Science.gov

Sample records for abuse liability profile

  1. Postmarketing surveillance of abuse liability of sibutramine.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Cynthia L; Schuster, Charles R; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn

    2003-03-01

    The abuse liability of medications is a growing concern as the number of newly approved psychoactive medications increases. Postmarketing surveillance can assist in determining abuse liability, but strategies are not well-defined for medications believed to be at low abuse risk. Using a newly approved medication (sibutramine--an anorectic drug), a novel approach to postmarketing abuse surveillance was introduced. A one-page anonymous questionnaire covering sibutramine, a scheduled anorectic drug (phentermine), and a fabricated name was added to the intake process of 58 treatment programs. From the 8780 completed questionnaires, 8.8% had heard of sibutramine and phentermine. For continued use to get high (a proxy for abuse), the rate for sibutramine was lower than for phentermine (0.6 vs. 2.2%, McNemar's chi(2) = 110.45, P < 0.001) but was higher than for the fabricated name (0.6 vs. 0.3%, McNemar's chi(2) = 11.86, P < 0.001). These results suggest the risk of abuse associated with sibutramine was lower than that associated with a known abused drug, one that itself is considered low risk despite decades of population exposure. The relatively high rate of hearing of sibutramine may be due to the direct-to-consumer advertisement. This approach is only one indicator in a surveillance framework but appears promising and validates findings from laboratory-based abuse liability studies that also indicate low abuse liability for sibutramine.

  2. Human abuse liability evaluation of CNS stimulant drugs.

    PubMed

    Romach, Myroslava K; Schoedel, Kerri A; Sellers, Edward M

    2014-12-01

    Psychoactive drugs that increase alertness, attention and concentration and energy, while also elevating mood, heart rate and blood pressure are referred to as stimulants. Despite some overlapping similarities, stimulants cannot be easily categorized by their chemical structure, mechanism of action, receptor binding profile, effects on monoamine uptake, behavioral pharmacology (e.g., effects on locomotion, temperature, and blood pressure), therapeutic indication or efficacy. Because of their abuse liability, a pre-market assessment of abuse potential is required for drugs that show stimulant properties; this review article focuses on the clinical aspects of this evaluation. This includes clinical trial adverse events, evidence of diversion or tampering, overdoses and the results of a human abuse potential study. While there are different types of human experimental studies that can be employed to evaluate stimulant abuse potential (e.g., drug discrimination, self-administration), only the human abuse potential study and clinical trial adverse event data are required for drug approval. The principal advances that have improved human abuse potential studies include using study enrichment strategies (pharmacologic qualification), larger sample sizes, better selection of endpoints and measurement strategies and more carefully considered interpretation of data. Because of the methodological advances, comparisons of newer studies with historical data is problematic and may contribute to a biased regulatory framework for the evaluation of newer stimulant-like drugs, such as A2 antagonists. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'.

  3. Human abuse liability evaluation of CNS stimulant drugs.

    PubMed

    Romach, Myroslava K; Schoedel, Kerri A; Sellers, Edward M

    2014-12-01

    Psychoactive drugs that increase alertness, attention and concentration and energy, while also elevating mood, heart rate and blood pressure are referred to as stimulants. Despite some overlapping similarities, stimulants cannot be easily categorized by their chemical structure, mechanism of action, receptor binding profile, effects on monoamine uptake, behavioral pharmacology (e.g., effects on locomotion, temperature, and blood pressure), therapeutic indication or efficacy. Because of their abuse liability, a pre-market assessment of abuse potential is required for drugs that show stimulant properties; this review article focuses on the clinical aspects of this evaluation. This includes clinical trial adverse events, evidence of diversion or tampering, overdoses and the results of a human abuse potential study. While there are different types of human experimental studies that can be employed to evaluate stimulant abuse potential (e.g., drug discrimination, self-administration), only the human abuse potential study and clinical trial adverse event data are required for drug approval. The principal advances that have improved human abuse potential studies include using study enrichment strategies (pharmacologic qualification), larger sample sizes, better selection of endpoints and measurement strategies and more carefully considered interpretation of data. Because of the methodological advances, comparisons of newer studies with historical data is problematic and may contribute to a biased regulatory framework for the evaluation of newer stimulant-like drugs, such as A2 antagonists. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'. PMID:24793872

  4. Civil Liability for Failing to Report Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehto, Neil J.

    1977-01-01

    The article examines the Landeros decision (which ruled that a doctor who fails to report a child abuse victim can be held liable for subsequent injuries inflicted on the child) and discusses three theories of proving civil liability for the failure to report child abuse victims. Addressed are the following topics: the problem of child abuse and…

  5. Electronic cigarettes: abuse liability, topography and subjective effects

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Sarah E; Hoffman, Allison C

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the available evidence evaluating the abuse liability, topography, subjective effects, craving and withdrawal suppression associated with e-cigarette use in order to identify information gaps and provide recommendations for future research. Methods Literature searches were conducted between October 2012 and January 2014 using five electronic databases. Studies were included in this review if they were peer-reviewed scientific journal articles evaluating clinical laboratory studies, national surveys or content analyses. Results A total of 15 peer-reviewed articles regarding behavioural use and effects of e-cigarettes published between 2010 and 2014 were included in this review. Abuse liability studies are limited in their generalisability. Topography (consumption behaviour) studies found that, compared with traditional cigarettes, e-cigarette average puff duration was significantly longer, and e-cigarette use required stronger suction. Data on e-cigarette subjective effects (such as anxiety, restlessness, concentration, alertness and satisfaction) and withdrawal suppression are limited and inconsistent. In general, study data should be interpreted with caution, given limitations associated with comparisons of novel and usual products, as well as the possible effects associated with subjects’ previous experience/inexperience with e-cigarettes. Conclusions Currently, very limited information is available on abuse liability, topography and subjective effects of e-cigarettes. Opportunities to examine extended e-cigarette use in a variety of settings with experienced e-cigarette users would help to more fully assess topography as well as behavioural and subjective outcomes. In addition, assessment of ‘real-world’ use, including amount and timing of use and responses to use, would clarify behavioural profiles and potential adverse health effects. PMID:24732159

  6. Liabilities of a physician confronted with child abuse.

    PubMed

    Vansweevelt, Thierry

    2013-06-01

    Several research questions raises when physicians are confronted with a possible case of child abuse. First, there is a problem of professional secrecy. In most European countries, physicians have the right to speak when confronted with a state of emergency. In other countries, physicians have a duty to speak and alert the police when the life or physical integrity of a person is at stake. A second topic to be discussed involves the possible liability of physicians who do not report child abuse. By not reporting a case of possible child abuse, the physician is respecting the family life of the parents, even though the child might continue to suffer damages. Third and essentially, I analyse the possible liability of physicians who do inform the prosecutor ofa suspected child abuse. Specific criteria are elaborated to establish negligence when physicians report child abuse to the prosecutor. PMID:23984493

  7. Securing insurance protection against fraud and abuse liability.

    PubMed

    Callison, S

    1999-07-01

    Healthcare organizations concerned about corporate compliance need to review securing appropriate insurance coverage as part of their corporate compliance program. Provider organizations often mistakenly expect that their directors and officers liability (D&O), malpractice, or standard errors and omissions (E&O) insurance policies will cover the cost of Medicare fraud and abuse fines. The insurance industry has developed a specific billing E&O insurance product to cover providers that run afoul of government fraud and abuse statutes. PMID:10558007

  8. Securing insurance protection against fraud and abuse liability.

    PubMed

    Callison, S

    1999-07-01

    Healthcare organizations concerned about corporate compliance need to review securing appropriate insurance coverage as part of their corporate compliance program. Provider organizations often mistakenly expect that their directors and officers liability (D&O), malpractice, or standard errors and omissions (E&O) insurance policies will cover the cost of Medicare fraud and abuse fines. The insurance industry has developed a specific billing E&O insurance product to cover providers that run afoul of government fraud and abuse statutes.

  9. 76 FR 62419 - Science of Abuse Liability Assessment; Public Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In the Federal Register of January 27, 2010 (75 FR 4400), FDA announced the... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Science of Abuse Liability Assessment; Public Workshop... Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop to discuss the science of...

  10. Comparative abuse liability of GHB and ethanol in humans.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew W; Griffiths, Roland R

    2013-04-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB; sodium oxybate) is approved for narcolepsy symptom treatment, and it is also abused. This study compared the participant-rated, observer-rated effects, motor/cognitive, physiological, and reinforcing effects of GHB and ethanol in participants with histories of sedative (including alcohol) abuse. Fourteen participants lived on a residential unit for ∼1 month. Sessions were conducted Monday through Friday. Measures were taken before and repeatedly up to 24 hours after drug administration. Participants were administered GHB (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 g/70 kg), ethanol (12, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 g/70 kg), or placebo in a double-blind, within-subjects design. For safety, GHB and ethanol were administered in an ascending dose sequence, with placebos and both drugs intermixed across sessions. The sequence for each drug was stopped if significant impairment or intolerable effects occurred. Only 9 and 10 participants received the full dose range for GHB and ethanol, respectively. The highest doses of GHB and ethanol showed onset within 30 minutes, with peak effects at 60 minutes. GHB effects dissipated between 4 and 6 hours, whereas ethanol effects dissipated between 6 and 8 hours. Dose-related effects were observed for both drugs on a variety of measures assessing sedative drug effects, abuse liability, performance impairment, and physiological effects. Within-session measures of abuse liability were similar between the two drugs. However, postsession measures of abuse liability, including a direct preference test between the highest tolerated doses of each drug, suggested somewhat greater abuse liability for GHB, most likely as a result of the delayed aversive ethanol effects (e.g., headache).

  11. Nicotine nasal spray and vapor inhaler: abuse liability assessment.

    PubMed

    Schuh, K J; Schuh, L M; Henningfield, J E; Stitzer, M L

    1997-04-01

    Acute subjective and physiological effects were examined to provide information relevant to abuse liability of new nicotine delivery systems. Subjects (n = 12) were overnight-deprived smokers who received 0, 4, 8 and 16 active puffs from nicotine-containing cigarettes (0.1 mg per puff), 0, 1, 2 or 4 nasal sprays (0.5 mg nicotine per spray) and 0, 30, 60 and 120 vapor inhalations (estimated 0.013 mg nicotine per inhalation) in a within-subject single blinded design. While smokers clearly liked cigarette puffs, there was much less evidence of liking produced by either nasal spray or vapor inhaler; only modest elevations on a measure of good drug effects were observed. The novel delivery products engendered unpleasant effects of burning throat and nose, watery eyes, runny nose, coughing and sneezing that might be expected to limit abuse liability. Nicotine plasma level and heart rate increase was dose-related for cigarettes and nasal spray but not for vapor inhaler, indicating limited nicotine delivery with the latter device. Overall, results are consistent with the conclusion that the nicotine nasal spray and vapor inhaler are of substantially lower abuse liability than cigarettes in experienced cigarette smokers receiving initial exposure to these products. PMID:9160851

  12. Prediction and Prevention of Prescription Drug Abuse: Role of Preclinical Assessment of Substance Abuse Liability.

    PubMed

    Marusich, Julie A; Lefever, Timothy W; Novak, Scott P; Blough, Bruce E; Wiley, Jenny L

    2013-07-01

    In 2011, the prevalence of prescription drug abuse exceeded that of any other illicit drug except marijuana. Consequently, efforts to curtail abuse of new medications should begin during the drug development process, where abuse liability can be identified and addressed before a candidate medication has widespread use. The first step in this process is scheduling with the Drug Enforcement Agency so that legal access is appropriately restricted, dependent upon levels of abuse risk and medical benefit. To facilitate scheduling, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has published guidance for industry that describes assessment of abuse liability. The purpose of this paper is to review methods that may be used to satisfy the FDA's regulatory requirements for animal behavioral and dependence pharmacology. Methods include psychomotor activity, self-administration (an animal model of the rewarding effects of a drug), drug discrimination (an animal model of the subjective effects of a drug), and evaluation of tolerance and dependence. Data from tests conducted at RTI with known drugs of abuse illustrate typical results, and demonstrate that RTI is capable of performing these tests. While using preclinical data to predict abuse liability is an imperfect process, it has substantial predictive validity. The ultimate goal is to increase consumer safety through appropriate scheduling of new medications.

  13. CNS effects and abuse liability of anabolic-androgenic steroids.

    PubMed

    Lukas, S E

    1996-01-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) have become more widely used and abused not only by elite athletes, but by nonathletes as well. It appears that these drugs are being used for cosmetic purposes as well as for promoting aggressive behavior. However, AASs may also be used in combination with other drugs such as ethyl alcohol and cocaine--a practice that may contribute to the observed increase in aggressive behavior. As there are no reliable animal models of AAS self-administration, it has been difficult to characterize the abuse liability and physical dependence potential of this class of drugs. A better understanding of neuroactive steroids, improved methods for assessing AAS abuse, and a revised interpretation of drug-seeking behavior is needed to develop improved treatment strategies for this emerging health-related problem.

  14. Assessment of hepatotoxic liabilities by transcript profiling

    SciTech Connect

    Ruepp, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.ruepp@roche.com; Boess, Franziska; Suter, Laura; Vera, Maria Cristina de; Steiner, Guido; Steele, Thomas; Weiser, Thomas; Albertini, Silvio

    2005-09-01

    Male Wistar rats were treated with various model compounds or the appropriate vehicle controls in order to create a reference database for toxicogenomics assessment of novel compounds. Hepatotoxic compounds in the database were either known hepatotoxicants or showed hepatotoxicity during preclinical testing. Histopathology and clinical chemistry data were used to anchor the transcript profiles to an established endpoint (steatosis, cholestasis, direct acting, peroxisomal proliferation or nontoxic/control). These reference data were analyzed using a supervised learning method (support vector machines, SVM) to generate classification rules. This predictive model was subsequently used to assess compounds with regard to a potential hepatotoxic liability. A steatotic and a non-hepatotoxic 5HT{sub 6} receptor antagonist compound from the same series were successfully discriminated by this toxicogenomics model. Additionally, an example is shown where a hepatotoxic liability was correctly recognized in the absence of pathological findings. In vitro experiments and a dog study confirmed the correctness of the toxicogenomics alert. Another interesting observation was that transcript profiles indicate toxicologically relevant changes at an earlier timepoint than routinely used methods. Together, these results support the useful application of toxicogenomics in raising alerts for adverse effects and generating mechanistic hypotheses that can be followed up by confirmatory experiments.

  15. Effects of cold pressor pain on the abuse liability of intranasal oxycodone in male and female prescription opioid abusers

    PubMed Central

    Lofwall, Michelle R.; Nuzzo, Paul A.; Walsh, Sharon L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Approximately 1.9 million persons in the U.S. have prescription opioid use disorders often with concomitant bodily pain, but systematic data on the impact of pain on abuse liability of opioids is lacking. The purpose of this study was to determine whether pain alters the intranasal abuse liability of oxycodone, a commonly prescribed and abused analgesic, in males and females. Methods Sporadic prescription opioid abusers (10 females, 10 males) participated in this mixed (between and within-subject), randomized inpatient study. Experimental sessions (n=6) tested intranasal placebo, oxycodone 15 or 30 mg/70 kg during cold pressor testing (CPT) and a warm water control. Observer- and subject-rated drug effect measures, analgesia, physiologic and cognitive effects were assessed. Results The CPT significantly increased blood pressure, heart rate, pain, stress, and “opiate desire” compared to the no-pain control but did not alter opioid liking, high or street value. Intranasal oxycodone produced effects within 10 minutes, significantly decreasing pain and significantly increasing subjective measures of abuse liability (e.g., high). Females had higher ratings of street value, high, and liking for one or both active doses. Conclusions The CPT was a reliably painful and stressful stimulus that did not diminish the abuse liability of intranasal Oxycodone®. Females were more sensitive to oxycodone on several abuse liability measures that warrant further follow-up. Snorting oxycodone rapidly produced psychoactive effects indicative of substantial abuse liability. PMID:22209386

  16. Assessment of substance abuse liability in rodents: self-administration, drug discrimination, and locomotor sensitization.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Neil E

    2012-09-01

    Assessing abuse liability is a crucial step in the development of a novel chemical entity (NCE) with central nervous system (CNS) activity or with chemical or pharmacological properties in common with known abused substances. Rodent assessment of abuse liability is highly attractive due to its relatively low cost and high predictive validity. Described in this unit are three rodent assays commonly used to provide data on the potential for abuse liability based on the acute effects of NCEs: specifically, self-administration, drug discrimination, and locomotor sensitization. As these assays provide insight into the potential abuse liability of NCEs as well as in vivo pharmacological mechanism(s) of action, they should form a key part of the development process for novel therapeutics aimed at treating CNS disorders.

  17. Relative abuse liability of prescription opioids compared to heroin in morphine-maintained heroin abusers

    PubMed Central

    Comer, Sandra D; Sullivan, Maria A; Whittington, Robert A; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Kowalczyk, William J

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of prescription opioid medications has increased dramatically in the U.S. during the past decade, as indicated by a variety of epidemiological sources. However, few studies have systematically examined the relative reinforcing effects of commonly abused opioid medications. The current double-blind, placebo-controlled inpatient study was designed to compare the effects of intravenously delivered fentanyl (0, 0.0625, 0.125, 0.187, and 0.250 mg/70 kg), oxycodone (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/70 kg), morphine (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, and 50 mg/70 kg), buprenorphine (0, 0.125, 0.5, 2, and 8 mg/70 kg), and heroin (0, 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, and 25 mg/70 kg) in morphine-maintained heroin abusers (N=8 completers maintained on 120 mg per day oral morphine in divided doses [30 mg q.i.d.]). All of the participants received all of the drugs tested; drugs and doses were administered in non-systematic order. All of the drugs produced statistically significant, dose-related increases in positive subjective ratings, such as “I feel a good drug effect” and “I like the drug.” In general, the order of potency in producing these effects, from most to least potent, was: fentanyl > buprenorphine ≥ heroin > morphine = oxycodone. In contrast, buprenorphine was the only drug that produced statistically significant increases in ratings of “I feel a bad drug effect” and it was the only drug that was not self-administered above placebo levels at any dose tested. These data suggest that the abuse liability of buprenorphine in heroin-dependent individuals may be low, despite the fact that it produces increases in positive subjective ratings. The abuse liabilities of fentanyl, morphine, oxycodone, and heroin, however, appear to be similar under these experimental conditions. PMID:17581533

  18. Flavor improvement does not increase abuse liability of nicotine chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Houtsmuller, Elisabeth J; Fant, Reginald V; Eissenberg, Thomas E; Henningfield, Jack E; Stitzer, Maxine L

    2002-06-01

    Because the taste of nicotine gum has impeded compliance with dosing recommendations, nicotine gum with improved taste (mint, orange) was developed and marketed. Prior to marketing, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required a rigorous abuse liability assessment to examine whether enhanced palatability of nicotine gum would increase its abuse liability. Subjective, physiological, and psychomotor effects of mint flavor and original nicotine gum were tested in adult smokers (22-55 years old); a group of younger subjects (18-21 years old) was also included to allow for assessment of abuse liability in young adults specifically. Amphetamine and confectionery gum served as positive controls for abuse liability and palatability. Subjects rated palatability of mint gum higher than original nicotine gum, but substantially lower than confectionery gum. Palatability decreased with increasing dose of nicotine. Neither original nor mint gum increased ratings of traditional abuse liability predictors [Good Effect, Like Effect, Morphine-Benzedrine Group (MBG) scales of Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI)], while amphetamine increased ratings of all these measures. Both flavors of nicotine gum decreased craving during 2 h of abstinence. These effects were more pronounced in the adult group and mint gum was more effective than original gum. Younger subjects reported fewer withdrawal symptoms and lower ratings for drug effects and flavor. Improved flavor of nicotine gum does not increase abuse liability, but may be associated with enhanced craving reduction. PMID:12175452

  19. Flavor improvement does not increase abuse liability of nicotine chewing gum.

    PubMed

    Houtsmuller, Elisabeth J; Fant, Reginald V; Eissenberg, Thomas E; Henningfield, Jack E; Stitzer, Maxine L

    2002-06-01

    Because the taste of nicotine gum has impeded compliance with dosing recommendations, nicotine gum with improved taste (mint, orange) was developed and marketed. Prior to marketing, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required a rigorous abuse liability assessment to examine whether enhanced palatability of nicotine gum would increase its abuse liability. Subjective, physiological, and psychomotor effects of mint flavor and original nicotine gum were tested in adult smokers (22-55 years old); a group of younger subjects (18-21 years old) was also included to allow for assessment of abuse liability in young adults specifically. Amphetamine and confectionery gum served as positive controls for abuse liability and palatability. Subjects rated palatability of mint gum higher than original nicotine gum, but substantially lower than confectionery gum. Palatability decreased with increasing dose of nicotine. Neither original nor mint gum increased ratings of traditional abuse liability predictors [Good Effect, Like Effect, Morphine-Benzedrine Group (MBG) scales of Addiction Research Center Inventory (ARCI)], while amphetamine increased ratings of all these measures. Both flavors of nicotine gum decreased craving during 2 h of abstinence. These effects were more pronounced in the adult group and mint gum was more effective than original gum. Younger subjects reported fewer withdrawal symptoms and lower ratings for drug effects and flavor. Improved flavor of nicotine gum does not increase abuse liability, but may be associated with enhanced craving reduction.

  20. Principles of assessment of abuse liability: US legal framework and regulatory environment.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Beatriz A

    2013-09-01

    Identifying the abuse potential of drug products in the premarketing and postmarketing environment has been a critical component in the implementation of drug abuse control laws worldwide. In the US, the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 (CSA) is a comprehensive federal law enacted to prevent the abuse or diversion of substances with abuse liability or addiction potential (for present purposes, these terms are used interchangeably). Under the jurisdiction of the Drug Enforcement Administration, the law applies to the manufacture and distribution of narcotics and other drug substances with potential of abuse. The CSA classifies substances with abuse potential into schedules I-V based on the substance's risk of diversion or abuse, and thus provides a legal framework for the assessment of abuse liability of New Molecular Entities. When the Food and Drug Administration reviews the safety and efficacy of a New Drug Application it also determines whether the drug has potential for abuse, and if so, will begin the process to schedule the drug under the CSA. As the assessment of abuse potential is a critical component of a marketing application, pharmaceutical companies (sponsors) bear the responsibility of generating a comprehensive preclinical and clinical data package for regulators to review and make decisions on labeling and the corresponding postmarketing surveillance. Recent regulatory guidelines adopted in the European Union (EU) (2006), Canada (2007), and USA (2010) provide recommendations to sponsors on preclinical and clinical methodologies for the assessment of abuse potential. This paper reviews the legal framework of the assessment of abuse liability and scheduling of controlled substances in the USA and describes the current global regulatory environment and the challenges that sponsors and regulators face when assessing abuse liability of New Molecular Entities, from the early stages of development through the late stages, review, and approval. PMID

  1. Principles of assessment of abuse liability: US legal framework and regulatory environment.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Beatriz A

    2013-09-01

    Identifying the abuse potential of drug products in the premarketing and postmarketing environment has been a critical component in the implementation of drug abuse control laws worldwide. In the US, the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 (CSA) is a comprehensive federal law enacted to prevent the abuse or diversion of substances with abuse liability or addiction potential (for present purposes, these terms are used interchangeably). Under the jurisdiction of the Drug Enforcement Administration, the law applies to the manufacture and distribution of narcotics and other drug substances with potential of abuse. The CSA classifies substances with abuse potential into schedules I-V based on the substance's risk of diversion or abuse, and thus provides a legal framework for the assessment of abuse liability of New Molecular Entities. When the Food and Drug Administration reviews the safety and efficacy of a New Drug Application it also determines whether the drug has potential for abuse, and if so, will begin the process to schedule the drug under the CSA. As the assessment of abuse potential is a critical component of a marketing application, pharmaceutical companies (sponsors) bear the responsibility of generating a comprehensive preclinical and clinical data package for regulators to review and make decisions on labeling and the corresponding postmarketing surveillance. Recent regulatory guidelines adopted in the European Union (EU) (2006), Canada (2007), and USA (2010) provide recommendations to sponsors on preclinical and clinical methodologies for the assessment of abuse potential. This paper reviews the legal framework of the assessment of abuse liability and scheduling of controlled substances in the USA and describes the current global regulatory environment and the challenges that sponsors and regulators face when assessing abuse liability of New Molecular Entities, from the early stages of development through the late stages, review, and approval.

  2. Alcohol increases impulsivity and abuse liability in heavy drinking women.

    PubMed

    Reed, Stephanie Collins; Levin, Frances R; Evans, Suzette M

    2012-12-01

    Heavy drinking has increased in recent years and has been linked to numerous health-related risks, particularly in women. A number of factors may play a role in exacerbating the risks linked to heavy drinking, such as impulsivity, which itself is related to a number of risky behaviors. The present study investigated the effects of alcohol (0, 0.5, 0.75 g/kg) on impulsivity in female heavy drinkers (n = 23) and female light drinkers (n = 23) using a double-blind, placebo-controlled outpatient design; all women were tested during follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Each session, participants completed a range of tasks including subjective measures of abuse liability, cognitive performance tasks, three behavioral impulsivity tasks, and a risk-taking task. Alcohol increased impulsivity on the Immediate and Delayed Memory Task (IMT and DMT) and Delay Discounting task. Heavy drinkers scored higher on impulsivity self-reports and were more impulsive on the IMT and the GoStop task than light drinkers. The high dose of alcohol further increased impulsive performance on the IMT and DMT in heavy drinkers. There were no group differences or alcohol effects on the Balloon Analogue Risk Task. Alcohol increased sedative-like effects more in light drinkers and increased stimulant-like effects and alcohol liking more in heavy drinkers. In summary, female heavy drinkers are less sensitive to the negative effects of alcohol, report more positive effects of alcohol, and are more impulsive than female light drinkers. Moreover, impulsive responding was exacerbated by alcohol drinking among female heavy drinkers, indicating that women who drink at this level are at increased risk for developing alcohol use disorders and engaging in other risky behaviors, particularly after drinking. PMID:23066857

  3. Dimethyltryptamine (DMT): prevalence, user characteristics and abuse liability in a large global sample.

    PubMed

    Winstock, Adam R; Kaar, Stephen; Borschmann, Rohan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents original research on prevalence, user characteristics and effect profile of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), a potent hallucinogenic which acts primarily through the serotonergic system. Data were obtained from the Global Drug Survey (an anonymous online survey of people, many of whom have used drugs) conducted between November and December 2012 with 22,289 responses. Lifetime prevalence of DMT use was 8.9% (n=1980) and past year prevalence use was 5.0% (n=1123). We explored the effect profile of DMT in 472 participants who identified DMT as the last new drug they had tried for the first time and compared it with ratings provided by other respondents on psilocybin (magic mushrooms), LSD and ketamine. DMT was most often smoked and offered a strong, intense, short-lived psychedelic high with relatively few negative effects or "come down". It had a larger proportion of new users compared with the other substances (24%), suggesting its popularity may increase. Overall, DMT seems to have a very desirable effect profile indicating a high abuse liability that maybe offset by a low urge to use more.

  4. Dimethyltryptamine (DMT): prevalence, user characteristics and abuse liability in a large global sample.

    PubMed

    Winstock, Adam R; Kaar, Stephen; Borschmann, Rohan

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents original research on prevalence, user characteristics and effect profile of N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), a potent hallucinogenic which acts primarily through the serotonergic system. Data were obtained from the Global Drug Survey (an anonymous online survey of people, many of whom have used drugs) conducted between November and December 2012 with 22,289 responses. Lifetime prevalence of DMT use was 8.9% (n=1980) and past year prevalence use was 5.0% (n=1123). We explored the effect profile of DMT in 472 participants who identified DMT as the last new drug they had tried for the first time and compared it with ratings provided by other respondents on psilocybin (magic mushrooms), LSD and ketamine. DMT was most often smoked and offered a strong, intense, short-lived psychedelic high with relatively few negative effects or "come down". It had a larger proportion of new users compared with the other substances (24%), suggesting its popularity may increase. Overall, DMT seems to have a very desirable effect profile indicating a high abuse liability that maybe offset by a low urge to use more. PMID:24284475

  5. A novel orvinol analog, BU08028, as a safe opioid analgesic without abuse liability in primates.

    PubMed

    Ding, Huiping; Czoty, Paul W; Kiguchi, Norikazu; Cami-Kobeci, Gerta; Sukhtankar, Devki D; Nader, Michael A; Husbands, Stephen M; Ko, Mei-Chuan

    2016-09-13

    Despite the critical need, no previous research has substantiated safe opioid analgesics without abuse liability in primates. Recent advances in medicinal chemistry have led to the development of ligands with mixed mu opioid peptide (MOP)/nociceptin-orphanin FQ peptide (NOP) receptor agonist activity to achieve this objective. BU08028 is a novel orvinol analog that displays a similar binding profile to buprenorphine with improved affinity and efficacy at NOP receptors. The aim of this preclinical study was to establish the functional profile of BU08028 in monkeys using clinically used MOP receptor agonists for side-by-side comparisons in various well-honed behavioral and physiological assays. Systemic BU08028 (0.001-0.01 mg/kg) produced potent long-lasting (i.e., >24 h) antinociceptive and antiallodynic effects, which were blocked by MOP or NOP receptor antagonists. More importantly, the reinforcing strength of BU08028 was significantly lower than that of cocaine, remifentanil, or buprenorphine in monkeys responding under a progressive-ratio schedule of drug self-administration. Unlike MOP receptor agonists, BU08028 at antinociceptive doses and ∼10- to 30-fold higher doses did not cause respiratory depression or cardiovascular adverse events as measured by telemetry devices. After repeated administration, the monkeys developed acute physical dependence on morphine, as manifested by precipitated withdrawal signs, such as increased respiratory rate, heart rate, and blood pressure. In contrast, monkeys did not show physical dependence on BU08028. These in vivo findings in primates not only document the efficacy and tolerability profile of bifunctional MOP/NOP receptor agonists, but also provide a means of translating such ligands into therapies as safe and potentially abuse-free opioid analgesics. PMID:27573832

  6. Assessment of the Abuse Liability of Synthetic Cannabinoid Agonists JWH-030, JWH-175, and JWH-176

    PubMed Central

    Tampus, Reinholdgher; Yoon, Seong Shoon; de la Peña, June Bryan; Botanas, Chrislean Jun; Kim, Hee Jin; Seo, Joung-Wook; Jeong, Eun Ju; Jang, Choon Gon; Cheong, Jae Hoon

    2015-01-01

    The emergence and use of synthetic cannabinoids have greatly increased in recent years. These substances are easily dispensed over the internet and on the streets. Some synthetic cannabinoids were shown to have abuse liability and were subsequently regulated by authorities. However, there are compounds that are still not regulated probably due to the lack of abuse liability studies. In the present study, we assessed the abuse liability of three synthetic cannabinoids, namely JWH-030, JWH-175, and JWH-176. The abuse liability of these drugs was evaluated in two of the most widely used animal models for assessing the abuse potential of drugs, the conditioned place preference (CPP) and self-administration (SA) test. In addition, the open-field test was utilized to assess the effects of repeated (7 days) treatment and abrupt cessation of these drugs on the psychomotor activity of animals. Results showed that JWH-175 (0.5 mg/kg), but not JWH-030 or JWH-176 at any dose, significantly decreased the locomotor activity of mice. This alteration in locomotor activity was only evident during acute exposure to the drug and was not observed during repeated treatment and abstinence. Similarly, only JWH-175 (0.1 mg/kg) produced significant CPP in rats. On the other hand, none of the drugs tested was self-administered by rats. Taken together, the present results indicate that JWH-175, but not JWH-030 and JWH-176, may have abuse potential. More importantly, our findings indicate the complex psychopharmacological effects of synthetic cannabinoids and the need to closely monitor the production, dispensation, and use of these substances. PMID:26535085

  7. The Liability of Colleges and Universities for Fraud, Waste, and Abuse in Federally Funded Grants and Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Steven D.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews legal and practical aspects of a university's potential liability for fraud, waste, and abuse. Discusses the array of criminal, civil, and administrative sanctions that may be imposed on grantees who engage in fraudulent practices. (84 references) (MLF)

  8. Conference on abuse liability and appeal of tobacco products: conclusions and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Henningfield, Jack E; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Zeller, Mitch; Peters, Ellen

    2011-07-01

    The rate of initiation and progression to dependence and premature mortality are higher for tobacco products than for any other dependence producing substance. This is not explained simply by the addictiveness ("abuse liability") or by enticing product designs ("product appeal") alone, but rather by both of these factors in combination with marketing and social influences that also influence "product appeal". A working meeting of leading experts in abuse liability (AL) and product appeal was convened to examine how these disciplines could be more effectively applied to the evaluation of tobacco products for the purposes of regulation that would include setting standards for designs and contents intended to reduce the risk of initiation and dependence. It was concluded that abuse liability assessment (ALA) is a validated approach to testing pharmaceutical products but has not been extensively applied to tobacco products: such application has demonstrated feasibility, but special challenges include the diverse range of products, product complexity, and the absence of satisfactory placebo products. Consumer testing for product appeal is widely used by consumer product marketers as well as by researchers in their efforts to understand consumer product preferences and use but has not been extensively applied to tobacco products except by the tobacco industry. Recommendations for testing, methods development, and research were developed. A major recommendation was that tobacco products should be tested for AL and product appeal, and the results integrated and evaluated so as to more accurately predict risk of initiation, dependence, and persistence of use. PMID:21376479

  9. Conference on abuse liability and appeal of tobacco products: conclusions and recommendations.

    PubMed

    Henningfield, Jack E; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Zeller, Mitch; Peters, Ellen

    2011-07-01

    The rate of initiation and progression to dependence and premature mortality are higher for tobacco products than for any other dependence producing substance. This is not explained simply by the addictiveness ("abuse liability") or by enticing product designs ("product appeal") alone, but rather by both of these factors in combination with marketing and social influences that also influence "product appeal". A working meeting of leading experts in abuse liability (AL) and product appeal was convened to examine how these disciplines could be more effectively applied to the evaluation of tobacco products for the purposes of regulation that would include setting standards for designs and contents intended to reduce the risk of initiation and dependence. It was concluded that abuse liability assessment (ALA) is a validated approach to testing pharmaceutical products but has not been extensively applied to tobacco products: such application has demonstrated feasibility, but special challenges include the diverse range of products, product complexity, and the absence of satisfactory placebo products. Consumer testing for product appeal is widely used by consumer product marketers as well as by researchers in their efforts to understand consumer product preferences and use but has not been extensively applied to tobacco products except by the tobacco industry. Recommendations for testing, methods development, and research were developed. A major recommendation was that tobacco products should be tested for AL and product appeal, and the results integrated and evaluated so as to more accurately predict risk of initiation, dependence, and persistence of use.

