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  1. Domestic violence

    MedlinePlus

    Intimate partner violence; Spousal abuse; Elder abuse; Child abuse; Sexual abuse - domestic violence ... Domestic violence can include any of these behaviors: Physical abuse, including hitting, kicking, biting, slapping, choking, or attacking with ...

  2. Spouse abuse and other domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Dickstein, L J

    1988-12-01

    Concern about the different forms of domestic violence continues to escalate. Beginning with identification of child abuse in the 1960s; spouse abuse, primarily of women, in the 1970s; and, most recently, identification of the rising incidence of elder abuse and neglect, the medical community, state, local, and federal governmental agencies and the public continue to promote joint programs to identify, guide to treatment, and simultaneously develop prevention and early intervention programs. Emphasis initially on the use of legal systems to stop, the abuse must almost be mandatory, because numerous studies show that treatment is most successful when abusers are forced to admit to themselves and others that they have, in fact, committed crimes. For women victims, safe refuge, self-help, and advocacy-support groups were found to be effective, whereas children first need the same protection and a great deal of empathy and explanation. Psychiatrists' roles lie in the important area of early diagnosis and treatment, as most domestic abuse victims do not readily admit to this violence, primarily out of shame, guilt, and fear. Numerous studies demonstrate that following a protocol with every patient, in every setting and under every circumstance, psychiatrists must ask about domestic violence when they least suspect it and when other diagnoses are obvious. The multiple etiologies include general sociocultural pressures, such as poverty and crowding, stereotypic sex role socialization, alcohol and drug abuse, history of head injury, and personal childhood abuse. Psychiatric treatment modalities must occur within a framework of acknowledging that domestic violence victims suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder. Psychiatrists can serve as leaders in coordinating multi-pronged treatment options for the victims: advocacy groups; alcohol and drug detoxification; and individual, couple, and family therapy. Psychiatrists can also serve as consultants, leaders, and educators

  3. Domestic Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... AQ FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ083 WOMEN’S HEALTH Domestic Violence • What is domestic violence? • What are the types of abuse? • How can ... available to help abused women? What is domestic violence? Domestic violence is a pattern of threatening or ...

  4. Domestic Violence

    MedlinePlus

    Domestic violence is a type of abuse. It usually involves a spouse or partner, but it can also be ... child, elderly relative, or other family member. Domestic violence may include Physical violence that can lead to ...

  5. Intersection of child abuse and children's exposure to domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Herrenkohl, Todd I; Sousa, Cynthia; Tajima, Emiko A; Herrenkohl, Roy C; Moylan, Carrie A

    2008-04-01

    This review addresses research on the overlap in physical child abuse and domestic violence, the prediction of child outcomes, and resilience in children exposed to family violence. The authors explore current findings on the intersection of physical child abuse and domestic violence within the context of other risk factors, including community violence and related family and environmental stressors. Evidence from the studies reviewed suggests considerable overlap, compounding effects, and possible gender differences in outcomes of violence exposure. The data indicate a need to apply a broad conceptualization of risk to the study of family violence and its effects on children. Further testing of competing theoretical models will advance understanding of the pathways through which exposure leads to later problems in youth, as well as protective factors and processes through which resilience unfolds.

  6. ADULTHOOD ANIMAL ABUSE AMONG MEN ARRESTED FOR DOMESTIC VIOLENCE

    PubMed Central

    Febres, Jeniimarie; Brasfield, Hope; Shorey, Ryan C.; Elmquist, Joanna; Ninnemann, Andrew; Schonbrun, Yael C.; Temple, Jeff R.; Recupero, Patricia R.; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2014-01-01

    Learning more about intimate partner violence (IPV) perpetrators could aid the development of more effective treatments. The prevalence of adulthood animal abuse (AAA) perpetration and its association with IPV perpetration, antisociality, and alcohol use in 307 men arrested for domestic violence was examined. 41% (n = 125) of the men committed at least one act of animal abuse since the age of 18, in contrast to the 3.0% prevalence rate reported by men in the general population. Controlling for antisociality and alcohol use, AAA showed a trend towards a significant association with physical and severe psychological IPV perpetration. PMID:25324474

  7. Adulthood animal abuse among men arrested for domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Febres, Jeniimarie; Brasfield, Hope; Shorey, Ryan C; Elmquist, Joanna; Ninnemann, Andrew; Schonbrun, Yael C; Temple, Jeff R; Recupero, Patricia R; Stuart, Gregory L

    2014-09-01

    Learning more about intimate partner violence (IPV), perpetrators could aid the development of more effective treatments. The prevalence of adulthood animal abuse (AAA) perpetration and its association with IPV perpetration, antisociality, and alcohol use in 307 men arrested for domestic violence were examined. Forty-one percent (n = 125) of the men committed at least one act of animal abuse since the age of 18, in contrast to the 1.5% prevalence rate reported by men in the general population. Controlling for antisociality and alcohol use, AAA showed a trend toward a significant association with physical and severe psychological IPV perpetration.

  8. Barriers to addressing substance abuse in domestic violence court.

    PubMed

    Riger, Stephanie; Bennett, Larry W; Sigurvinsdottir, Rannveig

    2014-03-01

    Substance abuse commonly co-occurs with intimate partner violence among both perpetrators and survivors. Specialized courts that focus on intimate partner violence provide a unique opportunity to address both problems simultaneously, but research has yet to identify whether this happens. In this qualitative study of a domestic violence court in a large midwestern metropolitan area, key informants were interviewed to understand how the Court treats substance abuse. Results indicate that substance abuse typically is not identified among perpetrators or survivors going through the Court unless it is mentioned in a police report. Barriers to such identification are the organization of the Court, bounded definition of actors' roles in the Court, limited resources, and negative attitudes towards survivors. These results suggest that specialized courts that attend to only one problem may overlook the possibility of addressing issues that commonly co-occur.

  9. Brainwashing and battering fatigue. Psychological abuse in domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Mega, L T; Mega, J L; Mega, B T; Harris, B M

    2000-01-01

    Intimate partner violence occurs often in the United States; it involves an interrelated combination of physical, sexual, and psychological abuse, usually directed against women. The psychological aspect deserves special attention because victims who lose their independence, self-esteem, and dignity tend to remain in abusive situations. The abuse is perpetrated by a domestic partner to maintain power and control in the relationship. To assert control, the abuser uses "brainwashing tactics" similar to those used on prisoners of war, hostages, or members of a cult. Common features of brainwashing include isolation, humiliation, accusation, and unpredictable attacks. The abusive environment produces real and anticipated fear, which contributes to the battered woman's belief that her situation is hopeless and that she must depend on her abuser. She develops coping strategies to deal with her oppressive environment, but eventually exhibits symptoms of "battering fatigue," similar to the battle fatigue of soldiers in combat who, like battered women, live in fear of being killed or severely injured. Recognizing the state of mind of these women can help us understand why it is difficult for them to flee their traumatic environment and why they may resort to suicide or homicide. For healthcare providers to screen and treat their patients adequately, it is imperative that they appreciate the complex and devastating psychological aspects of domestic violence.

  10. The Relationship between Domestic Violence and Animal Abuse: An Australian Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volant, Anne M.; Johnson, Judy A.; Gullone, Eleonora; Coleman, Grahame J.

    2008-01-01

    Several North American studies have found a connection between domestic violence and animal abuse. This article reports on the first Australian research to examine this connection. A group of 102 women recruited through 24 domestic violence services in the state of Victoria and a nondomestic violence comparison group (102 women) recruited from the…

  11. Domestic Violence and Child Abuse: A Selective Bibliography. Bibliography Series Eight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Mary Louise, Comp.

    This selective bibliography contains information on material dealing with domestic violence in the home with a special emphasis on child abuse, that may be obtained in the Robert E. Kennedy Library at California Polytechnic University. The bibliography is divided according to different forms of abuse, e.g., emotional child abuse, incest/sexual…

  12. Domestic Violence: Protecting Yourself and Your Children

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Domestic Violence: Protecting Yourself and Your Children Domestic Violence: Protecting Yourself and Your Children What is domestic violence? Domestic violence is abuse by a ...

  13. Writing the Male Abuser in Cultural Responses to Domestic Violence in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godsland, Shelley

    2012-01-01

    The article analyzes the portrayal of the male perpetrator of heterosexual domestic violence in a selection of contemporary Spanish texts (novel, drama, and autobiography) that form part of a clearly discernible cultural response to the issue of intimate partner violence in Spain today. It reads the figure of the abuser in conjunction with a range…

  14. Abused Women's Perspectives on the Criminal Justice System's Response to Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barata, Paula C.

    2007-01-01

    This study used Q methodology to better understand battered women's views about the criminal justice system (CJS). Fifty-eight abused and formerly abused women, representing a broad range of experiences, were involved in the study. Participants sorted 72 statements about domestic violence and the CJS according to how strongly they agreed with each…

  15. Themes of coping in the spectrum of domestic violence abuse: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Haeseler, Lisa Ann

    2013-01-01

    Women's coping experiences in the spectrum of domestic violence abuse are complex and multifaceted. The spectrum stages of abuse include when a woman is in, out, or returning to the abuse situation. In this article the author discusses the obstacles with which women cope and the service delivery initiatives to better serve women. The themes of women's coping in the spectrum of abuse for this research review include psycho-physiological, economic, education, family, and childcare factors. Service practitioners must fully recognize the factors with which women of abuse cope. Included are suggestions for service professionals aiding women to improve services as women utilize multiple services simultaneously.

  16. Substance Abuse Treatment and Domestic Violence. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Paddy; Gartner, Constance Grant; Markl, Lise; Henderson, Randi; Brooks, Margaret K.; Wesson, Donald; Dogoloff, Mary Lou; Vitzthum, Virginia; Hayes, Elizabeth

    The major goal of this TIP, on the best practice guidelines to improve the treatment of substance abuse, is to provide clinicians, educators, and paraprofessionals with the latest findings concerning domestic violence. The information is intended to educate providers about the needs and behaviors of batterers and survivors, and how to tailor…

  17. The process of adapting a universal dating abuse prevention program to adolescents exposed to domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Foshee, Vangie A; Dixon, Kimberly S; Ennett, Susan T; Moracco, Kathryn E; Bowling, J Michael; Chang, Ling-Yin; Moss, Jennifer L

    2015-07-01

    Adolescents exposed to domestic violence are at increased risk of dating abuse, yet no evaluated dating abuse prevention programs have been designed specifically for this high-risk population. This article describes the process of adapting Families for Safe Dates (FSD), an evidenced-based universal dating abuse prevention program, to this high-risk population, including conducting 12 focus groups and 107 interviews with the target audience. FSD includes six booklets of dating abuse prevention information, and activities for parents and adolescents to do together at home. We adapted FSD for mothers who were victims of domestic violence, but who no longer lived with the abuser, to do with their adolescents who had been exposed to the violence. Through the adaptation process, we learned that families liked the program structure and valued being offered the program and that some of our initial assumptions about this population were incorrect. We identified practices and beliefs of mother victims and attributes of these adolescents that might increase their risk of dating abuse that we had not previously considered. In addition, we learned that some of the content of the original program generated negative family interactions for some. The findings demonstrate the utility of using a careful process to adapt evidence-based interventions (EBIs) to cultural sub-groups, particularly the importance of obtaining feedback on the program from the target audience. Others can follow this process to adapt EBIs to groups other than the ones for which the original EBI was designed.

  18. Domestic Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... to anyone regardless of race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender. Domestic violence affects people of all ... ABOUT The Attorney General Budget & Performance Strategic Plans History AGENCIES BUSINESS Business Opportunities Small & Disadvantaged Business Grants ...

  19. Practitioner perspectives of the economic coping experiences of women of domestic violence abuse.

    PubMed

    Haeseler, Lisa Ann

    2013-01-01

    Through this case study the author investigates women's coping experiences with economic challenges in the spectrum of domestic violence abuse. Women of abuse cope with financial difficulties compounded by other ecologically contributing factors. Eight non-abused, social service practitioners from four different agencies, two providers per agency, described the economic coping experiences of women of abuse they serve. Comprehensive and interdisciplinary care is necessary to meet women's multifaceted, complex economic needs. Study results corroborate with research. Service delivery of care for women of abuse coping with family, schooling, and economic hardships are enhanced through schools and service agencies working together, collaborating networking, and sharing of resources in order to better advocate for women and children.

  20. The Effects of Child Abuse and Exposure to Domestic Violence on Adolescent Internalizing and Externalizing Behavior Problems.

    PubMed

    Moylan, Carrie A; Herrenkohl, Todd I; Sousa, Cindy; Tajima, Emiko A; Herrenkohl, Roy C; Russo, M Jean

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effects of child abuse and domestic violence exposure in childhood on adolescent internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Data for this analysis are from the Lehigh Longitudinal Study, a prospective study of 457 youth addressing outcomes of family violence and resilience in individuals and families. Results show that child abuse, domestic violence, and both in combination (i.e., dual exposure) increase a child's risk for internalizing and externalizing outcomes in adolescence. When accounting for risk factors associated with additional stressors in the family and surrounding environment, only those children with dual exposure had an elevated risk of the tested outcomes compared to non-exposed youth. However, while there were some observable differences in the prediction of outcomes for children with dual exposure compared to those with single exposure (i.e., abuse only or exposure to domestic violence only), these difference were not statistically significant. Analyses showed that the effects of exposure for boys and girls are statistically comparable.

  1. Domestic Violence and Abuse in Intimate Relationship from Public Health Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rakovec-Felser, Zlatka

    2014-01-01

    In this article we pay attention to the violence which, due to the fear of social stigma, could be hidden from the public eye for a long time but could have serious health consequences for the individual, family, and society – physical and psychological forms of domestic violence and abuse in male-female intimate relationship. Besides its nature and extent data in general population, we review also the surveys data about its theoretical basis, its risk factors and possible effects on mental and physical health, not only on in conflicts involved partners, but also on family as a whole, and especially on the children that growing up in such a problematic domestic circumstances. PMID:26973948

  2. Perceptions of Domestic Violence: The Effects of Domestic Violence Myths, Victim's Relationship with Her Abuser, and the Decision to Return to Her Abuser

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamawaki, Niwako; Ochoa-Shipp, Monica; Pulsipher, Craig; Harlos, Andrew; Swindler, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Researchers in this study examined the attitudes toward domestic violence, the victim, and her perpetrator. A total of 194 participants were randomly assigned to one of 4 hypothetical scenarios to evaluate how observers' perceptions were influenced by their own sex and myths about domestic violence, by the victim's decision to return to the…

  3. Domestic violence in America.

    PubMed

    Bash, K L; Jones, F

    1994-09-01

    Domestic violence is an underrecognized problem of immense cost. It is a crime; its victims must be identified and protected. The medical and judicial communities share responsibility in addressing this issue and providing support for victims. The role of health care workers in recognizing and preventing domestic violence cannot be overestimated. Direct questioning of patients, especially about the source of any injuries and about safety at home, is the first step in uncovering abuse. Educational programs for health care providers and the general public can change society's view and tolerance of this problem. Physicians must take an active role in changing community attitudes about domestic violence and in instituting programs to reduce its incidence. Medical treatment of the injuries resulting from domestic violence is not sufficient. Abused women need the care of a team of professionals who can address psychological, emotional, and physical injuries. They must also be provided with safe housing and financial and legal assistance in order to escape the abusive relationship. Physicians and legislators must work together to effect change. Domestic violence is a public health menace. We need to break the cycle of abuse that has become an integral part of our society.

  4. The effects of moms and teens for safe dates: a dating abuse prevention program for adolescents exposed to domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Foshee, Vangie A; Benefield, Thad; Dixon, Kimberly S; Chang, Ling-Yin; Senkomago, Virginia; Ennett, Susan T; Moracco, Kathryn E; Michael Bowling, J

    2015-05-01

    Adolescents exposed to domestic violence are at high risk for dating abuse. This randomized controlled trial evaluated a dating abuse prevention program designed specifically for this risk group. Moms and Teens for Safe Dates consisted of six mailed booklets of dating abuse prevention information and interactive activities. Mothers who had been victims of domestic violence but no longer lived with the abuser delivered the program to their adolescents who had been exposed to the abuse. Mother and adolescent pairs (N = 409) were recruited through community advertising; the adolescents ranged from 12 to 16 years old and 64 % were female. Mothers and adolescents completed baseline and 6-month follow-up telephone interviews. Booklet completion in the treatment group ranged from 80 % for the first to 62 % for the last booklet. The analyses first tested whether program effects on dating abuse varied by four a priori identified moderators (mother's psychological health, the amount of adolescent exposure to domestic violence, and adolescent sex and race/ethnicity). Main effects of the program were examined when there were no differential program effects. Program effects on psychological and physical victimization and psychological and cyber perpetration were moderated by the amount of adolescent exposure to domestic violence; there were significant favorable program effects for adolescents with higher, but not lower levels of exposure to domestic violence. There were no moderated or main effects on sexual violence victimization and perpetration or cyber victimization. The findings suggest that a dating abuse prevention program designed for adolescents exposed to domestic violence can have important positive effects. PMID:25776110

  5. The effects of moms and teens for safe dates: a dating abuse prevention program for adolescents exposed to domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Foshee, Vangie A; Benefield, Thad; Dixon, Kimberly S; Chang, Ling-Yin; Senkomago, Virginia; Ennett, Susan T; Moracco, Kathryn E; Michael Bowling, J

    2015-05-01

    Adolescents exposed to domestic violence are at high risk for dating abuse. This randomized controlled trial evaluated a dating abuse prevention program designed specifically for this risk group. Moms and Teens for Safe Dates consisted of six mailed booklets of dating abuse prevention information and interactive activities. Mothers who had been victims of domestic violence but no longer lived with the abuser delivered the program to their adolescents who had been exposed to the abuse. Mother and adolescent pairs (N = 409) were recruited through community advertising; the adolescents ranged from 12 to 16 years old and 64 % were female. Mothers and adolescents completed baseline and 6-month follow-up telephone interviews. Booklet completion in the treatment group ranged from 80 % for the first to 62 % for the last booklet. The analyses first tested whether program effects on dating abuse varied by four a priori identified moderators (mother's psychological health, the amount of adolescent exposure to domestic violence, and adolescent sex and race/ethnicity). Main effects of the program were examined when there were no differential program effects. Program effects on psychological and physical victimization and psychological and cyber perpetration were moderated by the amount of adolescent exposure to domestic violence; there were significant favorable program effects for adolescents with higher, but not lower levels of exposure to domestic violence. There were no moderated or main effects on sexual violence victimization and perpetration or cyber victimization. The findings suggest that a dating abuse prevention program designed for adolescents exposed to domestic violence can have important positive effects.

  6. Mother abuse: a matter of youth justice, child welfare or domestic violence?

    PubMed

    Hunter, Caroline; Nixon, Judy; Parr, Sadie

    2010-01-01

    International evidence suggests that in advanced welfare states the abuse of parents, most particularly mothers, by their (most frequently male) adolescent children is increasingly prevalent. In the United Kingdom, however, child-to-mother abuse remains one of the most under-acknowledged and under-researched forms of family violence. Although it is an issue shrouded in silence, stigma, and shame, the authors' work in the youth justice sphere, focusing on interventions to deal with anti-social behaviour, suggests that adolescent violence toward mothers is a topical and prevalent issue. We identify different ways of conceptualizing it in the policy realms of youth justice, child welfare, and domestic violence. The behaviour of both child/young person and mother is constructed in ways which inform the assignment of blame and responsibility. The paper highlights the silence that surrounds the issue in both the policy and wider academic spheres, hiding the failure of service providers to respond to this very destructive form of intimate interpersonal violence.

  7. Longitudinal measurement of cortisol in association with mental health and experience of domestic violence and abuse: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Domestic violence and abuse is threatening behavior, violence/abuse used by one person to control the other within an intimate or family-type relationship. Women experience more severe physical and sexual domestic violence and abuse and more mental health consequences than men. The current study aims at exploring of the role of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis activity in abuse impact on women's mental health. Study objectives: 1) To evaluate diurnal cortisol slope, cortisol awakening response, and the mean cortisol concentration in women with a current or recent experience of abuse; 2) To estimate whether cortisol secretion is associated with type, severity, duration and cessation of abuse; 3) To investigate whether cortisol acts as mediator between abuse and mental health condition; 4) To examine whether there is any distinction in cortisol levels between those women exposed to both childhood abuse and domestic violence and abuse and those experienced only the latter. 4) To explore whether cortisol secretion differs between women living in refuge and those still living in the community. Methods/Design To meet study objectives 128 women will be recruited in a domestic violence agency and local communities. Baseline and 3-month follow-up measures will be taken over 6 months after recruitment. Each assessment will include: (1) standardized self-administered questionnaires to evaluate socio-demographics, experience of violence and abuse, mental and physical health; (2) weight and height measurement; (3) self-completion of wakening, post-wakening and evening saliva samples. Saliva will be analysed for cortisol and cortisone using Ultra performance liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry. We will compare diurnal cortisol parameters between non-abused controls and abuse survivors with and without mental health conditions. First following descriptive statistics for all the cortisol and mental health outcomes, relationships between them

  8. Paraprofessional Home Visitors' Perspectives on Addressing Poor Mental Health, Substance Abuse, and Domestic Violence: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandon, S. Darius; Mercer, Constance D.; Saylor, Elizabeth L.; Duggan, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    This research was conducted to understand paraprofessional home visitors' perceptions of their training in addressing poor mental health, substance abuse, and domestic violence, and their actions in working with families in addressing these issues. Five focus groups were conducted with a total of 28 paraprofessional home visitors. Three main…

  9. The Impact of Childhood Abuse History and Domestic Violence on the Mental Health of Women in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Okuyama, Makiko; Izumi, Mayuko; Osada, Yukiko

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To understand the independent and interactive effects of childhood abuse history (CAH) and domestic violence (DV) on the mental health status of women in Japan. Methods: A self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted among a sample of 340 women staying in 83 Mother-Child Homes in Japan to assess the women's CAH and DV…

  10. Domestic Violence. Technical Assistance Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    Substance abuse has long been recognized as a precipitating factor in many domestic violence incidents. The main type of substance abuse is alcohol usage. Forty-six percent of the offenders reported being dependent on or abusing alcohol, while another 28% were found to be dependent on opiates, cocaine, marijuana, or inhalants. Nearly two-fifths of…

  11. The perpetrators of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Romans, S E; Poore, M R; Martin, J L

    2000-11-01

    There has been little useful research in recent years into those who perpetrate domestic violence. Domestic violence is always anchored in a social context in which the aspirations of men and women are dealt with unequally. The majority of perpetrators of domestic violence are men. Perpetrators are often young, troubled, unemployed, and of low self-esteem; they have often experienced abuse (of various types) themselves. However, these factors do not justify their abusive behaviour. General practitioners and other health workers have a responsibility to broach the subject of domestic violence with both perpetrators and victims. They are in a key position to break the silence that allows it to continue. Programs for stopping domestic violence can be effective for those who are motivated to change their behaviour and see the programs through to completion.

  12. Gun Violence: Making Connections with Suicide, Domestic Violence, and Substance Abuse. Join Together Action Kit, Spring 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Join Together, Boston, MA.

    Frequently, firearm fatalities occur in the context of domestic violence, suicide, or acts committed under the influence of alcohol and/or other drugs. Because gun violence is related to these other social problems, it must be considered more than just a criminal justice issue. It is also a public health issue that should be addressed by domestic…

  13. Promoting domestic violence education for nurses.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, M; Weber, J R

    1998-01-01

    Domestic violence is one of the major health problems facing families today. Women in rural areas often are an overlooked population at high risk for this problem. Domestic violence is a concern for women, who may be patients or healthcare workers. Teaching about domestic violence is a very sensitive issue because it is often difficult for the abused to admit or confront that she is being abused. The authors developed an effective interactive workshop to teach nurses how to assess and intervene with women who have experienced domestic violence.

  14. Multi-perpetrator domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Salter, Michael

    2014-04-01

    A significant proportion of reports of domestic violence against women involve multiple perpetrators. Although the number of perpetrators has been consistently identified as a measure of abuse severity, only a minority of studies of domestic violence examine the role of multiple offenders. Data on multi-perpetrator domestic violence (MDV) is frequently removed from analysis in domestic violence studies, or multi-perpetrator incidents are treated as single-perpetrator incidents. However, the available research links MDV to negative mental and physical health outcomes, intimate partner homicide, homelessness among women, and severe mental illness and suicidality. This article reviews the available prevalence data on MDV and draws together research on the contexts in which MDV takes place. It highlights two groups that are particularly vulnerable to MDV: (1) girls and women partnered to members of gangs and organized crime groups and (2) girls and women in some ethnic minority communities. While discussions of honor in relation to domestic violence are often racialized in Western media, this article highlights the cross-cultural role of masculine honor in collective violence against women in the working class and impoverished communities of majority cultures as well as in migrant and ethnic minority communities. It is clear that such complex forms of violence present a range of challenges for intervention and treatment and the article emphasizes the need for specialized and coordinated modes of investigation, support, and care. PMID:24217092

  15. Multi-perpetrator domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Salter, Michael

    2014-04-01

    A significant proportion of reports of domestic violence against women involve multiple perpetrators. Although the number of perpetrators has been consistently identified as a measure of abuse severity, only a minority of studies of domestic violence examine the role of multiple offenders. Data on multi-perpetrator domestic violence (MDV) is frequently removed from analysis in domestic violence studies, or multi-perpetrator incidents are treated as single-perpetrator incidents. However, the available research links MDV to negative mental and physical health outcomes, intimate partner homicide, homelessness among women, and severe mental illness and suicidality. This article reviews the available prevalence data on MDV and draws together research on the contexts in which MDV takes place. It highlights two groups that are particularly vulnerable to MDV: (1) girls and women partnered to members of gangs and organized crime groups and (2) girls and women in some ethnic minority communities. While discussions of honor in relation to domestic violence are often racialized in Western media, this article highlights the cross-cultural role of masculine honor in collective violence against women in the working class and impoverished communities of majority cultures as well as in migrant and ethnic minority communities. It is clear that such complex forms of violence present a range of challenges for intervention and treatment and the article emphasizes the need for specialized and coordinated modes of investigation, support, and care.

  16. Early detection and prevention of domestic violence using the Women Abuse Screening Tool (WAST) in primary health care clinics in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Yut-Lin, Wong; Othman, Sajaratulnisah

    2008-01-01

    Despite being an emergent major public health problem, little research has been done on domestic violence from the perspectives of early detection and prevention. Thus, this cross-sectional study was conducted to identify domestic violence among female adult patients attending health centers at the primary care level and to determine the relationship between social correlates of adult patients and domestic violence screening and subsequent help/health-seeking behavior if abused. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with 710 female adult patients from 8 health centers in Selangor who matched the inclusion criteria and consented to participate in the study, using a structured questionnaire that included adaptation of a validated 8-item Women Abuse Screening Tool (WAST). Statistical tests showed significant differences in ethnicity, income, and education between those screened positive and those screened negative for domestic violence. Of the participants, 92.4% reported that during consultations, doctors had never asked them whether they were abused by their husband/partner. Yet, 67.3% said they would voluntarily tell the doctor if they were abused by their husband/partner. The findings indicate that primary care has an important role in identifying domestic violence by applying the WAST screening tool, or an appropriate adaptation, with women patients during routine visits to the various health centers. Such assessment for abuse could be secondary prevention for the abused women, but more important, it will serve as primary prevention for nonabused women. This approach not only will complement the existing 1-stop crisis center policy by the Ministry of Health that copes with crisis intervention but also will spearhead efforts toward prevention of domestic violence in Malaysia.

  17. Domestic Violence against Married Women in Cambodia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yount, Kathryn M.; Carrera, Jennifer S.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluate the effects of marital resources and early-life experiences on recent domestic violence and attitudes about wife abuse among 2,074 married Cambodian women. Household standard of living was negatively associated with physical domestic violence. Women with 8-13 fewer years of schooling than their husbands more often experienced physical…

  18. Domestic Violence during Pregnancy in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahapatro, Meerambika; Gupta, R. N.; Gupta, Vinay; Kundu, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence can result in many negative health consequences for women's health and well-being. Studies on domestic violence illustrate that abused women in various settings had increased health problems such as injury, chronic pain, gastrointestinal, and gynecological signs including sexually transmitted diseases, depression, and…

  19. Longitudinal study on the effects of child abuse and children's exposure to domestic violence, parent-child attachments, and antisocial behavior in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cindy; Herrenkohl, Todd I; Moylan, Carrie A; Tajima, Emiko A; Klika, J Bart; Herrenkohl, Roy C; Russo, M Jean

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the unique and combined effects of child abuse and children's exposure to domestic violence on later attachment to parents and antisocial behavior during adolescence. Analyses also investigated whether the interaction of exposure and low attachment predicted youth outcomes. Findings suggest that, although youth dually exposed to abuse and domestic violence were less attached to parents in adolescence than those who were not exposed, for those who were abused only and those who were exposed only to domestic violence, the relationship between exposure types and youth outcomes did not differ by level of attachment to parents. However, stronger bonds of attachment to parents in adolescence did appear to predict a lower risk of antisocial behavior independent of exposure status. Preventing child abuse and children's exposure to domestic violence could lessen the risk of antisocial behavior during adolescence, as could strengthening parent-child attachments in adolescence. However, strengthening attachments between parents and children after exposure may not be sufficient to counter the negative impact of earlier violence trauma in children.

  20. Domestic Abuse in Behshahr, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rahmatian, Ali Akbar; Hosseini, Seyyed Ali Asghar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The United Nations in a resolution defined abuse as any violent act that is primarily or exclusively committed against females and results in physical, sexual and psychological harm. Objectives: The aim of this research was to study the contributing factors of husband’s violence against females residing in the city of Behshahr, Iran. Materials and Methods: We distributed a specifically designed questionnaire among 380 married females aged between 15 and 65 years. According to the Morgan table, the subjects were randomly selected from a list of 301000 females. Demographic data and data on spouse abuse were then analyzed using the SPSS software, Spearman and Pearson correlation coefficients. According to Cronbach’s alpha, the reliability of the questionnaire was 0.96. Results: All of the females reported at least one form of violence within the past year, with R square 0.20, indicating that the independent variable can explain 20% of the violence against females. years of marriage, female’s education, male’s addiction and the number of children each had their share in the explanation of violence against females. Conclusions: This study revealed a high prevalence of domestic violence in the sample population. Violence existed among all ages, social categories and male occupational groups, and also involved both employed and unemployed females. The situation regarding domestic abuse is similar worldwide. PMID:26834799

  1. Women who experience domestic violence and women survivors of childhood sexual abuse: a survey of health professionals' attitudes and clinical practice.

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, J; Feder, G; Eldridge, S; Chung, W S; Coid, J; Moorey, S

    2001-01-01

    Health professionals do not wish to routinely screen women for a history of domestic violence or childhood sexual abuse. However, over 80% believe that these are significant health care issues. Routine screening should not be prioritised until evidence of benefit has been established. PMID:11407053

  2. Longitudinal Study on the Effects of Child Abuse and Children's Exposure to Domestic Violence, Parent-Child Attachments, and Antisocial Behavior in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sousa, Cindy; Herrenkohl, Todd I.; Moylan, Carrie A.; Tajima, Emiko A.; Klika, J. Bart; Herrenkohl, Roy C.; Russo, M. Jean

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the unique and combined effects of child abuse and children's exposure to domestic violence on later attachment to parents and antisocial behavior during adolescence. Analyses also investigated whether the interaction of exposure and low attachment predicted youth outcomes. Findings suggest that, although youth dually exposed…

  3. Rural Domestic Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... Protective Orders Effective in Stopping or Reducing Partner Violence , they examine urban and rural differences in the community context of ... The impact of civil protective orders on reducing violence and abuse did not differ ... women. Community-level barriers to enforce civil protective ...

  4. Coordinated Community Intervention for Domestic Violence: The Effects of Arrest and Prosecution on Recidivism of Woman Abuse Perpetrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolman, Richard M.; Weisz, Arlene

    1995-01-01

    Reports results of a study on the effectiveness of a coordinated community intervention to reduce domestic violence in DuPage County, IL. Logistic regression analysis indicated that arrest significantly deterred subsequent domestic violence incidents over an 18-month follow-up period, especially with those with a previous history of police…

  5. Domestic violence in Iranian infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhan, Zohre; Ozgoli, Giti; Azar, Mahyar; Alavimajd, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Millions of men and women suffer from infertility worldwide. In many cultures, infertile women are at risk of social and emotional problems. Infertility may affect the public health in many countries. Domestic violence is the intentional use of physical force, power or threat against oneself, another person or another group or community which leads to injury, death, mental harm, lack of development or deprivation. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of domestic violence against infertile women who referred to the infertility centres of Tehran, Iran in 2011. Methods: This was cross- sectional descriptive study conducted on 400 infertile women who were selected through convenient sampling method. The questionnaire used in this study included two sections: a demographic section with questions about demographic characteristics of the infertile women and their husbands; and the domestic violence questionnaire with questions about physical, emotional and sexual violence. Data were analysed by SPSS16; descriptive statistics, Spearman’s test, t- test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and logistic regression were used for data analysis. Results: Four hundred women with the average age of 30.50 ± 6.16 years participated in the study; of whom, 34.7% experienced domestic violence physical violence (5.3%), emotional violence (74.3%) and sexual violence (47.3%). Domestic violence was significantly associated with unwanted marriage, number of IVFs, drug abuse, emotional status of the women, smoking and addiction or drug abuse of the spouse, mental and physical diseases of the husband (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Many of the current problems in this society, particularly in families are due to the transition of the society from a traditional model to a modern one. The majority of the infertile women experience violence in Iran. Domestic violence against infertile women is a problem that should not be ignored. Clinicians should identify abused women. Providing

  6. Child protective services and domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Findlater, J E; Kelly, S

    1999-01-01

    Studies estimate that domestic violence is present in at least one-third of the families involved in child protective services (CPS). Yet, until recently, CPS has not directly addressed domestic violence in its handling of child abuse and neglect cases. By the same token, domestic violence programs have historically emphasized services for battered women, with limited understanding of the child safety goals of CPS. Despite these historical differences, collaborative efforts between CPS and domestic violence service programs are emerging based on a common goal of safety from violence for all family members. Innovative strategies include the use of domestic violence specialists in a variety of child protection settings for case consultation and for support to the battered women, direct referrals of battered women from domestic violence programs to family preservation services, and cross-training of CPS workers and domestic violence service providers. A survey of state CPS administrators and domestic violence coalition directors conducted for this article revealed that although there is mutual interest in greater collaboration, such efforts remain limited. New forums, such as CPS citizen review panels and community-based CPS partnerships, hold promise for further collaboration. Critical to successful strategies are supportive agency leadership, greater trust and understanding across systems, a recognition of common goals, and a willingness to change policies and practice.

  7. Domestic Violence and the Impact on Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zinke, Michelle; Zinke, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Domestic violence can be described as a pattern of intentional behaviors that includes a variety of tactics, such as physical and sexual violence, stalking, threats/intimidation, isolation, psychological attacks, and spiritual and economic abuse. Domestic violence can happen to anyone. It does not discriminate on the basis of economic status,…

  8. Domestic violence among Iraqi refugees in Syria.

    PubMed

    Tappis, Hannah; Biermann, Elizabeth; Glass, Nancy; Tileva, Margarita; Doocy, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    A domestic violence questionnaire was administered to 701 adult females in a sample of 813 Iraqi households in Syria; unmarried women and women whose husbands were away were excluded, yielding a final sample of 486. Lifetime physical, verbal, or emotional abuse was reported by 30%, and approximately 20% experienced abuse within the past year. Non-Damascus residence, children <18 years in the household, no financial challenges upon arrival, and borrowing money in Syria were associated with increased risk of domestic violence within the past year. Support services are inadequate and should be expanded; and longer-term prevention measures also should be implemented.

  9. [Nursing discourse on domestic violence in Taiwan].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Joh-Jong

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to perform a critical appraisal of nursing discourses on domestic violence published in journals between 1999 and 2007 in Taiwan. All searched materials were retrieved from official websites using key words "domestic violence" or "marital violence". Ten related articles were obtained in all. The most significant finding was related to autonomic nursing intervention, which can effectively meet the needs of abused women. Such an approach differs from traditional order-based nursing activities in the patriarchal practicum of medical teams and offers a promising way to reform medical team hierarchies.

  10. Domestic violence and consanguineous marriages - perspective from Rawalpindi, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, M Ali; Kayani, A; Shaikh, I Ali

    2014-01-01

    Domestic violence is globally endemic and adversely impacts the health and economic well-being of women and society. This study used the standardized and validated assessment instrument "Woman Abuse Screening Tool" to study the prevalence of various forms of domestic violence among married women. The relationship between domestic violence and consanguineous marriage was studied using the chi-squared test. Cumulatively, 1010 married women were interviewed. Emotional abuse was the most commonly reported abuse, reported by 721 (71.4%) women as either often or sometimes, followed by sexual abuse and physical abuse, reported by 527 (52.2%) and 511 (50.6%) respectively. Being married to one's cousin did not protect married women from being abused either emotionally or physically by their husbands; thsi was statistically significant. There is a need for better understanding of the magnitude and scale of domestic violence in Pakistan by using standardized assessment tools for meaningful comparisons across different parts of the country over time.

  11. Exposure to Interpersonal Violence as a Predictor of PTSD Symptomatology in Domestic Violence Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffing, Sascha; Lewis, Carla S.; Chu, Melissa; Sage, Robert E.; Madry, Lorraine; Primm, Beny J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the interrelationships between childhood abuse, exposure to maternal domestic violence, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology in a multiethnic sample of 111 adult female residents of a domestic violence (DV) shelter. Participants completed structured interviews about the DV and their prior violence exposure,…

  12. Innovative Strategies to Help Families Cope with the Effects of Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haeseler, Lisa Ann

    2011-01-01

    Women and children coping with issues of domestic violence abuse urgently require help from early childhood professionals. The U.S. Department of Justice (2008) details these women and children are in peril. This article focuses on female domestic violence abuse. It presents some warning signs of domestic violence. It also offers steps on how to…

  13. Domestic Violence Encountered among Kurdish Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Sirwan Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Background and objective; There is growing recognition that violence against women has a large public health impact, in addition to being a gross violation of women's human rights. The study's aims were: To show the types of domestic abuse encountered by Kurdish women, and study the relationship between them. Methods; The study conducted in the…

  14. Domestic violence. Risk factors and outcomes.

    PubMed Central

    Berrios, D. C.; Grady, D.

    1991-01-01

    Domestic violence is a pervasive and frequently unrecognized cause of injury among women. We reviewed data from standardized interviews with 218 women who presented to an emergency department with injuries due to domestic violence. Victims ranged in age from 16 to 66 years and constituted a wide range of socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds. Domestic violence often resulted in severe injury; 28% of the women interviewed required admission to hospital for injuries, and 13% required major surgical treatment. The typical presentation was injuries to the face, skull, eyes, extremities, and upper torso. A third of the cases involved a weapon, such as a knife, club, or gun. In all, 10% of the victims were pregnant at the time of abuse, and 10% reported that their children had also been abused by the batterer. Most victims (86%) had suffered at least one previous incident of abuse, and about 40% had previously required medical care for abuse. Victim recognition and referral to appropriate agencies could be improved if primary care physicians were more aware of the prevalence, severity, frequency of occurrence, and typical presentation of domestic violence. PMID:1926841

  15. Domestic violence: impact on psychiatric medicine.

    PubMed

    Owens, P L

    1995-10-01

    The 1984 Attorney General's Task Force Report on Domestic Violence attested: Anyone who lives in a violent home experiences an essential loss. The one place on earth where they should feel safe and secure has become a place of danger...the shadow of domestic violence has fallen across their lives and they are forever changed. One report states that the victims of the crime of domestic violence include "not only the people who die from injuries, but the family members who daily endure the psychological, emotional and spiritual abuse and pass on the emotional scars and violent behavior to one generation after another." If we are to stop this cycle of violence, we as physicians must step forward and assume our personal and professional responsibilities. PMID:7474954

  16. Clinical Implications in Healing from Domestic Violence: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Mlki

    2004-01-01

    Violence against women by their intimate partners continues to be widespread today. Practicing psychologists who treat female clients will see the consequences of immediate and long-term emotional effects of abuse. The author uses a psychologist's personal story of domestic violence and healing from abuse to illustrate the psychological issues and…

  17. Reducing symbolic-violence in the research encounter: collaborating with a survivor of domestic abuse in a qualitative study in UK primary care.

    PubMed

    Malpass, Alice; Sales, Kim; Feder, Gene

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores ideas of symbolic violence inherent in the research encounter (Bourdieu 1999). After defining symbolic violence and how the concept enters into domestic violence and abuse (DVA) research, we discuss the challenges arising from a (DVA) survivor taking on the role of interviewer in a qualitative study nested within a UK primary care based trial: IRIS (Identification and Referral to Improve Safety). KS, a survivor of DVA, conducted interviews with 12 women who had been referred to a domestic violence agency by primary care clinicians taking part in the IRIS trial in two UK cities (Bristol and east London) during 2009. Field notes were kept during all of the research meetings with KS and these were included in analysis. Our analysis maps the research pathway of 'non-violent communication' and discusses the role of social symmetry and proximity in the research encounter. We conclude that while a welcoming disposition, empathy and active listening are all generic skills to qualitative research; if a researcher can enter fieldwork with a claim of social proximity and symmetry, their use of these generic skills is enhanced through a process of shared objectification and empowerment talk. We explore the limitations of social proximity, its relationship to feminist and anthropological theories of 'insider' research and its relevance to primary care research.

  18. Reducing symbolic-violence in the research encounter: collaborating with a survivor of domestic abuse in a qualitative study in UK primary care.

    PubMed

    Malpass, Alice; Sales, Kim; Feder, Gene

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores ideas of symbolic violence inherent in the research encounter (Bourdieu 1999). After defining symbolic violence and how the concept enters into domestic violence and abuse (DVA) research, we discuss the challenges arising from a (DVA) survivor taking on the role of interviewer in a qualitative study nested within a UK primary care based trial: IRIS (Identification and Referral to Improve Safety). KS, a survivor of DVA, conducted interviews with 12 women who had been referred to a domestic violence agency by primary care clinicians taking part in the IRIS trial in two UK cities (Bristol and east London) during 2009. Field notes were kept during all of the research meetings with KS and these were included in analysis. Our analysis maps the research pathway of 'non-violent communication' and discusses the role of social symmetry and proximity in the research encounter. We conclude that while a welcoming disposition, empathy and active listening are all generic skills to qualitative research; if a researcher can enter fieldwork with a claim of social proximity and symmetry, their use of these generic skills is enhanced through a process of shared objectification and empowerment talk. We explore the limitations of social proximity, its relationship to feminist and anthropological theories of 'insider' research and its relevance to primary care research. PMID:26403218

  19. [Domestic violence: any progress?].

    PubMed

    Henrion, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of the French national survey of violence against women in 2000, the fight against domestic violence has made steady progress. Knowledge of the phenomenon has significantly improved. A nationwide study of murders and manslaughters perpetrated by one partner of a couple against the other has been published annually since 2006. In 2012, domestic violence resulted in the deaths of 314 persons: 166 women, 31 men, 25 children, 9 collateral victims, 14 rivals, and two former spouses killed by their ex-fathers in law. In addition, 67 perpetrators committed suicide (51 men and3 women). The number of victims fluctuates from year to year but has remained fairly stable since 2006 (n=168). Legislation has improved significantly: eight new laws have been passed since 2004, all designed to protect women and to ensure that violent men are restrained and treated. New measures to inform and protect women have been implemented and others have been improved, such as the anonymous helpline (phone no 3919, "domestic violence information"). An inter-ministerial committee on the protection of women from violence and the prevention of human trafficking (MIPROF) was created on 3 January 2013. A website entitled "Stop violence against women " (Stop violences faites aux femmes) is now available. The "Imminent Danger" mobile phone system, designed to alert police if a suspected or known perpetrator breaches restraint conditions, will be extended to the entire country from January 2014. Referees charged with coordinating comprehensive long-tern care of women victims have been deployed at the county level. Information centers on the rights of women and families (CIDFF) now form a local nationwide network. Routine interviews with a midwife during the fourth month of pregnancy, focusing on the woman's emotional, economic and social conditions, have been implemented in 21 % of maternity units and should gradually be generalized. The authorities who have enforced the law have

  20. [Domestic violence: any progress?].

    PubMed

    Henrion, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Since the publication of the French national survey of violence against women in 2000, the fight against domestic violence has made steady progress. Knowledge of the phenomenon has significantly improved. A nationwide study of murders and manslaughters perpetrated by one partner of a couple against the other has been published annually since 2006. In 2012, domestic violence resulted in the deaths of 314 persons: 166 women, 31 men, 25 children, 9 collateral victims, 14 rivals, and two former spouses killed by their ex-fathers in law. In addition, 67 perpetrators committed suicide (51 men and3 women). The number of victims fluctuates from year to year but has remained fairly stable since 2006 (n=168). Legislation has improved significantly: eight new laws have been passed since 2004, all designed to protect women and to ensure that violent men are restrained and treated. New measures to inform and protect women have been implemented and others have been improved, such as the anonymous helpline (phone no 3919, "domestic violence information"). An inter-ministerial committee on the protection of women from violence and the prevention of human trafficking (MIPROF) was created on 3 January 2013. A website entitled "Stop violence against women " (Stop violences faites aux femmes) is now available. The "Imminent Danger" mobile phone system, designed to alert police if a suspected or known perpetrator breaches restraint conditions, will be extended to the entire country from January 2014. Referees charged with coordinating comprehensive long-tern care of women victims have been deployed at the county level. Information centers on the rights of women and families (CIDFF) now form a local nationwide network. Routine interviews with a midwife during the fourth month of pregnancy, focusing on the woman's emotional, economic and social conditions, have been implemented in 21 % of maternity units and should gradually be generalized. The authorities who have enforced the law have

  1. Hope and Healing for Children Affected by Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polites, Andrea; Kuchar, Karen; Bigelow, Shauna

    2010-01-01

    Domestic violence is a devastating social problem that leaves an enduring, negative impact on all family members, especially the victims and their children. The costs to children and to society as a whole are enormous. Children who have witnessed domestic violence or have been threatened or abused by a parent are at great risk for emotional and…

  2. Sex Disparities in Arrest Outcomes for Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Melissa; Worthen, Meredith G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence arrests have been historically focused on protecting women and children from abusive men. Arrest patterns continue to reflect this bias with more men arrested for domestic violence compared to women. Such potential gender variations in arrest patterns pave the way to the investigation of disparities by sex of the offender in…

  3. [Domestic violence: a bibliographic and bibliometric review].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Franco, Luís; López-Cepero, Javier; Rodríguez Díaz, Francisco Javier

    2009-05-01

    Violence among relatives and emotionally linked people has recently made a huge social impact. Professionals have suggested diverse concepts to explain the issue, but they have not yet reached an agreement about these concepts. The present work focuses on the scientific yield associated with the keywords "Domestic Violence", perhaps the most commonly used to refer to violence in romantic couples. A series of related publications is analyzed and data about publication years, countries, languages, sample genders, age groups, most prolific journals and authors, and victim-abuser relationships is provided, along with a reflection upon the correctness of the usage of the keyword.

