl-d-[(3)H]glucose equilibration methods. We found that AVP, hypoxia, aglycemia, and OGD (30 min to 5 h) each significantly increased astrocyte cell volume, and that estradiol (30-180 min) abolished swelling induced by AVP or hypoxia, but not by aglycemia or OGD. Bumetanide and/or HOE-642 also abolished swelling induced by AVP but not aglycemia. Abundance of aquaporin-4, known to participate in ischemia-induced astrocyte swelling, was significantly reduced following 7-day but not 2- or 3-h estradiol exposures. Our findings suggest that hypoxia, aglycemia, and AVP each contribute to ischemia-induced astrocyte swelling, and that the edema-attenuating effects of estradiol include reduction of hypoxia- and AVP-induced astrocyte swelling and also reduction of aquaporin-4 abundance.

  4. Serum neurofilament light chain protein is a measure of disease intensity in frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Woollacott, Ione O.C.; Dick, Katrina M.; Brotherhood, Emilie; Gordon, Elizabeth; Fellows, Alexander; Toombs, Jamie; Druyeh, Ronald; Cardoso, M. Jorge; Ourselin, Sebastien; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Norgren, Niklas; Mead, Simon; Andreasson, Ulf; Blennow, Kaj; Schott, Jonathan M.; Fox, Nick C.; Warren, Jason D.; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate serum neurofilament light chain (NfL) concentrations in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and to see whether they are associated with the severity of disease. Methods: Serum samples were collected from 74 participants (34 with behavioral variant FTD [bvFTD], 3 with FTD and motor neuron disease and 37 with primary progressive aphasia [PPA]) and 28 healthy controls. Twenty-four of the FTD participants carried a pathogenic mutation in C9orf72 (9), microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT; 11), or progranulin (GRN; 4). Serum NfL concentrations were determined with the NF-Light kit transferred onto the single-molecule array platform and compared between FTD and healthy controls and between the FTD clinical and genetic subtypes. We also assessed the relationship between NfL concentrations and measures of cognition and brain volume. Results: Serum NfL concentrations were higher in patients with FTD overall (mean 77.9 pg/mL [SD 51.3 pg/mL]) than controls (19.6 pg/mL [SD 8.2 pg/mL]; p < 0.001). Concentrations were also significantly higher in bvFTD (57.8 pg/mL [SD 33.1 pg/mL]) and both the semantic and nonfluent variants of PPA (95.9 and 82.5 pg/mL [SD 33.0 and 33.8 pg/mL], respectively) compared with controls and in semantic variant PPA compared with logopenic variant PPA. Concentrations were significantly higher than controls in both the C9orf72 and MAPT subgroups (79.2 and 40.5 pg/mL [SD 48.2 and 20.9 pg/mL], respectively) with a trend to a higher level in the GRN subgroup (138.5 pg/mL [SD 103.3 pg/mL). However, there was variability within all groups. Serum concentrations correlated particularly with frontal lobe atrophy rate (r = 0.53, p = 0.003). Conclusions: Increased serum NfL concentrations are seen in FTD but show wide variability within each clinical and genetic group. Higher concentrations may reflect the intensity of the disease in FTD and are associated with more rapid atrophy of the frontal lobes. PMID:27581216

  5. Functional insights into the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family from Dendrobium officinale (Orchidaceae) using an Escherichia coli system.

    PubMed

    Ling, Hong; Zeng, Xu; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-12-22

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, a diverse family, accumulate during seed desiccation in the later stages of embryogenesis. LEA proteins are associated with tolerance to abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity and high or cold temperature. Here, we report the first comprehensive survey of the LEA gene family in Dendrobium officinale, an important and widely grown medicinal orchid in China. Based on phylogenetic relationships with the complete set of Arabidopsis and Oryza LEA proteins, 17 genes encoding D. officinale LEAs (DofLEAs) were identified and their deduced proteins were classified into seven groups. The motif composition of these deduced proteins was correlated with the gene structure found in each LEA group. Our results reveal the DofLEA genes are widely distributed and expressed in tissues. Additionally, 11 genes from different groups were introduced into Escherichia coli to assess the functions of DofLEAs. Expression of 6 and 7 DofLEAs in E. coli improved growth performance compared with the control under salt and heat stress, respectively. Based on qPCR data, all of these genes were up-regulated in various tissues following exposure to salt and heat stresses. Our results suggest that DofLEAs play an important role in responses to abiotic stress.

  6. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-19

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty-three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers.

  7. Functional insights into the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein family from Dendrobium officinale (Orchidaceae) using an Escherichia coli system

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hong; Zeng, Xu; Guo, Shunxing

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, a diverse family, accumulate during seed desiccation in the later stages of embryogenesis. LEA proteins are associated with tolerance to abiotic stresses, such as drought, salinity and high or cold temperature. Here, we report the first comprehensive survey of the LEA gene family in Dendrobium officinale, an important and widely grown medicinal orchid in China. Based on phylogenetic relationships with the complete set of Arabidopsis and Oryza LEA proteins, 17 genes encoding D. officinale LEAs (DofLEAs) were identified and their deduced proteins were classified into seven groups. The motif composition of these deduced proteins was correlated with the gene structure found in each LEA group. Our results reveal the DofLEA genes are widely distributed and expressed in tissues. Additionally, 11 genes from different groups were introduced into Escherichia coli to assess the functions of DofLEAs. Expression of 6 and 7 DofLEAs in E. coli improved growth performance compared with the control under salt and heat stress, respectively. Based on qPCR data, all of these genes were up-regulated in various tissues following exposure to salt and heat stresses. Our results suggest that DofLEAs play an important role in responses to abiotic stress. PMID:28004781

  8. Functional characterization of the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein gene family from Pinus tabuliformis (Pinaceae) in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Lan, Ting

    2016-01-01

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are a large and highly diverse gene family present in a wide range of plant species. LEAs are proposed to play a role in various stress tolerance responses. Our study represents the first-ever survey of LEA proteins and their encoding genes in a widely distributed pine (Pinus tabuliformis) in China. Twenty–three LEA genes were identified from the P. tabuliformis belonging to seven groups. Proteins with repeated motifs are an important feature specific to LEA groups. Ten of 23 pine LEA genes were selectively expressed in specific tissues, and showed expression divergence within each group. In addition, we selected 13 genes representing each group and introduced theses genes into Escherichia coli to assess the protective function of PtaLEA under heat and salt stresses. Compared with control cells, the E. coli cells expressing PtaLEA fusion protein exhibited enhanced salt and heat resistance and viability, indicating the protein may play a protective role in cells under stress conditions. Furthermore, among these enhanced tolerance genes, a certain extent of function divergence appeared within a gene group as well as between gene groups, suggesting potential functional diversity of this gene family in conifers. PMID:26781930

  9. Correlation between Ocular Demodex Infestation and Serum Immunoreactivity to Bacillus Proteins in Patients with Facial Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianjing; O'Reilly, Niamh; Sheha, Hosam; Katz, Raananah; Raju, Vadrevu K.; Kavanagh, Kevin; Tseng, Scheffer C. G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate correlation between ocular Demodex infestation and serum. Design A prospective study to correlate clinical findings with laboratory data. Participants We consecutively enrolled 59 patients: 34 men and 25 women with a mean age of 60.4±17.6 years (range, 17–93). Methods Demodex counting was performed based on lash sampling. Serum immunoreactivity to two 62-kDa and 83-kDa proteins derived from B oleronius was determined by Western blot analysis. Facial rosacea, lid margin, and ocular surface inflammation were documented by photography and graded in a masked fashion. Main Outcome Measures Statistical significance based on correlative analyses of clinical and laboratory data. Results These 59 patients were age matched, but not gender matched, regarding serum immunoreactivity, ocular Demodex infestation, or facial rosacea. There was a significant correlation between serum immunoreactivity and facial rosacea (P = 0.009), lid margin inflammation (P = 0.040), and ocular Demodex infestation (P = 0.048), but not inferior bulbar conjunctival inflammation (P = 0.573). The Demodex count was significantly higher in patients with positive facial rosacea (6.6±9.0 vs. 1.9±2.2; P = 0.014). There was a significant correlation of facial rosacea with lid margin inflammation (P = 0.016), but not with inferior bulbar conjunctival inflammation (P = 0.728). Ocular Demodex infestation was less prevalent in patients with aqueous tear-deficiency dry eye than those without (7/38 vs. 12/21; P = 0.002). Conclusions The strong correlation provides a better understanding of comorbidity between Demodex mites and their symbiotic B oleronius in facial rosacea and blepharitis. Treatments directed to both warrant future investigation. PMID:20079929

  10. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment

    PubMed Central

    Rashydov, Namik M.; Hajduch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk. PMID:26217350

  11. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment.

    PubMed

    Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk.

  12. Comparison of composition, sensory, and volatile components of thirty-four percent whey protein and milk serum protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Evans, J; Zulewska, J; Newbold, M; Drake, M A; Barbano, D M

    2009-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to identify and compare the composition, flavor, and volatile components of serum protein concentrate (SPC) and whey protein concentrate (WPC) containing about 34% protein made from the same milk to each other and to commercial 34% WPC from 6 different factories. The SPC and WPC were manufactured in triplicate with each pair of serum and traditional whey protein manufactured from the same lot of milk. At each replication, SPC and WPC were spray dried (SD) and freeze dried (FD) to determine the effect of the heat used in spray drying on sensory properties. A trained sensory panel documented the sensory profiles of rehydrated SD or FD powders. Volatile components were extracted by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and solvent extraction followed by solvent-assisted flavor evaporation (SAFE) with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-olfactometry. Whey protein concentrates had higher fat content, calcium, and glycomacropeptide content than SPC. Color differences (Hunter L, a, b) were not evident between SPC and WPC powders, but when rehydrated, SPC solutions were clear, whereas WPC solutions were cloudy. No consistent differences were documented in sensory profiles of SD and FD SPC and WPC. The SD WPC had low but distinct buttery (diacetyl) and cardboard flavors, whereas the SD SPC did not. Sensory profiles of both rehydrated SD products were bland and lower in overall aroma and cardboard flavor compared with the commercial WPC. Twenty-nine aroma impact compounds were identified in the SPC and WPC. Lipid and protein oxidation products were present in both products. The SPC and WPC manufactured in this study had lower total volatiles and lower concentrations of many lipid oxidation compounds when compared with commercial WPC. Our results suggest that when SPC and WPC are manufactured under controlled conditions in a similar manner from the same milk using the same ultrafiltration equipment, there are few sensory

  13. RACK1 scaffold proteins influence miRNA abundance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Speth, Corinna; Willing, Eva-Maria; Rausch, Stephanie; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Laubinger, Sascha

    2013-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate plant development by post-transcriptional regulation of target genes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, DCL1 processes precursors (pri-miRNAs) to miRNA duplexes, which associate with AGO1. Additional proteins act in concert with DCL1 (e.g. HYL1 and SERRATE) or AGO1 to facilitate efficient and precise pri-miRNA processing and miRNA loading, respectively. In this study, we show that the accumulation of plant microRNAs depends on RECEPTOR FOR ACTIVATED C KINASE 1 (RACK1), a scaffold protein that is found in all higher eukaryotes. miRNA levels are reduced in rack1 mutants, and our data suggest that RACK1 affects the microRNA pathway via several distinct mechanisms involving direct interactions with known microRNA factors: RACK1 ensures the accumulation and processing of some pri-miRNAs, directly interacts with SERRATE and is part of an AGO1 complex. As a result, mutations in RACK1 lead to over-accumulation of miRNA target mRNAs, which are important for ABA responses and phyllotaxy, for example. In conclusion, our study identified complex functioning of RACK1 proteins in the Arabidopsis miRNA pathway; these proteins are important for miRNA production and therefore plant development.