  10. The predictive validity of the rat self-administration model for abuse liability.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Eoin C; Chapman, Kathryn; Butler, Paul; Mead, Andy N

    2011-01-01

    The self-administration model is the primary non-clinical approach for assessing the reinforcing properties of novel compounds. Given the now frequent use of rats in self-administration studies, it is important to understand the predictive validity of the rat self-administration model for use in abuse liability assessments. This review of 71 drugs identifies high concordance between findings from rat self-administration studies and two clinical indicators of abuse liability, namely reports of positive subjective-effects and the DEA drug scheduling status. To understand the influence of species on concordance we compare rodent and non-human primate (NHP) self-administration data. In the few instances where discrepancies are observed between rat data and the clinical indicators of abuse liability, rat self-administration data corresponds with NHP data in the majority of these cases. We discuss the influence of genetic factors (sex and strain), food deprivation state and the study design (acquisition or drug substitution) on self-administration study outcomes and highlight opportunities to improve the predictive validity of the self-administration model.

  11. Conference on Abuse Liability and Appeal of Tobacco Products: Conclusions and Recommendations*

    PubMed Central

    Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Zeller, Mitch; Peters, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    The rate of initiation and progression to dependence and premature mortality are higher for tobacco products than for any other dependence producing substance. This is not explained simply by the addictiveness (“abuse liability”) or by enticing product designs (“product appeal”) alone, but rather by both of these factors in combination with marketing and social influences that also influence “product appeal”. A working meeting of leading experts in abuse liability (AL) and product appeal was convened to examine how these disciplines could be more effectively applied to the evaluation of tobacco products for the purposes of regulation that would include setting standards for designs and contents intended to reduce the risk of initiation and dependence. It was concluded that abuse liability assessment (ALA) is a validated approach to testing pharmaceutical products but has not been extensively applied to tobacco products: such application has demonstrated feasibility, but special challenges include the diverse range of products, product complexity, and the absence of satisfactory placebo products. Consumer testing for product appeal is widely used by consumer products marketers as well as by researchers in their efforts to understand consumer product preferences and use but has not been extensively applied to tobacco products except by the tobacco industry. Recommendations for testing, methods development, and research were developed. A major recommendation was that tobacco products should be tested for AL and product appeal, and the results integrated and evaluated so as to more accurately predict risk of initiation, dependence, and persistence of use. PMID:21376479

  12. Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollander, Patricia A.

    Recent court cases involving tort liabilities of institutions of higher education are discussed in this chapter. Issues addressed include negligence citations for injuries in physical education classes, a wrongful death suit, medical malpractice cases, and slip and fall accidents. Other cases included fraudulent misrepresentation, defamation of…

  13. Mu/Kappa Opioid Interactions in Rhesus Monkeys: Implications for Analgesia and Abuse Liability

    PubMed Central

    Negus, S. Stevens; Katrina Schrode, KA; Stevenson, Glenn W.

    2008-01-01

    Mu opioid receptor agonists are clinically valuable as analgesics; however, their use is limited by high abuse liability. Kappa opioid agonists also produce antinociception, but they do not produce mu agonist-like abuse-related effects, suggesting that they may enhance the antinociceptive effects and/or attenuate the abuse-related effects of mu agonists. To evaluate this hypothesis, the present study examined interactions between the mu agonist fentanyl and the kappa agonist U69,593 in three behavioral assays in rhesus monkeys. In an assay of schedule-controlled responding, monkeys responded under a fixed-ratio 30 (FR 30) schedule of food presentation. Fentanyl and U69,593 each produced rate-decreasing effects when administered alone, and mixtures of 0.22:1, 0.65:1 and 1.96:1 U69,593/fentanyl usually produced subadditive effects. In an assay of thermal nociception, tail withdrawal latencies were measured from water heated to 50°C. Fentanyl and U69,593 each produced dose-dependent antinociception, and effects were additive for all mixtures. In an assay of drug self-administration, rhesus monkeys responded for i.v. drug injection, and both dose and FR values were manipulated. Fentanyl maintained self-administration, whereas U69,593 did not. Addition of U69,593 to fentanyl produced a proportion-dependent decrease in both rates of fentanyl self-administration and behavioral economic measures of the reinforcing efficacy of fentanyl. Taken together, these results suggest that simultaneous activation of mu and kappa receptors, either with a mixture of selective drugs or with a single drug that targets both receptors, may reduce abuse liability without reducing analgesic effects relative to selective mu agonists administered alone. PMID:18837635

  14. The Liability of Colleges and Universities for Fraud, Waste, and Abuse in Federally Funded Grants and Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Steven D.

    1996-01-01

    The federal government's war on fraud, waste, and abuse in expenditure of federal funds has reached college campuses. Institutions that fail to heed this development are vulnerable to harsh sanctions. They must tighten accounting practices and recognize their liability for fraudulent practices of faculty and students. Internal investigations and…

  15. Toward quantifying the abuse liability of ultraviolet tanning: A behavioral economic approach to tanning addiction.

    PubMed

    Reed, Derek D; Kaplan, Brent A; Becirevic, Amel; Roma, Peter G; Hursh, Steven R

    2016-07-01

    Many adults engage in ultraviolet indoor tanning despite evidence of its association with skin cancer. The constellation of behaviors associated with ultraviolet indoor tanning is analogous to that in other behavioral addictions. Despite a growing literature on ultraviolet indoor tanning as an addiction, there remains no consensus on how to identify ultraviolet indoor tanning addictive tendencies. The purpose of the present study was to translate a behavioral economic task more commonly used in substance abuse to quantify the "abuse liability" of ultraviolet indoor tanning, establish construct validity, and determine convergent validity with the most commonly used diagnostic tools for ultraviolet indoor tanning addiction (i.e., mCAGE and mDSM-IV-TR). We conducted a between-groups study using a novel hypothetical Tanning Purchase Task to quantify intensity and elasticity of ultraviolet indoor tanning demand and permit statistical comparisons with the mCAGE and mDSM-IV-TR. Results suggest that behavioral economic demand is related to ultraviolet indoor tanning addiction status and adequately discriminates between potential addicted individuals from nonaddicted individuals. Moreover, we provide evidence that the Tanning Purchase Task renders behavioral economic indicators that are relevant to public health research. The present findings are limited to two ultraviolet indoor tanning addiction tools and a relatively small sample of high-risk ultraviolet indoor tanning users; however, these pilot data demonstrate the potential for behavioral economic assessment tools as diagnostic and research aids in ultraviolet indoor tanning addiction studies. PMID:27400670

  16. Clinical laboratory assessment of the abuse liability of an electronic cigarette

    PubMed Central

    Vansickel, Andrea R; Weaver, Michael F; Eissenberg, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Aims To provide an initial abuse liability assessment of an electronic cigarette (EC) in current tobacco cigarette smokers. Design The first of four, within-subject sessions was an EC sampling session that involved six, 10-puff bouts (30s interpuff interval) with each bout separated by 30-mins. In the remaining three sessions participants made choices between 10 EC puffs and varying amounts of money, 10 EC puffs and a varying number of own brand cigarette (OB) puffs, or 10 OB puffs and varying amounts of money using the multiple-choice procedure (MCP). The MCP was completed six times at 30-min intervals, and one choice was randomly reinforced at each trial. Setting Clinical laboratory. Participants Twenty current tobacco cigarette smokers. Measurements Sampling session outcome measures included plasma nicotine, cardiovascular response, and subjective effects. Choice session outcome was the crossover value on the MCP. Findings: EC use resulted in significant nicotine delivery, tobacco abstinence symptom suppression, and increased product acceptability ratings. On the MCP, participants chose to receive 10 EC puffs over an average of $1.06 or 3 OB puffs and chose 10 OB puffs over an average of $1.50 (p<.003). Conclusions Electronic cigarettes can deliver clinically significant amounts of nicotine and reduce cigarette abstinence symptoms and appear to have lower potential for abuse relative to traditional tobacco cigarettes, at least under certain laboratory conditions. PMID:22229871

  17. Abuse liability assessment of tobacco products including potential reduced exposure products.

    PubMed

    Carter, Lawrence P; Stitzer, Maxine L; Henningfield, Jack E; O'Connor, Rich J; Cummings, K Michael; Hatsukami, Dorothy K

    2009-12-01

    The harm produced by tobacco products is a result of frequent use of a highly toxic product. Reducing the adverse public health impact of tobacco products might be most effectively achieved by reducing the likelihood of their use and the toxicity of the products. Products that retain some characteristics of cigarettes but have been altered with the intention of reducing toxicity have been referred to as modified risk tobacco products or potential reduced exposure products (MRTP/PREP). Evaluation of their content, emission, and toxicity is discussed in other articles in this special issue. Here, we discuss the methodology that has been used to examine the likelihood of abuse or addiction. Abuse liability assessment (ALA) methodology has been used by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other drug regulatory agencies world-wide for decades to assess the risks posed by a wide variety of pharmacologically active substances. ALA is routinely required among other evaluations of safety during the pre-market assessment of new drugs, and is continually adapted to meet the challenges posed by new drug classes and drug formulations. In the 2009 law giving FDA regulation over tobacco products, FDA is now required to evaluate new tobacco products including MRTP/PREPs to determine their risk for abuse and toxicity at the population level. This article describes the traditional tools and methods of ALA that can be used to evaluate new tobacco and nicotine products including MRTP/PREPs. Such ALA data could contribute to the scientific foundation on which future public policy decisions are based.

  18. Abuse Liability Assessment of Tobacco Products Including Potential Reduced Exposure Products (PREPs)

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Henningfield, Jack E.; O'Connor, Rich J.; Cummings, K. Michael; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.

    2009-01-01

    The harm produced by tobacco products is a result of frequent use of a highly toxic product. Reducing the adverse public health impact of tobacco products might be most effectively achieved by reducing the likelihood of their use and the toxicity of the products. Products that retain some characteristics of cigarettes, but have been altered with the intention of reducing toxicity have been referred to as modified risk tobacco products or potential reduced exposure products (MRTP/PREPS). Evaluation of their content, emission, and toxicity is discussed in other articles in this special issue. Here, we discuss the methodology that has been used to examine the likelihood of abuse or addiction. Abuse liability assessment (ALA) methodology has been used by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other drug regulatory agencies world-wide for decades to assess the risks posed by a wide variety of pharmacologically active substances. ALA is routinely required among other evaluations of safety during the premarket assessment of new drugs, and is continually adapted to meet the challenges posed by new drug classes and drug formulations. In the 2009 law giving FDA regulation over tobacco products, FDA is now required to evaluate new tobacco products including MRTP/PREPs to determine their risk for abuse and toxicity at the population level. This paper describes the traditional tools and methods of ALA that can be used to evaluate new tobacco and nicotine products including MRTP/PREPs. Such ALA data could contribute to the scientific foundation on which future public policy decisions are based. PMID:19959676

  19. Violence between Couples: Profiling the Male Abuser.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponzetti,James J. Jr.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Presents an integrative review of the literature on spousal violence as it relates to the abusive male. Suggests various issues that need to be addressed before effective intervention with abusive males can proceed. (Author)

  20. Profile of narcotic abuse in peninsula Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Buhrich, N; Haq, S

    1980-01-01

    Demographic and drug abuse characteristics of 3,484 new drug abuse contacts presenting to the General Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia are reported. The large majority were heroin inhalers. They were different from the traditional Eastern opium inhalers and similar to Western heroin injectors in that they were young, male, single, and frequently unemployed. These features and the relative underrepresentation of Chinese suggest that the Chinese of this study did not learn narcotic abuse from opium-smoking relatives. PMID:7446511

  1. A Review on Renal Toxicity Profile of Common Abusive Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Varun Parkash; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse has become a major social problem of the modern world and majority of these abusive drugs or their metabolites are excreted through the kidneys and, thus, the renal complications of these drugs are very common. Morphine, heroin, cocaine, nicotine and alcohol are the most commonly abused drugs, and their use is associated with various types of renal toxicity. The renal complications include a wide range of glomerular, interstitial and vascular diseases leading to acute or chronic renal failure. The present review discusses the renal toxicity profile and possible mechanisms of commonly abused drugs including morphine, heroin, cocaine, nicotine, caffeine and alcohol. PMID:23946695

  2. Determining the clinically important difference in visual analog scale scores in abuse liability studies evaluating novel opioid formulations

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Thomas A.; Comer, Sandra D.; Revicki, Dennis A.; van Inwegen, Richard G.; Stauffer, Joseph W.; Katz, Nathaniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study determined how the magnitude of change in positive subjective responses predicts clinical outcome in a treatment setting. Specifically, we attempted to define what constitutes a clinically important difference (CID) in subjective responses. Methods A 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS) measured subjective ratings of drug “high,” calculated via an anchor-based method with published data from participants receiving sustained-release naltrexone (NTX) and heroin in a laboratory setting. The data were then compared to clinical outcomes in a treatment trial with sustained-release naltrexone. A distribution-based method subsequently analyzed data from participants who received ALO-01 (extended-release morphine with sequestered NTX) to predict its abuse liability. Results Differences in ratings of drug high of approximately 10 mm on a 100-mm line were clinically significant. By extrapolation, CIDs were also found between crushed or intact ALO-01 and immediate-release morphine sulfate (IRMS). No CIDs were found between intact and crushed ALO-01. Conclusions From laboratory and treatment trial data involving naltrexone, calculation of CIDs in subjective ratings of high is possible. Consequently, crushing/swallowing or injecting ALO-01 produces clinically significantly less drug high than oral or intravenous morphine alone, suggesting that ALO-01 has lower abuse liability by those routes than morphine formulations. PMID:21964915

  3. Medical treatment of joint prosthesis: indication, opportunities and liability profiles.

    PubMed

    Molfetta, L; Trompetto, C; Silvestri, E

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic specialists should completely and sequentially manage osteoarthritis, from the onset to the prosthesis, with no attitude of resignation, complying with national and international Guidelines (GLs) and abiding by the criteria of appropriateness of drugs, rehabilitation and orthopaedic device prescription, in line with the ethics of the medical profession. The GLs are a paper that rationalises the quantity of existing information for a disease, without abusing the decision of the doctor; a large volume of scientific knowledge is concentrated in a format that is easily accessible to doctors when carrying out their work. The use of drugs has taken on a connotation of a rational and multifactorial choice, rather than an accidental and incremental choice - inspired only by safety, rather than efficacy criteria. The Notes compiled by the Italian Medicines Agency - a legal instrument to define the reimbursability of medicines and, therefore, an instrument for managing pharmaceutical expenditure – are, in reality, a means to guarantee the appropriateness of the use of medicines, orienting the therapeutic choices according to established Guidelines. In the specific case of osteoarthritis, the knowledge of the GLs is the most appropriate and complete approach towards the disease, in the context of its pathogenetic complexity in its natural history. Moreover, pharmacological treatment of the subchondral osteometabolic damage becomes necessary when documented by magnetic resonance or a scintigraphy; the bone-related pain cannot be challenged through symptomatic analgesic treatment alone.

  4. Dopamine transporter-dependent and -independent striatal binding of the benztropine analog JHW 007, a cocaine antagonist with low abuse liability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The benztropine analog JHW 007 displays high affinity for the dopamine transporter (DAT), but unlike typical DAT ligands, has relatively low abuse liability and blocks effects of cocaine,including its self-administration. To determine sites responsible for the cocaine-antagonist effects of JHW 007, ...

  5. Tramadol acts as a weak reinforcer in the rat self-administration model, consistent with its low abuse liability in humans.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Eoin C; Mead, Andy N

    2010-09-01

    Rodent models of abuse potential are considered to represent a false positive with respect to the low risk of abuse liability associated with the atypical opioid analgesic tramadol. This may reflect either the predictive limitations of the models used to formulate this proposition (drug discrimination and conditioned place preference) or the predictive ability of the rodent per se. To address this concern, we used the rat self-administration model to examine the reinforcing properties of tramadol (0.3-3mg/kg/infusion) under fixed (FR) and progressive-ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement. Comparisons were made with the typical opioid analgesics morphine (0.03-0.3mg/kg/infusion) and remifentanil (0.001-0.03mg/kg/infusion). All three compounds maintained responding under an FR3 schedule of reinforcement, although clear differences were observed in the rates of responding between compounds. Under a PR schedule, morphine and remifentanil maintained comparable break points, while break points for tramadol did not differ from vehicle. Thus, when examined in the self-administration model, tramadol acts as a relatively weak reinforcer in rodents. These data are consistent with the low risk of tramadol abuse liability in humans and highlight the value of using multiple abuse potential models for assessing abuse liability.

  6. Risk evaluation and mitigation strategies for drugs with abuse liability: public interest, special interest, conflicts of interest, and the industry perspective.

    PubMed

    Wright, Curtis; Schnoll, Sidney; Bernstein, David

    2008-10-01

    Risk evaluation and mitigation strategies (REMS) formerly known as Risk Minimization Action Plans (RiskMAPs) are a regulatory technique for dealing with anticipated risks of new medications and are especially important for new drugs with abuse potential. This paper describes the origin and history of risk-management plans for drugs that might be abused, the proper use of these plans in minimizing the risk to the public, and the special difficulties inherent in managing risks for drugs with abuse potential. Drugs with abuse liability are distinctive since the risks inherent in manufacture and distribution include not only risks to patients prescribed the medications, but also risks to the general public including subgroups in the population not intended to get the drug and who receive no medical benefit from the medication. The crafting of risk-management plans intended to protect nonpatient populations is unique for these products. The content, extent, and level of intensity of these plans affect areas of medical ethics, civil liability, and criminal prosecution. The need for risk-management plans for drugs with abuse liability can potentially act as a deterrent to investment and is a factor in decisions concerning the development of new medications for the treatments of pain, ADHD, anxiety disorders, and addictions. This paper provides a framework for moving the process of REMS development forward and criteria for evaluating the probity and adequacy of such programs. PMID:18991964

  7. Animal models to assess the abuse liability of tobacco products: effects of smokeless tobacco extracts on intracranial self-stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Andrew C.; Tally, Laura; Schmidt, Clare E.; Muelken, Peter; Stepanov, Irina; Saha, Subhrakanti; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; LeSage, Mark G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Preclinical models are needed to inform regulation of tobacco products by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Typically, animal models of tobacco addiction involve exposure to nicotine alone or nicotine combined with isolated tobacco constituents (e.g., minor alkaloids). The goal of this study was to develop a model using extracts derived from tobacco products that contain a range of tobacco constituents to more closely model product exposure in humans. Methods This study compared the addiction-related effects of nicotine alone and nicotine dose-equivalent concentrations of aqueous smokeless tobacco extracts on intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rats. Extracts were prepared from Kodiak Wintergreen, a conventional product, or Camel Snus, a potential “modified risk tobacco product”. Binding affinities of nicotine alone and extracts at various nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes were also compared. Results Kodiak and Camel Snus extracts contained levels of minor alkaloids within the range of those shown to enhance nicotine’s behavioral effects when studied in isolation. Nonetheless, acute injection of both extracts produced reinforcement-enhancing (ICSS threshold-decreasing) effects similar to those of nicotine alone at low to moderate nicotine doses, as well as similar reinforcement-attenuating/aversive (ICSS threshold-increasing) effects at high nicotine doses. Extracts and nicotine alone also had similar binding affinity at all nAChRs studied. Conclusions Relative nicotine content is the primary pharmacological determinant of the abuse liability of Kodiak and Camel Snus as measured using ICSS. These models may be useful to compare the relative abuse liability of other tobacco products and to model FDA-mandated changes in product performance standards. PMID:25561387

  8. Support and Profiles of Nonoffending Mothers of Sexually Abused Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyr, Mireille; McDuff, Pierre; Hebert, Martine

    2013-01-01

    Maternal support offered to sexually abused children following disclosure may be a crucial factor in children's recovery. A person-centered approach was used to examine how profiles of nonoffending mothers could better describe their ability to support their children after disclosure. Cluster analyses based on a total of 226 nonoffending…

  9. State Liability for Abuse in Primary Schools: Systemic Failure and "O'Keeffe" v. "Hickey"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Mahony, Conor

    2009-01-01

    Due to the historical arrangement between Church and State, the Irish State has always discharged its duty to provide for free primary education exclusively through the provision of funding to privately owned and managed schools. Consequently, in "O'Keeffe" v. "Hickey," where a woman sued the State in respect of sex abuse she suffered when in…

  10. Parenting Profiles and Adolescent Dating Relationship Abuse: Attitudes and Experiences.

    PubMed

    Mumford, Elizabeth A; Liu, Weiwei; Taylor, Bruce G

    2016-05-01

    Parenting behaviors such as monitoring and communications are known correlates of abusive outcomes in adolescent dating relationships. This longitudinal study draws on separate parent (58 % female; 61 % White non-Hispanic, 12 % Black non-Hispanic, 7 % other non-Hispanic, and 20 % Hispanic) and youth (ages 12-18 years; 48 % female) surveys from the nationally representative Survey of Teen Relationships and Intimate Violence. Latent class analyses were applied to investigate whether there are distinguishable parenting profiles based on six measures of parent-youth relationship and interactions, with youth's attitudes about abusive dating behavior and both perpetration and victimization examined in a follow-up survey as distal outcomes (n = 1117 parent-youth dyads). A three-class model-a "Positive Parenting" class, a "Strict/Harsh Parenting" class, and a "Disengaged/Harsh Parenting" class-was selected to best represent the data. The selected latent class model was conditioned on parents' (anger trait, relationship quality, attitudes about domestic violence) and youth's (prior victimization and perpetration) covariates, controlling for parent's gender, race/ethnicity, income, marital status, and youth's age and gender. Youth in the "Positive Parenting" class were significantly less likely 1 year later to be tolerant of violence against boyfriends under any conditions as well as less likely to perpetrate adolescent relationship abuse or to be a victim of adolescent relationship abuse. Parents' anger and relationship quality and youth's prior perpetration of adolescent relationship abuse as well as gender, age, and race/ethnicity predicted class membership, informing universal prevention program and message design, as well as indicated efforts to target communications and services for parents as well as for youth.

  11. Parenting Profiles and Adolescent Dating Relationship Abuse: Attitudes and Experiences.

    PubMed

    Mumford, Elizabeth A; Liu, Weiwei; Taylor, Bruce G

    2016-05-01

    Parenting behaviors such as monitoring and communications are known correlates of abusive outcomes in adolescent dating relationships. This longitudinal study draws on separate parent (58 % female; 61 % White non-Hispanic, 12 % Black non-Hispanic, 7 % other non-Hispanic, and 20 % Hispanic) and youth (ages 12-18 years; 48 % female) surveys from the nationally representative Survey of Teen Relationships and Intimate Violence. Latent class analyses were applied to investigate whether there are distinguishable parenting profiles based on six measures of parent-youth relationship and interactions, with youth's attitudes about abusive dating behavior and both perpetration and victimization examined in a follow-up survey as distal outcomes (n = 1117 parent-youth dyads). A three-class model-a "Positive Parenting" class, a "Strict/Harsh Parenting" class, and a "Disengaged/Harsh Parenting" class-was selected to best represent the data. The selected latent class model was conditioned on parents' (anger trait, relationship quality, attitudes about domestic violence) and youth's (prior victimization and perpetration) covariates, controlling for parent's gender, race/ethnicity, income, marital status, and youth's age and gender. Youth in the "Positive Parenting" class were significantly less likely 1 year later to be tolerant of violence against boyfriends under any conditions as well as less likely to perpetrate adolescent relationship abuse or to be a victim of adolescent relationship abuse. Parents' anger and relationship quality and youth's prior perpetration of adolescent relationship abuse as well as gender, age, and race/ethnicity predicted class membership, informing universal prevention program and message design, as well as indicated efforts to target communications and services for parents as well as for youth. PMID:26906058

  12. A Descriptive Profile of Abused Female Sex Workers in India

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sethulakshmi C.; Sivaram, Sudha; Srikrishnan, A.K.; Zelaya, Carla; Solomon, Suniti; Go, Vivian F.; Celentano, David

    2010-01-01

    This descriptive study presents the profiles of abused female sex workers (FSWs) in Chennai, India. Of 100 abused FSWs surveyed using a structured questionnaire, severe forms of violence by intimate partners were reported by most (98%) respondents. Of the total sample, 76% experienced violence by clients. Sexual coercion experiences of the FSWs included verbal threats (77%) and physical force (87%) by intimate partners and forced unwanted sexual acts (73%) by clients. While 39% of the women consumed alcohol before meeting a client, 26% reported that their drunkenness was a trigger for violence by clients. The findings suggest that there is an urgent need to integrate services, along with public-health interventions among FSWs to protect them from violence. Recognition of multiple identities of women in the contexts of intimate relationships versus sex work is vital in helping women to stay safe from adverse effects on health. PMID:20635631

  13. Evidence of clonazepam abuse liability: results of the tools developed by the French Centers for Evaluation and Information on Pharmacodependence (CEIP) network.

    PubMed

    Frauger, Elisabeth; Pauly, Vanessa; Pradel, Vincent; Rouby, Frank; Arditti, Jocelyne; Thirion, Xavier; Lapeyre Mestre, Maryse; Micallef, Joëlle

    2011-10-01

    Recent observations suggest the existence of clonazepam abuse. To determine its importance in France, a quantitative and systematic synthesis of all clonazepam data of several epidemiological tools of the Centers for Evaluation and Information on Pharmacodependence (CEIP) network has been performed in comparison with data on others benzodiazepines (BZD). Data on clonazepam and other BZD have been analysed from different epidemiological tools: OSIAP survey that identifies drugs obtained by means of falsified prescriptions, Observation of Illegal Drugs and Misuse of Psychotropic Medications (OPPIDUM) survey that describes modalities of use and data from regional French health reimbursement system. In OSIAP survey, the proportion of clonazepam falsified prescriptions among all BZD falsified prescriptions increased. During the 2006 OPPIDUM survey, the analysis of the BZD modalities of use highlights clonazepam abuse liability (for example 23% of illegal acquisition), in second rank after flunitrazepam. Studies based on data from the French health reimbursed system show that 1.5% of subjects with clonazepam dispensing had a deviant behaviour. Among BZD, clonazepam has the second most important doctor-shopping indicator (3%) after flunitrazepam. All these data provide some arguments in favour of clonazepam abuse liability in real life and the necessity to reinforce its monitoring.

  14. Abuse and dependence liability analysis of methylphenidate in the spontaneously hypertensive rat model of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): what have we learned?

    PubMed

    Dela Peña, Ike; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Han, Doug Hyun; Kim, Yeni; Cheong, Jae Hoon

    2013-04-01

    Methylphenidate is the most prescribed stimulant medication for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Despite the well documented clinical benefits of the drug, several questions remain unanswered concerning the effects of extended methylphenidate use (e.g. can methylphenidate be abused by ADHD patients? does repeated methylphenidate treatment produce addiction?). Preclinical studies can help address the long-term safety of clinical treatments, moreover animal studies provide valuable information on the details of drug actions. The spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), bred from normotensive Wistar Kyoto rat strain, is considered as the best validated and the most widely used animal model of ADHD. We reviewed the findings of research reports that investigated the abuse and dependence liability of methylphenidate in SHR. In particular, we surveyed the studies which investigated the effects of methylphenidate pretreatment on subsequent methylphenidate-induced conditioned place preference or self-administration for they may give insights into the abuse or dependence liability of long-term methylphenidate treatment in ADHD.