  4. The Complexities of Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutton, Donald G.

    2007-01-01

    Comments on the article by Robert Bornstein, "The complex relationship between dependency and domestic violence: Converging psychological factors and social forces." Although a more focused examination of the psychological factors involved in domestic violence is welcome, there are some factual errors in Bornstein's article that need attention and…

  5. New hospital-based policy for children whose parents present at the ER due to domestic violence, substance abuse and/or a suicide attempt.

    PubMed

    Hoytema van Konijnenburg, Eva M M; Sieswerda-Hoogendoorn, Tessa; Brilleslijper-Kater, Sonja N; van der Lee, Johanna H; Teeuw, Arianne H

    2013-02-01

    Child maltreatment is a major social problem with many adverse consequences, and a substantial number of maltreated children are not identified by health care professionals. In 2010, in order to improve the identification of maltreated children in hospitals, a new hospital-based policy was developed in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. This policy was adapted from another policy that was developed in The Hague, the Netherlands, in 2007. In the new Amsterdam policy, all adults presenting at the emergency department due to domestic violence, substance abuse, and/or a suicide attempt are asked whether they have any children in their care. If this is the case, parents are urged to visit the outpatient pediatric department together with all of their children. During this visit, problems are evaluated and voluntary referrals can be arranged to different care organizations. If parents refuse to cooperate, their children are reported to the Dutch Child Abuse Counseling and Reporting Centre. The two aims of this study are to describe (1) characteristics of the identified families and (2) the referrals made to different voluntary and involuntary care organizations during the first 2 years after implementation of the policy. Data were collected from medical records. One hundred and six children from 60 households were included, of which 68 children because their mother was a victim of domestic violence. Referrals to care organizations were arranged for 99 children, of which 67 on a voluntary basis. The Amsterdam policy seems successful in arranging voluntary support for the majority of identified children.

  6. Domestic Violence and Social Justice: A Structural Intersectional Framework for Teaching About Domestic Violence.

    PubMed

    Coker, Donna

    2016-10-01

    My Domestic Violence and Social Justice law school course is organized around a structural intersectional framework to encourage students to recognize how structural inequalities inform the types of abuse perpetrated, individual and community responses to abuse, meanings that a victim ascribes to abuse, and factors that increase the risk of abuse. The course challenges the dominant neoliberal ideology focus on individual responsibility that eclipses shared responsibility. The course combines experiential exercises, a presentation by members of a community-based survivor organization, discussion of a hypothetical case with a legal practitioner, and court observation to help students apply theoretical insights to practical issues of individual representation and policy-making. PMID:26834151

  7. Domestic Violence and Social Justice: A Structural Intersectional Framework for Teaching About Domestic Violence.

    PubMed

    Coker, Donna

    2016-10-01

    My Domestic Violence and Social Justice law school course is organized around a structural intersectional framework to encourage students to recognize how structural inequalities inform the types of abuse perpetrated, individual and community responses to abuse, meanings that a victim ascribes to abuse, and factors that increase the risk of abuse. The course challenges the dominant neoliberal ideology focus on individual responsibility that eclipses shared responsibility. The course combines experiential exercises, a presentation by members of a community-based survivor organization, discussion of a hypothetical case with a legal practitioner, and court observation to help students apply theoretical insights to practical issues of individual representation and policy-making.

  8. Physical Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    Navigation Physical Abuse Sexual Abuse Domestic Violence Psychological Abuse Financial Abuse Neglect Critical Issues What Communities Can Do The Role of Professionals and Concerned Citizens Help for Victims ...

  9. Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    Navigation Physical Abuse Sexual Abuse Domestic Violence Psychological Abuse Financial Abuse Neglect Critical Issues What Communities Can Do The Role of Professionals and Concerned Citizens Help for Victims ...

  10. Domestic Violence in Alaska among Women Who Delivered a Live Infant during 1996-1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perham-Hester, Kathy; Chamberlain, Linda

    1999-01-01

    Over 1,000 Alaskan women experienced domestic abuse during pregnancy in 1996-97. Alaska Native and teenage mothers are at increased risk of experiencing physical abuse before or during pregnancy. Most Alaska mothers do not receive domestic violence screening during prenatal care. Domestic violence training is recommended for prenatal care…

  11. Networks, support groups, and domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Sen, P

    1996-11-01

    This article discusses recent preliminary research findings on domestic violence against women in Calcutta, India, during 1994-95 and other evidence from around the world. The Beijing Conference on Women affirmed that physical, sexual, and psychological abuse of women occurs regardless of income, class, or culture. The author found from interviews with 47 abused Indian women from a mixture of backgrounds that middle-class women were the most private and difficult to interview. Findings from interviews suggest that women can resist or challenge the abuse by men, and resolution is the end to abuse. The research aimed to identify factors that enhanced resistance and resolution. Over 66% of abused women responded by informing others or crying or offering resistance. Single women and mothers are vulnerable due to stereotyping and economic insecurity. Women's groups recommend formation of shelters for abused women, income generation programs, and training projects, but funding is frequently limited for such activities. Some abused women are unaware of their rights or do not seek help from agencies. Illiteracy interferes with exchanges of pertinent information. Women in the Indian study did not accept violence as part of marriage. 70% of the women stated that after reporting the violence there was resolution. For sexual violence, resolution did not occur, and Indian law does not treat marital rape as a criminal offense. Most of the abused Indian women had contacts with governmental or other organizations. It appears that outside support is important to resolution and nonviolent relationships. Employment that is home-based isolates women and may not be useful as a resource for achieving resolution. Groups need to focus on capacity-building.

  12. Domestic violence: efficacy of health provider training in Utah.

    PubMed

    Allert, C S; Chalkley, C; Whitney, J R; Librett, A

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to improve the identification, treatment, and referral of domestic violence victims by prehospital care providers (Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) and paramedics) and emergency department personnel. The training focused on the definition of domestic violence, procedures to use when questioning patients about abuse, Utah's mandatory reporting law, and the referral of victims to community resources. While the training did improve the participant's knowledge concerning referral options and the law, health care providers still did not believe that domestic violence was a problem in their community. Although providers felt confident asking questions about abuse, the providers did not question patients unless they suspected domestic violence was the cause of the injury. Further training needs to be offered to staff to encourage regular screening for all adult patients.

  13. Strategic footholds for medical education about domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Baker, N J

    1995-11-01

    The author describes in detail the successful education initiatives on domestic violence, especially violence against adult women, that have been implemented for family medicine residents at the St. Paul-Ramsey Medical Center in St. Paul, Minnesota, and for medical students at each of the three Minnesota medical schools. For example, in 1990 the residency program adopted a community-oriented primary care approach to teaching and clinical activities, including the area of domestic violence. This approach stresses partnerships with community organizations that deal with domestic abuse. Also developed was a curriculum to help residents deal with their apprehension about domestic violence and acquire the knowledge, attitudes, and skills they need to confront this problem effectively. At the three medical schools, teaching about domestic violence takes place in preclinical courses, during clinical rotations (where students work with abuse victims), and through extracurricular activities. The author describes some important types of resistance to having instruction about domestic violence in the medical curriculum. To move forward, faculty must overcome their discomfort with the topic yet acknowledge that teaching about it is difficult and requires personal stamina and empathy with colleagues. Faculty must also agree to collaborate with those who have sensitivity and expertise in the area, and must make a long-term commitment to prepare physicians to recognize problems of domestic violence and work effectively with its victims and perpetrators.

  14. Domestic Violence: Intersection of Culture, Gender and Context.

    PubMed

    Tonsing, Jenny C

    2016-04-01

    This study examines South Asian women's experience of domestic violence in Hong Kong. Despite the proliferation of literature on domestic violence, this issue remain unexplored in the discourse of domestic violence in Hong Kong. A qualitative research approach through face to face interview with 14 women was employed. Participants were recruited through purposive and snowball sampling. Findings from this study highlight the importance of considering the social and cultural influence on how women perceived and construct their experiences of abuse.Implications for practice and policies are highlighted.

  15. [Domestic violence: a current issue to take into account in diagnostic imaging].

    PubMed

    Santos Corraliza, E; Larrañaga Hernando, G; Neve Lete, I; Sánchez García, A

    2014-01-01

    Domestic violence is currently an issue of great political and social importance. The real incidence of domestic violence is difficult to determine due to the environment where it takes place and the reluctance of victims to report abuse. On the other hand, all types of violence represent an important public health problem. We report the case of a young woman who presented with thromboembolic phenomena at different sites due to domestic violence. We emphasize that it is necessary for radiologists and other healthcare professionals to consider the possibility of domestic violence when establishing the diagnosis. This can be important for determining the incidence of abuse, diminishing its sequela, and help increase its reporting.

  16. Same-Sex Domestic Violence: Strategies for Change. Sage Series on Violence against Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leventhal, Beth, Ed.; Lundy, Sandra E., Ed.

    While a great deal has been written on domestic violence, the focus has been primarily on the violence of men against their current or former wives or girlfriends. Yet studies have shown that partner abuse is as common and severe among same-sex couples as among heterosexual couples. This book examines a broad range of issues that confront victims…

  17. Theological reflections on violence and abuse.

    PubMed

    Nienhuis, Nancy Eileen

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the contemporary problem of intimate violence and sexual assault within a larger theoretical and theological context. It does so by tracing two trajectories in theological thinking: first, that suffering is sent from God and requires obedience; and, second, that the roles of men and women are not only specific and hierarchical but must remain so lest society risk moral chaos. It argues that many messages from traditional Christian theology continue to haunt abused women in such a way as to at times facilitate domestic violence. It offers suggestions for transforming common theological interpretations in ways that are empowering for battered women. These recommendations include attempts to emphasize resources within a tradition that may help transform unjust power relations like those in abusive relationships.

  18. 25 CFR 11.454 - Domestic violence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Domestic violence. 11.454 Section 11.454 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.454 Domestic violence. (a) A person who commits domestic violence...

  19. 25 CFR 11.454 - Domestic violence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Domestic violence. 11.454 Section 11.454 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.454 Domestic violence. (a) A person who commits domestic violence by...

  20. 25 CFR 11.454 - Domestic violence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Domestic violence. 11.454 Section 11.454 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.454 Domestic violence. (a) A person who commits domestic violence...

  1. 25 CFR 11.454 - Domestic violence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Domestic violence. 11.454 Section 11.454 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.454 Domestic violence. (a) A person who commits domestic violence...

  2. 25 CFR 11.454 - Domestic violence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Domestic violence. 11.454 Section 11.454 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAW AND ORDER COURTS OF INDIAN OFFENSES AND LAW AND ORDER CODE Criminal Offenses § 11.454 Domestic violence. (a) A person who commits domestic violence...

  3. Risk Factors for Domestic Violence in Curacao

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Wijk, N. Ph. L.; de Bruijn, J. G. M.

    2012-01-01

    One out of three people (25% of men, 38% of women) in Curacao have experienced some form of domestic violence at some point in their adult lives. The most significant risk factors for domestic violence in Curacao are the female gender, a young age, low education, and experiencing domestic violence victimization in childhood. Divorce, single…

  4. Half of world's women are victims of domestic abuse.

    PubMed

    According to a report by the UN International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF), up to half of the world's female population have suffered abuse at the hands of those closest to them, at some point in their lives. This report on Domestic Violence Against Women and Girls is a first effort by the UNICEF to establish the global dimensions of domestic abuse. It is also another step deeper into an aggressive campaign to address the root causes of the problems of millions of the world's women and children. Meanwhile, an outcome of the 5-day UN special meeting is a new blueprint to improve women's lives, noting domestic violence as a primary issue with emphasis on abortion, and punishment for marital rape, domestic abuse, and trafficking. In addition, the conference acknowledged the role of men in the process of improving women's lives. Moreover, the issues of welfare for women caught in armed conflict are also discussed with focus on the war in Mindanao, Philippines.

  5. Women's lived experiences of domestic violence during pregnancy (1).

    PubMed

    Baird, Kathleen

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study, which explored women's experiences of domestic violence before, during and after pregnancy. During pregnancy the women were physically attacked, including blows and kicks to the pregnant abdomen; they were punched, slapped, kicked, bitten, pushed around, held by the throat and attempts at strangulation occurred for two of the women. The women were sexually abused, experienced enforced isolation and financial hardship. They experienced extreme psychological distress, including depression before, during and after pregnancy. Feelings of vulnerability about themselves and their unborn babies were intensified by their partners' continuing violence and abuse. The findings from this research will support midwives to recognise the warning signs of domestic violence and abuse during pregnancy and to be able to offer an appropriate response. PMID:26349329

  6. Domestic violence and employment: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Swanberg, Jennifer E; Logan, T K

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study sought to gather detailed information about how domestic violence affects women's employment, specifically to identify the types of job interference tactics used by abusers and their consequences on women's job performance; identify and understand the context associated with disclosure about victimization to employers and coworkers; and identify the supports offered to employees after disclosure. Qualitative analyses, guided by grounded theory, revealed that perpetrators exhibited job interference behaviors before, during, and after work. Abuser tactics reduced women's job performance as measured by absenteeism, tardiness, job leavings, and terminations. Among women who disclosed victimization to employers, informal and formal job supports were offered. Workplace supports led to short-term job retention, but fear and safety issues mitigated employers' attempts to retain workers.

  7. Victims' barriers to discussing domestic violence in clinical consultations: a qualitative enquiry.

    PubMed

    Othman, Sajaratulnisah; Goddard, Chris; Piterman, Leon

    2014-05-01

    Victims of domestic violence frequently attend health care facilities. In many cases, their abusive experience is neither disclosed nor discussed during clinical consultations. This study examined the barriers faced by women when discussing abuse with health care providers, specifically in cases involving Malaysian women with a history of domestic violence. A qualitative study using in-depth interviews was conducted with 10 women with a history of domestic violence residing at a shelter. Purposive sampling was conducted until data saturation. Using the grounded theory approach of analysis, themes that emerged from these interviews were then further analyzed to examine the barriers faced by these women. Women who experienced domestic violence faced multiple barriers while discussing their accounts of abuse with others. Values placed on the privacy of domestic violence; upholding the traditional gender roles; preserving the family unity; minimizing the abuse, the feeling of shame, self-blame; and fearing their abuser generally create internal barriers when discussing their encounters of abuse with health care providers. The perceived unknown role of health care professionals when dealing with patients experiencing domestic violence as well as the previous negative experiences in clinical consultations acted as external barriers for discussing abuse with health care providers. Women with domestic violence experiences faced internal and external barriers to discussing their abuse during clinical consultations. Physicians and health care providers must consider domestic violence in consultations with female patients. A good doctor-patient relationship that encompasses empathy, confidence, trust, support, assurance, confidentiality, and guidance can help patients with abusive backgrounds overcome these barriers, leading to the disclosure and discussion of their abusive encounters. Proper education, guidelines, and support for health care providers are required to help

  8. Psychopathology in Women Arrested for Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Gregory L.; Moore, Todd M.; Gordon, Kristina Coop; Ramsey, Susan E.; Kahler, Christopher W.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of psychopathology among women arrested for violence and whether the experience of intimate partner violence (IPV) was associated with Axis I psychopathology. Women who were arrested for domestic violence perpetration and court referred to violence intervention programs (N=103) completed measures of IPV…

  9. Violence between Couples: Profiling the Male Abuser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponzetti,James J. Jr.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Presents an integrative review of the literature on spousal violence as it relates to the abusive male. Suggests various issues that need to be addressed before effective intervention with abusive males can proceed. (Author)

  10. Report from the Attorney General's Task Force on Domestic Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1977

    This report lists a series of recommendations for dealing with the widespread but largely undocumented problem of domestic violence. The efforts of the Task Force were concentrated in the area of mate abuse. Working committees examined prevention methods, legal safeguards and social services. Two subcommittees examined the special problems of…

  11. Mothers, domestic violence, and child protection.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Heather; Walsh, Tamara

    2010-05-01

    This article explores the relationship between understandings of domestic violence and the child protection response drawing on material gathered in focus groups with workers who support mothers dealing with both domestic violence and child protection issues. The interviewees expressed concern that the dynamics of domestic violence are often misunderstood and inappropriately responded to by child protection workers. This article critically examines the interviewees' concerns and concludes that to properly protect children, it is crucial that child protection workers have a clear understanding of the dynamics of and issues related to domestic violence.

  12. Domestic Violence Between Same-Gender Partners: Recent Findings and Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClennen, Joan C.

    2005-01-01

    Empirical literature about same-gender domestic violence was relatively nonexistent until the past 20 years, and conducting research with this population about a sensitive topic remains a daunting endeavor. Existing studies reveal similarities between opposite- and same-gender domestic violence in prevalence, types of abuse, and various dynamics,…

  13. Constructions of Local Culture and Impacts on Domestic Violence in an Australian Rural Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wendt, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    Studies of domestic violence in rural areas have predominantly focused on barriers that keep women trapped in abusive relationships. The literature has frequently suggested that rural culture influences the incidence of domestic violence, the forms it takes, and how it is experienced. Yet there is surprisingly little research on how rural culture…

  14. "No Way Out." Russian-Speaking Women?s Experiences With Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, Marie; Senturia, Kirsten; Sullivan, Marianne; Shiu-Thornton, Sharyne

    2005-01-01

    This article explores the experience of domestic violence and utilization of domestic violence resources among immigrant women who were Russian speaking. Participants, many of whom came to the United States as so-called mail-order brides, reported diverse forms of abuse, including isolation and financial restrictions, and were reluctant to get…

  15. Domestic abuse and the duties of physicians: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Nazli; Khan, Sharmeen

    2015-01-01

    Domestic violence against women is a global issue. An earlier report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), USA, reported that injury caused by domestic violence was the second most common cause of death during pregnancy and in the postpartum period (1). The pregnancy-associated homicide ratio was found to be 1.7 per 100,000 deliveries and firearms were identified as the main source of injury. Domestic violence is more common in developing countries than in the developed world, and rural areas are worse affected than urban ones. The risk factors associated with intimate partner violence include husbands being unemloyed, belonging to a lower socioeconomic group, poor educational status, and alcohol and substance abuse. In a hospital-based study of 500 women, around 12.6% reported physical abuse by their spouses in index pregnancy (2). In another hospital-based study in which women were interviewed during the postpartum period, 23% reported physical abuse during index pregnancy (3). Death as a result of violence is not a new phenomenon. In 1994 the Human Rights Commission of Pakistan reported 372 cases of domestic violence, due to which around 274 women died during an 8-month period. According to a report for the year 2012-13 around 389 cases of domestic violence were reported in the Pakistani media that year. The same report states that in 2013, more than 800 women committed suicide due to domestic violence. In 2013, the Provincial Assembly of Sindh, Pakistan, passed The Domestic Violence (Prevention and Protection) Bill, 2013, which imposes a fine of Rs 20,000 for violent offences against women. Such bills have not been passed in other provincial assemblies of the country. Other countries in South Asia (India, Nepal, Bangladesh, the Maldives, Sri Lanka and Afghanistan) have national laws which make provision for extending medical assistance to women who have suffered domestic violence (4). However, a lot remains to be done to translate these

  16. Domestic violence. Do you know when and how to intervene?

    PubMed

    Steiner, R P; Vansickle, K; Lippmann, S B

    1996-07-01

    Physicians must be alert to the possibility of abuse within the family and home. They should be well prepared to help victims begin the transition to a safer environment. An awareness of the prevalence of abuse and a high index of suspicion are the most effective clinical tools for assisting victims of domestic violence. In addition, physicians need to be familiar with reporting laws in their states. Comprehensive management includes not only treatment but also investigation of injuries, reporting of suspected abuse, referral to appropriate community agencies for violence management or counseling, and addressing underlying chemical dependency or mental disorders. Close follow-up is critical to both detection and prevention. Physicians are obliged not only to treat individuals but also to support social policies that reduce family violence. PMID:8668610

  17. Domestic Violence, Personal Control, and Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umberson, Debra; Anderson, Kristin; Glick, Jennifer; Shapiro, Adam

    1998-01-01

    Explores how domestic violence is related to personal control. Finds that individuals who have initiated violence against a partner do not differ from individuals who have nonviolent relationships in feelings of personal control. Experiencing violence at the hands of a partner has more significant adverse effects on sense of personal control for…

  18. Domestic Violence and Social Responsibility in Contemporary Spanish Cinema: A Portfolio View of Behavioral Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanzana, Habib

    2010-01-01

    Domestic abuse continues to claim many lives in Spain despite a series of new laws to protect women and to punish abusers. This essay explores the cultural influences of contemporary Spanish cinema on domestic violence. Four films are assessed against a Portfolio Model of social responsibility that uses two basic dimensions: realism and human…

  19. Empowering Women with Domestic Violence Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anczewska, Marta; Roszczynska-Michta, Joanna; Waszkiewicz, Justyna; Charzynska, Katarzyna; Czabala, Czeslaw

    2012-01-01

    It is generally held that it has been only recently that domestic violence gained appropriate attention as a major social problem. However several approaches, drawn from different theories are applicable in explaining the origin of this negative phenomenon. It is well recognized that trauma of domestic violence has destructive impact on somatic…

  20. Culture and Domestic Violence: Transforming Knowledge Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent-Goodley, Tricia B.

    2005-01-01

    Cultural competence continues to receive limited attention in domestic violence service provision from research to the evaluation of programs. Yet with changing demographics reflecting larger numbers of people of color and increasing needs for more effective responses, it is critical that we change the way we think about domestic violence. Using a…

  1. Domestic Violence against Married Women in Edirne

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokuc, Burcu; Ekuklu, Galip; Avcioglu, Serap

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence and risk factors of domestic violence against married women in Edirne, Turkey. This is a cross-sectional study which included a representative sample of the married women living in the Provincial Center of Edirne. The total past year prevalence of some forms of physical domestic violence is 34% in…

  2. Responding to Domestic Violence against Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalans, Loretta J.; Lurigio, Arthur J.

    1995-01-01

    Gives an overview of issues related to domestic violence against women as a social problem: changing responses from the legal system and the community over the course of history, possible causes of domestic violence against women, current perspectives and trends, prevalence, seriousness, and our response as a society. (LKS)

  3. The psychosocial repercussions of domestic violence in battered women.

    PubMed

    Polychronopoulou, M; Douzenis, A

    2016-01-01

    This study is trying to record the consequences of domestic violence to the mental health of abused women. The tools that were used were the following: PCL-S and GHQ. The research was conducted by B΄Psychiatric Clinic of Attica General Hospital in collaboration with the National Centre of Social Solidarity and the WIN HELLAS (NGO). The victims did not have any diagnosed mental disorder before the present study. Concerning the form of violence that they had gone through, 33% of the victims had suffered psychological abuse, 30% has suffered physical abuse and the 16% sexual abuse, while 20% of the victims has suffered all the above forms of violence. As arises from the preliminary results of our research, 60% of the victims presented symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder while 46% from the above percentage presented chronic PTSD. Regarding to the state of their psychosomatic health, 40% of victims has declared that during the last two weeks they felt worse than usual. More specifically, 60% feels a physical discomfort, 73% of victims presents reduction in functionalism while 56% seems to have stress symptoms. Finally 53% of victims show symptoms of depressions. By referring to the duration of abuse, 72% of total victims declared that had suffered violence during the last months; while 13% of total declared that they were being abused for more than five years.1,2.

  4. The psychosocial repercussions of domestic violence in battered women.

    PubMed

    Polychronopoulou, M; Douzenis, A

    2016-01-01

    This study is trying to record the consequences of domestic violence to the mental health of abused women. The tools that were used were the following: PCL-S and GHQ. The research was conducted by B΄Psychiatric Clinic of Attica General Hospital in collaboration with the National Centre of Social Solidarity and the WIN HELLAS (NGO). The victims did not have any diagnosed mental disorder before the present study. Concerning the form of violence that they had gone through, 33% of the victims had suffered psychological abuse, 30% has suffered physical abuse and the 16% sexual abuse, while 20% of the victims has suffered all the above forms of violence. As arises from the preliminary results of our research, 60% of the victims presented symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder while 46% from the above percentage presented chronic PTSD. Regarding to the state of their psychosomatic health, 40% of victims has declared that during the last two weeks they felt worse than usual. More specifically, 60% feels a physical discomfort, 73% of victims presents reduction in functionalism while 56% seems to have stress symptoms. Finally 53% of victims show symptoms of depressions. By referring to the duration of abuse, 72% of total victims declared that had suffered violence during the last months; while 13% of total declared that they were being abused for more than five years.1,2. PMID:27467036

  5. Exposure to violence, typology, and recidivism in a probation sample of domestic violence perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Drew R; Cantos, Arthur L; Miller, Steven A

    2016-09-01

    The present study investigated the predictive utility of self-reported domestic violence perpetrators' exposure to violence in their family of origin and patterns related to this exposure through the use of longitudinal analyses on a sample of 228 men on probation in Lake County, Illinois. Differences in typology, recidivism, recidivism frequency, and violent behavior survival patterns in men with a history of domestic violence perpetration and with varying levels of family of origin violence exposure were examined. Findings suggest that those who witnessed interparental violence (either alone, or in combination with experiencing violence) were most likely to be classified as Generally Violent offenders (e.g., perpetrators who direct violence toward their family and others), compared to those who did not report experiencing or witnessing violence. In addition, results also indicate that men who experienced both witnessing interparental violence and receiving physical abuse in childhood were more likely to recidivate more frequently compared to those who did not report experiencing or witnessing violence. No significant findings for typology and recidivism were noted. Clinical and policy/practice implications are discussed.

  6. Exposure to violence, typology, and recidivism in a probation sample of domestic violence perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Drew R; Cantos, Arthur L; Miller, Steven A

    2016-09-01

    The present study investigated the predictive utility of self-reported domestic violence perpetrators' exposure to violence in their family of origin and patterns related to this exposure through the use of longitudinal analyses on a sample of 228 men on probation in Lake County, Illinois. Differences in typology, recidivism, recidivism frequency, and violent behavior survival patterns in men with a history of domestic violence perpetration and with varying levels of family of origin violence exposure were examined. Findings suggest that those who witnessed interparental violence (either alone, or in combination with experiencing violence) were most likely to be classified as Generally Violent offenders (e.g., perpetrators who direct violence toward their family and others), compared to those who did not report experiencing or witnessing violence. In addition, results also indicate that men who experienced both witnessing interparental violence and receiving physical abuse in childhood were more likely to recidivate more frequently compared to those who did not report experiencing or witnessing violence. No significant findings for typology and recidivism were noted. Clinical and policy/practice implications are discussed. PMID:27521763

  7. Domestic violence: knowledge, attitudes, and clinical practice of selected UK primary healthcare clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Ramsay, Jean; Rutterford, Clare; Gregory, Alison; Dunne, Danielle; Eldridge, Sandra; Sharp, Debbie; Feder, Gene

    2012-01-01

    Background Domestic violence affects one in four women and has significant health consequences. Women experiencing abuse identify doctors and other health professionals as potential sources of support. Primary care clinicians agree that domestic violence is a healthcare issue but have been reluctant to ask women if they are experiencing abuse. Aim To measure selected UK primary care clinicians’ current levels of knowledge, attitudes, and clinical skills in this area. Design and setting Prospective observational cohort in 48 general practices from Hackney in London and Bristol, UK. Method Administration of the Physician Readiness to Manage Intimate Partner Violence Survey (PREMIS), comprising five sections: responder profile, background (perceived preparation and knowledge), actual knowledge, opinions, and practice issues. Results Two hundred and seventy-two (59%) clinicians responded. Minimal previous domestic violence training was reported by participants. Clinicians only had basic knowledge about domestic violence but expressed a positive attitude towards engaging with women experiencing abuse. Many clinicians felt poorly prepared to ask relevant questions about domestic violence or to make appropriate referrals if abuse was disclosed. Forty per cent of participants never or seldom asked about abuse when a woman presented with injuries. Eighty per cent said that they did not have an adequate knowledge of local domestic violence resources. GPs were better prepared and more knowledgeable than practice nurses; they also identified a higher number of domestic violence cases. Conclusion Primary care clinicians’ attitudes towards women experiencing domestic violence are generally positive but they only have basic knowledge of the area. Both GPs and practice nurses need more comprehensive training on assessment and intervention, including the availability of local domestic violence services. PMID:22947586

  8. Women prisoners, mental health, violence and abuse.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Morag

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the specific experiences of women in prison, focusing on previous (and continuing) physical and mental abuse, the consequent health care requirements of women prisoners, the policy response and the availability of suitable health care in prisons across the EU. It draws from an extensive review of the literature on women prisoners across Europe that was part of an on-going European Project funded by the DAPHNE programme of the European Commission, entitled 'DAPHNE Strong'. It also uses the field research from the project collected via surveys and in-depth interviews with key personnel in organisations that work with women prisoners or ex-prisoners and staff with a strategic overview of activity from the ministries of justice, police, prison service and women's support organisations. There are probably many more women prisoners with a history of domestic abuse than is officially recognised. Many of the women prison population who have experienced violence and abuse mask this by problematic drug or alcohol use as well as self-injury. These are key areas that training for prison staff needs to address. The availability of services for this group of women is inconsistent within and between countries of the EU. The political will to address the situation of women in prison, as distinct from the norms applied to men, is variable and it seems to take the determined efforts of active lobby groups to make inroads into an area of latent inertia. PMID:23642339

  9. "No way out": Russian-speaking women's experiences with domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Marie; Senturia, Kirsten; Sullivan, Marianne; Shiu-Thornton, Sharyne

    2005-08-01

    This article explores the experience of domestic violence and utilization of domestic violence resources among immigrant women who were Russian speaking. Participants, many of whom came to the United States as so-called mail-order brides, reported diverse forms of abuse, including isolation and financial restrictions, and were reluctant to get outside help because of embarrassment about their circumstances. Survivors stressed the importance of language- and culture-appropriate outreach and services and urged that women receive information about domestic violence services and laws on immigration. Assistance with housing, child care, and job searches is integral to safe transitions out of abusive relationships.

  10. A Qualitative Evaluation of the Effects of Mandatory Reporting of Domestic Violence on Victims and Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antle, Becky; Barbee, Anita; Yankeelov, Pam; Bledsoe, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This purpose of this research was to evaluate the mandatory reporting law for domestic violence victims in the state of Kentucky through the qualitative interview of 24 female victims of domestic violence. Victims were generally supportive of the law and felt that professionals should be required to report domestic abuse. They did not feel that…

  11. The Gender Wage Gap and Domestic Violence.

    PubMed

    Aizer, Anna

    2010-09-01

    Three quarters of all violence against women is perpetrated by domestic partners. This study exploits exogenous changes in the demand for labor in female-dominated industries to estimate the impact of the male-female wage gap on domestic violence. Decreases in the wage gap reduce violence against women, consistent with a household bargaining model. These findings shed new light on the health production process as well as observed income gradients in health and suggest that in addition to addressing concerns of equity and efficiency, pay parity can also improve the health of American women via reductions in violence. PMID:25110354

  12. The Gender Wage Gap and Domestic Violence

    PubMed Central

    Aizer, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Three quarters of all violence against women is perpetrated by domestic partners. This study exploits exogenous changes in the demand for labor in female-dominated industries to estimate the impact of the male-female wage gap on domestic violence. Decreases in the wage gap reduce violence against women, consistent with a household bargaining model. These findings shed new light on the health production process as well as observed income gradients in health and suggest that in addition to addressing concerns of equity and efficiency, pay parity can also improve the health of American women via reductions in violence. PMID:25110354

  13. Experiences of Domestic and School Violence Among Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients.

    PubMed

    Völkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Huemer, Julia; Jandl-Jager, Elisabeth; Abensberg-Traun, Marihan; Marecek, Sonja; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Plattner, Belinda; Skala, Katrin

    2016-10-01

    The experience of cumulative childhood adversities, such as exposure to domestic violence or abuse by caregivers, has been described as risk factor for poor mental health outcomes in adolescence and adulthood. We performed an investigation of experience of violence in all patients aged 6 to 20 years who had consulted the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, as outpatients during the period of one year. We were using the Childhood Trauma Interview (CTI) in order to obtain information on the kind of violence. Seventy-five percent of all patients had reported experiences of violence. These youth were significantly more often involved in acts of school violence, thus a significant correlation between experience of domestic violence and violence at school could be revealed. The results of our study emphasize the need for interventions preventing violence both in domestic and in school environments. PMID:26487648

  14. Experiences of Domestic and School Violence Among Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients.

    PubMed

    Völkl-Kernstock, Sabine; Huemer, Julia; Jandl-Jager, Elisabeth; Abensberg-Traun, Marihan; Marecek, Sonja; Pellegrini, Elisabeth; Plattner, Belinda; Skala, Katrin

    2016-10-01

    The experience of cumulative childhood adversities, such as exposure to domestic violence or abuse by caregivers, has been described as risk factor for poor mental health outcomes in adolescence and adulthood. We performed an investigation of experience of violence in all patients aged 6 to 20 years who had consulted the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, as outpatients during the period of one year. We were using the Childhood Trauma Interview (CTI) in order to obtain information on the kind of violence. Seventy-five percent of all patients had reported experiences of violence. These youth were significantly more often involved in acts of school violence, thus a significant correlation between experience of domestic violence and violence at school could be revealed. The results of our study emphasize the need for interventions preventing violence both in domestic and in school environments.

  15. The cause and consequence of domestic violence on pregnant women in India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, N N

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate and elucidate the impact of domestic violence on the health and pregnancy outcomes of women. Data were extracted from literature through the MEDLINE database for years 2000-2011. Domestic violence occurs in every society, irrespective of class, creed, religion and country. Women attending antenatal clinics in Delhi reported experience of 26.9% physical, 29% mental and 6.2% sexual abuse, irrespective of their age. The spouse was the perpetrator of abuse in 47% cases and his family members were responsible for 31%. Pregnant women were hit by their husbands on the back and abdomen, sometimes repeatedly, besides psychological abuse. Incidence of domestic violence was more when the male spouse was less educated or in the habit of consuming alcohol, opium or tobacco. Illiteracy, poverty, family status and uncaring attitude of community about spousal violence were the causes of domestic violence. Women having experience of violence were less likely to receive antenatal care or home visits by health workers and had a risk of perinatal and neonatal mortality of 2.59 and 2.37 times higher, respectively, than women having no violence during pregnancy. The survey indicated that 4.5% of abused women required hospitalisation and 3.8% needed medical care. Women's education, economic autonomy and empowerment may reduce the incidence of domestic violence among Indian women. PMID:23550851

  16. The cause and consequence of domestic violence on pregnant women in India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, N N

    2013-04-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate and elucidate the impact of domestic violence on the health and pregnancy outcomes of women. Data were extracted from literature through the MEDLINE database for years 2000-2011. Domestic violence occurs in every society, irrespective of class, creed, religion and country. Women attending antenatal clinics in Delhi reported experience of 26.9% physical, 29% mental and 6.2% sexual abuse, irrespective of their age. The spouse was the perpetrator of abuse in 47% cases and his family members were responsible for 31%. Pregnant women were hit by their husbands on the back and abdomen, sometimes repeatedly, besides psychological abuse. Incidence of domestic violence was more when the male spouse was less educated or in the habit of consuming alcohol, opium or tobacco. Illiteracy, poverty, family status and uncaring attitude of community about spousal violence were the causes of domestic violence. Women having experience of violence were less likely to receive antenatal care or home visits by health workers and had a risk of perinatal and neonatal mortality of 2.59 and 2.37 times higher, respectively, than women having no violence during pregnancy. The survey indicated that 4.5% of abused women required hospitalisation and 3.8% needed medical care. Women's education, economic autonomy and empowerment may reduce the incidence of domestic violence among Indian women.

  17. Health Impact of Domestic Violence against Saudi Women: Cross Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Al Dosary, Ahmad Hamad

    2016-01-01

    Objective Domestic violence is a major public health problem. A wide range of health hazards result from violence against women directly, or from its long-term consequences. The objective of this study is to determine health related consequences of domestic violence against women. Method A community based cross-sectional study was carried through online survey; convenience sample was taken during the period between December 2013 and February 2014. 421 women completed the survey, who met the inclusion criteria and accepted willing to be a part of this study. The data was collected through online survey website. A validated Arabic version of NorVold Domestic Abuse Questionnaire (NOVAQ) was used as a tool to assess domestic violence among the study sample. Analysis was performed using SPSS, version 18.0. Results A total of 421 women participated in the survey. There was no significant correlation between socio-demographic characteristics and being abused or not. However, by further analysis we found more sexual abuse among non-working women P=0.048. There was significant correlation between abused women and general health status, doctor visits, depression, insomnia, and somatic symptoms. Conclusion The consequences of abuse are profound, extending beyond the health of individual to affect the well-being of entire community. So, we recommend to increase community awareness through national awareness campaign, national prevalence survey of domestic violence and well trained health professionals for assessing domestic violence cases. PMID:27103898

  18. Alienation and Domestic Abuse: How Abused Women Cope with Loneliness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arokach, Ami

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the manner in which abused women cope with loneliness. Eighty women, victims of domestic abuse, were compared to 84 women from the general population who have had no history of abusive relationships. A 34-item yes/no loneliness questionnaire was utilized in order to compare the "beneficial" ways of coping with loneliness in the…

  19. Comparing Demographic Characteristics of Male Victims of Domestic Violence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pournaghash-Tehrani, Said; Feizabadi, Zahra

    The present study investigated the demographic characteristics of male victims of domestic violence. These demographic characteristics were menxs age, level of education and level of income. To do this, an author-made questionnaire regarding victimization of domestic violence, both, physical and psychological, was administered to 120 randomly chosen men, referred to family courts by their councilors to seek divorce because of experiencing domestic violence. The results showed that age had significant effect on physical violence; specifically, hitting and psychological violence; specifically, denying choices and cessation of intermarital intercourse. Also, the level of education had significant effect on the physical (e.g., throwing objects) and psychological (e.g., Cessation of marital intercourse and denying choices). Finally, present results indicated that the level of income, by itself, did not have any effects on experiencing any types of violence by men but its effect was visible and significant in the presence of the other two factors, the age and the level of education. The results in the present study are, in fact, only of their kinds in that the characteristics of abused men by their wives are assessed in male victims of domestic violence and can contribute to further understanding of the types of men susceptible to victimization by their wives. Furthermore, it should be pointed out that other demographic variables such as the number of children, the type of housing (ownership of the house or renting) and so on, were also determined in this study, but given their lack of any significant effects on the occurrence of violence of any kind against men, were not mentioned in the study.

  20. Helping Children Exposed to Domestic Violence

    MedlinePlus

    ... withdrawal Depression or anxiety Loss of interest in school, friends or other things they enjoyed in the past Children and adolescents exposed to domestic violence should be evaluated by a trained mental health ...

  1. Police Attitudes toward Domestic Violence Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, T. K.; Shannon, Lisa; Walker, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Police attitudes are important in facilitating a sense of safety and comfort in women seeking justice-system support for protection from partner violence. This study examined police attitudes toward sanctions and treatment for domestic violence offenders compared with other violent and nonviolent offenders. In addition, police attitudes toward…

  2. Children's Actions when Experiencing Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overlien, Carolina; Hyden, Margareta

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is, by analysing children's discourses, to investigate their actions or absence of actions during a domestic violence episode. The empirical data are recorded group therapy sessions and individual interviews with children who have grown up experiencing their fathers' violence against their mothers. The analysis shows that…

  3. Community-based domestic violence services.

    PubMed

    Saathoff, A J; Stoffel, E A

    1999-01-01

    Community-based domestic violence services have grown significantly since their emergence in the 1970s. Now more than 2,000 in number, domestic violence organizations have expanded their range of programs. In addition to crisis-oriented services, such as telephone hot lines and temporary shelter, many of these agencies provide legal, health, mental health, or vocational services or referrals, and assistance in finding housing, relocating, and planning for safety. Most recently, in response to increasing knowledge about the deleterious effects of exposure to domestic violence on children, community-based service providers have developed programs addressing children's mental health, health, educational, and safety needs. This article describes and analyzes trends in service delivery by these community-based organizations to children affected by domestic violence. It concludes that, although there has been significant growth in services, substantial segments of the target population still are not reached, and most organizations do not yet have a sufficient range of services to meet children's diverse needs. Challenges posed by inadequate funding, needs for specialized staffing, and a dearth of data on the efficacy of current intervention programs hamper domestic violence service providers' ability to meet children's needs. However, this article highlights promising new directions in service delivery. Community-based domestic violence organizations increasingly are using innovative strategies to address children's service needs. These agencies are expanding community outreach efforts and attempts to educate the public and professionals about domestic violence and children. In addition, these organizations are building important collaborative relationships with other agencies concerned with children's welfare, such as child protective services, law enforcement, schools, and health care facilities. These and related developments suggest cautious optimism that future

  4. Role of the odontologist in the investigation of domestic violence, neglect of the vulnerable, and institutional violence and torture.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, Helena Soomer; Lincoln, Michael J

    2010-09-10

    Dentists have a significant role to identify and intervene in domestic abuse, violence, and neglect of the vulnerable. Over 75% of abuse victims have injuries to the head, face, mouth, and neck and so dentists are often first responders. However, under recognition and under reporting of domestic abuse and violence is a particular problem among health care providers, including dentists. Forensic odontologists are well suited to lead the training of their clinical colleagues in the various cultural determinants to abuse, including etiology, symptoms, physical signs of abuse, as well as appropriate reporting. In addition to leading their colleagues, forensic odontologists play an essential role as part of multidisciplinary teams that investigate conflict situations, serious crimes, exploitation of disadvantaged populations, and other serious violence and abuse. Whether in conflict zones or within private families, early detection and intervention is important to prevent establishment of abusive social and family patterns that perpetuate a "cycle of violence". This is especially true in young children, the most vulnerable population of all. To support this theory of early and effective intervention, this paper comprehensively reviews the most recent evidence concerning the etiology, detection, and prevention of violence and abuse. PMID:20417041

  5. Women's rights, domestic violence, and recourse seeking in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Sidney Ruth; Bates, Lisa M; Islam, Farzana

    2008-03-01

    This article seeks to deepen understanding of the reasons that abused women in a resource-poor rural setting seek recourse so seldom and with so little success. Data from in-depth interviews and group discussions are used to explore the range of responses to domestic violence and to examine barriers to recourse seeking. Findings illustrate how the combination of poverty and gender inequality, inequities in the legal framework, and patriarchal attitudes and corruption in both formal and informal institutions at the local level discourage abused women from seeking recourse and decrease the likelihood of a favorable outcome when they do.

  6. Prevalence of Domestic Violence in Hong Kong Chinese Women Presenting with Urinary Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wai Sze Paulin; Pun, Ting Chung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the prevalence of domestic violence and its risk factors in women presenting with urinary symptoms. Methods The study was carried out in the urogynecology clinic and general gynecology clinic, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong from 1st May 2013 till 31st October 2014. Two hundred and twenty-five women presenting to the urogynecology clinic with urinary symptoms were categorized according to their symptoms and were asked to complete the Modified Abuse Assessment Screen. Demographic data of the subjects and their partners were collected. Mann-Whitney U test were used for analysis of continuous variables, while Chi-square test and Fisher Exact test were used for analysis of categorical variables between the abused and non-abused group. Prevalence of domestic violence were calculated and compared. Results The prevalence of domestic violence among this group of patients (7.6%) was found to be lower when compared with other studies. Verbal abuse was the commonest form of violence in our locality. The median age of the abused group and the non-abused group were both 56 years old, with the age ranging from 40 to 64 and 29 to 70 years old respectively. The prevalence of domestic violence among patients with overactive bladder syndrome, stress urinary incontinence and mixed urinary incontinence were 19.5%, 4.2% and 5.5% respectively (Fisher Exact test for whole group, P<0.05). Conclusion The prevalence and nature of abuse in our locality was different from the quoted figures worldwide. Patients with overactive bladder syndrome were more likely to be victims of abuse than patients with other urinary symptoms. The difference in the prevalence of domestic violence among patients with different urinary symptoms could be related to their underlying pathophysiology. When encountering patients with overactive bladder syndrome, clinicians should consider this high incidence of domestic violence and provide prompt referral

  7. Personality Profiles of Women and Men Arrested for Domestic Violence: An Analysis of Similarities and Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Catherine A.; Lehmann, Peter; Cobb, Norman; Fowler, Carol R.

