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Sample records for abuse patient records

  1. Confidentiality of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Patient Records. Participant Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coggins, Patrick C.; And Others

    This participant manual is designed to provide an overview of federal laws and regulations pertaining to the confidentiality of alcohol and drug abuse patient records. The relationship of federal laws to state laws and regulations is also discussed. The materials, useful for persons involved in the fields of substance abuse treatment or…

  2. 42 CFR 2.1 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.1 Section 2.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.1 Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records. The restrictions of...

  3. 42 CFR 2.1 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.1 Section 2.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.1 Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records. The restrictions of...

  4. 42 CFR 2.1 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.1 Section 2.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.1 Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records. The restrictions of...

  5. 42 CFR 2.1 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.1 Section 2.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.1 Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records. The restrictions of...

  6. 42 CFR 2.1 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.1 Section 2.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.1 Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records. The restrictions of...

  7. 42 CFR 2.2 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... suspected child abuse and neglect to State or local authorities The prohibitions of this section do not... suspected child abuse and neglect to the appropriate State or local authorities. (f) Penalty for first and... abuse patient records. 2.2 Section 2.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  8. 42 CFR 2.2 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... suspected child abuse and neglect to State or local authorities The prohibitions of this section do not... suspected child abuse and neglect to the appropriate State or local authorities. (f) Penalty for first and... abuse patient records. 2.2 Section 2.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  9. 42 CFR 2.2 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... suspected child abuse and neglect to State or local authorities The prohibitions of this section do not... suspected child abuse and neglect to the appropriate State or local authorities. (f) Penalty for first and... abuse patient records. 2.2 Section 2.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  10. 42 CFR 2.2 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... suspected child abuse and neglect to State or local authorities The prohibitions of this section do not... suspected child abuse and neglect to the appropriate State or local authorities. (f) Penalty for first and... abuse patient records. 2.2 Section 2.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  11. 42 CFR 2.2 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... suspected child abuse and neglect to State or local authorities The prohibitions of this section do not... suspected child abuse and neglect to the appropriate State or local authorities. (f) Penalty for first and... abuse patient records. 2.2 Section 2.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  12. Evaluating abuse in the patient with dementia.

    PubMed

    Tronetti, Pamela

    2014-11-01

    For patients with dementia, abuse ranges from subtle scams to outright physical violence. As dementia progresses, abuse escalates. The stages of dementia--mild cognitive impairment, mild dementia, moderate dementia, and severe dementia--lend themselves to varied presentations of abuse. Knowing which types of abuse are more prominent at each stage aids the clinician in anticipating risk of abuse and patient and caregiver needs. Interviewing the victim is crucial in uncovering, documenting, and intervening in an abuse situation. A clinician who is skilled in drawing out the facts while remaining supportive of the patient is key in ending the victimization.

  13. Multicenter Patient Records Research

    PubMed Central

    Behlen, Fred M.; Johnson, Stephen B.

    1999-01-01

    The expanding health information infrastructure offers the promise of new medical knowledge drawn from patient records. Such promise will never be fulfilled, however, unless researchers first address policy issues regarding the rights and interests of both the patients and the institutions who hold their records. In this article, the authors analyze the interests of patients and institutions in light of public policy and institutional needs. They conclude that the multicenter study, with Institutional Review Board approval of each study at each site, protects the interests of both. “Anonymity” is no panacea, since patient records are so rich in information that they can never be truly anonymous. Researchers must earn and respect the trust of the public, as responsible stewards of facts about patients' lives. The authors find that computer security tools are needed to administer multicenter patient records studies and describe simple approaches that can be implemented using commercial database products. PMID:10579601

  14. Pregabalin Abuse amongst Opioid Substitution Treatment Patients.

    PubMed

    McNamara, S; Stokes, S; Kilduff, R; Shine, A

    2015-01-01

    Pregabalin (Lyrica®) is used in treating epilepsy, nerve pain and anxiety. Pregabalin was initially thought to have a low misuse potential however there are emerging reports of Pregabalin being abused. A study was commenced at the National Drug Treatment Centre's (NDTC) Drug Analysis Laboratory to determine the level of usage of Pregabalin within the addiction services population in Ireland. A total of 498 urine samples representing samples from 440 individual opioid substitution patients, initially screened by immunoassay for drugs of abuse, were subjected to further analysis for Pregabalin by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS). Of 440 patients tested, 39 tested positive for Pregabalin (9.2%). Only 10 patients from this group were prescribed this drug to our knowledge thus giving an estimated rate of misuse of 7.0%. Other drugs detected in the Pregabalin positive patients were Opiates (31.8%), Cocaine (11.4%), Benzodiazepines (79.5%) and Cannabis (77.8%). Our study confirms that Pregabalin abuse is taking place amongst the addiction services population. We believe that misuse of this prescription drug is a serious emerging issue which should be monitored carefully.

  15. Pregabalin Abuse amongst Opioid Substitution Treatment Patients.

    PubMed

    McNamara, S; Stokes, S; Kilduff, R; Shine, A

    2015-01-01

    Pregabalin (Lyrica®) is used in treating epilepsy, nerve pain and anxiety. Pregabalin was initially thought to have a low misuse potential however there are emerging reports of Pregabalin being abused. A study was commenced at the National Drug Treatment Centre's (NDTC) Drug Analysis Laboratory to determine the level of usage of Pregabalin within the addiction services population in Ireland. A total of 498 urine samples representing samples from 440 individual opioid substitution patients, initially screened by immunoassay for drugs of abuse, were subjected to further analysis for Pregabalin by Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS). Of 440 patients tested, 39 tested positive for Pregabalin (9.2%). Only 10 patients from this group were prescribed this drug to our knowledge thus giving an estimated rate of misuse of 7.0%. Other drugs detected in the Pregabalin positive patients were Opiates (31.8%), Cocaine (11.4%), Benzodiazepines (79.5%) and Cannabis (77.8%). Our study confirms that Pregabalin abuse is taking place amongst the addiction services population. We believe that misuse of this prescription drug is a serious emerging issue which should be monitored carefully. PMID:26817289

  16. Among a German Sample of Forensic Patients, Previous Animal Abuse Mediates Between Psychopathy and Sadistic Actions.

    PubMed

    Stupperich, Alexandra; Strack, Micha

    2016-05-01

    In an attempt to explain the relationship between psychopathy and severe violent behavior, this study associates previous animal abuse, psychopathy, and sadistic acting in forensic patients. Two topics are addressed: (i) whether previous animal abuse can be identified by a patient's Psychopathy Checklist profile and (ii) whether animal abuse statistically mediates between psychopathy and sadistic acting. In a German forensic hospital, 60 patients were investigated. Animal abuse was assessed using face-to-face interviews and the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV), and sadistic acting was identified by file records.Discriminant analysis separated previous animal abuse (10/60) by high adolescent antisocial behavior, superficiality, lack of remorse, lack of empathy, and grandiosity. The mediation from psychopathy to sadistic acting (6/60) through animal abuse was found to be complete.The results, although sample size is limited and base rate of animal abuse and sadistic acting are low, fit with a model suggestive of animal abuse as a causal step toward sadistic crimes. Animal abuse correlates with callous, unemotional traits, and a development of sadistic crimes. PMID:27122409

  17. Among a German Sample of Forensic Patients, Previous Animal Abuse Mediates Between Psychopathy and Sadistic Actions.

    PubMed

    Stupperich, Alexandra; Strack, Micha

    2016-05-01

    In an attempt to explain the relationship between psychopathy and severe violent behavior, this study associates previous animal abuse, psychopathy, and sadistic acting in forensic patients. Two topics are addressed: (i) whether previous animal abuse can be identified by a patient's Psychopathy Checklist profile and (ii) whether animal abuse statistically mediates between psychopathy and sadistic acting. In a German forensic hospital, 60 patients were investigated. Animal abuse was assessed using face-to-face interviews and the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV), and sadistic acting was identified by file records.Discriminant analysis separated previous animal abuse (10/60) by high adolescent antisocial behavior, superficiality, lack of remorse, lack of empathy, and grandiosity. The mediation from psychopathy to sadistic acting (6/60) through animal abuse was found to be complete.The results, although sample size is limited and base rate of animal abuse and sadistic acting are low, fit with a model suggestive of animal abuse as a causal step toward sadistic crimes. Animal abuse correlates with callous, unemotional traits, and a development of sadistic crimes.

  18. Electronic health record and electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Dimond, Bridgit

    This article considers the government plans for the development of electronic health and patient records as set out in the NHS Plan and the progress and problems which have been encountered in their realization. PMID:16116372

  19. The master patient index: split patient records.

    PubMed

    Wieners, W; Stewart, S P

    1988-11-01

    Systems integrators have overlooked the potential for corrupting the medical-record database through the creation of multiple (split) records for the individual patient. This article introduces a computer software technology that has been used at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Medical Center to identify split patient records.

  20. Medication misuse, abuse and dependence in chronic pain patients.

    PubMed

    Kouyanou, K; Pither, C E; Wessely, S

    1997-11-01

    We report the prevalence of drug use, misuse, abuse, and dependence in 125 chronic pain patients attending specialist pain clinics in South London. A total of 110 patients (88%) were taking medications for their pain problem. Opioid analgesics (69.6%), nonopioids (48%), antidepressants (25%), and benzodiazepines (17.6%) were the drugs most frequently used. Psychoactive substance abuse or dependence (DSM-III-R) was diagnosed in 12%. A total of 9.6% of the patients met the DSM-III-R criteria for substance abuse or dependence in remission. Data are also presented on the misuse and abuse of nonpsychoactive drugs, qualitative information on how patients use drugs, and the information they have received about medication.

  1. Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances

    PubMed Central

    Saveland, Christine; Hawker, Leisha; Miedema, Baukje; MacDougall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine family physicians’ career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse by controlled substance prescription seekers. Design A 4-page cross-sectional survey. Setting A family medicine continuing medical education event in Halifax, NS. Participants The survey was distributed to 316 family physicians attending the continuing medical education event. Main outcome measures Career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse related to the act of prescribing controlled substances. Results Fifty-six percent (n = 178) of the 316 surveys were returned completed. Half the study participants were men (49%). Most study participants were in private practice and lived in Nova Scotia, and approximately half (51%) practised in urban settings. On average, the study participants had 20 years of practice experience. The career prevalence of abusive encounters related to controlled substance prescribing was divided into “minor,” “major,” and “severe” incidents. Overall, 95% of study participants reported having experienced at least 1 incident of minor abuse; 48% had experienced at least 1 incident of major abuse; and 17% had experienced at least 1 incident of severe abuse during their careers. Further, 30% reported having been abused in the past month; among those, the average number of abusive encounters was 3. Most (82%) of the abusers were male with a history of addiction (85%) and mental illness (39%). Opioids were the most frequently sought controlled substance. Conclusion Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances is substantial. Family physicians who prescribe controlled substances are at risk of being subjected to minor, major, or even severe abuse. Opioids were the most often sought controlled substance. A national discussion to deal with this issue is needed. PMID:24522691

  2. Assessing Sexual Abuse/Attack Histories with Bariatric Surgery Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahony, David

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed sexual abuse/attack histories in 537 bariatric surgery patients using the PsyBari. The prevalence rates found were lower (15.5%, 19.3% of women, 5.2% of men) than other studies that used bariatric surgery patients but consistent with studies that used nonbariatric obese subjects. Furthermore, bariatric surgery patients who…

  3. The patient-physician relationship and the sexual abuse of patients.

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    The CMA's policy on the patient-physician relationship and the sexual abuse of patients follows a review of policies and initiatives of its provincial and territorial divisions and other professional associations. The CMA's approach to this policy has been to consider the overall patient-physician relationship in order to understand factors associated with functional and dysfunctional relationships, including those involving sexual abuse. In addition to defining abuse of patients by physicians in general and sexual abuse in particular this document gives guidelines on such issues as sexual or romantic relationships with current or former patients and provides educational and preventive strategies. PMID:8199968

  4. Management of the patient in labor who has abused substances.

    PubMed

    Geary, Franklyn H; Turnquest Wells, Mureena A

    2013-03-01

    The drug abusing patient can provide a management dilemma for health care providers including nurses, obstetrician, anesthesiologist, and pediatrician. Certain illicit drugs may mimic other diseases of pregnancy and result in inappropriate treatment for the mother and child. Pain management may be challenging in such patients because of increasing drug tolerance and increased sensitivity to pain. This article highlights the clinical presentation in a pregnant patient who may have recently used some of the more commonly abused drugs. The ability to identify such a patient is crucial so that the appropriate screening and treatment can occur. PMID:23370170

  5. Childhood sexual and physical abuse in adult patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Ogata, S N; Silk, K R; Goodrich, S; Lohr, N E; Westen, D; Hill, E M

    1990-08-01

    Experiences of abuse and neglect were assessed in 24 adults diagnosed as having borderline personality disorder according to the Diagnostic Interview for Borderline Patients and in 18 depressed control subjects without borderline disorder. Significantly more of the borderline patients than depressed patients reported childhood sexual abuse, abuse by more than one person, and both sexual and physical abuse. There were no between-group differences for rates of neglect or physical abuse without sexual abuse. A stepwise logistic regression revealed that derealization, diagnostic group, and chronic dysphoria were the best predictors of childhood sexual abuse in this group of patients.

  6. Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... also may fall prey to strangers who take advantage of their cognitive impairment. Types of abuse Signs ... property) to his or her disadvantage or the advantage of someone else Sexual abuse: touching, fondling or ...

  7. Compliance, medical records, and the FBI: preventing fraud and abuse.

    PubMed

    Vincze, L S

    1998-01-01

    The possibility of an investigation related to fraud and abuse is the last thing most people want to think about, but it's important to be prepared, just in case. The author gives some advice on how to react if your facility is the target of an investigation and points out some important steps to take to ensure compliance.

  8. Prevalence of a history of sexual abuse among female psychiatric patients in a state hospital system.

    PubMed

    Craine, L S; Henson, C E; Colliver, J A; MacLean, D G

    1988-03-01

    Fifty-one percent of a sample of 105 female state hospital patients were found to have been sexually abused as children or adolescents. In the majority of cases, hospital staff were unaware that the patients had histories of sexual abuse, and only 20 percent of the abused patients believed they had been adequately treated for sexual abuse. Sixty-six percent of the abused patients met the diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder, although none had received that diagnosis. Compared with patients who had not been sexually abused, abused patients were significantly more likely to have 17 of 32 symptoms commonly linked with sexual abuse. Every patient who was positive for six symptoms--compulsive sexual behavior, chemical dependency, sadomasochistic sexual fantasy, sexual identity issues, chronic fatigue, and loss of interest in sex--had been sexually abused.

  9. Patient Abuse in the Health Care Setting: The Nurse as Patient Advocate.

    PubMed

    Albina, Julie K

    2016-01-01

    Incidents of verbal and physical patient abuse in health care settings continue to occur, with some making headline news. Nurses have a professional and ethical responsibility to advocate for their patients when incidents of abuse occur. Tolerating or ignoring inappropriate behaviors occurs for multiple reasons, including ignorance, fear of retaliation, the need for peer acceptance, and concerns for personal advancement. Nurses need to reflect on their biases before they can truly respect patients' autonomy. Through the examination of reported cases of patient abuse, the need for a change in hospital culture becomes evident. The primary steps in eliminating patient abuse are opening communication, providing education, establishing competency, eliminating tolerance of unacceptable behavior, and creating a code of mutual respect. A change in culture to one of mutual respect and dignity for staff members and patients will lead to the best outcomes for all involved. PMID:26746029

  10. Arab Parents' Reactions to Child Sexual Abuse: A Review of Clinical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Baker, Khawla

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses parents' reactions to sexual abuse cases in their families. The study analyzed the clinical records of individual and family therapy sessions with 35 cases of Arab Palestinian clients, citizens of Israel (27 individuals and 8 families). Families were categorized as either functional or dysfunctional. It was concluded that…

  11. Benefits of listening to a recording of euphoric joint music making in polydrug abusers

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Thomas Hans; Vogt, Marius; Lederer, Annette; Schneider, Lydia; Fomicheva, Eira; Schneider, Martha; Villringer, Arno

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Listening to music can have powerful physiological and therapeutic effects. Some essential features of the mental mechanism underlying beneficial effects of music are probably strong physiological and emotional associations with music created during the act of music making. Here we tested this hypothesis in a clinical population of polydrug abusers in rehabilitation listening to a previously performed act of physiologically and emotionally intense music making. Methods: Psychological effects of listening to self-made music that was created in a previous musical feedback intervention were assessed. In this procedure, participants produced music with exercise machines (Jymmin) which modulate musical sounds. Results: The data showed a positive effect of listening to the recording of joint music making on self-efficacy, mood, and a readiness to engage socially. Furthermore, the data showed the powerful influence of context on how the recording evoked psychological benefits. The effects of listening to the self-made music were only observable when participants listened to their own performance first; listening to a control music piece first caused effects to deteriorate. We observed a positive correlation between participants’ mood and their desire to engage in social activities with their former training partners after listening to the self-made music. This shows that the observed effects of listening to the recording of the single musical feedback intervention are influenced by participants recapitulating intense pleasant social interactions during the Jymmin intervention. Conclusions: Listening to music that was the outcome of a previous musical feedback (Jymmin) intervention has beneficial psychological and probably social effects in patients that had suffered from polydrug addiction, increasing self-efficacy, mood, and a readiness to engage socially. These intervention effects, however, depend on the context in which the music recordings are

  12. [Response to treatment of patients abusing the "dappou drug" who participated in a group relapse prevention program: a comparison with patients abusing methamphetamine].

    PubMed

    Hikitsuchi, Emi; Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Wada, Kiyoshi; Tanibuchi, Yuko; Takano, Ayumi; Imamura, Fumi; Kawachi, Hiraku; Wakabayashi, Asako; Kato, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we compared the efficacy of a group relapse prevention program using the cognitive behavioral therapy-based workbook, Serigaya Methamphetamine Relapse Prevention Program (SMARPP), between patients abusing the so-called "dappou drugs" (designer drug in Japan, and those abusing methamphetamine (MAP). Both groups participated in the SMARPP at the Center Hospital, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry. Results showed that, no significant differences were found in the rates of participation in the program or self-reported frequency of drug or alcohol use between the patients abusing "dappou drugs" or MAP. However, patients using "dappou drugs" reported no significant increase in their confidence in their ability to resist the temptation to use drugs on the self- report drug abuse scales after the SMARPP intervention, while patients abusing MAP reported a significant positive difference in their ability to resist temptation. In addition, insight into substance abuse problems and motivation to participate in further treatment slightly declined in those using "dappou drugs," while there was a significant increase reported by the patients using MAP. These results suggested that the SMARPP might not be as effective for patients abusing "dappou drugs" as for those abusing MAP. The development of a relapse prevention program specifically designed for patients abusing "dappou drugs" is required. PMID:25831947

  13. Recreational drug abuse in patients hospitalized for diabetic ketosis or diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Isidro, María L; Jorge, Segundo

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the association between recreational drug use and diabetic ketosis (DK) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in our area. Retrospective examination of records from a 1,450 bed urban teaching hospital in Spain. All adult admissions for DK or DKA from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2009 in our hospital were included. Demographic, exploratory (blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate), and analytical data (glucose, urea, creatinine, corrected Na(+), K(+), pH, HCO3(-) and HbA1c) at admittance were recorded. In 152 patients, 253 episodes of DK or DKA occurred. Screening for drug use was performed in 40.3% of the events; 20.6% of the episodes (n = 52) were shown to be substance abuse. Cocaine, followed by cannabis and alcohol, was the most frequently involved drug. Poly-substance abuse occurred in 67.3% of them. Comorbidities were present in 11.5 and 39.8% of the cases shown and not shown to be related to drug use (P = 0.00). Seventy percent of the patients who were at least once shown to have consumed drugs, and 15.9% of those who were never shown to have done so, were admitted more than once (P = 0.00). The frequency of recent drug misuse in patients presenting with DK or DKA was high. Substance abuse screening was frequently neglected. Adverse profile, most significantly in readmission to hospital, was found in the patients with positive drug findings. History taking in this context should routinely include questions on substance abuse, and toxicology screening may be worthwhile, particularly in those with the history of frequent readmissions. PMID:21136122

  14. Recreational drug abuse in patients hospitalized for diabetic ketosis or diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Isidro, María L; Jorge, Segundo

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the association between recreational drug use and diabetic ketosis (DK) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in our area. Retrospective examination of records from a 1,450 bed urban teaching hospital in Spain. All adult admissions for DK or DKA from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2009 in our hospital were included. Demographic, exploratory (blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate), and analytical data (glucose, urea, creatinine, corrected Na(+), K(+), pH, HCO3(-) and HbA1c) at admittance were recorded. In 152 patients, 253 episodes of DK or DKA occurred. Screening for drug use was performed in 40.3% of the events; 20.6% of the episodes (n = 52) were shown to be substance abuse. Cocaine, followed by cannabis and alcohol, was the most frequently involved drug. Poly-substance abuse occurred in 67.3% of them. Comorbidities were present in 11.5 and 39.8% of the cases shown and not shown to be related to drug use (P = 0.00). Seventy percent of the patients who were at least once shown to have consumed drugs, and 15.9% of those who were never shown to have done so, were admitted more than once (P = 0.00). The frequency of recent drug misuse in patients presenting with DK or DKA was high. Substance abuse screening was frequently neglected. Adverse profile, most significantly in readmission to hospital, was found in the patients with positive drug findings. History taking in this context should routinely include questions on substance abuse, and toxicology screening may be worthwhile, particularly in those with the history of frequent readmissions.

  15. Anabolic-androgenic steroids: use and abuse in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Julie M; Congeni, Joseph A

    2007-08-01

    The "win at all costs" mentality fuels athletes to seek performance-enhancing substances, such as anabolic-androgenic steroids, to gain an advantage over their opponents. Nonathletes espouse this same attitude to "win" the battle of attractiveness. An enhanced understanding of anabolic-androgenic steroids and the motivations behind their abuse will arm pediatricians with the ability to engage their patients in a balanced discussion of the benefits and costly risks of anabolic-androgenic steroids and successfully deter further use.

  16. Psychological, physical, and sexual abuse in addicted patients who undergo treatment.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montalvo, Javier; López-Goñi, José J; Arteaga, Alfonso

    2015-05-01

    This study explored the prevalence of a history as victims of abuse among patients who sought outpatient treatment for drug addiction. A sample of 252 addicted patients was assessed. Information was collected on the patients' lifetime history of abuse (psychological, physical, and/or sexual abuse), sociodemographic factors, consumption factors, psychopathological factors, and personality variables. Drug-addicted patients who present a lifelong history of abuse were compared with patients who were not abused. Of the total sample, 46% of the patients (n = 115) who were addicted to drugs had been victims of abuse. There was a statistically significant difference between the victimization rates of men (37.8%) and women (79.6%). Moreover, for some variables, significant differences were observed between patients who had been abused and those who had not. Compared with patients who had not been abused, the addicted patients with a history of victimization scored significantly higher on several European Addiction Severity Index, Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II, and maladjustment variables but not on the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. The current results indicate that patients who present a lifelong history of abuse exhibit both a more severe addiction than patients who were not abused and several comorbidities. The implications of these results for further research and clinical practice are discussed.

  17. The Relationship of Sexual Abuse and HIV Risk Behaviors among Heterosexual Adult Female STD Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Nancy J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This study examined the relationship of childhood sexual abuse to high-risk sexual behavior and between sexual abuse and expectations for condom use. Among 83 female clinic patients with sexually transmitted diseases, those sexually abused in childhood had more sexual partners, more positive hedonic outcome expectations for condom use, and fewer…

  18. Patients reporting ritual abuse in childhood: a clinical syndrome. Report of 37 cases.

    PubMed

    Young, W C; Sachs, R G; Braun, B G; Watkins, R T

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-seven adult dissociative disorder patients who reported ritual abuse in childhood by satanic cults are described. Patients came from a variety of separate clinical settings and geographical locations and reported a number of similar abuses. The most frequently reported types of ritual abuse are outlined, and a clinical syndrome is presented which includes dissociative states with satanic overtones, severe post-traumatic stress disorder, survivor guilt, bizarre self abuse, unusual fears, sexualization of sadistic impulses, indoctrinated beliefs, and substance abuse. Questions relating to issues of reliability, credibility and verifiability are addressed in depth, and the findings and implications are discussed. PMID:2043970

  19. Substance Abuse and Schizophrenia: A Health Maintenance Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damron, Susan W.; Simpson, William R.

    Abuse of alcohol or other substances by schizophrenic patients seriously undermines effective treatment. To document the extent of substance abuse among schizophrenic patients hospitalized in one Veterans Administration Hospital, medical records of 100 patients were reviewed. The results revealed that 54 patients had recent substance abuse, with…

  20. Internet Patient Records: new techniques

    PubMed Central

    Moehrs, Sascha; Anedda, Paolo; Tuveri, Massimiliano; Zanetti, Gianluigi

    2001-01-01

    Background The ease by which the Internet is able to distribute information to geographically-distant users on a wide variety of computers makes it an obvious candidate for a technological solution for electronic patient record systems. Indeed, second-generation Internet technologies such as the ones described in this article - XML (eXtensible Markup Language), XSL (eXtensible Style Language), DOM (Document Object Model), CSS (Cascading Style Sheet), JavaScript, and JavaBeans - may significantly reduce the complexity of the development of distributed healthcare systems. Objective The demonstration of an experimental Electronic Patient Record (EPR) system built from those technologies that can support viewing of medical imaging exams and graphically-rich clinical reporting tools, while conforming to the newly emerging XML standard for digital documents. In particular, we aim to promote rapid prototyping of new reports by clinical specialists. Methods We have built a prototype EPR client, InfoDOM, that runs in both the popular web browsers. In this second version it receives each EPR as an XML record served via the secure SSL (Secure Socket Layer) protocol. JavaBean software components manipulate the XML to store it and then to transform it into a variety of useful clinical views. First a web page summary for the patient is produced. From that web page other JavaBeans can be launched. In particular, we have developed a medical imaging exam Viewer and a clinical Reporter bean parameterized appropriately for the particular patient and exam in question. Both present particular views of the XML data. The Viewer reads image sequences from a patient-specified network URL on a PACS (Picture Archiving and Communications System) server and presents them in a user-controllable animated sequence, while the Reporter provides a configurable anatomical map of the site of the pathology, from which individual "reportlets" can be launched. The specification of these reportlets is

  1. Ethics and Undertreatment of Pain in Patients with a History of Drug Abuse.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Brooke Faria

    2015-01-01

    Patients with substance abuse history make up 14% of inpatient admissions to acute care units, where it has been reported a great deal of patient pain is unrelieved (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration [SAMHSA], 2009. Definitions of substance abuse terms including tolerance, dependence, addiction, and pseudoaddiction are essential to a nurse's understanding of pain medication administration in patients with substance abuse history. Pain management is one of the nurse's main responsibilities, and using the principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice can guide the nurse to making appropriate pain management decisions for and with these patients. Nursing implications and resources for more information are discussed.

  2. Optimizing treatment outcomes in HIV-infected patients with substance abuse issues.

    PubMed

    Celentano, David D; Lucas, Greg

    2007-12-15

    Drug abuse is associated with poorer virologic and clinical outcomes for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Limited evidence, primarily from in vitro and animal studies, shows that some abused drugs (e.g., opioids) may have direct effects on HIV pathology and the immune response to infection, but the clinical effects are not known. Clinical data indicate that the primary effect of drug abuse on HIV disease progression is mediated via factors that may limit access and/or adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Drug abuse is associated with reduced adherence to HAART, which is strongly correlated with poorer virologic and clinical outcomes. However, the virologic and clinical effects of HAART are generally equivalent among drug abusers and non-drug abusers who adhere to therapy. These results underscore the importance of integrating medical and substance abuse interventions for HIV-positive drug abusers, to improve adherence to HAART and optimize outcomes of treatment for HIV infection.

  3. History of Abuse and Neglect in Patients with Schizophrenia Who Have a History of Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennouna-Greene, Mehdi; Bennouna-Greene, Valerie; Berna, Fabrice; Defranoux, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of five forms of abuse/neglect during childhood and adolescence in a group of schizophrenic patients with a history of violence. Methods: Twenty-eight patients hospitalized in a highly secured psychiatric unit were included. Abuse and neglect during patients' growth were evaluated with the childhood trauma…

  4. History of sexual, emotional or physical abuse and psychiatric comorbidity in substance-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Daigre, Constanza; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Tarifa, Núria; Rodríguez-Martos, Lola; Grau-López, Lara; Berenguer, Marta; Casas, Miguel; Roncero, Carlos

    2015-10-30

    Sexual, emotional or physical abuse history is a risk factor for mental disorders in addicted patients. However, the relationship between addiction and abuse lifespan is not well known. This study aims to compare clinical and psychopathological features of addicted patients according to the experience of abuse and to the number of different types of abuse suffered. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. 512 addicted patients seeking treatment were included, 45.9% reported abuse throughout life (38.9% emotional, 22.3% physical and 13.5% sexual abuse). It was found that female gender; depressive symptoms and borderline personality disorder were independently associated with history of any abuse throughout life. As well, it was found that 14% have been suffered from all three types of abuse (sexual, emotional and physical), 34.5% from two and 55.5% from one type. Female gender and borderline personality disorder were independently associated independently with a greater number of different types of abuse. Results suggest that history of abuse is frequent among substance-dependent patients and these experiences are more prevalent in women and are associated with more psychiatric comorbidity.

  5. History of sexual, emotional or physical abuse and psychiatric comorbidity in substance-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Daigre, Constanza; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Tarifa, Núria; Rodríguez-Martos, Lola; Grau-López, Lara; Berenguer, Marta; Casas, Miguel; Roncero, Carlos

    2015-10-30

    Sexual, emotional or physical abuse history is a risk factor for mental disorders in addicted patients. However, the relationship between addiction and abuse lifespan is not well known. This study aims to compare clinical and psychopathological features of addicted patients according to the experience of abuse and to the number of different types of abuse suffered. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. 512 addicted patients seeking treatment were included, 45.9% reported abuse throughout life (38.9% emotional, 22.3% physical and 13.5% sexual abuse). It was found that female gender; depressive symptoms and borderline personality disorder were independently associated with history of any abuse throughout life. As well, it was found that 14% have been suffered from all three types of abuse (sexual, emotional and physical), 34.5% from two and 55.5% from one type. Female gender and borderline personality disorder were independently associated independently with a greater number of different types of abuse. Results suggest that history of abuse is frequent among substance-dependent patients and these experiences are more prevalent in women and are associated with more psychiatric comorbidity. PMID:26279128

  6. Increased Childhood Abuse in Patients With Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder in a Turkish Sample: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Albayrak, Yakup; Sahin, Basak

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Abuse is considered to have a place in the etiology of various psychiatric disorders. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is one of the psychiatric disorders for which abuse could be an etiologic factor; however, few studies have investigated the relationship between abuse and PMDD. In this study, our aim was to investigate childhood abuse in patients with PMDD and compare them with healthy female subjects. Method: This cross-sectional study included 70 women with PMDD (DSM-IV-TR criteria) who were admitted to the outpatient psychiatry clinic of Ankara Yenimahalle State Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, between December 2012 and December 2013. Additionally, 78 healthy controls were included in the study. Sociodemographic, familial, and reproductive period characteristics of the women were recorded. All subjects were administered the Premenstrual Syndrome Scale (PMSS) and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Results: Among the sociodemographic characteristics, being a university graduate (76.9%) and being a public servant (70.5%) were significantly higher in the healthy control group (P = .01 and P = .01, respectively). A family history of PMDD (31.4%), a history of postpartum psychiatric disorders (11.4%), and a history of attempted suicide (7.1%) were higher in the PMDD group compared with the healthy control group (P = .001, P = .003, and P = .024, respectively). Significant differences were also found between PMDD and healthy controls in PMSS score (P ≤ .001), CTQ total scores (P = .002), and subscale scores including emotional abuse and emotional neglect (P = .004), physical abuse (P = .009), and sexual abuse (P = .012). Conclusions: To our knowledge, the present study is the first to investigate associations between PMDD and childhood abuse from Turkey. More comprehensive studies on this topic with larger sample sizes are required to enrich the literature and enable practitioners to be more effective in clinical practice. PMID:25664213

  7. Inpatient stays for patients diagnosed with severe psychiatric disorders and substance abuse.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, C J; Zarkin, G A

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To empirically determine if a substance abuse comorbidity is related to longer inpatient stays for patients diagnosed with schizophrenia and affective psychoses. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional analysis of patients in three states: Maryland, California, and Arizona. Using multivariate techniques, we control for the effects of patient severity, insurance, and hospital characteristics on length of stay. DATA COLLECTION: We used a patient-level and state-specific hospital discharge database merged with hospital characteristics from the American Hospital Association. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The conventional wisdom is that patients with a substance abuse comorbidity have longer inpatient stays than similar patients without a substance abuse comorbidity. We did not observe this trend. We found wide variation in length of stay by state and patients' health insurance. In some cases, length of stay was statistically shorter for patients with a substance abuse comorbidity. CONCLUSIONS: Our research demonstrates that a substance abuse comorbidity does not necessarily equate to longer inpatient stays and that previous studies may overstate the impact of substance abuse on inpatient care utilization. In addition, we find that a relationship between substance abuse and length of stay may not be generalizable across states, diagnoses, hospitals, and/or insurance types. Future studies of the impact of substance abuse on inpatient stays need to control for these important covariates. PMID:8885855

  8. Psychiatric comorbidity of patients on methadone maintenance treatment with a history of sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Peles, Einat; Potik, David; Schreiber, Shaul; Bloch, Miki; Adelson, Miriam

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of a history of sexual abuse and its relation to psychiatric comorbidity among former opiate addicts currently on methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). We evaluated the history of sexual abuse and current clinical obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), dissociative identity disorder (DID), and complex posttraumatic distress disorder (cPTSD), and administered the Life Events Inventory Questionnaire among 125 MMT patients (76 females and 49 males). Eighty (64%) patients had experienced sexual abuse, 69 (55.2%) met the criteria for clinical OCD, 20 (16.0%) for cPTSD and 13 (10.4%) for DID. More females had clinical OCD than males (63.2% vs. 42.9%, respectively, p=0.03). Sexually abused patients had higher rates of clinical OCD than their non-abused counterparts (67.5% vs. 33.3%, respectively, p<0.0005) and a higher mean number of negative life events (8.0±2.0 vs. 7.1±1.8, p=0.01). Sexually abused patients showed a trend towards a higher Dissociative Experiences Scale score (17.6±10.1 vs. 14.6±8.1, p=0.08) and rate of DID (13.8% vs. 4.4%, p=0.1), but no significant difference in the rate of cPTSD (17.5% vs. 13.3%, p=0.6) compared to non-abused subjects. The 80 sexually abused patients were mostly female (85%), and 57.5% of them were abused by a family member. In summary, more sexually abused MMT patients were diagnosed with clinical OCD and fewer with cPTSD and DID. Those with cPTSD were characterized by more negative life events, higher dissociation scores, and assaults by a family member. We conclude that sexually abused MMT patients should be screened for clinical OCD.

  9. [Patients' access to their medical records].

    PubMed

    Laranjo, Liliana; Neves, Ana Luisa; Villanueva, Tiago; Cruz, Jorge; Brito de Sá, Armando; Sakellarides, Constantitno

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, the medical record was seen exclusively as being the property of health institutions and doctors. Its great technical and scientific components, as well as the personal characteristics attributed by each doctor, have been the reasons appointed for that control. However, nowadays throughout the world that paradigm has been changing. In Portugal, since 2007 patients are allowed full and direct access to their medical records. Nevertheless, the Deontological Code of the Portuguese Medical Association (2009) explicitly states that patients' access to their medical records should have a doctor as intermediary and that the records are each physician's intellectual property. Furthermore, several doctors and health institutions, receiving requests from patients to access their medical records, end up requesting the legal opinion of the Commission for access to administrative documents. Each and every time, that opinion goes in line with the notion of full and direct patient access. Sharing medical records with patients seems crucial and inevitable in the current patient-centred care model, having the potential to improve patient empowerment, health literacy, autonomy, self-efficacy and satisfaction with care. With the recent technological developments and the fast dissemination of Personal Health Records, it is foreseeable that a growing number of patients will want to access their medical records. Therefore, promoting awareness on this topic is essential, in order to allow an informed debate between all the stakeholders.

  10. Why patients should keep their own records.

    PubMed

    Coleman, V

    1984-03-01

    Too many people now have access to confidential medical information. Patients are becoming justifiably wary and the doctor-patient relationship is deteriorating. We can avert the developing crisis by allowing patients to keep their own medical records at home. This will ensure that confidentiality is respected and that patients continue to trust their doctors.

  11. Differences in methylphenidate abuse rates among methadone maintenance treatment patients in two clinics.

    PubMed

    Peles, Einat; Schreiber, Shaul; Linzy, Shirley; Domani, Yoav; Adelson, Miriam

    2015-07-01

    Methylphenidate, an amphetamine-like prescription medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was suspected as being abused among methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) patients. We tested its presence in the routine urine monitoring of all patients in both Tel Aviv and Las Vegas MMT clinics. Data on demographic and addiction history, ADHD (Wender Utah Rating Scale), cognitive impairment (Mini Mental State Exam), and lifetime DSM-IV-TR psychiatric diagnosis from admission were retrieved, and retention following 6 months. None of the 190 patients in Las Vegas tested positive for methylphenidate, while 14.7% (45/306) did in Tel Aviv. Abusers were less educated (p = 0.01), had higher ADHD scores (p = 0.02), lower cognitive scores (p = 0.05), and a higher benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse rate (p < 0.0005), with no difference in age, gender, duration in MMT, cannabis, opiates, and cocaine abuse and infectious disease. Of the methylphenidate abuse 42.2% have take-home methadone dose privileges. Not like opiate use, being methylphenidate positive did not relate to 6-months retention. Compared to Tel Aviv, Las Vegas patients were more educated, with lower BDZ, and cocaine abuse. The greater abuse of methylphenidate among ADHD subjects might indicate their using it as self-medication, raising a possible indication for its prescription for that subgroup of MMT patients. The high rate of methylphenidate abuse in Israel needs future study. PMID:25605438

  12. Differences in methylphenidate abuse rates among methadone maintenance treatment patients in two clinics.

    PubMed

    Peles, Einat; Schreiber, Shaul; Linzy, Shirley; Domani, Yoav; Adelson, Miriam

    2015-07-01

    Methylphenidate, an amphetamine-like prescription medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was suspected as being abused among methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) patients. We tested its presence in the routine urine monitoring of all patients in both Tel Aviv and Las Vegas MMT clinics. Data on demographic and addiction history, ADHD (Wender Utah Rating Scale), cognitive impairment (Mini Mental State Exam), and lifetime DSM-IV-TR psychiatric diagnosis from admission were retrieved, and retention following 6 months. None of the 190 patients in Las Vegas tested positive for methylphenidate, while 14.7% (45/306) did in Tel Aviv. Abusers were less educated (p = 0.01), had higher ADHD scores (p = 0.02), lower cognitive scores (p = 0.05), and a higher benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse rate (p < 0.0005), with no difference in age, gender, duration in MMT, cannabis, opiates, and cocaine abuse and infectious disease. Of the methylphenidate abuse 42.2% have take-home methadone dose privileges. Not like opiate use, being methylphenidate positive did not relate to 6-months retention. Compared to Tel Aviv, Las Vegas patients were more educated, with lower BDZ, and cocaine abuse. The greater abuse of methylphenidate among ADHD subjects might indicate their using it as self-medication, raising a possible indication for its prescription for that subgroup of MMT patients. The high rate of methylphenidate abuse in Israel needs future study.

  13. Parental substance abuse, reports of chronic pain and coping in adult patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Christopher; Whitfield, Keith; Sudhakar, Shiv; Pearce, Michele; Byrd, Goldie; Wood, Mary; Feliu, Miriam; Leach-Beale, Brittani; DeCastro, Laura; Whitworth, Elaine; Abrams, Mary; Jonassaint, Jude; Harrison, M. Ojinga; Mathis, Markece; Scott, Lydia; Johnson, Stephanie; Durant, Lauren; Holmes, Anita; Presnell, Katherine; Bennett, Gary; Shelby, Rebecca; Robinson, Elwood

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing interest from a social learning perspective in understanding the role of parental factors on adult health behaviors and health outcomes. Our review revealed no studies, to date, that have evaluated the effects of parental substance abuse on reports of chronic pain and coping in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). We explored the effects of parental substance (alcohol or drug) abuse on reports of the sensory, affective and summary indices of pain in 67 adult patients, mean age 38.9 (13.5), with SCD. We also explored the effects of parental substance abuse on psychopathology associated with pain and active coping. Twenty-four percent of patients reported that their parent(s) abused substances. Patients whose parent(s) were characterized as substance abusers reported greater sensory (p=0.02), affective (p=0.01) and summary (VAS; p=0.02) indices of pain as compared to their counterparts, whose parent(s) were not characterized as substance abusers. Patients did not differ in average age, education or the propensity to respond in a socially acceptable manner. There was a significant trend towards patients who characterized their parents as abusers scoring higher than their counterparts on active coping. We propose a Social Learning Theory to explain the current findings and suggest a need for additional prospective research to simultaneously explore biological (genetic) and social factors that influence the interpretation, experience and reporting of chronic pain in adult patients with chronic disease. PMID:16573309

  14. The case against showing patients their records.

    PubMed

    Ross, A P

    1986-03-01

    The author, a British consultant surgeon, expresses his reservations about patients' having access to their medical records. The nature of communication between doctors may change if it is known that patients will see the material; potentially helpful yet tentative diagnoses may be excluded while other information is watered down. Physicians will have additional, perhaps burdensome, demands placed on them to explain the records--including parts written by deceased or otherwise unavailable doctors, medical students, or nonphysicians. Persons other than patients may see the records, further complicating the issue. Ross asserts that, while patients do have the right to see records, full access could be more harmful than beneficial to patients and could be fraught with problems for physicians.

  15. Relationship of Coping Styles with Suicidal Behavior in Hospitalized Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients: Substance Abusers versus Non- Substance Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Safa, Mitra; Talischi, Firouzeh; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of patients with chronic conditions requiring hospitalization requires patient acceptance and cooperation and adoption of coping strategies. Inappropriate coping strategies such as substance abuse are concerning in the course of treatment. This study sought to explore the association of coping strategies with suicidal behavior in substance abusers and non substance abuser patients with chronic pulmonary diseases namely asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Materials and Methods This comparative study was performed on 100 patients with asthma and COPD selected via convenience sampling. Subjects with and without substance abuse were separated into two groups of 50 patients each. Ways of Coping Questionnaire of Lazarus (WOCQ) and Suicide Behavior Questionnaire-Revised (SBQ-R) were completed by them. Five Persian speaking patients rated this questionnaire to be easily understandable in the pre-test stage. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to measure the internal consistency. Results The mean (±standard deviation) age of participants was 40 (±14) years; 58% of individuals were men; 62% had chosen problem-focused coping. The most abused substances were cigarettes (78%) and opium (42%); 6% of substance abusers had thought about suicide five times or more in the past year; 5% of substance abusers had seriously attempted suicide. Tendency to commit suicide was greater in men, substance abusers and participants who had chosen emotion-focused coping strategies, based on a regression model. Average score of suicide tendency was significantly higher in substance abusers (B=2.196, P =0.007). Conclusion Chronic disease is a crisis and patients need to acquire appropriate coping strategies to deal with it, especially in substance abusers and suicidal patients. Precise recognition of coping strategies in chronic pulmonary patients with substance abuse is necessary via a team cooperation among psychiatrics, psychologists and an internal

  16. Evaluating and Training Substance Abuse Counselors: A Pilot Study Assessing Standardized Patients as Authentic Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fussell, Holly E.; Lewy, Colleen S.; McFarland, Bentson H.

    2009-01-01

    Clinician training and supervision are needed to transfer evidence-based practices to community-based treatment organizations. Standardized patients (SPs) are used for clinician training and evaluating. However, to be effective for substance abuse counselors, SPs must realistically portray substance abuse treatment clients. The current study…

  17. Patient Perceptions of Electronic Health Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulejian, Armine

    2011-01-01

    Research objective. Electronic Health Records (EHR) are expected to transform the way medicine is delivered with patients/consumers being the intended beneficiaries. However, little is known regarding patient knowledge and attitudes about EHRs. This study examined patient perceptions about EHR. Study design. Surveys were administered following…

  18. The computer-based patient record and Robert Fulghum's 16 principles.

    PubMed

    Kahn, M G

    1995-01-01

    Robert Fulghum proposed 16 principles learned in kindergarten that he claimed should govern all human activities. How do these principles apply to current efforts to create a computer-based patient record? Fulghum's principles, when recast for the computer-based patient record, emphasize cooperation, privacy, security, and standardization--elements that are easily recognized as essential features of an electronic medical record. However, a number of less frequently discussed issues, such as data quality, integrity, abuse, and misuse can also be considered in terms of Fulghum's principles.

  19. Treatment compliance among prenatal care patients with substance abuse problems.

    PubMed

    Clark, K A; Dee, D L; Bale, P L; Martin, S L

    2001-02-01

    There is an insufficient number of substance abuse treatment programs available to pregnant women; however, even when women do enroll in treatment, they often choose not to comply with particular components of their treatment. To better understand what factors are associated with a woman's likelihood of compliance with treatment, this study assesses 244 pregnant, substance-using women enrolled in a specialized substance abuse treatment program. Women who complied with treatment referrals are compared with those who did not comply with referrals on various factors including their sociodemographic characteristics, types of substance use before and during pregnancy, experiences of violence before and during pregnancy, and prior substance use treatment. Bivariate analysis found that outpatient treatment compliance was more likely among women who smoked cigarettes before pregnancy, women who had received previous substance abuse treatment, and women whose partner had received previous substance abuse treatment. Outpatient treatment compliance did not vary by sociodemographic characteristics, any other type of substance use, or the women's experiences of violence. Inpatient treatment compliance was more likely among women who received prior substance abuse treatment; however, no other characteristic was found to be associated with inpatient treatment compliance. Logistic regression analyses, which controlled for various factors, suggested that past experiences with substance abuse treatment by the woman or her partner were significantly associated with treatment referral compliance. These findings suggest that the previous treatment experiences of women and their partners are important factors in shaping a successful substance abuse treatment program for pregnant women.

  20. Patient information: confidentiality and the electronic record.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    The rise of the electronic record now allows nurses to access a large archive of patient information that was more difficult to obtain when records consisted of manually held paper files. There have been several instances where curiosity and, occasionally, more malicious motivations have led nurses to access these records and read the notes of a celebrity or a person they know. In this article, Richard Griffith considers whether nurses' accessing and reading of the record of someone who is not in their care is in breach of their duty of confidentiality. PMID:26419719

  1. Preventing and Recognizing Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Abuse » Preventing and recognizing prescription drug abuse Prescription Drug Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Preventing and recognizing prescription drug abuse To ensure proper medical care, patients should discuss ...

  2. Lifetime positive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia and cannabis abuse are partially explained by co-morbid addiction.

    PubMed

    Dubertret, Caroline; Bidard, Isabelle; Adès, Jean; Gorwood, Philip

    2006-09-01

    Recent prospective findings have shown that cannabis use by young people could be a risk factor for psychotic symptoms in adulthood, but the long-term impact of cannabis abuse on the clinical features of declared schizophrenia remains to be explored. We assessed the independent influence of cannabis abuse on the clinical symptoms of schizophrenia, after controlling for frequently co-occurring addictive disorders. Patients with schizophrenia, and with (N=66), or without (N=139) cannabis abuse, were compared for lifetime positive and negative symptoms, taking into account presence of any other addictive disorders. The incidence of the abuse of drugs other than cannabis was nearly five times greater amongst patients with both schizophrenia and cannabis abuse. When the analyses were limited to subjects with no other abuse, less avolution and fewer apathy symptoms were still detected in patients with schizophrenia and cannabis abuse than in those with no abuse (p=0.0001). In contrast, between-group differences for positive symptoms were abolished when multiple substance abuses were taken into account. The strong association between cannabis abuse and fewer negative symptoms in schizophrenia was thus replicated in this sample, but once co-morbid addictive disorders had been controlled no influence of cannabis abuse on hallucinations was detected. Distinguishing the effects of co-occurring addictive disorder(s) in patients with schizophrenia and cannabis dependence may thus be important when attempting to analyse the impact of cannabis abuse.

  3. Integrated visualization of problemcentric urologic patient records.

    PubMed

    Bui, Aleex A T; Taira, Ricky K; Churchill, Bernard; Kangarloo, Hooshang

    2002-12-01

    The collision of computer-based technologies and the medical environment is resulting in an increasingly electronic multimedia patient record, consisting of not only the traditional types of data (e.g., clinic notes and laboratory reports), but also digital images (e.g., computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging) and other visual representations of patient data (e.g., pulmonary function graphs and urodynamic charts). Given the increasing amount of data made available to physicians, it is not only critical that the totality of a patient's medical record be accessible to a clinician, but that the diverse data be integrated and presented in a manner conducive to patient management: key information should be easily discovered. This paper describes a problemcentric time-based visualization of urologic conditions, whereby a patient's medical history is automatically organized around a medical problem and presented as a graphic chronology. Urology-related data in the patient medical record is organized in accord with an expert constructed knowledge-base, and plotted on a timeline using iconic representations. The user interface permits the physician to quickly view multimedia data and to visualize relationships between events in the patient's history.

  4. Iowa record-linkage study: death rates in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Black, D W

    1998-09-01

    The Iowa record-linkage study was developed to investigate death rates in psychiatric patients, and involved computer matching of death certificates with a roster of patients. A list of all patients admitted to our hospital from 1972 through 1981 was obtained and after removing duplicate entries the list was pared to 5412 names. The record included multiple identifiers (e.g., name, gender, date-of-birth, hospital number). This information was then linked by computer with all Iowa death certificates for the same period; a total of 331 deaths were identified. Patients were assigned to a single psychiatric diagnostic category based on a computer program that reviewed each patient's clinical diagnoses and picked the one with the highest priority in a hierarchy we had created. Age and sex adjusted mortality tables were constructed, allowing us to compute expected numbers of deaths. Relative risk for premature death was greatest among women, and those under 20 years. Risk was associated with all psychiatric diagnoses and was significantly higher among patients of either gender with an organic mental disorder or schizophrenia; women with acute schizophrenia, depressive neuroses, alcoholism, drug abuse, and psychophysiological disorders; and men with neuroses. Death from natural causes, especially from heart disease, was significantly excessive among women, while death from accidents and suicides was excessive for both men and women. The overall SMR was 1.65 (P < 0.001). Most importantly, we found that the greatest excess of mortality occurred within the first 2 years following hospital discharge. Thus, we were able to demonstrate that risk of mortality in general, and of suicide specifically, differed according to age, gender, diagnosis, and portion of the follow-up. We have subsequently used this method to investigate specific risk factors associated with mortality in mood disorders, schizophrenia, and antisocial personality disorder. Findings from these studies are

  5. Concordance Between Self-Reported Maltreatment and Court Records of Abuse or Neglect Among High-Risk Youths

    PubMed Central

    Swahn, Monica H.; Whitaker, Daniel J.; Pippen, Courtney B.; Leeb, Rebecca T.; Teplin, Linda A.; Abram, Karen M.; McClelland, Gary M.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the concordance between measures of self-reported maltreatment and court records of abuse or neglect in a sample of detained youths. Methods. Data were collected by the Northwestern Juvenile Project and include interviews from 1829 youths aged 10–18 years. Participants were newly detained youths in the Cook County Juvenile Temporary Detention Center in Illinois between 1995 and 1998. Self-reported cases of child maltreatment were compared with court records of abuse or neglect in the Cook County judicial system. Results. We found that among detained youths, 16.6% of those who reported any maltreatment, 22.2% of those who reported the highest level of maltreatment, and 25.1% of those who reported that they required medical treatment as a result of maltreatment had a court record of abuse or neglect. Among those with any self-reported maltreatment, girls (vs boys) and African Americans (vs Whites) were more likely to have a court record (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=2.18; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.53, 3.09; and AOR=2.12; 95% CI=1.23, 3.63, respectively). Conclusions. Official records seriously underestimate the prevalence of maltreatment, which indicates that multiple data sources are needed to document the true prevalence of maltreatment. PMID:17008582

  6. History of sexual abuse and suicide attempts in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, A; Klimkiewicz, A; Krasowska, A; Kopera, M; Sławińska-Ceran, A; Brower, K J; Wojnar, M

    2014-09-01

    History of child abuse is considered one of the important risk factors of suicide attempt in general population. At the same time it has been shown that suicide attempts appear significantly more frequently in alcoholics than in healthy individuals. The objective of this study was to investigate associations between history of childhood sexual abuse and suicide attempts in a sample of Polish alcohol dependent patients. A sample of 364 alcohol-dependent subjects was recruited in alcohol treatment centers in Warsaw, Poland. Information was obtained about demographics, family history of psychiatric problems, history of suicide attempts, sexual and physical abuse during childhood and adulthood and severity of alcohol problems. When analyzed by gender, 7.4% of male and 39.2% of female patients had a lifetime history of sexual abuse; 31.9% of the study group reported at least one suicide attempt during their lifetime. Patients who reported suicide attempts were significantly younger (p=0.0008), had greater severity of alcohol dependence (p=0.0002), lower social support (p=0.003), and worse economic status (p=0.002). Moreover, there was a significant association between history of suicide attempts and family history of psychiatric problems (p=0.00025), suicide attempts in the family (p=0.0073), childhood history of sexual abuse (p=0.009) as well as childhood history of physical abuse (p=0.002). When entered into linear regression analysis with other dependent variables history of childhood sexual abuse remained a significant predictor of suicide attempt (OR=2.52; p=0.035). Lifetime experience of sexual abuse is a significant and independent risk factor of suicide attempts in alcohol-dependent individuals.

  7. History of sexual abuse and suicide attempts in alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Jakubczyk, A; Klimkiewicz, A; Krasowska, A; Kopera, M; Sławińska-Ceran, A; Brower, K J; Wojnar, M

    2014-09-01

    History of child abuse is considered one of the important risk factors of suicide attempt in general population. At the same time it has been shown that suicide attempts appear significantly more frequently in alcoholics than in healthy individuals. The objective of this study was to investigate associations between history of childhood sexual abuse and suicide attempts in a sample of Polish alcohol dependent patients. A sample of 364 alcohol-dependent subjects was recruited in alcohol treatment centers in Warsaw, Poland. Information was obtained about demographics, family history of psychiatric problems, history of suicide attempts, sexual and physical abuse during childhood and adulthood and severity of alcohol problems. When analyzed by gender, 7.4% of male and 39.2% of female patients had a lifetime history of sexual abuse; 31.9% of the study group reported at least one suicide attempt during their lifetime. Patients who reported suicide attempts were significantly younger (p=0.0008), had greater severity of alcohol dependence (p=0.0002), lower social support (p=0.003), and worse economic status (p=0.002). Moreover, there was a significant association between history of suicide attempts and family history of psychiatric problems (p=0.00025), suicide attempts in the family (p=0.0073), childhood history of sexual abuse (p=0.009) as well as childhood history of physical abuse (p=0.002). When entered into linear regression analysis with other dependent variables history of childhood sexual abuse remained a significant predictor of suicide attempt (OR=2.52; p=0.035). Lifetime experience of sexual abuse is a significant and independent risk factor of suicide attempts in alcohol-dependent individuals. PMID:24997776

  8. Medical records: practicalities and principles of patient possession.

    PubMed

    Gilhooly, M L; McGhee, S M

    1991-09-01

    This review of issues and research is in two parts: 1) practical problems surrounding patient-held records and 2) ethical arguments for and against patient-held records. We argue that research on patient-held records indicates that there are no substantial practical drawbacks and considerable ethical benefits to be derived from giving patients custody of their medical records.

  9. Protecting Patient Records from Unwarranted Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Ryan; Garera, Sujata; Rubin, Aviel D.; Rajan, Anand; Rozas, Carlos V.; Sastry, Manoj

    Securing access to medical information is vital to protecting patient privacy. However, Electronic Patient Record (EPR) systems are vulnerable to a number of inside and outside threats. Adversaries can compromise EPR client machines to obtain a variety of highly sensitive information including valid EPR login credentials, without detection. Furthermore, medical staff can covertly view records of their choosing for personal interest or more malicious purposes. In particular, we observe that the lack of integrity measurement and auditability in these systems creates a potential threat to the privacy of patient information. We explore the use of virtualization and trusted computing hardware to address these problems. We identify open problems and encourage further research in the area.