  14. Differences in Abundances of Cell-Signalling Proteins in Blood Reveal Novel Biomarkers for Early Detection Of Clinical Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rocha de Paula, Mateus; Gómez Ravetti, Martín; Berretta, Regina; Moscato, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Background In November 2007 a study published in Nature Medicine proposed a simple test based on the abundance of 18 proteins in blood to predict the onset of clinical symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) two to six years before these symptoms manifest. Later, another study, published in PLoS ONE, showed that only five proteins (IL-1, IL-3, EGF, TNF- and G-CSF) have overall better prediction accuracy. These classifiers are based on the abundance of 120 proteins. Such values were standardised by a Z-score transformation, which means that their values are relative to the average of all others. Methodology The original datasets from the Nature Medicine paper are further studied using methods from combinatorial optimisation and Information Theory. We expand the original dataset by also including all pair-wise differences of z-score values of the original dataset (“metafeatures”). Using an exact algorithm to solve the resulting Feature Set problem, used to tackle the feature selection problem, we found signatures that contain either only features, metafeatures or both, and evaluated their predictive performance on the independent test set. Conclusions It was possible to show that a specific pattern of cell signalling imbalance in blood plasma has valuable information to distinguish between NDC and AD samples. The obtained signatures were able to predict AD in patients that already had a Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) with up to 84% of sensitivity, while maintaining also a strong prediction accuracy of 90% on a independent dataset with Non Demented Controls (NDC) and AD samples. The novel biomarkers uncovered with this method now confirms ANG-2, IL-11, PDGF-BB, CCL15/MIP-1; and supports the joint measurement of other signalling proteins not previously discussed: GM-CSF, NT-3, IGFBP-2 and VEGF-B. PMID:21479255

  15. Relief of amplification inhibition in PCR with bovine serum albumin or T4 gene 32 protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kreader, C.A.

    1996-03-01

    The benefits of adding bovine serum albumin (BSA) or T4 gene 32 proteins (gp32) to PCR were evaluated with reaction mixtures containing substances that inhibit amplification. Whereas 10- to 1,000-fold more FeCl{sub 3}, hemin, fulvic acids, humic acids, tannic acids, or extracts from feces, freshwater, or marine water were accommodated in PCR when either 400 ng of BSA per {mu}l was included in the reactions, neither BSA nor gp32 relieved interference significantly when minimum inhibitory levels of bile salts, bilirubin, EDTA, NaCl, sodium dodecyl sulfate, or Triton X-100 were present. Use of BSA and gp32 together offered no more relief of inhibition than either alone at its optimal level, and neither protein had any noticeable effect on amplification in the absence of inhibitors. 21 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Protein and water dynamics in bovine serum albumin-water mixtures over wide ranges of composition.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulou, A; Kyritsis, A; Shinyashiki, N; Pissis, P

    2012-04-19

    Dielectric dynamic behavior of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-water mixtures over wide ranges of water fractions, from dry protein until 40 wt % in water, was studied through dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (DRS). The α relaxation associated with the glass transition of the hydrated system was identified. The evolution of the low temperature dielectric relaxation of small polar groups of the protein surface with hydration level results in the enhancement of dielectric response and the decrease of relaxation times, until a critical water fraction, which corresponds to the percolation threshold for protonic conductivity. For water fractions higher than the critical one, the position of the secondary ν relaxation of water saturates in the Arrhenius diagram, while contributions originating from water molecules in excess (uncrystallized water or ice) follow separate relaxation modes slower than the ν relaxation.

  17. Camptothecin-binding site in human serum albumin and protein transformations induced by drug binding.

    PubMed

    Fleury, F; Ianoul, A; Berjot, M; Feofanov, A; Alix, A J; Nabiev, I

    1997-07-14

    Circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectroscopy were employed in order to locate a camptothecin (CPT)-binding site within human serum albumin (HSA) and to identify protein structural transformations induced by CPT binding. A competitive binding of CPT and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (a ligand occupying IIIA structural sub-domain of the protein) to HSA does not show any competition and demonstrates that the ligands are located in the different binding sites, whereas a HSA-bound CPT may be replaced by warfarin, occupying IIA structural sub-domain of the protein. Raman and CD spectra of HSA and HSA/CPT complexes show that the CPT-binding does not induce changes of the global protein secondary structure. On the other hand, Raman spectra reveal pronounced CPT-induced local structural modifications of the HSA molecule, involving changes in configuration of the two disulfide bonds and transfer of a single Trp-residue to hydrophilic environment. These data suggest that CPT is bound in the region of interdomain connections within the IIA structural domain of HSA and it induces relative movement of the protein structural domains.

  18. Human serum albumin binding to silica nanoparticles--effect of protein fatty acid ligand.

    PubMed

    Ang, Joo Chuan; Henderson, Mark J; Campbell, Richard A; Lin, Jhih-Min; Yaron, Peter N; Nelson, Andrew; Faunce, Thomas; White, John W

    2014-06-07

    Neutron reflectivity shows that fatted (F-HSA) and defatted (DF-HSA) versions of human serum albumin behave differently in their interaction with silica nanoparticles premixed in buffer solutions although these proteins have close to the same surface excess when the silica is absent. In both cases a silica containing film is quickly established at the air-water interface. This film is stable for F-HSA at all relative protein-silica concentrations measured. This behaviour has been verified for two small silica nanoparticle radii (42 Å and 48 Å). Contrast variation and co-refinement have been used to find the film composition for the F-HSA-silica system. The film structure changes with protein concentration only for the DF-HSA-silica system. The different behaviour of the two proteins is interpreted as a combination of three factors: increased structural stability of F-HSA induced by the fatty acid ligand, differences in the electrostatic interactions, and the higher propensity of defatted albumin to self-aggregate. The interfacial structures of the proteins alone in buffer are also reported and discussed.

  19. Serum amyloid A is a retinol binding protein that transports retinol during bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Derebe, Mehabaw G; Zlatkov, Clare M; Gattu, Sureka; Ruhn, Kelly A; Vaishnava, Shipra; Diehl, Gretchen E; MacMillan, John B; Williams, Noelle S; Hooper, Lora V

    2014-01-01

    Retinol plays a vital role in the immune response to infection, yet proteins that mediate retinol transport during infection have not been identified. Serum amyloid A (SAA) proteins are strongly induced in the liver by systemic infection and in the intestine by bacterial colonization, but their exact functions remain unclear. Here we show that mouse and human SAAs are retinol binding proteins. Mouse and human SAAs bound retinol with nanomolar affinity, were associated with retinol in vivo, and limited the bacterial burden in tissues after acute infection. We determined the crystal structure of mouse SAA3 at a resolution of 2 Å, finding that it forms a tetramer with a hydrophobic binding pocket that can accommodate retinol. Our results thus identify SAAs as a family of microbe-inducible retinol binding proteins, reveal a unique protein architecture involved in retinol binding, and suggest how retinol is circulated during infection. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03206.001 PMID:25073702

  20. Estimation of Serum Protein in Oral Potentially Malignant Disorders and Oral Malignancy – A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Palak H.; Venkatesh, Rashmi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In carcinogenesis, increased oxidative stress and weakened antioxidant defense produces damage to the macromolecules like proteins. Thus, protein can act as potential biomarker in oral premalignant and malignant lesions. Aim To determine and compare the levels of serum proteins in Oral Submucuous Fibrosis (OSMF), Oral Leukoplakia (OL), Nicotina Stomatitis (NS), Oral Malignancy (OM) and Healthy Controls (HC). Materials and Methods A total of 250 participants, were equally divided in five groups i.e., OSMF, OL, NS, OM and HC. Five ml of blood was collected from antecubital vein from each participant. The serum was analyzed for total protein, albumin and globulin levels using EBRA EM 200 semi-quantitive analyzer with the help of diagnostic kits. Results There were total 193 males and 57 females, who were between 18 to 82 years of age, with a mean of 46.32±13.89 years. The serum protein and globulin levels were significantly decreased in OSMF, OL and NS and increased in OM as compared to HC (p<0.001). No statistically significant difference was found in serum albumin levels between the study groups (p>0.05). Conclusion Serum proteins can be used as diagnostic and prognostic marker for oral premalignant and malignant lesions. PMID:28384973

  1. Short-term space flight on nitrogenous compounds, lipoproteins, and serum proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Lane, H. W.; Krauhs, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Biochemical variables in blood were measured in venous blood samples from 38 to 72 Space Shuttle astronauts before and immediately after flights of 2 to 11 days. Mean pre- and postflight values were compared using the paired t-test or the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The largest change in serum enzymes was a 21% increase (P = .0014) in gamma-glutamyl-transpeptidase, which may have been related to stress. The median value of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I decreased from 152 to 127 mg/dL (P < .0001), but the change in apo B (77 to 73 mg/dL) was not statistically significant, and the mean apo A-I/apo B ratio remained well above 1.5. A decrease in dietary fat and cholesterol intake during shuttle missions may have been a cause of the change in apo A-I. Twelve of the 16 nonenzyme serum proteins measured were significantly elevated (P < .05), possibly because of hemoconcentration and increased protein catabolism. The 56% increase in haptoglobin may be related to release of suppressed erythropoiesis at landing.

  2. Active fragments of the antihemorrhagic protein HSF from serum of habu (Trimeresurus flavoviridis).

    PubMed

    Aoki, Narumi; Deshimaru, Masanobu; Terada, Shigeyuki

    2007-04-01

    Certain snakes have antihemorrhagic proteins in their sera. Habu serum factor (HSF), an antihemorrhagic protein isolated from the serum of the Japanese habu snake (Trimeresurus flavoviridis) is composed of two cystatin-like domains (D1 and D2) and a His-rich domain, and it inhibits several snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs). The activity of HSF can be abolished by trinitrophenylation of Lys residues with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid. Upon complex formation of HSF with SVMP, however, the loss of its inhibitory activity by the chemical modification was suppressed, and Lys(15), Lys(41), and Lys(103) residues in HSF were not trinitrophenylated. In order to identify the domain that is critical to the inhibitory activity on SVMPs, native HSF was digested with papain followed by cleavage with cyanogen bromide, yielding a low-molecular mass fragment that was composed of two peptide chains (residues 5-89 and 312-317) linked by a disulfide bond. This fragment inhibited several SVMPs and showed significant antihemorrhagic activity. This indicates that the N-terminal half of D1 is indispensable for the antihemorrhagic activity of HSF. Furthermore, a three-dimensional model of two cystatin-like domains constructed by the homology modeling has indicated that three Lys residues (15, 41, and 103) are exposed to the same surface of HSF molecule.