    2005-01-01

    Women arrested for intimate partner violence raise challenges for those working in domestic violence programs. Theoretically, there is no agreement about whether women are aggressive for the same reasons as men or merely victims fighting back in an abusive relationship. Practically, there is very little research to guide treatment of this…

  8. Screening for domestic violence in public welfare offices: an analysis of case manager and client interactions.

    PubMed

    Lindhorst, Taryn; Meyers, Marcia; Casey, Erin

    2008-01-01

    Despite a high prevalence of domestic violence among welfare clients, most studies of the implementation of the Family Violence Option (FVO) under welfare reform find that women rarely receive domestic violence services in welfare offices. This study reviews findings from current research on the factors that improve the likelihood that women will reveal their domestic violence experiences to service personnel, and uses the guidelines drawn from this review to evaluate domestic violence screening practices in welfare offices using 782 transcribed interviews between welfare workers and clients from 11 sites in four states. The analysis found that only 9.3% of case encounters involved screening for domestic violence. Screening rates differed by state, interview type, and length of worker employment. Qualitative analysis of the interviews showed that the majority of screening by workers was routine or consisted of informing clients of the domestic violence policy without asking about abuse. Only 1.2% of the interviews incorporated at least two of the procedures that increase the likelihood of disclosure among domestic violence survivors, suggesting deeply inadequate approaches to screening for abuse within the context of welfare offices, and a need for improved training, protocol, and monitoring of FVO implementation.

  9. 75 FR 62303 - National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8575 of October 1, 2010 National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2010 By... Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), we have broken the silence surrounding domestic violence to reach... are critical achievements, domestic violence remains a devastating public health crisis when one...

  10. The Role of Teachers in Helping Children of Domestic Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearney, Margaret

    1999-01-01

    Discusses domestic violence as a social issue and the roles of school, social worker, and teacher in combating domestic violence. Focuses on teachers' roles in identifying domestic violence and includes questions to assist in identification. Suggests ways to respond to a child's disclosure of violence, and classroom strategies to establish a…

  11. Attitudes of Adult Nurse Practitioner Students toward Women Experiencing Domestic Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bessette, Heidi D.; Peterson, Sonja Stone

    2002-01-01

    A survey of 34 nurse practitioner graduate students (93% female) found that 32 had personal experience of abuse; 68% did not feel educational prepared to treat victims of domestic violence. Although a large majority was sympathetic toward victims, small percentages indicated abuse was sometimes justified and the victim bore some responsibility.…

  12. Are Battered Women Responsible for Protection of Their Children in Domestic Violence Cases?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charles

    1998-01-01

    Describes past perceptions of battered women's protection of their children. Examines the role of the child protection service worker in cases where an abused mother does not leave or returns to a household with an abusive male. Discusses the differences in the roles of child protection service professional and domestic violence professionals.…

  13. 3 CFR 8727 - Proclamation 8727 of October 3, 2011. National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, giving communities life-saving tools to help identify and treat child abuse or neglect. It also supports shelters, service programs, and the National..., psychological, and emotional harm. Children who experience domestic violence are at a higher risk for failure...

  14. When Violence Hits the Religious Home: Raising Awareness about Domestic Violence in Seminaries and amongst Religious Leaders.

    PubMed

    McMullin, Steve; Nason-Clark, Nancy; Fisher-Townsend, Barbara; Holtmann, Cathy

    2015-06-01

    The focus of this article by our research team looks specifically at the teaching of domestic violence classes in a seminary or religious context, as well as the ongoing professional education of religious leaders, such as pastors. It also considers ways to introduce therapeutic staff to the unique vulnerabilities of highly religious clients who have been abused or who act abusively. Based on data that we have collected at North American theological seminaries and in congregations, we explain some of the challenges of including instruction about domestic violence in a religious context. PMID:26227940

  15. Phenomenographic study of women's experiences of domestic violence during the childbearing years.

    PubMed

    McCosker, Heather; Barnard, Alan; Gerber, Rod

    2004-01-01

    Much of the domestic violence and abuse literature contains reports of quantitative research approaches that quantify the experience, identify those at risk, and recommend interventions. Although important, these approaches often fail to describe the experience and understanding from the perspective of and in the language used by women who have experienced abuse. This article reports a phenomenographic study of six women's understanding of their experiences of domestic violence during their childbearing years, the time period associated with pregnancy and the first twelve months after birth. The women described domestic violence as being experienced as a loss of self, being controlled and destruction. This report presents the women's views of domestic violence as a complex and damaging phenomenon that is experienced by them in a number of qualitatively different ways. PMID:14998352

  16. Domestic violence against married women in Edirne.

    PubMed

    Tokuç, Burcu; Ekuklu, Galip; Avcioglu, Serap

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence and risk factors of domestic violence against married women in Edirne, Turkey. This is a cross-sectional study which included a representative sample of the married women living in the Provincial Center of Edirne. The total past year prevalence of some forms of physical domestic violence is 34% in the last 12 months. 93% of women reported that they have been experiencing different forms of verbal and psychological domestic violence. The important risk factors for physical domestic violence were being Roma woman (OR = 2.97, 95% CI: 1.44-6.12), living with more than four people in the household (OR = 2.29, 95% CI: 1.21-4.36), being unemployed (OR = 2.15, 95% CI: 1.06-4.37), and got married only with her families' decision (OR = 4.60, 95% CI: 1.42-14.80). Our findings conclude that patriarchal and traditional values, women's lack of financial autonomy, and low socioeconomic status are the risk factors for physical domestic violence.

  17. The Impact of Exposure to Domestic Violence on Children and Young People: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Stephanie; Buckley, Helen; Whelan, Sadhbh

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article reviews the literature concerning the impact of exposure to domestic violence on the health and developmental well-being of children and young people. Impact is explored across four separate yet inter-related domains (domestic violence exposure and child abuse; impact on parental capacity; impact on child and adolescent…

  18. The Voices of survivors documentary: using patient narrative to educate physicians about domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Nicolaidis, Christina

    2002-02-01

    This article describes a method of developing physician education materials using analysis of domestic violence patient experiences and patients' descriptions of their experiences. The process began with interviews of 21 domestic violence survivors, focusing on what they wanted to teach physicians. Qualitative analysis of these interviews identified 4 main themes regarding what survivors wanted physicians to understand about life in an abusive relationship: that domestic violence is universal, that it is more than just physical assaults, that it is all about power and control, and that it affects the entire family. Because what survivors wanted from physicians differed depending on where they were in their abusive relationships, recommendations were developed for each of 5 common situations: when a patient may not yet recognize the abuse, when s/he may not be ready or able to disclose the abuse, when s/he chooses to remain in an abusive relationship, when s/he is seeking care for an acute assault, and when s/he has left the relationship but not yet healed. Interview excerpts representing each of the identified themes are used to create a 30-minute educational documentary. A written companion guide covers the traditional aspects of domestic violence education. In teaching about domestic violence or other health problems where it is difficult for physicians to understand their patients intuitively, an educator's most important role may be to direct learners to listen to the experience and wisdom of patients.

  19. Calabash pregnancy: a malingering response to infertility complicated by domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Adesiyun, A G; Ameh, N; Bawa, U; Adamu, H; Kolawole, A

    2012-03-01

    This is a case report of a 20-year old para 0+0 who presented with an 11-month pregnancy. On evaluation, the pregnancy was found to be a fake made-up 'calabash pregnancy'. There were no pregnancy symptoms and she had just menstruated three weeks prior to presentation. This was a deliberate event in response to delayed pregnancy attainment complicated by domestic violence. Domestic violence was in the form of verbal and physical abuse and later was on a monthly basis precipitated by onset of her menstrual flow. The patient's age, monogamous union and the fact that she is an orphan made her vulnerable to domestic violence. PMID:23155970

  20. [Domestic elder abuse and neglect--conclusions from the evaluation of a model project].

    PubMed

    Görgen, T; Nägele, B

    2005-02-01

    The main task of a federally funded model project in the German city of Hannover was to develop approaches for prevention and intervention in the field of domestic elder abuse. Over a three year period (1998-2001), different approaches--like a telephone helpline for senior citizens, and social workers operating as counsellors for elderly people and their relatives--were tested at a local level. The paper presents results from the evaluation of the project and draws conclusions for future prevention and intervention in the field. The authors argue that the explicit use of the conceptual framework of "violence"/"abuse" creates potentials for scandalizing the issue and is therefore supportive for media appearance, whereas it can impede the approach to the main target groups (elderly people and their relatives) and reduce accessibility of counselling services for potential clients. In the light of evaluation results the focus of the project ("domestic elder abuse" or "violence against elderly people in close relationships") was too narrow for a local project. Counselling services were used in a relatively small number of cases; analyses of cases show that incidents of domestic elder abuse are often embedded in complex problem constellations. Cases brought to the attention of the model project were multifaceted and not limited to incidents of neglect and abuse of elderly care recipients caused by caregiver overload. Cases of intimate violence in partnerships and of intergenerational violence without any of the participants being dependent on care show the need to develop a broader concept of domestic elder abuse. Integration of the concepts of domestic violence, violence against women, elder abuse/neglect and abuse/neglect in caregiving relationships is necessary on a conceptual level as well as on the level of interagency cooperation of institutions dealing with cases of "elder abuse". PMID:15756481

  1. [Domestic elder abuse and neglect--conclusions from the evaluation of a model project].

    PubMed

    Görgen, T; Nägele, B

    2005-02-01

    The main task of a federally funded model project in the German city of Hannover was to develop approaches for prevention and intervention in the field of domestic elder abuse. Over a three year period (1998-2001), different approaches--like a telephone helpline for senior citizens, and social workers operating as counsellors for elderly people and their relatives--were tested at a local level. The paper presents results from the evaluation of the project and draws conclusions for future prevention and intervention in the field. The authors argue that the explicit use of the conceptual framework of "violence"/"abuse" creates potentials for scandalizing the issue and is therefore supportive for media appearance, whereas it can impede the approach to the main target groups (elderly people and their relatives) and reduce accessibility of counselling services for potential clients. In the light of evaluation results the focus of the project ("domestic elder abuse" or "violence against elderly people in close relationships") was too narrow for a local project. Counselling services were used in a relatively small number of cases; analyses of cases show that incidents of domestic elder abuse are often embedded in complex problem constellations. Cases brought to the attention of the model project were multifaceted and not limited to incidents of neglect and abuse of elderly care recipients caused by caregiver overload. Cases of intimate violence in partnerships and of intergenerational violence without any of the participants being dependent on care show the need to develop a broader concept of domestic elder abuse. Integration of the concepts of domestic violence, violence against women, elder abuse/neglect and abuse/neglect in caregiving relationships is necessary on a conceptual level as well as on the level of interagency cooperation of institutions dealing with cases of "elder abuse".

  2. Reports to the Navy's Family Advocacy Program: impact of removal of mandatory reporting for domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Lutgendorf, Monica A; Snipes, Marie A; Rau, Terri; Busch, Jeanne M; Zelig, Craig M; Magann, Everett F

    2012-06-01

    The impact of mandatory reporting laws on domestic violence reports is unclear. In 2006, the Department of Defense removed its requirement for mandatory reporting of domestic violence against adults. Our objective was to determine if there was a change in the incidence of domestic violence reports to the Navy's Family Advocacy Program after the shift from mandatory reporting to a policy allowing restricted reporting. Reports of domestic violence to the Navy Central Registry between fiscal year (FY) 2000 and 2010 were studied. Frequencies and rates of domestic violence reports, type of abuse, and victim and offender gender were studied. Over the past 11 years, the total number of unrestricted domestic violence reports to the Navy Central Registry has decreased by just over a third. In addition, the number of substantiated reports has decreased by approximately 50%. Since the collection of data on restricted reports in 2008, the aggregated reporting rate of substantiated reports is significantly smaller, 0.87% for FYs 2008 to 2010 compared to 1.34% for FYs 2000 to 2005, p < 0.01. Domestic violence reports to the Navy Central Registry have declined over the past 11 years, even with the removal of the requirement for mandatory reporting of domestic violence. PMID:22730847

  3. Crisis Workers' Attributions for Domestic Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Margaret E.

    Attributions affect coping with victimization. Battered women who blame their husbands' moods are less likely to leave than are women who blame their husbands' permanent characteristics for the violence. Abused women often have repeated contacts with crisis intervention workers and the attitudes of those workers may affect the attributions made by…

  4. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants....

  5. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants....

  6. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants....

  7. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants....

  8. 45 CFR 1370.4 - State domestic violence coalition grants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false State domestic violence coalition grants. 1370.4... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS FAMILY VIOLENCE PREVENTION AND SERVICES PROGRAMS § 1370.4 State domestic violence coalition grants....

  9. 32 CFR 635.29 - Domestic violence and protection orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Domestic violence and protection orders. 635.29... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.29 Domestic violence... permitted by law and regulation. AR 608-18 contains additional information about domestic violence...

  10. 32 CFR 635.29 - Domestic violence and protection orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Domestic violence and protection orders. 635.29... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.29 Domestic violence... permitted by law and regulation. AR 608-18 contains additional information about domestic violence...

  11. 32 CFR 635.29 - Domestic violence and protection orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Domestic violence and protection orders. 635.29... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.29 Domestic violence... permitted by law and regulation. AR 608-18 contains additional information about domestic violence...

  12. 32 CFR 635.29 - Domestic violence and protection orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Domestic violence and protection orders. 635.29... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.29 Domestic violence... permitted by law and regulation. AR 608-18 contains additional information about domestic violence...

  13. 32 CFR 635.29 - Domestic violence and protection orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Domestic violence and protection orders. 635.29... ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS LAW ENFORCEMENT REPORTING Offense Reporting § 635.29 Domestic violence... permitted by law and regulation. AR 608-18 contains additional information about domestic violence...

  14. Precinct Domestic Violence Teams: Whose Goals Should Determine Program Activities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisz, Arlene N.; Black, Beverly M.; Nahan, Neva

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an urban community's attempts to increase domestic violence survivors' participation in the criminal justice system by combining social work advocacy, specialized police officers, and prosecutors into precinct domestic violence teams. An analysis of the outcomes of 1,057 domestic violence reports found that the presence of…

  15. Longitudinal Effects of Domestic Violence on Employment and Welfare Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindhorst, Taryn; Oxford, Monica; Gillmore, Mary Rogers

    2007-01-01

    This study uses longitudinal data spanning 13 years from a study of 234 adolescent mothers to evaluate the effects of cumulative domestic violence on employment and welfare use before and after welfare reform. Domestic violence increased the odds of unemployment after welfare reform, but not before; domestic violence had no effect on welfare use…

  16. Perceptions of Domestic Violence: A Dialogue with African American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent-Goodley, Tricia B.

    2004-01-01

    Although empirical research has accumulated over the past 20 years regarding African Americans and domestic violence, many questions remain about African American perceptions of domestic violence. This article explores African American women's perceptions about domestic violence through three focus groups held at a New York social services agency.…

  17. Domestic Violence among the Black Poor: Intersectionality and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conwill, William Louis

    2010-01-01

    There are striking gender, race, and class variations in rates of domestic violence. Some leading family theorists called for an intersectional analysis of how gender, race and class systems interact to improve domestic violence theory. This article improves domestic violence theory by: 1) using the discourse, or language, of intersectionality; 2)…

  18. Losing out on Both Counts: Disabled Women and Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiara, Ravi K.; Hague, Gill; Mullender, Audrey

    2011-01-01

    The links between disability and domestic violence have been under-examined to date, leading to the marginalisation of disabled women affected by domestic violence in theory, politics, and practice. This paper draws on the findings from the first national study in the United Kingdom of the needs of disabled women experiencing domestic violence and…

  19. Domestic Violence against People with Disabilities: Prevalence and Trend Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Lan-Ping; Lin, Pei-Ying; Wu, Jia-Lin; Li, Chien-De; Kuo, Fang-Yu

    2010-01-01

    The present study analyzed national data from "Domestic Violence Report System" derived primarily from the Council of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assaults Prevention, Ministry of the Interior, Taiwan, to describe the reported prevalence of domestic violence in people with disabilities and to examine the time-effect on the prevalence from years…

  20. Dialogic reverberations: police, domestic abuse, and the discontinuance of cases.

    PubMed

    Lea, Susan J; Lynn, Nick

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the social construction of domestic abuse by police officers, specifically in the context of arguments presented to the prosecutor for a decision on whether to proceed with or discontinue the case. Nineteen police files were examined with a particular focus on the MG3, the "Report to Crown Prosecutors for Charging Decision." Access to such sensitive material is usually denied to researchers; therefore, this study offers unusual insights into the treatment of victims and perpetrators of interpersonal violence by the police. Discourse analysis revealed three dominant speech genres: impartiality, credibility, and the "real" victim. These genres separately and in interaction served to construct domestic abuse cases in ways that did not support the victim's account. The "dialogic reverberations" of these findings are discussed and the implications of the work for research and practice are considered.

  1. Child Abuse and Violence against the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kratcoski, Peter C.

    1982-01-01

    An Ohio study found that a significant percentage of adolescents arrested for violent crimes had been victims of severe child abuse and were likely to behave violently toward family members and caretakers. Findings are discussed in relation to the culture of violence, learning, and stress theories of delinquency. (Author/MP)

  2. Domestic Violence in Puerto Rican Gay Male Couples: Perceived Prevalence, Intergenerational Violence, Addictive Behaviors, and Conflict Resolution Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro-Alfonso, Jose; Rodriguez-Madera, Sheilla

    2004-01-01

    Domestic violence (DV) is a pattern of behaviors in the context of an intimate relationship, which can be manifested in emotional, physical, or sexual abuse. DV currently represents a social and a public health issue. This study is an effort to foster a better understanding of DV among same-sex couples. In it, the authors included the…

  3. Attitudes toward Domestic Violence: A Cultural Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallach, Helene S.; Weingram, Ziv; Avitan, Orli

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effect of acculturation on the attitudes held by Ethiopian Jews in Israel toward domestic violence (DV). The study findings revealed the following: Ethiopians who immigrated to Israel (n = 31) held more lenient attitudes toward DV than Israeli born Jews (n = 62), which supported the hypothesis that culture influences…

  4. Domestic violence as a development issue.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, R

    1993-06-01

    Northern development agencies must provide practical support to the efforts of southern women to deal with domestic violence. In some ways, domestic violence wears the same face in the north and in the south: it is not an "abnormal" occurrence, it is not confined to any particular socioeconomic class, and it is a complex occurrence in which other women are sometimes complicities. Northern analyses, however, often refer to "battered wives," whereas in other parts of the world assaults may be made by brothers, uncles, or male in-laws. Development initiatives may also affect those power relations that trigger domestic violence. In Sri Lanka, a credit scheme allowed women who processed cashew nuts for export to expand their efforts and achieve remarkable increases in income and in living conditions. This increase, however, was taking place in the context of male unemployment (the men would not engage in the "women's work" of nut processing). Men in the villages where credit was available, therefore, consumed more alcohol. Thus, interventions are rarely gender-neutral. This must be recognized by those who prepare material on domestic violence.

  5. Lifelong Learning To Reduce Domestic Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Clinton E.; Mullins, Barbara K.

    2002-01-01

    Domestic violence is a legal, social, and public health issue. Increased public awareness has improved laws and training. Educational programs for both offenders and public officials (police, social workers, and health care providers) are addressing the issue. (Contains 19 references.) (SK)

  6. Domestic violence and mental health: a cross-sectional survey of women seeking help from domestic violence support services

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Giulia; Agnew-Davies, Roxane; Bailey, Jayne; Howard, Louise; Howarth, Emma; Peters, Tim J.; Sardinha, Lynnmarie; Feder, Gene Solomon

    2016-01-01

    Background Domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are associated with increased risk of mental illness, but we know little about the mental health of female DVA survivors seeking support from domestic violence services. Objective Our goal was to characterise the demography and mental health of women who access specialist DVA services in the United Kingdom and to investigate associations between severity of abuse and measures of mental health and health state utility, accounting for important confounders and moderators. Design Baseline data on 260 women enrolled in a randomized controlled trial of a psychological intervention for DVA survivors were analysed. We report the prevalence of and associations between mental health status and severity of abuse at the time of recruitment. We used logistic and normal regression models for binary and continuous outcomes, respectively. The following mental health measures were used: Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation – Outcome Measure (CORE-OM), Patient Health Questionnaire, Generalised Anxiety Disorder Assessment, and the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale to measure posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Composite Abuse Scale (CAS) measured abuse. Results Exposure to DVA was high, with a mean CAS score of 56 (SD 34). The mean CORE-OM score was 18 (SD 8) with 76% above the clinical threshold (95% confidence interval: 70–81%). Depression and anxiety levels were high, with means close to clinical thresholds, and more than three-quarters of respondents recorded PTSD scores above the clinical threshold. Symptoms of mental illness increased stepwise with increasing severity of DVA. Conclusions Women DVA survivors who seek support from DVA services have recently experienced high levels of abuse, depression, anxiety, and especially PTSD. Clinicians need to be aware that patients presenting with mental health conditions or symptoms of depression or anxiety may be experiencing or have experienced DVA. The high psychological

  7. Families Living with Domestic Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Caroline

    1997-01-01

    Examines the dynamics, rooted in early trauma, behind the problem of violence committed by children against foster and adoptive parents. Highlights the painful and often hidden dilemmas experienced by such parents and the failure of many child and family practitioners to alert themselves to the problem. Calls for development of therapeutic…

  8. Domestic violence and forced sex among the urban poor in South India: implications for HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Suniti; Subbaraman, Ramnath; Solomon, Sunil S; Srikrishnan, Aylur K; Johnson, Sethulakshmi C; Vasudevan, C K; Anand, Santhanam; Ganesh, Aylur K; Celentano, David D

    2009-07-01

    This article examined the prevalence of physical and sexual violence among 1,974 married women from 40 low-income communities in Chennai, India. The authors found a 99% and 75% lifetime prevalence of physical abuse and forced sex, respectively, whereas 65% of women experienced more than five episodes of physical abuse in the 3 months preceding the survey. Factors associated with violence after multivariate adjustment included elementary/middle school education and variables suggesting economic insecurity. These domestic violence rates exceed those in prior Indian reports, suggesting women in slums may be at increased risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.

  9. Recovery: resilience and growth in the aftermath of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kim M; Renner, Lynette M; Danis, Fran S

    2012-11-01

    This mixed-methods study explored the recovery process and outcomes for 37 women formerly in an abusive intimate partner relationship. Standardized measures of current psychosocial functioning indicated participants were largely asymptomatic for posttraumatic stress disorder and had relatively strong resilience. Qualitative analysis revealed how social and spiritual support was instrumental to participants' recovery, growth, and resilience. Implications for helping professionals include gaining a more comprehensive understanding of recovery from domestic violence. This type of knowledge may contribute to interventions that build on women's strengths and resourcefulness.

  10. Trends in domestic violence service and leadership: implications for an integrated shelter model.

    PubMed

    Panzer, P G; Philip, M B; Hayward, R A

    2000-05-01

    Domestic violence is a dangerous and prevalent social problem affecting up to 4 million women and countless children annually. Shelters offer safety and an opportunity for change during the crisis of family violence. These individuals also have the potential for retraumatization if leadership within the program recapitulates the abuse and coercion felt at home. This article reviews three related trends through the lens of power and control--domestic violence policy and service, models of leadership, and the study of traumatic stress disorders and recovery--and describes their implications for modern shelter service delivery.

  11. Animal Abuse and Youth Violence. Juvenile Justice Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascione, Frank R.

    The forms of abuse that animals are subjected to are similar to the forms of abuse children experience, such as physical abuse, serious neglect, and psychological abuse. This document describes psychiatric, psychological, and criminal research linking animal abuse to violence perpetrated by juveniles and adults. Particular attention is given to…

  12. Parenting in females exposed to intimate partner violence and childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Anna E; Cranston, Christopher C; Shadlow, Joanna O

    2012-01-01

    Child sexual abuse and intimate partner violence may have a significant impact on parenting. The current study expands on existing research by examining the effects of child sexual abuse and intimate partner violence on parenting styles and parenting self-efficacy. In women from a parenting intervention program (n = 20), child sexual abuse was related to lower parenting self-efficacy and more permissive parenting. In women at a domestic violence shelter (n = 45), child sexual abuse was related to current sexual coercion of the partner, and authoritative parenting was related to higher parenting self-efficacy. These results indicate that having a history of child sexual abuse should be taken into consideration when dealing with mothers in violent relationships.

  13. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Domestic Violence Against Women by Their Husbands in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jahromi, Marzieh Kargar; Jamali, Safieh; Koshkaki, Afifeh Rahmanian; Javadpour, Shohreh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Domestic violence against women is a health problem. Research on domestic violence in order to clarify the relationship between the different forms of violence and health outcomes is needed. This study aimed to determine the frequency and risk factors of domestic violence in women. It also assessed the association between risk factors and psychological, physical, and sexual violence against women by their intimate partners. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done on married women 16–80 years of age living in jahrom south of Iran between August 2013 and December 2014. This research was implemented through questionnaires including the demographic characteristic. The form of partner violence including emotional abuse, physical violence and sexual violence was assessed with a validated questionnaire. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated to measure the association between violence and factors. Results: The prevalence of physical, sexual and emotional domestic violence was respectively 16.4%, 18.6% and 44.4%.and was associated with Age (p=0.002), Husband’s Age (p=0.001), Length of marriage (p=0.002), Woman’s low educational level women’s education (OR=4.67 95%. CI=1.97-11.07), husband’s low education (OR=9.22 95%. CI=0.69-12.16), were the most important risk factors for violence. Conclusion: Prevalence of physical, emotional or sexual violence was very high. Men’s violence against women in intimate relationships is commonly occurring in Iran. Considering the factors contributing to violence against women, raising the level of education of men and women is one of the ways to prevent violence. PMID:26652083

  14. Impact of a rural domestic violence prevention campaign.

    PubMed

    Gadomski, A M; Tripp, M; Wolff, D A; Lewis, C; Jenkins, P

    2001-01-01

    Domestic violence is a prevalent health problem that in rural areas is further complicated by limited services, social isolation and the lack of privacy. Little is known about the impact of public health education on awareness, attitudes and behavior of the general public regarding domestic violence. This study sought to measure change in societal attitudes and behavioral intention in response to a seven-month public health education campaign targeting domestic violence in a rural county. From October 1998 to April 1999, the campaign used radio advertisements, posters, mailings to libraries and clergy, printed media articles, printed advertisements and health facility modifications. A random-digit-dialing telephone survey was used to evaluate attitudinal and behavioral changes in the intervention and comparison counties before and after the campaign. The response rates for the pre- (n =378) and postcampaign (n=633) surveys were 73 percent and 65 percent, respectively. Statistically significant increases in slogan and advertising recognition occurred in the intervention county (P=0.03), particularly among men recalling the campaign slogan (P=0.006). In a vignette regarding actions to be taken if the neighbor next door was abusing a partner, significant increases occurred in the intervention county in the percentage of respondents who thought that most people would talk to the victim (P=0.04), consult with friends (P=0.002) or talk to a doctor (P=0.004). Domestic violence agency hotline calls in the intervention county doubled following the campaign. Local public health education campaigns in a rural setting may be a valuable adjunct to national efforts, especially in reaching men. PMID:11765891

  15. Impact of a rural domestic violence prevention campaign.

    PubMed

    Gadomski, A M; Tripp, M; Wolff, D A; Lewis, C; Jenkins, P

    2001-01-01

    Domestic violence is a prevalent health problem that in rural areas is further complicated by limited services, social isolation and the lack of privacy. Little is known about the impact of public health education on awareness, attitudes and behavior of the general public regarding domestic violence. This study sought to measure change in societal attitudes and behavioral intention in response to a seven-month public health education campaign targeting domestic violence in a rural county. From October 1998 to April 1999, the campaign used radio advertisements, posters, mailings to libraries and clergy, printed media articles, printed advertisements and health facility modifications. A random-digit-dialing telephone survey was used to evaluate attitudinal and behavioral changes in the intervention and comparison counties before and after the campaign. The response rates for the pre- (n =378) and postcampaign (n=633) surveys were 73 percent and 65 percent, respectively. Statistically significant increases in slogan and advertising recognition occurred in the intervention county (P=0.03), particularly among men recalling the campaign slogan (P=0.006). In a vignette regarding actions to be taken if the neighbor next door was abusing a partner, significant increases occurred in the intervention county in the percentage of respondents who thought that most people would talk to the victim (P=0.04), consult with friends (P=0.002) or talk to a doctor (P=0.004). Domestic violence agency hotline calls in the intervention county doubled following the campaign. Local public health education campaigns in a rural setting may be a valuable adjunct to national efforts, especially in reaching men.

  16. 24 CFR 5.2007 - Documenting the occurrence of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... requirements of 24 CFR part 5. (e) Response to conflicting certification. In cases where the PHA, owner, or... domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. 5.2007 Section 5.2007 Housing and Urban Development Office...; WAIVERS Protection for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, or Stalking in Public and Section...

  17. 24 CFR 5.2007 - Documenting the occurrence of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... requirements of 24 CFR part 5. (e) Response to conflicting certification. In cases where the PHA, owner, or... domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. 5.2007 Section 5.2007 Housing and Urban Development Office...; WAIVERS Protection for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, or Stalking in Public and Section...

  18. 24 CFR 5.2007 - Documenting the occurrence of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... requirements of 24 CFR part 5. (e) Response to conflicting certification. In cases where the PHA, owner, or... domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. 5.2007 Section 5.2007 Housing and Urban Development Office...; WAIVERS Protection for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, or Stalking in Public and Section...

  19. 24 CFR 5.2007 - Documenting the occurrence of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... requirements of 24 CFR part 5. (e) Response to conflicting certification. In cases where the PHA, owner, or... domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. 5.2007 Section 5.2007 Housing and Urban Development Office...; WAIVERS Protection for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, or Stalking in Public and Section...

  20. Domestic violence in rural Uganda: evidence from a community-based study.

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Michael A.; Lutalo, Tom; Zhao, Feng; Nalugoda, Fred; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Kiwanuka, Noah; Wagman, Jennifer; Serwadda, David; Wawer, Maria; Gray, Ron

    2003-01-01

    Although domestic violence is an increasing public health concern in developing countries, evidence from representative, community-based studies is limited. In a survey of 5109 women of reproductive age in the Rakai District of Uganda, 30% of women had experienced physical threats or physical abuse from their current partner--20% during the year before the survey. Three of five women who reported recent physical threats or abuse reported three or more specific acts of violence during the preceding year, and just under a half reported injuries as a result. Analysis of risk factors highlights the pivotal roles of the male partner's alcohol consumption and his perceived human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk in increasing the risk of male against female domestic violence. Most respondents--70% of men and 90% of women--viewed beating of the wife or female partner as justifiable in some circumstances, posing a central challenge to preventing violence in such settings. PMID:12640477

  1. Domestic violence against women: representations of health professionals 1

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Vera Lúcia de Oliveira; Silva, Camila Daiane; de Oliveira, Denize Cristina; Acosta, Daniele Ferreira; Amarijo, Cristiane Lopes

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze the representations about domestic violence against women, among health professionals of Family Health Units. Method: qualitative study based on the Theory of Social Representations. Data were collected by means of evocations and interviews, treating them in the Ensemble de Programmes Pemettant L'Analyse des Evocations software - EVOC and content analysis. Results: nurses, physicians, nursing technicians and community health agents participated. The evocations were answered by 201 professionals and, of these, 64 were interviewed. The central core of this representation, comprised by the terms "aggression", "physical-aggression", "cowardice" and "lack of respect", which have negative connotations and were cited by interviewees. In the contrast zone, comprised by the terms "abuse", "abuse-power", "pain", "humiliation", "impunity", "suffering", "sadness" and "violence", two subgroups were identified. The first periphery contains the terms "fear", evoked most often, followed by "revolt", "low self-esteem" and "submission", and in the second periphery "acceptance" and "professional support". Conclusion: this is a structured representation since it contains conceptual, imagetic and attitudinal elements. The subgroups were comprised by professionals working in the rural area and by those who had completed their professional training course in or after 2004. These presented a representation of violence different from the representation of the general group, although all demonstrated a negative connotation of this phenomenon. PMID:26444175

  2. [Domestic violence against women and the role of the obstetrician/gynecologist].

    PubMed

    Rabinerson, David; Pollak-Rabinerson, Nataly; Glezerman, Marek

    2006-10-01

    Domestic violence against women is a worldwide phenomenon affecting women of all age groups and socio-economic backgrounds. It may take the form of mental, as well as physical or sexual abuse. Pregnant women are not excluded from being abused. The physical and mental health of women who suffer domestic violence is compromised in comparison with women who are not subjected to violence. These women are reluctant to report their problem to physicians and they, in turn, do not sufficiently investigate the possibility of exposure to domestic violence with their patients. In Israel there is comprehensive protective legislation concerning domestic violence against women and a developed welfare system managed by social workers. Nevertheless, the efforts to protect and help these women will remain futile without early recognition, identification and referral of such women by the attending physicians. Among physicians, the obstetrician/gynecologists have a unique role, since on many occasions they serve as the primary care physicians of women who suffer from domestic violence. They are therefore able to recognize and offer help to these women.

  3. Substance Abuse, Violence, HIV, and Depression

    PubMed Central

    González-Guarda, Rosa Maria; McCabe, Brian E.; Florom-Smith, Aubrey; Cianelli, Rosina; Peragallo, Nilda

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence from the literature suggests that substance abuse, violence, HIV risk, depressive symptoms, and underlying socioeconomic conditions are tied intrinsically to health disparities among Latinas. Although these health and social conditions appear to comprise a syndemic, an underlying phenomenon disproportionately accounting for the burden of disease among marginalized groups, these hypothesized relationships have not been formally tested. Objectives The aim of this study was to assess (a) if substance abuse, violence, HIV risk, and depressive symptoms comprised a syndemic and (b) if this syndemic was related to socioeconomic disadvantage among Latinas. Methods Baseline assessment data from a randomized controlled community trial testing the efficacy of an HIV risk reduction program for adult Latinas (n = 548) were used to measure demographic variables, substance abuse, violence, risk for HIV, and depressive symptoms. Structural equation modeling was used to test a single underlying syndemic factor model and any relation to socioeconomic disadvantage. Results The results of this study support the idea that HIV risk, substance abuse, violence, and depressive symptoms comprise a syndemic, χ2(27) = 53.26, p < .01 (relative χ2 = 1.97, comparative fit index = .91, root mean square error of approximation = .04). In addition, in limited accord with theory, this factor was related to 2 measures of socioeconomic disadvantage, percentage of years in the United States (b = 7.55, SE = 1.53, p < .001) and education (b = −1.98, SE = .87, p < .05). Discussion The results of this study could be used to guide public health programs and policies targeting behavioral health disparity conditions among Latinos and other vulnerable populations. Further study of the influence of gender-role expectations and community-level socioeconomic indicators may provide additional insight into this syndemic. PMID:21522030

  4. Development of an Outreach Group for Children Ages Five through Thirteen Who Have Witnessed Domestic Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Corinne

    This practicum took place at a spouse abuse shelter located in a county classified as urban in the southeast United States. It was found that once a family left the shelter, support groups were not available to help the children with feelings related to living in a home where domestic violence has occurred. Most of these children were already…

  5. Sex, Attribution, and Severity Influence Intervention Decisions of Informal Helpers in Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chabot, Heather Frasier; Tracy, Tracy L.; Manning, Christine A.; Poisson, Chelsea A.

    2009-01-01

    Most domestic violence (DV) researchers examine professional intervention (e.g., police and nurses), but informal helpers (e.g., friends and bystanders) are critical. The authors measure undergraduates' intervention likelihood, type of involvement (i.e., contact with abuser), and the influence of attribution decisions in DV situations where the…

  6. Interpreting Community Accountability: Citizen Views of Responding to Domestic Violence (or Not)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Jacob Z.; Allen, Nicole E.; Todd, Nathan R.

    2011-01-01

    In spite of common public condemnations of domestic violence, survey research suggests that citizens aware of actual abuse often believe they cannot or should not personally respond. Through in-depth interviews with 20 local citizens across the political spectrum, we sought to explore this dynamic more carefully by better understanding community…

  7. Toward a Typology of Abusive Women: Differences between Partner-Only and Generally Violent Women in the Use of Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babcock, Julia C.; Miller, Sarah A.; Siard, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    Based on previous typologies of domestically violent men (Holtzworth-Munroe & Stuart, 1994), women who were referred to a treatment agency for abusive behavior (N = 52) were categorized into two groups based on the breadth of their use of violence: Partner-Only (PO) and Generally Violent (GV). PO women were hypothesized to use reactive violence,…

  8. Service Providers' Reactions to Intimate Partner Violence as a Function of Victim Sexual Orientation and Type of Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basow, Susan A.; Thompson, Janelle

    2012-01-01

    In this online vignette study, a national sample of domestic violence shelter service providers (N = 282) completed a 10-item questionnaire about a woman experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV). Scenarios varied in terms of couple sexual orientation (heterosexual or lesbian) and type of abuse (physical or nonphysical). Results indicate that…

  9. Witnessing Domestic Abuse in Childhood as an Independent Risk Factor for Depressive Symptoms in Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, David; Springer, Kristen W.; Greenfield, Emily A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study addresses the relationship between retrospective reports of witnessing domestic abuse in childhood and levels of depressive symptoms in young adulthood. We examine whether the association between having witnessed violence in childhood and depression is independent of having been the direct target of sexual and/or physical…

  10. Consequences of Domestic Violence on Women's Mental Health in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    PubMed Central

    Avdibegović, Esmina; Sinanović, Osman

    2006-01-01

    Aim To assess psychological consequences of domestic violence, and determine the frequency and forms of domestic violence against women in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Methods The study was carried out in the Tuzla Canton region in the period from 2000 to 2002, and included 283 women aged 43 ± 9.6 years. Out of 283 women, 104 received psychiatric treatment at the Department for Psychiatry of the University Clinical Center Tuzla, 50 women were refugees; and 129 were domicile inhabitants of the Tuzla Canton. Domestic Violence Inventory, Cornell Index, Symptom Checklist-90-Revised, PTSD Checklist Version for Civilians, and Beck Depression Inventory were used for data collection. Basic sociodemographic data and information from the medical documentation of the Department for Psychiatry of the University Clinical Center Tuzla was also collected. Results Out of 283 women, 215 (75.9%) were physically, psychologically, and sexually abused by their husbands. Among the abused, 107 (50.7%) experienced a combination of various forms of domestic violence. The frequency of domestic violence was high among psychiatric patients (78.3%). Victims of domestic violence had a significantly higher rate of general neuroticism, depression, somatization, sensitivity, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, anxiety, and paranoid tendency than women who were not abused. The prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms according to the type of trauma was higher in women with the history of childhood abuse (8/11) and domestic violence (53/67) than in women who experienced war trauma (26/57) and the loss of loved ones (24/83). The majority of 104 psychiatric patients suffered from PTSD in comorbidity with depression (n = 45), followed by depression (n = 17), dissociative disorder (n = 13), psychotic disorder (n = 7), and borderline personality disorder with depression (n = 7). The intensity of psychological symptoms, depression, and Global Severity Index for

  11. Intimate partner violence: childhood exposure to domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ping-Hsin; Jacobs, Abbie; Rovi, Susan L D

    2013-09-01

    Children who are exposed to domestic violence (DV) may experience many short- and long-term negative effects. They are up to 3.8 times more likely to become perpetrators or victims in adulthood than are children not exposed to DV. They also are at high risk of health problems, risky health behaviors, violence, and social functioning problems. Girls who witness intimate partner violence (IPV) are more likely to experience depression, anxiety, and trauma symptoms, and boys exposed to IPV are more likely to exhibit aggression and delinquent behaviors. To prepare the practice to identify and assist children exposed to DV, physicians should undergo training, implement screening protocols, use caution when documenting findings, collaborate with local agencies, and learn about the state's reporting laws. State and local DV service programs or other community resources can provide assessment and intervention assistance. Social workers, mental health professionals, and child and DV advocates can assist in providing treatment for children exposed to violence. Physicians should schedule follow-up appointments for children who need treatment, monitor behavior, and coordinate intervention services. PMID:24053262

  12. ‘Elastic band strategy’: women's lived experiences of coping with domestic violence in rural Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Hayati, Elli Nur; Eriksson, Malin; Hakimi, Mohammad; Högberg, Ulf; Emmelin, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Background Experiencing domestic violence is considered a chronic and stressful life event. A theoretical framework of coping strategies can be used to understand how women deal with domestic violence. Traditional values strongly influenced by religious teachings that interpret men as the leaders of women play an important role in the lives of Javanese women, where women are obliged to obey their husbands. Little is known about how sociocultural and psychosocial contexts influence the ways in which women cope with domestic violence. Objective Our study aimed to deepen our understanding of how rural Javanese women cope with domestic violence. Our objective was to explore how the sociocultural context influences coping dynamics of women survivors of domestic violence in rural Purworejo. Design A phenomenological approach was used to transform lived experiences into textual expressions of the coping dynamics of women survivors of domestic violence. Results Experiencing chronic violence ruined the women's personal lives because of the associated physical, mental, psychosocial, and financial impairments. These chronic stressors led women to access external and internal resources to form coping strategies. Both external and internal factors prompted conflicting impulses to seek support, that is, to escape versus remain in the relationship. This strong tension led to a coping strategy that implied a long-term process of moving between actively opposing the violence and surrendering or tolerating the situation, resembling an elastic band that stretches in and out. Conclusions Women survivors in Purworejo face a lack of institutional support and tend to have traditional beliefs that hamper their potential to stop the abuse. Although the women in this study were educated and economically independent, they still had difficulty mobilizing internal and external support to end the abuse, partly due to internalized gender norms. PMID:23336615

  13. The Lived Experience of Domestic Violence in Iranian HIV-Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Nooredin; Kochak, Hamid Emadi; Gharacheh, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Domestic violence is one of the most prevalent problems linked to HIV. Domestic violence in HIV-infected women has not been sufficiently explored, particularly in developing countries including Iran. This study aimed to explore the lived experience of domestic violence in Iranian HIV-infected women. A qualitative approach was used to conduct the study. Data were collected through semi-structured, in-depth interviews with ten HIV-infected women and were analyzed using content analysis. During the data analysis, four main themes emerged including, “regretful past”, “disappointing future”, “loneliness”, and “no other option”, which refer to the condition that the participants experienced in their lives due to challenges that mainly stem from the experience of HIV-related domestic violence. HIV infection can be a risk factor for domestic violence. Health care providers need to address domestic violence during the assessment of HIV-infected women and make appropriate referrals for abused women. PMID:26156897

  14. Women's lived experiences of domestic violence during pregnancy (2).

    PubMed

    Baird, Kathleen

    2015-10-01

    This paper is a follow up paper to a study which explored women's experiences of domestic violence before, during and after pregnancy. Findings from this study suggested that women would like midwives to be able to recognise the signs of domestic violence and to be able to offer them an appropriate response and support. Midwives are well placed to recognise the signs of domestic violence and provide appropriate support. This paper addresses some of the challenges and dilemmas for midwives when identifying and supporting women who have experienced domestic violence and provides some key messages for midwifery practice. PMID:26638654

  15. Emotional Intelligence of Women Who Experience Domestic Violence.

    PubMed

    Tsirigotis, Konstantinos; Łuczak, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Violence in family constitutes serious social and psychological problem with harmful consequences leading, among others, to changes in emotional functioning of victim and, secondarily, also perpetrator. The aim of this study was to examine emotional intelligence of women experiencing domestic violence. INTE, i.e. Polish version of "Assessing Emotional Scale" by Schutte, was used to study two groups of women. Study (criterion) group included 40 women aged 23-47 years (mean age 35.28) using assistance of Crisis Intervention Centre due to experienced domestic violence. Reference (control) group was well-matched in terms of socio-demographic characteristics and consisted of 140 women not experiencing domestic violence. Study women experiencing domestic violence have significantly lower scores on all INTE indicators (general score, Factor I and Factor II). Women not experiencing domestic violence achieved significantly higher scores on Factor I than on Factor II. In this group all INTE components (general score, Factor I, Factor II) are positively correlated, whereas in group of women experiencing domestic violence there is no significant correlation between Factor I and Factor II and coefficients are lower. Emotional intelligence of study women experiencing domestic violence is lower than emotional intelligence of women not experiencing domestic violence. Their abilities and skills making up emotional intelligence are also less developed. The internal structure of emotional intelligence of study women experiencing domestic violence differs from emotional intelligence of women not experiencing domestic violence. It seems advisable to consider emotional intelligence in the process of providing women experiencing domestic violence with psychosocial help.

  16. Emotional Intelligence of Women Who Experience Domestic Violence.

    PubMed

    Tsirigotis, Konstantinos; Łuczak, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Violence in family constitutes serious social and psychological problem with harmful consequences leading, among others, to changes in emotional functioning of victim and, secondarily, also perpetrator. The aim of this study was to examine emotional intelligence of women experiencing domestic violence. INTE, i.e. Polish version of "Assessing Emotional Scale" by Schutte, was used to study two groups of women. Study (criterion) group included 40 women aged 23-47 years (mean age 35.28) using assistance of Crisis Intervention Centre due to experienced domestic violence. Reference (control) group was well-matched in terms of socio-demographic characteristics and consisted of 140 women not experiencing domestic violence. Study women experiencing domestic violence have significantly lower scores on all INTE indicators (general score, Factor I and Factor II). Women not experiencing domestic violence achieved significantly higher scores on Factor I than on Factor II. In this group all INTE components (general score, Factor I, Factor II) are positively correlated, whereas in group of women experiencing domestic violence there is no significant correlation between Factor I and Factor II and coefficients are lower. Emotional intelligence of study women experiencing domestic violence is lower than emotional intelligence of women not experiencing domestic violence. Their abilities and skills making up emotional intelligence are also less developed. The internal structure of emotional intelligence of study women experiencing domestic violence differs from emotional intelligence of women not experiencing domestic violence. It seems advisable to consider emotional intelligence in the process of providing women experiencing domestic violence with psychosocial help. PMID:25982081

  17. 78 FR 78375 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Certification of Domestic Violence, Dating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Certification of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, or Stalking AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public and... Collection Title of Information Collection: Certification of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence,...