  10. Identifying and assessing the risk of opioid abuse in patients with cancer: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Ashley-Nicole; Morgan, Laura; Del Fabbro, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    Background The misuse and abuse of opioid medications in many developed nations is a health crisis, leading to increased health-system utilization, emergency department visits, and overdose deaths. There are also increasing concerns about opioid abuse and diversion in patients with cancer, even at the end of life. Aims To evaluate the current literature on opioid misuse and abuse, and more specifically the identification and assessment of opioid-abuse risk in patients with cancer. Our secondary aim is to offer the most current evidence of best clinical practice and suggest future directions for research. Materials and methods Our integrative review included a literature search using the key terms “identification and assessment of opioid abuse in cancer”, “advanced cancer and opioid abuse”, “hospice and opioid abuse”, and “palliative care and opioid abuse”. PubMed, PsycInfo, and Embase were supplemented by a manual search. Results We found 691 articles and eliminated 657, because they were predominantly non cancer populations or specifically excluded cancer patients. A total of 34 articles met our criteria, including case studies, case series, retrospective observational studies, and narrative reviews. The studies were categorized into screening questionnaires for opioid abuse or alcohol, urine drug screens to identify opioid misuse or abuse, prescription drug-monitoring programs, and the use of universal precautions. Conclusion Screening questionnaires and urine drug screens indicated at least one in five patients with cancer may be at risk of opioid-use disorder. Several studies demonstrated associations between high-risk patients and clinical outcomes, such as aberrant behavior, prolonged opioid use, higher morphine-equivalent daily dose, greater health care utilization, and symptom burden. PMID:27330340

  11. Recurrent paraparesis and death of a patient with ‘whippet’ abuse

    PubMed Central

    Hirvioja, Jouni; Joutsa, Juho; Wahlsten, Pia; Korpela, Jaana

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide is increasingly used as a recreational drug that is easily and legally available worldwide. Occasional nitrous oxide use has been considered relatively safe without the development of addiction or major adverse effects. However, heavy long-term nitrous oxide abuse can be associated with severe neurological complications, and even deaths have been described. The characteristic presentation is myeloneuropathy with dorsal column degeneration and demyelinating sensory polyneuropathy related to vitamin B12 deficiency. Described is a 23-year-old male who developed recurrent paraparesis related to nitrous oxide abuse. A second, more severe, episode of paraparesis was associated with predominantly lower motor neuron damage. A partial recovery was achieved by discontinuation of nitrous oxide use and initiation of vitamin B12 supplementation. However, the patient relapsed and ultimately died while being intoxicated with several abusive substances. The case adds to the cumulative literature about the clinical phenomenology and dangers of nitrous oxide abuse. PMID:26989492

  12. Prevalent Intravenous Abuse of Methylphenidate Among Treatment-Seeking Patients With Substance Abuse Disorders: A Descriptive Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Haraldsson, Haraldur M.; Rafnar, Bjarni O.; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Steingrimsson, Steinn; Johannsson, Magnus; Bragadottir, Helena; Magnusson, Andres

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Prescription rates of methylphenidate (MPH) are sharply rising in most Western countries. Although it has been reported that MPH has abuse potential, little is known about the prevalence of intravenous (IV) abuse of MPH. The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of IV MPH abuse among treatment-seeking IV substance abusers in Iceland. Methods: This is a descriptive population-based study using a semistructured interview assessing sociodemographics, substance abuse history, and the method of administration of 108 IV substance abusers. During 1 year, consecutively admitted adult inpatients with substance use disorder at any detoxification center in Iceland that reported any IV substance abuse in the past 30 days were invited to participate. Abuse was defined as nontherapeutic use of a substance to gain psychological or physiological effect. Results: Prevalence of any IV MPH abuse among participants was 88% in the last 30 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82-0.94) and MPH was the most commonly abused substance (65%) and the preferred substance (63%). Around one third (30%) reported MPH as the first IV substance ever abused. However, among those reporting a shorter history than 10 years of IV abuse, 42% reported MPH as the first IV substance ever abused. Conclusions: This first nationwide study on IV abuse of MPH shows that it is common among treatment-seeking IV abusers in Iceland and suggests that MPH has high abuse potential. Therefore, both the use and possible abuse of MPH in those with high abuse potential should be monitored, especially in countries where MPH prescriptions rates are on the rise. PMID:25748561

  13. Perioperative management in the patient with substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Moran, Sharon; Isa, Jason; Steinemann, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Drug and alcohol use is a pervasive problem in the general population and in those requiring anesthesia for an operation. History and screening can help delineate those who may be acutely intoxicated or chronic drug and alcohol users. Both acute intoxication and chronic abuse of these substances present challenges for anesthetic management during and after an operation. The clinician should be aware of problems that may be encountered during any part of anesthesia or postoperative care.

  14. Comparability of neuropsychological test profiles in patients with chronic substance abuse and mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Lange, Rael T; Iverson, Grant L; Franzen, Michael D

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 104 patients with acute uncomplicated mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) to a sample of 104 patients from an inpatient substance abuse program to determine whether these patients could be differentiated by their pattern of relative cognitive strengths and weaknesses. Patients were matched on age, education, and gender. Eight cognitive measures were used that included tests of attention, memory, and processing speed. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups on any of the cognitive measures. Using a two-step cluster analysis procedure (i.e., hierarchical and k-means analyses), seven common profiles were identified. There was no significant difference in the proportions of patients from the MTBI or substance abuse group in each of the seven profiles. These results show that patients with uncomplicated MTBIs could not be reliably differentiated from patients with substance abuse problems on these cognitive measures. This is of particular concern for clinicians evaluating the neuropsychological effects of MTBI in individuals with a comorbid history of substance abuse. PMID:17853134

  15. Patient health record on a smart card.

    PubMed

    Naszlady, A; Naszlady, J

    1998-02-01

    A validated health questionnaire has been used for the documentation of a patient's history (826 items) and of the findings from physical examination (591 items) in our clinical ward for 25 years. This computerized patient record has been completed in EUCLIDES code (CEN TC/251) for laboratory tests and an ATC and EAN code listing for the names of the drugs permanently required by the patient. In addition, emergency data were also included on an EEPROM chipcard with a 24 kb capacity. The program is written in FOX-PRO language. A group of 5000 chronically ill in-patients received these cards which contain their health data. For security reasons the contents of the smart card is only accessible by a doctor's PIN coded key card. The personalization of each card was carried out in our health center and the depersonalized alphanumeric data were collected for further statistical evaluation. This information served as a basis for a real need assessment of health care and for the calculation of its cost. Code-combined with an optical card, a completely paperless electronic patient record system has been developed containing all three information carriers in medicine: Texts, Curves and Pictures.

  16. Combined Abuse of Clonidine and Amitriptyline in a Patient on Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dittmer, Trent; Sigman, Erika J.; Clemons, Holly; Johnson, J. Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance therapy is often prescribed in primary care to treat opioid dependence. Previous reports have described concomitant abuse of opioids and clonidine. In this case, a primary care patient on buprenorphine/naloxone maintenance therapy demonstrating altered mental status, hallucinations, falls, and rebound hypertension was found to be concomitantly abusing clonidine and amitryptyline, which share metabolic pathways with buprenorphine. Clinicians should be aware of patients' combining amitryptyline, clonidine, and gabapentin with buprenorphine to achieve a mood altering state, avoid co-prescribing them if possible, and maintain communication with pharmacies and other providers when they are prescribed. PMID:25314340

  17. Evaluation of a Training to Reduce Provider Bias Toward Pregnant Patients With Substance Abuse

    PubMed Central

    SEYBOLD, DARA; CALHOUN, BYRON; BURGESS, DENISE; LEWIS, TAMMI; GILBERT, KELLY; CASTO, ANGIE

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is not to present a scientific or systematic study, but to provide an initial framework for designing a training workshop to enhance health practitioners’ (nurses, social workers, physicians, etc.) knowledge regarding substance abuse treatment and to decrease their bias toward substance-abusing women, particularly pregnant women in rural communities. We incorporated the 4 Transdisciplinary Foundations from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Competencies Model, with specific competencies targeted that related to provider bias. After the conference, 52 of the 70 participants completed a questionnaire to self-assess knowledge level and confidence in skill related to substance abuse management. Participant mean scores were statistically significantly higher following the conference than 1 week prior ( p < .001) in the area of “gender difference with substance abuse,” moving from an average of 2.6 to 4.5 on a 5-point Likert scale. Our conference was successful in increasing attendees’ knowledge about gender difference and substance abuse among pregnant patients. PMID:26207103

  18. A search engine for virtual patient records.

    PubMed

    Malamateniou, F; Vassilacopoulos, G; Mantas, J

    1999-08-01

    Virtual patient records provide a means for integrated access to patient information that may be scattered around different healthcare settings. Within the boundaries of a health district providing all levels of care, this concept can be implemented in an Intranet environment to support longitudinal patient care activities across the participating healthcare providers. Since medical information is stored on multiple Intranet sites in various forms (e.g. codified data, transcribed documents, and images), a suite of appropriate tools is needed to enable access to such information in combined form. In most cases, however, access to medical information should be restricted to authorized users. To serve this purpose, a prototype search engine incorporating an authorization and access control functionality has been developed and presented in this paper. The system is based on the signature file access method and an experimental implementation written in JAVA is also described.

  19. Inhalant Use, Abuse, and Dependence among Adolescent Patients: Commonly Comorbid Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakai, Joseph T.; Hall, Shannon K.; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about adolescents with DSM-IV-defined inhalant abuse and dependence. The aim of this study was to compare comorbidity among (1) adolescents with inhalant use disorders, (2) adolescents who reported using inhalants without inhalant use disorder, and (3) other adolescent patients drawn from an adolescent drug and alcohol…

  20. [Electronic patient record as the tool for better patient safety].

    PubMed

    Schneider, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate again that there is a deficit in the use of electronic health records (EHR) in German hospitals. Despite good arguments in favour of their use, such as the rapid availability of data, German hospitals shy away from a wider implementation. The reason is the high cost of installing and maintaining the EHRs, for the benefit is difficult to evaluate in monetary terms for the hospital. Even if a benefit can be shown it is not necessarily evident within the hospital, but manifests itself only in the health system outside. Many hospitals only manage to partly implement EHR resulting in increased documentation requirements which reverse their positive effect.In the United States, electronic medical records are also viewed in light of their positive impact on patient safety. In particular, electronic medication systems prove the benefits they can provide in the context of patient safety. As a result, financing systems have been created to promote the digitalisation of hospitals in the United States. This has led to a large increase in the use of IT systems in the United States in recent years. The Universitätsklinikum Eppendorf (UKE) introduced electronic patient records in 2009. The benefits, in particular as regards patient safety, are numerous and there are many examples to illustrate this position. These positive results are intended to demonstrate the important role EHR play in hospitals. A financing system of the ailing IT landscape based on the American model is urgently needed to benefit-especially in terms of patient safety-from electronic medical records in the hospital. PMID:25475524

  1. Polysomnographic Findings in a Cohort of Chronic Insomnia Patients with Benzodiazepine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Marianna; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Marano, Giuseppe; Di Nicola, Marco; Dittoni, Serena; Gnoni, Valentina; Di Blasi, Chiara; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Lapenta, Leonardo; Brunetti, Valerio; Bria, Pietro; Janiri, Luigi; Mazza, Salvatore; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate sleep modifications induced by chronic benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse. Methods: Cohort study, comparison of sleep measures between BDZs abusers and controls. Drug Addiction Unit (Institute of Psychiatry) and Unit of Sleep Disorders (Institute of Neurology) of the Catholic University in Rome. Six outpatients affected by chronic BDZ abuse were enrolled, (4 men, 2 women, mean age 53.3 ± 14.8, range: 34-70 years); 55 healthy controls were also enrolled (23 men, 32 women, mean age 54.2 ± 13.0, range: 27-76 years). All patients underwent clinical evaluation, psychometric measures, ambulatory polysomnography, scoring of sleep macrostructure and microstructure (power spectral fast-frequency EEG arousal, cyclic alternating pattern [CAP]), and heart rate variability. Results: BDZ abusers had relevant modification of sleep macrostructure and a marked reduction of fast-frequency EEG arousal in NREM (patients: 6.6 ± 3.7 events/h, controls 13.7 ± 4.9 events/h, U-test: 294, p = 0.002) and REM (patients: 8.4 ± 2.4 events/h, controls 13.3 ± 5.1 events/h, U-test: 264, p = 0.016), and of CAP rate (patients: 15.0 ± 8.6%, controls: 51.2% ± 12.1%, U-test: 325, p < 0.001). Discussion: BDZ abusers have reduction of arousals associated with increased number of nocturnal awakenings and severe impairment of sleep architecture. The effect of chronic BDZ abuse on sleep may be described as a severe impairment of arousal dynamics; the result is the inability to modulate levels of vigilance. Citation: Mazza M; Losurdo A; Testani E; Marano G; Di Nicola M; Dittoni S; Gnoni V; Di Blasi C; Giannantoni NM; Lapenta L; Brunetti V; Bria P; Janiri L; Mazza S; Della Marca G. Polysomnographic findings in a cohort of chronic insomnia patients with benzodiazepine abuse. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(1):35-42. PMID:24426818

  2. The reliability and validity of a sexual and physical abuse history questionnaire in female patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Leserman, J; Drossman, D A; Li, Z

    1995-01-01

    Although the literature on the psychological and medical sequelae of sexual and physical abuse has been growing, researchers have made few attempts to standardize the measurement of abuse history. The authors of this article report the first standardization of a screening instrument to identify sexual and physical abuse in a medical population. Reliability was assessed using test-retest methodology, and validity was supported by comparison with an interview (criterion validity). The sample included 139 female patients in a gastroenterology clinic. Data indicate acceptable test-retest reliability of the sexual abuse instrument (81%) and 81% overall agreement between the questionnaire and the interview on any sexual abuse. In comparison, the authors found 77% agreement in test-retest reliability of the physical abuse questionnaire and 70% agreement between the questionnaire and the interview on physical abuse. From their analyses, they concluded that the sexual abuse questionnaire and, to a lesser extent, the physical abuse instrument have acceptable levels of reliability and validity. As a screening tool, the abuse measures could be used to identify women in clinic settings for further study. PMID:8789650

  3. Where does the nephrologist stand with a non-compliant, abusive dialysis patient?

    PubMed Central

    Ripley, Elizabeth B. D.

    2010-01-01

    Physicians have sworn to treat for the good of their patients. However, there are often conflicting needs and pressures which are ethical, medical, and legal which impact the ability of the physician to provide that care. Although most dialysis patients work with the physician and dialysis facility to obtain quality care, there are a few which are noncompliant and even abusive. This small minority requires an inordinate amount of work and presents the physician with a variety of ethical and legal issues. Unlike many other specialties, dialysis care presents additional problems due to the frequent interactions, limited treatment options, and morbid consequences of lack of care. This article outlines these issues and summarizes the difficult position that the nephrologist encounters when dealing with a noncompliant or abusive patient. PMID:21152373

  4. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital in such patients. This is important in order to minimize unnecessary diagnostic workup and provide adequate treatment and safe hospital stay for these patients. PMID:27433362

  5. Architecture for networked electronic patient record systems.

    PubMed

    Takeda, H; Matsumura, Y; Kuwata, S; Nakano, H; Sakamoto, N; Yamamoto, R

    2000-11-01

    There have been two major approaches to the development of networked electronic patient record (EPR) architecture. One uses object-oriented methodologies for constructing the model, which include the GEHR project, Synapses, HL7 RIM and so on. The second approach uses document-oriented methodologies, as applied in examples of HL7 PRA. It is practically beneficial to take the advantages of both approaches and to add solution technologies for network security such as PKI. In recognition of the similarity with electronic commerce, a certificate authority as a trusted third party will be organised for establishing networked EPR system. This paper describes a Japanese functional model that has been developed, and proposes a document-object-oriented architecture, which is-compared with other existing models. PMID:11154967

  6. TimeLine: visualizing integrated patient records.

    PubMed

    Bui, Alex A T; Aberle, Denise R; Kangarloo, Hooshang

    2007-07-01

    An increasing amount of data is now accrued in medical information systems; however, the organization of this data is still primarily driven by data source, and does not support the cognitive processes of physicians. As such, new methods to visualize patient medical records are becoming imperative in order to assist physicians with clinical tasks and medical decision-making. The TimeLine system is a problem-centric temporal visualization for medical data: information contained with medical records is reorganized around medical disease entities and conditions. Automatic construction of the TimeLine display from existing clinical repositories occurs in three steps: 1) data access, which uses an eXtensible Markup Language (XML) data representation to handle distributed, heterogeneous medical databases; 2) data mapping and reorganization, reformulating data into hierarchical, problemcentric views; and 3) data visualization, which renders the display to a target presentation platform. Leveraging past work, we describe the latter two components of the TimeLine system in this paper, and the issues surrounding the creation of medical problems lists and temporal visualization of medical data. A driving factor in the development of TimeLine was creating a foundation upon which new data types and the visualization metaphors could be readily incorporated.

  7. Reliability of the Revised Psychopathy Checklist in Substance Abuse Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alterman, Arthur I.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    One month test-retest reliability of the Revised Psychopathy Checklist (PCL-R) was examined in 88 methadone-maintained males, along with effects of increased information about patients on PCL-R scores and diagnostic derivations. Test-retest reliabilities are quite good. Other findings also confirm potential utility of the PCL-R for research. (SLD)

  8. Childhood abuse is associated with structural impairment in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and aggressiveness in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Morandotti, Niccolò; Dima, Danai; Jogia, Jigar; Frangou, Sophia; Sala, Michela; Vidovich, Giulia Zelda De; Lazzaretti, Matteo; Gambini, Francesca; Marraffini, Elisa; d'Allio, Giorgio; Barale, Francesco; Zappoli, Federico; Caverzasi, Edgardo; Brambilla, Paolo

    2013-07-30

    Volume reduction and functional impairment in areas of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) have been found in borderline personality disorder (BPD), particularly in patients with a history of childhood abuse. These abnormalities may contribute to the expression of emotion dysregulation and aggressiveness. In this study we investigated whether the volume of the PFC is reduced in BPD patients and whether a history of childhood abuse would be associated with greater PFC structural changes. Structural MRI data were obtained from 18 BPD patients and 19 healthy individuals matched for age, sex, handedness, and education and were analyzed using voxel based morphometry. The Child Abuse Scale was used to elicit a past history of abuse; aggression was evaluated using the Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI). The volume of the right ventrolateral PFC (VLPFC) was significantly reduced in BPD subjects with a history of childhood abuse compared to those without this risk factor. Additionally, right VLPFC gray matter volume significantly correlated with the BDHI total score and with BDHI irritability and negativism subscale scores in patients with a history of childhood abuse. Our results suggest that a history of childhood abuse may lead to increased aggression mediated by an impairment of the right VLPFC.

  9. 42 CFR 2.15 - Incompetent and deceased patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.15 Incompetent and deceased... a deceased patient as an alcohol or drug abuser is subject to these regulations. If a...

  10. 42 CFR 2.15 - Incompetent and deceased patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.15 Incompetent and deceased... a deceased patient as an alcohol or drug abuser is subject to these regulations. If a...

  11. 42 CFR 2.15 - Incompetent and deceased patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.15 Incompetent and deceased... a deceased patient as an alcohol or drug abuser is subject to these regulations. If a...

  12. 42 CFR 2.15 - Incompetent and deceased patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.15 Incompetent and deceased... a deceased patient as an alcohol or drug abuser is subject to these regulations. If a...

  13. Improving drug abuse treatment delivery through adoption of harmonized electronic health record systems.

    PubMed

    Ghitza, Udi E; Sparenborg, Steven; Tai, Betty

    2011-07-01

    A great divide currently exists between mainstream health care and specialty substance use disorders (SUD) treatment, concerning the coordination of care and sharing of medical information. Improving the coordination of SUD treatment with other disciplines of medicine will benefit SUD patients. The development and use of harmonized electronic health record systems (EHR) containing standardized person-level information will enable improved coordination of healthcare services. We attempt here to illuminate the urgent public health need to develop and implement at the national level harmonized EHR including data fields containing standardized vocabulary/terminologies relevant to SUD treatment. The many advantages and barriers to harmonized EHR implementation in SUD treatment service groups, and pathways to their successful implementation, are also discussed. As the US Federal Government incentivizes Medicare and Medicaid Service providers nationwide for "meaningful use" of health information technology (HIT) systems, relevant stakeholders may face relatively large and time-consuming processes to conform their local practices to meet the federal government's "meaningful use" criteria unless they proactively implement data standards and elements consistent with those criteria. Incorporating consensus-based common data elements and standards relevant to SUD screening, diagnosis, and treatment into the federal government's "meaningful use" criteria is an essential first step to develop necessary infrastructure for effective coordination of HIT systems among SUD treatment and other healthcare service providers to promote collaborative-care implementation of cost-effective, evidence-based treatments and to support program evaluations.

  14. The Formation of Marijuana Risk Perception in a Population of Substance Abusing Patients.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Samuel T; van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I; Davidson, Larry; D'Souza, Deepak C

    2016-03-01

    Risk perception has been shown to be protective with regard to marijuana use. Notably, the risk perception of marijuana in individuals with substance abuse problems varies significantly from that of the general public. Understanding how risk perception is formed in substance users could explain these differences and help predict the consequences of policy changes. Using this framework, we explored risk perception and its formation in a sample of substance abusing veterans. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with veterans who were receiving treatment for substance abuse. Interviews were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. A prominent perspective among the 31 participants was that marijuana is significantly different from other drugs because it is safe, not addictive, not associated with physical withdrawal, and has less overt behavioral effects than other substances. Many of these participants drew upon their own innocuous experiences with the drug in developing this perspective, more so than information from any other source. A contrasting narrative emphasized marijuana's capacity to cause negative social consequences, act as a gateway to the use of other, more harmful substances, and cause paranoia or worsen psychosis. In conclusion, individual experience with marijuana featured more prominently in informing risk perception than any other source of information. Our results and previous literature suggest that the significant disconnect between the individual experiences of substance users and the current clinical and legal policy towards marijuana may weaken the legitimacy of public policy or the authority of the medical community. PMID:25982082

  15. The influence of posttreatment mutual help group participation on the friendship networks of substance abuse patients.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, K; Noke, J M

    1997-02-01

    The effect of 12-step mutual help groups (e.g., Narcotics Anonymous) on members' friendship networks has received little attention. This 1-year longitudinal study examined such effects in a sample of 2,337 male substance abuse inpatients, 57.7% of whom became significantly involved in 12-step activities (e.g., reading program literature, attending meetings) after treatment. An a priori model of the interplay of 12-step involvement) and friendship networks was tested using structural equation modeling, and found to have excellent fit to the data. Twelve-step group involvement after treatment predicted better general friendship characteristics (e.g., number of close friends) and substance abuse-specific friendship characteristics (e.g., proportion of friends who abstain from drugs and alcohol) at follow-up. Results are discussed in terms of how mutual help group involvement benefits patients and how the self-help group evaluation paradigm should be broadened. PMID:9231993

  16. TeleMed: A distributed virtual patient record system

    SciTech Connect

    Forslund, D.W.; Phillips, R.L.; Kilman, D.G.; Cook, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    TeleMed is a distributed diagnosis and analysis system, which permits physicians who are not collocated to consult on the status of a patient. The patient`s record is dynamically constructed from data that may reside at several sites but which can be quickly assembled for viewing by pointing to the patient`s name. Then, a graphical patient record appears, through which consulting physicians can retrieve textual and radiographic data with a single mouse click. TeleMed uses modern distributed object technology and emerging telecollaboration tools. The authors describe in this paper some of the motivation for this change, what they mean by a virtual patient record, and some results of some early implementations of a virtual patient record.

  17. 78 FR 45454 - Patient Access to Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... records if VA determines that such release could have an adverse effect on the physical or mental health... ``would not be injurious to the physical or mental health of the claimant.'' VA developed a special...(d), in those cases where records contain information that may be injurious to the physical or...

  18. Personality disorders among alcohol-dependent patients manifesting or not manifesting cocaine abuse: a comparative pilot study.

    PubMed

    Echeburúa, Enrique; De Medina, Ricardo Bravo; Aizpiri, Javier

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed personality disorders (PDs) in 158 alcohol-dependent outpatients (62 manifesting cocaine abuse and 96 without cocaine abuse) with the International Personality Disorders Examination interview between 2003 and 2006. Thirty-nine alcohol-dependent/cocaine abusers (62.9% of this group) and 51 only alcohol-dependent patients (53.1% of this group) manifested at least one PD. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in the overall prevalence rate of PDs. The most prevalent PDs, among the alcohol-dependent/cocaine abusers, were antisocial (21%), narcissistic (14.5%), and borderline (11.3%) PDs. The most frequently diagnosed PDs among the only alcohol-dependent patients were obsessive-compulsive (20.8%), paranoid (10.4%), and dependent (9.4%) PDs. There were significant differences between the groups. The study limitations are discussed.

  19. Access to health records: the rights of the patient.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2010-07-01

    From time to time patients will ask to see or request a copy of the records made about them and the treatment they received from district nurses and other health professionals. While district nurses can informally allow a patient to see the content of the records they use, a request to view or have a copy of the wider health record requires a formal request for access under the Data Protection Act 1998. This article considers the requirements for requesting and granting access to a patient to view and obtain a copy of their health record.

  20. 42 CFR 137.178 - May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at the Federal Records Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at... SELF-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Records § 137.178 May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at the Federal Records Centers? Yes, at the option of a Self-Governance Tribe, patient records...

  1. 42 CFR 137.178 - May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at the Federal Records Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at... SELF-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Records § 137.178 May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at the Federal Records Centers? Yes, at the option of a Self-Governance Tribe, patient records...

  2. 42 CFR 137.178 - May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at the Federal Records Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at... SELF-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Records § 137.178 May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at the Federal Records Centers? Yes, at the option of a Self-Governance Tribe, patient records...

  3. 42 CFR 137.178 - May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at the Federal Records Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at... SELF-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Records § 137.178 May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at the Federal Records Centers? Yes, at the option of a Self-Governance Tribe, patient records...

  4. 42 CFR 137.178 - May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at the Federal Records Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at... SELF-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Records § 137.178 May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at the Federal Records Centers? Yes, at the option of a Self-Governance Tribe, patient records...

  5. The benefits and risks of patient self-disclosure in the psychotherapy of women with a history of childhood sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Farber, Barry A; Khurgin-Bott, Rachel; Feldman, Sarah

    2009-03-01

    This article explores the potential benefits and risks of patient self-disclosure in the psychotherapy of adult women survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA). Two primary questions frame this discussion: How are the primary benefits of patient disclosure influenced by CSA status, and what are the specific risks associated with each of these benefits in the case of CSA patients? The authors examine these questions by evaluating, from the perspective of clinical work with CSA patients, each of 6 putative benefits of self-disclosure in psychotherapy: self-awareness and identity formation, intimacy, validation and affirmation, differentiation, authenticity, and catharsis. The authors suggest that although clinical work with CSA survivors often necessitates encouraging these patients to discuss traumatic material, such disclosure may include substantial costs as well as benefits. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Patients' substance abuse and the primary care physician: patterns of practice.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, N H; Mullen, P D; McAlister, A L

    1987-01-01

    The Social Learning Theory concepts of self-efficacy and outcome expectations were used to study physician practice regarding patients' smoking, alcohol problems, OTC drug problems, and illicit drug use in a random sample of Texas primary care physicians. The highest proportion of physicians took histories and counseled patients regarding the abuse of cigarettes, followed by alcohol, OTC drugs, and illicit drugs. Outside referral was most likely for illicit drugs, followed by alcohol, OTC drugs, and smoking. Multivariate discriminant analysis showed year of graduation, specialty, self-efficacy, and outcome expectation for patient compliance to be predictive of many of the behavior/practice level combinations. More recently trained physicians, internists, and family practice specialists were more likely to practice in the substance abuse areas. Self-efficacy and outcome expectation were positively related to history-taking and counseling and negatively related to outside referral. Interventions to increase physicians' self-efficacy and expectations for patient compliance and to provide more realistic expectations for treatment "success" are needed, especially for physicians who are not recently trained. Further research to clarify the process by which physicians' cognitions of self-efficacy and outcome expectations influence their practice behavior is also recommended.

  7. The Effects of Abuse History on Sexually Intrusive Behavior by Children: An Analysis of Child Justice Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershkowitz, Irit

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: A commonly cited risk factor for sexually intrusive behavior (SIB) among children and adolescents is a history of abuse. Based on a large and non-clinical nationwide sample of children who were investigated as abuse victims and suspects of SIBs in Israel over a decade, the present study examines the rate of abuse history among child…

  8. Physical Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    Navigation Physical Abuse Sexual Abuse Domestic Violence Psychological Abuse Financial Abuse Neglect Critical Issues What Communities Can Do The Role of Professionals and Concerned Citizens Help for Victims ...

  9. Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    Navigation Physical Abuse Sexual Abuse Domestic Violence Psychological Abuse Financial Abuse Neglect Critical Issues What Communities Can Do The Role of Professionals and Concerned Citizens Help for Victims ...

  10. 42 CFR 2.65 - Procedures and criteria for orders authorizing disclosure and use of records to criminally...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., rape, kidnapping, armed robbery, assault with a deadly weapon, and child abuse and neglect. (2) There... OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Court Orders Authorizing Disclosure and Use §...

  11. 42 CFR 2.65 - Procedures and criteria for orders authorizing disclosure and use of records to criminally...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., rape, kidnapping, armed robbery, assault with a deadly weapon, and child abuse and neglect. (2) There... OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Court Orders Authorizing Disclosure and Use §...

  12. 42 CFR 2.65 - Procedures and criteria for orders authorizing disclosure and use of records to criminally...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., rape, kidnapping, armed robbery, assault with a deadly weapon, and child abuse and neglect. (2) There... OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Court Orders Authorizing Disclosure and Use §...

  13. 42 CFR 2.65 - Procedures and criteria for orders authorizing disclosure and use of records to criminally...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., rape, kidnapping, armed robbery, assault with a deadly weapon, and child abuse and neglect. (2) There... OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Court Orders Authorizing Disclosure and Use §...

  14. Platelet Activation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Patients Is Not Altered with Cocaine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Kiebala, Michelle; Singh, Meera V.; Piepenbrink, Michael S.; Qiu, Xing; Kobie, James J.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has indicated that platelets, which are anucleate blood cells, significantly contribute to inflammatory disorders. Importantly, platelets also likely contribute to various inflammatory secondary disorders that are increasingly associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV) infection including neurological impairments and cardiovascular complications. Indeed, HIV infection is often associated with increased levels of platelet activators. Additionally, cocaine, a drug commonly abused by HIV-infected individuals, leads to increased platelet activation in humans. Considering that orchestrated signaling mechanisms are essential for platelet activation, and that nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitors can alter platelet function, the role of NF-κB signaling in platelet activation during HIV infection warrants further investigation. Here we tested the hypothesis that inhibitory kappa B kinase complex (IKK) activation would be central for platelet activation induced by HIV and cocaine. Whole blood from HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals, with or without cocaine abuse was used to assess platelet activation via flow cytometry whereas IKK activation was analyzed by performing immunoblotting and in vitro kinase assays. We demonstrate that increased platelet activation in HIV patients, as measured by CD62P expression, is not altered with reported cocaine use. Furthermore, cocaine and HIV do not activate platelets in whole blood when treated ex vivo. Finally, HIV-induced platelet activation does not involve the NF-κB signaling intermediate, IKKβ. Platelet activation in HIV patients is not altered with cocaine abuse. These results support the notion that non-IKK targeting approaches will be better suited for the treatment of HIV-associated inflammatory disorders. PMID:26076359

  15. Suicidal and self-injurious behavior among patients with alcohol and drug abuse

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sharqi, Abdullah Mohammed; Sherra, Khaled Saad; Al-Habeeb, Abdulhameed Abdullah; Qureshi, Naseem Akhtar

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-injurious behavior, a major public health problem globally, is linked with alcohol and drug abuse. This cross-sectional study aimed to identify the prevalence and correlates of self-harming behavior in patients with alcohol or drug abuse problems. Methods This was a one-year study that recruited a convenience sample of 736 outpatients and inpatients identified with alcohol or drug abuse, and was conducted at Al-Amal mental health hospitals in three major cities. All consecutively selected patients were interviewed on five working days for data collection on a semistructured sociodemographic form using the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale Risk Assessment version. Results In addition to the socioclinical profile revealed, 50.7% of respondents reported any suicidal ideation, while 6.9% reported self-injurious behavior without intent to die. Any suicidal and self-injurious behavior was reported by 13.1% of participants. A total of 71.3% of respondents reported any recent negative activating events. In addition to any treatment history, observed correlates were hopelessness (60.7%), perceived burden on family (29.5%), refusing a safety plan (26.1%), and sexual abuse (11%). Conversely, reasons for living (64.9%), fear of death or dying due to pain and suffering (64.3%), and spirituality (92%) were largely endorsed as protective factors. There were multiple significant odds ratios (P ≤ 0.01) revealed when independent socioclinical variables were compared with dependent variables in terms of suspected risk and protective factors. In an adjusted logistic regression model, none of the independent variables contributed significantly to any suicidal and self-injurious behavior, any suicidal ideation, or protection from them (P > 0.05). Conclusion Our preliminary results suggest that there are some socioclinical correlates of any suicide ideation, suicidal and self-injurious behavior, and protection from risky behavior, but which of them contributes

  16. Patient ECG recording control for an automatic implantable defibrillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, Glen H. (Inventor); Lee, Jr., David G. (Inventor); Kitchin, David A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An implantable automatic defibrillator includes sensors which are placed on or near the patient's heart to detect electrical signals indicative of the physiology of the heart. The signals are digitally converted and stored into a FIFO region of a RAM by operation of a direct memory access (DMA) controller. The DMA controller operates transparently with respect to the microprocessor which is part of the defibrillator. The implantable defibrillator includes a telemetry communications circuit for sending data outbound from the defibrillator to an external device (either a patient controller or a physician's console or other) and a receiver for sensing at least an externally generated patient ECG recording command signal. The patient recording command signal is generated by the hand held patient controller. Upon detection of the patient ECG recording command, DMA copies the contents of the FIFO into a specific region of the RAM.

  17. A Recommendation for the Management of Illness Anxiety Disorder Patients Abusing the Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Almalki, Mohammad; Al-Tawayjri, Ibrahim; Al-Anazi, Ahmed; Mahmoud, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) entails a preoccupation with having a serious, undiagnosed illness in which somatic symptoms are, if present, mild in intensity (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Case Report. This is a case of seventy-three-year-old Saudi man who started visiting the primary health care center around twenty-five years ago. With concerns of having cancer, the patient continuously visited the hospital, costing over $170,000. Throughout this period, the patient has been exposed to extensive unnecessary imaging studies and laboratory tests that have effects on his life in all aspects with such concerns. Five years ago, a family doctor has put an end to that by directing the patient to the right path. The doctor made several actions; most importantly, he directed the patient to a cognitive behavioral therapy which significantly improved a range of hypochondriacal beliefs and attitudes. This patient's case demonstrates the fundamental importance of a proper health system that limits such patients from abusing the health system and depleting the medical resources. Moreover, this case emphasizes the important role of the family physician who can be the first physician to encounter such patients. Thus, proper understanding of the nature of such disorder is a key element for better diagnosis and management. PMID:27313939

  18. A Recommendation for the Management of Illness Anxiety Disorder Patients Abusing the Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Almalki, Mohammad; Al-Tawayjri, Ibrahim; Al-Anazi, Ahmed; Mahmoud, Sami; Al-Mohrej, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) entails a preoccupation with having a serious, undiagnosed illness in which somatic symptoms are, if present, mild in intensity (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Case Report. This is a case of seventy-three-year-old Saudi man who started visiting the primary health care center around twenty-five years ago. With concerns of having cancer, the patient continuously visited the hospital, costing over $170,000. Throughout this period, the patient has been exposed to extensive unnecessary imaging studies and laboratory tests that have effects on his life in all aspects with such concerns. Five years ago, a family doctor has put an end to that by directing the patient to the right path. The doctor made several actions; most importantly, he directed the patient to a cognitive behavioral therapy which significantly improved a range of hypochondriacal beliefs and attitudes. This patient's case demonstrates the fundamental importance of a proper health system that limits such patients from abusing the health system and depleting the medical resources. Moreover, this case emphasizes the important role of the family physician who can be the first physician to encounter such patients. Thus, proper understanding of the nature of such disorder is a key element for better diagnosis and management. PMID:27313939

  19. A Recommendation for the Management of Illness Anxiety Disorder Patients Abusing the Health Care System.

    PubMed

    Almalki, Mohammad; Al-Tawayjri, Ibrahim; Al-Anazi, Ahmed; Mahmoud, Sami; Al-Mohrej, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) entails a preoccupation with having a serious, undiagnosed illness in which somatic symptoms are, if present, mild in intensity (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Case Report. This is a case of seventy-three-year-old Saudi man who started visiting the primary health care center around twenty-five years ago. With concerns of having cancer, the patient continuously visited the hospital, costing over $170,000. Throughout this period, the patient has been exposed to extensive unnecessary imaging studies and laboratory tests that have effects on his life in all aspects with such concerns. Five years ago, a family doctor has put an end to that by directing the patient to the right path. The doctor made several actions; most importantly, he directed the patient to a cognitive behavioral therapy which significantly improved a range of hypochondriacal beliefs and attitudes. This patient's case demonstrates the fundamental importance of a proper health system that limits such patients from abusing the health system and depleting the medical resources. Moreover, this case emphasizes the important role of the family physician who can be the first physician to encounter such patients. Thus, proper understanding of the nature of such disorder is a key element for better diagnosis and management.

  20. Information integrity and privacy for computerized medical patient records

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, J.; Hamilton, V.; Gaylor, T.; McCurley, K.; Meeks, T.

    1996-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Oceania, Inc. entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) in November 1993 to provide ``Information Integrity and Privacy for Computerized Medical Patient Records`` (CRADA No. SC93/01183). The main objective of the project was to develop information protection methods that are appropriate for databases of patient records in health information systems. This document describes the findings and alternative solutions that resulted from this CRADA.

  1. 42 CFR 2.14 - Minor patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.14 Minor patients. (a) Definition of minor... or drug abuse treatment, any written consent for disclosure authorized under subpart C of these... drug abuse treatment, any written consent for disclosure authorized under subpart C of...

  2. 42 CFR 2.14 - Minor patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.14 Minor patients. (a) Definition of minor... or drug abuse treatment, any written consent for disclosure authorized under subpart C of these... drug abuse treatment, any written consent for disclosure authorized under subpart C of...

  3. 42 CFR 2.14 - Minor patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.14 Minor patients. (a) Definition of minor... or drug abuse treatment, any written consent for disclosure authorized under subpart C of these... drug abuse treatment, any written consent for disclosure authorized under subpart C of...

  4. Centralised versus decentralised management of patients' medical records.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Fassa, Maniane; Breton, Vincent; Jaquet-Chiffelle, David-Olivier; de Vlieger, Paul; Lypszyc, Norbert; Boire, Jean-Yves; Roux, Christian; Allaert, François-André

    2009-01-01

    For more than 20 years, many countries have been trying to set up a standardised medical record at the regional or at the national level. Most of them have not reached this goal, essentially due to two main difficulties related to patient identification and medical records standardisation. Moreover, the issues raised by the centralisation of all gathered medical data have to be tackled particularly in terms of security and privacy. We discuss here the interest of a non-centralised management of medical records which would require a specific procedure that gives to the patient access to his/her distributed medical data, wherever he/she is located.

  5. Should a patient have access to his medical records.

    PubMed

    de Klerk, A

    1989-01-01

    An investigation is undertaken into the right of a patient to have access to medical records concerning himself, and the ownership of medical records and X-ray photographs is discussed. It is argued that record accessibility by patients is to favoured. The current situation in England and the United States of America is considered and proposals de lege ferenda are made with respect to South Africa. The author is of the opinion that the South African legislature should consider legislation in this regard.

  6. Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Additional Resources Return to: What is Elder Abuse? Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse Substance abuse has been identified ... the most frequently cited risk factor associated with elder abuse and neglect. It may be the victim and/ ...

  7. Gray cases of child abuse: Investigating factors associated with uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Chaiyachati, Barbara H; Asnes, Andrea G; Moles, Rebecca L; Schaeffer, Paula; Leventhal, John M

    2016-01-01

    Research in child abuse pediatrics has advanced clinicians' abilities to discriminate abusive from accidental injuries. Less attention, however, has been paid to cases with uncertain diagnoses. These uncertain cases - the "gray" cases between decisions of abuse and not abuse - represent a meaningful challenge in the practice of child abuse pediatricians. In this study, we describe a series of gray cases, representing 17% of 134 consecutive children who were hospitalized at a single pediatric hospital and referred to a child abuse pediatrician for concerns of possible abuse. Gray cases were defined by scores of 3, 4, or 5 on a 7-point clinical judgment scale of the likelihood of abuse. We evaluated details of the case presentation, including incident history, patient medical and developmental histories, family social histories, medical studies, and injuries from the medical record and sought to identify unique and shared characteristics compared with abuse and accidental cases. Overall, the gray cases had incident histories that were ambiguous, medical and social histories that were more similar to abuse cases, and injuries that were similar to accidental injuries. Thus, the lack of clarity in these cases was not attributable to any single element of the incident, history, or injury. Gray cases represent a clinical challenge in child abuse pediatrics and deserve continued attention in research. PMID:26615776

  8. Gray cases of child abuse: Investigating factors associated with uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Chaiyachati, Barbara H; Asnes, Andrea G; Moles, Rebecca L; Schaeffer, Paula; Leventhal, John M

    2016-01-01

    Research in child abuse pediatrics has advanced clinicians' abilities to discriminate abusive from accidental injuries. Less attention, however, has been paid to cases with uncertain diagnoses. These uncertain cases - the "gray" cases between decisions of abuse and not abuse - represent a meaningful challenge in the practice of child abuse pediatricians. In this study, we describe a series of gray cases, representing 17% of 134 consecutive children who were hospitalized at a single pediatric hospital and referred to a child abuse pediatrician for concerns of possible abuse. Gray cases were defined by scores of 3, 4, or 5 on a 7-point clinical judgment scale of the likelihood of abuse. We evaluated details of the case presentation, including incident history, patient medical and developmental histories, family social histories, medical studies, and injuries from the medical record and sought to identify unique and shared characteristics compared with abuse and accidental cases. Overall, the gray cases had incident histories that were ambiguous, medical and social histories that were more similar to abuse cases, and injuries that were similar to accidental injuries. Thus, the lack of clarity in these cases was not attributable to any single element of the incident, history, or injury. Gray cases represent a clinical challenge in child abuse pediatrics and deserve continued attention in research.

  9. The electronic patient record: a strategic planning framework.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D B; Marafioti, S; Carter, M; Kunov, H; Dolan, A

    1995-01-01

    Sunnybrook Health Science Center (Sunnybrook) is a multifacility academic teaching center. In May 1994, Sunnybrook struck an electronic patient record taskforce to develop a strategic plan for the implementation of a comprehensive, facility wide electronic patient record (EPR). The taskforce sought to create a conceptual framework which provides context and integrates decision-making related to the comprehensive electronic patient record. The EPR is very much broader in scope than the traditional paper-based record. It is not restricted to simply reporting individual patient data. By the Institute of Medicine's definition, the electronic patient record resides in a system specifically designed to support users through availability of complete and accurate data, practitioner reminders and alerts, clinical decision support systems, links to bodies of medical knowledge, and other aids [1]. It is a comprehensive resource for patient care. The taskforce proposed a three domain model for determining how the EPR affects Sunnybrook. The EPR enables Sunnybrook to have a high performance team structure (domain 1), to function as an integrated organization (domain 2), and to reach out and develop new relationships with external organizations to become an extended enterprise (domain 3) [2]. Domain 1: Sunnybrook's high performance teams or patient service units' (PSUs) are decentralized, autonomous operating units that provide care to patients grouped by 'like' diagnosis and resource needs. The EPR must provide functions and applications which promote patient focused care, such as cross functional charting and care maps, group scheduling, clinical email, and a range of enabling technologies for multiskilled workers. Domain 2: In the integrated organization domain, the EPR should facilitate closer linkages between the arrangement of PSUs into clinical teams and with other facilities within the center in order to provide a longitudinal record that covers a continuum of care

  10. The electronic patient record: a strategic planning framework.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D B; Marafioti, S; Carter, M; Kunov, H; Dolan, A

    1995-01-01

    Sunnybrook Health Science Center (Sunnybrook) is a multifacility academic teaching center. In May 1994, Sunnybrook struck an electronic patient record taskforce to develop a strategic plan for the implementation of a comprehensive, facility wide electronic patient record (EPR). The taskforce sought to create a conceptual framework which provides context and integrates decision-making related to the comprehensive electronic patient record. The EPR is very much broader in scope than the traditional paper-based record. It is not restricted to simply reporting individual patient data. By the Institute of Medicine's definition, the electronic patient record resides in a system specifically designed to support users through availability of complete and accurate data, practitioner reminders and alerts, clinical decision support systems, links to bodies of medical knowledge, and other aids [1]. It is a comprehensive resource for patient care. The taskforce proposed a three domain model for determining how the EPR affects Sunnybrook. The EPR enables Sunnybrook to have a high performance team structure (domain 1), to function as an integrated organization (domain 2), and to reach out and develop new relationships with external organizations to become an extended enterprise (domain 3) [2]. Domain 1: Sunnybrook's high performance teams or patient service units' (PSUs) are decentralized, autonomous operating units that provide care to patients grouped by 'like' diagnosis and resource needs. The EPR must provide functions and applications which promote patient focused care, such as cross functional charting and care maps, group scheduling, clinical email, and a range of enabling technologies for multiskilled workers. Domain 2: In the integrated organization domain, the EPR should facilitate closer linkages between the arrangement of PSUs into clinical teams and with other facilities within the center in order to provide a longitudinal record that covers a continuum of care

  11. Privacy and security requirements of distributed computer based patient records.

    PubMed

    Moehr, J R

    1994-02-01

    Privacy and security issues increase in complexity as we move from the conventional patient record to the computer based patient record (CPR) supporting patient care and to cross-institutional networked CPRs. The privacy and security issues surrounding the CPR are outlined. Measures for privacy and security protection are summarized. It is suggested that we lack a key component of an information sharing culture. We need means for semantic indexing in the form of a metadata base at the level of the instantiation of a data base rather than at the level of its schemas.

  12. Anabolic steroids abuse-induced cardiomyopathy and ischaemic stroke in a young male patient.

    PubMed

    Shamloul, Reham Mohammed; Aborayah, Ahmed Fathy; Hashad, Assem; Abd-Allah, Foad

    2014-02-26

    We report a case of a 37-year-old man presented with acute stroke and hepatorenal impairment which were associated with anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) abuse over 2 years. Despite the absence of apparent symptoms and signs of congestive heart failure at presentation, an AAS-induced dilated cardiomyopathy with multiple thrombi in the left ventricle was attributed to be the underlying cause of his condition. Awareness of the complications of AAS led to the prompt treatment of the initially unrecognised dilated cardiomyopathy, and improved the liver and kidney functions. However, the patient was exposed to a second severe ischaemic event, which led to his death. This unique and complex presentation of AAS complications opens for better recognition and treatment of their potentially fatal effects.

  13. Long-Term Effects of Incest: Life Events Triggering Mental Disorders in Female Patients with Sexual Abuse in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzl, Johannes; Biebl, Wilfried

    1992-01-01

    Psychosocial, psychosomatic, and psychodynamic factors were evaluated in 33 female psychiatric patients who had been victims of incest. Sexual abuse experiences in childhood were related to feelings of anxiety, helplessness, and powerlessness, which, with a lack of support from the mother, led to ego weakness, and an autoplastic model of coping…

  14. Development framework for a patient-centered record.

    PubMed

    Puentes, John; Roux, Michèle; Montagner, Julien; Lecornu, Laurent

    2012-12-01

    Patient records have been developed to support the physician-oriented medical activity scheme. One recommended yet rarely studied alternative, expected to improve healthcare, is the patient-centered record. We propose a development framework for such record, which includes domain-specific database models at the conceptual level, analyzing the fundamental role of complementary information destined to ensure proper patient understanding of related clinical situations. A patient-centered awareness field study of user requirements and medical workflow was carried out in three medical services and two technical units to identify the most relevant elements of the framework, and compared to the definitions of a theoretical approach. Three core data models - centered on the patient, medical personnel, and complementary patient information, corresponding to the determined set of entities, information exchanges and actors roles, constitute the technical recommendations of the development framework. An open source proof of concept prototype was developed to show the model feasibility. The resulting patient-centered record development framework implies particular medical personnel contributions to supply complementary information.

  15. Development framework for a patient-centered record.

    PubMed

    Puentes, John; Roux, Michèle; Montagner, Julien; Lecornu, Laurent

    2012-12-01

    Patient records have been developed to support the physician-oriented medical activity scheme. One recommended yet rarely studied alternative, expected to improve healthcare, is the patient-centered record. We propose a development framework for such record, which includes domain-specific database models at the conceptual level, analyzing the fundamental role of complementary information destined to ensure proper patient understanding of related clinical situations. A patient-centered awareness field study of user requirements and medical workflow was carried out in three medical services and two technical units to identify the most relevant elements of the framework, and compared to the definitions of a theoretical approach. Three core data models - centered on the patient, medical personnel, and complementary patient information, corresponding to the determined set of entities, information exchanges and actors roles, constitute the technical recommendations of the development framework. An open source proof of concept prototype was developed to show the model feasibility. The resulting patient-centered record development framework implies particular medical personnel contributions to supply complementary information. PMID:22795581

  16. Personality Disorders in Substance Abusers: A Comparison of Patients Treated in a Prison Unit and Patients Treated in Inpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefansson, Ragnar; Hesse, Morten

    2008-01-01

    A large body of literature has shown a high prevalence of personality disorders in substance abusers. We compared a sample of substance abusers treated in a prison setting with substance abusers treated in a non-prison inpatient setting rated with the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III. Base-rate scores indicated a prevalence of 95% of…

  17. Computer-based patient record: the essential data set approach.

    PubMed Central

    Moidu, K.; Falsone, J. J.; Nair, S.

    1994-01-01

    The clamor for data to study the impact of care, to evaluate clinical performance and justify resource utilization is increasing. The data in demand normally should exist in the record of a clinical encounter. Advances in information technology and software techniques have provided us with tools to develop and implement computer-based patient record systems. The issues that constrain development are integral issues of clinical medicine, such as the variability in medical data, specialized practice of medicine, and differing demands of the numerous end-users of a medical record. This paper describes an approach to develop a computer-based patient record. The focus is on identification of the essential data set by infological data modeling and its implementation in a commercially available package for a physician's office. PMID:7949970

  18. Redundancy-Aware Topic Modeling for Patient Record Notes

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Raphael; Aviram, Iddo; Elhadad, Michael; Elhadad, Noémie

    2014-01-01

    The clinical notes in a given patient record contain much redundancy, in large part due to clinicians’ documentation habit of copying from previous notes in the record and pasting into a new note. Previous work has shown that this redundancy has a negative impact on the quality of text mining and topic modeling in particular. In this paper we describe a novel variant of Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) topic modeling, Red-LDA, which takes into account the inherent redundancy of patient records when modeling content of clinical notes. To assess the value of Red-LDA, we experiment with three baselines and our novel redundancy-aware topic modeling method: given a large collection of patient records, (i) apply vanilla LDA to all documents in all input records; (ii) identify and remove all redundancy by chosing a single representative document for each record as input to LDA; (iii) identify and remove all redundant paragraphs in each record, leaving partial, non-redundant documents as input to LDA; and (iv) apply Red-LDA to all documents in all input records. Both quantitative evaluation carried out through log-likelihood on held-out data and topic coherence of produced topics and qualitative assessement of topics carried out by physicians show that Red-LDA produces superior models to all three baseline strategies. This research contributes to the emerging field of understanding the characteristics of the electronic health record and how to account for them in the framework of data mining. The code for the two redundancy-elimination baselines and Red-LDA is made publicly available to the community. PMID:24551060

  19. Redundancy-aware topic modeling for patient record notes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Raphael; Aviram, Iddo; Elhadad, Michael; Elhadad, Noémie

    2014-01-01

    The clinical notes in a given patient record contain much redundancy, in large part due to clinicians' documentation habit of copying from previous notes in the record and pasting into a new note. Previous work has shown that this redundancy has a negative impact on the quality of text mining and topic modeling in particular. In this paper we describe a novel variant of Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) topic modeling, Red-LDA, which takes into account the inherent redundancy of patient records when modeling content of clinical notes. To assess the value of Red-LDA, we experiment with three baselines and our novel redundancy-aware topic modeling method: given a large collection of patient records, (i) apply vanilla LDA to all documents in all input records; (ii) identify and remove all redundancy by chosing a single representative document for each record as input to LDA; (iii) identify and remove all redundant paragraphs in each record, leaving partial, non-redundant documents as input to LDA; and (iv) apply Red-LDA to all documents in all input records. Both quantitative evaluation carried out through log-likelihood on held-out data and topic coherence of produced topics and qualitative assessment of topics carried out by physicians show that Red-LDA produces superior models to all three baseline strategies. This research contributes to the emerging field of understanding the characteristics of the electronic health record and how to account for them in the framework of data mining. The code for the two redundancy-elimination baselines and Red-LDA is made publicly available to the community. PMID:24551060

  20. How Patients Can Improve the Accuracy of their Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Dullabh, Prashila M.; Sondheimer, Norman K.; Katsh, Ethan; Evans, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Assess (1) if patients can improve their medical records’ accuracy if effectively engaged using a networked Personal Health Record; (2) workflow efficiency and reliability for receiving and processing patient feedback; and (3) patient feedback’s impact on medical record accuracy. Background: Improving medical record’ accuracy and associated challenges have been documented extensively. Providing patients with useful access to their records through information technology gives them new opportunities to improve their records’ accuracy and completeness. A new approach supporting online contributions to their medication lists by patients of Geisinger Health Systems, an online patient-engagement advocate, revealed this can be done successfully. In late 2011, Geisinger launched an online process for patients to provide electronic feedback on their medication lists’ accuracy before a doctor visit. Patient feedback was routed to a Geisinger pharmacist, who reviewed it and followed up with the patient before changing the medication list shared by the patient and the clinicians. Methods: The evaluation employed mixed methods and consisted of patient focus groups (users, nonusers, and partial users of the feedback form), semi structured interviews with providers and pharmacists, user observations with patients, and quantitative analysis of patient feedback data and pharmacists’ medication reconciliation logs. Findings/Discussion: (1) Patients were eager to provide feedback on their medications and saw numerous advantages. Thirty percent of patient feedback forms (457 of 1,500) were completed and submitted to Geisinger. Patients requested changes to the shared medication lists in 89 percent of cases (369 of 414 forms). These included frequency—or dosage changes to existing prescriptions and requests for new medications (prescriptions and over-the counter). (2) Patients provided useful and accurate online feedback. In a subsample of 107 forms

  1. SU-E-T-502: Biometrically Accepted Patient Records

    SciTech Connect

    Basavatia, A; Kalnicki, S; Garg, M; Lukaj, A; Hong, L; Fret, J; Yaparpalvi, R; Tome, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To implement a clinically useful palm vein pattern recognition biometric system to treat the correct treatment plan to the correct patient each and every time and to check-in the patient into the department to access the correct medical record. Methods: A commercially available hand vein scanning system was paired to Aria and utilized an ADT interface from the hospital electronic health system. Integration at two points in Aria, version 11 MR2, first at the appointment tracker screen for the front desk medical record access and second at the queue screen on the 4D treatment console took place for patient daily time-out. A test patient was utilized to check accuracy of identification as well as to check that no unintended interactions take place between the 4D treatment console and the hand vein scanning system. This system has been in clinical use since December 2013. Results: Since implementation, 445 patients have been enrolled into our biometric system. 95% of patients learn the correct methodology of hand placement on the scanner in the first try. We have had two instances of patient not found because of a bad initial scan. We simply erased the scanned metric and the patient enrolled again in those cases. The accuracy of the match is 100% for each patient, we have not had one patient misidentified. We can state this because we still use patient photo and date of birth as identifiers. A QA test patient is run monthly to check the integrity of the system. Conclusion: By utilizing palm vein scans along with the date of birth and patient photo, another means of patient identification now exits. This work indicates the successful implementation of technology in the area of patient safety by closing the gap of treating the wrong plan to a patient in radiation oncology. FOJP Service Corporation covered some of the costs of the hardware and software of the palm vein pattern recognition biometric system.