  3. [Refractometric measurement of total serum protein, comparison of refractometry and biuret test (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Liappis, N; Jäkel, A

    1978-07-01

    Study on the Refractometric Determination of Total Protein in Serum, Comparison of the Refractometric and Biuret Method. Total protein concentration in serum was determined by the aid of the Abbé-refractometer and the biuret method. Both methods showed a good precision and accuracy. The investigation was carried out in 241 sera with normal bilirubin (up to 1 mg/100 ml), cholesterol (up to 200 mg/100 ml) and urea (up to 23,0 mg/100 ml) concentration, in 43 sera with increased (10,6-26,6 mg/100 ml) bilirubin concentration, in 129 sera with increased (200-520 mg/100 ml) cholesterol concentration and in 43 sera with increased (23,0-155,3 mg/100 ml) urea concentration. The comparison of the refractometric values with the values obtained by the biuret method in the 241 sera with normal bilirubin, cholesterol and urea concentration (correlation coefficient = 0,971) showed a close correlation and in the 43 sera with increased bilirubin concentration (correlation coefficient = 0,958) an acceptable correlation. However no close correlations were observed in the 129 sera with increased cholesterol concentration and in the 43 sera with increased urea concentration. The correlation lines diverged proportional with the increase of cholesterol and urea concentration from the expected correlation lines.

  4. Serum neurofilament light protein predicts clinical outcome in traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Shahim, Pashtun; Gren, Magnus; Liman, Victor; Andreasson, Ulf; Norgren, Niklas; Tegner, Yelverton; Mattsson, Niklas; Andreasen, Niels; Öst, Martin; Zetterberg, Henrik; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj

    2016-01-01

    Axonal white matter injury is believed to be a major determinant of adverse outcomes following traumatic brain injury (TBI). We hypothesized that measurement of neurofilament light protein (NF-L), a protein found in long white-matter axons, in blood samples, may serve as a suitable biomarker for neuronal damage in TBI patients. To test our hypotheses, we designed a study in two parts: i) we developed an immunoassay based on Single molecule array technology for quantification of NF-L in blood, and ii) in a proof-of-concept study, we tested our newly developed method on serial serum samples from severe TBI (sTBI) patients (n = 72) and controls (n = 35). We also compared the diagnostic and prognostic utility of NF-L with the established blood biomarker S100B. NF-L levels were markedly increased in sTBI patients compared with controls. NF-L at admission yielded an AUC of 0.99 to detect TBI versus controls (AUC 0.96 for S100B), and increased to 1.00 at day 12 (0.65 for S100B). Importantly, initial NF-L levels predicted poor 12-month clinical outcome. In contrast, S100B was not related to outcome. Taken together, our data suggests that measurement of serum NF-L may be useful to assess the severity of neuronal injury following sTBI. PMID:27819296

  5. Association of serum antibodies to heat-shock protein 65 with carotid atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Q; Willeit, J; Marosi, M; Kleindienst, R; Oberhollenzer, F; Kiechl, S; Stulnig, T; Luef, G; Wick, G

    1993-01-30

    Arteriosclerotic lesions can be induced in normocholesterolaemic rabbits by immunisation with heat-shock protein (hsp) 65, a stress protein expressed in high concentrations in human atherosclerotic lesions. If an immune reaction to hsp65 also plays a part in human atherogenesis, it should be possible to detect anti-hsp65 antibodies in patients with atherosclerotic lesions. To study the possible relation between immune reaction to hsp65 and atherosclerosis, 867 normal inhabitants of South Tyrol, aged 40-79 years, were selected randomly for determination of serum antibodies against hsp65, simultaneous sonographic assessment of carotid atherosclerotic lesions, and evaluation of established risk factors--ie, blood cholesterol, hypertension, smoking, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. Autoantibodies to nuclear antigens, thyroid antigens, and rheumatoid factors were also measured. Serum anti-hsp65 antibodies were significantly (p < 0.05) increased in subjects aged 60-79 years with carotid atherosclerosis compared with those without lesions, and increased antibody concentration was independent of age, sex, and other established risk factors. On the other hand, the incidence and titres of autoantibodies did not correlate with carotid atherosclerotic lesions. Our data provide the first evidence of a strong correlation between anti-hsp65 antibodies and carotid atherosclerosis, suggesting that hsp65 might be involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  6. Metal-catalyzed oxidation of human serum albumin: conformational and functional changes. Implications in protein aging.

    PubMed

    Meucci, E; Mordente, A; Martorana, G E

    1991-03-15

    Mild oxidative stress, as elicited by ascorbate, oxygen, and trace metals, affects the binding properties of human serum albumin via purely conformational changes. In fact, no gross alteration can be observed in the electrophoretic and chromatographic patterns of albumin, whereas localized modifications are indicated by the changes in absorption and fluorescence spectra and in polarization degree. The oxidized protein presents a small increase of bityrosine production and a time-dependent increase in the content of carbonyl groups, whereas proteolytic susceptibility is unchanged. A higher affinity for cis-parinaric acid and a slight loss of solubility in high salt indicate a greater surface hydrophobicity. Pinpoint denaturation of the albumin molecule is also suggested by a decreased "esterase" activity in the presence of p-nitrophenyl acetate. Conformational stability evaluated through thermal shock and addition of moderate amounts of guanidine indicate that the oxidized protein is more heat-resistant, less flexible, and more rigid than the native one. Although limited, structural damages afforded by the oxidative stress cause alterations of albumin binding properties as documented by experiments with probes and physiological ligands. The loss of biological activity of human serum albumin induced by ascorbate system appears of medical relevance, because it can affect drug metabolism and particularly drug tolerance in the elderly.

  7. Influence of the fetal bovine serum proteins on the growth of human osteoblast cells on graphene.

    PubMed

    Kalbacova, Marie; Broz, Antonin; Kalbac, Martin

    2012-11-01

    The influence of single-layer graphene produced by chemical vapor deposition on human osteoblast cells under different conditions was studied. Measurements probed the ability of cells to adhere and proliferate on graphene compared with SiO(2)/Si substrates and standard tissue culture plastic when cells were incubated for the first 2 h in the presence or the absence of fetal bovine serum (FBS), thus influencing the initial, direct interaction of cells with the substrate. It was found that after 48 h of human osteoblast incubation on graphene films, there were a comparable number of cells of a similar size irrespective of the presence or the absence of serum proteins. On the other hand, a strong initial influence through the presence of FBS proteins on cell number and cell size was observed in the case of the SiO(2)/Si substrate and control plastic. Thus, our study showed that the initial presence/absence of FBS in the medium does not determine cell fate in the case of a graphene substrate, which is very unusual and different from the behavior of cells on other materials.

  8. Analysis of crude protein and allergen abundance in peanuts (Arachis hypogaea cv. Walter) from three growing regions in Australia.

    PubMed

    Walczyk, Nicole E; Smith, Penelope M C; Tovey, Euan; Wright, Graeme C; Fleischfresser, Dayle B; Roberts, Thomas H

    2013-04-17

    The effects of plant growth conditions on concentrations of proteins, including allergens, in peanut ( Arachis hypogaea L.) kernels are largely unknown. Peanuts (cv. Walter) were grown at five sites (Taabinga, Redvale, Childers, Bundaberg, and Kairi) covering three commercial growing regions in Queensland, Australia. Differences in temperature, rainfall, and solar radiation during the growing season were evaluated. Kernel yield varied from 2.3 t/ha (Kairi) to 3.9 t/ha (Childers), probably due to differences in solar radiation. Crude protein appeared to vary only between Kairi and Childers, whereas Ara h 1 and 2 concentrations were similar in all locations. 2D-DIGE revealed significant differences in spot volumes for only two minor protein spots from peanuts grown in the five locations. Western blotting using peanut-allergic serum revealed no qualitative differences in recognition of antigens. It was concluded that peanuts grown in different growing regions in Queensland, Australia, had similar protein compositions and therefore were unlikely to show differences in allergenicity.

  9. Mastitomics, the integrated omics of bovine milk in an experimental model of Streptococcus uberis mastitis: 1. High abundance proteins, acute phase proteins and peptidomics† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6mb00239k Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Funmilola Clara; Mullen, William; Tassi, Riccardo; Ramírez-Torres, Adela; Mudaliar, Manikhandan; McNeilly, Tom N.; Zadoks, Ruth N.; Burchmore, Richard

    2016-01-01

    A peptidomic investigation of milk from an experimental model of Streptococcus uberis mastitis in dairy cows has incorporated a study of milk high abundance and acute phase (APP) proteins as well as analysis of low molecular weight peptide biomarkers. Intramammary infection (IMI) with S. uberis caused a shift in abundance from caseins, β-lactoglobulin and α-lactalbumin to albumin, lactoferrin and IgG with the increase in lactoferrin occurring last. The APP response of haptoglobin, mammary associated serum amyloid A3 and C-reactive protein occurred between 30–48 hours post challenge with peak concentrations of APPs at 72–96 hours post challenge and declined thereafter at a rate resembling the fall in bacterial count rather than the somatic cell count. A peptide biomarker panel for IMI based on capillary electrophoresis and mass spectrometry was developed. It comprised 77 identified peptides (IMI77) composed mainly of casein derived peptides but also including peptides of glycosylation dependent cell adhesion molecule and serum amyloid A. The panel had a biomarker classification score that increased from 36 hour to 81 hour post challenge, significantly differentiating infected from non-infected milk, thus suggesting potential as a peptide biomarker panel of bovine mastitis and specifically that of S. uberis origin. The use of omic technology has shown a multifactorial cross system reaction in high and low abundance proteins and their peptide derivatives with changes of over a thousand fold in analyte levels in response to S. uberis infection. PMID:27412456

  10. Development of an ELISA detecting Tumor Protein 53-Induced Nuclear Protein 1 in serum of prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Houda; Seillier, Marion; Sandi, Maria José; Peuget, Sylvain; Kellenberger, Christine; Gravis, Gwenaëlle; Dusetti, Nelson J; Iovanna, Juan L; Rocchi, Palma; Amri, Mohamed; Carrier, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Tumor Protein 53-Induced Nuclear Protein 1 (TP53INP1) plays an important role during cell stress response in synergy with the potent "genome-keeper" p53. In human, the gene encoding TP53INP1 is expressed at very high level in some pathological situations, such as inflammation and prostate cancer (PC). TP53INP1 overexpression in PC seems to be a worse prognostic factor, particularly predictive of biological cancer relapse, making TP53INP1 a relevant specific target for molecular therapy of Castration Resistant (CR) PC. In that context, detection of TP53INP1 in patient biological fluids is a promising diagnostic avenue. We report here successful development of a new Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) detecting TP53INP1, taking advantage of molecular tools (monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and recombinant proteins) generated in the laboratory during the course of basic functional investigations devoted to TP53INP1. The ELISA principle is based on a sandwich immunoenzymatic system, TP53INP1 protein being trapped by a first specific mAb coated on microplate then recognized by a second specific mAb. This new assay allows specific detection of TP53INP1 in serum of several PC patients. This breakthrough paves the way towards investigation of a large cohort of patients and assessment of clinical applications of TP53INP1 dosage.

  11. Study of model systems to test the potential function of Artemia group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins.

