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Sample records for abuse patient records

  1. Confidentiality of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Patient Records. Participant Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coggins, Patrick C.; And Others

    This participant manual is designed to provide an overview of federal laws and regulations pertaining to the confidentiality of alcohol and drug abuse patient records. The relationship of federal laws to state laws and regulations is also discussed. The materials, useful for persons involved in the fields of substance abuse treatment or…

  2. 42 CFR 2.1 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.1 Section 2.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.1 Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records. The restrictions of...

  3. 42 CFR 2.1 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Introduction § 2.1 Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records. The restrictions of these regulations upon the disclosure and use of drug abuse patient records were initially authorized by section...

  4. 42 CFR 2.2 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.2 Section 2.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 2.2 Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records. The restrictions of... section. (2) Whether or not the patient, with respect to whom any given record referred to in...

  5. 42 CFR 2.2 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.2 Section 2.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 2.2 Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records. The restrictions of... section. (2) Whether or not the patient, with respect to whom any given record referred to in...

  6. 42 CFR 2.2 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.2 Section 2.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 2.2 Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records. The restrictions of... section. (2) Whether or not the patient, with respect to whom any given record referred to in...

  7. 42 CFR 2.2 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.2 Section 2.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 2.2 Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records. The restrictions of... section. (2) Whether or not the patient, with respect to whom any given record referred to in...

  8. 42 CFR 2.2 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... abuse patient records. 2.2 Section 2.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... § 2.2 Statutory authority for confidentiality of alcohol abuse patient records. The restrictions of... section. (2) Whether or not the patient, with respect to whom any given record referred to in...

  9. 42 CFR 2.1 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... this section. (b) Purposes and circumstances of disclosure affecting consenting patient and patient... disclosed in accordance with the prior written consent of the patient with respect to whom such record is... abuse patient records. 2.1 Section 2.1 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH...

  10. 42 CFR 2.1 - Statutory authority for confidentiality of drug abuse patient records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... (e) Armed Forces and Veterans' Administration; interchange of records; report of suspected child abuse and neglect to State or local authorities The prohibitions of this section do not apply to any... prohibitions of this section do not apply to the reporting under State law of incidents of suspected...

  11. Evaluating abuse in the patient with dementia.

    PubMed

    Tronetti, Pamela

    2014-11-01

    For patients with dementia, abuse ranges from subtle scams to outright physical violence. As dementia progresses, abuse escalates. The stages of dementia--mild cognitive impairment, mild dementia, moderate dementia, and severe dementia--lend themselves to varied presentations of abuse. Knowing which types of abuse are more prominent at each stage aids the clinician in anticipating risk of abuse and patient and caregiver needs. Interviewing the victim is crucial in uncovering, documenting, and intervening in an abuse situation. A clinician who is skilled in drawing out the facts while remaining supportive of the patient is key in ending the victimization.

  12. Assisting sexually abused adults. Practical guide to interviewing patients.

    PubMed Central

    Leach, M. M.; Bethune, C.

    1996-01-01

    Millions of adults have been sexually abused. Patients often confide in their family physicians concerning their abuse. Physicians must understand their own issues surrounding sexual abuse and its sequelae before they attempt to treat sexually abused patients. The PLISSIT model offers a practical guide for assisting abused adult patients. PMID:8924817

  13. Sexual abuse in patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Tice, L; Hall, R C; Beresford, T P; Quinones, J; Hall, A K

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of sexual abuse in eating disorder patients appears significant. Fifty percent of both our anorectic and bulimic patients reported a history of sexual abuse while only 28% of a non-anorexic, non-bulimic control population reported similar problems (p less than 0.01). Several patterns of behavior seemed related to previous sexual assault. In one, the eating disorder was used to change the body image of the patient and therefore to provide a defense to future abuse. Other behaviors which occurred more specifically in bulimic women dealt with a projection of repressed anger toward male authority figures. Forty six percent of the bulimic women seen in our study exhibited some promiscuous behavior, using sex either as a gauge of their own self worth or as a means of punishing men. It is essential that sexual issues be addressed early in the treatment of patients with eating disorders. Disclosure is often difficult particularly in outpatient situations where the patient lives at home with her family. It usually does not occur in such cases until the later stages of therapy, or until the patient is hospitalized. Rape is the exception since our data suggests that it is usually revealed early in the course of treatment (p less than 0.001). Once disclosure occurs, a dramatic change is usually seen in the patient and treatment becomes more effective. As the patient deals with the issues of sexual abuse, they no longer need to deny their sexuality or punish themselves or others. Issues of guilt, depression, repressed anger, low self-esteem, social isolation and inadequacy are important and need to be addressed during the course of therapy with sexually abused patients.

  14. Acute Precipitants of Physical Elder Abuse: Qualitative Analysis of Legal Records From Highly Adjudicated Cases.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Tony; Bloemen, Elizabeth M; LoFaso, Veronica M; Clark, Sunday; Flomenbaum, Neal E; Breckman, Risa; Markarian, Arlene; Riffin, Catherine; Lachs, Mark S; Pillemer, Karl

    2016-08-09

    Elder abuse is a common phenomenon with potentially devastating consequences for older adults. Although researchers have begun to identify predisposing risk factors for elder abuse victims and abusers, little is known about the acute precipitants that lead to escalation to physical violence. We analyzed legal records from highly adjudicated cases to describe these acute precipitants for physical elder abuse. In collaboration with a large, urban district attorney's office, we qualitatively evaluated legal records from 87 successfully prosecuted physical elder abuse cases from 2003 to 2015. We transcribed and analyzed narratives of the events surrounding physical abuse within victim statements, police reports, and prosecutor records. We identified major themes using content analysis. We identified 10 categories of acute precipitants that commonly triggered physical elder abuse, including victim attempting to prevent the abuser from entering or demanding that he or she leave, victim threatening or attempting to leave/escape, threat or perception that the victim would involve the authorities, conflict about a romantic relationship, presence during/intervention in ongoing family violence, issues in multi-generational child rearing, conflict about the abuser's substance abuse, confrontation about financial exploitation, dispute over theft/destruction of property, and disputes over minor household issues. Common acute precipitants of physical elder abuse may be identified. Improved understanding of these acute precipitants for escalation to physical violence and their contribution to elder abuse may assist in the development of prevention and management strategies.

  15. Among a German Sample of Forensic Patients, Previous Animal Abuse Mediates Between Psychopathy and Sadistic Actions.

    PubMed

    Stupperich, Alexandra; Strack, Micha

    2016-05-01

    In an attempt to explain the relationship between psychopathy and severe violent behavior, this study associates previous animal abuse, psychopathy, and sadistic acting in forensic patients. Two topics are addressed: (i) whether previous animal abuse can be identified by a patient's Psychopathy Checklist profile and (ii) whether animal abuse statistically mediates between psychopathy and sadistic acting. In a German forensic hospital, 60 patients were investigated. Animal abuse was assessed using face-to-face interviews and the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL:SV), and sadistic acting was identified by file records.Discriminant analysis separated previous animal abuse (10/60) by high adolescent antisocial behavior, superficiality, lack of remorse, lack of empathy, and grandiosity. The mediation from psychopathy to sadistic acting (6/60) through animal abuse was found to be complete.The results, although sample size is limited and base rate of animal abuse and sadistic acting are low, fit with a model suggestive of animal abuse as a causal step toward sadistic crimes. Animal abuse correlates with callous, unemotional traits, and a development of sadistic crimes.

  16. Looking forward in records of youth abused as children: risks for homicidal, violent, and delinquent offenses.

    PubMed

    Hughes, John Russell; Zagar, Robert John; Busch, Kenneth G; Grove, William M; Arbit, Jack

    2009-02-01

    To study risks of abuse, violence, and homicide, 181 Abused Children (M age = 12.85 yr., SD = 2.74; 58 girls, 123 boys) were matched with 181 clinic-referred Controls. Data analysis was Shao's bootstrapped logistic regression with area under curve (AUC) and odds ratios (OR). Predictors of abused status were court contacts (OR = 2.04e+22) and poorer executive function (OR = .81; AUC = .99; 95% CI = .97-.99). Groups were tracked forward in records for 9 years (M = 8.78 yr., SD = 1.41). Looking forward, youth (M age = 21.63 yr., SD = 2.07) were classified into Abused Children Later Homicidal (5%, n = 10), Abused Children Later Violent (23%, n = 41), Abused Children Later Delinquent (28%, n = 50), Abused Children Later Nondelinquent (44%, n = 80), and Controls (n = 181). Data were analyzed with two more logistic regressions. Predictors of Abused Children Later Homicidal compared with Controls were number of court contacts (OR = 50,398.78) and poorer executive function (OR = 79.72; AUC = .91; 95% CI = .80-.95). The predictor of Abused Children Later Homicidal contrasted with Abused Children Later Nondelinquent was court contacts (OR = 2,077,089,352; AUC = .87; 95% CI = .65-.95). The common predictor for Abused Children and Abused Children Later Homicidal groups was court contacts.

  17. Confidentiality of Substance Use Disorder Patient Records. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2017-01-18

    The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is issuing this final rule to update and modernize the Confidentiality of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Patient Records regulations and facilitate information exchange within new health care models while addressing the legitimate privacy concerns of patients seeking treatment for a substance use disorder. These modifications also help clarify the regulations and reduce unnecessary burden.

  18. The Relationships between Recreational Drug Abuse and School Records among Korean Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; So, Wi-Young

    2017-01-01

    Background: Recreational drug abuse control has long been a major goal of global health and social welfare organizations. Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the possible associations between recreational drug abuse and Korean adolescents' school records. Methods: In 2012, 74,186 seventh- through twelfth-grade students participated…

  19. The Impact of Sexual Abuse in Patients Undergoing Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nicolai, Melianthe P. J.; Keller, Josbert J.; de Vries, Lieke; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Nicolai, Jan J.; Hardwick, James C. H.; Putter, Hein; Pelger, Rob C. M.; Elzevier, Henk W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Sexual abuse has been linked to strong effects on gastrointestinal health. Colonoscopy can provoke intense emotional reactions in patients with a sexual abuse history and may lead to avoidance of endoscopic procedures. Objective To determine whether care around colonoscopy needs adjustment for patients with sexual abuse experience, thereby exploring targets for the improvement of care around colonoscopic procedures. Methods Questionnaires were mailed to patients (n = 1419) from two centers within 11 months after colonoscopy. Differences in experience of the colonoscopy between patients with and without a sexual abuse history were assessed and patients' views regarding physicians' inquiry about sexual abuse and care around endoscopic procedures were obtained. Results A total of 768 questionnaires were analyzed. The prevalence of sexual abuse was 3.9% in male and 9.5% in female patients. Patients born in a non-western country reported more sexual abuse (14.9%) than those born in a western country (6.3%; p = 0.008). Discomfort during colonoscopy was indicated on a scale from 0 to 10, mean distress score of patients with sexual abuse was 4.8(±3.47) compared to 3.5(±3.11) in patients without a sexual abuse history (p = 0.007). Abdominal pain was a predictor for higher distress during colonoscopy (β = −0.019 (SE = 0.008); p = 0.02, as well as the number of complaints indicated as reason for colonoscopy (β = 0.738 (SE = 0.276); p = 0.008). Of patients with sexual abuse experience, 53.8% believed gastroenterologists should ask about it, 43.4% said deeper sedation during colonoscopy would diminish the distress. Conclusions Sexual abuse is prevalent in patients presenting for colonoscopy. Patients with a sexual abuse history experience more distress during the procedure and indicate that extra attention around and during colonoscopy may diminish this distress. PMID:24454784

  20. Newborn Patients of Mothers with Substance Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Albersheim, Susan G.

    1991-01-01

    It is important to identify high-risk women abusing drugs in order to provide good care for them and their babies. These infants require close observation after birth for perinatal complications withdrawal, long-term neurobehavioral abnormalities (even with drug use only early in pregnancy), and sudden infant death syndrome. The degree of withdrawal is not an indicator of outcome. Early involvement of Child Protective Services is important for this group, at risk for abuse and neglect. PMID:21228966

  1. Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances

    PubMed Central

    Saveland, Christine; Hawker, Leisha; Miedema, Baukje; MacDougall, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine family physicians’ career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse by controlled substance prescription seekers. Design A 4-page cross-sectional survey. Setting A family medicine continuing medical education event in Halifax, NS. Participants The survey was distributed to 316 family physicians attending the continuing medical education event. Main outcome measures Career prevalence and monthly incidence of workplace abuse related to the act of prescribing controlled substances. Results Fifty-six percent (n = 178) of the 316 surveys were returned completed. Half the study participants were men (49%). Most study participants were in private practice and lived in Nova Scotia, and approximately half (51%) practised in urban settings. On average, the study participants had 20 years of practice experience. The career prevalence of abusive encounters related to controlled substance prescribing was divided into “minor,” “major,” and “severe” incidents. Overall, 95% of study participants reported having experienced at least 1 incident of minor abuse; 48% had experienced at least 1 incident of major abuse; and 17% had experienced at least 1 incident of severe abuse during their careers. Further, 30% reported having been abused in the past month; among those, the average number of abusive encounters was 3. Most (82%) of the abusers were male with a history of addiction (85%) and mental illness (39%). Opioids were the most frequently sought controlled substance. Conclusion Abuse of family physicians by patients seeking controlled substances is substantial. Family physicians who prescribe controlled substances are at risk of being subjected to minor, major, or even severe abuse. Opioids were the most often sought controlled substance. A national discussion to deal with this issue is needed. PMID:24522691

  2. Study on elder abuse and neglect among patients in a medical college hospital, Bangalore, India.

    PubMed

    Nisha, Catherin; Manjaly, Steve; Kiran, Pretesh; Mathew, Betsy; Kasturi, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Elder abuse and neglect is a problem that occurs across all settings and all populations. Elder abuse has many forms, such as abandonment, emotional or psychological abuse, financial or material exploitation, neglect, physical abuse, and sexual abuse. We conducted this research to determine the prevalence of various types of abuse and neglect and their associated factors among elderly patients attending the urban and rural geriatric clinics at a medical college hospital in Bangalore, India. A total of 200 elderly patients participated in the study. The overall prevalence of elder abuse or neglect was 32 (16%), comprised of: verbal abuse in 25 (12.5%); neglect in 22 (11%); financial abuse in 17 (8.5%); and physical abuse in 3 (1.5%). Hence, many elderly patients had experienced multiple forms of abuse. There was statistically significant association between elder abuse and total financial dependence, lack of social support, and depression among the elderly patients.

  3. Patient access to medical records.

    PubMed

    Mair, J L

    1996-01-01

    The issue of, and access to, medical records has been a contentious matter for some years in Australia. The recent High Court decision of Breen v Williams has clarified the law nationwide. The High Court confirmed that the ownership of medical records is vested in the creator of the records. The High Court further held that a patient has no right at law to access his or her medical records in the absence of any statute granting such a right, or other legal process.

  4. Assessing Sexual Abuse/Attack Histories with Bariatric Surgery Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahony, David

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed sexual abuse/attack histories in 537 bariatric surgery patients using the PsyBari. The prevalence rates found were lower (15.5%, 19.3% of women, 5.2% of men) than other studies that used bariatric surgery patients but consistent with studies that used nonbariatric obese subjects. Furthermore, bariatric surgery patients who…

  5. Recognizing alcohol and drug abuse in patients with eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Conason, A H; Brunstein Klomek, A; Sher, L

    2006-05-01

    Eating disorders and alcohol/drug abuse are frequently comorbid. Eating-disordered patients are already at an increased risk for morbidity and mortality, so alcohol and drug use pose additional dangers for these patients. Restricting anorexics, binge eaters, and bulimics appear to be distinct subgroups within the eating-disordered population, with binge eaters and bulimics more prone to alcohol and drug use. Personality traits such as impulsivity have been linked to both bulimia nervosa and substance abuse. Many researchers have proposed that an addictive personality is an underlying trait that predisposes individuals to both eating disorders and alcohol abuse. Interviewing is generally the most useful tool in diagnosing alcohol and substance abuse disorders in individuals with eating disorders. It is essential for the physician to be non-judgmental when assessing for substance abuse disorders in this population. We discuss interviewing techniques, screening instruments, physical examination, and biological tests that can be used in evaluating patients with comorbid eating disorders and substance abuse. More studies are needed to understand psychobiological mechanisms of this comorbidity, and to develop treatments for individuals with comorbid eating disorders and substance misuse.

  6. Implementing an interprofessional patient record.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul; Anderson, Alan; Coyne, Clare; Beastall, Helen; Hill, Joanne

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an interprofessional patient record (IPPR) at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (STHFT). The IPPR was a two-year project, commencing in May 2008, aimed at creating a single IPPR to which all staff contribute. Prior to the IPPR, records were profession specific with nursing, medical and therapy staff keeping separate ones. This paper describes the process for the project including the stakeholder engagement plan, the development of IPPR standards, the education and training programme and the key measures used to assess implementation. The staff survey and clinical audit data suggest that the IPPR was successfully implemented with many of the perceived benefits realised. The keys to success of this major change project were: time spent engaging clinical staff, board level support, the appointment of a dedicated project team and the involvement and support of many staff involved in patient records throughout STHFT.

  7. Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... member, a trusted teacher, a doctor, or a school or religious youth counselor. Many teachers and counselors have training in how to recognize and report abuse. Telephone and online directories list local child abuse and family violence hotline numbers that you can call for help. ...

  8. Arab Parents' Reactions to Child Sexual Abuse: A Review of Clinical Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abu-Baker, Khawla

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses parents' reactions to sexual abuse cases in their families. The study analyzed the clinical records of individual and family therapy sessions with 35 cases of Arab Palestinian clients, citizens of Israel (27 individuals and 8 families). Families were categorized as either functional or dysfunctional. It was concluded that the…

  9. Benefits of listening to a recording of euphoric joint music making in polydrug abusers

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Thomas Hans; Vogt, Marius; Lederer, Annette; Schneider, Lydia; Fomicheva, Eira; Schneider, Martha; Villringer, Arno

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: Listening to music can have powerful physiological and therapeutic effects. Some essential features of the mental mechanism underlying beneficial effects of music are probably strong physiological and emotional associations with music created during the act of music making. Here we tested this hypothesis in a clinical population of polydrug abusers in rehabilitation listening to a previously performed act of physiologically and emotionally intense music making. Methods: Psychological effects of listening to self-made music that was created in a previous musical feedback intervention were assessed. In this procedure, participants produced music with exercise machines (Jymmin) which modulate musical sounds. Results: The data showed a positive effect of listening to the recording of joint music making on self-efficacy, mood, and a readiness to engage socially. Furthermore, the data showed the powerful influence of context on how the recording evoked psychological benefits. The effects of listening to the self-made music were only observable when participants listened to their own performance first; listening to a control music piece first caused effects to deteriorate. We observed a positive correlation between participants’ mood and their desire to engage in social activities with their former training partners after listening to the self-made music. This shows that the observed effects of listening to the recording of the single musical feedback intervention are influenced by participants recapitulating intense pleasant social interactions during the Jymmin intervention. Conclusions: Listening to music that was the outcome of a previous musical feedback (Jymmin) intervention has beneficial psychological and probably social effects in patients that had suffered from polydrug addiction, increasing self-efficacy, mood, and a readiness to engage socially. These intervention effects, however, depend on the context in which the music recordings are

  10. Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... people to control their actions. Certain types of personality disorders or mental illness might also interfere with ... self-control. Of course, not everyone with a personality disorder or mental illness becomes abusive. Fortunately, people ...

  11. Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stages Early-Stage Caregiving Middle-Stage Caregiving Late-Stage Caregiving Behaviors Aggression & Anger Anxiety & Agitation Depression Hallucinations Memory Loss & Confusion Repetition Sleep Issues & Sundowning Suspicion & Delusions Wandering Abuse Start Here ...

  12. Patient Abuse in the Health Care Setting: The Nurse as Patient Advocate.

    PubMed

    Albina, Julie K

    2016-01-01

    Incidents of verbal and physical patient abuse in health care settings continue to occur, with some making headline news. Nurses have a professional and ethical responsibility to advocate for their patients when incidents of abuse occur. Tolerating or ignoring inappropriate behaviors occurs for multiple reasons, including ignorance, fear of retaliation, the need for peer acceptance, and concerns for personal advancement. Nurses need to reflect on their biases before they can truly respect patients' autonomy. Through the examination of reported cases of patient abuse, the need for a change in hospital culture becomes evident. The primary steps in eliminating patient abuse are opening communication, providing education, establishing competency, eliminating tolerance of unacceptable behavior, and creating a code of mutual respect. A change in culture to one of mutual respect and dignity for staff members and patients will lead to the best outcomes for all involved.

  13. 78 FR 79201 - Medicare and State Health Care Programs: Fraud and Abuse; Electronic Health Records Safe Harbor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... 1001 Medicare and State Health Care Programs: Fraud and Abuse; Electronic Health Records Safe Harbor... Inspector General 42 CFR Part 1001 RIN 0991-AB33 Medicare and State Health Care Programs: Fraud and Abuse... and technologies in the health care industry. In accordance with this authority, OIG published a...

  14. Recreational drug abuse in patients hospitalized for diabetic ketosis or diabetic ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Isidro, María L; Jorge, Segundo

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the association between recreational drug use and diabetic ketosis (DK) and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in our area. Retrospective examination of records from a 1,450 bed urban teaching hospital in Spain. All adult admissions for DK or DKA from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2009 in our hospital were included. Demographic, exploratory (blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate), and analytical data (glucose, urea, creatinine, corrected Na(+), K(+), pH, HCO3(-) and HbA1c) at admittance were recorded. In 152 patients, 253 episodes of DK or DKA occurred. Screening for drug use was performed in 40.3% of the events; 20.6% of the episodes (n = 52) were shown to be substance abuse. Cocaine, followed by cannabis and alcohol, was the most frequently involved drug. Poly-substance abuse occurred in 67.3% of them. Comorbidities were present in 11.5 and 39.8% of the cases shown and not shown to be related to drug use (P = 0.00). Seventy percent of the patients who were at least once shown to have consumed drugs, and 15.9% of those who were never shown to have done so, were admitted more than once (P = 0.00). The frequency of recent drug misuse in patients presenting with DK or DKA was high. Substance abuse screening was frequently neglected. Adverse profile, most significantly in readmission to hospital, was found in the patients with positive drug findings. History taking in this context should routinely include questions on substance abuse, and toxicology screening may be worthwhile, particularly in those with the history of frequent readmissions.

  15. Childhood sexual abuse in adult patients with borderline personality disorder

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Preethi; Chaudhari, Bhushan; Saldanha, Daniel; Devabhaktuni, Spandana; Bhattacharya, Labanya

    2016-01-01

    Background: Researchers have found elevated rates of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) in borderline personality disorder (BPD) patients. They have also implicated the role of CSA later in BPD. However, there has been a scarcity of studies regarding this in Indian population. Objectives: To profile the occurrence of CSA and its parameters in BPD patients and to document symptomatology of BPD associated with CSA. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six consecutive patients with BPD were administered with a two-staged semi-structured interview by different interviewers with the first stage for collecting sociodemographic details and confirming BPD diagnosis and the second stage for collecting information about CSA. Results: Of 36 BPD patients, 16 (44.44%) reported a history of definite CSA. The majority of CSA associated with BPD were having characteristics of onset at 7–12 years, <10 occasions of abuse, perpetrator being a close relative or a close acquaintance and genital type of CSA. Identity disturbances (P = 0.0354), recurrent suicidal/self-harm behavior (P = 0.0177), and stress-related paranoid/dissociative symptoms (P = 0.0177) were significantly associated with the presence of CSA while unstable interpersonal relationships (P = 0.001) were significantly associated with the absence of CSA. Conclusion: Significant proportion of BPD patients reported CSA. The specific symptom profile of BPD patients can be used to predict the presence of CSA in these patients, which has a direct implication in the treatment of these patients. PMID:28163415

  16. Internet Patient Records: new techniques

    PubMed Central

    Moehrs, Sascha; Anedda, Paolo; Tuveri, Massimiliano; Zanetti, Gianluigi

    2001-01-01

    Background The ease by which the Internet is able to distribute information to geographically-distant users on a wide variety of computers makes it an obvious candidate for a technological solution for electronic patient record systems. Indeed, second-generation Internet technologies such as the ones described in this article - XML (eXtensible Markup Language), XSL (eXtensible Style Language), DOM (Document Object Model), CSS (Cascading Style Sheet), JavaScript, and JavaBeans - may significantly reduce the complexity of the development of distributed healthcare systems. Objective The demonstration of an experimental Electronic Patient Record (EPR) system built from those technologies that can support viewing of medical imaging exams and graphically-rich clinical reporting tools, while conforming to the newly emerging XML standard for digital documents. In particular, we aim to promote rapid prototyping of new reports by clinical specialists. Methods We have built a prototype EPR client, InfoDOM, that runs in both the popular web browsers. In this second version it receives each EPR as an XML record served via the secure SSL (Secure Socket Layer) protocol. JavaBean software components manipulate the XML to store it and then to transform it into a variety of useful clinical views. First a web page summary for the patient is produced. From that web page other JavaBeans can be launched. In particular, we have developed a medical imaging exam Viewer and a clinical Reporter bean parameterized appropriately for the particular patient and exam in question. Both present particular views of the XML data. The Viewer reads image sequences from a patient-specified network URL on a PACS (Picture Archiving and Communications System) server and presents them in a user-controllable animated sequence, while the Reporter provides a configurable anatomical map of the site of the pathology, from which individual "reportlets" can be launched. The specification of these reportlets is

  17. Psychological, physical, and sexual abuse in addicted patients who undergo treatment.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Montalvo, Javier; López-Goñi, José J; Arteaga, Alfonso

    2015-05-01

    This study explored the prevalence of a history as victims of abuse among patients who sought outpatient treatment for drug addiction. A sample of 252 addicted patients was assessed. Information was collected on the patients' lifetime history of abuse (psychological, physical, and/or sexual abuse), sociodemographic factors, consumption factors, psychopathological factors, and personality variables. Drug-addicted patients who present a lifelong history of abuse were compared with patients who were not abused. Of the total sample, 46% of the patients (n = 115) who were addicted to drugs had been victims of abuse. There was a statistically significant difference between the victimization rates of men (37.8%) and women (79.6%). Moreover, for some variables, significant differences were observed between patients who had been abused and those who had not. Compared with patients who had not been abused, the addicted patients with a history of victimization scored significantly higher on several European Addiction Severity Index, Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II, and maladjustment variables but not on the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised. The current results indicate that patients who present a lifelong history of abuse exhibit both a more severe addiction than patients who were not abused and several comorbidities. The implications of these results for further research and clinical practice are discussed.

  18. [Analgesic abuse and psychiatric comorbidity in headache patients].

    PubMed

    Radat, F; Irachabal, S; Swendsen, J; Henry, P

    2002-01-01

    Headache patients frequently overuse analgesic medications: 20% of the patients from headache centers is concerned by this problem, which has been estimated to occur in four percent of the community migrainers. Frequent use of various types of headache medication may paradoxically cause an increase in headache attack frequency as well as their chronicisation due to potentially complex mechanisms of sensitization. Patients will enter into a self- perpetuating cycle of daily headaches and use of symptomatic medications which can lead to addiction and to social and occupational impairement. Indeed, many patients will experience pharmacological tolerance and dependence but also by some kind of craving. International Headache Society qualify these patients as abusers referring mostly to the amount of substance ingested. Hence patients are labelled analgesic abusers . However, as many of these analgesic medications contained psychotropic substances (i.e. caffeine, codeine.), these patients may fulfill DSM IV criteria of dependance. Nevertheless, the dependance criteria should be adapted to chronic pain patients. Indeed, if pharmacological dependence and tolerance criteria are easy to apply in such patients, it is not the case for the criteria a great deal of time spent to obtain substances, to use substances or to recover from substances effects . As analgesic medications are legally obtained from medical practitioners, drug seeking behaviours are mostly: obtaining medications from multiple providers, repeating episodes of prescription loss and multiplying requests for early refills. Moreover the detrimental effects of analgesic abuse on psychosocial functioning is likely to be related to pain rather than to medication overuse. Finally the best indicator of addictive behaviors in such patients, is the loss of control over the use of analgesic medication despite the adverse consequences over pain. Comorbidity with addiction to other substances has never been specifically

  19. Substance Abuse and Schizophrenia: A Health Maintenance Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damron, Susan W.; Simpson, William R.

    Abuse of alcohol or other substances by schizophrenic patients seriously undermines effective treatment. To document the extent of substance abuse among schizophrenic patients hospitalized in one Veterans Administration Hospital, medical records of 100 patients were reviewed. The results revealed that 54 patients had recent substance abuse, with…

  20. Ethics and Undertreatment of Pain in Patients with a History of Drug Abuse.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Brooke Faria

    2015-01-01

    Patients with substance abuse history make up 14% of inpatient admissions to acute care units, where it has been reported a great deal of patient pain is unrelieved (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Service Administration [SAMHSA], 2009. Definitions of substance abuse terms including tolerance, dependence, addiction, and pseudoaddiction are essential to a nurse's understanding of pain medication administration in patients with substance abuse history. Pain management is one of the nurse's main responsibilities, and using the principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice can guide the nurse to making appropriate pain management decisions for and with these patients. Nursing implications and resources for more information are discussed.

  1. Substance abuse in first-episode schizophrenic patients: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Several studies suggest a high comorbidity of substance abuse and schizophrenia, associated with higher frequency of relapse, more positive symptoms and depression, cognitive impairment, poorer outcome and treatment response. A high incidence of substance abuse is also observed in first-episode patients. Among patients with substance abuse, the onset precedes the onset of psychosis of several years in most cases. All the patients with a first episode of schizophrenia, at first admission to the Psychiatric Service of Diagnosis and Treatment of Ospedale Maggiore of Milan during the years 1990 to 2004, have been included in our study. The clinical evaluation has been obtained considering the following items of Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS): conceptual disorganization, depressed mood, hostility, hallucinations, unusual content of thought. The results showed that 34.7% of first-episode schizophrenic patients had a lifetime history of substance abuse. The age of onset of schizophrenia is significantly lower for drug abusers than for patients without any type of abuse and for alcohol abusers (p < 0.005). In multi drug abusers, cannabis resulted the most frequently used (49%), followed by alcohol (13%), and cocaine (4%). Substance abusers have obtained a significant higher score in "thought disturbance" item (p < 0.005) and in "hostility" item (p < 0.005) compared to non substance abusers. Non drug abusers showed lower mean scores of "hostility" item compared to cocaine abusers and multi drug abusers (p < 0.005). Our findings seem to indicate that substance abuse in the early course of illness determines an earlier onset of schizophrenia and increases severity of some psychotic symptoms like "hallucination" and "unusual content of thought". Therefore persons incurring a risk of schizophrenia may be warned of the possible relation between substances and psychosis and have to be counselled against the use of them. PMID:16556300

  2. History of Abuse and Neglect in Patients with Schizophrenia Who Have a History of Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennouna-Greene, Mehdi; Bennouna-Greene, Valerie; Berna, Fabrice; Defranoux, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of five forms of abuse/neglect during childhood and adolescence in a group of schizophrenic patients with a history of violence. Methods: Twenty-eight patients hospitalized in a highly secured psychiatric unit were included. Abuse and neglect during patients' growth were evaluated with the childhood trauma…

  3. Missed Opportunity: National Survey of Primary Care Physicians and Patients on Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    A national representative survey of primary care physicians (N=648) was conducted to determine how they deal with patients who have substance abuse problems. The survey revealed how physicians identify substance abuse in their patients, what efforts they make to help these patients, and what barriers they find to effective diagnosis and treatment.…

  4. Evaluation of ongoing oxycodone abuse among methadone-maintained patients.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Kelly E; Sigmon, Stacey C; McGee, Mark R; Heil, Sarah H; Higgins, Stephen T

    2008-12-01

    Prevalence of prescription opioid abuse has increased dramatically in recent years in the United States generally, and a similar pattern of increasing prescription opioid use has also been noted among patients seeking treatment for opioid dependence. This study presents results from an internal quality assurance project conducted by an outpatient methadone maintenance (MM) treatment clinic which sought to examine the extent of ongoing oxycodone abuse among patients that might be going undetected with current urinalysis-testing methods. One hundred five MM patients provided 437 urine samples over a 6-week period. Samples were analyzed using the clinic's usual enzyme multiplied immunoassay test (EMIT) opiate assay (300 ng/ml opiate cutpoint) and a supplemental oxycodone test strip (100 ng/ml oxycodone cutpoint). The EMIT assay identified only 6% (20/437) of samples as positive for oxycodone, whereas the oxycodone test strip indicated that 19% (83/437) tested positive for recent oxycodone use. Inspection of patient characteristics revealed that oxycodone users were more likely to report a prescription opioid as their primary drug at intake, be in MM treatment for a significantly shorter duration, and provide significantly more opioid- and cocaine-positive urine samples. Overall, these data illustrate the potential importance of monitoring for ongoing oxycodone use in MM clinics. Although future efforts should examine this question using more rigorous experimental methods, findings from this initial project have implications for clinical issues such as evaluating patient stability in treatment, making medication-dosing decisions, and determining patient eligibility for methadone take-home privileges.

  5. 42 CFR 2.22 - Notice to patients of Federal confidentiality requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.22... alcohol and drug abuse patient records. (d) Sample notice. Confidentiality of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Patient Records The confidentiality of alcohol and drug abuse patient records maintained by this...

  6. Drug abuse identification and pain management in dental patients: a case study and literature review.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Fahmida; Frare, Robert W; Py Berrios, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    Properly identifying patients with a history of drug abuse is the first step in providing effective dental care. Dental professionals need to be fully aware of the challenges associated with treating this population. In the current study, the authors analyzed the physical and oral manifestations of illicit drug abuse to aid in the identification of patients who abuse drugs and the pain management strategies needed to treat them. The authors also present a clinical case of a patient with unique skin lesions and discuss the typical clinical findings of drug abuse based on a literature review.