  2. Severe lactic acidosis in a diabetic patient after ethanol abuse and floor cleaner intake.

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Jeroen J M A; Lagas, Jurjen S; Daling, Ratana; Hooijberg, Jan Hendrik; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Brandjes, Desiderius P M; Huitema, Alwin D R

    2014-11-01

    An intoxication with drugs, ethanol or cleaning solvents may cause a complex clinical scenario if multiple agents have been ingested simultaneously. The situation can become even more complex in patients with (multiple) co-morbidities. A 59-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus (without treatment two weeks before the intoxication) intentionally ingested a substantial amount of ethanol along with ~750 mL of laminate floor cleaner containing citric acid. The patient was admitted with severe metabolic acidosis (both ketoacidosis and lactic acidosis, with serum lactate levels of 22 mM). He was treated with sodium bicarbonate, insulin and thiamine after which he recovered within two days. Diabetic ketoacidosis and lactic acidosis aggravated due to ethanol intoxication, thiamine deficiency and citrate. The high lactate levels were explained by excessive lactate formation caused by the combination of untreated diabetes mellitus, thiamine deficiency and ethanol abuse. Metabolic acidosis in diabetes is multi-factorial, and the clinical situation may be further complicated, when ingestion of ethanol and toxic agents are involved. Here, we reported a patient in whom diabetic ketoacidosis was accompanied by severe lactic acidosis as a result of citric acid and mainly ethanol ingestion and a possible thiamine deficiency. In the presence of lactic acidosis in diabetic ketoacidosis, physicians need to consider thiamine deficiency and ingestion of ethanol or other toxins. PMID:24717115

  3. Severe lactic acidosis in a diabetic patient after ethanol abuse and floor cleaner intake.

    PubMed

    Hendrikx, Jeroen J M A; Lagas, Jurjen S; Daling, Ratana; Hooijberg, Jan Hendrik; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Brandjes, Desiderius P M; Huitema, Alwin D R

    2014-11-01

    An intoxication with drugs, ethanol or cleaning solvents may cause a complex clinical scenario if multiple agents have been ingested simultaneously. The situation can become even more complex in patients with (multiple) co-morbidities. A 59-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus (without treatment two weeks before the intoxication) intentionally ingested a substantial amount of ethanol along with ~750 mL of laminate floor cleaner containing citric acid. The patient was admitted with severe metabolic acidosis (both ketoacidosis and lactic acidosis, with serum lactate levels of 22 mM). He was treated with sodium bicarbonate, insulin and thiamine after which he recovered within two days. Diabetic ketoacidosis and lactic acidosis aggravated due to ethanol intoxication, thiamine deficiency and citrate. The high lactate levels were explained by excessive lactate formation caused by the combination of untreated diabetes mellitus, thiamine deficiency and ethanol abuse. Metabolic acidosis in diabetes is multi-factorial, and the clinical situation may be further complicated, when ingestion of ethanol and toxic agents are involved. Here, we reported a patient in whom diabetic ketoacidosis was accompanied by severe lactic acidosis as a result of citric acid and mainly ethanol ingestion and a possible thiamine deficiency. In the presence of lactic acidosis in diabetic ketoacidosis, physicians need to consider thiamine deficiency and ingestion of ethanol or other toxins.

  4. The independent effects of child sexual abuse and impulsivity on lifetime suicide attempts among female patients.

    PubMed

    Daray, Federico M; Rojas, Sasha M; Bridges, Ana J; Badour, Christal L; Grendas, Leandro; Rodante, Demián; Puppo, Soledad; Rebok, Federico

    2016-08-01

    Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a causal agent in many negative adulthood outcomes, including the risk for life-threatening behaviors such as suicide ideation and suicide attempts. Traumatic events such as CSA may pose risk in the healthy development of cognitive and emotional functioning during childhood. In fact, high impulsivity, a risk factor for suicidal behavior, is characteristic of CSA victims. The current study aims to understand the relations among CSA, impulsivity, and frequency of lifetime suicide attempts among a female patient sample admitted for suicidal behavior. Participants included 177 female patients between the ages of 18 and 63 years admitted at two hospitals in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Number of previous suicide attempts and CSA were assessed via structured interviews, while impulsivity was assessed with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11). A model of structural equations was employed to evaluate the role of impulsivity in the relation between CSA and suicide attempts. CSA (β=.18, p<.05) and impulsivity (β=.24, p<.05) were associated with the number of previous suicide attempts. However, impulsivity was not significantly associated with CSA (β=.09, p>.05). CSA and impulsivity are independently associated with lifetime suicide attempts among female patients with recent suicidal behavior. PMID:27352091

  5. Differing effects of antipsychotic medications on substance abuse treatment patients with co-occurring psychotic and substance abuse disorders.

    PubMed

    Stuyt, Elizabeth B; Sajbel, Terrie A; Allen, Michael H

    2006-01-01

    This retrospective study of patients treated in a ninety-day, inpatient, dual-diagnosis treatment program examined antipsychotic effectiveness in this population using length of stay in treatment and successful program completion as outcome measures. All patients with co-occurring substance dependence and schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder treated with olanzapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, and typical depot neuroleptics from January 2001 to December 2003 (N = 55) are the subjects of this study. Patients stayed longer in treatment when taking risperidone (82 +/- 19 days) or ziprasidone (74 +/- 21 days) compared with olanzapine (44 +/- 30 days) or typicals (47 +/- 36 days). Eighty-eight percent of risperidone patients and 64% of ziprasidone patients successfully completed the program, while only 33% of olanzapine patients and 40% of patients on typicals successfully completed the program. Risperidone and ziprasidone were associated with significantly better program performance than olanzapine or depot typicals in this population. Possible reasons for this difference are discussed.

  6. Patient clustering with uncoded text in electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Henao, Ricardo; Murray, Jared; Ginsburg, Geoffrey; Carin, Lawrence; Lucas, Joseph E

    2013-01-01

    We propose a mixture model for text data designed to capture underlying structure in the history of present illness section of electronic medical records data. Additionally, we propose a method to induce bias that leads to more homogeneous sets of diagnoses for patients in each cluster. We apply our model to a collection of electronic records from an emergency department and compare our results to three other relevant models in order to assess performance. Results using standard metrics demonstrate that patient clusters from our model are more homogeneous when compared to others, and qualitative analyses suggest that our approach leads to interpretable patient sub-populations when applied to real data. Finally, we demonstrate an example of our patient clustering model to identify adverse drug events.

  7. Patient Clustering with Uncoded Text in Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Henao, Ricardo; Murray, Jared; Ginsburg, Geoffrey; Carin, Lawrence; Lucas, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a mixture model for text data designed to capture underlying structure in the history of present illness section of electronic medical records data. Additionally, we propose a method to induce bias that leads to more homogeneous sets of diagnoses for patients in each cluster. We apply our model to a collection of electronic records from an emergency department and compare our results to three other relevant models in order to assess performance. Results using standard metrics demonstrate that patient clusters from our model are more homogeneous when compared to others, and qualitative analyses suggest that our approach leads to interpretable patient sub-populations when applied to real data. Finally, we demonstrate an example of our patient clustering model to identify adverse drug events. PMID:24551361

  8. Giving Patients Access to Their Medical Records via the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Masys, Daniel; Baker, Dixie; Butros, Amy; Cowles, Kevin E.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The Patient-Centered Access to Secure Systems Online (pcasso) project is designed to apply state-of-the-art-security to the communication of clinical information over the Internet. Design: The authors report the legal and regulatory issues associated with deploying the system, and results of its use by providers and patients. Human subject protection concerns raised by the Institutional Review Board focused on three areas—unauthorized access to information by persons other than the patient; the effect of startling or poorly understood information; and the effect of patient access to records on the record-keeping behavior of providers. Measurements: Objective and subjective measures of security and usability were obtained. Results: During its initial deployment phase, the project enrolled 216 physicians and 41 patients; of these, 68 physicians and 26 patients used the system one or more times. The system performed as designed, with no unauthorized information access or intrusions detected. Providers rated the usability of the system low because of the complexity of the secure login and other security features and restrictions limiting their access to those patients with whom they had a professional relationship. In contrast, patients rated the usability and functionality of the system favorably. Conclusion: High-assurance systems that serve both patients and providers will need to address differing expectations regarding security and ease of use. PMID:11861633

  9. Prevalence and Record of Alcoholism Among Emergency Department Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boniatti, Márcio Manozzo; Diogo, Luciano Passamani; Almeida, Caroline Lorenzoni; de Oliveira Cardoso, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of alcoholism among inpatients, to identify social and demographic factors associated with this prevalence and to determine its rate of recognition by the medical team. METHODS: The study population consisted of all patients admitted to the emergency room at Hospital São Lucas, Porto Alegre, Brazil, between July and September of 2005. The data were collected in two steps: an interview with the patient and a review of the medical records to investigate the cases of alcoholism recorded by the medical team. The questionnaire consisted of questions concerning social and demographic data, smoking habits and Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test. RESULTS: We interviewed 248 patients. Twenty-eight (11.3%) were identified as alcoholics. Compared to the patients with a negative Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test value (less than 8), those with a positive Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test were more likely to be male, illiterate and smokers. The medical records of 217 (87.5%) patients were reviewed. Only 5 (20.0%) of the 25 patients with a positive Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test whose medical records were reviewed were identified as alcoholics by the medical team. The diagnosis made by the medical team, compared to Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, shows only a 20% sensitivity, 93% specificity and positive and negative predictive values of 29% and 90%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Alcoholism has been underrecognized in patients who are hospitalized, and, as such, this opportunity for possible early intervention is often lost. Key social and demographic factors could provide physicians with risk factors and, when used together with a standardized diagnostic instrument, could significantly improve the rate of identification of alcoholic patients. PMID:19142548

  10. Using a computerized patient record to reengineer an outpatient clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Borowitz, S. M.

    1994-01-01

    By employing process flow analysis and work redesign techniques during the design and implementation of a computerized patient record in the pediatric outpatient clinics at the University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, we have developed a database of clinical observations while simultaneously shortening the time that patients spend waiting in the pediatric clinics and decreasing the number of support staff employed within the clinics. PMID:7949936

  11. Monocyte function in intravenous drug abusers with lymphadenopathy syndrome and in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: selective impairment of chemotaxis.

    PubMed Central

    Poli, G; Bottazzi, B; Acero, R; Bersani, L; Rossi, V; Introna, M; Lazzarin, A; Galli, M; Mantovani, A

    1985-01-01

    We have investigated monocyte function in 17 intravenous drug abusers with the clinical and laboratory features of lymphadenopathy syndrome (LAS). LAS patients had normal numbers of circulating monocytes. Monocytes from LAS patients were comparable to cells from normal donors in terms of phagocytosis of latex beads, interleukin-1 secretion, O2- release and killing of antibody-sensitized lymphoma cells or actinomycin D pretreated WEHI 164 cells. In contrast 13 out of 17 LAS subjects tested in this respect as well as six out of nine AIDS patients showed a marked defect of monocyte chemotaxis. Thus monocytes from patients with LAS or AIDS have a selective defect of monocyte chemotaxis. PMID:2998656

  12. Meconium Indicators of Maternal Alcohol Abuse during Pregnancy and Association with Patient Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Goecke, Tamme W.; Burger, Pascal; Fasching, Peter A.; Bakdash, Abdulsallam; Engel, Anne; Häberle, Lothar; Voigt, Franziska; Faschingbauer, Florian; Raabe, Eva; Maass, Nicolai; Rothe, Michael; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Pragst, Fritz

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Identification of women with moderate alcohol abuse during pregnancy is difficult. We correlated self-reported alcohol consumption during pregnancy and patient characteristics with objective alcohol indicators measured in fetal meconium. Methods. A total of 557 women singleton births and available psychological tests, obstetric data and meconium samples were included in statistical analysis. Alcohol metabolites (fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) and ethyl glucuronide (EtG)), were determined from meconium and correlated with patient characteristics. Results. We found that 21.2% of the 557 participants admitted low-to-moderate alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Of the parameters analyzed from meconium, only EtG showed an association with alcohol history (P < 0.01). This association was inverse in cases with EtG value above 120 ng/g. These values indicate women with most severe alcohol consumption, who obviously denied having consumed alcohol during pregnancy. No other associations between socioeconomic or psychological characteristics and the drinking status (via meconium alcohol metabolites) could be found. Conclusion. Women who drink higher doses of ethanol during pregnancy, according to metabolite measures in meconium, might be less likely to admit alcohol consumption. No profile of socioeconomic or psychological characteristics of those women positively tested via meconium could be established. PMID:24800249

  13. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  14. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  15. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  16. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  17. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  18. Childhood Physical and Sexual Abuse in Depressed Patients with Single and Multiple Suicide Attempts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andover, Margaret S.; Zlotnick, Caron; Miller, Ivan W.

    2007-01-01

    Research has shown both childhood physical and sexual abuse to be associated with later suicide attempts, although some studies have not supported these findings. However, few studies have investigated differences in physical and sexual abuse histories among single and multiple suicide attempters. The goals of the current study were two-fold: (a)…

  19. Mental Illness, Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, Multiple Disabilities...Whose Patient, Whose Treatment Approach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sciacca, Kathleen

    This paper reviews issues in the provision of services to individuals who are mentally ill chemical abusers and addicted (MICAA). Introductory material defines this population and notes that these people are frequently ineligible for services aimed at either mental illness or chemical abuse alone. Service provisions within the psychiatric/mental…

  20. Silencing the Patient: Freud, Sexual Abuse, and "The Etiology of Hysteria."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McOmber, James B.

    1996-01-01

    States that, in "The Etiology of Hysteria," Sigmund Freud's "seduction theory" asserted that child sexual abuse was the single cause of adult hysteria. Argues that Freud's failure to persuade his audience can be attributed not only to their denial of sexual abuse but also to his failure to clarify how pschyoanalysis could comport with traditional…

  1. The Development of a Substance Abuse Treatment Program for Forensic Patients with Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassmire, David M.; Welsh, Robert K.; Clevenger, Jeanne K.

    2007-01-01

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Illness (SAMI) program combines cognitive rehabilitation and dual-diagnosis substance abuse treatment within a stages of change context. This article describes the development, implementation, and preliminary outcome analysis of the SAMI program in a forensic hospital.

  2. Long-term, high-dose benzodiazepine prescriptions in veteran patients with PTSD: influence of preexisting alcoholism and drug-abuse diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Hermos, John A; Young, Melissa M; Lawler, Elizabeth V; Rosenbloom, David; Fiore, Louis D

    2007-10-01

    Databases from the New England Veterans Integrated Service Network were analyzed to determine factors associated with long-term, high-dose anxiolytic benzodiazepine prescriptions dispensed to patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and existing alcoholism and/or drug abuse diagnoses. Among 2,183 PTSD patients, 234 received the highest 10% average daily doses for alprazolam, clonazepam, diazepam, or lorazepam, doses above those typically recommended. Highest doses were more commonly prescribed to patients with existing drug abuse diagnoses. Among patients with PTSD and alcoholism, younger age, drug abuse, and concurrent prescriptions for another benzodiazepine and oxycodone/acetaminophen independently predicted high doses. Results indicate that for veteran patients with PTSD, alcoholism alone is not associated with high-dose benzodiazepines, but existing drug abuse diagnoses do increase that risk.

  3. The mixed management of patients' medical records: responsibility sharing between the patient and the physician.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Fassa, Maniane; Benzenine, Eric; Jaquet-Chiffelle, David-Olivier; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François-André

    2010-01-01

    Through this article, we propose a mixed management of patients' medical records, so as to share responsibilities between the patient and the Medical Practitioner by making Patients responsible for the validation of their administrative information, and MPs responsible for the validation of their Patients' medical information. Our proposal can be considered a solution to the main problem faced by patients, health practitioners and the authorities, namely the gathering and updating of administrative and medical data belonging to the patient in order to accurately reconstitute a patient's medical history. This method is based on two processes. The aim of the first process is to provide a patient's administrative data, in order to know where and when the patient received care (name of the health structure or health practitioner, type of care: out patient or inpatient). The aim of the second process is to provide a patient's medical information and to validate it under the accountability of the Medical Practitioner with the help of the patient if needed. During these two processes, the patient's privacy will be ensured through cryptographic hash functions like the Secure Hash Algorithm, which allows pseudonymisation of a patient's identity. The proposed Medical Record Search Engines will be able to retrieve and to provide upon a request formulated by the Medical Practitioner all the available information concerning a patient who has received care in different health structures without divulging the patient's identity. Our method can lead to improved efficiency of personal medical record management under the mixed responsibilities of the patient and the MP.

  4. Integration of electronic patient record context with message context.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Etienne; Bangels, Marc; France, Francis Roger

    2004-01-01

    A methodology to construct specific messages with clear objectives inside clinical processes, while simultaneously including contextual information, remains a problem today. This paper addresses the issue of combining specific message context (process driven) with the context of a patient record (patient centered). In Belgium, simplified conceptual models for Electronic Patient Record (EPR) architecture and for message architecture, based on previous comprehensive and international work, have been produced, validated and mapped into an integrated message format. The resulting model described in this paper highlights the main conceptual links between both basic models: at the action level and at the Transaction level. Using XML, some parts of the model have already been implemented in various national projects. Key lessons learned may be imported at the international level. PMID:15360968

  5. Improving personal health records for patient-centered care

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Henry J; Ross, Stephen E; Safran, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the patient-centeredness of personal health records (PHR) and offer recommendations for best practice guidelines. Design Semi-structured interviews were conducted in seven large early PHR adopter organizations in 2007. Organizations were purposively selected to represent a variety of US settings, including medium and large hospitals, ambulatory care facilities, insurers and health plans, government departments, and commercial sectors. Measurements Patient-centeredness was assessed against a framework of care that includes: (1) respect for patient values, preferences, and expressed needs; (2) information and education; (3) access to care; (4) emotional support to relieve fear and anxiety; (5) involvement of family and friends; (6) continuity and secure transition between healthcare providers; (7) physical comfort; (8) coordination of care. Within this framework we used evidence for patient preferences (where it exists) to compare existing PHR policies, and propose a best practice model. Results Most organizations enable many patient-centered functions such as data access for proxies and minors. No organization allows patient views of clinical progress notes, and turnaround times for PHR reporting of normal laboratory results can be up to 7 days. Conclusion Findings suggest patient-centeredness for personal health records can be improved, and recommendations are made for best practice guidelines. PMID:20190063

  6. Should psychiatric patients be granted access to their hospital records?

    PubMed

    Sergeant, H

    1986-12-01

    Beginning in September 1987, the British public will have the right to consult their computerized medical records and by extension, it is expected, noncomputerized ones as well. The author analyzed the case notes of 100 consecutive patients admitted under his care to a psychiatric day hospital. He classified material likely to affect patients adversely as puzzling or unintelligible, alarming, apparently insulting or objectionable, or sensitive information from or about others. Sergeant rejects proposals to omit sensitive material, to keep secret notes, or to grant access only to some psychiatric patients or to deny access to psychiatric patients as a class. Maintaining that there is no dividing line between somatic and psychological medicine, he concludes that access to personal health data for all patients should be limited to the disclosure of bare administrative details. Further information should be supplied within the traditional medical consultation.

  7. Personal Health Records for Patients with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblum, R.; Park, A.; Dunn, M.; Bates, D.W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Personal health records (PHRs) connected to a physician’s electronic health record system hold substantial promise for supporting and engaging patients with chronic disease. Objectives: To explore how U.S. health care organizations are currently utilizing PHRs for chronic disease populations. Methods A mixed methods study including semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire was conducted. A purposive sample was developed of health care organizations which were recognized as exemplars for PHRs and were high performers in national patient satisfaction surveys (H-CAHPS or CAHPS). Within each organization, participants were health IT leaders or those managing high-risk or chronic disease populations. Results Interviews were conducted with 30 informants and completed questionnaires were received from 16 organizations (84% response rate). Most PHRs allowed patients to access health records and educational material, message their provider, renew prescriptions and request appointments. Patient generated data was increasingly being sought and combined with messaging, resulted in greater understanding of patient health and functioning outside of the clinic visit. However for chronic disease populations, there was little targeted involvement in PHR design and few tools to help interpret and manage their conditions beyond those offered for all. The PHR was largely uncoupled from high risk population management interventions and no clear framework for future PHR development emerged. Conclusion This technology is currently underutilized and represents a major opportunity given the potential benefits of patient engagement and shared decision making. A coherent patient-centric PHR design and evaluation strategy is required to realize its potential and maximize this natural hub for multidisciplinary care co-ordination. PMID:25024758

  8. Substance Abuse, Relapse, and Treatment Program Evaluation in Malaysia: Perspective of Rehab Patients and Staff Using the Mixed Method Approach.

    PubMed

    Chie, Qiu Ting; Tam, Cai Lian; Bonn, Gregory; Dang, Hoang Minh; Khairuddin, Rozainee

    2016-01-01

    This study examined reasons for substance abuse and evaluated the effectiveness of substance treatment programs in Malaysia through interviews with rehab patients and staff. Substance rehab patients (aged 18-69 years; n = 30) and staff (ages 30-72 years; n = 10) participated in semi-structured interviews covering a range of topics, including family and peer relationships, substance use and treatment history, factors for substance use and relapse, motivation for entering treatment, work experience, job satisfaction, treatment evaluation, and patient satisfaction. Most patients did not demonstrate the substance progression trend and had normal family relationships. Most patients reported having peers from normal family backgrounds as well. Various environmental and personal factors was cited as contributing to substance abuse and relapse. There was no significant difference between patient and staff program evaluation scores although the mean score for patients was lower. A holistic treatment approach with a combination of cognitive-behavioral, medical, social, and spiritual components was favored by patients. Suggestions for improving existing programs include better tailoring treatment to individual needs, and providing more post-treatment group support. PMID:27303313

  9. Substance Abuse, Relapse, and Treatment Program Evaluation in Malaysia: Perspective of Rehab Patients and Staff Using the Mixed Method Approach.

    PubMed

    Chie, Qiu Ting; Tam, Cai Lian; Bonn, Gregory; Dang, Hoang Minh; Khairuddin, Rozainee

    2016-01-01

    This study examined reasons for substance abuse and evaluated the effectiveness of substance treatment programs in Malaysia through interviews with rehab patients and staff. Substance rehab patients (aged 18-69 years; n = 30) and staff (ages 30-72 years; n = 10) participated in semi-structured interviews covering a range of topics, including family and peer relationships, substance use and treatment history, factors for substance use and relapse, motivation for entering treatment, work experience, job satisfaction, treatment evaluation, and patient satisfaction. Most patients did not demonstrate the substance progression trend and had normal family relationships. Most patients reported having peers from normal family backgrounds as well. Various environmental and personal factors was cited as contributing to substance abuse and relapse. There was no significant difference between patient and staff program evaluation scores although the mean score for patients was lower. A holistic treatment approach with a combination of cognitive-behavioral, medical, social, and spiritual components was favored by patients. Suggestions for improving existing programs include better tailoring treatment to individual needs, and providing more post-treatment group support.

  10. Substance Abuse, Relapse, and Treatment Program Evaluation in Malaysia: Perspective of Rehab Patients and Staff Using the Mixed Method Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chie, Qiu Ting; Tam, Cai Lian; Bonn, Gregory; Dang, Hoang Minh; Khairuddin, Rozainee

    2016-01-01

    This study examined reasons for substance abuse and evaluated the effectiveness of substance treatment programs in Malaysia through interviews with rehab patients and staff. Substance rehab patients (aged 18–69 years; n = 30) and staff (ages 30–72 years; n = 10) participated in semi-structured interviews covering a range of topics, including family and peer relationships, substance use and treatment history, factors for substance use and relapse, motivation for entering treatment, work experience, job satisfaction, treatment evaluation, and patient satisfaction. Most patients did not demonstrate the substance progression trend and had normal family relationships. Most patients reported having peers from normal family backgrounds as well. Various environmental and personal factors was cited as contributing to substance abuse and relapse. There was no significant difference between patient and staff program evaluation scores although the mean score for patients was lower. A holistic treatment approach with a combination of cognitive–behavioral, medical, social, and spiritual components was favored by patients. Suggestions for improving existing programs include better tailoring treatment to individual needs, and providing more post-treatment group support. PMID:27303313

  11. Lessons Learned for Follow-up Phone Booster Counseling Calls with Substance Abusing Emergency Department Patients

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Dennis M.; Hatch-Maillette, Mary A.; Phares, Melissa M.; McGarry, Ernest; Peavy, K. Michelle; Taborsky, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Background Post-visit “booster” sessions have been recommended to augment the impact of brief interventions delivered in the Emergency Department (ED). This paper, which focuses on implementation issues, presents descriptive information and interventionists’ qualitative perspectives on providing brief interventions over the phone, challenges, “lessons learned”, and recommendations for others attempting to implement adjunctive booster calls. Method Attempts were made to complete two 20-minute telephone “booster” calls within a week following a patient’s ED discharge with 425 patients who screened positive for and had recent problematic substance use other than alcohol or nicotine. Results Over half (56.2%) of participants completed the initial call; 66.9% of those who received the initial call also completed the second call. Median number of attempts to successfully contact participants for the first and second calls was 4 and 3, respectively. Each completed call lasted an average of about 22 minutes. Common challenges/barriers identified by booster callers included unstable housing, limited phone access, unavailability due to additional treatment, lack of compensation for booster calls, and booster calls coming from an area code different than the participants’ locale and from someone other than ED staff. Conclusions Specific recommendations are presented with respect to implementing a successful centralized adjunctive booster call system. Future use of booster calls might be informed by research on contingency management (e.g., incentivizing call completions), smoking cessation quitlines, and phone-based continuing care for substance abuse patients. Future research needs to evaluate the incremental benefit of adjunctive booster calls on outcomes over and above that of brief motivational interventions delivered in the ED setting. PMID:25534151

  12. Patient-Reported Use of Personalized Video Recordings to Improve Neurosurgical Patient-Provider Communication

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Randall

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing patients with a video recording of their visit with a medical professional is a common-sense method for improving patient-provider communication. Objective: To describe the patient and provider experiences to video recording clinical medical encounters and providing the patient with a copy of the video for informational purposes. Methods: Since 2009, over 2,800 patients of eight different neurosurgeons chose to be video recorded during their encounter with the doctor and were provided access to the recording to watch over again as a way to recall what the doctor had said. The video system was set up as a handheld video camera, and video files were downloaded and made accessible to patients via a secure Internet patient portal. Between 2012 and 2014, patients who participated were surveyed regarding their use of the video and what was recorded on the video. The experience of the providers from a clinical and medico-legal standpoint was also reviewed. Results: Three hundred and thirty-three responses to the survey were received (39.2% response rate). More than half of patients (N=333; 56.2%) watched their video more than once, and over two-thirds (N=333; 68.6%) shared their video with a family member, friend, or another physician. Patients self-reported improved memory after watching their videos (N=299; 73.6% could remember more) and 50.2% responded that having the video made them feel more “at ease” with their medical problem (N=299). Overall, 88.0% of respondents indicated that their video had been helpful to them, and 98.5% would recommend having future visits video recorded. No patient made a comment that the video was intrusive or had prevented them from being open with their doctor. Finally, in the high-risk specialty of neurosurgery, none of the 2,807 patients who have been recorded since 2009 have used a video in a medico-legal action. Conclusions: Patient responses to the recording system and having a copy of their video

  13. Developing a handheld record for patients with cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Omendra; Davies, Siobhan; Tibbins, Carly; Rees, JH Martyn; Lenney, Warren; Gilchrist, Francis J

    2015-01-01

    Patient handheld records (PHHRs) promote self-management and empower the holder to take a more active role in the management of their disease. They have been used successfully in improving preventative care for children and have contributed to improved adherence in a number of chronic illnesses. Despite the potential advantages, there are no standard PHHRs for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We report the consultation process that led to the development of a CF PHHR, describe the final document, and analyze the feedback from their use at our center. We have made the CF PHHR freely available online. PMID:26316833

  14. [Personality variables, psychopathological alterations and personality disorders in alcohol-dependent patients according to Cloninger's typology of alcohol abuse].

    PubMed

    Echeburúa, Enrique; Bravo de Medina, Ricardo; Aizpiri, Javier

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, an evaluation of Cloninger's typology of alcohol abuse in personality, psychopathology and personality disorders is carried out. The sample consisted of 158 alcoholics in treatment (56 Type I alcohol-dependent patients and 102 Type II alcohol-dependent patients). All subjects were assessed with diverse assessment tools related to personality (Impulsiveness Scale, Sensation Seeking Scale and STAI), psychopathology (SCL-90-R, BDI and Inadaptation Scale) and personality disorders (IPDE). The main findings were that Type II alcohol-dependent patients were more impulsive and sensation-seeking and they displayed more hostility and emotional distress than Type I alcohol-dependent patients. Personality disorders were not so prevalent in the case of Type I alcohol-dependent patients. The most specific personality disorders for Type II alcohol-dependent patients were narcissistic and paranoid. The implications of this study for further research are commented on.

  15. Patient access to complex chronic disease records on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Access to medical records on the Internet has been reported to be acceptable and popular with patients, although most published evaluations have been of primary care or office-based practice. We tested the feasibility and acceptability of making unscreened results and data from a complex chronic disease pathway (renal medicine) available to patients over the Internet in a project involving more than half of renal units in the UK. Methods Content and presentation of the Renal PatientView (RPV) system was developed with patient groups. It was designed to receive information from multiple local information systems and to require minimal extra work in units. After piloting in 4 centres in 2005 it was made available more widely. Opinions were sought from both patients who enrolled and from those who did not in a paper survey, and from staff in an electronic survey. Anonymous data on enrolments and usage were extracted from the webserver. Results By mid 2011 over 17,000 patients from 47 of the 75 renal units in the UK had registered. Users had a wide age range (<10 to >90 yrs) but were younger and had more years of education than non-users. They were enthusiastic about the concept, found it easy to use, and 80% felt it gave them a better understanding of their disease. The most common reason for not enrolling was being unaware of the system. A minority of patients had security concerns, and these were reduced after enrolling. Staff responses were also strongly positive. They reported that it aided patient concordance and disease management, and increased the quality of consultations with a neutral effect on consultation length. Neither patient nor staff responses suggested that RPV led to an overall increase in patient anxiety or to an increased burden on renal units beyond the time required to enrol each patient. Conclusions Patient Internet access to secondary care records concerning a complex chronic disease is feasible and popular, providing an increased

  16. Sociodemographic profile and pattern of opioid abuse among patients presenting to a de-addiction centre in tertiary care Hospital of Kashmir

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, Samina; Hussain, Syed Sajad; Rather, Yasir Hassan; Hussain, Syed Karrar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The substances abuse has become one of the major public health problems of present society. Recently there has been an increase in the incidence of substance abuse including that of opioids throughout the world. The proper assessment of the current trends and pattern of opioid abuse can be helpful in more effective intervention of this menace. Materials and Methods: To find out various socio-demographic variables and pattern of opioid abuse, a predevised questionnaire was administered to 200 opioid patients who presented to de-addiction center for treatment. Results: Majority of the participants (75%) were of young age group (20–30 years) and the mean age of subjects was 27.6 years. More than half of participants (55%) were abusing the opioid substances for < 3 years followed by 30% of the abusers who were using the opioids for 4–6 years. Oral route was the most common route(35%)of substance administration followed by chasing(13%) and intravenous(11%) routes. Diverted pharmaceuticals emerged as one of the common substances of abuse, and peer pressure was found to be the main reason to start substance abuse. Conclusion: A comprehensive preventive program targeting young adults needs to be formulated and strict laws against sales of diverted pharmaceuticals to be implemented. PMID:26229346

  17. 42 CFR 2.16 - Security for written records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security for written records. 2.16 Section 2.16... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.16 Security for written records. (a) Written records which are subject to these regulations must be maintained in a secure...

  18. Training Tomorrow's Doctors to Safeguard the Patients of Today: Using Medical Student Simulation Training to Explore Barriers to Recognition of Elder Abuse.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James M; Rudd, Matthew P; Walker, Richard W; Stewart, Jane

    2016-01-01

    In recognition of the fact that elder abuse is a global problem that doctors underrecognize and underreport, a simulation training session for undergraduate medical students was developed. The primary objective of this qualitative study was to examine barriers to and drivers of medical students making a diagnosis of elder abuse in simulated practice, with the goal of refining teaching methods and informing future teaching sessions for other clinical teachers. Third-year medical students (Newcastle University, United Kingdom) undertook a simulation scenario with a high-fidelity mannequin representing an elder abuse victim. After the simulation scenario, students underwent a semistructured debriefing. A tripartite approach to data collection was employed that included audio recordings of the simulation, data sheets capturing students' thoughts during the scenario, and postscenario debriefing. A different researcher analyzed each data set in isolation before discussions were held to triangulate findings from the data sets. Forty-six students undertook the scenario; none declined to participate. A number of barriers to students diagnosing elder abuse were identified. Students held a low index of suspicion for elder abuse and were overly optimistic regarding the etiology of the individual's injuries. Students lacked the confidence to raise concerns about possible elder abuse, believing that certainty was required before doing so. There was widespread confusion about nomenclature. These findings provide clinical teachers with important topic areas to address in future teaching sessions. Simulation, as a method to teach about elder abuse in a reproducible and immersive fashion, is recommended to clinical teachers. PMID:26782868

  19. Sexual Abuse of the Mentally Retarded Patient: Medical and Legal Analysis for the Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Jamie P.

    2001-01-01

    The primary care physician has a vital role in documenting and preventing sexual abuse among the mentally retarded populations in our community. Since the current national trend is to integrate citizens with mental retardation into the community away from institutionalized care, it is essential that all physicians have a basic understanding of the unique medical and legal ramifications of their clinical diagnoses. As the legal arena is currently revising laws concerning rights of sexual consent among the mentally retarded, it is essential that determinations of mental competency follow national standards in order to delineate clearly any instance of sexual abuse. Clinical documentation of sexual abuse and sexually transmitted disease is an important part of a routine examination since many such individuals are indeed sexually active. Legal codes adjudicating sexual abuse cases of the mentally retarded often offer scant protection and vague terminology. Thus, medical documentation and physician competency rulings form a solid foundation for future work toward legal recourse for the abused. PMID:15014610

  20. 42 CFR 2.14 - Minor patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.14 Minor patients. (a) Definition of minor... patient acting alone has the legal capacity under the applicable State law to apply for and obtain alcohol or drug abuse treatment, any written consent for disclosure authorized under subpart C of...

  1. Polysubstance abuse: alcohol, opioids and benzodiazepines require coordinated engagement by society, patients, and physicians.

    PubMed

    Ogbu, Uzor C; Lotfipour, Shahram; Chakravarthy, Bharath

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has published significant data trends related to substance abuse involving opioid pain relievers (OPR), benzodiazepines and alcohol in the United States. The CDC describes opioid misuse and abuse as an epidemic, with the use of OPR surpassing that of illicit drugs. Alcohol has also been a persistent problem and is associated with a number of emergency department visits and deaths independent of other substances. The use of these drugs in combination creates an additive effect with increased central nervous system suppression and a heightened risk of an overdose. We present a summary of the findings from the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) with commentary on strategies to combat prescription drug and alcohol abuse.

  2. Prolonged Exposure for Treating PTSD Among Female Methadone Patients Who Were Survivors of Sexual Abuse in Israel.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Miriam; Nacasch, Nitsa; Levit, Shabtay; Katz, Noam; Foa, Edna B

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this pilot study were: (a) to test the feasibility of prolonged exposure (PE) therapy conducted by a social worker staff on female patients in methadone program clinics who were survivors of child sexual abuse or rape and (b) to examine preliminary outcomes of PE on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and illicit drug use at pre- and posttreatment, and up to 12-month follow-ups. Twelve female methadone patients who were survivors of child sexual abuse or rape diagnosed with PTSD were enrolled in 13-19 weekly individual PE sessions. Assessments were conducted at pre-, mid-, and posttreatment, as well as at 3, 6, and 12-month follow-ups. The treatment outcomes measures included PTSD symptoms, depressive symptoms, and illicit drug use. Ten of the 12 study patients completed treatment. PTSD and depressive symptoms showed significant reduction. No relapse to illicit drug use was detected. These preliminary results suggest that PE may be delivered by methadone social workers with successful outcomes. Further research should test the efficacy of PE among methadone patients in a randomized control trial with standard care as the control condition.

  3. The challenges in making electronic health records accessible to patients.

    PubMed

    Beard, Leslie; Schein, Rebecca; Morra, Dante; Wilson, Kumanan; Keelan, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that there is a tension between growing consumer demands for access to information and a healthcare system that may not be prepared to meet these demands. Designing an effective solution for this problem will require a thorough understanding of the barriers that now stand in the way of giving patients electronic access to their health data. This paper reviews the following challenges related to the sharing of electronic health records: cost and security concerns, problems in assigning responsibilities and rights among the various players, liability issues and tensions between flexible access to data and flexible access to physicians.

  4. The challenges in making electronic health records accessible to patients

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Leslie; Schein, Rebecca; Morra, Dante; Wilson, Kumanan

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that there is a tension between growing consumer demands for access to information and a healthcare system that may not be prepared to meet these demands. Designing an effective solution for this problem will require a thorough understanding of the barriers that now stand in the way of giving patients electronic access to their health data. This paper reviews the following challenges related to the sharing of electronic health records: cost and security concerns, problems in assigning responsibilities and rights among the various players, liability issues and tensions between flexible access to data and flexible access to physicians. PMID:22120207

  5. Patients, privacy and trust: patients' willingness to allow researchers to access their medical records.

    PubMed

    Damschroder, Laura J; Pritts, Joy L; Neblo, Michael A; Kalarickal, Rosemarie J; Creswell, John W; Hayward, Rodney A

    2007-01-01

    The federal Privacy Rule, implemented in the United States in 2003, as part of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), created new restrictions on the release of medical information for research. Many believe that its restrictions have fallen disproportionately on researchers prompting some to call for changes to the Rule. Here we ask what patients think about researchers' access to medical records, and what influences these opinions. A sample of 217 patients from 4 Veteran Affairs (VA) facilities deliberated in small groups at each location with the opportunity to question experts and inform themselves about privacy issues related to medical records research. After extensive deliberation, these patients were united in their inclination to share their medical records for research. Yet they were also united in their recommendations to institute procedures that would give them more control over whether and how their medical records are used for research. We integrated qualitative and quantitative results to derive a better understanding of this apparent paradox. Our findings can best be presented as answers to questions related to five dimensions of trust: Patients' trust in VA researchers was the most powerful determinant of the kind of control they want over their medical records. More specifically, those who had lower trust in VA researchers were more likely to recommend a more stringent process for obtaining individual consent. Insights on the critical role of trust suggest actions that researchers and others can take to more fully engage patients in research.

  6. Association between Experience of Child Abuse and Severity of Drug Addiction Measured by the Addiction Severity Index among Japanese Drug-Dependent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ogai, Yasukazu; Senoo, Eiichi; Gardner, Fumiyuki Chin; Haraguchi, Ayako; Saito, Tamaki; Morita, Nobuaki; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the association between child abuse experiences and drug addiction severity among Japanese drug-dependent patients using the Addiction Severity Index-Japanese version (ASI-J). One hundred and eleven inpatients and outpatients with drug dependence participated in the study. Some of the questions on the ASI-J asked about lifetime experiences of abuse. A higher percentage of female participants experienced child abuse compared with male participants. Male participants who experienced child abuse (MEA) had a significantly higher severity of drug use than men who did not experience it (MNEA). Female participants who experienced child abuse (FEA) had significantly more serious problems in family/social relationships than female participants who did not experience it (FNEA). Patients in the MEA group were arrested less frequently for drug charges, experienced more serious problems with their fathers, and experienced more severe anxiety in their lifetime compared with the MNEA group. The FEA group experienced more serious troubles with their sexual partners, close friends, and families and experienced more severe psychiatric problems in their lifetime compared with the FNEA group. These results suggest gender differences in the problems experienced by drug-dependent patients with child abuse experiences, and gender-specific interventions may be more effective in treating their drug dependence. PMID:25741639

  7. The Moderating Role of Purging Behaviour in the Relationship Between Sexual/Physical Abuse and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in Eating Disorder Patients.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Sónia; Machado, Bárbara; Silva, Cátia; Crosby, Ross D; Lavender, Jason M; Cao, Li; Machado, Paulo P P

    2016-03-01

    This study sought to examine predictors of nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) in eating disorder patients and to evaluate the moderating role of purging behaviours in the relationship between a theorised predictor (i.e. sexual/physical abuse) and NSSI. Participants in this study were 177 female patients with eating disorders (age range = 14-38 years) who completed semistructured interviews assessing eating disorder symptoms and eating disorder-related risk factors (e.g. history of sexual and physical abuse, history of NSSI and feelings of fatness). Results revealed that 65 participants (36.7%) reported lifetime engagement in NSSI, and 48 participants (27.1%) reported a history of sexual/physical abuse. Early onset of eating problems, lower BMI, feeling fat, a history of sexual/physical abuse and the presence of purging behaviours were all positively associated with the lifetime occurrence of NSSI. The relationship between sexual/physical abuse before eating disorder onset and lifetime NSSI was moderated by the presence of purging behaviours, such that the relationship was stronger in the absence of purging. These findings are consistent with the notion that purging and NSSI may serve similar functions in eating disorder patients (e.g. emotion regulation), such that the presence of purging may attenuate the strength of the association between sexual/physical abuse history (which is also associated with elevated NSSI risk) and engagement in NSSI behaviours. PMID:26606864

  8. Association between experience of child abuse and severity of drug addiction measured by the Addiction Severity Index among Japanese drug-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Ogai, Yasukazu; Senoo, Eiichi; Gardner, Fumiyuki Chin; Haraguchi, Ayako; Saito, Tamaki; Morita, Nobuaki; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2015-03-03

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the association between child abuse experiences and drug addiction severity among Japanese drug-dependent patients using the Addiction Severity Index-Japanese version (ASI-J). One hundred and eleven inpatients and outpatients with drug dependence participated in the study. Some of the questions on the ASI-J asked about lifetime experiences of abuse. A higher percentage of female participants experienced child abuse compared with male participants. Male participants who experienced child abuse (MEA) had a significantly higher severity of drug use than men who did not experience it (MNEA). Female participants who experienced child abuse (FEA) had significantly more serious problems in family/social relationships than female participants who did not experience it (FNEA). Patients in the MEA group were arrested less frequently for drug charges, experienced more serious problems with their fathers, and experienced more severe anxiety in their lifetime compared with the MNEA group. The FEA group experienced more serious troubles with their sexual partners, close friends, and families and experienced more severe psychiatric problems in their lifetime compared with the FNEA group. These results suggest gender differences in the problems experienced by drug-dependent patients with child abuse experiences, and gender-specific interventions may be more effective in treating their drug dependence.

  9. Consumers' Perceptions of Patient-Accessible Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Vaughon, Wendy L; Czaja, Sara J; Levy, Joslyn; Rockoff, Maxine L

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic health information (eHealth) tools for patients, including patient-accessible electronic medical records (patient portals), are proliferating in health care delivery systems nationally. However, there has been very limited study of the perceived utility and functionality of portals, as well as limited assessment of these systems by vulnerable (low education level, racial/ethnic minority) consumers. Objective The objective of the study was to identify vulnerable consumers’ response to patient portals, their perceived utility and value, as well as their reactions to specific portal functions. Methods This qualitative study used 4 focus groups with 28 low education level, English-speaking consumers in June and July 2010, in New York City. Results Participants included 10 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21-63 years; 19 non-Hispanic black, 7 Hispanic, 1 non-Hispanic White and 1 Other. None of the participants had higher than a high school level education, and 13 had less than a high school education. All participants had experience with computers and 26 used the Internet. Major themes were enhanced consumer engagement/patient empowerment, extending the doctor’s visit/enhancing communication with health care providers, literacy and health literacy factors, improved prevention and health maintenance, and privacy and security concerns. Consumers were also asked to comment on a number of key portal features. Consumers were most positive about features that increased convenience, such as making appointments and refilling prescriptions. Consumers raised concerns about a number of potential barriers to usage, such as complex language, complex visual layouts, and poor usability features. Conclusions Most consumers were enthusiastic about patient portals and perceived that they had great utility and value. Study findings suggest that for patient portals to be effective for all consumers, portals must be designed to be easy to read, visually

  10. Why elder abuse continues to elude the health care system.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Fay S; Paris BE, Barbara E

    2003-01-01

    Elderly men and women of all socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds are vulnerable to mistreatment, and most often it goes undetected. For many elderly victims of abuse, the hospital is the only potential site for outside contact and support. An elder abuse program has been created at The Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, and funding was granted to assist victims with compensation claims; provide counsel and advocacy for victims; and provide support via ongoing telephone contact and referrals to community agencies. Simultaneously, hospital-wide educational seminars and rounds have provided the staff and students with information concerning detection of abuse and neglect. Over a 2-year period, 182 cases were identified and assessed. More than 50% of these cases involved patients with a diagnosis of memory impairment. Five percent of the cases involved a long history of domestic violence. In most cases a family member was identified as the abuser, and in a majority of instances the victim either denied the suspected abuse or tried to rationalize the behavior of the abuser. Patients were afraid of reporting abuse or changing their situation, despite being informed of possible resources. To combat this escalating problem in our growing elderly population, interdisciplinary collaboration between physicians and social workers is often crucial. Communication via the medical record can be key to monitoring patients in the community. There also needs to be ongoing education of all hospital staff in an effort to continually heighten awareness of this problem. PMID:12516011

  11. Reviewing 741 patients records in two hours with FASTVISU

    PubMed Central

    Escudié, Jean-Baptiste; Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Zapletal, Eric; Cohen, Sarah; Malamut, Georgia; Burgun, Anita; Rance, Bastien

    2015-01-01

    The secondary use of electronic health records opens up new perspectives. They provide researchers with structured data and unstructured data, including free text reports. Many applications been developed to leverage knowledge from free-text reports, but manual review of documents is still a complex process. We developed FASTVISU a web-based application to assist clinicians in reviewing documents. We used FASTVISU to review a set of 6340 documents from 741 patients suffering from the celiac disease. A first automated selection pruned the original set to 847 documents from 276 patients’ records. The records were reviewed by two trained physicians to identify the presence of 15 auto-immune diseases. It took respectively two hours and two hours and a half to evaluate the entire corpus. Inter-annotator agreement was high (Cohen’s kappa at 0.89). FASTVISU is a user-friendly modular solution to validate entities extracted by NLP methods from free-text documents stored in clinical data warehouses. PMID:26958189

  12. The complexities of elder abuse.

    PubMed

    Roberto, Karen A

    2016-01-01

    Elder abuse is a growing societal concern, affecting at least 1 in 10 older Americans. Researchers and practitioners alike consistently assert that a dramatic discrepancy exists between the prevalence rates of elder abuse and the number of elder abuse cases reported. As a field of study, recognition and understanding of elder abuse is still emerging. Comparing findings of a small, but growing, body of literature on perceived and substantiated cases of elder abuse is challenging because there is no uniform term or agreed-upon definition used among state governments, researchers, health care and service providers, and advocates. This article summarizes current understanding of elder abuse, including what constitutes elder abuse, risk factors for elder abuse, perpetrators of elder abuse, and outcomes of elder abuse. Issues associated with the detection of elder abuse and intervention strategies for victims of abuse are addressed. In the final section, potential roles and contributions of psychologists for advancing elder abuse research, professional practice, and policy development are highlighted. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Alternative drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Sutter, M E; Chenoweth, J; Albertson, T E

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of drug abuse with alternative agents is increasing. The term "alternative drugs of abuse" is a catch-all term for abused chemicals that do not fit into one of the classic categories of drugs of abuse. The most common age group abusing these agents range from 17 to 25 years old and are often associated with group settings. Due to their diverse pharmacological nature, legislative efforts to classify these chemicals as a schedule I drug have lagged behind the development of new alternative agents. The potential reason for abuse of these agents is their hallucinogenic, dissociative, stimulant, anti-muscarinic, or sedative properties. Some of these drugs are easily obtainable such as Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) or Lophophora williamsii (Peyote) because they are natural plants indigenous to certain regions. The diverse pharmacology and clinical effects of these agents are so broad that they do not produce a universal constellation of signs and symptoms. Detailed physical exams are essential for identifying clues leading one to suspect an alternative drug of abuse. Testing for the presence of these agents is often limited, and even when available, the results do not return in a timely fashion. Intoxications from these agents pose unique challenges for health care providers. Physician knowledge of the physiological effects of these alternative agents and the local patterns of drug of abuse are important for the accurate diagnosis and optimal care of poisoned patients. This review summarizes the current knowledge of alternative drugs of abuse and highlights their clinical presentations. PMID:23636733

  14. Alternative drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Sutter, M E; Chenoweth, J; Albertson, T E

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of drug abuse with alternative agents is increasing. The term "alternative drugs of abuse" is a catch-all term for abused chemicals that do not fit into one of the classic categories of drugs of abuse. The most common age group abusing these agents range from 17 to 25 years old and are often associated with group settings. Due to their diverse pharmacological nature, legislative efforts to classify these chemicals as a schedule I drug have lagged behind the development of new alternative agents. The potential reason for abuse of these agents is their hallucinogenic, dissociative, stimulant, anti-muscarinic, or sedative properties. Some of these drugs are easily obtainable such as Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) or Lophophora williamsii (Peyote) because they are natural plants indigenous to certain regions. The diverse pharmacology and clinical effects of these agents are so broad that they do not produce a universal constellation of signs and symptoms. Detailed physical exams are essential for identifying clues leading one to suspect an alternative drug of abuse. Testing for the presence of these agents is often limited, and even when available, the results do not return in a timely fashion. Intoxications from these agents pose unique challenges for health care providers. Physician knowledge of the physiological effects of these alternative agents and the local patterns of drug of abuse are important for the accurate diagnosis and optimal care of poisoned patients. This review summarizes the current knowledge of alternative drugs of abuse and highlights their clinical presentations.

  15. The efficacy of hair and urine toxicology screening on the detection of child abuse by burning.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Shady N; Wibbenmeyer, Lucy A; Kealey, Lyn Dee H; Williams, Ingrid M; Oral, Resmiye; Onwuameze, Obiora; Light, Timothy D; Latenser, Barbara A; Lewis, Robert W; Kealey, Gerald P

    2009-01-01

    Abuse by burning is estimated to occur in 1 to 25% of children admitted with burn injuries annually. Hair and urine toxicology for illicit drug exposure may provide additional confirmatory evidence for abuse. To determine the impact of hair and urine toxicology on the identification of child abuse, we performed a retrospective chart review of all pediatric patients admitted to our burn unit. The medical records of 263 children aged 0 to 16 years of age who were admitted to our burn unit from January 2002 to December 2007 were reviewed. Sixty-five children had suspected abuse. Of those with suspected abuse, 33 were confirmed by the Department of Health and Human Services and comprised the study group. Each of the 33 cases was randomly matched to three pediatric (0-16 years of age) control patients (99). The average annual incidence of abuse in pediatric burn patients was 13.7+/-8.4% of total annual pediatric admissions (range, 0-25.6%). Age younger than 5 years, hot tap water cause, bilateral, and posterior location of injury were significantly associated with nonaccidental burn injury on multivariate analysis. Thirteen (39.4%) abused children had positive ancillary tests. These included four (16%) skeletal surveys positive for fractures and 10 (45%) hair samples positive for drugs of abuse (one patient had a fracture and a positive hair screen). In three (9.1%) patients who were not initially suspected of abuse but later confirmed, positive hair test for illicit drugs was the only indicator of abuse. Nonaccidental injury can be difficult to confirm. Although inconsistent injury history and burn injury pattern remain central to the diagnosis of abuse by burning, hair and urine toxicology offers a further means to facilitate confirmation of abuse.

  16. Physicians, Patients, and the Electronic Health Record: An Ethnographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ventres, William; Kooienga, Sarah; Vuckovic, Nancy; Marlin, Ryan; Nygren, Peggy; Stewart, Valerie

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE Little is known about the effects of the electronic health record (EHR) on physician-patient encounters. The objectives of this study were to identify the factors that influence the manner by which physicians use the EHR with patients. METHODS This ethnographic study included 4 qualitative components: 80 hours of participant observation in 4 primary care offices in the Pacific Northwest; individual interviews with 52 patients, 12 office staff members, 23 physicians, and 1 nurse-practitioner; videotaped reviews of 29 clinical encounters; and 5 focus-group interviews with physicians and computer advocates. The main outcome measures were factors that influence how physicians use the EHR. Researchers qualitatively derived these factors through serial reviews of data. RESULTS This study identified 14 factors that influence how EHRs are used and perceived in medical practice today. These factors were categorized into 4 thematic domains: (1) spatial—effect of the physical presence and location of EHRs on interactions between physicians and patients; (2) relational—perceptions of physicians and patients about the EHR and how those perceptions affected its use; (3) educational—issues of developing physicians’ proficiency with and improving patients’ understandings about EHR use; and (4) structural—institutional and technological forces that influence how physicians perceived their use of EHR. CONCLUSIONS This study found that the introduction of EHRs into practice influences multiple cognitive and social dimensions of the clinical encounter. It brings into focus important questions that through further inquiry can determine how to make best use of the EHR to enhance therapeutic relationships. PMID:16569715

  17. Patients' empowerment of their personal health record requires strong traceability to guarantee patients health care security.

    PubMed

    Allaert, François André; Quantin, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Giving patients power over their personal health record is an unavoidable evolution in all industrialized countries which will reflect their active participation in the management of their own health. This would lead to patients sharing management with health professionals, which would need traceability of the data provider to maintain trust and transparency. The systematic use of electronic signatures by medical practitioners will be essential to provide sufficient guarantees and to clearly determine who has added what in the PEHR.

  18. Accelerometer recorder and display system for ambulatory patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berka, Martin; Żyliński, Marek; Niewiadomski, Wiktor; Cybulski, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the design of a compact, wearable, rechargeable acceleration recorder to support long-term monitoring of ambulatory patients with motor disorders, and of software to display and analyze its output. The device consists of a microcontroller, operational amplifier, accelerometer, SD card, indicator LED, rechargeable battery, and associated minor components. It can operate for over a day without charging and can continuously collect data for three weeks without downloading to an outside system, as currently configured. With slight modifications, this period could be extended to several months. The accompanying software provides flexible visualization of the acceleration data over long periods, basic file operations and compression for easier archiving, annotation of segments of interest, and functions for calculation of various parameters and detection of immobility and vibration frequencies. Applications in analysis of gait and other movements are discussed.

  19. Clinical characteristics of cough mixture abusers referred to three substance abuse clinics in Hong Kong: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Tang, A K; Tang, W K; Liang, H J; Chan, F; Mak, S C; Ungvari, G S

    2012-12-01

    OBJECTIVES. Cough mixture is the third most commonly abused substance in patients attending the Prince of Wales Hospital Substance Abuse Clinic. The content of the local cough mixture is not well researched. Paranoid psychosis manifesting as persecutory delusions and derogatory hallucination, as well as mood symptoms, is common in these patients. The natural history and outcome of such psychoses associated with cough mixture abuse are not well known. This study aimed to address these questions. METHODS. This was a retrospective study of cough mixture abuse in Hong Kong. Case records of cough mixture abusers currently receiving treatment at the 3 substance abuse clinics at the Prince of Wales Hospital, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, and the North District Hospital were retrieved for data collection. The patients' demographic data, duration and intake pattern of cough mixture, and use of any other drugs were documented. The presenting psychopathology, first urine toxicology results, diagnosis, treatment, number of hospitalizations, and course of the illness were also recorded. RESULTS. A total of 63 patients with the diagnosis of cough mixture abuse were identified in the database; 89% were male. The mean +/- SD age of the patients was 34.4 +/- 6.2 years; 67% were single and 83% were unemployed. The mean +/- SD age of onset of cough mixture abuse was 20 +/- 5 years. Psychiatric symptoms developed a mean +/- SD of 7.6 +/- 6.0 years after onset of abuse. According to the ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders criteria, the top psychiatric diagnoses were substance-induced psychotic disorder (67%), schizophrenia (19%), depressive disorder (11%), and dysthymia (10%). The most common ingredients in the urine sample at first presentation were promethazine (75%), pseudoephedrine (67%), codeine (60%), ephedrine (57%), zopiclone (17%), and hydrocodone (16%). Additionally, 16% of patients were in the priority follow-up group. The mean +/- SD follow-up period was 6

  20. Decreased brain dopamine transporters are related to cognitive deficits in HIV patients with or without cocaine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Linda; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D; Ernst, Thomas; Telang, Frank; Logan, Jean; Fowler, Joanna S

    2008-01-01

    Objective Decreased dopamine transporters (DAT) in the basal ganglia were shown in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated dementia. Therefore, we assessed the relationship between striatal DAT and dopamine D2 receptors (D2R) availability and cognitive performance, and whether cocaine abuse, a common co-morbid condition in HIV patients, would be associated with further decreases in DAT and D2 receptors. Methods 35 HIV-positive subjects [24 without (HIV) and 11 with a history of cocaine-dependence (HIV+Coc)] and 14 seronegative controls (SN) were evaluated with PET to measure DAT using [C-11]cocaine and D2R using [C-11]raclopride (availability of DAT or D2R estimated with Bmax/Kd), and a battery of neuropsychological tests. Results Compared to SN controls, both HIV subject groups had lower DAT in putamen (HIV+Coc: −16.7%, p=0.003; HIV: −12.2%, p=0.02) and only HIV+Coc showed lower DAT in caudate (−12.2%, p=0.04). Lower D2R in both regions of both HIV groups were accounted by the greater nicotine use. Lower DAT, but not D2R, in putamen and caudate were associated with poorer performance on multiple neuropsychological tests, corrected for the effects of age, education, intelligence, mood, and nicotine use. Furthermore, a structural equation model (SEM) indicated that lower average dopamine function (both DAT and D2R) were related to poorer overall function on neuropsychological tests (p=0.05). Interpretation Reduced dopaminergic function may contribute to cognitive dysfunction in HIV patients with or without additional cocaine abuse. These findings suggest that these HIV patients may benefit from treatments that enhance dopamine function or protection from dopamine cell injury. PMID:18579413

  1. 42 CFR 2.22 - Notice to patients of Federal confidentiality requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) A statement that reports of suspected child abuse and neglect made under State law to appropriate... suspected child abuse or neglect from being reported under State law to appropriate State or local... GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions §...