  18. 24 CFR 5.2009 - Remedies available to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking in HUD-assisted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking in HUD-assisted housing. 5.2009 Section 5.2009 Housing and... PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Protection for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, or Stalking in Public and Section 8 Housing § 5.2009 Remedies available to victims of domestic violence, dating...

  19. 24 CFR 5.2009 - Remedies available to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking in HUD-assisted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking in HUD-assisted housing. 5.2009 Section 5.2009 Housing and... PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Protection for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, or Stalking in Public and Section 8 Housing § 5.2009 Remedies available to victims of domestic violence, dating...

  20. 24 CFR 5.2009 - Remedies available to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking in HUD-assisted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking in HUD-assisted housing. 5.2009 Section 5.2009 Housing and... PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Protection for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, or Stalking in Public and Section 8 Housing § 5.2009 Remedies available to victims of domestic violence, dating...

  1. 24 CFR 5.2009 - Remedies available to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking in HUD-assisted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking in HUD-assisted housing. 5.2009 Section 5.2009 Housing and... PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Protection for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, or Stalking in Public and Section 8 Housing § 5.2009 Remedies available to victims of domestic violence, dating...

  2. Effects of Alcohol Use and Anti-American Indian Attitudes on Domestic-Violence Culpability Decisions for American Indian and Euro-American Actors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esqueda, Cynthia Willis; Hack, Lori; Tehee, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the unique issues surrounding American Indian violence. Yet American Indian women are at high risk for domestic abuse, and domestic violence has been identified as the most important issue for American Indians now and in the future by the National Congress of American Indians. American Indian women suffer from domestic…

  3. 32 CFR 635.30 - Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of Understanding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of... Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of Understanding. (a) Coordination between military law enforcement..., especially concerning domestic violence investigations, arrests, and prosecutions involving...

  4. 32 CFR 635.30 - Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of Understanding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of... Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of Understanding. (a) Coordination between military law enforcement..., especially concerning domestic violence investigations, arrests, and prosecutions involving...

  5. 32 CFR 635.30 - Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of Understanding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of... Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of Understanding. (a) Coordination between military law enforcement..., especially concerning domestic violence investigations, arrests, and prosecutions involving...

  6. 32 CFR 635.30 - Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of Understanding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of... Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of Understanding. (a) Coordination between military law enforcement..., especially concerning domestic violence investigations, arrests, and prosecutions involving...

  7. 32 CFR 635.30 - Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of Understanding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of... Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of Understanding. (a) Coordination between military law enforcement..., especially concerning domestic violence investigations, arrests, and prosecutions involving...

  8. 78 FR 64245 - AG Survey of Transitional Housing Assistance for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... Survey of Transitional Housing Assistance for Victims of Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking, or... notice. The Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) will be submitting the... collection. If you have questions concerning the collection, please Cathy Poston, Office on Violence...

  9. The impact of culture and minority status on women's experience of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Kasturirangan, Aarati; Krishnan, Sandhya; Riger, Stephanie

    2004-10-01

    The influence of culture and ethnic background on women's experience of domestic violence has been explored in research only recently. Here the authors review research about the impact of culture and minority status in the United States on women's experience of domestic violence, considering family structure,immigration, acculturation, oppression, and community response. The authors encourage researchers and service providers to acknowledge the effects on women of sociopolitical dynamics, including racism, and to identify specific aspects of culture that are relevant to intimate partner abuse.

  10. "Like a bird in a cage": Vietnamese women survivors talk about domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Shiu-Thornton, Sharyne; Senturia, Kirsten; Sullivan, Marianne

    2005-08-01

    In recent years, a growing literature has emerged that explores the role of culture in domestic violence for ethnic minority populations, including immigrants and refugees. This article presents qualitative data collected from Vietnamese refugee women through a research project in partnership with the Refugee Women's Alliance in Seattle, Washington. Through the women's stories, their own self-awareness of domestic violence as Vietnamese women residing in the United States is available for reflection and review. Issues of acculturation, changing gender roles, examples of strength, and cultural persistence constitute the thematic structure within which these women articulate their needs for creating and sustaining a life free of abuse for themselves and their children.

  11. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Domestic Violence against Iranian Women: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohamadian, Fathola; Hashemian, Ataollah; Bagheri, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background Violence against women in families is the most common form of violence against them. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of domestic violence and its effects on married women of Ilam. Methods In this descriptive-sectional research, 334 married women referred to medical health centers in Ilam were selected to participate using a random sampling method. After obtaining their consent to participate in the study, participants responded to a 46 items questionnaire and responses were analyzed using IBM SPSS for Windows ver. 20.0 (IBM Co., Armonk, NY, USA). Results The majority of the participants reported experiencing domestic violence and emotional violence was more prevalent than other kinds of violence. Logistic regression analysis showed that lower education level, marriage at a younger age, shorter duration of marriage, fewer children, being a housewife, and husband's unemployment had a significant relationship with domestic violence against women. Conclusion The high prevalence of wife abuse in Ilam especially emotional violence due to lower education levels and marriage at younger age could be a serious threat for women's health as well as for other members of the family. This could be a grounding factor for other social harms such as suicide and this issue must be studied from legal, religious, and cultural standpoints. PMID:27468345

  12. Frontline worker responses to domestic violence disclosure in public welfare offices.

    PubMed

    Lindhorst, Taryn; Casey, Erin; Meyers, Marcia

    2010-07-01

    Although substantial numbers of women seeking Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) report domestic violence, few receive mandated services through the Family Violence Option (FVO). This study used transcripts ofinterviews between welfare caseworkers and their clients to identify and classify the responses made by workers to client disclosures of abuse and to assess the match or mismatch of these responses with FVO policy requirements. Only 22 of 782 client interviews involved the disclosure of abuse to the welfare caseworker. A typology of worker responses was created, from least to most engaged. This typology shows that only half of those who disclosed abuse received assistance from the welfare worker, despite policy mandates that clients receive information on TANF waivers and community resources. This study suggests that problems with implementation of the FVO reflect a systemic reluctance to address issues of violence with women rather than problems of individual workers.

  13. Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Service Goal Priorities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macy, Rebecca J.; Johns, Natalie; Rizo, Cynthia F.; Martin, Sandra L.; Giattina, Mary

    2011-01-01

    We investigated agency directors' perspectives about how service goals should be prioritized for domestic violence and sexual assault service subtypes, including crisis, legal advocacy, medical advocacy, counseling, support group, and shelter services. A sample of 97 (94% response rate) North Carolina domestic violence and/or sexual assault agency…

  14. What Would They Do? Latino Church Leaders and Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behnke, Andrew O.; Ames, Natalie; Hancock, Tina U.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding what Latino church leaders believe about domestic violence, and what they do when they confront it, is a key step in developing programs to help them engage in domestic violence prevention and intervention activities in their congregations. This article presents the findings from an exploratory study of 28 Latino church leaders. The…

  15. Understanding How Domestic Violence Affects Behavior in High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Malika

    2011-01-01

    This paper will provide the reader with an understanding of how domestic violence affects the behavior of high school students. The presentation is designed to provide the reader with a working definition of domestic violence, the rate of occurrence and its effects on high school students. Additionally the paper will summarize the negative effects…

  16. Impact of a Rural Domestic Violence Prevention Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadomski, Anne M.; Tripp, Maria; Wolff, Debra A.; Lewis, Carol; Jenkins, Paul

    2001-01-01

    A 7-month public health information campaign used radio advertising, mass media articles, mailings, and posters to address attitudes and behavioral intentions toward domestic violence in a rural county. The campaign raised public awareness, particularly among men; increased stated intentions to intervene in a neighbor's domestic violence; and…

  17. 77 FR 60611 - National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2012-24682 Filed 10-3-12; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F3 ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8877 of October 1, 2012 National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2012 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation For far too long, domestic violence...

  18. 76 FR 62291 - National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-26147 Filed 10-6-11; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8727 of October 3, 2011 National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation During Domestic Violence Awareness...

  19. Risk Factors and Interventions for Domestic Violence among Asian Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Irene

    This paper discusses domestic violence, examining its epidemiology for the general population and for two Asian American groups. It reviews data from 10 empirical studies on domestic violence among Asian American women. Qualitative studies stress the impact of family ties, family honor, and shame; religious values; fear of the legal system; and…

  20. Local initiatives: USAID / Peru supports national legislation on domestic violence.

    PubMed

    1997-01-01

    This brief article describes the activities of USAID-funded groups that promote gender equality and the protection of women and children against domestic violence in Peru. The Peruvian legislature passed Public Law 26260 in 1993, which addresses the issue of domestic violence. The Movimiento Mujers Peruanas Manuela Ramos received support from USAID to develop a registration, protection, redress, and referral system for women who suffer domestic violence. A campaign was conducted that used leaflets and radio and television to educate women about the new law and their rights under it. USAID also supported the Ombudsman's Office for Women. This office instituted a national study on domestic violence that will provide a database for monitoring reductions in domestic violence expected from the new law and the campaign. ReproSalud has a reproductive health project that USAID is funding. This group as well as 18 other groups function under an umbrella group, the Manuela Ramos. The target is poor women living in disadvantaged rural and urban areas, who are at greater risk of domestic violence. Manuela Ramos conducted participatory, qualitative research that helps women rank their reproductive health needs. All 18 organizations found domestic violence to be a reproductive health problem. One organization identified it as the most serious problem, and one that contributes to complications during delivery. Manuela Ramos works to make men more aware of the negative impact that domestic violence has on women.

  1. Judging Risk: Key Determinants in British Domestic Violence Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Amanda L.; Howarth, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Data from the largest study to date of the working practices of British victim support workers (known as Independent Domestic Violence Advisors or IDVAs) are used to provide insight into how "risk judgments" are made in cases of domestic violence. Using data from more than 2,000 victims, this study found a convergence between actuarial data and…

  2. Modeling Prosecutors' Charging Decisions in Domestic Violence Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrall, John L.; Ross, Jay W.; McCord, Eric S.

    2006-01-01

    Relatively little research explaining prosecutors' charging decisions in criminal cases is available. Even less has focused on charging decisions in domestic violence cases. Past studies have also relied on restrictive definitions of domestic violence, notably cases with male offenders and female victims, and they have not considered prosecutors'…

  3. Next steps in research on children exposed to domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Ronald J; Feerick, Margaret M

    2003-09-01

    The papers in this special issue of Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review provided an overview of what is known about children's exposure to domestic violence, and include indications of gaps in extant research. These gaps and research needs are summarized in this conclusion. Specifically, there is need for further research in several broad areas: definition and measurement of children's exposure to domestic violence; development of research methods and statistical designs that provide detailed information and provide for evidence of intervention effectiveness; impact of domestic violence on parenting and family functioning; the role of child factors and exposure to violence factors in predicting developmental risk and resilience; medical and health consequences of exposure to violence; and the nature of child-system interaction in response to domestic violence. Research needs in these areas are discussed in greater detail, and specific questions are raised for further development.

  4. Next steps in research on children exposed to domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Ronald J; Feerick, Margaret M

    2003-09-01

    The papers in this special issue of Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review provided an overview of what is known about children's exposure to domestic violence, and include indications of gaps in extant research. These gaps and research needs are summarized in this conclusion. Specifically, there is need for further research in several broad areas: definition and measurement of children's exposure to domestic violence; development of research methods and statistical designs that provide detailed information and provide for evidence of intervention effectiveness; impact of domestic violence on parenting and family functioning; the role of child factors and exposure to violence factors in predicting developmental risk and resilience; medical and health consequences of exposure to violence; and the nature of child-system interaction in response to domestic violence. Research needs in these areas are discussed in greater detail, and specific questions are raised for further development. PMID:14620581

  5. Domestic violence in pregnancy: midwives and routine questioning.

    PubMed

    Stonard, Gill; Whapples, Emma

    2016-01-01

    The Confidential enquiry into maternal and child health (CEMACH) (2004) set the standard for maternity care to protect women from domestic violence. Twelve women who were murdered by their partner and 43 further deaths from disclosure with no appropriate referrals prompted the routine enquiry for domestic violence to be initiated in 2000. The death rate from domestic violence had marginally decreased slightly in the latest report from The Centre for Maternal and Child Enquiries (CMACE) (2011) with 11 women murdered by their partner and 34 further deaths from disclosure with no referrals. The aim of this article is to review the current literature in order to explore evidence that questions the confidence of midwives when asking about domestic violence in pregnancy. The article aims to highlight the concerns that midwives face when confronted with a positive disclosure of domestic violence, and to provide a flow chart to aid in referral. PMID:26975130

  6. Mainstreaming domestic and gender-based violence into sociology and the criminology of violence

    PubMed Central

    Walby, Sylvia; Towers, Jude; Francis, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Sociological and criminological views of domestic and gender-based violence generally either dismiss it as not worthy of consideration, or focus on specific groups of offenders and victims (male youth gangs, partner violence victims). In this paper, we take a holistic approach to violence, extending the definition from that commonly in use to encompass domestic violence and sexual violence. We operationalize that definition by using data from the latest sweep of the Crime Survey for England and Wales. By so doing, we identify that violence is currently under-measured and ubiquitous; that it is gendered, and that other forms of violence (family violence, acquaintance violence against women) are equally of concern. We argue that violence studies are an important form of activity for sociologists. PMID:25641992

  7. [Factors associated with institutionalization: perspectives for children who suffered domestic violence].

    PubMed

    Gabatz, Ruth Irmgard Bärtschi; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello; Neves, Eliane Tatsch; Terra, Marlene Gomes

    2010-12-01

    This is a qualitative study aimed to understand the factors associated with institutionalization of children who suffered domestic violence. It was carried out in two institutions for shelter in Southern Brazil in June and July, 2008. The creative sensitive method was chosen for data production and involved two dynamics of creativity and sensibility: playing on stage and body knowledge with four school-age children. The data were submitted to French discourse analysis. The results pointed out as factors associated to institutionalization: mother's mental disorders and alcohol abuse and aggression. We believe that the reconnaissance of the factors associated with domestic violence enables a preventive work, minimizing its deleterious effects to family as a whole. In this way, caring must be directed not only to the children whom suffered domestic violence but also to their families involving victims and aggressors. PMID:21805876

  8. The production of the "battered immigrant" in public policy and domestic violence advocacy.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Rupaleem

    2008-02-01

    In the context of U.S. public policy, battered immigrant signifies a person who is eligible to adjust his or her status under immigration law if he or she can demonstrate they have suffered domestic violence in the United States perpetrated by a U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident. Among community organizers, the term battered immigrant signifies a broader range of people for whom legal immigration status plays a role in their options for safety planning and/or leaving an abuser, the potential threat of deportation, and the eligibility for public benefits. Based on an ethnographic study of domestic violence advocacy with South Asian immigrants in Seattle and around the United States, this article examines how the difference in signification has direct social and political consequences with regard to who may access the benefits and protection offered to victims of domestic violence in the United States.

  9. Predicting intentions versus predicting behaviors: domestic violence prevention from a theory of reasoned action perspective.

    PubMed

    Nabi, Robin L; Southwell, Brian; Hornik, Robert

    2002-01-01

    A central assumption of many models of human behavior is that intention to perform a behavior is highly predictive of actual behavior. This article presents evidence that belies this notion. Based on a survey of 1,250 Philadelphia adults, a clear and consistent pattern emerged suggesting that beliefs related to domestic violence correlate with intentions to act with respect to domestic violence but rarely correlate with reported actions (e.g., talking to the abused woman). Numerous methodological and substantive explanations for this finding are offered with emphasis placed on the complexity of the context in which an action to prevent a domestic violence incident occurs. We conclude by arguing that despite the small, insignificant relationships between beliefs and behaviors found, worthwhile aggregate effects on behavior might still exist, thus reaffirming the role of communication campaign efforts.

  10. [Factors associated with institutionalization: perspectives for children who suffered domestic violence].

    PubMed

    Gabatz, Ruth Irmgard Bärtschi; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello; Neves, Eliane Tatsch; Terra, Marlene Gomes

    2010-12-01

    This is a qualitative study aimed to understand the factors associated with institutionalization of children who suffered domestic violence. It was carried out in two institutions for shelter in Southern Brazil in June and July, 2008. The creative sensitive method was chosen for data production and involved two dynamics of creativity and sensibility: playing on stage and body knowledge with four school-age children. The data were submitted to French discourse analysis. The results pointed out as factors associated to institutionalization: mother's mental disorders and alcohol abuse and aggression. We believe that the reconnaissance of the factors associated with domestic violence enables a preventive work, minimizing its deleterious effects to family as a whole. In this way, caring must be directed not only to the children whom suffered domestic violence but also to their families involving victims and aggressors.

  11. State Employment Protection Statutes for Victims of Domestic Violence: Public Policy's Response to Domestic Violence as an Employment Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanberg, Jennifer E.; Ojha, Mamta U.; Macke, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Evidence indicates that domestic violence has negative consequences on victims' employment; yet employers lag in recognizing this as a workplace issue. To address the problem, some states have established several policy solutions. To understand the scope of the public sector's response to domestic violence as a workplace issue, a content analysis…

  12. Addressing domestic violence through antenatal care in Sri Lanka's plantation estates: Contributions of public health midwives.

    PubMed

    Infanti, Jennifer J; Lund, Ragnhild; Muzrif, Munas M; Schei, Berit; Wijewardena, Kumudu

    2015-11-01

    Domestic violence in pregnancy is a significant health concern for women around the world. Globally, much has been written about how the health sector can respond effectively and comprehensively to domestic violence during pregnancy via antenatal services. The evidence from low-income settings is, however, limited. Sri Lanka is internationally acknowledged as a model amongst low-income countries for its maternal and child health statistics. Yet, very little research has considered the perspectives and experiences of the key front line health providers for pregnant women in Sri Lanka, public health midwives (PHMs). We address this gap by consulting PHMs about their experiences identifying and responding to pregnant women affected by domestic violence in an underserved area: the tea estate sector of Badulla district. Over two months in late 2014, our interdisciplinary team of social scientists and medical doctors met with 31 estate PHMs for group interviews and a participatory workshop at health clinics across Badulla district. In the paper, we propose a modified livelihoods model to conceptualise the physical, social and symbolic assets, strategies and constraints that simultaneously enable and limit the effectiveness of community-based health care responses to domestic violence. Our findings also highlight conceptual and practical strategies identified by PHMs to ensure improvements in this complex landscape of care. Such strategies include estate-based counselling services; basic training in family counselling and mediation for PHMs; greater surveillance of abusive men's behaviours by male community leaders; and performance evaluation and incentives for work undertaken to respond to domestic violence. The study contributes to international discussions on the meanings, frameworks, and identities constructed at the local levels of health care delivery in the global challenge to end domestic violence. In turn, such knowledge adds to international debates on the roles

  13. Addressing domestic violence through antenatal care in Sri Lanka's plantation estates: Contributions of public health midwives.

    PubMed

    Infanti, Jennifer J; Lund, Ragnhild; Muzrif, Munas M; Schei, Berit; Wijewardena, Kumudu

    2015-11-01

    Domestic violence in pregnancy is a significant health concern for women around the world. Globally, much has been written about how the health sector can respond effectively and comprehensively to domestic violence during pregnancy via antenatal services. The evidence from low-income settings is, however, limited. Sri Lanka is internationally acknowledged as a model amongst low-income countries for its maternal and child health statistics. Yet, very little research has considered the perspectives and experiences of the key front line health providers for pregnant women in Sri Lanka, public health midwives (PHMs). We address this gap by consulting PHMs about their experiences identifying and responding to pregnant women affected by domestic violence in an underserved area: the tea estate sector of Badulla district. Over two months in late 2014, our interdisciplinary team of social scientists and medical doctors met with 31 estate PHMs for group interviews and a participatory workshop at health clinics across Badulla district. In the paper, we propose a modified livelihoods model to conceptualise the physical, social and symbolic assets, strategies and constraints that simultaneously enable and limit the effectiveness of community-based health care responses to domestic violence. Our findings also highlight conceptual and practical strategies identified by PHMs to ensure improvements in this complex landscape of care. Such strategies include estate-based counselling services; basic training in family counselling and mediation for PHMs; greater surveillance of abusive men's behaviours by male community leaders; and performance evaluation and incentives for work undertaken to respond to domestic violence. The study contributes to international discussions on the meanings, frameworks, and identities constructed at the local levels of health care delivery in the global challenge to end domestic violence. In turn, such knowledge adds to international debates on the roles

  14. Empowering physicians to respond to domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Fullin, K J; Cosgrove, A

    1992-06-01

    Despite the progress of the last 15 years in combating family violence, some individuals, community agencies and institutions still support a man's "right" to control, and they often disregard the physical violence he uses. Because threats and assault are in fact against the law, a man who physically or sexually assaults his wife or girlfriend couldn't keep doing it without this support from the very people who are supposed to enforce the law and help the victims of crime-namely, police, prosecutors, judges, clergy, psychologists, social workers and doctors. Some let him get away with it, look the other way, or--unsure of what to do to stop it--do nothing at all. Thus, they reinforce his "right" to use force, even if they never say, "Go ahead, hit her." The police officer who walks a man around the block or fails to show up when called, the clergyman who advises a woman to go home and pray, the doctor who gently patches her injuries but avoids asking who inflicted them, all cooperate with the abusive man in several ways. He comes to understand that no one will stop him from doing what he does. He learns that there are no consequences to his actions--even his violent actions. He can beat up "his woman" if he wants to and get away with it.

  15. Policy and procedures for domestic violence patients in Canadian emergency departments: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Hotch, D; Grunfeld, A; Mackay, K; Ritch, L

    1996-08-01

    A cross-sectional research survey aimed to obtain information concerning 1) the proportion of Canadian emergency departments with domestic violence intervention policies and procedures; 2) how hospitals identify and provide service to patients who have been abused; and 3) measures that have been problematic/helpful in implementing domestic violence protocols in emergency departments. The study sample included 230 Canadian hospitals with emergency departments. Results showed that 198 hospitals returned the questionnaires, of which 39% indicated that there were policies and procedures concerning domestic violence for the emergency departments. Large, major hospitals were more likely than smaller community hospitals to have policies or protocols in place. About 26 hospitals reported screening all patients for domestic violence and 61 hospitals provided referral services and 46 hospitals provided on-site counseling. Physicians were principally involved in the physical examination, referral and identification. Follow-up, emotional support, and safety planning were provided by social workers. Findings of this survey encourage hospitals and individual health care providers to adopt guidelines concerning domestic violence to ensure a widespread adoption and implementation.

  16. 24 CFR 5.2005 - Protection of victims of domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking in public and Section 8...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... violence, dating violence, and stalking in public and Section 8 housing. 5.2005 Section 5.2005 Housing and... PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Protection for Victims of Domestic Violence in Public and Section 8 Housing § 5.2005 Protection of victims of domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking in public...

  17. Intergenerational violence in Burundi: Experienced childhood maltreatment increases the risk of abusive child rearing and intimate partner violence

    PubMed Central

    Crombach, Anselm; Bambonyé, Manassé

    2015-01-01

    Background Experiencing abuse during childhood affects the psychological well-being of individuals throughout their lives and may even influence their offspring by enhancing the likelihood of an intergenerational transmission of violence. Understanding the effects of childhood maltreatment on child-rearing practices and intimate partner violence might be of particular importance to overcome the consequences of violent conflicts in African societies. Objective Using Burundi as an example, we aimed to explore the associations between childhood maltreatment, intimate partner violence, perceived partner intimidation, gender and the probability of violently acting out against one's own children or romantic partner. Methods Amongst a sample of 141 men and 141 women in the capital of Burundi, we identified those who had biological children and those who lived or had lived in relationships. Using culturally appropriate instruments, we enquired about their exposure to childhood maltreatment and partner violence as well as their inclinations to act out violently. Results We found that childhood maltreatment and perceived partner intimidation were strong predictors for the perpetration of violence against children. Moreover, we found that women were more likely to use violence against children if they experienced partner violence and less likely to resort to violence if they felt intimidated. Men were more likely to perpetrate violence against their partner. Childhood maltreatment was again a strong predictor. The more women experienced partner violence, the more they fought back. Conclusions Childhood maltreatment is a strong predictor for domestic violence and has to be addressed to interrupt the cycle of violence in post-conflict countries. PMID:26679146

  18. Domestic violence and immigration status among Latina mothers in the child welfare system: findings from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being II (NSCAW II).

    PubMed

    Ogbonnaya, Ijeoma Nwabuzor; Finno-Velasquez, Megan; Kohl, Patricia L

    2015-01-01

    Many children involved with the child welfare system witness parental domestic violence. The association between children's domestic violence exposure and child welfare involvement may be influenced by certain socio-cultural factors; however, minimal research has examined this relationship. The current study compares domestic violence experiences and case outcomes among Latinas who are legal immigrants (n=39), unauthorized immigrants (n=77), naturalized citizens (n=30), and US-born citizen mothers (n=383) reported for child maltreatment. This analysis used data from the second round of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being. Mothers were asked about whether they experienced domestic violence during the past year. In addition, data were collected to assess if (a) domestic violence was the primary abuse type reported and, if so, (b) the maltreatment allegation was substantiated. Results show that naturalized citizens, legal residents, and unauthorized immigrants did not differ from US-born citizens in self-reports of domestic violence; approximately 33% of mothers reported experiences of domestic violence within the past year. Yet, unauthorized immigrants were 3.76 times more likely than US-born citizens to have cases with allegations of domestic violence as the primary abuse type. Despite higher rates of alleged domestic violence, unauthorized citizens were not more likely than US-born citizens to have these cases substantiated for domestic violence (F(2.26, 153.99)=0.709, p=.510). Findings highlight that domestic violence is not accurately accounted for in families with unauthorized immigrant mothers. We recommend child welfare workers are trained to properly assess and fulfill the needs of immigrant families, particularly as it relates to domestic violence.

  19. Poverty, Violence, and Health: The Impact of Domestic Violence during Pregnancy on Newborn Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aizer, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Two percent of women in the United States suffer from intimate partner violence annually, with poor and minority women disproportionately affected. I provide evidence of an important negative externality associated with domestic violence by estimating a negative and causal relationship between violence during pregnancy and newborn health,…

  20. Counselors' Attitudes toward Domestic Violence in Same-Sex versus Opposite-Sex Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Jamye R.; Fedewa, Alicia L.

    2012-01-01

    Domestic violence is often perceived to occur only in heterosexual relationships. However, domestic violence is also prevalent in same-sex relationships. The majority of the research indicates that counselors perceive same-sex domestic violence differently than heterosexual domestic violence. This literature review synthesizes the research…

  1. Using Simulation to Introduce Nursing Students to Caring for Victims of Elder Abuse and Intimate Partner Violence.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Susan G; Benson, Kim H

    2015-01-01

    Learning experiences about domestic violence may not be readily available to nursing students at their traditional clinical sites. Faculty at an associate degree nursing program developed and implemented elder abuse and intimate partner violence simulation scenarios for a Health Systems Concepts course. Learning objectives focused on assessment, safety, communication, education, and legal responsibilities for nurses. After the simulation, students participated in debriefing, completed student evaluations, and responded to three questions about the experience in their reflective journals. Faculty and students expressed satisfaction with this method of learning about domestic violence.

  2. Using Simulation to Introduce Nursing Students to Caring for Victims of Elder Abuse and Intimate Partner Violence.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Susan G; Benson, Kim H

    2015-01-01

    Learning experiences about domestic violence may not be readily available to nursing students at their traditional clinical sites. Faculty at an associate degree nursing program developed and implemented elder abuse and intimate partner violence simulation scenarios for a Health Systems Concepts course. Learning objectives focused on assessment, safety, communication, education, and legal responsibilities for nurses. After the simulation, students participated in debriefing, completed student evaluations, and responded to three questions about the experience in their reflective journals. Faculty and students expressed satisfaction with this method of learning about domestic violence. PMID:26753306

  3. The Risk of Abusive Violence among Children with Nongenetic Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelles, Richard J.; Harrop, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Data from Second National Family Violence Survey revealed no significant differences between genetic and nongenetic parents in rates of severe and very severe violence toward children. Findings have implications for diagnosing cases of child abuse and for biosocial theory of child maltreatment. (Author/NB)

  4. A meta-summary of qualitative findings on the lived experience among culturally diverse domestic violence survivors.

    PubMed

    Childress, Saltanat

    2013-09-01

    This meta-summary study explores, extracts, and summarizes themes from related qualitative studies on the lived experiences and coping mechanisms among culturally diverse domestic violence survivors. Using Sandelowski and Barroso's meta-summary strategy, a systematic literature review of articles published between 1990 and 2010 was conducted using a qualitative approach. Of a total of 802 studies, nine met the study inclusion criteria. This meta-summary of nine studies confirms the recurring themes in primary qualitative studies in the literature that illustrate women's experiences of domestic violence. These themes include (a) the effects of violence, (b) the cyclical nature of violence, (c) normalizing and tolerating violence, (d) the strength and resilience of victims, (e) barriers to help-seeking, and (f) the role of substance use in domestic violence. The review shows key cross-cultural differences in women's perceptions of abuse and the causes and strategies for responding to abuse. The review also reveals the lack of studies on domestic violence among women from Central Asia and the former Soviet Union.

  5. Measuring domestic violence in human immunodeficiency virus-positive women

    PubMed Central

    Patrikar, Seema; Verma, AK; Bhatti, VK; Shatabdi, S

    2012-01-01

    Background Violence affects the lives of millions of women worldwide, in all socioeconomic classes. Violence and the fear of violence are emerging as important risk factor contributing to the vulnerability to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection for women. The objective of the present cross sectional study is to compare the experiences of domestic violence between HIV-positive and HIV-negative married women seeking treatment in a tertiary care hospital. Methods The study is conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Pune on a randomly selected 150 married women (75 HIV-positive and 75 HIV-negative). Informed consent was obtained from all the women and also a trained counsellor was present during the process of data collection. The data was collected by interview method by taking precautions as laid down in the World Health Organization's ethical and safety recommendations for research on domestic violence and using modified conflict tactics scale (CTS). The definition of violence followed is as per the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in 1993. Results The percentage of women reporting domestic violence is 44.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 36.84–52.68). The proportion of physical, emotional and sexual violence reported is 38% (95% CI = 30.49–45.96), 24% (95% CI = 17.67–31.31), and 14.7% (95% CI = 9.66–21.02), respectively. The odds of reporting violence of all forms is significantly higher among HIV-positive women than among HIV-negative women (P<0.05). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression is carried out to examine the possible predictors of domestic violence. Conclusion The findings suggest high proportion of HIV-positive women report violence then HIV-negative women which must be addressed through multilevel prevention approaches. PMID:24669053

  6. Domestic violence among adolescents in HIV prevention research in Tanzania: Participant experiences and measurement issues

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Joy Noel; Kaaya, Sylvia; Karungula, Happy; Kaale, Anna; Headley, Jennifer; Tolley, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Under-representation of female adolescents in HIV clinical trials may inhibit their access to future prevention technologies. Domestic violence, broadly defined as violence perpetrated by intimate partners and/or family members, may affect trial participation. This study describes violence in the lives of adolescents and young women in Tanzania, explores use of the Women’s Experience with Battering (WEB) Scale to measure battering, and examines the associations between battering and socio-demographic and HIV risk factors. Methods Community formative research (CFR) and a mock clinical trial (MCT) were conducted to examine the challenges of recruiting younger (15-17) versus older (18-21) participants into HIV prevention trials. The CFR included qualitative interviews with 23 participants and there were 135 MCT participants. The WEB was administered in both the CFR and MCT. Results Nineteen CFR participants experienced physical/sexual violence and 17% scored positive for battering. All married participants reported partner-related domestic violence, and half scored positive for battering. Many believed beatings were normal. None of the single participants scored positive on battering, but one-third reported abuse by relatives. Among MCT participants, 15% scored positive for battering; most perpetrators were relatives. Younger participants were more likely to report battering. Conclusions Adolescents experienced high rates of domestic violence and the WEB captured battering from both partners and relatives. The level of familial violence was unexpected and has implications for parental roles in study recruitment. Addressing adolescent abuse in HIV prevention trials and in the general population should be a public health priority. PMID:24740725

  7. 'Every bone of my body:' domestic violence and the diagnostic body.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Paige L

    2014-12-01

    Diagnostic categories for domestic violence have shifted over time, transforming from a disorder of psychological passivity and acute injury into a chronic and somatically invasive condition. This paper links these changing diagnoses to constructions of the abused body and to victim-blaming narratives. Based on an analysis of medical journal articles, this research identifies two logics that undergird domestic violence diagnoses, the body, and victim-blaming: 1) the logic of injury (1970s-1980s); and 2) the logic of health (late 1980s-present). The logic of injury is associated with overt victim-blaming, a temporally bounded and injured body, and psychological passivity. Once the feminist anti-violence movement gained mainstream credibility, however, the logic of injury fell out of favor as an explanation for domestic violence. What surfaced next was the logic of health, which is associated with chronic diagnoses and what the author calls a temporally extended body. The temporally extended body is flexible and layered, linking up past, present, and future states of disordered embodiment. The author suggests that, rather than ushering in hope and possibility via the logic of health's somatic flexibility, this abused body creates spaces into which new forms of blame and self-responsibility can take shape.

  8. Dilemmas in mandatory reporting of domestic violence: carative ethics in emergency rooms.

    PubMed

    Mayer, B

    1998-01-01

    Laws are clear when it comes to reporting child abuse, elder abuse, or maltreatment of the disabeled; however, the fuzzy area of domestic violence, or injury to women by their husbands or intimates, puzzles the system ethically and legally. Experts are divided on the issue of mandatory reporting of domestic violence by health care professionals. As exemplified by the Florida law, the crux of the problem may be twofold. First, the law requires reporting of certain incidents that are ambiguously defined. Second, reporting may be mandatory without the patient's consent. Many experts in the field of domestic violence suggest that mandated reporting by health care workers is not in the best interests of the victims; it may lead to more violence and increase the victim's reluctance to get needed health care. This victim vulnerability creates ethical dilemmas in the emergency department, often the first outside contact after a violent incident. This paper examines the implications of reporting applied to emergency practice in the context of basic ethical standards. The application of mandatory reporting laws to competent adult victims presents questions related to nonmaleficence, beneficence, autonomy, confidentiality, and a variety of contextual issues that arise from these main ethical domains.

  9. Dilemmas in mandatory reporting of domestic violence: carative ethics in emergency rooms.

    PubMed

    Mayer, B

    1998-01-01

    Laws are clear when it comes to reporting child abuse, elder abuse, or maltreatment of the disabeled; however, the fuzzy area of domestic violence, or injury to women by their husbands or intimates, puzzles the system ethically and legally. Experts are divided on the issue of mandatory reporting of domestic violence by health care professionals. As exemplified by the Florida law, the crux of the problem may be twofold. First, the law requires reporting of certain incidents that are ambiguously defined. Second, reporting may be mandatory without the patient's consent. Many experts in the field of domestic violence suggest that mandated reporting by health care workers is not in the best interests of the victims; it may lead to more violence and increase the victim's reluctance to get needed health care. This victim vulnerability creates ethical dilemmas in the emergency department, often the first outside contact after a violent incident. This paper examines the implications of reporting applied to emergency practice in the context of basic ethical standards. The application of mandatory reporting laws to competent adult victims presents questions related to nonmaleficence, beneficence, autonomy, confidentiality, and a variety of contextual issues that arise from these main ethical domains. PMID:10197004

  10. Animal Cruelty by Children Exposed to Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currie, Cheryl L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The first objective of this study was to determine if children exposed to domestic violence were significantly more likely to be cruel to animals than children not exposed to violence. The second was to determine if there were significant age and gender differences between children who were and were not cruel to animals. Method: A…

  11. The perceived impact of a child maltreatment report from the perspective of the domestic violence shelter worker.

    PubMed

    Steen, Julie A

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine domestic violence shelter workers' perceptions of child maltreatment reporting. A sample of 82 professionals from domestic violence shelters across the United States participated in a survey focusing on a variety of different types of reports and the frequency of both positive and negative outcomes arising from these reports. Possible outcomes included in the study are damage to the relationship between the worker and the battered woman, disempowerment of the battered woman, discouragement from seeking further help, protection of the child, further traumatization of the child, further disruption to the family, and damage to the woman's likelihood of maintaining custody. Significant differences in perceived impact are found based on identity of abuser (spousal batterer vs. battered woman) and nature of report (child as witness to domestic violence vs. child as victim of abuse). These results point to the complexity of perceptions regarding the impact of reporting.

  12. Variation in the Prevalence of Domestic Violence between Neighboring Areas

    PubMed Central

    Nouhjah, Sedigheh; Latifi, Seyed Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Domestic violence against women is an important health issue, but few studies have focused on city of residence and ethnic differences. To estimate the prevalence of various forms of domestic violence and certain related factors, with a specific focus on city of residence and ethnicity, we studied 1820 married women attending public health centers in 4 large cities in Khuzestan Province, southwestern Islamic Republic of Iran. We used an interviewer-administered questionnaire for data collection. The prevalence of some forms of lifetime domestic violence against women was 47.3%. The prevalence of physical, psychological, and any form of lifetime violence was the highest in Dezful (25.7%, 54.8%, and 57.7%, resp.). For sexual violence, the highest prevalence was reported in Ahvaz (17.7%). The highest prevalence of physical and sexual violence during any point of life was reported by Arab women (25.1% and 16.7%). The experience of all forms of violence was significantly associated with city of residence. Results of regression logistic analysis revealed that all of the forms of violence except psychological violence were statistically significantly associated with ethnicity (P < 0.05). PMID:27433514

  13. Is it abuse? Deaf female undergraduates' labeling of partner violence.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Melissa L; Kobek Pezzarossi, Caroline M

    2012-01-01

    The current study investigated the labeling of abuse experiences in a sample of 97 Deaf female undergraduate students, exploring the following questions: What is the prevalence of violent behaviors experienced by Deaf female undergraduates in their past-year relationships, what proportion of these relationships are identified as "abuse," and what scripts and strategies do Deaf female undergraduates utilize to label their experiences of partner violence? Results indicated that over half of the sample chose not to label past-year experiences of psychological aggression, physical assault, and sexual coercion as abuse, even when these experiences included severe violence. Implications for the Deaf education system will be discussed. PMID:22140216

  14. Animal abuse and intimate partner violence: researching the link and its significance in Ireland - a veterinary perspective.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, B; Allen, M; Jones, B

    2008-01-01

    Research on domestic violence has established a substantial association between intimate partner abuse and the abuse of children within the home. It is only recently however, that researchers have demonstrated the correlation between non-accidental injury in animals, and abuse of women by their intimate male partners. A growing body of evidence suggests that animal abuse can be an early indicator for other forms of violent behaviour. This research includes the responses of a sample of 23 women using refuge services in the Republic of Ireland. It investigates the connection between domestic violence and animal abuse, and ascertains if there is sufficient support service for animals and people relevant to domestic abuse. In the survey population, 57% of women reported witnessing one or more forms of abuse, or threats of abuse, of their pets. Five of which were reported to have resulted in the death of the pet. Eighty seven per cent of women felt a facility to accommodate pets would have made their decision to leave the family home easier. Four women disclosed that lack of such a service and concern for the welfare of their companion animals caused them to remain in their abusive relationships for longer than they felt appropriate. Nine families placed pets in the care of family or friends, one woman is unaware of the fate of her pet, while the pets of six families remained with the abusive male after his partner entered a refuge. The majority of women felt unable to talk to anyone about their fears for their pets' welfare. Many felt that there is no service which can provide temporary accommodation for womens' pets while they are in refuge. The results obtained support those found elsewhere in larger studies in the USA and UK, and demonstrate an association of animal abuse in households where there is reported domestic violence.

  15. 24 CFR 960.103 - Equal opportunity requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 CFR part 5, subpart L in all applicable cases where there is involved or claimed to be involved... protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. 960.103 Section 960.103 Housing... Equal opportunity requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence,...

  16. 24 CFR 960.103 - Equal opportunity requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 CFR part 5, subpart L in all applicable cases where there is involved or claimed to be involved... protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. 960.103 Section 960.103 Housing... Equal opportunity requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence,...

  17. 24 CFR 960.103 - Equal opportunity requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 CFR part 5, subpart L in all applicable cases where there is involved or claimed to be involved... protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. 960.103 Section 960.103 Housing... Equal opportunity requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence,...

  18. 24 CFR 960.103 - Equal opportunity requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 CFR part 5, subpart L in all applicable cases where there is involved or claimed to be involved... protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. 960.103 Section 960.103 Housing... Equal opportunity requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence,...

  19. 75 FR 14596 - Family Violence Prevention and Services/Grants for Domestic Violence Shelters/Grants to Native...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Family Violence Prevention and Services/Grants for Domestic Violence Shelters/Grants to Native American Tribes (Including Alaska Native Villages) and... Title: Family Violence Prevention and Services/Grants for Domestic Violence Shelters/Grants to...

  20. Study of the Types of Domestic Violence Committed Against Women Referred to the Legal Medical Organization in Urmia - Iran

    PubMed Central

    Aghakhani, Nader; Sharif Nia, Hamid; Moosavi, Ehsan; Eftekhari, Ali; Zarei, Abbas; Bahrami, Nasim; Nikoonejad, Ali Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Today, domestic violence against women is a growing epidemic that can be observed in many countries. Objectives: This study was carried out to determine the types of domestic violence against women who were referred to the Legal Medical Organization of Iran in Urmia, Iran in 2012. Materials and Methods: The descriptive survey included demographic information, abuse screening, and items regarding partner involvement. Data was gathered using face-to-face structured interviews. The study population included 300, women 18 years of age or older, and data was collected about their demographic characteristics and the types of domestic violence they experienced. SPSS software version 16 was used for the analyses. Results: The majority of participants were in the 25 – 30 age group, and 83% of them were battered by their husbands in various ways. No significant relationships were observed between violence and unemployment, increasing age, and home ownership. Conclusions: The prevalence of abuse reported by women in this population suggests that many women that are referred to the Legal Medical Organization of Iran may have a history of abuse. Abused women may have different reasons for seeking a divorce. If routine screening for abuse is included in counseling, health providers will have the opportunity to develop a safety plan and initiate appropriate referrals. PMID:26834806

  1. Canadian Mock Juror Attitudes and Decisions in Domestic Violence Cases Involving Asian and White Interracial and Intraracial Couples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maeder, Evelyn M.; Mossiere, Annik; Cheung, Liann

    2013-01-01

    This study manipulated the race of the defendant and the victim (White/White, White/Asian, Asian/Asian, and Asian/White) in a domestic violence case to examine the potential prejudicial impact of race on juror decision making. A total of 181undergraduate students read a trial transcript involving an allegation of spousal abuse in which defendant…

  2. 45 CFR 286.140 - What special provisions apply to victims of domestic violence?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... domestic violence? 286.140 Section 286.140 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF... special provisions apply to victims of domestic violence? (a) Tribes electing the Family Violence Option... and identify individuals receiving TANF assistance with a history of domestic violence,...

  3. 45 CFR 286.140 - What special provisions apply to victims of domestic violence?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... domestic violence? 286.140 Section 286.140 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF... special provisions apply to victims of domestic violence? (a) Tribes electing the Family Violence Option... and identify individuals receiving TANF assistance with a history of domestic violence,...

  4. 45 CFR 286.140 - What special provisions apply to victims of domestic violence?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... domestic violence? 286.140 Section 286.140 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF... special provisions apply to victims of domestic violence? (a) Tribes electing the Family Violence Option... and identify individuals receiving TANF assistance with a history of domestic violence,...

  5. 45 CFR 286.140 - What special provisions apply to victims of domestic violence?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... domestic violence? 286.140 Section 286.140 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF... special provisions apply to victims of domestic violence? (a) Tribes electing the Family Violence Option... and identify individuals receiving TANF assistance with a history of domestic violence,...

  6. 45 CFR 286.140 - What special provisions apply to victims of domestic violence?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... domestic violence? 286.140 Section 286.140 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF... special provisions apply to victims of domestic violence? (a) Tribes electing the Family Violence Option... and identify individuals receiving TANF assistance with a history of domestic violence,...

  7. Domestic Violence and Its Related Factors Based a Prevalence Study in Iran.

    PubMed

    Abbaspoor, Zahra; Momtazpour, Mozhgan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of present study was to assess the frequency of violence against married women and its related factors in health centers affiliated to Isfahan University of medical sciences.This is a cross-sectional study was conducted on married women who were attending in health centers in Isfahan city, Iran. Woman Abuse scale was used to illicit information regard to violence and a structured questionnaire was used to gathering data regard to socio demographic characteristics. Out of the total 600 women (61.7%) reported positive domestic violence.Psychological, physical, sever (life threatened) and sexual violence was found to be 59.7%, 33.2%, 10% and 39.3% respectively. Significant difference was found between violence and some socio demographic characteristics including: age, years of marriage, occupation, education, smoking, number of children, satisfaction with baby sex and socio economic status (p<0.05).Prevalence of domestic violence is high in Isfahan city. Thus, the health providers should be trained to help and support victims through providing referral services and also adequate treatment to making a positive difference in their lives. PMID:27357868

  8. The Therapeutic Efficacy of Domestic Violence Victim Interventions.

    PubMed

    Hackett, Shannon; McWhirter, Paula T; Lesher, Susan

    2016-04-01

    A meta-analysis on domestic violence interventions was conducted to determine overall effectiveness of mental health programs involving women and children in joint treatment. These interventions were further analyzed to determine whether outcomes are differentially affected based on the outcome measure employed. To date, no meta-analyses have been published on domestic violence victim intervention efficacy. The 17 investigations that met study criteria yielded findings indicating that domestic violence interventions have a large effect size (d = .812), which decreases to a medium effect size when compared to control groups (d = .518). Effect sizes were assessed to determine whether treatment differed according to the focus of the outcome measure employed: (a) external stress (behavioral problems, aggression, or alcohol use); (b) psychological adjustment (depression, anxiety, or happiness); (c) self-concept (self-esteem, perceived competence, or internal locus of control); (d) social adjustment (popularity, loneliness, or cooperativeness); (e) family relations (mother-child relations, affection, or quality of interaction); and (f) maltreatment events (reoccurrence of violence, return to partner). Results reveal that domestic violence interventions across all outcome categories yield effects in the medium to large range for both internalized and externalized symptomatology. Implications for greater awareness and support for domestic violence treatment and programming are discussed. PMID:25612799

  9. Domestic violence: from the visible to the invisible.

    PubMed

    Iossi Silva, Marta Angélica; Carvalho Ferriani, Maria das Graças

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and analyze notifications of domestic violence against children registered at the Regional Health Services in Guarulhos, São Paulo, Brazil; the limitations imposed to health professionals' actions and the meaning of domestic violence against children in the health professionals' routine. The notifications registered between 2001 and 2002 were characterized in order to better understand this reality and also to support the collected data through the qualitative approach. There is a predominance of negligence cases 45%, while 26% of the notifications related to physical violence and 14% to suspected sexual violence. Social workers registered the highest number of notifications, 46%. Based on the social agents' discourse, we identified two empirical categories: "interfaces of the violence" and "fear".