  7. [Patients' access to their medical records].

    PubMed

    Laranjo, Liliana; Neves, Ana Luisa; Villanueva, Tiago; Cruz, Jorge; Brito de Sá, Armando; Sakellarides, Constantitno

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, the medical record was seen exclusively as being the property of health institutions and doctors. Its great technical and scientific components, as well as the personal characteristics attributed by each doctor, have been the reasons appointed for that control. However, nowadays throughout the world that paradigm has been changing. In Portugal, since 2007 patients are allowed full and direct access to their medical records. Nevertheless, the Deontological Code of the Portuguese Medical Association (2009) explicitly states that patients' access to their medical records should have a doctor as intermediary and that the records are each physician's intellectual property. Furthermore, several doctors and health institutions, receiving requests from patients to access their medical records, end up requesting the legal opinion of the Commission for access to administrative documents. Each and every time, that opinion goes in line with the notion of full and direct patient access. Sharing medical records with patients seems crucial and inevitable in the current patient-centred care model, having the potential to improve patient empowerment, health literacy, autonomy, self-efficacy and satisfaction with care. With the recent technological developments and the fast dissemination of Personal Health Records, it is foreseeable that a growing number of patients will want to access their medical records. Therefore, promoting awareness on this topic is essential, in order to allow an informed debate between all the stakeholders.

  8. Prevalence of illicit drug use in patients without controlled substance abuse in interventional pain management.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Damron, Kim S; Beyer, Carla D; Barnhill, Renee C

    2003-04-01

    Drug abuse with illicit drugs and licit drugs has been increasing steadily over the past decade. A recent National Household Survey on Drug Abuse found statistically significant increases between 2000 and 2001 in the use of multiple drugs, including marijuana, cocaine, and non-medical use of pain relievers and tranquilizers. Prescription controlled substance abuse is a major issue in chronic pain management. Various means suggested to avoid or monitor abuse in patients in treatment include urine/serum drug screening whenever requested, along with other precautions including one prescribing physician and one designated pharmacy, etc. Based on the present evidence, physicians assume that patients adhering to controlled substance agreements and without obvious dependency behavior do not abuse either illicit or licit drugs. Thus, it is accepted that there is no necessity to perform routine urine/drug testing in this specific group of the patient population. One hundred patients undergoing interventional pain management and receiving controlled substances were randomly selected for evaluation of illicit drug abuse by urine drug testing. They were selected from a total of 250 patients who were identified as non-abusers of prescription drugs. Results showed that illicit drug abuse in patients without history of controlled substance abuse was seen in 16 patients. Thirteen of the 16 patients tested positive for marijuana and 3 patients tested positive for cocaine. Only one patient tested positive for a combined use of both marijuana and cocaine. This study showed that, in an interventional pain management setting, there is significant use of illicit drugs (16%) with 13% use of marijuana and 3% use of cocaine in patients who are considered as non-abusers of prescription controlled substances and those who are adherent to controlled substance agreements. However, if cocaine is considered as a hardcore drug in contrast to marijuana, abuse of hardcore illicit drugs is only 3%.

  9. History of sexual, emotional or physical abuse and psychiatric comorbidity in substance-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Daigre, Constanza; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Tarifa, Núria; Rodríguez-Martos, Lola; Grau-López, Lara; Berenguer, Marta; Casas, Miguel; Roncero, Carlos

    2015-10-30

    Sexual, emotional or physical abuse history is a risk factor for mental disorders in addicted patients. However, the relationship between addiction and abuse lifespan is not well known. This study aims to compare clinical and psychopathological features of addicted patients according to the experience of abuse and to the number of different types of abuse suffered. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. 512 addicted patients seeking treatment were included, 45.9% reported abuse throughout life (38.9% emotional, 22.3% physical and 13.5% sexual abuse). It was found that female gender; depressive symptoms and borderline personality disorder were independently associated with history of any abuse throughout life. As well, it was found that 14% have been suffered from all three types of abuse (sexual, emotional and physical), 34.5% from two and 55.5% from one type. Female gender and borderline personality disorder were independently associated independently with a greater number of different types of abuse. Results suggest that history of abuse is frequent among substance-dependent patients and these experiences are more prevalent in women and are associated with more psychiatric comorbidity.

  10. Increased Childhood Abuse in Patients With Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder in a Turkish Sample: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Albayrak, Yakup; Sahin, Basak

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Abuse is considered to have a place in the etiology of various psychiatric disorders. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) is one of the psychiatric disorders for which abuse could be an etiologic factor; however, few studies have investigated the relationship between abuse and PMDD. In this study, our aim was to investigate childhood abuse in patients with PMDD and compare them with healthy female subjects. Method: This cross-sectional study included 70 women with PMDD (DSM-IV-TR criteria) who were admitted to the outpatient psychiatry clinic of Ankara Yenimahalle State Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, between December 2012 and December 2013. Additionally, 78 healthy controls were included in the study. Sociodemographic, familial, and reproductive period characteristics of the women were recorded. All subjects were administered the Premenstrual Syndrome Scale (PMSS) and the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ). Results: Among the sociodemographic characteristics, being a university graduate (76.9%) and being a public servant (70.5%) were significantly higher in the healthy control group (P = .01 and P = .01, respectively). A family history of PMDD (31.4%), a history of postpartum psychiatric disorders (11.4%), and a history of attempted suicide (7.1%) were higher in the PMDD group compared with the healthy control group (P = .001, P = .003, and P = .024, respectively). Significant differences were also found between PMDD and healthy controls in PMSS score (P ≤ .001), CTQ total scores (P = .002), and subscale scores including emotional abuse and emotional neglect (P = .004), physical abuse (P = .009), and sexual abuse (P = .012). Conclusions: To our knowledge, the present study is the first to investigate associations between PMDD and childhood abuse from Turkey. More comprehensive studies on this topic with larger sample sizes are required to enrich the literature and enable practitioners to be more effective in clinical practice. PMID:25664213

  11. Childhood abuse and suicidality in obstetrics patients in a hospital-based urban prenatal clinic.

    PubMed

    Farber, E W; Herbert, S E; Reviere, S L

    1996-01-01

    This study reports findings from a chart review examining the relationship between self-report of a history of childhood abuse and the emergence of suicidal ideation in pregnancy in a group of patients referred for psychiatric evaluation. The relationship between history of childhood abuse and actual suicide attempts prior to the current pregnancy was also investigated. Results revealed that women reporting a history of childhood sexual abuse, physical abuse, or both were significantly more likely than those not reporting a history of abuse to evidence suicidal ideation during the pregnancy. Additionally, those reporting a history of sexual abuse or both physical and sexual abuse were more likely than those not reporting such a history to have made a suicide attempt in the past at some point prior to the current pregnancy. Interpretations and potential implications of these findings for clinical work with psychiatrically at-risk pregnant women are discussed.

  12. Reliability and comparability of psychosis patients' retrospective reports of childhood abuse.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Helen L; Craig, Thomas K; Fearon, Paul; Morgan, Kevin; Dazzan, Paola; Lappin, Julia; Hutchinson, Gerard; Doody, Gillian A; Jones, Peter B; McGuffin, Peter; Murray, Robin M; Leff, Julian; Morgan, Craig

    2011-05-01

    An increasing number of studies are demonstrating an association between childhood abuse and psychosis. However, the majority of these rely on retrospective self-reports in adulthood that may be unduly influenced by current psychopathology. We therefore set out to explore the reliability and comparability of first-presentation psychosis patients' reports of childhood abuse. Psychosis case subjects were drawn from the Aetiology and Ethnicity of Schizophrenia and Other Psychoses (ÆSOP) epidemiological study and completed the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse Questionnaire to elicit abusive experiences that occurred prior to 16 years of age. High levels of concurrent validity were demonstrated with the Parental Bonding Instrument (antipathy: r(s)=0.350-0.737, P<.001; neglect: r(s)=0.688-0.715, P<.001), and good convergent validity was shown with clinical case notes (sexual abuse: κ=0.526, P<.001; physical abuse: κ=0.394, P<.001). Psychosis patients' reports were also reasonably stable over a 7-year period (sexual abuse: κ=0.590, P<.01; physical abuse: κ=0.634, P<.001; antipathy: κ=0.492, P<.01; neglect: κ=0.432, P<.05). Additionally, their reports of childhood abuse were not associated with current severity of psychotic symptoms (sexual abuse: U=1768.5, P=.998; physical abuse: U=2167.5, P=.815; antipathy: U=2216.5, P=.988; neglect: U=1906.0, P=.835) or depressed mood (sexual abuse: χ(2)=0.634, P=.277; physical abuse: χ(2)=0.159, P=.419; antipathy: χ(2)=0.868, P=.229; neglect: χ(2)=0.639, P=.274). These findings provide justification for the use in future studies of retrospective reports of childhood abuse obtained from individuals with psychotic disorders.

  13. Patient Perceptions of Electronic Health Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lulejian, Armine

    2011-01-01

    Research objective. Electronic Health Records (EHR) are expected to transform the way medicine is delivered with patients/consumers being the intended beneficiaries. However, little is known regarding patient knowledge and attitudes about EHRs. This study examined patient perceptions about EHR. Study design. Surveys were administered following…

  14. The endoscopy patient with a history of sexual abuse: strategies for compassionate care.

    PubMed

    Davy, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Incident estimates of sexual abuse in children and adults in the United States range from 6% to 74%, depending on case findings and documentation methods. A past history of abuse can put the patient at risk of developing physical and psychological sequelae including fear of medical procedures. Invasive procedures such as endoscopy and colonoscopy may further exacerbate fears and provoke stress reactions in patients with a past history of abuse. Although patients may not disclose a past history of abuse, their reactions during the procedure may provide cues for the healthcare team. This article reviews the need for a careful assessment and intervention during endoscopy procedures for patients with a past history of abuse. Guidelines for compassionate care and follow-up are discussed.

  15. Monthly Incidence Rates of Abusive Encounters for Canadian Family Physicians by Patients and Their Families

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje (Bo); Hamilton, Ryan; Tatemichi, Sue; Lambert-Lanning, Anita; Lemire, Francine; Manca, Donna; Ramsden, Vivian R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. The goal of this study was to examine the monthly incidence rates of abusive encounters for family physicians in Canada. Methods. A 7-page cross-sectional survey. Results. Of the entire study sample (N = 720), 29% of the physicians reported having experienced an abusive event in the last month by a patient or patient family member. Abusive incidents were classified as minor, major, or severe. Of the physician participants who reported having been abused, all reported having experienced a minor event, 26% a major, and 8% a severe event. Of the physicians who experienced an abusive event, 55% were not aware of any policies to protect them, 76% did not seek help, and 64% did not report the abusive event. Conclusion. Family physicians are subjected to significant amounts of abuse in their day-to-day practices. Few physicians are aware of workplace policies that could protect them, and fewer report abusive encounters. Physicians would benefit from increased awareness of institutional policies that can protect them against abusive patients and their families and from the development of a national policy. PMID:22332007

  16. Differences in methylphenidate abuse rates among methadone maintenance treatment patients in two clinics.

    PubMed

    Peles, Einat; Schreiber, Shaul; Linzy, Shirley; Domani, Yoav; Adelson, Miriam

    2015-07-01

    Methylphenidate, an amphetamine-like prescription medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was suspected as being abused among methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) patients. We tested its presence in the routine urine monitoring of all patients in both Tel Aviv and Las Vegas MMT clinics. Data on demographic and addiction history, ADHD (Wender Utah Rating Scale), cognitive impairment (Mini Mental State Exam), and lifetime DSM-IV-TR psychiatric diagnosis from admission were retrieved, and retention following 6 months. None of the 190 patients in Las Vegas tested positive for methylphenidate, while 14.7% (45/306) did in Tel Aviv. Abusers were less educated (p = 0.01), had higher ADHD scores (p = 0.02), lower cognitive scores (p = 0.05), and a higher benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse rate (p < 0.0005), with no difference in age, gender, duration in MMT, cannabis, opiates, and cocaine abuse and infectious disease. Of the methylphenidate abuse 42.2% have take-home methadone dose privileges. Not like opiate use, being methylphenidate positive did not relate to 6-months retention. Compared to Tel Aviv, Las Vegas patients were more educated, with lower BDZ, and cocaine abuse. The greater abuse of methylphenidate among ADHD subjects might indicate their using it as self-medication, raising a possible indication for its prescription for that subgroup of MMT patients. The high rate of methylphenidate abuse in Israel needs future study.

  17. Relationship of Coping Styles with Suicidal Behavior in Hospitalized Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients: Substance Abusers versus Non- Substance Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Safa, Mitra; Talischi, Firouzeh; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background Treatment of patients with chronic conditions requiring hospitalization requires patient acceptance and cooperation and adoption of coping strategies. Inappropriate coping strategies such as substance abuse are concerning in the course of treatment. This study sought to explore the association of coping strategies with suicidal behavior in substance abusers and non substance abuser patients with chronic pulmonary diseases namely asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Materials and Methods This comparative study was performed on 100 patients with asthma and COPD selected via convenience sampling. Subjects with and without substance abuse were separated into two groups of 50 patients each. Ways of Coping Questionnaire of Lazarus (WOCQ) and Suicide Behavior Questionnaire-Revised (SBQ-R) were completed by them. Five Persian speaking patients rated this questionnaire to be easily understandable in the pre-test stage. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to measure the internal consistency. Results The mean (±standard deviation) age of participants was 40 (±14) years; 58% of individuals were men; 62% had chosen problem-focused coping. The most abused substances were cigarettes (78%) and opium (42%); 6% of substance abusers had thought about suicide five times or more in the past year; 5% of substance abusers had seriously attempted suicide. Tendency to commit suicide was greater in men, substance abusers and participants who had chosen emotion-focused coping strategies, based on a regression model. Average score of suicide tendency was significantly higher in substance abusers (B=2.196, P =0.007). Conclusion Chronic disease is a crisis and patients need to acquire appropriate coping strategies to deal with it, especially in substance abusers and suicidal patients. Precise recognition of coping strategies in chronic pulmonary patients with substance abuse is necessary via a team cooperation among psychiatrics, psychologists and an internal

  18. Parental substance abuse, reports of chronic pain and coping in adult patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Christopher; Whitfield, Keith; Sudhakar, Shiv; Pearce, Michele; Byrd, Goldie; Wood, Mary; Feliu, Miriam; Leach-Beale, Brittani; DeCastro, Laura; Whitworth, Elaine; Abrams, Mary; Jonassaint, Jude; Harrison, M. Ojinga; Mathis, Markece; Scott, Lydia; Johnson, Stephanie; Durant, Lauren; Holmes, Anita; Presnell, Katherine; Bennett, Gary; Shelby, Rebecca; Robinson, Elwood

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing interest from a social learning perspective in understanding the role of parental factors on adult health behaviors and health outcomes. Our review revealed no studies, to date, that have evaluated the effects of parental substance abuse on reports of chronic pain and coping in adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). We explored the effects of parental substance (alcohol or drug) abuse on reports of the sensory, affective and summary indices of pain in 67 adult patients, mean age 38.9 (13.5), with SCD. We also explored the effects of parental substance abuse on psychopathology associated with pain and active coping. Twenty-four percent of patients reported that their parent(s) abused substances. Patients whose parent(s) were characterized as substance abusers reported greater sensory (p=0.02), affective (p=0.01) and summary (VAS; p=0.02) indices of pain as compared to their counterparts, whose parent(s) were not characterized as substance abusers. Patients did not differ in average age, education or the propensity to respond in a socially acceptable manner. There was a significant trend towards patients who characterized their parents as abusers scoring higher than their counterparts on active coping. We propose a Social Learning Theory to explain the current findings and suggest a need for additional prospective research to simultaneously explore biological (genetic) and social factors that influence the interpretation, experience and reporting of chronic pain in adult patients with chronic disease. PMID:16573309

  19. Patients Reporting Ritual Abuse in Childhood: A Clinical Syndrome. Report of 37 Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Walter C.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-seven adult dissociative disorder patients who reported ritual abuse in childhood by satanic cults are described. A clinical syndrome is presented that includes dissociative states with satanic overtones, posttraumatic stress disorder, survivor guilt, unusual fears, and substance abuse. Questions concerning reliability, credibility, and…

  20. Evaluating and Training Substance Abuse Counselors: A Pilot Study Assessing Standardized Patients as Authentic Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fussell, Holly E.; Lewy, Colleen S.; McFarland, Bentson H.

    2009-01-01

    Clinician training and supervision are needed to transfer evidence-based practices to community-based treatment organizations. Standardized patients (SPs) are used for clinician training and evaluating. However, to be effective for substance abuse counselors, SPs must realistically portray substance abuse treatment clients. The current study…

  1. Opioid therapy in patients with a history of substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Passik, Steven D; Kirsh, Kenneth L

    2004-01-01

    A range of aberrant drug-taking behaviours can occur in patients who are undergoing treatment for chronic pain, especially if opioid therapy is involved. Assessing and understanding these behaviours, and their relationship to addiction (or substance use disorder), can be difficult but it is necessary for assuring quality pain management. Aberrant drug-taking behaviour may be evident, for example, when a patient with pain is unilaterally escalating doses of opioids or using the medications to treat other symptoms or when prescriptions are being mishandled. In patients with a history of substance abuse, these are often serious developments to which a clinician must know how to react. These complex behaviours may be indicative of addiction or may be simply a reaction to under-medicated pain. The clinician therefore is challenged to understand such behaviours and plan interventions accordingly. Although it is becoming increasingly common to avoid opioid therapy in patients demonstrating such challenging behaviours for fear of regulatory scrutiny, clinical management can be tailored to address the many possibilities that might be giving rise to such behaviours. In addition, control over prescriptions can be accomplished without necessarily terminating the prescribing of controlled substances entirely. Optimal medical management of chronic pain in those patients with addiction problems or engaging in problematic behaviours involves careful, ongoing assessment by the clinician as well as a tailored management approach. This approach should use multiple structures including strict contracts, prudent drug selection and frequent follow-ups to pain and addiction treatments, including the use of urine toxicology screening, to maximise the likelihood of a good outcome.

  2. Aggression and recent substance abuse: absence of association in psychiatric emergency room patients.

    PubMed

    Dhossche, D M

    1999-01-01

    Substance abuse has been linked to aggression in community and psychiatric samples. A retrospective chart review in 311 consecutive psychiatric emergency room patients was conducted to assess the association of substance abuse and aggression in an acute psychiatric setting. Various indices of substance abuse, including positive urine toxicology for alcohol, cocaine, and/or cannabis, were not associated with aggressive behavior. Patients with positive toxicology for cocaine were less frequently aggressive than cocaine-negative patients. Among aggressive patients, the presence of psychotic symptoms was the most important factor associated with admission. These findings suggest that aggression is not a common acute manifestation of recent substance abuse in psychiatric emergency room patients. Selection factors in this population and the specifics of an acute psychiatric setting may obscure the association, if any. Acute psychosis seems to have a more important role in this setting. Future studies should focus on the prevention and early treatment of aggression in psychotic emergency room patients.

  3. [The lipid composition of bloodserum in patients with salmonella infection and suffering of alcohol abuse].

    PubMed

    Makarov, V K; Leventsova, A E

    2012-10-01

    The impact of bacterial salmonella infection manifested in higher level of common lipids, increase of relative content of common phospholipids, free cholesterol, free fatty acids and phosphatidylcholine and decrease of content of cholesterol esters and total lysophospholipids. The patients with salmonella infection, suffering of alcohol abuse as opposed to non-abusing patients characterized by higher content of triglycerides, free cholesterol, total lysophospholipids, phosphatidylcholine and lower content of cholesterol esters and phosphatidylcholine.

  4. Identifying medical-surgical nursing staff perceptions of the drug-abusing patient.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Stacy L; Stone, Wendy L; Burleson, Stephanie L

    2013-01-01

    Nurses report a negative, stereotypical, and moralistic view of substance-abusing patients. Unaddressed bias may impede delivery of quality care. There is limited research of the needs specific to medical-surgical nursing staff interacting with substance-abusing patients. Nursing therapeutic commitment refers to the degree the nurse feels prepared with an adequate knowledge base, professional support, and personal ownership of a patient condition. Low therapeutic commitment correlates with job dissatisfaction. The Drug and Drug Problems Perceptions Questionnaire assesses healthcare provider attitude and therapeutic commitment to patients using or abusing medication or illicit substances. This therapeutic commitment survey serves as a staff needs assessment for a targeted educational innovation. The results show that the medical and surgical nursing staff has a constructive attitude and a moderately high degree of therapeutic commitment to the drug-abusing patient population, similar to more specialized multidisciplinary, mental healthcare workers. This study showed that medical-surgical nurses feel professionally responsible and clinically supported with patients with primary or comorbid drug abuse. Consistent with established results, focused and ongoing education on the risk factors, outcomes, and physical and psychological effects of illicit substances is necessary to improve therapeutic commitment to drug-dependent patients.

  5. Patient health record on a smart card.

    PubMed

    Naszlady, A; Naszlady, J

    1998-02-01

    A validated health questionnaire has been used for the documentation of a patient's history (826 items) and of the findings from physical examination (591 items) in our clinical ward for 25 years. This computerized patient record has been completed in EUCLIDES code (CEN TC/251) for laboratory tests and an ATC and EAN code listing for the names of the drugs permanently required by the patient. In addition, emergency data were also included on an EEPROM chipcard with a 24 kb capacity. The program is written in FOX-PRO language. A group of 5000 chronically ill in-patients received these cards which contain their health data. For security reasons the contents of the smart card is only accessible by a doctor's PIN coded key card. The personalization of each card was carried out in our health center and the depersonalized alphanumeric data were collected for further statistical evaluation. This information served as a basis for a real need assessment of health care and for the calculation of its cost. Code-combined with an optical card, a completely paperless electronic patient record system has been developed containing all three information carriers in medicine: Texts, Curves and Pictures.

  6. Physical and sexual abuse histories in patients with eating disorders: a comparison of Japanese and American patients.

    PubMed

    Nagata, T; Kaye, W H; Kiriike, N; Rao, R; McConaha, C; Plotnicov, K H

    2001-08-01

    Physical and sexual abuse among patients with eating disorders has been a focus of attention in Western countries, however, there is no study comparing the incidence of these factors in Western and Asian countries. Japanese subjects consisted of 38 patients with anorexia nervosa restricting type (AN-R), 46 patients with anorexia nervosa binge eating/purging type (AN-BP), 76 patients with bulimia nervosa purging type (BN) and 99 controls. Subjects from the USA consisted of 29 AN-R, 34 AN-BP and 16 BN. The Physical and Sexual Abuse Questionnaire was administered to all subjects. Minor sexual abuse such as confronting exhibitionism or being fondled by a stranger tended to be more prevalent among Japanese subjects, while victimization by rape or incest was more prevalent among USA subjects. Conversely, physical abuse history was similarly distributed across each diagnostic subgroup in both countries. Events related to physical abuse, such as an abusive family background, may contribute whether eating disorder patients are restricting or bulimic and regardless of culture.

  7. Identifying and assessing the risk of opioid abuse in patients with cancer: an integrative review

    PubMed Central

    Carmichael, Ashley-Nicole; Morgan, Laura; Del Fabbro, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    Background The misuse and abuse of opioid medications in many developed nations is a health crisis, leading to increased health-system utilization, emergency department visits, and overdose deaths. There are also increasing concerns about opioid abuse and diversion in patients with cancer, even at the end of life. Aims To evaluate the current literature on opioid misuse and abuse, and more specifically the identification and assessment of opioid-abuse risk in patients with cancer. Our secondary aim is to offer the most current evidence of best clinical practice and suggest future directions for research. Materials and methods Our integrative review included a literature search using the key terms “identification and assessment of opioid abuse in cancer”, “advanced cancer and opioid abuse”, “hospice and opioid abuse”, and “palliative care and opioid abuse”. PubMed, PsycInfo, and Embase were supplemented by a manual search. Results We found 691 articles and eliminated 657, because they were predominantly non cancer populations or specifically excluded cancer patients. A total of 34 articles met our criteria, including case studies, case series, retrospective observational studies, and narrative reviews. The studies were categorized into screening questionnaires for opioid abuse or alcohol, urine drug screens to identify opioid misuse or abuse, prescription drug-monitoring programs, and the use of universal precautions. Conclusion Screening questionnaires and urine drug screens indicated at least one in five patients with cancer may be at risk of opioid-use disorder. Several studies demonstrated associations between high-risk patients and clinical outcomes, such as aberrant behavior, prolonged opioid use, higher morphine-equivalent daily dose, greater health care utilization, and symptom burden. PMID:27330340

  8. Assessing the risks and benefits of benzodiazepines for anxiety disorders in patients with a history of substance abuse or dependence.

    PubMed

    Posternak, M A; Mueller, T I

    2001-01-01

    In this article, the authors reevaluate the traditional position that benzodiazepines should be avoided in anxiety disorder patients with a history of substance abuse or dependence. The efficacy of benzodiazepines in each of the anxiety disorders is reviewed, as are their side effects and toxicity. The definitions of benzodiazepine abuse and dependence are discussed, and relevant animal, experimental, and clinical data are reviewed and analyzed. A manual and computerized (MEDLINE) search was performed from 1966 to the present to examine the English-language literature published on benzodiazepines, substance abuse, and each of the anxiety disorders listed in DSM-IV. The authors found that benzodiazepines have demonstrated efficacy in generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and agoraphobia; they are promising agents in the treatment of social phobia and alcohol-induced anxiety disorders. They are generally well tolerated. There is much ambiguity over appropriate definitions for benzodiazepine abuse and dependence: although most benzodiazepine abusers concurrently abuse other substances, there is little evidence to indicate that a history of substance abuse is a major risk factor for future benzodiazepine abuse or dependence. Furthermore, benzodiazepines do not appear to induce relapse of substance abuse in these patients. The authors conclude that the position that benzodiazepines are contraindicated in former substance abusers appears to lack empirical justification. Benzodiazepines may be indicated in certain patients with anxiety disorders and a history of substance abuse or dependence.

  9. Comparison of Early Maladaptive Schemas and Parenting Origins in Patients with Opioid Abuse and Non-Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Zargar, Mohammad; Salavati, Mojgan; Kakavand, Ali Reza

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine the difference of early maladaptive schemas and parenting origins in opioid abusers and non-opioid abusers. Method The early maladaptive schemas and parenting origins were compared in 56 opioid abusers and 56 non-opioids abusers. Schemas were assessed by the Young Schema Questionnaire 3rd (short form); and parenting origins were assessed by the Young Parenting Inventory. Results Data were analyzed by multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). The analysis showed that the means for schemas between opioid abusers and non-opioid abusers were different. Chi square test showed that parenting origins were significantly associated with their related schemas. Conclusion The early maladaptive schemas and parenting origins in opioid abusers were more than non-opioid abusers; and parenting origins were related to their Corresponding schemas. PMID:22952522

  10. Applicability of different types of Patient Records for Patient Recruitment Systems.

    PubMed

    Schreiweis, Björn; Bergh, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Patient records--types of Electronic Medical Records--are implemented to support patient recruitment. Different types of patient records have not yet been analyzed as to the number of Patient Recruitment System requirements can be found in each type of patient record. According to our analysis, personal electronic health records (PEHRs) tend to allow for most requirements to be found.

  11. Evaluation of a Training to Reduce Provider Bias Toward Pregnant Patients With Substance Abuse

    PubMed Central

    SEYBOLD, DARA; CALHOUN, BYRON; BURGESS, DENISE; LEWIS, TAMMI; GILBERT, KELLY; CASTO, ANGIE

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is not to present a scientific or systematic study, but to provide an initial framework for designing a training workshop to enhance health practitioners’ (nurses, social workers, physicians, etc.) knowledge regarding substance abuse treatment and to decrease their bias toward substance-abusing women, particularly pregnant women in rural communities. We incorporated the 4 Transdisciplinary Foundations from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Competencies Model, with specific competencies targeted that related to provider bias. After the conference, 52 of the 70 participants completed a questionnaire to self-assess knowledge level and confidence in skill related to substance abuse management. Participant mean scores were statistically significantly higher following the conference than 1 week prior ( p < .001) in the area of “gender difference with substance abuse,” moving from an average of 2.6 to 4.5 on a 5-point Likert scale. Our conference was successful in increasing attendees’ knowledge about gender difference and substance abuse among pregnant patients. PMID:26207103

  12. A Case of Skin Picking Disorder of a Patient with a History of Childhood Abuse

    PubMed Central

    OKAN İBİLOĞLU, Aslıhan; ATLI, Abdullah; KAYA, Mehmet Cemal; DEMİR, Süleyman; BULUT, Mahmut; SIR, Aytekin

    2016-01-01

    Skin picking (excoriation) disorder is the recurrent excoriation of one’s own skin, resulting in noticeable skin damage. People pick their skin for different reasons. For the majority of patients, first skin picking is associated with a history of childhood abuse and personal problems. Subjects who moderately to severely cause injurious self-harm are more likely to have a history of exposure to domestic violence and childhood abuse than those who do not self-harm. At the same time, these conditions could be related to the etiology for majority of other psychiatric disorders. We report herein, a case of a patient with skin picking disorder who had a history of childhood physical and emotional abuse with borderline personality disorder. PMID:28360794

  13. [Electronic patient record as the tool for better patient safety].

    PubMed

    Schneider, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies indicate again that there is a deficit in the use of electronic health records (EHR) in German hospitals. Despite good arguments in favour of their use, such as the rapid availability of data, German hospitals shy away from a wider implementation. The reason is the high cost of installing and maintaining the EHRs, for the benefit is difficult to evaluate in monetary terms for the hospital. Even if a benefit can be shown it is not necessarily evident within the hospital, but manifests itself only in the health system outside. Many hospitals only manage to partly implement EHR resulting in increased documentation requirements which reverse their positive effect.In the United States, electronic medical records are also viewed in light of their positive impact on patient safety. In particular, electronic medication systems prove the benefits they can provide in the context of patient safety. As a result, financing systems have been created to promote the digitalisation of hospitals in the United States. This has led to a large increase in the use of IT systems in the United States in recent years. The Universitätsklinikum Eppendorf (UKE) introduced electronic patient records in 2009. The benefits, in particular as regards patient safety, are numerous and there are many examples to illustrate this position. These positive results are intended to demonstrate the important role EHR play in hospitals. A financing system of the ailing IT landscape based on the American model is urgently needed to benefit-especially in terms of patient safety-from electronic medical records in the hospital.

  14. Architecture for networked electronic patient record systems.

    PubMed

    Takeda, H; Matsumura, Y; Kuwata, S; Nakano, H; Sakamoto, N; Yamamoto, R

    2000-11-01

    There have been two major approaches to the development of networked electronic patient record (EPR) architecture. One uses object-oriented methodologies for constructing the model, which include the GEHR project, Synapses, HL7 RIM and so on. The second approach uses document-oriented methodologies, as applied in examples of HL7 PRA. It is practically beneficial to take the advantages of both approaches and to add solution technologies for network security such as PKI. In recognition of the similarity with electronic commerce, a certificate authority as a trusted third party will be organised for establishing networked EPR system. This paper describes a Japanese functional model that has been developed, and proposes a document-object-oriented architecture, which is-compared with other existing models.

  15. Inhalant Use, Abuse, and Dependence among Adolescent Patients: Commonly Comorbid Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakai, Joseph T.; Hall, Shannon K.; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about adolescents with DSM-IV-defined inhalant abuse and dependence. The aim of this study was to compare comorbidity among (1) adolescents with inhalant use disorders, (2) adolescents who reported using inhalants without inhalant use disorder, and (3) other adolescent patients drawn from an adolescent drug and alcohol…

  16. Current status and evolving role of abuse-deterrent opioids in managing patients with chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynn; St Marie, Barbara; McCarberg, Bill; Passik, Steven D; Panchal, Sunil J; Voth, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Opioids are widely used for the treatment of patients with chronic pain; yet, the increase in their abuse, misuse, and diversion is an ongoing focus of regulatory, governmental, and legal scrutiny. As a consequence, clinicians are faced with numerous challenges in an effort to use opioids in appropriate patients with pain while minimizing the potential for opioid abuse, misuse, and diversion. Policies and programs such as state prescription monitoring programs, which have been in existence for decades, are but one attempt to address some of the issues regarding the prescribing of opioids. Another is a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy for opioids under consideration by the US Food and Drug Administration. At the clinical level, a universal precautions and risk management package that includes risk assessment and patient monitoring is a recommended approach. This approach can also include the use of abuse-deterrent and abuse-resistant formulations designed to reduce the nonmedical use of opioids. Several of these opioid formulations have been approved or should soon be on the market for use in the United States; however, their role and other questions regarding their use remain unanswered. The authors offer their clinical perspective on several of these key questions.