  2. Abusive Relationships

    MedlinePlus

    ... relationships and friendships. Emotional abuse (stuff like teasing, bullying, and humiliating others) can be difficult to recognize ... How to Break Up Respectfully Abuse Dealing With Bullying Date Rape Getting Over a Break-Up Posttraumatic ...

  3. How to manage secure direct access of European patients to their computerized medical record and personal medical record.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Allaert, François André; Fassa, Maniane; Riandey, Benoît; Avillach, Paul; Cohen, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    The multiplication of the requests of the patients for a direct access to their Medical Record (MR), the development of Personal Medical Record (PMR) supervised by the patients themselves, the increasing development of the patients' electronic medical records (EMRs) and the world wide internet utilization will lead to envisage an access by using technical automatic and scientific way. It will require the addition of different conditions: a unique patient identifier which could base on a familial component in order to get access to the right record anywhere in Europe, very strict identity checks using cryptographic techniques such as those for the electronic signature, which will ensure the authentication of the requests sender and the integrity of the file but also the protection of the confidentiality and the access follow up. The electronic medical record must also be electronically signed by the practitioner in order to get evidence that he has given his agreement and taken the liability for that. This electronic signature also avoids any kind of post-transmission falsification. This will become extremely important, especially in France where patients will have the possibility to mask information that, they do not want to appear in their personal medical record. Currently, the idea of every citizen having electronic signatures available appears positively Utopian. But this is yet the case in eGovernment, eHealth and eShopping, world-wide. The same was thought about smart cards before they became generally available and useful when banks issued them.

  4. Evaluation of a urine on-site drugs of abuse screening test in patients admitted to a psychiatric emergency unit.

    PubMed

    Bagøien, Gunnhild; Morken, Gunnar; Zahlsen, Kolbjørn; Aamo, Trond; Spigset, Olav

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the usefulness and reliability of a commonly used urinary on-site drugs of abuse screening test device when used routinely at admittances to a psychiatric emergency unit. Urine samples from 262 emergency psychiatric admittances representing 217 patients were analyzed by a commercially available on-site test for the detection of amphetamines, benzodiazepines, cannabis, cocaine, and opiates in urine. The samples were first screened by nurses at the psychiatric department, thereafter by 2 technicians at the laboratory, and finally, analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Results of 45.8% of the screening tests were true negative for all 5 drugs/drug groups tested, whereas those of 29.4% were true positive for 1 or several drugs/drug groups and true negative for the others. Thus, in total, 75.2% were correct for all 5 drugs/drug groups. In general, the sensitivities (42.9%-90.0% for the various drug groups) were lower than the specificities (92.7%-100.0%). The accuracies were 86.3% for benzodiazepines, 92.4% for cannabis, 94.7% for opiates, and 97.0% for amphetamines. No cocaine was found in any of the samples. For cannabis, the accuracy was higher among the laboratory technicians than among the nurses. The results from on-site screening testing should not be considered as the final conclusion on the intake of drugs of abuse but must be interpreted with caution.

  5. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug ...

  6. Child Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... or become violent. An older child may use drugs or alcohol, try to run away or abuse others. Child abuse is a serious problem. If you suspect a child is being abused or neglected, call the police or your local child welfare agency.

  7. Documenting wife abuse: a guide for physicians

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, L E; McMain-Klein, M; Silver, L

    1997-01-01

    An estimated 12% to 30% of women are assaulted by their male partners at least once during the relationship. Therefore, in their everyday practice, physicians are likely to encounter women who have suffered domestic abuse. The authors define wife abuse, outline epidemiologic aspects and discuss common signs and symptoms. In cases of suspected or confirmed abuse, it is very important for physicians to document the details of the injuries, the patient visit, any treatment and follow-up as well as to screen for associated conditions and ensure that any samples taken are not tampered with. When asked to disclose information by police or courts, physicians need to know when they are obliged to submit copies of their patients' medical records, when patient consent is required, what information should be divulged and how to defend this information in court. The authors present information about the necessary, relevant and appropriate evidence to be collected and documented for both medical and legal purposes. They also discuss the criminal justice system and the role of physicians in legal proceedings concerning wife abuse. PMID:9099172

  8. Physical abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, D E; Cecutti, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of physical abuse during late pregnancy and to investigate how abused and nonabused pregnant women differ in demographic characteristics, health habits, psychologic distress and attitudes about fetal health. DESIGN: Survey of women attending for prenatal health care or admitted to hospital for delivery. The information was obtained on one occasion from self-report questionnaires, completed with the option of anonymity. SETTINGS: Community-based prenatal clinic, private obstetricians' offices in a large city, private family physicians' offices in a large city, family physicians' offices in a small town, and a university teaching hospital. PATIENTS: English-speaking women at 20 weeks' or more gestation attending or admitted consecutively. INTERVENTIONS: Three self-report questionnaires: the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), the Fetal Health Locus of Control (FHLC) and the study questionnaire. RESULTS: Thirteen women (2.4%) refused to participate in the survey. Of the 548 women who completed the questionnaires 36 (6.6%) reported physical abuse during the current pregnancy and 60 (10.9%) before it. There were no significant differences in rates of abuse between settings. Of the women abused during the pregnancy 23 (63.9%) reported increased abuse during the pregnancy, and 28 (77.8%) remained with the abuser. Twenty-four pregnant women (66.7%) received medical treatment for abuse, but only 1 (2.8%) told her prenatal care provider of the abuse. Factor analysis revealed three factors associated with physical abuse in pregnancy: "social instability" (comprising low age, unmarried status, lower level of education, unemployment and unplanned pregnancy), "unhealthy lifestyle" (comprising poor diet, alcohol use, illicit drug use and emotional problems) and "physical health problems" (comprising health problems and prescription drug use). The GHQ scores showed that the abused women were significantly more emotionally distressed than the

  9. Comparing the security risks of paper-based and computerized patient record systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collmann, Jeff R.; Meissner, Marion C.; Tohme, Walid G.; Winchester, James F.; Mun, Seong K.

    1997-05-01

    How should hospital administrators compare the security risks of paper-based and computerized patient record systems. There is a general tendency to assume that because computer networks potentially provide broad access to hospital archives, computerized patient records are less secure than paper records and increase the risk of breaches of patient confidentiality. This assumption is ill-founded on two grounds. Reasons exist to say that the computerized patient record provides better access to patient information while enhancing overall information system security. A range of options with different trade-offs between access and security exist in both paper-based and computerized records management systems. The relative accessibility and security of any particular patient record management system depends, therefore, on administrative choice, not simply on the intrinsic features of paper or computerized information management systems.

  10. Patient-Centered e-Health Record over the Cloud.

    PubMed

    Koumaditis, Konstantinos; Themistocleous, Marinos; Vassilacopoulos, George; Prentza, Andrianna; Kyriazis, Dimosthenis; Malamateniou, Flora; Maglaveras, Nicos; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Mourouzis, Alexandros

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Patient-Centered e-Health (PCEH) conceptual aspects alongside a multidisciplinary project that combines state-of-the-art technologies like cloud computing. The project, by combining several aspects of PCEH, such as: (a) electronic Personal Healthcare Record (e-PHR), (b) homecare telemedicine technologies, (c) e-prescribing, e-referral, e-learning, with advanced technologies like cloud computing and Service Oriented Architecture (SOA), will lead to an innovative integrated e-health platform of many benefits to the society, the economy, the industry, and the research community. To achieve this, a consortium of experts, both from industry (two companies, one hospital and one healthcare organization) and academia (three universities), was set to investigate, analyse, design, build and test the new platform. This paper provides insights to the PCEH concept and to the current stage of the project. In doing so, we aim at increasing the awareness of this important endeavor and sharing the lessons learned so far throughout our work.

  11. [Save or destroy? The importance of medical record for former patients and future patients].

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, F E; Schornagel, J H

    2001-03-10

    In 1995, a new privacy law was introduced in the Netherlands. According to this law, medical records should be saved for 10 years, and then destroyed, unless keeping the records for a longer period follows reasonably from the duties of the treating physician (as is the case, for example, when treating patients with a chronic disease). There are serious concerns with regard to the future availability of medical record data for clinical research and patient care after 2005. Evaluation of the late effects of many medical treatments will no longer be possible in the Netherlands. Patient care, particularly genetic counselling, will be also seriously compromised. As a possible solution the profession might name diagnoses and treatments regarding for which, from the point of view of good care, it is necessary for files to be kept for longer than 10 years. For a uniform nationwide policy it would be better if all files, perhaps after sorting by diagnosis and treatment, should be obligatorily kept for much longer than 10 years, preferably for the duration of the life expectancy.

  12. The prevalence of problem opioid use in patients receiving chronic opioid therapy: computer-assisted review of electronic health record clinical notes.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Roy E; Carrell, David S; Cronkite, David; Saunders, Kathleen; Gross, David E; Masters, Elizabeth; Donevan, Sean; Hylan, Timothy R; Von Kroff, Michael

    2015-07-01

    To estimate the prevalence of problem opioid use, we used natural language processing (NLP) techniques to identify clinical notes containing text indicating problem opioid use from over 8 million electronic health records (EHRs) of 22,142 adult patients receiving chronic opioid therapy (COT) within Group Health clinics from 2006 to 2012. Computer-assisted manual review of NLP-identified clinical notes was then used to identify patients with problem opioid use (overuse, misuse, or abuse) according to the study criteria. These methods identified 9.4% of patients receiving COT as having problem opioid use documented during the study period. An additional 4.1% of COT patients had an International Classification of Disease, version 9 (ICD-9) diagnosis without NLP-identified problem opioid use. Agreement between the NLP methods and ICD-9 coding was moderate (kappa = 0.61). Over one-third of the NLP-positive patients did not have an ICD-9 diagnostic code for opioid abuse or dependence. We used structured EHR data to identify 14 risk indicators for problem opioid use. Forty-seven percent of the COT patients had 3 or more risk indicators. The prevalence of problem opioid use was 9.6% among patients with 3 to 4 risk indicators, 26.6% among those with 5 to 6 risk indicators, and 55.04% among those with 7 or more risk indicators. Higher rates of problem opioid use were observed among young COT patients, patients who sustained opioid use for more than 4 quarters, and patients who received higher opioid doses. Methods used in this study provide a promising approach to efficiently identify clinically recognized problem opioid use documented in EHRs of large patient populations. Computer-assisted manual review of EHR clinical notes found a rate of problem opioid use of 9.4% among 22,142 COT patients over 7 years.

  13. Vacuum-assisted therapy accelerates wound healing in necrotizing soft tissue infections: our experience in two intravenous drug abuse patients.

    PubMed

    Marinis, Athanasios; Voultsos, Mavroudis; Grivas, Paraskevas; Dikeakos, Panagiotis; Liarmakopoulos, Emmanouil; Paschalidis, Nikolaos; Rizos, Spyros

    2013-12-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy using vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) devices is currently a well established technique for managing complicated wounds. Such wounds occur after aggressive surgical debridement for necrotizing soft tissue infections (NSTI). In this report we present our experience in two intravenous drug abusers managed with VAC for NSTIs. The patients were 25 and 34 years old, HCV positive and presented with oedema of the upper femoral compartments and concomitant severe sepsis. Ultrasonography and computed tomography revealed severe cellulitis, fluid collection and necrosis of the affected fasciae and muscles. After emergent and subsequent aggressive surgical debridement during the first 48h, the VAC device was applied. Both patients had an uncomplicated postoperative course and a fast recovery from their multiorgan dysfunction. Suture closure of the wounds was achieved at the 25th and 38th postoperative days respectively and patients were discharged without any motor deficit. Negative pressure wound therapy is a modern therapeutic modality for treating complicated infected wounds. Moreover, it accelerates wound healing and primary closure, facilitating patient ambulation and recovery. A dedicated medical and nursing team is an important prerequisite for a successful outcome.

  14. Standardized Patient Walkthroughs in the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network: Common Challenges to Protocol Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Fussell, Holly; Kunkel, Lynn E.; McCarty, Dennis; Lewy, Colleen S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Training research staff to implement clinical trials occurring in community-based addiction treatment programs presents unique challenges. Standardized patient walkthroughs of study procedures may enhance training and protocol implementation. Objectives Examine and discuss cross-site and cross-study challenges of participant screening and data collection procedures identified during standardized patient walkthroughs of multi-site clinical trials. Method Actors portrayed clients and “walked through” study procedures with protocol research staff. The study completed 57 walkthroughs during implementation of 4 clinical trials. Results Observers and walkthrough participants identified three areas of concern (consent procedures, screening and assessment processes, and protocol implementation) and made suggestions for resolving the concerns. Conclusions and Scientific Significance Standardized patient walkthroughs capture issues with study procedures previously unidentified with didactic training or unscripted rehearsals. Clinical trials within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network are conducted in addiction treatment centers that vary on multiple dimensions. Based on walkthrough observations, the national protocol team and local site leadership modify standardized operating procedures and resolve cross-site problems prior to recruiting study participants. The standardized patient walkthrough improves consistency across study sites and reduces potential site variation in study outcomes. PMID:21854287

  15. The use and costs of health and social services in patients with longstanding substance abuse

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Persons with longstanding substance abuse might become increasingly dependent on help by the public, eventually requiring permanent care. In 2006 the municipality of Stavanger established a so-called addiction ward for these clients, comprising 17 beds at the largest municipal nursing home. We assumed that the residents of this ward were high consumers of health care and social services during the last months preceding their admission. The aim of the study was to register the type and extent of services that were claimed by this client group during the last six months prior to admission, and to calculate the costs that were caused. Further, we estimated the incremental costs for nursing home placement. Methods In 15 residents from the addiction ward the use of all welfare services during the six months prior to admission were registered. Costs were calculated by unit costs from a municipal, national and societal perspective. Results Mean total costs during this period were €32 474. Approximately half of these costs were borne by state-funded institutions, and half were borne by the municipality. The clients used a great variety of services aimed at subsistence, health care and support in independent living, while services aimed at drug withdrawal were not claimed. There was no correlation between costs and the level of functioning. The incremental costs for nursing home admission were borne by the municipalities. Conclusion Persons with longstanding substance abuse represent a group with a high use of welfare resources and hence cause high costs. However, our findings do not indicate any correlation between the amount of services rendered and the level of functioning. Further research should focus on the identification of the clients’ need for support in order to facilitate targeted interventions that might prevent further deterioration and, finally, the need for permanent care. PMID:23692822

  16. Deep Patient: An Unsupervised Representation to Predict the Future of Patients from the Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Riccardo; Li, Li; Kidd, Brian A; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health records (EHRs) promises to advance clinical research and better inform clinical decision making. Challenges in summarizing and representing patient data prevent widespread practice of predictive modeling using EHRs. Here we present a novel unsupervised deep feature learning method to derive a general-purpose patient representation from EHR data that facilitates clinical predictive modeling. In particular, a three-layer stack of denoising autoencoders was used to capture hierarchical regularities and dependencies in the aggregated EHRs of about 700,000 patients from the Mount Sinai data warehouse. The result is a representation we name "deep patient". We evaluated this representation as broadly predictive of health states by assessing the probability of patients to develop various diseases. We performed evaluation using 76,214 test patients comprising 78 diseases from diverse clinical domains and temporal windows. Our results significantly outperformed those achieved using representations based on raw EHR data and alternative feature learning strategies. Prediction performance for severe diabetes, schizophrenia, and various cancers were among the top performing. These findings indicate that deep learning applied to EHRs can derive patient representations that offer improved clinical predictions, and could provide a machine learning framework for augmenting clinical decision systems. PMID:27185194

  17. Embedded-structure template for electronic records affects patient note quality and management for emergency head injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Sonoo, Tomohiro; Iwai, Satoshi; Inokuchi, Ryota; Gunshin, Masataka; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Along with article-based checklists, structured template recording systems have been reported as useful to create more accurate clinical recording, but their contributions to the improvement of the quality of patient care have been controversial. An emergency department (ED) must manage many patients in a short time. Therefore, such a template might be especially useful, but few ED-based studies have examined such systems. A structured template produced according to widely used head injury guidelines was used by ED residents for head injury patients. The study was conducted by comparing each 6-month period before and after launching the system. The quality of the patient notes and factors recorded in the patient notes to support the head computed tomography (CT) performance were evaluated by medical students blinded to patient information. The subject patients were 188 and 177 in respective periods. The numbers of patient notes categorized as “CT indication cannot be determined” were significantly lower in the postintervention term (18% → 9.0%), which represents the patient note quality improvement. No difference was found in the rates of CT performance or CT skip without clearly recorded CT indication in the patient notes. The structured template functioned as a checklist to support residents in writing more appropriately recorded patient notes in the ED head injury patients. Such a template customized to each clinical condition can facilitate standardized patient management and can improve patient safety in the ED. PMID:27749590

  18. The effect of electronic patient records on hepatitis B vaccination completion rates at a genitourinary medicine clinic.

    PubMed

    Kuria, Patrick; Brook, Gary; McSorley, John

    2016-05-01

    The study was conducted to assess whether the introduction of an electronic patient records-based system affected hepatitis B vaccination completion rates and post-vaccination return rates, when compared to a paper-based system. Data were gathered for three groups of patients: those commencing vaccination (a) when paper records were in use (paper records group), (b) after electronic patient records were introduced (basic electronic patient records group) and (c) after electronic patient records were enhanced with recall (enhanced electronic patient records group). Compared to the paper records group, the third dose completion rates for patients managed using electronic patient records did not differ significantly: 74/119 (62.2%) paper vs. 58/98 (59.2%) basic electronic patient records, p = 0.652 and 89/130 (68.5%) enhanced electronic patient records, p = 0.298. On sub-group analysis, completion rates in patients of black ethnicity in the enhanced electronic patient records group were significantly higher than those in the paper records group: 16/19 (84.2%) enhanced electronic patient records vs. 11/23 (47.8%) paper, p = 0.014. Patients in the enhanced electronic patient records group were more likely than those in the paper records group to attend for measurement of hepatitis B surface antibody levels: 61/130 (46.9%) vs. 39/119 (32.8%), p = 0.023.

  19. On the usage of health records for the design of virtual patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The process of creating and designing Virtual Patients for teaching students of medicine is an expensive and time-consuming task. In order to explore potential methods of mitigating these costs, our group began exploring the possibility of creating Virtual Patients based on electronic health records. This review assesses the usage of electronic health records in the creation of interactive Virtual Patients for teaching clinical decision-making. Methods The PubMed database was accessed programmatically to find papers relating to Virtual Patients. The returned citations were classified and the relevant full text articles were reviewed to find Virtual Patient systems that used electronic health records to create learning modalities. Results A total of n = 362 citations were found on PubMed and subsequently classified, of which n = 28 full-text articles were reviewed. Few articles used unformatted electronic health records other than patient CT or MRI scans. The use of patient data, extracted from electronic health records or otherwise, is widespread. The use of unformatted electronic health records in their raw form is less frequent. Patient data use is broad and spans several areas, such as teaching, training, 3D visualisation, and assessment. Conclusions Virtual Patients that are based on real patient data are widespread, yet the use of unformatted electronic health records, abundant in hospital information systems, is reported less often. The majority of teaching systems use reformatted patient data gathered from electronic health records, and do not use these electronic health records directly. Furthermore, many systems were found that used patient data in the form of CT or MRI scans. Much potential research exists regarding the use of unformatted electronic health records for the creation of Virtual Patients. PMID:24011027

  20. Digital Audio Recording of Initial Patient Visits to an Ocular Oncology Clinic: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Seider, Michael I; Damato, Bertil E

    2015-05-01

    It is challenging for patients to receive a new diagnosis of a life-threatening ocular tumor when visiting an ocular oncology clinic for the first time. Audio recording of patient-physician interactions has been shown to be an effective memory aid and stress-reducing technique for patients with various types of nonophthalmic cancer. This study evaluated a protocol for digitally recording the initial conversation between the ocular oncologist and the patient. Twenty patients were enrolled in the study, and 13 patients (65%) returned the survey. All of the patients who returned the survey reported being "very satisfied" with the audio recording, indicating that patients with a newly diagnosed ocular tumor were highly satisfied with the audio recording of their conversations with the ocular oncologist. Although larger studies are needed to confirm this conclusion, the initial results are encouraging. PMID:26057768

  1. Recreational nitrous oxide abuse-induced vitamin B12 deficiency in a patient presenting with hyperpigmentation of the skin.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Tsung-Ta; Hung, Chih-Tsung; Wang, Wei-Ming; Lee, Jiunn-Tay; Yang, Fu-Chi

    2013-05-01

    Vitamin B12 deficiency causes skin hyperpigmentation, subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord, and megaloblastic anemia. Although vitamin B12 deficiency rarely occurs in well-nourished, healthy, young people, nitrous oxide (N2O) intoxication is an important cause of vitamin B12 deficiency in this cohort. N2O, a colorless gas used as an anesthetic since the late 19th century because of its euphoric and analgesic qualities, is now used as a recreational drug and is available via the Internet and at clubs. Here, we describe the case of a 29-year-old woman presenting with skin hyperpigmentation as her only initial symptom after N2O abuse for approximately 2 years. N2O intoxication-induced vitamin B12 deficiency was diagnosed based on the skin pigmentation that had manifested over the dorsa of her fingers, toes, and trunk, coupled with myeloneuropathy of the posterior and lateral columns, a low serum vitamin B12 level, an elevated serum homocysteine level, and the N2O exposure revealed while establishing the patient's history. Symptoms improved significantly with vitamin B12 treatment. We recommend that dermatologists consider N2O intoxication-induced vitamin B12 deficiency as a potential cause of skin hyperpigmentation and myeloneuropathy of the posterior and lateral columns in young, otherwise healthy patients. Failure to recognize this presentation may result in inappropriate treatment, thus affecting patients' clinical outcomes. PMID:23898268

  2. Frequency of intrusions and flashbacks in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder related to childhood sexual abuse: an electronic diary study.

    PubMed

    Priebe, Kathlen; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Zimmer, Josepha; Koudela, Susanne; Ebner-Priemer, Ulrich; Bohus, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Intrusions and flashbacks are core features of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The frequency of these symptoms is usually assessed through retrospective questionnaires, which may be subject to recall bias of unknown magnitude. Electronic diaries that enable real-time assessment have been used to address recall biases in several psychiatric disorders. However, to our knowledge, this is the first study to apply this method to assess intrusions and flashbacks in PTSD related to childhood sexual abuse (CSA). Female patients with PTSD related to CSA (n = 28) were provided with electronic diaries for repeated real-time assessment of intrusions and flashbacks over the period of 1 week. At the end of this period, they were asked to retrospectively report how many such symptoms they recalled having experienced over the past week. The total number of symptoms reported in the electronic diaries (74.5 ± 62.0 intrusions and 24.4 ± 36.0 flashbacks for the week) was substantially higher than those reported in previous studies. Furthermore, electronic diaries revealed the occurrence of about 50% more intrusions and flashbacks than did the retrospective assessment (74.5 vs. 49.5 for intrusions, and 24.4 vs. 13.4 for flashbacks). Such high frequencies are not captured with existing assessment instruments and suggest a possible ceiling effect. Future research needs to clarify whether these high numbers are specific to highly symptomatic PTSD patients or might generalize to other populations of PTSD patients. PMID:23876157

  3. The Computer-Based Patient Record and Confidentiality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodward, Beverly

    1996-01-01

    Information technology poses a threat to confidentiality of medical records. The number of parties claiming a need to know is increasing, but unrestricted access can lead to improper disclosure. Making health records semipublic may affect when and how people choose to obtain medical services. (SK)

  4. Deep Patient: An Unsupervised Representation to Predict the Future of Patients from the Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Miotto, Riccardo; Li, Li; Kidd, Brian A.; Dudley, Joel T.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health records (EHRs) promises to advance clinical research and better inform clinical decision making. Challenges in summarizing and representing patient data prevent widespread practice of predictive modeling using EHRs. Here we present a novel unsupervised deep feature learning method to derive a general-purpose patient representation from EHR data that facilitates clinical predictive modeling. In particular, a three-layer stack of denoising autoencoders was used to capture hierarchical regularities and dependencies in the aggregated EHRs of about 700,000 patients from the Mount Sinai data warehouse. The result is a representation we name “deep patient”. We evaluated this representation as broadly predictive of health states by assessing the probability of patients to develop various diseases. We performed evaluation using 76,214 test patients comprising 78 diseases from diverse clinical domains and temporal windows. Our results significantly outperformed those achieved using representations based on raw EHR data and alternative feature learning strategies. Prediction performance for severe diabetes, schizophrenia, and various cancers were among the top performing. These findings indicate that deep learning applied to EHRs can derive patient representations that offer improved clinical predictions, and could provide a machine learning framework for augmenting clinical decision systems. PMID:27185194

  5. Patients Reading Their Medical Records: Differences in Experiences and Attitudes between Regular and Inexperienced Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto; Daniels, Mats; Cajander, Åsa; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We report results of a study of how ordering and reading of printouts of medical records by regular and inexperienced readers relate to how the records are used, to the health information practices of patients, and to their expectations of the usefulness of new e-Health services and online access to medical records. Method: The study…

  6. Spiritual abuse.

    PubMed

    Purcell, B C

    1998-01-01

    Spiritual abuse is the act of making people believe--whether by stating or merely implying--that they are going to be punished in this life and/or tormented in hell-fire forever for failure to live life good enough to please God and thus earn admission to heaven. Spiritual terrorism is the most extreme form of spiritual abuse and may cause serious mental health problems. Those people who have not been spiritually terrorized have not necessarily been spared from spiritual abuse and therefore may still be in need of competent, spiritual counseling. Spiritual abuse, which may be active or passive, can best be conceptualized on a continuum from terroristic to zero abuse. Severity is determined by intensity, age of onset, duration, and individual reaction. The underlying issue in all forms of abuse is control. PMID:9729974

  7. Incorporating Personal Health Records into the Disease Management of Rural Heart Failure Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Karen Parsley

    2012-01-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs) allow patients to access and in some cases manage their own health records. Their potential benefits include access to health information, enhanced asynchronous communication between patients and clinicians, and convenience of online appointment scheduling and prescription refills. Potential barriers to PHR use…

  8. [Dutch Health Care Inspectorate (IGZ) abuses its inspection authority in patient files].

    PubMed

    van Lessen Kloeke, Koosje

    2014-01-01

    For its investigation regarding the transfer of data after discharge of vulnerable elderly patients from hospital to nursing homes, care homes or home care, the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate (IGZ) demands access to patients' files, without their explicit consent. Doctors who do not cooperate run the risk of penalty payments. Since it concerns a limited number of patients per practice, it would not be unreasonably onerous for the Inspectorate to allow doctors to ask their patients' consent. Other reasons mentioned by the Inspectorate, such as possible "inappropriate correction" of data and the capability of vulnerable elderly patients to give their consent seem improper grounds to breach patients' right to privacy and to demand that doctors breach professional confidentiality. The legality of the Inspectorate's actions could be addressed in a test case and should be discussed more widely in light of the Inspectorate's work plan for 2014. PMID:24893819

  9. [Dutch Health Care Inspectorate (IGZ) abuses its inspection authority in patient files].

    PubMed

    van Lessen Kloeke, Koosje

    2014-01-01

    For its investigation regarding the transfer of data after discharge of vulnerable elderly patients from hospital to nursing homes, care homes or home care, the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate (IGZ) demands access to patients' files, without their explicit consent. Doctors who do not cooperate run the risk of penalty payments. Since it concerns a limited number of patients per practice, it would not be unreasonably onerous for the Inspectorate to allow doctors to ask their patients' consent. Other reasons mentioned by the Inspectorate, such as possible "inappropriate correction" of data and the capability of vulnerable elderly patients to give their consent seem improper grounds to breach patients' right to privacy and to demand that doctors breach professional confidentiality. The legality of the Inspectorate's actions could be addressed in a test case and should be discussed more widely in light of the Inspectorate's work plan for 2014.

  10. Low-cost contingency management for treating cocaine- and opioid-abusing methadone patients.

    PubMed

    Petry, Nancy M; Martin, Bonnie

    2002-04-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of a low-cost contingency management (CM) procedure in reducing concurrent cocaine and opioid use among methadone patients. Forty-two patients were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of standard treatment or standard treatment plus CM. CM patients eamed the opportunity to draw from a bowl and win prizes ranging from $1 to $ 100 in value for submitting samples negative for cocaine and opioids. Patients in the CM condition achieved longer durations of continuous abstinence than patients in the standard treatment condition, and these effects were maintained throughout a 6-month follow-up period. On average, patients in the CM condition earned $137 of prizes. These data suggest that this prize reinforcement procedure may be suitable for community-based settings.

  11. The Use and Abuse of Tranquillizing Drugs for Chronic Mental Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dewar, Robert; Ross, Hugo

    1962-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the necessity of administering maintenance doses of tranquillizing drugs to chronic mental patients. The behaviour of 16 female psychotic patients in a mental hospital was measured while they received maintenance doses of chlorpromazine (average dose, 50 mg. q.i.d.) and again while receiving identical doses of a placebo. The double-blind technique was employed. Nurses used a behaviour rating scale to measure noisiness, personal cleanliness, interpersonal relations among patients, occupational activities, hostility, activity, co-operation, dress, eating, and sleeping. Patients' behaviour over a six-week period of chlorpromazine administration was compared with behaviour over an equal period of placebo administration. There was no evident difference in behaviour in 90% of the cases. Among the others there was a slight trend towards improved behaviour while the patients received placebo. It was concluded that tranquillizing drugs are often used needlessly for chronic mental patients. Implications of the use of tranquillizing drugs with chronic mental patients are discussed. PMID:14027427

  12. [Patients' complaints of verbal abuse by health professionals during hospital care in Northeast Brazil].

    PubMed

    Nations, Marilyn K; Gomes, Annatália Meneses de Amorim

    2007-09-01

    The current anthropological study focuses on the assessment by patients/citizens concerning the conduct of health professionals in a public general hospital in Fortaleza, Ceará State, Brazil. From January to July 2005 we tracked 13 key informants during hospitalization and analyzed their narratives of the experience. According to our observations, patients develop definite opinions of the caregivers' gestures and expressions during the entire process. In the health professionals, patients appreciate the human ability to express affect, to talk, and to include them in clinical decisions, above and beyond the professionals' technical skills. Patients criticize aloof, cold, and rude attitudes by health professionals, whom patients compare metaphorically to "human quadrupeds". They recommend an affective, empathetic, and ethical approach and clinical communications backed by straight talk, friendly conversation, and respect for daily customs related to life in Northeast Brazil. We contend that this legitimate and critical voice of the patient/citizen provides valuable clues for transforming professional conduct, rehabilitating patients' morale, and building a humane hospital within a context of social inequalities. PMID:17700945

  13. Fetal Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Lindsey; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Five cases of fetal abuse by mothers suffering from depression are discussed. Four of the women had unplanned pregnancies and had considered termination of the pregnancy. Other factors associated with fetal abuse include pregnancy denial, pregnancy ambivalence, previous postpartum depression, and difficulties in relationships. Vigilance for…

  14. A Patient Registry to Improve Patient Safety: Recording General Neurosurgery Complications

    PubMed Central

    Sarnthein, Johannes; Stieglitz, Lennart; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Regli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Background To improve the transparency of the local health care system, treatment cost was recently referenced to disease related groups. Treatment quality must be legally documented in a patient registry, in particular for the highly specialized treatments provided by neurosurgery departments. Methods In 2013 we have installed a patient registry focused on cranial neurosurgery. Surgeries are characterized by indication, treatment, location and other specific neurosurgical parameters. Preoperative state and postoperative outcome are recorded prospectively using neurological and sociological scales. Complications are graded by their severity in a therapy-oriented complication score system (Clavien-Dindo-Grading system, CDG). Results are presented at the monthly clinical staff meeting. Results Data acquisition compatible with the clinic workflow permitted to include all eligible patients into the registry. Until December 2015, we have registered 2880 patients that were treated in 3959 surgeries and 8528 consultations. Since the registry is fully operational (August 2014), we have registered 325 complications on 1341 patient discharge forms (24%). In 64% of these complications, no or only pharmacological treatment was required. At discharge, there was a clear correlation of the severity of the complication and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS, ρ = -0.3, slope -6 KPS percentage points per increment of CDG) and the length of stay (ρ = 0.4, slope 1.5 days per increment of CDG). Conclusions While the therapy-oriented complication scores correlate reasonably well with outcome and length of stay, they do not account for new deficits that cannot be treated. Outcome grading and complication severity grading thus serve a complimentary purpose. Overall, the registry serves to streamline and to complete information flow in the clinic, to identify complication rates and trends early for the internal quality monitoring and communication with patients. Conversely, the

  15. Visualizing collaborative electronic health record usage for hospitalized patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Matthew B; Lee, Young Ji; Schneider, Daniel H; Skeehan, Connor T; Scholtens, Denise M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To visualize and describe collaborative electronic health record (EHR) usage for hospitalized patients with heart failure. Materials and methods We identified records of patients with heart failure and all associated healthcare provider record usage through queries of the Northwestern Medicine Enterprise Data Warehouse. We constructed a network by equating access and updates of a patient’s EHR to a provider-patient interaction. We then considered shared patient record access as the basis for a second network that we termed the provider collaboration network. We calculated network statistics, the modularity of provider interactions, and provider cliques. Results We identified 548 patient records accessed by 5113 healthcare providers in 2012. The provider collaboration network had 1504 nodes and 83 998 edges. We identified 7 major provider collaboration modules. Average clique size was 87.9 providers. We used a graph database to demonstrate an ad hoc query of our provider-patient network. Discussion Our analysis suggests a large number of healthcare providers across a wide variety of professions access records of patients with heart failure during their hospital stay. This shared record access tends to take place not only in a pairwise manner but also among large groups of providers. Conclusion EHRs encode valuable interactions, implicitly or explicitly, between patients and providers. Network analysis provided strong evidence of multidisciplinary record access of patients with heart failure across teams of 100+ providers. Further investigation may lead to clearer understanding of how record access information can be used to strategically guide care coordination for patients hospitalized for heart failure. PMID:25710558

  16. Patients recording clinical encounters: a path to empowerment? Assessment by mixed methods

    PubMed Central

    Elwyn, Glyn; Barr, Paul James; Grande, Stuart W

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the motivations of patients recording clinical encounters, covertly or otherwise, and why some do not wish to record encounters. Design Mixed-methods analysis of survey data and nested semistructured interviews. Setting Survey to UK audience, using social media and radio broadcast. Participants 168 survey respondents, of whom 161 were 18 years of age or older (130 completions). Of the 56 participants who agreed to be contacted, we included data from 17 interviews. Results 19 (15%) respondents indicated having secretly recorded a clinical encounter and 14 (11%) were aware of someone who had secretly recorded a clinical encounter. 45 (35%) said they would consider recording secretly and 44 (34%) said they would record after asking permission. Totally, 69% of respondents indicated their desire to record clinical encounters, split equally between wanting to do so covertly or with permission. Thematic analysis of the interviews showed that most patients are motivated by the wish to replay, relisten and share the recording with others. Some are also motivated by the idea of owning a personal record, and its potential use as verification of a poor healthcare experience. The rationale for permission seeking was based on the wish to prioritise a trusting relationship with a health professional. Those who preferred to record covertly described a pre-existing lack of trust, a fear that recording would be denied, and a concern that an affronted clinician would deny them access to future care. There was a general wish that recording should be facilitated. Conclusions Patients’ prime motivation for recording is to enhance their experience of care, and to share it with others. Patients know that recording challenges the ‘ceremonial order of the clinic’, and so some decide to act covertly. Patients wanted clearer, more permissive policies to be developed. PMID:26264274

  17. 42 CFR 2.16 - Security for written records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Security for written records. 2.16 Section 2.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.16 Security for written...

  18. 42 CFR 2.16 - Security for written records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Security for written records. 2.16 Section 2.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.16 Security for written...

  19. 42 CFR 2.16 - Security for written records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security for written records. 2.16 Section 2.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.16 Security for written...

  20. Point and counterpoint: patient control of access to data in their electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Caine, Kelly; Tierney, William M

    2015-01-01

    Information collection, storage, and management is central to the practice of health care. For centuries, patients' and providers' expectations kept medical records confidential between providers and patients. With the advent of electronic health records, patient health information has become more widely available to providers and health care managers and has broadened its potential use beyond individual patient care. Adhering to the principles of Fair Information Practice, including giving patients control over the availability and use of their individual health records, would improve care by fostering the sharing of sensitive information between patients and providers. However, adherence to such principles could put patients at risk for unsafe care as a result of both missed opportunities for providing needed care as well as provision of contraindicated care, as it would prevent health care providers from having full access to health information. Patients' expectations for the highest possible quality and safety of care, therefore, may be at odds with their desire to limit provider access to their health records. Conversely, provider expectations that patients would willingly seek care for embarrassing conditions and disclose sensitive information may be at odds with patients' information privacy rights. An open dialogue between patients and providers will be necessary to balance respect for patient rights with provider need for patient information.

  1. Point and counterpoint: patient control of access to data in their electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Caine, Kelly; Tierney, William M

    2015-01-01

    Information collection, storage, and management is central to the practice of health care. For centuries, patients' and providers' expectations kept medical records confidential between providers and patients. With the advent of electronic health records, patient health information has become more widely available to providers and health care managers and has broadened its potential use beyond individual patient care. Adhering to the principles of Fair Information Practice, including giving patients control over the availability and use of their individual health records, would improve care by fostering the sharing of sensitive information between patients and providers. However, adherence to such principles could put patients at risk for unsafe care as a result of both missed opportunities for providing needed care as well as provision of contraindicated care, as it would prevent health care providers from having full access to health information. Patients' expectations for the highest possible quality and safety of care, therefore, may be at odds with their desire to limit provider access to their health records. Conversely, provider expectations that patients would willingly seek care for embarrassing conditions and disclose sensitive information may be at odds with patients' information privacy rights. An open dialogue between patients and providers will be necessary to balance respect for patient rights with provider need for patient information. PMID:25480723

  2. Management Systems, Patient Quality Improvement, Resource Availability, and Substance Abuse Treatment Quality

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Dail; Roman, Paul M; Blum, Terry C

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationships among general management systems, patient-focused quality management/continuous process improvement (TQM/CPI) processes, resource availability, and multiple dimensions of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment. Data Sources/Study Setting Data are from a nationally representative sample of 221 SUD treatment centers through the National Treatment Center Study (NTCS). Study Design The design was a cross-sectional field study using latent variable structural equation models. The key variables are management practices, TQM/continuous quality improvement (CQI) practices, resource availability, and treatment center performance. Data Collection Interviews and questionnaires provided data from treatment center administrative directors and clinical directors in 2007–2008. Principal Findings Patient-focused TQM/CQI practices fully mediated the relationship between internal management practices and performance. The effects of TQM/CQI on performance are significantly larger for treatment centers with higher levels of staff per patient. Conclusions Internal management practices may create a setting that supports implementation of specific patient-focused practices and protocols inherent to TQM/CQI processes. However, the positive effects of internal management practices on treatment center performance occur through use of specific patient-focused TQM/CPI practices and have more impact when greater amounts of supporting resources are present. PMID:22098342

  3. A patient-controlled journal for an electronic medical record: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Wald, Jonathan S; Middleton, Blackford; Bloom, Amy; Walmsley, Dan; Gleason, Mary; Nelson, Elizabeth; Li, Qi; Epstein, Marianna; Volk, Lynn; Bates, David W

    2004-01-01

    Partners Healthcare System, Boston, MA, has developed a patient Web portal that features a patient-controlled electronic "journal" to allow patients to interact with their physician's electronic medical record. Patients can view and respond to health reminders, critique electronic chart information maintained by their doctor's office, enter additional clinical information, and prepare information summaries before an office visit. Creating shared information resources to support a collaborative care model required analysis of the business, architectural, and workflow requirements of the patient-controlled clinical portal and the physician-controlled electronic medical record system. In this paper we describe the challenges in aligning the two systems and serving the different user groups. Coupling the Patient Gateway system, serving over 8700 patients of 90 physicians as of September, 2003, with the Longitudinal Medical Record system, serving over 4000 physicians, has required a clear definition of user goals and workflow, well-defined interfaces, and careful consideration of system assumptions to succeed.

  4. Developing and Implementing Patients' Full-Scale Electronic Access to Their Health Record.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Tove; Johansen, Monika A

    2016-01-01

    To increase patients' empowerment and involvement in their own health, several countries has decided to provide patients with electronic access to their health record. This paper reports on the main findings from sub-studies and pilots prior to the implementation of patients' access to their medical records in large-scale in the Northern Norway Region. The largest pilot included nearly 500 patients. Data for the participatory design process was collected through questionnaires and interviews. The results revealed that the service in general functioned as expected. The patients reported that they would continue to use the service, recommend it to others, and generally had no problems in understanding the content. PMID:27577347

  5. No free lunch: institutional preparations for computer-based patient records.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, S. H.

    1999-01-01

    The Veterans Administration (VA) is aggressively pursuing computer-based medical records by deploying the Computerized Patient Record System (CPRS) across its 150 medical centers and 400 outpatient clinics. CPRS's client-server, patient-centered approach to clinical computing is a departure from VA's traditional terminal-compatible, department-centered approach. Although the CPRS software is freely distributed, institutional readiness for computer-based patient records has proven expensive. Preparations include organizational changes, human resource development, hardware deployment, physical plant upgrades, and software testing. This paper details CPRS preparations and their costs at one VA Medical Center. Lessons learned during the process are summarized. PMID:10566406

  6. Unrecognized "crack" cocaine abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D; Parr, M J; Shutt, L E

    1996-10-01

    We report a case of "crack" cocaine abuse in a pregnant patient associated with haematuria, proteinuria, haemolytic anaemia, renal impairment, thrombocytopenia and pulmonary oedema. The case illustrates the problems for clinicians where unrecognized cocaine abuse interferes with the diagnosis and management of a complicated pregnancy. In addition, we discuss the principles for the safe conduct of anaesthesia in the pregnant cocaine abuser.

  7. Unrecognized "crack" cocaine abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D; Parr, M J; Shutt, L E

    1996-10-01

    We report a case of "crack" cocaine abuse in a pregnant patient associated with haematuria, proteinuria, haemolytic anaemia, renal impairment, thrombocytopenia and pulmonary oedema. The case illustrates the problems for clinicians where unrecognized cocaine abuse interferes with the diagnosis and management of a complicated pregnancy. In addition, we discuss the principles for the safe conduct of anaesthesia in the pregnant cocaine abuser. PMID:8942348

  8. Empowerment of patients over their personal health record implies sharing responsibility with the physician.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Benzenine, Eric; Auverlot, Bertrand; Jaquet-Chiffelle, David-Olivier; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François-André

    2011-01-01

    Through this article, we point out the unavoidable empowerment of patients with regard to their personal health record and propose the mixed management of patients' medical records. This mixed management implies sharing responsibilities between the patient and the Medical Practitioner (MP) by making patients responsible for the validation of their administrative information, and MPs responsible for the validation of their patients' medical information. We propose a solution to gather and update patients' administrative and medical data in order to reconstitute patients' medical histories accurately. This method is based on two processes. The aim of the first process is to provide patients administrative data, in order to know where and when they received care (name of the health structure or health practitioner, type of care: outpatient or inpatient). The aim of the second process is to provide patients' medical information and to validate it under the responsibility of the MP with the help of patients if needed. During these two processes, the patients' privacy will be ensured through cryptographic hash functions like the Secure Hash Algorithm, which allows the pseudonymization of patients' identities. The Medical Record Search Engine we propose will be able to retrieve and to provide upon a request formulated by the MP all the available information concerning a patient who has received care in different health structures without divulging the patient's true identity. Associated with strong traceability of all access, modifications or deletions, our method can lead to improved efficiency of personal medical record management while reinforcing the empowerment of patients over their medical records.

  9. Commentary on the abuse of metal chelation therapy in patients with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    Approximately half a million patients with autism spectrum disorders are subjected to chelation therapy in the US annually. The overwhelming majority of such cases are chelated for non-accepted medical indications. These patients may seek evaluation when a urine sample is assayed after the administration of a chelating agent and the values obtained have been improperly compared to references ranges for non-chelated urines, causing falsely elevated results. Legitimate practitioners confronted with such data must decide, preferably in consultation with the patient or their guardian(s), whether to do further testing using legitimate methodology or to simply dismiss the results of the improper testing. Bayesian principles tell us that further testing is likely to yield results within normal reference ranges. However, under some circumstances, it is useful to do such testing in order to demonstrate that there is no need for chelation therapy. Unnecessary chelation therapy is expensive, can cause significant acute adverse effects, and may be associated with long-term consequences. PMID:24113859

  10. Comparing the abuse potential of methylphenidate versus other stimulants: a review of available evidence and relevance to the ADHD patient.

    PubMed

    Kollins, Scott H

    2003-01-01

    The use of psychostimulants to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been controversial for a number of reasons. In an effort to clarify the extent to which the psychostimulant methylphenidate has abuse potential, the existing published evidence has been reviewed and is summarized here, with an emphasis on delineating a number of related but independent issues that are often confused. Methylphenidate produces behavioral effects associated with abuse potential as assessed by traditional assays, but the relevance of this literature to the clinical use of the drug in the treatment of ADHD is ambiguous at best. Existing neuropharmacologic data suggest that methylphenidate has pharmacokinetic properties that reduce its abuse potential as compared with other stimulant drugs of abuse, such as cocaine.

  11. Event related potentials recorded in patients with locked-in syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Onofrj, M.; Thomas, A.; Paci, C.; Scesi, M.; Tombari, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the possibility of recording "cognitive" event related potentials (ERPs) in locked-in patients and therefore to determine whether ERPs can have a role in differential diagnosis of coma.
METHODS—ERPs to classic auditory or visual "odd ball paradigms" were recorded three to four days, seven to eight days, and 30 to 60days after admission to the intensive care unit, in four patients affected by basilar artery thrombembolism resulting in locked-in syndrome. Two patients (one 32 year old man, one 31 year old woman) could move the eyes laterally and vertically spontaneously and on command. One patient (a 39 year old man) had a "one and half syndrome", one patient (a 40 year old woman) could only elevate the left eyelid and eye. Results were compared with data from 30 age matched controls. In the last recording session a letter recognition paradigm was applied, in which ERPs were produced by the identification of letters forming a word. Results were compared with five age matched controls. Brainstem lesions extending to the pontomesencephalic junction were found on MRI and CT.
RESULTS—ERPs to the oddball paradigms were recorded in three patients in the first recording session, in all patients in the second recording session. Latency, amplitude, and topographic distribution of ERP components were inside normal limits. With the letter recognition paradigm the patients could emit a P3 component to correspond with target letters, with the same margin of error as controls.
CONCLUSION—It is possible to record ERPs in patients with locked-in syndrome shortly after the acute ischaemic lesion, and therefore to assess objectively cognitive activities. Furthermore the letter recognition paradigm could be implemented to facilitate linguistic communication with patients with locked-in syndrome.

 PMID:9416812

  12. Patients Know Best: Qualitative Study on How Families Use Patient-Controlled Personal Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Hanna; Hill, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-management technologies, such as patient-controlled electronic health records (PCEHRs), have the potential to help people manage and cope with disease. Objective This study set out to investigate patient families’ lived experiences of working with a PCEHR. Methods We conducted a semistructured qualitative field study with patient families and clinicians at a children’s hospital in the UK that uses a PCEHR (Patients Know Best). All families were managing the health of a child with a serious chronic condition, who was typically under the care of multiple clinicians. As data gathering and analysis progressed, it became clear that while much of the literature assumes that patients are willing and waiting to take more responsibility for and control over their health management (eg, with PCEHRs), only a minority of participants in our study responded in this way. Their experiences with the PCEHR were diverse and strongly shaped by their coping styles. Theory on coping identifies a continuum of coping styles, from approach to avoidance oriented, and proposes that patients’ information needs depend on their style. Results We identified 3 groups of patient families and an outlier, distinguished by their coping style and their PCEHR use. We refer to the outlier as controlling (approach oriented, highly motivated to use PCEHR), and the 3 groups as collaborating (approach oriented, motivated to use PCEHR), cooperating (avoidance oriented, less motivated to use PCEHR), and avoiding (very avoidance oriented, not motivated to use PCEHR). Conclusions The PCEHR met the needs of controller and collaborators better than the needs of cooperators and avoiders. We draw on the Self-Determination Theory to propose ways in which a PCEHR design might better meet the needs of avoidance-oriented users. Further, we highlight the need for families to also relinquish control at times, and propose ways in which PCEHR design might support a better distribution of control

  13. Recording of the retruded position of the mandible in patients with mandibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Helkimo, M; Ingervall, B

    1978-01-01

    The precision (reproducibility) of active and passive recordings of the retruded position of the mandible was studied by two examiners on 10 patients with mandibular dysfunction symptoms. The position of the mandible was recorded with an intra-oral graphic method, before and after treatment of the symptoms. The precision of the recording was highest when the retruded position was recorded by passive hinge movement and lowest when it was recorded by active hinge movement and when recording habitual closure. Both systematical and accidental errors tended to be somewhat larger among these patients than that previously found among individuals without signs or symptoms of mandibular dysfunction. The accidental errors in antero-posterior and medio-lateral directions were the same fo both examiners and of the same magnitude before and after treatment of the symptoms. Both examiners recorded the retruded position on the average 0.20 mm more posterior after treatment than before. The results showed that because of its good reproducibility the retruded position of the mandible can be recommended as a reference position in functional analysis of occlusion and for jaw recordings also in patients with TMJ muscle-pain dysfunction symptoms. During the recording the conventional technique with passive hinge movement and a posterior pressure should be used.

  14. The Accuracy of ICD Codes: Identifying Physical Abuse in 4 Children’s Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Hooft, Anneka M.; Asnes, Andrea G.; Livingston, Nina; Deutsch, Stephanie; Cahill, Linda; Wood, Joanne N.; Leventhal, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the accuracy of International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM), codes in identifying cases of child physical abuse in 4 children’s hospitals. Methods We included all children evaluated by a child abuse pediatrician (CAP) for suspicion of abuse at 4 children’s hospitals from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2010. Subjects included both patients judged to have injuries from abuse and those judged to have injuries from accidents or to have medical problems. The ICD-9-CM codes entered in the hospital discharge database for each child were compared to the decisions made by the CAPs on the likelihood of abuse. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated. Medical records for discordant cases were abstracted and reviewed to assess factors contributing to coding discrepancies. Results Of 936 cases of suspected physical abuse, 65.8% occurred in children <1 year of age. CAPs rated 32.7% as abuse, 18.2% as unknown cause, and 49.1% as accident/medical cause. Sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9-CM codes for abuse were 73.5% (95% confidence interval 68.2, 78.4), and 92.4% (95% confidence interval 90.0, 94.0), respectively. Among hospitals, sensitivity ranged from 53.8% to 83.8% and specificity from 85.4% to 100%. Analysis of discordant cases revealed variations in coding practices and physicians’ notations among hospitals that contributed to differences in sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9-CM codes in child physical abuse. Conclusions Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of ICD-9-CM codes in identifying cases of child physical abuse were relatively low, suggesting both an under- and overcounting of abuse cases. PMID:26142071

  15. Drugs of abuse and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mursaleen, Leah R; Stamford, Jonathan A

    2016-01-01

    The term "drug of abuse" is highly contextual. What constitutes a drug of abuse for one population of patients does not for another. It is therefore important to examine the needs of the patient population to properly assess the status of drugs of abuse. The focus of this article is on the bidirectional relationship between patients and drug abuse. In this paper we will introduce the dopaminergic systems of the brain in Parkinson's and the influence of antiparkinsonian drugs upon them before discussing this synergy of condition and medication as fertile ground for drug abuse. We will then examine the relationship between drugs of abuse and Parkinson's, both beneficial and deleterious. In summary we will draw the different strands together and speculate on the future merit of current drugs of abuse as treatments for Parkinson's disease.

  16. Ongoing incestuous abuse during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Individual cases of adult incestuous abuse have surfaced repeatedly in the lay and professional literature of the past 1.5 centuries without it occasioning systematic investigation, such as the reporting of a case series of individuals subjected to such extreme abuse. Yet substantial numbers of patients with dissociative identity disorder at the time of presentation report incestuous abuse continuing into the adult years, and for many the abuse is ongoing. Data relating to a series of 10 such incestuously abused women are presented. These patients were sexually abused from a very early age (typically from before age 3), with the manipulation of their sexual response a key component in conditioning an enduring sexualized attachment. Shame and fear were also used to ensure compliance and silence. The women, when able to speak of it, describe the induction by their paternal abuser of orgasm at an early age, typically around the age of 6. The women have high indices of self-harm and suicidality and are prone to placing themselves in dangerous reenactment scenarios. The average duration of incestuous abuse for this group of women was 31 years, and the average estimate of total episodes of sexual abuse was 3,320. Most women do not feel that they own their body and experience being "fused" to their father. Their mother was reported as an active participant in the sexual abuse or as having done nothing to protect their daughter despite seeing obvious evidence of incest. The fathers, despite a propensity to use or threaten violence, were generally outwardly productively employed, financially comfortable, and stably married and half had close church involvement. However, suicide and murder occurred within the 1st- or 2nd-degree relatives of these women at a high frequency. All 10 had been sexually abused by various groupings of individuals connected to their fathers. PMID:23627476

  17. Ongoing incestuous abuse during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Individual cases of adult incestuous abuse have surfaced repeatedly in the lay and professional literature of the past 1.5 centuries without it occasioning systematic investigation, such as the reporting of a case series of individuals subjected to such extreme abuse. Yet substantial numbers of patients with dissociative identity disorder at the time of presentation report incestuous abuse continuing into the adult years, and for many the abuse is ongoing. Data relating to a series of 10 such incestuously abused women are presented. These patients were sexually abused from a very early age (typically from before age 3), with the manipulation of their sexual response a key component in conditioning an enduring sexualized attachment. Shame and fear were also used to ensure compliance and silence. The women, when able to speak of it, describe the induction by their paternal abuser of orgasm at an early age, typically around the age of 6. The women have high indices of self-harm and suicidality and are prone to placing themselves in dangerous reenactment scenarios. The average duration of incestuous abuse for this group of women was 31 years, and the average estimate of total episodes of sexual abuse was 3,320. Most women do not feel that they own their body and experience being "fused" to their father. Their mother was reported as an active participant in the sexual abuse or as having done nothing to protect their daughter despite seeing obvious evidence of incest. The fathers, despite a propensity to use or threaten violence, were generally outwardly productively employed, financially comfortable, and stably married and half had close church involvement. However, suicide and murder occurred within the 1st- or 2nd-degree relatives of these women at a high frequency. All 10 had been sexually abused by various groupings of individuals connected to their fathers.

  18. An analysis of the paper-based health record: information content and its implications for electronic patient records.

    PubMed

    Geiger, G; Merrilees, K; Walo, R; Gordon, D; Kunov, H

    1995-01-01

    An analysis of paper-based charting was carried out at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center as a prelude to developing a strategic plan to implement an electronic patient record. A relational model of the Sunnybrook paper chart was developed, describing each of its forms in terms of specific data fields. Three hundred and forty nine different forms are in current use at Sunnybrook, containing 64 types of data fields such as Patient Demographics, Vital Signs, and Doctor's Orders. The extent of data field duplication at the level of hospital forms was significant. A Patient Demographics field was present on all forms and on all pages of a patient's chart, as would be expected. Twenty seven other fields were duplicated on more than ten different forms, including Working Diagnosis which was present on 110 forms, History of Past Illness on 42 forms, and History of Present Illness on 32 forms. Current Medications were recorded on 32 forms and Allergy fields were present on 29 separate forms. Only five data fields of the total 64 were present on only one form. The duplication of data fields within complete patient charts was then examined to confirm that data field duplication was occurring within the actual healthcare delivery process. Using the relational model of the charting system, 143 acute care in-patient encounters were abstracted into the database. The charts were selected randomly from each of the hospital inpatient services. The numbers and types of forms within each chart were recorded, amounting to 18,654 physical pages and using 165 of the different forms. The average in-patient encounter within the model was 130.4 pages long, with a minimum of 27 pages, a maximum of 559 pages, and containing on average 25.8 different forms. The duplication of data fields within actual charts followed a pattern similar to the duplication found on the forms. Initial diagnosis was present on an average of 20.4 pages within the charts, with a minimum of 2 pages and a maximum of

  19. [Characteristics of the pharmacological treatment of toxic liver damage in patients with an alcohol abused syndrome and an acute severe ethanol poison].