  15. Changing Profile of Abused Substances by Older Persons Entering Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lofwall, Michelle R.; Schuster, Alyson; Strain, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated whether there were increasing admissions for illicit drug abuse treatment among older persons from 1992 to 2005 in the United States and describes the characteristics, number, and type of substances most commonly abused in this population over this 14-year period. Analyses used public data files from the Treatment Episode Data Set, which tracks federally and state funded substance abuse treatment admissions. From 1992 to 2005, admissions for illicit drug abuse increased significantly; in 2005, 61% of admissions age 50 to 54 years old and 45% of admissions age 55 years and older reported some type of illicit drug abuse, most commonly heroin or cocaine abuse. Criminal justice referrals for drug abuse admissions have increased over time and daily substance use remains high. Efforts to determine best practices for prevention, identification, and treatment of illicit drug abuse in older persons are indicated. PMID:19077857

  16. Family profile of victims of child abuse and neglect in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Almuneef, Maha A.; Alghamdi, Linah A.; Saleheen, Hassan N.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the family profile of child abuse and neglect (CAN) subjects in Saudi Arabia. Methods: Data were collected retrospectively between July 2009 and December 2013 from patients’ files, which were obtained from the Child Protection Centre (CPC) based in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Four main sets of variables were examined: demographics of victim, family profile, parental information, and information on perpetrator and forms of abuse. Results: The charts of 220 CAN cases were retrospectively reviewed. Physical abuse was the most common form of abuse (42%), followed by neglect (39%), sexual abuse (14%), and emotional abuse (4%). Children with unemployed fathers were 2.8 times as likely to experience physical abuse. Children living in single/step-parent households were 4 times as likely to experience physical abuse. Regarding neglect children living in larger households (≥6) were 1.5 times as likely to be neglected by their parents as were children living in smaller households (<6). Regarding sexual abuse, male children were 2.9 times as likely to be abused as were female children. Conclusions: The recent acknowledgment of CAN as a public health problem in Saudi Arabia suggests that time will be needed to employ effective and culturally sensitive prevention strategies based on family risk factors. PMID:27464866

  17. Diagnostic Profiles of Offenders in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs

    PubMed Central

    Grella, Christine E.; Greenwell, Lisa; Prendergast, Michael; Sacks, Stanley; Melnick, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the association of Axis I and Axis II disorders among offenders who were in prison-based substance abuse treatment in a national multi-site study. Participants (N = 280) received a psychosocial assessment and a structured diagnostic interview in two separate sessions. Logistic regression models examined the association between lifetime mood and anxiety disorders with two personality disorders, and the relationship of Axis I and Axis II disorders (alone and in combination) to pre-treatment psychosocial functioning. Over two-thirds of the sample met criteria for at least one mental disorder. Borderline personality disorder was strongly associated with having a lifetime mood disorder (odds ratio = 7.5) or lifetime anxiety disorder (odds ratio = 8.7). Individuals with only an Axis II disorder, or who had both Axis I and Axis II disorders, had more severe problems in psychosocial functioning than those without any disorder. Clinical treatment approaches need to address this heterogeneity in diagnostic profiles, symptom severity, and psychosocial functioning. PMID:18683206

  18. Latent practice profiles of substance abuse treatment counselors: do evidence-based techniques displace traditional techniques?

    PubMed

    Smith, Brenda D; Liu, Junqing

    2014-04-01

    As more substance abuse treatment counselors begin to use evidence-based treatment techniques, questions arise regarding the continued use of traditional techniques. This study aims to (1) assess whether there are meaningful practice profiles among practitioners reflecting distinct combinations of cognitive-behavioral and traditional treatment techniques; and (2) if so, identify practitioner characteristics associated with the distinct practice profiles. Survey data from 278 frontline counselors working in community substance abuse treatment organizations were used to conduct latent profile analysis. The emergent practice profiles illustrate that practitioners vary most in the use of traditional techniques. Multinomial regression models suggest that practitioners with less experience, more education, and less traditional beliefs about treatment and substance abuse are least likely to mix traditional techniques with cognitive-behavioral techniques. Findings add to the understanding of how evidence-based practices are implemented in routine settings and have implications for training and support of substance abuse treatment counselors.

  19. Psychological Profile of Male and Female Animal Abusers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Rebecca L.; Fremouw, William; Schenk, Allison; Ragatz, Laurie L.

    2012-01-01

    This study had three purposes: to explore psychological characteristics of animal abusers (criminal thinking styles, empathy, and personality traits), to replicate previously reported results (past illegal actions, bullying behavior), and to examine potential gender differences. The self-reported animal abuser group was 29 college students who…

  20. Do adolescent child abusers, peer abusers, and non-sex offenders have different personality profiles?

    PubMed

    Glowacz, Fabienne; Born, Michel

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify two sub-populations of sex offenders based on the age of the victims and on the age difference between the abuser and the victim (child sexual abusers vs. peer sexual abusers), and to compare the personality characteristics of these two subgroups with those of juvenile non-sex offenders. The group was composed of 67 adolescent offenders aged 13-18 years who were adjudicated for sexual offenses or non-sexual offenses: 20 non-sex offenders (JNSOs), 26 child sexual abusers (CAs), and 21 peer sexual abusers (PAs). The Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) was administered to all participants. The mean scores and clinical cutoffs on the MACI scales were compared across the three samples. Compared with PAs, CAs were more submissive and conforming, and they experienced more anxious feelings. Peer sexual abusers scored higher on the unruly and forceful personality scales, on social insensitivity, and on delinquent predisposition. Peer sexual abusers also reported higher scores on substance-abuse proneness, impulsive propensities, and antisocial functioning than CAs, but their scores were similar to those of JNSOs. Our results show clear similarities between PAs and JNSOs in terms of personality and clinical characteristics, especially with regard to antisocial personality traits. Child sexual abusers did not display the personality characteristics typical of PAs and JNSOs which predisposed them to delinquent activities. These results raise questions as to whether juvenile sex offenders should be treated within the same institutions as non-sex offenders and whether the same treatment programs should be implemented for all types of juvenile sex offenders.

  1. Profile of solvent abusers (glue sniffers) in East Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Zabedah, M Y; Razak, M; Zakiah, I; Zuraidah, A B

    2001-12-01

    Solvent abuse is deliberate sniffing of an organic solvent for the intention of altering the physiological state of the individual. It is also commonly known as glue sniffing because glue is the most commonly abused substance. This form of substance abuse is widespread throughout the world and usually popular among secondary school children and young adults because of its easy availability and it is cheaper compared with most drugs of abuse. In Malaysia this problem has been recognized especially among the children in East Malaysia. In this study, 37 children and young adults from or around Kota Kinabalu, Sabah were referred to Bukit Padang Psychiatric Hospital by the Anti-drug Task force for suspected solvent abuse. These children were interviewed using questionaire and examined physically. Blood and urine were analysed for toluene and hippuric acid. 27 of the children, age ranging between 8 and 20 years, willingly admitted to sniffing glue for a period between a few months to 2 years. Most of them were children of Fillipino illegal immigrants in Kota Kinabalu. Biochemical parameters were found to be normal. Two of them were pale with low hemoglobin and 7 had eosinophilia. Haematuria and proteinuria were found in 21 children (78%). 16 blood samples with toluene levels ranging from 0.3 to 41 microg/ml and 10 urine samples have elevated urinary hippuric acid levels ranging from 1.2 to 7.4 mg/ml. Strong positive correlation was noted between mean blood toluene levels and duration of abuse. PMID:12166590

  2. Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... also may fall prey to strangers who take advantage of their cognitive impairment. Types of abuse Signs ... property) to his or her disadvantage or the advantage of someone else Sexual abuse: touching, fondling or ...

  3. African American Caregivers and Substance Abuse in Child Welfare: Identification of Multiple Risk Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Small, Eusebius; Kohl, Patricia L.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the strong correlation between caregiver substance abuse and child maltreatment, little information exists to understand the typology of African American caregivers with substance abuse problems in the child welfare system. Research shows African American caregivers contend with multiple problems stemming from substance abuse. Unfortunately, we do not yet know how to best tailor resources to be responsive to varying groups of African American caregivers. Using data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAW), this investigation tested for distinct multivariate profiles among a subset of African American caregivers with substance abuse problems (n=258). Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was used to classify caregivers, and five classes were identified among this high risk sample – each with distinct risk profiles. Based on these findings, we discuss implications for tailored practices to enhance the safety and stability of children involved with child welfare. PMID:22962521

  4. Profiles of Adolescent Substance Abstainers, Users, and Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Stephen B.; Sawilowsky, Shlomo S.

    Psychoactive drugs are widely available in the United States. Many, such as coffee, cigarettes, and alcohol, are used commonly and acceptably by adults. For children and adolescents sorting through the complex messages about both licit and illicit drugs is difficult. Previous research examined differences between substance users and abusers with…

  5. Effects of the delta-opioid agonist SNC80 on the abuse liability of methadone in rhesus monkeys: a behavioral economic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Matthew L.; Roma, Peter G.; Folk, John E.; Rice, Kenner C.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Delta-opioid agonists enhance the antinociceptive efficacy of methadone and other mu-opioid agonists. However, relatively little is known about the degree to which delta agonists might enhance the abuse-related effects of mu agonists. Objective This study used a behavioral economic approach to examine effects of the delta agonist SNC80 [(+)-4-[(αR)-α-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxy-benzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide] on the reinforcing effects of methadone in a drug self-administration assay. Interactions between SNC80 and cocaine were also examined for comparison. Methods Rhesus monkeys (n=4), surgically implanted with indwelling intravenous catheters, were tested in two phases. In phase 1, drug self-administration dose-effect curves for methadone (0.0032–0.1 mg/kg/injection (inj)) and cocaine (0.0032–0.32 mg/kg/inj) alone were determined under a fixed-ratio 10 (FR 10) schedule of reinforcement. In phase 2, FR values were increased every 3 days (FR 1–FR 1800) during availability of methadone alone (0.032 mg/kg/inj) and in combination with varying proportions of SNC80 (0.1:1, 0.3:1, and 0.9:1 SNC80/methadone) or of cocaine alone (0.032 mg/kg/inj) and in combination with varying proportions of SNC80 (0.33:1, 1:1, and 3:1 SNC80/ cocaine). Demand curves related drug intake to FR price, and measures of reinforcement were derived. Results Methadone and cocaine alone each functioned as a reinforcer. SNC80 did not alter measures of reinforcement for either methadone or cocaine. Conclusions SNC80 at proportions previously shown to enhance methadone-induced antinociception did not enhance the abuse-related effects of methadone. These results support the proposition that delta agonists may selectively enhance mu agonist analgesic effects without enhancing mu agonist abuse liability. PMID:21369752

  6. Involvement in High-Profile Child Sexual Abuse Controversies: Costs and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mildred, Jane

    2004-01-01

    The costs and benefits associated with participation in conflicts around child sexual abuse are explored. Using qualitative data from interviews with 40 high-profile participants, findings suggest that professionals experience both positive and negative consequences as a result of their involvement. Costs identified include attacks and…

  7. Evaluation of WIN 55,212-2 self-administration in rats as a potential cannabinoid abuse liability model

    PubMed Central

    Lefever, Timothy W.; Marusich, Julie A.; Antonazzo, Kateland R.; Wiley, Jenny L.

    2014-01-01

    Because Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has been a false negative in rat intravenous self-administration procedures, evaluation of the abuse potential of candidate cannabinoid medications has proved difficult. One lab group has successfully trained self-administration of the aminoalkylindole WIN55,212-2 in rats; however, their results have not been independently replicated. The purpose of this study was to extend their model by using a within-subjects design, with the goal of establishing a robust method suitable for substitution testing of other cannabinoids. Male Long-Evans rats were trained to self-administer WIN55,212-2 (0.01 mg/kg/infusion) on a fixed ratio 3 schedule. Dose-effect curves for WIN55,212-2 were determined, followed by vehicle substitution and a dose-effect curve with THC. WIN55,212-2 self-administration was acquired; however, substitution with THC did not maintain responding above vehicle levels. Dose-dependent attenuation by rimonabant confirmed CB1 receptor mediation of WIN55,212-2’s reinforcing effects. Vehicle substitution resulted in a session-dependent decrease in responding (i.e., extinction). While this study provides systematic replication of previous studies, lack of substitution with THC is problematic and suggests that WIN55,212-2 self-administration may be of limited usefulness as a screening tool for detection of the reinforcing effects of potential cannabinoid medications. Clarification of underlying factors responsible for failure of THC to maintain self-administration in cannabinoid-trained rats is needed. PMID:24412835

  8. MMPI Profiles of Adolescent Substance Abusers in Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walfish, Steven; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examined non-K-corrected Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory profiles of 243 adolescents presenting themselves for chemical dependency treatment in a residential setting. Results suggest general lack of psychopathology in this population, although significant elevation on Pd scale did emerge. Compared data to findings of previous studies…

  9. Comparability of neuropsychological test profiles in patients with chronic substance abuse and mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Iverson, Grant L; Franzen, Michael D

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 104 patients with acute uncomplicated mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) to a sample of 104 patients from an inpatient substance abuse program to determine whether these patients could be differentiated by their pattern of relative cognitive strengths and weaknesses. Patients were matched on age, education, and gender. Eight cognitive measures were used that included tests of attention, memory, and processing speed. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups on any of the cognitive measures. Using a two-step cluster analysis procedure (i.e., hierarchical and k-means analyses), seven common profiles were identified. There was no significant difference in the proportions of patients from the MTBI or substance abuse group in each of the seven profiles. These results show that patients with uncomplicated MTBIs could not be reliably differentiated from patients with substance abuse problems on these cognitive measures. This is of particular concern for clinicians evaluating the neuropsychological effects of MTBI in individuals with a comorbid history of substance abuse. PMID:17853134

  10. Dopamine Transporter-Dependent and -Independent Striatal Binding of the Benztropine Analog JHW 007, a Cocaine Antagonist with Low Abuse Liability

    PubMed Central

    Kopajtic, Theresa A.; Liu, Yi; Surratt, Christopher K.; Donovan, David M.; Newman, Amy H.; Katz, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    The benztropine analog N-(n-butyl)-3α-[bis(4′-fluorophenyl)methoxy]-tropane (JHW 007) displays high affinity for the dopamine transporter (DAT), but unlike typical DAT ligands, has relatively low abuse liability and blocks the effects of cocaine, including its self-administration. To determine sites responsible for the cocaine antagonist effects of JHW 007, its in vitro binding was compared with that of methyl (1R,2S,3S,5S)-3-(4-fluorophenyl)-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane-2-carboxylate (WIN 35428) in rats, mice, and human DAT (hDAT)-transfected cells. A one-site model, with Kd values of 4.21 (rat) and 8.99 nM (mouse) best fit the [3H]WIN 35428 data. [3H]JHW 007 binding best fit a two-site model (rat, 7.40/4400 nM; mouse, 8.18/2750 nM), although a one-site fit was observed with hDAT membranes (43.7 nM). Drugs selective for the norepinephrine and serotonin transporters had relatively low affinity in competition with [3H]JHW 007 binding, as did drugs selective for other sites identified previously as potential JHW 007 binding sites. The association of [3H]WIN 35428 best fit a one-phase model, whereas the association of [3H]JHW 007 best fit a two-phase model in all tissues. Because cocaine antagonist effects of JHW 007 have been observed previously soon after injection, its rapid association observed here may contribute to those effects. Multiple [3H]JHW 007 binding sites were obtained in tissue from mice lacking the DAT, suggesting these as yet unidentified sites as potential contributors to the cocaine antagonist effects of JHW 007. Unlike WIN 35428, the binding of JHW 007 was Na+-independent. This feature of JHW 007 has been linked to the conformational status of the DAT, which in turn may contribute to the antagonism of cocaine. PMID:20855444

  11. The Impact of High-Profile Sexual Abuse Cases in the Media on a Pediatric Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Dustin D; Stephens, Clare L; Thompson, Amy D

    2016-01-01

    High-profile media cases of sexual abuse may encourage disclosures of abuse from victims of unrelated assaults and also influence parental concerns, leading to increased emergency department visits. In the region of the study authors' institution, there are two recent high-profile sexual abuse cases with media coverage: Earl Bradley, a Delaware pediatrician, and Jerry Sandusky, a Pennsylvania college football coach. This is a retrospective cohort study of children evaluated for sexual abuse at a pediatric emergency department. Patients were classified as either presenting during a media period or non-media period. The media periods were one-month periods immediately following breaking news reports, when the cases were highly publicized in the media. The non-media periods were the 12-month periods directly preceding the first reports. The median number of emergency department visits per month during a non-media period was 9 visits (interquartile range 6-10). There were 11 visits in the month following the Sandusky case and 13 visits following the Bradley case. There was no statistical difference in number of emergency department visits for sexual abuse between the periods (p = .09). These finding have implications regarding use of resources in pediatric EDs after high-profile sexual abuse cases. PMID:27561119

  12. The Impact of High-Profile Sexual Abuse Cases in the Media on a Pediatric Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Flannery, Dustin D; Stephens, Clare L; Thompson, Amy D

    2016-01-01

    High-profile media cases of sexual abuse may encourage disclosures of abuse from victims of unrelated assaults and also influence parental concerns, leading to increased emergency department visits. In the region of the study authors' institution, there are two recent high-profile sexual abuse cases with media coverage: Earl Bradley, a Delaware pediatrician, and Jerry Sandusky, a Pennsylvania college football coach. This is a retrospective cohort study of children evaluated for sexual abuse at a pediatric emergency department. Patients were classified as either presenting during a media period or non-media period. The media periods were one-month periods immediately following breaking news reports, when the cases were highly publicized in the media. The non-media periods were the 12-month periods directly preceding the first reports. The median number of emergency department visits per month during a non-media period was 9 visits (interquartile range 6-10). There were 11 visits in the month following the Sandusky case and 13 visits following the Bradley case. There was no statistical difference in number of emergency department visits for sexual abuse between the periods (p = .09). These finding have implications regarding use of resources in pediatric EDs after high-profile sexual abuse cases.

  13. Tort Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudgins, H. C., Jr.

    This chapter summarices and analyzes all state supreme court and federal court decisions as well as other significant court decisions involving the tort liability of school districts and school personnel. The cases discussed are generally limited to those decided during 1974 and reported in the General Digest on or before March 1, 1975. In his…

  14. Tort Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudgins, H. C., Jr.

    This chapter summarizes recent state supreme court and federal court decisions involving the tort liability of school districts and school personnel. The cases discussed are generally limited to those decided during 1975 and reported in the General Digest as of March 1976, although a few 1974 cases not treated in the 1975 yearbook are also…

  15. Persistent Alterations in Biological Profiles in Women With Abuse Histories: Influence of Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Girdler, Susan S.; Leserman, Jane; Bunevicius, Robertas; Klatzkin, Rebecca; Pedersen, Cort A.; Light, Kathleen C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine dysregulation in biological measures associated with histories of abuse in women and whether women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) differ in their dysregulation. Design Twenty-five women meeting prospective criteria for PMDD and 42 non-PMDD controls underwent structured interview to determine abuse histories and lifetime Axis I diagnoses, excluding those with current Axis I disorders or using medications. Major Outcome Measures Plasma cortisol and norepinephrine (NE), heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and vascular resistance index (VRI) were assessed at rest and in response to mental stress. Results A greater proportion of PMDD women had prior abuse compared with non-PMDD women. Regardless of PMDD status, all abused women had lower plasma NE and higher HRs and tended to have lower plasma cortisol at rest and during stress. Abused women also reported more severe daily emotional and physical symptoms. Greater VRI and BP at rest and during stress were seen only in PMDD women with abuse. Conclusion There is persistent dysregulation in stress-responsive systems in all abused women that cannot be accounted for by current psychiatric illness or medications, and PMDD women may be differentially more vulnerable to the impact of abuse on measures reflecting α-adrenergic receptor function. PMID:17385972

  16. In the Name of God: A Profile of Religion-Related Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottoms, Bette L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines cases of religion-related child abuse reported to mental health professionals nationwide and statistically describes cases involving the withholding of medical care, the expulsion of evil in a child, and abuse by persons holding religious authority. The authors argue that society should protect children's rights and welfare whenever they…

  17. A Molecular Profile of Cocaine Abuse Includes the Differential Expression of Genes that Regulate Transcription, Chromatin, and Dopamine Cell Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Bannon, Michael J; Johnson, Magen M; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Hartley, Zachary J; Halter, Steven D; David, James A; Kapatos, Gregory; Schmidt, Carl J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic drug abuse, craving, and relapse are thought to be linked to long-lasting changes in neural gene expression arising through transcriptional and chromatin-related mechanisms. The key contributions of midbrain dopamine (DA)-synthesizing neurons throughout the addiction process provide a compelling rationale for determining the drug-induced molecular changes that occur in these cells. Yet our understanding of these processes remains rudimentary. The postmortem human brain constitutes a unique resource that can be exploited to gain insights into the pathophysiology of complex disorders such as drug addiction. In this study, we analyzed the profiles of midbrain gene expression in chronic cocaine abusers and well-matched drug-free control subjects using microarray and quantitative PCR. A small number of genes exhibited robust differential expression; many of these are involved in the regulation of transcription, chromatin, or DA cell phenotype. Transcript abundances for approximately half of these differentially expressed genes were diagnostic for assigning subjects to the cocaine-abusing vs control cohort. Identification of a molecular signature associated with pathophysiological changes occurring in cocaine abusers' midbrains should contribute to the development of biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets for drug addiction. PMID:24642598

  18. 42 CFR 1001.101 - Basis for liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... criminal offense related to the neglect or abuse of a patient, in connection with the delivery of a health... abuse of patients (the delivery of a health care item or service includes the provision of any item or... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Basis for liability. 1001.101 Section...

  19. 42 CFR 1001.101 - Basis for liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... criminal offense related to the neglect or abuse of a patient, in connection with the delivery of a health... abuse of patients (the delivery of a health care item or service includes the provision of any item or... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Basis for liability. 1001.101 Section...

  20. 42 CFR 1001.101 - Basis for liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... criminal offense related to the neglect or abuse of a patient, in connection with the delivery of a health... abuse of patients (the delivery of a health care item or service includes the provision of any item or... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis for liability. 1001.101 Section...

  1. 42 CFR 1001.101 - Basis for liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... criminal offense related to the neglect or abuse of a patient, in connection with the delivery of a health... abuse of patients (the delivery of a health care item or service includes the provision of any item or... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Basis for liability. 1001.101 Section...

  2. 42 CFR 1001.101 - Basis for liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... criminal offense related to the neglect or abuse of a patient, in connection with the delivery of a health... abuse of patients (the delivery of a health care item or service includes the provision of any item or... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Basis for liability. 1001.101 Section...

  3. Child Abuse: The Educator's Responsibilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Office of the Attorney General, Sacramento. School Safety Center.

    Addressing educators and citing the California Penal Code, this booklet discusses the legal responsibilities of persons in child care situations regarding incidents of suspected child abuse. Included are: (1) a definition of child abuse and neglect; (2) reporting procedures including liability of failure to report and immunity of the reporting…

  4. Clinical biochemical and hormonal profiling in plasma: a promising strategy to predict growth hormone abuse in cattle.

    PubMed

    Doué, Mickael; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Cesbron, Nora; Stefani, Annalisa; Moro, Letizia; Biancotto, Giancarlo; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2015-06-01

    Recombinant bovine somatotrophin (rbST) is widely used in some countries to increase milk production. Since 1994, both marketing and use of this substance have been prohibited within the European Union. In this context, the targeted plasma biochemical and hormonal profiling was assessed as a potential screening strategy to highlight rbST (ab)use in cattle. Twenty-one routinely measured clinical blood parameters, representative of main biological profiles (energetic, proteic, etc.), were measured in the plasma of six lactating cows before and after rbST treatment throughout a 23-day study period. Appropriate multivariate statistical analyses [principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least square (OPLS)] enabled discriminating animal samples before and after treatment (days 0 vs. 2 to 9, P = 2.10(-9)) and highlighted the five most relevant blood parameters in this discrimination. Based on each five-analyte contribution, a simple mathematically weighted equation was suggested to predict the status of samples. A suspicious threshold was proposed, and the model was further tested with the status prediction of the supplementary samples from untreated (n = 20) and treated cows (n = 22). The calculated false-positive (10%) and false-negative (4.5%) rates were in accordance with the EU requirements for screening methods. Although the model needs to be further validated with additional samples, such targeted plasma biochemical and hormonal profiling already appears as a potential promising screening strategy to highlight rbST (ab)use in cattle.

  5. Using Neuropsychological Profiles to Classify Neglected Children with or without Physical Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolin, Pierre; Ethier, Louise

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is twofold: First, to investigate whether cognitive functions can contribute to differentiating neglected children with or without physical abuse compared to comparison participants; second, to demonstrate the detrimental impact of children being victimized by a combination of different types of maltreatment.…

  6. [Perspectives in medical liability].

    PubMed

    Pizarro W, Carlos

    2008-04-01

    The progressive increase of medical negligence law suits requires an updated analysis of the current situation of medical liability in Chile. The application of a new criminal procedure will avoid criminal prosecution of doctors, transferring to the civil courts the pecuniary sanctions for malpractice. Medical negligence and damage inflicted by doctors that require compensation are explained. The most likely evolution of medical liability is proposed, through an increase in civil liability insurance and the necessary standardization of rules applicable to professional liability.

  7. Differential Drug–Drug Interactions of the Synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073: Implications for Drug Abuse Liability and Pain Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Brents, Lisa K.; Zimmerman, Sarah M.; Saffell, Amanda R.; Prather, Paul L.

    2013-01-01

    Marijuana substitutes often contain blends of multiple psychoactive synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs), including the prevalent SCBs (1-pentyl-1H-indole-3-yl)-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (JWH-018) and (1-butyl-1H-indole-3-yl)-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (JWH-073). Because SCBs are frequently used in combinations, we hypothesized that coadministering multiple SCBs induces synergistic drug–drug interactions. Drug–drug interactions between JWH-018 and JWH-073 were investigated in vivo for Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)-like discriminative stimulus effects, analgesia, task disruption, and hypothermia. Combinations (JWH-018:JWH-073) of these drugs were administered to mice in assays of Δ9-THC discrimination, tail-immersion, and food-maintained responding, and rectal temperatures were measured. Synergism occurred in the Δ9-THC discrimination assay for two constant dose ratio combinations (1:3 and 1:1). A 1:1 and 2:3 dose ratio induced additivity and synergy, respectively, in the tail-immersion assay. Both 1:1 and 2:3 dose ratios were additive for hypothermia, whereas a 1:3 dose ratio induced subadditive suppression of food-maintained responding. In vitro drug–drug interactions were assessed using competition receptor-binding assays employing mouse brain homogenates and cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R)-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity in Neuro2A wild-type cells. Interestingly, synergy occurred in the competition receptor-binding assay for two dose ratios (1:5 and 1:10), but not in the adenylyl cyclase activity assay (1:5). Altogether, these data indicate that drug–drug interactions between JWH-018 and JWH-073 are effect- and ratio-dependent and may increase the relative potency of marijuana substitutes for subjective Δ9-THC–like effects. Combinations may improve the therapeutic profile of cannabinoids, considering that analgesia but not hypothermia or task disruption was potentiated. Importantly, synergy in the competition receptor–binding assay

  8. Differential drug-drug interactions of the synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073: implications for drug abuse liability and pain therapy.

    PubMed

    Brents, Lisa K; Zimmerman, Sarah M; Saffell, Amanda R; Prather, Paul L; Fantegrossi, William E

    2013-09-01

    Marijuana substitutes often contain blends of multiple psychoactive synthetic cannabinoids (SCBs), including the prevalent SCBs (1-pentyl-1H-indole-3-yl)-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (JWH-018) and (1-butyl-1H-indole-3-yl)-1-naphthalenyl-methanone (JWH-073). Because SCBs are frequently used in combinations, we hypothesized that coadministering multiple SCBs induces synergistic drug-drug interactions. Drug-drug interactions between JWH-018 and JWH-073 were investigated in vivo for Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)-like discriminative stimulus effects, analgesia, task disruption, and hypothermia. Combinations (JWH-018:JWH-073) of these drugs were administered to mice in assays of Δ(9)-THC discrimination, tail-immersion, and food-maintained responding, and rectal temperatures were measured. Synergism occurred in the Δ(9)-THC discrimination assay for two constant dose ratio combinations (1:3 and 1:1). A 1:1 and 2:3 dose ratio induced additivity and synergy, respectively, in the tail-immersion assay. Both 1:1 and 2:3 dose ratios were additive for hypothermia, whereas a 1:3 dose ratio induced subadditive suppression of food-maintained responding. In vitro drug-drug interactions were assessed using competition receptor-binding assays employing mouse brain homogenates and cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R)-mediated inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity in Neuro2A wild-type cells. Interestingly, synergy occurred in the competition receptor-binding assay for two dose ratios (1:5 and 1:10), but not in the adenylyl cyclase activity assay (1:5). Altogether, these data indicate that drug-drug interactions between JWH-018 and JWH-073 are effect- and ratio-dependent and may increase the relative potency of marijuana substitutes for subjective Δ(9)-THC-like effects. Combinations may improve the therapeutic profile of cannabinoids, considering that analgesia but not hypothermia or task disruption was potentiated. Importantly, synergy in the competition receptor-binding assay

  9. Clinical biochemical and hormonal profiling in plasma: a promising strategy to predict growth hormone abuse in cattle.

    PubMed

    Doué, Mickael; Dervilly-Pinel, Gaud; Cesbron, Nora; Stefani, Annalisa; Moro, Letizia; Biancotto, Giancarlo; Le Bizec, Bruno

    2015-06-01

    Recombinant bovine somatotrophin (rbST) is widely used in some countries to increase milk production. Since 1994, both marketing and use of this substance have been prohibited within the European Union. In this context, the targeted plasma biochemical and hormonal profiling was assessed as a potential screening strategy to highlight rbST (ab)use in cattle. Twenty-one routinely measured clinical blood parameters, representative of main biological profiles (energetic, proteic, etc.), were measured in the plasma of six lactating cows before and after rbST treatment throughout a 23-day study period. Appropriate multivariate statistical analyses [principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least square (OPLS)] enabled discriminating animal samples before and after treatment (days 0 vs. 2 to 9, P = 2.10(-9)) and highlighted the five most relevant blood parameters in this discrimination. Based on each five-analyte contribution, a simple mathematically weighted equation was suggested to predict the status of samples. A suspicious threshold was proposed, and the model was further tested with the status prediction of the supplementary samples from untreated (n = 20) and treated cows (n = 22). The calculated false-positive (10%) and false-negative (4.5%) rates were in accordance with the EU requirements for screening methods. Although the model needs to be further validated with additional samples, such targeted plasma biochemical and hormonal profiling already appears as a potential promising screening strategy to highlight rbST (ab)use in cattle. PMID:25716468

  10. The pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profile of intranasal crushed buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone tablets in opioid abusers

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, L.S.; Nuzzo, P.A.; Lofwall, M.R.; Moody, D.E.; Walsh, S.L.