  10. Domestic violence, poverty, and social services: does location matter?

    PubMed

    Hetling, Andrea; Zhang, Haiyan

    2010-01-01

    Objective. This study investigates whether or not domestic violence agencies are located in areas of need. Recent research indicates that community economic disadvantage is a risk factor for intimate partner violence, but related questions regarding the geographic location of social service agencies have not been investigated.Methods. Using Connecticut as a case study, we analyze the relationship of agency location and police-reported domestic violence incidents and assaults using OLS regression and correcting for spatial autocorrelation.Results. The presence of an agency within a town has no relationship with the rates of domestic violence. However, regional patterns are evident.Conclusion. Findings indicate that programs are not geographically mismatched with need, but neither are programs located in towns with higher rates of incidents or assaults. Future research and planning efforts should consider the geographic location of agencies. PMID:21117333

  11. Portrayal of women as intimate partner domestic violence perpetrators.

    PubMed

    Hester, Marianne

    2012-09-01

    The article explores some of the ways heterosexual women are portrayed as perpetrators of intimate partner domestic violence (IPV) in police domestic violence records in England and is the first study in the United Kingdom to examine the issue of gender and domestic violence perpetrators in any detail and over time. The article is based on a study of 128 IPV cases tracked longitudinally over 6 years, including 32 cases where women were the sole perpetrators and a further 32 cases where women were "dual" perpetrators alongside men. Women were 3 times more likely than men to be arrested when they were construed as the perpetrator. However, Pence and Dasgupta's category of "pathological violence" appeared more useful as an analytical category in the construction of women as "perpetrators" and men as "victims" than the notion of "battering."

  12. Domestic Violence Reforms: Empty Promises or Fulfilled Expectations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert C.; Smith, Barbara

    1995-01-01

    Considers major reforms in the criminal justice system in response to domestic violence incidents: more frequent arrest, reduced control of victims in domestic court cases, more widespread use of restraining orders, and court-mandated treatment for batterers. Concludes that these do not work well across a variety of situations to reduce future…

  13. Domestic violence in the Solomon Islands

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Mikaela A.; Stewart, Molly G.; Tiller, Rose E.; Rice, Rebecca G.; Crowley, Louise E.; Williams, Nicola J.

    2016-01-01

    The Solomon Islands has one of the highest rates of family and sexual violence (FSV) in the world with 64% of women aged 15–49 have reported physical and/or sexual abuse by a partner. The National Referral Hospital (NRH) in the capital, Honiara, is the only tertiary hospital for the country. Our 4-week medical elective at the NRH was spent reflecting on healthcare challenges including FSV, with the aim of identifying cases of FSV and assessing on the current strategies to improve care for victims. Throughout our placement, we encountered many cases of probable FSV, particularly in the Emergency Department and Obstetrics and Gynecology. These patients were often not managed effectively, largely due to time pressures and overcrowding in the hospital. However, we identified a number of strategies, which have recently been implemented in order to help FSV victims in the Solomon Islands. These include strategies within the healthcare setting, in particular, the commencement of FSV reporting within the hospital, and the production of a manual to enable healthcare worker education on the issue. Strategies within the criminal justice system are also in place. These include recent changes in legislation and the work of the volunteer police force, Royal Assist Mission to the Solomon Islands, to improve attitudes toward FSV. These approaches to tackle the problem of FSV are currently in their early stages and have largely stemmed from Western policies and ideals. This report concludes that more time is needed to accurately assess the impact of the current changes before further recommendations are made. PMID:27453837

  14. Domestic violence in the Solomon Islands.

    PubMed

    Ming, Mikaela A; Stewart, Molly G; Tiller, Rose E; Rice, Rebecca G; Crowley, Louise E; Williams, Nicola J

    2016-01-01

    The Solomon Islands has one of the highest rates of family and sexual violence (FSV) in the world with 64% of women aged 15-49 have reported physical and/or sexual abuse by a partner. The National Referral Hospital (NRH) in the capital, Honiara, is the only tertiary hospital for the country. Our 4-week medical elective at the NRH was spent reflecting on healthcare challenges including FSV, with the aim of identifying cases of FSV and assessing on the current strategies to improve care for victims. Throughout our placement, we encountered many cases of probable FSV, particularly in the Emergency Department and Obstetrics and Gynecology. These patients were often not managed effectively, largely due to time pressures and overcrowding in the hospital. However, we identified a number of strategies, which have recently been implemented in order to help FSV victims in the Solomon Islands. These include strategies within the healthcare setting, in particular, the commencement of FSV reporting within the hospital, and the production of a manual to enable healthcare worker education on the issue. Strategies within the criminal justice system are also in place. These include recent changes in legislation and the work of the volunteer police force, Royal Assist Mission to the Solomon Islands, to improve attitudes toward FSV. These approaches to tackle the problem of FSV are currently in their early stages and have largely stemmed from Western policies and ideals. This report concludes that more time is needed to accurately assess the impact of the current changes before further recommendations are made. PMID:27453837

  15. Uxoricide in pregnancy: ancient Greek domestic violence in evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Deacy, Susan; McHardy, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of ancient Greek examples of uxoricide in pregnancy have concluded that the theme is used to suggest tyrannical abuse of power and that the violence is a product of the patriarchal nature of ancient society. This article uses evolutionary analyses of violence during pregnancy to argue that the themes of sexual jealousy and uncertainty over paternity are as crucial as the theme of power to an understanding of these examples and that the examples can be seen as typical instances of spousal abuse as it occurs in all types of society. PMID:24153380

  16. Uxoricide in pregnancy: ancient Greek domestic violence in evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Deacy, Susan; McHardy, Fiona

    2013-10-24

    Previous studies of ancient Greek examples of uxoricide in pregnancy have concluded that the theme is used to suggest tyrannical abuse of power and that the violence is a product of the patriarchal nature of ancient society. This article uses evolutionary analyses of violence during pregnancy to argue that the themes of sexual jealousy and uncertainty over paternity are as crucial as the theme of power to an understanding of these examples and that the examples can be seen as typical instances of spousal abuse as it occurs in all types of society.

  17. Attitudes and Beliefs About Domestic Violence: Results of a Public Opinion Survey. I. Definitions of Domestic Violence, Criminal Domestic Violence, and Prevalence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Bonnie E.; Worden, Alissa Pollitz

    2005-01-01

    This study reports analyses and findings from a public opinion survey designed to explore beliefs about domestic violence (DV) -- what it is, when it is against the law, and how prevalent it is. The project interviewed 1,200 residents from six New York communities. The analyses reveal substantial first hand and second hand experience with DV and…

  18. Divorce in the context of domestic violence against women in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Vu, Ha Song; Schuler, Sidney; Hoang, Tu Anh; Quach, Trang

    2014-06-01

    This paper examines obstacles for women who face domestic violence in making decisions about divorce and in seeking and securing support for a divorce. The research was undertaken in the context of a project in one district of a coastal province in Vietnam that sought to reduce gender based-violence and mitigate its effects. Data from in-depth interviews and focus-group discussions are used to examine abused women's attitudes, strategies and behaviours and the responses of people in their communities and in the support system established by the project. The findings show that social norms supporting marriage discourage abused women from seeking divorce and, in some cases, any kind of support, and discourage community-based support networks, police and local court systems from providing effective assistance to these women.

  19. Coordinated Community Response to Family Violence: The Role of Domestic Violence Service Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, Neena M.; Ward, Kristin; Janczewski, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    There is increasing awareness that domestic violence (DV) and child maltreatment often overlap and that there are significant negative consequences to women and children who are victims in the same families. The present study contains data from a participatory evaluation of a multisite national demonstration project on family violence (the…

  20. Finding Common Ground in the Study of Child Maltreatment, Youth Violence, and Adult Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daro, Deborah; Edleson, Jeffrey L.; Pinderhughes, Howard

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, we have witnessed a surge in public policies aimed at ending child maltreatment, youth violence, and adult domestic violence. Commensurate with this increased interest has been a growing body of research on each issues etiology, affected population, and the public policy and prevention impacts. Even a cursory review of the…

  1. Reduced visual cortex gray matter volume and thickness in young adults who witnessed domestic violence during childhood.

    PubMed

    Tomoda, Akemi; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M; Teicher, Martin H

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to interparental violence is associated with negative outcomes, such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and reduced cognitive abilities. However, little is known about the potential effects of witnessing domestic violence during childhood on gray matter volume (GMV) or cortical thickness. High-resolution 3.0 T volumetric scans (Siemens Trio Scanner) were obtained on 52 subjects (18-25 years) including 22 (6 males/16 females) with a history of visually witnessing episodes of domestic violence, and 30 (8 males/22 females) unexposed control subjects, with neither a current nor past DSM-IV Axis I or II disorder. Potential confounding effects of age, gender, level of parental verbal aggression, parental education, financial stress, full scale IQ, and total GMV, or average thickness were modeled using voxel based morphometry and FreeSurfer. Witnessing domestic violence subjects had a 6.1% GMV reduction in the right lingual gyrus (BA18) (P = 0.029, False Discovery Rate corrected peak level). Thickness in this region was also reduced, as was thickness in V2 bilaterally and left occipital pole. Theses regions were maximally sensitive to exposure to witnessing domestic violence between 11-13 years of age. Regional reductions in GMV and thickness were observed in both susceptible and resilient witnessing domestic violence subjects. Results in subjects witnessing domestic violence were similar to previously reported results in subjects with childhood sexual abuse, as the primary region affected was visual cortex. Brain regions that process and convey the adverse sensory input of the abuse may be specifically modified by this experience, particularly in subjects exposed to a single type of maltreatment. Exposure to multiple types of maltreatment is more commonly associated with morphological alterations in corticolimbic regions. These findings fit with preclinical studies showing that visual cortex is a highly plastic structure. PMID:23300699

  2. Reduced Visual Cortex Gray Matter Volume and Thickness in Young Adults Who Witnessed Domestic Violence during Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Tomoda, Akemi; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M.; Teicher, Martin H.

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to interparental violence is associated with negative outcomes, such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and reduced cognitive abilities. However, little is known about the potential effects of witnessing domestic violence during childhood on gray matter volume (GMV) or cortical thickness. High-resolution 3.0 T volumetric scans (Siemens Trio Scanner) were obtained on 52 subjects (18–25 years) including 22 (6 males/16 females) with a history of visually witnessing episodes of domestic violence, and 30 (8 males/22 females) unexposed control subjects, with neither a current nor past DSM-IV Axis I or II disorder. Potential confounding effects of age, gender, level of parental verbal aggression, parental education, financial stress, full scale IQ, and total GMV, or average thickness were modeled using voxel based morphometry and FreeSurfer. Witnessing domestic violence subjects had a 6.1% GMV reduction in the right lingual gyrus (BA18) (P = 0.029, False Discovery Rate corrected peak level). Thickness in this region was also reduced, as was thickness in V2 bilaterally and left occipital pole. Theses regions were maximally sensitive to exposure to witnessing domestic violence between 11–13 years of age. Regional reductions in GMV and thickness were observed in both susceptible and resilient witnessing domestic violence subjects. Results in subjects witnessing domestic violence were similar to previously reported results in subjects with childhood sexual abuse, as the primary region affected was visual cortex. Brain regions that process and convey the adverse sensory input of the abuse may be specifically modified by this experience, particularly in subjects exposed to a single type of maltreatment. Exposure to multiple types of maltreatment is more commonly associated with morphological alterations in corticolimbic regions. These findings fit with preclinical studies showing that visual cortex is a highly plastic structure. PMID:23300699

  3. Reduced visual cortex gray matter volume and thickness in young adults who witnessed domestic violence during childhood.

    PubMed

    Tomoda, Akemi; Polcari, Ann; Anderson, Carl M; Teicher, Martin H

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to interparental violence is associated with negative outcomes, such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder and reduced cognitive abilities. However, little is known about the potential effects of witnessing domestic violence during childhood on gray matter volume (GMV) or cortical thickness. High-resolution 3.0 T volumetric scans (Siemens Trio Scanner) were obtained on 52 subjects (18-25 years) including 22 (6 males/16 females) with a history of visually witnessing episodes of domestic violence, and 30 (8 males/22 females) unexposed control subjects, with neither a current nor past DSM-IV Axis I or II disorder. Potential confounding effects of age, gender, level of parental verbal aggression, parental education, financial stress, full scale IQ, and total GMV, or average thickness were modeled using voxel based morphometry and FreeSurfer. Witnessing domestic violence subjects had a 6.1% GMV reduction in the right lingual gyrus (BA18) (P = 0.029, False Discovery Rate corrected peak level). Thickness in this region was also reduced, as was thickness in V2 bilaterally and left occipital pole. Theses regions were maximally sensitive to exposure to witnessing domestic violence between 11-13 years of age. Regional reductions in GMV and thickness were observed in both susceptible and resilient witnessing domestic violence subjects. Results in subjects witnessing domestic violence were similar to previously reported results in subjects with childhood sexual abuse, as the primary region affected was visual cortex. Brain regions that process and convey the adverse sensory input of the abuse may be specifically modified by this experience, particularly in subjects exposed to a single type of maltreatment. Exposure to multiple types of maltreatment is more commonly associated with morphological alterations in corticolimbic regions. These findings fit with preclinical studies showing that visual cortex is a highly plastic structure.

  4. Occupational Needs and Goals of Survivors of Domestic Violence.

    PubMed

    Javaherian-Dysinger, Heather; Krpalek, Dragana; Huecker, Esther; Hewitt, Liane; Cabrera, Michelle; Brown, Canique; Francis, Jason; Rogers, Katie; Server, Sage

    2016-01-01

    This study's purpose was to describe the occupational needs and goals of women residing in a domestic violence shelter and their self-perceived changes in satisfaction and occupational performance. Using a retrospective design, data from 68 occupational therapy evaluations from two domestic violence shelter settings were examined. Data were analyzed by coding problem areas and occupational goals and calculating frequencies for these variables. Where data were available, we also analyzed changes in pre- and postscores for self-perceived satisfaction and occupational performance (n = 25). The most common problem areas were leisure, education, work, child rearing, and health management. The most common goals were in the areas of education, work, health management, child rearing, and home management. Retrospective pre- and postchange scores in performance and satisfaction for 25 women were statistically significant. Findings provide direction for, and highlight the importance of occupational therapy services within domestic violence shelters as women regain their life skills. PMID:26647100

  5. Mandatory reporting of domestic violence: the law, friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Iavicoli, Laura G

    2005-07-01

    Should physicians be mandated to report domestic violence involving a competent adult patient regardless of whether or not he or she consents to the report? This is a complex ethical and moral issue; in some states such as California, Colorado, Kentucky, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and New Mexico it has become a legal one as well. The Federal health privacy regulation instituted in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) addresses issues of privacy protection for survivors of domestic violence, but it does not preempt those state laws that are less (or more) protective of patient privacy. In the above states, physicians and/or health care providers are mandated to report acts of domestic violence to an agency, under their own circumstances, regardless of whether the physician or health care worker believes that reporting the violence is in the patient's best interest or not. But is mandatory reporting truly "good" or "bad" for the patient, the physician or society as a whole? This article explores the laws and the evidence (including evidence-based research) surrounding the issue of mandatory reporting of domestic violence when it pertains to a competent adult.

  6. The criminalization of domestic violence: what social workers need to know.

    PubMed

    Danis, Fran S

    2003-04-01

    Domestic violence is a crosscutting issue that affects clients seeking social work services. The criminalization of domestic violence refers to efforts to address domestic violence through the passage and enforcement of criminal and civil laws. This article reviews the social science, legal, and criminal justice literature regarding interventions used to stop domestic violence. The theoretical foundations and effectiveness of police interventions, the use of protective orders, prosecution and victim advocacy, court responses, batterers' intervention as a condition of probation, and coordinated community responses to domestic violence are examined. Implications for social work practice are given, along with basic information for assisting clients who are victims of violence in their own homes.

  7. Domestic Violence: Assessment of Attributions, Types and Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pournaghash-Tehrani, Said; Ahmad-Kooye Nasr, Jalal Al

    The present research discusses various aspects, e.g., the attributions, the types and the reactions to domestic violence by their partners, of domestic violence in some families in Tehran. Specifically, one hundred couples were randomly selected from couples referring to four family courts in Tehran seeking divorce due to family violence. The present results showed that while men believed spouses` indifference and spouses` complaints about food were two factors which caused disagreement between them and their wives, women believed that men`s lack of cooperation in home-related matters were the main causes of their differences with their husbands. Regarding the types of violence, the study indicated that, when stress levels were high for a couple, women resorted to physical violence more than men. Also, regarding reactions exhibited by husbands and wives towards their spouses` violence, the present results showed that women, mostly, adopted psychological strategies in response to their husbands` violence. These results are discussed in the context of Iranian culture and some possible explanations for their occurrence are offered.

  8. Gay and bisexual male domestic violence victimization: challenges to feminist theory and responses to violence.

    PubMed

    Letellier, P

    1994-01-01

    This article demonstrates how same-sex male battering challenges contemporary feminist domestic violence theory. The author shows current theory to be heterosexist and therefore insufficient to explain the phenomenon of battering among gay/bisexual men. Domestic violence theories that integrate a sociopolitical and a psychological analysis of battering are presented as more inclusive of same-sex domestic violence. Differences between battered gay/bisexual men and battered women are illustrated, focusing on how these men conceptualize and respond to violence against them. The author also examines the social context of homophobia in which same-sex battering occurs; the impact of AIDS on gay/bisexual men as it pertains to battering; the misconception of "mutual combat"; and the difficulty of seeking help. The article highlights the need for empirical research on same-sex male battering.

  9. Violence Against Women in Mexico: A Study of Abuse Before and During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Roberto; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Ruiz, Agustin

    2003-01-01

    Objective. We identified the prevalence and types of violence experienced by pregnant women, the ways victimization changed during pregnancy from the year prior to pregnancy, and factors associated with violence during pregnancy. Methods. We interviewed 914 pregnant women treated in health clinics in Mexico about violence during and prior to pregnancy, violence during childhood and against their own children, and other socioeconomic indicators. Results. Approximately one quarter of the women experienced violence during pregnancy. The severity of emotional violence increased during pregnancy, whereas physical and sexual violence decreased. The strongest predictors of abuse were violence prior to pregnancy, low socioeconomic status, parental violence witnessed by women in childhood, and violence in the abusive partner’s childhood. The probability of violence during pregnancy for women experiencing all of these factors was 61%. Conclusions. Violence is common among pregnant women, but pregnancy does not appear to be an initiating factor. Intergenerational violence is highly predictive of violence during pregnancy. PMID:12835194

  10. 3 CFR - Establishing Policies for Addressing Domestic Violence in the Federal Workforce

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Violence in the Federal Workforce Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of April 18, 2012 Establishing Policies for Addressing Domestic Violence in the Federal Workforce Memorandum... initial passage of the Violence Against Women Act in 1994 (Public Law 103-322), domestic violence...

  11. 24 CFR 960.103 - Equal opportunity requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... violence, dating violence, and stalking. The PHA must apply 24 CFR part 5, subpart L in all applicable... protection for victims of domestic violence. 960.103 Section 960.103 Housing and Urban Development... requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence. (a) Applicable requirements. The PHA...

  12. Testing the Cycle of Violence Hypothesis: Child Abuse and Adolescent Dating Violence as Predictors of Intimate Partner Violence in Young Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Anu Manchikanti

    2011-01-01

    Child abuse is an important determinant of future violence perpetration and victimization. Past research examining linkages between child abuse and adult intimate partner violence (IPV) has predominantly focused on married individuals and not considered adolescent dating violence. In the present study, data from three waves of the National…

  13. Domestic and institutional elder abuse legislation.

    PubMed

    Daly, Jeanette M

    2011-12-01

    Statutes pertinent to elder abuse vary widely. This article provides examples of organizational structure, dependency and age of the victim, definitions of abuse, classification of penalties, and investigation processes. Health care providers must learn their state's elder abuse laws and review any operating manuals produced from the statutes or regulations. All health care workers must know and implement the law to protect the welfare of older persons. PMID:22055906

  14. Domestic and institutional elder abuse legislation.

    PubMed

    Daly, Jeanette M

    2011-12-01

    Statutes pertinent to elder abuse vary widely. This article provides examples of organizational structure, dependency and age of the victim, definitions of abuse, classification of penalties, and investigation processes. Health care providers must learn their state's elder abuse laws and review any operating manuals produced from the statutes or regulations. All health care workers must know and implement the law to protect the welfare of older persons.

  15. Delinquency, Child Abuse, and Suggestions to Stomp Out Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely, Margery A.

    Studies have traced a possible link between patterns of family interaction, faulty socialization, child abuse, and delinquent behavior. Counselors can respond to the needs of society to reduce violence by their access to the research on human development and in their work with families and children. Some types of discipline and parental attitudes…

  16. Intimate Partner Violence during Pregnancy and Mothers' Child Abuse Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casanueva, Cecilia E.; Martin, Sandra L.

    2007-01-01

    This research examines whether women who have experienced intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy have a higher child abuse potential than women who have not experienced IPV. Data were analyzed from a longitudinal investigation of IPV during pregnancy. This study recruited 88 pregnant women during prenatal care and followed them for 1 1/2…

  17. Domestic violence during pregnancy in Turkey and responsibility of prenatal healthcare providers.

    PubMed

    Yanikkerem, Emre; Karadaş, Gülşah; Adigüzel, Betül; Sevil, Umran

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate prevalence and risk groups of domestic violence during pregnancy in Manisa, Turkey, and to determine antenatal complications or health problems and health service use. This study was a population-based, cross-sectional, and household survey. The study universe included two primary health units situated in two different socioeconomic areas (rural and urban) in the city of Manisa, Turkey, from January to June 2004; the homes of 246 women were visited and the study sample included 217 women. A questionnaire was used that comprised sociodemographic and reproductive characteristics, and the Domestic Violence Against Women Determination Scale, developed by Yanikkerem in 2002 to measure the frequencies of type and severity of violence. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS, version 10.0 for Windows) was used to analyze the data. Student t test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to evaluate data. Results indicated that 9.7% of women were beaten by their partner during the pregnancy (17.3% in the rural area and 2.7% in the urban area) and 14.3% of women were beaten before pregnancy. A total of 10.6% of women said they had been slapped, 9.1% reported an object was thrown at them by their partner, and 6.5% admitted to having been kicked during pregnancy. A total of 36.4% of women reported experiencing forced sexual activity. Abused pregnant women were less educated, had lower income, were unmarried, were multiparous, had more children, had a longer duration of marriage, lived rural areas, were more likely to have unplanned pregnancies, had miscarriage, had an interpregnancy interval of 2 years or less, smoked more cigarettes, did not visit a health institution for control during pregnancy and did not know the sex or knew the fetus was female when compared with nonabused women. Abused women who live with various problems during pregnancy and are victims of violence tend to feel isolated, insecure, and depressed. Our

  18. Accountability in Teenage Dating Violence: A Comparative Examination of Adult Domestic Violence and Juvenile Justice Systems Policies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zosky, Diane L.

    2010-01-01

    Unlike in the adult criminal justice system, where domestic violence policies hold perpetrators accountable for their violence, the juvenile justice system rarely addresses teenage dating violence. Although the adult criminal justice system has pursued policies toward intimate partner violence grounded on a "zero tolerance" ideology, the juvenile…

  19. 3 CFR 8877 - Proclamation 8877 of October 1, 2012. National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2012

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2012 8877 Proclamation 8877 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8877 of October 1, 2012 Proc. 8877 National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2012By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation For far too long, domestic violence was ignored...

  20. Changing Coverage of Domestic Violence Murders: A Longitudinal Experiment in Participatory Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Charlotte; Anastario, Mike; DaCunha, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    Stressing relation-building and participatory communication approaches, the Rhode Island Coalition against Domestic Violence worked with journalists to develop a best practices handbook on news coverage of domestic violence murders. This study compares print coverage of domestic violence murders prehandbook (1996-1999) and posthandbook…

  1. Endorsement of Couples Counseling in a Domestic Violence Case as a Function of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bapat, Mona; Tracey, Terence

    2009-01-01

    Reactions of students in helping professions to domestic violence were examined with respect to whether or not the students had any training in domestic violence. One hundred, four students read one of two vignettes describing a domestic violence case and responded to statements related to treatment options. The vignettes differed only in…

  2. 3 CFR 8428 - Proclamation 8428 of October 1, 2009. National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2009

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., far too many women and families in this country and around the world are affected by domestic violence... homes, our communities, and our country. To effectively respond to domestic violence, we must provide... Americans to do their part to end domestic violence in this country by supporting their communities’...

  3. Rehabilitation Counseling Master's Students: Beliefs and Attitudes about Domestic Violence toward Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Dytisha Monicke

    2013-01-01

    Domestic violence is a national concern that affects women of all ages and ethnicities, as well as women with disabilities. Although there is literature focusing on attitudes about domestic violence toward women, the literature review provided no studies that investigated attitudes about domestic violence toward women in relation to domestic…

  4. Prevalence and Risk Factors for Domestic Violence among Pregnant Women in Northern Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iliyasu, Zubairu; Abubakar, Isa S.; Galadanci, Hadiza S.; Hayatu, Zainab; Aliyu, Muktar H.

    2013-01-01

    Many women experience domestic violence during pregnancy. The magnitude and risk factors for domestic violence during pregnancy are not well documented in many countries, including Nigeria. Using interviewer- administered questionnaires the authors investigated predictors of domestic violence during current pregnancy among women presenting for…

  5. Police Response to Domestic Violence: Making Decisions about Risk and Risk Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez Trujillo, Monica; Ross, Stuart

    2008-01-01

    Assessing and responding to risk are key elements in how police respond to domestic violence. However, relatively little is known about the way police make judgments about the risks associated with domestic violence and how these judgments influence their actions. This study examines police decisions about risk in domestic violence incidents when…

  6. Children's Experiences of Domestic Violence: Developing an Integrated Response from Police and Child Protection Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, Nicky; Miller, Pam; Richardson Foster, Helen; Thomson, Gill

    2011-01-01

    Police notifications of incidents of domestic violence to child protection services constitute an acknowledgement of the harm that domestic violence inflicts on children. However, these notifications represent a substantial demand on child welfare services and the outcomes for children and victims of domestic violence have been questioned. This…

  7. Domestic Violence Survivors Experience of a Psycho-Educational Career Group: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jagow-France, Desiree A.

    2009-01-01

    Domestic violence is a prevalent occurring phenomenon not only within the United States but in other countries as well. Research has just begun to explore the impact domestic violence has on the career paths of survivors and has made limited exploration of the impact domestic violence, in general, has on ethnic minorities. The purpose of this…

  8. Predicting the Occurrence of Stalking in Relationships Characterized by Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Heather C.

    2007-01-01

    A high correlation has been found between domestic violence and stalking. However, very few studies have examined what factors predict the occurrence of stalking in relationships characterized by domestic violence. Using in-depth interviews with victims of domestic violence whose cases have gone through the criminal justice system, this article…

  9. Providing Services to Survivors of Domestic Violence: A Comparison of Rural and Urban Service Provider Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastman, Brenda J.; Bunch, Shelia Grant

    2007-01-01

    Although there is a considerable body of knowledge about domestic violence, a limited proportion focuses on domestic violence in rural settings. Using a nonprobability purposive sampling technique, 93 providers of domestic violence services from rural and urban localities in North Carolina and Virginia were located and asked to complete a…

  10. Domestic violence in Israel: changing attitudes.

    PubMed

    Muhlbauer, Varda

    2006-11-01

    For many years, knowledge of the prevalence of violence against women in Israel was marginalized in such a way that it never figured in public discourse. Elite groups of academics and feminist activists with a Western background, together with human rights groups, delivered subversive messages that gradually infiltrated into larger circles and ultimately changed public policies. The issue is now central in public affairs. This article discusses the extent of violence against women in Israel and suggests explanations for the shift from denial to greater public awareness. PMID:17189512

  11. What factors are associated with recent intimate partner violence? findings from the WHO multi-country study on women's health and domestic violence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) against women is a global public health and human rights concern. Despite a growing body of research into risk factors for IPV, methodological differences limit the extent to which comparisons can be made between studies. We used data from ten countries included in the WHO Multi-country Study on Women's Health and Domestic Violence to identify factors that are consistently associated with abuse across sites, in order to inform the design of IPV prevention programs. Methods Standardised population-based household surveys were done between 2000 and 2003. One woman aged 15-49 years was randomly selected from each sampled household. Those who had ever had a male partner were asked about their experiences of physically and sexually violent acts. We performed multivariate logistic regression to identify predictors of physical and/or sexual partner violence within the past 12 months. Results Despite wide variations in the prevalence of IPV, many factors affected IPV risk similarly across sites. Secondary education, high SES, and formal marriage offered protection, while alcohol abuse, cohabitation, young age, attitudes supportive of wife beating, having outside sexual partners, experiencing childhood abuse, growing up with domestic violence, and experiencing or perpetrating other forms of violence in adulthood, increased the risk of IPV. The strength of the association was greatest when both the woman and her partner had the risk factor. Conclusions IPV prevention programs should increase focus on transforming gender norms and attitudes, addressing childhood abuse, and reducing harmful drinking. Development initiatives to improve access to education for girls and boys may also have an important role in violence prevention. PMID:21324186

  12. Domestic Violence Shelters as Prevention Agents for HIV/AIDS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rountree, Michele A.; Pomeroy, Elizabeth C.; Marsiglia, Flavio F.

    2008-01-01

    The article reports findings from a pilot study of 21 domestic violence shelters in a southwestern state in the United States. The survey instrument included descriptive information on shelter service delivery. Specifically, questions were asked about the practice of assessing a client's risk of HIV/AIDS, the provision of HIV/AIDS educational and…

  13. Domestic Violence Assessments in the Child Advocacy Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thackeray, Jonathan D.; Scribano, Philip V.; Rhoda, Dale

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study was designed to identify the frequency, methods, and practices of universal assessments for domestic violence (DV) within child advocacy centers (CACs) and determine which factors are associated with CACs that conduct universal DV assessments. Methods: The study design was a cross-sectional, web-based survey distributed to…

  14. Developing a Practical Forecasting Screener for Domestic Violence Incidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berk, Richard A.; He, Yan; Sorenson, Susan B.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors report on the development of a short screening tool that deputies in the Los Angeles Sheriff's Department could use in the field to help forecast domestic violence incidents in particular households. The data come from more than 500 households to which sheriff's deputies were dispatched in fall 2003. Information on…

  15. Fathers' Rights Groups, Domestic Violence and Political Countermobilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Jocelyn Elise

    2009-01-01

    Domestic violence continues to be a serious problem for women in the United States. As a result, the battered women's movement has been tireless in campaigning for greater awareness of the issue, tougher penalties against offenders, and public vigilance against potential batterers, including fathers from dissolving families. In reaction to this…

  16. 78 FR 61811 - National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-04

    ....) [FR Doc. 2013-24385 Filed 10-3-13; 8:45 am] Billing code 3295-F4 ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9031 of September 30, 2013 National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Since the passage of the...

  17. Domestic Violence and Implications for Citizenship Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chistolini, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    This comparative qualitative study was conducted in four countries: Cyprus (central scientific coordinator), Italy, Romania, Slovakia. Research priorities are domestic violence and children's rights. I present the results of the Italian portion of the study and report some of the themes drawn from testimonies (n = 58) from focus group interviews…

  18. Domestic Violence and Dependency Courts: The "Greenbook" Demonstration Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, Neena M.; Silverman, Jerry; Wang, Kathleen; Janczewski, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    This field study reports on a cross-site evaluation of dependency courts in communities receiving federal funding to implement the "Greenbook" initiative, a multisite demonstration for community improvement of coordinated responses to families victimized by domestic violence and child maltreatment. This article focuses on the dependency court,…

  19. Patterns of Injuries in Domestic Violence in a Romanian Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curca, George Cristian; Dermengiu, Dan; Hostiuc, Sorin

    2012-01-01

    In Romania, the quantification of traumatic injuries is achieved in medical- legal services; therefore, each domestic violence (DV) victim needs a medical-legal certificate to prove in a court of law the presence of traumatic injuries. In this study, we aimed to determine the pattern of traumatic injuries in DV. A total of 219 consecutive DV cases…

  20. Domestic Violence Survivors: Perceived Vocational Supports and Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chronister, Krista M.; Brown, Chris; O'Brien, Karen M.; Wettersten, Kara B.; Burt, Michelle; Falkenstein, Corrina; Shahane, Amit

    2009-01-01

    Domestic violence survivors encounter numerous barriers and few supports in pursuit of their vocational goals. There is a dearth of research, however, on the vocational supports and barriers salient for survivors. This study aims (a) to assess the psychometric properties of vocational supports and barriers measures with a racially and…

  1. Attributing Responsibility for Child Maltreatment when Domestic Violence Is Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsman, Miriam J.; Hartley, Carolyn Copps

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine factors that influence how child welfare workers attribute responsibility for child maltreatment and child safety in cases involving domestic violence. Methods: The study used a factorial survey approach, combining elements of survey research with an experimental design. Case vignettes were…

  2. When your patient is a batterer. What you need to know before treating perpetrators of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Mintz, H A; Cornett, F W

    1997-04-01

    This article describes the three types of male perpetrators of domestic violence, their behavioral patterns, and the steps for providing them appropriate treatment. Batterers manifest the same cyclical behavior and express the same brutal and irrational rage, no matter what language they speak; they still communicate the same hate words and accusations of blame. There are three types of batterers identified by Dutton and Golant. First is the cyclical emotionally volatile type. This involves a constellation of feelings involving rage and jealousy. The second type comprises the overcontrolled batterers. This group of batterers exhibits less physical aggression, but more psychological abuse compared to the first group. These men receive extremely high score on the dominance isolation factor of abusiveness. Overcontrolled abusers are divided into active control freaks and the passive abusers. The third type includes the psychopathic batterers. This group of batterers lack emotional responsiveness and exhibit no remorse about their behavior. These men engage in criminal activities and are often violent with friends, strangers, co-workers, and employers as well as with their wife. They often reflect antisocial behavior and sadistic aggression. Domestic violence thrives on silence. Physicians can help penetrate this silence by discussing the issue with their patients, listening to patients' direct or indirect references to their own experiences with domestic violence, and making referrals for treatment. Furthermore, group therapy has proven to be the best option for treating a battering behavior.

  3. Domestic Violence: The Case for Social Advocacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Mary Smith; Sobieraj, Karen

    In order for counselors to more effectively serve their clients and contribute to an environment that is life enhancing for women and girls as well as for men and boys they must advocate an end to all violence against women. In a national study of women who escaped from battering, participants rated the effectiveness of formal help sources from…

  4. An ethnographic-feminist study of Jordanian women's experiences of domestic violence and process of resolution.

    PubMed

    Safadi, Reema; Swigart, Valerie; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Banimustafa, Radwan; Constantino, Rose E

    2013-01-01

    We interviewed 12 Jordanian women who had experienced domestic violence (DV) and were receiving assistance at the Jordanian Women's Union (JWU). Our aim was to explore the history and factors supporting attainment of freedom from DV. Narratives revealed themes of DV toward girls; forced marriage; physical, psychological, or sexual abuse before and during marriage; and escalation and enduring DV. Escaping from DV required family and JWU support. In the context of a strongly patriarchal, religious society, we observed a process of resolution by shifting cultural values and themes of empowerment, with an undercurrent of suffering blamed on inequalities in the legal process.

  5. Canadian mock juror attitudes and decisions in domestic violence cases involving asian and white interracial and intraracial couples.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Evelyn M; Mossière, Annik; Cheung, Liann

    2013-03-01

    This study manipulated the race of the defendant and the victim (White/White, White/Asian, Asian/Asian, and Asian/White) in a domestic violence case to examine the potential prejudicial impact of race on juror decision making. A total of 181 undergraduate students read a trial transcript involving an allegation of spousal abuse in which defendant and victim race were manipulated using photographs. They then provided a verdict and confidence rating, a sentence, and responsibility attributions, and completed various scales measuring attitudes toward wife abuse and women. Findings revealed that female jurors were harsher toward the defendant than were male jurors. When controlling for attitudes toward Asians, jurors found the defendant guilty more often in cases involving interracial couples, as compared to same-race couples. Path analyses revealed various factors and attitudes involved in domestic violence trial outcomes. Findings contribute to the scarce literature on legal proceedings involving Asians, particularly in domestic violence cases. Outcomes also provide a model for relevant factors and characteristics of jurors in domestic violence cases. Roadblocks inherent in jury research are also discussed. PMID:22929345

  6. The prevalence of domestic violence against pregnant women in Perak, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Jahanfar, Shayesteh; Kamarudin, Ellizza Bt; Sarpin, Mohammad Alavi B; Zakaria, Nordin B; Abdul Rahman, Raihan Bt; Samsuddin, Rinni Damayanti Bt

    2007-07-01

    Domestic violence during pregnancy is a key issue in maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. This cross-sectional study aimed at obtaining the prevalence of domestic violence amongst pregnant women who attended Ipoh General Hospital in Perak, Malaysia and to determine the risk factors associated with domestic violence during pregnancy. The prevalence of domestic violence was low (4.5%). Comparison between the two groups of subjects with or without domestic violence did not show any significant difference in terms of risk factors. The effect of domestic violence on pregnancy should be investigated comprehensively in a multicentral or community-based study using a culturally sensitive questionnaire. With the estimated low prevalence of domestic violence in this study, the need for screening it in health-care services in Malaysia is yet to be determined.

  7. Parenting in Females Exposed to Intimate Partner Violence and Childhood Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, Anna E.; Cranston, Christopher C.; Shadlow, Joanna O.

    2012-01-01

    Child sexual abuse and intimate partner violence may have a significant impact on parenting. The current study expands on existing research by examining the effects of child sexual abuse and intimate partner violence on parenting styles and parenting self-efficacy. In women from a parenting intervention program (n = 20), child sexual abuse was…

  8. Intimate Partner Violence by Men Abusing and Non-abusing Alcohol in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Makara-Studzinska, Marta; Gustaw, Katarzyna

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol use is to one of the most of risk factors for intimate partner violence. The aim of this study was to check the difference of demographic characteristics and type of violence between of the perpetrators with a history of alcohol abuse (A) versus the perpetrators without a history of alcohol abuse (N). Data were obtained from the survey conducted in the office of the Association for Violence Prevention in the city of Lublin, Poland. 400 perpetrators and their victims (400 subjects) were examined. To collect information from victims a specially designed questionnaire was used (VQ). Besides, another questionnaire (PQ) and The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) was used to measure alcohol use in the perpetrators. About 76% of the perpetrators scored 8 and above (AUDIT). 84.8% of the perpetrators with a history of alcohol abuse (A) versus 9.2% of the perpetrators without a history of alcohol abuse (N) committed acts of violence after alcohol consumption. The A-perpetrators were more likely to be younger, have lower education and break law, and less likely to have permanent jobs than the N- perpetrators. The significant difference in the type of violence was found: the A-perpetrators were more likely to commit physical violence (78.2%) than the N-perpetrators (33.2%) and the N-perpetrators were more likely to commit sexual violence (32.2%) than A-perpetrators (9.14%). We would like to conclude that despite similarities among perpetrators, they are not a homogenous group so different therapeutic approach should be considered. PMID:17431319

  9. Treatment of Concurrent Substance Dependence, Child Neglect and Domestic Violence: A Single Case Examination Involving Family Behavior Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Valerie; Allen, Daniel N.

    2012-01-01

    Although child neglect and substance abuse co-occur in greater than 60% of child protective service cases, intervention outcome studies are deplorably lacking. Therefore, a home-based Family Behavior Therapy is described in the treatment of a woman evidencing child neglect, substance dependence, domestic violence and other co-occurring problems. Treatment included contingency management, self control, stimulus control, communication and child management skills training exercises, and financial management components. Results indicated improvements in child abuse potential, home hazards, domestic violence, and drug use, which were substantiated by objective urinalysis testing, and tours of her home. Validity checks indicated the participant was being truthful in her responses to standardized questionnaires, and assessors were “blind” to study intent. Limitations (i.e., lack of experimental control and follow-up data collection) of this case example are discussed in light of these results. PMID:23226920

  10. A community-based perspective on living with domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Keeling, June

    Women living within a violent relationship suffer from a multitude of somatic and psychological complaints. The constant erosion of their self-esteem undermines their confidence and decision-making abilities, eventually leading to a learned helplessness and apathy. In association with this is the significant deleterious effect on the psychological and physical health of any children witnessing this abuse within the home. Community health care providers such as district nurses, practice nurses and GPs are in close contact with the family and can observe the family dynamics. They are often the only health care professionals in a position to be able to build a rapport with the family. Consequently a survivor of domestic abuse may confide in them, enforcing the health professional to play a pivotal role in empowerment and the initiation of essential support services. This article highlights the detrimental effects of domestic abuse and the necessity to raise awareness within the community forum. PMID:15060964

  11. Attitudes Justifying Domestic Violence Predict Endorsement of Corporal Punishment and Physical and Psychological Aggression towards Children: A Study in 25 Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Lansford, Jennifer E.; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Bornstein, Marc H.; Putnick, Diane L.; Bradley, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Convention on the Rights of the Child has prompted countries to protect children from abuse and exploitation. Exposure to domestic violence and corporal punishment are risk factors in children’s development. This study investigated how women’s attitudes about domestic violence are related to attitudes about corporal punishment, and harsh behaviors toward children, and whether country-wide norms regarding domestic violence and corporal punishment are related to psychological aggression and physical violence toward children. Study design Data were drawn from the Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, a nationally representative and internationally comparable household survey developed by UNICEF. Measures of domestic violence and discipline were completed by 85,999 female caregivers of children between the ages of 2 and 14 years from families in 25 low- and middle-income countries. Results Mothers who believed that husbands were justified in hitting their wives were more likely to believe that corporal punishment is necessary to rear children, and, in turn, were justified in hitting their wives and that corporal punishment is necessary to rear children were more likely to report that their child had experienced psychological aggression and physical violence. Countrywide norms regarding the acceptability of husbands hitting wives and advisability of corporal punishment moderated the links between mothers’ attitudes and their behaviors toward children. Conclusions Pediatricians can address parents’ psychological aggression and physical violence toward children by discussing parents’ attitudes and behaviors within a framework that incorporates social norms regarding the acceptability of domestic violence and corporal punishment. PMID:24412139

  12. Inclusive domestic violence standards: strategies to improve interventions for women with disabilities?

    PubMed

    Healey, Lucy; Humphreys, Cathy; Howe, Keran

    2013-01-01

    Women with disabilities experience violence at greater rates than other women, yet their access to domestic violence services is more limited. This limitation is mirrored in domestic violence sector standards, which often fail to include the specific issues for women with disabilities. This article has a dual focus: to outline a set of internationally transferrable standards for inclusive practice with women with disabilities affected by domestic violence; and report on the results of a documentary analysis of domestic violence service standards, codes of practice, and practice guidelines. It draws on the Building the Evidence (BtE) research and advocacy project in Victoria, Australia in which a matrix tool was developed to identify minimum standards to support the inclusion of women with disabilities in existing domestic violence sector standards. This tool is designed to interrogate domestic violence sector standards for their attention to women with disabilities.

  13. "He said they'd deport me": factors influencing domestic violence help-seeking practices among Latina immigrants.

    PubMed

    Reina, Angelica S; Lohman, Brenda J; Maldonado, Marta María

    2014-03-01

    Significant developments have been made in research on domestic violence experienced by women as well as on the practical front of the services women seek and receive when living with partner abuse. Yet, most of the studies that explore the experiences of victims of partner abuse in the United States have focused on nonimmigrant White women. The current study aims to contribute to the literature by exploring Latina immigrant victims' experiences with domestic violence service outreach in the Midwest. This exploratory study used one-on-one interviews and a focus group to identify the challenges faced by 10 Latina victims of partner abuse who had previously contacted an antiviolence organization in Iowa and had used its services. Findings demonstrate that immigration status and the inability to understand domestic violence within given cultural norms are major barriers keeping Latina victims from seeking help from formal advocacy agencies. Other impediments include feeling shame, isolation, along with the lack of bilingual service providers in mainstream institutions and, the lack of knowledge about resources among newcomers. We end with recommendations for research and practice. PMID:24142446

  14. "He said they'd deport me": factors influencing domestic violence help-seeking practices among Latina immigrants.

    PubMed

    Reina, Angelica S; Lohman, Brenda J; Maldonado, Marta María

    2014-03-01

    Significant developments have been made in research on domestic violence experienced by women as well as on the practical front of the services women seek and receive when living with partner abuse. Yet, most of the studies that explore the experiences of victims of partner abuse in the United States have focused on nonimmigrant White women. The current study aims to contribute to the literature by exploring Latina immigrant victims' experiences with domestic violence service outreach in the Midwest. This exploratory study used one-on-one interviews and a focus group to identify the challenges faced by 10 Latina victims of partner abuse who had previously contacted an antiviolence organization in Iowa and had used its services. Findings demonstrate that immigration status and the inability to understand domestic violence within given cultural norms are major barriers keeping Latina victims from seeking help from formal advocacy agencies. Other impediments include feeling shame, isolation, along with the lack of bilingual service providers in mainstream institutions and, the lack of knowledge about resources among newcomers. We end with recommendations for research and practice.