  17. Polysomnographic Findings in a Cohort of Chronic Insomnia Patients with Benzodiazepine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Mazza, Marianna; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Marano, Giuseppe; Di Nicola, Marco; Dittoni, Serena; Gnoni, Valentina; Di Blasi, Chiara; Giannantoni, Nadia Mariagrazia; Lapenta, Leonardo; Brunetti, Valerio; Bria, Pietro; Janiri, Luigi; Mazza, Salvatore; Della Marca, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate sleep modifications induced by chronic benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse. Methods: Cohort study, comparison of sleep measures between BDZs abusers and controls. Drug Addiction Unit (Institute of Psychiatry) and Unit of Sleep Disorders (Institute of Neurology) of the Catholic University in Rome. Six outpatients affected by chronic BDZ abuse were enrolled, (4 men, 2 women, mean age 53.3 ± 14.8, range: 34-70 years); 55 healthy controls were also enrolled (23 men, 32 women, mean age 54.2 ± 13.0, range: 27-76 years). All patients underwent clinical evaluation, psychometric measures, ambulatory polysomnography, scoring of sleep macrostructure and microstructure (power spectral fast-frequency EEG arousal, cyclic alternating pattern [CAP]), and heart rate variability. Results: BDZ abusers had relevant modification of sleep macrostructure and a marked reduction of fast-frequency EEG arousal in NREM (patients: 6.6 ± 3.7 events/h, controls 13.7 ± 4.9 events/h, U-test: 294, p = 0.002) and REM (patients: 8.4 ± 2.4 events/h, controls 13.3 ± 5.1 events/h, U-test: 264, p = 0.016), and of CAP rate (patients: 15.0 ± 8.6%, controls: 51.2% ± 12.1%, U-test: 325, p < 0.001). Discussion: BDZ abusers have reduction of arousals associated with increased number of nocturnal awakenings and severe impairment of sleep architecture. The effect of chronic BDZ abuse on sleep may be described as a severe impairment of arousal dynamics; the result is the inability to modulate levels of vigilance. Citation: Mazza M; Losurdo A; Testani E; Marano G; Di Nicola M; Dittoni S; Gnoni V; Di Blasi C; Giannantoni NM; Lapenta L; Brunetti V; Bria P; Janiri L; Mazza S; Della Marca G. Polysomnographic findings in a cohort of chronic insomnia patients with benzodiazepine abuse. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(1):35-42. PMID:24426818

  18. Multiple Prescription Drug Abuse and Salt Craving in a Psychotic Patient: A Case Report From a Teaching Hospital in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Deema; Al Awwa, Izzat; Wazaify, Mayyada

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Diuretics and laxative abuse as a means of purging is common in patients with bulimia nervosa and there may be an underestimation of the true prevalence of diuretic abuse, as some are also available without prescription. Case Presentation: A 28-year-old woman presented with tetany due to hypocalcemia, hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia. She had a history of laxative and diuretic abuse, and salt craving. Psychiatric evaluation revealed a disturbed social history with masked depression that necessitated treatment. Conclusions: Multiple prescription drug abuse and salt/salty food addiction usually reflects a personality of addiction, which leads to harmful use and dependence. PMID:26495254

  19. Where does the nephrologist stand with a non-compliant, abusive dialysis patient?

    PubMed Central

    Ripley, Elizabeth B. D.

    2010-01-01

    Physicians have sworn to treat for the good of their patients. However, there are often conflicting needs and pressures which are ethical, medical, and legal which impact the ability of the physician to provide that care. Although most dialysis patients work with the physician and dialysis facility to obtain quality care, there are a few which are noncompliant and even abusive. This small minority requires an inordinate amount of work and presents the physician with a variety of ethical and legal issues. Unlike many other specialties, dialysis care presents additional problems due to the frequent interactions, limited treatment options, and morbid consequences of lack of care. This article outlines these issues and summarizes the difficult position that the nephrologist encounters when dealing with a noncompliant or abusive patient. PMID:21152373

  20. From computerized patient records to national resource.

    PubMed

    Zuker, Allon

    2003-01-01

    To help curb constantly rising costs of medical services, healthcare providers in Israel have been busy incorporating computerized patient record systems (CPR) into their organizations since the early 1990s. Our CPR based integrated system solutions (named Clicks) now serve over 90% of primary and secondary medical care professionals throughout the country, covering over 90% of the population across medical fields with all healthcare providers. Online verification of member rights, embedded business rules and medical protocols as well as Preventive Medical Assistance (PMA) rules are incorporated into the system. These, coupled by bi-directional communication to facilitate implementation and enforcement at all points of service and to transmit administrative and focal medical information, have created a firm foundation for carrying out the organization's cost control and expense management strategies. The CPR systems based on these underlying concepts and on token driven data entry methodology have transformed traditional medical work areas into virtually paperless environments. The enterprise wide solutions use dedicated viewports to address the needs and requirements of any medical field, user population and a wide range of medical facilities. Extensive data collection and detailed documentation are maintained universally at all points of service, for the entire patient population. Current applications, based on a distributed approach and local databases with communication to central systems for bi-directional transfer of information, gradually give way to unified databases located on central systems. Two concepts are being implemented: (a) MDC (Medical Data Core), which contains patients' focal medical data as transmitted from the local database at the physician's workstation, and (b) a complete centrally located database, where continuous communication is required from the physician's workstation to the central system, through dumb terminals. This concept

  1. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Goel, Noopur; Munshi, Lubna Bashir; Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital in such patients. This is important in order to minimize unnecessary diagnostic workup and provide adequate treatment and safe hospital stay for these patients.

  2. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia

    PubMed Central

    Thyagarajan, Braghadheeswar

    2016-01-01

    Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital in such patients. This is important in order to minimize unnecessary diagnostic workup and provide adequate treatment and safe hospital stay for these patients. PMID:27433362

  3. Implementing security in computer based patient records clinical experiences.

    PubMed

    Iversen, K R; Heimly, V; Lundgren, T I

    1995-01-01

    In Norway, organizational changes in hospitals and a stronger focus on patient safety have changed the way of organizing and managing paper based patient records. Hospital-wide patient records tend to replace department based records. Since not only clinicians, but also other non-medical staff have access to the paper records, they also have easy access to all the information which is available on a specific patient; such a system has obvious 'side effects' on privacy and security. Computer based patient records (CPRs) can provide the solution to this apparent paradox if the complex aspects of security, privacy, effectiveness, and user friendliness are focused on jointly from the outset in designing such systems. Clinical experiences in Norway show that it is possible to design patient record systems that provide a very useful tool for clinicians and other health care personnel (HCP) while fully complying with comprehensive security and privacy requirements.

  4. Patient Satisfaction and Sustained Outcomes of Drug Abuse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, ZHIWEI; GERSTEIN, DEAN R.; FRIEDMANN, PETER D.

    2009-01-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between patients’ self-rated satisfaction with treatment services during and shortly after treatment with their drug use outcomes at one year follow-up, using a U.S. national panel survey of patients in 62 methadone, outpatient, short-term residential, and long-term residential programs. A favorable evaluation of treatment near the time of discharge had a significant positive relationship with drug use improvement outcomes approximately one year later, independent of the separately measured effects of treatment duration, counseling intensity, patient adherence to treatment protocols, pre-treatment drug use patterns, and other characteristics of patients and treatment programs. PMID:18420772

  5. Contingency management is especially efficacious in engendering long durations of abstinence in patients with sexual abuse histories

    PubMed Central

    Petry, Nancy M.; Ford, Julian D.; Barry, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to sexual victimization is prevalent among persons with substance use disorders (SUDs). Contingency management (CM) treatments utilize concrete and relatively immediate positive reinforcers to retain patients in treatment and reduce substance use, and CM may have particular benefits for patients with histories of sexual victimization. Using data from three randomized trials of CM (N = 393), this study evaluated main and interactive effects of sexual abuse history and treatment condition (standard care versus CM) with respect to during treatment outcomes (retention, proportion of negative urine samples submitted, and longest duration of abstinence) and abstinence at a nine-month follow-up. Compared to patients without sexual abuse histories (N = 316), those with sexual abuse histories (N = 77) submitted a significantly higher proportion of negative samples in treatment. In CM, but not in standard care, patients with sexual abuse histories achieved significantly longer durations of abstinence during treatment than those without sexual abuse histories. Although sexual abuse history was not associated with abstinence at nine-month follow-up evaluations, longest duration of abstinence during treatment was significantly associated with this long-term outcome. Results suggest that SUD patients with sexual abuse histories may accrue particular benefits during CM treatment that are associated with long-term abstinence. PMID:21443305

  6. The Effects of Abuse History on Sexually Intrusive Behavior by Children: An Analysis of Child Justice Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hershkowitz, Irit

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: A commonly cited risk factor for sexually intrusive behavior (SIB) among children and adolescents is a history of abuse. Based on a large and non-clinical nationwide sample of children who were investigated as abuse victims and suspects of SIBs in Israel over a decade, the present study examines the rate of abuse history among child…

  7. 78 FR 45454 - Patient Access to Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-29

    ... records if VA determines that such release could have an adverse effect on the physical or mental health... ``would not be injurious to the physical or mental health of the claimant.'' VA developed a special...(d), in those cases where records contain information that may be injurious to the physical or...

  8. Customer-oriented medical records can promote patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1988-04-01

    The customer-oriented medical record helps promote patient satisfaction by providing a mechanism to monitor and document quality of care from the patient's perspective. Information that should be contained in the record includes the following: Personal and family information. Reasons for selecting the provider. Reasons for patient visit. Patient requests and responses thereto. Provider and staff observations. Patient feedback. Summaries of previous visits. Record of progress made. In addition to promoting patient satisfaction, the customer-oriented medical record provides a data base for analyzing the current market that can be used in designing marketing communications to attract new patients. It also contributes to provider success by reminding care givers of their commitment to patient satisfaction, motivating them to be sensitive to patients' needs and expectations, and helping them to personalize the care experience.

  9. Profile of female patients seeking in-patient treatment for prescription opioid abuse from a tertiary care drug dependence treatment centre from India

    PubMed Central

    Dayal, Prabhoo; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: There has been a limited focus on prescription drug abuse among women in the country. Choice of psychoactive substance, reasons for initiation and co-occurring disorders have been found to be different among men and women. The current study was aimed at studying the profile of female patients seeking in-patient treatment for prescription drug use over a period of five years at a tertiary care drug dependence treatment centre in India. Methods: Case records of all female patients admitted with substance use disorder at a national level drug dependence treatment centre in north India across five years (between January 2008 and December 2012) were reviewed retrospectively to study their socio-demographic and clinical profile. The information was gathered using a semi-structured proforma and detailed case records. Abstinence, relapse and retention rates were calculated. Results: Over the five years, 31 female patients were admitted with prescription drug abuse. Of them, 12 (39%) used prescription opioids and 11 (36%) used prescription opioid along with benzodiazepines. Commonest prescription opioid was pentazocine used by 87 per cent of the women. Twenty two (71%) women were introduced to opioid by medical practitioners and commonest reason for introduction was pain (among 48%). Common co-occurring psychiatric diagnoses were depressive disorder (26%), cluster B traits/disorder (19%) and somatoform disorder (13%). Eight women did not complete treatment and left against medical advice. Thirteen women were advised maintenance treatment, and 70 per cent of them were retained for at least six months. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings revealed a link between mental illness, pain and non-medical use of prescription opioids among women. Majority of these women received opioids as a legitimate prescription form physician. Therefore, these legitimate prescribers should be trained for pain management to facilitate proper treatment of pain and to

  10. Patient records: from single events to elements for health planning.

    PubMed

    Pisanelli, D M; Ricci, F L

    1994-12-01

    Data collected in patient records are not only the kernel of a ward information system, but also the groundwork for planning and evaluating services in health care. The aim of this study was to analyze the problem of aggregate data generation starting from separate items in patient records. After describing the different uses of patient record data, we outline the process which generates aggregates data starting from individual records. This process leads to the definition of the "view on aggregation" as an intermediate step between patient records and aggregate data. A simplified schema is presented based on the Entity-Relationship model representing a conceptual model of the integration of aggregate data and patient record items. Finally, the role is discussed of automation in this process and the perspectives for its implementation.

  11. Toward an integrated computerized patient record.

    PubMed

    Dole, T R; Luberti, A A

    2000-04-01

    Developing a comprehensive electronic medical record system to serve ambulatory care providers in a large health care enterprise requires significant time and resources. One approach to achieving this system is to devise a series of short-term, workable solutions until a complete system is designed and implemented. The initial solution introduced a basic (mini) medical record system that provided an automated problem/summary sheet and decentralization of ambulatory-based medical records. The next step was to partner with an information system vendor committed to continued development of the long-term system capable of supporting the health care organization well into the future.

  12. Reliability of the Revised Psychopathy Checklist in Substance Abuse Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alterman, Arthur I.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    One month test-retest reliability of the Revised Psychopathy Checklist (PCL-R) was examined in 88 methadone-maintained males, along with effects of increased information about patients on PCL-R scores and diagnostic derivations. Test-retest reliabilities are quite good. Other findings also confirm potential utility of the PCL-R for research. (SLD)

  13. TeleMed: A distributed virtual patient record system

    SciTech Connect

    Forslund, D.W.; Phillips, R.L.; Kilman, D.G.; Cook, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    TeleMed is a distributed diagnosis and analysis system, which permits physicians who are not collocated to consult on the status of a patient. The patient`s record is dynamically constructed from data that may reside at several sites but which can be quickly assembled for viewing by pointing to the patient`s name. Then, a graphical patient record appears, through which consulting physicians can retrieve textual and radiographic data with a single mouse click. TeleMed uses modern distributed object technology and emerging telecollaboration tools. The authors describe in this paper some of the motivation for this change, what they mean by a virtual patient record, and some results of some early implementations of a virtual patient record.

  14. 42 CFR 137.178 - May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at the Federal Records Centers?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at... SELF-GOVERNANCE Operational Provisions Records § 137.178 May Self-Governance Tribes store patient records at the Federal Records Centers? Yes, at the option of a Self-Governance Tribe, patient records...

  15. The Formation of Marijuana Risk Perception in a Population of Substance Abusing Patients.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Samuel T; van Schalkwyk, Gerrit I; Davidson, Larry; D'Souza, Deepak C

    2016-03-01

    Risk perception has been shown to be protective with regard to marijuana use. Notably, the risk perception of marijuana in individuals with substance abuse problems varies significantly from that of the general public. Understanding how risk perception is formed in substance users could explain these differences and help predict the consequences of policy changes. Using this framework, we explored risk perception and its formation in a sample of substance abusing veterans. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with veterans who were receiving treatment for substance abuse. Interviews were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using inductive thematic analysis. A prominent perspective among the 31 participants was that marijuana is significantly different from other drugs because it is safe, not addictive, not associated with physical withdrawal, and has less overt behavioral effects than other substances. Many of these participants drew upon their own innocuous experiences with the drug in developing this perspective, more so than information from any other source. A contrasting narrative emphasized marijuana's capacity to cause negative social consequences, act as a gateway to the use of other, more harmful substances, and cause paranoia or worsen psychosis. In conclusion, individual experience with marijuana featured more prominently in informing risk perception than any other source of information. Our results and previous literature suggest that the significant disconnect between the individual experiences of substance users and the current clinical and legal policy towards marijuana may weaken the legitimacy of public policy or the authority of the medical community.

  16. The electronic patient records of the Hannover Medical School.

    PubMed

    Porth, A J; Niehoff, C; Matthies, H K

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, the successful introduction of a commercially available electronic patient record archiving system at the Hannover Medical School is described. Since 1996, more than 11 million document sheets of 130,000 patient records have been stored electronically. Currently, 100,000 sheets are stored each week.

  17. The relationship between vulnerable attachment style, psychopathology, drug abuse, and retention in treatment among methadone maintenance treatment patients.

    PubMed

    Potik, David; Peles, Einat; Abramsohn, Yahli; Adelson, Miriam; Schreiber, Shaul

    2014-01-01

    The relationship between vulnerable attachment style, psychopathology, drug abuse, and retention in treatment among patients in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) was examined by the Vulnerable Attachment Style Questionnaire (VASQ), the Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90), and drug abuse urine tests. After six years, retention in treatment and repeated urine test results were studied. Patients with vulnerable attachment style (a high VASQ score) had higher rates of drug abuse and higher psychopathology levels compared to patients with secure attachment style, especially on the interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety, hostility, phobic anxiety, and paranoid ideation scales. Drug abstinence at baseline was related to retention in treatment and to higher rates of drug abstinence after six years in MMT, whereas a vulnerable attachment style could not predict drug abstinence and retention in treatment. Clinical Implications concerning treatment of drug abusing populations and methodological issues concerning the VASQ's subscales are also discussed.

  18. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis of odontogenic origin in a diabetic patient complicated by substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Camino Junior, Rubens; Naclerio-Homem, Maria G; Cabral, Lecy Marcondes; Luz, João Gualberto C

    2014-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) is an uncommon, potentially fatal soft tissue infection with rapid progression characterized by necrosis in the subcutaneous tissue and fascia. A case of CNF of odontogenic origin in a diabetic patient, complicated by alcohol dependence and tobacco abuse, is presented with a literature review. The emergency procedure comprised hydration, colloid administration, glycemic control and broad spectrum antibiotic therapy, followed by aggressive surgical debridement. Necrosis in the platysma muscle was verified by histopathologic analysis. Reconstructive surgery was performed after suppressing the infection, and the wound was closed with an autologous skin graft. The patient had a long hospital stay, in part because the substance abuse led to a difficult recovery. The principles of early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement, broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and intensive supportive care in the treatment of CNF were confirmed in the present case. It was concluded that given the occurrence of CNF in the presence of diabetes mellitus and abuse of substances such as alcohol and tobacco, the health care professional should consider a stronger response to treatment and longer hospitalization.

  19. 42 CFR 2.15 - Incompetent and deceased patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... a deceased patient as an alcohol or drug abuser is subject to these regulations. If a written... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.15 Incompetent and...

  20. Patient knowledge and antibiotic abuse: Evidence from an audit study in China.

    PubMed

    Currie, Janet; Lin, Wanchuan; Zhang, Wei

    2011-09-01

    We conduct an audit study in which a pair of simulated patients with identical flu-like complaints visits the same physician. Simulated patient A is instructed to ask a question that showcases his/her knowledge of appropriate antibiotic use, whereas patient B is instructed to say nothing beyond describing his/her symptoms. We find that a patient who displays knowledge of appropriate antibiotics use reduces both antibiotic prescription rates and drug expenditures. Such knowledge also increases physicians' information provision about possible side effects, but has a negative impact on the quality of the physician-patient interactions. Our results suggest that antibiotics abuse in China is not driven by patients actively demanding antibiotics, but is largely a supply-side phenomenon.

  1. Solving incompatibilities between electronic records for orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Magni, Antonio; de Oliveira Albuquerque, Robson; de Sousa, Rafael Timóteo; Hans, Mark G; Magni, Franco G

    2007-07-01

    Today, orthodontists should not need to burden their work load with tasks such as figuring out how to send patient information to colleagues or how to share the same patient record across different software programs. In a long-term attempt to lighten these tasks, we are developing a standard for electronic orthodontic patient records to enable a seamless interchange of data between software programs. This article describes a practical proposal that integrates 2 existing standards, HL7 and DICOM, to create a standard for electronic orthodontic patient records.

  2. Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... to: What is Elder Abuse? Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse Substance abuse has been identified as the most frequently cited ... victim and/or the perpetrator who has the substance abuse problem. Substance abuse is believed to be a ...

  3. Multicenter patient records research: security policies and tools.

    PubMed

    Behlen, F M; Johnson, S B

    1999-01-01

    The expanding health information infrastructure offers the promise of new medical knowledge drawn from patient records. Such promise will never be fulfilled, however, unless researchers first address policy issues regarding the rights and interests of both the patients and the institutions who hold their records. In this article, the authors analyze the interests of patients and institutions in light of public policy and institutional needs. They conclude that the multicenter study, with Institutional Review Board approval of each study at each site, protects the interests of both. "Anonymity" is no panacea, since patient records are so rich in information that they can never be truly anonymous. Researchers must earn and respect the trust of the public, as responsible stewards of facts about patients' lives. The authors find that computer security tools are needed to administer multicenter patient records studies and describe simple approaches that can be implemented using commercial database products.

  4. The liver in acquired immune deficiency syndrome: emphasis on patients with intravenous drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, B M; Stahl, R E; Giardina, M A; Wormser, G P; Weiss, L; Jankowski, R; Rosenthal, W S

    1987-03-01

    To assess the spectrum of hepatic abnormalities in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), we reviewed clinical, biochemical, and pathological material in 32 patients with AIDS. Eight-four percent of AIDS cases had a history of intravenous drug abuse. Ninety percent of AIDS patients has some liver biochemical abnormality at the first presentation of illness. During the course of AIDS, significant (p less than 0.05, paired Student's t test) rises in alkaline phosphatase and bilirubin occurred, without rises in aminotransferases. Mean abnormalities were mild, reflecting approximately 2-fold increases over baseline. Liver failure was not believed to contribute to the death of any AIDS patient. Pathological findings in AIDS included specific infectious diagnosis in 26%, granulomas in 16%, hemosiderosis in 26%, nonspecific abnormalities in 39%, cirrhosis in 23%, and chronic active hepatitis in 3%. AIDS cases were also compared to 10 selected age, sex, and epidemiologically similar non-AIDS patients. Although granulomas or infections were not seen in our comparison group, only the incidence of chronic active hepatitis was significantly different between the groups. If only those with intravenous drug abuse were studied, then none of 24 AIDS patients versus four of eight non-AIDS cases (p less than 0.005) had chronic active hepatitis. AIDS patients with specific hepatic infections tended to have a higher alkaline phosphatase and aspartate aminotransferase (p less than 0.05) than noninfected cases. However, substantial overlap existed, and no difference in hepatomegaly was noted. Ninety percent of AIDS patients were ingesting at least one potentially hepatotoxic drug. We conclude that AIDS patients have a high incidence of underlying hepatic abnormalities. However, clinical and biochemical abnormalities are similar in our selected liver biopsy patients with intravenous drug abuse with or without AIDS. As expected, AIDS patients have a higher incidence of hepatic

  5. 42 CFR 2.65 - Procedures and criteria for orders authorizing disclosure and use of records to criminally...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., rape, kidnapping, armed robbery, assault with a deadly weapon, and child abuse and neglect. (2) There... OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Court Orders Authorizing Disclosure and Use §...

  6. 42 CFR 2.65 - Procedures and criteria for orders authorizing disclosure and use of records to criminally...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Court Orders Authorizing Disclosure and Use § 2.65..., rape, kidnapping, armed robbery, assault with a deadly weapon, and child abuse and neglect. (2)...

  7. Sensation-seeking, social anhedonia, and impulsivity in substance use disorder patients with and without schizophrenia and in non-abusing schizophrenia patients.

    PubMed

    Zhornitsky, Simon; Rizkallah, Elie; Pampoulova, Tania; Chiasson, Jean-Pierre; Lipp, Olivier; Stip, Emmanuel; Potvin, Stéphane

    2012-12-30

    Substance use disorders (SUDs) are common in patients with schizophrenia and this comorbidity is associated with a poorer prognosis, relative to non-abusing patients. One hypothesis that has been advanced in the literature is that dual diagnosis (DD) patients may have a different personality profile than non-abusing schizophrenia patients. The present case-control study aimed to characterize levels of personality traits (sensation-seeking, social anhedonia, and impulsivity) in substance abuse/dependence patients with (DD group; n=31) and without schizophrenia (SUD group; n=39), relative to non-abusing schizophrenia patients (SCZ group; n=23), and healthy controls (n=25). Impulsivity was assessed using the Barratt Impulsivity Scale. Sensation-seeking was assessed using the Zuckerman Sensation Seeking Scale. Social anhedonia was assessed with the Chapman Social Anhedonia Scale. We found that sensation-seeking was significantly higher in DD and SUD, relative to SCZ patients. We found that social anhedonia was significantly elevated in DD and SCZ, relative to healthy controls. We found that impulsivity was significantly higher in DD, SCZ and SUD patients, compared to healthy controls. The results suggest that sensation-seeking is prominent in substance abuse/dependence (irrespective of schizophrenia), social anhedonia is prominent in schizophrenia (irrespective of substance abuse/dependence), and impulsivity is prominent in all three populations.

  8. Patient ECG recording control for an automatic implantable defibrillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, Glen H. (Inventor); Lee, Jr., David G. (Inventor); Kitchin, David A. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    An implantable automatic defibrillator includes sensors which are placed on or near the patient's heart to detect electrical signals indicative of the physiology of the heart. The signals are digitally converted and stored into a FIFO region of a RAM by operation of a direct memory access (DMA) controller. The DMA controller operates transparently with respect to the microprocessor which is part of the defibrillator. The implantable defibrillator includes a telemetry communications circuit for sending data outbound from the defibrillator to an external device (either a patient controller or a physician's console or other) and a receiver for sensing at least an externally generated patient ECG recording command signal. The patient recording command signal is generated by the hand held patient controller. Upon detection of the patient ECG recording command, DMA copies the contents of the FIFO into a specific region of the RAM.

  9. [Diagnostics and treatment of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome patients with an alcohol abuse].

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Maria; Sonne, Charlotte

    2013-04-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is a condition with high morbidity and mortality and occurs as a consequence of thiamine deficiency. Clinical symptoms are often ambiguous and post-mortem examinations show that the syndrome is underdiagnosed and probably undertreated. There is sparse clinical evidence concerning optimal dosage and duration of treatment. This article reviews the current literature and concludes that all patients with a history of alcohol abuse should be treated with high dosage IV thiamine for an extended period of time, albeit further research is needed.

  10. The Health of the Computer-Based Patient Record.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisse, Mark E.

    1992-01-01

    The newly incorporated Computer-Based Patient Record Institute (CPRI) is discussed in the context of the history of medical records, the need for change (mainly because of health care reimbursement and regulation), and the need for involvement by all medical professionals in the development of standards of data collection which reflect public…

  11. Information integrity and privacy for computerized medical patient records

    SciTech Connect

    Gallegos, J.; Hamilton, V.; Gaylor, T.; McCurley, K.; Meeks, T.

    1996-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Oceania, Inc. entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) in November 1993 to provide ``Information Integrity and Privacy for Computerized Medical Patient Records`` (CRADA No. SC93/01183). The main objective of the project was to develop information protection methods that are appropriate for databases of patient records in health information systems. This document describes the findings and alternative solutions that resulted from this CRADA.

  12. Challenges and methodology for indexing the computerized patient record.

    PubMed

    Ehrler, Frédéric; Ruch, Patrick; Geissbuhler, Antoine; Lovis, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Patient records contain most crucial documents for managing the treatments and healthcare of patients in the hospital. Retrieving information from these records in an easy, quick and safe way helps care providers to save time and find important facts about their patient's health. This paper presents the scalability issues induced by the indexing and the retrieval of the information contained in the patient records. For this study, EasyIR, an information retrieval tool performing full text queries and retrieving the related documents has been used. An evaluation of the performance reveals that the indexing process suffers from overhead consequence of the particular structure of the patient records. Most IR tools are designed to manage very large numbers of documents in a single index whereas in our hypothesis, one index per record, which usually implies few documents, has been imposed. As the number of modifications and creations of patient records are significant in a day, using a specialized and efficient indexation tool is required.

  13. Childhood sexual abuse in advanced cancer patients in the palliative care setting.

    PubMed

    Wygant, Carmella; Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2011-08-01

    Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is a common, distressing, yet rarely discussed topic in palliative care. The long-term effects of CSA can have a significant impact on patients' quality of life, particularly at the end of life. In this article, we aim to initiate a discussion regarding the need to address CSA in the palliative care setting, using the example of an advanced cancer patient and her caregiver sister who revealed their common past. Specifically, we will be discussing 1) the comorbidities, psychological distress, and family distress associated with CSA, 2) its impact on health care delivery, 3) an approach to initiating conversations regarding CSA, and 4) various management strategies. Successful management of CSA necessitates an interprofessional team approach and may help to improve the quality of life of patients and their families.

  14. Cutaneous manifestations of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Kos, Liborka; Shwayder, Tor

    2006-01-01

    Dermatologists and child abuse are not frequently associated in the minds of most physicians. Yet the most common manifestations of child abuse are cutaneous. This article reviews cutaneous manifestations of physical abuse, including bruises, lacerations, abrasions, human bites, and burns. It also discusses ways that dermatologists can differentiate abusive injuries from accidental ones as well as from the many dermatologic conditions that can mimic child abuse. Finally, we review what actions the dermatologist should take when suspecting abuse in a patient.

  15. Electronic health records and national patient-safety goals.

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F; Singh, Hardeep

    2012-11-08

    Hospitals and clinics are adapting to new technologies and implementing electronic health records, but the efforts need to be aligned explicitly with goals for patient safety. EHRs bring the risks of both technical failures and inappropriate use, but they can also help to monitor and improve patient safety.

  16. Predictors of recovery following involuntary hospitalization of violent substance abuse patients.

    PubMed

    André, Charles; Jaber-Filho, Jorge A; Carvalho, Marcelo; Jullien, Carlos; Hoffman, Angela

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the results and predictors of good recovery following involuntary hospitalization of violent substance abuse patients. Twenty patients (16 male, aged 13 to 53 years [mean+/-s.d.=32.9+/-10.2]) were admitted in 1997 with a median hospital time of 73.5 days (20 to 455) for exhibiting violent behavior following drug abuse and a loss of self-control. They were treated with psychiatric medication, a 12-step program (Minnesota), psychotherapy and family therapy, and, following hospitalization, counselling, psychotherapy, and participation in self-help groups. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 24 months (17.8+/-4.9). We studied the probability of maintenance of complete abstinence and social adaptation (professional-educational, family and legal parameters) using T and Fisher tests (significance level p< or =0.05). Of the twenty, thirteen patients (65%) achieved excellent social reintegration, and twelve maintained total abstinence. Two patients died (AIDS, hepatic cirrhosis). The chances of complete abstinence and social reintegration were increased by lower age at admission (p=0.02), some form of treatment following hospitalization (p=0.007), adherence to the entire period of treatment (p=0.05), and regular attendance at self-help groups (p=0.05). No significant differences were found in terms of other demographic parameters, drugs used (number or class), previous hospital admissions, length of hospitalization, or follow-up. Sixty percent of patients can expect an excellent outcome over a period of 18 months, according to strict clinical and social criteria. Early intervention and factors increasing adherence to prolonged treatment increase abstinence and social reintegration and thus should be further explored.

  17. The electronic patient record: a strategic planning framework.

    PubMed

    Gordon, D B; Marafioti, S; Carter, M; Kunov, H; Dolan, A

    1995-01-01

    Sunnybrook Health Science Center (Sunnybrook) is a multifacility academic teaching center. In May 1994, Sunnybrook struck an electronic patient record taskforce to develop a strategic plan for the implementation of a comprehensive, facility wide electronic patient record (EPR). The taskforce sought to create a conceptual framework which provides context and integrates decision-making related to the comprehensive electronic patient record. The EPR is very much broader in scope than the traditional paper-based record. It is not restricted to simply reporting individual patient data. By the Institute of Medicine's definition, the electronic patient record resides in a system specifically designed to support users through availability of complete and accurate data, practitioner reminders and alerts, clinical decision support systems, links to bodies of medical knowledge, and other aids [1]. It is a comprehensive resource for patient care. The taskforce proposed a three domain model for determining how the EPR affects Sunnybrook. The EPR enables Sunnybrook to have a high performance team structure (domain 1), to function as an integrated organization (domain 2), and to reach out and develop new relationships with external organizations to become an extended enterprise (domain 3) [2]. Domain 1: Sunnybrook's high performance teams or patient service units' (PSUs) are decentralized, autonomous operating units that provide care to patients grouped by 'like' diagnosis and resource needs. The EPR must provide functions and applications which promote patient focused care, such as cross functional charting and care maps, group scheduling, clinical email, and a range of enabling technologies for multiskilled workers. Domain 2: In the integrated organization domain, the EPR should facilitate closer linkages between the arrangement of PSUs into clinical teams and with other facilities within the center in order to provide a longitudinal record that covers a continuum of care

  18. A Recommendation for the Management of Illness Anxiety Disorder Patients Abusing the Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    Almalki, Mohammad; Al-Tawayjri, Ibrahim; Al-Anazi, Ahmed; Mahmoud, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Illness anxiety disorder (IAD) entails a preoccupation with having a serious, undiagnosed illness in which somatic symptoms are, if present, mild in intensity (American Psychiatric Association, 2013). Case Report. This is a case of seventy-three-year-old Saudi man who started visiting the primary health care center around twenty-five years ago. With concerns of having cancer, the patient continuously visited the hospital, costing over $170,000. Throughout this period, the patient has been exposed to extensive unnecessary imaging studies and laboratory tests that have effects on his life in all aspects with such concerns. Five years ago, a family doctor has put an end to that by directing the patient to the right path. The doctor made several actions; most importantly, he directed the patient to a cognitive behavioral therapy which significantly improved a range of hypochondriacal beliefs and attitudes. This patient's case demonstrates the fundamental importance of a proper health system that limits such patients from abusing the health system and depleting the medical resources. Moreover, this case emphasizes the important role of the family physician who can be the first physician to encounter such patients. Thus, proper understanding of the nature of such disorder is a key element for better diagnosis and management. PMID:27313939

  19. [Alcohol- and substance abuse among mentally ill patients with migration background in Austria].

    PubMed

    Stompe, Thomas; Ritter, Kristina; Holzer, David; Topitz, Andrea; Wenzel, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The refugee movements of the recent years are confronting the health care with new challenges. However, it has turned out that in Austria data on the mental health of migrants are nearly not available. Especially data on the frequency and patterns of comorbid substance abuse of migrants with mental disorders do not exist even from international studies. We analyzed data from 1819 patients (1726 first generation, 93 second generation) treated in the outpatient clinic for transcultural psychiatry and migration related disorders at the Vienna General Hospital: In first-generation migrants the cultural and religious background of the region of origin has the greatest impact on the frequency and the patterns of misused substances. In second-generation migrants the consumer habits approximate to those of the majority of the society. The primary diagnosis plays a minor role. Only patients with personality disorders exhibit higher rates of illicit substance compared with other diagnoses.

  20. From medical record to patient record through electronic data interchange (EDI).

    PubMed

    Kinkhorst, O M; Lalleman, A W; Hasman, A

    1996-07-01

    In this contribution the role of Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) for patient records is discussed. It is our opinion that unlimited access to patient records of different care provides is not a wise thing to do and may even not be acceptable legally. The exchange of EDI messages may be a solution in that the relevant information is exchanged on a need to know basis under the responsibility of the care provider that generated the information. The state of the art with respect to the availability of EDI messages in Europe is presented.