    2011-01-01

    Aims Sublingual buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone are efficacious opioid dependence pharmacotherapies, but there are reports of their diversion and misuse by the intranasal route. The study objectives were to characterize and compare their intranasal pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic profiles. Design A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. Setting An in-patient research unit at the University of Kentucky. Participants Healthy adults (n=10) abusing, but not physically dependent on, intranasal opioids. Measurements Six sessions (72 hours apart) tested five intranasal doses [0/0, crushed buprenorphine (2, 8 mg), crushed buprenorphine/naloxone (2/0.5, 8/2 mg)] and one intravenous dose (0.8 mg buprenorphine/0.2 mg naloxone for bioavailability assessment). Plasma samples, physiological, subject- and observer-rated measures were collected before and for up to 72 hours after drug administration. Findings Both formulations produced time- and dose-dependent increases on subjective and physiological mu-opioid agonist effects (e.g. ‘liking’, miosis). Subjects reported higher subjective ratings and street values for 8 mg compared to 8/2 mg, but these differences were not statistically significant. No significant formulation differences in peak plasma buprenorphine concentration or time-course were observed. Buprenorphine bioavailability was 38–44% and Tmax was 35–40 minutes after all intranasal doses. Naloxone bioavailability was 24% and 30% following 2/0.5 and 8/2 mg, respectively. Conclusions It is difficult to determine if observed differences in abuse potential between intranasal buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone are clinically relevant at the doses tested. Greater bioavailability and faster onset of pharmacodynamic effects compared to sublingual administration suggests a motivation for intranasal misuse in non-dependent opioid abusers. However, significant naloxone absorption from intranasal buprenorphine

  11. Physical Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    Navigation Physical Abuse Sexual Abuse Domestic Violence Psychological Abuse Financial Abuse Neglect Critical Issues What Communities Can Do The Role of Professionals and Concerned Citizens Help for Victims ...

  12. Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    Navigation Physical Abuse Sexual Abuse Domestic Violence Psychological Abuse Financial Abuse Neglect Critical Issues What Communities Can Do The Role of Professionals and Concerned Citizens Help for Victims ...

  13. Profile of Ritualistic and Religion-Related Abuse Allegations Reported to Clinical Psychologists in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottoms, Bette L.; And Others

    One of the most shocking claims about child abuse in recent years is that satanic, occult, or ritualistic abuse is occurring and on the rise. To date, no one has attempted to assess the prevalence of claims of such abuse, or to determine the range of cases and the nature of the typical case. This study is currently surveying approximately 41,000…

  14. Problem Severity Profiles of Substance Abusing Women in Therapeutic Treatment Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isralowitz, Richard; Reznik, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to examine specific substance use profiles among former Soviet Union (FSU) immigrant and native-born women in Israeli therapeutic treatment facilities. Individuals were sampled at drug treatment facilities and assessed using the Addiction Severity Index. ASI scores suggest differences between the two groups. Among the findings…

  15. Socio-demographic and Clinical Profile of Substance Abusers Attending a Regional Drug De-addiction Centre in Chronic Conflict Area: Kashmir, India

    PubMed Central

    Rather, Yasir Hassan; Bashir, Wiqar; Sheikh, Ajaz Ahmad; Amin, Marya; Zahgeer, Yasir Arafat

    2013-01-01

    Background: The menace of substance abuse is not only a socially unacceptable reality, but in its entirety is a disease and emerging as a major public health challenge. Objective: To study the socio-demographic and clinical profile of patients attending the drug de-addiction centre. Methods: A descriptive study was undertaken in a drug de-addiction centre at the Police Hospital in Srinagar, and all patients (198) who were admitted during this period were interviewed. Results: The mean (SD) age of patients was 26.8 years (SD 7.37), and over half (56%) belonged to the lower-middle social class. Poly-substance abuse was seen in 91.9%; medicinal opioids and cannabis were the most common substances abused. Most common age of initiation was 11–20 years (76.8%), with peer pressure and relief from a negative mood state being the most common reasons given for starting the drug(s). Prevalence of a co-morbid psychiatric disorder was high, on the order of 49.5%. A high rate of volatile substance use was observed among adolescents (54.5%). Conclusion: A pattern of poly-substance abuse was found to be quite common in patients, and use of volatile substances at a very young age emerged as a new trend. The dreadful repercussions of substance abuse justify the urgency to evolve a comprehensive strategy. PMID:23966822

  16. Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Additional Resources Return to: What is Elder Abuse? Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse Substance abuse has been identified ... the most frequently cited risk factor associated with elder abuse and neglect. It may be the victim and/ ...

  17. Safety and Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berthelot, Ronald J.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    This series of five articles highlights Pensacola Junior College's occupational safety course, involving simulated emergencies, Florida's standards for teacher liability, electrical safety in the classroom and laboratory, color coding for machine safety, and Florida industrial arts safety instructional materials. (SK)

  18. Where Are They Now? An Update on Defendants. Part 3--High Profile Sexual Abuse in Child Care Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strickland, Jim

    1999-01-01

    Following up on "Child Abuse Storm Scale--Part 1" ("Child Care Information Exchange," Jan-Feb 1999) and Part 2 (Mar-Apr 1999), this article shares the current status of prominent sexual abuse in child care cases. Cases include McMartin Preschool, Fells Acres Day Care, Wee Care Nursery School (the Kelly Michaels case), Little Rascals, and Breezy…

  19. Hazardous substance liability insurance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    The study was carried out to meet requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980. It considers the adequacy and feasibility of private insurance to protect owners and operators of ships covered by the Act and for post-closure financial responsibility for hazardous waste disposal facilities. The report is in three parts: Pt. 1 is an introduction to the hazardous substance insurance problem; Pt. 2 considers the adequacy of private insurance for owners and operators of vessels and facilities; Pt. 3 focuses on the problem of a private insurance alternative to the Post-Closure Liability Fund for 'inactive' hazardous waste disposal facilities.

  20. Recognizing liability risks

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.; Zimmer, M.J.; Karas, J.L. )

    1993-09-01

    Project developers, owners, investors, and lenders face potential liability for environmental contamination and cleanup. Being aware of the risks is the first step in mitigating future concerns. Independent power participants are wise to be concerned with a range of risks arising from off- or on-site contamination, civil and criminal violations of rules and regulations, and future compliance costs.

  1. Legal Liabilities of Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Julie

    This chapter of "Principles of School Business Management" discusses the implications of several court cases for legal issues affecting the role of the school business official. The issues addressed include civil rights, negligence, contracts, criminal liability, tuition and fees, and student records. The chapter opens with a brief overview of…

  2. Homegrown liability insurance.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Howard

    2004-03-01

    Every crisis presents an opportunity, and today's med-mal insurance squeeze is no exception. Forced to seek innovative solutions or lose essential physician services, hospitals are finding that sponsoring liability coverage for doctors can pay off. Such sponsorship provides leverage to engage physicians in comprehensive risk-management programs.

  3. Endogenous steroid profiling by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and multivariate statistics for the detection of natural hormone abuse in cattle.

    PubMed

    Blokland, M H; Van Tricht, E F; Van Rossum, H J; Sterk, S S; Nielen, M W F

    2012-01-01

    For years it has been suspected that natural hormones are illegally used as growth promoters in cattle in the European Union. Unfortunately there is a lack of methods and criteria that can be used to detect the abuse of natural hormones and distinguish treated from non-treated animals. Pattern recognition of steroid profiles is a promising approach for tracing/detecting the abuse of natural hormones administered to cattle. Traditionally steroids are analysed in urine as free steroid after deconjugation of the glucuronide (and sulphate) conjugates. The disadvantage of this deconjugation is that valuable information about the steroid profile in the sample is lost. In this study we develop a method to analyse steroids at very low concentration levels (ng l(-1)) for the free steroid, glucuronide and sulphate conjugates in urine samples. This method was used to determine concentrations of natural (pro)hormones in a large population (n = 620) of samples from male and female bovine animals and from bovine animals treated with testosterone-cypionate, estradiol-benzoate, dihydroepiandrosterone and pregnenolone. The data acquired were used to build a statistical model applying the multivariate technique 'Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy' (SIMCA). It is demonstrated that by using this model the results of the urine analysis can indicate which animal may have had illegal treatment with natural (pro)hormones.

  4. Preventing Alcohol and Drug Abuse through Programs at the Workplace. WBGH Worksite Wellness Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Diana Chapman; Kelleher, Susan E.

    Alcohol and drug abuse have serious physical, psychological, and social consequences, and employees who abuse alcohol and/or drugs ultimately reduce their companies' profits. Employee substance abuse leads to reduced productivity as well as to increased absenteeism, health care and health insurance costs, and liability claims against employers of…

  5. Liability for pediatric care.

    PubMed

    Classé, J G

    1996-01-01

    Liability claims involving eye care for pediatric patients may constitute as much as 20% of claims against optometrists, with the most common sources of litigation being failure to detect tumors affecting the visual system, improper diagnosis and management of binocular vision disorders, and injuries from shattered spectacle lenses. Claims for pediatric patients tend to allege large damages, partially because of the significant effect exerted by lifelong vision impairment or loss of vision.

  6. Becoming Heroes: Teachers Can Help Abused Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bancroft, Sharon

    1997-01-01

    Teachers can provide an effective counterbalance to the effects of an abusive home. They should not allow their skeptical attitudes, fear of liability, defensiveness about discipline, or religious and political affiliations to cloud their perceptions. Teachers can help hurting children by attending to their basic needs for warmth and security,…

  7. When the Abuser Is an Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Bill

    1994-01-01

    Amid growing legal liability concerns, school districts are experiencing an upsurge in sexual abuse complaints against educators. Cases leading to teacher convictions in several states are summarized. Sidebars investigate why certain districts face multiple allegations and report on necessary actions for unprosecutable offenses, teacher defenses…

  8. Tort Liability and Liability Insurance. School Law Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC. Research Div.

    This report contains a compilation of State-by-State statutory provisions relating to the tort liability of school districts and to their purchase of liability insurance. The statutory provisions described herein reveal various degrees of governmental immunity made available to school districts. (JF)

  9. Interpersonal types among alcohol abusers: a comparison with drug abusers.

    PubMed

    Turner, J A; Mayr, S

    1990-07-01

    Interpersonal types among alcohol abusers were examined with Calsyn, Roszell, and Anderson's (1988) nine-type system for classifying FIRO-B profiles. The frequencies of the nine FIRO-B types among a sample of 135 male veteran alcohol abusers were compared with Calsyn et al.'s (1988) previously published data for a sample of male veteran drug abusers, a normative veteran sample, and a general population sample. The alcohol abusers, like Calsyn et al.'s sample of drug abusers, were more likely to be categorized as "loners," "rebels," and "pessimists" than was the general population sample. While exhibiting preferences for interpersonal types that emphasized social withdrawal, avoidance of responsibility, and mistrust of others, both the alcohol abusers and the drug abusers were heterogeneous groups whose members demonstrated a variety of interpersonal types.

  10. [Tort Liability and School Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franke, Allyn J.

    School districts, school employees, bus companies contracted by districts, and bus company employees could be involved in court litigation over student injury and student civil rights related to school bus transportation. Civil rights insurance should be added to general liability insurance and motor vehicle liability insurance. Students must be…

  11. Neuropsychological profiles of victims of financial elder exploitation at the los angeles county elder abuse forensic center.

    PubMed

    Wood, Stacey; Rakela, Benjamin; Liu, Pi-Ju; Navarro, Adria E; Bernatz, Susan; Wilber, Kathleen H; Allen, Robin; Homeier, Diana; Homier, Diana

    2014-01-01

    The current article examines neuropsychological correlates of financial elder exploitation in a sample of older adults who have been documented victims of financial elder exploitation. The purpose of this exploratory study was twofold. First, a subsample of the referrals at the Los Angeles County Elder Abuse Forensic Center (LACEAFC) was compared to community dwelling adults in terms of the specific cognitive domains linked to financial capacity including memory, calculation, and executive functioning. Next, the correlation between presence of neuropsychological data and the likelihood of filing a case with the LA County's District Attorney office was examined. Twenty-seven LACEAFC cases and 32 controls were assessed. Overall, the forensic center group performed worse than a community-based age-matched control group on the MMSE, calculation, and executive functioning (ps < .01). The presence of neuropsychological data was significantly correlated to an increased likelihood of a case being filed. PMID:24848863

  12. Neuropsychological profiles of victims of financial elder exploitation at the los angeles county elder abuse forensic center.

    PubMed

    Wood, Stacey; Rakela, Benjamin; Liu, Pi-Ju; Navarro, Adria E; Bernatz, Susan; Wilber, Kathleen H; Allen, Robin; Homeier, Diana; Homier, Diana

    2014-01-01

    The current article examines neuropsychological correlates of financial elder exploitation in a sample of older adults who have been documented victims of financial elder exploitation. The purpose of this exploratory study was twofold. First, a subsample of the referrals at the Los Angeles County Elder Abuse Forensic Center (LACEAFC) was compared to community dwelling adults in terms of the specific cognitive domains linked to financial capacity including memory, calculation, and executive functioning. Next, the correlation between presence of neuropsychological data and the likelihood of filing a case with the LA County's District Attorney office was examined. Twenty-seven LACEAFC cases and 32 controls were assessed. Overall, the forensic center group performed worse than a community-based age-matched control group on the MMSE, calculation, and executive functioning (ps < .01). The presence of neuropsychological data was significantly correlated to an increased likelihood of a case being filed.

  13. Understanding emotional abuse.

    PubMed

    Rees, C A

    2010-01-01

    Emotional abuse lacks the public and political profile of physical and sexual abuse, despite being at their core and frequently their most damaging dimension. Difficulties in recognition, definition and legal proof put children at risk of remaining in damaging circumstances. Assessment of the emotional environment is necessary when interpreting possible physical or sexual abuse and balancing the risks and benefits of intervention. This article considers factors contributing to professional difficulty. It is suggested that understanding emotional abuse from the first principles of the causes and implications of the dysfunctional parent-child relationships it represents can help prevention, recognition and timely intervention. It may facilitate the professional communication needed to build up a picture of emotional abuse and of the emotional context of physical and sexual abuse. Doing so may contribute to the safety of child protection practice. The long-term cost of emotional abuse for individuals and society should be a powerful incentive for ensuring that development of services and clinical research are priorities, and that the false economy of short-term saving is avoided.

  14. Abusive Relationships

    MedlinePlus

    ... relationships and friendships. Emotional abuse (stuff like teasing, bullying, and humiliating others) can be difficult to recognize ... How to Break Up Respectfully Abuse Dealing With Bullying Date Rape Getting Over a Break-Up Posttraumatic ...

  15. Medical liability reform crisis 2008.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Stuart L

    2009-02-01

    The crisis of medical liability has resulted in drastic increases in insurance premiums and reduced access for patients to specialty care, particularly in areas such as obstetrics/gynecology, neurosurgery, and orthopaedic surgery. The current liability environment neither effectively compensates persons injured from medical negligence nor encourages addressing system errors to improve patient safety. The author reviews trends across the nation and reports on the efforts of an organization called "Doctors for Medical Liability Reform" to educate the public and lawmakers on the need for solutions to the chaotic process of adjudicating medical malpractice claims in the United States. PMID:18989732

  16. Medical Liability Reform Crisis 2008

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The crisis of medical liability has resulted in drastic increases in insurance premiums and reduced access for patients to specialty care, particularly in areas such as obstetrics/gynecology, neurosurgery, and orthopaedic surgery. The current liability environment neither effectively compensates persons injured from medical negligence nor encourages addressing system errors to improve patient safety. The author reviews trends across the nation and reports on the efforts of an organization called “Doctors for Medical Liability Reform” to educate the public and lawmakers on the need for solutions to the chaotic process of adjudicating medical malpractice claims in the United States. PMID:18989732

  17. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug ...

  18. Child Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... or become violent. An older child may use drugs or alcohol, try to run away or abuse others. Child abuse is a serious problem. If you suspect a child is being abused or neglected, call the police or your local child welfare agency.

  19. Spiritual abuse.

    PubMed

    Purcell, B C

    1998-01-01

    Spiritual abuse is the act of making people believe--whether by stating or merely implying--that they are going to be punished in this life and/or tormented in hell-fire forever for failure to live life good enough to please God and thus earn admission to heaven. Spiritual terrorism is the most extreme form of spiritual abuse and may cause serious mental health problems. Those people who have not been spiritually terrorized have not necessarily been spared from spiritual abuse and therefore may still be in need of competent, spiritual counseling. Spiritual abuse, which may be active or passive, can best be conceptualized on a continuum from terroristic to zero abuse. Severity is determined by intensity, age of onset, duration, and individual reaction. The underlying issue in all forms of abuse is control. PMID:9729974

  20. Parents with Co-Occurring Mental Health and Substance Abuse Conditions Involved in Child Protection Services: Clinical Profile and Treatment Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stromwall, Layne K.; Larson, Nancy C.; Nieri, Tanya; Holley, Lynn C.; Topping, Diane; Castillo, Jason; Ashford, Jose B.

    2008-01-01

    This article reports findings of an exploratory study of 71 parents with substance abuse conditions involved in a child dependency court. Over half (59%) of the parents had a co-occurring mental health condition. Parents with co-occurring conditions (PWCC) differed in several important ways from those with only substance abuse conditions. PWCC…

  1. Sociodemographic profile and pattern of opioid abuse among patients presenting to a de-addiction centre in tertiary care Hospital of Kashmir

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, Samina; Hussain, Syed Sajad; Rather, Yasir Hassan; Hussain, Syed Karrar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The substances abuse has become one of the major public health problems of present society. Recently there has been an increase in the incidence of substance abuse including that of opioids throughout the world. The proper assessment of the current trends and pattern of opioid abuse can be helpful in more effective intervention of this menace. Materials and Methods: To find out various socio-demographic variables and pattern of opioid abuse, a predevised questionnaire was administered to 200 opioid patients who presented to de-addiction center for treatment. Results: Majority of the participants (75%) were of young age group (20–30 years) and the mean age of subjects was 27.6 years. More than half of participants (55%) were abusing the opioid substances for < 3 years followed by 30% of the abusers who were using the opioids for 4–6 years. Oral route was the most common route(35%)of substance administration followed by chasing(13%) and intravenous(11%) routes. Diverted pharmaceuticals emerged as one of the common substances of abuse, and peer pressure was found to be the main reason to start substance abuse. Conclusion: A comprehensive preventive program targeting young adults needs to be formulated and strict laws against sales of diverted pharmaceuticals to be implemented. PMID:26229346

  2. Performance-based testing for drugs of abuse: dose and time profiles of marijuana, amphetamine, alcohol, and diazepam.

    PubMed

    Kelly, T H; Foltin, R W; Emurian, C S; Fischman, M W

    1993-09-01

    The time courses of the effects of acute doses of amphetamine (5 and 10 mg/70 kg), alcohol (0.3 and 0.6 g/kg), diazepam (5 and 10 mg/70 kg), and marijuana (2.0% and 3.5% delta 9-THC) on performance engendered by each of four computerized behavioral tasks were evaluated in six human subjects. These performance-based tasks have potential commercial utility for drug-use detection in the workplace. Alcohol and marijuana effects were reliably detected for up to three hours following dose administration with most procedures. Amphetamine and diazepam effects were also detected, but the dose effects and time courses were variable. The profile of behavioral effects varied across drugs, suggesting that performance-based testing procedures might be useful in discriminating which drug was administered and the time course of the drug's effects. Results indicate that repeated measurement with performance-based drug detection procedures can provide immediate indications of performance impairment in a cost-effective and noninvasive manner and, as such, would be a useful supplement to biological sample testing for drug-use detection.

  3. Fetal Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Lindsey; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Five cases of fetal abuse by mothers suffering from depression are discussed. Four of the women had unplanned pregnancies and had considered termination of the pregnancy. Other factors associated with fetal abuse include pregnancy denial, pregnancy ambivalence, previous postpartum depression, and difficulties in relationships. Vigilance for…

  4. The vesicular monoamine transporter-2: an important pharmacological target for the discovery of novel therapeutics to treat methamphetamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Justin R; Siripurapu, Kiran B; Vartak, Ashish; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine abuse escalates, but no approved therapeutics are available to treat addicted individuals. Methamphetamine increases extracellular dopamine in reward-relevant pathways by interacting at vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) to inhibit dopamine uptake and promote dopamine release from synaptic vesicles, increasing cytosolic dopamine available for reverse transport by the dopamine transporter (DAT). VMAT2 is the target of our iterative drug discovery efforts to identify pharmacotherapeutics for methamphetamine addiction. Lobeline, the major alkaloid in Lobelia inflata, potently inhibited VMAT2, methamphetamine-evoked striatal dopamine release, and methamphetamine self-administration in rats but exhibited high affinity for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Defunctionalized, unsaturated lobeline analog, meso-transdiene (MTD), exhibited lobeline-like in vitro pharmacology, lacked nAChR affinity, but exhibited high affinity for DAT, suggesting potential abuse liability. The 2,4-dicholorophenyl MTD analog, UKMH-106, exhibited selectivity for VMAT2 over DAT, inhibited methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release, but required a difficult synthetic approach. Lobelane, a saturated, defunctionalized lobeline analog, inhibited the neurochemical and behavioral effects of methamphetamine; tolerance developed to the lobelane-induced decrease in methamphetamine self-administration. Improved drug-likeness was afforded by the incorporation of a chiral N-1,2-dihydroxypropyl moiety into lobelane to afford GZ-793A, which inhibited the neurochemical and behavioral effects of methamphetamine, without tolerance. From a series of 2,5-disubstituted pyrrolidine analogs, AV-2-192 emerged as a lead, exhibiting high affinity for VMAT2 and inhibiting methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release. Current results support the hypothesis that potent, selective VMAT2 inhibitors provide the requisite preclinical behavioral profile for evaluation as pharmacotherapeutics for

  5. The Vesicular Monoamine Transporter-2: An Important Pharmacological Target for the Discovery of Novel Therapeutics to Treat Methamphetamine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, Justin R.; Siripurapu, Kiran B.; Vartak, Ashish; Crooks, Peter A.; Dwoskin, Linda P.

    2014-01-01

    Methamphetamine abuse escalates, but no approved therapeutics are available to treat addicted individuals. Methamphetamine increases extracellular dopamine in reward-relevant pathways by interacting at vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) to inhibit dopamine uptake and promote dopamine release from synaptic vesicles, increasing cytosolic dopamine available for reverse transport by the dopamine transporter (DAT). VMAT2 is the target of our iterative drug discovery efforts to identify pharmacotherapeutics for methamphetamine addiction. Lobeline, the major alkaloid in Lobelia inflata, potently inhibited VMAT2, methamphetamine-evoked striatal dopamine release, and methamphetamine self-administration in rats but exhibited high affinity for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Defunctionalized, unsaturated lobeline analog, meso-transdiene (MTD), exhibited lobeline-like in vitro pharmacology, lacked nAChR affinity, but exhibited high affinity for DAT, suggesting potential abuse liability. The 2,4-dicholorophenyl MTD analog, UKMH-106, exhibited selectivity for VMAT2 over DAT, inhibited methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release, but required a difficult synthetic approach. Lobelane, a saturated, defunctionalized lobeline analog, inhibited the neurochemical and behavioral effects of methamphetamine; tolerance developed to the lobelane-induced decrease in methamphetamine self-administration. Improved drug-likeness was afforded by the incorporation of a chiral N-1,2-dihydroxypropyl moiety into lobelane to afford GZ-793A, which inhibited the neurochemical and behavioral effects of methamphetamine, without tolerance. From a series of 2,5-disubstituted pyrrolidine analogs, AV-2-192 emerged as a lead, exhibiting high affinity for VMAT2 and inhibiting methamphetamine-evoked dopamine release. Current results support the hypothesis that potent, selective VMAT2 inhibitors provide the requisite preclinical behavioral profile for evaluation as pharmacotherapeutics for

  6. Teacher Liability in School-Shop Accidents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegin, Denis J.

    The intent of the book is to stimulate interest in the problem of shop-teacher liability and to identify certain needs which have not been adequately met by existing laws and statutes. Chapter 1, The Significance of Teacher Liability, discusses basic legal considerations, the environment of the school shop, and the possibility of liability.…

  7. 33 CFR 401.23 - Liability insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Liability insurance. 401.23....23 Liability insurance. (a) It is a condition of approval of an application for preclearance that the vessel is covered by liability insurance equal to or exceeding $100 per gross registered ton. (b)...

  8. 29 CFR 18.411 - Liability insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Liability insurance. 18.411 Section 18.411 Labor Office of... OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Relevancy and Its Limits § 18.411 Liability insurance... evidence of insurance against liability when offered for another purpose, such as proof of...

  9. 33 CFR 401.23 - Liability insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Liability insurance. 401.23....23 Liability insurance. (a) It is a condition of approval of an application for preclearance that the vessel is covered by liability insurance equal to or exceeding $100 per gross registered ton. (b)...

  10. 29 CFR 18.411 - Liability insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Liability insurance. 18.411 Section 18.411 Labor Office of... OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Relevancy and Its Limits § 18.411 Liability insurance... evidence of insurance against liability when offered for another purpose, such as proof of...

  11. 40 CFR 267.147 - Liability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 CFR 264.147(j). (2) Surety bond for liability coverage. An owner or operator may meet the requirements of this section by obtaining a surety bond for liability coverage as specified in 40 CFR 264.147(i... section by obtaining a letter of credit for liability coverage as specified in 40 CFR 264.147(h)....

  12. 12 CFR 229.21 - Civil liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Civil liability. 229.21 Section 229.21 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM... Availability Policies § 229.21 Civil liability. (a) Civil liability. A bank that fails to comply with...

  13. 33 CFR 401.23 - Liability insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Liability insurance. 401.23....23 Liability insurance. (a) It is a condition of approval of an application for preclearance that the vessel is covered by liability insurance equal to or exceeding $100 per gross registered ton. (b)...

  14. 29 CFR 18.411 - Liability insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Liability insurance. 18.411 Section 18.411 Labor Office of... OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Relevancy and Its Limits § 18.411 Liability insurance... evidence of insurance against liability when offered for another purpose, such as proof of...

  15. 29 CFR 18.411 - Liability insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Liability insurance. 18.411 Section 18.411 Labor Office of... OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Relevancy and Its Limits § 18.411 Liability insurance... evidence of insurance against liability when offered for another purpose, such as proof of...

  16. 33 CFR 401.23 - Liability insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Liability insurance. 401.23....23 Liability insurance. (a) It is a condition of approval of an application for preclearance that the vessel is covered by liability insurance equal to or exceeding $100 per gross registered ton. (b)...

  17. 29 CFR 18.411 - Liability insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Liability insurance. 18.411 Section 18.411 Labor Office of... OF ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES Rules of Evidence Relevancy and Its Limits § 18.411 Liability insurance... evidence of insurance against liability when offered for another purpose, such as proof of...

  18. 33 CFR 401.23 - Liability insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Liability insurance. 401.23....23 Liability insurance. (a) It is a condition of approval of an application for preclearance that the vessel is covered by liability insurance equal to or exceeding $100 per gross registered ton. (b)...

  19. University Liability for Sports Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieder, Robert W.; Woodruff, William B., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Analyzes sports injury claims against colleges and universities in recent years to help administrators better understand and minimize liability risks for certain curricular and cocurricular activities. Reviews court cases in areas of duty of care and negligence and proximate cause, and discusses defenses. (Author/NB)

  20. 77 FR 27384 - Demurrage Liability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ....Ct. 993 (2011) (mem.). \\13\\ Demurrage Liability, EP 707 (STB served Dec. 6, 2010), 75 FR 76,496 (Dec... rulemaking (NPRM), the Board is proposing a rule establishing that a person receiving rail cars from a rail carrier for loading or unloading who detains the cars beyond the ``free time'' provided in the...

  1. Vehicle Safety. Managing Liability Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Deborah, Ed.

    This monograph discusses the safety of vehicles owned, leased, maintained, and operated by colleges and universities. First, the risks by colleges and universities is discussed. First, the risks associated with college vehicles are outlined, including the liability that comes with staff/faculty and student drivers and such special concerns as…

  2. Trustee Liability Insurance Under ERISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertner, Marc

    1975-01-01

    Consideration of errors and omissions insurance under ERISA demands a brief review of pre-ERISA trustee liability insurance law in this symposium report for historical and practical perspective. Specific problems are discussed, and it is concluded that the purchase of insurance should not lull a fiduciary into a false sense of security.…

  3. Schoolyard Ponds: Safety and Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danks, Sharon Gamson

    2001-01-01

    Engaging, attractive schoolyard ponds provide habitat for wildlife and hold great educational promise. Reviews water safety and liability issues including mud, stagnant pond water that serves as mosquito breeding grounds, and drowning. Offers ideas for creatively addressing those issues through site planning, shallow water depth, signage and…

  4. Endorsement liability: putting your good name at risk.

    PubMed

    Aicher, R H

    2001-07-01

    Endorsements designed to sell products are most effective when the endorser is a celebrity or an expert. If such endorsements contain misrepresentations, the endorser risks personal liability. For products related to health and safety, endorsements are subject to evaluation by reliable independent sources. In a number of high-profile cases, the Federal Trade Commission determined that endorsers must have a reasonable basis for their representations. (Aesthetic Surg J 2001;21:373-374.). PMID:19331918

  5. Parents with co-occurring mental health and substance abuse conditions involved in Child Protection Services: clinical profile and treatment needs.

    PubMed

    Stromwall, Layne K; Larson, Nancy C; Nieri, Tanya; Holley, Lynn C; Topping, Diane; Castillo, Jason; Ashford, José B

    2008-01-01

    This article reports findings of an exploratory study of 71 parents with substance abuse conditions involved in a child dependency court. Over half (59%) of the parents had a co-occurring mental health condition. Parents with co-occurring conditions (PWCC) differed in several important ways from those with only substance abuse conditions. PWCC were also more likely than their case managers were to report a need for mental health treatment. Implications for child welfare practice and research are offered.

  6. THE LIABILITY FORMS OF THE MEDICAL PERSONNEL.

    PubMed

    Bărcan, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    Current legislation, namely Law no. 95/2006 on healthcare reform in the medical malpractice domain stipulates that medical staff can be held accountable in the following forms: disciplinary liability, administrative liability, civil liability and criminal liability. Each form of legal liability presents its features, aspects that are found mainly in the procedural rules. However, the differences between the various legal forms of liability are not met only in the procedural rules but also in their effects and consequences. It is necessary to know what the procedure for disciplinary responsibility, administrative liability, civil liability, or criminal liability is. In addition to the differentiation determined by the consequences that may arise from the different forms of legal liability, it is important to know the competent authorities to investigate a case further and the solutions which various public institutions can take regarding the medical staff. Depending on the type of legal liability, authorities have a specialized authority. If the Disciplinary Committee is encountered at the College of Physicians, it may not intervene in cases before the monitoring and competence for malpractice cases Committee. The latter two committees cannot intervene directly in the legal assessment of civil or criminal cases, as no criminal investigation authorities cannot intervene in strictly civilian cases. Therefore, the importance of knowing the competent institutions is imperative.