  15. 24 CFR 982.53 - Equal opportunity requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. The PHA must apply 24 CFR part 5... cited at 24 CFR 5.105(a) and title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, 42 U.S.C. 12101 et seq. (b... protection for victims of domestic violence. 982.53 Section 982.53 Housing and Urban Development...

  16. 3 CFR 9031 - Proclamation 9031 of September 30, 2013. National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2013

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2013 9031 Proclamation 9031 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 9031 of September 30, 2013 Proc. 9031 National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2013By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Since the passage of the Violence Against Women...

  17. Domestic Violence Screening and Service Acceptance among Adult Victims in a Dependency Court Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivers, James E.; Maze, Candice L.; Hannah, Stefanie A.; Lederman, Cindy S.

    2007-01-01

    Many child welfare systems are unable to effectively identify and address co-occurring domestic violence and child maltreatment. In response, the Dependency Court Intervention Program for Family Violence implemented a protocol to identify indicators of domestic violence in families involved with child protection proceedings. This article…

  18. Domestic Violence during Pregnancy in an Eastern City of Turkey: A Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arslantas, Hulya; Adana, Filiz; Ergin, Filiz; Gey, Neriman; Bicer, Nejla; Kiransal, Nilufer

    2012-01-01

    Violence is an increasing and important community health problem that can be seen in any area of human life. Limited studies were found about domestic violence among pregnant women and its relation with social status of women. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and types of domestic violence during pregnancy, factors affecting…

  19. Response to the Victims of Domestic Violence: Analysis and Implications of the British Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Diane C.

    1995-01-01

    Examines problem of domestic violence in Great Britain, which has a stronger feminist movement and a much lower level of stranger-to-stranger violence than does the United States. The prevalence rate of domestic violence is quite similar to that of the United States and the British system has been less progressive in its response. (LKS)

  20. Dialogic Reverberations: Police, Domestic Abuse, and the Discontinuance of Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lea, Susan J.; Lynn, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the social construction of domestic abuse by police officers, specifically in the context of arguments presented to the prosecutor for a decision on whether to proceed with or discontinue the case. Nineteen police files were examined with a particular focus on the MG3, the "Report to Crown Prosecutors for Charging…

  1. Domestic violence and social responsibility in contemporary Spanish cinema: a portfolio view of behavioral dynamics.

    PubMed

    Zanzana, Habib

    2010-01-01

    Domestic abuse continues to claim many lives in Spain despite a series of new laws to protect women and to punish abusers. This essay explores the cultural influences of contemporary Spanish cinema on domestic violence. Four films are assessed against a Portfolio Model of social responsibility that uses two basic dimensions: realism and human rights. Realism in each film is determined by the behavioral components of the internationally recognized Duluth Model and the Wheel of Power and Control. The human rights dimension addresses equality, power and agency for women. This study focuses on Icíar Bollaín's "Te doy mis ojos" (2003), Javier Balaguer's "Sólo mía" (2001), Benito Zambrano's "Solas" (1999), and Pedro Almodóvar's "Pepi, Luci, Bom y otras chicas del montón" (1980). The results demonstrate significant variations in the measure of social responsibility indicating that contemporary Spanish cinema may play a role in perpetuating gender-based violence.

  2. Evaluating shame transformation in group treatment of domestic violence offenders.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Christopher H; Prelog, Andrew J; Unnithan, N Prabha; Pogrebin, Mark R

    2010-08-01

    Offender rehabilitation, pitting the rational ability of criminal justice against the seeming irrationality of criminal behavior, remains controversial. Psychology highlights the importance of emotions in mediating individual behavior. Borrowing from restorative justice as a more emotionally intelligent form of justice, this article examines the role of shame and guilt in a domestic violence offender treatment program. The emotions are differentiated and then activated, similar to the use of reintegrative shaming in restorative justice, to promote greater offender accountability and empathy. Using a two-group comparison of male domestic violence offenders, measurements were taken on three sets of scales in assessing the outcome of the shame transformation process. Statistically significant effects were found for self-esteem and empathetic concern. Findings and future research are discussed.

  3. Process theology's relevance for older survivors of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Bowland, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Pastoral work with survivors of domestic violence may reveal theological struggles. Understandings of scripture that reinforce a sense of powerlessness and alienation from God may contribute to an impaired relationship and limit resources for healing. One framework for re-imaging a relationship with God is process theology. This framework was applied to a case study for one survivor. The application resulted in a line of inquiry that may assist survivors in their healing process.

  4. Domestic Violence against Children: Strategies of Explanation and Counteraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iarskaia-Smirnova, E. R.; Romanov, P. V.; Antonova, E. P.

    2008-01-01

    The safest place for children should be their own home and family, but the facts place this assumption in doubt. According to data of Russian statistics, 2,000-2,500 children die every year as a result of domestic violence; about 2 million minor children up to the age of fourteen are beaten by their parents, more than 50,000 children run away from…

  5. 24 CFR 982.53 - Equal opportunity requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., dating violence, or stalking. The PHA must apply 24 CFR part 5, subpart L, in all applicable cases where... imposed by contract or federal law, including the authorities cited at 24 CFR 5.105(a) and title II of the... protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. 982.53 Section 982.53 Housing...

  6. 24 CFR 982.53 - Equal opportunity requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., dating violence, or stalking. The PHA must apply 24 CFR part 5, subpart L, in all applicable cases where... imposed by contract or federal law, including the authorities cited at 24 CFR 5.105(a) and title II of the... protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. 982.53 Section 982.53 Housing...

  7. 24 CFR 982.53 - Equal opportunity requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., dating violence, or stalking. The PHA must apply 24 CFR part 5, subpart L, in all applicable cases where... imposed by contract or federal law, including the authorities cited at 24 CFR 5.105(a) and title II of the... protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. 982.53 Section 982.53 Housing...

  8. 24 CFR 982.53 - Equal opportunity requirements and protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., dating violence, or stalking. The PHA must apply 24 CFR part 5, subpart L, in all applicable cases where... imposed by contract or federal law, including the authorities cited at 24 CFR 5.105(a) and title II of the... protection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking. 982.53 Section 982.53 Housing...

  9. Therapeutic Groupwork with Young Children and Mothers Who Have Experienced Domestic Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Lynda Warren

    2009-01-01

    There is mounting recognition that exposure to domestic abuse causes far-reaching damage to children's lives, development and psychological well-being. Studies estimate 10% to 20% of children are at risk of exposure to domestic abuse--thus domestic abuse must be seen as a crucial issue for educational psychologists (EPs). This study investigates…

  10. Fostering Resilience in Children Exposed to Domestic Violence: Practical Strategies EC Staff Can Put into Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Children enmeshed in violence don't experience a relaxed, predictable, or trusting home life. In fact, children exposed to home violence often experience symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) just as adults do after enduring violence. Domestic violence robs children of their childhood. And while early childhood staff can't erase the…

  11. Protecting prosecution: exploring the powers of law in an intervention program for domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Römkens, Renée

    2006-02-01

    This article critically analyzes how the criminal justice system centrally situates itself in an intervention program intended to protect victims of domestic abuse and stalking. Based on the first empirical, in-depth study in the Netherlands of an intervention program using electronic technology that is increasingly used in the United States, results indicate how the central role of the criminal justice actors can evoke a shift toward foregrounding prosecutorial interests. Drawing from a critical theoretical understanding of the powers of law and the legal system, the author argues that current tendencies toward criminalization in domestic violence interventions can have an unintended violent impact for victims who are either excluded from the program or are forced into a criminal justice regime that might not be in their primary interest. In this study, women seem to actively navigate the use of the criminal justice system to receive the protection they need.

  12. Stalking as a variant of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Kurt, J L

    1995-01-01

    Much of what is presently known about stalking in a domestic context has been depicted by the popular press, typically following a tragic outcome, and suggests that it is a problem of increasing dimensions. However, scientific literature on this subject is quite limited. This article provides an overview of scientific data related to stalking and associated psychiatric syndromes, including erotomania. It reviews the current antistalking legislation and the National Institute of Justice Model Anti-Stalking Code. Four case studies of stalkers with psychotic disorders versus personality disorders are presented, and the differential diagnoses are discussed. The implications of diagnostic classification, with respect to criminal responsibility, are also discussed.

  13. The effects of domestic violence allegations on custody evaluators' recommendations.

    PubMed

    Hans, Jason D; Hardesty, Jennifer L; Haselschwerdt, Megan L; Frey, Laura M

    2014-12-01

    Judges and attorneys often request professional assessments from child custody evaluators when allegations of adult domestic violence (DV) have been made, but it is unclear whether and how evaluators' recommendations are impacted by these allegations. Custody evaluators (N = 607) in the United States responded to a multiple-segment factorial vignette designed to examine the effects of 2 key factors in DV allegations: type of alleged violence (conflict-based, control-based) and counterallegations (none, mutual, and female-initiated). Effects of control- versus conflict-based DV allegations by the mother on custody recommendations were small and the majority of evaluators recommended joint custody regardless of violence type. Reported confidence in making a recommendation increased once the father responded to the allegation, but to a smaller degree when a counterallegation of mutual or female-initiated violence was made. Evaluators were no more skeptical about the potential motive of a counterallegation in the context of controlling behavior than in the context of conflict-based behavior. Overall, results indicate that most custody evaluators are not sufficiently sensitized to distinguish between situational couple violence and coercive controlling behavior, and the postseparation safety of mothers and their children may therefore be jeopardized.

  14. 78 FR 21370 - Funding Opportunity Announcement for Family Violence Prevention and Services/Grants for Domestic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... efforts to support the establishment, maintenance, and expansion of programs and projects: (1) to prevent... information likely to disclose the location of a victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual...

  15. The Need for Domestic Violence Laws with Adequate Legal and Social Support Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmons, Willa M.

    1981-01-01

    Describes the need for comprehensive domestic violence programs that include medical, legal, economic, psychological, and child care services. Although most states have family violence legislation, more work is needed to adequately implement these programs. (Author/JAC)

  16. The ecology of domestic violence: the role of alcohol outlet density.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Studies have consistently found positive associations between the density of alcohol outlets and levels of violence in areas. Few studies have examined whether this relationship holds for domestic violence. This study assesses whether alcohol outlet density is related to domestic violence and whether this relationship is due to alcohol availability or to co-occurring economic disadvantage and social disorganisation. Cross-sectional data on family incidents, liquor outlets and socio-demographic characteristics were obtained for 217 postcodes in Melbourne, Australia. These data were used to construct models assessing the association between alcohol outlet density and domestic violence, both with and without controlling for socio-demographic factors. Models were tested for spatial autocorrelation, and spatial- error models were developed to control for its influence. Outlet density was significantly associated with rates of domestic violence, even controlling for socio-demographic factors. The density of hotels (pubs) was positively associated with domestic violence rates and the density of restaurants and bars was negatively associated with domestic violence. Socio-economic disadvantage was also associated with domestic violence rates. The density of packaged liquor outlets was not associated with rates of domestic violence. The results present a mixed picture, and further study is required to develop a clearer understanding of the links between alcohol availability and domestic violence.

  17. The dead end of domestic violence: spotlight on children's narratives during forensic investigations following domestic homicide.

    PubMed

    Katz, Carmit

    2014-12-01

    The current study provides an in-depth exploration of the narratives of children who witnessed their father killing their mother. This exploration was conducted using a thematic analysis of the children's forensic interviews based on seven investigative interviews that were conducted with children following the domestic homicide. Investigative interviews were selected for study only for substantiated cases and only if the children disclosed the domestic homicide. All of the investigative interviews were conducted within 24h of the domestic homicide. Thematic analysis revealed the following four key categories: the domestic homicide as the dead end of domestic violence, what I did when daddy killed mommy, that one time that daddy killed mommy, and mommy will feel better and will go back home. The discussion examines the multiple layers of this phenomenon as revealed in the children's narratives and its consequences for professionals within the legal and clinical contexts.

  18. Does Child Abuse and Neglect Increase Risk for Perpetration of Violence Inside and Outside the Home?

    PubMed Central

    Milaniak, Izabela; Widom, Cathy Spatz

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine the extent to which abused and neglected children perpetrate three different types of violence within and outside the home: criminal, child abuse, and intimate partner violence and determine whether childhood maltreatment leads to an increased risk for poly-violence perpetration. Method: Using data from a prospective cohort design study, children (ages 0-11) with documented histories of physical and sexual abuse and/or neglect (n = 676) were matched with children without such histories (n = 520) and assessed in young adulthood (average age 29). Official criminal records in conjunction with self-report data were used to assess violent outcomes. Results: Compared to the control group, individuals with histories of child abuse and/or neglect were significantly more likely to be poly-violence perpetrators, perpetrating violence in all three domains (relative risk = 1.26). All forms of childhood maltreatment (physical and sexual abuse and neglect) significantly predicted poly-violence perpetration. Conclusions: These findings expand the cycle of violence literature by combining the distinct literatures on criminal violence, child abuse, and partner violence to call attention to the phenomenon of poly-violence perpetration by maltreated children. Future research should examine the characteristics of maltreated children who become poly-violence perpetrators and mechanisms that lead to these outcomes. PMID:26191459

  19. Breaking the Silence on Domestic Violence: Information for Children's Services Workers. Australian Early Childhood Resource Booklets No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGregor, Heather

    This booklet is designed to provide Australian early childhood workers with information about domestic violence and response techniques to employ if they become aware that children under their care are witnessing domestic violence. The booklet notes that domestic violence can include physical and sexual violence, as well as psychological, social,…

  20. Female domestic violence offenders: their attachment security, trauma symptoms, and personality organization.

    PubMed

    Goldenson, Julie; Geffner, Robert; Foster, Sharon L; Clipson, Clark R

    2007-01-01

    Unlike male domestic violence offenders, female domestic violence offenders have traditionally been overlooked in research and theory, despite the fact that females also have high rates of domestic violence perpetration. Towards the aim of extending extant research on male and female pepetrators of domestic violence, we examined attachment style, trauma symptoms, and personality organization in 33 female offenders receiving mandated treatment for domestic violence. These offenders were compared to 32 nonoffending women receiving psychological treatment. The Experiences in Close Relationships Revised (ECR-Revised) was used to examine adult attachment, the Trauma Symptom Inventory (TSI) was used to examine trauma symptomology, and finally, the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory III (MCMI-III) was used to examine cluster B personality traits. Analyses indicated that female domestic violence offenders reported less attachment security, more trauma-related symptoms, and more personality psychopathology (Antisocial, Borderline, and Dependent Subscales) than did nonoffender clinical comparison women.

  1. Teaching Domestic Violence Online: A Step Forward or a Step Backward?

    PubMed

    Danis, Fran S

    2016-10-01

    With the increasing number of courses and degree programs available online, faculty may be interested in developing an online course on domestic violence. This article analyzes the similarities and differences involved in teaching about domestic violence online versus face-to-face. Highlights of course activities and notable online resources are identified including YouTube videos, webinars, online training modules, and websites. The limitations and challenges of teaching domestic violence in an asynchronous online course and recommendations for future teaching are discussed.

  2. Do laws restricting access to firearms by domestic violence offenders prevent intimate partner homicide?

    PubMed

    Vigdor, Elizabeth Richardson; Mercy, James A

    2006-06-01

    Domestic violence imposes a large cost on society. The authors exploit state variation in timing to examine the impact of three types of law on intimate partner homicides. These laws restrict access to firearms by individuals who are subject to a restraining order or have been convicted of a domestic violence misdemeanor or allow law enforcement officers to confiscate firearms at a domestic violence scene. The authors find that female intimate partner homicide rates decline 7% after a state passes a restraining order law. They find no effect from the domestic violence misdemeanor or confiscation laws. PMID:16679499

  3. Narrative Exemplars and the Celebrity Spokesperson in Lebanese Anti-Domestic Violence Public Service Announcements.

    PubMed

    El-Khoury, Jessica R; Shafer, Autumn

    2016-08-01

    Domestic violence is a worldwide epidemic. This study examines the effects of narrative exemplars and a celebrity spokesperson in anti-domestic violence ads on Lebanese college students' attitudes and beliefs towards domestic violence and whether these effects are impacted by personal experience. The practical significance is derived from the high prevalence of domestic violence internationally, making it important to find ways to effectively use media to address this health-related issue that has huge consequences for the individual and society. This study adds to the theoretical understanding of narrative persuasion and media effects. Results indicated that narrative exemplars in anti-domestic violence ads promoting bystander awareness and intervention were more beneficial for people without relevant experience compared to people who know someone affected by domestic violence. Anti-domestic violence ads without narrative exemplars, but that also featured an emotional self-efficacy appeal targeting bystanders, were more effective for participants who know someone who had experienced domestic violence compared to participants without relevant experience. The presence of a celebrity spokesperson elicited more positive attitudes about the ad than a noncelebrity, but failed to directly affect relevant anti-domestic violence attitudes or beliefs. These results highlight the significance of formative audience research in health communication message design. PMID:27441946

  4. Narrative Exemplars and the Celebrity Spokesperson in Lebanese Anti-Domestic Violence Public Service Announcements.

    PubMed

    El-Khoury, Jessica R; Shafer, Autumn

    2016-08-01

    Domestic violence is a worldwide epidemic. This study examines the effects of narrative exemplars and a celebrity spokesperson in anti-domestic violence ads on Lebanese college students' attitudes and beliefs towards domestic violence and whether these effects are impacted by personal experience. The practical significance is derived from the high prevalence of domestic violence internationally, making it important to find ways to effectively use media to address this health-related issue that has huge consequences for the individual and society. This study adds to the theoretical understanding of narrative persuasion and media effects. Results indicated that narrative exemplars in anti-domestic violence ads promoting bystander awareness and intervention were more beneficial for people without relevant experience compared to people who know someone affected by domestic violence. Anti-domestic violence ads without narrative exemplars, but that also featured an emotional self-efficacy appeal targeting bystanders, were more effective for participants who know someone who had experienced domestic violence compared to participants without relevant experience. The presence of a celebrity spokesperson elicited more positive attitudes about the ad than a noncelebrity, but failed to directly affect relevant anti-domestic violence attitudes or beliefs. These results highlight the significance of formative audience research in health communication message design.

  5. How well does the World Health Organization definition of domestic violence work for India?

    PubMed

    Kalokhe, Ameeta S; Potdar, Ratnaprabha R; Stephenson, Rob; Dunkle, Kristin L; Paranjape, Anuradha; Del Rio, Carlos; Sahay, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Domestic violence (DV) is reported by 40% of married women in India and associated with substantial morbidity. An operational research definition is therefore needed to enhance understanding of DV epidemiology in India and inform DV interventions and measures. To arrive at a culturally-tailored definition, we aimed to better understand how definitions provided by the World Health Organization and the 2005 India Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act match the perceptions of behaviors constituting DV among the Indian community. Between September 2012 and January 2013, 16 key informant interviews with experts in DV and family counseling and 2 gender-concordant focus groups of lay community members were conducted in Pune, India to understand community perceptions of the definition of DV, perpetrators of DV, and examples of DV encountered by married women in Pune, India. Several key themes emerged regarding behaviors and acts constituting DV including 1) the exertion of control over a woman's reproductive decision-making, mobility, socializing with family and friends, finances, and access to food and nutrition, 2) the widespread acceptance of sexual abuse and the influences of affluence on sexual DV manifestations, 3) the shaping of physical abuse experiences by readily-available tools and the presence of witnesses, 4) psychological abuse for infertility, dowry, and girl-children, and 5) the perpetration of DV by the husband and other members of his family. Findings support the need for a culturally-tailored operational definition that expands on the WHO surveillance definition to inform the development of more effective DV intervention strategies and measures.

  6. How Well Does the World Health Organization Definition of Domestic Violence Work for India?

    PubMed Central

    Kalokhe, Ameeta S.; Potdar, Ratnaprabha R.; Stephenson, Rob; Dunkle, Kristin L.; Paranjape, Anuradha; del Rio, Carlos; Sahay, Seema

    2015-01-01

    Domestic violence (DV) is reported by 40% of married women in India and associated with substantial morbidity. An operational research definition is therefore needed to enhance understanding of DV epidemiology in India and inform DV interventions and measures. To arrive at a culturally-tailored definition, we aimed to better understand how definitions provided by the World Health Organization and the 2005 India Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act match the perceptions of behaviors constituting DV among the Indian community. Between September 2012 and January 2013, 16 key informant interviews with experts in DV and family counseling and 2 gender-concordant focus groups of lay community members were conducted in Pune, India to understand community perceptions of the definition of DV, perpetrators of DV, and examples of DV encountered by married women in Pune, India. Several key themes emerged regarding behaviors and acts constituting DV including 1) the exertion of control over a woman’s reproductive decision-making, mobility, socializing with family and friends, finances, and access to food and nutrition, 2) the widespread acceptance of sexual abuse and the influences of affluence on sexual DV manifestations, 3) the shaping of physical abuse experiences by readily-available tools and the presence of witnesses, 4) psychological abuse for infertility, dowry, and girl-children, and 5) the perpetration of DV by the husband and other members of his family. Findings support the need for a culturally-tailored operational definition that expands on the WHO surveillance definition to inform the development of more effective DV intervention strategies and measures. PMID:25811374

  7. Aggression and Violence in Households of Crack Sellers/Abusers

    PubMed Central

    DUNLAP, ELOISE; JOHNSON, BRUCE D.; RATH, JULIA W.

    2009-01-01

    While the consequences of aggression and violence in family settings have been extensively documented, the intergenerational processes by which such behaviors are modeled, learned, and practiced have not been firmly established. This research was derived from a larger ethnographic study of crack sellers and their family systems and provides a case study of one kin network in Harlem where many adults were actively involved in alcohol and hard drug use and sales. “Illuminating episodes” suggest the various processes by which aggression and violence were directly modeled by adults and observed and learned by children. Aggression and violent behavior were entrenched in the Jones and Smith family, as was drug consumption and sales. Adults often fought over drugs or money and feuded while under the influence of crack and alcohol. They used aggression and violence against family members as retribution or punishment for previous aggressive and violent acts. Aggressive language and excessive profanity were routine adult behaviors and a major means of communication; jokes and insults led to arguments, often followed by fights. Most adults who were abused physically or sexually as children did the same to their own as when one mother was knifed by her daughter. Children rarely obtained special attention and support and had almost no opportunity to learn nonaggressive patterns. Rather, youths learned to model adult behaviors, such that the intergenerational transmission of aggression and violence was well established in this kin network. PMID:19920879

  8. Violence against women is strongly associated with suicide attempts: evidence from the WHO multi-country study on women's health and domestic violence against women.

    PubMed

    Devries, Karen; Watts, Charlotte; Yoshihama, Mieko; Kiss, Ligia; Schraiber, Lilia Blima; Deyessa, Negussie; Heise, Lori; Durand, Julia; Mbwambo, Jessie; Jansen, Henrica; Berhane, Yemane; Ellsberg, Mary; Garcia-Moreno, Claudia

    2011-07-01

    Suicidal behaviours are one of the most important contributors to the global burden of disease among women, but little is known about prevalence and modifiable risk factors in low and middle income countries. We use data from the WHO multi-country study on women's health and domestic violence against women to examine the prevalence of suicidal thoughts and attempts, and relationships between suicide attempts and mental health status, child sexual abuse, partner violence and other variables. Population representative cross-sectional household surveys were conducted from 2000-2003 in 13 provincial (more rural) and city (urban) sites in Brazil, Ethiopia, Japan, Namibia, Peru, Samoa, Serbia, Thailand and Tanzania. 20967 women aged 15-49 years participated. Prevalence of lifetime suicide attempts, lifetime suicidal thoughts, and suicidal thoughts in the past four weeks were calculated, and multivariate logistic regression models were fit to examine factors associated with suicide attempts in each site. Prevalence of lifetime suicide attempts ranged from 0.8% (Tanzania) to 12.0% (Peru city); lifetime thoughts of suicide from 7.2% (Tanzania province) to 29.0% (Peru province), and thoughts in the past four weeks from 1.9% (Serbia) to 13.6% (Peru province). 25-50% of women with suicidal thoughts in the past four weeks had also visited a health worker in that time. The most consistent risk factors for suicide attempts after adjusting for probable common mental health disorders were: intimate partner violence, non-partner physical violence, ever being divorced, separated or widowed, childhood sexual abuse and having a mother who had experienced intimate partner violence. Mental health policies and services must recognise the consistent relationship between violence and suicidality in women in low and middle income countries. Training health sector workers to recognize and respond to the consequences of violence may substantially reduce the health burden associated with

  9. Evaluation of the module on domestic violence at the UCLA School of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Short, L M; Cotton, D; Hodgson, C S

    1997-01-01

    Physicians and other hospital staff have a unique opportunity to assist victims of abuse. It is imperative that they develop the skills necessary to identify and diagnose cases and provide the support and referral services needed to help victims end the cycle of violence. This paper describes a comprehensive evaluation of the instructional design, implementation, and learning outcomes of the Domestic Violence Module at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Medicine to determine the effectiveness of this curriculum in helping medical students develop such skills. Expert reviewers found it to be an innovative, well-planned curriculum, and students and faculty tutors expressed a great deal of interest in and satisfaction with the course as a whole. However, the different evaluation components identified the same areas for improvement: (1) students need more opportunity to practice skills and receive feedback during the module, (2) there is inconsistency across classes in what is learned, and (3) tutors need better preparation sessions. The student outcomes reflected these needs and therefore suggest that the study may be useful in determining the components of an effective curriculum. After the training, the students reported significant increases in their feelings of self-efficacy and in their intentions, especially in comparison with a group of control students. Therefore, the module seems to be successful in inspiring medical students to work with victims of abuse.

  10. [Dealing with victims of domestic violence. Suggestions for daily practice].

    PubMed

    Graß, Hildegard Lilly; Gahr, Britta; Ritz-Timme, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    The recognition of victims of violence and their treatment in medical facilities is a subject which has been covered for several years in a number of ways. In medicine and in other disciplines, the focus of research, publication, and practical work has been on the quality of care provided. Guidelines for the treatment of victims of violence have been developed and needs have been assessed. These examples show there is an abundance of knowledge on the subject. Nevertheless, the transfer of this knowledge into the everyday practice of medicine at hospitals and doctors' offices is clearly still not functioning in an optimal way and faces a wide range of hurdles and stumbling blocks. Based on the experience gained in a pilot project involving the medical intervention in doctors' offices against violence perpetuated against women (Project MIGG, funded by the German Federal Ministry of Family, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth (BMFSFJ)), approaches for the optimal treatment of victims of violence in outpatient medical facilities are presented. The key steps to achieving the goal of optimal treatment are: (i) the entire practice team commits to establishing a victim-centered approach to care and (ii) the necessary processes and structures are implemented (i.e., adequate documentation in patient records, patient information is made available in the doctor's office, information on post-treatment services and sources of support in the region are provided, contact is maintained with such institutions, and programs of further education are offered). This paper provides a catalogue of keywords with an overview illustrating how to optimize practice management to deal with cases of domestic violence. In addition, various areas of work are described, such the special requirements involving the collection of evidence. PMID:26519330

  11. Primary care Identification and Referral to Improve Safety of women experiencing domestic violence (IRIS): protocol for a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Domestic violence, which may be psychological, physical, sexual, financial or emotional, is a major public health problem due to the long-term health consequences for women who have experienced it and for their children who witness it. In populations of women attending general practice, the prevalence of physical or sexual abuse in the past year from a partner or ex-partner ranges from 6 to 23%, and lifetime prevalence from 21 to 55%. Domestic violence is particularly important in general practice because women have many contacts with primary care clinicians and because women experiencing abuse identify doctors and nurses as professionals from whom they would like to get support. Yet health professionals rarely ask about domestic violence and have little or no training in how to respond to disclosure of abuse. Methods/Design This protocol describes IRIS, a pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial with the general practice as unit of randomisation. Our trial tests the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a training and support programme targeted at general practice teams. The primary outcome is referral of women to specialist domestic violence agencies. Forty-eight practices in two UK cities (Bristol and London) are randomly allocated, using minimisation, into intervention and control groups. The intervention, based on an adult learning model in an educational outreach framework, has been designed to address barriers to asking women about domestic violence and to encourage appropriate responses to disclosure and referral to specialist domestic violence agencies. Multidisciplinary training sessions are held with clinicians and administrative staff in each of the intervention practices, with periodic feedback of identification and referral data to practice teams. Intervention practices have a prompt to ask about abuse integrated in the electronic medical record system. Other components of the intervention include an IRIS champion in each practice

  12. The Comparison of Self-differentiation and Self-concept in Divorced and Non-divorced Women Who Experience Domestic Violence

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Fatemeh; Khodabakhshi Koolaee, Anahita; Rahmati Zadeh, Masoumeh

    2013-01-01

    Background A number of researches indicate that domestic violence (DV) causes abuse and vulnerability of women and children. Two components that can decrease violence and divorce are self-concept and self-differentiation. Objectives In this research, we compare self-differentiation and self-concept in divorced and non-divorced women that experience domestic violence. Materials and Methods To achieve the goal of the research, 80 divorced women with domestic violence were chosen through available sampling and equalized with 80 non divorced women with domestic violence in aspect of age and education. They respond to instrument of self-differentiation (Skowron) and self-concept (Rodgers). Data was analyzed between the two groups using independent t-test. The significant level was (P < 0.01). Results The findings indicated divorced women have more self-differentiation and self-concept than non-divorced women. In addition, there is a significant difference with respect to self-differentiation and self-concept in divorced and non-divorced women with domestic violence. Conclusions These results emphasize that self-differentiation and self-concept can be considered in premarital education (therapeutic interventions) to protective conditions against the occurrence of DV. PMID:24971277

  13. Is exposure to domestic violence and violent crime associated with bullying behaviour among underage adolescent psychiatric inpatients?

    PubMed

    Mustanoja, Susanna; Luukkonen, Anu-Helmi; Hakko, Helinä; Räsänen, Pirkko; Säävälä, Hannu; Riala, Kaisa

    2011-08-01

    We examined the relationship of exposure to domestic violence and violence occurring outside home to bullying behaviour in a sample (508; 40.9% males, 59.1% females) of underage psychiatric inpatient adolescents. Participants were interviewed using K-SADS-PL to assess DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses and to gather information about domestic and other violence and bullying behaviour. Witnessing interparental violence increased the risk of being a victim of bullying up to 2.5-fold among boys. For girls, being a victim of a violent crime was an over 10-fold risk factor for being a bully-victim. Gender differences were seen in witnessing of a violent crime; girls were more likely to be bullies than boys. Further, as regards being a victim of a violent crime outside home and physical abuse by parents at home, girls were significantly more often bully-victims than boys. When interfering and preventing bullying behaviour, it is important to screen adolescents' earlier experiences of violence.

  14. STAND BY ME. NURSES AND MIDWIVES PUTTING A STOP TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Natalie

    2015-08-01

    The scale and atrocity of domestic and family violence in Australia has come under the spotlight in 2015 largely due to the voice of Australian of the Year and family violence campaigner Rosie Batty. The implications of family violence are far reaching for many nurses and midwives, professionally and personally. Natalie Dragon reports. PMID:26454979

  15. STAND BY ME. NURSES AND MIDWIVES PUTTING A STOP TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE.

    PubMed

    Dragon, Natalie

    2015-08-01

    The scale and atrocity of domestic and family violence in Australia has come under the spotlight in 2015 largely due to the voice of Australian of the Year and family violence campaigner Rosie Batty. The implications of family violence are far reaching for many nurses and midwives, professionally and personally. Natalie Dragon reports.

  16. Exposure to Domestic Violence between Parents: A Perspective from Tehran, Iran

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vameghi, Meroe; Feizzadeh, Ali; Mirabzadeh, Arash; Feizzadeh, Golnaz

    2010-01-01

    Women may bear the brunt of domestic violence, but children are also inflicted by the consequences of violence between their parents. We sought to evaluate the lifetime prevalence of exposure to physical violence between parents among some senior secondary school students in Tehran. The study was conducted on senior secondary school students in…

  17. Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Services: Historical Concerns and Contemporary Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macy, Rebecca J.; Giattina, Mary C.; Parish, Susan L.; Crosby, Carmen

    2010-01-01

    More than 20 years ago, concerns were raised about whether domestic violence and sexual assault agencies need for stable funding would conflict with the values that initiated these respective movements. Since then, the movements have evolved considerably. Therefore, it is timely to investigate the challenges domestic violence and sexual assault…

  18. A Randomized Controlled Study of Brief Interventions To Teach Residents about Domestic Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coonrod, Dean V.; Bay, R. Curtis; Rowley, Beverley D.; Del Mar, Nancy B.; Gabriele, Laura; Tessman, Terrie D.; Chambliss, Linda R.

    2000-01-01

    Medical residents were randomly assigned to either a 20-minute session on the importance of screening for domestic violence or to an unrelated topic. Subsequently, 71 percent of the trained residents diagnosed at least one case of domestic violence compared to 52 percent of residents in the control group. Rates of diagnosis also differed by…

  19. Incorporating Domestic Violence Awareness through an Undergraduate Reading Course Focused on Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lelli, Colleen M.

    2010-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined preservice teachers' awareness of domestic violence through an undergraduate reading course which focused on children's literature. Pre and post surveys were administered to preservice teachers to determine whether their knowledge and skills in recognizing signs of domestic violence in behaviors of the elementary…

  20. Collaborative Efforts to Improve System Response to Families Who Are Experiencing Child Maltreatment and Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Duren; Dutch, Nicole; Wang, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    The "Greenbook" demonstration initiative provided federal funding and other support to six communities to establish collaborations to plan and implement policy and practice changes in systems that serve families who are experiencing domestic violence and child maltreatment or child exposure to domestic violence. The demonstration sites established…

  1. English-Speaking and Spanish-Speaking Domestic Violence Perpetrators: An MMPI-2 Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Ronald L.; Flowers, John V.; Bulnes, Alejandro; Olmsted, Eileen; Carbajal-Madrid, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    The use of assessments to characterize domestic violence perpetrators continues to develop with an emphasis on increasing the effectiveness of domestic violence interventions. The present study examines and compares Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI)-2 responses from 41 English-speaking and 48 Spanish-speaking men who were in…

  2. The association of neighborhood characteristics and domestic violence in Santiago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Kim, Huiyun; Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew; Han, Yoonsun; Maurizi, Laura; Delva, Jorge

    2013-02-01

    The growing tension between conservative attitudes and liberal policies on gender issues in Chile is reflected by the high rates of domestic violence juxtaposed by a strong governmental policy aimed at preventing this social problem. Attempts to understand factors associated with domestic violence in Chile, and in other countries as well, have not paid much attention to neighborhood-level factors. This manuscript examined the extent to which selected neighborhood characteristics were associated with domestic violence against women. Relying on theories of social disorganization and social stress, this study conceptualized residence in a disadvantaged neighborhood as a source of stress and examined the relationship between detrimental physical and social characteristics of neighborhoods and the chance of women experiencing domestic violence. Results revealed that a higher level of trash in neighborhoods was associated with increased rates of domestic violence above and beyond individual characteristics. Findings also suggested that the relationship between high levels of trash in neighborhoods and domestic violence was greater for women with higher levels of financial stress. Given the potential role of neighborhood environments in reducing domestic violence, a comprehensive approach incorporating both neighborhood- and individual-level factors may be critical in designing effective preventive interventions for domestic violence.

  3. 3 CFR 8575 - Proclamation 8575 of October 1, 2010. National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2010

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2010 8575 Proclamation 8575 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8575 of October 1, 2010 Proc. 8575 National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, 2010By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation In the 16 years since the passage of the...

  4. A Summary and Analysis of Warrantless Arrest Statutes for Domestic Violence in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeoli, April M.; Norris, Alexis; Brenner, Hannah

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have enacted statutes that allow police officers to make warrantless arrests for domestic violence given probable cause; however, state laws differ from one another in multiple, important ways. Research on domestic violence warrantless arrest laws rarely describe them as anything…

  5. 77 FR 24337 - Establishing Policies for Addressing Domestic Violence in the Federal Workforce

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    .... (Presidential Sig.) THE WHITE HOUSE, Washington, April 18, 2012 [FR Doc. 2012-9899 Filed 4-20-12; 11:15 am... Domestic Violence in the Federal Workforce #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0; #0;#0;Federal... President ] Memorandum of April 18, 2012 Establishing Policies for Addressing Domestic Violence in...

  6. Domestic Violence in India: Insights from the 2005-2006 National Family Health Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimuna, Sitawa R.; Djamba, Yanyi K.; Ciciurkaite, Gabriele; Cherukuri, Suvarna

    2013-01-01

    This article assesses the prevalence and risk factors of domestic violence in India. The study uses the 2005-2006 India National Family Health Survey-III (NFHS-III) and focuses on the 69,484 ever-married women ages 15 to 49 from all regions, who were administered the domestic violence module. The results show that 31% of respondents experienced…

  7. Attitudes toward Police Response to Domestic Violence: A Comparison of Chinese and American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Ivan Y.; Su, Mingyue; Wu, Yuning

    2011-01-01

    Domestic violence has emerged as a worldwide concern since the 1970s. Although a substantial amount of efforts have been devoted to assessing various aspects of domestic violence, a relatively small number of studies have empirically examined factors that shape public attitudes toward police response to such incidents. Even rarer is investigating…

  8. Examining the Perceptions of Zimbabwean Women about the Domestic Violence Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makahamadze, Tompson; Isacco, Anthony; Chireshe, Excellent

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to qualitatively examine how Christian women from Zimbabwe perceived the effectiveness of the Domestic Violence Act in preventing and responding to domestic violence. The study also aims to understand the unique social, cultural, and religious context of the participants that affect their attitudes and beliefs about…

  9. On Integrating Variables and Separating Facts in the Complex Relationship between Dependency and Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornstein, Robert F.

    2007-01-01

    Presents a reply by Robert Bornstein to comments from Chronister and regarding his article, "The complex relationship between dependency and domestic violence: Converging psychological factors and social forces." In addition to raising some important issues regarding the link between dependency and domestic violence, the comments by Chronister and…

  10. What Criteria Do Child Protective Services Investigators Use to Substantiate Exposure to Domestic Violence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coohey, Carol

    2007-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to determine whether child protective services investigators apply a recognizable set of criteria to substantiate batterers and victims of battering for exposing their children to domestic violence. Although domestic violence occurred in 35% of the 1,248 substantiated incidents of child maltreatment, only 31…

  11. "Women Must Endure According to Their Karma." Cambodian Immigrant Women Talk About Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhuyan, Rupaleem; Mell, Molly; Senturia, Kirsten; Sullivan, Marianne; Shiu-Thornton, Sharyne

    2005-01-01

    Asian populations living in the United States share similar cultural values that influence their experiences with domestic violence. However, it is critical to recognize how differential cultural beliefs in the context of immigration and adjustment to life in the United States affect attitudes, interpretations, and response to domestic violence.…

  12. Safer Beginnings: Perinatal Child-Parent Psychotherapy for Newborns and Mothers Exposed to Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, Alicia F.; Diaz, Manuela A.; Van Horn, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Pregnancy is a time of heightened risk for domestic violence and of increased vulnerability to traumatic events. In this article, the authors explain how the experience of domestic violence during pregnancy threatens the newborn's healthy development as well as the parent-child relationship. San Francisco General Hospital's Perinatal Child-Parent…

  13. Do Laws Restricting Access to Firearms by Domestic Violence Offenders Prevent Intimate Partner Homicide?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigdor, Elizabeth Richardson; Mercy, James A.

    2006-01-01

    Domestic violence imposes a large cost on society. The authors exploit state variation in timing to examine the impact of three types of law on intimate partner homicides. These laws restrict access to firearms by individuals who are subject to a restraining order or have been convicted of a domestic violence misdemeanor or allow law enforcement…

  14. Evaluation Study of an Interdisciplinary Social Work and Law Curriculum for Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colarossi, Lisa; Forgey, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01

    This article evaluates the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary social work and law curriculum for domestic violence. A pretest-posttest control group design with both law and social work students indicates that the course effectively increased: (1) knowledge about domestic violence theory and practice and differential roles, duties, and…

  15. Teaching Social Work Students to Resolve Ethical Dilemmas in Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent-Goodley, Tricia B.

    2007-01-01

    This article examines findings from three focus groups conducted about resolving ethical dilemmas in the area of domestic violence. The study's findings point to the need to increase content on domestic violence throughout the social work curriculum and provide educational opportunities for field instructors and local professionals. Helping…

  16. Family Business or Social Problem? The Cost of Unreported Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrell, Scott E.; Hoekstra, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Social interest in problems such as domestic violence is typically motivated by concerns regarding equity, rather than efficiency. However, we document that taking steps to reduce domestic violence by reporting it yields substantial benefits to external parties. Specifically, we find that although children exposed to as-yet-unreported domestic…

  17. Domestic Violence: Frequency and Women`s Perception in Iran (I.R)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrusi, Behshid; Nakhaee, Nouzar; Zangiabadi, Mahin

    This study was aimed to estimate the prevalence of different kinds of domestic violence against women in an Iranian population and to explore their attitudes. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Kerman, Iran. Three hundred ninety eight women referring to randomly selected health centers were interviewed in early 2005. The questionnaire explored the women`s views regarding domestic violence and their experiences of domestic violence during the year before interview. Ignoring women's capabilities by their spouses (36.7%) was the most frequent type of violence. Roughly 27% of them were beaten by their husbands over preceding year. The respondents showed the least agreement with `violence toward wife ceases during pregnancy`. Although the findings may not be generalizable to other parts of the country due to cultural diversity, considering the high prevalence of different types of domestic violence it should be regarded as a priority for health service policy.

  18. Telepsychiatry program for rural victims of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christopher R; Miller, Greg; Hartshorn, Jeanette C; Speck, Nancy C; Walker, Glenda

    2005-10-01

    Domestic violence is a significant public health problem and is correlated with serious mental and physical disorders. Victims' fear and isolation seriously limit access to psychiatric evaluation and treatment. Telemedicine provides a means to overcome these obstacles. This article describes a telemedicine program that provides psychiatric screening, evaluation, treatment, and referral for ongoing care to clients of a rural women's crisis center. Psychiatric evaluation and treatment were provided to a rural women's shelter program using telepsychiatry. The shelter program had difficulty accessing traditional mental health service. All new clients entering the program were screened for mental health problems. Those requiring further evaluation received a physical examination with medical history and initial psychological interview on site, followed by psychiatric evaluation by videoconference. Appropriate treatment was initiated, and referral for ongoing psychiatric care through the local community mental health clinic was arranged. Of the 38 women referred for mental health services by clinic staff, 35 completed a psychiatric evaluation using telepsychiatry and 31 entered treatment. The most commonly identified disorders were anxiety and major affective disorders, followed by substance use disorders. Telepsychiatry can provide rapid crisis intervention and effective mental health services to victims of domestic violence in a rural setting.

  19. The Relationship of Animal Abuse to Violence and Other Forms of Antisocial Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arluke, Arnold; Levin, Jack; Luke, Carter; Ascione, Frank

    1999-01-01

    Criminal records of 153 animal abusers and 153 control participants were tracked and compared. Animal abusers were more likely to commit property offenses, drug offenses, and public disorder offenses. Thus, results show an association between animal abuse and a variety of antisocial behavior, but not violence alone. Implications of these findings…

  20. Changing coverage of domestic violence murders: a longitudinal experiment in participatory communication.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Charlotte; Anastario, Mike; DaCunha, Alfredo

    2006-02-01

    Stressing relation-building and participatory communication approaches, the Rhode Island Coalition against Domestic Violence worked with journalists to develop a best practices handbook on news coverage of domestic violence murders. This study compares print coverage of domestic violence murders prehandbook (1996-1999) and posthandbook (2000-2002). Significant changes include increased labeling of the murder of intimates as domestic violence and doubled usage of advocates as sources. As a result, domestic violence murders, previously framed as unpredictable private tragedies, are more commonly framed posthandbook as social problems warranting public intervention. The authors conclude that relation-building approaches can affect news cultures and public discourse when conducted in conjunction with comprehensive participatory communications strategies.

  1. Understanding and Informing Policy Implementation: A Case Study of the Domestic Violence Provisions of the Maryland Gun Violence Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frattaroli, Shannon; Teret, Stephen P.

    2006-01-01

    The Maryland Gun Violence Act, enacted into law in 1996, explicitly authorized courts to order batterers to surrender their firearms through civil protective orders. It also vested law enforcement with the explicit authority to remove guns when responding to a domestic violence complaint. In order to assess how these laws were implemented, we…

  2. Evaluation of DELTA PREP: A Project Aimed at Integrating Primary Prevention of Intimate Partner Violence within State Domestic Violence Coalitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freire, Kimberley E.; Zakocs, Ronda; Le, Brenda; Hill, Jessica A.; Brown, Pamela; Wheaton, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been recognized as a public health problem since the late 20th century. To spur IPV prevention efforts nationwide, the DELTA PREP Project selected 19 state domestic violence coalitions to build organizational prevention capacity and catalyze IPV primary prevention strategies within their states.…

  3. Dating violence victimization across the teen years: Abuse frequency, number of abusive partners, and age at first occurrence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Prior longitudinal studies have shown high cumulative dating violence exposure rates among U.S adolescents, with 36 percent of males and 44 percent to 88 percent of females experiencing victimization across adolescence/young adulthood. Despite promising information characterizing adolescents’ dating violence experiences longitudinally, prior studies tended to concentrate on physical and sexual types of violence only, and did not report information on the number of times dating violence was experienced across multiple abusive partners. We used a method similar to the timeline follow-back interview to query adolescents about dating violence victimization from age 13 to 19—including dating violence types (physical, sexual, and psychological), frequency, age at first occurrence, and number of abusive partners. Methods A total of 730 subjects were randomly sampled from university registrar records and invited to complete an online survey, which utilized methods similar to the timeline follow-back interview, to retrospectively assess relationship histories and dating violence victimization from age 13 to 19 (eight questions adapted from widely-used surveys covering physical, sexual, and psychological abuse). Then, for each dating violence type, we asked about the number of occurrences, number of abusive partners, and age at first occurrence. Of 341 subjects who completed the survey, we included 297 (64 percent females; 36 percent males) who had a dating partner from age 13 to 19. Results Fully 64.7 percent of females and 61.7 percent of males reported dating violence victimization between age 13 and 19, with most experiencing multiple occurrences. More than one-third of abused females had two or more abusive partners: controlling behavior (35.6 percent); put downs/name calling (37.0); pressured sex (42.9); insults (44.3); slapped/hit (50.0); and threats (62.5). Males also had two or more abusive partners, as follows: controlling behavior (42.1 percent

  4. Intimate Partner Violence Perpetration by Court-Ordered Men: Distinctions and Intersections among Physical Violence, Sexual Violence, Psychological Abuse, and Stalking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basile, Kathleen C.; Hall, Jeffrey E.