    PubMed

    Warner, Alden H; Guo, Zhi-hao; Moshi, Sandra; Hudson, John W; Kozarova, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Embryos of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana, are genetically programmed to develop either ovoviparously or oviparously depending on environmental conditions. Shortly upon their release from the female, oviparous embryos enter diapause during which time they undergo major metabolic rate depression while simultaneously synthesize proteins that permit them to tolerate a wide range of stressful environmental events including prolonged periods of desiccation, freezing, and anoxia. Among the known stress-related proteins that accumulate in embryos entering diapause are the late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins. This large group of intrinsically disordered proteins has been proposed to act as molecular shields or chaperones of macromolecules which are otherwise intolerant to harsh conditions associated with diapause. In this research, we used two model systems to study the potential function of the group 1 LEA proteins from Artemia. Expression of the Artemia group 1 gene (AfrLEA-1) in Escherichia coli inhibited growth in proportion to the number of 20-mer amino acid motifs expressed. As well, clones of E. coli, transformed with the AfrLEA-1 gene, expressed multiple bands of LEA proteins, either intrinsically or upon induction with isopropyl-β-thiogalactoside (IPTG), in a vector-specific manner. Expression of AfrLEA-1 in E. coli did not overcome the inhibitory effects of high concentrations of NaCl and KCl but modulated growth inhibition resulting from high concentrations of sorbitol in the growth medium. In contrast, expression of the AfrLEA-1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae did not alter the growth kinetics or permit yeast to tolerate high concentrations of NaCl, KCl, or sorbitol. However, expression of AfrLEA-1 in yeast improved its tolerance to drying (desiccation) and freezing. Under our experimental conditions, both E. coli and S. cerevisiae appear to be potentially suitable hosts to study the function of Artemia group 1 LEA proteins under environmentally

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Non-depleted Serum Proteins from Bottlenose Dolphins Uncovers a High Vanin-1 Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sobolesky, Philip; Parry, Celeste; Boxall, Baylye; Wells, Randall; Venn-Watson, Stephanie; Janech, Michael G

    2016-09-26

    Targeted approaches have been widely used to help explain physiological adaptations, but few studies have used non-targeted omics approaches to explore differences between diving marine mammals and terrestrial mammals. A rank comparison of undepleted serum proteins from common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and pooled normal human serum led to the discovery of 11 proteins that appeared exclusive to dolphin serum. Compared to the comprehensive human plasma proteome, 5 of 11 serum proteins had a differential rank greater than 200. One of these proteins, Vanin-1, was quantified using parallel reaction monitoring in dolphins under human care and free-ranging dolphins. Dolphin serum Vanin-1 ranged between 31-106 μg/ml, which is 20-1000 times higher than concentrations reported for healthy humans. Serum Vanin-1 was also higher in dolphins under human care compared to free-ranging dolphins (64 ± 16 vs. 47 ± 12 μg/ml P < 0.05). Vanin-1 levels positively correlated with liver enzymes AST and ALT, and negatively correlated with white blood cell counts and fibrinogen in free-ranging dolphins. Major differences exist in the circulating blood proteome of the bottlenose dolphin compared to terrestrial mammals and exploration of these differences in bottlenose dolphins and other marine mammals may identify veiled protective strategies to counter physiological stress.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Non-depleted Serum Proteins from Bottlenose Dolphins Uncovers a High Vanin-1 Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Sobolesky, Philip; Parry, Celeste; Boxall, Baylye; Wells, Randall; Venn-Watson, Stephanie; Janech, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted approaches have been widely used to help explain physiological adaptations, but few studies have used non-targeted omics approaches to explore differences between diving marine mammals and terrestrial mammals. A rank comparison of undepleted serum proteins from common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and pooled normal human serum led to the discovery of 11 proteins that appeared exclusive to dolphin serum. Compared to the comprehensive human plasma proteome, 5 of 11 serum proteins had a differential rank greater than 200. One of these proteins, Vanin-1, was quantified using parallel reaction monitoring in dolphins under human care and free-ranging dolphins. Dolphin serum Vanin-1 ranged between 31–106 μg/ml, which is 20–1000 times higher than concentrations reported for healthy humans. Serum Vanin-1 was also higher in dolphins under human care compared to free-ranging dolphins (64 ± 16 vs. 47 ± 12 μg/ml P < 0.05). Vanin-1 levels positively correlated with liver enzymes AST and ALT, and negatively correlated with white blood cell counts and fibrinogen in free-ranging dolphins. Major differences exist in the circulating blood proteome of the bottlenose dolphin compared to terrestrial mammals and exploration of these differences in bottlenose dolphins and other marine mammals may identify veiled protective strategies to counter physiological stress. PMID:27667588

  14. Marsupial and monotreme serum immunoglobulin binding by proteins A, G and L and anti-kangaroo antibody.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Paola K; Hartley, Carol A; Browning, Glenn F; Devlin, Joanne M

    2015-12-01

    Serological studies are often conducted to examine exposure to infectious agents in wildlife populations. However, specific immunological reagents for wildlife species are seldom available and can limit the study of infectious diseases in these animals. This study examined the ability of four commercially available immunoglobulin-binding reagents to bind serum immunoglobulins from 17 species within the Marsupialia and Monotremata. Serum samples were assessed for binding, using immunoblots and ELISAs (Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays), to three microbially-derived proteins - staphylococcal protein A, streptococcal protein G and peptostreptococcal protein L. Additionally, an anti-kangaroo antibody was included for comparison. The inter- and intra-familial binding patterns of the reagents to serum immunoglobulins varied and evolutionary distance between animal species was not an accurate predictor of the ability of reagents to bind immunoglobulins. Results from this study can be used to inform the selection of appropriate immunological reagents in future serological studies in these clades.

  15. Integration of binding peptide selection and multifunctional particles as tool-box for capture of soluble proteins in serum

    PubMed Central

    Cusano, Angela Maria; Causa, Filippo; Moglie, Raffaella Della; Falco, Nunzia; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana; Aliberti, Anna; Vecchione, Raffaele; Battista, Edmondo; Marasco, Daniela; Savarese, Marika; Raucci, Umberto; Rega, Nadia; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we report on a general approach for the detection of a specific tumoural biomarker directly in serum. Such detection is made possible using a protein-binding peptide selected through an improved phage display technique and then conjugated to engineered microparticles (MPs). Protein biomarkers represent an unlimited source of information for non-invasive diagnostic and prognostic tests; MP-based assays are becoming largely used in manipulation of soluble biomarkers, but their direct use in serum is hampered by the complex biomolecular environment. Our technique overcomes the current limitations as it produces a selective MP—engineered with an antifouling layer—that ‘captures’ the relevant protein staying impervious to the background. Our system succeeds in fishing-out the human tumour necrosis factor alpha directly in serum with a high selectivity degree. Our method could have great impact in soluble protein manipulation and detection for a wide variety of diagnostic applications. PMID:25100324

  16. Integration of binding peptide selection and multifunctional particles as tool-box for capture of soluble proteins in serum.

    PubMed

    Cusano, Angela Maria; Causa, Filippo; Moglie, Raffaella Della; Falco, Nunzia; Scognamiglio, Pasqualina Liana; Aliberti, Anna; Vecchione, Raffaele; Battista, Edmondo; Marasco, Daniela; Savarese, Marika; Raucci, Umberto; Rega, Nadia; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2014-10-06

    In this paper, we report on a general approach for the detection of a specific tumoural biomarker directly in serum. Such detection is made possible using a protein-binding peptide selected through an improved phage display technique and then conjugated to engineered microparticles (MPs). Protein biomarkers represent an unlimited source of information for non-invasive diagnostic and prognostic tests; MP-based assays are becoming largely used in manipulation of soluble biomarkers, but their direct use in serum is hampered by the complex biomolecular environment. Our technique overcomes the current limitations as it produces a selective MP--engineered with an antifouling layer--that 'captures' the relevant protein staying impervious to the background. Our system succeeds in fishing-out the human tumour necrosis factor alpha directly in serum with a high selectivity degree. Our method could have great impact in soluble protein manipulation and detection for a wide variety of diagnostic applications.

  17. Film thickness dependence of protein adsorption from blood serum and plasma onto poly(sulfobetaine)-grafted surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Chen, Shengfu; Cheng, Gang; Vaisocherová, Hana; Xue, Hong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Jinli; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2008-09-02

    In this work, we investigate protein adsorption from single protein solutions and complex media such as 100% blood serum and plasma onto poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (polySBMA)-grafted surfaces via atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) at varying film thicknesses. It is interesting to observe that protein adsorption exhibits a minimum at a medium film thickness. Results show that the surface with 62 nm polySBMA brushes presents the best nonfouling character in 100% blood serum and plasma although all of these surfaces are highly resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption from single fibrinogen and lysozyme solutions. Surface resistance to 100% blood serum or plasma is necessary for many applications from blood-contacting devices to drug delivery. This work provides a new in vitro evaluation standard for the application of biomaterials in vivo.

  18. Embryo culture in teratological surveillance and serum proteins in development. Comprehensive fourteen year report, 1968-1982

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, N.W.

    1982-07-01

    A testing procedure is being developed which may reduce the incidence of birth defects. The procedure uses in vitro cultures of whole rat embryos. Early studies on the nutrition of embryos involved attempts to culture whole chick embryos on protein-free chemically defined media. Media containing proteins from whole egg were superior. No single protein would support growth and development, at least two proteins were required. One protein was a transferrin, the second protein could be either ovalbumin or lipovitellin. To determine the path taken by nutrient proteins from medium to embryo, radioactive ovalbumin was prepared. The results showed that intact ovalbumin was taken up by the extra-embryonic yolk-sac and degraded to constituent amino acids within this structure. This observation was difficult to reconcile with the observed responses of the embryo to nutrient proteins. Consideration was given to yolk-sac function. When isolated yolk-sacs were incubated in Ringer's salt solution, they synthesized and secreted a distinct group of proteins. Yolk-sacs cultured on media containing various protein constituents synthesized serum proteins in relative amounts that were distinct for each medium. This suggested that the embryo responses to various culture media were mediated by changes in the relative synthesis of serum proteins. This hypothesis led to two lines of experimentation: what are the mechanisms regulating the relative synthesis of serum proteins by the yolk-sac; and do serum proteins actually provide signals of developmental significance. The first question led to studies with cultures of endodermal cells while the second question led to work on the development of a test for teratological surveillance. (ERB)

  19. Serum antibody responses to Wolbachia surface protein in patients with human lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Shiny, Chandanapurath; Krushna, Nagampalli S A; Archana, Bairavasundaram; Farzana, Begum; Narayanan, Rangarajan B

    2009-12-01

    Wolbachia surface protein (WSP), which is the most abundantly expressed protein of Wolbachia from the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi, was chosen for the present study. B-cell epitope prediction of the WSP protein sequence indicates a high antigenicity, surface probability and hydrophilicity by DNA STAR software analysis. ProPred analysis suggests the presence of HLA class II binding regions in the WSP protein that contribute to T-cell responses and isotype reactivity. In order to validate these findings, the gene coding for endosymbiont WSP was PCR-amplified from the genomic DNA of the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi and cloned in T-7 expression vector pRSET-A. Western blot and ELISA at the total IgG level with recombiant WSP indicated a significantly elevated reactivity in CP compared to MF, EN and NEN individuals. Isotype ELISA also suggested an elevated reactivity in CP patients at the IgG1 level. In contrast, WSP-specific IgG4 levels were found to be elevated in MF patients compared to CP and EN. Besides this, WSP-specific IgE levels indicated an elevated reactivity in CP and MF patients compared to normals. Observations from ELISA supported the in silico predictions that indicate the presence of B- and T-cell epitopes. Hence, a combinatorial approach of in silico predictions and wet-lab studies provides interesting insights into the role of Wolbachia proteins in filarial pathogenesis.