  7. Managed care, liability, and ERISA.

    PubMed

    Stone, A A

    1999-03-01

    Congress originally passed ERISA to secure the contractual benefits negotiated between employers and employees. In 1974, when the statute quickly moved through Congress, no one realized what its eventual significance for health care would be. Certainly no one expected that ERISA preemption would allow MCHPs to reduce professional standards of care while being protected from liability. The Department of Labor believes that it was never the intention of Congress to preempt ordinary damage claims for malpractice. There are now chinks in the legal armor of ERISA created by activists' courts as in the Dukes case. Even conservative Judges recognize the injustice of results, such as Corcoran. The American medical profession has traditionally complained about malpractice litigation and the wastefulness of defensive medicine. Perhaps ERISA will make the profession recognize that malpractice liability can serve a useful purpose.

  8. Oxazepam for the Treatment of Substance Abuse and Depression: Is it Appropriate?

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2016-05-01

    Distinguishing itself from other benzodiazepine drugs, oxazepam has an interesting pharmacological and clinical profile, including binding effects on the translocator protein (TSPO) and a relatively favorable safety and abuse liability profile. TSPO is found in the brain (where it is involved in neurosteroid synthesis), but is also expressed in the heart and other peripheral tissues. Oxazepam is potentially useful in the treatment of substance abuse, especially in conjunction with the cortisol synthesis inhibitor metyrapone, and can be considered an appropriate medication to use in the treatment of depression. The oxazepam/metyrapone combination has been piloted in cocaine-dependent patients and should be investigated in patients with depression. Expression of cardiac TSPO is altered by different stress conditions, and drugs binding to TSPO may have cardioprotective effects. The possibility of oxazepam, alone or together with antidepressant drugs, having a positive effect on cardiac function in patients with depression should also be studied. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 54(5), 21-24.]. PMID:27135891

  9. Environmental liability assessments at PTS facilities

    SciTech Connect

    McNeish, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    Pipeline, Terminal and Storage (PTS) facilities have inherent environmental liabilities due to the handling and use of hazardous materials and the potential for release to the environment. Defining the potential cost of the environmental liability for a PTS facility requires assessment of the activities, events, and facilities which may contribute to environmental damage. Such environmental liability assessments contain significant uncertainty. The extent of contamination, potential for a spill, probable environmental damage from a spill, or remediation cost of existing contamination may not be known. Including the uncertainty in such assessments provides a more realistic portrayal of the potential environmental liability of a PTS facility than a simple deterministic assessment. The environmental liabilities which may be associated with PTS facilities are presented in Section 2. An approach to cost risk assessment of environmental liabilities is discussed in Section 3, followed by an example cost risk analysis in Section 4 and a brief summary in Section 5.

  10. Liability considerations presented by human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Palmer, J G

    1991-01-01

    Through the use of a hypothetical scenario, this article examines the legal liability associated with gene therapy. Basic negligence principles are applied to the factual context of a human gene therapy experiment gone awry, including its prior governmental review and its potential effect on future generations. The federal requirements, while not preempting state law damages claims, do provide a mechanism for achieving some protection from liability. The effect on future generations raises questions about the limits of liability.

  11. 7 CFR 1210.361 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan Miscellaneous § 1210.361 Personal liability. No...

  12. 7 CFR 1210.361 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan Miscellaneous § 1210.361 Personal liability. No...

  13. 7 CFR 1210.361 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan Miscellaneous § 1210.361 Personal liability. No...

  14. 7 CFR 1210.361 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan Miscellaneous § 1210.361 Personal liability. No...

  15. 7 CFR 1210.361 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan Miscellaneous § 1210.361 Personal liability. No...

  16. National Costs Of The Medical Liability System

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Michelle M.; Chandra, Amitabh; Gawande, Atul A.; Studdert, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Concerns about reducing the rate of growth of health expenditures have reignited interest in medical liability reforms and their potential to save money by reducing the practice of defensive medicine. It is not easy to estimate the costs of the medical liability system, however. This article identifies the various components of liability system costs, generates national estimates for each component, and discusses the level of evidence available to support the estimates. Overall annual medical liability system costs, including defensive medicine, are estimated to be $55.6 billion in 2008 dollars, or 2.4 percent of total health care spending. PMID:20820010

  17. 7 CFR 1207.365 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Miscellaneous § 1207.365 Personal liability. No member of...

  18. 7 CFR 1207.365 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Miscellaneous § 1207.365 Personal liability. No member of...

  19. 7 CFR 1207.365 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Miscellaneous § 1207.365 Personal liability. No member of...

  20. 7 CFR 1207.365 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Miscellaneous § 1207.365 Personal liability. No member of...

  1. 7 CFR 1207.365 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Miscellaneous § 1207.365 Personal liability. No member of...

  2. Options in Education, Transcript for December 1, 1975: Guaranteed Student Loan Investigation, Child Abuse, Profile of the Experimental and Bilingual Institute, and Learning to Tune a Piano.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George Washington Univ., Washington, DC. Inst. for Educational Leadership.

    "Options in Education" is a radio program which focuses on issues and developments in education. This transcript of the show contains discussions of the guaranteed-student-loan investigation, child abuse, the Experimental and Bilingual Institute in Spanish Harlem, and learning how to tune a piano. Participants in the program include John Merrow…

  3. Fertility rhymes with liability: medical liability in 'ART'.

    PubMed

    Raposo, Vera Lúcia

    2015-01-01

    Medical malpractice claims have been growing all over the world. Medical acts involving new technologies and complex scientific acknowledgements are especially at stake, since they look particularly threatening to patients and judges and are, effectively, potentially more risky. The reason is that, side by side with traditional medical faults, new sources of liability emerge, as for instance the exchange or misappropriation of genetic material or surplus embryos. The present study analyses some of those new medical faults with the aim of alerting health institutions and health professionals, enlightening them about the juridical consequences of those conducts and providing simple tips to avoid lawsuits and condemnations. PMID:26665349

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of inhaled [11C]butane and intravenously injected [11C]acetone as potential radiotracers for studying inhalant abuse.

    PubMed

    Gerasimov, Madina R; Ferrieri, Richard A; Pareto, Deborah; Logan, Jean; Alexoff, David; Ding, Yu-Shin

    2005-02-01

    The phenomenon of inhalant abuse is a growing problem in the US and many countries around the world. Yet, relatively little is known about the pharmacokinetic properties of inhalants that underlie their abuse potential. While the synthesis of 11C-labeled toluene, acetone and butane has been proposed in the literature, none of these compounds has been developed as radiotracers for PET studies. In the present report we extend our previous studies with [11C]toluene to include [11C]acetone and [11C]butane with the goal of comparing the pharmacokinetic profiles of these three volatile abused substances. Both [11C]toluene and [11C]acetone were administered intravenously and [11C]butane was administered via inhalation to anesthesized baboons. Rapid and efficient uptake of radiolabeled toluene and acetone into the brain was followed by fast clearance in the case of toluene and slower kinetics in the case of acetone. [11C]Butane was detected in the blood and brain following inhalation, but the levels of radioactivity in both tissues dropped to half of the maximal values over the period of less than a minute. To our knowledge, this is the first reported study of the in vivo brain pharmacokinetics of labeled acetone and butane in nonhuman primates. These data provide insight into the pharmacokinetic features possibly associated with the abuse liability of toluene, acetone and butane.

  5. Child Abuse, Dissociation, and Core Beliefs in Bulimic Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartt, Joanne; Waller, Glenn

    2002-01-01

    A study involving 23 British women with bulimic disorders found no dimensional relationship between any form of child abuse and bulimic pathology. However, neglect and sexual abuse were correlated with dissociation. A subset of core beliefs was associated with child abuse, with different cognitive profiles associated with each trauma. (Contains…

  6. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies

    MedlinePlus

    ... hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies Enable Javascript to ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies is a disorder ...

  7. Monoamine Transporter Inhibitors and Substrates as Treatments for Stimulant Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Leonard L.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2015-01-01

    The acute and chronic effects of abused psychostimulants on monoamine transporters and associated neurobiology have encouraged development of candidate medications that target these transporters. Monoamine transporters in general, and dopamine transporters in particular, are critical molecular targets that mediate abuse-related effects of psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. Moreover, chronic administration of psychostimulants can cause enduring changes in neurobiology reflected in dysregulation of monoamine neurochemistry and behavior. The current review will evaluate evidence for the efficacy of monoamine transporter inhibitors and substrates to reduce abuse-related effects of stimulants in preclinical assays of stimulant self-administration, drug discrimination and reinstatement. In considering deployment of monoamine transport inhibitors and substrates as agonist-type medications to treat stimulant abuse, the safety and abuse liability of the medications are an obvious concern, and this will also be addressed. Future directions in drug discovery should identify novel medications that retain efficacy to decrease stimulant use but possess lower abuse liability, and evaluate the degree to which efficacious medications can attenuate or reverse neurobiological effects of chronic stimulant use. PMID:24484977

  8. Monoamine transporter inhibitors and substrates as treatments for stimulant abuse.

    PubMed

    Howell, Leonard L; Negus, S Stevens

    2014-01-01

    The acute and chronic effects of abused psychostimulants on monoamine transporters and associated neurobiology have encouraged development of candidate medications that target these transporters. Monoamine transporters, in general, and dopamine transporters, in particular, are critical molecular targets that mediate abuse-related effects of psychostimulants such as cocaine and amphetamine. Moreover, chronic administration of psychostimulants can cause enduring changes in neurobiology reflected in dysregulation of monoamine neurochemistry and behavior. The current review will evaluate evidence for the efficacy of monoamine transporter inhibitors and substrates to reduce abuse-related effects of stimulants in preclinical assays of stimulant self-administration, drug discrimination, and reinstatement. In considering deployment of monoamine transport inhibitors and substrates as agonist-type medications to treat stimulant abuse, the safety and abuse liability of the medications are an obvious concern, and this will also be addressed. Future directions in drug discovery should identify novel medications that retain efficacy to decrease stimulant use but possess lower abuse liability and evaluate the degree to which efficacious medications can attenuate or reverse neurobiological effects of chronic stimulant use. PMID:24484977

  9. Psychiatric disorders, spouse abuse and child abuse.

    PubMed

    Bland, R C; Orn, H

    1986-01-01

    The results of 2000 standardized psychiatric diagnostic interviews of randomly selected adult household residents of Edmonton showed that having had any psychiatric diagnosis increased the risk for being involved in spouse and child abuse, particularly for those with alcohol abuse/dependence plus anti-social personality or depression. Altogether 56% of spouse abusers and 69% of child abusers had a lifetime psychiatric diagnosis.

  10. 34 CFR 668.138 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Liability. 668.138 Section 668.138 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION... Liability. (a) A student is liable for any LEAP, FSEOG, Federal Pell Grant, ACG, National SMART Grant,...

  11. 34 CFR 668.138 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Liability. 668.138 Section 668.138 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION... Liability. (a) A student is liable for any LEAP, FSEOG, Federal Pell Grant, ACG, National SMART Grant,...

  12. 12 CFR 229.56 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Liability. 229.56 Section 229.56 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Substitute Checks § 229.56 Liability. (a)...

  13. Understanding and Limiting School Board Member Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Terry; Jones, Stephanie; Purvis, Mary L.; Rubin, David B.; Thrasher, Doralee; Underwood, Julie; Watkins, W. David

    This book is a primer on board-member liability issues and is intended for both board members and school attorneys. The first chapter, "The Legal System," examines federal sources of legal authority, state and local sources of legal authority, and federal and state judicial structures. Liability under state tort law is the subject of chapter 2,…

  14. EMPLOYEE GROUP PROPERTY AND LIABILITY INSURANCE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FIELD, IRVING M.

    AN ATTEMPT IS MADE TO ESTABLISH A THEORETICAL FOUNDATION FOR GROUP PROPERTY AND LIABILITY INSURANCE AND TO ADVANCE THE GENERAL HYPOTHESIS THAT THE PRINCIPLES USED IN INSTALLING AND ADMINISTERING GROUP LIFE AND HEALTH INSURANCE ARE APPLICABLE TO THE INSTALLATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF GROUP PROPERTY AND LIABILITY INSURANCE. A SURVEY WAS CONDUCTED TO…

  15. 77 FR 74121 - Limited Liability Partnerships (LLPs)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Election Campaign Act, 64 FR 37397, 98 (Jul. 12, 1999), available at www.fec.gov/law/cfr/ej_compilation...; ] FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION 11 CFR Part 110 Limited Liability Partnerships (LLPs) AGENCY: Federal Election... the treatment of limited liability partnerships (``LLPs'') for purposes of the Federal...

  16. 12 CFR 965.2 - Authorized liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authorized liabilities. 965.2 Section 965.2 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK LIABILITIES SOURCE OF FUNDS § 965... accordance with part 966 of this chapter; (b) Accepting time or demand deposits from members, other Banks...

  17. Statutory Protection for Principals: Tort Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluckman, Ivan

    1986-01-01

    Due to increasing numbers of lawsuits, educators need protection against financial liability to persons claiming injury on school property or in school-related activities. This legal memorandum describes needed protections, discusses the National Association of Secondary School Principals' (NASSP) role in developing liability insurance, and…

  18. College and University Liability under Superfund.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manderfeld, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    A discussion of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 concerning responsibility for toxic waste disposal looks at college and university liability under the act, institutional defenses that could be raised under the act, and the settlement process. (MSE)

  19. 31 CFR 100.7 - Treasury's liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Treasury's liability. 100.7 Section 100.7 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN Exchange of Mutilated Paper Currency § 100.7 Treasury's liability. (a) Payment will be...

  20. 7 CFR 1205.347 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Personal liability. 1205.347 Section 1205.347 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... Cotton Research and Promotion Order Miscellaneous § 1205.347 Personal liability. No member or...

  1. 7 CFR 1205.347 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Personal liability. 1205.347 Section 1205.347 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... Cotton Research and Promotion Order Miscellaneous § 1205.347 Personal liability. No member or...

  2. 7 CFR 1205.347 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal liability. 1205.347 Section 1205.347 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... Cotton Research and Promotion Order Miscellaneous § 1205.347 Personal liability. No member or...

  3. 7 CFR 1205.347 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Personal liability. 1205.347 Section 1205.347 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... Cotton Research and Promotion Order Miscellaneous § 1205.347 Personal liability. No member or...

  4. 7 CFR 1205.347 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Personal liability. 1205.347 Section 1205.347 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... Cotton Research and Promotion Order Miscellaneous § 1205.347 Personal liability. No member or...

  5. 12 CFR 229.56 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Liability. 229.56 Section 229.56 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Substitute Checks § 229.56 Liability. (a)...

  6. 12 CFR 229.56 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Liability. 229.56 Section 229.56 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Substitute Checks § 229.56 Liability....

  7. 12 CFR 229.56 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Liability. 229.56 Section 229.56 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Substitute Checks § 229.56 Liability....

  8. Liability, Athletic Equipment, and the Athletic Trainer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Richard

    Standards of conduct, roles, and responsibilities expected of athletic trainers should be developed and disseminated. These guidelines could be used in court to show that the athletic trainer was following basic standards if he should be charged with liability. A review of liability cases involving athletic injuries received while athletes were…

  9. 30 CFR 875.19 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION CERTIFICATION AND NONCOAL RECLAMATION § 875.19 Limited liability. No State... abandoned mine reclamation plan. This section shall not preclude liability for costs or damages as a...

  10. 30 CFR 875.19 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION CERTIFICATION AND NONCOAL RECLAMATION § 875.19 Limited liability. No State... abandoned mine reclamation plan. This section shall not preclude liability for costs or damages as a...

  11. 30 CFR 875.19 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION CERTIFICATION AND NONCOAL RECLAMATION § 875.19 Limited liability. No State... abandoned mine reclamation plan. This section shall not preclude liability for costs or damages as a...

  12. 30 CFR 875.19 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION CERTIFICATION AND NONCOAL RECLAMATION § 875.19 Limited liability. No State... abandoned mine reclamation plan. This section shall not preclude liability for costs or damages as a...

  13. 30 CFR 875.19 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION CERTIFICATION AND NONCOAL RECLAMATION § 875.19 Limited liability. No State... abandoned mine reclamation plan. This section shall not preclude liability for costs or damages as a...

  14. [The civil liability of obstetricians].

    PubMed

    Uphoff, R; Hindemith, J

    2011-12-01

    The number of maternal and child deaths associated with delivery in Germany has reached a historically low level. Even so, the number of claims for damages arising from birth complications is continuously increasing. The reasons for this apparent paradox are analysed in the present contribution. Basic principles of the present situation concerning legal precedents with regard to birth damages are illustrated. The legal instrumentarium which the courts use to reach their decisions is presented. The interactions of the reasons for liability are demonstrated for the five most frequently occurring critical obstetric situations (intrauterine asphyxia, premature amniorrhexis, danger of premature birth, intrauterine growth retardation, birth of a depressed child).From an analysis of court decisions on liability questions that result from an objective failure of obstetric management in critical situations, four general empirical rules can be derived and observation of these rules could markedly reduce the number of patient claims. The function of civil court rulings as a necessary control instance is positively accepted.

  15. Neurotoxic Profiles of HIV, Psychostimulant Drugs of Abuse, and their Concerted Effect on the Brain: Current Status of Dopamine System Vulnerability in NeuroAIDS

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Mark J.; Mactutus, Charles F.; Booze, Rosemarie M.

    2008-01-01

    There are roughly 30 to 40 million HIV infected individuals in the world as of December 2007, and drug abuse directly contributes to one-third of all HIV-infections in the United States. Antiretroviral therapy has increased the lifespan of HIV-seropositives, but CNS function often remains diminished, effectively decreasing quality of life. A modest proportion may develop HIV-associated dementia, the severity and progression of which is increased with drug abuse. HIV and drugs of abuse in the CNS target subcortical brain structures and DA systems in particular. This toxicity is mediated by a number of neurotoxic mechanisms, including but not limited to, aberrant immune response and oxidative stress. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies must be developed that can address a wide variety of disparate neurotoxic mechanisms and apoptotic cascades. This paper reviews the research pertaining to the where, what, and how of HIV and cocaine/methamphetamine toxicity in the CNS. Specifically, where these toxins most affect the brain, what aspects of the virus are neurotoxic, and how these toxins mediate neurotoxicity. PMID:18430470

  16. Child Abuse: Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Timothy L.-Y.

    The purpose of this paper was to elaborate on the definitions of child abuse in order to improve the understanding of child abuse. The definitions given by the U.S. House Joint Committee on Child Abuse in the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, and in research by Holden (1984), are cited. These definitions refer to the nature of abusive acts…

  17. OPPIDUM surveillance program: 20 years of information on drug abuse in France.

    PubMed

    Frauger, Elisabeth; Moracchini, Christophe; Le Boisselier, Reynald; Braunstein, David; Thirion, Xavier; Micallef, Joëlle

    2013-12-01

    It is important to assess drug abuse liability in 'real life' using different surveillance systems. Some are based on specific population surveys, such as individuals with drug abuse or dependence, or under opiate maintenance treatment, because this population is very familiar with drugs and is more likely to divert or abuse them. In France, an original surveillance system based on this specific population and called 'Observation of illegal drugs and misuse of psychotropic medications (OPPIDUM) survey' was set up in 1990 as the first of its kind. The aim of this article is to describe this precursor of French drug abuse surveillance using different examples, to demonstrate its ability to effectively give health authorities and physicians interesting data on drug abuse. OPPIDUM is an annual, cross-sectional survey that anonymously collects information on abuse and dependence observed in patients recruited in specialized care centers dedicated to drug dependence. From 1990 to 2010, a total of 50,734 patients were included with descriptions of 102,631 psychoactive substance consumptions. These data have outlined emergent behaviors such as the misuse of buprenorphine by intravenous or nasal administration. It has contributed to assess abuse liability of emergent drugs such as clonazepam or methylphenidate. This surveillance system was also able to detect the decrease of flunitrazepam abuse following implementation of regulatory measures. OPPIDUM's twenty years of experience clearly demonstrate that collection of valid and useful data on drug abuse is possible and can provide helpful information for physicians and health authorities.

  18. 4-Methylmethcathinone (mephedrone): neuropharmacological effects of a designer stimulant of abuse.

    PubMed

    Hadlock, Gregory C; Webb, Katy M; McFadden, Lisa M; Chu, Pei Wen; Ellis, Jonathan D; Allen, Scott C; Andrenyak, David M; Vieira-Brock, Paula L; German, Christopher L; Conrad, Kevin M; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Gibb, James W; Wilkins, Diana G; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2011-11-01

    The designer stimulant 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone) is among the most popular of the derivatives of the naturally occurring psychostimulant cathinone. Mephedrone has been readily available for legal purchase both online and in some stores and has been promoted by aggressive Web-based marketing. Its abuse in many countries, including the United States, is a serious public health concern. Owing largely to its recent emergence, there are no formal pharmacodynamic or pharmacokinetic studies of mephedrone. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to evaluate effects of this agent in a rat model. Results revealed that, similar to methylenedioxymethamphetamine, methamphetamine, and methcathinone, repeated mephedrone injections (4× 10 or 25 mg/kg s.c. per injection, 2-h intervals, administered in a pattern used frequently to mimic psychostimulant "binge" treatment) cause a rapid decrease in striatal dopamine (DA) and hippocampal serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5HT) transporter function. Mephedrone also inhibited both synaptosomal DA and 5HT uptake. Like methylenedioxymethamphetamine, but unlike methamphetamine or methcathinone, repeated mephedrone administrations also caused persistent serotonergic, but not dopaminergic, deficits. However, mephedrone caused DA release from a striatal suspension approaching that of methamphetamine and was self-administered by rodents. A method was developed to assess mephedrone concentrations in rat brain and plasma, and mephedrone levels were determined 1 h after a binge treatment. These data demonstrate that mephedrone has a unique pharmacological profile with both abuse liability and neurotoxic potential.

  19. An Examination of Immunity Statutes Regarding the Liability of Recreational Youth Sport Organizations for the Pedophilic Actions of Coaches, Administrators, and Officials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Thomas A., III; Connaughton, Daniel P.; Zhang, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Millions of children in the United States participate in youth sports. The literature demonstrates that sexual abuse is a problem in sports. This study examined voluntary immunity statutes for all 50 states and the District of Columbia with the purpose of determining potential liability for recreational youth sport organizations for the pedophilic…

  20. Update to an evaluation of ICD-11 PTSD and complex PTSD criteria in a sample of adult survivors of childhood institutional abuse by Knefel & Lueger-Schuster (2013): a latent profile analysis

    PubMed Central

    Knefel, Matthias; Garvert, Donn W.; Cloitre, Marylene; Lueger-Schuster, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) International Classification of Diseases, 11th version (ICD-11), has proposed a trauma-related diagnosis of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (CPTSD) separate and distinct from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Objective To determine whether the symptoms endorsed by individuals who had experienced childhood institutional abuse form classes that are consistent with diagnostic criteria for ICD-11 CPTSD as distinct from PTSD. Methods A latent profile analysis (LPA) was conducted on 229 adult survivors of institutional abuse using the Brief Symptom Inventory and the PTSD Checklist—Civilian Version to assess current psychopathological symptoms. Results The LPA revealed four classes of individuals: (1) a class with elevated symptoms of CPTSD (PTSD symptoms and disturbances in self-organization); (2) a class with elevated symptoms of PTSD and low disturbances in self-organization; (3) a class with elevated disturbances in self-organization symptoms and some elevated PTSD symptoms; and (4) a class with low symptoms. Conclusions The results support the existence of a distinct group in our sample, that could be described by the proposed diagnostic category termed CPTSD more precisely than by normal PTSD. In addition, there seems to be a group of persons that do not fulfill the criteria for a trauma-related disorder but yet suffer from psychopathological symptoms. PMID:25557561

  1. Estimating Local Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ards, Sheila

    1989-01-01

    Three conceptual approaches to estimating local child abuse rates using the National Incidence Study of Child Abuse and Neglect data set are evaluated. All three approaches yield estimates of actual abuse cases that exceed the number of reported cases. (SLD)

  2. Child Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... victim of prolonged sexual abuse usually develops low self-esteem, a feeling of worthlessness and an abnormal or ... can help abused children regain a sense of self-esteem, cope with feelings of guilt about the abuse, ...

  3. How to Handle Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... them. Another word for hurting someone is "abuse." Child abuse (say: ah-BYOOS) can affect all kinds of ... a babysitter, teacher, coach, or a bigger kid. Child abuse can happen anywhere — at home, school, childcare, or ...

  4. 26 CFR 1.455-4 - Cessation of taxpayer's liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cessation of taxpayer's liability. 1.455-4...-4 Cessation of taxpayer's liability. (a) If a taxpayer has elected to apply the provisions of... for the taxable year in which such liability ends. A taxpayer's liability may end, for...

  5. 19 CFR 141.1 - Liability of importer for duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Liability of importer for duties. 141.1 Section... Merchandise § 141.1 Liability of importer for duties. (a) Time duties accrue. Duties and the liability for... for by law. (b) Payment of duties—(1) Personal debt of importer. The liability for duties,...

  6. 26 CFR 1.1502-2 - Computation of tax liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Computation of tax liability. 1.1502-2 Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Consolidated Tax Liability § 1.1502-2 Computation of tax liability. The tax liability of a group for a consolidated return year shall be determined by...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1502-2 - Computation of tax liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Computation of tax liability. 1.1502-2 Section... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Consolidated Tax Liability § 1.1502-2 Computation of tax liability. The tax liability of a group for a consolidated return year shall be determined by...

  8. 29 CFR 4219.11 - Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal. 4219.11 Section... Redetermination of Withdrawal Liability Upon Mass Withdrawal § 4219.11 Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal. (a) Initial withdrawal liability. The plan sponsor of a multiemployer plan that experiences a...

  9. 29 CFR 4219.11 - Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal. 4219.11 Section... Redetermination of Withdrawal Liability Upon Mass Withdrawal § 4219.11 Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal. (a) Initial withdrawal liability. The plan sponsor of a multiemployer plan that experiences a...

  10. 29 CFR 4219.11 - Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal. 4219.11 Section... Redetermination of Withdrawal Liability Upon Mass Withdrawal § 4219.11 Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal. (a) Initial withdrawal liability. The plan sponsor of a multiemployer plan that experiences a...

  11. 29 CFR 4219.11 - Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LIABILITY FOR MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS NOTICE, COLLECTION, AND REDETERMINATION OF WITHDRAWAL LIABILITY.... (a) Initial withdrawal liability. The plan sponsor of a multiemployer plan that experiences a mass... that has completely or partially withdrawn from the plan and for whom the liability has not...

  12. 29 CFR 4219.11 - Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LIABILITY FOR MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS NOTICE, COLLECTION, AND REDETERMINATION OF WITHDRAWAL LIABILITY.... (a) Initial withdrawal liability. The plan sponsor of a multiemployer plan that experiences a mass... that has completely or partially withdrawn from the plan and for whom the liability has not...

  13. The Welfare Effects of Medical Malpractice Liability

    PubMed Central

    Lakdawalla, Darius N.; Seabury, Seth A.

    2013-01-01

    We use variation in the generosity of local juries to identify the causal impact of medical malpractice liability on social welfare. Growth in malpractice payments contributed at most 5 percentage points to the 33% total real growth in medical expenditures from 1990-2003. On the other hand, malpractice leads to modest mortality reductions; the value of these more than likely exceeds the costs of malpractice liability. Therefore, reducing malpractice liability is unlikely to have a major impact on health care spending, and unlikely to be cost-effective over conventionally accepted values of a statistical life. PMID:23526860

  14. A translational pharmacology approach to understanding the predictive value of abuse potential assessments.

    PubMed

    Horton, David B; Potter, David M; Mead, Andy N

    2013-09-01

    Within the drug development industry the assessment of abuse potential for novel molecules involves the generation and review of data from multiple sources, ranging from in-vitro binding and functional assays through to in-vivo nonclinical models in mammals, as well as collection of information from studies in humans. This breadth of data aligns with current expectations from regulatory agencies in both the USA and Europe. To date, there have been a limited number of reviews on the predictive value of individual models within this sequence, but there has been no systematic review on how each of these models contributes to our overall understanding of abuse potential risk. To address this, we analyzed data from 100 small molecules to compare the predictive validity for drug scheduling status of a number of models that typically contribute to the abuse potential assessment package. These models range from the assessment of in-vitro binding and functional profiles at receptors or transporters typically associated with abuse through in-vivo models including locomotor activity, drug discrimination, and self-administration in rodents. Data from subjective report assessments in humans following acute dosing of compounds were also included. The predictive value of each model was then evaluated relative to the scheduling status of each drug in the USA. In recognition of the fact that drug scheduling can be influenced by factors other than the pharmacology of the drug, we also evaluated the predictive value of each assay for the outcome of the human subjective effects assessment. This approach provides an objective and statistical assessment of the predictive value of many of the models typically applied within the pharmaceutical industry to evaluate abuse potential risk. In addition, the impact of combining information from multiple models was examined. This analysis adds to our understanding of the predictive value of each model, allows us to critically evaluate the

  15. 15 CFR 996.4 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES QUALITY ASSURANCE AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES General § 996.4 Liability. The Government of the United...

  16. 15 CFR 996.4 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES QUALITY ASSURANCE AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES General § 996.4 Liability. The Government of the United...

  17. 15 CFR 996.4 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES QUALITY ASSURANCE AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES General § 996.4 Liability. The Government of the United...

  18. 15 CFR 996.4 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES QUALITY ASSURANCE AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES General § 996.4 Liability. The Government of the United...

  19. 15 CFR 996.4 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES QUALITY ASSURANCE AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES General § 996.4 Liability. The Government of the United...

  20. 7 CFR 1220.253 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Miscellaneous § 1220.253 Personal liability. No... Soybean Boards, acting pursuant to authority provided in this subpart, shall be held...

  1. 7 CFR 1220.253 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Miscellaneous § 1220.253 Personal liability. No... Soybean Boards, acting pursuant to authority provided in this subpart, shall be held...

  2. 7 CFR 1220.253 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Miscellaneous § 1220.253 Personal liability. No... Soybean Boards, acting pursuant to authority provided in this subpart, shall be held...

  3. 7 CFR 1220.253 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Miscellaneous § 1220.253 Personal liability. No... Soybean Boards, acting pursuant to authority provided in this subpart, shall be held...

  4. 7 CFR 1220.253 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Miscellaneous § 1220.253 Personal liability. No... Soybean Boards, acting pursuant to authority provided in this subpart, shall be held...

  5. Liability exposure for surgical robotics instructors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu L; Kilic, Gokhan; Phelps, John Y

    2012-01-01

    Surgical robotics instructors provide an essential service in improving the competency of novice gynecologic surgeons learning robotic surgery and advancing surgical skills on behalf of patients. However, despite best intentions, robotics instructors and the gynecologists who use their services expose themselves to liability. The fear of litigation in the event of a surgical complication may reduce the availability and utility of robotics instructors. A better understanding of the principles of duty of care and the physician-patient relationship, and their potential applicability in a court of law likely will help to dismantle some concerns and uncertainties about liability. This commentary is not meant to discourage current and future surgical instructors but to raise awareness of liability issues among robotics instructors and their students and to recommend certain preventive measures to curb potential liability risks.