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the construct validity of two different measurement models of male partners' perpetration of physical violence, sexual violence, psychological abuse, and stalking against intimate partners. Data were obtained from a sample of 340 men arrested for physical assault of a female spouse or partner and court ordered into batterer…

  5. Coordinated community response to family violence: the role of domestic violence service organizations.

    PubMed

    Malik, Neena M; Ward, Kristin; Janczewski, Colleen

    2008-07-01

    There is increasing awareness that domestic violence (DV) and child maltreatment often overlap and that there are significant negative consequences to women and children who are victims in the same families. The present study contains data from a participatory evaluation of a multisite national demonstration project on family violence (the Greenbook Initiative), funded jointly by the U.S. Departments of Health and Human Services and Justice. The goal of this initiative was to increase community capacity to assist dually victimized families. This article focuses on the DV service organizations in the demonstration with regard to collaborations with other agencies and work within the DV system to respond to dually victimized families. Findings suggest that DV agencies participated in leadership roles, cross-system collaborations, and cross-system trainings throughout the initiative. Within-agency practice changes were less apparent. Research and policy implications are discussed. PMID:18378804

  6. Understanding and informing policy implementation: a case study of the domestic violence provisions of the Maryland Gun Violence Act.

    PubMed

    Frattaroli, Shannon; Teret, Stephen P

    2006-06-01

    The Maryland Gun Violence Act, enacted into law in 1996, explicitly authorized courts to order batterers to surrender their firearms through civil protective orders. It also vested law enforcement with the explicit authority to remove guns when responding to a domestic violence complaint. In order to assess how these laws were implemented, we designed a case study and collected data from in-depth, key informant interviews, court observations, and relevant documents. We present findings from this study and recommend how to increase the likelihood that policies designed to separate batterers and guns are implemented in a way that will result in greater protections for victims of domestic violence. PMID:16679500

  7. Domestic violence against women in Kosovo: a qualitative study of women's experiences.

    PubMed

    Kelmendi, Kaltrina

    2015-02-01

    Research on gender-based violence describes domestic violence by male partners as a major public health issue and serious human rights violation. Many studies have been conducted in Kosovo to understand the factors that contribute to violence against women. The present study aims to examine the experiences of battered women and their understanding of the violence from an ecological framework, by asking questions regarding personal, situational, and socio-cultural factors. The study is qualitative, consisting of 50 in-depth interviews with victims of domestic violence, and uses a grounded theory approach to identify main themes of the women's experiences. Findings from the study suggest that poverty, a patriarchal culture, strictly defined gender roles, and lack of programs for reintegrating victims subordinate women and leave them susceptible to domestic violence.

  8. Removing guns from batterers: findings from a pilot survey of domestic violence restraining order recipients in California.

    PubMed

    Vittes, Katherine A; Webster, Daniel W; Frattaroli, Shannon; Claire, Barbara E; Wintemute, Garen J

    2013-05-01

    Persons under certain domestic violence restraining orders in California are required to surrender any firearms in their possession within 24 hours of service. The California Department of Justice funded a pilot program in which Sheriff's Offices in two counties developed a system for better enforcing the firearm surrender requirement. As part of a larger process evaluation, 17 restraining order recipients were interviewed about their experiences with and feelings about the removal of firearms from their abusers. Most women surveyed wanted firearms removed and felt safer as a result of their removal. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  9. Exposure to domestic violence and identity development among adolescent university students in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Makhubela, Malose S

    2012-06-01

    This study examined the relationship between exposure to domestic violence and identity development in a sample of 108 undergraduate students with an average age of 18.7 yr. from University of Limpopo in South Africa. There were more women (n = 64; 58.7%) in the study than men (n = 45; 41.3%). Participants were classified into high and low domestic violence exposure groups on the basis of a median split in physical violence scores from the Child Exposure to Domestic Violence Scale (CEDV). Exposure was then compared with identity development as measured by the Ochse and Plug Erikson scale. The results indicated a significant mean difference between the two groups on identity development. Furthermore, exposure to domestic violence was significantly associated with lower scores for identity development as represented by subscales measuring trust, autonomy, initiative and other Eriksonian constructs. Implications and limitations of the study are discussed.

  10. Public's and police officers' interpretation and handling of domestic violence cases: divergent realities.

    PubMed

    Stalans, Loretta J; Finn, Mary A

    2006-09-01

    The public's and police officers'interpretation and handling of realistic hypothetical domestic violence cases and their stereotypic views about domestic violence are discussed. A sample of 131 experienced officers, 127 novice officers, and 157 adult laypersons were randomly assigned to read a domestic violence case. Experienced officers were more likely to arrest only the husband than were laypersons or rookie officers even when respondents inferred that the husband was primarily responsible or had used violence before. Experienced officers considered their stereotypic beliefs about battered women's propensity to use self-defense in arriving at their arrest decision whereas laypersons and rookie officers did not. These findings indicate that the public and police officers have not adopted the feminists' message that arrest is the best response to handle all domestic violence cases. Policy implications are discussed. PMID:16893962

  11. The Impact of Domestic Violence in the Workplace

    PubMed Central

    MacGregor, Jennifer C. D.; MacQuarrie, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: When workers experience domestic violence (DV) at home, impacts are felt in the workplace; however, little research is available on this topic. Methods: We conducted an online survey regarding the impacts of DV at work. Results: A total of 8429 people completed the survey. More than a third of respondents reported experiencing DV; among them, more than a third reported that DV affected their ability to get to work, and more than half reported that it continued at or near work. Most reported that DV negatively affected their performance. Almost all respondents, regardless of DV experience, believed that it impacts victims' work lives. Conclusions: This research identifies the scope and impact of DV on workers and workplaces. The data should assist governments, unions, and employers to enact and evaluate proactive practices to address the impact of DV in the workplace. PMID:26147553

  12. Impact of the Spread of Mass Education on Married Women’s Experience with Domestic Violence

    PubMed Central

    Ghimire, Dirgha J.; Axinn, William G.; Smith-Greenaway, Emily

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the association between mass education and married women’s experience with domestic violence in rural Nepal. Previous research on domestic violence in South Asian societies emphasizes patriarchal ideology and the widespread subordinate status of women within their communities and families. The recent spread of mass education is likely to shift these gendered dynamics, thereby lowering women’s likelihood of experiencing domestic violence. Using data from 1,775 currently married women from the Chitwan Valley Family Study in Nepal, we provide a thorough analysis of how the spread of mass education is associated with domestic violence among married women. The results show that women’s childhood access to school, their parents’ schooling, their own schooling, and their husbands’ schooling are each associated with their lower likelihood of experiencing domestic violence. Indeed, husbands’ education has a particularly strong, inverse association with women’s likelihood of experiencing domestic violence. These associations suggest that the proliferation of mass education will lead to a marked decline in women’s experience with domestic violence in Nepal. PMID:26463551

  13. Models of Invisibility: Rendering Domestic and Other Gendered Violence Visible to Students Through Clinical Law Teaching.

    PubMed

    MacDowell, Elizabeth L; Cammett, Ann

    2016-10-01

    The proliferation of university courses about domestic violence includes clinical courses in law schools in which students represent victims in their legal cases. This essay advocates for a broader approach to teaching about the problem. Using examples from their clinic cases, the authors show how teachers can overcome pedagogical challenges and render domestic and other forms of gendered violence, including state and community violence, more visible to students by intentionally raising and placing it within larger frameworks of structural inequality. In this way, students learn to identify and address gendered violence even when it is not the presenting problem.

  14. Attitudes towards domestic violence in Lebanon: a qualitative study of primary care practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Usta, Jinan; Feder, Gene; Antoun, Jumana

    2014-01-01

    Background Domestic violence (DV) is highly prevalent in the developing and developed world. Healthcare systems internationally are still not adequately addressing the needs of patients experiencing violence. Aim To explore physicians’ attitudes about responding to DV, their perception of the physician’s role, and the factors that influence their response. Design and setting Qualitative study using individual interviews among primary care practitioners working in Lebanon. Method Primary care clinicians practising for >5 years and with >100 patient consultations a week were interviewed. Physicians were asked about their practice when encountering women disclosing abuse, their opinion about the engagement of the health services with DV, their potential role, and the anticipated reaction of patients and society to this extended role. Results Physicians felt that they were well positioned to play a pivotal role in addressing DV; yet they had concerns related to personal safety, worry about losing patients, and opposing the norms of a largely conservative society. Several physicians justified DV or blamed the survivor rather than the perpetrator for triggering the violent behaviour. Moreover, religion was perceived as sanctioning DV. Conclusion Perceived cultural norms and religious beliefs seem to be major barriers to physicians responding to DV in Lebanon, and possibly in the Arab world more generally. Financial concerns also need to be addressed to encourage physicians to address DV. PMID:24868068

  15. [Fifty feminine shades of domestic violence: time for doctors to get involved!].

    PubMed

    Chiffi De Los Rios, T; Regard, S; Escard, E

    2015-09-23

    Domestic violences are very common and constitute a criminal offence. Women are mainly victims but can also be perpetrators. Domestic violences have a major health impact on people, families and society. The primary care physician holds a major role in the targeted detection of domestic violences and their prevention. He must know their specificities and adapt his response according to the situations. This specific response does not prevent a rational approach: we propose to distinguish between different types of women's vulnerability. Management must involve an efficient network taking into account individual, family, community and social factors. In this context, use of regularly updated information from official websites is mandatory. PMID:26591790

  16. "What's the problem?": Australian public policy constructions of domestic and family violence.

    PubMed

    Murray, Suellen; Powell, Anastasia

    2009-05-01

    The campaign of feminists to have domestic violence formally acknowledged as a key issue affecting Australian women succeeded in the early 1980s when governments began developing policy seeking to address the problem. Far from simply adopting feminist gendered understandings of domestic violence, however, the development of contemporary policy responses to this issue has been influenced by a number of competing discourses about the problem, its causes, and possible solutions. Drawing on Bacchi's policy analysis approach, the authors compare the discursive constructions of domestic violence inherent in how the issue is named, framed, and defined across contemporary Australian policy documents. PMID:19208919

  17. Teaching Domestic Violence Online: A Step Forward or a Step Backward?

    PubMed

    Danis, Fran S

    2016-10-01

    With the increasing number of courses and degree programs available online, faculty may be interested in developing an online course on domestic violence. This article analyzes the similarities and differences involved in teaching about domestic violence online versus face-to-face. Highlights of course activities and notable online resources are identified including YouTube videos, webinars, online training modules, and websites. The limitations and challenges of teaching domestic violence in an asynchronous online course and recommendations for future teaching are discussed. PMID:26796780

  18. Personality Assessment Screener, Childhood Abuse, and Adult Partner Violence in African American Women Using Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Porcerelli, John H; Hurrell, Kristen; Cogan, Rosemary; Jeffries, Keturah; Markova, Tsveti

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the relationship between psychopathology with the Personality Assessment Screener (PAS) and childhood physical and sexual abuse and adult physical and sexual partner violence in a primary care sample of 98 urban-dwelling African American women. Patients completed the PAS, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, and the Conflict Tactics Scale. The PAS total score significantly correlated with all measures of childhood and adult abuse. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that PAS element scores of Suicidal Thinking and Hostile Control significantly predicted a history of childhood physical abuse; Suicidal Thinking, Hostile Control, and Acting Out significantly predicted a history of childhood sexual abuse; Suicidal Thinking, Negative Affect, and Alienation significantly predicted current adult partner physical violence; and Psychotic Features, Alcohol Problems, and Anger Control significantly predicted current adult sexual partner violence. The PAS appears to be a useful measure for fast-paced primary care settings for identifying patients who need a more thorough assessment for abuse.

  19. Personality Assessment Screener, Childhood Abuse, and Adult Partner Violence in African American Women Using Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Porcerelli, John H; Hurrell, Kristen; Cogan, Rosemary; Jeffries, Keturah; Markova, Tsveti

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the relationship between psychopathology with the Personality Assessment Screener (PAS) and childhood physical and sexual abuse and adult physical and sexual partner violence in a primary care sample of 98 urban-dwelling African American women. Patients completed the PAS, the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, and the Conflict Tactics Scale. The PAS total score significantly correlated with all measures of childhood and adult abuse. Stepwise regression analyses revealed that PAS element scores of Suicidal Thinking and Hostile Control significantly predicted a history of childhood physical abuse; Suicidal Thinking, Hostile Control, and Acting Out significantly predicted a history of childhood sexual abuse; Suicidal Thinking, Negative Affect, and Alienation significantly predicted current adult partner physical violence; and Psychotic Features, Alcohol Problems, and Anger Control significantly predicted current adult sexual partner violence. The PAS appears to be a useful measure for fast-paced primary care settings for identifying patients who need a more thorough assessment for abuse. PMID:26374084

  20. Child abuse and neglect and intimate partner violence victimization and perpetration: a prospective investigation.

    PubMed

    Widom, Cathy Spatz; Czaja, Sally; Dutton, Mary Ann

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes the extent to which abused and neglected children report intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization and perpetration when followed up into middle adulthood. Using data from a prospective cohort design study, children (ages 0-11) with documented histories of physical and sexual abuse and/or neglect (n=497) were matched with children without such histories (n=395) and assessed in adulthood (Mage=39.5). Prevalence, number, and variety of four types of IPV (psychological abuse, physical violence, sexual violence, and injury) were measured. Over 80% of both groups - childhood abuse and neglect (CAN) and controls - reported some form of IPV victimization during the past year (most commonly psychological abuse) and about 75% of both groups reported perpetration of IPV toward their partner. Controlling for age, sex, and race, overall CAN [adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.60, 95% CI [1.03, 2.49

  1. Stopping the Violence at Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkman, Antoinette

    2004-01-01

    Public interest in domestic violence waxes and wanes with the headlines. This article describes how libraries can play an important--and even lifesaving--role in empowering abused women, providing useful resources for shelters and other agencies, and enlightening students and the general public about domestic violence.

  2. Domestic violence in India: insights from the 2005-2006 national family health survey.

    PubMed

    Kimuna, Sitawa R; Djamba, Yanyi K; Ciciurkaite, Gabriele; Cherukuri, Suvarna

    2013-03-01

    This article assesses the prevalence and risk factors of domestic violence in India. The study uses the 2005-2006 India National Family Health Survey-III (NFHS-III) and focuses on the 69,484 ever-married women ages 15 to 49 from all regions, who were administered the domestic violence module. The results show that 31% of respondents experienced physical violence in the past 12 months before the survey; the corresponding figure for sexual violence was 8.3%. The multivariate logistic regression results show key determinants of physical and sexual violence. Some of the most salient findings are that urban residence, household wealth, affiliation with Christian religious denominations, wife's age at marriage and education are associated with lower risk of physical and sexual violence. In contrast, being employed and being the wife of a man who drank alcohol increased the odds of experiencing both physical and sexual violence. Moreover, respondents who believed that wife-beating was justified under certain circumstances were more likely to experience domestic violence. These results and significant regional differences observed in this study suggest that gender role conditioning and cultural norms both contribute to domestic violence. Interventions, therefore, need to go beyond the institutional and legal levels to include cultural capital, which addresses partner and relationship issues.

  3. Exposure to domestic violence between parents: a perspective from Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Vameghi, Meroe; Feizzadeh, Ali; Mirabzadeh, Arash; Feizzadeh, Golnaz

    2010-06-01

    Women may bear the brunt of domestic violence, but children are also inflicted by the consequences of violence between their parents. We sought to evaluate the lifetime prevalence of exposure to physical violence between parents among some senior secondary school students in Tehran. The study was conducted on senior secondary school students in all 19 educational districts of the Iranian capital, Tehran, in the academic year of 2005-06 using a multi-stage sampling. Data were collected via a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 1,495 students participated in this survey, with the prevalence estimated at 22.8%. More than half of the subjects had witnessed domestic violence between their parents; the prevalence of exposure among the girls was twice that among the boys. The most frequent act of violence was beating the partner with bare hands and the perpetrators of the violent acts were predominantly the fathers. Exposure was long-lasting; and in those with more than one exposure, the mean duration of exposure was 5.1 years. The most prevalent rates of exposure to domestic violence came from Educational Districts 15 and 10. The fact that a considerable portion of the teenagers in the present study had witnessed physical violence between their parents bears testimony to the high frequency of this form of violence in Tehran households. It is noteworthy that the socio-economic status of the families and parental divorce and estrangement increased the likelihood of exposure to domestic violence in our series.

  4. Domestic violence in India: insights from the 2005-2006 national family health survey.

    PubMed

    Kimuna, Sitawa R; Djamba, Yanyi K; Ciciurkaite, Gabriele; Cherukuri, Suvarna

    2013-03-01

    This article assesses the prevalence and risk factors of domestic violence in India. The study uses the 2005-2006 India National Family Health Survey-III (NFHS-III) and focuses on the 69,484 ever-married women ages 15 to 49 from all regions, who were administered the domestic violence module. The results show that 31% of respondents experienced physical violence in the past 12 months before the survey; the corresponding figure for sexual violence was 8.3%. The multivariate logistic regression results show key determinants of physical and sexual violence. Some of the most salient findings are that urban residence, household wealth, affiliation with Christian religious denominations, wife's age at marriage and education are associated with lower risk of physical and sexual violence. In contrast, being employed and being the wife of a man who drank alcohol increased the odds of experiencing both physical and sexual violence. Moreover, respondents who believed that wife-beating was justified under certain circumstances were more likely to experience domestic violence. These results and significant regional differences observed in this study suggest that gender role conditioning and cultural norms both contribute to domestic violence. Interventions, therefore, need to go beyond the institutional and legal levels to include cultural capital, which addresses partner and relationship issues. PMID:22935947

  5. Results from the Hawaii domestic violence fatality review, 2000-2009

    PubMed Central

    Pobutsky, Ann; Brown, Melissa; Nakao, Lisa; Reyes-Salvail, Florentina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Patterns of domestic violence fatalities and agency responses in Hawaii have not been explicated. Methods: Retrospective reviews of events leading up to domestic violence related fatalities in Hawaii were assessed from 45 adjudicated cases that resulted in 62 fatalities for the ten year period from 2000-2009. Results: Almost one-half of the fatalities were homicide/suicide combinations. Females were disproportionately more likely to be fatal victims of domestic violence relative to their proportion in the population. Those aged 21-40 years and those over 80 years were more likely to be fatal victims of domestic violence, relative to their proportion in the population. Filipinas and ‘Other” ethnic groups are disproportionately more likely to be fatal victims of domestic violence while Native Hawaiians and Japanese are less likely to be fatal victims, relative to their proportions in the population. In more than two-thirds of the cases, the victim had made some attempt to leave the relationship prior to the fatality. Conclusions: In the majority of cases there was agency involvement in some form: either the victim alone or the perpetrator alone, or both. However, less than one-third (31.1%) of the cases over the past ten years had documentation of prior violence from medical reports, so this may be an area to further document and address domestic violence. PMID:24292165

  6. Future law enforcement officers and social workers: perceptions of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    McMullan, Elizabeth C; Carlan, Philip E; Nored, Lisa S

    2010-08-01

    This study compares perceptions of domestic violence for college students planning to work in law enforcement with students aspiring to careers in social work and non-law-enforcement criminal justice (N = 491). The study involves students attending four public universities across one Southern state who completed a survey (spring of 2006) measuring whether various scenarios were (1) related to domestic violence, and (2) worthy of being reported to law enforcement. Findings indicate that all student groups (law enforcement, non-law-enforcement criminal justice, and social work) tended to identify the various scenarios as domestic violence (and worthy of being reported) regardless of the person's sexual orientation, violence severity, and offender's or victim's gender. However, law enforcement students are less sensitive to domestic violence when compared with social work and non-law enforcement criminal justice students. Findings reveal that (1) graduate students, (2) female students, and (3) White students (compared with African American students in general) attending majority White universities were more likely to identify domestic violence and its worthiness of being reported.The data in this study indicate that criminal justice programs produce graduates who are reasonably sensitive toward the importance of appropriate domestic violence response but could still improve using the techniques employed within social work programs.

  7. Domestic elder abuse in Yazd, Iran: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Morowatisharifabad, Mohammad Ali; Rezaeipandari, Hassan; Dehghani, Ali; Zeinali, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Social changes due to urbanism, acculturation, and fading of values have led to some challenges in family relationships, including domestic elder abuse. This study was conducted to determine elder abuse status in Yazd, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 250 elderly people over 60 years in Yazd in 2014-2015. Clustered random sampling was used to recruit the participants from 10 clusters in Yazd (25 individuals from each cluster). The data were gathered by the 49-item,Iranian Domestic Elder Abuse Questionnaire which was filled out through private interviews with the participants. Results: Mean score of elder abuse was 11.84 (SD: 12.70) of total 100. Of the participants,79.6% (95% CI: 74.5-84.6) experienced at least one type of abuse. Emotional neglect was the most reported abuse and physical abuse was the least reported. Abuse score was associated with age, education level, living status, and insurance status of elders. Further, those who reported history of gastrointestinal problems, dyslipidemia, respiratory diseases, sleep disorders, audiovisual problems, joints pain, hypertension, dental/oral problems, cardiovascular disease,urinary incontinence and disability, reported a statistically significant higher abuse score. Conclusion: Despite overall low rate of domestic elder abuse, its high prevalence indicates that some interventions are necessary to decrease domestic elder abuse. Emotional neglect of elders should be addressed more than other abuse types. PMID:27386426

  8. Reduced Fractional Anisotropy in the Visual Limbic Pathway of Young Adults Witnessing Domestic Violence in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jeewook; Jeong, Bumseok; Polcari, Ann; Rohan, Michael L.; Teicher, Martin H.

    2011-01-01

    Witnessing domestic violence (WDV) is a traumatic childhood experience associated with increased risk for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder and reduced IQ scores. Specific affects of WDV on brain development have not been assessed. We sought to ascertain whether WDV was associated with abnormalities in white matter (WM) tract integrity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Twenty subjects who witnessed domestic violence (16F/ 4M, mean age 22.4±2.48 yrs) but were not physically or sexually abused were compared to 27 healthy controls (19F/ 8M, 21.9±1.97 yrs) without exposure to trauma or Axis I and II disorders. DTI images were acquired with a 3T Siemens Trio scanner. Group differences in fractional anisotropy (FA), covaried by age, gender, parental education, perceived financial sufficiency, IQ and degree of exposure to parental verbal aggression were assessed using tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS), which projects FA values onto an alignment-invariant fiber tract representation. FA values in the inferior longitudinal fasciculus of left lateral occipital lobe were significantly lower (p<0.05 corrected for multiple comparison) in the WDV group. FA values correlated inversely with ratings of depression, anxiety, somatization, ‘limbic irritability’ and neuropsychological measures of processing speed. Measures of radial but not axial diffusivity were affected suggesting alterations in myelination. Degree of FA reduction was associated with duration of witnessing interparental verbal aggression and with exposure between ages 7 – 13 years. The inferior longitudinal fasciculus connects occipital and temporal cortex and is the main component of the visual–limbic pathway that subserves emotional, learning and memory functions that are modality specific to vision. This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to childhood maltreatment is associated with alterations in fiber pathways that convey the adverse experience to frontal, temporal

  9. History of Abuse and Neglect in Patients with Schizophrenia Who Have a History of Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennouna-Greene, Mehdi; Bennouna-Greene, Valerie; Berna, Fabrice; Defranoux, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of five forms of abuse/neglect during childhood and adolescence in a group of schizophrenic patients with a history of violence. Methods: Twenty-eight patients hospitalized in a highly secured psychiatric unit were included. Abuse and neglect during patients' growth were evaluated with the childhood trauma…

  10. Understanding the role of culture in domestic violence: the Ahimsa Project for Safe Families.

    PubMed

    Pan, Amy; Daley, Sandra; Rivera, Lourdes M; Williams, Kara; Lingle, Danielle; Reznik, Vivian

    2006-01-01

    Domestic violence affects women across all racial, national, social, and economic groups. In particular, immigrant and refugee families are at risk for domestic violence because of their migration history and differences in cultural values and norms. The Ahimsa for Safe Families Project is an innovative collaborative project that addresses domestic violence in immigrant and refugee communities in San Diego. The project is designed to increase awareness of domestic violence among Latino, Somali, and Vietnamese communities and to develop and implement culturally specific programs aimed at each community. Here the authors describe the Project's needs assessment and community dialogues that guided the development of specific interventions; present the lessons learned; and describe replicable, culturally specific prevention strategies utilized by the Project.

  11. Dealing with mentally ill domestic violence perpetrators: A therapeutic jurisprudence judicial model.

    PubMed

    Winick, Bruce J; Wiener, Richard; Castro, Anthony; Emmert, Aryn; Georges, Leah S

    2010-01-01

    People suffering from mental illness are increasingly referred to the domestic violence court. Yet the typical diversion programs available, including batterer's intervention programs, are inappropriate for those with serious mental illness. As a result, the Miami-Dade Domestic Violence Court has developed a new approach for dealing with this population that applies mental health court techniques in domestic violence court. This article will describe and discuss this pioneering model. It also will situate this model within the context of other problem-solving courts and discuss how the court uses principles and approaches of therapeutic jurisprudence. The paper presents some preliminary data that describe the social and legal characteristics of 20 defendants in the Domestic Violence Mental Health Court followed over a two year period between 2005 and 2007.

  12. Frontline Worker Responses to Domestic Violence Disclosure in Public Welfare Offices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindhorst, Taryn; Casey, Erin; Meyers, Marcia

    2010-01-01

    Although substantial numbers of women seeking Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) report domestic violence, few receive mandated services through the Family Violence Option (FVO). This study used transcripts of interviews between welfare caseworkers and their clients to identify and classify the responses made by workers to client…

  13. Exposure to Domestic and Community Violence in a Nonrisk Sample: Associations with Child Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, Neena M.

    2008-01-01

    Limited data exist on the unique, additive, and interactive effects of exposure to domestic and community violence on children's functioning, particularly in community samples. This study examined relations between children's violence exposure, at home and in the community, and symptoms of externalizing and internalizing problems. Parents reported…

  14. A Mixed Methods Study of Participant Reaction to Domestic Violence Research in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Cari Jo; Shahrouri, Manal; Halasa, Louma; Khalaf, Inaam; Spencer, Rachael; Everson-Rose, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Research on domestic violence against women has increased considerably over the past few decades. Most participants in such studies find the exercise worthwhile and of greater benefit than emotional cost; however, systematic examination of participant reaction to research on violence is considerably lacking, especially in the Middle East region.…

  15. Gender Role Attitudes, Religion, and Spirituality as Predictors of Domestic Violence Attitudes in White College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkel, LaVerne A.; Vandiver, Beverly J.; Bahner, Angela D.

    2004-01-01

    In this study we investigated gender role attitudes, religion, and spirituality as predictors of beliefs about violence against women in a sample of 316 White college students. Results indicated that gender role attitudes were the best overall predictor of domestic violence beliefs. Spirituality also contributed to the models for men and women.…

  16. Partner and Relationship Factors in Domestic Violence: Perspectives of Women from a Slum in Calcutta, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, G. K.; Dutt, Debashis; Banerjee, Bratati

    2009-01-01

    A cross-sectional study in a representative sample of 751 women, living in slums, examined their perspectives on partner and relationship factors of domestic violence. More than 17% of women experienced physical violence in the past year. Individual factors related to the husband--namely, poor socioeconomic status, use of alcohol, extramarital…

  17. Understanding Gender and Domestic Violence from a Sample of Married Women in Urban Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Xiaohe; Kerley, Kent R.; Sirisunyaluck, Bangon

    2011-01-01

    There is a widespread agreement among gender and family violence investigators that gender and socioeconomic inequalities play key roles in domestic violence against women (DVAW). By integrating the concepts of gender traditionalism and decision-making power into a variety of resource-based theories, this study develops a gender perspective to…

  18. Forensic dentistry. Recognizing the signs and symptoms of domestic violence: a guide for dentists.

    PubMed

    McDowell, J D

    1997-01-01

    Non-accidental trauma (NAT) is a leading cause of death and injury in America. Women and elderly persons are much more likely to be injured by a family member or by someone known to them than by any other individual. This aggressive, violent behavior directed against an individual within the home or family has been defined as "domestic violence." Intrafamily violence effects one in two American families and occurs in all segments of society. Studies have shown that unless intervention occurs, the violence tends to escalate often resulting in serious injury or death. Because greater than half of all domestic violence injuries occur in the head and neck area, the dentist is often the first to treat the domestic violence victim. Each member of the dental team must be a participant in the early recognition of domestic violence and other forms of non-accidental trauma. Intervention can only begin after the victim is recognized. While acknowledging the important role of the forensic odontologist in the diagnosis and documentation of intentionally inflicted injuries, the general dentist and the dental team play an equally important role in stopping domestic violence. PMID:9540703

  19. Women's Initiation of Physical Violence Against an Abusive Partner Outside of a Violent Episode.

    PubMed

    Fanslow, Janet L; Gulliver, Pauline; Dixon, Robyn; Ayallo, Irene

    2015-09-01

    This article explores women's use of physical violence against an abusive male partner, outside of the context of a violence episode. Data were drawn from the New Zealand Violence Against Women Study, a cross-sectional household survey conducted using a population-based cluster-sampling scheme. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with women initiating physical violence against their male partners. Of the 845 women who had experienced physical violence perpetrated by their intimate partner, 19% reported physically mistreating their partner at least once outside of a male initiated violent episode, while 81% never initiated violence against their partner. Analyses showed that women's initiation of violence under these circumstances was strongly associated with either or both partners having alcohol problems, her recreational drug use, her number of violent partners, and her mother being hit or beaten by her father when she was a child.

  20. Violence against Native Women in Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saylors, Karen; Daliparthy, Nalini

    2006-01-01

    Many mental health problems among substance abusing populations are directly linked to high rates of abuse and trauma. There is increasing evidence of associations between childhood physical and sexual abuse to adult substance use and HIV-risk behavior. The relationship of abuse, mental health problems, substance abuse, and high-risk sexual…

  1. Surviving life as a woman: a critical ethnography of violence in the lives of female domestic workers in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy; Rodriguez, Rachel; Ammar, Nawal; Nemoto, Keiko

    2009-09-01

    A common form of employment for low-income third world women is domestic work. The power dynamics in this type of employer-employee relationship may place women at risk for abuse. Our aim in conducting this qualitative inquiry was to describe the experiences of violence in the lives of young female domestic workers in Malawi, a small country in South East Africa. Forty-eight women participated in focus group and individual interviews. "Surviving" was the main theme identified, with women employing creative ways of surviving the challenges they met at various points in their lives. This study provides information that health care professionals could use in assisting women through the process of surviving.

  2. Association of Domestic Violence From Husband and Women Empowerment in Slum Community, Mumbai.

    PubMed

    Donta, Balaiah; Nair, Saritha; Begum, Shahina; Prakasam, C P

    2016-07-01

    Prevalence of violence by husband against wife is an indicator of women's status at household level. The objective of the study is to understand the relationship between domestic violence and women's empowerment in a slum community in Mumbai, India. Data were collected from a sample of 1,136 married women aged 18 to 39 years having at least one child and reporting of unmet need for family planning. Domestic violence by husband against wife was measured in terms of either physical, sexual, or emotional violence. Three logit regression analyses were carried out using decision-making power, freedom of movement, and justified wife beating as dependent variables separately and socio-demographic and economic variables as independent variables. Furthermore, the relationship between domestic violence and women's decision-making power, freedom of movement, and justified wife-beating index has been explored. About 21% of women had ever experienced violence, and 38% of women had decision-making power with respect to own health care, household purchase, or visiting family and relatives. A little more than one fifth of the women reported freedom of movement to market, health facilities, or places outside the community. Women who justified wife beating were 2.29 (95% CI [1.59, 3.29]) times at risk of experiencing violence than women who disagreed with the wife-beating statements. Women not empowered in decision making were 1.15 (95% CI [0.91, 1.46]) times at risk of experiencing domestic violence than women who were empowered in decision making. Women who are empowered are less likely to be at risk of domestic violence. Programs aimed at empowering women must address socio-cultural norms relating to justification of violence in marriage.

  3. Reaction to and Coping With Domestic Violence by Iranian Women Victims: A Qualitative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Masoud; Shokrollahi, Paymaneh; Kohan, Shahnaz; Momeni, Ghodratollah; Rivaz, Mozhgan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Domestic violence is a continual stressor that motivates its victim to react. The way a woman deals with her husband’s violence determine the consequence of the violent relationship. In the present study, a qualitative approach was employed to investigate women’s reactions to and ways of coping with domestic violence. Method: Semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2014 with 18 women who experienced domestic violence in an attempt to explain how women deal with domestic violence. After the interviews were transcribed word by word, they were explored in the form of meaningful units and encoded as subcategories and categories through inductive content analysis. The reliability and validity of the interviews were measured by an external supervisor. Results: Two categories of reaction and coping were identified through content analysis: passive and non-normative measures and active measures. Passive and non-normative measures included the subcategories of harmful behaviors, retaliation, tolerance, and silence. Active measures included seeking help and advice, legal measures, leaving the spouse, positive and health promoting measures. Conclusion: In the present study, ways of coping with a husband’s violence among women experiencing domestic violence were divided into two categories: passive and non-normative measures and active measures. These categories confirmed the models of coping with stress in previous studies. Adopting an appropriate approach to dealing with domestic violence is affected by a woman’s capacity and beliefs, the dominant culture, intensity of the violence, available social and legal supports, and effectiveness of evaluation measures. To generalize service provision to victimized women, the type of coping and the reason for adopting the chosen approach need to be taken into account. PMID:26925908

  4. Intersection between alcohol abuse and intimate partner's violence in a rural Ijaw community in Bayelsa State, South-South Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Brisibe, Seiyefa; Ordinioha, Best; Dienye, Paul O

    2012-02-01

    According to the 2008 National Demographic and Health Survey, the south-south zone of Nigeria had the highest prevalence of domestic violence. This study is to find out if this is related to the widespread consumption of alcohol in the region. The study was carried out in Okoloba, a rural Ijaw community in Bayelsa State, where alcohol is produced and consumed in large quantities; using a cross-sectional study design. The data was collected from married or cohabitating adults aged between 16 and 65 years, with a structured interviewer-administered questionnaire. A total of 346 subjects, comprising 187 males, and 159 females were studied. They had an average age of 41.4 ± 2.5 years, were mostly Christians (91.9%), farmers/fisher folk (52.3%), and had at most primary school education (64.2%). More than 90% of the subjects took alcohol in the preceding year, while 36% can be classified as alcohol abusers according to their AUDIT score. More than half (55.8%) were perpetrators of intimate partner violence during the preceding 12 months, with a male-to-female prevalence of 83.4%, and female-to-male prevalence of 23.3%. Out of these, 77.2% were under the influence of alcohol during the act. The violence was more likely to be perpetrated by male alcohol abusers (p-value < 0.001), but there were no significant differences in the educational levels and religion of the perpetrators (p-value > 0.05). The study therefore concludes that there is a link between intimate partner abuse and alcohol abuse in the study community. PMID:21987506

  5. Intersection between alcohol abuse and intimate partner's violence in a rural Ijaw community in Bayelsa State, South-South Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Brisibe, Seiyefa; Ordinioha, Best; Dienye, Paul O

    2012-02-01

    According to the 2008 National Demographic and Health Survey, the south-south zone of Nigeria had the highest prevalence of domestic violence. This study is to find out if this is related to the widespread consumption of alcohol in the region. The study was carried out in Okoloba, a rural Ijaw community in Bayelsa State, where alcohol is produced and consumed in large quantities; using a cross-sectional study design. The data was collected from married or cohabitating adults aged between 16 and 65 years, with a structured interviewer-administered questionnaire. A total of 346 subjects, comprising 187 males, and 159 females were studied. They had an average age of 41.4 ± 2.5 years, were mostly Christians (91.9%), farmers/fisher folk (52.3%), and had at most primary school education (64.2%). More than 90% of the subjects took alcohol in the preceding year, while 36% can be classified as alcohol abusers according to their AUDIT score. More than half (55.8%) were perpetrators of intimate partner violence during the preceding 12 months, with a male-to-female prevalence of 83.4%, and female-to-male prevalence of 23.3%. Out of these, 77.2% were under the influence of alcohol during the act. The violence was more likely to be perpetrated by male alcohol abusers (p-value < 0.001), but there were no significant differences in the educational levels and religion of the perpetrators (p-value > 0.05). The study therefore concludes that there is a link between intimate partner abuse and alcohol abuse in the study community.

  6. Custody evaluators' beliefs about domestic violence allegations during divorce: feminist and family violence perspectives.

    PubMed

    Haselschwerdt, Megan L; Hardesty, Jennifer L; Hans, Jason D

    2011-05-01

    Approximately, 20% of divorcing couples in the United States require judicial intervention to reach a custody agreement. In such cases, courts often call on child custody evaluators to conduct comprehensive evaluations and recommend custody agreements and services that meet children's best interests. Estimates suggest that allegations of domestic violence (DV) are raised and substantiated in about 75% of these cases. Custody evaluators are thus in a position to ensure that divorcing parents with DV receive effective services and enter into safe custody agreements. They are also in a position to minimize or deny the seriousness of DV and its relevance to custody decisions. The present study uses grounded theory methods to examine how custody evaluators' theoretical perspectives on DV and beliefs about custody disputes in the context of DV are related to their evaluation process and recommendations.

  7. Violence exposure as a predictor of internalizing and externalizing problems among children of substance abusers.

    PubMed

    Conners-Burrow, Nicola; McKelvey, Lorraine; Kyzer, Angela; Swindle, Taren; Cheerla, Rajalakshmi; Kraleti, Shashank

    2013-01-01

    We explore the associations between exposure to conflict and crime in the home and community, and child anxiety and self-control problems among 60 children whose mothers were in treatment for substance abuse problems. Experiences with violence and crime were widespread, with many children exposed to multiple incidents. Approximately one-third (35.5%) of children exhibited clinically elevated anxiety. Controlling for other potential predictors, both children's exposure to violence and the number of years the mother had been using substances predicted higher anxiety in children, while only exposure to violence predicted problems in self-control. Results highlight the importance of screening for violence exposure. PMID:23261353

  8. Violence exposure as a predictor of internalizing and externalizing problems among children of substance abusers.

    PubMed

    Conners-Burrow, Nicola; McKelvey, Lorraine; Kyzer, Angela; Swindle, Taren; Cheerla, Rajalakshmi; Kraleti, Shashank

    2013-01-01

    We explore the associations between exposure to conflict and crime in the home and community, and child anxiety and self-control problems among 60 children whose mothers were in treatment for substance abuse problems. Experiences with violence and crime were widespread, with many children exposed to multiple incidents. Approximately one-third (35.5%) of children exhibited clinically elevated anxiety. Controlling for other potential predictors, both children's exposure to violence and the number of years the mother had been using substances predicted higher anxiety in children, while only exposure to violence predicted problems in self-control. Results highlight the importance of screening for violence exposure.

  9. Assessing and enhancing health care providers' response to domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Leppäkoski, Tuija; Flinck, Aune; Paavilainen, Eija

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to examine possible changes from 2008 to 2012 in the skills of health care staff in identifying and intervening in domestic violence (DV). A longitudinal descriptive study design with volunteer samples (baseline; n = 68, follow-up; n = 100) was used to acquire information regarding the present state and needs of the staff in practices related to DV. The results of the baseline survey were used as a basis for planning two interventions: staff training and drafting practical guidelines. Information was collected by questionnaires from nurses, physicians, and social workers and supplemented by responses from the interviews. The data were analysed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A chi-square test was used to test the statistical significance of the data sets. In addition, participants' quotes are used to describe specific phenomena or issues. The comparison showed that overall a small positive change had taken place between the study periods. However, the participants were aware of their own shortcomings in identifying and intervening in DV. Changes happen slowly, and administrative support is needed to sustain such changes. Therefore, this paper offers recommendations to improve health care providers' response to DV. Moreover, there is a great need for evaluating the training programme used. PMID:24864205

  10. Domestic violence. Incidence and prevalence in a northern emergency department.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jane; Bota, Gary W.; Carter, Mary; Bretzlaff-Michaud, Jennifer A.; Sahai, Vic; Rowe, Brian H.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the incidence and prevalence of domestic violence (DV) against women presenting to emergency departments. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study to determine health status and exposure to DV. SETTING: Hospital emergency department in urban northern Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Random sample of women older than 16 presenting to the emergency department for any reason. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographic variables, exposure to DV. RESULTS: Of 1800 potential subjects, 577 (32%) did not fit inclusion criteria. Of the remaining 1223, 983 (80%) agreed to participate. Mean age was 41, 135 of participants (14%) were aboriginal, and 546 (56%) were married. Overall, 725 (74%) had current partners. Incidence of DV resulting in emergency department presentation on the day of assessment was 2%. Of women with partners, 66 (9%) had previously been threatened or injured by those partners. Lifetime prevalence of DV was 51%; physical DV was experienced by 40%. One-year prevalence was 26%. CONCLUSION: Incidence of DV was lower than expected; prevalence of DV was high. PMID:14761109

  11. Identifying and responding to gaps in domestic abuse services for older women.

    PubMed

    Shiel, Rebecca

    2016-07-01

    Domestic abuse is widespread and indiscriminate. Older women living with domestic abuse report more health-related concerns than any other group, and demonstrate a higher incidence of significant mental health issues. Research suggests that older women who have experienced domestic abuse are not having their psychological and physical support needs met by existing services. This article examines the physical and mental health issues that older women face as a result of abusive relationships, and the barriers to seeking help. Multidisciplinary healthcare professionals can facilitate the therapeutic engagement of older women living with domestic abuse. Refuges and related interventions are limited in terms of the support they can offer, however, research suggests that developing a stepped approach, tailored to suit older women's needs, could be beneficial.

  12. Identifying and responding to gaps in domestic abuse services for older women.

    PubMed

    Shiel, Rebecca

    2016-07-01

    Domestic abuse is widespread and indiscriminate. Older women living with domestic abuse report more health-related concerns than any other group, and demonstrate a higher incidence of significant mental health issues. Research suggests that older women who have experienced domestic abuse are not having their psychological and physical support needs met by existing services. This article examines the physical and mental health issues that older women face as a result of abusive relationships, and the barriers to seeking help. Multidisciplinary healthcare professionals can facilitate the therapeutic engagement of older women living with domestic abuse. Refuges and related interventions are limited in terms of the support they can offer, however, research suggests that developing a stepped approach, tailored to suit older women's needs, could be beneficial. PMID:27353789

  13. Narratives of suffering of South Asian immigrant survivors of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Kallivayalil, Diya

    2010-07-01

    This article examines the narratives of suffering expressed by a group of South Asian immigrant survivors of domestic violence who accessed a mental health clinic in New York City. These accounts illustrate women's own perceptions of their suffering and symptoms and provide a window into the South Asian immigrant community's ideologies and moral domains regarding gender, violence, and sickness, as well as how individuals vary in their endorsement of these ideologies. The women's narratives illustrate how migration and culture interact with the deeply personal experience of suffering caused by domestic and sexual violence.

  14. Shared Risk Factors for the Perpetration of Physical Dating Violence, Bullying, and Sexual Harassment Among Adolescents Exposed to Domestic Violence.

    PubMed

    Foshee, Vangie A; McNaughton Reyes, H Luz; Chen, May S; Ennett, Susan T; Basile, Kathleen C; DeGue, Sarah; Vivolo-Kantor, Alana M; Moracco, Kathryn E; Bowling, J Michael

    2016-04-01

    The high risk of perpetrating physical dating violence, bullying, and sexual harassment by adolescents exposed to domestic violence points to the need for programs to prevent these types of aggression among this group. This study of adolescents exposed to domestic violence examined whether these forms of aggression share risk factors that could be targeted for change in single programs designed to prevent all three types of aggression. Analyses were conducted on 399 mother victims of domestic violence and their adolescents, recruited through community advertising. The adolescents ranged in age from 12 to 16 years; 64 % were female. Generalized estimating equations was used to control for the covariation among the aggression types when testing for shared risk factors. Approximately 70 % of the adolescents reported perpetrating at least one of the three forms of aggression. In models examining one risk factor at a time, but controlling for demographics, adolescent acceptance of sexual violence, mother-adolescent discord, family conflict, low maternal monitoring, low mother-adolescent closeness, low family cohesion, depressed affect, feelings of anger, and anger reactivity were shared across all three aggression types. In multivariable models, which included all of the risk factors examined and the demographic variables, low maternal monitoring, depressed affect and anger reactivity remained significant shared risk factors. Our findings suggest that programs targeting these risk factors for change have the potential to prevent all three forms of aggression. In multivariable models, poor conflict management skills was a risk for bullying and sexual harassment, but not dating violence; acceptance of dating violence was a risk for dating violence and bullying, but not sexual harassment; and none of the examined risk factors were unique to aggression type. The study's implications for the development of interventions and future research are discussed. PMID:26746242

  15. Domestic violence and minoritisation: legal and policy barriers facing minoritized women leaving violent relationships.