    PubMed

    Shilov, V V; Shikalova, I A; Vasil'ev, S A; Loladze, A T; Batotsyrenov, B V

    2012-01-01

    The examination of 130 patients with an alcohol abused syndrome and a severe ethanol poison have revealed that ethanol action are accompanied by significant metabolic disturbances. The comparative evaluation of the inclusion of heptral and remaxol in the treatment has shown that remaxol improves the clinical course of mentioned disorders decreasing the frequency and duration of alcohol delirium. Patients treated with this drug spent less time in acute care and their treatment duration was shorter. Remaxol reduces more effectively the severity of metabolic disorders.

  20. [Automatic registration of patients in digital radiology facilities: dosimetric record].

    PubMed

    Ten Morón, J I; Vañó Carruana, E; Arrazola García, J

    2013-12-01

    There is a consensus in the international community regarding both the need for and benefits of systematic registration and planning of the dosage indicators in patients exposed to ionizing radiation. The main interest is in the registration and follow-up of the techniques and procedures that can involve the greatest risk from exposure to radiation. This register should be planned to include the structure and tools necessary to take the radiological safety of the patients into account, enabling the physicians requesting the studies to access the most important information in the register so they can appropriately justify the request for additional studies. Likewise, it should be considered a priority to establish diagnostic reference levels for the different magnitudes that are defined in function of the modality and techniques used; this information is useful for the staff involved in procedures that use ionizing radiation.

  1. Intrinsic chemosensory signal recorded from the human nasal mucosa in patients with smell loss.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Tadashi; Krone, Franziska; Scheibe, Mandy; Gudziol, Volker; Negoias, Simona; Hummel, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Physiological investigation of olfactory receptor function in hyposmic or anosmic patients is rare. Pioneers examined the electro-olfactogram in patients with olfactory disturbance. Although the electro-olfactogram is an established method to record olfactory responses from human olfactory epithelium, the response is only measured at specific sites of the olfactory mucosa. In contrast to that the response of the olfactory epithelium to chemosensory stimuli can be studied in a specific nasal area by means of intrinsic optical signal recording. Five functionally anosmic patients were included in the present study. In all patients, responses could be obtained following trigeminal stimulation with CO2. In some patients, responses could be obtained after olfactory stimulation with H2S and PEA. The present data show that in the studied patients trigeminal function seems to be preserved, while it appears that in some patients olfactory function is preserved to a certain degree.

  2. Self-Reported HIV and HCV Screening Rates and Serostatus Among Substance Abuse Treatment Patients.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Diana; Feaster, Daniel J; Gooden, Lauren; Douaihy, Antoine; Mandler, Raul; Erickson, Sarah J; Kyle, Tiffany; Haynes, Louise; Schwartz, Robert; Das, Moupali; Metsch, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Substance users are at increased risk for HIV and HCV infection. Still, many substance use treatment programs (SUTP) fail to offer HIV/HCV testing. The present secondary analysis of screening data from a multi-site randomized trial of rapid HIV testing examines self-reported HIV/HCV testing patterns and serostatus of 2473 SUTP patients in 12 community-based sites that had not previously offered on-site testing. Results indicate that most respondents screened for the randomized trial tested more than a year prior to intake for HIV (52 %) and HCV (38 %). Prevalence rates were 3.6 and 30 % for HIV and HCV, respectively. The majority of participants that were HIV (52.2 %) and HCV-positive (40.5 %) reported having been diagnosed within the last 1-5 years. Multivariable logistic regression showed that members of high-risk groups were more likely to have tested. Bundled HIV/HCV testing and linkage to care issues are recommended for expanding testing in community-based SUTP settings. PMID:25952768

  3. Self-Reported HIV and HCV Screening Rates and Serostatus Among Substance Abuse Treatment Patients.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Diana; Feaster, Daniel J; Gooden, Lauren; Douaihy, Antoine; Mandler, Raul; Erickson, Sarah J; Kyle, Tiffany; Haynes, Louise; Schwartz, Robert; Das, Moupali; Metsch, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Substance users are at increased risk for HIV and HCV infection. Still, many substance use treatment programs (SUTP) fail to offer HIV/HCV testing. The present secondary analysis of screening data from a multi-site randomized trial of rapid HIV testing examines self-reported HIV/HCV testing patterns and serostatus of 2473 SUTP patients in 12 community-based sites that had not previously offered on-site testing. Results indicate that most respondents screened for the randomized trial tested more than a year prior to intake for HIV (52 %) and HCV (38 %). Prevalence rates were 3.6 and 30 % for HIV and HCV, respectively. The majority of participants that were HIV (52.2 %) and HCV-positive (40.5 %) reported having been diagnosed within the last 1-5 years. Multivariable logistic regression showed that members of high-risk groups were more likely to have tested. Bundled HIV/HCV testing and linkage to care issues are recommended for expanding testing in community-based SUTP settings.

  4. Assessment of Factors Resulting in Abuse Evaluations in Young Children with Minor Head Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderst, James D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The primary objective was to determine which of the examined factors prompted physicians to initiate a further abuse evaluation in young children with minor head injury. The recording of important historical elements in the charts of these patients was also evaluated. Methods: Charts of 349 children less than 3 years of age with minor…

  5. “Nothing About Me Without Me”: An Interpretative Review of Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Ryan; Sevdalis, Nick; Mayer, Erik K; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient accessible electronic health records (PAEHRs) enable patients to access and manage personal clinical information that is made available to them by their health care providers (HCPs). It is thought that the shared management nature of medical record access improves patient outcomes and improves patient satisfaction. However, recent reviews have found that this is not the case. Furthermore, little research has focused on PAEHRs from the HCP viewpoint. HCPs include physicians, nurses, and service providers. Objective We provide a systematic review of reviews of the impact of giving patients record access from both a patient and HCP point of view. The review covers a broad range of outcome measures, including patient safety, patient satisfaction, privacy and security, self-efficacy, and health outcome. Methods A systematic search was conducted using Web of Science to identify review articles on the impact of PAEHRs. Our search was limited to English-language reviews published between January 2002 and November 2014. A total of 73 citations were retrieved from a series of Boolean search terms including “review*” with “patient access to records”. These reviews went through a novel scoring system analysis whereby we calculated how many positive outcomes were reported per every outcome measure investigated. This provided a way to quantify the impact of PAEHRs. Results Ten reviews covering chronic patients (eg, diabetes and hypertension) and primary care patients, as well as HCPs were found but eight were included for the analysis of outcome measures. We found mixed outcomes across both patient and HCP groups, with approximately half of the reviews showing positive changes with record access. Patients believe that record access increases their perception of control; however, outcome measures thought to create psychological concerns (such as patient anxiety as a result of seeing their medical record) are still unanswered. Nurses are more likely than

  6. 38 CFR 1.465 - Incompetent and deceased patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Release of Information from Department of Veterans Affairs (va) Records Relating to Drug Abuse, Alcoholism Or Alcohol Abuse, Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (hiv), Or... information relating to the cause of death of a patient under laws requiring the collection of death or...

  7. 38 CFR 1.465 - Incompetent and deceased patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Release of Information from Department of Veterans Affairs (va) Records Relating to Drug Abuse, Alcoholism Or Alcohol Abuse, Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (hiv), Or... information relating to the cause of death of a patient under laws requiring the collection of death or...

  8. 38 CFR 1.465 - Incompetent and deceased patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Release of Information from Department of Veterans Affairs (va) Records Relating to Drug Abuse, Alcoholism Or Alcohol Abuse, Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (hiv), Or... information relating to the cause of death of a patient under laws requiring the collection of death or...

  9. 38 CFR 1.465 - Incompetent and deceased patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Release of Information from Department of Veterans Affairs (va) Records Relating to Drug Abuse, Alcoholism Or Alcohol Abuse, Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (hiv), Or... information relating to the cause of death of a patient under laws requiring the collection of death or...

  10. 38 CFR 1.465 - Incompetent and deceased patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Release of Information from Department of Veterans Affairs (va) Records Relating to Drug Abuse, Alcoholism Or Alcohol Abuse, Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (hiv), Or... information relating to the cause of death of a patient under laws requiring the collection of death or...

  11. Treatment of anxiety disorders and comorbid alcohol abuse with buspirone in a patient with antidepressant-induced platelet dysfunction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mazhar, Mir; Hassan, Tariq; Munshi, Tariq

    2013-01-01

    The risk of abnormal bleeding with serotonin reuptake inhibitors has been known, but there is insufficient evidence base to guide pharmacological treatment of anxiety in patients with underlying haematological conditions. The following case report is about a 50-year-old female with generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, obsessive compulsive disorder, and alcohol abuse where pharmacological treatment of anxiety symptoms has been difficult as it would lead to bruising due to the patient's underlying qualitative platelet dysfunction. Treatment with venlafaxine, citalopram, escitalopram, and clomipramine resulted in improvement and anxiety symptoms, as well as reduction in alcohol use, but pharmacological treatment has to be discontinued because of bruising and hematomas. In view of an active substance use disorder, benzodiazepines were avoided as a treatment option. The patient's anxiety symptoms and comorbid alcohol abuse responded well to pharmacological treatment with buspirone which gradually titrated up to a dose of 30 mg BID. Patient was followed for around a six-month period while she was on buspirone before being discharged to family doctor's care. Buspirone is unlikely to have a significant effect on platelet serotonin transponder and could be an effective alternative for pharmacological treatment of anxiety in patients with a bleeding diathesis. PMID:24416612

  12. Body posture recognition and turning recording system for the care of bed bound patients.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Rong-Shue; Mi, Zhenqiang; Yang, Bo-Ru; Kau, Lih-Jen; Bitew, Mekuanint Agegnehu; Li, Tzu-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes body posture recognition and turning recording system for assisting the care of bed bound patients in nursing homes. The system continuously detects the patient's body posture and records the length of time for each body posture. If the patient remains in the same body posture long enough to develop pressure ulcers, the system notifies caregivers to change the patient's body posture. The objective of recording is to provide the log of body turning for querying of patients' family members. In order to accurately detect patient's body posture, we developed a novel pressure sensing pad which contains force sensing resistor sensors. Based on the proposed pressure sensing pad, we developed a bed posture recognition module which includes a bed posture recognition algorithm. The algorithm is based on fuzzy theory. The body posture recognition algorithm can detect the patient's bed posture whether it is right lateral decubitus, left lateral decubitus, or supine. The detected information of patient's body posture can be then transmitted to the server of healthcare center by the communication module to perform the functions of recording and notification. Experimental results showed that the average posture recognition accuracy for our proposed module is 92%. PMID:26444814

  13. Patients want granular privacy control over health information in electronic medical records

    PubMed Central

    Caine, Kelly; Hanania, Rima

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess patients’ desire for granular level privacy control over which personal health information should be shared, with whom, and for what purpose; and whether these preferences vary based on sensitivity of health information. Materials and methods A card task for matching health information with providers, questionnaire, and interview with 30 patients whose health information is stored in an electronic medical record system. Most patients’ records contained sensitive health information. Results No patients reported that they would prefer to share all information stored in an electronic medical record (EMR) with all potential recipients. Sharing preferences varied by type of information (EMR data element) and recipient (eg, primary care provider), and overall sharing preferences varied by participant. Patients with and without sensitive records preferred less sharing of sensitive versus less-sensitive information. Discussion Patients expressed sharing preferences consistent with a desire for granular privacy control over which health information should be shared with whom and expressed differences in sharing preferences for sensitive versus less-sensitive EMR data. The pattern of results may be used by designers to generate privacy-preserving EMR systems including interfaces for patients to express privacy and sharing preferences. Conclusions To maintain the level of privacy afforded by medical records and to achieve alignment with patients’ preferences, patients should have granular privacy control over information contained in their EMR. PMID:23184192

  14. Personal Health Records: Beneficial or Burdensome for Patients and Healthcare Providers?

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Melissa; Boateng, Samuel; Studeny, Jana; Coustasse, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) have been mandated to be made available to patients to provide increased access to medical care information, encourage participation in healthcare decision making, and enable correction of errors within medical records. The purpose of this study was to analyze the usefulness of PHRs from the perspectives of patients and providers. The methodology of this qualitative study was a literature review using 34 articles. PHRs are powerful tools for patients and healthcare providers. Better healthcare results and correction of medical records have been shown to be positive outcomes of the use of PHRs. PHRs have also been shown to be difficult for patients to use and understand, and providers had concerns about correct information transferring to the portals and patients eliminating information from the record. Concerns regarding patient understanding of medical records, legal liability, and the response time required of providers were also identified. For the PHR to succeed in the US healthcare system, assurance that the information will be protected, useful, and easily accessed is necessary. PMID:27134613

  15. Is Canada ready for patient accessible electronic health records? A national scan

    PubMed Central

    Urowitz, Sara; Wiljer, David; Apatu, Emma; Eysenbach, Gunther; DeLenardo, Claudette; Harth, Tamara; Pai, Howard; Leonard, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Background Access to personal health information through the electronic health record (EHR) is an innovative means to enable people to be active participants in their own health care. Currently this is not an available option for consumers of health. The absence of a key technology, the EHR, is a significant obstacle to providing patient accessible electronic records. To assess the readiness for the implementation and adoption of EHRs in Canada, a national scan was conducted to determine organizational readiness and willingness for patient accessible electronic records. Methods A survey was conducted of Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) of Canadian public and acute care hospitals. Results Two hundred thirteen emails were sent to CEOs of Canadian general and acute care hospitals, with a 39% response rate. Over half (54.2%) of hospitals had some sort of EHR, but few had a record that was predominately electronic. Financial resources were identified as the most important barrier to providing patients access to their EHR and there was a divergence in perceptions from healthcare providers and what they thought patients would want in terms of access to the EHR, with providers being less willing to provide access and patients desire for greater access to the full record. Conclusion As the use of EHRs becomes more commonplace, organizations should explore the possibility of responding to patient needs for clinical information by providing access to their EHR. The best way to achieve this is still being debated. PMID:18652695

  16. Need for analgesics/drugs of abuse: a comparison between headache patients and addicts by the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire (LDQ).

    PubMed

    Ferrari, A; Cicero, A F G; Bertolini, A; Leone, S; Pasciullo, G; Sternieri, E

    2006-02-01

    Our aim was to compare the need for analgesics/drugs of abuse between headache patients--chronic and episodic headache sufferers--and addicts, by the Leeds Dependence Questionnaire (LDQ). This is a self-completion 10-item instrument to measure dependence upon a variety of substances. We administered the LDQ questionnaire to 122 chronic daily headache (CDH) sufferers who had been taking one dose of analgesic drug every day for at least 1 year; 71 subjects suffering from episodic headache (EH) using analgesics only occasionally; 115 consecutive drug addicts (DA) with a diagnosis of substance dependence. The mean LDQ total score was similar in the CDH (11.58+/-6.35) and DA (10.37+/-6.51) groups, and for both it was significantly higher than the score in the EH (5.61+/-3.00) group (P<0.001). The CDH group had the highest scores, and higher scores than the DA group (Z=-8.18, P<0.001) in item 8, assessing the primacy of effect over the kind of analgesic used, and in item 10 (Z=-5.03, P<0.001), asking if it is difficult to live without the analgesic; the DA group had the highest scores, and higher scores than the CDH group, in item 9 (Z=-5.07, P<0.001) addressing the need for the continued administration of the drug to maintain well-being, and in item 3 (Z=-2.39, P<0.05), exploring compulsion to start the use of the drug. The EH group had lower scores in all items (P<0.05) except for item 9, where there was no difference from CDH group; the EH group had also lower scores (P<0.001) than the DA group, except for item 8, where, instead, the score was higher than in the DA group (Z=-5.33, P<0.001). A strong link develops between chronic headache patients and the analgesics they use. This sort of 'dependence' appears to be a consequence of headache, originating from the necessity for the analgesic to cope with everyday life.

  17. Substance abuse in an inpatient psychiatric sample.

    PubMed

    Brady, K; Casto, S; Lydiard, R B; Malcolm, R; Arana, G

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between psychoactive drug abuse and psychopathology is complex. There have been few systematic explorations of substance abuse in psychiatric populations since the recent epidemic of cocaine abuse. To update and further explore the relationship between psychiatric illness and substance abuse, 100 consecutively admitted patients to an inpatient psychiatry unit were administered a drug and alcohol use/abuse questionnaire. Sixty-four percent endorsed current or past problems with substance abuse and 29% met DSM-III-R criteria for substance abuse in the 30 days prior to admission. For the major diagnostic categories, there were no significant differences between groups in percentages of patients with substance abuse disorders. There was a trend (p less than or equal to .2) toward an increased number of lifetime psychiatric hospitalizations in the substance-abusing group. Alcohol was the most common drug of choice followed by stimulants, cannabis, and sedative hypnotics. Differences in drug choices between diagnostic categories are discussed. Forty-three percent of urine drug screens obtained were positive, and of those with positive urine drug screens, 42% denied drug use upon admission. Only 40% of patients with current or past substance abuse problems had received treatment for their chemical dependency. In our sample, while substance abuse was very prevalent, it was underreported and undertreated.

  18. Cocaine enhances HIV-1-induced CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis: implications in disease progression in cocaine-abusing HIV-1 patients.

    PubMed

    Pandhare, Jui; Addai, Amma B; Mantri, Chinmay K; Hager, Cynthia; Smith, Rita M; Barnett, Louis; Villalta, Fernando; Kalams, Spyros A; Dash, Chandravanu

    2014-04-01

    Substance abuse is a major barrier in eradication of the HIV epidemic because it serves as a powerful cofactor for viral transmission, disease progression, and AIDS-related mortality. Cocaine, one of the commonly abused drugs among HIV-1 patients, has been suggested to accelerate HIV disease progression. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Therefore, we tested whether cocaine augments HIV-1-associated CD4(+) T-cell decline, a predictor of HIV disease progression. We examined apoptosis of resting CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-negative and HIV-1-positive donors in our study, because decline of uninfected cells plays a major role in HIV-1 disease progression. Treatment of resting CD4(+) T cells with cocaine (up to 100 μmol/L concentrations) did not induce apoptosis, but 200 to 1000 μmol/L cocaine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, treatment of CD4(+) T cells isolated from healthy donors with both HIV-1 virions and cocaine significantly increased apoptosis compared with the apoptosis induced by cocaine or virions alone. Most important, our biochemical data suggest that cocaine induces CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and inducing mitochondrial depolarization. Collectively, our results provide evidence of a synergy between cocaine and HIV-1 on CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis that may, in part, explain the accelerated disease observed in HIV-1-infected drug abusers.

  19. The impact of using electronic patient records on practices of reading and writing.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, Heleena; Kaunonen, Marja; Åstedt-Kurki, Paivi

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of electronic patient records in daily practice. In four wards of a large hospital district in Finland, N = 43 patients' care and activities were observed and analysed in terms of the Grounded Theory method. The findings revealed that using electronic patient records created a particular process of writing and reading. Wireless technology enabled simultaneous patient involvement and point-of-care documentation, additionally supporting real-time reading. Remote and retrospective documentation was distant in terms of both space and time. The remoteness caused double documentation, reduced accuracy and less-efficient use of time. 'Non-reading' practices were witnessed in retrospective reading, causing delays in patient care and increase in workload. Similarly, if documentation was insufficient or non-existent, the consequences were found to be detrimental to the patients. The use of an electronic patient record system has a significant impact on patient care. Therefore, it is crucial to develop wireless technology and interdisciplinary collaboration in order to improve and support high-quality patient care.

  20. Meeting the health information needs of prostate cancer patients using personal health records

    PubMed Central

    Pai, H.H.; Lau, F.; Barnett, J.; Jones, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is interest in the use of health information technology in the form of personal health record (phr) systems to support patient needs for health information, care, and decision-making, particularly for patients with distressing, chronic diseases such as prostate cancer (pca). We sought feedback from pca patients who used a phr. Methods For 6 months, 22 pca patients in various phases of care at the BC Cancer Agency (bcca) were given access to a secure Web-based phr called provider, which they could use to view their medical records and use a set of support tools. Feedback was obtained using an end-of-study survey on usability, satisfaction, and concerns with provider. Site activity was recorded to assess usage patterns. Results Of the 17 patients who completed the study, 29% encountered some minor difficulties using provider. No security breaches were known to have occurred. The two most commonly accessed medical records were laboratory test results and transcribed doctor’s notes. Of survey respondents, 94% were satisfied with the access to their medical records, 65% said that provider helped to answer their questions, 77% felt that their privacy and confidentiality were preserved, 65% felt that using provider helped them to communicate better with their physicians, 83% found new and useful information that they would not have received by talking to their health care providers, and 88% said that they would continue to use provider. Conclusions Our results support the notion that phrs can provide cancer patients with timely access to their medical records and health information, and can assist in communication with health care providers, in knowledge generation, and in patient empowerment. PMID:24311957

  1. Mental Health and Substance Use Characteristics of Flight Attendants Enrolled in an In-Patient Substance Abuse Treatment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Gail; Diaz, Naelys; McIlveen, John; Weiner, Michael; Mullaney, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence rates of co-occurring mental health problems among 70 flight attendants in substance abuse treatment. Results indicated that flight attendants in treatment were more likely to experience alcohol dependency than drug dependency. A high proportion of participants reported clinical levels of…

  2. Modulation of the proteome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-1 infected patients by drugs of abuse

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Jessica L.; Mahajan, Supriya D.; Aalinkeel, Ravikunar; Nair, Bindukumar; Sykes, Donald E.; Agosto-Mujica, Arnadri; Hsiao, Chiu Bin; Schwartz, Stanley A.

    2010-01-01

    We used proteomic analyses to assess how drug abuse modulates immunologic responses to infections with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Two dimensional (2D) difference gel electrophoresis was utilized to determine changes in the proteome of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) isolated from HIV-1 positive donors that occurred after treatment with cocaine or methamphetamine. Both drugs differentially regulated the expression of several functional classes of proteins. We further isolated specific subpopulations of PBMC to determine which subpopulations were selectively affected by treatment with drugs of abuse. Monocytes, B cells and T cells were positively or negatively selected from PBMC isolated from HIV-1 positive donors. Our results demonstrate that cocaine and methamphetamine modulate gene expression primarily in monocytes and T cells, the primary targets of HIV-1 infection. Proteomic data were validated with quantitative, real-time PCR. These studies elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of drugs of abuse on HIV-1 infections. Several functionally relevant classes of proteins were identified as potential mediators of HIV-1 pathogenesis and disease progression associated with drug abuse. PMID:19543960

  3. The smart card: an ideal tool for a computer-based patient record.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, R; Hildebrand, C; Jung, E

    1995-01-01

    Over the past decades, technology has advanced in all areas. Medical documentation, however, has not altered considerably. This means that medical care is often below standard. This article tries to point out how healthcare could benefit from a computer-based medical record. It also discusses the use of a medical smart card as a computer-based patient record--exemplified by the European DIABCARD-project which develops a chip card for persons with diabetes.

  4. SOEMPI: A Secure Open Enterprise Master Patient Index Software Toolkit for Private Record Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Csaba; Durham, Elizabeth; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Xue, Yuan; Malin, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    To mitigate bias in multi-institutional research studies, healthcare organizations need to integrate patient records. However, this process must be accomplished without disclosing the identities of the corresponding patients. Various private record linkage (PRL) techniques have been proposed, but there is a lack of translation into practice because no software suite supports the entire PRL lifecycle. This paper addresses this issue with the introduction of the Secure Open Enterprise Master Patient Index (SOEMPI). We show how SOEMPI covers the PRL lifecycle, illustrate the implementation of several PRL protocols, and provide a runtime analysis for the integration of two datasets consisting of 10,000 records. While the PRL process is slower than a non-secure setting, our analysis shows the majority of processes in a PRL protocol require several seconds or less and that SOEMPI completes the process in approximately two minutes, which is a practical amount of time for integration. PMID:25954421

  5. Formal representation of a conceptual data model for the patient-based medical record.

    PubMed

    Gouveia-Oliveira, A; Lopes, L

    1993-01-01

    We present a general architecture for the patient-based medical record as it is being developed for the SAMS, a private social security system. The conceptual data model is described in a convenient formal notation, the entity-relationship diagram. Although following the original formulation of the problem-oriented medical record (POMR), the data model was designed with a level of generalization that, functionally, makes structural differences between conventional and POMR no longer apparent. The main features of this model are its adaptability to individual work practices and its problem-oriented structure, including the representation of problems' evolution. This structure will enable physicians to organize the data, mostly collected elsewhere, by explicitly relating the facts that constitute a particular patient record, which is a simple way to store context information and clinical knowledge that is not part of patient data.

  6. Urolithiasis related to laxative abuse.

    PubMed

    Wu, W J; Huang, C H; Chiang, C P; Huang, C N; Wang, C N

    1993-11-01

    Urinary calcareous disease related to laxative abuse is rare. The gastrointestinal loss of fluid and electrolytes leads to chronic depletion of the urinary volume, relative supersaturation and many other pathophysiologic derangements. These calculi are generally radiolucent with uric acid and ammonium acid urate as major components. We report on a female patient with frequent, repetitive formation of urinary calculi and rapid double J stent encrustation, which were related to the chronic abuse of bisacodyl. Although these stones can be fragmented successfully by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy, it seems that the better treatment for this type of stone formation is to avoid the abuse of laxatives.

  7. Is patient confidentiality compromised with the electronic health record?: a position paper.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ilse M

    2015-02-01

    In order for electronic health records to fulfill their expected benefits, protection of privacy of patient information is key. Lack of trust in confidentiality can lead to reluctance in disclosing all relevant information, which could have grave consequences. This position paper contemplates whether patient confidentiality is compromised by electronic health records. The position that confidentiality is compromised was supported by the four bioethical principles and argued that despite laws and various safeguards to protect patients' confidentiality, numerous data breaches have occurred. The position that confidentiality is not compromised was supported by virtue ethics and a utilitarian viewpoint and argued that safeguards keep information confidential and the public feels relatively safe with the electronic health record. The article concludes with an ethically superior position that confidentiality is compromised with the electronic health record. Although organizational and governmental ways of enhancing the confidentiality of patient information within the electronic health record facilitate confidentiality, the ultimate responsibility of maintaining confidentiality rests with the individual end-users and their ethical code of conduct. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for nurses calls for nurses to be watchful with data security in electronic communications.

  8. Electronic patient records for dental school clinics: more than paperless systems.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Jane C; Zeller, Gregory G; Shah, Chhaya

    2002-05-01

    The Electronic Patient Record (EPR) or "computer-based medical record" is defined by the Patient Record Institute as "a repository for patient information with one health-care enterprise that is supported by digital computer input and integrated with other information sources." The information technology revolution coupled with everyday use of computers in clinical dentistry has created new demand for electronic patient records. Ultimately, the EPR should improve health care quality. The major short-term disadvantage is cost, including software, equipment, training, and personnel time involved in the associated business process re-engineering. An internal review committee with expertise in information technology and/or database management evaluated commercially available software in light of the unique needs of academic dental facilities. This paper discusses their deficiencies and suggests areas for improvement. The dental profession should develop a more common record with standard diagnostic codes and clinical outcome measures to make the EPR more useful for clinical research and improve the quality of care. PMID:12056768

  9. Development and initial validation of a content taxonomy for patient records in general dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Amit; Hernandez, Pedro; Thyvalikakath, Thankam; Ye, Harold; Song, Mei; Schleyer, Titus

    2013-01-01

    Objective Develop and validate an initial content taxonomy for patient records in general dentistry. Methods Phase 1–Obtain 95 de-identified patient records from 11 general dentists in the United States. Phase 2–Extract individual data fields (information items), both explicit (labeled) and implicit (unlabeled), from records, and organize into categories mirroring original field context. Phase 3–Refine raw list of information items by eliminating duplicates/redundancies and focusing on general dentistry. Phase 4–Validate all items regarding inclusion and importance using a two-round Delphi study with a panel of 22 general dentists active in clinical practice, education, and research. Results Analysis of 76 patient records from 9 dentists, combined with previous work, yielded a raw list of 1,509 information items. Refinement reduced this list to 1,107 items, subsequently rated by the Delphi panel. The final model contained 870 items, with 761 (88%) rated as mandatory. In Round 1, 95% (825) of the final items were accepted, in Round 2 the remaining 5% (45). Only 45 items on the initial list were rejected and 192 (or 17%) remained equivocal. Conclusion Grounded in the reality of clinical practice, our proposed content taxonomy represents a significant advance over existing guidelines and standards by providing a granular and comprehensive information representation for general dental patient records. It offers a significant foundational asset for implementing an interoperable health information technology infrastructure for general dentistry. PMID:23838618

  10. Using a Patient Portal to Transmit Patient Reported Health Information into the Electronic Record: Workflow Implications and User Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sorondo, Barbara; Allen, Amy; Bayleran, Janet; Doore, Stacy; Fathima, Samreen; Sabbagh, Iyad; Newcomb, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This project implemented an integrated patient self-reported screening tool in a patient portal and assessed clinical workflow and user experience in primary care practices. Methods: An electronic health risk assessment based on the CMS Annual Wellness Visit (AWV) was developed to integrate self-reported health information into the patient’s electronic health record (EHR). Patients enrolled in care coordination tested the implementation. The evaluation plan included quantitative and qualitative measures of patient adoption, provider adoption, workflow impact, financial impact, and technology impact. Findings: Seventy-two patients completed the sample AWV, and 80% of the questionnaires had clinical findings that required provider follow-up. Patients expressed satisfaction with the portal, as it enabled them to view their health record and enter information. Implementation did not reduce office staff time. Providers and office staff agreed that an electronic system for adding information to their record would increase patient satisfaction, but they expressed concern with the need to promptly review the information and the time involved to accomplish this prior to an office visit. Discussion: Despite satisfaction among patients, portal adoption is still low, due to technological limitations and to the lack of adaptability to primary care practice workflow. Notwithstanding those barriers, the use of the portal for completion of repetitive tasks, such as screening tools, should be encouraged. Conclusions: Patients can effectively use portals to complete the patient reported section of the CMS AWV. However, if the information is not completed during the same day of the office visit, the time required to address health findings outside of a regular office visit is uncompensated, and diminished the enthusiasm for this process among primary care practice staff.

  11. Using a Patient Portal to Transmit Patient Reported Health Information into the Electronic Record: Workflow Implications and User Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sorondo, Barbara; Allen, Amy; Bayleran, Janet; Doore, Stacy; Fathima, Samreen; Sabbagh, Iyad; Newcomb, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This project implemented an integrated patient self-reported screening tool in a patient portal and assessed clinical workflow and user experience in primary care practices. Methods: An electronic health risk assessment based on the CMS Annual Wellness Visit (AWV) was developed to integrate self-reported health information into the patient’s electronic health record (EHR). Patients enrolled in care coordination tested the implementation. The evaluation plan included quantitative and qualitative measures of patient adoption, provider adoption, workflow impact, financial impact, and technology impact. Findings: Seventy-two patients completed the sample AWV, and 80% of the questionnaires had clinical findings that required provider follow-up. Patients expressed satisfaction with the portal, as it enabled them to view their health record and enter information. Implementation did not reduce office staff time. Providers and office staff agreed that an electronic system for adding information to their record would increase patient satisfaction, but they expressed concern with the need to promptly review the information and the time involved to accomplish this prior to an office visit. Discussion: Despite satisfaction among patients, portal adoption is still low, due to technological limitations and to the lack of adaptability to primary care practice workflow. Notwithstanding those barriers, the use of the portal for completion of repetitive tasks, such as screening tools, should be encouraged. Conclusions: Patients can effectively use portals to complete the patient reported section of the CMS AWV. However, if the information is not completed during the same day of the office visit, the time required to address health findings outside of a regular office visit is uncompensated, and diminished the enthusiasm for this process among primary care practice staff. PMID:27683669

  12. Jimson "loco" weed abuse in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Shervette, R E; Schydlower, M; Lampe, R M; Fearnow, R G

    1979-04-01

    Over a three-year period, 29 adolescent patients were hospitalized because of intentional Jimson weed ingestion. Their records were reviewed for the presence of signs and symptoms of atropine/scopolamine toxicity clinical course, treatment, and outcome. Twenty-two were male and seven were female. All had mydriasis, hallucinations, and were disoriented. Tachycardia (heart rate greater than 95), dry mucous membranes, and flushed facies were often present. Urinary retention requiring catheterization was present in five patients. Sixty-five percent (17/26) had detectable atropine or scopolamine in their urine. The average length of hospitalization was 1.8 days. No serious complications were encountered during hospitalization and full recovery were noted in all patients. Gastric lavage and hospital admission for close monitoring and medical support are essential phases of management. Physicians who care for adolescents should be aware of this relatively new form of drug abuse and its management. PMID:440859

  13. Drugs of abuse--opiates.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, W; Wesson, D R

    1990-01-01

    Treating opiate-dependent patients can be difficult for many physicians because the patients' life-styles, values, and beliefs differ from those of the physicians. Primary care physicians, however, are often involved in the treatment of the medical complications of opiate abuse, and physicians must often manage a patient's opiate dependence until appropriate referral to a drug abuse treatment program can be arranged. Treatment is guided by an understanding of the patient's addictive disease, for which there are specific diagnostic criteria, and an understanding of the pharmacology of opiates of abuse and the medications used in treating opiate dependence. The opiate agonist, methadone, is useful for both detoxification and maintenance. The opiate antagonist, naloxone, is the treatment of choice for opiate overdose, and naltrexone, also an opiate antagonist, is a useful adjunct in subgroups of opiate-dependent patients for preventing relapse. New medications for the treatment of opiate dependence are being developed. PMID:2161588

  14. Psychiatric disorders, spouse abuse and child abuse.

    PubMed

    Bland, R C; Orn, H

    1986-01-01

    The results of 2000 standardized psychiatric diagnostic interviews of randomly selected adult household residents of Edmonton showed that having had any psychiatric diagnosis increased the risk for being involved in spouse and child abuse, particularly for those with alcohol abuse/dependence plus anti-social personality or depression. Altogether 56% of spouse abusers and 69% of child abusers had a lifetime psychiatric diagnosis.

  15. Patients' consent preferences for research uses of information in electronic medical records: interview and survey data

    PubMed Central

    Willison, Donald J; Keshavjee, Karim; Nair, Kalpana; Goldsmith, Charlie; Holbrook, Anne M

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To assess patients' preferred method of consent for the use of information from electronic medical records for research. Design Interviews and a structured survey of patients in practices with electronic medical records. Setting Family practices in southern Ontario, Canada. Participants 123 patients: 17 were interviewed and 106 completed a survey. Main outcome measures Patients' opinions and concerns on use of information from their medical records for research and their preferences for method of consent. Results Most interviewees were willing to allow the use of their information for research purposes, although the majority preferred that consent was sought first. The seeking of consent was considered an important element of respect for the individual. Most interviewees made little distinction between identifiable and anonymised data. Research sponsored by private insurance firms generated the greatest concern, and research sponsored by foundation the least. Sponsorship by drug companies evoked negative responses during interview and positive responses in the survey. Conclusions Patients are willing to allow information from their medical records to be used for research, but most prefer to be asked for consent either verbally or in writing. What is already known on this topicLegislation is being introduced worldwide to restrict the circumstances under which personal information may be used for secondary purposes without consentLittle empirical information exists about patients' concerns over privacy and preferences for consent for use of such information for researchWhat this study addsPatients are willing to allow personal information to be used for research purposes but want to be actively consulted firstPatients make little distinction between identifiable and non-identifiable informationMost patients prefer a time limit for their consent PMID:12586673

  16. Semantic extraction and processing of medical records for patient-oriented visual index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weilin; Dong, Wenjie; Chen, Xiangjiao; Zhang, Jianguo

    2012-02-01

    To have comprehensive and completed understanding healthcare status of a patient, doctors need to search patient medical records from different healthcare information systems, such as PACS, RIS, HIS, USIS, as a reference of diagnosis and treatment decisions for the patient. However, it is time-consuming and tedious to do these procedures. In order to solve this kind of problems, we developed a patient-oriented visual index system (VIS) to use the visual technology to show health status and to retrieve the patients' examination information stored in each system with a 3D human model. In this presentation, we present a new approach about how to extract the semantic and characteristic information from the medical record systems such as RIS/USIS to create the 3D Visual Index. This approach includes following steps: (1) Building a medical characteristic semantic knowledge base; (2) Developing natural language processing (NLP) engine to perform semantic analysis and logical judgment on text-based medical records; (3) Applying the knowledge base and NLP engine on medical records to extract medical characteristics (e.g., the positive focus information), and then mapping extracted information to related organ/parts of 3D human model to create the visual index. We performed the testing procedures on 559 samples of radiological reports which include 853 focuses, and achieved 828 focuses' information. The successful rate of focus extraction is about 97.1%.

  17. Forensic revolution need maintenance of dental records of patients by the dentists: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anamika; Mishra, Gaurav; Bhutani, Hemant; Hoshing, Chetan; Bhalla, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: With the growth of forensic odontology, dental records have become an essential source of information, especially for medicolegal cases in general practice. It is mandated by the law that every dentist must keep some kind of records for every patient they treat. After the death of an individual, remnants of teeth are usually damaged at the last among all body parts. Dental records assist in personal identification in cases of mass disasters, criminal investigations, and medicolegal issues. However, in India, rules for maintaining dental records are not very strictly followed. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge regarding the maintenance of dental records among dentists in Punjab and Uttar Pradesh. Materials and Methods: Data collection was performed via a questionnaire. The study population responded to the questions pertaining to knowledge regarding forensic odontology methods and the mode of maintaining dental records in their regular practice through a personal interview. A descriptive analysis was carried out for the data. The data were summarized and analyzed using the statistical software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 18.0. Results: A very low percentage (22%) of the dentists were seen to be maintaining records on a regular basis. Seventy-eight percent of the dentists were not maintaining any records. Conclusion: This study clearly indicates that the dentists in Punjab and Uttar Pradesh need to be properly trained for any kind of forensic and medicolegal needs. PMID:27583219

  18. Automated identification of patients with a diagnosis of binge eating disorder from narrative electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Bellows, Brandon K; LaFleur, Joanne; Kamauu, Aaron W C; Ginter, Thomas; Forbush, Tyler B; Agbor, Stephen; Supina, Dylan; Hodgkins, Paul; DuVall, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) does not have an International Classification of Diseases, 9th or 10th edition code, but is included under ‘eating disorder not otherwise specified’ (EDNOS). This historical cohort study identified patients with clinician-diagnosed BED from electronic health records (EHR) in the Department of Veterans Affairs between 2000 and 2011 using natural language processing (NLP) and compared their characteristics to patients identified by EDNOS diagnosis codes. NLP identified 1487 BED patients with classification accuracy of 91.8% and sensitivity of 96.2% compared to human review. After applying study inclusion criteria, 525 patients had NLP-identified BED only, 1354 had EDNOS only, and 68 had both BED and EDNOS. Patient characteristics were similar between the groups. This is the first study to use NLP as a method to identify BED patients from EHR data and will allow further epidemiological study of patients with BED in systems with adequate clinical notes. PMID:24201026

  19. New drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Rech, Megan A; Donahey, Elisabeth; Cappiello Dziedzic, Jacqueline M; Oh, Laura; Greenhalgh, Elizabeth

    2015-02-01

    Drug abuse is a common problem and growing concern in the United States, and over the past decade, novel or atypical drugs have emerged and have become increasingly popular. Recognition and treatment of new drugs of abuse pose many challenges for health care providers due to lack of quantitative reporting and routine surveillance, and the difficulty of detection in routine blood and urine analyses. Furthermore, street manufacturers are able to rapidly adapt and develop new synthetic isolates of older drugs as soon as law enforcement agencies render them illegal. In this article, we describe the clinical and adverse effects and purported pharmacology of several new classes of drugs of abuse including synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones, salvia, desomorphine, and kratom. Because many of these substances can have severe or life-threatening adverse effects, knowledge of general toxicology is key in recognizing acute intoxication and overdose; however, typical toxidromes (e.g., cholinergic, sympathomimetic, opioid, etc.) are not precipitated by many of these agents. Medical management of patients who abuse or overdose on these drugs largely consists of supportive care, although naloxone may be used as an antidote for desomorphine overdose. Symptoms of aggression and psychosis may be treated with sedation (benzodiazepines, propofol) and antipsychotics (haloperidol or atypical agents such as quetiapine or ziprasidone). Other facets of management to consider include treatment for withdrawal or addiction, nutrition support, and potential for transmission of infectious diseases. PMID:25471045

  20. 38 CFR 1.484 - Disclosure of medical information to the surrogate of a patient who lacks decision-making capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., diagnosis, prognosis, or treatment of a patient that is maintained in connection with the performance of any VA program or activity relating to drug abuse, alcoholism or alcohol abuse, infection with the human... given record necessary for the surrogate to make an informed decision regarding the patient's...

  1. Youth Alcohol Use and Dating Abuse Victimization and Perpetration: A Test of the Relationships at the Daily Level in a Sample of Pediatric Emergency Department Patients Who Use Alcohol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Emily F.; Stuart, Gregory L.; Winter, Michael; Wang, Na; Bowen, Deborah J.; Bernstein, Judith; Vinci, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study retrospectively examined the daily-level associations between youth alcohol use and dating abuse (DA) victimization and perpetration for a 6-month period. Method: Timeline Followback (TLFB) interview data were collected from 397 urban emergency department patients, ages 17 to 21 years. Patients were eligible if they reported…

  2. 42 CFR 495.368 - Combating fraud and abuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE... laws and regulations designed to prevent fraud, waste, and abuse, including, but not limited...

  3. 42 CFR 495.368 - Combating fraud and abuse.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION STANDARDS FOR THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD TECHNOLOGY INCENTIVE... laws and regulations designed to prevent fraud, waste, and abuse, including, but not limited...

  4. Practicing preventive ethics, protecting patients: challenges of the electronic health record.

    PubMed

    Satkoske, Valerie B; Parker, Lisa S

    2010-01-01

    Implementation of guidelines regarding breaches of electronic health information requires an anticipatory stance and physician and patient education regarding security and monitoring measures and methods of redress. Adopting a preventive ethics, rather than a crisis management, model may also increase physician awareness of how the information they choose to include and privilege within the health record may expose patients to added harms if not done mindfully.

  5. Comorbidity of Schizophrenia and Substance Abuse: Implications for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueser, Kim T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reviews substance abuse disorders in schizophrenia patients, including prevalence of comorbid disorders, assessment, hypothesized mechanisms underlying abuse, and clinical effects of abuse on course of illness and cognitive functioning. Outlines principles of treatment for dual-diagnosis schizophrenia patients, noting limitations of existing…

  6. Multidisciplinary recording and continuity of care for stroke patients with eating difficulties.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Eva; Ehnfors, Margareta; Ehrenberg, Anna

    2010-05-01

    Eating difficulties after stroke are common and can, in addition to being a risk for serious medical complications, impair functional capability, social life and self-image. Stroke unit care entails systematic multidisciplinary teamwork and continuity of care. The purpose of this study was to describe (i) multidisciplinary stroke care as represented in patient records for patients with eating difficulties, and (ii) the written information that was transferred from hospital to elderly care. Data from 59 patient records were analysed with descriptive statistics and by categorization of phrases. Signs of multidisciplinary collaboration to manage eating problems were scarce in the records. While two notes from physiotherapists were found, nurses contributed with 78% of all notes (n = 358). Screening of swallowing and body weight was documented for most patients, whereas data on nutritional status and eating were largely lacking. The majority of notes represented patients' handling of food in the mouth, swallowing and lack of energy. Care plans were unstructured and few contained steps for managing eating. Discharge summaries held poor information on care related to eating difficulties. The language of all professionals was mostly unspecific. However, notes from speech-language therapists were comprehensive and entailed information on follow-up and patient participation. PMID:20178426

  7. 42 CFR 2.19 - Disposition of records by discontinued programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disposition of records by discontinued programs. 2.19 Section 2.19 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.19 Disposition...

  8. 42 CFR 2.19 - Disposition of records by discontinued programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disposition of records by discontinued programs. 2.19 Section 2.19 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.19 Disposition...

  9. 42 CFR 2.19 - Disposition of records by discontinued programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disposition of records by discontinued programs. 2.19 Section 2.19 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.19 Disposition...

  10. 42 CFR 2.19 - Disposition of records by discontinued programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disposition of records by discontinued programs. 2.19 Section 2.19 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.19 Disposition...

  11. Cocaine abuse during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cressman, Alex M; Natekar, Aniket; Kim, Eunji; Koren, Gideon; Bozzo, Pina

    2014-07-01

    Cocaine abuse during pregnancy is a significant public health problem but is infrequently discussed between physicians and patients. The impact of in utero cocaine exposure on pregnancy and the baby has received significant media attention in preceding decades because of fears of teratogenicity, long-term health consequences, and poor cognitive and neurodevelopmental outcomes. We sought to review the medical literature examining these phenomena. We identified risks to the pregnancy and baby in women abusing cocaine during pregnancy. These include preterm birth, placenta-associated syndromes (e.g., placental abruption, preeclampsia, and placental infarction), and impaired fetal growth. Long-term neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits include (but are not limited to) poorer language development, learning and perceptual reasoning, behavioural problems, and adverse effects on memory and executive function. However, these results should be interpreted cautiously because cocaine abuse may be accompanied by many other maternal and sociodemographic risk factors, so it is difficult to ascertain the effect of cocaine alone. Therefore, it is critical to counsel patients about potential risk, and perhaps more importantly, to treat addiction and to better understand, and advocate for improvements to, these patients' high-risk environment.

  12. Issues in identification and linkage of patient records across an integrated delivery system.

    PubMed

    Arellano, M G; Weber, G I

    1998-01-01

    Historically, the health information systems community has viewed linking personal records as a mundane task. The oversimplified view that routine database manipulation can accurately identify multiple records for a single individual is erroneous, an assumption based on a misperception of the quality of the underlying data. Such data have been adversely affected by the evolution of individual facility patient indexes from multiple systems and the results of backload procedures, and the lack of focus on the need for data integrity by users of the automated systems. Much of the random, invalid data we identify on a daily basis is directly associated with the need for system users to place data in the patient record while they face the situation of having no obvious data field in which to place them. Combined with an underlying lack of standards for the collection of personal identification information, this results in pure chaos when reviewing an MPI file containing a million records at the start of a linkage evaluation project. We have documented the considerable effort that must therefore be made in standardizing the MPI files using stringent analytical procedures and applying common edit routines before commencing record linkage. This preprocessing effort must then be supplemented with sophisticated matching procedures that can handle the dual challenge of minimizing false negatives (the failure to identify true linkages) and false positives (the incorrect linking of records that do not represent the same person). The identification of pairs of linked records does not, however, complete an EPI loading. Because it is fairly common for a multiple facility linkage evaluation to identify more than two medical record numbers for the same patient, and the primary goal of an EPI is to assign a unique identifier for the patient which will link that patient's multiple files, it becomes necessary to develop a means of readily associating three or more records for the same

  13. Develop security architecture for both in-house healthcare information systems and electronic patient record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Chen, Xiaomeng; Zhuang, Jun; Jiang, Jianrong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Dongqing; Huang, H. K.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we presented a new security approach to provide security measures and features in both healthcare information systems (PACS, RIS/HIS), and electronic patient record (EPR). We introduced two security components, certificate authoring (CA) system and patient record digital signature management (DSPR) system, as well as electronic envelope technology, into the current hospital healthcare information infrastructure to provide security measures and functions such as confidential or privacy, authenticity, integrity, reliability, non-repudiation, and authentication for in-house healthcare information systems daily operating, and EPR exchanging among the hospitals or healthcare administration levels, and the DSPR component manages the all the digital signatures of patient medical records signed through using an-symmetry key encryption technologies. The electronic envelopes used for EPR exchanging are created based on the information of signers, digital signatures, and identifications of patient records stored in CAS and DSMS, as well as the destinations and the remote users. The CAS and DSMS were developed and integrated into a RIS-integrated PACS, and the integration of these new security components is seamless and painless. The electronic envelopes designed for EPR were used successfully in multimedia data transmission.

  14. Refining Measurement of Substance Use Disorders Among Women of Child-Bearing Age Using Hospital Records: The Development of the Explicit-Mention Substance Abuse Need for Treatment in Women (EMSANT-W) Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Derrington, Taletha Mae; Bernstein, Judith; Belanoff, Candice; Cabral, Howard J; Babakhanlou-Chase, Hermik; Diop, Hafsatou; Evans, Stephen R; Kotelchuck, Milton

    2015-10-01

    Substance use disorder (SUD) in women of reproductive age is associated with adverse health consequences for both women and their offspring. US states need a feasible population-based, case-identification tool to generate better approximations of SUD prevalence, treatment use, and treatment outcomes among women. This article presents the development of the Explicit Mention Substance Abuse Need for Treatment in Women (EMSANT-W), a gender-tailored tool based upon existing International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition, Clinical Modification diagnostic code-based groupers that can be applied to hospital administrative data. Gender-tailoring entailed the addition of codes related to infants, pregnancy, and prescription drug abuse, as well as the creation of inclusion/exclusion rules based on other conditions present in the diagnostic record. Among 1,728,027 women and associated infants who accessed hospital care from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2008 in Massachusetts, EMSANT-W identified 103,059 women with probable SUD. EMSANT-W identified 4,116 women who were not identified by the widely used Clinical Classifications Software for Mental Health and Substance Abuse (CCS-MHSA) and did not capture 853 women identified by CCS-MHSA. Content and approach innovations in EMSANT-W address potential limitations of the Clinical Classifications Software, and create a methodologically sound, gender-tailored and feasible population-based tool for identifying women of reproductive age in need of further evaluation for SUD treatment. Rapid changes in health care service infrastructure, delivery systems and policies require tools such as the EMSANT-W that provide more precise identification methods for sub-populations and can serve as the foundation for analyses of treatment use and outcomes. PMID:25680703

  15. Refining Measurement of Substance Use Disorders Among Women of Child-Bearing Age Using Hospital Records: The Development of the Explicit-Mention Substance Abuse Need for Treatment in Women (EMSANT-W) Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Derrington, Taletha Mae; Bernstein, Judith; Belanoff, Candice; Cabral, Howard J; Babakhanlou-Chase, Hermik; Diop, Hafsatou; Evans, Stephen R; Kotelchuck, Milton

    2015-10-01

    Substance use disorder (SUD) in women of reproductive age is associated with adverse health consequences for both women and their offspring. US states need a feasible population-based, case-identification tool to generate better approximations of SUD prevalence, treatment use, and treatment outcomes among women. This article presents the development of the Explicit Mention Substance Abuse Need for Treatment in Women (EMSANT-W), a gender-tailored tool based upon existing International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition, Clinical Modification diagnostic code-based groupers that can be applied to hospital administrative data. Gender-tailoring entailed the addition of codes related to infants, pregnancy, and prescription drug abuse, as well as the creation of inclusion/exclusion rules based on other conditions present in the diagnostic record. Among 1,728,027 women and associated infants who accessed hospital care from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2008 in Massachusetts, EMSANT-W identified 103,059 women with probable SUD. EMSANT-W identified 4,116 women who were not identified by the widely used Clinical Classifications Software for Mental Health and Substance Abuse (CCS-MHSA) and did not capture 853 women identified by CCS-MHSA. Content and approach innovations in EMSANT-W address potential limitations of the Clinical Classifications Software, and create a methodologically sound, gender-tailored and feasible population-based tool for identifying women of reproductive age in need of further evaluation for SUD treatment. Rapid changes in health care service infrastructure, delivery systems and policies require tools such as the EMSANT-W that provide more precise identification methods for sub-populations and can serve as the foundation for analyses of treatment use and outcomes.

  16. Refining Measurement of Substance Use Disorders among Women of Child-bearing Age Using Hospital Records: The Development of the Explicit-Mention Substance Abuse Need for Treatment in Women (EMSANT-W) Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Derrington, Taletha Mae; Bernstein, Judith; Belanoff, Candice; Cabral, Howard J.; Babakhanlou-Chase, Hermik; Diop, Hafsatou; Evans, Stephen R.; Kotelchuck, Milton

    2015-01-01

    Substance use disorder (SUD) in women of reproductive age is associated with adverse health consequences for both women and their offspring. US states need a feasible population-based, case-identification tool to generate better approximations of SUD prevalence, treatment use, and treatment outcomes among women. This article presents the development of the Explicit Mention Substance Abuse Need for Treatment in Women (EMSANT-W), a gender-tailored tool based upon existing International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition, Clinical Modification diagnostic code-based groupers that can be applied to hospital administrative data. Gender-tailoring entailed the addition of codes related to infants, pregnancy, and prescription drug abuse, as well as the creation of inclusion/exclusion rules based on other conditions present in the diagnostic record. Among 1,728,027 women and associated infants who accessed hospital care from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2008 in Massachusetts, EMSANT-W identified 103,059 women with probable SUD. EMSANT-W identified 4,116 women who were not identified by the widely used Clinical Classifications Software for Mental Health and Substance Abuse (CCS-MHSA) and did not capture 853 women identified by CCS-MHSA. Content and approach innovations in EMSANT-W address potential limitations of the Clinical Classifications Software, and create a methodologically sound, gender-tailored and feasible population-based tool for identifying women of reproductive age in need of further evaluation for SUD treatment. Rapid changes in health care service infrastructure, delivery systems and policies require tools such as the EMSANT-W that provide more precise identification methods for sub-populations and can serve as the foundation for analyses of treatment use and outcomes. PMID:25680703

  17. Wireless connection of continuous glucose monitoring system to the electronic patient record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Alexandre; Gutierrez, Marco A.; Lage, Silvia G.; Rebelo, Marina S.; Granja, Luiz A. R.; Ramires, Jose A. F.

    2005-04-01

    The control of blood sugar level (BSL) at near-normal levels has been documented to reduce both acute and chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. Recent studies suggested, the reduction of mortality in a surgical intensive care unit (ICU), when the BSL are maintained at normal levels. Despite of the benefits appointed by these and others clinical studies, the strict BSL control in critically ill patients suffers from some difficulties: a) medical staff need to measure and control the patient"s BSL using blood sample at least every hour. This is a complex and time consuming task; b) the inaccuracy of standard capillary glucose monitoring (fingerstick) in hypotensive patients and, if frequently used to sample arterial or venous blood, may lead to excess phlebotomy; c) there is no validated procedure for continuously monitoring of BSL levels. This study used the MiniMed CGMS in ill patients at ICU to send, in real-time, BSL values to a Web-Based Electronic Patient Record. The BSL values are parsed and delivered through a wireless network as an HL7 message. The HL7 messages with BSL values are collected, stored into the Electronic Patient Record and presented into a bed-side monitor at the ICU together with other relevant patient information.