  1. Cognitive Analysis of the Summarization of Longitudinal Patient Records

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Daniel; Kaufman, David; Bloxham, Benjamin; Chase, Herbert; Elhadad, Noémie

    2010-01-01

    Electronic health records contain an abundance of valuable information that can be used to guide patient care. However, the large volume of information embodied in these records also renders access to relevant information a time-consuming and inefficient process. Our ultimate objective is to develop an automated summarizer that succinctly captures all relevant information in the patient record. In this paper, we present a cognitive study of 8 clinicians who were asked to create summaries based on data contained in the patients’ electronic health record. The study characterized the primary sources of information that were prioritized by clinicians, the temporal strategies used to develop a summary and the cognitive operations used to guide the summarization process. Although we would not expect the automated summarizer to emulate human performance, we anticipate that this study will inform its development in instrumental ways. PMID:21347062

  2. Redundancy-aware topic modeling for patient record notes.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Raphael; Aviram, Iddo; Elhadad, Michael; Elhadad, Noémie

    2014-01-01

    The clinical notes in a given patient record contain much redundancy, in large part due to clinicians' documentation habit of copying from previous notes in the record and pasting into a new note. Previous work has shown that this redundancy has a negative impact on the quality of text mining and topic modeling in particular. In this paper we describe a novel variant of Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) topic modeling, Red-LDA, which takes into account the inherent redundancy of patient records when modeling content of clinical notes. To assess the value of Red-LDA, we experiment with three baselines and our novel redundancy-aware topic modeling method: given a large collection of patient records, (i) apply vanilla LDA to all documents in all input records; (ii) identify and remove all redundancy by chosing a single representative document for each record as input to LDA; (iii) identify and remove all redundant paragraphs in each record, leaving partial, non-redundant documents as input to LDA; and (iv) apply Red-LDA to all documents in all input records. Both quantitative evaluation carried out through log-likelihood on held-out data and topic coherence of produced topics and qualitative assessment of topics carried out by physicians show that Red-LDA produces superior models to all three baseline strategies. This research contributes to the emerging field of understanding the characteristics of the electronic health record and how to account for them in the framework of data mining. The code for the two redundancy-elimination baselines and Red-LDA is made publicly available to the community.

  3. Considering Governance for Patient Access to E-Medical Records.

    PubMed

    Day, Karen; Wells, Susan

    2015-01-01

    People having access to their medical records could have a transformative improvement effect on healthcare delivery and use. Our research aimed to explore the concerns and attitudes of giving people electronic access to their medical records through patient portals. We conducted 28 semi-structured interviews with 30 people, asking questions about portal design, organisational implications and governance. We report the findings of the governance considerations raised during the interviews. These revealed that (1) there is uncertainty about the possible design and extent of giving people access to their medical records to view/use, (2) existing policies about patient authentication, proxy, and privacy require modification, and (3) existing governance structures and functions require further examination and adjustment. Future research should include more input from patients and health informaticians.

  4. Patient experiences with electronic medical records: Lessons learned

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Dale; Richter, Louiseann T; Kapustin, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To describe the lived experience of patients communicating with their nurse practitioners and physicians while using paper health records (PHRs) and electronic health records (EHRs) in the examination rooms. The significance of the study lies in the salience of communication between the patient and provider in promoting optimal clinical outcomes and the highest level of patient satisfaction. Data sources The study used a qualitative, phenomenological design. Audio-taped focus group interviews were conducted with 21 patients from a diabetes clinic in Baltimore, Maryland. Patients had visits with the provider before and after implementation of EHRs in the clinic. Conclusions The four themes that emerged from the three focus groups included communication issues, patient preferences for electronic records, safety and security concerns, and transition problems with implementation of EHRs. Implications for practice Potential benefits for nurse practitioners implementing the recommendations in this study include enhanced communication between patients and providers while using EHRs, increased patient satisfaction, higher levels of nurse practitioner and physician satisfaction, and avoidance of communication issues during implementation of EHR systems. PMID:25234112

  5. How Patients Can Improve the Accuracy of their Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Dullabh, Prashila M.; Sondheimer, Norman K.; Katsh, Ethan; Evans, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Assess (1) if patients can improve their medical records’ accuracy if effectively engaged using a networked Personal Health Record; (2) workflow efficiency and reliability for receiving and processing patient feedback; and (3) patient feedback’s impact on medical record accuracy. Background: Improving medical record’ accuracy and associated challenges have been documented extensively. Providing patients with useful access to their records through information technology gives them new opportunities to improve their records’ accuracy and completeness. A new approach supporting online contributions to their medication lists by patients of Geisinger Health Systems, an online patient-engagement advocate, revealed this can be done successfully. In late 2011, Geisinger launched an online process for patients to provide electronic feedback on their medication lists’ accuracy before a doctor visit. Patient feedback was routed to a Geisinger pharmacist, who reviewed it and followed up with the patient before changing the medication list shared by the patient and the clinicians. Methods: The evaluation employed mixed methods and consisted of patient focus groups (users, nonusers, and partial users of the feedback form), semi structured interviews with providers and pharmacists, user observations with patients, and quantitative analysis of patient feedback data and pharmacists’ medication reconciliation logs. Findings/Discussion: (1) Patients were eager to provide feedback on their medications and saw numerous advantages. Thirty percent of patient feedback forms (457 of 1,500) were completed and submitted to Geisinger. Patients requested changes to the shared medication lists in 89 percent of cases (369 of 414 forms). These included frequency—or dosage changes to existing prescriptions and requests for new medications (prescriptions and over-the counter). (2) Patients provided useful and accurate online feedback. In a subsample of 107 forms

  6. Antisocial personality disorder in Turkish substance dependent patients and its relationship with anxiety, depression and a history of childhood abuse.

    PubMed

    Evren, Cuneyt; Kural, Sevil; Erkiran, Murat

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) in treatment-seeking Turkish substance dependent patients and the relationship of ASPD with clinical characteristics were studied. Participants were 132 inpatients with substance dependence according to the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-I), Turkish version. The clinician applied a semi-structured socio-demographic form, SCID-I, SCID-II, Childhood Abuse and Neglect Questionnaire (CANQ), Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Among the 132 substance dependent patients, 31 (23.5%) had ASPD diagnosis and 56 (42.4%) had no personality disorder or personality traits. Rate of childhood physical abuse, childhood verbal abuse, childhood neglect, suicide attempt history, self-destructive behavior and lifetime major depression were higher among patients with ASPD. Also mean scores of BDI, BAI and MAST were higher among patients with ASPD. The high rate of ASPD found among Turkish substance dependent patients suggests that special attention must be paid to identify ASPD in this group. Findings in this study showed that there is an association between ASPD and childhood abuse, lifetime major depression and severity of substance use.

  7. 42 CFR 2.14 - Minor patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.14 Minor patients. (a) Definition of minor... or drug abuse treatment, any written consent for disclosure authorized under subpart C of these... drug abuse treatment, any written consent for disclosure authorized under subpart C of...

  8. 42 CFR 2.14 - Minor patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.14 Minor patients. (a) Definition of minor... or drug abuse treatment, any written consent for disclosure authorized under subpart C of these... drug abuse treatment, any written consent for disclosure authorized under subpart C of...

  9. SU-E-T-502: Biometrically Accepted Patient Records

    SciTech Connect

    Basavatia, A; Kalnicki, S; Garg, M; Lukaj, A; Hong, L; Fret, J; Yaparpalvi, R; Tome, W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To implement a clinically useful palm vein pattern recognition biometric system to treat the correct treatment plan to the correct patient each and every time and to check-in the patient into the department to access the correct medical record. Methods: A commercially available hand vein scanning system was paired to Aria and utilized an ADT interface from the hospital electronic health system. Integration at two points in Aria, version 11 MR2, first at the appointment tracker screen for the front desk medical record access and second at the queue screen on the 4D treatment console took place for patient daily time-out. A test patient was utilized to check accuracy of identification as well as to check that no unintended interactions take place between the 4D treatment console and the hand vein scanning system. This system has been in clinical use since December 2013. Results: Since implementation, 445 patients have been enrolled into our biometric system. 95% of patients learn the correct methodology of hand placement on the scanner in the first try. We have had two instances of patient not found because of a bad initial scan. We simply erased the scanned metric and the patient enrolled again in those cases. The accuracy of the match is 100% for each patient, we have not had one patient misidentified. We can state this because we still use patient photo and date of birth as identifiers. A QA test patient is run monthly to check the integrity of the system. Conclusion: By utilizing palm vein scans along with the date of birth and patient photo, another means of patient identification now exits. This work indicates the successful implementation of technology in the area of patient safety by closing the gap of treating the wrong plan to a patient in radiation oncology. FOJP Service Corporation covered some of the costs of the hardware and software of the palm vein pattern recognition biometric system.

  10. An object oriented computer-based patient record reference model.

    PubMed Central

    Doré, L.; Lavril, M.; Jean, F. C.; Degoulet, P.

    1995-01-01

    In the context of health care information systems based on client/server architecture, we address the problem of a common Computer-based Patient Record (CPR). We define it as a collection of faithful observations about patients care, with respect to the free expression of physicians. This CPR model supports several views of the medical data, in order to provide applications with a comprehensive and standardized access to distributed patient data. Finally, we validated our CPR approach as a primary data model server for an application for hypertensive patient management. PMID:8563306

  11. Anabolic steroids abuse-induced cardiomyopathy and ischaemic stroke in a young male patient.

    PubMed

    Shamloul, Reham Mohammed; Aborayah, Ahmed Fathy; Hashad, Assem; Abd-Allah, Foad

    2014-02-26

    We report a case of a 37-year-old man presented with acute stroke and hepatorenal impairment which were associated with anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) abuse over 2 years. Despite the absence of apparent symptoms and signs of congestive heart failure at presentation, an AAS-induced dilated cardiomyopathy with multiple thrombi in the left ventricle was attributed to be the underlying cause of his condition. Awareness of the complications of AAS led to the prompt treatment of the initially unrecognised dilated cardiomyopathy, and improved the liver and kidney functions. However, the patient was exposed to a second severe ischaemic event, which led to his death. This unique and complex presentation of AAS complications opens for better recognition and treatment of their potentially fatal effects.

  12. Long-Term Effects of Incest: Life Events Triggering Mental Disorders in Female Patients with Sexual Abuse in Childhood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinzl, Johannes; Biebl, Wilfried

    1992-01-01

    Psychosocial, psychosomatic, and psychodynamic factors were evaluated in 33 female psychiatric patients who had been victims of incest. Sexual abuse experiences in childhood were related to feelings of anxiety, helplessness, and powerlessness, which, with a lack of support from the mother, led to ego weakness, and an autoplastic model of coping…

  13. Giving Patients Access to Their Medical Records via the Internet

    PubMed Central

    Masys, Daniel; Baker, Dixie; Butros, Amy; Cowles, Kevin E.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The Patient-Centered Access to Secure Systems Online (pcasso) project is designed to apply state-of-the-art-security to the communication of clinical information over the Internet. Design: The authors report the legal and regulatory issues associated with deploying the system, and results of its use by providers and patients. Human subject protection concerns raised by the Institutional Review Board focused on three areas—unauthorized access to information by persons other than the patient; the effect of startling or poorly understood information; and the effect of patient access to records on the record-keeping behavior of providers. Measurements: Objective and subjective measures of security and usability were obtained. Results: During its initial deployment phase, the project enrolled 216 physicians and 41 patients; of these, 68 physicians and 26 patients used the system one or more times. The system performed as designed, with no unauthorized information access or intrusions detected. Providers rated the usability of the system low because of the complexity of the secure login and other security features and restrictions limiting their access to those patients with whom they had a professional relationship. In contrast, patients rated the usability and functionality of the system favorably. Conclusion: High-assurance systems that serve both patients and providers will need to address differing expectations regarding security and ease of use. PMID:11861633

  14. Access to records by persons other than the patient.

    PubMed

    Dimond, Bridgit

    This article explores what rights persons, other than the patient, have to access health records which come under Data Protection Act and other statutory provisions. These other persons could include the relatives of a patient, the parents of a child or those concerned with the estate of a deceased person. In addition, there are other rights of disclosure recognized by the common law and these will be considered in a later article.

  15. Personality Disorders in Substance Abusers: A Comparison of Patients Treated in a Prison Unit and Patients Treated in Inpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefansson, Ragnar; Hesse, Morten

    2008-01-01

    A large body of literature has shown a high prevalence of personality disorders in substance abusers. We compared a sample of substance abusers treated in a prison setting with substance abusers treated in a non-prison inpatient setting rated with the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III. Base-rate scores indicated a prevalence of 95% of…

  16. Physical characteristics of residential psychiatric and substance abuse programs: organizational determinants and patients outcomes.

    PubMed

    Timko, C

    1996-02-01

    Described the Physical and Architectural Characteristics Inventory (PACI), which assesses the physical characteristics of hospital- and community-based psychiatric and substance abuse residential treatment programs for adults. Developed using data from 94 representative programs, the PACI has 7 dimensions that assess community accessibility, physical features that add convenience, aid recreation, and provide support for patients, and space for patient and staff functions. In comparison to community-based programs (n = 63), hospital programs (n = 31) had more social-recreational and prosthetic aids, safety features, staff facilities, and space. The PACI dimensions were also related to other organizational features, such as facility ownership and program size and staffing level. Programs with more physical amenities had patients who were more involved in self-initiated and community activities and were more likely to successfully complete the program and be discharged to independent living situations and paid jobs. Programs with more social-recreational and prosthetic aids, space, and access to community resources also had better patient outcomes. In addition, PACI dimensions were related to observers' ratings of facility attractiveness. Potential applications of the PACI and the full inventory of which it is a part are discussed.

  17. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  18. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  19. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  20. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  1. 42 CFR 491.10 - Patient health records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patient health records. 491.10 Section 491.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF CERTAIN HEALTH FACILITIES Rural Health...

  2. Medical record keeping and system performance in orthopaedic trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Cosic, Filip; Kimmel, Lara; Edwards, Elton

    2016-02-18

    Objective The medical record is critical for documentation and communication between healthcare professionals. The aim of the present study was to evaluate important aspects of the orthopaedic medical record and system performance to determine whether any deficiencies exist in these areas.Methods Review of 200 medical records of surgically treated traumatic lower limb injury patients was undertaken. The operative report, discharge summary and first and second outpatient reviews were evaluated.Results In all cases, an operative report was completed by a senior surgeon. Weight-bearing status was adequately documented in 91% of reports. Discharge summaries were completed for 82.5% of admissions, with 87.3% of these having instructions reflective of those in the operative report. Of first and second outpatient reviews, 69% and 73%, respectively, occurred within 1 week of the requested time. Previously documented management plans were changed in 30% of reviews. At 6-months post-operatively, 42% of patients had been reviewed by a member of their operating team.Discussion Orthopaedic medical record documentation remains an area for improvement. In addition, hospital out-patient systems perform suboptimally and may affect patient outcomes.What is known about the topic? Medical records are an essential tool in modern medical practice. Despite the importance of comprehensive documentation in the medical record, numerous examples of poor documentation have been demonstrated, including substandard documentation during consultant ward rounds by junior doctors leading to a breakdown in healthcare professional communication and potential patient mismanagement. Further inadequacies of medical record documentation have been demonstrated in surgical discharge notes, with complete and correct documentation reported to be as low as 65%.What does this paper add? Standards of patient care should be constantly monitored and deficiencies identified in order to implement a remedy and close

  3. Can Patient Record Summarization Support Quality Metric Abstraction?

    PubMed Central

    Pivovarov, Rimma; Coppleson, Yael Judith; Gorman, Sharon Lipsky; Vawdrey, David K.; Elhadad, Noémie

    2016-01-01

    We present a pre/post intervention study, where HARVEST, a general-purpose patient record summarization tool, was introduced to ten data abstraction specialists. The specialists are responsible for reviewing hundreds of patient charts each month and reporting disease-specific quality metrics to a variety of online registries and databases. We qualitatively and quantitatively investigated whether HARVEST improved the process of quality metric abstraction. Study instruments included pre/post questionnaires and log analyses of the specialists’ actions in the electronic health record (EHR). The specialists reported favorable impressions of HARVEST and suggested that it was most useful when abstracting metrics from patients with long hospitalizations and for metrics that were not consistently captured in a structured manner in the EHR. A statistically significant reduction in time spent per chart before and after use of HARVEST was observed for 50% of the specialists and 90% of the specialists continue to use HARVEST after the study period. PMID:28269899

  4. A computer-based patient record: Emory's approach.

    PubMed

    Bennett, J J; Alligood, R; Beck, K L; Dardeen, K; Payne, L

    1993-05-01

    The replacement of the paper medical record at Emory will be gradual over the next several years. We foresee milestone events after which portions of the patient record are no longer retained in paper form. As these milestones are identified, the HIM professionals at the three institutions will begin the formidable task of managing the transition to a paperless system. Evaluation of business processes and the skill sets needed by staff members can be accomplished and a plan for each phase of transition developed.

  5. Personal Health Records for Patients with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rozenblum, R.; Park, A.; Dunn, M.; Bates, D.W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Personal health records (PHRs) connected to a physician’s electronic health record system hold substantial promise for supporting and engaging patients with chronic disease. Objectives: To explore how U.S. health care organizations are currently utilizing PHRs for chronic disease populations. Methods A mixed methods study including semi-structured interviews and a questionnaire was conducted. A purposive sample was developed of health care organizations which were recognized as exemplars for PHRs and were high performers in national patient satisfaction surveys (H-CAHPS or CAHPS). Within each organization, participants were health IT leaders or those managing high-risk or chronic disease populations. Results Interviews were conducted with 30 informants and completed questionnaires were received from 16 organizations (84% response rate). Most PHRs allowed patients to access health records and educational material, message their provider, renew prescriptions and request appointments. Patient generated data was increasingly being sought and combined with messaging, resulted in greater understanding of patient health and functioning outside of the clinic visit. However for chronic disease populations, there was little targeted involvement in PHR design and few tools to help interpret and manage their conditions beyond those offered for all. The PHR was largely uncoupled from high risk population management interventions and no clear framework for future PHR development emerged. Conclusion This technology is currently underutilized and represents a major opportunity given the potential benefits of patient engagement and shared decision making. A coherent patient-centric PHR design and evaluation strategy is required to realize its potential and maximize this natural hub for multidisciplinary care co-ordination. PMID:25024758

  6. Mental Illness, Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, Multiple Disabilities...Whose Patient, Whose Treatment Approach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sciacca, Kathleen

    This paper reviews issues in the provision of services to individuals who are mentally ill chemical abusers and addicted (MICAA). Introductory material defines this population and notes that these people are frequently ineligible for services aimed at either mental illness or chemical abuse alone. Service provisions within the psychiatric/mental…

  7. The Development of a Substance Abuse Treatment Program for Forensic Patients with Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassmire, David M.; Welsh, Robert K.; Clevenger, Jeanne K.

    2007-01-01

    The Substance Abuse and Mental Illness (SAMI) program combines cognitive rehabilitation and dual-diagnosis substance abuse treatment within a stages of change context. This article describes the development, implementation, and preliminary outcome analysis of the SAMI program in a forensic hospital.

  8. Silencing the Patient: Freud, Sexual Abuse, and "The Etiology of Hysteria."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McOmber, James B.

    1996-01-01

    States that, in "The Etiology of Hysteria," Sigmund Freud's "seduction theory" asserted that child sexual abuse was the single cause of adult hysteria. Argues that Freud's failure to persuade his audience can be attributed not only to their denial of sexual abuse but also to his failure to clarify how pschyoanalysis could…

  9. 42 CFR 2.19 - Disposition of records by discontinued programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... acquired by another program, it must purge patient identifying information from its records or destroy the records unless— (1) The patient who is the subject of the records gives written consent (meeting the... PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.19 Disposition...

  10. 42 CFR 2.19 - Disposition of records by discontinued programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... acquired by another program, it must purge patient identifying information from its records or destroy the records unless— (1) The patient who is the subject of the records gives written consent (meeting the... PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.19 Disposition...

  11. 42 CFR 2.19 - Disposition of records by discontinued programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... acquired by another program, it must purge patient identifying information from its records or destroy the records unless— (1) The patient who is the subject of the records gives written consent (meeting the... PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.19 Disposition...

  12. Giving patients a copy of their computer medical record.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, M G

    1982-02-01

    Medical summaries were prepared by a general practitioner for inclusion in a computer system. Both the medical records and a patient-filled questionnaire were used. A representative sample of the practice population were then sent their summaries. In creating the summaries the general practitioner felt the need to exclude 11 diagnoses whenever they appeared (5 per cent of the patients), and to suppress one or more diagnoses in a further 14 per cent of patients. In 2 per cent of summaries the general practitioner felt unable to give a copy to the patient because he was afraid of an adverse reaction by the patient or immediate relatives.The patients' views of the usefulness of the summaries, and of their accuracy and completeness, were sought by a questionnaire. Replies were received from 71 per cent; of these, 91 per cent reported that they thought the summary useful. However, in 18 per cent of cases, the patients requested additions, corrections or deletions. Only 1 per cent of patients replied that they definitely did not like the idea of a computer containing their medical information.Some of the benefits and difficulties both of using a computer to store medical information, and of giving the patient a copy of the medical summary, are discussed.

  13. Electronic patient record and archive of records in Cardio.net system for telecardiology.

    PubMed

    Sierdziński, Janusz; Karpiński, Grzegorz

    2003-01-01

    In modern medicine the well structured patient data set, fast access to it and reporting capability become an important question. With the dynamic development of information technology (IT) such question is solved via building electronic patient record (EPR) archives. We then obtain fast access to patient data, diagnostic and treatment protocols etc. It results in more efficient, better and cheaper treatment. The aim of the work was to design a uniform Electronic Patient Record, implemented in cardio.net system for telecardiology allowing the co-operation among regional hospitals and reference centers. It includes questionnaires for demographic data and questionnaires supporting doctor's work (initial diagnosis, final diagnosis, history and physical, ECG at the discharge, applied treatment, additional tests, drugs, daily and periodical reports). The browser is implemented in EPR archive to facilitate data retrieval. Several tools for creating EPR and EPR archive were used such as: XML, PHP, Java Script and MySQL. The separate question is the security of data on WWW server. The security is ensured via Security Socket Layer (SSL) protocols and other tools. EPR in Cardio.net system is a module enabling the co-work of many physicians and the communication among different medical centers.

  14. 42 CFR 2.22 - Notice to patients of Federal confidentiality requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... identifying a patient as an alcohol or drug abuser. (2) A statement that violation of the Federal law and... an alcohol or drug abuser Unless: (1) The patient consents in writing: (2) The disclosure is allowed... GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions §...

  15. Substance abuse in patients with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder : therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Schubiner, Howard

    2005-01-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common disorder in children that frequently persists into adulthood. Studies have found that substance use disorders (SUD) are seen more commonly in those with ADHD than the general population. Although treatment with stimulant medications has been shown to be effective for individuals with ADHD, concern about the use of these agents in this population persists. This review article highlights the research in this area with a focus on the treatment of individuals who present with concomitant ADHD and SUD. Although stimulants can be abused, studies have shown that adolescents who are prescribed stimulants for ADHD have lower rates of SUD than those who are not treated with stimulants. It may be particularly difficult to evaluate adults for the diagnosis of ADHD when SUD is a co-morbid factor. Studies show that 20--30% of adults presenting with SUD have concomitant ADHD and approximately 20--40% of adults with ADHD have histories of SUD. Therefore, it is critical to perform careful diagnostic interviews to discern if patients have either or both of these disorders. Many clinical experts suggest that adults with ADHD and active SUD be treated for the SUD until a period of sobriety persists prior to initiation of specific treatment for ADHD. Since individuals with ADHD and active SUD are more likely to have more severe SUD and a worse prognosis, this approach may not serve many patients, as they relapse prior to obtaining ADHD treatment. Therefore, research has been directed towards determining if the treatment of ADHD with stimulant medications can be safe and effective for the individual with active SUD and concomitant ADHD. An initial trial of methylphenidate in a population of adults with active cocaine dependence and ADHD indicates that this is the case. Individuals with ADHD and SUD can present difficult diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. It appears that the most effective treatment option is to create a

  16. A clerking tool for the patient record system.

    PubMed

    McDermott, D; Heathfield, H; Kirby, J

    1995-01-01

    1. BACKGROUND. The goal of the PEN&PAD (Elderly Care) project is to develop a patient record system to assist the many different professionals that care for patients in a hospital setting. At the core of the project is the use of structured data which can be reused in a variety of ways--both within the system for further manipulation and display, and externally for auditing and statistical purposes. To accommodate these needs, a compositional method of data entry called Structured Data Entry (SDE) was used in this application. SDE was developed in an earlier project PEN&PAD (GP)(1). Our application utilizes a network representation of the medical semantics that can be queried to obtain what is sensible to "say" about a particular concept. This functionality is contained within a separate application known as the Terminology Server (TeS), which has been developed within the GALEN project (2). The client application (the patient record system) requests information from the TeS which can then be used to produce compositional data entry forms that require the user to choose values for given attributes (e.g., if information pertaining to chest pain were being recorded, the attribute 'location' and a choice of possible values i.e., 'left' 'right' and 'bilateral' might appear on the form). Given the importance of capturing clinical information in a highly structured format, SDE is a valuable tool. However, its long term success depends on a very comprehensive model of the medical terminology corpus. This component is currently being studied by the GALEN team. 2. CURRENT WORK. We are developing a clerking tool to be used to create records for the newly admitted patient. The clinician seeks to identify a patient's problems based on physical examination and information obtained through conversation with the patient. Patients are usually admitted with a presenting complaint and obtaining more information about this complaint is an important part of the clerking process. While

  17. Patient access to complex chronic disease records on the Internet

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Access to medical records on the Internet has been reported to be acceptable and popular with patients, although most published evaluations have been of primary care or office-based practice. We tested the feasibility and acceptability of making unscreened results and data from a complex chronic disease pathway (renal medicine) available to patients over the Internet in a project involving more than half of renal units in the UK. Methods Content and presentation of the Renal PatientView (RPV) system was developed with patient groups. It was designed to receive information from multiple local information systems and to require minimal extra work in units. After piloting in 4 centres in 2005 it was made available more widely. Opinions were sought from both patients who enrolled and from those who did not in a paper survey, and from staff in an electronic survey. Anonymous data on enrolments and usage were extracted from the webserver. Results By mid 2011 over 17,000 patients from 47 of the 75 renal units in the UK had registered. Users had a wide age range (<10 to >90 yrs) but were younger and had more years of education than non-users. They were enthusiastic about the concept, found it easy to use, and 80% felt it gave them a better understanding of their disease. The most common reason for not enrolling was being unaware of the system. A minority of patients had security concerns, and these were reduced after enrolling. Staff responses were also strongly positive. They reported that it aided patient concordance and disease management, and increased the quality of consultations with a neutral effect on consultation length. Neither patient nor staff responses suggested that RPV led to an overall increase in patient anxiety or to an increased burden on renal units beyond the time required to enrol each patient. Conclusions Patient Internet access to secondary care records concerning a complex chronic disease is feasible and popular, providing an increased

  18. Patient-Reported Use of Personalized Video Recordings to Improve Neurosurgical Patient-Provider Communication

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Randall

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing patients with a video recording of their visit with a medical professional is a common-sense method for improving patient-provider communication. Objective: To describe the patient and provider experiences to video recording clinical medical encounters and providing the patient with a copy of the video for informational purposes. Methods: Since 2009, over 2,800 patients of eight different neurosurgeons chose to be video recorded during their encounter with the doctor and were provided access to the recording to watch over again as a way to recall what the doctor had said. The video system was set up as a handheld video camera, and video files were downloaded and made accessible to patients via a secure Internet patient portal. Between 2012 and 2014, patients who participated were surveyed regarding their use of the video and what was recorded on the video. The experience of the providers from a clinical and medico-legal standpoint was also reviewed. Results: Three hundred and thirty-three responses to the survey were received (39.2% response rate). More than half of patients (N=333; 56.2%) watched their video more than once, and over two-thirds (N=333; 68.6%) shared their video with a family member, friend, or another physician. Patients self-reported improved memory after watching their videos (N=299; 73.6% could remember more) and 50.2% responded that having the video made them feel more “at ease” with their medical problem (N=299). Overall, 88.0% of respondents indicated that their video had been helpful to them, and 98.5% would recommend having future visits video recorded. No patient made a comment that the video was intrusive or had prevented them from being open with their doctor. Finally, in the high-risk specialty of neurosurgery, none of the 2,807 patients who have been recorded since 2009 have used a video in a medico-legal action. Conclusions: Patient responses to the recording system and having a copy of their video

  19. Elder Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... mistreatment may be Physical, sexual, or emotional abuse Neglect or abandonment Financial abuse - stealing of money or belongings Possible signs of elder abuse include unexplained bruises, burns, and injuries. There ...

  20. Child Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... or puts a child at risk of harm. Child abuse can be physical, sexual or emotional. Neglect, or not providing for a child's needs, is also a form of abuse. Most abused children suffer greater emotional than physical ...

  1. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... abuse also plays a role in many major social problems, such as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a ...

  2. 42 CFR 2.16 - Security for written records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Security for written records. 2.16 Section 2.16... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.16 Security for written records. (a) Written records which are subject to these regulations must be maintained in a secure...

  3. 42 CFR 2.16 - Security for written records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Security for written records. 2.16 Section 2.16... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.16 Security for written records. (a) Written records which are subject to these regulations must be maintained in a secure...

  4. Substance Abuse, Relapse, and Treatment Program Evaluation in Malaysia: Perspective of Rehab Patients and Staff Using the Mixed Method Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chie, Qiu Ting; Tam, Cai Lian; Bonn, Gregory; Dang, Hoang Minh; Khairuddin, Rozainee

    2016-01-01

    This study examined reasons for substance abuse and evaluated the effectiveness of substance treatment programs in Malaysia through interviews with rehab patients and staff. Substance rehab patients (aged 18–69 years; n = 30) and staff (ages 30–72 years; n = 10) participated in semi-structured interviews covering a range of topics, including family and peer relationships, substance use and treatment history, factors for substance use and relapse, motivation for entering treatment, work experience, job satisfaction, treatment evaluation, and patient satisfaction. Most patients did not demonstrate the substance progression trend and had normal family relationships. Most patients reported having peers from normal family backgrounds as well. Various environmental and personal factors was cited as contributing to substance abuse and relapse. There was no significant difference between patient and staff program evaluation scores although the mean score for patients was lower. A holistic treatment approach with a combination of cognitive–behavioral, medical, social, and spiritual components was favored by patients. Suggestions for improving existing programs include better tailoring treatment to individual needs, and providing more post-treatment group support. PMID:27303313

  5. Automated NFC enabled rural healthcare for reliable patient record maintainance.

    PubMed

    Sethia, Divyashikha; Jain, Shantanu; Kakkar, Himadri

    2012-01-01

    Body sensor networks can be used for health monitoring of patients by expert medical doctors, in remote locations like rural areas in developing countries, and can also be used to provide medical aid to areas affected by natural disasters in any part of the world. An important issue to be addressed, when the number of patients is large, is to reliably maintain the patient records and have simple automated mobile applications for healthcare helpers to use. We propose an automated healthcare architecture using NFC-enabled mobile phones and patients having their patient ID on RFID tags. It utilizes NFC-enabled mobile phones to read the patient ID, followed by automated gathering of healthcare vital parameters from body sensors using Bluetooth, analyses the information and transmits it to a medical server for expert feedback. With limited hospital resources and less training requirement for healthcare helpers through simpler applications, this automation of healthcare processing can provide time effective and reliable mass health consultation from medical experts in remote locations.

  6. Lessons Learned for Follow-up Phone Booster Counseling Calls with Substance Abusing Emergency Department Patients

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Dennis M.; Hatch-Maillette, Mary A.; Phares, Melissa M.; McGarry, Ernest; Peavy, K. Michelle; Taborsky, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Background Post-visit “booster” sessions have been recommended to augment the impact of brief interventions delivered in the Emergency Department (ED). This paper, which focuses on implementation issues, presents descriptive information and interventionists’ qualitative perspectives on providing brief interventions over the phone, challenges, “lessons learned”, and recommendations for others attempting to implement adjunctive booster calls. Method Attempts were made to complete two 20-minute telephone “booster” calls within a week following a patient’s ED discharge with 425 patients who screened positive for and had recent problematic substance use other than alcohol or nicotine. Results Over half (56.2%) of participants completed the initial call; 66.9% of those who received the initial call also completed the second call. Median number of attempts to successfully contact participants for the first and second calls was 4 and 3, respectively. Each completed call lasted an average of about 22 minutes. Common challenges/barriers identified by booster callers included unstable housing, limited phone access, unavailability due to additional treatment, lack of compensation for booster calls, and booster calls coming from an area code different than the participants’ locale and from someone other than ED staff. Conclusions Specific recommendations are presented with respect to implementing a successful centralized adjunctive booster call system. Future use of booster calls might be informed by research on contingency management (e.g., incentivizing call completions), smoking cessation quitlines, and phone-based continuing care for substance abuse patients. Future research needs to evaluate the incremental benefit of adjunctive booster calls on outcomes over and above that of brief motivational interventions delivered in the ED setting. PMID:25534151

  7. History of Childhood Abuse, Drinking Motives, Alcohol Use, and Sexual Risk Behavior Among STD Clinic Patients in St. Petersburg, Russia: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Abdala, Nadia; Li, Fangyong; Shaboltas, Alla V; Skochilov, Roman V; Krasnoselskikh, Tatiana V

    2016-03-01

    The relationship between level of childhood abuse (physical and emotional) and sexual risk behavior of sexually transmitted disease clinic patients in St. Petersburg, Russia was examined through path analyses. Mediating variables investigated were: Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), drinking motives (for social interaction, to enhance mood, to facilitate sexual encounters), intimate partner violence (IPV), anxiety, and depression symptoms. Results showed a significant indirect effect of childhood abuse on women's sexual risk behavior: higher level of childhood abuse was associated with a greater likelihood of IPV, motivations to drink, leading to higher AUDIT scores and correlated to higher likelihood of having multiple, new or casual sexual partner(s). No significant effect was identified in paths to condom use. Among men, childhood abuse had no significant effect on sexual risk behavior. Reduction in alcohol-related sexual risk behavior may be achieved by addressing the effects of childhood abuse among female participants.