    PubMed

    Burman, Erica; Chantler, Khatidja

    2005-01-01

    This article on service responses to women of African, African-Caribbean, Irish, Jewish and South Asian backgrounds facing domestic violence draws on our recently completed study based in Manchester, UK () [Batsteeler, J., Burman, E., Chantler, K., McIntosh, S.H., Pantling, K., Smailes, S., Warner, S., et al. 2002. Domestic violence minoritisation: Supporting women to indepence. Women's Studies Centre: The Manchester Metropolitan University]. We frame our analysis of domestic violence and minoritisation around the question that is frequently posed in relation to women living with domestic violence: 'why doesn't she leave?' In response, we highlight the complex and intersecting connections between domestic violence, law, mental health provision, entitlement to welfare services, which function alongside constructions of 'culture' and cultural identifications, structures of racism, class and gendered oppression. All these contribute to maintain women, particularly minoritized women, in violent relationships. Further, we illustrate how leaving violent relationships does not necessarily guarantee the safety of women and children escaping domestic violence. Despite many recent legal and social policy initiatives in the UK that have usefully brought domestic violence into the public domain, there have also been counter-measures which have made leaving violent relationships correspondingly more difficult, in particular for women from minoritized communities. We offer an analysis of how state practices, particularly facets of immigration law in the UK (although , provides an equivalent U.S. analysis), interact with domestic violence. These not only equip perpetrators with a powerful tool to oppress minoritized women further, but it also indicates how state structures thereby come to impact directly on women's distress (Chantler et al, 2001). In addition, we highlight how other aspects of state policy and practice which enter into the material well-being of survivors of

  16. Domestic violence and minoritisation: legal and policy barriers facing minoritized women leaving violent relationships.

    PubMed

    Burman, Erica; Chantler, Khatidja

    2005-01-01

    This article on service responses to women of African, African-Caribbean, Irish, Jewish and South Asian backgrounds facing domestic violence draws on our recently completed study based in Manchester, UK () [Batsteeler, J., Burman, E., Chantler, K., McIntosh, S.H., Pantling, K., Smailes, S., Warner, S., et al. 2002. Domestic violence minoritisation: Supporting women to indepence. Women's Studies Centre: The Manchester Metropolitan University]. We frame our analysis of domestic violence and minoritisation around the question that is frequently posed in relation to women living with domestic violence: 'why doesn't she leave?' In response, we highlight the complex and intersecting connections between domestic violence, law, mental health provision, entitlement to welfare services, which function alongside constructions of 'culture' and cultural identifications, structures of racism, class and gendered oppression. All these contribute to maintain women, particularly minoritized women, in violent relationships. Further, we illustrate how leaving violent relationships does not necessarily guarantee the safety of women and children escaping domestic violence. Despite many recent legal and social policy initiatives in the UK that have usefully brought domestic violence into the public domain, there have also been counter-measures which have made leaving violent relationships correspondingly more difficult, in particular for women from minoritized communities. We offer an analysis of how state practices, particularly facets of immigration law in the UK (although , provides an equivalent U.S. analysis), interact with domestic violence. These not only equip perpetrators with a powerful tool to oppress minoritized women further, but it also indicates how state structures thereby come to impact directly on women's distress (Chantler et al, 2001). In addition, we highlight how other aspects of state policy and practice which enter into the material well-being of survivors of

  17. When status hurts: dimensions of women's status and domestic abuse in rural Northern India.

    PubMed

    Mogford, Elizabeth

    2011-07-01

    This study is a multiple logistic regression analysis of the relationship between dimensions of women's status and domestic abuse in rural Uttar Pradesh, India, using the 1998-1999 National Family Health Survey (NFHS-2). Findings indicate that the effects of a woman's status on her likelihood of experiencing abuse depend on the social realm within which status operates. Specifically, more "public" dimensions of status are associated with a greater probability of abuse, while "domestic" dimensions are protective. The findings are interpreted in terms of transitioning gender norms in Uttar Pradesh and provide clarity to the literature on the complex relationship between status and abuse. PMID:21705360

  18. Hispanic Women’s Experiences With Substance Abuse, Intimate Partner Violence, and Risk for HIV

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa Maria; Vasquez, Elias P.; Urrutia, Maria T.; Villarruel, Antonia M.; Peragallo, Nilda

    2011-01-01

    Hispanic females are disproportionately affected by substance abuse, intimate partner violence, and HIV. Despite these disparities, research describing the cultural and gender-specific experiences of Hispanic women with regard to these conditions is lacking. The purpose of this study is to describe the experiences that Hispanic community-dwelling women have with regard to substance abuse, violence, and risky sexual behaviors. Eight focus groups with 81 women were conducted. A bilingual, bicultural moderator asked women open-ended questions regarding the experiences that Hispanic women have with these conditions. Focus groups were audiotaped, transcribed, translated, verified, and then analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Participants discussed substance abuse, violence, and risky sexual behaviors interchangeably, often identifying common risk factors associated with these. Nevertheless, intimate partner violence was the most salient of conditions discussed. Three major themes emerged from the analysis: Transplantadas en otro mundo (Uprooted in another world), El criador de abuso (The breeding ground of abuse), and Rompiendo el silencio (Breaking the silence). This study supports the importance of addressing substance abuse, violence, and risk for HIV in an integrated manner and stresses the importance of addressing associated cultural factors (e.g., acculturation, machismo) in interventions targeting Hispanics. PMID:21191036

  19. Addressing substance abuse and violence in substance use disorder treatment and batterer intervention programs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Substance use disorders and perpetration of intimate partner violence (IPV) are interrelated, major public health problems. Methods We surveyed directors of a sample of substance use disorder treatment programs (SUDPs; N=241) and batterer intervention programs (BIPs; N=235) in California (70% response rate) to examine the extent to which SUDPs address IPV, and BIPs address substance abuse. Results Generally, SUDPs were not addressing co-occurring IPV perpetration in a formal and comprehensive way. Few had a policy requiring assessment of potential clients, or monitoring of admitted clients, for violence perpetration; almost one-quarter did not admit potential clients who had perpetrated IPV, and only 20% had a component or track to address violence. About one-third suspended or terminated clients engaging in violence. The most common barriers to SUDPs providing IPV services were that violence prevention was not part of the program’s mission, staff lacked training in violence, and the lack of reimbursement mechanisms for such services. In contrast, BIPs tended to address substance abuse in a more formal and comprehensive way; e.g., one-half had a policy requiring potential clients to be assessed, two-thirds required monitoring of substance abuse among admitted clients, and almost one-half had a component or track to address substance abuse. SUDPs had clients with fewer resources (marriage, employment, income, housing), and more severe problems (both alcohol and drug use disorders, dual substance use and other mental health disorders, HIV + status). We found little evidence that services are centralized for individuals with both substance abuse and violence problems, even though most SUDP and BIP directors agreed that help for both problems should be obtained simultaneously in separate programs. Conclusions SUDPs may have difficulty addressing violence because they have a clientele with relatively few resources and more complex psychological and medical

  20. Prevalence and Predictors of Domestic-Violence towards Wives by their Psychiatric Hospitalized Husbands

    PubMed Central

    Sahraian, Ali; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Hashemi, Seyed Hamzeh; Mohammadi, Mohammad Reza; Ahmadzadeh, Laaya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Violence imposed on wives by their inpatient psychiatric husbands has not been studied yet. The current study surveyed the rates and predictors of violence committed by inpatient psychiatric husbands towards their wives. Methods: A convenient sample of wives of 209 married male psychiatric inpatients completed a self-reported questionnaire. They were asked about physical, emotional, social and economic abuse. Results: More than 80% of the husbands socially abused their wives; 73.0% of the wives had been regularly beaten by their husbands; the rate for humiliation was 77.2%; and only 14.1% of the wives reported that their sexual relationship with their husbands is with desire. Conclusion There is a dramatic high rate of different types of abuse toward wives by their inpatient psychiatric husbands. They are commonly victimized by their husbands. Moreover, different types of violence always co-occur. Future studies should consider this important issue which is unfortunately an ignored research area. PMID:27006668

  1. Correlates of partner violence among female street-based sex workers: substance abuse, history of childhood abuse, and HIV risks.

    PubMed

    El-Bassel, N; Witte, S S; Wada, T; Gilbert, L; Wallace, J

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the prevalence of physical and sexual abuse by intimate and commercial sexual partners among street-based sex workers and explores correlates of partner abuse by commercial partners using the following factors: sociodemographics, substance abuse, sexual behavior, and physical and sexual childhood abuse. One hundred thirteen street sex workers were recruited from December 1996 through May 1997 while receiving services from the Foundations for Research on Sexually Transmitted Diseases (FROST'D), a nonprofit organization based in New York City. Partner abuse is a common occurrence among street sex workers. Two of three street prostitutes have experienced lifetime physical or sexual abuse by either an intimate or commercial partner. In addition, one of eight reported physical and sexual abuse by both intimate and commercial partners during her lifetime. Women who were homeless in the last year, those who reported exchanging for drugs and money as their main source of income, used injection drugs in the past year and had sex in crack houses, and who were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive were more likely to be report combined physical and sexual abuse. Understanding the relationship between partner violence, victim's substance abuse, and HIV-risk behavior is important for the development of public policies and treatment and prevention strategies to address the constellation of problems that drug-using female street sex workers face.

  2. Evaluating the Impact of Intimate Partner Violence on the Perpetrator: The Perceived Consequences of Domestic Violence Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Denise D.; Neighbors, Clayton; Mbilinyi, Lyungai F.; O'Rourke, Allison; Zegree, Joan; Roffman, Roger A.; Edleson, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Surprisingly, little is known about how IPV perpetrators perceive the consequences of their violent behavior. This article describes the development and evaluation of the Perceived Consequences of Domestic Violence Questionnaire (PCDVQ). The PCDVQ is a 27 item self report instrument designed to assess the consequences of intimate partner violence…

  3. Homeless in Dhaka: Violence, Sexual Harassment, and Drug-abuse

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Jasim; Ashraf, Ali; Rashid, Mashida

    2009-01-01

    Bangladesh has experienced one of the highest urban population growth rates (around 7% per year) over the past three decades. Dhaka, the capital city, attracts approximately 320,000 migrants from rural areas every year. The city is unable to provide shelter, food, education, healthcare, and employment for its rapidly-expanding population. An estimated 3.4 million people live in the overcrowded slums of Dhaka, and many more live in public spaces lacking the most basic shelter. While a small but growing body of research describes the lives of people who live in urban informal settlements or slums, very little research describes the population with no housing at all. Anecdotally, the homeless population in Dhaka is known to face extortion, erratic unemployment, exposure to violence, and sexual harassment and to engage in high-risk behaviours. However, this has not been systematically documented. This cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted to better understand the challenges in the lives of the homeless population in 11 areas of Dhaka during a 13-month period from June 2007 to June 2008. A modified cluster-sampling method was used for selecting 32 clusters of 14 female and male respondents, for a sample of 896. In addition to sociodemographic details, this paper focuses specifically on violence, drug-abuse, and sexual harassment. The findings showed that physical assaults among the homeless, particularly among women, were a regular phenomenon. Eighty-three percent of female respondents (n=372) were assaulted by their husbands, station masters, and male police officers. They were subjected to lewd gestures, unwelcome advances, and rape. Male respondents reported being physically assaulted while trying to collect food, fighting over space, or while stealing, by police officers, miscreants, or other homeless people. Sixty-nine percent of the male respondents (n=309) used locally-available drugs, such as marijuana and heroin, and two-thirds of injecting drug

  4. Homeless in Dhaka: violence, sexual harassment, and drug-abuse.

    PubMed

    Koehlmoos, Tracey Pérez; Uddin, Md Jasim; Ashraf, Ali; Rashid, Mashida

    2009-08-01

    Bangladesh has experienced one of the highest urban population growth rates (around 7% per year) over the past three decades. Dhaka, the capital city, attracts approximately 320,000 migrants from rural areas every year. The city is unable to provide shelter, food, education, healthcare, and employment for its rapidly-expanding population. An estimated 3.4 million people live in the overcrowded slums of Dhaka, and many more live in public spaces lacking the most basic shelter. While a small but growing body of research describes the lives of people who live in urban informal settlements or slums, very little research describes the population with no housing at all. Anecdotally, the homeless population in Dhaka is known to face extortion, erratic unemployment, exposure to violence, and sexual harassment and to engage in high-risk behaviours. However, this has not been systematically documented. This cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted to better understand the challenges in the lives of the homeless population in 11 areas of Dhaka during a 13-month period from June 2007 to June 2008. A modified cluster-sampling method was used for selecting 32 clusters of 14 female and male respondents, for a sample of 896. In addition to sociodemographic details, this paper focuses specifically on violence, drug-abuse, and sexual harassment. The findings showed that physical assaults among the homeless, particularly among women, were a regular phenomenon. Eighty-three percent of female respondents (n=372) were assaulted by their husbands, station masters, and male police officers. They were subjected to lewd gestures, unwelcome advances, and rape. Male respondents reported being physically assaulted while trying to collect food, fighting over space, or while stealing, by police officers, miscreants, or other homeless people. Sixty-nine percent of the male respondents (n=309) used locally-available drugs, such as marijuana and heroin, and two-thirds of injecting drug

  5. Association of various reproductive rights, domestic violence and marital rape with depression among Pakistani women

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Depression among women is common in developing countries. Gender inequality can contribute to women's risk for depression. Lack of reproductive and sexual rights is an important marker of gender inequality and women do not have the freedom to express their reproductive and sexual needs in many parts of the world. Therefore we designed this study to determine the association of depression with lack of various reproductive rights and domestic violence among married women in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods A case-control study with 152 cases and 152 controls, which included women 15-48 years, recruited from two teaching hospitals from 1st June 2007 through 31st August 2007. The SRQ was administered to all subjects. A cut off score of 8 was used to confirm cases of depression diagnosed by physicians, and to exclude cases of depression from the controls. Self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the risk factors. Results 61% of the cases and 43% of the controls were ever abused by spouse and the frequency of marital rape was 33% in cases and 13% in controls. After adjusting for the effects of other variables in the model, less than 18 years of age at marriage (OR 2.00; 95% CI = 1.07, 3.7), decision for marriage by parents (OR 3.51; 95% CI = 1.67, 7.37), abuse by in laws (OR 4.91; 95% CI = 2.66, 9.06), ≤ 3 hours per day spent with husband (OR 2.33; 95% CI = 1.34, 4.08), frequency of intercourse ≤ 2 times per week (OR 1.85; 95% CI = 1.06, 3.22) and marital rape (OR 3.03; 95% CI = 1.50, 6.11) were associated with depression among women. Conclusion In our study depression in married women was associated with younger age at marriage, lack of autonomy in marriage decisions, marital rape and domestic abuse by in-laws. Efforts should be directed towards creating awareness about the reproductive and sexual rights of women in Pakistan. Physicians should be trained to screen and identify women who may be at risk for psychological distress as a result of denial

  6. Domestic violence and its predictors among married women in reproductive age in Fagitalekoma Woreda, Awi zone, Amhara regional state, North Western Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Violence against women is one of the most systematic and prevalent human rights abuses in the world. It is a form of discrimination and deeply rooted in power imbalances and structural inequality between women and men. Documenting the extent of the problem and associated factors is essential to develop public health interventions to tackle violence against women. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine magnitude of domestic violence and identify its predictors among married women in the reproductive age in north western Ethiopia. Methods Community-based cross-sectional study was conducted from February 15 to March 15, 2011 among 682 married women and 46 key informants. Systematic sampling technique was used to select respondents for the quantitative method. Purposive sampling was used to select in-depth interview key informants for and focus group discussants. Data were analyzed using SPSS window version 16.0. Binary logistic regression and multivariable logistic regression analysis were carried out to determine the prevalence and identify independent predictors of domestic violence against women. Statistical association was measured by adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Statistical significance was declared at P < 0.05. Result The prevalence of domestic violence was 78.0%. About 73.3%, 58.4% and 49.1% of women reported different forms of psychological, physical and sexual violence, respectively. Alcohol consumption by husband (AOR = 1.9, 95%CI = 1.3, 2.8), being pregnant (AOR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.4, 3.4), decision making power (AOR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.5, 3.4) and annual income (AOR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.1, 3.3) were predictors of domestic violence. Conclusion The prevalence of domestic violence was very high as compared to other studies. Women’s husband alcohol consumption, decision making power annual household income and being pregnant are some of the predictors of domestic violence against

  7. The Relationship Between Family-of-Origin Violence, Hostility, and Intimate Partner Violence in Men Arrested for Domestic Violence: Testing a Mediational Model.

    PubMed

    Elmquist, JoAnna; Shorey, Ryan C; Labrecque, Lindsay; Ninnemann, Andrew; Zapor, Heather; Febres, Jeniimarie; Wolford-Clevenger, Caitlin; Plasencia, Maribel; Temple, Jeff R; Stuart, Gregory L

    2016-09-01

    Although research has shown links between family-of-origin violence (FOV), intimate partner violence (IPV), and hostility, research has not examined whether hostility mediates the relationship between FOV and IPV. The current study examined whether hostility mediates FOV and IPV perpetration in 302 men arrested for domestic violence. Results demonstrated that hostility fully mediated the relationship between father-to-participant FOV and physical and psychological IPV, and the relationship between mother-to-participant FOV and physical IPV. Results indicated that hostility fully mediated the relationship between experiencing and witnessing FOV and physical IPV (composite FOV), and partially mediated the relationship between composite FOV and psychological aggression. PMID:26712239

  8. La Mancha Negra: Substance Abuse, Violence, and Sexual Risks Among Hispanic Males

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Guarda, Rosa Maria; Ortega, Johis; Vasquez, Elias P.; De Santis, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Hispanics are disproportionately affected by substance abuse, intimate partner violence, and HIV. Although the relationship between these conditions has been documented in the literature, few studies have explored the intersection of these health problems and their culture-related risk factors in an integrative manner. The purpose of this study is to explore the experiences that Hispanic heterosexual males in South Florida have with substance abuse, violence, and risky sexual behaviors. Three focus groups with a total of 25 Hispanic adult men are completed and analyzed using grounded theory. Three core categories emerge from the data. These include la cuna de problemas sociales (the cradle of social problems), ramas de una sola mata (branches from one same tree), and la mancha negra (the black stain). This study suggests that substance abuse, violence, and risky sexual behaviors are linked conditions with common cultural and socioenvironmental risk factors and consequences. PMID:19915207

  9. Domestic violence survivors' empowerment and mental health: Exploring the role of the alliance with advocates.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Lisa A; Fauci, Jennifer E; Sullivan, Cris M; DiGiovanni, Craig D; Wilson, Joshua M

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 4 decades, domestic violence (DV) programs-both residential and nonresidential-have sprung up in communities across the country with the aim of helping survivors become safe. These programs place strong emphasis on the relationship between the advocate and survivor as critical to becoming safer and healing from the trauma of abuse. Yet little research has demonstrated the extent to which specific aspects of the advocate-survivor alliance are related to specific indicators of survivor well-being, nor shown what factors might mediate that relationship. This study explored in a sample of help-seeking survivors (N = 370) whether the strength of the alliance between survivors and their advocates is related to lower symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and whether this association is mediated by survivors' sense of empowerment in the domain of safety. The structural equation model we tested also controlled for variables that might influence these relationships, including race/ethnicity, financial strain, and length of stay in the program. As expected, stronger alliance was associated with reduced symptoms of both depression and PTSD, through the mechanism of empowerment in the domain safety. These findings provide direction to programs seeking to establish a theory of change and point the way toward longitudinal research on the nature and function of the alliance as a potential contributor to healing. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27196389

  10. Domestic abuse as a transgressive practice: understanding nurses' responses through the lens of abjection.

    PubMed

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Taylor, Julie

    2013-10-01

    Domestic abuse is a worldwide public health issue with long-term health and social consequences. Nurses play a key role in recognizing and responding to domestic abuse. Yet there is considerable evidence that their responses are often inappropriate and unhelpful, such as trivializing or ignoring the abuse. Empirical studies have identified several reasons why nurses' responses are sometimes wanting. These include organizational constraints, e.g. lack of time and privacy; and interpersonal factors such as fear of offending women and lack of confidence. We propose, however, that these factors present only a partial explanation. Drawing on the work of Julia Kristeva, we suggest that alternative understandings may be derived through applying the concept of abjection. Abjection is a psychological defence against any threat (the abject) to the clean and proper self that results in rejection of the abject. Using examples from our own domestic abuse research, we contend that exposure of nurses to the horror of domestic abuse evokes a state of abjection. Domestic abuse (the abject) transgresses established social boundaries of clean and proper. Thus when exposed to patients' and clients' experiences of it, some nurses subconsciously reject domestic abuse as a possibility (abjection). They do this to protect themselves from the horror of the act, but in so doing, render themselves unable to formulate appropriate responses. Rather than understanding the practice of some nurses as wilfully neglectful or ignorant, we argue that through a state of abjection, they are powerless to act. This does not refute existing evidence about nurses' responses to domestic abuse. Rather, as a relatively unknown concept in nursing, abjection provides an additional explanatory layer that accounts for why some nurses respond the way they do. Crucially, it elucidates the need for nurses to be supported emotionally when faced with the transgressive practice of abuse.

  11. Domestic abuse as a transgressive practice: understanding nurses' responses through the lens of abjection.

    PubMed

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Taylor, Julie

    2013-10-01

    Domestic abuse is a worldwide public health issue with long-term health and social consequences. Nurses play a key role in recognizing and responding to domestic abuse. Yet there is considerable evidence that their responses are often inappropriate and unhelpful, such as trivializing or ignoring the abuse. Empirical studies have identified several reasons why nurses' responses are sometimes wanting. These include organizational constraints, e.g. lack of time and privacy; and interpersonal factors such as fear of offending women and lack of confidence. We propose, however, that these factors present only a partial explanation. Drawing on the work of Julia Kristeva, we suggest that alternative understandings may be derived through applying the concept of abjection. Abjection is a psychological defence against any threat (the abject) to the clean and proper self that results in rejection of the abject. Using examples from our own domestic abuse research, we contend that exposure of nurses to the horror of domestic abuse evokes a state of abjection. Domestic abuse (the abject) transgresses established social boundaries of clean and proper. Thus when exposed to patients' and clients' experiences of it, some nurses subconsciously reject domestic abuse as a possibility (abjection). They do this to protect themselves from the horror of the act, but in so doing, render themselves unable to formulate appropriate responses. Rather than understanding the practice of some nurses as wilfully neglectful or ignorant, we argue that through a state of abjection, they are powerless to act. This does not refute existing evidence about nurses' responses to domestic abuse. Rather, as a relatively unknown concept in nursing, abjection provides an additional explanatory layer that accounts for why some nurses respond the way they do. Crucially, it elucidates the need for nurses to be supported emotionally when faced with the transgressive practice of abuse. PMID:24034160

  12. Domestic Violence Among Iranian Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hajnasiri, Hamideh; Ghanei Gheshlagh, Reza; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Moafi, Farnoosh; Farajzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Context Violence against women, or domestic violence, is both a physical and mental health issue that is rampant in many societies. It undermines the personal health of those involved by inflicting physical, sexual, and psychological damage. The purpose of the present systematic review and meta-analysis is to assess the prevalence of domestic violence in Iranian society. Evidence Acquisition A total of 31 articles published between 2000 and 2014 in Iranian and international databases (MagIran, IranMedex, SID, Google Scholar, Science Direct, PubMed, Pre Quest, and Scopus) were examined. The data collected from the articles were analyzed through a meta-analysis using a random effects model. The heterogeneity of the articles was examined using the I2 index, and the analyses were performed with STATA software version 11.2. Results Based on the 31 articles, which represent a sample size of 15,514 persons, we estimated the prevalence of domestic violence to be 66% (CI 95%: 55 - 77). The geographical classification showed that the prevalence of domestic violence was 70% (CI 95%: 57 - 84) in the east of the country, 70% in the south (CI 95%: 32 - 100), 75% in the west (CI 95%: 56 - 94), 62% in the north (CI 95%: 37 - 86), and 59% in the center (CI 95%: 44 - 74). Conclusions The results of the study showed a high prevalence of domestic violence in Iran, which requires the adoption of appropriate measures and the initiation of effective interventions by the legal authorities. These measures and interventions should aim to determine the causes of domestic violence and to develop ways of controlling and reducing this destructive phenomenon.

  13. Domestic Violence Among Iranian Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hajnasiri, Hamideh; Ghanei Gheshlagh, Reza; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Moafi, Farnoosh; Farajzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Context Violence against women, or domestic violence, is both a physical and mental health issue that is rampant in many societies. It undermines the personal health of those involved by inflicting physical, sexual, and psychological damage. The purpose of the present systematic review and meta-analysis is to assess the prevalence of domestic violence in Iranian society. Evidence Acquisition A total of 31 articles published between 2000 and 2014 in Iranian and international databases (MagIran, IranMedex, SID, Google Scholar, Science Direct, PubMed, Pre Quest, and Scopus) were examined. The data collected from the articles were analyzed through a meta-analysis using a random effects model. The heterogeneity of the articles was examined using the I2 index, and the analyses were performed with STATA software version 11.2. Results Based on the 31 articles, which represent a sample size of 15,514 persons, we estimated the prevalence of domestic violence to be 66% (CI 95%: 55 - 77). The geographical classification showed that the prevalence of domestic violence was 70% (CI 95%: 57 - 84) in the east of the country, 70% in the south (CI 95%: 32 - 100), 75% in the west (CI 95%: 56 - 94), 62% in the north (CI 95%: 37 - 86), and 59% in the center (CI 95%: 44 - 74). Conclusions The results of the study showed a high prevalence of domestic violence in Iran, which requires the adoption of appropriate measures and the initiation of effective interventions by the legal authorities. These measures and interventions should aim to determine the causes of domestic violence and to develop ways of controlling and reducing this destructive phenomenon. PMID:27621936

  14. Silent Victims: Children Exposed to Family Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolar, Kathryn R.; Davey, Debrynda

    2007-01-01

    Annually an estimated 3 million or more children are exposed to acts of domestic violence between adults in their homes. These children are at risk for abuse themselves as well as other immediate and long-term problems, especially if they have been exposed to repeated episodes of domestic violence. Multiple behavioral manifestations, including…

  15. Does Steroid Abuse Cause-or Excuse-Violence?

    PubMed

    Lubell, A

    1989-02-01

    Some researchers claim that the psychiatric effects of steroid abuse, such as violent aggressiveness, pose a significant threat to society. Ironically, some lawyers see such abuse as opening the door to an insanity plea.

  16. Domestic Abuse and Child Contact: Positioning Children in the Decision-Making Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on a three-year Irish research study, this paper focuses on the decision-making process in child contact, specifically the assessment and management of risk of continuing abuse to young people previously exposed to domestic abuse. A mixed methodological approach involved the completion of survey questionnaires by 219 mothers and the…

  17. Linking Childhood and Adult Criminality: Using a Life Course Framework to Examine Childhood Abuse and Neglect, Substance Use and Adult Partner Violence

    PubMed Central

    Minh, Anita; Matheson, Flora I.; Daoud, Nihaya; Hamilton-Wright, Sarah; Pedersen, Cheryl; Borenstein, Heidi; O’Campo, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Child abuse and neglect, considered criminal acts under the Criminal Code of Canada, play an important role in substance use, violence, and other criminal behaviour in adulthood. We adopted the life course perspective to identify modifiable contextual influences and co-occurring individual, social, and familial determinants associated with adult criminality. Using in-depth interview data, a sub-sample of 13 women who had recently experienced intimate partner violence, recounted their experiences of childhood abuse, their own substance use or criminality, as well as implications of these factors on their children’s life trajectories. For the purposes of this paper criminality was defined as child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, illegal substance use and underage alcohol use. Our objective was to explore, in our data: (1) patterns and trajectories of criminality from childhood to adulthood among women who were victims of violence, and (2) cumulative effects of early life exposures on experiences of criminality; with the aim of describing the life course perspective as a useful framework to understand criminality along the life trajectory. The analysis was not designed to demonstrate causal connections between early childhood and adulthood experiences of criminality. Rather we generated qualitative and quantitative hypotheses to guide future research in the field. Implications for research and interventions are discussed. PMID:24169410

  18. Visible and invisible marks: facial injuries suffered by women as the result of acts of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Dourado, Suzana de Magalhães; Noronha, Ceci Vilar

    2015-09-01

    This article focuses on female facial injuries caused by domestic partners in the light of the cultural assumption that the face is the most valued area of the human body. Through a quantitative/qualitative approach, the study aimed to estimate the prevalence of lesions on the face, head and neck of women abused by their partners. The intention is to comprehend the significance, from the victim's standpoint, of the marks originated in the violent episode and investigate issues concerning healthcare in the treatment of injuries. Statistical data were obtained from reports of the Special Police Department for Women in Salvador, Bahia, and the qualitative phase of research consisted of interviews with women who filed such reports. The results showed that, in 63.2% of studied cases, there were injuries to the face and/or head and/or neck of battered women. Speech analysis revealed that facial injuries, especially permanent ones, tend to result in feelings of low self-esteem, shame and humiliation in the victim, causing severe psychological distress. It was revealed that healthcare was limited to the physical aspects of victimization, without the perception of domestic violence as a health problem and the consequent lack of referral of patients to the centers for women in situations of violence.

  19. The Prevalence of Exposure to Domestic Violence Among High School Students in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Sajadi, Homeira; Rahimy, Hossein; Rafiey, Hassan; Vameghi, Meroe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Domestic violence appears to be a major social problem. Researches in the last 10 years have uncovered multiple effects of witnessing domestic violence on children, ranging in severity from little or no effect to sever psychological harm. Objectives: This study aimed to measure the prevalence of exposure to domestic violence among high school students in Tehran. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted on high school students of Tehran in the school year 2011–2012. The “Children’s Exposure to Domestic Violence Scale” was administered to a total cohort of 1,212 students (615 males and 597 females) selected by the stratified sampling method. Results: Approximately one-half of the participants (44.3%) had been exposed to their fathers’s violence against their mothers at least sometimes in their lives, the most common form of which was preventing the mother from doing something (28.5%) and the least common, hurting the mother with sharp or deadly tools (9.6%). A substantial proportion of the students (90.6%) had been exposed to violence in the community or at school, the most common kind would be being heard from someone calling another person names or making fun of them (81.7%) and the least common, being injured a child in the community or at school (31.8%). Conclusions: Exposure to violence is a widespread problem among children in Tehran. It encompasses a wide range and children were exposed to violence in different ways and forms. PMID:24719707

  20. Attitudes Toward Domestic Violence and Corporal Punishment Among Former Soviet Union Immigrants in Israel.

    PubMed

    Enosh, Guy; Leshem, Elazar; Buchbinder, Eli

    2016-10-01

    The study regards attitudes of Russian immigrants in Israel toward wife abuse and corporal punishment. The sample consisted of 1,028 participants, based on a multistage cluster sampling. The study used a questionnaire related to immigration, acculturation, and attitudinal issues. The findings indicate a dual-causal model, in which corporal punishment attitudes contribute to wife abuse attitudes and vice versa. However, the effect of attitudes supporting corporal punishment was stronger than the effect of wife abuse attitudes, indicating that the attitudinal system as a precursor of violent behavior is already merging the two types of violence.

  1. Attitudes Toward Domestic Violence and Corporal Punishment Among Former Soviet Union Immigrants in Israel.

    PubMed

    Enosh, Guy; Leshem, Elazar; Buchbinder, Eli

    2016-10-01

    The study regards attitudes of Russian immigrants in Israel toward wife abuse and corporal punishment. The sample consisted of 1,028 participants, based on a multistage cluster sampling. The study used a questionnaire related to immigration, acculturation, and attitudinal issues. The findings indicate a dual-causal model, in which corporal punishment attitudes contribute to wife abuse attitudes and vice versa. However, the effect of attitudes supporting corporal punishment was stronger than the effect of wife abuse attitudes, indicating that the attitudinal system as a precursor of violent behavior is already merging the two types of violence. PMID:26834146

  2. Simulations and Social Empathy: Domestic Violence Education in the New Millennium.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Madelaine; Rosenberg, Karen E; Hobart, Margaret

    2016-10-01

    When teaching about domestic violence, we hope that our students will be moved to act and organize against it within a social justice framework. We argue that instructional simulations can be used to inspire students to do so. Instructional simulations and gaming tools have been part of higher education pedagogical tool kits since at least the 1960s. Yet it is only recently that a domestic violence resource exists that reflects the interdisciplinary, interactive, and empathy-building orientation of feminist pedagogy. Drawing on the concept of "social empathy," we analyze the potential of the instructional simulation "In Her Shoes," developed by the Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence, to help students gain knowledge of and empathy for the constrained choices facing battered women, understand the frequent disjuncture between leaving and safety, and close the gap between cultural perceptions and lived realities.

  3. Teaching Lawyering With Heart in the George Washington University Law School Domestic Violence Project.

    PubMed

    Meier, Joan

    2016-10-01

    The Domestic Violence Project (DVP) began as an experiment but has become my favorite model for teaching law students about domestic violence work. The heart of the course is its emphasis on developing awareness of and compassion for the personally and emotionally challenging dimensions of domestic violence work. I achieve this (i) through an intensive and personal dialogue with students through written journals and responses; (ii) by inviting students to consider creative expression for their final project, and (iii) by teaching students about vicarious trauma and encouraging their understanding of it in themselves and other system players. Students seem to experience this course as an oasis of holistic professional and personal growth within the often dispiriting experience of law school.

  4. Mothers' physical abusiveness in a context of violence: effects on the mother-child relationship.

    PubMed

    Timmer, Susan G; Thompson, Dianne; Culver, Michelle A; Urquiza, Anthony J; Altenhofen, Shannon

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of mothers' physical abusiveness on the quality of the mother-child relationship, and note how it further varied by their exposure to interparental violence (IPV). The sample consisted of 232 clinic-referred children, aged 2 to 7 years, and their biological mothers. Slightly more than a quarter of the children (N = 63, 27.2%) had been physically abused by their mothers; approximately half of these children also had a history of exposure to IPV (N = 34, 54%). Investigating effects of physical abuse in the context of IPV history on mothers' and children's emotional availability, we found that physically abused children with no IPV exposure appeared less optimally emotionally available than physically abused children with an IPV exposure. However, subsequent analyses showed that although dyads with dual-violence exposure showed emotional availability levels similar those of nonabusive dyads, they were more overresponsive and overinvolving, a kind of caregiving controllingness charasteric of children with disorganized attachment styles. These findings lend some support to the notion that the effects of abuse on the parent-child relationship are influenced by the context of family violence, although the effects appear to be complex.

  5. Challenges for a local service agency to address domestic violence -a case study from rural Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Hayati, Elli Nur; Emmelin, Maria; Eriksson, Malin

    2014-08-15

    Since the launch of a Zero Tolerance Policy in Indonesia, several policies to address domestic violence have been enacted. The obligation of local governments to establish service units for women survivors of domestic violence is one of them. Since domestic violence is a sensitive and complex issue in Indonesia it is important to understand how governmentally regulated services function in practice. This case study aimed to explore challenges faced by a local service agency in managing service provision for women survivors of domestic violence in rural Indonesia. Data from one focus group discussion (12 participants), four individual interviews, six short narratives, two days of participant observation, as well as archive reviews were collected. All data were analyzed using Grounded Theory Situational Analysis. The major challenge faced by the local agency was the low priority that was given them by the local authorities, mirrored also in low involvement by the assigned volunteers in the daily service. The study also identified a gap between the socio-cultural arena and the law & policy arena that needs to be bridged to avoid that the two arenas address domestic violence in a contradictory way. Budget allocation to support the sustainability of the daily routines of service agencies has to be given priority. There is also a need for careful considerations regarding the composition of personnel involved within daily management of service agencies addressing domestic violence. To bridge the gap between the legal systems and traditional cultural values, culturally adjusted alternative justice systems could be developed to increase women's access to legal support.

  6. Risk of Behaviors Associated with Lethal Violence and Functional Outcomes for Abused Women Who Do and Do Not Return to the Abuser Following a Community-Based Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Nava, Angeles; Gilroy, Heidi; Maddoux, John

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: To determine the differential risk of behaviors associated with lethal violence and functioning outcomes for abused women with children who received an intervention of shelter or justice services and return to the abuser were compared with women who did not return. Methods: The study was carried out using a matched-pair analysis of 152 women. Measures of risk of behaviors associated with lethal violence, type, and severity of abuse, and poor mental health symptoms were measured every 4 months for 24 months. Results: Irrespective of service used, women returning to the abuser reported significantly (p<0.001) more risk of behaviors associated with lethal violence compared to women who did not return. Additionally, severity of physical abuse was significantly higher (p<0.01) for women returning to the abuser who had been in a shelter but not for women who received a protection order. Similarly, levels of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and anxiety were significantly higher (p<0.01) for sheltered women who returned to the abuser but not for women using a protection order who returned. Conclusions: Risk of behaviors associated with lethal violence increases when abused women return to live with the abuser. Abused women should be informed of the heightened risk and greater probability for poor mental health. PMID:25714332

  7. Family Violence: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (DHHS/OHDS), Washington, DC.

    Family violence is a widespread problem; research has shown multiple factors are associated with family violence. Types of family violence include spouse abuse; elder abuse and neglect; child abuse and neglect; parent abuse; and sibling abuse. There are three types of spouse abuse: physical abuse, sexual violence, and psychological/emotional…

  8. Minimizing risks and monitoring safety of an antenatal care intervention to mitigate domestic violence among young Indian women: The Dil Mil trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Domestic violence - physical, psychological, or sexual abuse perpetrated against women by one or more family members – is highly prevalent in India. However, relatively little research has been conducted on interventions with the potential to mitigate domestic violence and its adverse health consequences, and few resources exist to guide safety planning and monitoring in the context of intervention research. Dil Mil is a promising women’s empowerment-based intervention developed in India that engages with young women (daughters-in-law) and their mothers-in-law to mitigate domestic violence and related adverse health outcomes. This paper describes the design of a randomized controlled trial of Dil Mil in Bengaluru, India, with a focus on strategies used to minimize study-related risks and monitor safety. Methods/design A phase 2 randomized controlled trial using a parallel comparison of the Dil Mil intervention versus standard care will be implemented in three public primary health centers in Bengaluru. Young pregnant women in the first or second trimester of pregnancy will be recruited from antenatal services at study health centers and through community outreach. If eligible and willing, their mother-in-law will also be recruited. Once enrolled, dyads will participate in a baseline interview and then randomized either to the control arm and receive standard care or to the intervention arm and receive standard care plus the Dil Mil intervention. Additional evaluations will be conducted at 3 months and 6 months postpartum. Data will be analyzed to examine the feasibility and safety of the intervention and the effect of the intervention on intermediary outcomes (the empowerment of daughters-in-law and mothers-in-law), incidence of domestic violence among daughters-in-law, and health outcomes including perceived quality of life, psychosocial status and maternal and infant health outcomes. Discussion This study offers approaches that may help guide

  9. Substance abuse by men in partner abuse intervention programs: current issues and promising trends.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Larry W

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses key studies linking intervention for co-occurring substance abuse and partner abuse. Findings are grouped into three areas: (a) the effect of addictions treatment on partner violence; (b) application of transtheoretical, motivational, and culturally focused approaches to improve engagement and prevent attrition; and (c) assessment-based matching of services. Finally, the relative value of serial, coordinated, and integrated substance abuse programs and partner abuse intervention programs are considered. We reached three primary conclusions: (a) Addiction treatment alone reduces the risk for future domestic violence in a subset of men who batter, (b) screening and assessment for substance abuse by all men in partner abuse intervention programs is a standard of practice but needs to extend beyond "intake" and occur periodically, and (c) coordinated and integrated substance abuse and domestic violence programs probably offer more safety than traditional serial substance abuse treatment followed by partner abuse intervention.

  10. The Rate of Cyber Dating Abuse among Teens and How It Relates to Other Forms of Teen Dating Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zweig, Janine M.; Dank, Meredith; Yahner, Jennifer; Lachman, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    To date, little research has documented how teens might misuse technology to harass, control, and abuse their dating partners. This study examined the extent of cyber dating abuse--abuse via technology and new media--in youth relationships and how it relates to other forms of teen dating violence. A total of 5,647 youth from ten schools in three…

  11. Intimate Partner Violence and Miscarriage: Examination of the Role of Physical and Psychological Abuse and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morland, Leslie A.; Leskin, Gregory A.; Block, Carolyn Rebecca; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Friedman, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite research documenting high rates of violence during pregnancy, few studies have examined the impact of physical abuse, psychological abuse, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on miscarriage. Secondary analysis of data collected by the Chicago Women's Health Risk Study permitted an exploration of the relationships among physical abuse,…

  12. An intergenerational women's empowerment intervention to mitigate domestic violence: results of a pilot study in Bengaluru, India.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Suneeta; Subbiah, Kalyani; Khanum, Sajida; Chandra, Prabha S; Padian, Nancy S

    2012-03-01

    A growing body of literature has documented the global prevalence of domestic violence against women of reproductive age as well as the association between violence and an array of adverse reproductive, psychosocial, and child health outcomes. However, there is a dearth of research on domestic violence prevention interventions in the peer-reviewed literature to guide program planning and policy-making efforts. In this article, the authors describe the development and assessment of the feasibility, acceptability, and potential effectiveness of an intergenerational women's empowerment-based intervention to mitigate domestic violence and related adverse health outcomes in low-income urban communities in Southern India. PMID:22531083

  13. The Perceived Impact of a Child Maltreatment Report from the Perspective of the Domestic Violence Shelter Worker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine domestic violence shelter workers' perceptions of child maltreatment reporting. A sample of 82 professionals from domestic violence shelters across the United States participated in a survey focusing on a variety of different types of reports and the frequency of both positive and negative outcomes arising…

  14. Externalities in the Classroom: How Children Exposed to Domestic Violence Affect Everyone's Kids. NBER Working Paper No. 14246

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrell, Scott E.; Hoekstra, Mark L.

    2008-01-01

    It is estimated that between ten and twenty percent of children in the United States are exposed to domestic violence annually. While much is known about the impact of domestic violence and other family problems on children within the home, little is known regarding the extent to which these problems spill over to children outside the family. The…

  15. Council on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault. Annual Report to Governor Walter J. Hickel and the Alaska State Legislature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Domestic Violence, Juneau, AK.

    This document presents a report on domestic violence and sexual assault in Alaska. An introduction includes vignettes and a review of the problems of domestic violence and sexual assault. National and state statistics are provided and it is noted that Alaska has the highest incidence of rape in the country. The next section describes major…

  16. Recognising domestic violence in clinical practice using the diagnoses of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression and low self-esteem.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, Fiona

    2006-04-01

    This discussion paper reviews the health impacts, physical and mental, of domestic violence and explores the link between domestic violence and psychological symptoms. This paper focuses more on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than depression and low self-esteem because doctors are less familiar with PTSD. The barriers preventing health workers from detecting domestic violence are reviewed and the fear of health professionals that asking about trauma can harm patients is explored. The article then outlines practical strategies to improve detection of domestic violence using patients' presenting psychological symptoms and the diagnoses frequently associated with domestic violence namely, PTSD, depression and low self-esteem. It is argued that it is inadvisable to try to implement a policy of screening for domestic violence in general practice when the public health model is currently inappropriate. The paper discusses why the diagnostic frameworks of depression and PTSD are helpful in general practice, not only in detecting domestic violence but in working with the patient to establish trust and ways forward that can be tailored to meet the needs of the patient and their children. Patients' and professionals' dilemmas about what to do once domestic violence is detected are briefly explored.

  17. Is Exposure to Domestic Violence and Violent Crime Associated with Bullying Behaviour among Underage Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mustanoja, Susanna; Luukkonen, Anu-Helmi; Hakko, Helina; Rasanen, Pirkko; Saavala, Hannu; Riala, Kaisa

    2011-01-01

    We examined the relationship of exposure to domestic violence and violence occurring outside home to bullying behaviour in a sample (508; 40.9% males, 59.1% females) of underage psychiatric inpatient adolescents. Participants were interviewed using K-SADS-PL to assess DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses and to gather information about domestic and other…

  18. Cultural Consensus and Cultural Diversity: A Mixed Methods Investigation of Human Service Providers' Models of Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Cyleste C.; Dressler, William W.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses mixed methods and theory from cognitive anthropology to examine the cultural models of domestic violence among domestic violence agency workers, welfare workers, nurses, and a general population comparison group. Data collection and analysis uses quantitative and qualitative techniques, and the findings are integrated for…

  19. Lessons from Africa: combating the twin epidemics of domestic violence and HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Ezer, Tamar

    2008-12-01

    Domestic violence and HIV/AIDS have proven a lethal combination, exacting a heavy toll on women's lives, particularly in Africa. In this article, partially based on a presentation made at the human rights networking zone at the conference, Tamar Ezer examines the interrelation between domestic violence and HIV/AIDS, provides an analysis of obligations under human rights law, and describes innovative programs that attempt to address the intersection of these twin epidemics. The author argues for holistic approaches that address the social, economic and legal dimensions of the problem.

  20. Training police officers on domestic violence and racism: challenges and strategies.

    PubMed

    Huisman, Kimberly; Martinez, Jeri; Wilson, Cathleen

    2005-06-01

    Teaching about domestic violence and racism is a formidable task that requires the inclusion of material that challenges dominant ideologies about race and gender. A recent training for police officers about domestic violence and racism serves as a good example of how challenging the task can be. Drawing from this 1-day police training, from existing pedagogical literature, and from the authors' collective experiences teaching about these issues, the authors address challenges encountered and propose strategies to mitigate them. The authors propose a multilevel approach to implementing strategies to address these challenges, which includes ongoing involvement during three stages of the training.