  6. Liability of physicians supervising nonphysician clinicians.

    PubMed

    Paterick, Barbara B; Waterhouse, Blake E; Paterick, Timothy E; Sanbar, Sandy S

    2014-01-01

    Physicians confront a variety of liability issues when supervising nonphysician clinicians (NPC) including: (1) direct liability resulting from a failure to meet the state-defined standards of supervision/collaboration with NPCs; (2) vicarious liability, arising from agency law, where physicians are held accountable for NPC clinical care that does not meet the national standard of care; and (3) responsibility for medical errors when the NPC and physician are co-employees of the corporate enterprise. Physician-NPC co-employee relationships are highlighted because they are new and becoming predominant in existing healthcare models. Because of their novelty, there is a paucity of judicial decisions determining liability for NPC errors in this setting. Knowledge of the existence of these risks will allow physicians to make informed decisions on what relationships they will enter with NPCs and how these relationships will be structured and monitored. PMID:24873129

  7. Contaminated land liability issues: legal perspective.

    PubMed

    Fogleman, V M

    2000-09-01

    Until recently, companies that contaminated land faced little prospect of being prosecuted or having claims made against them for any personal injuries or property damage arising from the contamination. Most companies would have considered it to be inconceivable that they could be required to clean up contamination resulting from an historic disposal, particularly if the disposal had been neither negligent nor unlawful. Current environmental law differs significantly, however, from the law which existed even 10 years ago. This paper examines liabilities arising from contaminated land. First, it discusses the new contaminated land regime and a parallel regime to remediate sites that are contaminated with radioactive substances. Second, it discusses remediation liabilities for water pollution. Such liabilities may well involve the remediation of contaminated land when groundwater is polluted. Finally, the paper examines liabilities for property damage and personal injuries arising from contamination by radioactive substances.

  8. The Novel N-Substituted Benztropine Analog GA2-50 Possesses Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Profiles Favorable for a Candidate Substitute Medication for Cocaine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    OTHMAN, AHMED A.; NEWMAN, AMY H.; EDDINGTON, NATALIE D.

    2009-01-01

    GA2-50 is a novel N-substituted benztropine analog with improved potency and selectivity for the dopamine transporter. The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of GA2-50 were characterized as a part of its preclinical evaluation as a substitute medication for cocaine abuse. In vitro transport and metabolism studies as well as pharmacokinetic studies in rats were conducted. Effect of GA2-50 on the extracelluar nucleus accumbens (NAc) dopamine levels and on cocaine’s induced dopamine elevation was evaluated using intracerebral microdialysis. GA2-50 showed high transcellular permeability despite being a P-glycoprotein substrate. GA2-50 was a substrate of human CYP2D6, CYP2C19, CYP2E1, rat CYP2C11, CYP2D1, CYP3A1, and CYP1A2; with low intrinsic clearance values. In vivo, GA2-50 showed high brain uptake (Ri ~ 10), large volume of distribution (Vss =37 L/kg), and long elimination half-life (t½ =19 h). GA2-50 resulted in 1.6- and 2.7-fold dopamine elevation at the 5 and 10 mg/kg i.v. doses. Dopamine elevation induced by GA2-50 was significantly reduced, slower and longer lasting than previously observed for cocaine. GA2-50 had no significant effect on cocaine’s induced dopamine elevation upon simultaneous administration. Results from the present study indicate that GA2-50 possesses several attributes sought after for a substitute medication for cocaine abuse. PMID:18425847

  9. Parent Abuse: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennair, Nicola; Mellor, David

    2007-01-01

    A recent focus of research and clinical practice has been on the issue of abuse of parents by their children (parent abuse). This paper reviews the literature on this phenomenon. While parent abuse falls under the umbrella of family violence, it appears to be qualitatively different from other forms of intra-family abuse. Research has primarily…

  10. Counseling Abused Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Emily Jean

    This guide on counseling abused children was written to help counselors meet the needs of children and adolescents and to provide ways of working with the child's family. Chapter 1 presents an overview of child maltreatment by identifying types of maltreatment (neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse and exploitation, and emotional abuse or neglect)…

  11. [Misuse of tianeptine: five cases of abuse].

    PubMed

    Leterme, Loïc; Singlan, Yves-Stéphane; Auclair, Valérie; Le Boisselier, Reynald; Frimas, Vincent

    2003-11-01

    Five cases of excessive consumption of tianeptine suggest possible drug-abuse of this substance. This side effect is unknown in animals and humans. According to DSM IV, CIM 10 criteria and the French public health code, these five patients had pathological profiles of psychoactive drug abusers. Tianeptine dosage was always used higher than recommended and the drug was taken in association with other psychotropes. Withdrawal was difficult and induced anxiety and other disorders which led to relapse in most of the patients.

  12. Polydrug abuse: A review of opioid and benzodiazepine combination use

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jermaine D.; Mogali, Shanthi; Comer, Sandra D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews studies examining the pharmacological interactions and epidemiology of the combined use of opioids and benzodiazepines (BZD). A search of English language publications from 1970 - 2012 was conducted using PubMed and PsycINFO®. Our search found approximately 200 articles appropriate for inclusion in this paper. While numerous reports indicate that the co-abuse of opioids and BZDs is ubiquitous around the world, the reasons for the co-abuse of these medications are not entirely clear. Though the possibility remains that opioid (ab)users are using BZDs therapeutically to self-medicate anxiety, mania or insomnia, the data reviewed in this paper suggest that BZD use is primarily recreational. For example, co-users report seeking BZD prescriptions for the purpose of enhancing opioid intoxication or “high,” and use doses that exceed the therapeutic range. Since there are few clinical studies investigating the pharmacological interaction and abuse liability of their combined use, this hypothesis has not been extensively evaluated in clinical settings. As such, our analysis encourages further systematic investigation of BZD abuse among opioid users. The co-abuse of BZDs and opioids is substantial and has negative consequences for general health, overdose lethality, and treatment outcome. Physicians should address this important and underappreciated problem with more cautious prescribing practices, and increased vigilance for abusive patterns of use. PMID:22857878

  13. Behavioral economics of drug self-administration and drug abuse policy.

    PubMed Central

    Hursh, S R

    1991-01-01

    The concepts of behavioral economics have proven useful for understanding the environmental control of overall levels of responding for a variety of commodities, including reinforcement by drug self-administration. These general concepts are summarized for application to the analysis of drug-reinforced behavior and proposed as the basis for future applications. This behavioral agenda includes the assessment of abuse liability, the assay of drug-reinforcer interactions, the design of drug abuse interventions, and the formulation of drug abuse public policy. These separate domains of investigation are described as part of an overall strategy for designing model projects to control drug use and testing public policy initiatives. PMID:1955823

  14. Vicarious liability: Is it an issue for your organization?

    PubMed

    West, John C

    2016-07-01

    Vicarious liability is a very real concern for hospitals and other health care entities. There are two forms of vicarious liability: respondeat superior (liability for an employee's actions) and agency (liability for nonemployees who appear to be the agent of the entity). Since an entity works through its employees, there is little that can be done, in most cases, to avoid respondeat superior liability. Entities need to be aware of the ways in which nonemployees can be perceived to be the entity's agent so that the appearance of agency can be prevented. There are methods to avoid vicarious liability and to deal with it should it occur.

  15. Vicarious liability: Is it an issue for your organization?

    PubMed

    West, John C

    2016-07-01

    Vicarious liability is a very real concern for hospitals and other health care entities. There are two forms of vicarious liability: respondeat superior (liability for an employee's actions) and agency (liability for nonemployees who appear to be the agent of the entity). Since an entity works through its employees, there is little that can be done, in most cases, to avoid respondeat superior liability. Entities need to be aware of the ways in which nonemployees can be perceived to be the entity's agent so that the appearance of agency can be prevented. There are methods to avoid vicarious liability and to deal with it should it occur. PMID:27400173

  16. [Current issues in medical liability].

    PubMed

    Kaatsch, H J

    1987-01-01

    Currently, liability discussions are being dominated by AIDS and the legal problems associated with birth and death. The introduction of routine AIDS tests without the knowledge of those concerned is disputed heatedly and, in fact, may well constitute bodily assault and render those responsible liable to prosecution. In AIDS cases, the apparent breach of the Hippocratic oath of secrecy by Physicians can be justified on the grounds of both the extraordinary circumstances prevailing and conflicting duties. The transmission of AIDS could give rise to prosecution for causing bodily injury or manslaughter. The drawing up of a law to protect embryos is designed to establish legal constraints in the fields of reproduction and gene technology. In reframing section 168 StGB, which provides protection to the dead embryo, legislators assume that the head of a medical clinic is the lawful custodian of the corpse of a person who has died in his institution. This should help to resolve many of the problems arising from post-mortem examinations. The questions of euthanasia and medical assistance in cases of suicide were raised at the 1986 Conference of German Lawyers. Whereas medical treatment that could be considered as interference with the natural process of dying may be withdrawn in the case of irreversible terminal suffering, active euthanasia, i.e. the deliberate killing of a terminal patient, was rejected. With regard to noninterference in a suicide attempt by a third party, the free decision of the person wishing to commit suicide should be respected. In general, however, the maxim in dubio pro vita should be respected and where any doubt exists, an attempt should be made to save the person's life.

  17. Child abuse by drowning.

    PubMed

    Griest, K J; Zumwalt, R E

    1989-01-01

    Drowning as a form of subtle fatal child abuse is difficult to distinguish from accidental immersion or from sudden unexpected natural death when the circumstances of immersion are concealed. Homicidal drownings are unwitnessed, usually occurring in the home, and the victims are young, either infants or toddlers. Accidental drownings are more likely to involve toddlers or older children in public areas such as swimming pools, drainage ditches, lakes, and rivers. This is especially true in rural areas. In cities, bathtubs remain a major site of accidental childhood drownings. Perpetrators of deliberate drownings often fit the sociopathologic profile of a child abuser. Because there is often a survival interval between immersion and death, pathologic findings consistent with postimmersion syndrome suggest the cause of death. Foreign material in the lungs, if immersion was other than in clear tap water, and injuries of the face are other positive correlating factors. A thorough investigation of the circumstances and cooperation between the investigating agency and the pathologist are essential to determine the correct manner of death in these cases. PMID:2909975

  18. Child abuse by drowning.

    PubMed

    Griest, K J; Zumwalt, R E

    1989-01-01

    Drowning as a form of subtle fatal child abuse is difficult to distinguish from accidental immersion or from sudden unexpected natural death when the circumstances of immersion are concealed. Homicidal drownings are unwitnessed, usually occurring in the home, and the victims are young, either infants or toddlers. Accidental drownings are more likely to involve toddlers or older children in public areas such as swimming pools, drainage ditches, lakes, and rivers. This is especially true in rural areas. In cities, bathtubs remain a major site of accidental childhood drownings. Perpetrators of deliberate drownings often fit the sociopathologic profile of a child abuser. Because there is often a survival interval between immersion and death, pathologic findings consistent with postimmersion syndrome suggest the cause of death. Foreign material in the lungs, if immersion was other than in clear tap water, and injuries of the face are other positive correlating factors. A thorough investigation of the circumstances and cooperation between the investigating agency and the pathologist are essential to determine the correct manner of death in these cases.

  19. Avoiding liability in contact lens practice.

    PubMed

    Classé, J G

    1994-01-01

    Contact lens practice is the leading source of liability claims involving optometrists. Claims most often allege negligence, although informed consent or product liability may also be causes of legal claims for damages. For daily wear patients, the most likely causes of claims are nonapproved use of lenses or solutions, monovision contact lenses, negligence by a contact lens technician, failure to verify lenses before dispensing, mismanagement of contact lens-related corneal abrasions, and inadequate monitoring of ocular health. For extended-wear patients, the most common sources of liability claims are inappropriate patient selection, inadequate training of patients, improper wearing schedules, improper management of contact lens-related corneal complications, and inadequate monitoring of ocular health.

  20. Civil liability: characterization of the demand for lawsuits against dentists.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Alice Aquino; Herrera, Lara Maria; Melani, Rodolfo Francisco Haltenhoff

    2016-01-01

    In light of the fact that dentists may be held civilly liable for their practice, it is important to understand the current situation of lawsuits filed against these professionals by studying current legal decisions and the literature. The objective of this study was to analyze the case law of the Court of Justice of São Paulo, Brazil, relative to the profile of patients and professionals, the most commonly involved specialties, the amounts litigated and the court decisions pertaining to civil liability lawsuits against dentists. In an inductive approach, a single researcher screened and collected civil liability rulings by accessing the Court's website, and following a statistical-descriptive procedure and an indirect observation technique. The most frequently involved specialty was prosthodontics. However, oral and maxillofacial surgery was related to a higher incidence of damages awarded to settle claims and to higher damage amounts. The dentist was found guilty in 44.32% of the cases researched. Pecuniary damages ranged between R$ 485.50 and R$ 12,530.00, and non-pecuniary damages ranged between R$ 2,500.00 and R$ 70,000.00. Most lawsuits were filed by women against male dentists. An increase in the relative number of lawsuits against companies versus individuals was observed.

  1. Civil liability: characterization of the demand for lawsuits against dentists.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Alice Aquino; Herrera, Lara Maria; Melani, Rodolfo Francisco Haltenhoff

    2016-01-01

    In light of the fact that dentists may be held civilly liable for their practice, it is important to understand the current situation of lawsuits filed against these professionals by studying current legal decisions and the literature. The objective of this study was to analyze the case law of the Court of Justice of São Paulo, Brazil, relative to the profile of patients and professionals, the most commonly involved specialties, the amounts litigated and the court decisions pertaining to civil liability lawsuits against dentists. In an inductive approach, a single researcher screened and collected civil liability rulings by accessing the Court's website, and following a statistical-descriptive procedure and an indirect observation technique. The most frequently involved specialty was prosthodontics. However, oral and maxillofacial surgery was related to a higher incidence of damages awarded to settle claims and to higher damage amounts. The dentist was found guilty in 44.32% of the cases researched. Pecuniary damages ranged between R$ 485.50 and R$ 12,530.00, and non-pecuniary damages ranged between R$ 2,500.00 and R$ 70,000.00. Most lawsuits were filed by women against male dentists. An increase in the relative number of lawsuits against companies versus individuals was observed. PMID:27556556

  2. Process liability evaluation for EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Hajime; Tawarayama, Kazuo; Tanaka, Yuusuke; Kawamura, Daisuke; Arisawa, Yukiyasu; Uno, Taiga; Kamo, Takashi; Tanaka, Toshihiko; Itani, Toshiro; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Yumi; Inanami, Ryoichi; Takai, Kosuke; Murano, Koji; Koshiba, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Kohji; Mori, Ichiro

    2009-03-01

    This paper concerns the readiness of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) for high-volume manufacture based on accelerated development in critical areas and the construction of a process liability (PL) test site that integrates results in these areas. The overall lithography performance was determined from the performance of the exposure tool, the printability obtainable with the resist, mask fabrication with accurate critical dimension (CD) control, and correction technology for mask data preparation. The EUV1 exposure tool can carry out exposure over the full field (26 mm × 33 mm) at a resolution high enough for 32-nm line-and-space patterns when Selete Standard Resist 3 (SSR3) is used. Thus, the test site was designed for the full-field exposure of various pattern sizes [half-pitch (hp) 32-50 nm]. The CD variation of the mask was found to be as good as 2.8 nm (3σ) and only one printable defect was detected. The effect of flare on CD variation is a critical issue in EUVL; so flare was compensated for based on the point spread function for the projection optics of the EUV1 and aerial simulations that took resist blur into account. The accuracy obtained when an electronic design automation (EDA) tool was used for mask resizing was found to be very good (error <= +/-2 nm). Metal wiring patterns with a size of hp 32 nm were successfully formed by wafer processing. The production readiness of EUVL based on the integration of results in these areas was evaluated by electrical tests on low-resistance tungsten wiring. The yield for the electrically open test for hp 50 nm (32-nm logic node) and hp 40 nm (22-nm logic node) were found to be over 60% and around 50%, respectively; and the yield tended to decrease as patterns became smaller. We found the PL test site to be very useful for determining where further improvements need to be made and for evaluating the production readiness of EUVL.

  3. Analysis of your professional liability insurance policy.

    PubMed

    SADUSK, J F; HASSARD, H; WATERSON, R

    1958-01-01

    The most important lessons for the physician to learn in regard to his professional liability insurance coverage are the following:1. The physician should carefully read his professional liability policy and should secure the educated aid of his attorney and his insurance broker, if they are conversant with this field.2. He should particularly read the definition of coverage and carefully survey the exclusion clauses which may deny him coverage under certain circumstances.3. If the physician is in partnership or in a group, he should be certain that he has contingent partnership coverage.4. The physician should accept coverage only from an insurance carrier of sufficient size and stability that he can be sure his coverage will be guaranteed for "latent liability" claims as the years go along-certainly for his lifetime.5. The insurance carrier offering the professional liability policy should be prepared to offer coverages up to at least $100,000/$300,000.6. The physician should be assured that the insurance carrier has claims-handling personnel and legal counsel who are experienced and expert in the professional liability field and who are locally available for service.7. The physician is best protected by a local or state group program, next best by a national group program, and last, by individual coverage.8. The physician should look with suspicion on a cancellation clause in which his policy may be summarily cancelled on brief notice.9. The physician should not buy professional liability insurance on the basis of price alone; adequacy of coverage and service and a good insurance company for his protection should be the deciding factors.

  4. Analysis of your professional liability insurance policy.

    PubMed

    SADUSK, J F; HASSARD, H; WATERSON, R

    1958-01-01

    The most important lessons for the physician to learn in regard to his professional liability insurance coverage are the following:1. The physician should carefully read his professional liability policy and should secure the educated aid of his attorney and his insurance broker, if they are conversant with this field.2. He should particularly read the definition of coverage and carefully survey the exclusion clauses which may deny him coverage under certain circumstances.3. If the physician is in partnership or in a group, he should be certain that he has contingent partnership coverage.4. The physician should accept coverage only from an insurance carrier of sufficient size and stability that he can be sure his coverage will be guaranteed for "latent liability" claims as the years go along-certainly for his lifetime.5. The insurance carrier offering the professional liability policy should be prepared to offer coverages up to at least $100,000/$300,000.6. The physician should be assured that the insurance carrier has claims-handling personnel and legal counsel who are experienced and expert in the professional liability field and who are locally available for service.7. The physician is best protected by a local or state group program, next best by a national group program, and last, by individual coverage.8. The physician should look with suspicion on a cancellation clause in which his policy may be summarily cancelled on brief notice.9. The physician should not buy professional liability insurance on the basis of price alone; adequacy of coverage and service and a good insurance company for his protection should be the deciding factors. PMID:13489519

  5. 7 CFR 281.6 - Liabilities and sanctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION OF SNAP ON INDIAN RESERVATIONS § 281.6 Liabilities and sanctions. An ITO administering SNAP on a reservation is subject to the same liabilities...

  6. Potential liability for transfusion-associated AIDS.

    PubMed

    Miller, P J; O'Connell, J; Leipold, A; Wenzel, R P

    1985-06-21

    Statistical evidence for the transmission of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) through blood and blood products is cited, and the potential legal ramifications for blood suppliers are discussed. An AIDS victim could bring a claim against a hospital or blood bank on the contention that the facility had supplied an unfit product for patient use. Remedies for recovery in such a case might be based on a breach of implied warranties, strict liability, or negligence. Precautions which blood suppliers and physicians can take to reduce the potential for liability are suggested.

  7. EMAC Volunteers: Liability and Workers’ Compensation

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Wilfredo; Kershner, Stacie P.; Penn, Matthew S.

    2015-01-01

    The Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC) provides a mechanism for states to assist each other during natural disasters and other emergencies. Congress ratified EMAC in 1996, and all 50 states and 3 territories have adopted it. EMAC allows a state affected by a disaster to request personnel and materiel from another state. For personnel requests, EMAC provides that the requesting state cover the tort liability and the responding state cover the workers’ compensation liability. This article discusses the limitations of EMAC in deploying volunteers and how the Uniform Emergency Volunteer Health Practitioners Act and other provisions address those limitations. PMID:24041195

  8. Trends in liability affecting technical writers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driskill, L. P.

    1981-01-01

    Liability of technical writers for defective products is explored. Documents generated during a product's life cycle (including design memos, design tests, clinical trials, trial use reports, letters, and proposals) become relevant because they are likely to become the only available means of showing that the product was not defectively designed. These documents become the evidence that the product underwent balanced and well considered planning, development, testing, quality control, and field testing. The predicted increased involvement of technical writers in the prevention and defense of product liability claims is cited in view of a greater number of cases turning on "failure to warn".

  9. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Cold Medicine Abuse DrugFacts: Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised May 2014 Some ... diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines are usually consumed ...

  10. Pollution liability. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning court decisions regarding pollution liability. Specific aspects of pollution legislation that must be proven to establish liability are discussed. Federal, state, or civil exemptions to pollution laws are detailed. Pollution liability insurance is examined. Punitive assessments providing economic recovery and clean up costs to injured parties are briefly considered. Specific court decisions are used to highlight general principles of pollution liability. (Contains a minimum of 225 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. 12 CFR 1270.10 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 1270.10 Section... Consolidated Obligations § 1270.10 Joint and several liability. (a) In general—(1) Each and every Bank..., the joint and several liability of all of the Banks on any consolidated obligation. (b)...

  12. 12 CFR 1270.10 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 1270.10 Section... Consolidated Obligations § 1270.10 Joint and several liability. (a) In general. (1) Each and every Bank..., the joint and several liability of all of the Banks on any consolidated obligation. (b)...

  13. 31 CFR 50.90 - Cap on annual liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cap on annual liability. 50.90 Section 50.90 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Cap on Annual Liability § 50.90 Cap on annual liability. Pursuant to Section 103 of the Act,...

  14. 26 CFR 1.1502-6 - Liability for tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Liability for tax. 1.1502-6 Section 1.1502-6 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Consolidated Tax Liability § 1.1502-6 Liability for tax. (a) Several...

  15. 26 CFR 1.1502-6 - Liability for tax.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Liability for tax. 1.1502-6 Section 1.1502-6 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Consolidated Tax Liability § 1.1502-6 Liability for tax. (a) Several...

  16. 31 CFR 50.90 - Cap on annual liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cap on annual liability. 50.90 Section 50.90 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Cap on Annual Liability § 50.90 Cap on annual liability. Pursuant to Section 103 of the Act,...

  17. 12 CFR 966.9 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 966.9 Section 966.9 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK LIABILITIES CONSOLIDATED OBLIGATIONS § 966.9 Joint and several liability. (a) In general. (1) Each and every Bank, individually...

  18. 48 CFR 252.247-7007 - Liability and insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liability and insurance... of Provisions And Clauses 252.247-7007 Liability and insurance. As prescribed in 247.270-4(g), use the following clause: Liability and Insurance (DEC 1991) (a) The Contractor shall be— (1) Liable...

  19. 48 CFR 1452.228-70 - Liability Insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liability Insurance. 1452... Insurance. As prescribed in 1428.301, insert the following clause: Liability Insurance—Department of the... extension thereof liability insurance in form satisfactory to the Contracting Officer by an...

  20. 48 CFR 252.217-7012 - Liability and insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liability and insurance... of Provisions And Clauses 252.217-7012 Liability and insurance. As prescribed in 217.7104(a), use the following clause: Liability and Insurance (AUG 2003) (a) The Contractor shall exercise its best efforts...

  1. 48 CFR 1452.228-70 - Liability Insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liability Insurance. 1452... Insurance. As prescribed in 1428.301, insert the following clause: Liability Insurance—Department of the... extension thereof liability insurance in form satisfactory to the Contracting Officer by an...

  2. 48 CFR 1352.271-79 - Liability and insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Liability and insurance. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1371.110, insert the following clause: Liability and... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liability and insurance.... Nothing contained in this paragraph shall create or give rise to any right, privilege or power in...

  3. 48 CFR 1352.271-79 - Liability and insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Liability and insurance. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1371.110, insert the following clause: Liability and... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Liability and insurance.... Nothing contained in this paragraph shall create or give rise to any right, privilege or power in...

  4. 47 CFR 64.1140 - Carrier liability for slamming.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carrier liability for slamming. 64.1140 Section 64.1140 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... Providers § 64.1140 Carrier liability for slamming. (a) Carrier Liability for Charges. Any...

  5. 14 CFR 1274.916 - Liability and risk of loss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Liability and risk of loss. 1274.916... AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.916 Liability and risk of..., or indemnification of, developers of experimental aerospace vehicles. Liability and Risk of Loss...

  6. 31 CFR 50.90 - Cap on annual liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cap on annual liability. 50.90 Section 50.90 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Cap on Annual Liability § 50.90 Cap on annual liability. Pursuant to Section 103 of the Act,...

  7. 31 CFR 50.90 - Cap on annual liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cap on annual liability. 50.90 Section 50.90 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Cap on Annual Liability § 50.90 Cap on annual liability. Pursuant to Section 103 of the Act,...

  8. 31 CFR 50.90 - Cap on annual liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cap on annual liability. 50.90 Section 50.90 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Cap on Annual Liability § 50.90 Cap on annual liability. Pursuant to Section 103 of the Act,...

  9. 48 CFR 1452.228-70 - Liability Insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liability Insurance. 1452... Insurance. As prescribed in 1428.301, insert the following clause: Liability Insurance—Department of the... extension thereof liability insurance in form satisfactory to the Contracting Officer by an...

  10. 48 CFR 1452.228-70 - Liability Insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liability Insurance. 1452... Insurance. As prescribed in 1428.301, insert the following clause: Liability Insurance—Department of the... extension thereof liability insurance in form satisfactory to the Contracting Officer by an...

  11. 48 CFR 3052.217-95 - Liability and insurance (USCG).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 3052.217-95 Liability and insurance (USCG). As prescribed in USCG guidance at (HSAR) 48 CFR 3017.9000(a) and (b), insert the following clause: Liability and... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Liability and...

  12. 48 CFR 1452.228-70 - Liability Insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Liability Insurance. 1452... Insurance. As prescribed in 1428.301, insert the following clause: Liability Insurance—Department of the... extension thereof liability insurance in form satisfactory to the Contracting Officer by an...

  13. 48 CFR 252.217-7012 - Liability and insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liability and insurance... of Provisions And Clauses 252.217-7012 Liability and insurance. As prescribed in 217.7104(a), use the following clause: Liability and Insurance (AUG 2003) (a) The Contractor shall exercise its best efforts...

  14. 48 CFR 252.247-7007 - Liability and insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Liability and insurance... of Provisions And Clauses 252.247-7007 Liability and insurance. As prescribed in 247.270-4(g), use the following clause: Liability and Insurance (DEC 1991) (a) The Contractor shall be— (1) Liable...

  15. 29 CFR 4219.16 - Imposition of liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Within 30 days after the mass withdrawal valuation date, the plan sponsor shall give written notice of... liability of employers, the plan sponsor shall issue a notice of redetermination liability in writing to... employers, the plan sponsor shall issue a notice of reallocation liability in writing to each...

  16. 47 CFR 32.25 - Unusual items and contingent liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unusual items and contingent liabilities. 32.25 Section 32.25 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... contingent liabilities. Extraordinary items, prior period adjustments, and contingent liabilities may...

  17. Drug Abuse and School Children: A Survey and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard T.

    The purpose of this paper is twofold: (1) to survey the nature of the drug abuse problem among younger students; and (2) to determine whether profiles from abuse research on older student groups apply to a younger student sample. Subjects were 676 fifth graders in a semi-urban area. Incidence data on drug use and availability were gathered through…

  18. Child Custody Decisions in Families Experiencing Woman Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Daniel G.

    1994-01-01

    Reviews literature comparing risk that battered women and men who batter will physically abuse their children. Challenges several tenets of social work practice lore and cautions practitioners about use of psychological tests and profiles to judge child abuse potential and parenting ability. Discusses hazards of mediation and joint custody and…

  19. The White Bull effect: abusive coauthorship and publication parasitism

    PubMed Central

    Kwok, L

    2005-01-01

    Junior researchers can be abused and bullied by unscrupulous senior collaborators. This article describes the profile of a type of serial abuser, the White Bull, who uses his academic seniority to distort authorship credit and who disguises his parasitism with carefully premeditated deception. Further research into the personality traits of such perpetrators is warranted. PMID:16131560

  20. The White Bull effect: abusive coauthorship and publication parasitism.

    PubMed

    Kwok, L S

    2005-09-01

    Junior researchers can be abused and bullied by unscrupulous senior collaborators. This article describes the profile of a type of serial abuser, the White Bull, who uses his academic seniority to distort authorship credit and who disguises his parasitism with carefully premeditated deception. Further research into the personality traits of such perpetrators is warranted.

  1. Students and Drug Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todays Educ, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Introduction to "Students and Drug Abuse, prepared by the Public Information Branch and Center for Studies of Narcotic and Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, in cooperation with the staff of Today's Education.

  2. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  3. Abuse during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... depressed, eat unhealthy foods, or pick up bad habits such as smoking or drinking . An abusive partner may try to ... depressed, eat unhealthy foods, or pick up bad habits such as smoking or drinking . An abusive partner may try to ...

  4. Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug abuse. It could be Taking a medicine that ... purpose, such as getting high Abusing some prescription drugs can lead to addiction. These include narcotic painkillers, ...

  5. Child Abuse: Educator's Responsibilities. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Office of the Attorney General, Sacramento. Crime Prevention Center.

    This document presents the educator with a guide to child abuse. A section defining child abuse examines the issues of physical abuse, physical neglect, sexual abuse, and emotional maltreatment. Areas discussed for these types of abuse include abuse indicators, location of injury, history, behavioral indicators, and types of injury. Incestuous and…

  6. 7 CFR 983.82 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal liability. 983.82 Section 983.82 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  7. 7 CFR 984.84 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Personal liability. 984.84 Section 984.84 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  8. 7 CFR 984.84 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Personal liability. 984.84 Section 984.84 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  9. 7 CFR 984.84 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Personal liability. 984.84 Section 984.84 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  10. 7 CFR 984.84 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal liability. 984.84 Section 984.84 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  11. 7 CFR 984.84 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Personal liability. 984.84 Section 984.84 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WALNUTS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  12. Sexual Harassment at Camp: Reducing Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakleaf, Linda; Grube, Angela Johnson

    2003-01-01

    Employers are responsible for sexual harassment perpetrated by a supervisor. Camps may be responsible for sexual harassment between campers. Steps to reduce liability include providing multiple channels for reporting sexual harassment; having written policies prohibiting sexual harassment and procedures for reporting it; posting these policies and…

  13. 7 CFR 982.81 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Personal liability. 982.81 Section 982.81 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON...

  14. 7 CFR 982.81 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal liability. 982.81 Section 982.81 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON...