  8. History of Childhood Abuse, Drinking Motives, Alcohol Use, and Sexual Risk Behavior among STD clinic patients in St. Petersburg, Russia: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Abdala, Nadia; Li, Fangyong; Shaboltas, Alla V.; Skochilov, Roman V.; Krasnoselskikh, Tatiana V.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between level of childhood abuse (physical and emotional) and sexual risk behavior of sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic patients in St. Petersburg, Russia was examined through path analyses. Mediating variables investigated were: Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), drinking motives (for social interaction, to enhance mood, to facilitate sexual encounters), intimate partner violence (IPV), anxiety, and depression symptoms. Results showed a significant indirect effect of childhood abuse on women’s sexual risk behavior: higher level of childhood abuse was associated with a greater likelihood of IPV, motivations to drink, leading to higher AUDIT scores and correlated to higher likelihood of having multiple, new or casual sexual partner(s). No significant effect was identified in paths to condom use. Among men, childhood abuse had no significant effect on sexual risk behavior. Reduction in alcohol-related sexual risk behavior may be achieved by addressing the effects of childhood abuse among female participants. PMID:25801476

  9. The challenges in making electronic health records accessible to patients

    PubMed Central

    Beard, Leslie; Schein, Rebecca; Morra, Dante; Wilson, Kumanan

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that there is a tension between growing consumer demands for access to information and a healthcare system that may not be prepared to meet these demands. Designing an effective solution for this problem will require a thorough understanding of the barriers that now stand in the way of giving patients electronic access to their health data. This paper reviews the following challenges related to the sharing of electronic health records: cost and security concerns, problems in assigning responsibilities and rights among the various players, liability issues and tensions between flexible access to data and flexible access to physicians. PMID:22120207

  10. The standard data model approach to patient record transfer.

    PubMed

    Canfield, K; Silva, M; Petrucci, K

    1994-01-01

    This paper develops an approach to electronic data exchange of patient records from Ambulatory Encounter Systems (AESs). This approach assumes that the AES is based upon a standard data model. The data modeling standard used here is IDEFIX for Entity/Relationship (E/R) modeling. Each site that uses a relational database implementation of this standard data model (or a subset of it) can exchange very detailed patient data with other such sites using industry standard tools and without excessive programming efforts. This design is detailed below for a demonstration project between the research-oriented geriatric clinic at the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center (BVAMC) and the Laboratory for Healthcare Informatics (LHI) at the University of Maryland.

  11. Reviewing 741 patients records in two hours with FASTVISU

    PubMed Central

    Escudié, Jean-Baptiste; Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Zapletal, Eric; Cohen, Sarah; Malamut, Georgia; Burgun, Anita; Rance, Bastien

    2015-01-01

    The secondary use of electronic health records opens up new perspectives. They provide researchers with structured data and unstructured data, including free text reports. Many applications been developed to leverage knowledge from free-text reports, but manual review of documents is still a complex process. We developed FASTVISU a web-based application to assist clinicians in reviewing documents. We used FASTVISU to review a set of 6340 documents from 741 patients suffering from the celiac disease. A first automated selection pruned the original set to 847 documents from 276 patients’ records. The records were reviewed by two trained physicians to identify the presence of 15 auto-immune diseases. It took respectively two hours and two hours and a half to evaluate the entire corpus. Inter-annotator agreement was high (Cohen’s kappa at 0.89). FASTVISU is a user-friendly modular solution to validate entities extracted by NLP methods from free-text documents stored in clinical data warehouses. PMID:26958189

  12. Consumers' Perceptions of Patient-Accessible Electronic Medical Records

    PubMed Central

    Vaughon, Wendy L; Czaja, Sara J; Levy, Joslyn; Rockoff, Maxine L

    2013-01-01

    Background Electronic health information (eHealth) tools for patients, including patient-accessible electronic medical records (patient portals), are proliferating in health care delivery systems nationally. However, there has been very limited study of the perceived utility and functionality of portals, as well as limited assessment of these systems by vulnerable (low education level, racial/ethnic minority) consumers. Objective The objective of the study was to identify vulnerable consumers’ response to patient portals, their perceived utility and value, as well as their reactions to specific portal functions. Methods This qualitative study used 4 focus groups with 28 low education level, English-speaking consumers in June and July 2010, in New York City. Results Participants included 10 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21-63 years; 19 non-Hispanic black, 7 Hispanic, 1 non-Hispanic White and 1 Other. None of the participants had higher than a high school level education, and 13 had less than a high school education. All participants had experience with computers and 26 used the Internet. Major themes were enhanced consumer engagement/patient empowerment, extending the doctor’s visit/enhancing communication with health care providers, literacy and health literacy factors, improved prevention and health maintenance, and privacy and security concerns. Consumers were also asked to comment on a number of key portal features. Consumers were most positive about features that increased convenience, such as making appointments and refilling prescriptions. Consumers raised concerns about a number of potential barriers to usage, such as complex language, complex visual layouts, and poor usability features. Conclusions Most consumers were enthusiastic about patient portals and perceived that they had great utility and value. Study findings suggest that for patient portals to be effective for all consumers, portals must be designed to be easy to read, visually

  13. Automatic Application of Health Care Criteria to Narrative Patient Records

    PubMed Central

    Hirschman, Lynette; Sager, Naomi; Lyman, Margaret

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental computer program for the application of health care review criteria to hospital discharge summaries. The use of the computer in this process would make it possible to speed up the routine screening of patient records; it could also facilitate experimental evaluation of alternate proposed audit criteria. The computer program has two components. The first component creates a structured form of the information contained in natural language medical records. It maps the words of each sentence into labelled columns of a table (or information format) according to the type of medical information contained in each word. This structured information is suitable for use as a data base in many areas of clinical research. The second component consists of a set of retrieval routines, each of which corresponds to a criterion of the health care evaluation form, e.g., was the patient afebrile at discharge? The retrieval component is built up in modular fashion, so that basic routines can be used in other applications. The application of this program to a sample hospital discharge summary is presented and compared to the results obtained by a physician reviewer.

  14. Electronic Health Record Innovations for Healthier Patients and Happier Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H.

    2015-01-01

    This special issue explores a range of health information technology (HIT) issues that can help primary care practices and patients. Findings address the design of HIT systems, primarily electronic health records (EHRs), the utility of various functionalities, and implementation strategies that ensure the greatest value. The articles also remind us that, while HIT can support the delivery of care, it is not a panacea. To be effective, functionality needs to be relevant and timely for both the clinician and patient. Prompts and better documentation can improve care, and “prompt fatigue” is not inevitable. Information presented within EHRs needs to be actionable. There is an ongoing tension between information overload and the right—and helpful—information. Even the order of presentation of information can make a difference in the outcome. Whether supported by HIT or not, basic tenants of care, such as including the whole care team in trainings, communicating with other providers, and engaging patients, remain essential. The studies in this issue will prove useful for informatics developers, practices and health systems making HIT decisions, and care teams refining HIT to support the needs of their patients. PMID:25957359

  15. Patients, privacy and trust: patients' willingness to allow researchers to access their medical records.

    PubMed

    Damschroder, Laura J; Pritts, Joy L; Neblo, Michael A; Kalarickal, Rosemarie J; Creswell, John W; Hayward, Rodney A

    2007-01-01

    The federal Privacy Rule, implemented in the United States in 2003, as part of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA), created new restrictions on the release of medical information for research. Many believe that its restrictions have fallen disproportionately on researchers prompting some to call for changes to the Rule. Here we ask what patients think about researchers' access to medical records, and what influences these opinions. A sample of 217 patients from 4 Veteran Affairs (VA) facilities deliberated in small groups at each location with the opportunity to question experts and inform themselves about privacy issues related to medical records research. After extensive deliberation, these patients were united in their inclination to share their medical records for research. Yet they were also united in their recommendations to institute procedures that would give them more control over whether and how their medical records are used for research. We integrated qualitative and quantitative results to derive a better understanding of this apparent paradox. Our findings can best be presented as answers to questions related to five dimensions of trust: Patients' trust in VA researchers was the most powerful determinant of the kind of control they want over their medical records. More specifically, those who had lower trust in VA researchers were more likely to recommend a more stringent process for obtaining individual consent. Insights on the critical role of trust suggest actions that researchers and others can take to more fully engage patients in research.

  16. Sexual orientation disparities in substance misuse: the role of childhood abuse and intimate partner violence among patients in care at an urban community health center.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Sari L; Falb, Kathryn L; Wagenen, Aimee Van; Grasso, Chris; Bradford, Judith

    2013-02-01

    This study examined disparities in lifetime substance misuse by sexual orientation among 2,653 patients engaged in care at an urban community health center in Boston, MA, as well as the potential mediating roles of childhood abuse abuse by sexual orientation with differences seen by sex. Clinicians should assess history of CA and IPV among sexual minorities presenting with a history of substance abuse disorders. The study's limitations are noted.

  17. Polysubstance abuse: alcohol, opioids and benzodiazepines require coordinated engagement by society, patients, and physicians.

    PubMed

    Ogbu, Uzor C; Lotfipour, Shahram; Chakravarthy, Bharath

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has published significant data trends related to substance abuse involving opioid pain relievers (OPR), benzodiazepines and alcohol in the United States. The CDC describes opioid misuse and abuse as an epidemic, with the use of OPR surpassing that of illicit drugs. Alcohol has also been a persistent problem and is associated with a number of emergency department visits and deaths independent of other substances. The use of these drugs in combination creates an additive effect with increased central nervous system suppression and a heightened risk of an overdose. We present a summary of the findings from the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) with commentary on strategies to combat prescription drug and alcohol abuse.

  18. Polysubstance Abuse: Alcohol, Opioids and Benzodiazepines Require Coordinated Engagement by Society, Patients, and Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Ogbu, Uzor C.; Lotfipour, Shahram; Chakravarthy, Bharath

    2015-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has published significant data trends related to substance abuse involving opioid pain relievers (OPR), benzodiazepines and alcohol in the United States. The CDC describes opioid misuse and abuse as an epidemic, with the use of OPR surpassing that of illicit drugs. Alcohol has also been a persistent problem and is associated with a number of emergency department visits and deaths independent of other substances. The use of these drugs in combination creates an additive effect with increased central nervous system suppression and a heightened risk of an overdose. We present a summary of the findings from the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) with commentary on strategies to combat prescription drug and alcohol abuse. PMID:25671013

  19. 42 CFR 137.180 - Are there other laws that govern access to patient records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Are there other laws that govern access to patient... Provisions Records § 137.180 Are there other laws that govern access to patient records? Yes, a Tribe must... requests for access to Tribal patient records, such as the provisions 42 CFR 2.1-2.67 pertaining to...

  20. Intravenous methylphenidate abuse. Prototype for prescription drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Parran, T V; Jasinski, D R

    1991-04-01

    Data are presented from a case series of 22 patients who abused methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin-SR). The abuse pattern and symptoms of toxicity were similar to that seen with cocaine hydrochloride and amphetamine sulfate addiction; yet, the morbidity and mortality seen in this case series were greater than usual for a group of patients involved in intravenous drug abuse. We describe the characteristics of the methylphenidate abuse syndrome in terms of the pharmacology of methylphenidate, the constituents of the Ritalin-SR preparation, and the disease of chemical dependence. We propose solutions to the problem of methylphenidate abuse.

  1. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Portal Implementation Toolkit for Ambulatory Clinics: A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Diblasi, Catherine; Gonzales, Eva; Silver, Kristi; Zhu, Shijun; Sagherian, Knar; Kongs, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Personal health records and patient portals have been shown to be effective in managing chronic illnesses. Despite recent nationwide implementation efforts, the personal health record and patient portal adoption rates among patients are low, and the lack of support for patients using the programs remains a critical gap in most implementation processes. In this study, we implemented the Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit in a large diabetes/endocrinology center and assessed its preliminary impact on personal health record and patient portal knowledge, self-efficacy, patient-provider communication, and adherence to treatment plans. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit is composed of Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General, clinic-level resources for clinicians, staff, and patients, and Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit Plus, an optional 4-week online resource program for patients ("MyHealthPortal"). First, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General was implemented, and all clinicians and staff were educated about the center's personal health record and patient portal. Then general patient education was initiated, while a randomized controlled trial was conducted to test the preliminary effects of "MyHealthPortal" using a small sample (n = 74) with three observations (baseline and 4 and 12 weeks). The intervention group showed significantly greater improvement than the control group in patient-provider communication at 4 weeks (t56 = 3.00, P = .004). For other variables, the intervention group tended to show greater improvement; however, the differences were not significant. In this preliminary study, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit showed potential for filling the gap in the current

  2. Abuse of prescription drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Wilford, B B

    1990-01-01

    An estimated 3% of the United States population deliberately misuse or abuse psychoactive medications, with severe consequences. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, more than half of patients who sought treatment or died of drug-related medical problems in 1989 were abusing prescription drugs. Physicians who contribute to this problem have been described by the American Medical Association as dishonest--willfully misprescribing for purposes of abuse, usually for profit; disabled by personal problems with drugs or alcohol; dated in their knowledge of current pharmacology or therapeutics; or deceived by various patient-initiated fraudulent approaches. Even physicians who do not meet any of these descriptions must guard against contributing to prescription drug abuse through injudicious prescribing, inadequate safeguarding of prescription forms or drug supplies, or acquiescing to the demands or ruses used to obtain drugs for other than medical purposes. PMID:2349801

  3. The Effects of Promoting Patient Access to Medical Records: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Stephen E.; Lin, Chen-Tan

    2003-01-01

    The Health Insurance Privacy and Portability Act (HIPPA) stipulates that patients must be permitted to review and amend their medical records. As information technology makes medical records more accessible to patients, it may become more commonplace for patients to review their records routinely. This article analyzes the potential benefits and drawbacks of facilitating patient access to the medical record by reviewing previously published research. Previous research includes analysis of clinical notes, surveys of patients and practitioners, and studies of patient-accessible medical records. Overall, studies suggest the potential for modest benefits (for instance, in enhancing doctor-patient communication). Risks (for instance, increasing patient worry or confusion) appear to be minimal in medical patients. The studies, however, were of limited quality and low statistical power to detect the variety of outcomes that may result from implementation of a patient-accessible medical record. The data from these studies lay the foundation for future research. PMID:12595402

  4. Alternative drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Sutter, M E; Chenoweth, J; Albertson, T E

    2014-02-01

    The incidence of drug abuse with alternative agents is increasing. The term "alternative drugs of abuse" is a catch-all term for abused chemicals that do not fit into one of the classic categories of drugs of abuse. The most common age group abusing these agents range from 17 to 25 years old and are often associated with group settings. Due to their diverse pharmacological nature, legislative efforts to classify these chemicals as a schedule I drug have lagged behind the development of new alternative agents. The potential reason for abuse of these agents is their hallucinogenic, dissociative, stimulant, anti-muscarinic, or sedative properties. Some of these drugs are easily obtainable such as Datura stramonium (Jimson Weed) or Lophophora williamsii (Peyote) because they are natural plants indigenous to certain regions. The diverse pharmacology and clinical effects of these agents are so broad that they do not produce a universal constellation of signs and symptoms. Detailed physical exams are essential for identifying clues leading one to suspect an alternative drug of abuse. Testing for the presence of these agents is often limited, and even when available, the results do not return in a timely fashion. Intoxications from these agents pose unique challenges for health care providers. Physician knowledge of the physiological effects of these alternative agents and the local patterns of drug of abuse are important for the accurate diagnosis and optimal care of poisoned patients. This review summarizes the current knowledge of alternative drugs of abuse and highlights their clinical presentations.

  5. Prolonged Exposure for Treating PTSD Among Female Methadone Patients Who Were Survivors of Sexual Abuse in Israel.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Miriam; Nacasch, Nitsa; Levit, Shabtay; Katz, Noam; Foa, Edna B

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this pilot study were: (a) to test the feasibility of prolonged exposure (PE) therapy conducted by a social worker staff on female patients in methadone program clinics who were survivors of child sexual abuse or rape and (b) to examine preliminary outcomes of PE on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and illicit drug use at pre- and posttreatment, and up to 12-month follow-ups. Twelve female methadone patients who were survivors of child sexual abuse or rape diagnosed with PTSD were enrolled in 13-19 weekly individual PE sessions. Assessments were conducted at pre-, mid-, and posttreatment, as well as at 3, 6, and 12-month follow-ups. The treatment outcomes measures included PTSD symptoms, depressive symptoms, and illicit drug use. Ten of the 12 study patients completed treatment. PTSD and depressive symptoms showed significant reduction. No relapse to illicit drug use was detected. These preliminary results suggest that PE may be delivered by methadone social workers with successful outcomes. Further research should test the efficacy of PE among methadone patients in a randomized control trial with standard care as the control condition.

  6. Security architecture for multi-site patient records research.

    PubMed Central

    Behlen, F. M.; Johnson, S. B.

    1999-01-01

    A security system was developed as part of a patient records research database project intended for both local and multi-site studies. A comprehensive review of ethical foundations and legal environment was undertaken, and a security system comprising both administrative policies and computer tools was developed. For multi-site studies, Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval is required for each study, at each participating site. A sponsoring Principal Investigator (PI) is required at each site, and each PI needs automated enforcement tools. Systems fitting this model were implemented at two academic medical centers. Security features of commercial database systems were found to be adequate for basic enforcement of approved research protocols. PMID:10566404

  7. Association between experience of child abuse and severity of drug addiction measured by the Addiction Severity Index among Japanese drug-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Ogai, Yasukazu; Senoo, Eiichi; Gardner, Fumiyuki Chin; Haraguchi, Ayako; Saito, Tamaki; Morita, Nobuaki; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2015-03-03

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the association between child abuse experiences and drug addiction severity among Japanese drug-dependent patients using the Addiction Severity Index-Japanese version (ASI-J). One hundred and eleven inpatients and outpatients with drug dependence participated in the study. Some of the questions on the ASI-J asked about lifetime experiences of abuse. A higher percentage of female participants experienced child abuse compared with male participants. Male participants who experienced child abuse (MEA) had a significantly higher severity of drug use than men who did not experience it (MNEA). Female participants who experienced child abuse (FEA) had significantly more serious problems in family/social relationships than female participants who did not experience it (FNEA). Patients in the MEA group were arrested less frequently for drug charges, experienced more serious problems with their fathers, and experienced more severe anxiety in their lifetime compared with the MNEA group. The FEA group experienced more serious troubles with their sexual partners, close friends, and families and experienced more severe psychiatric problems in their lifetime compared with the FNEA group. These results suggest gender differences in the problems experienced by drug-dependent patients with child abuse experiences, and gender-specific interventions may be more effective in treating their drug dependence.

  8. Child Abuse: One Tree in the Forest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burland, J. Alexis; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The records of 28 abused or severely neglected children, as reviewed and analyzed, show the importance of meeting the child's and parent's dependency needs, rather than focusing exclusively on the abuse itself. (Author/CS)

  9. Substance Abuse Treatment Patients in Housing Programs Respond to Contingency Management Interventions.

    PubMed

    Rash, Carla J; Alessi, Sheila M; Petry, Nancy M

    2017-01-01

    Use of homeless and transitional housing (e.g., recovery homes) programs can be associated with success in substance abuse treatment, perhaps because many of these programs encourage or mandate sobriety. In this study, we examined whether contingency management (CM) protocols that use tangible incentives for submission of drug-free specimens or other specific behaviors are effective for treatment-seeking substance abusers whose behavior may also be shaped by housing programs. Of 355 participants in randomized trials of CM, 56 (16%) reported using transitional housing during the 12-week treatment period. Main and interaction effects of housing status and treatment condition were evaluated for the primary substance abuse treatment outcomes: a) longest duration of abstinence from alcohol, cocaine, and opioids, b) percentage of samples submitted that were negative for these substances, and c) treatment retention. After controlling for demographic and clinical characteristics, those who accessed housing programs submitted a higher percentage of negative samples (75%) compared to those who did not access housing programs (67%). Housing status groups did not differ in terms of longest duration of abstinence (accessed housing: M=3.1 weeks, SE=0.6; did not access housing: M=3.9 weeks, SE=0.3) or retention in substance abuse treatment (accessed housing: M=6.4 weeks, SE=0.6; did not access housing: M=6.6 weeks, SE=0.3). Regardless of housing status, CM was associated with longer durations of abstinence and treatment retention. No interactive effects of housing and treatment condition were observed (p>.05). Results suggest that those who accessed housing programs during substance abuse treatment benefit from CM to a comparable degree as their peers who did not use such programs. These effects suggest that CM remains appropriate for those accessing housing in community-based programs.

  10. Association between improvement in depression, reduced benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse, and increased psychotropic medication use in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) patients.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Shaul; Peles, Einat; Adelson, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    We had evaluated the depressive symptoms severity of 75 former heroin addicts in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) using the 21-item Hamilton rating scale for depression (21-HAM-D) and re-assessed 63 of them 1.6+/-0.3 years later. The second mean 21-HAM-D score was lower than the first (11.8+/-8.4 versus 17.4+/-6.2, p<0.0005). Benzodiazepine (BDZ) abuse was lower although not significantly (p=0.06) during the month preceding the second analysis (32/63, 50.8%) than the month preceding the first one (40/63, 63.5%). Psychotropic medication usage was higher at the second assessment than at the first one (50/63, 79.4% versus 27/63, 42.9%, p<0.0005). 21-HAM-D score reduced significantly over time among 13 "no psychotropic medication" patients (13.5+/-6.3 versus 6.8+/-6.8, p=0.005) and in 27 who started medication following the first assessment (19.3+/-3.8 versus 11.0+/-8.4, p<0.0005), but not in those who were already taking any medication before the first assessment (17.7+/-7.0 versus 15.0+/-8.0, p=n.s). 21-HAM-D score reduced in all BDZ groups but scores were still highest in the 32 patients who continued BDZ abuse (19.4+/-5.6 versus 15.2+/-7.7) followed by 14 who stopped it (16.8+/-6.4 versus 9.6+/-9.1) and were lowest in 17 patients who never abused BDZ (14.2+/-5.2 versus 7.2+/-6.4) (repeated measured, time and group effect, each p<0.0005). Predictors for being depressed at follow-up were pre-existing depression only. Stopping BDZ abuse and starting psychotropic treatment was associated with a reduction of depressive symptoms among MMT patients.

  11. The efficacy of hair and urine toxicology screening on the detection of child abuse by burning.

    PubMed

    Hayek, Shady N; Wibbenmeyer, Lucy A; Kealey, Lyn Dee H; Williams, Ingrid M; Oral, Resmiye; Onwuameze, Obiora; Light, Timothy D; Latenser, Barbara A; Lewis, Robert W; Kealey, Gerald P

    2009-01-01

    Abuse by burning is estimated to occur in 1 to 25% of children admitted with burn injuries annually. Hair and urine toxicology for illicit drug exposure may provide additional confirmatory evidence for abuse. To determine the impact of hair and urine toxicology on the identification of child abuse, we performed a retrospective chart review of all pediatric patients admitted to our burn unit. The medical records of 263 children aged 0 to 16 years of age who were admitted to our burn unit from January 2002 to December 2007 were reviewed. Sixty-five children had suspected abuse. Of those with suspected abuse, 33 were confirmed by the Department of Health and Human Services and comprised the study group. Each of the 33 cases was randomly matched to three pediatric (0-16 years of age) control patients (99). The average annual incidence of abuse in pediatric burn patients was 13.7+/-8.4% of total annual pediatric admissions (range, 0-25.6%). Age younger than 5 years, hot tap water cause, bilateral, and posterior location of injury were significantly associated with nonaccidental burn injury on multivariate analysis. Thirteen (39.4%) abused children had positive ancillary tests. These included four (16%) skeletal surveys positive for fractures and 10 (45%) hair samples positive for drugs of abuse (one patient had a fracture and a positive hair screen). In three (9.1%) patients who were not initially suspected of abuse but later confirmed, positive hair test for illicit drugs was the only indicator of abuse. Nonaccidental injury can be difficult to confirm. Although inconsistent injury history and burn injury pattern remain central to the diagnosis of abuse by burning, hair and urine toxicology offers a further means to facilitate confirmation of abuse.

  12. Examination of an Electronic Patient Record Display Method to Protect Patient Information Privacy.

    PubMed

    Niimi, Yukari; Ota, Katsumasa

    2017-02-01

    Electronic patient records facilitate the provision of safe, high-quality medical care. However, because personnel can view almost all stored information, this study designed a display method using a mosaic blur (pixelation) to temporarily conceal information patients do not want shared. This study developed an electronic patient records display method for patient information that balanced the patient's desire for personal information protection against the need for information sharing among medical personnel. First, medical personnel were interviewed about the degree of information required for both individual duties and team-based care. Subsequently, they tested a mock display method that partially concealed information using a mosaic blur, and they were interviewed about the effectiveness of the display method that ensures patient privacy. Participants better understood patients' demand for confidentiality, suggesting increased awareness of patients' privacy protection. However, participants also indicated that temporary concealment of certain information was problematic. Other issues included the inconvenience of removing the mosaic blur to obtain required information and risk of insufficient information for medical care. Despite several issues with using a display method that temporarily conceals information according to patient privacy needs, medical personnel could accept this display method if information essential to medical safety remains accessible.

  13. Recognizing abuse.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, R; Newman-Giger, J

    1996-01-01

    After years as a taboo topic, abuse has come "out of the closet" and is being talked about openly in society. Yet, while abuse in the workplace is being confronted, abuse within families still often goes unrecognized by outsiders, including by nurses. Failure of nurses to recognize abuse is unfortunate since frequently they are the first point of contact with the victim of abuse in the emergency room, clinic and home. Understanding and insight into the problem of family violence by nurses is critical in addressing this problem. Knowledge is crucial in planning strategies that will have the long-lasting effect of decreasing the cycle of abuse in families.

  14. Effects of handedness (left vs right) and cannabis abuse on intermanual coordination and negative symptoms in schizophrenic patients of the paranoid type.

    PubMed

    Gorynia, Inge; Schwaiger, Markus

    2011-09-01

    Intermanual coordination as an index of interhemispheric transfer and negative symptoms were investigated in 50 left- and 42 right-handed schizophrenic inpatients of the paranoid type, also including drug abusers. The primary objective was to show that there were higher values in intermanual coordination and fewer manifestations of negative symptoms in the left-handed compared to the right-handed patients. This assumption was based on previous studies. Most importantly, right- and left-handed patients showed a different behaviour in intermanual coordination, when the duration of illness was taken into consideration. Thus, long-term left-handed paranoid patients performed better in intermanual coordination and showed fewer manifestations of negative symptoms than did long-term right-handed patients. These results were true for the large group of all patients, and among them for the subgroup of patients without drug abuse. Consequently, higher scores in intermanual coordination in left-handed patients may be related to a better interhemispheric crosstalk resulting in less pronounced negative symptoms. Secondary objectives assessed by explorative data analysis included the effects of cannabis abuse. While cannabis abuse may be more prevalent in left-handed patients, its effects may be more pronounced in right-handed patients, scoring higher in intermanual coordination and lower in manifestations of negative symptoms.

  15. Recording signs of deterioration in acute patients: The documentation of vital signs within electronic health records in patients who suffered in-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Jean E; Israelsson, Johan; Nilsson, Gunilla C; Petersson, Göran I; Bath, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Vital sign documentation is crucial to detecting patient deterioration. Little is known about the documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. This study aimed to examine documentation of vital signs in electronic health records. We examined the vital signs documented in the electronic health records of patients who had suffered an in-hospital cardiac arrest and on whom cardiopulmonary resuscitation was attempted between 2007 and 2011 (n = 228), in a 372-bed district general hospital. We assessed the completeness of vital sign data compared to VitalPAC™ Early Warning Score and the location of vital signs within the electronic health records. There was a noticeable lack of completeness of vital signs. Vital signs were fragmented through various sections of the electronic health records. The study identified serious shortfalls in the representation of vital signs in the electronic health records, with consequential threats to patient safety.

  16. Physical Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... seniors who are not abused. What are the indicators? Indicators are signs or clues that abuse has ... clusters of indicators that suggest a problem. Physical indicators Sprains, dislocations, fractures, or broken bones Burns from ...

  17. Inhalant Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Who may be abusing inhalants?The most common abusers of inhalants are teenagers, especially those who are ... to your child about the dangers of trying drugs can help him or her make the right ...

  18. Abusive Relationships

    MedlinePlus

    ... relationships and friendships. Emotional abuse (stuff like teasing, bullying, and humiliating others) can be difficult to recognize ... How to Break Up Respectfully Abuse Dealing With Bullying Date Rape Getting Over a Break-Up Posttraumatic ...

  19. Clinical characteristics of cough mixture abusers referred to three substance abuse clinics in Hong Kong: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Tang, A K; Tang, W K; Liang, H J; Chan, F; Mak, S C; Ungvari, G S

    2012-12-01

    OBJECTIVES. Cough mixture is the third most commonly abused substance in patients attending the Prince of Wales Hospital Substance Abuse Clinic. The content of the local cough mixture is not well researched. Paranoid psychosis manifesting as persecutory delusions and derogatory hallucination, as well as mood symptoms, is common in these patients. The natural history and outcome of such psychoses associated with cough mixture abuse are not well known. This study aimed to address these questions. METHODS. This was a retrospective study of cough mixture abuse in Hong Kong. Case records of cough mixture abusers currently receiving treatment at the 3 substance abuse clinics at the Prince of Wales Hospital, Alice Ho Miu Ling Nethersole Hospital, and the North District Hospital were retrieved for data collection. The patients' demographic data, duration and intake pattern of cough mixture, and use of any other drugs were documented. The presenting psychopathology, first urine toxicology results, diagnosis, treatment, number of hospitalizations, and course of the illness were also recorded. RESULTS. A total of 63 patients with the diagnosis of cough mixture abuse were identified in the database; 89% were male. The mean +/- SD age of the patients was 34.4 +/- 6.2 years; 67% were single and 83% were unemployed. The mean +/- SD age of onset of cough mixture abuse was 20 +/- 5 years. Psychiatric symptoms developed a mean +/- SD of 7.6 +/- 6.0 years after onset of abuse. According to the ICD-10 Mental and Behavioural Disorders criteria, the top psychiatric diagnoses were substance-induced psychotic disorder (67%), schizophrenia (19%), depressive disorder (11%), and dysthymia (10%). The most common ingredients in the urine sample at first presentation were promethazine (75%), pseudoephedrine (67%), codeine (60%), ephedrine (57%), zopiclone (17%), and hydrocodone (16%). Additionally, 16% of patients were in the priority follow-up group. The mean +/- SD follow-up period was 6

  20. Engaging Primary Care Patients to Use a Patient-Centered Personal Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Krist, Alex H.; Woolf, Steven H.; Bello, Ghalib A.; Sabo, Roy T.; Longo, Daniel R.; Kashiri, Paulette; Etz, Rebecca S.; Loomis, John; Rothemich, Stephen F.; Peele, J. Eric; Cohn, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Health care leaders encourage clinicians to offer portals that enable patients to access personal health records, but implementation has been a challenge. Although large integrated health systems have promoted use through costly advertising campaigns, other implementation methods are needed for small to medium-sized practices where most patients receive their care. METHODS We conducted a mixed methods assessment of a proactive implementation strategy for a patient portal (an interactive preventive health record [IPHR]) offered by 8 primary care practices. The practices implemented a series of learning collaboratives with practice champions and redesigned workflow to integrate portal use into care. Practice implementation strategies, portal use, and factors influencing use were assessed prospectively. RESULTS A proactive and customized implementation strategy designed by practices resulted in 25.6% of patients using the IPHR, with the rate increasing 1.0% per month over 31 months. Fully 23.5% of IPHR users signed up within 1 day of their office visit. Older patients and patients with comorbidities were more likely to use the IPHR, but blacks and Hispanics were less likely. Older age diminished as a factor after adjusting for comorbidities. Implementation by practice varied considerably (from 22.1% to 27.9%, P <.001) based on clinician characteristics and workflow innovations adopted by practices to enhance uptake. CONCLUSIONS By directly engaging patients to use a portal and supporting practices to integrate use into care, primary care practices can match or potentially surpass the usage rates achieved by large health systems. PMID:25354405

  1. Adolescent Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Susan; Seligman, Linda

    1983-01-01

    Discusses legal and developmental aspects of adolescent abuse, as distinguished from child abuse. The role of the school counselor in identifying and counseling abused adolescents and their families is discussed and several forms of intervention and support services are described. (JAC)

  2. Pedunculopontine nucleus microelectrode recordings in movement disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Weinberger, Moran; Hamani, Clement; Hutchison, William D; Moro, Elena; Lozano, Andres M; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O

    2008-06-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) lies within the brainstem reticular formation and is involved in the motor control of gait and posture. Interest has focused recently on the PPN as a target for implantation of chronic deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes for Parkinson's disease (PD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) therapy. The aim of this study was to examine the neurophysiology of the human PPN region and to identify neurophysiological landmarks that may aid the proper placement of DBS electrodes in the nucleus for the treatment of PD and PSP. Neuronal firing and local field potentials were recorded simultaneously from two independently driven microelectrodes during stereotactic neurosurgery for implantation of a unilateral DBS electrode in the PPN in five PD patients and two PSP patients. Within the PPN region, the majority (57%) of the neurons fired randomly while about 21% of the neurons exhibited 'bursty' firing. In addition, 21% of the neurons had a long action potential duration and significantly lower firing rate suggesting they were cholinergic neurons. A change in firing rate produced by passive and/or active contralateral limb movement was observed in 38% of the neurons that were tested in the PPN region. Interestingly, oscillatory local field potential activity in the beta frequency range ( approximately 25 Hz) was also observed in the PPN region. These electrophysiological characteristics of the PPN region provide further support for the proposed role of this region in motor control. It remains to be seen to what extent the physiological characteristics of the neurons and the stimulation-evoked effects will permit reliable identification of PPN and determination of the optimal target for DBS therapy.