  20. First evidence of protein G-binding protein in the most primitive vertebrate: serum lectin from lamprey (Lampetra japonica).

    PubMed

    Xue, Zhuang; Pang, Yue; Liu, Xin; Zheng, Zhen; Xiao, Rong; Jin, Minli; Han, Yinglun; Su, Peng; Lv, Li; Wang, Jihong; Li, QingWei

    2013-12-01

    The intelectins, a recently identified subgroup of extracellular animal lectins, are glycan-binding receptors that recognize glycan epitopes on foreign pathogens in host systems. Here, we have described NPGBP (novel protein G-binding protein), a novel serum lectin found in the lamprey, Lampetra japonica. RT-PCR yielded a 1005 bp cDNA sequence from the lamprey liver encoding a 334 amino acid secretory protein with homology to mammalian and aquatic organism intelectins. Gene expression analyses showed that the NPGBP gene was expressed in the blood, intestines, kidney, heart, gill, liver, adipose tissue and gonads. NPGBP was isolated by protein G-conjugated agarose immunoprecipitation, and SDS-PAGE analyses showed that NPGBP migrated as a specific band (∼35 and ∼124 kDa under reducing and non-reducing conditions, respectively). These results suggested that NPGBP forms monomers and tetramers. NPGBP gene expression was induced by in vivo bacterial stimulation, and NPGBP showed different agglutination activities against pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. The induction of NPGBP suggested that it plays an important role in defense against microorganisms in the internal circulation system of the lamprey. When incubated with an unrelated antibody, the specific binding between NPGBP and protein G was competitively inhibited, indicating that NPGBP and the Fc region of Ig bind to the same site on protein G. We thus assume that the tertiary structure of NPGBP is similar to that of the Fc region of Ig. Additionally, NPGBP can effectively promote endothelial cell mitosis. These findings suggest that NPGBP plays a role in the immune defense against microorganisms, and this study represents one of the few examples of the characterization and functional analysis of an aquatic organism intelectin.

  1. The COG and COPI complexes interact to control the abundance of GEARs, a subset of Golgi integral membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Oka, Toshihiko; Ungar, Daniel; Hughson, Frederick M; Krieger, Monty

    2004-05-01

    The conserved oligomeric Golgi (COG) complex is a soluble hetero-octamer associated with the cytoplasmic surface of the Golgi. Mammalian somatic cell mutants lacking the Cog1 (ldlB) or Cog2 (ldlC) subunits exhibit pleiotropic defects in Golgi-associated glycoprotein and glycolipid processing that suggest COG is involved in the localization, transport, and/or function of multiple Golgi processing proteins. We have identified a set of COG-sensitive, integral membrane Golgi proteins called GEARs (mannosidase II, GOS-28, GS15, GPP130, CASP, giantin, and golgin-84) whose abundances were reduced in the mutant cells and, in some cases, increased in COG-overexpressing cells. In the mutants, some GEARs were abnormally localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and were degraded by proteasomes. The distributions of the GEARs were altered by small interfering RNA depletion of epsilon-COP in wild-type cells under conditions in which COG-insensitive proteins were unaffected. Furthermore, synthetic phenotypes arose in mutants deficient in both epsilon-COP and either Cog1 or Cog2. COG and COPI may work in concert to ensure the proper retention or retrieval of a subset of proteins in the Golgi, and COG helps prevent the endoplasmic reticulum accumulation and degradation of some GEARs.

  2. BacS: an abundant bacteroid protein in Rhizobium etli whose expression ex planta requires nifA.

    PubMed

    Jahn, Olivia J; Davila, Guillermo; Romero, David; Noel, K Dale

    2003-01-01

    Rhizobium etli CFN42 bacteroids from bean nodules possessed an abundant 16-kDa protein (BacS) that was found in the membrane pellet after cell disruption. This protein was not detected in bacteria cultured in tryptone-yeast extract. In minimal media, it was produced at low oxygen concentration but not in a mutant whose nifA was disrupted. N-terminal sequencing of the protein led to isolation of a bacS DNA fragment. DNA hybridization and nucleotide sequencing revealed three copies of the bacS gene, all residing on the main symbiotic plasmid of strain CFN42. A stretch of 304 nucleotides, exactly conserved upstream of all three bacS open reading frames, had very close matches with the NifA and sigma 54 consensus binding sequences. The only bacS homology in the genetic sequence databases was to three hypothetical proteins of unknown function, all from rhizobial species. Mutation and genetic complementation indicated that each of the bacS genes gives rise to a BacS polypeptide. Mutants disrupted or deleted in all three genes did not produce the BacS polypeptide but were Nod+ and Fix+ on Phaseolus vulgaris.

  3. LEA polypeptide profiling of recalcitrant and orthodox legume seeds reveals ABI3-regulated LEA protein abundance linked to desiccation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hundertmark, Michaela; Buitink, Julia

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to orthodox seeds that acquire desiccation tolerance during maturation, recalcitrant seeds are unable to survive drying. These desiccation-sensitive seeds constitute an interesting model for comparative analysis with phylogenetically close species that are desiccation tolerant. Considering the importance of LEA (late embryogenesis abundant) proteins as protective molecules both in drought and in desiccation tolerance, the heat-stable proteome was characterized in cotyledons of the legume Castanospermum australe and it was compared with that of the orthodox model legume Medicago truncatula. RNA sequencing identified transcripts of 16 homologues out of 17 LEA genes for which polypeptides are detected in M. truncatula seeds. It is shown that for 12 LEA genes, polypeptides were either absent or strongly reduced in C. australe cotyledons compared with M. truncatula seeds. Instead, osmotically responsive, non-seed-specific dehydrins accumulated to high levels in the recalcitrant cotyledons compared with orthodox seeds. Next, M. truncatula mutants of the ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3) gene were characterized. Mature Mtabi3 seeds were found to be desiccation sensitive when dried below a critical water content of 0.4g H2O g DW–1. Characterization of the LEA proteome of the Mtabi3 seeds revealed a subset of LEA proteins with severely reduced abundance that were also found to be reduced or absent in C. australe cotyledons. Transcripts of these genes were indeed shown to be ABI3 responsive. The results highlight those LEA proteins that are critical to desiccation tolerance and suggest that comparable regulatory pathways responsible for their accumulation are missing in both desiccation-sensitive genotypes, revealing new insights into the mechanistic basis of the recalcitrant trait in seeds. PMID:24043848

  4. Monte carlo method-based QSAR modeling of penicillins binding to human serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Veselinović, Jovana B; Toropov, Andrey A; Toropova, Alla P; Nikolić, Goran M; Veselinović, Aleksandar M

    2015-01-01

    The binding of penicillins to human serum proteins was modeled with optimal descriptors based on the Simplified Molecular Input-Line Entry System (SMILES). The concentrations of protein-bound drug for 87 penicillins expressed as percentage of the total plasma concentration were used as experimental data. The Monte Carlo method was used as a computational tool to build up the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model for penicillins binding to plasma proteins. One random data split into training, test and validation set was examined. The calculated QSAR model had the following statistical parameters: r(2)  = 0.8760, q(2)  = 0.8665, s = 8.94 for the training set and r(2)  = 0.9812, q(2)  = 0.9753, s = 7.31 for the test set. For the validation set, the statistical parameters were r(2)  = 0.727 and s = 12.52, but after removing the three worst outliers, the statistical parameters improved to r(2)  = 0.921 and s = 7.18. SMILES-based molecular fragments (structural indicators) responsible for the increase and decrease of penicillins binding to plasma proteins were identified. The possibility of using these results for the computer-aided design of new penicillins with desired binding properties is presented.

  5. Serum concentration and increased temperature alter Mayaro virus RNA and protein synthesis in Aedes albopictus (mosquito)-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Motta, M C; Fournier, M V; Carvalho, M G

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown the inhibition of Mayaro virus multiplication in Aedes albopictus-infected cells maintained at a supraoptimal temperature for growth (37 degrees C) and a stimulation of virus production in response to high serum concentrations in the incubation medium. In the present study, we addressed the question of how the effect of continuous heat stress and high serum concentration soon after infection interfere with virus macromolecule synthesis. Cells maintained at 28 degrees C in the presence of 2% serum synthesized a viral genomic RNA of 12 kb and a subgenomic RNA of 5.2 kb 6 h postinfection. Analysis of the protein profile showed the presence of the viral nucleocapsid protein of 34 kDa (P34). However, if infected cells were maintained at 37 degrees C, a smear starting immediately below the 5.2-kb RNA was noticed and the viral P34 was not detected by SDS-PAGE. Addition of 10% serum to the growth medium of infected cells maintained at 37 degrees C results in a viral RNA profile and protein synthesis similar to those observed in cultures kept at 28 degrees C, i.e., the smear was not observed and the P34 protein was detected. The results suggest that the inhibition of virus multiplication by temperature may be related to the inhibition of viral nonstructural protein synthesis early during infection. The presence of high serum levels in the incubation medium protects macromolecule synthesis against heat stress.

  6. Serum and tissue thiocyanate concentrations in growing pigs fed cassava peel or corn based diets containing graded protein levels.

    PubMed

    Tewe, O O

    1984-11-01

    Thiocyanate concentrations of serum, liver, kidney, spleen and longissimus dorsi were determined in 64 growing Large White x Landrace pigs offered 8 experimental isocaloric diets containing different levels of cassava peel and crude protein. Cassava peel increased serum thiocyanate on day 60 (P less than 0.01) and day 90 (P less than 0.01) of the trial, while the crude protein level increased it (P less than 0.05) on days 30 and 90, respectively. Interaction of the two factors was significant on day 30 (P less than 0.05) and day 90 (P less than 0.05). There was a correlation between cyanide intake and serum thiocyanate level. Coefficient of determination revealed that cyanide alone accounted for 28.5; 60.6 and 48.8% variation in serum thiocyanate on days 30, 60 and 90, respectively. Liver, spleen and longissimus dorsi thiocyanate were affected by dietary protein intake (P less than 0.05). Thiocyanate concentration was higher (P less than 0.05) on cassava peel diet. Generally, crude protein at 5% reduced organ and muscle thiocyanate concentrations. A diet containing 112.2-117.3 mg/kg hydrocyanic acid (HCN) affected serum but not organ and muscle thiocyanate in protein-sufficient diets.

  7. Affinity depletion of plasma and serum for mass spectrometry-based proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Jaros, Julian A J; Guest, Paul C; Bahn, Sabine; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Protein biomarker discovery in blood plasma and serum is severely hampered by the vast dynamic range of the proteome. With protein concentrations spanning 12 orders of magnitude, conventional mass spectrometric analysis allows for detection of only a few low-abundance proteins. Prior depletion of high-abundant proteins from the sample can increase analytical depth considerably and has become a widely used practice. We describe in detail an affinity depletion method that selectively removes 14 of the most abundant proteins in plasma and serum.