  18. A multicenter, primary care-based, open-label study to identify behaviors related to prescription opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion in opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain

    PubMed Central

    Setnik, Beatrice; Roland, Carl L; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Pixton, Glenn C; Berke, Robert; Calkins, Anne; Goli, Veeraindar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the investigator assessment of patient risk for prescription opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion with patient self-reports of these activities in a population with chronic pain. Methods As a secondary objective of an open-label, multicenter, primary care-based clinical study to evaluate the success of converting opioid-experienced patients with chronic pain to morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride, risk for misuse, abuse, and diversion was assessed using two nonvalidated questionnaires: one was completed by the investigator and another by the patient (Self-Reported Misuse, Abuse, and Diversion [SR-MAD]). In addition, the validated Current Opioid Misuse Measure (COMM) test and urine drug test were used. Results Of the 684 patients assessed by the investigators, 537 returned the self-assessment, SR-MAD. Most patients were assigned by the investigator as low risk for misuse (84.2%), abuse (89.3%), and diversion (94.3%). Of the patients who returned SR-MAD, 60% indicated having taken more opioids than prescribed and 10.9% reported chewing or crushing their opioids in the past. Of the patients who completed COMM, 40.6% were deemed as having aberrant behaviors. COMM results correlated with the risk levels from the investigator assessment. One-third of patients (33.8%) had at least one abnormal urine drug test result. Conclusion More research is needed to better understand the gap between the investigator assessment of potential risk for misuse, abuse, and diversion and the actual extent of these behaviors among patients with chronic pain. PMID:26185467

  19. Child Abuse: Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Timothy L.-Y.

    The purpose of this paper was to elaborate on the definitions of child abuse in order to improve the understanding of child abuse. The definitions given by the U.S. House Joint Committee on Child Abuse in the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, and in research by Holden (1984), are cited. These definitions refer to the nature of abusive acts…

  20. A Guide for Pain Management in Low and Middle Income Communities. Managing the Risk of Opioid Abuse in Patients with Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Zampogna, Gianpietro; Taylor, Robert; Gonima, Edmundo; Posada, Jose; Raffa, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Most patients who present with cancer have advanced disease and often suffer moderate to severe pain. Opioid therapy can be safe and effective for use in cancer patients with pain, but there are rightful concerns about inappropriate opioid use even in the cancer population. Since cancer patients live longer than ever before in history (and survivors may have long exposure times to opioid therapy), opioid misuse among cancer patients is an important topic worthy of deeper investigation. Cancer patients with pain must be evaluated for risk factors for potential opioid misuse and aberrant drug-taking behaviors assessed. A variety of validated screening tools should be used. Of particular importance is the fact that pain in cancer patients changes frequently, whether it is related to their underlying disease (progression or remission), pain related to treatment (such as painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy), and concomitant pain unrelated to cancer (such as osteoarthritis, headache, or back pain). Fortunately, clinicians can use universal precautions to help reduce the risk of opioid misuse while still assuring that cancer patients get the pain therapy they need. Another important new "tool" in this regard is the emergence of abuse-deterrent opioid formulations. PMID:26973529

  1. A Guide for Pain Management in Low and Middle Income Communities. Managing the Risk of Opioid Abuse in Patients with Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V.; Zampogna, Gianpietro; Taylor, Robert; Gonima, Edmundo; Posada, Jose; Raffa, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Most patients who present with cancer have advanced disease and often suffer moderate to severe pain. Opioid therapy can be safe and effective for use in cancer patients with pain, but there are rightful concerns about inappropriate opioid use even in the cancer population. Since cancer patients live longer than ever before in history (and survivors may have long exposure times to opioid therapy), opioid misuse among cancer patients is an important topic worthy of deeper investigation. Cancer patients with pain must be evaluated for risk factors for potential opioid misuse and aberrant drug-taking behaviors assessed. A variety of validated screening tools should be used. Of particular importance is the fact that pain in cancer patients changes frequently, whether it is related to their underlying disease (progression or remission), pain related to treatment (such as painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy), and concomitant pain unrelated to cancer (such as osteoarthritis, headache, or back pain). Fortunately, clinicians can use universal precautions to help reduce the risk of opioid misuse while still assuring that cancer patients get the pain therapy they need. Another important new “tool” in this regard is the emergence of abuse-deterrent opioid formulations. PMID:26973529

  2. Designing patient-centered personal health records (PHRs): health care professionals' perspective on patient-generated data.

    PubMed

    Huba, Nicholas; Zhang, Yan

    2012-12-01

    Currently, patients not only want access to various medical records their health care providers keep about them, but they also are willing to become active participants in managing their own health information and the health information of the ones they care for. Personal health records were developed to help fulfill this need. Health care professionals are instrumental in the successful adoption of PHRs. Nevertheless, a full understanding of different health care practitioners' views of PHRs, including how PHRs could fit into the existing health care system, is lacking. The purpose of this exploratory study is to investigate PHRs from the perspective of health care professionals. Twenty-one practitioners with 10 different specialties were interviewed. The results suggest that although PHRs were still a novel concept to the study participants, a majority of them did value information provided by patients and would recommend that patients keep such records. Participants with different specialties tended to look for different types of information to be included in PHRs, and wished the information to be presented in ways that supported their work, as well as supported knowledge discovery. The participants also expressed a need to share patient information, but had various concerns about sharing. The implications of the results of the study in regard to the design of future PHR systems are discussed.

  3. Drug abuse in slum population

    PubMed Central

    Ghulam, Ram; Verma, Kamal; Sharma, Pankaj; Razdan, Monica; Razdan, Rahul Anand

    2016-01-01

    Substance abuse is an important health problem throughout the world including India, but prevalence and pattern of abuse varies from country to country and in different types of population. Slums have their own social and economic problems so that substance abuse may be different in this population and might be related with these problems. The aim of the present study was to study the prevalence and pattern substances in slum population. Prakash Chandra Sethi Nagar slum area of Indore district was selected for the purpose of this study. In first phase of the study, first a camp was organized to sensitize local leaders, key persons, and local inhabitants about drug abuse at Chandra Prakash Sethi Nagar. After that basic information was gathered with the key persons in Chandra Prakash Sethi Nagar. In second phase by house-to-house survey, all members of the family were interviewed in detail and information was recorded on semi-structured proforma. We observed prevalence rate of 560/1000 populations, 78.2% were males, 28.2% were females, and two-third abusers were laborers (72%). In order of frequency, tobacco was the most common substance abused in 53.9% population followed by gutka (nontobacco pan masala). Other drugs in order of frequency were alcohol 46.5%, cannabis 8.9%, opiates 4.9%, sedative and hypnotic 2.0%, solvents 1.0%, and cocaine in 0.1%. Slum population has higher prevalence rates than general population. PMID:26985110

  4. The contribution of health anxiety to retrospectively-recalled emergency department visits within a sample of patients in residential substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Fergus, Thomas A; Bardeen, Joseph R; Gratz, Kim L; Fulton, Jessica J; Tull, Matthew T

    2015-01-01

    With the burden of emergency department (ED) use increasing, research examining the factors associated with ED visits among individuals who use the ED most frequently is needed. Given that substance use is strongly linked to ED visits, this study sought to examine the factors associated with greater ED visits among patients with substance use disorders (SUD). More precisely, we examined whether health anxiety incrementally contributes to the prediction of ED visits for medical care among adult patients (N = 118) in a residential substance abuse disorder treatment facility. As predicted, health anxiety was significantly positively correlated with ED visits during the past year. Furthermore, health anxiety remained a significant predictor of ED visits after accounting for sociodemographic variables, frequency of substance use, and physical health status. These results suggest that health anxiety may contribute to increased ED visits for medical care among individuals with SUD.

  5. Integrated multimedia electronic patient record and graph-based image information for cerebral tumors.

    PubMed

    Puentes, John; Batrancourt, Bénédicte; Atif, Jamal; Angelini, Elsa; Lecornu, Laurent; Zemirline, Abdelhamid; Bloch, Isabelle; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Roux, Christian

    2008-04-01

    Current electronic patient record (EPR) implementations do not incorporate medical images, nor structural information extracted from them, despite images increasing role for diagnosis. This paper presents an integration framework into EPRs of anatomical and pathological knowledge extracted from segmented magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), applying a graph of representation for anatomical and functional information for individual patients. Focusing on cerebral tumors examination and patient follow-up, multimedia EPRs were created and evaluated through a 3D navigation application, developed with open-source libraries and standards. Results suggest that the enhanced clinical information scheme could lead to original changes in the way medical experts utilize image-based information.

  6. The Risk of Suicide according to Drug Abuse and Nicotine Dependence in Patients with War Injuries and Chronic Traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari Nejad, Alireza; Kheradmand, Ali; Mirzaiee, Mahdieh

    2011-01-01

    Background The incidence of suicide is higher in individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than the general population. This prevalence rate is related to many factors including drug dependence. This study was conducted in people wounded during the Iran-Iraq war with PTSD, in order to compare the risk of suicide in those with and without drug and nicotine dependence. Methods This cross-sectional study, conducted in 2007-2008, comprised 104 male individuals who had participated in the Iran-Iraq war and had a current diagnosis of PTSD. They had been referred to a psychiatry hospital and the psychiatrists' offices in Kerman, Iran. Three questionnaires were used including Davidson Trauma Scale, California Risk Estimator for Suicide and the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence to assess the severity of PTSD, the risk of suicide, and nicotine dependence, respectively. Data were analyzed by descriptive and analytical statistics using chi-square, regression, analysis of variance (ANOVA), student-t and correlation tests. Findings The severity of PTSD was significantly different in individuals with low to moderate dependence on cigarette smoking than in those with heavy dependence on smoking (P = 0.002). However, the corresponding figures were not significantly different in individuals with and without substance abuse. Although the risk of suicide had no significant difference among individuals with low to moderate dependence on cigarettes compared to those with high nicotine dependence, it was higher in subjects with substance abuse than in those without it (P = 0.0001). Conclusion Our findings suggest that dependence on cigarettes may not play a role in increasing the risk of suicide, whereas the dependence on opium and its derivatives may increase this risk. Therefore, prevention and treatment of drug abuse may be effective on the incidence of suicide in patients with war injuries and PTSD. PMID:24494115

  7. A detailed description and assessment of outcomes of patients with hospital recorded QTc prolongation.

    PubMed

    Laksman, Zachary; Momciu, Bogdan; Seong, You Won; Burrows, Patricia; Conacher, Susan; Manlucu, Jaimie; Leong-Sit, Peter; Gula, Lorne J; Skanes, Allan C; Yee, Raymond; Klein, George J; Krahn, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Corrected QT (QTc) interval prolongation has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality in many clinical settings and is a common finding in hospitalized patients. The causes and outcomes of patients with extreme QTc interval prolongation during a hospital admission are poorly described. The aim of this study was to prospectively identify patients with automated readings of QTc intervals >550 ms at 1 academic tertiary hospital. One hundred seventy-two patients with dramatic QTc interval prolongation (574 ± 53 ms) were identified (mean age 67.6 ± 15.1 years, 48% women). Most patients had underlying heart disease (60%), predominantly ischemic cardiomyopathy (43%). At lease 1 credible and presumed reversible cause associated with QTc interval prolongation was identified in 98% of patients. The most common culprits were QTc interval-prolonging medications, which were deemed most responsible in 48% of patients, with 25% of these patients taking ≥2 offending drugs. Two patients were diagnosed with congenital long-QT syndrome. Patients with electrocardiograms available before and after hospital admission demonstrated significantly lower preadmission and postdischarge QTc intervals compared with the QTc intervals recorded in the hospital. In conclusion, in-hospital mortality was high in the study population (29%), with only 4% of patients experiencing arrhythmic deaths, all of which were attributed to secondary causes. PMID:25665761

  8. Worldwide telemedicine services based on distributed multimedia electronic patient records by using the second generation Web server hyperwave.

    PubMed Central

    Quade, G.; Novotny, J.; Burde, B.; May, F.; Beck, L. E.; Goldschmidt, A.

    1999-01-01

    A distributed multimedia electronic patient record (EPR) is a central component of a medicine-telematics application that supports physicians working in rural areas of South America, and offers medical services to scientists in Antarctica. A Hyperwave server is used to maintain the patient record. As opposed to common web servers--and as a second generation web server--Hyperwave provides the capability of holding documents in a distributed web space without the problem of broken links. This enables physicians to browse through a patient's record by using a standard browser even if the patient's record is distributed over several servers. The patient record is basically implemented on the "Good European Health Record" (GEHR) architecture. Images Figure 1 PMID:10566494

  9. Stress, substance abuse, and addiction.

    PubMed

    Duffing, Tiffany M; Greiner, Stefanie G; Mathias, Charles W; Dougherty, Donald M

    2014-01-01

    Experiencing stressful life events is reciprocally associated with substance use and abuse. The nature of these relationships varies based on the age of stress exposure and stage of substance use involvement. This chapter reviews the developmental and biological processes involved in the relationship of stress exposure and substance use initiation, substance use maintenance and relapse, and response to substance abuse treatment. Special emphasis is given to describing the various stress-related mechanisms involved in substance use and abuse, highlighting the differences between each of these phases of drug use and drawing upon current research to make suggestions for treatments of substance use disorder (SUD) patients. Stress is inherent to the experience of life and, in many situations, unavoidable. Through ongoing research and treatment development, there is the potential to modify the relationship of stress with ongoing substance use and abuse. PMID:24510301

  10. Should medical students track former patients in the electronic health record? An emerging ethical conflict.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Gregory E; Neely, Kathy Johnson; Tyler, Patrick D; Barnard, Cynthia

    2015-08-01

    Medical students are increasingly using electronic health records (EHRs) in clerkships, and medical educators should seek opportunities to use this new technology to improve training. One such opportunity is the ability to "track" former patients in the EHR, defined as following up on patients in the EHR for educational purposes for a defined period of time after they have left one's direct care. This activity offers great promise in clinical training by enabling students to audit their diagnostic impressions and follow the clinical history of illness in a manner not possible in the era of paper charting. However, tracking raises important questions about the ethical use of protected health information, including concerns about compromising patient autonomy, resulting in a conflict between medical education and patient privacy. The authors offer critical analysis of arguments on both sides and discuss strategies to balance the ethical conflict by optimizing outcomes and mitigating harms. They observe that tracking improves training, thus offering long-lasting benefits to society, and is supported by the principle of distributive justice. They conclude that students should be permitted to track for educational purposes, but only with defined limits to safeguard patient autonomy, including obtaining permission from patients, having legitimate educational intent, and self-restricting review of records to those essential for training. Lastly, the authors observe that this conflict will become increasingly important with completion of the planned Nationwide Health Information Network and emphasize the need for national guidelines on tracking patients in an ethically appropriate manner.

  11. Estimating Local Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ards, Sheila

    1989-01-01

    Three conceptual approaches to estimating local child abuse rates using the National Incidence Study of Child Abuse and Neglect data set are evaluated. All three approaches yield estimates of actual abuse cases that exceed the number of reported cases. (SLD)

  12. Child Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... victim of prolonged sexual abuse usually develops low self-esteem, a feeling of worthlessness and an abnormal or ... can help abused children regain a sense of self-esteem, cope with feelings of guilt about the abuse, ...

  13. How to Handle Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... them. Another word for hurting someone is "abuse." Child abuse (say: ah-BYOOS) can affect all kinds of ... a babysitter, teacher, coach, or a bigger kid. Child abuse can happen anywhere — at home, school, childcare, or ...

  14. Patient Core Data Set. Standard for a longitudinal health/medical record.

    PubMed

    Renner, A L; Swart, J C

    1997-01-01

    Blue Chip Computers Company, in collaboration with Wright State University-Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health, with support from the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, Public Health Service, completed Small Business innovative Research research to design a comprehensive integrated Patient information System. The Wright State University consultants undertook the development of a Patient Core Data Set (PCDS) in response to the lack of uniform standards of minimum data sets, and lack of standards in data transfer for continuity of care. The purpose of the Patient Core Data Set is to develop a longitudinal patient health record and medical history using a common set of standard data elements with uniform definitions and coding consistent with Health Level 7 (HL7) protocol and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. The PCDS, intended for transfer across all patient-care settings, is essential information for clinicians, administrators, researchers, and health policy makers.

  15. Focusing on Patient Safety: the Challenge of Securely Sharing Electronic Medical Records in Complex Care Continuums.

    PubMed

    Key, Diana; Ferneini, Elie M

    2015-09-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act's (PPACA) regulated approach to inclusive provision of care will increase the challenge health care administrators face ensuring secure communication and secure sharing of electronic medical records between divisions and care subcontractors. This analysis includes a summary overview of the PPACA; the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act (HCERA) of 2010; and required Essential Health Benefits (EHB). The analysis integrates an overview of how secure communication and secure sharing of electronic medical records will be essential to clinical outcomes across complex care continuums; as well as the actionable strategies health care leadership can employ to overcome associated IT security challenges.

  16. Giving patients secure < Google-like > access to their medical record.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Fassa, Maniane; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Breton, Vincent; Boire, Jean Yves; Allaert, François André

    2008-01-01

    The main problem for the patient who wants to have access to all of the information about his health is that this information is very often spread over many medical records. Therefore, it would be convenient for the patient, after being identified and authenticated, to use a kind of specific medical search engine as one part of the solution to this main problem. The principal objective is for the patient to have access to his or her medical information at anytime and wherever it has been stored. This proposal for secure "Google Like" access requires the addition of different conditions: very strict identity checks using cryptographic techniques such as those planned for the electronic signature, which will not only ensure authentication of the patient and integrity of the file, but also protection of the confidentiality and access follow-up. The electronic medical record must also be electronically signed by the practitioner in order to provide evidence that he has given his agreement and accepted responsibility for the content. This electronic signature also prevents any kind of post-transmission falsification. New advances in technology make it possible to envisage access to medical records anywhere and anytime, thanks to Grid and watermarking methodologies.

  17. The languages of health in general practice electronic patient records: a Zipf’s law analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Natural human languages show a power law behaviour in which word frequency (in any large enough corpus) is inversely proportional to word rank - Zipf’s law. We have therefore asked whether similar power law behaviours could be seen in data from electronic patient records. Results In order to examine this question, anonymised data were obtained from all general practices in Salford covering a seven year period and captured in the form of Read codes. It was found that data for patient diagnoses and procedures followed Zipf’s law. However, the medication data behaved very differently, looking much more like a referential index. We also observed differences in the statistical behaviour of the language used to describe patient diagnosis as a function of an anonymised GP practice identifier. Conclusions This works demonstrate that data from electronic patient records does follow Zipf’s law. We also found significant differences in Zipf’s law behaviour in data from different GP practices. This suggests that computational linguistic techniques could become a useful additional tool to help understand and monitor the data quality of health records. PMID:24410884

  18. Implications of Swedish National Regulatory Framework of the Patient Accessible Electronic Health Record.

    PubMed

    Scandurra, Isabella; Lyttkens, Leif; Eklund, Benny

    2016-01-01

    Online access to your own electronic health record is a controversial issue. In a Swedish county such eHealth service has been in operation since 2012 and it is now being widely deployed in the other counties. This first review presents work regarding current National Regulatory Framework (NRF) related to the public eHealth service Patient Accessible Electronic Health Record (PAEHR) and points out how electable paragraphs have been applied in different counties. Potential implications due to the different decisions made are discussed in terms of patient centricity and health information outcome. In current PAEHR, care providers have assessed differently how to apply the NRF. For the patients, this means that information gathered from the health record may be displayed differently, depending on where, when and why they seek treatment. When a patient visits different care providers such solution may cause confusion and its purpose may go lost. Consequently a revised NRF with less electable paragraphs is recommended, as well as adherence to the next NRF by all county councils. PMID:27577474

  19. Can routine information from electronic patient records predict a future diagnosis of alcohol use disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Lid, Torgeir Gilje; Eide, Geir Egil; Dalen, Ingvild; Meland, Eivind

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore whether information regarding potentially alcohol-related health incidents recorded in electronic patient records might aid in earlier identification of alcohol use disorders. Design We extracted potentially alcohol-related information in electronic patient records and tested if alcohol-related diagnoses, prescriptions of codeine, tramadol, ethylmorphine, and benzodiazepines; elevated levels of gamma-glutamyl-transferase (GGT), and mean cell volume (MCV); and new sick leave certificates predicted specific alcohol use disorder. Setting Nine general practitioner surgeries with varying size and stability. Subjects Totally 20,764 patients with active electronic patient record until data gathering and with a history of at least four years without a specific alcohol use disorder after turning 18 years of age. Methods The Cox proportional hazard analysis with time-dependent covariates of potential accumulated risks over the previous four years. Main outcome measures Time from inclusion until the first specific alcohol use disorder, defined by either an alcohol specific diagnostic code or a text fragment documenting an alcohol problem. Results In the unadjusted and adjusted Cox-regression with time-dependent covariates all variables were highly significant with adjusted hazard ratios ranging from 1.25 to 3.50. Addictive drugs, sick leaves, GGT, MCV and International Classification for Primary Care version 2 (ICPC-2), and International Classification of Diseases version 10 (ICD-10) diagnoses were analyzed. Elevated GGT and MCV, ICD-10-diagnoses, and gender demonstrated the highest hazard ratios. Conclusions Many frequent health problems are potential predictors of an increased risk or vulnerability for alcohol use disorders. However, due to the modest hazard ratios, we were unable to establish a clinically useful tool. Key Points Alcohol is potentially relevant for many health problems, but current strategies for identification and intervention in

  20. Understanding Emergency Department 72-Hour Revisits Among Medicaid Patients Using Electronic Healthcare Records.

    PubMed

    Ryan, James; Hendler, James; Bennett, Kristin P

    2015-12-01

    Electronic Healthcare Records (EHRs) have the potential to improve healthcare quality and to decrease costs by providing quality metrics, discovering actionable insights, and supporting decision-making to improve future outcomes. Within the United States Medicaid Program, rates of recidivism among emergency department (ED) patients serve as metrics of hospital performance that help ensure efficient and effective treatment within the ED. We analyze ED Medicaid patient data from 1,149,738 EHRs provided by a hospital over a 2-year period to understand the characteristics of the ED return visits within a 72-hour time frame. Frequent flyer patients with multiple revisits account for 47% of Medicaid patient revisits over this period. ED encounters by frequent flyer patients with prior 72-hour revisits in the last 6 months are thrice more likely to result in a readmit than those of infrequent patients. Statistical L1-logistic regression and random forest analyses reveal distinct patterns of ED usage and patient diagnoses between frequent and infrequent patient encounters, suggesting distinct opportunities for interventions to improve efficacy of care and streamline ED workflow. This work forms a foundation for future development of predictive models, which could flag patients at high risk of revisiting.

  1. The right of patients to have access to their medical records: the position in South African law.

    PubMed

    de Klerk, A

    1993-01-01

    In this article an investigation is undertaken into the right in South African law of a patient to have access to medical records concerning himself or herself, and the ownership of medical records in South African law is also discussed. It is argued that record accessibility by patients is to be favoured. The author is of the opinion that the South African legislature should consider legislation in this regard.

  2. Substance abuse attitude changes in medical students.

    PubMed

    Chappel, J N; Jordan, R D; Treadway, B J; Miller, P R

    1977-04-01

    The authors describe a course in substance abuse given to sophomore medical students with the intention of positively influencing their attitudes toward substance-abusing patients and their treatment. Clinical problem solving and small group discussion were emphasized in addition to field trips. By pretest and posttest measures, significant positive changes were obtained in student attitudes: they reported feeling less upset when they encountered alcoholics, "hard" drug abusers, "soft" drug abusers, compulsive smokers, and obese overeaters as well as having a more positive view of the physician's role in the treatment of substance dependence. Personal experience with alcohol and other drugs was shown to have an influence on attitude changes.

  3. Using patient-held records to evaluate contraceptive use in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Ngwalo, Ruth; Branson, Keith; Gondwe, Levie; Taulo, Frank; Ngwira, Bagrey; Zaba, Basia; Crampin, Amelia C

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate a method of using patient-held records to collect contraception data in Malawi, that could be used to explore contraceptive discontinuation and method switching. Methods In 2012, all 7393 women aged 15 to 49 years living in the area covered by the Karonga demographic surveillance site were offered a family planning card, which was attached to the woman’s health passport – a patient-held medical record. Health-care providers were trained to use the cards to record details of contraception given to women. During the study, providers underwent refresher training sessions and received motivational text messages to improve data completeness. After one year, the family planning cards were collected for analysis. Findings Of the 7393 eligible women, 6861 (92.8%) received a family planning card and 4678 (63.3%) returned it after one year. Details of 87.3% (2725/3122) of contacts between health-care providers and the women had been recorded by health-care providers on either family planning cards or health passports. Lower-level health-care providers were more diligent at recording data on the family planning cards than higher-level providers. Conclusion The use of family planning cards was an effective way of recording details of contraception provided by family planning providers. The involvement of health-care providers was key to the success of this approach. Data collected in this way should prove helpful in producing accurate estimates of method switching and the continuity of contraceptive use by women. PMID:26549904

  4. Epsilon waves detected by various electrocardiographic recording methods: in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Bing; Chen, Hongwu; Ju, Weizhu; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Fengxiang; Cao, Kejiang; Chen, Minglong

    2010-01-01

    We analyzed the shape and distribution of epsilon waves by 3 various methods of electrocardiographic recording in patients with arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy.Thirty-two patients who met recognized diagnostic criteria for arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy were included in this study (24 men and 8 women; mean age, 42.3 ± 12.9 yr). Epsilon waves were detected by standard 12-lead electrocardiography (S-ECG), right-sided precordial lead electrocardiography (R-ECG), and Fontaine bipolar precordial lead electrocardiography (F-ECG). We found 3 types of epsilon waves: wiggle waves, small spike waves, and smooth potential waves that formed an atypical prolonged R' wave. The most common configuration was small spiked waves. In some circumstances, epsilon waves were evident in some leads (especially in leads V(1) through V(3)), but notches were recorded in the other leads during the corresponding phase. These waves could be detected only by S-ECG in 1 patient, R-ECG in 3 patients, and F-ECG in 5 patients; the rates of epsilon-wave detection by these 3 methods were 38% (12/32), 38% (12/32), and 50% (16/32), respectively. However, the detection rate using combined methods was significantly higher than that by S-ECG alone (SF-ECG 56% vs S-ECG 38%, P = 0.0312; and SRF-ECG 66% vs S-ECG 38%, P = 0.0039). In addition, the rate of widespread T-wave inversion (exceeding V(3)) was significantly higher in patients with epsilon waves than in those without (48% vs 9%, P = 0.029), as was ventricular tachycardia (95% vs 64%, P = 0.019).These 3 electrocardiographic recording methods should be used in combination to improve the detection rate of epsilon waves. PMID:20844612

  5. Image-based electronic patient records for secured collaborative medical applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianguo; Sun, Jianyong; Yang, Yuanyuan; Liang, Chenwen; Yao, Yihong; Cai, Weihua; Jin, Jin; Zhang, Guozhen; Sun, Kun

    2005-01-01

    We developed a Web-based system to interactively display image-based electronic patient records (EPR) for secured intranet and Internet collaborative medical applications. The system consists of four major components: EPR DICOM gateway (EPR-GW), Image-based EPR repository server (EPR-Server), Web Server and EPR DICOM viewer (EPR-Viewer). In the EPR-GW and EPR-Viewer, the security modules of Digital Signature and Authentication are integrated to perform the security processing on the EPR data with integrity and authenticity. The privacy of EPR in data communication and exchanging is provided by SSL/TLS-based secure communication. This presentation gave a new approach to create and manage image-based EPR from actual patient records, and also presented a way to use Web technology and DICOM standard to build an open architecture for collaborative medical applications. PMID:17282930

  6. Elder abuse and dementia--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cooney, C; Mortimer, A

    1995-01-01

    An anonymous postal questionnaire was distributed to 200 members of a voluntary organisation providing information and support for the carers of dementia sufferers. Carers were asked about the possible occurrence of verbal, physical abuse and neglect. Those carers who admitted to any form of abuse were compared with those who did not and risk factors in both carers and patients were analysed to determine risk factors for abuse. Fifty-five per cent of carers admitted to some form of abuse with verbal abuse being the most common form. Verbal abuse was associated with a poor premorbid relationship and social isolation of the carer and was found to be a risk factor for physical abuse. Those carers who had high GHQ scores and who had been caring for longer were more likely to physically abuse the person they cared for. This study supports the hypothesis that various categories of abuse have different correlates.

  7. Towards the Prevention of Alcohol Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facy, FranCoise; Rabaud, Myriam

    2006-01-01

    Mortality resulting from alcohol abuse in young French people is too high in spite of prevention campaigns for road safety in particular. There are problems in identifying alcohol abuse in young people in preventive medicine or alcohol care services. This study was carried out in alcohol centres; data from patients under 25 are analysed and…

  8. "Community vital signs": incorporating geocoded social determinants into electronic records to promote patient and population health.

    PubMed

    Bazemore, Andrew W; Cottrell, Erika K; Gold, Rachel; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L; Angier, Heather; Burdick, Timothy E; Carrozza, Mark A; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-03-01

    Social determinants of health significantly impact morbidity and mortality; however, physicians lack ready access to this information in patient care and population management. Just as traditional vital signs give providers a biometric assessment of any patient, "community vital signs" (Community VS) can provide an aggregated overview of the social and environmental factors impacting patient health. Knowing Community VS could inform clinical recommendations for individual patients, facilitate referrals to community services, and expand understanding of factors impacting treatment adherence and health outcomes. This information could also help care teams target disease prevention initiatives and other health improvement efforts for clinic panels and populations. Given the proliferation of big data, geospatial technologies, and democratization of data, the time has come to integrate Community VS into the electronic health record (EHR). Here, the authors describe (i) historical precedent for this concept, (ii) opportunities to expand upon these historical foundations, and (iii) a novel approach to EHR integration. PMID:26174867

  9. A contextual role-based access control authorization model for electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Motta, Gustavo H M B; Furuie, Sergio S

    2003-09-01

    The design of proper models for authorization and access control for electronic patient record (EPR) is essential to a wide scale use of EPR in large health organizations. In this paper, we propose a contextual role-based access control authorization model aiming to increase the patient privacy and the confidentiality of patient data, whereas being flexible enough to consider specific cases. This model regulates user's access to EPR based on organizational roles. It supports a role-tree hierarchy with authorization inheritance; positive and negative authorizations; static and dynamic separation of duties based on weak and strong role conflicts. Contextual authorizations use environmental information available at access time, like user/patient relationship, in order to decide whether a user is allowed to access an EPR resource. This enables the specification of a more flexible and precise authorization policy, where permission is granted or denied according to the right and the need of the user to carry out a particular job function.

  10. A Patient-Held Medical Record Integrating Depression Care into Diabetes Care

    PubMed Central

    Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Ito, Hiroto; Akashi, Tomoyuki; Yamakage, Hajime; Kotani, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Daisuke; Nakagome, Kazuyuki; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE Depression is frequently observed in people with diabetes. The purpose of this study is to develop a tool for individuals with diabetes and depression to communicate their comorbid conditions to health-care providers. METHOD We searched the Internet to review patient-held medical records (PHRs) of patients with diabetes and examine current levels of integration of diabetes and depression care in Japan. RESULTS Eight sets of PHRs were found for people with diabetes. All PHRs included clinical follow-up of diabetes and multidisciplinary clinical pathways for diabetes care. No PHRs included depression monitoring and/or treatment. In terms of an integrated PHR for a patient comorbid with diabetes and depression, necessary components include hopes/preferences, educational information on diabetes complications and treatment, medical history, stress and coping, resources, and monitoring diabetes and depression. CONCLUSION A new PHR may be suitable for comorbid patients with diabetes and depression. PMID:27478395

  11. "Community vital signs": incorporating geocoded social determinants into electronic records to promote patient and population health.

    PubMed

    Bazemore, Andrew W; Cottrell, Erika K; Gold, Rachel; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L; Angier, Heather; Burdick, Timothy E; Carrozza, Mark A; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-03-01

    Social determinants of health significantly impact morbidity and mortality; however, physicians lack ready access to this information in patient care and population management. Just as traditional vital signs give providers a biometric assessment of any patient, "community vital signs" (Community VS) can provide an aggregated overview of the social and environmental factors impacting patient health. Knowing Community VS could inform clinical recommendations for individual patients, facilitate referrals to community services, and expand understanding of factors impacting treatment adherence and health outcomes. This information could also help care teams target disease prevention initiatives and other health improvement efforts for clinic panels and populations. Given the proliferation of big data, geospatial technologies, and democratization of data, the time has come to integrate Community VS into the electronic health record (EHR). Here, the authors describe (i) historical precedent for this concept, (ii) opportunities to expand upon these historical foundations, and (iii) a novel approach to EHR integration.

  12. Abuse and misuse of antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth A; Sullivan, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    Background Rates of prescription drug abuse have reached epidemic proportions. Large-scale epidemiologic surveys of this under-recognized clinical problem have not included antidepressants despite their contribution to morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this review is to look specifically at the misuse of antidepressants and how this behavior may fit into the growing crisis of nonmedical use of prescription drugs. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search on PubMed, Medline, and PsycINFO using the search terms “antidepressant”, “abuse”, “misuse”, “nonmedical use”, “dependence”, and “addiction”, as well as individual antidepressant classes (eg, “SSRI”) and individual antidepressants (eg, “fluoxetine”) in various combinations, to identify articles of antidepressant misuse and abuse. Results A small but growing literature on the misuse and abuse of antidepressants consists largely of case reports. Most cases of antidepressant abuse have occurred in individuals with comorbid substance use and mood disorders. The most commonly reported motivation for abuse is to achieve a psychostimulant-like effect. Antidepressants are abused at high doses and via a variety of routes of administration (eg, intranasal, intravenous). Negative consequences vary based upon antidepressant class and pharmacology, but these have included seizures, confusion, and psychotic-like symptoms. Conclusion The majority of individuals prescribed antidepressants do not misuse the medication. However, certain classes of antidepressants do carry abuse potential. Vulnerable patient populations include those with a history of substance abuse and those in controlled environments. Warning signs include the presence of aberrant behaviors. Physicians should include antidepressants when screening for risky prescription medication use. When antidepressant misuse is detected, a thoughtful treatment plan, including referral to an addiction specialist, should be developed and

  13. Using Electronic Health Record Data to Evaluate Preventive Service Utilization Among Uninsured Safety Net Patients

    PubMed Central

    Marino, Miguel; Hoopes, Megan; Bailey, Steffani; Gold, Rachel; Crawford, Courtney; Cowburn, Stuart; O’Malley, Jean; Nelson, Christine; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study compared the preventive service utilization of uninsured patients receiving care at Oregon community health centers (CHCs) in 2008 through 2011 with that of continuously insured patients at the same CHCs in the same period, using electronic health record (EHR) data. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort analysis, using logistic mixed effects regression modeling to calculate odds ratios and rates of preventive service utilization for patients without insurance, or with continuous insurance. Results CHCs provided many preventive services to uninsured patients. Uninsured patients were less likely than continuously insured patients to receive 5 of 11 preventive services, ranging from OR 0.52 (95% CI: 0.35–0.77) for mammogram orders to 0.75 (95% CI: 0.66–0.86) for lipid panels. This disparity persisted even in patients who visited the clinic regularly. Conclusion Lack of insurance is a barrier to preventive service utilization, even in patients who can access care at a CHC. Policymakers in the United States should continue to address this significant prevention disparity. PMID:25124279

  14. Contribution of record linkage to vital status determination in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Fournel, Isabelle; Schwarzinger, Michaël; Binquet, Christine; Benzenine, Eric; Hill, Catherine; Quantin, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    To assess the performance of vital status determination by record linkage between a hospital database and the French national mortality database with anonymised data in order to adhere to French legislation. Hospital database of the Institut Gustave Roussy (IGR), the largest cancer centre in France, and the French mortality databases from 1998-2004 were used for this record linkage. A phonetic code adapted to French language was first applied to identifiers. The last name, maiden name, all first names and the date of birth were then each rendered anonymous using irreversible hash coding. Record linkage, using the probabilistic method developed by Jaro, was based on four fields: the last name, first given name, date of birth and code of birth place. Other variables were used for further automatic and manual validation. Linkage results were very satisfactory for the 10,089 patients included: sensitivity was 94.8% and specificity 99.5%. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were respectively 190 and 0.05. The main causes of discordances were erroneous or incomplete information such as unrecorded maiden name in the hospital database. Results were improved by adding manual validation to electronic matching: sensitivity rose to 97.2% and specificity to 99.4%. Record linkage using anonymised data applied to large scale hospital data is possible and has good validity. This method offers new prospects for large prognostic studies based on hospital data provided that the diagnosis date is systematically recorded in the hospital database.

  15. The Role of Anxiety Sensitivity and Difficulties in Emotion Regulation in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Crack/Cocaine Dependent Patients in Residential Substance Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Michael J.; Tull, Matthew T.; Gratz, Kim L.; Daughters, Stacey B.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2009-01-01

    Current research suggests the importance of anxiety sensitivity (AS) in the risk for PTSD, and a growing body of research has demonstrated that difficulties in emotion regulation may also play a role. This study examined the unique relationships between AS dimensions, difficulties in emotion regulation, and a probable PTSD diagnosis among a sample of inner-city crack/cocaine dependent patients in residential substance abuse treatment. Probable PTSD participants exhibited higher levels of the AS dimension of social concerns and emotion regulation difficulties. Emotion regulation difficulties reliably distinguished probable PTSD participants from non-PTSD participants above and beyond both anxiety symptom severity and the AS dimension of social concerns. Further, social concerns did not account for unique variance when difficulties in emotion regulation was entered into the model. Results provide support for the central role of difficulties in emotion regulation relative to AS dimensions in the prediction of PTSD within a crack/cocaine dependent population. PMID:19233609

  16. [Hebephrenic symptoms as an expression of an XYY chromosome abnormality? Case report of a patient with suspected sexual abuse of his own 2 minor children].

    PubMed

    Dirksen, T; Mönikes, E

    1995-06-01

    A 48 year old patient was hospitalised because of parasuicidal behaviour and suicidal ideation. He was under suspicion of having sexually abused his 4-year old daughter and his 4-year old son. At the age of 17, he was hospitalised in a psychiatric ward under the diagnosis of hebephrenic schizophrenia. He successfully received an insulin coma therapy. Because of his increased height (1.89 m), mental retardation and other psychical disorders in his youth, we now suspected him of having an extra Y chromosome which was confirmed by chromosome analysis. The non-uniform symptomatology of XYY-individuals includes a hebephrenic aspect. Concerning the different therapeutical and juridical consequences, we considered a critical investigation of the former diagnosis "Hebephrenic Schizophrenia".

  17. A peculiar aspect of patients' safety: the discriminating power of identifiers for record linkage.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Binquet, Christine; Bourquard, Karima; Pattisina, Ronny; Gouyon-Cornet, Béatrice; Ferdynus, Cyril; Gouyon, Jean-Bernard; Allaert, François-André

    2004-01-01

    Today, one of the main stake of the interfaced health information systems or networks is to be able to gather the different parts of the medical record of a patient without any risk to mix them with those of one other patient. This objective could appear easy to reach but only in theory because in practice many name are misspelled or erroneous and a great attention has to be paid to define what is the best identifier to link medical record. As a linkage using less informative identifiers could lead to linkage errors, it is essential to quantify the information associated to each identifier. The aim of this study was to estimate the discriminating power of different identifiers susceptible to be used in a record linkage process. This work showed the interest of three identifiers when linking data concerning a same patient using an automatic procedure based on the method proposed by Jaro; the date of birth, the first and the last names seemed to be the more appropriate identifiers. Including a poorly discriminating identifier like gender did not improve the results. Moreover, adding a second christian name, often missing, increased linkage errors. On the contrary, it seemed that using a phonetic treatment adapted to the French language could improve the results of linkage in comparison to the Soundex. However, whatever, the method used it seems necessary to improve the quality of identifier collection as it could greatly influence linkage results.

  18. Realization of a universal patient identifier for electronic medical records through biometric technology.

    PubMed

    Leonard, D C; Pons, Alexander P; Asfour, Shihab S

    2009-07-01

    The technology exists for the migration of healthcare data from its archaic paper-based system to an electronic one, and, once in digital form, to be transported anywhere in the world in a matter of seconds. The advent of universally accessible healthcare data has benefited all participants, but one of the outstanding problems that must be addressed is how the creation of a standardized nationwide electronic healthcare record system in the United States would uniquely identify and match a composite of an individual's recorded healthcare information to an identified individual patients out of approximately 300 million people to a 1:1 match. To date, a few solutions to this problem have been proposed that are limited in their effectiveness. We propose the use of biometric technology within our fingerprint, iris, retina scan, and DNA (FIRD) framework, which is a multiphase system whose primary phase is a multilayer consisting of these four types of biometric identifiers: 1) fingerprint; 2) iris; 3) retina scan; and 4) DNA. In addition, it also consists of additional phases of integration, consolidation, and data discrepancy functions to solve the unique association of a patient to their medical data distinctively. This would allow a patient to have real-time access to all of their recorded healthcare information electronically whenever it is necessary, securely with minimal effort, greater effectiveness, and ease. PMID:19273015

  19. Substance abuse: an overview.

    PubMed

    Comerci, G D; Schwebel, R

    2000-02-01

    Substance abuse continues to be a major adolescent health risk. Despite encouraging trends toward decreased drug use in the late 1980s, an increase in use occurred in the early 1990s and only now is beginning to level off. A brief update on the status of the most commonly abused substances is provided. A discussion of current research is given in support of viewing drug addiction as a medical condition, i.e., a "brain disease." Reasons are suggested to explain why adolescents use and abuse drugs and why trends occur in their use. Two aspects of diagnosis are reviewed: psychiatric and medical comorbidity and drug screening and laboratory assessment of the adolescent. Prevention and early intervention are presented with an emphasis on drug education, behavioral wellness, family communication, doctor-patient discussion and assessment, and referral. Commentary is made on the ethics of care; issues of confidentiality and the right to privacy with regard to drug testing and sharing of information are explored. A review of various policy statements of the American Academy of Pediatrics and other medical organizations is presented.

  20. Comparison of Conventional Mercury Thermometer and Continuous TherCom® Temperature Recording in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dakappa, Pradeepa H; Bhat, Gopalkrishna K; Bolumbu, Ganaraja; Rao, Sathish B; Adappa, Sushma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Detection of accurate body temperature fluctu-ations in hospitalized patients is crucial for appropriate clinical decision-making. The accuracy and reliability of body temperature assessment may significantly affect the proper treatment. Aim To compare the conventional and continuous body temperature recordings in hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out at a tertiary care centre and study included 55 patients aged between 18-65 years with a history of fever admitted to a tertiary care hospital. A noninvasive continuous temperature recording was done using TherCom® device through tympanic temperature probe at tympanic site at one-minute intervals for 24 hours. The conventional temperatures were recorded in the axilla using mercury thermometer at specific time intervals at 12:00 noon, 8:00 PM and 5:00 AM. Peak temperature differences between continuous and conventional methods were compared by applying Independent sample t-test. Intra class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) test was performed to assess the reliability between two temperature-monitoring methods. A p<0.05 was considered as significant. Results The average peak temperature by non-invasive continuous recording method was 39.07°C ±0.76°C while it was 37.55°C ±0.62°C by the conventional method. A significant temperature difference of 1.52°C [p<0.001;95% CI(1.26-1.78)] was observed between continuous and conventional temperature methods. Intra class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) between continuous and conventional temperature readings at 12:00 noon was α= 0.540, which had moderate reliability. The corresponding coefficients at 8:00 PM and 5:00 AM were α=0.425 and 0.435, respectively, which had poor reliability. Conclusion The conventional recording of temperature is routinely practiced and does not reflect the true temperature fluctuations. However, the continuous non-invasive temperature recording is simple, inexpensive and a better tool

  1. Sexual, Physical, Verbal/Emotional Abuse and Unexplained Chest Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eslick, Guy D.; Koloski, Natasha A.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately one third of patients with non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) report a history of abuse, however no data exists on the prevalence of abuse among people with unexplained chest pain in the general population. We aimed to determine if there is a relationship between childhood sexual, physical, emotional abuse and unexplained…

  2. Parent Abuse: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennair, Nicola; Mellor, David

    2007-01-01

    A recent focus of research and clinical practice has been on the issue of abuse of parents by their children (parent abuse). This paper reviews the literature on this phenomenon. While parent abuse falls under the umbrella of family violence, it appears to be qualitatively different from other forms of intra-family abuse. Research has primarily…

  3. Counseling Abused Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Emily Jean

    This guide on counseling abused children was written to help counselors meet the needs of children and adolescents and to provide ways of working with the child's family. Chapter 1 presents an overview of child maltreatment by identifying types of maltreatment (neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse and exploitation, and emotional abuse or neglect)…

  4. Signal averaging technique for noninvasive recording of late potentials in patients with coronary artery disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abboud, S.; Blatt, C. M.; Lown, B.; Graboys, T. B.; Sadeh, D.; Cohen, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced non invasive signal averaging technique was used to detect late potentials in two groups of patients: Group A (24 patients) with coronary artery disease (CAD) and without sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) and Group B (8 patients) with CAD and sustained VT. Recorded analog data were digitized and aligned using a cross correlation function with fast Fourier transform schema, averaged and band pass filtered between 60 and 200 Hz with a non-recursive digital filter. Averaged filtered waveforms were analyzed by computer program for 3 parameters: (1) filtered QRS (fQRS) duration (2) interval between the peak of the R wave peak and the end of fQRS (R-LP) (3) RMS value of last 40 msec of fQRS (RMS). Significant change was found between Groups A and B in fQRS (101 -/+ 13 msec vs 123 -/+ 15 msec; p < .0005) and in R-LP vs 52 -/+ 11 msec vs 71-/+18 msec, p <.002). We conclude that (1) the use of a cross correlation triggering method and non-recursive digital filter enables a reliable recording of late potentials from the body surface; (2) fQRS and R-LP durations are sensitive indicators of CAD patients susceptible to VT.

  5. Impact of patient-accessible electronic medical records in rheumatology: use, satisfaction and effects on empowerment among patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To measure the use, satisfaction and impact of a web portal which provides patients with rheumatoid arthritis home access to their electronic medical records (EMR). Methods A pretest-posttest study was conducted among 360 patients. Questionnaires assessed socio-demographics, health literacy, Internet use, disease characteristics, patient-provider relationship and empowerment before and after launching a hospital-based patient web portal. To measure the impact of the portal, patients’ satisfaction with care, trust in their rheumatologist, self-efficacy in patient-provider communication, illness perceptions, and medication adherence were assessed. The post-test included questions on portal use, satisfaction, and self-perceived impact due to portal use. Results 54% of respondents with Internet access had viewed their EMR. Respondents were positive about the ease of use and usefulness of the portal and reported very few problems. Age (P = .03), amount of Internet use (P = .01) and self-perceived Internet skills (P = .03) significantly predicted portal use. Of the respondents who had logged in, 44% reported feeling more involved in their treatment and 37% felt they had more knowledge about their treatment. Significant differences over time were not found on the empowerment-related instruments. Conclusions The current portal succeeded in offering patients access to their EMR in a usable and understandable way. While its true impact is difficult to grasp, a relevant portion of the patients felt more involved in their treatment due to the web portal. Offering patients home EMR access, therefore, appears to be a valuable addition to the care process. PMID:24673997

  6. Maxillary sinus manifestations of methamphetamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Faucett, Erynne A; Marsh, Katherine M; Farshad, Kayven; Erman, Audrey B; Chiu, Alexander G

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamines are the second most commonly used illicit drug worldwide and cost the United States health-care system ∼$23.4 billion annually. Use of this drug affects multiple organ systems and causes a variety of clinical manifestations. Although there are commonly known sequelae of methamphetamine abuse such as "meth mouth," there is limited evidence regarding maxillary sinus manifestations. The following cases highlight the initial evaluation and management of two methamphetamine abusers with loculated purulent collections within the maxillary sinus as a result of methamphetamine abuse. Our aim was to delineate the otolaryngologic symptoms associated with the patients' methamphetamine abuse. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed loculated purulent collections within the maxillary sinus of probable odontogenic origin in both patients. Methamphetamine abuse leading to rampant caries and poor oral hygiene may predispose individuals for craniofacial infections and fluid collections. These cases illustrate the development of maxillary sinusitis and maxilla mucoceles that have been associated with methamphetamine use.

  7. Loperamide dependence and abuse.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Ryan; Heiner, Jason; Villarreal, Joshua; Strote, Jared

    2015-05-02

    Loperamide is a common over-the-counter antidiarrheal considered safe in a broad range of dosages and thought devoid of abuse potential. We describe the first case of a patient with loperamide dependence due to misuse of its opiate-like effects achieved by chronic massive oral ingestions. A 26-year-old man who was taking 800 mg of loperamide per day presented requesting detoxification referral. Loperamide has potential for euphoric effects and information on how to facilitate such effects is easily available. It is important for physicians to be aware of the potential for misuse of and dependence on loperamide, with symptoms mimicking opiate use.

  8. Bringing electronic patient records into health professional education: towards an integrative framework.

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Armstrong, Brian; Joe, Ron; Otto, Tony

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss our approach for integrating electronic patient records into health professional education. Electronic patient record (EPR) use is increasing globally. The EPR is considered the cornerstone of the modernization and streamlining of healthcare worldwide. However, despite the importance of the EPR, health professional education in much of the world provides health professional students (who will become the practicing health professionals of the future) with limited access or knowledge about the EPR. New ways of exposing students to EPRs will be needed in order to ensure that health professionals will adopt and use this complex technology wisely and effect the positive benefits EPRs are expected to bring to healthcare globally. In this paper we describe: (a) a framework we have developed for integrating EPRs into health professional education and (b) an innovative Web portal, known as the University of Victoria Electronic Health Record (EHR) Educational Portal (which houses a number of EPRs) that can be used to explore the integration of EPRs in health professional education. It is hoped that adoption and use of EPRs will ultimately be improved through the use of the portal to allow students virtual and ubiquitous access to example EPRs, coupled with principled educational approaches for integrating EPR technology into health professional curricula.

  9. Case-based reasoning using electronic health records efficiently identifies eligible patients for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Miotto, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a cost-effective, case-based reasoning framework for clinical research eligibility screening by only reusing the electronic health records (EHRs) of minimal enrolled participants to represent the target patient for each trial under consideration. Materials and Methods The EHR data—specifically diagnosis, medications, laboratory results, and clinical notes—of known clinical trial participants were aggregated to profile the “target patient” for a trial, which was used to discover new eligible patients for that trial. The EHR data of unseen patients were matched to this “target patient” to determine their relevance to the trial; the higher the relevance, the more likely the patient was eligible. Relevance scores were a weighted linear combination of cosine similarities computed over individual EHR data types. For evaluation, we identified 262 participants of 13 diversified clinical trials conducted at Columbia University as our gold standard. We ran a 2-fold cross validation with half of the participants used for training and the other half used for testing along with other 30 000 patients selected at random from our clinical database. We performed binary classification and ranking experiments. Results The overall area under the ROC curve for classification was 0.95, enabling the highlight of eligible patients with good precision. Ranking showed satisfactory results especially at the top of the recommended list, with each trial having at least one eligible patient in the top five positions. Conclusions This relevance-based method can potentially be used to identify eligible patients for clinical trials by processing patient EHR data alone without parsing free-text eligibility criteria, and shows promise of efficient “case-based reasoning” modeled only on minimal trial participants. PMID:25769682

  10. Child Abuse Reporting Barriers: Iranian Nurses’ Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Borimnejad, Leili; Khoshnavay Fomani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although in many countries child abuse reporting is mandated, Iranian nurses report abused cases voluntary. Some of the cases are reported to the police and others are referred to welfare organizations or other non-governmental organizations. Absence of a uniform reporting system along with a lack of legal support in the specific cultural context of Iran has resulted challenges for the reporters of child abuse. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the Iranian nurses’ experiences of reporting child abuse as well as to explore the existing barriers. Patients and Methods: A qualitative study with conventional content analysis was conducted to explore the barriers of reporting child abuse. Individual interviews between 30 and 45 minutes in duration were conducted with a purposive sample of 16 nurses with direct experience of dealing with children who had been abused. Graneheim and Lundman’s method was used for data analysis. Results: The data were classified to five themes including “knowledge deficit”, “previous unpleasant experiences about child abuse reporting”, “ethical challenges”,” legal challenges” and “cultural beliefs”. Conclusions: According to the findings, enhancement of nurses and public knowledge about child abuse, legal issues and jurisprudence along with legislation of clear and simple laws, are mandatory to protect abused children in Iran. PMID:26430523

  11. The Patient Portal of the Personal Cross-Enterprise Electronic Health Record (PEHR) in the Rhine-Neckar-Region.

    PubMed

    Brandner, Antje; Schreiweis, Björn; Aguduri, Lakshmi S; Bronsch, Tobias; Kunz, Aline; Pensold, Peter; Stein, Katharina E; Weiss, Nicolas; Yüksekogul, Nilay; Bergh, Björn; Heinze, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Over the last years we stepwise implemented our vision of a personal cross-enterprise electronic health record (PEHR) in the Rhine-Neckar-Region in Germany. The patient portal is one part of the PEHR architecture with IHE connectivity. The patient is enabled to access and manage his medical record by use of the patient portal. Moreover, he can give his consent regarding which healthcare providers are allowed to send data into or read data from his medical record. Forthcoming studies will give evidence for improvements and further requirements to develop. PMID:27577362

  12. One positive impact of health care reform to physicians: the computer-based patient record.

    PubMed

    England, S P

    1993-11-01

    The health care industry is an information-dependent business that will require a new generation of health information systems if successful health care reform is to occur. We critically need integrated clinical management information systems to support the physician and related clinicians at the direct care level, which in turn will have linkages with secondary users of health information such as health payors, regulators, and researchers. The economic dependence of health care industry on the CPR cannot be underestimated, says Jeffrey Ritter. He sees the U.S. health industry as about to enter a bold new age where our records are electronic, our computers are interconnected, and our money is nothing but pulses running across the telephone lines. Hence the United States is now in an age of electronic commerce. Clinical systems reform must begin with the community-based patient chart, which is located in the physician's office, the hospital, and other related health care provider offices. A community-based CPR and CPR system that integrates all providers within a managed care network is the most logical step since all health information begins with the creation of a patient record. Once a community-based CPR system is in place, the physician and his or her clinical associates will have a common patient record upon which all direct providers have access to input and record patient information. Once a community-level CPR system is in place with a community provider network, each physician will have available health information and data processing capability that will finally provide real savings in professional time and effort. Lost patient charts will no longer be a problem. Data input and storage of health information would occur electronically via transcripted text, voice, and document imaging. All electronic clinical information, voice, and graphics could be recalled at any time and transmitted to any terminal location within the health provider network. Hence

  13. Hybridity as a process of technology's 'translation': customizing a national Electronic Patient Record.

    PubMed

    Petrakaki, Dimitra; Klecun, Ela

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores how national Electronic Patient Record (EPR) systems are customized in local settings and, in particular, how the context of their origin plays out with the context of their use. It shows how representations of healthcare organizations and of local clinical practice are built into EPR systems within a complex context whereby different stakeholder groups negotiate to produce an EPR package that aims to meet both local and generic needs. The paper draws from research into the implementation of the National Care Record Service, a part of the National Programme for Information Technology (NPfIT), in the English National Health Service (NHS). The paper makes two arguments. First, customization of national EPR is a distributed process that involves cycles of 'translation', which span across geographical, cultural and professional boundaries. Second, 'translation' is an inherently political process during which hybrid technology gets consolidated. The paper concludes, that hybrid technology opens up possibilities for standardization of healthcare. PMID:25461880

  14. A computerised out-patient medical records programme based on the Summary Time-Oriented Record (STOR) System.

    PubMed

    Cheong, P Y; Goh, L G; Ong, R; Wong, P K

    1992-12-01

    Advances in microcomputer hardware and software technology have made computerised outpatient medical records practical. We have developed a programme based on the Summary Time-Oriented Record (STOR) system which complements existing paper-based record keeping. The elements of the Problem Oriented Medical Record (POMR) System are displayed in two windows within one screen, namely, the SOAP (Subjective information, Objective information, Assessments and Plans) elements in the Reason For Encounter (RFE) window and the problem list with outcomes in the Problem List (PL) window. Context sensitive child windows display details of plans of management in the RFE window and clinical notes in the PL window. The benefits of such innovations to clinical decision making and practice based research and its medico-legal implications are discussed.

  15. Medicare and state health care programs: fraud and abuse; electronic health records safe harbor under the anti-kickback statute. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-12-27

    In this final rule, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) amends the safe harbor regulation concerning electronic health records items and services, which defines certain conduct that is protected from liability under the Federal anti-kickback statute, section 1128B(b) of the Social Security Act (the Act). Amendments include updating the provision under which electronic health records software is deemed interoperable; removing the electronic prescribing capability requirement; extending the sunset provision until December 31, 2021; limiting the scope of protected donors to exclude laboratory companies; and clarifying the condition that prohibits a donor from taking any action to limit or restrict the use, compatibility, or interoperability of the donated items or services.

  16. Electronic Health Records: An Enhanced Security Paradigm to Preserve Patient's Privacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamanig, Daniel; Stingl, Christian

    In recent years, demographic change and increasing treatment costs demand the adoption of more cost efficient, highly qualitative and integrated health care processes. The rapid growth and availability of the Internet facilitate the development of eHealth services and especially of electronic health records (EHRs) which are promising solutions to meet the aforementioned requirements. Considering actual web-based EHR systems, patient-centric and patient moderated approaches are widely deployed. Besides, there is an emerging market of so called personal health record platforms, e.g. Google Health. Both concepts provide a central and web-based access to highly sensitive medical data. Additionally, the fact that these systems may be hosted by not fully trustworthy providers necessitates to thoroughly consider privacy issues. In this paper we define security and privacy objectives that play an important role in context of web-based EHRs. Furthermore, we discuss deployed solutions as well as concepts proposed in the literature with respect to this objectives and point out several weaknesses. Finally, we introduce a system which overcomes the drawbacks of existing solutions by considering an holistic approach to preserve patient's privacy and discuss the applied methods.