  3. [Problematic substance abuse and history of suicidal behavior in female patients in an acute mental health service].

    PubMed

    Camino, Sebastián; Expósito, Ramiro; Rodante, Demián

    2016-07-01

    Current publications that analyze operational and epidemiologic variables in the Argentinian Mental Health System are scarce. Several international studies have found a correlation between substance abuse and suicidal behavior. However, to our knowledge, there are no local studies that verify this association, especially in hospitalized female patients. The aim of this study is to verify this association in a population of female patients hospitalized in a Mental Health Hospital between august 2007 and july 2013. The electronic database of the Emergency department of the "Braulio A. Moyano" Neuropsychiatric Hospital was used as secondary source. The correlation between problematic substance use and history of suicidal behavior was studied, according to the type of substance used, diagnosis and age of the sample. These results might allow the creation of hypotheses that may benefit the planning and clinical practice in mental health in the local area.

  4. [Aorto pulmonary fistula: left-sided infective endocarditis in HIV and intravenous drugs abuser patient. Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Obón Azuara, B; Zalba Etayo, B; Gutiérrez Cía, I; Villanueva Anadón, B

    2007-11-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is the most severe complication in intravenous drug abusers (IVDAs). HIV infection increases the risk of IE in IVDAs too. IE in both population are special tendency to infect the right-sided heart, but unusual infective aortic valve. We report a case of HIV and IVDA patient admitted in hospital due to fever syndrome, with X-ray test normal and the first blood cultures negatives. CD4 count cell 90 mm3. It was impossible doing a transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) and transtoracic echocardiogramma (TTE) only showed a moderate aortic insufficiency with conserved systolic function. Despite using antibiotics, antifungals and highly active antiretroviral therapy, he developed ARDS, and mechanical ventilation should be performed. At that moment, TEE showed an aorto pulmonary fistula due to left-sided IE. Further cultures was undergone and only one blood culture was positive to Staphylococcus aureus. Cardiac surgery was not indicated. The patient died 3 weeks later.

  5. Documenting wife abuse: a guide for physicians

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, L E; McMain-Klein, M; Silver, L

    1997-01-01

    An estimated 12% to 30% of women are assaulted by their male partners at least once during the relationship. Therefore, in their everyday practice, physicians are likely to encounter women who have suffered domestic abuse. The authors define wife abuse, outline epidemiologic aspects and discuss common signs and symptoms. In cases of suspected or confirmed abuse, it is very important for physicians to document the details of the injuries, the patient visit, any treatment and follow-up as well as to screen for associated conditions and ensure that any samples taken are not tampered with. When asked to disclose information by police or courts, physicians need to know when they are obliged to submit copies of their patients' medical records, when patient consent is required, what information should be divulged and how to defend this information in court. The authors present information about the necessary, relevant and appropriate evidence to be collected and documented for both medical and legal purposes. They also discuss the criminal justice system and the role of physicians in legal proceedings concerning wife abuse. PMID:9099172

  6. Accuracy of Dialysis Medical Records in Determining Patient Interest in and Suitability for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Huml, Anne M.; Sullivan, Catherine M.; Pencak, Julie A.; Sehgal, Ashwini R.

    2013-01-01

    Background We sought to determine the accuracy of dialysis medical records in identifying patient interest in and suitability for transplantation. Study Design Cluster randomized controlled trial Setting and Participants 167 patients recruited from 23 hemodialysis facilities. Intervention Navigators met with intervention patients to provide transplant information and assistance. Control patients continued to receive usual care. Outcomes Agreement at study initiation between medical records and (a) patient self-reported interest in transplantation and (b) study assessments of medical suitability for transplant referral. Measurements Medical record assessments, self-reports, and study assessments of patient interest in and suitability for transplantation. Results There was disagreement between medical records and patient self-reported interest in transplantation for 66 (40%) of the 167 study patients. In most of these cases, patients reported being more interested in transplantation than their medical records indicated. The study team determined that all 92 intervention patients were medically suitable for transplant referral. However, for 38 (41%) intervention patients, medical records indicated that they were not suitable. About two-thirds of these patients successfully moved forward in the transplant process. Conclusion Dialysis medical records are frequently inaccurate in determining patient interest in and suitability for transplantation. PMID:23803012

  7. [Audit: medical record documentation among advanced cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Perceau, Elise; Chirac, Anne; Rhondali, Wadih; Ruer, Murielle; Chabloz, Claire; Filbet, Marilène

    2014-02-01

    Medical record documentation of cancer inpatients is a core component of continuity of care. The main goal of the study was an assessment of medical record documentation in a palliative care unit (PCU) using a targeted clinical audit based on deceased inpatients' charts. Stage 1 (2010): a clinical audit of medical record documentation assessed by a list of items (diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, power of attorney directive, advance directives). Stage 2 (2011): corrective measures. Stage 3 (2012): re-assessment with the same items' list after six month. Forty cases were investigated during stage 1 and 3. After the corrective measures, inpatient's medical record documentation was significantly improved, including for diagnosis (P = 0.01), diseases extension and treatment (P < 0.001). Our results highlighted the persistence of a weak rate of medical record documentation for advanced directives (P = 0.145).

  8. [Inhalant abusers and psychiatric symptoms].

    PubMed

    Okudaira, K; Yabana, T; Takahashi, H; Iizuka, H; Nakajima, K; Saito, A

    1996-01-01

    There are different opinions about the cause of chronic psychiatric symptoms observed in drug abusers between Japanese and foreign psychiatrists. The Japanese seem to recognize the chronic psychosis as the result of drug abuse. In the other hand, foreigners diagnose these cases as dual diagnosis of drug abuse and psychosis. Authors studied the problem in this research. One of the authors has examined 120 inhalant abusers of all, in- and out-patients in Kanagawa Prefectural Center of Psychiatry, Serigaya Hospital from 1991 to 1995. These patients were classified into three groups: psychosis group (23 patients), dependence group (51 patients) and abuse group (46 patients) according to their clinical courses and psychiatric symptoms. The psychosis group consists of patients who showed psychiatric symptoms such as hallucination, delusion and thought disturbance for long time after detoxification. The dependence group contains patients whose inhalant dependence was severe and met DSM-4 Diagnostic Criteria for Substance Dependence, but manifested no chronic psychiatric symptoms after detoxification. The patients belonging to abuse group were at the earlier stages of inhalant abuse and had no chronic psychiatric symptoms. The average age of the first inhalant abuse was 14.7 years old in the psychosis group, 14.8 years in the dependence group and 14.7 years in the abuse group. The average years of abuse was 9.0 years in the psychosis group, and 8.5 years in the dependence group. There was little difference between these two groups. The psychosis patients manifested chronic symptoms 5.7 years on average after the first abuse of inhalants. About one forth (26.1%) of the psychosis patients and only 5.9% of the dependence patients had family history of schizophrenia. The difference was statistically significant. These results suggest that chronic psychiatric symptoms are caused not only by inhalant abuse, but also by the genetic factors of psychosis of each patient. There have

  9. Maternity patients' access to their electronic medical records: use and perspectives of a patient portal.

    PubMed

    Megan Forster, Megan; Dennison, Kerrie; Callen, Joanne; Andrew, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna I

    2015-01-01

    Patients have been able to access clinical information from their paper-based health records for a number of years. With the advent of Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) access to this information can now be achieved online using a secure electronic patient portal. The purpose of this study was to investigate maternity patients' use and perceptions of a patient portal developed at the Mater Mothers' Hospital in Brisbane, Australia. A web-based patient portal, one of the first developed and deployed in Australia, was introduced on 26 June 2012. The portal was designed for maternity patients booked at Mater Mothers' Hospital, as an alternative to the paper-based Pregnancy Health Record. Through the portal, maternity patients are able to complete their hospital registration form online and obtain current health information about their pregnancy (via their EMR), as well as access a variety of support tools to use during their pregnancy such as tailored public health advice. A retrospective cross-sectional study design was employed. Usage statistics were extracted from the system for a one year period (1 July 2012 to 30 June 2013). Patients' perceptions of the portal were obtained using an online survey, accessible by maternity patients for two weeks in February 2013 (n=80). Descriptive statistics were employed to analyse the data. Between July 2012 and June 2013, 10,892 maternity patients were offered a patient portal account and access to their EMR. Of those 6,518 created one (60%; 6,518/10,892) and 3,104 went on to request access to their EMR (48%; 3,104/6,518). Of these, 1,751 had their access application granted by 30 June 2013. The majority of maternity patients submitted registration forms online via the patient portal (56.7%). Patients could view their EMR multiple times: there were 671 views of the EMR, 2,781 views of appointment schedules and 135 birth preferences submitted via the EMR. Eighty survey responses were received from EMR account holders, (response

  10. Deep Patient: An Unsupervised Representation to Predict the Future of Patients from the Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Miotto, Riccardo; Li, Li; Kidd, Brian A; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-05-17

    Secondary use of electronic health records (EHRs) promises to advance clinical research and better inform clinical decision making. Challenges in summarizing and representing patient data prevent widespread practice of predictive modeling using EHRs. Here we present a novel unsupervised deep feature learning method to derive a general-purpose patient representation from EHR data that facilitates clinical predictive modeling. In particular, a three-layer stack of denoising autoencoders was used to capture hierarchical regularities and dependencies in the aggregated EHRs of about 700,000 patients from the Mount Sinai data warehouse. The result is a representation we name "deep patient". We evaluated this representation as broadly predictive of health states by assessing the probability of patients to develop various diseases. We performed evaluation using 76,214 test patients comprising 78 diseases from diverse clinical domains and temporal windows. Our results significantly outperformed those achieved using representations based on raw EHR data and alternative feature learning strategies. Prediction performance for severe diabetes, schizophrenia, and various cancers were among the top performing. These findings indicate that deep learning applied to EHRs can derive patient representations that offer improved clinical predictions, and could provide a machine learning framework for augmenting clinical decision systems.

  11. On the usage of health records for the design of virtual patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The process of creating and designing Virtual Patients for teaching students of medicine is an expensive and time-consuming task. In order to explore potential methods of mitigating these costs, our group began exploring the possibility of creating Virtual Patients based on electronic health records. This review assesses the usage of electronic health records in the creation of interactive Virtual Patients for teaching clinical decision-making. Methods The PubMed database was accessed programmatically to find papers relating to Virtual Patients. The returned citations were classified and the relevant full text articles were reviewed to find Virtual Patient systems that used electronic health records to create learning modalities. Results A total of n = 362 citations were found on PubMed and subsequently classified, of which n = 28 full-text articles were reviewed. Few articles used unformatted electronic health records other than patient CT or MRI scans. The use of patient data, extracted from electronic health records or otherwise, is widespread. The use of unformatted electronic health records in their raw form is less frequent. Patient data use is broad and spans several areas, such as teaching, training, 3D visualisation, and assessment. Conclusions Virtual Patients that are based on real patient data are widespread, yet the use of unformatted electronic health records, abundant in hospital information systems, is reported less often. The majority of teaching systems use reformatted patient data gathered from electronic health records, and do not use these electronic health records directly. Furthermore, many systems were found that used patient data in the form of CT or MRI scans. Much potential research exists regarding the use of unformatted electronic health records for the creation of Virtual Patients. PMID:24011027

  12. From planning to realisation of an electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Krämer, T; Rapp, R; Krämer, K-L

    1999-03-01

    The high complex requirements on information and information flow in todays hospitals can only be accomplished by the use of modern Information Systems (IS). In order to achieve this, the Stiftung Orthopädische Universitätsklinik has carried out first the Project "Strategic Informations System Planning" in 1993. Then realizing the neccessary infrastructure (network; client-server) from 1993 to 1997, and finally started the introduction of modern IS (SAP R/3 and IXOS-Archive) in the clinical area. One of the approved goal was the replacement of the paper medical record by an up-to-date electronical medical record. In this article the following three topics will be discussed: the difference between the up-to-date electronical medical record and the electronically archived finished cases, steps performed by our clinic to realize the up-to-date electronical medical record and the problems occured during this process.

  13. Patients Reading Their Medical Records: Differences in Experiences and Attitudes between Regular and Inexperienced Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto; Daniels, Mats; Cajander, Åsa; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We report results of a study of how ordering and reading of printouts of medical records by regular and inexperienced readers relate to how the records are used, to the health information practices of patients, and to their expectations of the usefulness of new e-Health services and online access to medical records. Method: The study…

  14. [A Case of an Elderly Diabetic Patient Developing Wernicke Encephalopathy without Alcohol Abuse or an Unbalanced Diet].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tsurutani, Yuya; Sagawa, Naoko; Kondo, Mai; Sata, Akira; Miyao, Mariko; Azuma, Reo; Orimo, Satoshi; Mizuno, Yuzo

    2015-01-01

    A 70-year-old man with a 28-year history of type 2 diabetes mellitus was admitted due to persistent vomiting and neurological abnormalities in Nov 2012. He had developed gait disturbance and diplopia for six months during antiplatelet therapy, which was initiated following the diagnosis of a cerebellar infarction in June 2012. He had nystagmus, truncal ataxia and an ocular motility disorder, and the MRI study showed increased FLAIR and DWI signals in the peri-third ventricle and periaqueductal region, in addition to the cerebellar vermis. Wernicke encephalopathy was suspected according to his symptoms, and thiamine administration dramatically improved his condition. He did not have a history of alcohol abuse or poor eating habits; however, various coexisting factors, including diabetes mellitus, pyloric stenosis and the use of antiulcer drugs and insulin, were considered to be responsible for Wernicke encephalopathy. This case demonstrates the importance of distinguishing Wernicke encephalopathy from cerebrovascular disease in elderly patients.

  15. The effectiveness of an abuse assessment protocol in public health prenatal clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Wiist, W H; McFarlane, J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated whether incorporation of an abuse assessment protocol into the routine procedures of the prenatal clinics of a large urban public health department led to increased referral for and assessment, identification, and documentation of abuse. METHODS: Evaluation was conducted at 3 matched prenatal clinics serving a total of 12,000 maternity patients per year. Two clinics used the abuse protocol and 1 did not. An audit was performed at the clinics on a randomly selected sample of 540 maternity patient charts for the 15 months before the protocol was initiated and of 540 records for the 15 months after the protocol was introduced. Ninety-six percent of the patients represented in the sample were Latina. RESULTS: At the clinics using the protocol, abuse assessment increased from 0 to 88%. Detection of abuse increased from 0.8% to 7%. There were no changes at the comparison clinic. CONCLUSIONS: Incorporation of an abuse assessment protocol into the routine procedures of public health department prenatal clinics increases the assessment, identification, and documentation of and referral for abuse among pregnant women. An abuse protocol should be a routine part of maternity care. PMID:10432909

  16. Embedded-structure template for electronic records affects patient note quality and management for emergency head injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Sonoo, Tomohiro; Iwai, Satoshi; Inokuchi, Ryota; Gunshin, Masataka; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Along with article-based checklists, structured template recording systems have been reported as useful to create more accurate clinical recording, but their contributions to the improvement of the quality of patient care have been controversial. An emergency department (ED) must manage many patients in a short time. Therefore, such a template might be especially useful, but few ED-based studies have examined such systems. A structured template produced according to widely used head injury guidelines was used by ED residents for head injury patients. The study was conducted by comparing each 6-month period before and after launching the system. The quality of the patient notes and factors recorded in the patient notes to support the head computed tomography (CT) performance were evaluated by medical students blinded to patient information. The subject patients were 188 and 177 in respective periods. The numbers of patient notes categorized as “CT indication cannot be determined” were significantly lower in the postintervention term (18% → 9.0%), which represents the patient note quality improvement. No difference was found in the rates of CT performance or CT skip without clearly recorded CT indication in the patient notes. The structured template functioned as a checklist to support residents in writing more appropriately recorded patient notes in the ED head injury patients. Such a template customized to each clinical condition can facilitate standardized patient management and can improve patient safety in the ED. PMID:27749590

  17. Deep Patient: An Unsupervised Representation to Predict the Future of Patients from the Electronic Health Records

    PubMed Central

    Miotto, Riccardo; Li, Li; Kidd, Brian A.; Dudley, Joel T.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary use of electronic health records (EHRs) promises to advance clinical research and better inform clinical decision making. Challenges in summarizing and representing patient data prevent widespread practice of predictive modeling using EHRs. Here we present a novel unsupervised deep feature learning method to derive a general-purpose patient representation from EHR data that facilitates clinical predictive modeling. In particular, a three-layer stack of denoising autoencoders was used to capture hierarchical regularities and dependencies in the aggregated EHRs of about 700,000 patients from the Mount Sinai data warehouse. The result is a representation we name “deep patient”. We evaluated this representation as broadly predictive of health states by assessing the probability of patients to develop various diseases. We performed evaluation using 76,214 test patients comprising 78 diseases from diverse clinical domains and temporal windows. Our results significantly outperformed those achieved using representations based on raw EHR data and alternative feature learning strategies. Prediction performance for severe diabetes, schizophrenia, and various cancers were among the top performing. These findings indicate that deep learning applied to EHRs can derive patient representations that offer improved clinical predictions, and could provide a machine learning framework for augmenting clinical decision systems. PMID:27185194

  18. Deep Patient: An Unsupervised Representation to Predict the Future of Patients from the Electronic Health Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miotto, Riccardo; Li, Li; Kidd, Brian A.; Dudley, Joel T.

    2016-05-01

    Secondary use of electronic health records (EHRs) promises to advance clinical research and better inform clinical decision making. Challenges in summarizing and representing patient data prevent widespread practice of predictive modeling using EHRs. Here we present a novel unsupervised deep feature learning method to derive a general-purpose patient representation from EHR data that facilitates clinical predictive modeling. In particular, a three-layer stack of denoising autoencoders was used to capture hierarchical regularities and dependencies in the aggregated EHRs of about 700,000 patients from the Mount Sinai data warehouse. The result is a representation we name “deep patient”. We evaluated this representation as broadly predictive of health states by assessing the probability of patients to develop various diseases. We performed evaluation using 76,214 test patients comprising 78 diseases from diverse clinical domains and temporal windows. Our results significantly outperformed those achieved using representations based on raw EHR data and alternative feature learning strategies. Prediction performance for severe diabetes, schizophrenia, and various cancers were among the top performing. These findings indicate that deep learning applied to EHRs can derive patient representations that offer improved clinical predictions, and could provide a machine learning framework for augmenting clinical decision systems.

  19. Using Health Information Technology to Foster Engagement: Patients' Experiences with an Active Patient Health Record.

    PubMed

    Rief, John J; Hamm, Megan E; Zickmund, Susan L; Nikolajski, Cara; Lesky, Dan; Hess, Rachel; Fischer, Gary S; Weimer, Melissa; Clark, Sunday; Zieth, Caroline; Roberts, Mark S

    2017-03-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) typically employ "passive" communication strategies, such as non-personalized medical text, rather than direct patient engagement in care. Currently there is a call for more active PHRs that directly engage patients in an effort to improve their health by offering elements such as personalized medical information, health coaches, and secure messaging with primary care providers. As part of a randomized clinical trial comparing "passive" with "active" PHRs, we explore patients' experiences with using an "active" PHR known as HealthTrak. The "passive" elements of this PHR included problem lists, medication lists, information about patient allergies and immunizations, medical and surgical histories, lab test results, health reminders, and secure messaging. The active arm included all of these elements and added personalized alerts delivered through the secure messaging platform to patients for services coming due based on various demographic features (including age and sex) and chronic medical conditions. Our participants were part of the larger clinical trial and were eligible if they had been randomized to the active PHR arm, one that included regular personalized alerts. We conducted focus group discussions on the benefits of this active PHR for patients who are at risk for cardiovascular disease. Forty-one patients agreed to participate and were organized into five separate focus group sessions. Three main themes emerged from the qualitatively analyzed focus groups: participants reported that the active PHR promoted better communication with providers; enabled them to more effectively partner with their providers; and helped them become more proactive about tracking their health information. In conclusion, patients reported improved communication, partnership with their providers, and a sense of self-management, thus adding insights for PHR designers hoping to address low adoption rates and other patient barriers to the development

  20. Incorporating Personal Health Records into the Disease Management of Rural Heart Failure Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Karen Parsley

    2012-01-01

    Personal Health Records (PHRs) allow patients to access and in some cases manage their own health records. Their potential benefits include access to health information, enhanced asynchronous communication between patients and clinicians, and convenience of online appointment scheduling and prescription refills. Potential barriers to PHR use…

  1. A survey of user acceptance of electronic patient anesthesia records

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hyun Seung; Lee, Suk Young; Jeong, Hui Yeon; Choi, Soo Joo; Lee, Hye Won

    2012-01-01

    Background An anesthesia information management system (AIMS), although not widely used in Korea, will eventually replace handwritten records. This hospital began using AIMS in April 2010. The purpose of this study was to evaluate users' attitudes concerning AIMS and to compare them with manual documentation in the operating room (OR). Methods A structured questionnaire focused on satisfaction with electronic anesthetic records and comparison with handwritten anesthesia records was administered to anesthesiologists, trainees, and nurses during February 2011 and the responses were collected anonymously during March 2011. Results A total of 28 anesthesiologists, 27 trainees, and 47 nurses responded to this survey. Most participants involved in this survey were satisfied with AIMS (96.3%, 82.2%, and 89.3% of trainees, anesthesiologists, and nurses, respectively) and preferred AIMS over handwritten anesthesia records in 96.3%, 71.4%, and 97.9% of trainees, anesthesiologists, and nurses, respectively. However, there were also criticisms of AIMS related to user-discomfort during short, simple or emergency surgeries, doubtful legal status, and inconvenient placement of the system. Conclusions Overall, most of the anesthetic practitioners in this hospital quickly accepted and prefer AIMS over the handwritten anesthetic records in the OR. PMID:22558502

  2. Installing and Implementing a Computer-based Patient Record System in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Mosoriot Medical Record System

    PubMed Central

    Rotich, Joseph K.; Hannan, Terry J.; Smith, Faye E.; Bii, John; Odero, Wilson W.; Vu, Nguyen; Mamlin, Burke W.; Mamlin, Joseph J.; Einterz, Robert M.; Tierney, William M.

    2003-01-01

    The authors implemented an electronic medical record system in a rural Kenyan health center. Visit data are recorded on a paper encounter form, eliminating duplicate documentation in multiple clinic logbooks. Data are entered into an MS-Access database supported by redundant power systems. The system was initiated in February 2001, and 10,000 visit records were entered for 6,190 patients in six months. The authors present a summary of the clinics visited, diagnoses made, drugs prescribed, and tests performed. After system implementation, patient visits were 22% shorter. They spent 58% less time with providers (p < 0.001) and 38% less time waiting (p = 0.06). Clinic personnel spent 50% less time interacting with patients, two thirds less time interacting with each other, and more time in personal activities. This simple electronic medical record system has bridged the “digital divide.” Financial and technical sustainability by Kenyans will be key to its future use and development. PMID:12668697

  3. Changes to criminal records checks used to safeguard vulnerable patients.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard; Tengnah, Cassam

    2012-07-01

    The Protection of Freedoms Act 2012 is introducing changes to the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) checks carried out on those people who work with vulnerable groups. The new law is the coalition Government's response to the criticism of the Safeguarding Vulnerable Group Act 2006. It will merge the CRB and Independent Safeguarding Authority into a new Disclosure and Barring Service and will enhance the rights of applicants to challenge the CRB's right to disclose non-conviction information as part of an enhanced criminal records check. In the first of two articles on the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012, Richard Griffith and Cassam Tengnah discuss the current framework for disclosing criminal records and the impact of the changes on district nurses applying for new posts.

  4. The electronic patient record in primary care—regression or progression? A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Hippisley-Cox, Julia; Pringle, Mike; Cater, Ruth; Wynn, Alison; Hammersley, Vicky; Coupland, Carol; Hapgood, Rhydian; Horsfield, Peter; Teasdale, Sheila; Johnson, Christine

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether paperless medical records contained less information than paper based medical records and whether that information was harder to retrieve. Design Cross sectional study with review of medical records and interviews with general practitioners. Setting 25 general practices in Trent region. Participants 53 British general practitioners (25 using paperless records and 28 using paper based records) who each provided records of 10 consultations. Main outcome measures Content of a sample of records and doctor recall of consultations for which paperless or paper based records had been made. Results Compared with paper based records, more paperless records were fully understandable (89.2% v 69.9%, P=0.0001) and fully legible (100% v 64.3%, P < 0.0001). Paperless records were significantly more likely to have at least one diagnosis recorded (48.2% v 33.2%, P=0.05), to record that advice had been given (23.7% vs 10.7%, P=0.017), and, when a referral had been made, were more likely to contain details of the specialty (77.4% v 59.5%, P=0.03). When a prescription had been issued, paperless records were more likely to specify the drug dose (86.6% v 66.2%, P=0.005). Paperless records contained significantly more words, abbreviations, and symbols (P < 0.01 for all). At doctor interview, there was no difference between the groups for the proportion of patients or consultations that could be recalled. Doctors using paperless records were able to recall more advice given to patients (38.6% v 26.8%, P=0.03). Conclusion We found no evidence to support our hypotheses that paperless records would be truncated and contain more local abbreviations; and that the absence of writing would decrease subsequent recall. Conversely we found that the paperless records compared favourably with manual records. PMID:12829558

  5. Emergency Department Presentations for Injuries in Older Adults Independently Known to be Victims of Elder Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Tony; Bloemen, Elizabeth M.; LoFaso, Veronica M.; Clark, Sunday; Flomenbaum, Neal; Lachs, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Elder abuse is under-recognized by Emergency Department (ED) providers, largely due to challenges distinguishing between abuse and accidental trauma. Objective To describe patterns and circumstances surrounding elder abuse-related and potentially abuse-related injuries in ED patients independently known to be physical elder abuse victims. Methods ED utilization of community-dwelling victims of physical elder abuse in New Haven, CT from 1981-1994 was analyzed previously. Cases were identified using Elderly Protective Services data matched to ED records. 66 ED visits were judged to have high probability of being related to elder abuse and 244 of indeterminate probability. We re-examined these visits to assess whether they occurred due to injury. We identified and analyzed in detail 31 injury-associated ED visits from 26 patients with high probability of being related to elder abuse and 108 visits from 57 patients with intermediate probability and accidental injury. Results Abuse-related injuries were most common on upper extremities (45% of visits) and lower extremities (32%), with injuries on head or neck noted in 13 visits (42%). Bruising was observed in 39% of visits, most commonly on upper extremities. 42% of purportedly accidental injuries had suspicious characteristics, with the most common suspicious circumstance being injury occurring >1 day prior to presentation and the most common suspicious injury pattern being maxillofacial injuries. Conclusion Victims of physical elder abuse commonly have injuries on upper extremities, head, and neck. Suspicious circumstances and injury patterns may be identified and are commonly present when victims of physical elder abuse present with purportedly accidental injuries. PMID:26810019

  6. Cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online access to their electronic medical records: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Rexhepi, Hanife; Åhlfeldt, Rose-Mharie; Cajander, Åsa; Huvila, Isto

    2016-07-19

    Patients' access to their online medical records serves as one of the cornerstones in the efforts to increase patient engagement and improve healthcare outcomes. The aim of this article is to provide in-depth understanding of cancer patients' attitudes and experiences of online medical records, as well as an increased understanding of the complexities of developing and launching e-Health services. The study result confirms that online access can help patients prepare for doctor visits and to understand their medical issues. In contrast to the fears of many physicians, the study shows that online access to medical records did not generate substantial anxiety, concerns or increased phone calls to the hospital.

  7. Methamphetamine abuse and "meth mouth".

    PubMed

    Rhodus, Nelson L; Little, James W

    2005-01-01

    Dental management for the patient who abuses drugs is always a challenge. The number of patients abusing methamphetamines appears to be increasing. The dentist needs to be aware of the clinical presentation and medical risks presented by these patients and to attempt to get the patient to seek professional help. Additionally, special attention will be necessary for the high prevalence and severity of oral manifestations including rampant caries, enamel erosion, xerostomia, bruxism, and muscle trismus.

  8. Child Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... for pornography is also sexual abuse. Most sexual abusers know the child they abuse. They may be ... friends, neighbors or babysitters. About one-third of abusers are related to the child. Most abusers are ...

  9. Fetal Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Lindsey; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Five cases of fetal abuse by mothers suffering from depression are discussed. Four of the women had unplanned pregnancies and had considered termination of the pregnancy. Other factors associated with fetal abuse include pregnancy denial, pregnancy ambivalence, previous postpartum depression, and difficulties in relationships. Vigilance for…

  10. Clinical characteristics and treatment outcome of depression in patients with and without a history of emotional and physical abuse.

    PubMed

    Miniati, M; Rucci, P; Benvenuti, A; Frank, E; Buttenfield, J; Giorgi, G; Cassano, G B

    2010-04-01

    Clinical features and treatment outcome were compared in depressed outpatients with and without a history of emotional and physical abuse (EPA), including childhood maltreatment. Patients were initially randomized to IPT or SSRI and then augmented with the second treatment if they did not remit with monotherapy. Assessments included the SCID-I, the SCID-II for DSM-IV diagnoses, the HRSD, the QIDS and the Mood Spectrum Self-Report (MOODS-SR). Seventy-eight (25%) patients reported a history of EPA; 60 (76.9%) were women. Patients with a history of EPA did not differ from those without on HRSD scores at baseline, but showed an earlier age at onset of depression and a longer duration of illness. The two groups differed on several mood spectrum factors, namely: 'depressivemood' (15.6+/-4.9 vs. 13.5+/-5.4; p<0.004), 'psychomotorretardation' (11.7+/-4.5 vs. 9.6+/-4.7; p<0.001), 'drugandillness-relateddepression' (1.3+/-1.3 vs. 0.6+/-1.0; p<0.0001), and 'neurovegetativesymptoms' (8.3+/-2.6 vs. 6.9+/-2.9; p<0.0001). Patients with EPA had also a significantly longer time to remission (89 vs. 67days, log-rank test, p=0.035). The need for augmentation treatment was significantly more frequent among patients with EPA than in those without. The present study suggests that patients with a history of EPA show a subtype of depression characterized by poor treatment response and more severe neurovegetative and psychomotor symptoms.

  11. The impacts of substance abuse and dependence on neuropsychological functions in a sample of patients from Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background A lot of studies were directed to explore the relation between drug abuse and neuropsychological functions. Some studies reported that even after a long duration of disappearance of withdrawal or intoxication symptoms, many patients have obvious deterioration of cognitive functions. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between the substance use disorders and the executive functions. Methods Two groups were selected for this study. An experimental group consisted of 154 patients and further subdivided according to the substance used into three different subgroups: opioid, amphetamine and alcohol groups which included 49, 56 and 49 patients respectively. The control group was selected matching the experimental group in the demographic characteristics and included 100 healthy persons. Tools used were: Benton visual retention tests, color trail making test, Stroop colors-word test, symbol digit modalities test, the five dots cognitive flexibility test, and TAM verbal flexibility test. All the data were subjected to statistical analysis Results The study showed that the group of drug-dependent subjects performed significantly worse than the comparison group on all measures Also, there were significant differences among the subgroups as the alcoholic group was much worse followed by the amphetamine then the opioids groups. Patients with longer duration of dependence and multiple hospital readmissions were much worse in comparison to patients with shorter duration of dependence and less readmission. Conclusion The study confirmed that the functions of specific brain regions underlying cognitive control are significantly impaired in patients of drug addiction. This impairment was significantly related to type of substance, duration of use and number of hospitalization and may contribute to most of behavioral disturbances found in addicts and need much attention during tailoring of treatment programs. PMID:20003358

  12. 42 CFR 2.16 - Security for written records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Security for written records. 2.16 Section 2.16 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.16 Security for written...