  15. 7 CFR 982.81 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Personal liability. 982.81 Section 982.81 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON...

  16. 7 CFR 982.81 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Personal liability. 982.81 Section 982.81 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON...

  17. 7 CFR 982.81 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Personal liability. 982.81 Section 982.81 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON...

  18. 12 CFR 229.38 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... deadline for return under the U.C.C., Regulation J (12 CFR part 210), or § 229.30(c) in connection with a... OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Collection of Checks § 229.38 Liability....

  19. 7 CFR 922.70 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Personal liability. 922.70 Section 922.70 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED...

  20. 7 CFR 922.70 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal liability. 922.70 Section 922.70 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED...

  1. 7 CFR 922.70 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Personal liability. 922.70 Section 922.70 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED...

  2. 7 CFR 922.70 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Personal liability. 922.70 Section 922.70 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED...

  3. 7 CFR 922.70 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Personal liability. 922.70 Section 922.70 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE APRICOTS GROWN IN DESIGNATED...

  4. The End of Responsible Relative Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Mark C.

    1987-01-01

    The article describes the conflict between parents and state governments regarding the relative liability in financial responsibility for residential placement of handicapped, particularly developmentally disabled, children and comments on implications of the "Parks v. Pavkovic" decision in Illinois which held the state financially responsible.…

  5. [Agent liability: a law in flux].

    PubMed

    Hardy, J

    2000-02-01

    This communication aims to show the impact of the recent reform of the French sanitary organization, and of the evolutions of the French law of liability. Contrary to what it seems, the important reform of the safety system has less immediate consequences than the change in laws on the way in which transfusion professionals perceive their juridical situation.

  6. 31 CFR 210.11 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Limited liability. 210.11 Section 210.11 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN THE...

  7. 31 CFR 210.11 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limited liability. 210.11 Section 210.11 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN THE...

  8. 31 CFR 210.11 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Limited liability. 210.11 Section 210.11 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN THE...

  9. 31 CFR 210.10 - RDFI liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false RDFI liability. 210.10 Section 210.10 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN THE...

  10. 31 CFR 210.10 - RDFI liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false RDFI liability. 210.10 Section 210.10 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN THE...

  11. 31 CFR 210.10 - RDFI liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false RDFI liability. 210.10 Section 210.10 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN THE...

  12. 31 CFR 210.11 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Limited liability. 210.11 Section 210.11 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN THE...

  13. 31 CFR 210.11 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Limited liability. 210.11 Section 210.11 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE FISCAL SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN THE...

  14. 31 CFR 210.10 - RDFI liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false RDFI liability. 210.10 Section 210.10 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN THE...

  15. 31 CFR 210.10 - RDFI liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false RDFI liability. 210.10 Section 210.10 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE FISCAL SERVICE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PARTICIPATION IN THE...

  16. 40 CFR 264.147 - Liability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... least $10 million; and (C) Assets in the United States amounting to either: (1) At least 90 percent of... amount of liability coverage to be demonstrated by this test; and (D) Assets in the United States... United States, a guarantee may be used to satisfy the requirements of this section only if the...

  17. 40 CFR 264.147 - Liability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... least $10 million; and (C) Assets in the United States amounting to either: (1) At least 90 percent of... amount of liability coverage to be demonstrated by this test; and (D) Assets in the United States... United States, a guarantee may be used to satisfy the requirements of this section only if the...

  18. 40 CFR 265.147 - Liability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... net worth of at least $10 million; and (C) Assets in the United States amounting to either: (1) At... amount of liability coverage to be demonstrated by this test; and (D) Assets in the United States... United States, a guarantee may be used to satisfy the requirements of this section only if the...

  19. 40 CFR 265.147 - Liability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... net worth of at least $10 million; and (C) Assets in the United States amounting to either: (1) At... amount of liability coverage to be demonstrated by this test; and (D) Assets in the United States... United States, a guarantee may be used to satisfy the requirements of this section only if the...

  20. 40 CFR 265.147 - Liability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... net worth of at least $10 million; and (C) Assets in the United States amounting to either: (1) At... amount of liability coverage to be demonstrated by this test; and (D) Assets in the United States... United States, a guarantee may be used to satisfy the requirements of this section only if the...

  1. 40 CFR 264.147 - Liability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... least $10 million; and (C) Assets in the United States amounting to either: (1) At least 90 percent of... amount of liability coverage to be demonstrated by this test; and (D) Assets in the United States... United States, a guarantee may be used to satisfy the requirements of this section only if the...

  2. 40 CFR 264.147 - Liability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... least $10 million; and (C) Assets in the United States amounting to either: (1) At least 90 percent of... amount of liability coverage to be demonstrated by this test; and (D) Assets in the United States... United States, a guarantee may be used to satisfy the requirements of this section only if the...

  3. 40 CFR 265.147 - Liability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... net worth of at least $10 million; and (C) Assets in the United States amounting to either: (1) At... amount of liability coverage to be demonstrated by this test; and (D) Assets in the United States... United States, a guarantee may be used to satisfy the requirements of this section only if the...

  4. Self-Insurance: Working within for Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Robert K.

    1993-01-01

    Through membership in intergovernmental cooperatives designed to provide liability protection, school districts can achieve greater control over insurance products at all levels. Defines terms, lists self-insurance pool contract provisions, and discusses dangers and miscellaneous issues for self-insurance pools. (MLF)

  5. Legal Liability of Individual School Board Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leverett, E. Freeman

    Federal court decisions and federal statutes have established a number of new rights for individuals in recent years, and the Supreme Court decided in 1975 that school board members have only limited immunity from liability for the possible denial of those rights by school board actions. These two developments have drastically increased the amount…

  6. 7 CFR 955.85 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Personal liability. 955.85 Section 955.85 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIDALIA ONIONS GROWN IN...

  7. 7 CFR 955.85 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal liability. 955.85 Section 955.85 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIDALIA ONIONS GROWN IN...

  8. 7 CFR 955.85 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Personal liability. 955.85 Section 955.85 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIDALIA ONIONS GROWN IN...

  9. 7 CFR 955.85 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Personal liability. 955.85 Section 955.85 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIDALIA ONIONS GROWN IN...

  10. 7 CFR 955.85 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Personal liability. 955.85 Section 955.85 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIDALIA ONIONS GROWN IN...

  11. The Tort Liability of the Classroom Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripps, Stephen R.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the tort liabilities (both intentional and negligent torts) to which school and college teachers are exposed. Noting that the doctrine of sovereign immunity has protected the instructor and that litigation has increased in states which have waived their immunity, the author concludes that the likelihood of litigation is greater now than…

  12. 7 CFR 3565.505 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Liability. 3565.505 Section 3565.505 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM Agency Guaranteed Loans That Back Ginnie Mae Guaranteed...

  13. 40 CFR 267.147 - Liability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... section by obtaining a letter of credit for liability coverage as specified in 40 CFR 264.147(h). (4... specified in 40 CFR 264.151(h)(2). A certified copy of the guarantee must accompany the items sent to the... executed as described in this section and 40 CFR 264.151(h)(2) is a legally valid and...

  14. 40 CFR 261.147 - Liability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... paragraphs (a) and (b) of 40 CFR 264.147 and 265.147. (3) To demonstrate that he meets this test, the owner... must be identical to the wording specified in § 261.151(h). The wording of the certificate of insurance... liability coverage as specified in paragraph (h) of this section. (4) An owner or operator may meet...

  15. Violence in the Workplace: Avoiding Institutional Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Ranaye J.; Hall, Bradley H.

    This document is intended to provide career and technical education faculty and administrators with information on institutional liability relating to workplace violence as documented in court cases. The major legislation regarding violence in schools is summarized. Seventeen warning signs of violence are presented along with simple steps…

  16. Preventing punitive damages from employment liability claims.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Robert E

    2004-01-01

    In general, employers do not have a good grasp of the liability they confront in dealing with personnel in terms of hiring, discipline, and firing. Medical practices frequently are quite oblivious to the problem. This article discusses recent judicial decisions and the ways practices may deal with prevention of litigation with special emphasis on management training.

  17. 31 CFR 100.7 - Treasury's liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Treasury's liability. 100.7 Section 100.7 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN Exchange of Mutilated Paper Currency §...

  18. Auditing medical records helps reduce liability.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, G; Winfrey, S

    1990-10-01

    An internal audit of a hospital's medical records department compares the department to standards developed by the hospital and to benchmarks set by accrediting organizations. An auditor can review the department's economy and effectiveness through employee surveys, direct observation, and interviews. By uncovering deficiencies and making recommendations for their correction, an internal audit can help limit a hospital's liability exposure.

  19. Trouble with Your Liability Insurance? Here's Why.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AGB Reports, 1985

    1985-01-01

    The insurance industry is in trouble, which means problems for colleges and universities--especially in the area of liability insurance. Some strategies for higher education are discussed, including risk-management programs, self-insurance, catastrophic or excess insurance, and risk-management consortia. (MLW)

  20. 27 CFR 479.40 - Partnership liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Partnership liability. 479.40 Section 479.40 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  1. 27 CFR 479.40 - Partnership liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Partnership liability. 479.40 Section 479.40 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  2. 27 CFR 479.40 - Partnership liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2012-04-01 2010-04-01 true Partnership liability. 479.40 Section 479.40 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  3. 27 CFR 479.40 - Partnership liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Partnership liability. 479.40 Section 479.40 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  4. 27 CFR 479.40 - Partnership liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Partnership liability. 479.40 Section 479.40 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION MACHINE GUNS, DESTRUCTIVE DEVICES, AND...

  5. 5 CFR 838.1015 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Court Orders Affecting Civil Service Retirement Benefits § 838.1015 Liability. OPM is not liable for any payment made from employee retirement benefits pursuant to a...

  6. 5 CFR 838.1015 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) COURT ORDERS AFFECTING RETIREMENT BENEFITS Court Orders Affecting Civil Service Retirement Benefits § 838.1015 Liability. OPM is not liable for any payment made from employee retirement benefits pursuant to a...

  7. 7 CFR 3565.505 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Liability. 3565.505 Section 3565.505 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM Agency Guaranteed Loans That Back Ginnie Mae Guaranteed...

  8. 12 CFR 229.38 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... affect a paying bank's liability to its customer under the U.C.C. or other law. (b) Paying bank's failure... deadline for return under the U.C.C., Regulation J (12 CFR part 210), or § 229.30(c) in connection with a... provision, but not both. (c) Comparative negligence. If a person, including a bank, fails to...

  9. 7 CFR 923.70 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Personal liability. 923.70 Section 923.70 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN...

  10. 7 CFR 923.70 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Personal liability. 923.70 Section 923.70 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN...

  11. 7 CFR 923.70 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal liability. 923.70 Section 923.70 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN...

  12. 7 CFR 923.70 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Personal liability. 923.70 Section 923.70 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN...

  13. 7 CFR 923.70 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Personal liability. 923.70 Section 923.70 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SWEET CHERRIES GROWN IN...

  14. 7 CFR 981.85 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Personal liability. 981.85 Section 981.85 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  15. 7 CFR 981.85 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Personal liability. 981.85 Section 981.85 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  16. 7 CFR 981.85 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Personal liability. 981.85 Section 981.85 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  17. 7 CFR 981.85 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Personal liability. 981.85 Section 981.85 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  18. 7 CFR 981.85 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal liability. 981.85 Section 981.85 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ALMONDS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  19. 40 CFR 267.147 - Liability requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 CFR 264.147(j). (2) Surety bond for liability coverage. An owner or operator may meet the... coverage through the use of combinations of mechanisms as allowed by 40 CFR 264.147(a)(6). (8) An owner or... parent corporation of the owner or operator, or a firm with a “substantial business relationship”...

  20. 7 CFR 906.61 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER... liability. No member or alternate of the committee or any employee or agent thereof, shall be held... such member, alternate, agent, or employee, except for act of dishonesty, willful misconduct, or...

  1. 7 CFR 906.61 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER... liability. No member or alternate of the committee or any employee or agent thereof, shall be held... such member, alternate, agent, or employee, except for act of dishonesty, willful misconduct, or...

  2. 7 CFR 906.61 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER... liability. No member or alternate of the committee or any employee or agent thereof, shall be held... such member, alternate, agent, or employee, except for act of dishonesty, willful misconduct, or...

  3. 7 CFR 906.61 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER... liability. No member or alternate of the committee or any employee or agent thereof, shall be held... such member, alternate, agent, or employee, except for act of dishonesty, willful misconduct, or...

  4. 7 CFR 906.61 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER... liability. No member or alternate of the committee or any employee or agent thereof, shall be held... such member, alternate, agent, or employee, except for act of dishonesty, willful misconduct, or...

  5. 12 CFR 229.38 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... deadline for return under the U.C.C., Regulation J (12 CFR part 210), or § 229.30(c) in connection with a... OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Collection of Checks § 229.38 Liability....

  6. 12 CFR 229.38 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... deadline for return under the U.C.C., Regulation J (12 CFR part 210), or § 229.30(c) in connection with a...) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Collection of Checks § 229.38 Liability....

  7. 12 CFR 229.38 - Liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... deadline for return under the U.C.C., Regulation J (12 CFR part 210), or § 229.30(c) in connection with a...) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Collection of Checks § 229.38 Liability....

  8. 12 CFR 229.21 - Civil liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Civil liability. 229.21 Section 229.21 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Availability of Funds...

  9. Preventive Medicine: Safeguards against Virus Liability Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Phyllis L.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Colleges and universities that provide computer services have become vulnerable to potential lawsuits associated with contraction and spread of computer viruses. Bookstore, library, and computer classroom or laboratory are most susceptible. In addition to protection against legal liability, schools should take specific steps to prevent problems.…

  10. 5 CFR 2634.305 - Liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS EXECUTIVE BRANCH FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE, QUALIFIED TRUSTS, AND CERTIFICATES OF DIVESTITURE Contents of Public Reports § 2634.305 Liabilities. (a) In general. Each financial disclosure report filed pursuant to this subpart shall identify and include...

  11. 5 CFR 2634.305 - Liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS EXECUTIVE BRANCH FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE, QUALIFIED TRUSTS, AND CERTIFICATES OF DIVESTITURE Contents of Public Reports § 2634.305 Liabilities. (a) In general. Each financial disclosure report filed pursuant to this subpart shall identify and include...

  12. 5 CFR 2634.305 - Liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS EXECUTIVE BRANCH FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE, QUALIFIED TRUSTS, AND CERTIFICATES OF DIVESTITURE Contents of Public Reports § 2634.305 Liabilities. (a) In general. Each financial disclosure report filed pursuant to this subpart shall identify and include...

  13. 5 CFR 2634.305 - Liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS EXECUTIVE BRANCH FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE, QUALIFIED TRUSTS, AND CERTIFICATES OF DIVESTITURE Contents of Public Reports § 2634.305 Liabilities. (a) In general. Each financial disclosure report filed pursuant to this subpart shall identify and include...

  14. 5 CFR 2634.305 - Liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF GOVERNMENT ETHICS GOVERNMENT ETHICS EXECUTIVE BRANCH FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE, QUALIFIED TRUSTS, AND CERTIFICATES OF DIVESTITURE Contents of Public Reports § 2634.305 Liabilities. (a) In general. Each financial disclosure report filed pursuant to this subpart shall identify and include...

  15. 7 CFR 932.74 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Personal liability. 932.74 Section 932.74 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  16. 7 CFR 932.74 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Personal liability. 932.74 Section 932.74 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  17. 7 CFR 932.74 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal liability. 932.74 Section 932.74 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  18. 7 CFR 932.74 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Personal liability. 932.74 Section 932.74 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  19. 7 CFR 932.74 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Personal liability. 932.74 Section 932.74 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  20. 7 CFR 929.75 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Personal liability. 929.75 Section 929.75 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES...

  1. 7 CFR 929.75 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Personal liability. 929.75 Section 929.75 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES...

  2. 7 CFR 929.75 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal liability. 929.75 Section 929.75 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES...

  3. 7 CFR 929.75 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Personal liability. 929.75 Section 929.75 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES...

  4. 7 CFR 929.75 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Personal liability. 929.75 Section 929.75 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CRANBERRIES GROWN IN STATES...

  5. 7 CFR 966.90 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal liability. 966.90 Section 966.90 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA...

  6. 7 CFR 966.90 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Personal liability. 966.90 Section 966.90 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA...

  7. 7 CFR 966.90 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Personal liability. 966.90 Section 966.90 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA...

  8. 7 CFR 966.90 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Personal liability. 966.90 Section 966.90 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA...

  9. 7 CFR 966.90 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Personal liability. 966.90 Section 966.90 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA...

  10. 7 CFR 983.82 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Personal liability. 983.82 Section 983.82 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  11. 7 CFR 983.82 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Personal liability. 983.82 Section 983.82 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  12. 7 CFR 983.82 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Personal liability. 983.82 Section 983.82 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  13. 7 CFR 983.82 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Personal liability. 983.82 Section 983.82 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN...

  14. 7 CFR 1150.183 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Personal liability. 1150.183 Section 1150.183 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM Dairy Promotion and...

  15. 7 CFR 1150.183 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Personal liability. 1150.183 Section 1150.183 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MILK), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM Dairy Promotion and...

  16. 7 CFR 1150.183 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Personal liability. 1150.183 Section 1150.183 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM Dairy Promotion and...

  17. 7 CFR 1150.183 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Personal liability. 1150.183 Section 1150.183 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MILK), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM Dairy Promotion and...

  18. 30 CFR 874.15 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION GENERAL RECLAMATION REQUIREMENTS § 874.15 Limited liability. No State or... action taken or omitted in the course of carrying out an approved State or Indian tribe abandoned...

  19. 30 CFR 874.15 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION GENERAL RECLAMATION REQUIREMENTS § 874.15 Limited liability. No State or... action taken or omitted in the course of carrying out an approved State or Indian tribe abandoned...

  20. 30 CFR 874.15 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION GENERAL RECLAMATION REQUIREMENTS § 874.15 Limited liability. No State or... action taken or omitted in the course of carrying out an approved State or Indian tribe abandoned...

  1. 30 CFR 874.15 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION GENERAL RECLAMATION REQUIREMENTS § 874.15 Limited liability. No State or... action taken or omitted in the course of carrying out an approved State or Indian tribe abandoned...

  2. 30 CFR 874.15 - Limited liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION GENERAL RECLAMATION REQUIREMENTS § 874.15 Limited liability. No State or... action taken or omitted in the course of carrying out an approved State or Indian tribe abandoned...

  3. 7 CFR 925.68 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal liability. 925.68 Section 925.68 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GRAPES GROWN IN A DESIGNATED AREA...

  4. 7 CFR 925.68 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Personal liability. 925.68 Section 925.68 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GRAPES GROWN IN A DESIGNATED AREA...

  5. 7 CFR 925.68 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Personal liability. 925.68 Section 925.68 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GRAPES GROWN IN A DESIGNATED AREA...

  6. 7 CFR 925.68 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Personal liability. 925.68 Section 925.68 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GRAPES GROWN IN A DESIGNATED AREA...

  7. 7 CFR 925.68 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Personal liability. 925.68 Section 925.68 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GRAPES GROWN IN A DESIGNATED AREA...

  8. 7 CFR 920.69 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Personal liability. 920.69 Section 920.69 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  9. 7 CFR 920.69 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal liability. 920.69 Section 920.69 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  10. 7 CFR 920.69 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Personal liability. 920.69 Section 920.69 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  11. 7 CFR 920.69 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Personal liability. 920.69 Section 920.69 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  12. 7 CFR 920.69 - Personal liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Personal liability. 920.69 Section 920.69 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN...

  13. Substance Abuse. Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collaboration for Youth, Washington, DC.

    This paper presents the policy statement on substance abuse from the National Collaboration for Youth (NCY). The policy statement section lists programs and activities supported by the NCY. A section on background includes a statement of the issue of substance abuse. Areas examined in this section include alcohol abuse and drunk driving among…

  14. Elder Abuse Awareness Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Marilyn J.; Doyle, Kathleen

    The Elder Abuse Awareness Project was developed to determine the incidence of abuse and neglect of elderly people in several rural counties in central Illinois. A primary purpose of the study was to survey service providers as to their actual encounters with elder abuse and neglect. Each provider was asked about warning signs or cues that were…

  15. Child Abuse and Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Children's Centre, Paris (France).

    A series of four documents address the definition and identification of child abuse and neglect. In the first, which is designed for professionals, a historical review is followed by discussion of clinical and social evidence of abuse. Resources for managing child abuse are described, and personnel functions are outlined. The second document,…

  16. Dynamics of Parental Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Eugene; Schlater, Theodore L.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of the various categories of parental abuse are examined with special emphasis on abuse by adult offspring living in the same household or adults acting as caretakers or legal guardians for their elderly parents. Society's role in the dynamics of parental abuse is examined.

  17. 78 FR 19499 - National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute on Drug Abuse; Notice of Closed Meeting... Committee: National Institute on Drug Abuse Special Emphasis Panel; Profile Screening and Predictive..., Office of Extramural Affairs, National Institute on Drug Abuse, NIH, DHHS, Room 4227, MSC 9550,...

  18. Analysis of Your Professional Liability Insurance Policy

    PubMed Central

    Sadusk, Joseph F.; Hassard, Howard; Waterson, Rollen

    1958-01-01

    The most important lessons for the physician to learn in regard to his professional liability insurance coverage are the following: 1. The physician should carefully read his professional liability policy and should secure the educated aid of his attorney and his insurance broker, if they are conversant with this field. 2. He should particularly read the definition of coverage and carefully survey the exclusion clauses which may deny him coverage under certain circumstances. 3. If the physician is in partnership or in a group, he should be certain that he has contingent partnership coverage. 4. The physician should accept coverage only from an insurance carrier of sufficient size and stability that he can be sure his coverage will be guaranteed for “latent liability” claims as the years go along—certainly for his lifetime. 5. The insurance carrier offering the professional liability policy should be prepared to offer coverages up to at least $100,000/$300,000. 6. The physician should be assured that the insurance carrier has claims-handling personnel and legal counsel who are experienced and expert in the professional liability field and who are locally available for service. 7. The physician is best protected by a local or state group program, next best by a national group program, and last, by individual coverage. 8. The physician should look with suspicion on a cancellation clause in which his policy may be summarily cancelled on brief notice. 9. The physician should not buy professional liability insurance on the basis of price alone; adequacy of coverage and service and a good insurance company for his protection should be the deciding factors. PMID:13489519

  19. [Liability, moral consciousness and psychopatology. International comparative profiles].

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, Vincenzo; Desimoni, Luis Maria; Ventura, Nicoletta

    2012-01-01

    The paper considers the concepts of intentionality, judgment, desire, awareness and the relative scientific, psychological, psychiatric and neurophysiological studies, including the concept of "moral consciousness" and the evolution of moral standards, marked out by Piaget and Kolberg. There are several references to a psychopathology point of view, for which mental infirmity is independent from the verification of an organic substrate and classification in official nosology (it is said, then, that "it is true that mental infirmity can exist even in the absence of a typical disease of the mind, framed in the scientific classification of mental illness, it is still necessary that a defect in part descended from a morbid state, dependent on a pathological changes in clinically ascertained" (as Cass, Sec. I, n. 9739/1997). The concept of illness, then widens to include not only the organic psychoses, but psychic morbid disorders such as psychopathy, neuroses, disorders of affect too: under investigation, therefore, it is no longer the person-body, but the person-psyche. In psychiatry there are existing guidelines which assert an "integrated model" of mental illness, able to explain mental disorder based on different explanatory hypotheses of its nature and origin: essentially consisting of "an integrated vision that takes into account all the variables, biological, psychological, social, relational, that come into play in causing the disease", in such a manner developing from the monocausal etiology of mental illness vision, to a "multifactorial integrated" conception. PMID:23023119

  20. Abused and Neglected Elderly: What Can the Family Physician Do?

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Niels H.

    1986-01-01

    Family abuse involving children and spouses is estimated to occur with one Canadian child or spouse in 10. The same figures probably apply to elderly persons cared for by a family member. This paper defines and describes abuse and neglect of the elderly, reviews the stress factors that often underlie it and profiles high-risk candidates for giving and receiving abuse. It provides guidance in detecting the occurrence of abuse of the elderly and suggests means of handling such occurrences in a humane, sensible and protective way. PMID:20469454

  1. Inhalant Abuse and Dextromethorphan.

    PubMed

    Storck, Michael; Black, Laura; Liddell, Morgan

    2016-07-01

    Inhalant abuse is the intentional inhalation of a volatile substance for the purpose of achieving an altered mental state. As an important, yet underrecognized form of substance abuse, inhalant abuse crosses all demographic, ethnic, and socioeconomic boundaries, causing significant morbidity and mortality in school-aged and older children. This review presents current perspectives on epidemiology, detection, and clinical challenges of inhalant abuse and offers advice regarding the medical and mental health providers' roles in the prevention and management of this substance abuse problem. Also discussed is the misuse of a specific "over-the-counter" dissociative, dextromethorphan. PMID:27338970

  2. Environmental liability and redevelopment of old industrial land.

    PubMed

    Sigman, Hilary

    2010-01-01

    Many communities are concerned about the reuse of potentially contaminated land (brownfields) and believe that environmental liability is a hindrance to redevelopment. However, with land price adjustments, liability might not impede the reuse of this land. This article studies state liability rules-specifically, strict liability and joint and several liability-that affect the level and distribution of expected costs of private cleanup. It explores the effects of this variation on industrial land prices and vacancy rates and on reported brownfields in a panel of cities across the United States. In the estimated equations, joint and several liability reduces land prices and increases vacancy rates in central cities. The results suggest that liability is at least partly capitalized but does still deter redevelopment.

  3. Research design considerations for clinical studies of abuse-deterrent opioid analgesics: IMMPACT recommendations.

    PubMed

    Turk, Dennis C; O'Connor, Alec B; Dworkin, Robert H; Chaudhry, Amina; Katz, Nathaniel P; Adams, Edgar H; Brownstein, John S; Comer, Sandra D; Dart, Richard; Dasgupta, Nabarun; Denisco, Richard A; Klein, Michael; Leiderman, Deborah B; Lubran, Robert; Rappaport, Bob A; Zacny, James P; Ahdieh, Harry; Burke, Laurie B; Cowan, Penney; Jacobs, Petra; Malamut, Richard; Markman, John; Michna, Edward; Palmer, Pamela; Peirce-Sandner, Sarah; Potter, Jennifer S; Raja, Srinivasa N; Rauschkolb, Christine; Roland, Carl L; Webster, Lynn R; Weiss, Roger D; Wolf, Kerry

    2012-10-01

    Opioids are essential to the management of pain in many patients, but they also are associated with potential risks for abuse, overdose, and diversion. A number of efforts have been devoted to the development of abuse-deterrent formulations of opioids to reduce these risks. This article summarizes a consensus meeting that was organized to propose recommendations for the types of clinical studies that can be used to assess the abuse deterrence of different opioid formulations. Because of the many types of individuals who may be exposed to opioids, an opioid formulation will need to be studied in several populations using various study designs to determine its abuse-deterrent capabilities. It is recommended that the research conducted to evaluate abuse deterrence should include studies assessing: (1) abuse liability, (2) the likelihood that opioid abusers will find methods to circumvent the deterrent properties of the formulation, (3) measures of misuse and abuse in randomized clinical trials involving pain patients with both low risk and high risk of abuse, and (4) postmarketing epidemiological studies.

  4. Preventing and Recognizing Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abuse » Preventing and recognizing prescription drug abuse Prescription Drug Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Preventing and recognizing prescription drug abuse To ensure proper medical care, patients should discuss ...

  5. Teachers' Knowledge and Beliefs About Child Sexual Abuse.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Flores, María Mercedes; Márquez-Hernández, Verónica V; Granados-Gámez, Genoveva

    2016-07-01

    Child sexual abuse is one of the main types of abuse still to be addressed within the field of education, yet the education system itself can serve as a primary tool for its prevention. A better understanding of teachers' knowledge and beliefs about child sexual abuse will allow us to establish key starting points from which to utilize the system for prevention. Four hundred and fifty teachers participated in this study, completing a questionnaire regarding their knowledge and beliefs about child sexual abuse. The study revealed that over half the teachers, 65.3% (n = 294), had never received any type of training in child sexual abuse education and that the majority were not familiar with methods of identifying child sexual abuse, 90.7% (n = 279). Various mistaken beliefs were identified among the participating teachers, such as pathological profiles of abusers, that the vast majority of child sexual abuse implies violent behavior, and that there cannot be abusers the same age as the victim. These results indicate that knowledge deficiencies do exist about child sexual abuse among teachers and highlight the need for training in this field. PMID:27472508

  6. Coping capacity among women with abusive partners.

    PubMed

    Nurius, P S; Furrey, J; Berliner, L

    1992-01-01

    Coping capacity, although increasingly implicated as a mediating force in how individuals respond to personal threat, is an underrecognized factor in work with women of abusive partners. To explore the utility of coping capacity as a multivariable set to guide intervention with women of abusive partners, findings are reported comparing four groups of women: those whose partners do not engage in abuse, are abusive toward them, are sex offenders of children for whom the woman is a parent, or are offenders of children for whom the woman is not a parent. Three variable sets were included: vulnerability factors that may negatively influence appraisals of threat and ability to cope with abuse; coping responses that include cognitive, emotional, and behavioral reactions to the abuse; and coping resources expected to mediate effects of vulnerability factors and to influence the mobilization (of lack thereof) of coping responses. There were significant differences in coping capacity profiles across the four groups. These appeared to be a continuum of coping capacity, with women who were most directly threatened showing the lowest and women who were least directly threatened showing the highest levels of coping capacity. In order from the lowest to the highest levels of coping capacity were (1) battered women, (2) women whose partners are offenders against their children, (3) women whose partners are offenders against children of whom they are not the parent, and (4) control group women. The paper ends with a conceptual interpretation of the mediating functions of coping resources and implications for intervention and further study.

  7. Legal issues in environmental contractor liability

    SciTech Connect

    Slap, A.J.

    1994-12-31

    Business is booming for environmental professionals. Increasingly, environmental consultants and engineers are called upon by property owners and government agencies to clean up contaminated sites, assess environmental risk for potential purchasers and lenders, and investigate the extent of contamination prior to a real estate purchase. But these activities are not risk-free for the environmental professional. To the contrary, there are many ways for a remediation or site assessment to go awry. Risks that the remediation contractor face include the possibility that activities on the site may actually cause or contribute to further releases of the hazardous substances sought to be remediated. Because environmental professionals many times face substantial risk in performing their jobs, it is necessary that they understand and appreciate the potential liabilities when something does go wrong, and how to best protect themselves. This article describes the types of legal theories that could be brought against environmental professionals and how to best protect yourself from such liability.