  17. Repeat deliberate self-harm: a link with childhood sexual abuse?

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, H M; Yeo, W W

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify whether a past history of childhood sexual abuse is a risk factor for repeated Deliberate Self-Harm (DSH). The study was a 6-month prospective study of 178 patients responsible for 190 consecutive cases of DSH seen during a 3-month censoring period. Patients were identified by review of the in-patient and accident and emergency (A&E) records of all cases of DSH at the A&E department of a major teaching hospital. Patients with a history of childhood sexual abuse showed a marked clustering of four major risk factors for repeat DSH (unemployment, past deliberate self-poisoning, self-injury and psychiatric illness) and were significantly more likely to repeat DSH within the 6-month follow-up period. PMID:8216587

  18. Characterizing the sexual abuse experiences of young adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Negriff, Sonya; Schneiderman, Janet U.; Smith, Caitlin; Schreyer, Justine K.; Trickett, Penelope K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to: (a) compare the demographics of maltreated youth initially labeled as sexually abused by the Department of Child and Family Services (DCFS) to maltreated youth classified as sexually abused using current and past case records, (b) identify differences in sexual abuse experiences and types of perpetrators between boys and girls, and (c) provide a detailed description of the sexual abuse experiences for boys and girls. Participants were youth ages 9–12 years old with a recent maltreatment allegation. The Maltreatment Case Record Abstraction Instrument (MCRAI) was used to code child welfare records of 303 maltreated youth of whom 60 experienced sexual abuse. Perpetrators were classified by gender into four categories (biological parent, parental figure, relative, and unrelated) and type of abuse was classified into three categories (penetrative, contact without penetration, and non-contact). Using Chi-Square tests, perpetrator categories and sexual abuse types were compared by child gender for significant differences. Only 23 (38.3%) of the 60 sexually abused youth were labeled as sexually abused in the most recent DCFS report when they entered the study. About three-quarters of the sexually abused youth experienced non-penetrative physical contact, 40% experienced penetration, and 15% experienced sexual abuse without physical contact. Most youth (91.7%) were victimized by a male, and 21.7% were abused by a female. Youth experienced a large range of sexual abuse experiences, the details of which may be important for exploration of consequences of childhood sexual abuse. PMID:24095179

  19. Use of electronic health records for early detection of high-cost, low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Maeng, Daniel D; Stewart, Walter F; Yan, Xiaowei; Boscarino, Joseph A; Mardekian, Jack; Harnett, James; Von Korff, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP) is a debilitating condition that is complex to manage. One reason is that clinicians lack means to identify early on patients who are likely to become high care utilizers. OBJECTIVE: To explore the feasibility of developing a ‘dynamic’ predictive model using electronic health record data to identify costly LBP patients within the first year after their initial LBP encounter with a primary care provider. Dynamic, in this context, indicates a process in which the decision on how to manage patients is dependent on whether they are at their first, second or third LBP visit with the provider. METHODS: A series of logistic regression models was developed to predict who will be a high-cost patient (defined as top 30% of the cost distribution) at each of the first three LBP visits. RESULTS: The c-statistics of the three logistic regression models corresponding to each of the first three visits were 0.683, 0.795 and 0.741, respectively. The overall sensitivity of the model was 42%, the specificity was 86% and the positive predictive value was 48%. Men were more likely to become expensive than women, while patients who had workers’ compensation as their primary payer type had higher use of prescription opioid drugs or were smokers before the first LBP visit were also more likely to become expensive. CONCLUSION: The results suggest that it is feasible to develop a dynamic, primary care provider visit-based predictive model for LBP care based on longitudinal data obtained via electronic health records. PMID:26291127

  20. Common drugs of abuse--Part II.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, Mary Linda Stotter

    2004-01-01

    Drug abuse affects a significant number of individuals of all ages. Health care practitioners must be knowledgeable about both the physiological effects of such drugs and the impact of drug-seeking behavior on their patients.

  1. Nonrandomness, nonlinear dependence, and nonstationarity of electroencephalographic recordings from epilepsy patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Schindler, Kaspar; Rummel, Christian

    2012-10-01

    To derive tests for randomness, nonlinear-independence, and stationarity, we combine surrogates with a nonlinear prediction error, a nonlinear interdependence measure, and linear variability measures, respectively. We apply these tests to intracranial electroencephalographic recordings (EEG) from patients suffering from pharmacoresistant focal-onset epilepsy. These recordings had been performed prior to and independent from our study as part of the epilepsy diagnostics. The clinical purpose of these recordings was to delineate the brain areas to be surgically removed in each individual patient in order to achieve seizure control. This allowed us to define two distinct sets of signals: One set of signals recorded from brain areas where the first ictal EEG signal changes were detected as judged by expert visual inspection (“focal signals”) and one set of signals recorded from brain areas that were not involved at seizure onset (“nonfocal signals”). We find more rejections for both the randomness and the nonlinear-independence test for focal versus nonfocal signals. In contrast more rejections of the stationarity test are found for nonfocal signals. Furthermore, while for nonfocal signals the rejection of the stationarity test increases the rejection probability of the randomness and nonlinear-independence test substantially, we find a much weaker influence for the focal signals. In consequence, the contrast between the focal and nonfocal signals obtained from the randomness and nonlinear-independence test is further enhanced when we exclude signals for which the stationarity test is rejected. To study the dependence between the randomness and nonlinear-independence test we include only focal signals for which the stationarity test is not rejected. We show that the rejection of these two tests correlates across signals. The rejection of either test is, however, neither necessary nor sufficient for the rejection of the other test. Thus, our results suggest that

  2. Gradual Electronic Health Record Implementation: New Insights on Physician and Patient Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Shield, Renée R.; Goldman, Roberta E.; Anthony, David A.; Wang, Nina; Doyle, Richard J.; Borkan, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Although there is significant interest in implementation of electronic health records (EHRs), limited data have been published in the United States about how physicians, staff, and patients adapt to this implementation process. The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of EHR implementation, especially regarding physician-patient communication and behaviors and patients’ responses. METHODS We undertook a 22-month, triangulation design, mixed methods study of gradual EHR implementation in a residency-based family medicine outpatient center. Data collection included participant observation and time measurements of 170 clinical encounters, patient exit interviews, focus groups with nurses, nurse’s aides, and office staff, and unstructured observations and interviews with nursing staff and physicians. Analysis involved iterative immersion-crystallization discussion and searches for alternate hypotheses. RESULTS Patient trust in the physician and security in the physician-patient relationship appeared to override most patients’ concerns about information technology. Overall, staff concerns about potential deleterious consequences of EHR implementation were dispelled, positive anticipated outcomes were realized, and unexpected benefits were found. Physicians appeared to become comfortable with the “third actor” in the room, and nursing and office staff resistance to EHR implementation was ameliorated with improved work efficiencies. Unexpected advantages included just-in-time improvements and decreased physician time out of the examination room. CONCLUSIONS Strong patient trust in the physician-patient relationship was maintained and work flow improved with EHR implementation. Gradual EHR implementation may help support the development of beneficial physician and staff adaptations, while maintaining positive patient-physician relationships and fostering the sharing of medical information. PMID:20644186

  3. A nursing perspective to design and implementation of electronic patient record systems.

    PubMed

    Moen, Anne

    2003-01-01

    Achievements in informatics and use of new technologies are important to develop knowledge from clinical nursing practice. At the same time, progress in design and implementation of clinical information systems such as comprehensive Electronic Patient Record (EPR) systems can be complemented by attention to and examination of information processes as well as the health care constituencies' characteristics. In this article, selected issues and challenges related to EPR design and implementation are reviewed with a particular emphasis on those related to nursing practice and nursing leadership.

  4. Detecting elder abuse and neglect: assessment and intervention.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Robert M; Polson, Michol

    2014-03-15

    Elder mistreatment includes intentional or neglectful acts by a caregiver or trusted person that harm a vulnerable older person. It can occur in a variety of settings. One out of 10 older adults experiences some form of abuse or neglect by a caregiver each year, and the incidence is expected to increase. Although the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence that screening for elder abuse reduces harm, physicians in most states have professional and legal obligations to appropriately diagnose, report, and refer persons who have been abused. Screening or systematic inquiry can detect abuse. A detailed medical evaluation of patients suspected of being abused is necessary because medical and psychiatric conditions can mimic abuse. Signs of abuse may include specific patterns of injury. Interviewing patients and caregivers separately is helpful. Evaluation for possible abuse should include assessment of cognitive function. The Elder Abuse Suspicion Index is validated to screen for abuse in cognitively intact patients. A more detailed two-step process is used to screen patients with cognitive impairment. The National Center on Elder Abuse website provides detailed, state-specific reporting and resource information for family physicians.

  5. [Misuse of tianeptine: five cases of abuse].

    PubMed

    Leterme, Loïc; Singlan, Yves-Stéphane; Auclair, Valérie; Le Boisselier, Reynald; Frimas, Vincent

    2003-11-01

    Five cases of excessive consumption of tianeptine suggest possible drug-abuse of this substance. This side effect is unknown in animals and humans. According to DSM IV, CIM 10 criteria and the French public health code, these five patients had pathological profiles of psychoactive drug abusers. Tianeptine dosage was always used higher than recommended and the drug was taken in association with other psychotropes. Withdrawal was difficult and induced anxiety and other disorders which led to relapse in most of the patients.

  6. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  7. Toward best practice: leveraging the electronic patient record as a clinical data warehouse.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, C S; Morgan, M W

    2001-01-01

    Automating clinical and administrative processes via an electronic patient record (EPR) gives clinicians the point-of-care tools they need to deliver better patient care. However, to improve clinical practice as a whole and then evaluate it, healthcare must go beyond basic automation and convert EPR data into aggregated, multidimensional information. Unfortunately, few EPR systems have the established, powerful analytical clinical data warehouses (CDWs) required for this conversion. This article describes how an organization can support best practice by leveraging a CDW that is fully integrated into its EPR and clinical decision support (CDS) system. The article (1) discusses the requirements for comprehensive CDS, including on-line analytical processing (OLAP) of data at both transactional and aggregate levels, (2) suggests that the transactional data acquired by an OLTP EPR system must be remodeled to support retrospective, population-based, aggregate analysis of those data, and (3) concludes that this aggregate analysis is best provided by a separate CDW system.

  8. Patient access to medical records--from issue to law. Part I: An historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Morgan, C

    1984-05-01

    The growing interest of the individual in gaining control of his destiny, reflected over the past two decades in the consumer movement, has run a course parallel to the establishment of patient rights in consumption of health services. The desire to know the particulars of his health care is one such area of consumer interest, and across the nation, this desire to know is fast becoming an absolute right to know. Although in some states this right has become established through the courts, it would appear to be more satisfactorily ensured by means of specific legislation. The state of Maryland has enacted a statute which guarantees the patient access to his own medical record information: this process is surveyed as a means of expanding the evolutionary process from issue to law. Part II of this article, which will appear in the next issue of JAMRA provides an action model for states in which similar change is sought.

  9. The place of SGML and HTML in building electronic patient records.

    PubMed

    Pitty, D; Gordon, C; Reeves, P; Capey, A; Vieyra, P; Rickards, T

    1997-01-01

    The authors are concerned that, although popular, SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language) is only one approach to capturing, storing, viewing and exchanging healthcare information and does not provide a suitable paradigm for solving most of the problems associated with paper based patient record systems. Although a discussion of the relative merits of SGML, HTML (HyperText Markup Language) may be interesting, we feel such a discussion is avoiding the real issues associated with the most appropriate way to model, represent, and store electronic patient information in order to solve healthcare problems, and therefore the medical informatics community should firstly concern itself with these issues. The paper substantiates this viewpoint and concludes with some suggestions of how progress can be made.

  10. Are cardiac transplant patients more likely to have periodontitis? A case record study.

    PubMed

    Lessem, Jan; Drisko, Connie; Greenwell, Henry; Persson, Rutger; Newman, Hubert; Smart, Graham; Hopkins, Lydia; Parameshwar, Jayan; Fishbein, Daniel; Partridge, C; Bhat, G; Goldsmith, J

    2002-07-01

    In several large epidemiological studies chronic periodontitis has been implicated as an additional risk factor, independent of other risk factors, for the development of ischaemic heart disease. The underlying mechanism is thought to be a localised infection giving rise to an inflammatory host response, and some experimental data agree with this hypothesis. Recently, however, some studies have questioned the post dated relationship between the two diseases. The current case-record study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence of chronic periodontitis and the severity of such periodontal disease in a heart transplant population, assuming the latter represented a relatively severely compromised cardiovascular patient population. The study demonstrated that 76% of the patients had various degrees of periodontal disease prior to undergoing a heart transplant. Thus, it is possible that a relationship between cardiovascular disease and periodontal disease exists, but further, large intervention studies will be needed to confirm such a conclusion.

  11. Caveats of bisphosphonate abuse

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Sanjay; Agashe, Vikas M; Shetty, Vivek; Mohrir, Ganesh; Moonot, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bisphosphonates (BPs) are the common drugs used for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Short term benefits of the BPs are well known. However, there are concerns regarding their long term use. The aim of the study was to analyze the association between atypical femoral fractures and BP misuse/abuse as well as study the outcome of management of these fractures. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of a prospectively studied patients who presented with atypical femoral fractures between January 2010 and August 2012 and were followed up upto June 2014. The cohort consisted of nine female patients (12 fractures) with an average age of 71 years (range 58-85 years). Analysis was done for the indications, duration of BP use, configuration of associated fractures and method of treatment. Results: The mean duration of BP use was 6.6 years (range 4-10 years). BP treatment was initiated without sufficient indication and continued without proper review and followup in most cases. Most patients did not followup and continued to consume BPs without any review by the doctors. All patients had prodromal thigh pain of various duration, which was inadequately investigated and managed before the presentation. Two cases with an incomplete fracture and no thigh pain were managed successfully with conservative treatment. The rest were treated by surgery with intramedullary nailing. The average union time was longer and two fractures went into nonunion which required further surgical intervention. Conclusion: Atypical femoral fractures appear to be strongly related to abuse of BPs. Great care is to be exercised at initiation as well as the continuation of BP therapy, and regular review is required. There is a need for improved awareness among physicians about the possibility of such fractures, and interpretation of thigh pain and radiological findings, especially if the patient has been on BPs therapy. Internal fixation for complete fractures and for

  12. e-Patients Perceptions of Using Personal Health Records for Self-management Support of Chronic Illness.

    PubMed

    Gee, Perry M; Paterniti, Debora A; Ward, Deborah; Soederberg Miller, Lisa M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic illness self-management is largely moving from healthcare professionals and into the hands of the patient. One tool that has been promoted to facilitate self-management support of chronic illness by policymakers, health advocates, providers, and consumers is the personal health record. Little is known about how consumers effectively use personal health records for self-management support and for productive patient-provider interactions. The purpose of this study was to learn from chronically ill engaged, experienced, and educated (e-patient) adults how and why they use personal health records for self-management support and productive patient-provider interactions. Eighteen purposively selected consumers were interviewed in two communities. Qualitative description methods were used, and we used a grounded theory approach to analyzing interview data, which was digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. We identified four major thematic categories that capture the perceptions of the chronically ill using personal health records: (1) patient engagement and health self-management, (2) access to and control over personal health data, (3) promotion of productive communication, and (4) opportunities for training and education. Knowledge gained from the e-patient personal health record users suggest that making improvements to the portal system and providing education to consumers and providers will increase the utility among the experienced users and encourage new users to embrace adoption and use.

  13. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Cold Medicine Abuse DrugFacts: Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised May 2014 Some ... diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines are usually consumed ...

  14. Towards iconic language for patient records, drug monographs, guidelines and medical search engines.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Duclos, Catherine; Hamek, Saliha; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Kerdelhué, Gaetan; Darmoni, Stefan; Favre, Madeleine; Falcoff, Hector; Simon, Christian; Pereira, Suzanne; Serrot, Elisabeth; Mitouard, Thierry; Hardouin, Etienne; Kergosien, Yannick; Venot, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Practicing physicians have limited time for consulting medical knowledge and records. We have previously shown that using icons instead of text to present drug monographs may allow contraindications and adverse effects to be identified more rapidly and more accurately. These findings were based on the use of an iconic language designed for drug knowledge, providing icons for many medical concepts, including diseases, antecedents, drug classes and tests. In this paper, we describe a new project aimed at extending this iconic language, and exploring the possible applications of these icons in medicine. Based on evaluators' comments, focus groups of physicians and opinions of academic, industrial and associative partners, we propose iconic applications related to patient records, for example summarizing patient conditions, searching for specific clinical documents and helping to code structured data. Other applications involve the presentation of clinical practice guidelines and improving the interface of medical search engines. These new applications could use the same iconic language that was designed for drug knowledge, with a few additional items that respect the logic of the language.

  15. Attitudes of First-year Medical Students Toward the Confidentiality of Computerized Patient Records

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Luke; Domm, Jennifer A.; Konikoff, Michael R.; Miller, Randolph A.

    1999-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the attitudes of students entering medical school toward the confidentiality of computerized medical records. Design: First-year medical students at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine responded to a series of questions about a hypothetic breach of patient's privacy through a computerized patient record system. Measurements: The individual authors independently grouped the blinded responses according to whether they were consistent with then-current institutional policy. These preliminary groupings were discussed, and final categorizations were made by consensus. Results: While most students had a sense of what was right and wrong in absolute terms, half the class suggested at least one course of action that was deemed to be inconsistent with institutional policies. Conclusions: The authors believe that medical schools should directly address ethical and legal issues related to the use of computers in clinical practice as an integral part of medical school curricula. Several teaching approaches can facilitate a greater awareness of the issues surrounding technology and medicine. PMID:9925228

  16. [The preparatory education of electronic patient record for nursing students before practical nursing training].

    PubMed

    Nagamatsu, Yuki; Kanayama, Masako; Yoshioka, Makoto; Anan, Ayumi; Takeyama, Yumiko; Kubo, Yoko; Shibata, Hiroko; Kawamoto, Rieko

    2006-12-01

    Preparatory education has been provided for both nursing students and teachers to understand the electronic patient record (EPR) since 2004 when EPR was introduced to the hospitals where students are allocated to undertake their work experience. First, the training and management board contacted our medical information department for an appointment and sent us a working group. They taught the nursing training staff how to use EPR and how to assign students to the proper patient record in the EPR system. Second, as preparatory education for the students, they explained the procedure for the use of EPR and the protection of personal information. Students practiced with training in the EPR system, focusing on the functions which are used frequently in practical tasks. As a result of this preparatory education, students understood the protection of personal information very well, although their understanding of the operation and management of the equipment was relatively poor and adversely affected their practice. We need to review our education contents more often. We also need to examine the present state of understanding of EPR and the problems of teaching in practical nursing training.

  17. Elder abuse: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Bird, P E; Harrington, D T; Barillo, D J; McSweeney, A; Shirani, K Z; Goodwin, C W

    1998-01-01

    An estimated 2 million people a year are victims of elder abuse, which ranges from neglect and mistreatment to physical abuse. By the year 2020, a full 22% of the population will be aged 65 or older. This demographic explosion demands that we identify and protect those at risk. To investigate the incidence of elder abuse or neglect (EAN) and to determine clinician awareness of associated risk factors, we conducted a 1-year retrospective review of thermally injured patients aged 60 or older. Data included age, total body surface area burned, mechanism of injury, length of hospital stay, mortality, abuse or neglect risk factors, and referral to the appropriate social agency. We found that our elderly patients (n = 28) were poorly screened for EAN. While 64% to 96% of patients were screened for cognitive impairment, overall health, and financial resources, none were screened for risk factors of emotional isolation. None of the patient's caregivers, including any spouses, roommates, or guardians, were screened for risk factors of substance abuse, familial violence, dependency needs, or external stresses. With the use of available data, we were able to place 11 patients on the following levels of abuse or neglect: 1) low risk for abuse; 2) self-neglect; 3) neglect; and 4) abuse. By this scale, 7 patients (64%) were victims of self-neglect, 3 patients (27%) were victims of neglect, and 1 patient (9%) was a victim of abuse. Adult Protective Services intervened in 2 cases. Recognizing that all cases of EAN should be preventable, we cannot accept the socioeconomic impact of this entity. The 11 patients identified as victims of neglect, self-neglect, or abuse accounted for 135 hospital days and 8 fatalities. Before we can address EAN, health care personnel must be made aware of the problem and routine screening for risk factors must be implemented. The true incidence of EAN is likely underestimated because health care providers have difficulty recognizing its features. A

  18. Methodological issues in workplace substance abuse prevention research.

    PubMed

    Hersch, R K; Cook, R F; Deitz, D K; Trudeau, J V

    2000-05-01

    Substance abuse among working adults represents billions of dollars in preventable health care costs and industry financial loss. Therefore, it is imperative to develop and test effective substance abuse prevention programs for the workplace. However, applied workplace substance abuse prevention research is fraught with numerous methodological challenges. This article highlights a number of these challenges, which include (1) reaching a broad audience with prevention messages, (2) handling the concerns of the employer, (3) collecting substance use data in the workplace, (4) accessing and using records-based data, and (5) linking survey and records-based data. Using examples from the authors' ongoing research assessing a workplace health promotion and substance abuse prevention program, funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, the authors address these challenges.

  19. Giving rheumatology patients online home access to their electronic medical record (EMR): advantages, drawbacks and preconditions according to care providers.

    PubMed

    van der Vaart, Rosalie; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-09-01

    Technology enables patients home access to their electronic medical record (EMR), via a patient portal. This study aims to analyse (dis)advantages, preconditions and suitable content for this service, according to rheumatology health professionals. A two-phase policy Delphi study was conducted. First, interviews were performed with nurses/nurse practitioners (n = 9) and rheumatologists (n = 13). Subsequently, collected responses were quantified, using a questionnaire among the interviewees. The following advantages of patient home access to the EMR were reported: (1) enhancement of patient participation in treatment, (2) increased knowledge and self-management, (3) improved patient-provider interaction, (4) increased patient safety, and (5) better communication with others. Foreseen disadvantages of the service included: (1) problems with interpretation of data, (2) extra workload, (3) a change in consultation content, and (4) disturbing the patient-provider interaction. Also, the following preconditions emerged from the data: (1) optimal security, (2) no extra record, but a patient-accessible section, (3) no access to clinical notes, and (4) a lag time on the release of lab data. Most respondents reported that data on diagnosis, medication, treatment plan and consultations could be released to patients. On releasing more complex data, such as bodily examinations, lab results and radiological images the opinions differed considerably. Providing patients home access to their medical record might be a valuable next step into patient empowerment and in service towards the patient, provided that security is optimal and content and presentation of data are carefully considered. PMID:22453527

  20. Identifying patients with asthma in primary care electronic medical record systems

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Nancy; Wallace, Rebecca; Agarwal, Gina; Chan, David; Gershon, Andrea; Gupta, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop and test a variety of electronic medical record (EMR) search algorithms to allow clinicians to accurately identify their patients with asthma in order to enable improved care. Design A retrospective chart analysis identified 5 relevant unique EMR information fields (electronic disease registry, cumulative patient profile, billing diagnostic code, medications, and chart notes); asthma-related search terms were designated for each field. The accuracy of each term was tested for its ability to identify the asthma patients among all patients whose charts were reviewed. Increasingly sophisticated search algorithms were then designed and evaluated by serially combining individual searches with Boolean operators. Setting Two large academic primary care clinics in Hamilton, Ont. Participants Charts for 600 randomly selected patients aged 16 years and older identified in an initial EMR search as likely having asthma (n = 150), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (n = 150), other respiratory conditions (n = 150), or nonrespiratory conditions (n = 150) were reviewed until 100 patients per category were identified (or until all available names were exhausted). A total of 398 charts were reviewed in full and included. Main outcome measures Sensitivity and specificity of each search for asthma diagnosis (against the reference standard of a physician chart review–based diagnosis). Results Two physicians reviewed the charts identified in the initial EMR search using a standardized data collection form and ascribed the following diagnoses in 398 patients: 112 (28.1%) had asthma, 81 (20.4%) had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, 104 (26.1%) had other respiratory conditions, and 101 (25.4%) had nonrespiratory conditions. Concordance between reviewers in chart abstraction diagnosis was high (κ = 0.89, 95% CI 0.80 to 0.97). Overall, the algorithm searching for patients who had asthma in their cumulative patient profiles or for whom an asthma billing code

  1. Decoding of motor intentions from epidural ECoG recordings in severely paralyzed chronic stroke patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spüler, M.; Walter, A.; Ramos-Murguialday, A.; Naros, G.; Birbaumer, N.; Gharabaghi, A.; Rosenstiel, W.; Bogdan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Recently, there have been several approaches to utilize a brain-computer interface (BCI) for rehabilitation with stroke patients or as an assistive device for the paralyzed. In this study we investigated whether up to seven different hand movement intentions can be decoded from epidural electrocorticography (ECoG) in chronic stroke patients. Approach. In a screening session we recorded epidural ECoG data over the ipsilesional motor cortex from four chronic stroke patients who had no residual hand movement. Data was analyzed offline using a support vector machine (SVM) to decode different movement intentions. Main results. We showed that up to seven hand movement intentions can be decoded with an average accuracy of 61% (chance level 15.6%). When reducing the number of classes, average accuracies up to 88% can be achieved for decoding three different movement intentions. Significance. The findings suggest that ipsilesional epidural ECoG can be used as a viable control signal for BCI-driven neuroprosthesis. Although patients showed no sign of residual hand movement, brain activity at the ipsilesional motor cortex still shows enough intention-related activity to decode different movement intentions with sufficient accuracy.

  2. Mining Symptom-Herb Patterns from Patient Records Using Tripartite Graph

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinpeng; Poon, Josiah; Poon, Simon K.; Xu, Ling; Sze, Daniel M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Unlike the western medical approach where a drug is prescribed against specific symptoms of patients, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment has a unique step, which is called syndrome differentiation (SD). It is argued that SD is considered as patient classification because prior to the selection of the most appropriate formula from a set of relevant formulae for personalization, a practitioner has to label a patient belonging to a particular class (syndrome) first. Hence, to detect the patterns between herbs and symptoms via syndrome is a challenging problem; finding these patterns can help prepare a prescription that contributes to the efficacy of a treatment. In order to highlight this unique triangular relationship of symptom, syndrome, and herb, we propose a novel three-step mining approach. It first starts with the construction of a heterogeneous tripartite information network, which carries richer information. The second step is to systematically extract path-based topological features from this tripartite network. Finally, an unsupervised method is used to learn the best parameters associated with different features in deciding the symptom-herb relationships. Experiments have been carried out on four real-world patient records (Insomnia, Diabetes, Infertility, and Tourette syndrome) with comprehensive measurements. Interesting and insightful experimental results are noted and discussed. PMID:26167191

  3. Electronic medical record: a balancing act of patient safety, privacy and health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Gummadi, Sriharsha; Housri, Nadine; Zimmers, Teresa A; Koniaris, Leonidas G

    2014-09-01

    With almost $35 billion appropriated in government incentives and additional funds spent in development by institutions, the concept of an electronic patient record (EPR) within integrated health information technology (HIT) systems has taken the United States by storm. However, the United Kingdom's expensive struggle to implement a seamless EPR highlights the variety of pitfalls and unforeseen complications ranging from recognizing the importance of accurately assessing EPR-related patient risks to understanding the difficulties in the exchange of information across a gradient of distinct interfaces. Furthermore, the tenuous relationship between HIT implementation and patient outcomes in the short-term draws into question the value of EPR construction costs along with the ethical and privacy issues they create. Nonetheless, experts agree that with future software advances and physician familiarization, a robust HIT will be an important asset to patient autonomy, epidemiologic and clinical research, evidence-based error reduction and the potential for cost reduction. This article seeks to review the current status of this initiative and potential pitfalls that remain.

  4. Patterns of Response to Patient-Centered Decision Support Through a Personal Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Gary S.; Sullivan, Sarah M.; Dong, XinXin; Weimer, Melissa; Zeith, Caroline; Clark, Sunday; Roberts, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Over 140 million people in the United States have at least one chronic medical condition, but they receive fewer than 60% of guideline-recommended services for these conditions. Increasing patients' involvement in their own care may improve the receipt of guideline-recommended services. We evaluated patients' patterns of responses to notifications regarding guideline-recommended services delivered through a personalized health record (PHR). Materials and Methods: We enrolled 584 participants with high cardiovascular disease risk from 73 primary care practices into an active PHR in which they received patient-centered decision support—notifications delivered via a PHR regarding prevention gaps (i.e., unmet preventive healthcare or chronic disease monitoring). Participants with prevention gaps received up to three weekly messages regarding all services due within a 2-month time frame. These three-message cycles could repeat up to every 2 months for a new, or continuing, prevention gap. Results: Of the 584 participants, 501 (86%) received at least one reminder. Approximately 61% of these participants accessed the PHR or received the care that triggered the message after the first message and 73% after the first two messages. In subsequent three-message cycles, we observed no change in the number of messages required prior to participants accessing the PHR or receiving recommended care (chi-squared=12.4, p=0.3). Of the 2,656 prevention gaps these participants had over 1 year, 1,539 (58%) were closed. Conclusions: In this low-intensity intervention, participants accessed the PHR and received recommended care. Providing notification through the PHR allows patients to choose when they receive, and take action on, the message. Notifications can be provided to patients through a PHR without alert fatigue and may be an additional tool to help patients achieve better health. PMID:25243350

  5. Security of the distributed electronic patient record: a case-based approach to identifying policy issues.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J G

    2000-11-01

    The growth of managed care and integrated delivery systems has created a new commodity, health information and the technology that it requires. Surveys by Deloitte and Touche indicate that over half of the hospitals in the US are in the process of implementing electronic patient record (EPR) systems. The National Research Council has established that industry spends as much as $15 billion on information technology (IT), an amount that is expanding by 20% per year. The importance of collecting, electronically storing, and using the information is undisputed. This information is needed by consumers to make informed choices; by physicians to provide appropriate quality clinical care: and by health plans to assess outcomes, control costs and monitor quality. The collection, storage and communication of a large variety of personal patient data, however, present a major dilemma. How can we provide the data required by the new forms of health care delivery and at the same time protect the personal privacy of patients? Recent debates concerning medical privacy legislation, software regulation, and telemedicine suggest that this dilemma will not be easily resolved. The problem is systemic and arises out of the routine use and flow of information throughout the health industry. Health care information is primarily transferred among authorized users. Not only is the information used for patient care and financial reimbursement, secondary users of the information include medical, nursing, and allied health education, research, social services, public health, regulation, litigation, and commercial purposes such as the development of new medical technology and marketing. The main threats to privacy and confidentiality arise from within the institutions that provide patient care as well as institutions that have access to patient data for secondary purposes.

  6. Pilot study on identification of incidents in healthcare transitions and concordance between medical records and patient interview data

    PubMed Central

    van Melle, Marije A; Erkelens, Daphne C A; van Stel, Henk F; de Wit, Niek J; Zwart, Dorien L M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether transitional incidents can be identified from the medical records of the general practitioners and the hospital and to assess the concordance of transitional incidents between medical records and patient interviews. Design A pilot study. Setting The study was conducted in 2 regions in the Netherlands: a rural and an urban region. Participants A purposeful sample of patients who experienced a transitional incident or are at high risk of experiencing transitional incidents. Main outcome measures Transitional incidents were identified from both the interviews with patients and medical records and concordance was assessed. We also classified the transitional incidents according to type, severity, estimated cause and preventability. Results We identified 28 transitional incidents within 78 transitions of which 3 could not be found in the medical records and another 5 could have been missed without the patient as information source. To summarise, 8 (29%) incidents could have been missed using solely medical records, and 7 (25%) using the patients’ information exclusively. Concordance in transitional incidents between patient interviews and medical records was 64% (18/28). The majority of the transitional incidents were unsafe situations; however, 43% (12/28) of the incidents reached the patient and 18% (5/28) caused temporary patient harm. Over half of the incidents were potentially preventable. Conclusions This pilot study suggests that the majority of transitional incidents can be identified from medical records of the general practitioner and hospital. With this information, we aim to develop a measurement tool for transitional incidents in the medical record of general practitioner and hospital. PMID:27543588

  7. Using Electronic Health Record Data to Identify Prostate Cancer Patients That May Qualify for Active Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Knighton, Andrew J.; Belnap, Tom; Brunisholz, Kim; Huynh, Kelly; Bishoff, Jay T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The introduction of the protein-specific antigen (PSA) test in care means that prostate cancer (PCa) is being detected earlier and more frequently. The result of increased screening using PSA, digital rectal examination and awareness of prostate was an increase in the number of men with low risk cancers. Active surveillance has become a viable alternative to immediate treatment with surgery, radiation and other forms of localized treatment. Evidence suggests that there is no significant difference in mortality rates between AS and surgery. In addition, patients may potentially delay other complications associated with surgery, radiation or deprivation therapy. Methods: This quality improvement study using a delivery system science framework describes the electronic identification of AS candidates given an evidence-based identification criteria based upon national guidelines and clinical judgement. The study population (n=649) was drawn from health records of all patients who received a prostate biopsy (n=1731) at Intermountain Healthcare from 1/1/2013 to 12/31/2014. Automated and manual abstraction was performed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to compare AS-eligible patients to the actual treatment received to identify potential care improvement opportunities. Among those with complete data, 24.7% of this population (n=160) met “AS-eligible” criteria. 39.1% of the population had not received surgery, radiation or androgen deprivation therapy and were considered as being treated using an AS approach. 9% of AS-eligible patients did not receive AS; 27% of patients who did not meet AS-eligible criteria received AS. Estimated guideline adherence measured using area under the curve was 0.70 (95% CI: 0.66–0.73). Modest variation in criteria parameters for identifying AS-eligible patients did not significantly change estimated adherence levels. Conclusion: Implementation of evidence-based criteria for detection of AS

  8. Using Electronic Health Record Data to Identify Prostate Cancer Patients That May Qualify for Active Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Knighton, Andrew J.; Belnap, Tom; Brunisholz, Kim; Huynh, Kelly; Bishoff, Jay T.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The introduction of the protein-specific antigen (PSA) test in care means that prostate cancer (PCa) is being detected earlier and more frequently. The result of increased screening using PSA, digital rectal examination and awareness of prostate was an increase in the number of men with low risk cancers. Active surveillance has become a viable alternative to immediate treatment with surgery, radiation and other forms of localized treatment. Evidence suggests that there is no significant difference in mortality rates between AS and surgery. In addition, patients may potentially delay other complications associated with surgery, radiation or deprivation therapy. Methods: This quality improvement study using a delivery system science framework describes the electronic identification of AS candidates given an evidence-based identification criteria based upon national guidelines and clinical judgement. The study population (n=649) was drawn from health records of all patients who received a prostate biopsy (n=1731) at Intermountain Healthcare from 1/1/2013 to 12/31/2014. Automated and manual abstraction was performed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to compare AS-eligible patients to the actual treatment received to identify potential care improvement opportunities. Among those with complete data, 24.7% of this population (n=160) met “AS-eligible” criteria. 39.1% of the population had not received surgery, radiation or androgen deprivation therapy and were considered as being treated using an AS approach. 9% of AS-eligible patients did not receive AS; 27% of patients who did not meet AS-eligible criteria received AS. Estimated guideline adherence measured using area under the curve was 0.70 (95% CI: 0.66–0.73). Modest variation in criteria parameters for identifying AS-eligible patients did not significantly change estimated adherence levels. Conclusion: Implementation of evidence-based criteria for detection of AS

  9. Students and Drug Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todays Educ, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Introduction to "Students and Drug Abuse, prepared by the Public Information Branch and Center for Studies of Narcotic and Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, in cooperation with the staff of Today's Education.

  10. Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse KidsHealth > For Teens > Cough & Cold Medicine Abuse ... DXM Why Do People Use Cough and Cold Medicines to Get High? There's an ingredient in many ...

  11. Abuse during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... depressed, eat unhealthy foods, or pick up bad habits such as smoking or drinking . An abusive partner may try to ... depressed, eat unhealthy foods, or pick up bad habits such as smoking or drinking . An abusive partner may try to ...

  12. Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug abuse. It could be Taking a medicine that ... purpose, such as getting high Abusing some prescription drugs can lead to addiction. These include narcotic painkillers, ...

  13. Child Abuse: Educator's Responsibilities. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Office of the Attorney General, Sacramento. Crime Prevention Center.

    This document presents the educator with a guide to child abuse. A section defining child abuse examines the issues of physical abuse, physical neglect, sexual abuse, and emotional maltreatment. Areas discussed for these types of abuse include abuse indicators, location of injury, history, behavioral indicators, and types of injury. Incestuous and…

  14. Leveraging electronic healthcare record standards and semantic web technologies for the identification of patient cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Maldonado, José Alberto; Marcos, Mar; Legaz-García, María del Carmen; Moner, David; Torres-Sospedra, Joaquín; Esteban-Gil, Angel; Martínez-Salvador, Begoña; Robles, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Background The secondary use of electronic healthcare records (EHRs) often requires the identification of patient cohorts. In this context, an important problem is the heterogeneity of clinical data sources, which can be overcome with the combined use of standardized information models, virtual health records, and semantic technologies, since each of them contributes to solving aspects related to the semantic interoperability of EHR data. Objective To develop methods allowing for a direct use of EHR data for the identification of patient cohorts leveraging current EHR standards and semantic web technologies. Materials and methods We propose to take advantage of the best features of working with EHR standards and ontologies. Our proposal is based on our previous results and experience working with both technological infrastructures. Our main principle is to perform each activity at the abstraction level with the most appropriate technology available. This means that part of the processing will be performed using archetypes (ie, data level) and the rest using ontologies (ie, knowledge level). Our approach will start working with EHR data in proprietary format, which will be first normalized and elaborated using EHR standards and then transformed into a semantic representation, which will be exploited by automated reasoning. Results We have applied our approach to protocols for colorectal cancer screening. The results comprise the archetypes, ontologies, and datasets developed for the standardization and semantic analysis of EHR data. Anonymized real data have been used and the patients have been successfully classified by the risk of developing colorectal cancer. Conclusions This work provides new insights in how archetypes and ontologies can be effectively combined for EHR-driven phenotyping. The methodological approach can be applied to other problems provided that suitable archetypes, ontologies, and classification rules can be designed. PMID:23934950

  15. Modafinil treatment of amphetamine abuse in adult ADHD.

    PubMed

    Mann, N; Bitsios, P

    2009-06-01

    Substance abuse is a frequent co-morbid condition of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment with conventional psychostimulants in adult ADHD with co-morbid stimulant abuse may be problematic. In this study, we report the case of a patient with adult ADHD with co-morbid amphetamine abuse who was treated successfully with the non-stimulant alertness-promoting drug modafinil. The drug resolved both the inattention/hyperactivity symptoms as well as the amphetamine abuse. Modafinil may be a suitable candidate treatment for adults with ADHD and stimulant abuse.

  16. Vaginal Foreign Bodies and Child Sexual Abuse: An Important Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Closson, Forrest T.; Lichenstein, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Vaginal foreign bodies are a complaint occasionally encountered in pediatric clinics and emergency departments, and when pediatric patients present with a vaginal foreign body sexual abuse may not be considered. We describe two children with vaginal foreign bodies who were found to have been sexually abused. Each child had a discharge positive for a sexually transmitted infection despite no disclosure or allegation of abuse. We recommend that all pre-pubertal girls who present with a vaginal foreign body should be considered as possible victims of sexual abuse and should receive a sexual abuse history and testing for sexually transmitted infections. PMID:24106536

  17. Abuse of the elderly--the hidden agenda. I. The caretakers and the categories of abuse.

    PubMed

    Kimsey, L R; Tarbox, A R; Bragg, D F

    1981-10-01

    An overview of the problem of abuse of the elderly is presented in an effort to guide future research. Categories of caretakers for the aged include formal (i.e., institutional settings) and informal (e.g., family, neighbors, sitters). Data are presented from a task force report on the status of nursing homes in the State of Texas. Categories of abuse are discussed under four divisions: physical, psychologic, material, and fiscal. Deliberate physical abuse by formal caretakers was the least common; physical neglect was far more common, e.g., the development of decubitus ulcers, inadequate nutrition, improper medication, and vermin infestation. Psychologic abuse was most frequent in the area of benign neglect, with patients regarded as "going to die anyway." A tendency toward infantilization by formal caretakers was observed. Material abuse included primarily theft, chiefly of personal items rather than medication items. Fiscal abuse included embezzlement of patients' trust funds, improper charges for service, failure to notify the State of the death or departure of a patient, abuse for drugs, and artificial upgrading of Medicaid recipients' classifications. Possible causes of abuse are reviewed.

  18. Analysis of clinical records of dental patients attending Jordan University Hospital: Documentation of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections

    PubMed Central

    Dar-Odeh, Najla; Ryalat, Soukaina; Shayyab, Mohammad; Abu-Hammad, Osama

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze clinical records of dental patients attending the Dental Department at the University of Jordan Hospital: a teaching hospital in Jordan. Analysis aimed at determining whether dental specialists properly documented the drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections given to their patients. Methods: Dental records of the Dental Department at the Jordan University Hospital were reviewed during the period from April 3rd until April 26th 2007 along with the issued prescriptions during that period. Results: A total of 1000 records were reviewed with a total of 53 prescriptions issued during that period. Thirty records documented the prescription by stating the category of the prescribed drug. Only 13 records stated the generic or the trade names of the prescribed drugs. Of these, 5 records contained the full elements of a prescription. As for local anesthetic injections, the term “LA used” was found in 22 records while the names and quantities of the local anesthetics used were documented in only 13 records. Only 5 records documented the full elements of a local anesthetic injection. Conclusion: The essential data of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections were poorly documented by the investigated group of dental specialists. It is recommended that the administration of the hospital and the dental department implement clear and firm guidelines for dental practitioners in particular to do the required documentation procedure. PMID:19209291

  19. Substance Abuse. Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collaboration for Youth, Washington, DC.

    This paper presents the policy statement on substance abuse from the National Collaboration for Youth (NCY). The policy statement section lists programs and activities supported by the NCY. A section on background includes a statement of the issue of substance abuse. Areas examined in this section include alcohol abuse and drunk driving among…

  20. Elder Abuse Awareness Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Marilyn J.; Doyle, Kathleen

    The Elder Abuse Awareness Project was developed to determine the incidence of abuse and neglect of elderly people in several rural counties in central Illinois. A primary purpose of the study was to survey service providers as to their actual encounters with elder abuse and neglect. Each provider was asked about warning signs or cues that were…

  1. Child Abuse and Neglect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Children's Centre, Paris (France).

    A series of four documents address the definition and identification of child abuse and neglect. In the first, which is designed for professionals, a historical review is followed by discussion of clinical and social evidence of abuse. Resources for managing child abuse are described, and personnel functions are outlined. The second document,…

  2. Dynamics of Parental Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Hardin, Eugene; Schlater, Theodore L.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of the various categories of parental abuse are examined with special emphasis on abuse by adult offspring living in the same household or adults acting as caretakers or legal guardians for their elderly parents. Society's role in the dynamics of parental abuse is examined.

  3. Organizational strategies for promoting patient and provider uptake of personal health records

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Susan; Rozenblum, Ronen; Park, Andrea; Dunn, Marie; Bates, David W

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate organizational strategies to promote personal health records (PHRs) adoption with a focus on patients with chronic disease. Methods Using semi-structured interviews and a web-based survey, we sampled US health delivery organizations which had implemented PHRs for at least 12 months, were recognized as PHR innovators, and had scored highly in national patient satisfaction surveys. Respondents had lead positions for clinical information systems or high-risk population management. Using grounded theory approach, thematic categories were derived from interviews and coupled with data from the survey. Results Interviews were conducted with 30 informants from 16 identified organizations. Organizational strategies were directed towards raising patient awareness via multimedia communications, and provider acceptance and uptake. Strategies for providers were grouped into six main themes: organizational vision, governance and policies, work process redesign, staff training, information technology (IT) support, and monitoring and incentives. Successful organizations actively communicated their vision, engaged leaders at all levels, had clear governance, planning, and protocols, set targets, and celebrated achievement. The most effective strategy for patient uptake was through health professional encouragement. No specific outreach efforts targeted patients with chronic disease. Registration and PHR activity was routinely measured but without reference to a denominator population or high risk subpopulations. Discussion and conclusion Successful PHR implementation represents a social change and operational project catalyzed by a technical solution. The key to clinician acceptance is making their work easier. However, organizations will likely not achieve the value they want from PHRs unless they target specific populations and monitor their uptake. PMID:25326601

  4. Enhancing Practice Efficiency and Patient Care by Sharing Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Megan E.; Kelling, Sarah E.; Cornelius, Douglas C.; Oni, Hafusat A.; Bright, David R.

    2015-01-01

    One primary function of community pharmacies is to dispense medications to patients. In doing so, pharmacists frequently communicate with physicians' offices to clarify prescription orders and obtain additional information to ensure the safe and accurate dispensing of medications. Such communication is often done by telephone or fax, which is inefficient for both the pharmacy and the physician's office. This problem was highlighted in a recent American Medical Association resolution defining certain pharmacy inquiries as “interference with the practice of medicine and unwarranted.” As a result, many are seeking to understand how to balance the needs of the patient care process with the need for operational efficiency in the physician's office and pharmacy. This study presents one example of a health information technology–based solution involving shared access to an electronic health record (EHR), and describes a case in which a physician's office and a community pharmacy experimented with this model to promote practice efficiency while also providing enhanced access to clinical information in both directions. The rationale behind the process change, a brief description of how the new process came into existence, and a description of how information sharing can be helpful in related clinical situations are provided. Similar models that involve sharing of EHRs may create valuable opportunities for collaboration between physicians and pharmacists to enhance patient care and improve workflow efficiency. PMID:26604871

  5. Enhancing Practice Efficiency and Patient Care by Sharing Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Keller, Megan E; Kelling, Sarah E; Cornelius, Douglas C; Oni, Hafusat A; Bright, David R

    2015-01-01

    One primary function of community pharmacies is to dispense medications to patients. In doing so, pharmacists frequently communicate with physicians' offices to clarify prescription orders and obtain additional information to ensure the safe and accurate dispensing of medications. Such communication is often done by telephone or fax, which is inefficient for both the pharmacy and the physician's office. This problem was highlighted in a recent American Medical Association resolution defining certain pharmacy inquiries as "interference with the practice of medicine and unwarranted." As a result, many are seeking to understand how to balance the needs of the patient care process with the need for operational efficiency in the physician's office and pharmacy. This study presents one example of a health information technology-based solution involving shared access to an electronic health record (EHR), and describes a case in which a physician's office and a community pharmacy experimented with this model to promote practice efficiency while also providing enhanced access to clinical information in both directions. The rationale behind the process change, a brief description of how the new process came into existence, and a description of how information sharing can be helpful in related clinical situations are provided. Similar models that involve sharing of EHRs may create valuable opportunities for collaboration between physicians and pharmacists to enhance patient care and improve workflow efficiency. PMID:26604871

  6. How bioethics principles can aid design of electronic health records to accommodate patient granular control.

    PubMed

    Meslin, Eric M; Schwartz, Peter H

    2015-01-01

    Ethics should guide the design of electronic health records (EHR), and recognized principles of bioethics can play an important role. This approach was recently adopted by a team of informaticists who are designing and testing a system where patients exert granular control over who views their personal health information. While this method of building ethics in from the start of the design process has significant benefits, questions remain about how useful the application of bioethics principles can be in this process, especially when principles conflict. For instance, while the ethical principle of respect for autonomy supports a robust system of granular control, the principles of beneficence and nonmaleficence counsel restraint due to the danger of patients being harmed by restrictions on provider access to data. Conflict between principles has long been recognized by ethicists and has even motivated attacks on approaches that state and apply principles. In this paper, we show how using ethical principles can help in the design of EHRs by first explaining how ethical principles can and should be used generally, and then by discussing how attention to details in specific cases can show that the tension between principles is not as bad as it initially appeared. We conclude by suggesting ways in which the application of these (and other) principles can add value to the ongoing discussion of patient involvement in their health care. This is a new approach to linking principles to informatics design that we expect will stimulate further interest.

  7. Family history of mental illness or alcohol abuse and the irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Knight, James R.; Locke, G. Richard; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Schleck, Cathy D.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We have observed that many patients with IBS drink very little alcohol, and postulated this may reflect membership in families affected by alcoholism and mental illness. We aimed to evaluate whether a family history of substance or alcohol abuse, or psychiatric illness, is associated with IBS. Methods A valid GI questionnaire was mailed to a randomly selected population-based cohort to identify IBS and healthy controls. The electronic medical record was reviewed to record the subjects’ self-reported personal and family health histories. Results 2300 subjects responded (response rate 55%; IBS 13% n=287). 230 subjects with IBS and 318 controls were eligible. Family history of alcohol/substance abuse was reported by 33% of cases and 25% of controls (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0–2.1, p=0.06). Family history of psychiatric illness was reported by 37% of cases and 22% of controls (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.3–2.9, p<0.001). In the absence of a personal history of alcohol use, a family history of alcohol/substance abuse was predictive of IBS status (OR adjusted for age and gender 1.5, 95% CI 1.0–2.3, p=0.05). In the absence of a personal history of alcohol use, reporting both a family history of alcohol/substance abuse and anxiety/depression/mental illness was clearly predictive of IBS status (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.4–4.5; p<0.005). Substance abuse as a child was associated with an increased risk of IBS (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.1–4.8; p<0.03). Conclusion IBS is independently associated with a family history of psychiatric illness and may be linked to a family history of alcohol/substance abuse. PMID:25582802

  8. Dilated cardiomyopathy associated with toluene abuse.

    PubMed

    Vural, Mutlu; Ogel, Kultegin

    2006-01-01

    The use of paint thinner and glue to achieve an euphoric state has been associated with serious social and health problems in children and young adults. We present the case of a 21-year-old man with dilated cardiomyopathy occurring following abuse of paint thinner and glue containing toluene as main compound. After cessation of toluene abuse, the patient recovered rapidly and completely. Because of the increasing prevalence of toluene abuse, harmful effects of this volatile agent on the heart are also discussed. PMID:16479101

  9. Casebook: a virtual patient iPad application for teaching decision-making through the use of electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Virtual Patients are a well-known and widely used form of interactive software used to simulate aspects of patient care that students are increasingly less likely to encounter during their studies. However, to take full advantage of the benefits of using Virtual Patients, students should have access to multitudes of cases. In order to promote the creation of collections of cases, a tablet application was developed which makes use of electronic health records as material for Virtual Patient cases. Because electronic health records are abundantly available on hospital information systems, this results in much material for the basis of case creation. Results An iPad-based Virtual Patient interactive software system was developed entitled Casebook. The application has been designed to read specially formatted patient cases that have been created using electronic health records, in the form of X-ray images, electrocardiograms, lab reports, and physician notes, and present these to the medical student. These health records are organised into a timeline, and the student navigates the case while answering questions regarding the patient along the way. Each health record can also be annotated with meta-information by the case designer, such as insight into the thought processes and the decision-making rationale of the physician who originally worked with the patient. Students learn decision-making skills by observing and interacting with real patient cases in this simulated environment. This paper discusses our approach in detail. Conclusions Our group is of the opinion that Virtual Patient cases, targeted at undergraduate students, should concern patients who exhibit prototypical symptoms of the kind students may encounter when beginning their first medical jobs. Learning theory research has shown that students learn decision-making skills best when they have access to multitudes of patient cases and it is this plurality that allows students to develop their

  10. Searching electronic health records for temporal patterns in patient histories: a case study with microsoft amalga.

    PubMed

    Plaisant, Catherine; Lam, Stanley; Lam, Stanley J; Shneiderman, Ben; Smith, Mark S; Roseman, David; Roseman, David H; Marchand, Greg; Gillam, Michael; Feied, Craig; Handler, Jonathan; Rappaport, Hank

    2008-11-06

    As electronic health records (EHR) become more widespread, they enable clinicians and researchers to pose complex queries that can benefit immediate patient care and deepen understanding of medical treatment and outcomes. However, current query tools make complex temporal queries difficult to pose, and physicians have to rely on computer professionals to specify the queries for them. This paper describes our efforts to develop a novel query tool implemented in a large operational system at the Washington Hospital Center (Microsoft Amalga, formerly known as Azyxxi). We describe our design of the interface to specify temporal patterns and the visual presentation of results, and report on a pilot user study looking for adverse reactions following radiology studies using contrast.

  11. Traceability of patient records usage: barriers and opportunities for improving user interface design and data management.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Correia, Ricardo; Lapão, Luís; Rodrigues, Pedro Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Although IT governance practices (like ITIL, which recommends on the use of audit logs for proper service level management) are being introduced in many Hospitals to cope with increasing levels of information quality and safety requirements, the standard maturity levels of hospital IT departments is still not enough to reach the level of frequent use of audit logs. This paper aims to address the issues related to the existence of AT in patient records, describe the Hospitals scenario and to produce recommendations. Representatives from four hospitals were interviewed regarding the use of AT in their Hospital IS. Very few AT are known to exist in these hospitals (average of 1 per hospital in an estimate of 21 existing IS). CIOs should to be much more concerned with the existence and maintenance of AT. Recommendations include server clock synchronization and using advanced log visualization tools. PMID:21893756

  12. Traceability of patient records usage: barriers and opportunities for improving user interface design and data management.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Correia, Ricardo; Lapão, Luís; Rodrigues, Pedro Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Although IT governance practices (like ITIL, which recommends on the use of audit logs for proper service level management) are being introduced in many Hospitals to cope with increasing levels of information quality and safety requirements, the standard maturity levels of hospital IT departments is still not enough to reach the level of frequent use of audit logs. This paper aims to address the issues related to the existence of AT in patient records, describe the Hospitals scenario and to produce recommendations. Representatives from four hospitals were interviewed regarding the use of AT in their Hospital IS. Very few AT are known to exist in these hospitals (average of 1 per hospital in an estimate of 21 existing IS). CIOs should to be much more concerned with the existence and maintenance of AT. Recommendations include server clock synchronization and using advanced log visualization tools.

  13. The development and design of an electronic patient record using open source web-based technology.

    PubMed

    Syed-Mohamad, Sharifa Mastura; Ali, Siti Hawa; Mat-Husin, Mohd Nazri

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the method used to develop the One Stop Crisis Centre (OSCC) Portal, an open source web-based electronic patient record system (EPR) for the One Stop Crisis Center, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) in Kelantan, Malaysia. Features and functionalities of the system are presented to demonstrate the workflow. Use of the OSCC Portal improved data integration and data communication and contributed to improvements in care management. With implementation of the OSCC portal, improved coordination between disciplines and standardisation of data in HUSM were noticed. It is expected that this will in turn result in improved data confidentiality and data integrity. The collected data will also be useful for quality assessment and research. Other low-resource centers with limited computer hardware and access to open-source software could benefit from this endeavour. PMID:20335647

  14. Prevalence of abusive encounters in the workplace of family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; Hamilton, Ryan; Lambert-Lanning, Anita; Tatemichi, Sue R.; Lemire, Francine; Manca, Donna; Ramsden, Vivian R.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To examine the career prevalence of abusive encounters for family physicians in Canada. DESIGN A 7-page cross-sectional mailed survey in English and French. SETTING Canada. PARTICIPANTS A total of 3802 randomly selected practising family physicians who were members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Demographic characteristics of survey participants, career prevalence of abusive encounters, and perpetrators of abuse. MAIN FINDINGS Twenty percent (20.4%) of the surveys (n = 774) were returned. Of the respondents, 44% were men and 56% were women. Most were in private practice in urban settings. The average number of years in practice was 15. The career prevalence of abusive encounters was divided into “minor,” “major,” and “severe” incidents. Of all the respondents, 98% had experienced at least 1 incident of minor abuse, 75% had experienced at least 1 incident of major abuse, and 39% had experienced at least 1 incident of severe abuse. Using χ2 analysis, a number of demographic variables were found to be significantly associated with abuse including the physician’s race and sex. Patients were the most common perpetrators of abuse. Ninety percent of family physicians surveyed reported that they had been abused by patients, while 70% reported that they had been abused by family members of patients. CONCLUSION Approximately 2 in 5 family physicians surveyed were subjected to a considerable amount of severe abuse during practice. Abuse in the office setting might have grave consequences for the health and well-being of the victimized physicians and might hinder service retention where the risk of abuse is greatest. PMID:20228289

  15. Inhalant Abuse and Dextromethorphan.

    PubMed

    Storck, Michael; Black, Laura; Liddell, Morgan

    2016-07-01

    Inhalant abuse is the intentional inhalation of a volatile substance for the purpose of achieving an altered mental state. As an important, yet underrecognized form of substance abuse, inhalant abuse crosses all demographic, ethnic, and socioeconomic boundaries, causing significant morbidity and mortality in school-aged and older children. This review presents current perspectives on epidemiology, detection, and clinical challenges of inhalant abuse and offers advice regarding the medical and mental health providers' roles in the prevention and management of this substance abuse problem. Also discussed is the misuse of a specific "over-the-counter" dissociative, dextromethorphan. PMID:27338970

  16. Qualities and Characteristics of the Child Abusing Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breiner, Sander J.