  13. Is Sexual Abuse a Part of War? A 4-Year Retrospective Study on Cases of Sexual Abuse at the Kenyatta National Hospital, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Omondi, Lilian; Olando, Yvonne; Makenyengo, Margaret; Bukusi, David

    2013-01-01

    The harmful effects of sexual abuse are long lasting. Sexual abuse when associated with violence is likely to impact negatively on the life of the victim. Anecdotal reports indicate that there was an increase in the number of cases of sexual violence following the 2007 post election conflict and violence in Kenya. Although such increases in sexual abuse are common during war or conflict periods the above reports have not been confirmed through research evidence. The purpose of the current study is to establish the trend in numbers of reported cases of sexual abuse at Kenyatta National Hospital over a 4-year period (2006-2009). Data on sexually abused persons for the year 2006-2009 was retrieved from the hospitals record. A researcher designed questionnaire was used to collect relevant data from the completed Post Rape Care (PRC) form. The PRC-Ministry of Health no. 363 (MOH363) form is mandatorily completed by the physician attending the sexually abused patient. There was an increase in the number of cases of sexual abuse reported in 2007 election year in Kenya, with a statistically significant increase in the sexually abused male cases. Sexual crime is more prevalent when there is war or conflict. PMID:28299094

  14. Digital Recording and Documentation of Endoscopic Procedures: Do Patients and Doctors Think Alike?

    PubMed Central

    Peled-Raz, Maya; Shteinberg, Dan; Shteinberg, Michal; Keren, Dean; Rainis, Tova

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Methods. Conducting a survey study of a large number of patients and gastroenterologists aimed at identifying relevant predictors of interest in digital recording and documentation (DRD) of endoscopic procedures. Outpatients presenting to the endoscopy unit at our institution for an endoscopy examination were anonymously surveyed, regarding their views and opinions of a possible recording of the procedure. A parallel survey for gastroenterologists was conducted. Results. 417 patients and 62 gastroenterologists participated in two parallel surveys regarding DRD of endoscopic procedures. 66.4% of the patients expressed interest in digital documentation of their endoscopic procedure, with 90.5% of them requesting a copy. 43.6% of the physicians supported digital recording while 27.4% opposed it, with 48.4% opposing to making a copy of the recording available to the patient. No sociodemographic or background factors predicted patient's interest in DRD. 66% of the physicians reported having recording facilities in their institutions, but only 43.6% of them stated performing recording. Having institutional guidelines for DRD was found to be the only significant predictor for routine recording. Conclusions. Our study exposes patients' positive views of digital recording and documentation of endoscopic procedures. In contrast, physicians appear to be much more reluctant towards DRD and are centrally motivated by legal concerns when opposing DRD, as well as when supporting it. PMID:27999770

  15. Digital Recording and Documentation of Endoscopic Procedures: Do Patients and Doctors Think Alike?

    PubMed

    Willner, Nadav; Peled-Raz, Maya; Shteinberg, Dan; Shteinberg, Michal; Keren, Dean; Rainis, Tova

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Methods. Conducting a survey study of a large number of patients and gastroenterologists aimed at identifying relevant predictors of interest in digital recording and documentation (DRD) of endoscopic procedures. Outpatients presenting to the endoscopy unit at our institution for an endoscopy examination were anonymously surveyed, regarding their views and opinions of a possible recording of the procedure. A parallel survey for gastroenterologists was conducted. Results. 417 patients and 62 gastroenterologists participated in two parallel surveys regarding DRD of endoscopic procedures. 66.4% of the patients expressed interest in digital documentation of their endoscopic procedure, with 90.5% of them requesting a copy. 43.6% of the physicians supported digital recording while 27.4% opposed it, with 48.4% opposing to making a copy of the recording available to the patient. No sociodemographic or background factors predicted patient's interest in DRD. 66% of the physicians reported having recording facilities in their institutions, but only 43.6% of them stated performing recording. Having institutional guidelines for DRD was found to be the only significant predictor for routine recording. Conclusions. Our study exposes patients' positive views of digital recording and documentation of endoscopic procedures. In contrast, physicians appear to be much more reluctant towards DRD and are centrally motivated by legal concerns when opposing DRD, as well as when supporting it.

  16. Abuse of elderly people by their carers.

    PubMed Central

    Homer, A C; Gilleard, C

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the prevalence of abuse of elderly people by their carers and the characteristics of abusers and the abused. DESIGN--Information on abuse and risk factors was collected over six months from carers and patients. Risk factors were identified in the abused group and compared with those in a non-abused control group. SETTING--Carers were interviewed at home; patients were examined in the wards of Putney and Barnes geriatric hospitals, London. SUBJECTS--All patients referred from any source for respite care to the geriatric services over a six month period and their carers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Amount of physical and verbal abuse or neglect. Quantification of risk factors and correlation with the presence or absence of abuse. RESULTS--45% Of carers openly admitted to some form of abuse. Few patients admitted abuse. The most significant risk factor for physical abuse was alcohol consumption by the carer (p less than 0.001). Other significant risk factors were a poor pre-morbid relationship and previous abuse over many years. Abuse was often reciprocated and was associated with social dysfunction in many patients. Service delivery, respite care, and level of mental and physical disability were not significantly associated with abuse. CONCLUSION--The high level of abuse found in elderly patients in respite care was particularly associated with alcohol abuse and long term relationships of poor quality, which are difficult to change. Even with increased provision of services, care in the community may not be the best solution for these people. PMID:2271883

  17. Psychologic aspects of sexual abuse in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Jeffrey, T B; Jeffrey, L K

    1991-12-01

    This paper reviews psychologic aspects of sexual abuse in female adolescents. It documents that sexual abuse is widespread, occurring at an alarming rate at all socioeconomic levels of society. It is perpetrated principally by adult men in the victim's family. Often its effects are tragic. Adolescent female sexual abuse victims are at high risk for subsequent acting out behavior, sexual promiscuity, physical and sexual abuse, anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, alcohol and drug abuse or dependence, chronic sleep disturbance, dissociative disorders, eating disorders, emotional numbing, dissociation, guilt, shame, hyperalertness, suicidal ideation, and multiple associated psychiatric disorders. Although it may appear at a surface level that sexual abuse victims recover from such abuse, follow-up studies suggest that many remain disabled long after the abuse has ended. Health care professionals should be especially cognizant of the magnitude of the impact of sexual abuse on adolescent girls and recognize the need of these patients for psychologic and medical services.

  18. A Patient Registry to Improve Patient Safety: Recording General Neurosurgery Complications

    PubMed Central

    Sarnthein, Johannes; Stieglitz, Lennart; Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Regli, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Background To improve the transparency of the local health care system, treatment cost was recently referenced to disease related groups. Treatment quality must be legally documented in a patient registry, in particular for the highly specialized treatments provided by neurosurgery departments. Methods In 2013 we have installed a patient registry focused on cranial neurosurgery. Surgeries are characterized by indication, treatment, location and other specific neurosurgical parameters. Preoperative state and postoperative outcome are recorded prospectively using neurological and sociological scales. Complications are graded by their severity in a therapy-oriented complication score system (Clavien-Dindo-Grading system, CDG). Results are presented at the monthly clinical staff meeting. Results Data acquisition compatible with the clinic workflow permitted to include all eligible patients into the registry. Until December 2015, we have registered 2880 patients that were treated in 3959 surgeries and 8528 consultations. Since the registry is fully operational (August 2014), we have registered 325 complications on 1341 patient discharge forms (24%). In 64% of these complications, no or only pharmacological treatment was required. At discharge, there was a clear correlation of the severity of the complication and the Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS, ρ = -0.3, slope -6 KPS percentage points per increment of CDG) and the length of stay (ρ = 0.4, slope 1.5 days per increment of CDG). Conclusions While the therapy-oriented complication scores correlate reasonably well with outcome and length of stay, they do not account for new deficits that cannot be treated. Outcome grading and complication severity grading thus serve a complimentary purpose. Overall, the registry serves to streamline and to complete information flow in the clinic, to identify complication rates and trends early for the internal quality monitoring and communication with patients. Conversely, the

  19. Child sexual abuse: consequences and implications.

    PubMed

    Hornor, Gail

    2010-01-01

    Sexual abuse is a problem of epidemic proportions in the United States. Given the sheer numbers of sexually abused children, it is vital for pediatric nurse practitioners to understand both short-term and long-term consequences of sexual abuse. Understanding consequences of sexual abuse can assist the pediatric nurse practitioner in anticipating the physical and mental health needs of patients and also may assist in the identification of sexual abuse victims. Sexual abuse typically does not occur in isolation. Implications for practice will be discussed.

  20. Bringing attention to domestic abuse.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2014-06-03

    Nursing skills are vital to the roles of those working with victims of domestic abuse in Nottinghamshire. Specialist nurses at Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust are involved in referring patients on to further support services and training hospital staff to identify and respond to signs of abuse.

  1. Developing and Implementing Patients' Full-Scale Electronic Access to Their Health Record.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Tove; Johansen, Monika A

    2016-01-01

    To increase patients' empowerment and involvement in their own health, several countries has decided to provide patients with electronic access to their health record. This paper reports on the main findings from sub-studies and pilots prior to the implementation of patients' access to their medical records in large-scale in the Northern Norway Region. The largest pilot included nearly 500 patients. Data for the participatory design process was collected through questionnaires and interviews. The results revealed that the service in general functioned as expected. The patients reported that they would continue to use the service, recommend it to others, and generally had no problems in understanding the content.

  2. 42 CFR 2.22 - Notice to patients of Federal confidentiality requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... an alcohol or drug abuser Unless: (1) The patient consents in writing: (2) The disclosure is allowed... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notice to patients of Federal confidentiality... GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions §...

  3. Identifying Patients for Clinical Studies from Electronic Health Records: TREC 2012 Medical Records Track at OHSU

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    with peripheral neuropathy and edema"), which was surprising given that this does not appear to have been a particularly difficult topic for other...quite problematic. In developing the query, we specified the ICD-9 code or the term “edema,” and the codes or term for “ peripheral neuropathy ...Patients with peripheral neuropathy and edema (discharge_icd_codes_txt:782.3 OR report_text:"lower extremity edema" OR report_text:"foot|heel|ankle edema

  4. Exploring the concept of empathy in nursing: can it lead to abuse of patient trust?

    PubMed

    Chowdhry, Sue

    This article examines the reasons why empathy and compassion have become so highly politicised. It encourages those involved in the delivery of patient care to consider the implications of embracing new initiatives that are aimed at improving, measuring and monitoring levels of empathy or compassion within the nurse-patient relationship.

  5. [A comparative analysis of a hospitalized population because of alcohol "dependence" or "abuse" and other similar alcoholic populations: a study of 1300 patients].

    PubMed

    Conde López, V; Pacheco Yáñez, L; Pérez Puente, C

    1990-01-01

    The authors refer on introduction to a former research where they describe results from 150 inpatients diagnosed of "Alcohol Dependence" and "Alcohol Abuse Syndromes" admitted during 1980-1984 at the Psychiatry Department of University Hospital of Valladolid. A comparison of epidemiologic, clinic, diagnostic and care patients patterns is made versus three others researches, where similar groups of alcoholic patients are studied through 47 variables. The first ++ investigation reports findings from 613 alcoholic out patients demanding psychiatric care at University Hospital in Valladolid. The second one study 134 alcoholic patients (70% out patients and 30% in patients) at the Hospital General in Burgos. The last one reports finding from 403 alcoholic in patients at the Psychiatric Service of "Ramon y Cajal" Hospital of Madrid. A group of 130 patients are studied as a whole, 1127 males (86.89%) and 173 females (13.3%). Fifty per cent of the simple (n = 653) were in-patient and the remainder were out-patients; 28.30% (n = 368) were diagnosed by means of CIE-8 , 61.38% (n = 798) by means of CIE-9 and 10.30 by DSM-III diagnostic criteria. The variables evaluated were population, age, sex, civil state, place of birth, place of living, level of education, profession, work capability, economical status and current social class, working and marriage adaptation, place composition, first work age, emigration, family psychiatric problems, affective deprivation, personal background, former treatment for drinking problems, start of drinking average age, abuse average time, kind of drinking, drinking day average amount, motive of abuse increments, consultation motive, somatic and psychiatric diagnoses, other drug consumptions, TAC and EEG results, first pharmacologic treatment, in-patient average time, and later hospitalisations. A table, a graphic, and 83 bibliographic quotations, part of which belong to a former work, are included.

  6. An Unusual Case of Baclofen Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Das, Soumitra; Palappalllil, Dhanya Sasidharan; Purushothaman, Sumesh Thoppil; Rajan, Varun

    2016-01-01

    Baclofen was initially used for the treatment of spastic conditions. Last decade has seen its emergence as a treatment of profound interest in alcohol dependence, opiates and cocaine abuse, and tobacco addiction. However, the published literature on baclofen abuse is sparse. Here, we report a patient with baclofen abuse. PMID:27833235

  7. Protocols for the Assessment of Elder Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulmer, Terry; Wetle, Terrie

    The fact that many states have passed elder abuse reporting laws has left care providers with a dilemma. If suspected abuse is reported, the relationship between caregiver and patient may change and the family's difficulties may increase. Indicators of abuse are not easy to differentiate from health problems, especially in the frail elderly. An…

  8. Are low income patients receiving the benefits of electronic health records? A statewide survey.

    PubMed

    Butler, Matthew J; Harootunian, Gevork; Johnson, William G

    2013-06-01

    There are concerns that physicians serving low-income, Medicaid patients, in the United States are less likely to adopt electronic health records and, if so, that Medicaid patients will be denied the benefits from electronic health record use. This study seeks to determine whether physicians treating Medicaid patients were less likely to have adopted electronic health records. Physician surveys completed during physicians' license renewal process in Arizona were merged with the physician licensing data and Medicaid administrative claims data. Survey responses were received from 50.7 percent (6,780 out of 13,380) of all physicians practicing in Arizona. Physician survey responses were used to identify whether the physician used electronic health records and the degree to which the physician exchanged electronic health records with other health-care providers. Medicaid claims data were used to identify which physicians provided health care to Medicaid beneficiaries. The primary outcome of interest was whether Medicaid providers were more or less likely to have adopted electronic health records. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate average marginal effects. In multivariate analysis, physicians with 20 or more Medicaid patients during the survey cycle were 4.1 percent more likely to use an electronic health record and 5.2 percent more likely to be able to transmit electronic health records to at least one health-care provider outside of their practice. These effects increase in magnitude when the analysis is restricted to solo practice physicians This is the first study to find a pro-Medicaid gap in electronic health record adoption suggesting that the low income patients served by Arizona's Health Care Cost Containment System are not at a disadvantage with regard to electronic health record access and that Arizona's model of promoting electronic health record adoption merits further study.

  9. 42 CFR 2.66 - Procedures and criteria for orders authorizing disclosure and use of records to investigate or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... patient has given a written consent (meeting the requirements of § 2.31 of these regulations) to that... PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Court Orders Authorizing Disclosure and... the disclosure or use of patient records to criminally or administratively investigate or prosecute...

  10. 42 CFR 2.66 - Procedures and criteria for orders authorizing disclosure and use of records to investigate or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... patient has given a written consent (meeting the requirements of § 2.31 of these regulations) to that... PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Court Orders Authorizing Disclosure and... the disclosure or use of patient records to criminally or administratively investigate or prosecute...

  11. 42 CFR 2.66 - Procedures and criteria for orders authorizing disclosure and use of records to investigate or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... patient has given a written consent (meeting the requirements of § 2.31 of these regulations) to that... PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Court Orders Authorizing Disclosure and... the disclosure or use of patient records to criminally or administratively investigate or prosecute...

  12. 42 CFR 2.66 - Procedures and criteria for orders authorizing disclosure and use of records to investigate or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... patient has given a written consent (meeting the requirements of § 2.31 of these regulations) to that... PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS Court Orders Authorizing Disclosure and... the disclosure or use of patient records to criminally or administratively investigate or prosecute...

  13. Empowerment of patients over their personal health record implies sharing responsibility with the physician.

    PubMed

    Quantin, Catherine; Benzenine, Eric; Auverlot, Bertrand; Jaquet-Chiffelle, David-Olivier; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Allaert, François-André

    2011-01-01

    Through this article, we point out the unavoidable empowerment of patients with regard to their personal health record and propose the mixed management of patients' medical records. This mixed management implies sharing responsibilities between the patient and the Medical Practitioner (MP) by making patients responsible for the validation of their administrative information, and MPs responsible for the validation of their patients' medical information. We propose a solution to gather and update patients' administrative and medical data in order to reconstitute patients' medical histories accurately. This method is based on two processes. The aim of the first process is to provide patients administrative data, in order to know where and when they received care (name of the health structure or health practitioner, type of care: outpatient or inpatient). The aim of the second process is to provide patients' medical information and to validate it under the responsibility of the MP with the help of patients if needed. During these two processes, the patients' privacy will be ensured through cryptographic hash functions like the Secure Hash Algorithm, which allows the pseudonymization of patients' identities. The Medical Record Search Engine we propose will be able to retrieve and to provide upon a request formulated by the MP all the available information concerning a patient who has received care in different health structures without divulging the patient's true identity. Associated with strong traceability of all access, modifications or deletions, our method can lead to improved efficiency of personal medical record management while reinforcing the empowerment of patients over their medical records.

  14. Drug abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. Weiss RD. Drugs of abuse. In: Goldman L, ... Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the ...

  15. Abusive Relationships

    MedlinePlus

    ... Break Up Respectfully Abuse Sexual Harassment and Sexual Bullying Love and Romance Getting Over a Break-Up Dealing With Bullying Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Sexual Attraction and Orientation Teens ...

  16. [Automatic registration of patients in digital radiology facilities: dosimetric record].

    PubMed

    Ten Morón, J I; Vañó Carruana, E; Arrazola García, J

    2013-12-01

    There is a consensus in the international community regarding both the need for and benefits of systematic registration and planning of the dosage indicators in patients exposed to ionizing radiation. The main interest is in the registration and follow-up of the techniques and procedures that can involve the greatest risk from exposure to radiation. This register should be planned to include the structure and tools necessary to take the radiological safety of the patients into account, enabling the physicians requesting the studies to access the most important information in the register so they can appropriately justify the request for additional studies. Likewise, it should be considered a priority to establish diagnostic reference levels for the different magnitudes that are defined in function of the modality and techniques used; this information is useful for the staff involved in procedures that use ionizing radiation.

  17. Event related potentials recorded in patients with locked-in syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Onofrj, M.; Thomas, A.; Paci, C.; Scesi, M.; Tombari, R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine the possibility of recording "cognitive" event related potentials (ERPs) in locked-in patients and therefore to determine whether ERPs can have a role in differential diagnosis of coma.
METHODS—ERPs to classic auditory or visual "odd ball paradigms" were recorded three to four days, seven to eight days, and 30 to 60days after admission to the intensive care unit, in four patients affected by basilar artery thrombembolism resulting in locked-in syndrome. Two patients (one 32 year old man, one 31 year old woman) could move the eyes laterally and vertically spontaneously and on command. One patient (a 39 year old man) had a "one and half syndrome", one patient (a 40 year old woman) could only elevate the left eyelid and eye. Results were compared with data from 30 age matched controls. In the last recording session a letter recognition paradigm was applied, in which ERPs were produced by the identification of letters forming a word. Results were compared with five age matched controls. Brainstem lesions extending to the pontomesencephalic junction were found on MRI and CT.
RESULTS—ERPs to the oddball paradigms were recorded in three patients in the first recording session, in all patients in the second recording session. Latency, amplitude, and topographic distribution of ERP components were inside normal limits. With the letter recognition paradigm the patients could emit a P3 component to correspond with target letters, with the same margin of error as controls.
CONCLUSION—It is possible to record ERPs in patients with locked-in syndrome shortly after the acute ischaemic lesion, and therefore to assess objectively cognitive activities. Furthermore the letter recognition paradigm could be implemented to facilitate linguistic communication with patients with locked-in syndrome.

 PMID:9416812

  18. A one-appointment impression and centric relation record technique for compromised complete denture patients.

    PubMed

    Ansari, I H

    1997-09-01

    This article describes a two-in-one modified custom tray and record block system that is recommended for compromised elderly patients. Custom trays, which are made on primary casts and formed from a patient's functionally corrected old dentures, are used to make final impressions and centric jaw relation records in one clinical appointment. The clinical visits are reduced without compromising the quality of denture construction.

  19. Privacy preservation and information security protection for patients' portable electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lu-Chou; Chu, Huei-Chung; Lien, Chung-Yueh; Hsiao, Chia-Hung; Kao, Tsair

    2009-09-01

    As patients face the possibility of copying and keeping their electronic health records (EHRs) through portable storage media, they will encounter new risks to the protection of their private information. In this study, we propose a method to preserve the privacy and security of patients' portable medical records in portable storage media to avoid any inappropriate or unintentional disclosure. Following HIPAA guidelines, the method is designed to protect, recover and verify patient's identifiers in portable EHRs. The results of this study show that our methods are effective in ensuring both information security and privacy preservation for patients through portable storage medium.

  20. Management Systems, Patient Quality Improvement, Resource Availability, and Substance Abuse Treatment Quality

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Dail; Roman, Paul M; Blum, Terry C

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationships among general management systems, patient-focused quality management/continuous process improvement (TQM/CPI) processes, resource availability, and multiple dimensions of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment. Data Sources/Study Setting Data are from a nationally representative sample of 221 SUD treatment centers through the National Treatment Center Study (NTCS). Study Design The design was a cross-sectional field study using latent variable structural equation models. The key variables are management practices, TQM/continuous quality improvement (CQI) practices, resource availability, and treatment center performance. Data Collection Interviews and questionnaires provided data from treatment center administrative directors and clinical directors in 2007–2008. Principal Findings Patient-focused TQM/CQI practices fully mediated the relationship between internal management practices and performance. The effects of TQM/CQI on performance are significantly larger for treatment centers with higher levels of staff per patient. Conclusions Internal management practices may create a setting that supports implementation of specific patient-focused practices and protocols inherent to TQM/CQI processes. However, the positive effects of internal management practices on treatment center performance occur through use of specific patient-focused TQM/CPI practices and have more impact when greater amounts of supporting resources are present. PMID:22098342

  1. Alprazolam abuse in Texas, 1998-2004.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2006-02-01

    Alprazolam (Xanax) is used in the treatment of anxiety, depression, and panic attacks, and is subject to abuse. The objective of this study was to describe the patterns of alprazolam abuse and drug identification (ID) calls received by several poison control centers. Cases were alprazolam calls received by 6 poison control centers during 1998-2004. Of 25,954 alprazolam calls received, 42% were drug ID calls and 51% were human exposure calls, of which 18% were abuse calls. The number of drug ID calls and the number of abuse calls both increased during the 7-yr period. Male patients accounted for 54% of abuse calls and females for 66% of nonabuse calls. Adolescent patients comprised 43% of abuse calls but only 12% of nonabuse calls. Although the majority of both types of human exposures occurred at the patient's own residence, abuse exposures were more likely than other exposures to occur at school (9% vs. 1%) and public areas (6% vs. 1%). While abuse calls were less likely than nonabuse calls to have no adverse clinical effects (19% vs. 23%), they were more likely to have minor medical outcomes (60% vs. 50%). Alprazolam abuse in Texas appears to be increasing. Alprazolam abusers are more likely to be male and often adolescent. Alprazolam abuse as compared to other exposures is more likely to occur outside of the person's home. Alprazolam abuse is more likely to involve some sort of adverse medical outcome.

  2. ASAM Patient Placement Criteria treatment levels: do they correspond to care actually received by homeless substance abusing adults?

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Thomas P; Freyder, Paul J; Gibbon, Jeanette L; Hanusa, Barbara J; Seltzer, Debora; Fine, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    We report findings from a community-based two-city survey of homeless adults comparing the level of substance abuse treatment assigned to them using the ASAM Patient Placement Criteria with care actually received during the previous 12 months. Overall 531 adults were surveyed with 382 meeting DSM-IIIR criteria of being in need of treatment or having a demand for treatment. Of those with a treatment need, 1.5% met criteria for outpatient care, 40.3% intensive outpatient/partial hospitalization care, 29.8% medically monitored care and 28.8% managed care levels. In contrast, of those receiving treatment (50.5%, 162 persons), almost all care received by this cohort was either inpatient or residential based (83.6%). Unsheltered homeless persons and those without insurance were significantly more likely to report not receiving needed treatment. Lack of treatment availability or capacity, expense, and changing one's mind while on a wait list were the most commonly cited reasons for no treatment.

  3. Childrens Hospital Integrated Patient Electronic Record System Continuation (CHIPERS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    System Continuation (CHIPERS) PRINCIPAL...Decision  Support  (CDS)   system .    We  are   enrolling  patients  in  the  Pediatric  ICU  with  severe  sepsis/shock...sensitivities”  as  well  as  determine  how  environmental  and   systems  factors  influence  the  decisions  to

  4. Ongoing incestuous abuse during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Individual cases of adult incestuous abuse have surfaced repeatedly in the lay and professional literature of the past 1.5 centuries without it occasioning systematic investigation, such as the reporting of a case series of individuals subjected to such extreme abuse. Yet substantial numbers of patients with dissociative identity disorder at the time of presentation report incestuous abuse continuing into the adult years, and for many the abuse is ongoing. Data relating to a series of 10 such incestuously abused women are presented. These patients were sexually abused from a very early age (typically from before age 3), with the manipulation of their sexual response a key component in conditioning an enduring sexualized attachment. Shame and fear were also used to ensure compliance and silence. The women, when able to speak of it, describe the induction by their paternal abuser of orgasm at an early age, typically around the age of 6. The women have high indices of self-harm and suicidality and are prone to placing themselves in dangerous reenactment scenarios. The average duration of incestuous abuse for this group of women was 31 years, and the average estimate of total episodes of sexual abuse was 3,320. Most women do not feel that they own their body and experience being "fused" to their father. Their mother was reported as an active participant in the sexual abuse or as having done nothing to protect their daughter despite seeing obvious evidence of incest. The fathers, despite a propensity to use or threaten violence, were generally outwardly productively employed, financially comfortable, and stably married and half had close church involvement. However, suicide and murder occurred within the 1st- or 2nd-degree relatives of these women at a high frequency. All 10 had been sexually abused by various groupings of individuals connected to their fathers.

  5. Drugs of abuse and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mursaleen, Leah R; Stamford, Jonathan A

    2016-01-04

    The term "drug of abuse" is highly contextual. What constitutes a drug of abuse for one population of patients does not for another. It is therefore important to examine the needs of the patient population to properly assess the status of drugs of abuse. The focus of this article is on the bidirectional relationship between patients and drug abuse. In this paper we will introduce the dopaminergic systems of the brain in Parkinson's and the influence of antiparkinsonian drugs upon them before discussing this synergy of condition and medication as fertile ground for drug abuse. We will then examine the relationship between drugs of abuse and Parkinson's, both beneficial and deleterious. In summary we will draw the different strands together and speculate on the future merit of current drugs of abuse as treatments for Parkinson's disease.

  6. Childhood abuse, adult interpersonal abuse, and depression in individuals with extreme obesity.

    PubMed

    Salwen, Jessica K; Hymowitz, Genna F; Vivian, Dina; O'Leary, K Daniel

    2014-03-01

    This study sought to examine (a) a mediational model of childhood abuse, adult interpersonal abuse, and depressive symptoms and (b) the impact of weight-related teasing on rates and correlates of childhood abuse. Charts of 187 extremely obese individuals seeking psychological clearance for bariatric (weight-loss) surgery were retrospectively examined. Among the participants, 61% reported a history of childhood abuse, 30.5% reported adult interpersonal abuse, and 15% reported clinically significant depressive symptoms. Initially, the relationship between childhood abuse and current depressive symptoms was significant (p<.001). However, the introduction of adult interpersonal abuse as a mediator in the model reduced the magnitude of its significance (Sobel's test p=.01). The associations between childhood abuse and adult interpersonal abuse and between adult interpersonal abuse and depressive symptoms were significant (p<.001 and p=.002, respectively), and the model showed a good fit across multiple indices. Finally, weight-related teasing was a significant moderator in the relationship between childhood and adult interpersonal abuse. Bariatric surgery patients report elevated rates of childhood abuse that are comparable to rates in psychiatric populations (e.g., eating disorders, depression), and higher than those in community samples and other medical populations. The relationship between child abuse and depressive symptomatology may be partially explained by the presence of adult interpersonal abuse; additionally, the relationship between childhood and adult interpersonal abuse was stronger for those who did not endure weight-related teasing than for those who did.

  7. Can multilingual machine translation help make medical record content more comprehensible to patients?

    PubMed

    Zeng-Treitler, Qing; Kim, Hyeoneui; Rosemblat, Graciela; Keselman, Alla

    2010-01-01

    With the development of electronic personal health records, more patients are gaining access to their own medical records. However, comprehension of medical record content remains difficult for many patients. Because each record is unique, it is also prohibitively costly to employ human translators to solve this problem. In this study, we investigated whether multilingual machine translation could help make medical record content more comprehensible to patients who lack proficiency in the language of the records. We used a popular general-purpose machine translation tool called Babel Fish to translate 213 medical record sentences from English into Spanish, Chinese, Russian and Korean. We evaluated the comprehensibility and accuracy of the translation. The text characteristics of the incorrectly translated sentences were also analyzed. In each language, the majority of the translations were incomprehensible (76% to 92%) and/or incorrect (77% to 89%). The main causes of the translation are vocabulary difficulty and syntactical complexity. A general-purpose machine translation tool like the Babel Fish is not adequate for the translation of medical records; however, a machine translation tool can potentially be improved significantly, if it is trained to target certain narrow domains in medicine.

  8. Comparing the abuse potential of methylphenidate versus other stimulants: a review of available evidence and relevance to the ADHD patient.

    PubMed

    Kollins, Scott H

    2003-01-01

    The use of psychostimulants to treat attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been controversial for a number of reasons. In an effort to clarify the extent to which the psychostimulant methylphenidate has abuse potential, the existing published evidence has been reviewed and is summarized here, with an emphasis on delineating a number of related but independent issues that are often confused. Methylphenidate produces behavioral effects associated with abuse potential as assessed by traditional assays, but the relevance of this literature to the clinical use of the drug in the treatment of ADHD is ambiguous at best. Existing neuropharmacologic data suggest that methylphenidate has pharmacokinetic properties that reduce its abuse potential as compared with other stimulant drugs of abuse, such as cocaine.

  9. Matching prosthetics order records in VA National Prosthetics Patient Database to healthcare utilization databases.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark W; Su, Pon; Phibbs, Ciaran S

    2010-01-01

    The National Prosthetics Patient Database (NPPD) is the national Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) dataset that records characteristics of individual prosthetic and assistive devices. It remains unknown how well NPPD records can be matched to encounter records for the same individuals in major VA utilization databases. We compared the count of prosthetics records in the NPPD with the count of prosthetics-related procedures for the same individuals recorded in major VA utilization databases. We then attempted to match the NPPD records to the utilization records by person and date. In general, 40% to 60% of the NPPD records could be matched to outpatient utilization records within a 14-day window around the NPPD dataset entry date. Match rates for inpatient data were lower: 10% to 16% within a 14-day window. The NPPD will be particularly important for studies of certain veteran groups, such as those with spinal cord injury or blast-related polytraumatic injury. Health services researchers should use both the NPPD and utilization databases to develop a full understanding of prosthetics use by individual patients.

  10. Epidemiology of Patient Harms in New Zealand: Protocol of a General Practice Records Review Study

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, Sharon; Wallis, Katharine A; Eggleton, Kyle S; Cunningham, Wayne K; Williamson, Martyn I; Lillis, Steven; McMenamin, Andrew W; Tilyard, Murray W; Reith, David M; Samaranayaka, Ari; Hall, Jason E

    2017-01-01

    Background Knowing where and why harm occurs in general practice will assist patients, doctors, and others in making informed decisions about the risks and benefits of treatment options. Research to date has been unable to verify the safety of primary health care and epidemiological research about patient harms in general practice is now a top priority for advancing health systems safety. Objective We aim to study the incidence, distribution, severity, and preventability of the harms patients experience due to their health care, from the whole-of-health-system lens afforded by electronic general practice patient records. Methods “Harm” is defined as disease, injury, disability, suffering, and death, arising from the health system. The study design is a stratified, 2-level cluster, retrospective records review study. Both general practices and patients will be randomly selected so that the study’s results will apply nationally, after weighting. Stratification by practice size and rurality will allow comparisons between 6 study groups (large, medium-sized, small; urban and rural practices). Records of equal numbers of patients from each study group will be included in the study because there may be systematic differences in patient harms in different types of practices. Eight general practitioner investigators will review 3 years of electronic general practice health records (consultation notes, prescriptions, investigations, referrals, and summaries of hospital care) from 9000 patients registered in 60 general practices. Double-blinded reviews will check the concordance of reviewers’ assessments. Study data will comprise demographic data of all 9000 patients and reviewers’ assessments of whether patients experienced harm arising from health care. Where patient harm is identified, their types, preventability, severity, and outcomes will be coded using the Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) 18.0. Results We have recruited practices and

  11. Schizophrenia patients with polydipsia and water intoxication are characterized by greater severity of psychotic illness and a more frequent history of alcohol abuse.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Simon; Legris, Geneviève; Tremblay, Philippe; Michea, Rodrigo; Viau-Guay, Laurence; Mérette, Chantal; Bouchard, Roch-Hugo; Maziade, Michel; Roy, Marc-André

    2010-05-01

    Polydipsia and water intoxication (PWI) are relatively frequent among schizophrenic subjects, particularly in institutional settings and may lead to severe complications. However, little is known on their association with other characteristics of psychosis. Hence, we took advantage of a cohort of 114 subjects extensively assessed on natural history and clinical variables to examine the correlates of PWI in chronic schizophrenia. We randomly sampled DSM-IV schizophrenic subjects from: i) a lower functioning subgroup, i.e., long-term psychiatric wards or highly structured group housing facilities; and ii) a higher functioning subgroup, i.e., patients living in the community without supervision. Subjects were assessed from multiple sources for lifetime severity of positive, disorganisation, negative and depressive symptoms, premorbid adjustment, age of onset, level of functioning, comorbid diagnoses of substance abuse and lifetime history of PWI. Twelve subjects (10.5%) met our PWI criteria. We observed more severe psychotic symptoms, earlier onset, poorer current adjustment and more frequent prior alcohol use disorder in PWI subjects. When restricting comparisons to patients living in institutional setting, differences on clinical and natural history variables vanished but the association between PWI and prior alcohol abuse persisted (72.7% in PWI vs. 21.4% in non-PWI subjects, p<0.01). Onset of alcohol abuse predated the onset of PWI by a mean of 12.8 years. PWI schizophrenic subjects are characterized by a non-specific greater severity on a broad array of clinical and natural history variables and by a specific association with prior alcohol abuse. Thus, our data suggest that a greater severity of illness and a prior history of alcohol use disorders interact in increasing the risk of developing PWI in chronic schizophrenic patients.

  12. Child Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Child Sexual Abuse Public This section is for Veterans, General Public, Family, & Friends Child Sexual Abuse What is child sexual abuse? Child sexual abuse ...