  8. Assessment of current mass spectrometric workflows for the quantification of low abundant proteins and phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Manuel; Ahrné, Erik; Baron, Anna P.; Glatter, Timo; Fava, Luca L.; Santamaria, Anna; Nigg, Erich A.; Schmidt, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The data described here provide a systematic performance evaluation of popular data-dependent (DDA) and independent (DIA) mass spectrometric (MS) workflows currently used in quantitative proteomics. We assessed the limits of identification, quantification and detection for each method by analyzing a dilution series of 20 unmodified and 10 phosphorylated synthetic heavy labeled reference peptides, respectively, covering six orders of magnitude in peptide concentration with and without a complex human cell digest background. We found that all methods performed very similarly in the absence of background proteins, however, when analyzing whole cell lysates, targeted methods were at least 5–10 times more sensitive than directed or DDA methods. In particular, higher stage fragmentation (MS3) of the neutral loss peak using a linear ion trap increased dynamic quantification range of some phosphopeptides up to 100-fold. We illustrate the power of this targeted MS3 approach for phosphopeptide monitoring by successfully quantifying 9 phosphorylation sites of the kinetochore and spindle assembly checkpoint component Mad1 over different cell cycle states from non-enriched pull-down samples. The data are associated to the research article ‘Evaluation of data-dependent and data-independent mass spectrometric workflows for sensitive quantification of proteins and phosphorylation sites׳ (Bauer et al., 2014) [1]. The mass spectrometry and the analysis dataset have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org) via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000964. PMID:26550600

  9. An integrated bioanalytical platform for supporting high-throughput serum protein binding screening.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Shou, Wilson Z; Vath, Marianne; Kieltyka, Kasia; Maloney, Jennifer; Elvebak, Larry; Stewart, Jeremy; Herbst, John; Weller, Harold N

    2010-12-30

    Quantification of small molecules using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer has become a common practice in bioanalytical support of in vitro adsorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) screening. The bioanalysis process involves primarily three indispensable steps: MS/MS optimization for a large number of new chemical compounds undergoing various screening assays in early drug discovery, high-throughput sample analysis with LC/MS/MS for those chemically diverse compounds using the optimized MS/MS conditions, and post-acquisition data review and reporting. To improve overall efficiency of ADME bioanalysis, an integrated system was proposed featuring an automated and unattended MS/MS optimization, a staggered parallel LC/MS/MS for high-throughput sample analysis, and a sophisticated software tool for LC/MS/MS raw data review as well as biological data calculation and reporting. The integrated platform has been used in bioanalytical support of a serum protein binding screening assay with high speed, high capacity, and good robustness. In this new platform, a unique sample dilution scheme was also introduced. With this dilution design, the total number of analytical samples was reduced; therefore, the total operation time was reduced and the overall throughput was further improved. The performance of the protein binding screening assay was monitored with two controls representing high and low binding properties and an acceptable inter-assay consistency was achieved. This platform has been successfully used for the determination of serum protein binding in multiple species for more than 4000 compounds.

  10. Elevated serum levels in human pregnancy of a molecule immunochemically similar to eosinophil granule major basic protein

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    We have shown that serum levels of a molecule immunochemically similar to eosinophil granule major basic protein (MBP) are elevated in pregnant women throughout gestation. MBP levels increase during gestation and plateau at approximately 7,500 ng/ml by the 20th wk (greater than 10-fold above normal). Levels return to normal after delivery, with a T1/2 of 13.7 d. The MBP in pregnancy serum is remarkably similar to the eosinophil granule MBP in that: (a) pregnancy MBP fully inhibits the binding of radiolabeled MBP standard in a double antibody radioimmunoassay; (b) this inhibition reaction is specific for human MBP because pregnancy serum produces no inhibition of the binding of radiolabeled guinea pig MBP in the guinea pig MBP radioimmunoassay; (c) in a two-site immunoradiometric assay for MBP, slopes of dose- response curves for pregnancy serum, purified MBP, and serum from a patient with hypereosinophilic syndrome are identical, and maximal binding is comparable; (d) reduction and alkylation of pregnancy sera increases measured MBP 100-fold, as previously shown for eosinophil granule MBP in serum; and (e) the MBP in pregnancy serum demonstrates the same pattern of heat lability as has been previously reported for MBP. Four observations have raised the possibility that the eosinophil is not the source of the MBP in pregnancy serum: (a) no correlation between serum MBP level and peripheral blood eosinophil count exists in pregnant women, in contrast to previous studies of patients with eosinophilia; (b) levels of three other eosinophil-associated proteins are normal or low in pregnancy sera, whereas the serum levels of these proteins are elevated in patients with eosinophilia; (c) the slopes of dose-response curves for pregnancy sera and MBP standards differ in the double antibody radioimmunoassay; and (d) the molecule in pregnancy serum elutes from Sephadex G-50 columns at the void volume, while eosinophil granule MBP and the MBP in serum of patients with

  11. Brix refractometry in serum as a measure of failure of passive transfer compared to measured immunoglobulin G and total protein by refractometry in serum from dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, D; Nydam, D V; Godden, S M; Bristol, L S; Kryzer, A; Ranum, J; Schaefer, D

    2016-05-01

    A series of trials were conducted to evaluate Brix refractometry (Brix %) for the assessment of failure of passive transfer (FPT) in dairy calves compared to: (1) serum IgG (reference standard) when measured by radial immunodiffusion (RID) or a turbidometric immunoassay (TIA), and (2) serum total protein refractometry (STP). For the serum samples tested with TIA, STP, and Brix % (n = 310; Holstein calves), the median concentrations were 21.3 g/L IgG, 58 g/L STP, and 9.2%, respectively. For the serum samples tested with RID, STP and Brix % (n = 112; Jersey calves), the mean concentrations were 38 g/L IgG, 68 g/L STP, and 10.2%, respectively. For samples tested with only Brix % and STP (n = 265; Holstein calves), median STP and Brix % were 50 g/L STP and 8.5%, respectively. Correlations between Brix % and RID, and between Brix % and TIA were equal (r = 0.79, respectively). Brix % and STP were positively correlated (r = 0.99). Brix % estimated serum IgG concentrations determined by TIA and RID (r(2) = 0.63, 0.62, respectively). When FPT was defined as serum IgG < 10 g/L, Brix % ≤ 8.5% showed optimal sensitivity (100%) and specificity (89.2%) to predict FPT. At the same IgG cut-point, an STP value of ≤ 52 g/L showed a similar sensitivity (100%) and specificity (80.4%) to predict FPT. Brix refractometry predicted successful transfer of passive immunity in dairy calves, but further evaluation as a diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of FPT is warranted.

  12. Serum thyroid hormone, insulin, glucose, triglycerides and protein concentrations in normal horses: association with topical dexamethasone usage.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Getu; Allersmeier, Maren; Schusser, Gerald F; Ungemach, Fritz R

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if topical application of dexamethasone affected the serum concentrations of thyroid hormones (triiodothyronine T(3) and thyroxine T(4)), glucose, triglycerides, total protein and insulin in normal horses. Ten horses were treated twice daily for 10 days with 50 g dexamethasone using an ointment formulation. Thyroid hormones and insulin were assayed using standard radioimmunoassay methods, while glucose, triglycerides and total protein were determined using a standard enzymatic method and the Biuret reaction, respectively. An increase in serum glucose and triglyceride concentrations was accompanied by 2-6-fold increases in serum insulin concentrations, but there was no change in serum total protein concentration. Insulin secretion increased with concomitant hyperglycemia and hypertriglyceridemia. A non-significant decline in T(4) secretion was noted. Serum T(3) and T(4) concentrations declined continuously below baseline values from 48 h. Glucose and insulin levels returned to baseline values 3 days after treatment withdrawal, whereas triglycerides reverted to baseline by 7 days. In contrast, baseline values of serum T(3) and T(4) were not reached by 20 days following drug withdrawal. The results indicated that topical administration of dexamethasone affected thyroid function and physiological metabolic functions, which may have implications for potential doping cases in racing horses.

  13. Legionella pneumophila DNA in serum samples during Legionnaires' disease in relation to C-reactive protein levels.

    PubMed

    van de Veerdonk, F L; de Jager, C P C; Schellekens, J J A; Huijsmans, C J J; Beaumont, F; Hermans, M H A; Wever, P C

    2009-04-01

    Legionella pneumophila DNA can be detected in serum from patients with Legionnaires' disease (LD). We explored this observation studying the kinetics of L. pneumophila DNA in serum samples in relation to C-reactive protein (CRP). Eleven hospitalized patients with LD were studied. Diagnosis was made by Legionella urinary antigen test in 8 patients and seroconversion in 3 patients. A macrophage infectivity potentiator (MIP) real-time PCR was performed on 31 serum samples, including 20 follow-up serum samples. Serum samples obtained on the day of admission were MIP PCR-positive in 7 (64%) and MIP PCR-negative in 4 (36%) patients. Three (75%) of the 4 patients with a MIP PCR-negative serum sample on the day of admission became positive during follow-up. Overall, L. pneumophila DNA was detected in serum samples from 10 of the 11 patients (91%). CRP levels in the 7 patients with a positive MIP PCR serum sample on day of admission (499 +/- 144 mg/l; median +/- SD) were significantly higher than those in the 4 patients with a negative MIP PCR serum sample on the day of admission (244 +/- 97 mg/l). No difference in the severity of the disease on the day of admission was found between these patients. The presence of L. pneumophila DNA in serum is a common phenomenon in hospitalized patients with LD, although in some cases it is not yet present on the day of admission. L. pneumophila DNA in serum on the day of admission correlates with high CRP levels, but not with the severity of the disease.

  14. [Evaluation of the relations between serum proteins electrophoresis and other laboratory tests in monoclonal gammopathies (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Ramacciotti, P G; Lazzari, L; Minardi, P

    1976-03-01

    We have considered interesting to determine monoclonal gammopathies incidence, in 2191 serum proteins electrophoresis performed in our laboratory from January to December 1974. We have found 15 cases of monoclonal gammopathies, some cases combined with Mieloma (3 cases), some other with other with non specific diseases. We have considered the relations between type of gammopathy and other laboratory tests useful for any other diagnose: they are: immunochemical analysis, E.S.R., red and white count, total proteins, Bence Jones protein.

  15. Day/night changes in serum S100B protein concentrations in acute paranoid schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Morera-Fumero, Armando L; Díaz-Mesa, Estefanía; Abreu-Gonzalez, Pedro; Fernandez-Lopez, Lourdes; Cejas-Mendez, Maria Del Rosario

    2017-04-03

    There are day/night and seasonal changes in biological markers such as melatonin and cortisol. Controversial changes in serum S100B protein levels have been described in schizophrenia. We aim studying whether serum S100B levels present day/night variations in schizophrenia patients and whether S100B levels are related to psychopathology. Sixty-five paranoid schizophrenic inpatients participated in the study. Psychopathology was assessed with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) at admission and discharge. Blood was drawn at 12:00 (midday) and 00:00 (midnight) hours at admission and discharge. Sixty-five healthy subjects matched by age, gender and season acted as control group. At admission and discharge patients had significantly higher serum S100B concentrations at midday and midnight than healthy subjects. At admission, patients showed a day/night variation of S100B levels, with higher S100B levels at 12:00 than at 00:00h (143.7±26.3pg/ml vs. 96.9±16.6pg/ml). This day/night difference was not present in the control group. Midday and midnight S100B at admission decreased when compared to S100B at discharge (midday, 143.7±26.3 vs. 83.0±12, midnight 96.9±16.6 vs. 68.6±14.5). There was a positive correlation between the PANSS positive subscale and S100B concentrations at admission. This correlation was not present at discharge.