    Most child abuse has a violent quality. A review of the research on child abusers reveals some interesting psychosocial and historical characteristics. Research has shown violence to be more likely in less stable populations, in persons with poor driving records and histories of severe accidents, and in those who are undereducated and unsuccessful…

  17. Developmental Experiences of Child Sexual Abusers and Rapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Dominique A.; Wurtele, Sandy K.; Durham, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to identify the distinct developmental experiences associated with child sexual abuse and rape. Method: For 269 sexual offenders (137 rapists and 132 child sexual abusers), developmental experiences were recorded from a behavioral checklist, a parental-bonding survey, and a sexual history questionnaire. Offender…

  18. Routes of abuse of prescription opioid analgesics: a review and assessment of the potential impact of abuse-deterrent formulations.

    PubMed

    Gasior, Maciej; Bond, Mary; Malamut, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics are an important treatment option for patients with chronic pain; however, misuse, abuse and diversion of these medications are a major global public health concern. Prescription opioid analgesics can be abused via intended and non-intended routes of administration, both intact or after manipulation of the original formulation to alter the drug-delivery characteristics. Available data indicate that ingestion (with or without manipulation of the prescribed formulation) is the most prevalent route of abuse, followed by inhalation (snorting, smoking and vaping) and injection. However, reported routes of abuse vary considerably between different formulations. A number of factors have been identified that appear to be associated with non-oral routes of abuse, including a longer duration of abuse, younger age, male sex and a rural or socially deprived location. The development of abuse-deterrent formulations of prescription opioid analgesics is an important step toward reducing abuse of these medications. Available abuse-deterrent formulations aim to hinder extraction of the active ingredient, prevent administration through alternative routes and/or make abuse of the manipulated product less attractive, less rewarding or even aversive. There are currently five opioid analgesics with a Food and Drug Administration abuse-deterrent label, and a number of other products are under review. A growing body of evidence suggests that introduction of abuse-deterrent opioid analgesics in the USA has been associated with decreased rates of abuse of these formulations. The availability of abuse-deterrent formulations therefore appears to represent an important step toward curbing the epidemic of abuse of prescription opioid analgesics, while ensuring the availability of effective pain medications for patients with legitimate medical need.

  19. Displays of authority in the clinical consultation: a linguistic ethnographic study of the electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Swinglehurst, Deborah

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of computers into general practice settings has profoundly changed the dynamics of the clinical consultation. Previous research exploring the impact of the computer (in what has been termed the 'triadic' consultation) has shown that computer use and communication between doctor and patient are intricately coordinated and inseparable. Swinglehurst et al. have recently been critical of the ongoing tendency within health communication research to focus on 'the computer' as a relatively simple 'black box', or as a material presence in the consultation. By re-focussing on the electronic patient record (EPR) and conceptualising this as a complex collection of silent but consequential voices, they have opened up new and more nuanced possibilities for analysis. This orientation makes visible a tension between the immediate contingencies of the interaction as it unfolds moment-by-moment and the more standardised, institutional demands which are embedded in the EPR ('dilemma of attention'). In this paper I extend this work, presenting an in-depth examination of how participants in the consultation manage this tension. I used linguistic ethnographic methods to study 54 video recorded consultations from a dataset collected between 2007 and 2008 in two UK general practices, combining microanalysis of the consultation with ethnographic attention to the wider organisational and institutional context. My analysis draws on the theoretical work of Erving Goffman and Mikhail Bakhtin, incorporating attention to the 'here and now' of the interaction as well as an appreciation of the 'distributed' nature of the EPR, its role in hosting and circulating new voices, and in mediating participants' talk and social practices. It reveals - in apparently fleeting moments of negotiation and contestation - the extent to which the EPR shapes the dynamic construction, display and circulation of authority in the contemporary consultation. PMID:25086422

  20. Displays of authority in the clinical consultation: a linguistic ethnographic study of the electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Swinglehurst, Deborah

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of computers into general practice settings has profoundly changed the dynamics of the clinical consultation. Previous research exploring the impact of the computer (in what has been termed the 'triadic' consultation) has shown that computer use and communication between doctor and patient are intricately coordinated and inseparable. Swinglehurst et al. have recently been critical of the ongoing tendency within health communication research to focus on 'the computer' as a relatively simple 'black box', or as a material presence in the consultation. By re-focussing on the electronic patient record (EPR) and conceptualising this as a complex collection of silent but consequential voices, they have opened up new and more nuanced possibilities for analysis. This orientation makes visible a tension between the immediate contingencies of the interaction as it unfolds moment-by-moment and the more standardised, institutional demands which are embedded in the EPR ('dilemma of attention'). In this paper I extend this work, presenting an in-depth examination of how participants in the consultation manage this tension. I used linguistic ethnographic methods to study 54 video recorded consultations from a dataset collected between 2007 and 2008 in two UK general practices, combining microanalysis of the consultation with ethnographic attention to the wider organisational and institutional context. My analysis draws on the theoretical work of Erving Goffman and Mikhail Bakhtin, incorporating attention to the 'here and now' of the interaction as well as an appreciation of the 'distributed' nature of the EPR, its role in hosting and circulating new voices, and in mediating participants' talk and social practices. It reveals - in apparently fleeting moments of negotiation and contestation - the extent to which the EPR shapes the dynamic construction, display and circulation of authority in the contemporary consultation.

  1. Renal failure associated with laxative abuse.

    PubMed

    Copeland, P M

    1994-01-01

    Eating disorder patients often abuse laxatives in an attempt to purge excess food. Laxative abuse can cause hypokalemia and volume depletion. Hypokalemia, in turn, can lead to rhabdomyolysis. Laxative-induced hypokalemia and volume depletion have been previously reported to cause renal insufficiency, but not severe enough to require hemodialysis. A 27-year-old woman with a long history of laxative abuse presented with severe renal failure associated with hypokalemia and volume depletion. She required acute hemodialysis for worsening acidosis (pH 7.05) despite assisted ventilation. A prior episode of hypokalemic rhabdomyolysis at age 23 had resulted in only mild renal insufficiency. Her later episode of severe renal failure was linked to profound volume depletion (blood urea nitrogen 135 mg/dl). This patient calls attention to a potentially life-threatening complication of laxative abuse and indicates that volume depletion can exacerbate laxative-associated renal failure. PMID:7531354

  2. Patient characteristics associated with venous thromboembolic events: a cohort study using pooled electronic health record data

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Wendy; Gilder, Jason; Love, Thomas E; Jain, Anil K

    2012-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the potential of de-identified clinical data from multiple healthcare systems using different electronic health records (EHR) to be efficiently used for very large retrospective cohort studies. Materials and methods Data of 959 030 patients, pooled from multiple different healthcare systems with distinct EHR, were obtained. Data were standardized and normalized using common ontologies, searchable through a HIPAA-compliant, patient de-identified web application (Explore; Explorys Inc). Patients were 26 years or older seen in multiple healthcare systems from 1999 to 2011 with data from EHR. Results Comparing obese, tall subjects with normal body mass index, short subjects, the venous thromboembolic events (VTE) OR was 1.83 (95% CI 1.76 to 1.91) for women and 1.21 (1.10 to 1.32) for men. Weight had more effect then height on VTE. Compared with Caucasian, Hispanic/Latino subjects had a much lower risk of VTE (female OR 0.47, 0.41 to 0.55; male OR 0.24, 0.20 to 0.28) and African-Americans a substantially higher risk (female OR 1.83, 1.76 to 1.91; male OR 1.58, 1.50 to 1.66). This 13-year retrospective study of almost one million patients was performed over approximately 125 h in 11 weeks, part time by the five authors. Discussion As research informatics tools develop and more clinical data become available in EHR, it is important to study and understand unique opportunities for clinical research informatics to transform the scale and resources needed to perform certain types of clinical research. Conclusions With the right clinical research informatics tools and EHR data, some types of very large cohort studies can be completed with minimal resources. PMID:22759621

  3. Electronic Health Record Based Algorithm to Identify Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei; Bochenek, Joseph; Doshi-Velez, Finale; Manning-Courtney, Patty; Bickel, Julie; Wildenger Welchons, Leah; Reinhold, Judy; Bing, Nicole; Ni, Yizhao; Barbaresi, William; Mentch, Frank; Basford, Melissa; Denny, Joshua; Vazquez, Lyam; Perry, Cassandra; Namjou, Bahram; Qiu, Haijun; Connolly, John; Abrams, Debra; Holm, Ingrid A.; Cobb, Beth A.; Lingren, Nataline; Solti, Imre; Hakonarson, Hakon; Kohane, Isaac S.; Harley, John; Savova, Guergana

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cohort selection is challenging for large-scale electronic health record (EHR) analyses, as International Classification of Diseases 9th edition (ICD-9) diagnostic codes are notoriously unreliable disease predictors. Our objective was to develop, evaluate, and validate an automated algorithm for determining an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) patient cohort from EHR. We demonstrate its utility via the largest investigation to date of the co-occurrence patterns of medical comorbidities in ASD. Methods We extracted ICD-9 codes and concepts derived from the clinical notes. A gold standard patient set was labeled by clinicians at Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) (N = 150) and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and Medical Center (CCHMC) (N = 152). Two algorithms were created: (1) rule-based implementing the ASD criteria from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Diseases 4th edition, (2) predictive classifier. The positive predictive values (PPV) achieved by these algorithms were compared to an ICD-9 code baseline. We clustered the patients based on grouped ICD-9 codes and evaluated subgroups. Results The rule-based algorithm produced the best PPV: (a) BCH: 0.885 vs. 0.273 (baseline); (b) CCHMC: 0.840 vs. 0.645 (baseline); (c) combined: 0.864 vs. 0.460 (baseline). A validation at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia yielded 0.848 (PPV). Clustering analyses of comorbidities on the three-site large cohort (N = 20,658 ASD patients) identified psychiatric, developmental, and seizure disorder clusters. Conclusions In a large cross-institutional cohort, co-occurrence patterns of comorbidities in ASDs provide further hypothetical evidence for distinct courses in ASD. The proposed automated algorithms for cohort selection open avenues for other large-scale EHR studies and individualized treatment of ASD. PMID:27472449

  4. Technology versus humanism: how patients perceive the use of electronic health records in physicians' offices--a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Mwachofi, Ari K; Khaliq, Amir A; Carrillo, Estevan R; Winfree, William

    2016-01-01

    Electronic Health Records (EHRs) have the potential to improve the quality of care. In view of the accelerated adoption of EHRs, there is a need to understand conditions necessary for their effective use. Patients are the focus of healthcare and their perceptions and expectations need to be included in developing and implementing EHRs. The purpose of this study was to gather exploratory qualitative information from patients about their experiences and perceptions regarding the effects of EHRs on healthcare quality in physicians' offices. We conducted five focus groups with patients representing a random mix of diverse socio-demographic backgrounds in Oklahoma. Related to EHRs, patients reported improvements on the technical side of care but no change on the human side. They expressed concerns about the potential for breach of confidentiality and security of medical records. They were also concerned about the possibility of governmental agencies or insurance companies having unauthorized access to patient records. Patients differentiated between the human and technical sides of care and reported no change or improvement in the doctor-patient interaction. Patients have an important perspective on the use of EHRs and their perceptions and experiences should be considered in the development, adoption and implementation of EHRs. Otherwise, the use of EHRs may not be fully effective. There is also a need to educate patients about the potential benefits and risks of EHRs and the steps being taken to mitigate such risks.

  5. [Substance abuse in older adults].

    PubMed

    Bitar, Raoul; Dürsteler, Kenneth M; Rösner, Susanne; Grosshans, Martin; Herdener, Marcus; Mutschler, Jochen

    2014-09-01

    In respect of demographic change, the number of older patients with substance abuse and addiction is on the raise. In this review we present important clinical and therapeutic aspects of substance abuse and addiction in the elderly and focus on alcohol, benzodiazepines and opioids. Daily and risky alcohol consumption is common among older people. They also have an increased risk getting alcohol-related complications. For early detection, laboratory parameters and questionnaires such as the AUDIT-C are suitable. Therapeutically brief interventions have been proved successful. Also, abuse of benzodiazepines, especially low-dose addiction, is widespread among older persons, although often overlooked, and patients often do not recognize their addiction. The physician has to know the correct indication, adequate dosage and pharmacological interactions. A slow-dose reduction is recommended in case of addiction. Thanks to opioid substitution therapy, patients with an opioidaddiction can reach a higher age. Age influences the effects of the substitute, which may require an adjustment of the dosage. Treatment of elderly patients should be based on their needs and resources and is usually very effective.

  6. 42 CFR 2.23 - Patient access and restrictions on use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Patient access and restrictions on use. 2.23 Section 2.23 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.23 Patient...

  7. 42 CFR 2.23 - Patient access and restrictions on use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patient access and restrictions on use. 2.23 Section 2.23 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.23 Patient...

  8. 42 CFR 2.23 - Patient access and restrictions on use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Patient access and restrictions on use. 2.23 Section 2.23 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.23 Patient...

  9. 42 CFR 2.23 - Patient access and restrictions on use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patient access and restrictions on use. 2.23 Section 2.23 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.23 Patient...

  10. Patients' Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice.

    PubMed

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-12-04

    Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1) Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2) Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3) Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4) Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1) How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2) The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems.

  11. 49 CFR 219.903 - Retention of drug testing records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... by part 40 of this title, each railroad must maintain drug abuse prevention program records in a.... (4) Records related to employee training: (i) Materials on drug abuse awareness, including a copy of the railroad's policy on drug abuse. (ii) Documentation of compliance with the requirements of §...

  12. Risk of individual malignant neoplasms in patients with sickle cell disease: English national record linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Seminog, Olena O; Ogunlaja, Oyindamola I; Yeates, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective Case reports suggest that there may be an increased risk of some cancers associated with sickle cell disease. However, population-based studies are scarce and there is no comprehensive enumeration of the risks across the whole range of site-specific cancers. Our aim was to provide this. Design We used an English national dataset of linked statistical records of hospital admissions and deaths from 1999 to 2011 to undertake a retrospective cohort study. Setting England. Participants Records of all hospital admissions in England with SCD or with conditions included in the control cohort. Main outcome measures Rate ratios were calculated comparing rates of cancer in a sickle cell disease cohort and a control cohort, confining the analyses to people whose ethnicity was recorded as Black. Results Comparing the sickle cell disease cohort with the cohort without sickle cell disease, the rate ratio for all cancers combined was 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.7–2.5). There were significantly high rate ratios for haematological malignancies, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma (rate ratio 3.7, 1.5–8.4), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (2.6, 1.3–4.8), multiple myeloma (5.5, 2.8–10.1), lymphoid leukaemia (3.3, 1.3–8.0) and myeloid leukaemia (10.0, 4.6–21.5). Four solid tumours showed elevated rate ratios: colon cancer (2.8, 1.2–5.5), non-melanoma skin cancer (4.4, 1.3–12.2), kidney cancer (5.4, 2.3–11.5) and thyroid cancer (5.1, 1.3–15.4). Conclusions The risk of some malignancies may be raised in patients with sickle cell disease. However, this study was based on administrative data without the scope to validate these against patients’ full clinical records. Our findings need confirmation or refutation. If confirmed, work to elucidate, at the genetic and molecular level, why people with sickle cell disease have elevated risks of individual cancers might make contributions to the fundamental understanding of carcinogenesis. PMID:27325377

  13. [Formalizing observation: The emergence of the modern patient record exemplified by Berlin and Paris medicine, 1725-1830].

    PubMed

    Hess, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The paper focuses on the material basis of the development of modern clinical documentation. With the examples of Berlin and Paris medicine, it analyzes the various ways of recording clinical data in the 18th century, from where they came, and how they were introduced into bedside observations. Particular interest is given to the interrelation between administrative techniques (registration, book-keeping etc.) and the practices of medical recording developed within the hospitals. Comparing Berlin and Paris makes it possible to work out the differences in writing cultures and to consider the local interdependencies. With this approach it can be demonstrated that the "patient record" was already established as a patient related recording system in the form of loose files in the early 19th century.

  14. The Relationship of Animal Abuse to Violence and Other Forms of Antisocial Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arluke, Arnold; Levin, Jack; Luke, Carter; Ascione, Frank

    1999-01-01

    Criminal records of 153 animal abusers and 153 control participants were tracked and compared. Animal abusers were more likely to commit property offenses, drug offenses, and public disorder offenses. Thus, results show an association between animal abuse and a variety of antisocial behavior, but not violence alone. Implications of these findings…

  15. Patients Undergoing Substance Abuse Treatment and Receiving Financial Assistance for a Physical Disability Respond Well to Contingency Management Treatment.

    PubMed

    Burch, Ashley E; Morasco, Benjamin J; Petry, Nancy M

    2015-11-01

    Physical illness and disability are common in individuals with substance use disorders, but little is known about the impact of physical disability status on substance use treatment outcomes. This study examined the main and interactive effects of physical disability payment status on substance use treatment. Participants (N = 1,013) were enrolled in one of six prior randomized clinical trials comparing contingency management (CM) to standard care; 79 (7.8%) participants reported receiving disability payments, CM improved all three primary substance use outcomes: treatment retention, percent negative samples and longest duration of abstinence. There was no significant main effect of physical disability payment status on treatment outcomes; however, a significant treatment condition by physical disability status interaction effect emerged in terms of retention in treatment and duration of abstinence achieved. Patients who were receiving physical disability payments responded particularly well to CM, and their time in treatment and durations of drug and alcohol abstinence increased even more markedly with CM than did that of their counterparts who were not receiving physical disability assistance. These findings suggest an objectively defined cohort of patients receiving substance use treatment who respond particularly well to CM.

  16. Impact of telemedicine on the quality of forensic sexual abuse examinations in rural communities.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Sheridan; Dharmar, Madan; Boyle, Cathy; Yang, Nikki H; MacLeod, Kristen; Rogers, Kristen; Nesbitt, Thomas; Marcin, James P

    2014-09-01

    To assess the quality and diagnostic accuracy of pediatric sexual abuse forensic examinations conducted at rural hospitals with access to telemedicine compared with examinations conducted at similar hospitals without telemedicine support. Medical records of children less than 18 years of age referred for sexual abuse forensic examinations were reviewed at five rural hospitals with access to telemedicine consultations and three comparison hospitals with existing sexual abuse programs without telemedicine. Forensic examination quality and accuracy were independently evaluated by expert review of state mandated forensic reporting forms, photo/video documentation, and medical records using two structured implicit review instruments. Among the 183 patients included in the study, 101 (55.2%) children were evaluated at telemedicine hospitals and 82 (44.8%) were evaluated at comparison hospitals. Evaluation of state mandatory sexual abuse examination reporting forms demonstrated that hospitals with telemedicine had significantly higher quality scores in several domains including the general exam, the genital exam, documentation of examination findings, the overall assessment, and the summed total quality score (p<0.05 for each). Evaluation of the photos/videos and medical records documenting the completeness and accuracy of the examinations demonstrated that hospitals with telemedicine also had significantly higher scores in several domains including photo/video quality, completeness of the examination, and the summed total completeness and accuracy score (p<0.05 for each). Rural hospitals using telemedicine for pediatric sexual abuse forensic examination consultations provided significantly higher quality evaluations, more complete examinations, and more accurate diagnoses than similar hospitals conducting examinations without telemedicine support. PMID:24841062

  17. Impact of telemedicine on the quality of forensic sexual abuse examinations in rural communities.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Sheridan; Dharmar, Madan; Boyle, Cathy; Yang, Nikki H; MacLeod, Kristen; Rogers, Kristen; Nesbitt, Thomas; Marcin, James P

    2014-09-01

    To assess the quality and diagnostic accuracy of pediatric sexual abuse forensic examinations conducted at rural hospitals with access to telemedicine compared with examinations conducted at similar hospitals without telemedicine support. Medical records of children less than 18 years of age referred for sexual abuse forensic examinations were reviewed at five rural hospitals with access to telemedicine consultations and three comparison hospitals with existing sexual abuse programs without telemedicine. Forensic examination quality and accuracy were independently evaluated by expert review of state mandated forensic reporting forms, photo/video documentation, and medical records using two structured implicit review instruments. Among the 183 patients included in the study, 101 (55.2%) children were evaluated at telemedicine hospitals and 82 (44.8%) were evaluated at comparison hospitals. Evaluation of state mandatory sexual abuse examination reporting forms demonstrated that hospitals with telemedicine had significantly higher quality scores in several domains including the general exam, the genital exam, documentation of examination findings, the overall assessment, and the summed total quality score (p<0.05 for each). Evaluation of the photos/videos and medical records documenting the completeness and accuracy of the examinations demonstrated that hospitals with telemedicine also had significantly higher scores in several domains including photo/video quality, completeness of the examination, and the summed total completeness and accuracy score (p<0.05 for each). Rural hospitals using telemedicine for pediatric sexual abuse forensic examination consultations provided significantly higher quality evaluations, more complete examinations, and more accurate diagnoses than similar hospitals conducting examinations without telemedicine support.

  18. The computer based patient record: a strategic issue in process innovation.

    PubMed

    Sicotte, C; Denis, J L; Lehoux, P

    1998-12-01

    Reengineering of the workplace through Information Technology is an important strategic issue for today's hospitals. The computer-based patient record (CPR) is one technology that has the potential to profoundly modify the work routines of the care unit. This study investigates a CPR project aimed at allowing physicians and nurses to work in a completely electronic environment. The focus of our analysis was the patient nursing care process. The rationale behind the introduction of this technology was based on its alleged capability to both enhance quality of care and control costs. This is done by better managing the flow of information within the organization and by introducing mechanisms such as the timeless and spaceless organization of the work place, de-localization, and automation of work processes. The present case study analyzed the implementation of a large CPR project ($45 million U.S.) conducted in four hospitals in joint venture with two computer firms. The computerized system had to be withdrawn because of boycotts from both the medical and nursing personnel. User-resistance was not the problem. Despite its failure, this project was a good opportunity to understand better the intricate complexity of introducing technology in professional work where the usefulness of information is short lived and where it is difficult to predetermine the relevancy of information. Profound misconceptions in achieving a tighter fit (synchronization) between care processes and information processes were the main problems. PMID:9871877

  19. Task and error analysis balancing benefits over business of electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Deborah Sater; Rodriguez, Walter; Wood, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    Task and error analysis research was performed to identify: a) the process for healthcare organisations in managing healthcare for patients with mental illness or substance abuse; b) how the process can be enhanced and; c) if electronic medical records (EMRs) have a role in this process from a business and safety perspective. The research question is if EMRs have a role in enhancing the healthcare for patients with mental illness or substance abuse. A discussion on the business of EMRs is addressed to understand the balancing act between the safety and business aspects of an EMR.

  20. Electronic Health Record Patient Portal Adoption by Health Care Consumers: An Acceptance Model and Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The future of health care delivery is becoming more citizen centered, as today’s user is more active, better informed, and more demanding. Worldwide governments are promoting online health services, such as electronic health record (EHR) patient portals and, as a result, the deployment and use of these services. Overall, this makes the adoption of patient-accessible EHR portals an important field to study and understand. Objective The aim of this study is to understand the factors that drive individuals to adopt EHR portals. Methods We applied a new adoption model using, as a starting point, Ventkatesh's Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology in a consumer context (UTAUT2) by integrating a new construct specific to health care, a new moderator, and new relationships. To test the research model, we used the partial least squares (PLS) causal modelling approach. An online questionnaire was administrated. We collected 360 valid responses. Results The statistically significant drivers of behavioral intention are performance expectancy (beta=.200; t=3.619), effort expectancy (beta=.185; t=2.907), habit (beta=.388; t=7.320), and self-perception (beta=.098; t=2.285). The predictors of use behavior are habit (beta=0.206; t=2.752) and behavioral intention (beta=0.258; t=4.036). The model explained 49.7% of the variance in behavioral intention and 26.8% of the variance in use behavior. Conclusions Our research helps to understand the desired technology characteristics of EHR portals. By testing an information technology acceptance model, we are able to determine what is more valued by patients when it comes to deciding whether to adopt EHR portals or not. The inclusion of specific constructs and relationships related to the health care consumer area also had a significant impact on understanding the adoption of EHR portals. PMID:26935646

  1. Assertiveness training to prevent verbal abuse in the OR.

    PubMed

    Buback, Debra

    2004-01-01

    THE HIGH INCIDENCE OF VERBAL ABUSE directed toward perioperative nurses by surgeons has been the subject of recent research studies. REPEATED INCIDENTS of verbal abuse in the OR contribute to increased incidence of errors, low morale, and high turnover among nursing staff members. ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING that focuses on conflict resolution and communication skills is an effective method of coping with verbal abuse. EACH MEMBER is a vital part of the perioperative team. Any disruption to the team, including verbal abuse, can compromise patient safety. Collaboration among team members is critical to ensure safe patient outcomes. PMID:14763584

  2. Pattern-visual evoked potentials in thinner abusers.

    PubMed

    Poblano, A; Lope Huerta, M; Martínez, J M; Falcón, H D

    1996-01-01

    Organic solvents cause injury to lipids of neuronal and glial membranes. A well known characteristic of workers exposed to thinner is optic neuropathy. We decided to look for neurophysiologic signs of visual damage in patients identified as thinner abusers. Pattern reversal visual evoked potentials was performed on 34 thinner abuser patients and 30 controls. P-100 wave latency was found to be longer on abuser than control subjects. Results show the possibility of central alterations on thinner abusers despite absence of clinical symptoms. PMID:8987190

  3. Opioid use and abuse: a pain clinic perspective.

    PubMed

    Schultz, David

    2013-03-01

    Prescription opioid abuse has become the biggest drug problem facing the United States, surpassing abuse of cocaine, methamphetamines and heroin combined. For physicians treating patients with chronic pain, deciding whether to prescribe opioids, especially long-term, can be a challenge. This article describes the history of the opioid abuse problem in the United States, new agents that are effective but less prone to abuse, and tools physicians can use to evaluate whether a patient is a candidate for prescription opioids or other options for pain control.

  4. Patient-Held Maternal and/or Child Health Records: Meeting the Information Needs of Patients and Healthcare Providers in Developing Countries?

    PubMed

    Turner, Kathleen E; Fuller, Sherrilynne

    2011-01-01

    Though improvements in infant and maternal mortality rates have occurred over time, women and children still die every hour from preventable causes. Various regional, social and economic factors are involved in the ability of women and children to receive adequate care and prevention services. Patient-held maternal and/or child health records have been used for a number of years in many countries to help track health risks, vaccinations and other preventative health measures performed. Though these records are primarily designed to record patient histories and healthcare information and guide healthcare workers providing care, because the records are patient-held, they also allow families a greater ability to track their own health and prevention strategies. A LITERATURE SEARCH WAS PERFORMED TO ANSWER THESE QUESTIONS: (1) What are maternal information needs regarding pregnancy, post-natal and infant healthcare, especially in developing countries? (2) What is known about maternal information seeking behavior in developing countries? (3) What is the history and current state of maternal and/or child patient-held healthcare records, do they provide for the information needs of the healthcare provider and what are the effects and outcomes of patient-held records in general and for maternal and/or child health in particular? Specific information needs of pregnant women and mothers are rarely studied. The small numbers of maternal information behavior results available indicate that mothers, in general, prefer to receive health information directly from their healthcare provider as opposed to from other sources (written, etc.) Overall, in developing countries, patient-held maternal and/or child healthcare records have a mostly positive effect for both patient and care provider. Mothers and children with records tend to have better outcomes in healthcare and preventative measures. Further research into the information behaviors of pregnant women and mothers to determine

  5. [Investigations on the present status of infections with Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), Mycoplasma hominis (Mh) and Ureaplasma urealyticum (Uu) in patients with venereal diseases, sexual abusers and healthy people in Da Lian].

    PubMed

    Jiang, R; Yu, A; Zhang, Z

    1994-04-01

    From January to June 1992, we conducted the detection of serum antibodies against Ct, Mh and Uu in patients with venereal diseases, sexual abusers and healthy people. The results showed that the positive rates of antibodies against Ct, Mh and Uu in patients were the highest, while in healthy people those of antibodies against Ct and Uu were the lowest. The positive rates between the antibody against Uu and that against Mh have no obvious difference between male and female. All samples have dual infection of Ct and Mh.

  6. Melatonin ineffective in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis patients with fragmented or normal motor activity rhythms recorded by wrist actigraphy.

    PubMed

    Hätönen, T; Kirveskari, E; Heiskala, H; Sainio, K; Laakso, M L; Santavuori, P

    1999-04-01

    Melatonin was tested as a sleeping pill in five patients with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. The single-blind, placebo-controlled study consisted of motor activity recordings, sleep logs, and administration of placebo or melatonin (2.5 or 5 mg). Daily motor activity rhythms were measured by wrist actigraphy during four 7-day periods (baseline, placebo, melatonin 2.5 mg, and melatonin 5 mg). The placebo or melatonin was administered in the evenings for 3 weeks, and the recordings were made during the last week of the 3-week treatment. Sleep logs were kept by the caregivers during the recordings. Based on period analyses, the activity recordings were evaluated to display a normal (24-h) or fragmented rhythm. Three patients had normal motor activity patterns during the baseline recordings, and administration of placebo or melatonin did not affect their rest/activity rhythms. Two patients had abnormally fragmented activity rhythms during the baseline periods, and administration of placebo or melatonin did not induce synchronization. According to the actigraphic data, there were no changes in activity rhythms resulting from administration of melatonin. However, based on the observations, three families reported that melatonin slightly improved the sleep quality of the patients. These controversial findings show the difficulties involved in specifying the role of melatonin in modulating sleep. Thus, we conclude that more evidence is required before the significance of melatonin as a sleeping pill is defined. PMID:10191137

  7. Melatonin ineffective in neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis patients with fragmented or normal motor activity rhythms recorded by wrist actigraphy.

    PubMed

    Hätönen, T; Kirveskari, E; Heiskala, H; Sainio, K; Laakso, M L; Santavuori, P

    1999-04-01

    Melatonin was tested as a sleeping pill in five patients with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses. The single-blind, placebo-controlled study consisted of motor activity recordings, sleep logs, and administration of placebo or melatonin (2.5 or 5 mg). Daily motor activity rhythms were measured by wrist actigraphy during four 7-day periods (baseline, placebo, melatonin 2.5 mg, and melatonin 5 mg). The placebo or melatonin was administered in the evenings for 3 weeks, and the recordings were made during the last week of the 3-week treatment. Sleep logs were kept by the caregivers during the recordings. Based on period analyses, the activity recordings were evaluated to display a normal (24-h) or fragmented rhythm. Three patients had normal motor activity patterns during the baseline recordings, and administration of placebo or melatonin did not affect their rest/activity rhythms. Two patients had abnormally fragmented activity rhythms during the baseline periods, and administration of placebo or melatonin did not induce synchronization. According to the actigraphic data, there were no changes in activity rhythms resulting from administration of melatonin. However, based on the observations, three families reported that melatonin slightly improved the sleep quality of the patients. These controversial findings show the difficulties involved in specifying the role of melatonin in modulating sleep. Thus, we conclude that more evidence is required before the significance of melatonin as a sleeping pill is defined.

  8. 38 CFR 1.466 - Security for records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROVISIONS Release of Information from Department of Veterans Affairs (va) Records Relating to Drug Abuse, Alcoholism Or Alcohol Abuse, Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (hiv), Or Sickle Cell Anemia §...

  9. 38 CFR 1.466 - Security for records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PROVISIONS Release of Information from Department of Veterans Affairs (va) Records Relating to Drug Abuse, Alcoholism Or Alcohol Abuse, Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (hiv), Or Sickle Cell Anemia §...

  10. 38 CFR 1.466 - Security for records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... PROVISIONS Release of Information from Department of Veterans Affairs (va) Records Relating to Drug Abuse, Alcoholism Or Alcohol Abuse, Infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (hiv), Or Sickle Cell Anemia §...

  11. Reported child sexual abuse in Bahrain: 2000-2009

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mahroos, Fadheela; Al-Amer, Eshraq

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a common problem with severe short and long-term consequences to the abused child, the family and to society. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of CSA, and demographic and other characteristics of the abused and their families. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective and descriptive study based on a review of medical records of CSA cases from 2000-2009 at Sulmaniya Medical Complex, the main secondary and tertiary medical care facility in Bahrain. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The review included demographic data, child and family characteristics, manifestations and interventions. RESULTS: The 440 children diagnosed with CSA had a mean age of 8 years (range, 9 months to 17 years); 222 were males (50.5%) and 218 were females (49.5%). There was a steady increase in cases from 31 per year in 2000 to 77 cases in 2009. Children disclosed abuse in 26% of cases, while health sector professionals recognized 53% of the cases. Genital touching and fondling (62.5%) were the most common form of CSA, followed by sodomy in 39%. Gonorrhea was documented in 2% of the cases and pregnancy in 4% of the females. The illiteracy rate among the fathers and mothers was 9% and 12%, respectively, which is higher than the rate among the adult general population. Children came from all socio-economic classes. There was referral to police in 56%, public prosecution in 31% of the cases, but only 8% reached the court. CONCLUSION: During ten years there has been a 2.5% increase in reported cases of CSA. Improving the skill of professionals in identifying CSA indicators and a mandatory reporting law might be needed to improve the rate of recognition and referral of CSA cases. Further general population-based surveys are needed to determine more accurately the scope of CSA and the risk and protective factors in the family and community. PMID:21808114

  12. Sexual Abuse History and Pelvic Floor Disorders in Women

    PubMed Central

    Cichowski, Sara B.; Dunivan, Gena C.; Komesu, Yuko M.; Rogers, Rebecca G.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Sexual abuse rates in the general female population range between 15% and 25%, and sexual abuse is known to have a long-term impact on a woman’s health. The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of sexual abuse history in women presenting to clinicians for pelvic floor disorders (PFD) and to determine whether a history of sexual abuse is associated with a specific type of PFD. Methods We conducted a retrospective chart review of new urogynecology patients seen at the University of New Mexico Hospital. All women underwent a standardized history and physical examination and completed symptom severity and quality-of-life measures. Univariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to determine which PFDs were associated with a history of sexual abuse among women with and without a history of sexual abuse. Results A total of 1899 new urogynecology patients with complete information were identified from January 2007 and October 2011; 1260 (66%) were asked about a history of sexual abuse. The prevalence of sexual abuse was 213/1260 (17%). In the multivariable analysis, only chronic pelvic pain remained significantly associated with a history of sexual abuse. Conclusions A history of sexual abuse is common among women with PFDs, and these women were more likely to have chronic pelvic pain. PMID:24305526

  13. Can men who abuse children change?

    PubMed

    Saphira, M

    1989-01-01

    Convicted child sexual offenders studied and method of treatment described. The role of alcohol is looked at and the sex offender who abuses alcohol is distinguished from the alcoholic who molests or rapes children. The criteria for success are set out and the rate of success recorded.

  14. Selected Materials on Drug Abuse and Misuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigo County Public Library, Terre Haute, IN.

    The Vigo County Public Library has a Center for Drug Information which contains pamphlets, leaflets, newsletters, realia kits, films, records, cassettes, slides, educational aids and other materials on drug use, abuse and education. The materials in this list were selected for their relevance to the needs of local groups and organizations in…

  15. An analysis of electronic health record-related patient safety concerns

    PubMed Central

    Meeks, Derek W; Smith, Michael W; Taylor, Lesley; Sittig, Dean F; Scott, Jean M; Singh, Hardeep

    2014-01-01

    Objective A recent Institute of Medicine report called for attention to safety issues related to electronic health records (EHRs). We analyzed EHR-related safety concerns reported within a large, integrated healthcare system. Methods The Informatics Patient Safety Office of the Veterans Health Administration (VA) maintains a non-punitive, voluntary reporting system to collect and investigate EHR-related safety concerns (ie, adverse events, potential events, and near misses). We analyzed completed investigations using an eight-dimension sociotechnical conceptual model that accounted for both technical and non-technical dimensions of safety. Using the framework analysis approach to qualitative data, we identified emergent and recurring safety concerns common to multiple reports. Results We extracted 100 consecutive, unique, closed investigations between August 2009 and May 2013 from 344 reported incidents. Seventy-four involved unsafe technology and 25 involved unsafe use of technology. A majority (70%) involved two or more model dimensions. Most often, non-technical dimensions such as workflow, policies, and personnel interacted in a complex fashion with technical dimensions such as software/hardware, content, and user interface to produce safety concerns. Most (94%) safety concerns related to either unmet data-display needs in the EHR (ie, displayed information available to the end user failed to reduce uncertainty or led to increased potential for patient harm), software upgrades or modifications, data transmission between components of the EHR, or ‘hidden dependencies’ within the EHR. Discussion EHR-related safety concerns involving both unsafe technology and unsafe use of technology persist long after ‘go-live’ and despite the sophisticated EHR infrastructure represented in our data source. Currently, few healthcare institutions have reporting and analysis capabilities similar to the VA. Conclusions Because EHR-related safety concerns have complex

  16. [Sexual abuse of minors].

    PubMed

    Hayez, J Y

    1991-01-01

    The author gives a definition of sexual abuse on minors, emphasizing its more frequent occurrence inside the family (incest) than outside. He describes the countertransference reactions induced by this type of abuse, especially in professional teams who tend to put each other in a position of rivalry. Next, he sketches the pathogeny of sexual abuse, the clinical signs and the long term effects. The author deduces what should be the first signs of sexual abuse and proposes a pattern of diagnosis. Finally, he explains a management model, of the crisis and the follow-up of this difficult situation. PMID:1670411

  17. Elder physical abuse.

    PubMed

    Young, Lisa M

    2014-11-01

    Physical abuse of the elderly is a significant public health concern. The true prevalence of all types is unknown, and under-reporting is known to be significant. The geriatric population is projected to increase dramatically over the next 10 years, and the number of abused individuals is projected to increase also. It is critical that health care providers feel competent in addressing physical elder abuse. This article presents cases illustrating the variety of presenting symptoms that may be attributed to physical elder abuse.

  18. Measurement of patient safety: a systematic review of the reliability and validity of adverse event detection with record review

    PubMed Central

    Hanskamp-Sebregts, Mirelle; Zegers, Marieke; Vincent, Charles; van Gurp, Petra J; de Vet, Henrica C W; Wollersheim, Hub

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Record review is the most used method to quantify patient safety. We systematically reviewed the reliability and validity of adverse event detection with record review. Design A systematic review of the literature. Methods We searched PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO and the Cochrane Library and from their inception through February 2015. We included all studies that aimed to describe the reliability and/or validity of record review. Two reviewers conducted data extraction. We pooled κ values (κ) and analysed the differences in subgroups according to number of reviewers, reviewer experience and training level, adjusted for the prevalence of adverse events. Results In 25 studies, the psychometric data of the Global Trigger Tool (GTT) and the Harvard Medical Practice Study (HMPS) were reported and 24 studies were included for statistical pooling. The inter-rater reliability of the GTT and HMPS showed a pooled κ of 0.65 and 0.55, respectively. The inter-rater agreement was statistically significantly higher when the group of reviewers within a study consisted of a maximum five reviewers. We found no studies reporting on the validity of the GTT and HMPS. Conclusions The reliability of record review is moderate to substantial and improved when a small group of reviewers carried out record review. The validity of the record review method has never been evaluated, while clinical data registries, autopsy or direct observations of patient care are potential reference methods that can be used to test concurrent validity. PMID:27550650

  19. Real time information from bedside monitors as part of a web-based patient record.

    PubMed

    Tachinardi, U; de Sà Rebelo, M; de Magalhães Oliveira, P P; Pilon, P E

    2001-01-01

    Traditional paper-based Medical Records, and even most of their digital counterparts, represent historical patient information. On the other hand new generations of Point-of-Care devices can be connected to standard networks and deliver streams of real time data through an Intranet, or even the Internet. Vital signs provided by IP-based devices can then be viewed at remote stations. Merging both worlds, real time and historical, in the pursuit of a comprehensive EPR is the main challenge of the present project. The basic infra-structure is composed of three main components: an existing Web-based EPR viewing station1 (Web-EPR); a fully integrated HIS/PACS system1; and a monitoring network (Siemens Infinity Network 2). Communication between the components was obtained by developing interfaces based on both HL7 and Siemens protocols the later only for waveforms. For the graphical display a web-browser-based application of the streamed signals was developed and integrated into the existing Web-EPR. This addition expanded the Web-EPR capabilities providing means to include real time signals and calculated parameters on the set of information already available. Some extra features of this project include: one-way SMS messaging of the parameters, interactive WAP access and a DICOM compliant storage of signal waveforms.

  20. Implications of the Java language on computer-based patient records.

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, D.; Kucharz, E.; Hammond, W. E.

    1996-01-01

    The growth of the utilization of the World Wide Web (WWW) as a medium for the delivery of computer-based patient records (CBPR) has created a new paradigm in which clinical information may be delivered. Until recently the authoring tools and environment for application development on the WWW have been limited to Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) utilizing common gateway interface scripts. While, at times, this provides an effective medium for the delivery of CBPR, it is a less than optimal solution. The server-centric dynamics and low levels of interactivity do not provide for a robust application which is required in a clinical environment. The emergence of Sun Microsystems' Java language is a solution to the problem. In this paper we examine the Java language and its implications to the CBPR. A quantitative and qualitative assessment was performed. The Java environment is compared to HTML and Telnet CBPR environments. Qualitative comparisons include level of interactivity, server load, client load, ease of use, and application capabilities. Quantitative comparisons include data transfer time delays. The Java language has demonstrated promise for delivering CBPRs. PMID:8947762

  1. Implementation of computer-based patient records in primary care: the societal health economic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Arias-Vimárlund, V.; Ljunggren, M.; Timpka, T.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Exploration of the societal health economic effects occurring during the first year after implementation of Computerised Patient Records (CPRs) at Primary Health Care (PHC) centres. DESIGN: Comparative case studies of practice processes and their consequences one year after CPR implementation, using the constant comparison method. Application of transaction-cost analyses at a societal level on the results. SETTING: Two urban PHC centres under a managed care contract in Ostergötland county, Sweden. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Central implementation issues. First-year societal direct normal costs, direct unexpected costs, and indirect costs. Societal benefits. RESULTS: The total societal effect of the CPR implementation was a cost of nearly 250,000 SEK (USD 37,000) per GP team. About 20% of the effect consisted of direct unexpected costs, accured from the reduction of practitioners' leisure time. The main issues in the implementation process were medical informatics knowledge and computer skills, adaptation of the human-computer interaction design to practice routines, and information access through the CPR. CONCLUSIONS: The societal costs exceed the benefits during the first year after CPR implementation at the observed PHC centres. Early investments in requirements engineering and staff training may increase the efficiency. Exploitation of the CPR for disease prevention and clinical quality improvement is necessary to defend the investment in societal terms. The exact calculation of societal costs requires further analysis of the affected groups' willingness to pay. PMID:8947717

  2. Towards shared patient records: an architecture for using routine data for nationwide research.

    PubMed

    Knaup, Petra; Garde, Sebastian; Merzweiler, Angela; Graf, Norbert; Schilling, Freimut; Weber, Ralf; Haux, Reinhold

    2006-01-01

    Ubiquitous information is currently one of the most challenging slogans in medical informatics research. An adequate architecture for shared electronic patient records is needed which can use data for multiple purposes and which is extensible for new research questions. We introduce eardap as architecture for using routine data for nationwide clinical research in a multihospital environment. eardap can be characterized as terminology-based. Main advantage of our approach is the extensibility by new items and new research questions. Once the definition of items for a research question is finished, a consistent, corresponding database can be created without any informatics skills. Our experiences in pediatric oncology in Germany have shown the applicability of eardap. The functions of our core system were in routine clinical use in several hospitals. We validated the terminology management system (TMS) and the module generation tool with the basic data set of pediatric oncology. The multiple usability depends mainly on the quality of item planning in the TMS. High quality harmonization will lead to a higher amount of multiply used data. When using eardap, special emphasis is to be placed on interfaces to local hospital information systems and data security issues. PMID:16115794

  3. Factors affecting the diffusion of the Computer-Based Patient Record.

    PubMed Central

    Ash, J. S.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of the perceptions of 629 informatics experts representing 67 institutions with accredited schools of medicine was used to identify factors most important in implementing the Computer-Based Patient Record. A model outlined three theoretical factors: Innovation Attributes (attributes inherent in the CPR itself); Organizational Attributes; and Boundary-Spanning Attributes (related to marketing efforts). The model was explored using multiple regression techniques to delineate the relative importance of 15 variables within the three sets of factors and their effect on two measures of diffusion. The two dependent variables were internal diffusion, or spread of usage of the CPR, and infusion, or depth of usage. Data from the 144 respondents indicate that for diffusion, the organizational variables of "decision making" and "planning" had a significant impact, although the relation between "planning" and diffusion was negative. For infusion, the Innovation Attributes variable "visibility" was significant. The major implication is that successfully encouraging usage of the CPR entails attention and resources devoted to managing the organizational aspects of implementation. PMID:9357712

  4. Patient perceptions of electronic medical records use and ratings of care quality

    PubMed Central

    Finney Rutten, Lila J; Vieux, Sana N; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Arora, Neeraj K; Moser, Richard P; Beckjord, Ellen Burke; Hesse, Bradford W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Despite considerable potential for improving health care quality, adoption of new technologies, such as electronic medical records (EMRs), requires prudence, to ensure that such tools are designed, implemented, and used meaningfully to facilitate patient-centered communication and care processes, and better health outcomes. The association between patients’ perceptions of health care provider use of EMRs and health care quality ratings was assessed. Method Data from two iterations of the Health Information National Trends Survey, fielded in 2011 and 2012, were pooled for these analyses. The data were collected via mailed questionnaire, using a nationally representative listing of home addresses as the sampling frame (n=7,390). All data were weighted to provide representative estimates of quality of care ratings and physician use of EMR, in the adult US population. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, and multivariable linear regression analyses were conducted. Results EMR use was reported significantly more frequently by females, younger age groups, non-Hispanic whites, and those with higher education, higher incomes, health insurance, and a usual source of health care. Respondents who reported physician use of EMRs had significantly higher ratings of care quality (Beta=4.83, standard error [SE]=1.7, P<0.01), controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, usual source of health care, and health insurance status. Conclusion Nationally representative data suggest that patients’ perceptions of EMR use are associated with their perceptions of the quality of the health care they receive. PMID:24711715

  5. Using frames to influence consumer willingness to pay for the patient health record: a randomized experiment.

    PubMed

    Vishwanath, Arun

    2009-07-01

    The American College of Medical Informatics rated the lack of willingness to pay for the patient health record (PHR) as the biggest obstacles to its rapid diffusion. Extending research propositions from the decision sciences and political communication, this study tests the influence of different types of emphasis frames on increasing consumer willingness to pay for the PHR. Using a randomized experiment embedded within a probability survey, the effects of 3 different types of emphasis frames (individual-focused, collective-focused, and joint), along with a no-frames control, are tested on a sample of early and later technology adopters. The results indicate a significant relationship between the type of frame and the type of adopter. Early adopters were more susceptible to individual-focused frames that made causal attributions at the individual level, whereas later adopters were significantly influenced by collective-focused frames that made causal attributions at the societal level. Interestingly, the framing effect continued and significantly influenced both early and later adopters' willingness to pay for the PHR. The findings demonstrate the need to carefully communicate the value of a technology to adopters and suggest the possibility of using frames to spur the diffusion of PHRs.

  6. Substance abuse patterns and psychiatric symptomatology among three healthcare provider groups evaluated in an out-patient program for impaired healthcare professionals.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Julio I; Jeon-Slaughter, Haekyung; Brand, Michael; Koos, Erin

    2013-01-01

    Three impaired health care provider groups (N = 84) (nurses, pharmacists, and providers with prescriptive authority) referred for a substance abuse evaluation at an outpatient-based program were compared on demographic and family factors, substance abuse patterns, and psychiatric symptomology as assessed by the Personality Assessment Inventory. Nurses had the highest rates of family history of addiction, problems with benzodiazepines, and psychiatric comorbidity. Overall, health care professionals endorsed opioids twice as often as alcohol as a preferred substance. Family history of addiction, sex, and psychiatric comorbidity emerged as salient factors among these health care professionals. Clinical implications are examined in light of the current findings.

  7. Embracing the Sparse, Noisy, and Interrelated Aspects of Patient Demographics for use in Clinical Medical Record Linkage.

    PubMed

    Ash, Stephen M; Ip-Lin, King

    2015-01-01

    Duplicate patient records in health information systems have received increased attention in recent time due to regulatory incentives to integrate the healthcare enterprise. Historically, most patient record matching systems have been limited to simple applications of the Fellegi-Sunter theory of record linkage with edit distance based string similarity measurements. String similarity approaches ignore the rich semantic information present by reducing it to a simple syntactic comparison of characters. This work describes an updated approach to building clinical medical record linkage systems, which embraces the unavoidable problems present in real-world patient matching. Using a ground truth dataset of a real patient population, we demonstrate that systems built in this fashion improve recall by 76% with little reduction in precision. This result empirically demonstrates the size of the gap between sophisticated systems and naïve approaches. Additionally, it accentuates the difficulty in estimating the false negative error in this setting as previous research has reported much higher levels of recall, due, in part, to measuring from biased samples. PMID:26306279

  8. Embracing the Sparse, Noisy, and Interrelated Aspects of Patient Demographics for use in Clinical Medical Record Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Stephen M.; Ip-Lin, King

    2015-01-01

    Duplicate patient records in health information systems have received increased attention in recent time due to regulatory incentives to integrate the healthcare enterprise. Historically, most patient record matching systems have been limited to simple applications of the Fellegi-Sunter theory of record linkage with edit distance based string similarity measurements. String similarity approaches ignore the rich semantic information present by reducing it to a simple syntactic comparison of characters. This work describes an updated approach to building clinical medical record linkage systems, which embraces the unavoidable problems present in real-world patient matching. Using a ground truth dataset of a real patient population, we demonstrate that systems built in this fashion improve recall by 76% with little reduction in precision. This result empirically demonstrates the size of the gap between sophisticated systems and naïve approaches. Additionally, it accentuates the difficulty in estimating the false negative error in this setting as previous research has reported much higher levels of recall, due, in part, to measuring from biased samples. PMID:26306279

  9. Women's Dependency on Prescription Drugs; Hearing Before the Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House.

    This record of the Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control contains testimonies addressing the problems facing drug abusing women. The extensive prescribing of legal drugs such as tranquilizers, sedatives, pain killers, and stimulants is examined. The problems of polydrug abuse and alcohol abuse in combination with other drugs are also…

  10. 42 CFR 2.65 - Procedures and criteria for orders authorizing disclosure and use of records to criminally...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Court Orders Authorizing Disclosure and Use § 2.65... hearing. Unless an order under § 2.66 is sought with an order under this section, the person holding the... court finds that all of the following criteria are met: (1) The crime involved is extremely...

  11. Public attitudes towards the use of primary care patient record data in medical research without consent: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Robling, M; Hood, K; Houston, H; Pill, R; Fay, J; Evans, H

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Recent legislative changes within the United Kingdom have stimulated professional debate about access to patient data within research. However, there is currently little awareness of public views about such research. The authors sought to explore attitudes of the public, and their lay representatives, towards the use of primary care medical record data for research when patient consent was not being sought. Methods: 49 members of the public and four non-medical members of local community health councils in South Wales, UK gave their views on the value and acceptability of three current research scenarios, each describing access to data without patient consent. Results: Among focus group participants, awareness of research in primary care was low, and the appropriateness of general practitioners as researchers was questioned. There was general support for research but also concerns expressed about data collection without consent. These included lack of respect and patient control over the process. Unauthorised access to data by external agencies was a common fear. Current data collection practices, including population based disease registers elicited much anxiety. The key informants were equally critical of the scenarios and generally less accepting. Conclusions: This exploratory study has highlighted a number of areas of public concern when medical records are accessed for research without patient consent. Public acceptability regarding the use of medical records in research cannot simply be assumed. Further work is required to determine how widespread such views are and to inform those advising on confidentiality issues. PMID:14872086

  12. Sexual abuse in children - what to know

    MedlinePlus

    Sexual abuse - children ... are sexually abused before they turn 18. Sexual abuse of children is any activity that the abuser ... or vagina Tongue kissing Oral sex Intercourse Sexual abuse can also happen without physical contact, such as: ...

  13. Sleep in the surgical intensive care unit: continuous polygraphic recording of sleep in nine patients receiving postoperative care.

    PubMed Central

    Aurell, J; Elmqvist, D

    1985-01-01

    Sleep was studied in nine patients for two to four days after major non-cardiac surgery by continuous polygraphic recording of electroencephalogram, electrooculogram, and electromyogram. Presumed optimal conditions for sleep were provided by a concerted effort by staff to offer constant pain relief and reduce environmental disturbance to a minimum. All patients were severely deprived of sleep compared with normal. The mean cumulative sleep time (stage 1 excluded) for the first two nights, daytime sleep included, was less than two hours a night. Stages 3 and 4 and rapid eye movement sleep were severely or completely suppressed. The sustained wakefulness could be attributed to pain and environmental disturbance to only minor degree. Sleep time as estimated by nursing staff was often grossly misjudged and consistently overestimated when compared with the parallel polygraphic recording. The grossly abnormal sleep pattern observed in these patients may suggest some fundamental disarrangement of the sleep-wake regulating mechanism. PMID:3921096

  14. Antitussives and substance abuse

    PubMed Central

    Burns, Jarrett M; Boyer, Edward W

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of antitussive preparations is a continuing problem in the United States and throughout the world. Illicit, exploratory, or recreational use of dextromethorphan and codeine/promethazine cough syrups is widely described. This review describes the pharmacology, clinical effects, and management of toxicity from commonly abused antitussive formulations. PMID:24648790

  15. Defining Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giovannoni, Jeanne M.; Becerra, Rosina M.

    In seeking to clarify the meaning of the terms "child abuse" and "child neglect" it has been assumed that, like other forms of social deviance, they are socially defined phenomena. Interviews were conducted with those professionals (lawyers, pediatricians, police officers, and social workers) who daily handle the problems of abuse and neglect for…

  16. Substance Abuse and Disability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sales, Amos

    A review of the literature provides the conclusion that individuals with a disability versus those without a disability are more likely to have a substance abuse problem and less likely to get effective treatment. Data suggest 10-40% of all individuals in treatment for substance abuse have a coexisting physical or mental disability. Alcohol rates…

  17. Antitussives and substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Burns, Jarrett M; Boyer, Edward W

    2013-01-01

    Abuse of antitussive preparations is a continuing problem in the United States and throughout the world. Illicit, exploratory, or recreational use of dextromethorphan and codeine/promethazine cough syrups is widely described. This review describes the pharmacology, clinical effects, and management of toxicity from commonly abused antitussive formulations. PMID:24648790

  18. Adolescent Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Craig R.; DeBlassie, Richard R.

    1985-01-01

    Cummings (1979), citing evidence from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, reports that one of every eleven adult Americans suffers from a severe addictive problem. Drug addiction is epidemic among teenagers; one of every six teenagers suffers from a severe addictive problem. This paper focuses on adolescent drug/substance abuse. (Author)

  19. [A case of tianeptine abuse].

    PubMed

    Saatçioğlu, Omer; Erim, Rahşan; Cakmak, Duran

    2006-01-01

    Tianeptine is an antidepressant agent like the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). The anxiolytic efficacy of tianeptine is similar to that of tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants. Very few cases have been reported in connection with excessive consumption of tianeptine. Although it is not reconciled with results of many studies on excessive consumption of tianeptine, stimulant action has been specifically emphasized on some case reports of tianeptine abuse. These reports indicate that a tolerance is developed, there is a strong mode of feeling, and there are physical withdrawal symptoms if not taken again. Treatment with tianeptine can pose a risk for addicted patients in terms of high doses as well as tolerability. In this article, we report a 24-year-old patient who abused tianeptine for one year. The biological tolerance was excellent, and hepatic parameters were not affected. The patient experienced and seeks a psychostimulant effect. The patient had a previous history of addiction to cannabis, opiates and cocaine. We concluded that the effect of tianeptine and its addiction risk at the patient who had a history of addiction to multiple substances, and spontaneously increased dose of tianeptine during the last one year up to 3000 mg per day at present. In the literature, reports of addictions to antidepressants are scarce and most of them involve agents with amphetamine-like properties, including amineptine and tranylcypromine. Other reports involving other antidepressant agents, including amitriptyline, fluoxetine and tianeptine remain exceptional.

  20. Childhood Sexual Abuse Patterns, Psychosocial Correlates, and Treatment Outcomes among Adults in Drug Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boles, Sharon M.; Joshi, Vandana; Grella, Christine; Wellisch, Jean

    2005-01-01

    This study reports on the effects of having a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) on treatment outcomes among substance abusing men and women (N = 2,434) in a national, multisite study of drug treatment outcomes. A history of CSA was reported by 27.2% of the women and 9.2% of the men. Controlling for gender, compared to patients without CSA,…