  8. Finance, providers issue brief: insurer liability.

    PubMed

    Rothouse, M; Stauffer, M

    2000-05-24

    When a health plan denies payment for a procedure on grounds that it is not medically necessary or when it refuses a physician-ordered referral to a specialist, has it crossed the line from making an insurance judgment to practicing medicine? If the patient suffers harm as a result of the decision, is the plan liable for medical malpractice? Those were questions 35 states considered in 1999, and at least 32 states are grappling with this year as they seek to respond to physician and patient pressure to curb the power of the managed care industry. Traditionally, health insurers have been protected by state laws banning "the corporate practice of medicine," which means the patient's only recourse is to sue under a "vicarious liability" theory. Now, however, lawmakers are debating legislation to extend the scope of malpractice liability beyond individual practitioners to insurance carriers and plans themselves. PMID:11073416

  9. Finance, providers issue brief: insurer liability.

    PubMed

    Rothouse, M

    1999-07-01

    When a health plan denies payment for a procedure on grounds that it is not medically necessary or when it refuses a physician-ordered referral to a specialist, has it crossed the line from making an insurance judgment to practicing medicine? If the patient suffers harm as a result of the decision, is the plan liable for medical malpractice? Those are questions 29 states considered in 1998, and at least 35 states are grappling with this year as they seek to respond to physician and patient pressure to curb the power of the managed care industry. Traditionally, health insurers have been protected by state laws banning "the corporate practice of medicine," which means the patient's only recourse is to sue under a "vicarious liability" theory. Now, however, lawmakers are debating legislation to extend the scope of malpractice liability beyond individual practitioners to insurance carriers and plans themselves. PMID:11073388

  10. Sheltered workshops: financial and philosophical liabilities.

    PubMed

    Schuster, J W

    1990-08-01

    Some of the economic and philosophical reasons why sheltered workshops remain liabilities within the field of special education were discussed. Low wage rates, the unavailability of work, changing industrial forecasts for blue collar employment, financial dependence, tax returns, segregation, and normalization issues, along with other factors, were examined to provide support for the assertion that sheltered workshops are not providing clients with appropriate work experiences. PMID:2215244

  11. Liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, J.J.

    1994-04-01

    This presentation examines liability issues surrounding oil drilling mud sumps and discusses them in relation to two recent cases that arose in Ventura County, California. Following a brief history of regulatory interest in oil drilling mud and its common hazardous substances, various cause of action arising from oil drilling mud deposits are enumerated, followed by defenses to these causes of action. Section 8002 (m) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is mentioned, as are constituents of oil and gas waste not inherent in petroleum and therefore not exempt from regulation under the petroleum exclusion in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Recovery Act. Key legal words such as hazardous substance, release, public and private nuisance, trespass, responsible parties, joint and several liability, negligence, and strict liability are explained. The effects on liability of knowledge of the deposits, duty to restore land to its original condition, consent to the deposit of oil drilling mud, and noncompliance and compliance with permit conditions are analyzed. The state-of-the-art defense and research to establish this defense are mentioned. The newly created cause of action for fear of increased risk of cancer is discussed. Issues on transfer of property where oil drilling mud has been deposited are explored, such as knowledge of prior owners being imputed to later owners, claims of fraudulent concealment, and as is' clauses. The effects on the oil and gas industry of the California Court of Appeals for the Second District rulings in Dolan v. Humacid-MacLeod and Stevens v. McQueen are speculated.

  12. Integrating legal liabilities in nanomanufacturing risk management.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Mayank; Trump, Benjamin D; Bates, Matthew E; Monica, John C; Linkov, Igor

    2012-08-01

    Among other things, the wide-scale development and use of nanomaterials is expected to produce costly regulatory and civil liabilities for nanomanufacturers due to lingering uncertainties, unanticipated effects, and potential toxicity. The life-cycle environmental, health, and safety (EHS) risks of nanomaterials are currently being studied, but the corresponding legal risks have not been systematically addressed. With the aid of a systematic approach that holistically evaluates and accounts for uncertainties about the inherent properties of nanomaterials, it is possible to provide an order of magnitude estimate of liability risks from regulatory and litigious sources based on current knowledge. In this work, we present a conceptual framework for integrating estimated legal liabilities with EHS risks across nanomaterial life-cycle stages using empirical knowledge in the field, scientific and legal judgment, probabilistic risk assessment, and multicriteria decision analysis. Such estimates will provide investors and operators with a basis to compare different technologies and practices and will also inform regulatory and legislative bodies in determining standards that balance risks with technical advancement. We illustrate the framework through the hypothetical case of a manufacturer of nanoscale titanium dioxide and use the resulting expected legal costs to evaluate alternative risk-management actions.

  13. Telecommunications, health care, and legal liability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Chris

    1990-06-01

    Regulation of health care telecommunications is fragmented in Canada. Further neither the legislative nor the administrative nor the judicial processes have managed to respond successfully to the impact of telecommunications technology. The result is a legal environment that is necessarily speculative for both telecommunications service providers and health care personnel and facilities. Critical issues include ensuring confidentiality for sensitive patient records and health information liability of telecommunications service providers for inaccurate transmission liability of health care providers for use or non-use of telecommunications services. Limitation of legal liability for both telecommunications and health care service providers is likely to be most effective when based on contract but the creation of the necessary contracts is potentially unduly cumbersome both legally and practically. 1. CONSTITUTIONAL ASPECTS Telecommunications systems that are empowered to operate or connect cross provincial or international boundaries are subject to federal regulation bu the scheme is incomplete in respect of a system set up as a provincial agency. Health care on the other hand is very much a matter of provincial rather than federal authority as a matter of strict law but the fiscal strength of the federal government enables it to provide money to the provinces for financing health care and to4 use this as a device for securing compliance with certain federal standards. Nevertheless the political willingness of the federal health authorities to impose standards on the provinces

  14. Integrating legal liabilities in nanomanufacturing risk management.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Mayank; Trump, Benjamin D; Bates, Matthew E; Monica, John C; Linkov, Igor

    2012-08-01

    Among other things, the wide-scale development and use of nanomaterials is expected to produce costly regulatory and civil liabilities for nanomanufacturers due to lingering uncertainties, unanticipated effects, and potential toxicity. The life-cycle environmental, health, and safety (EHS) risks of nanomaterials are currently being studied, but the corresponding legal risks have not been systematically addressed. With the aid of a systematic approach that holistically evaluates and accounts for uncertainties about the inherent properties of nanomaterials, it is possible to provide an order of magnitude estimate of liability risks from regulatory and litigious sources based on current knowledge. In this work, we present a conceptual framework for integrating estimated legal liabilities with EHS risks across nanomaterial life-cycle stages using empirical knowledge in the field, scientific and legal judgment, probabilistic risk assessment, and multicriteria decision analysis. Such estimates will provide investors and operators with a basis to compare different technologies and practices and will also inform regulatory and legislative bodies in determining standards that balance risks with technical advancement. We illustrate the framework through the hypothetical case of a manufacturer of nanoscale titanium dioxide and use the resulting expected legal costs to evaluate alternative risk-management actions. PMID:22717005

  15. Supervised extensions of chemography approaches: case studies of chemical liabilities assessment

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Chemical liabilities, such as adverse effects and toxicity, play a significant role in modern drug discovery process. In silico assessment of chemical liabilities is an important step aimed to reduce costs and animal testing by complementing or replacing in vitro and in vivo experiments. Herein, we propose an approach combining several classification and chemography methods to be able to predict chemical liabilities and to interpret obtained results in the context of impact of structural changes of compounds on their pharmacological profile. To our knowledge for the first time, the supervised extension of Generative Topographic Mapping is proposed as an effective new chemography method. New approach for mapping new data using supervised Isomap without re-building models from the scratch has been proposed. Two approaches for estimation of model’s applicability domain are used in our study to our knowledge for the first time in chemoinformatics. The structural alerts responsible for the negative characteristics of pharmacological profile of chemical compounds has been found as a result of model interpretation. PMID:24868246

  16. Dimensions, Patterns, and Personality Correlates of Drug Abuse in an Offender Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, Terrill R.

    1978-01-01

    Drug abuse scores from prisoners resulted in two factors describing lifetime use of cannabis versus opiates. Analysis of Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) profiles versus drug abuse patterns indicated moderate, unidimensional relationship between variables. MMPI profiles of opiate users were similar to those identified in research…

  17. Alternative drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Sutter, M E; Chenoweth, J; Albertson, T E

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of drug abuse with alternative agents is increasing. The term "alternative drugs of abuse" is a catch-all term for abused chemicals that do not fit into one of the classic categories of drugs of abuse. The most common age group abusing these agents range from 17 to 25 years old and are often associated with group settings. Due to their diverse pharmacological nature, legislative efforts to classify these chemicals as a schedule I drug have lagged behind the development of new alternative agents. The potential reason for abuse of these agents is their hallucinogenic, dissociative, stimulant, anti-muscarinic, or sedative properties. Some of these drugs are easily obtainable such as Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) or Lophophora williamsii (Peyote) because they are natural plants indigenous to certain regions. The diverse pharmacology and clinical effects of these agents are so broad that they do not produce a universal constellation of signs and symptoms. Detailed physical exams are essential for identifying clues leading one to suspect an alternative drug of abuse. Testing for the presence of these agents is often limited, and even when available, the results do not return in a timely fashion. Intoxications from these agents pose unique challenges for health care providers. Physician knowledge of the physiological effects of these alternative agents and the local patterns of drug of abuse are important for the accurate diagnosis and optimal care of poisoned patients. This review summarizes the current knowledge of alternative drugs of abuse and highlights their clinical presentations. PMID:23636733

  18. [Sexual abuse of minors].

    PubMed

    Hayez, J Y

    1991-01-01

    The author gives a definition of sexual abuse on minors, emphasizing its more frequent occurrence inside the family (incest) than outside. He describes the countertransference reactions induced by this type of abuse, especially in professional teams who tend to put each other in a position of rivalry. Next, he sketches the pathogeny of sexual abuse, the clinical signs and the long term effects. The author deduces what should be the first signs of sexual abuse and proposes a pattern of diagnosis. Finally, he explains a management model, of the crisis and the follow-up of this difficult situation. PMID:1670411

  19. Elder physical abuse.

    PubMed

    Young, Lisa M

    2014-11-01

    Physical abuse of the elderly is a significant public health concern. The true prevalence of all types is unknown, and under-reporting is known to be significant. The geriatric population is projected to increase dramatically over the next 10 years, and the number of abused individuals is projected to increase also. It is critical that health care providers feel competent in addressing physical elder abuse. This article presents cases illustrating the variety of presenting symptoms that may be attributed to physical elder abuse.

  20. Alternative drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Sutter, M E; Chenoweth, J; Albertson, T E

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of drug abuse with alternative agents is increasing. The term "alternative drugs of abuse" is a catch-all term for abused chemicals that do not fit into one of the classic categories of drugs of abuse. The most common age group abusing these agents range from 17 to 25 years old and are often associated with group settings. Due to their diverse pharmacological nature, legislative efforts to classify these chemicals as a schedule I drug have lagged behind the development of new alternative agents. The potential reason for abuse of these agents is their hallucinogenic, dissociative, stimulant, anti-muscarinic, or sedative properties. Some of these drugs are easily obtainable such as Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) or Lophophora williamsii (Peyote) because they are natural plants indigenous to certain regions. The diverse pharmacology and clinical effects of these agents are so broad that they do not produce a universal constellation of signs and symptoms. Detailed physical exams are essential for identifying clues leading one to suspect an alternative drug of abuse. Testing for the presence of these agents is often limited, and even when available, the results do not return in a timely fashion. Intoxications from these agents pose unique challenges for health care providers. Physician knowledge of the physiological effects of these alternative agents and the local patterns of drug of abuse are important for the accurate diagnosis and optimal care of poisoned patients. This review summarizes the current knowledge of alternative drugs of abuse and highlights their clinical presentations.

  1. 7 CFR 3431.19 - Payment and tax liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., AND EXTENSION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VETERINARY MEDICINE LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAM Administration of the Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program § 3431.19 Payment and tax liability. (a)...

  2. Sexual abuse in children - what to know

    MedlinePlus

    Sexual abuse - children ... are sexually abused before they turn 18. Sexual abuse of children is any activity that the abuser ... or vagina Tongue kissing Oral sex Intercourse Sexual abuse can also happen without physical contact, such as: ...

  3. Antitussives and substance abuse

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Jarrett M; Boyer, Edward W

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of antitussive preparations is a continuing problem in the United States and throughout the world. Illicit, exploratory, or recreational use of dextromethorphan and codeine/promethazine cough syrups is widely described. This review describes the pharmacology, clinical effects, and management of toxicity from commonly abused antitussive formulations. PMID:24648790

  4. Defining Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giovannoni, Jeanne M.; Becerra, Rosina M.

    In seeking to clarify the meaning of the terms "child abuse" and "child neglect" it has been assumed that, like other forms of social deviance, they are socially defined phenomena. Interviews were conducted with those professionals (lawyers, pediatricians, police officers, and social workers) who daily handle the problems of abuse and neglect for…

  5. Substance Abuse and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Amos

    A review of the literature provides the conclusion that individuals with a disability versus those without a disability are more likely to have a substance abuse problem and less likely to get effective treatment. Data suggest 10-40% of all individuals in treatment for substance abuse have a coexisting physical or mental disability. Alcohol rates…

  6. Antitussives and substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jarrett M; Boyer, Edward W

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of antitussive preparations is a continuing problem in the United States and throughout the world. Illicit, exploratory, or recreational use of dextromethorphan and codeine/promethazine cough syrups is widely described. This review describes the pharmacology, clinical effects, and management of toxicity from commonly abused antitussive formulations. PMID:24648790

  7. Adolescent Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Craig R.; DeBlassie, Richard R.

    1985-01-01

    Cummings (1979), citing evidence from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, reports that one of every eleven adult Americans suffers from a severe addictive problem. Drug addiction is epidemic among teenagers; one of every six teenagers suffers from a severe addictive problem. This paper focuses on adolescent drug/substance abuse. (Author)

  8. Medical liability and health care reform.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Leonard J; Morrisey, Michael A; Becker, David J

    2011-01-01

    We examine the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on medical liability and the controversy over whether federal medical reform including a damages cap could make a useful contribution to health care reform. By providing guaranteed access to health care insurance at community rates, the ACA could reduce the problem of under-compensation resulting from damages caps. However, it may also exacerbate the problem of under-claiming in the malpractice system, thereby reducing incentives to invest in loss prevention activities. Shifting losses from liability insurers to health insurers could further undermine the already weak deterrent effect of the medical liability system. Republicans in Congress and physician groups both pushed for the adoption of a federal damages cap as part of health care reform. Physician support for damages caps could be explained by concerns about the insurance cycle and the consequent instability of the market. Our own study presented here suggests that there is greater insurance market stability in states with caps on non-economic damages. Republicans in Congress argued that the enactment of damages caps would reduce aggregate health care costs. The Congressional Budget Office included savings from reduced health care utilization in its estimates of cost savings that would result from the enactment of a federal damages cap. But notwithstanding recent opinions offered by the CBO, it is not clear that caps will significantly reduce health care costs or that any savings will be passed on to consumers. The ACA included funding for state level demonstration projects for promising reforms such as offer and disclosure and health courts, but at this time the benefits of these reforms are also uncertain. There is a need for further studies on these issues.

  9. Abuse in Cyberspace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashmore, Robert W.; Herman, Brian M.

    2006-01-01

    With the continued explosive growth of personalized websites, more and more public school administrators can expect to face situations in which inappropriate materials have been posted by a teacher, staff member or student. While failing to recognize employees' rights of free speech can result in legal liability, administrators also must be…

  10. [Liability in Anaesthesiology: theory of disproportionate damage].

    PubMed

    Galán Gutiérrez, J C; Galán Cortés, J C

    2013-10-01

    An analysis is made of the controversial application of the theory of disproportionate damage in the anaesthetic act, due to the high inherent risk, and regardless of the seriousness and importance of the surgery being performed. The existence of a disproportionate damage, that is, damage not foreseen nor accountable within the framework of the professional performance of the anaesthetist, does not by itself determine the existence of liability on the part of the anaesthetist, but the demand from the professionals themselves for a coherent explanation of the serious disagreement between the initial risk implied by their actions and the final consequence produced.

  11. Insurance recovery for manufactured gas plant liabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, G.S.; Wise, K.T.; Hanser, P.

    1997-04-15

    This article addresses insurance and liability issues arising from former manufactured gas plant sites. Three issues are discussed in detail: (1) how to place a value on a potential insurance recovery or damage award, (2) how to maximize recovery through litigation or settlement, and (3) how to mediate coverage disputes to avoid litigation. The first issue, valuing potential recovery, is discussed in the most detail. An approach is outlined which includes organizing policy data, evaluating site facts relevant to coverage, estimating site costs, estimating coverage likelihoods, and assessing the expected value of litigation. Probability and cost estimate data is provided to aid in assessments.

  12. [Liability in Anaesthesiology: theory of disproportionate damage].

    PubMed

    Galán Gutiérrez, J C; Galán Cortés, J C

    2013-10-01

    An analysis is made of the controversial application of the theory of disproportionate damage in the anaesthetic act, due to the high inherent risk, and regardless of the seriousness and importance of the surgery being performed. The existence of a disproportionate damage, that is, damage not foreseen nor accountable within the framework of the professional performance of the anaesthetist, does not by itself determine the existence of liability on the part of the anaesthetist, but the demand from the professionals themselves for a coherent explanation of the serious disagreement between the initial risk implied by their actions and the final consequence produced. PMID:23528691

  13. Old duties and new: recovered memories and the question of third-party liability.

    PubMed

    Behnke, S H

    1999-01-01

    This article addresses how courts have analyzed the question of third-party liability in a class of cases that has recently challenged settled law. In these cases a patient recovers apparent memories of sexual abuse during the course of a therapy. Based on these memories and perhaps with the therapist's aid and encouragement, the patient identifies a family member as the perpetrator, often in a legal or other public forum. The accused family member then brings a lawsuit against the therapist for negligent treatment of the patient. The legal question to be determined is whether the therapist owes a duty of care to the third-party family member. The article first examines the concept of duty from a historical perspective. The article next looks at the method of analysis courts have used to approach the question of third-party liability in recovered memory cases. The article's third section examines how several state courts have applied this analysis to actual cases. Finally, the article evaluates the most compelling arguments on both sides of the issue and raises additional arguments suggested by the state court analyses.

  14. Association of dopamine receptor gene polymorphism and psychological personality traits in liability for opioid addiction

    PubMed Central

    Mehić-Basara, Nermana; Oruč, Lilijana; Kapur-Pojskić, Lejla; Ramić, Jasmin

    2013-01-01

    There is a clear evidence that same psychoactive substance may cause various individual physiological reactions in same environmental conditions. Although there is a general attitude on equal liability to opioid addiction, latest genetic analysis findings imply there are certain quantifiable factors that could lead to elevated individual liability towards development of opioid addiction. The goal of this study was to investigate association of certain personality traits and genetic factors (separately and in combination) with heroin addiction. Total of 200 individuals participated in the study: 100 patients on Metadone Maintenance Treatment (MMT) and 100 age and sex matched healthy volunteers. All were medically examined, interviewed and psychologically evaluated using Eysenck personality questionnaire (EPQ) and genotyped for DRD2 (rs1800497) using PCR-RFLP method. Overrepresentation of certain personality traits (neuroticism, psychoticism and extraversion/intraversion), together with environemental risk factors such as: upbringing within incomplete families and familial history of psychotropic substances abuse, are associated with high-risk development of opioid addiction. PMID:23988166

  15. Physical abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, D E; Cecutti, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of physical abuse during late pregnancy and to investigate how abused and nonabused pregnant women differ in demographic characteristics, health habits, psychologic distress and attitudes about fetal health. DESIGN: Survey of women attending for prenatal health care or admitted to hospital for delivery. The information was obtained on one occasion from self-report questionnaires, completed with the option of anonymity. SETTINGS: Community-based prenatal clinic, private obstetricians' offices in a large city, private family physicians' offices in a large city, family physicians' offices in a small town, and a university teaching hospital. PATIENTS: English-speaking women at 20 weeks' or more gestation attending or admitted consecutively. INTERVENTIONS: Three self-report questionnaires: the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), the Fetal Health Locus of Control (FHLC) and the study questionnaire. RESULTS: Thirteen women (2.4%) refused to participate in the survey. Of the 548 women who completed the questionnaires 36 (6.6%) reported physical abuse during the current pregnancy and 60 (10.9%) before it. There were no significant differences in rates of abuse between settings. Of the women abused during the pregnancy 23 (63.9%) reported increased abuse during the pregnancy, and 28 (77.8%) remained with the abuser. Twenty-four pregnant women (66.7%) received medical treatment for abuse, but only 1 (2.8%) told her prenatal care provider of the abuse. Factor analysis revealed three factors associated with physical abuse in pregnancy: "social instability" (comprising low age, unmarried status, lower level of education, unemployment and unplanned pregnancy), "unhealthy lifestyle" (comprising poor diet, alcohol use, illicit drug use and emotional problems) and "physical health problems" (comprising health problems and prescription drug use). The GHQ scores showed that the abused women were significantly more emotionally distressed than the

  16. 18 CFR 367.15 - Contingent assets and liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Contingent assets and liabilities. 367.15 Section 367.15 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... assets and liabilities (including cumulative dividends on preference stock) in its annual report and...

  17. 18 CFR 367.15 - Contingent assets and liabilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Contingent assets and liabilities. 367.15 Section 367.15 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... assets and liabilities (including cumulative dividends on preference stock) in its annual report and...

  18. Warning! Slippery Road Ahead: Internet Access and District Liability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, Joan M.

    1995-01-01

    As schools merge onto the information highway, districts must address their liability associated with Internet access. Schools need a practical policy supporting high access to global educational resources while limiting district liability. USENET provides easy access to controversial and pornographic materials. This article outlines federal…

  19. 27 CFR 70.266 - Credit against barred liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Credit against barred... Collection of Excise and Special (Occupational) Tax Limitations § 70.266 Credit against barred liability. Any credit against a liability in respect of any taxable year shall be void if the collection of...

  20. 27 CFR 70.266 - Credit against barred liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Credit against barred... Collection of Excise and Special (Occupational) Tax Limitations § 70.266 Credit against barred liability. Any credit against a liability in respect of any taxable year shall be void if the collection of...

  1. 16 CFR 432.6 - Liability for violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Liability for violation. 432.6 Section 432.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES POWER OUTPUT CLAIMS FOR AMPLIFIERS UTILIZED IN HOME ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTS § 432.6 Liability for violation. If the manufacturer or, in...

  2. 16 CFR 432.6 - Liability for violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Liability for violation. 432.6 Section 432.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES POWER OUTPUT CLAIMS FOR AMPLIFIERS UTILIZED IN HOME ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTS § 432.6 Liability for violation. If the manufacturer or, in...

  3. 16 CFR 432.6 - Liability for violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Liability for violation. 432.6 Section 432.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES POWER OUTPUT CLAIMS FOR AMPLIFIERS UTILIZED IN HOME ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTS § 432.6 Liability for violation. If the manufacturer or, in...

  4. 16 CFR 432.6 - Liability for violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Liability for violation. 432.6 Section 432.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES POWER OUTPUT CLAIMS FOR AMPLIFIERS UTILIZED IN HOME ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTS § 432.6 Liability for violation. If the manufacturer or, in...

  5. 16 CFR 432.6 - Liability for violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Liability for violation. 432.6 Section 432.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES POWER OUTPUT CLAIMS FOR AMPLIFIERS UTILIZED IN HOME ENTERTAINMENT PRODUCTS § 432.6 Liability for violation. If the manufacturer or, in...

  6. 38 CFR 1.933 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Joint and several liability. 1.933 Section 1.933 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Standards for Compromise of Claims § 1.933 Joint and several liability. (a) When two...

  7. 38 CFR 1.933 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Joint and several liability. 1.933 Section 1.933 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Standards for Compromise of Claims § 1.933 Joint and several liability. (a) When two...

  8. 78 FR 49242 - Relief From Joint and Several Liability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-13

    ... (TD 9003, 67 FR 47278). Sections 1.6015-2, 1.6015-3, and 1.6015-4 of the final regulations provide... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BK51 Relief From Joint and Several Liability AGENCY... contains proposed regulations relating to relief from joint and several tax liability under section 6015...

  9. 38 CFR 1.933 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Joint and several liability. 1.933 Section 1.933 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Standards for Compromise of Claims § 1.933 Joint and several liability. (a) When two...

  10. 41 CFR 105-55.022 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 105-55.022 Section 105-55.022 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... Administration 55-COLLECTION OF CLAIMS OWED THE UNITED STATES § 105-55.022 Joint and several liability. (a)...

  11. 10 CFR 1015.304 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 1015.304 Section 1015.304 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COLLECTION OF CLAIMS OWED THE UNITED STATES Standards for the Compromise of Claims § 1015.304 Joint and several liability. (a) When two or more debtors...

  12. 41 CFR 105-55.022 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 105-55.022 Section 105-55.022 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... Administration 55-COLLECTION OF CLAIMS OWED THE UNITED STATES § 105-55.022 Joint and several liability. (a)...

  13. 40 CFR 13.27 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Joint and several liability. 13.27 Section 13.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS Compromise of Debts § 13.27 Joint and several liability. When two or more debtors are jointly...

  14. 41 CFR 105-55.022 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Joint and several liability. 105-55.022 Section 105-55.022 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... Administration 55-COLLECTION OF CLAIMS OWED THE UNITED STATES § 105-55.022 Joint and several liability. (a)...

  15. 42 CFR 401.623 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Joint and several liability. 401.623 Section 401... GENERAL PROVISIONS GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Claims Collection and Compromise § 401.623 Joint... cases of joint and several liability among two or more debtors, CMS will not allocate the burden...

  16. 10 CFR 1015.304 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 1015.304 Section 1015.304 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COLLECTION OF CLAIMS OWED THE UNITED STATES Standards for the Compromise of Claims § 1015.304 Joint and several liability. (a) When two or more debtors...

  17. 22 CFR 213.27 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Joint and several liability. 213.27 Section 213.27 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CLAIMS COLLECTION Compromise of Debts § 213.27 Joint and several liability. When two or more debtors are jointly and severally liable,...

  18. 7 CFR 1400.6 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 1400.6 Section 1400.6... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS General Provisions § 1400.6 Joint and several liability. (a) Any legal entity, including joint ventures and general partnerships, and any member of a...

  19. 22 CFR 213.27 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Joint and several liability. 213.27 Section 213.27 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CLAIMS COLLECTION Compromise of Debts § 213.27 Joint and several liability. When two or more debtors are jointly and severally liable,...

  20. 12 CFR 966.9 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 966.9 Section 966... OBLIGATIONS § 966.9 Joint and several liability. (a) In general. (1) Each and every Bank, individually and... this part shall not limit, restrict or otherwise diminish, in any manner, the joint and...

  1. 7 CFR 1400.6 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 1400.6 Section 1400.6... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS General Provisions § 1400.6 Joint and several liability. (a) Any legal entity, including joint operations, and any member of a legal entity determined to...

  2. 38 CFR 1.933 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Joint and several liability. 1.933 Section 1.933 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Standards for Compromise of Claims § 1.933 Joint and several liability. (a) When two...

  3. 10 CFR 1015.304 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 1015.304 Section 1015.304 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COLLECTION OF CLAIMS OWED THE UNITED STATES Standards for the Compromise of Claims § 1015.304 Joint and several liability. (a) When two or more debtors...

  4. 31 CFR 902.4 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Joint and several liability. 902.4 Section 902.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FEDERAL... COMPROMISE OF CLAIMS § 902.4 Joint and several liability. (a) When two or more debtors are jointly...

  5. 45 CFR 30.24 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Joint and several liability. 30.24 Section 30.24 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS COLLECTION Debt Compromise § 30.24 Joint and several liability. (a) When two or more debtors are jointly and severally...

  6. 7 CFR 1400.6 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 1400.6 Section 1400.6... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS General Provisions § 1400.6 Joint and several liability. (a) Any legal entity, including joint operations, and any member of a legal entity determined to...

  7. 31 CFR 902.4 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Joint and several liability. 902.4 Section 902.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FEDERAL... COMPROMISE OF CLAIMS § 902.4 Joint and several liability. (a) When two or more debtors are jointly...

  8. 7 CFR 1400.6 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 1400.6 Section 1400.6... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS General Provisions § 1400.6 Joint and several liability. (a) Any legal entity, including joint operations, and any member of a legal entity determined to...

  9. 42 CFR 401.623 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Joint and several liability. 401.623 Section 401... GENERAL PROVISIONS GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Claims Collection and Compromise § 401.623 Joint... cases of joint and several liability among two or more debtors, CMS will not allocate the burden...

  10. 42 CFR 401.623 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Joint and several liability. 401.623 Section 401... GENERAL PROVISIONS GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Claims Collection and Compromise § 401.623 Joint... cases of joint and several liability among two or more debtors, CMS will not allocate the burden...

  11. 10 CFR 1015.304 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 1015.304 Section 1015.304 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) COLLECTION OF CLAIMS OWED THE UNITED STATES Standards for the Compromise of Claims § 1015.304 Joint and several liability. (a) When two or more debtors...

  12. 7 CFR 1400.6 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Joint and several liability. 1400.6 Section 1400.6... AND SUBSEQUENT CROP, PROGRAM, OR FISCAL YEARS General Provisions § 1400.6 Joint and several liability. (a) Any legal entity, including joint operations, and any member of a legal entity determined to...

  13. 22 CFR 213.27 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Joint and several liability. 213.27 Section 213.27 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CLAIMS COLLECTION Compromise of Debts § 213.27 Joint and several liability. When two or more debtors are jointly and severally liable,...

  14. 42 CFR 401.623 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Joint and several liability. 401.623 Section 401... GENERAL PROVISIONS GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Claims Collection and Compromise § 401.623 Joint... cases of joint and several liability among two or more debtors, CMS will not allocate the burden...

  15. 45 CFR 30.24 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Joint and several liability. 30.24 Section 30.24 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS COLLECTION Debt Compromise § 30.24 Joint and several liability. (a) When two or more debtors are jointly and severally...

  16. 38 CFR 1.933 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Joint and several liability. 1.933 Section 1.933 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Standards for Compromise of Claims § 1.933 Joint and several liability. (a) When two...

  17. 45 CFR 30.24 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Joint and several liability. 30.24 Section 30.24 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS COLLECTION Debt Compromise § 30.24 Joint and several liability. (a) When two or more debtors are jointly and severally...

  18. 22 CFR 213.27 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Joint and several liability. 213.27 Section 213.27 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CLAIMS COLLECTION Compromise of Debts § 213.27 Joint and several liability. When two or more debtors are jointly and severally liable,...

  19. 42 CFR 401.623 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Joint and several liability. 401.623 Section 401... GENERAL PROVISIONS GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Claims Collection and Compromise § 401.623 Joint... cases of joint and several liability among two or more debtors, CMS will not allocate the burden...

  20. 41 CFR 105-55.022 - Joint and several liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Joint and several liability. 105-55.022 Section 105-55.022 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... Administration 55-COLLECTION OF CLAIMS OWED THE UNITED STATES § 105-55.022 Joint and several liability. (a)...