  16. Intestinal Dysbiosis and Lowered Serum Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Satoru; Goto, Sae; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Okuno, Tatsuya; Asahara, Takashi; Nomoto, Koji; Shibata, Akihide; Fujisawa, Yoshiro; Minato, Tomomi; Okamoto, Akira; Ohno, Kinji; Hirayama, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Background The intestine is one of the first affected organs in Parkinson’s disease (PD). PD subjects show abnormal staining for Escherichia coli and α-synuclein in the colon. Methods We recruited 52 PD patients and 36 healthy cohabitants. We measured serum markers and quantified the numbers of 19 fecal bacterial groups/genera/species by quantitative RT-PCR of 16S or 23S rRNA. Although the six most predominant bacterial groups/genera/species covered on average 71.3% of total intestinal bacteria, our analysis was not comprehensive compared to metagenome analysis or 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing. Results In PD, the number of Lactobacillus was higher, while the sum of analyzed bacteria, Clostridium coccoides group, and Bacteroides fragilis group were lower than controls. Additionally, the sum of putative hydrogen-producing bacteria was lower in PD. A linear regression model to predict disease durations demonstrated that C. coccoides group and Lactobacillus gasseri subgroup had the largest negative and positive coefficients, respectively. As a linear regression model to predict stool frequencies showed that these bacteria were not associated with constipation, changes in these bacteria were unlikely to represent worsening of constipation in the course of progression of PD. In PD, the serum lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein levels were lower than controls, while the levels of serum diamine oxidase, a marker for intestinal mucosal integrity, remained unchanged in PD. Conclusions The permeability to LPS is likely to be increased without compromising the integrity of intestinal mucosa in PD. The increased intestinal permeability in PD may make the patients susceptible to intestinal dysbiosis. Conversely, intestinal dysbiosis may lead to the increased intestinal permeability. One or both of the two mechanisms may be operational in development and progression of PD. PMID:26539989

  17. Photooxidation of Tryptophan and Tyrosine Residues in Human Serum Albumin Sensitized by Pterin: A Model for Globular Protein Photodamage in Skin.

    PubMed

    Reid, Lara O; Roman, Ernesto A; Thomas, Andrés H; Dántola, M Laura

    2016-08-30

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant protein in the circulatory system. Oxidized albumin was identified in the skin of patients suffering from vitiligo, a depigmentation disorder in which the protection against ultraviolet (UV) radiation fails because of the lack of melanin. Oxidized pterins, efficient photosensitizers under UV-A irradiation, accumulate in the skin affected by vitiligo. In this work, we have investigated the ability of pterin (Ptr), the parent compound of oxidized pterins, to induce structural and chemical changes in HSA under UV-A irradiation. Our results showed that Ptr is able to photoinduce oxidation of the protein in at least two amino acid residues: tryptophan (Trp) and tyrosine (Tyr). HSA undergoes oligomerization, yielding protein structures whose molecular weight increases with irradiation time. The protein cross-linking, due to the formation of dimers of Tyr, does not significantly affect the secondary and tertiary structures of HSA. Trp is consumed in the photosensitized process, and N-formylkynurenine was identified as one of its oxidation products. The photosensitization of HSA takes place via a purely dynamic process, which involves the triplet excited state of Ptr. The results presented in this work suggest that protein photodamage mediated by endogenous photosensitizers can significantly contribute to the harmful effects of UV-A radiation on the human skin.

  18. [Immunochemical investigations on the protein of the "pregnancy zone". XI. Serum concentration of the pregnancy-associated alpha2-glycoprotein (Pregnancy Zone protein) in normal pregnancy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Straube, W; Hofmann, R; Klausch, B; Grummt, B; Rockstroh, K; Kruse, H J

    1976-09-17

    A quantitative study of the pregnancy zone proteins was made in the sera of 383 healthy pregnant women by means of radial immunodiffusion according to Mancini and co-workers. The serum levels related to a pregnancy serum standard were measured from the 6th to 44th week of pregnancy. The serum concentration of the protein showed a considerable individual variation. The mean concentration began to rise in gestational weeks 8 to 24. Until the week 32 a rather stable average level was reached. Before delivery a slight decrease was observed. Women with over term pregnancies showed particular high mean concentrations. The differences of serum levels were statistically significant until the gestational week 14.

  19. Proteome profiling of the growth phases of Leishmania pifanoi promastigotes in axenic culture reveals differential abundance of immunostimulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Alonso, Ana; García-Tabares, Francisco; Mena, María del Carmen; Ciordia, Sergio; Larraga, Vicente

    2016-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a term that encompasses a compendium of neglected tropical diseases caused by dimorphic and digenetic protozoan parasites from the genus Leishmania (Kinetoplastida: Trypanosomatidae). The clinical manifestations of neotropical cutaneous leishmaniasis (NCL) caused by Leishmania pifanoi and other species of the "Leishmania mexicana complex" mainly correspond to anergic diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis (ADCL), which is the origin of considerable morbidity. Despite the outstanding advances in the characterization of the trypanosomatid genomes and proteomes, the biology of this species has been scarcely explored. However, the close relation of L. pifanoi to the sequenced species L. mexicana and others included in the "L. mexicana complex" allowed us to perform a two-dimension electrophoresis (2DE) approach to the promastigote proteome at the differential expression level. Protein identifications were performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF). This insight has revealed similarities and differences between L. pifanoi and other species responsible for cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis. Interestingly, certain proteins that were previously described as immunostimulatory (elongation factor 1β, trypanothione peroxidase, heat shock protein 70, enolase, GDP-forming succinyl-CoA and aldehyde dehydrogenase) are more abundant in the final growth stages of promastigotes (late-logarithmic and/or stationary phase) in the case of L. pifanoi.

  20. Dynamin-related proteins Vps1p and Dnm1p control peroxisome abundance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kuravi, Kasinath; Nagotu, Shirisha; Krikken, Arjen M; Sjollema, Klaas; Deckers, Markus; Erdmann, Ralf; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J

    2006-10-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains three dynamin-related-proteins, Vps1p, Dnm1p and Mgm1p. Previous data from glucose-grown VPS1 and DNM1 null mutants suggested that Vps1p, but not Dnm1p, plays a role in regulating peroxisome abundance. Here we show that deletion of DNM1 also results in reduction of peroxisome numbers. This was not observed in glucose-grown dnm1 cells, but was evident in cells grown in the presence of oleate. Similar observations were made in cells lacking Fis1p, a protein involved in Dnm1p function. Fluorescence microscopy of cells producing Dnm1-GFP or GFP-Fis1p demonstrated that both proteins had a dual localization on mitochondria and peroxisomes. Quantitative analysis revealed a greater reduction in peroxisome number in oleate-induced vps1 cells relative to dnm1 or fis1 cells. A significant fraction of oleate-induced vps1 cells still contained two or more peroxisomes. Conversely, almost all cells of a dnm1 vps1 double-deletion strain contained only one, enlarged peroxisome. This suggests that deletion of DNM1 reinforces the vps1 peroxisome phenotype. Time-lapse imaging indicated that during budding of dnm1 vps1 cells, the single peroxisome present in the mother cell formed long protrusions into the developing bud. This organelle divided at a very late stage of the budding process, possibly during cytokinesis.

  1. Increased Abundance of Proteins Involved in Phytosiderophore Production in Boron-Tolerant Barley1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, John; Ford, Kris; Cassin, Andrew; Natera, Siria; Bacic, Antony

    2007-01-01

    Boron (B) phytotoxicity affects cereal-growing regions worldwide. Although B-tolerant barley (Hordeum vulgare) germplasm is available, molecules responsible for this tolerance mechanism have not been defined. We describe and use a new comparative proteomic technique, iTRAQ peptide tagging (iTRAQ), to compare the abundances of proteins from B-tolerant and -intolerant barley plants from a ‘Clipper’ × ‘Sahara’ doubled-haploid population selected on the basis of a presence or absence of two B-tolerance quantitative trait loci. iTRAQ was used to identify three enzymes involved in siderophore production (Iron Deficiency Sensitive2 [IDS2], IDS3, and a methylthio-ribose kinase) as being elevated in abundance in the B-tolerant plants. Following from this result, we report a potential link between iron, B, and the siderophore hydroxymugineic acid. We believe that this study highlights the potency of the iTRAQ approach to better understand mechanisms of abiotic stress tolerance in cereals, particularly when applied in conjunction with bulked segregant analysis. PMID:17478636

  2. Enrichment of serum low-molecular-weight proteins using C18 absorbent under urea/dithiothreitol denatured environment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; An, Yuan; Pu, Hai; Shan, Yue; Ren, Xiaoqing; An, Mingrui; Wang, Qingsong; Wei, Shicheng; Ji, Jianguo

    2010-03-01

    Serum low-molecular-weight proteins (LMWPs, molecular weight<30kDa) are closely related to the body physiological and pathological situations, whereas many difficulties are encountered when enriching and fractionating them. Using C(18) absorbent (100 A) enrichment and fractionation under urea/dithiothreitol (DTT) denatured environment followed by 60% acetonitrile (ACN) elution, serum LMWPs could be enriched more than 100-fold and were evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), and isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) labeling quantification. Proteins existing in human serum at low nanograms/milliliter (ng/ml) levels, such as myeloid-related proteins (MRPs), could be identified directly from 2-DE coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) and LTQ-Orbitrap MS. Sixteen proteins were confidentially identified and quantified using ICAT labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). By virtue of its easy operation and high reproducibility to process large quantity complex serum samples, this method has potential uses in enriching LMWPs either in serum or in cell and tissue samples.

  3. Engineering protein processing of the mammary gland to produce abundant hemophilia B therapy in milk

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianguo; Xu, Weijie; Ross, Jason W.; Walters, Eric M.; Butler, Stephen P.; Whyte, Jeff J.; Kelso, Lindsey; Fatemi, Mostafa; Vanderslice, Nicholas C.; Giroux, Keith; Spate, Lee D.; Samuel, Melissa S.; Murphy, Cliff N.; Wells, Kevin D.; Masiello, Nick C.; Prather, Randall S.; Velander, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Both the low animal cell density of bioreactors and their ability to post-translationally process recombinant factor IX (rFIX) limit hemophilia B therapy to <20% of the world’s population. We used transgenic pigs to make rFIX in milk at about 3,000-fold higher output than provided by industrial bioreactors. However, this resulted in incomplete γ-carboxylation and propeptide cleavage where both processes are transmembrane mediated. We then bioengineered the co-expression of truncated, soluble human furin (rFurin) with pro-rFIX at a favorable enzyme to substrate ratio. This resulted in the complete conversion of pro-rFIX to rFIX while yielding a normal lactation. Importantly, these high levels of propeptide processing by soluble rFurin did not preempt γ-carboxylation in the ER and therefore was compartmentalized to the Trans-Golgi Network (TGN) and also to milk. The Golgi specific engineering demonstrated here segues the ER targeted enhancement of γ-carboxylation needed to biomanufacture coagulation proteins like rFIX using transgenic livestock. PMID:26387706

  4. A comparison of blood factor XII autoactivation in buffer, protein cocktail, serum, and plasma solutions.

    PubMed

    Golas, Avantika; Yeh, Chyi-Huey Josh; Pitakjakpipop, Harit; Siedlecki, Christopher A; Vogler, Erwin A

    2013-01-01

    Activation of blood plasma coagulation in vitro by contact with material surfaces is demonstrably dependent on plasma-volume-to-activator-surface-area ratio. The only plausible explanation consistent with current understanding of coagulation-cascade biochemistry is that procoagulant stimulus arising from the activation complex of the intrinsic pathway is dependent on activator surface area. And yet, it is herein shown that activation of the blood zymogen factor XII (Hageman factor, FXII) dissolved in buffer, protein cocktail, heat-denatured serum, and FXI deficient plasma does not exhibit activator surface-area dependence. Instead, a highly-variable burst of procoagulant-enzyme yield is measured that exhibits no measurable kinetics, sensitivity to mixing, or solution-temperature dependence. Thus, FXII activation in both buffer and protein-containing solutions does not exhibit characteristics of a biochemical reaction but rather appears to be a "mechanochemical" reaction induced by FXII molecule interactions with hydrophilic activator particles that do not formally adsorb blood proteins from solution. Results of this study strongly suggest that activator surface-area dependence observed in contact activation of plasma coagulation does not solely arise at the FXII activation step of the intrinsic pathway.

  5. Hyperglycemia and non-enzymatic glycation of serum and tissue proteins in chickens.

    PubMed

    Klandorf, H; Holt, S B; McGowan, J A; Pinchasov, Y; Deyette, D; Peterson, R A

    1995-02-01

    The objectives of these studies were to determine whether elevated plasma glucose concentrations in broiler breeder chickens (200-250 mg/dl) can result in the non-enzymatic attachment of glucose to serum proteins (fructosamine) and eventual cross-linking of tissue proteins (basement membrane thickness), and to investigate the effects of a factor that may influence this cross-linking process. In response to feeding the satiety factor calcium propionate (CaP, 1.7%), plasma glucose and fructosamine concentrations were increased (P < 0.05) from 1 to 9 weeks of age, whereas concentrations of plasma glucose and fructosamine in feed-restricted chicks were reduced for the first 7 weeks after hatch. In a second study, the age-related increase in kidney capillary basement membrane thickness was prevented (P < 0.05) by feeding the cross-linking inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG, 800 ppm) to 30-week-old broiler breeder hens for 34 weeks. The results from these studies suggest that concentrations of plasma glucose in chickens may, in fact, be exerting long-term detrimental effects on tissue proteins, which can be ameliorated by factors that limit the cross-linking reaction.

  6. A microfiltration process to maximize removal of serum proteins from skim milk before cheese making.

    PubMed

    Nelson, B K; Barbano, D M

    2005-05-01

    Microfiltration (MF) is a membrane process that can separate casein micelles from milk serum proteins (SP), mainly beta-lactoglobulin and alpha-lactalbumin. Our objective was to develop a multistage MF process to remove a high percentage of SP from skim milk while producing a low concentration factor retentate from microfiltration (RMF) with concentrations of soluble minerals, nonprotein nitrogen (NPN), and lactose similar to the original skim milk. The RMF could be blended with cream to standardize milk for traditional Cheddar cheese making. Permeate from ultrafiltration (PUF) obtained from the ultrafiltration (UF) of permeate from MF (PMF) of skim milk was successfully used as a diafiltrant to remove SP from skim milk before cheese making, while maintaining the concentration of lactose, NPN, and nonmicellar calcium. About 95% of the SP originally in skim milk was removed by combining one 3 x MF stage and two 3 x PUF diafiltration stages. The final 3 x RMF can be diluted with PUF to the desired concentration of casein for traditional cheese making. The PMF from the skim milk was concentrated in a UF system to yield an SP concentrate with protein content similar to a whey protein concentrate, but without residuals from cheese making (i.e., rennet, culture, color, and lactic acid) that can produce undesirable functional and sensory characteristics in whey products. Additional processing steps to this 3-stage MF process for SP removal are discussed to produce an MF skim retentate for a continuous cottage cheese manufacturing process.

  7. Serum protein profiling of adults and children with Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaiopoulou, Anna; Gazouli, Maria; Papadopoulou, Aggeliki; Anagnostopoulos, Athanassios K; Karamanolis, George; Theodoropoulos, George E.; M’Koma, Amosy; Tsangaris, George T.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), known collectively as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic immuno-inflammatory pathologies of unknown etiology. Despite the frequent utilization of biomarkers in medical practice, there is a relative lack of information regarding validated paediatric biomarkers for IBD. Further, biomarkers proved to be efficacious in adults are frequently extrapolated to the paediatric clinical setting without considering that the pathogenesis of many diseases is distinctly different in children. In the current study, proteomics technology was employed in order to monitor differences in protein expression among adult and children CD patients, in order to identify a panel of candidate protein biomarkers that might be used to improve prognostic-diagnostic accuracy and to advance paediatric medical care. Methods Male and female serum samples from 12 adults and 12 children with active CD were subjected to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Following the relative quantitation of protein spots exhibiting a differential expression between the two groups by densitometry, the spots were further characterized by MALDI-TOF-MS. Results were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Results Clusterin (CLUS) was found to be significantly over-expressed in adults with CD, whereas ceruloplasmin (CERU) and apolipoprotein B-100 (APOB) were found to be significantly over-expressed in children indicating that the expression of these proteins might be implicated in the onset or progression of CD in these two sub-groups of patients. Conclusions Interestingly, we found a differential expression of several proteins in adults versus paediatric CD patients. Undoubtedly, future experiments using a larger cohort of CD patients are needed to evaluate the relevance of our preliminary findings. PMID:25250685

  8. Impact of Elevated Hemoglobin and Serum Protein on Vasovagal Reaction from Blood Donation.

    PubMed

    Odajima, Takeshi; Takanashi, Minoko; Sugimori, Hiroki; Tanba, Taiko; Yoshinaga, Kentaro; Motoji, Toshiko; Munakata, Masaya; Nakajima, Kazunori; Minami, Mutsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a cross-sectional study to elucidate factors contributing to vasovagal reaction (VVR), the most frequent side effect following whole blood and apheresis donations. Complications recorded at the collection sites after voluntary donations by the Japanese Red Cross Tokyo Blood Center (JRC), in the 2006 and 2007 fiscal years, were analyzed by both univariate analysis and the multivariate conditional logistic regression model. Of 1,119,716 blood donations over the full two years, complications were recorded for 13,320 donations (1.18%), among which 67% were VVR. There were 4,303 VVR cases which had sufficient information and could be used for this study. For each VVR case, two sex- and age-matched controls (n = 8,606) were randomly selected from the donors without complications. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), predonation blood pressure, pulse and blood test results, including total protein, albumin, and hemoglobin, were compared between the VVR group and the control group. In univariate analysis, the VVR group was significantly younger, with a lower BMI, higher blood pressure and higher blood protein and hemoglobin levels than the control group (p<0.001). Furthermore, blood protein and hemoglobin levels showed dose-dependent relationships with VVR incidences by the Cochran-Armitage trend test (p<0.01). For both sexes, after adjusting for confounders with the multivariate conditional logistic regression model, the higher than median groups for total protein (male: OR 1.97; 95%CI 1.76,-2.21; female: OR 2.29; 95%CI 2.05-2.56), albumin (male: 1.75; 1.55-1.96; female: 1.76; 1.57-1.97) and hemoglobin (male: 1.98; 1.76-2.22; female: 1.62; 1.45-1.81) had statistically significant higher risk of VVR compared to the lower than median groups. These elevated serum protein and hemoglobin levels might offer new indicators to help understand VVR occurrence.

  9. Non-covalent nanodiamond-polymer dispersions and electrostatic immobilization of bovine serum albumin protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skaltsas, T.; Pispas, S.; Tagmatarchis, N.

    2015-11-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) lack efficient dispersion, not only in solvents but also in aqueous media. The latter is of great importance, considering the inherent biocompatibility of NDs and the plethora of suitable strategies for immobilizing functional biomolecules. In this work, a series of polymers was non-covalently interacted with NDs, forming ND-polymer ensembles, and their dispersibility and stability was examined. Dynamic light scattering gave valuable information regarding the size of the ensembles in liquid phase, while their morphology was further examined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. In addition, thermal analysis measurements were applied to collect information on the thermal behavior of NDs and their ensembles and to calculate the amount of polymer interacting with the NDs, as well as the dispersibility values of the ND-polymer ensembles. Finally, the bovine serum albumin protein was electrostatically bound to a ND-polymer ensemble in which the polymeric moiety was carrying quaternized pyridine units.

  10. Prevention of interference by dextran with biuret-type assay of serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Flack, C P; Woollen, J W

    1984-04-01

    In assay of serum proteins by use of the biuret reaction, dextran can cause turbidity by formation of an insoluble complex of dextran with copper and tartrate (or EDTA) in strongly alkaline solution. Whether or not the turbidity occurs depends on the tartrate concentration: turbidity is maximal at about 10 g/L, absent at 20 g/L or more, and only slight and delayed at 4 g/L. Two biuret reagents, containing respectively 5.6 and 22.5 g of tartrate per liter, obviate the interference, but the former is suitable only when a short (5 min) incubation is used. Both reagents show linear calibration curves and yield virtually identical results.

  11. Human serum amyloid A protein. Behaviour in aqueous and urea-containing solutions and antibody production.

    PubMed

    Strachan, A F; Shephard, E G; Bellstedt, D U; Coetzee, G A; van der Westhuyzen, D R; de Beer, F C

    1989-10-15

    Human serum amyloid A protein (apo-SAA) can be prepared by gel filtration of delipidated acute-phase high-density lipoprotein in the presence of urea. The resultant apo-SAA is soluble (greater than 90% solubility) in a wide range of buffer solutions, with all of the six major isoforms of apo-SAA being equally soluble. In urea-containing solutions the isoforms behave qualitatively differently in various urea concentrations, probably reflecting subtle primary-structure variations. The higher-pI isoforms are only completely unfolded at greater than 7 M-urea. By immunizing with apo-SAA adsorbed to acid-treated bacteria (Salmonella minnesota R595), high-titre antibodies can easily be elicited in rabbits.

  12. A group 6 late embryogenesis abundant protein from common bean is a disordered protein with extended helical structure and oligomer-forming properties.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Najera, Lucero Y; Saab-Rincón, Gloria; Battaglia, Marina; Amero, Carlos; Pulido, Nancy O; García-Hernández, Enrique; Solórzano, Rosa M; Reyes, José L; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2014-11-14

    Late embryogenesis-abundant proteins accumulate to high levels in dry seeds. Some of them also accumulate in response to water deficit in vegetative tissues, which leads to a remarkable association between their presence and low water availability conditions. A major sub-group of these proteins, also known as typical LEA proteins, shows high hydrophilicity and a high percentage of glycine and other small amino acid residues, distinctive physicochemical properties that predict a high content of structural disorder. Although all typical LEA proteins share these characteristics, seven groups can be distinguished by sequence similarity, indicating structural and functional diversity among them. Some of these groups have been extensively studied; however, others require a more detailed analysis to advance in their functional understanding. In this work, we report the struc