  13. Patients Covertly Recording Clinical Encounters: Threat or Opportunity? A Qualitative Analysis of Online Texts

    PubMed Central

    Tsulukidze, Maka; Grande, Stuart W.; Thompson, Rachel; Rudd, Kenneth; Elwyn, Glyn

    2015-01-01

    Background The phenomenon of patients covertly recording clinical encounters has generated controversial media reports. This study aims to examine the phenomenon and analyze the underlying issues. Methods and Findings We conducted a qualitative analysis of online posts, articles, blogs, and forums (texts) discussing patients covertly recording clinical encounters. Using Google and Google Blog search engines, we identified and analyzed 62 eligible texts published in multiple countries between 2006 and 2013. Thematic analysis revealed four key themes: 1) a new behavior that elicits strong reactions, both positive and negative, 2) an erosion of trust, 3) shifting patient-clinician roles and relationships, and 4) the existence of confused and conflicting responses. When patients covertly record clinical encounters – a behavior made possible by various digital recording technologies – strong reactions are evoked among a range of stakeholders. The behavior represents one consequence of an erosion of trust between patients and clinicians, and when discovered, leads to further deterioration of trust. Confused and conflicting responses to the phenomenon by patients and clinicians highlight the need for policy guidance. Conclusions This study describes strong reactions, both positive and negative, to the phenomenon of patients covertly recording clinical encounters. The availability of smartphones capable of digital recording, and shifting attitudes to patient-clinician relationships, seems to have led to this behavior, mostly viewed as a threat by clinicians but as a welcome and helpful innovation by some patients, possibly indicating a perception of subordination and a lack of empowerment. Further examination of this tension and its implications is needed. PMID:25933002

  14. The patient's photograph in the medical record as a diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Golan-Cohen, Avivit; Horn, Oded; Sive, Philip H; Vinker, Shlomo

    2008-12-01

    Two case reports are presented: one of acromegaly and the other of hyperthyroidism. Previous photographs of the patients that appeared in their military medical record were of considerable assistance in making the correct diagnoses. When "smart cards" are issued in the future, inclusion of a photograph as an integral part of the patient's medical information should be considered.

  15. Personal Health Records: Beneficial or Burdensome for Patients and Healthcare Providers?

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Melissa; Boateng, Samuel; Studeny, Jana; Coustasse, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Personal health records (PHRs) have been mandated to be made available to patients to provide increased access to medical care information, encourage participation in healthcare decision making, and enable correction of errors within medical records. The purpose of this study was to analyze the usefulness of PHRs from the perspectives of patients and providers. The methodology of this qualitative study was a literature review using 34 articles. PHRs are powerful tools for patients and healthcare providers. Better healthcare results and correction of medical records have been shown to be positive outcomes of the use of PHRs. PHRs have also been shown to be difficult for patients to use and understand, and providers had concerns about correct information transferring to the portals and patients eliminating information from the record. Concerns regarding patient understanding of medical records, legal liability, and the response time required of providers were also identified. For the PHR to succeed in the US healthcare system, assurance that the information will be protected, useful, and easily accessed is necessary. PMID:27134613

  16. [Child abuse].

    PubMed

    V Essen, H; Schlickewei, W; Dietz, H-G

    2005-02-01

    Child abuse is most often diagnosed by an emergency doctor on call who sometimes "feels" more than knows what he is confronted with. He should nevertheless always take a medical history and make a physical and radiological examination. X-ray imaging and an ophthalmologic retinal examination are the most important diagnostic steps. Typical findings are multiple and/or dorsal rib fractures, complex skull fractures, physeal fractures, all fractures within the first 12 months, multiple fractures in different localisations and stages of healing, all injuries with uncommon distributions, all patterned bruises, immersion burns, intramural hematoma and every unexplained loss of consciousness. The first step towards victim protection is always the removal of the abused child from its caregivers by admitting it to hospital, as 95% of all cases of reported child abuse take place within the child's family.

  17. Cocaine modulates HIV-1 integration in primary CD4+ T cells: implications in HIV-1 pathogenesis in drug-abusing patients.

    PubMed

    Addai, Amma B; Pandhare, Jui; Paromov, Victor; Mantri, Chinmay K; Pratap, Siddharth; Dash, Chandravanu

    2015-04-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that cocaine abuse worsens HIV-1 disease progression. Increased viral load has been suggested to play a key role for the accelerated HIV disease among cocaine-abusing patients. The goal of this study was to investigate whether cocaine enhances proviral DNA integration as a mechanism to increase viral load. We infected CD4(+) T cells that are the primary targets of HIV-1 in vivo and treated the cells with physiologically relevant concentrations of cocaine (1 µM-100 µM). Proviral DNA integration in the host genome was measured by nested qPCR. Our results illustrated that cocaine from 1 µM through 50 µM increased HIV-1 integration in CD4(+) T cells in a dose-dependent manner. As integration can be modulated by several early postentry steps of HIV-1 infection, we examined the direct effects of cocaine on viral integration by in vitro integration assays by use of HIV-1 PICs. Our data illustrated that cocaine directly increases viral DNA integration. Furthermore, our MS analysis showed that cocaine is able to enter CD4(+) T cells and localize to the nucleus-. In summary, our data provide strong evidence that cocaine can increase HIV-1 integration in CD4(+) T cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that increased HIV-1 integration is a novel mechanism by which cocaine enhances viral load and worsens disease progression in drug-abusing HIV-1 patients.

  18. The Electronic Health Record Objective Structured Clinical Examination: Assessing Student Competency in Patient Interactions While Using the Electronic Health Record

    PubMed Central

    Biagioli, Frances E.; Elliot, Diane L.; Palmer, Ryan T.; Graichen, Carla C.; Rdesinski, Rebecca E.; Kumar, Kaparaboyna Ashok; Galper, Ari B.; Tysinger, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Problem Because many medical students do not have access to electronic health records (EHRs) in the clinical environment, simulated EHR training is necessary. Explicitly training medical students to use EHRs appropriately during patient encounters equips them to engage patients while also attending to the accuracy of the record and contributing to a culture of information safety. Approach Faculty developed and successfully implemented an EHR objective structured clinical examination (EHR-OSCE) for clerkship students at two institutions. The EHR-OSCE objectives include assessing EHR-related communication and data management skills. Outcomes The authors collected performance data for students (n = 71) at the first institution during academic years 2011–2013 and for students (n = 211) at the second institution during academic year 2013–2014. EHR-OSCE assessment checklist scores showed that students performed well in EHR-related communication tasks, such as maintaining eye contact and stopping all computer work when the patient expresses worry. Findings indicated student EHR skill deficiencies in the areas of EHR data management including medical history review, medication reconciliation, and allergy reconciliation. Most students’ EHR skills failed to improve as the year progressed, suggesting that they did not gain the EHR training and experience they need in clinics and hospitals. Next Steps Cross-institutional data comparisons will help determine whether differences in curricula affect students’ EHR skills. National and institutional policies and faculty development are needed to ensure that students receive adequate EHR education, including hands-on experience in the clinic as well as simulated EHR practice. PMID:27332870

  19. Reliability of multidimensional substance abuse treatment matching: implementing the ASAM Patient Placement Criteria.

    PubMed

    Baker, Sharon L; Gastfriend, David R

    2003-01-01

    For meaningful adoption, the Patient Placement Criteria (PPC) of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) will need adequate interrater reliability. In a decision analysis of the original PPC, we reduced potential sources of unreliability, mapped question items from clinical research instruments to each decision point, and programmed the item map as a computerized structured interview. Then, target videotapes from eight substance dependent adults who had been distributed by the algorithm into three levels of care (LOC) were independently scored by four raters who were blind as to ASAM LOC. The intraclass correlation coefficient for ASAM LOC assignment was .77. For all but two subscales of component instruments, values were above .70 and significant, indicating high interrater reliability. With these methods, excellent reliability is possible for complex decision trees, making it possible to improve the validity of the ASAM Criteria and similar complex hierarchical clinical protocols.

  20. Assessment of Factors Resulting in Abuse Evaluations in Young Children with Minor Head Trauma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderst, James D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The primary objective was to determine which of the examined factors prompted physicians to initiate a further abuse evaluation in young children with minor head injury. The recording of important historical elements in the charts of these patients was also evaluated. Methods: Charts of 349 children less than 3 years of age with minor…

  1. Patient Accessible Electronic Health Records: Exploring Recommendations for Successful Implementation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Urowitz, Sara; Apatu, Emma; DeLenardo, Claudette; Eysenbach, Gunther; Harth, Tamara; Pai, Howard; Leonard, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Background Providing patients with access to their electronic health records offers great promise to improve patient health and satisfaction with their care, as well to improve professional and organizational approaches to health care. Although many benefits have been identified, there are many questions about best practices for the implementation of patient accessible Electronic Health Records (EHRs). Objectives To develop recommendations to assist health care organizations in providing patients with access to EHRs in a meaningful, responsible, and responsive manner. Methods A Patient Accessible Electronic Health Record (PAEHR) Workshop was held with nationally and internationally renowned experts to explore issues related to providing patient access to the EHR and managing institutional change. Results The PAEHR Workshop was attended by 45 participants who discussed recommendations for the implementation of patient accessible EHRs. Recommendations were discussed under four subject domains: (1) providing patient access to the EHR, (2) maintaining privacy and confidentiality related to the PAEHR, (3) patient education and navigation of the PAEHR, and (4) strategies for managing institutional change. The discussion focused on the need for national infrastructure, clear definitions for privacy, security and confidentiality, flexible, interoperable solutions, and patient and professional education. In addition, there was a strong call for research into all domains of patient accessible EHRs to ensure the adoption of evidence-based practices. Conclusions Patient access to personal health information is a fundamental issue for patient engagement and empowerment. Health care professionals and organizations should consider the potential benefits and risks of patient access when developing EHR strategies. Flexible, standardized, and interoperable solutions must be integrated with outcomes-based research to activate effectively patients as partners in their health care

  2. Retrospective record review in proactive patient safety work – identification of no-harm incidents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In contrast to other safety critical industries, well-developed systems to monitor safety within the healthcare system remain limited. Retrospective record review is one way of identifying adverse events in healthcare. In proactive patient safety work, retrospective record review could be used to identify, analyze and gain information and knowledge about no-harm incidents and deficiencies in healthcare processes. The aim of the study was to evaluate retrospective record review for the detection and characterization of no-harm incidents, and compare findings with conventional incident-reporting systems. Methods A two-stage structured retrospective record review of no-harm incidents was performed on a random sample of 350 admissions at a Swedish orthopedic department. Results were compared with those found in one local, and four national incident-reporting systems. Results We identified 118 no-harm incidents in 91 (26.0%) of the 350 records by retrospective record review. Ninety-four (79.7%) no-harm incidents were classified as preventable. The five incident-reporting systems identified 16 no-harm incidents, of which ten were also found by retrospective record review. The most common no-harm incidents were related to drug therapy (n = 66), of which 87.9% were regarded as preventable. Conclusions No-harm incidents are common and often preventable. Retrospective record review seems to be a valuable tool for identifying and characterizing no-harm incidents. Both harm and no-harm incidents can be identified in parallel during the same record review. By adding a retrospective record review of randomly selected records to conventional incident-reporting, health care providers can gain a clearer and broader picture of commonly occurring, no-harm incidents in order to improve patient safety. PMID:23876023

  3. Designing a patient-centered personal health record to promote preventive care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence-based preventive services offer profound health benefits, yet Americans receive only half of indicated care. A variety of government and specialty society policy initiatives are promoting the adoption of information technologies to engage patients in their care, such as personal health records, but current systems may not utilize the technology's full potential. Methods Using a previously described model to make information technology more patient-centered, we developed an interactive preventive health record (IPHR) designed to more deeply engage patients in preventive care and health promotion. We recruited 14 primary care practices to promote the IPHR to all adult patients and sought practice and patient input in designing the IPHR to ensure its usability, salience, and generalizability. The input involved patient usability tests, practice workflow observations, learning collaboratives, and patient feedback. Use of the IPHR was measured using practice appointment and IPHR databases. Results The IPHR that emerged from this process generates tailored patient recommendations based on guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and other organizations. It extracts clinical data from the practices' electronic medical record and obtains health risk assessment information from patients. Clinical content is translated and explained in lay language. Recommendations review the benefits and uncertainties of services and possible actions for patients and clinicians. Embedded in recommendations are self management tools, risk calculators, decision aids, and community resources - selected to match patient's clinical circumstances. Within six months, practices had encouraged 14.4% of patients to use the IPHR (ranging from 1.5% to 28.3% across the 14 practices). Practices successfully incorporated the IPHR into workflow, using it to prepare patients for visits, augment health behavior counseling, explain test results, automatically issue patient

  4. The relationship between abuse and depression.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, Kelsey L

    2011-12-01

    Very strong links exist between abuse and depression in clinical practice. Abuse and depression often coexist in the victims and perpetrators of abuse. In nursing practice, responding to patients, particularly women, presenting with depression or depressive symptoms requires an understanding of the underlying and perhaps hidden issues of abuse and violence. Women who have experienced trauma often are diagnosed with depression, when in fact they have symptoms more consistent with posttraumatic stress disorder. Furthermore, depression often improves over time, when women manage to escape the abuse and violence in the relationship.

  5. [Comparative analysis of a population hospitalized for alcohol "dependence" and "abuse" with other similar alcoholic populations: a study of 1,300 patients].

    PubMed

    Conde López, V; Pacheco Yáñez, L; Pérez Puente, C

    1991-01-01

    The authors refer on introduction to a former research where they describe results from 150 inpatients diagnosed of "Alcohol Dependence" and "Alcohol Abuse Syndromes" admitted during 1980-1984 at the Psychiatry Department of University Hospital of Valladolid. A comparison of epidemiologic, clinic, diagnostic and care patients patterns is made versus three other studies , where similar groups of alcoholic patients are studied through 47 variables. The first investigation reports findings from 613 alcoholic out patients demanding psychiatric care at University Hospital in Valladolid. The second one study 134 alcoholic patients (70% outpatients and 30% inpatients) at the Hospital General in Burgos. The last one reports finding from 403 alcoholic inpatients at the Psychiatric Service of "Ramón y Cajal" Hospital of Madrid. A group of 130 patients are studied as a whole, 1,127 males (86.89%) and 173 females (13.3%). Fifty per cent of the sample (n = 653) were inpatients and the remainder were outpatients; 28.30% (n = 368) were diagnosed by means of CIE-8a; 61.38% (n = 798) by means of CIE-9a; and 10.30 by DSM-III diagnostic criteria. The variables evaluated were population, age, sex, civil state, place of birth, place of living, level of education, profession, work capability, economical status and current social class, working and marriage adaptation, place composition, first work age, emigration, family psychiatric problems, affective deprivation, personal background, former treatment for drinking problems, start of drinking average age, abuse average time, kind of drinking, drinking day average amount, motive of abuse increments, consultation motive, somatic and psychiatric diagnoses, others drugs consultations, TAC and EEG results, first pharmacologic treatment, inpatient average time, and later hospitalizations. A table, a graphic and 83 bibliographic quotations, part of which belong to a former work, are included.

  6. The smart card: an ideal tool for a computer-based patient record.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, R; Hildebrand, C; Jung, E

    1995-01-01

    Over the past decades, technology has advanced in all areas. Medical documentation, however, has not altered considerably. This means that medical care is often below standard. This article tries to point out how healthcare could benefit from a computer-based medical record. It also discusses the use of a medical smart card as a computer-based patient record--exemplified by the European DIABCARD-project which develops a chip card for persons with diabetes.

  7. Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... bruises, while behavioral indicators are ways victims and abusers act or interact with each other. Some of the indicators listed below can be explained by other causes (e.g. inappropriate or unusual behavior may signal dementia or drug interactions) and no single indicator can be taken ...

  8. Toward secure distribution of electronic health records: quantitative feasibility study on secure E-mail systems for sharing patient records.

    PubMed

    Gomi, Yuichiro; Nogawa, Hiroki; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2005-12-01

    If the quality and efficiency of medical services are to be ensured, electronic health records (EHR) and EHR-supporting infrastructure must be prevalent. Many hospitals, however, have EHR systems for their internal use only, and the standardization process for the exchange of medical information is still in process. This standardization process addresses information security and is considering public key infrastructure (PKI) as one security measure, but PKI is rarely used by medical practioners because of its poor user-friendliness. Here we propose an effective use of the identity-based encryption (IBE) system as a security measure. This system enables us to send encrypted and signed messages without requiring the receiver to get a public key, and it enables us to deliver secured messages to ambiguous receivers like those to whom letters of reference are sent. We evaluated the feasibility of this technology by using the analytic hierarchy process, which is an effective analysis tool when selection and judgment depend on nonquantitative psychological factors, to analyze the results of an experiment in which medical workers used E-mail agents with and without PKI and IBE. We found that medical practioners and researchers avoid using PKI because of its poor user-friendliness and instead use IBE even though it is harder to install. We therefore think IBE would encourage medical institutions to share patient records.

  9. SOEMPI: A Secure Open Enterprise Master Patient Index Software Toolkit for Private Record Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Toth, Csaba; Durham, Elizabeth; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Xue, Yuan; Malin, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    To mitigate bias in multi-institutional research studies, healthcare organizations need to integrate patient records. However, this process must be accomplished without disclosing the identities of the corresponding patients. Various private record linkage (PRL) techniques have been proposed, but there is a lack of translation into practice because no software suite supports the entire PRL lifecycle. This paper addresses this issue with the introduction of the Secure Open Enterprise Master Patient Index (SOEMPI). We show how SOEMPI covers the PRL lifecycle, illustrate the implementation of several PRL protocols, and provide a runtime analysis for the integration of two datasets consisting of 10,000 records. While the PRL process is slower than a non-secure setting, our analysis shows the majority of processes in a PRL protocol require several seconds or less and that SOEMPI completes the process in approximately two minutes, which is a practical amount of time for integration. PMID:25954421

  10. Ensuring Privacy When Integrating Patient-Based Datasets: New Methods and Developments in Record Linkage

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adrian P.; Ferrante, Anna M.; Randall, Sean M.; Boyd, James H.; Semmens, James B.

    2017-01-01

    In an era where the volume of structured and unstructured digital data has exploded, there has been an enormous growth in the creation of data about individuals that can be used for understanding and treating disease. Joining these records together at an individual level provides a complete picture of a patient’s interaction with health services and allows better assessment of patient outcomes and effectiveness of treatment and services. Record linkage techniques provide an efficient and cost-effective method to bring individual records together as patient profiles. These linkage procedures bring their own challenges, especially relating to the protection of privacy. The development and implementation of record linkage systems that do not require the release of personal information can reduce the risks associated with record linkage and overcome legal barriers to data sharing. Current conceptual and experimental privacy-preserving record linkage (PPRL) models show promise in addressing data integration challenges. Enhancing and operationalizing PPRL protocols can help address the dilemma faced by some custodians between using data to improve quality of life and dealing with the ethical, legal, and administrative issues associated with protecting an individual’s privacy. These methods can reduce the risk to privacy, as they do not require personally identifying information to be shared. PPRL methods can improve the delivery of record linkage services to the health and broader research community. PMID:28303240

  11. Refining Measurement of Substance Use Disorders Among Women of Child-Bearing Age Using Hospital Records: The Development of the Explicit-Mention Substance Abuse Need for Treatment in Women (EMSANT-W) Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Derrington, Taletha Mae; Bernstein, Judith; Belanoff, Candice; Cabral, Howard J; Babakhanlou-Chase, Hermik; Diop, Hafsatou; Evans, Stephen R; Kotelchuck, Milton

    2015-10-01

    Substance use disorder (SUD) in women of reproductive age is associated with adverse health consequences for both women and their offspring. US states need a feasible population-based, case-identification tool to generate better approximations of SUD prevalence, treatment use, and treatment outcomes among women. This article presents the development of the Explicit Mention Substance Abuse Need for Treatment in Women (EMSANT-W), a gender-tailored tool based upon existing International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition, Clinical Modification diagnostic code-based groupers that can be applied to hospital administrative data. Gender-tailoring entailed the addition of codes related to infants, pregnancy, and prescription drug abuse, as well as the creation of inclusion/exclusion rules based on other conditions present in the diagnostic record. Among 1,728,027 women and associated infants who accessed hospital care from January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2008 in Massachusetts, EMSANT-W identified 103,059 women with probable SUD. EMSANT-W identified 4,116 women who were not identified by the widely used Clinical Classifications Software for Mental Health and Substance Abuse (CCS-MHSA) and did not capture 853 women identified by CCS-MHSA. Content and approach innovations in EMSANT-W address potential limitations of the Clinical Classifications Software, and create a methodologically sound, gender-tailored and feasible population-based tool for identifying women of reproductive age in need of further evaluation for SUD treatment. Rapid changes in health care service infrastructure, delivery systems and policies require tools such as the EMSANT-W that provide more precise identification methods for sub-populations and can serve as the foundation for analyses of treatment use and outcomes.

  12. Electronic patient records for dental school clinics: more than paperless systems.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Jane C; Zeller, Gregory G; Shah, Chhaya

    2002-05-01

    The Electronic Patient Record (EPR) or "computer-based medical record" is defined by the Patient Record Institute as "a repository for patient information with one health-care enterprise that is supported by digital computer input and integrated with other information sources." The information technology revolution coupled with everyday use of computers in clinical dentistry has created new demand for electronic patient records. Ultimately, the EPR should improve health care quality. The major short-term disadvantage is cost, including software, equipment, training, and personnel time involved in the associated business process re-engineering. An internal review committee with expertise in information technology and/or database management evaluated commercially available software in light of the unique needs of academic dental facilities. This paper discusses their deficiencies and suggests areas for improvement. The dental profession should develop a more common record with standard diagnostic codes and clinical outcome measures to make the EPR more useful for clinical research and improve the quality of care.

  13. Is patient confidentiality compromised with the electronic health record?: a position paper.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ilse M

    2015-02-01

    In order for electronic health records to fulfill their expected benefits, protection of privacy of patient information is key. Lack of trust in confidentiality can lead to reluctance in disclosing all relevant information, which could have grave consequences. This position paper contemplates whether patient confidentiality is compromised by electronic health records. The position that confidentiality is compromised was supported by the four bioethical principles and argued that despite laws and various safeguards to protect patients' confidentiality, numerous data breaches have occurred. The position that confidentiality is not compromised was supported by virtue ethics and a utilitarian viewpoint and argued that safeguards keep information confidential and the public feels relatively safe with the electronic health record. The article concludes with an ethically superior position that confidentiality is compromised with the electronic health record. Although organizational and governmental ways of enhancing the confidentiality of patient information within the electronic health record facilitate confidentiality, the ultimate responsibility of maintaining confidentiality rests with the individual end-users and their ethical code of conduct. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics for nurses calls for nurses to be watchful with data security in electronic communications.

  14. Cocaine enhances HIV-1-induced CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis: implications in disease progression in cocaine-abusing HIV-1 patients.

    PubMed

    Pandhare, Jui; Addai, Amma B; Mantri, Chinmay K; Hager, Cynthia; Smith, Rita M; Barnett, Louis; Villalta, Fernando; Kalams, Spyros A; Dash, Chandravanu

    2014-04-01

    Substance abuse is a major barrier in eradication of the HIV epidemic because it serves as a powerful cofactor for viral transmission, disease progression, and AIDS-related mortality. Cocaine, one of the commonly abused drugs among HIV-1 patients, has been suggested to accelerate HIV disease progression. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Therefore, we tested whether cocaine augments HIV-1-associated CD4(+) T-cell decline, a predictor of HIV disease progression. We examined apoptosis of resting CD4(+) T cells from HIV-1-negative and HIV-1-positive donors in our study, because decline of uninfected cells plays a major role in HIV-1 disease progression. Treatment of resting CD4(+) T cells with cocaine (up to 100 μmol/L concentrations) did not induce apoptosis, but 200 to 1000 μmol/L cocaine induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Notably, treatment of CD4(+) T cells isolated from healthy donors with both HIV-1 virions and cocaine significantly increased apoptosis compared with the apoptosis induced by cocaine or virions alone. Most important, our biochemical data suggest that cocaine induces CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis by increasing intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and inducing mitochondrial depolarization. Collectively, our results provide evidence of a synergy between cocaine and HIV-1 on CD4(+) T-cell apoptosis that may, in part, explain the accelerated disease observed in HIV-1-infected drug abusers.

  15. Forensic revolution need maintenance of dental records of patients by the dentists: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anamika; Mishra, Gaurav; Bhutani, Hemant; Hoshing, Chetan; Bhalla, Ashish

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: With the growth of forensic odontology, dental records have become an essential source of information, especially for medicolegal cases in general practice. It is mandated by the law that every dentist must keep some kind of records for every patient they treat. After the death of an individual, remnants of teeth are usually damaged at the last among all body parts. Dental records assist in personal identification in cases of mass disasters, criminal investigations, and medicolegal issues. However, in India, rules for maintaining dental records are not very strictly followed. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the knowledge regarding the maintenance of dental records among dentists in Punjab and Uttar Pradesh. Materials and Methods: Data collection was performed via a questionnaire. The study population responded to the questions pertaining to knowledge regarding forensic odontology methods and the mode of maintaining dental records in their regular practice through a personal interview. A descriptive analysis was carried out for the data. The data were summarized and analyzed using the statistical software Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 18.0. Results: A very low percentage (22%) of the dentists were seen to be maintaining records on a regular basis. Seventy-eight percent of the dentists were not maintaining any records. Conclusion: This study clearly indicates that the dentists in Punjab and Uttar Pradesh need to be properly trained for any kind of forensic and medicolegal needs. PMID:27583219

  16. Patients' consent preferences for research uses of information in electronic medical records: interview and survey data

    PubMed Central

    Willison, Donald J; Keshavjee, Karim; Nair, Kalpana; Goldsmith, Charlie; Holbrook, Anne M

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To assess patients' preferred method of consent for the use of information from electronic medical records for research. Design Interviews and a structured survey of patients in practices with electronic medical records. Setting Family practices in southern Ontario, Canada. Participants 123 patients: 17 were interviewed and 106 completed a survey. Main outcome measures Patients' opinions and concerns on use of information from their medical records for research and their preferences for method of consent. Results Most interviewees were willing to allow the use of their information for research purposes, although the majority preferred that consent was sought first. The seeking of consent was considered an important element of respect for the individual. Most interviewees made little distinction between identifiable and anonymised data. Research sponsored by private insurance firms generated the greatest concern, and research sponsored by foundation the least. Sponsorship by drug companies evoked negative responses during interview and positive responses in the survey. Conclusions Patients are willing to allow information from their medical records to be used for research, but most prefer to be asked for consent either verbally or in writing. What is already known on this topicLegislation is being introduced worldwide to restrict the circumstances under which personal information may be used for secondary purposes without consentLittle empirical information exists about patients' concerns over privacy and preferences for consent for use of such information for researchWhat this study addsPatients are willing to allow personal information to be used for research purposes but want to be actively consulted firstPatients make little distinction between identifiable and non-identifiable informationMost patients prefer a time limit for their consent PMID:12586673

  17. Patient Experiences With Full Electronic Access to Health Records and Clinical Notes Through the My HealtheVet Personal Health Record Pilot: Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Erin; Tuepker, Anais; Press, Nancy A; Nazi, Kim M; Turvey, Carolyn L; Nichol, W. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background Full sharing of the electronic health record with patients has been identified as an important opportunity to engage patients in their health and health care. The My HealtheVet Pilot, the initial personal health record of the US Department of Veterans Affairs, allowed patients and their delegates to view and download content in their electronic health record, including clinical notes, laboratory tests, and imaging reports. Objective A qualitative study with purposeful sampling sought to examine patients’ views and experiences with reading their health records, including their clinical notes, online. Methods Five focus group sessions were conducted with patients and family members who enrolled in the My HealtheVet Pilot at the Portland Veterans Administration Medical Center, Oregon. A total of 30 patients enrolled in the My HealtheVet Pilot, and 6 family members who had accessed and viewed their electronic health records participated in the sessions. Results Four themes characterized patient experiences with reading the full complement of their health information. Patients felt that seeing their records positively affected communication with providers and the health system, enhanced knowledge of their health and improved self-care, and allowed for greater participation in the quality of their care such as follow-up of abnormal test results or decision-making on when to seek care. While some patients felt that seeing previously undisclosed information, derogatory language, or inconsistencies in their notes caused challenges, they overwhelmingly felt that having more, rather than less, of their health record information provided benefits. Conclusions Patients and their delegates had predominantly positive experiences with health record transparency and the open sharing of notes and test results. Viewing their records appears to empower patients and enhance their contributions to care, calling into question common provider concerns about the effect of full

  18. Semantic extraction and processing of medical records for patient-oriented visual index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weilin; Dong, Wenjie; Chen, Xiangjiao; Zhang, Jianguo

    2012-02-01

    To have comprehensive and completed understanding healthcare status of a patient, doctors need to search patient medical records from different healthcare information systems, such as PACS, RIS, HIS, USIS, as a reference of diagnosis and treatment decisions for the patient. However, it is time-consuming and tedious to do these procedures. In order to solve this kind of problems, we developed a patient-oriented visual index system (VIS) to use the visual technology to show health status and to retrieve the patients' examination information stored in each system with a 3D human model. In this presentation, we present a new approach about how to extract the semantic and characteristic information from the medical record systems such as RIS/USIS to create the 3D Visual Index. This approach includes following steps: (1) Building a medical characteristic semantic knowledge base; (2) Developing natural language processing (NLP) engine to perform semantic analysis and logical judgment on text-based medical records; (3) Applying the knowledge base and NLP engine on medical records to extract medical characteristics (e.g., the positive focus information), and then mapping extracted information to related organ/parts of 3D human model to create the visual index. We performed the testing procedures on 559 samples of radiological reports which include 853 focuses, and achieved 828 focuses' information. The successful rate of focus extraction is about 97.1%.

  19. Overcoming barriers to implementing patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Listhaus, Alyson; Covarrubias, Constanza M; Schmidt, Siegfried OF; Mackey, Sean; Carek, Peter J; Fillingim, Roger B; Hurley, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    In this case report, the authors describe the implementation of a system for collecting patient-reported outcomes and integrating results in an electronic health record. The objective was to identify lessons learned in overcoming barriers to collecting and integrating patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record. The authors analyzed qualitative data in 42 documents collected from system development meetings, written feedback from users, and clinical observations with practice staff, providers, and patients. Guided by the Unified Theory on the Adoption and Use of Information Technology, 5 emergent themes were identified. Two barriers emerged: (i) uncertain clinical benefit and (ii) time, work flow, and effort constraints. Three facilitators emerged: (iii) process automation, (iv) usable system interfaces, and (v) collecting patient-reported outcomes for the right patient at the right time. For electronic health record-integrated patient-reported outcomes to succeed as useful clinical tools, system designers must ensure the clinical relevance of the information being collected while minimizing provider, staff, and patient burden. PMID:26159464

  20. Overcoming barriers to implementing patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record: a case report.

    PubMed

    Harle, Christopher A; Listhaus, Alyson; Covarrubias, Constanza M; Schmidt, Siegfried Of; Mackey, Sean; Carek, Peter J; Fillingim, Roger B; Hurley, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    In this case report, the authors describe the implementation of a system for collecting patient-reported outcomes and integrating results in an electronic health record. The objective was to identify lessons learned in overcoming barriers to collecting and integrating patient-reported outcomes in an electronic health record. The authors analyzed qualitative data in 42 documents collected from system development meetings, written feedback from users, and clinical observations with practice staff, providers, and patients. Guided by the Unified Theory on the Adoption and Use of Information Technology, 5 emergent themes were identified. Two barriers emerged: (i) uncertain clinical benefit and (ii) time, work flow, and effort constraints. Three facilitators emerged: (iii) process automation, (iv) usable system interfaces, and (v) collecting patient-reported outcomes for the right patient at the right time. For electronic health record-integrated patient-reported outcomes to succeed as useful clinical tools, system designers must ensure the clinical relevance of the information being collected while minimizing provider, staff, and patient burden.

  1. Automated identification of patients with a diagnosis of binge eating disorder from narrative electronic health records.

    PubMed

    Bellows, Brandon K; LaFleur, Joanne; Kamauu, Aaron W C; Ginter, Thomas; Forbush, Tyler B; Agbor, Stephen; Supina, Dylan; Hodgkins, Paul; DuVall, Scott L

    2014-02-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) does not have an International Classification of Diseases, 9th or 10th edition code, but is included under 'eating disorder not otherwise specified' (EDNOS). This historical cohort study identified patients with clinician-diagnosed BED from electronic health records (EHR) in the Department of Veterans Affairs between 2000 and 2011 using natural language processing (NLP) and compared their characteristics to patients identified by EDNOS diagnosis codes. NLP identified 1487 BED patients with classification accuracy of 91.8% and sensitivity of 96.2% compared to human review. After applying study inclusion criteria, 525 patients had NLP-identified BED only, 1354 had EDNOS only, and 68 had both BED and EDNOS. Patient characteristics were similar between the groups. This is the first study to use NLP as a method to identify BED patients from EHR data and will allow further epidemiological study of patients with BED in systems with adequate clinical notes.

  2. Automated identification of patients with a diagnosis of binge eating disorder from narrative electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Bellows, Brandon K; LaFleur, Joanne; Kamauu, Aaron W C; Ginter, Thomas; Forbush, Tyler B; Agbor, Stephen; Supina, Dylan; Hodgkins, Paul; DuVall, Scott L

    2014-01-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) does not have an International Classification of Diseases, 9th or 10th edition code, but is included under ‘eating disorder not otherwise specified’ (EDNOS). This historical cohort study identified patients with clinician-diagnosed BED from electronic health records (EHR) in the Department of Veterans Affairs between 2000 and 2011 using natural language processing (NLP) and compared their characteristics to patients identified by EDNOS diagnosis codes. NLP identified 1487 BED patients with classification accuracy of 91.8% and sensitivity of 96.2% compared to human review. After applying study inclusion criteria, 525 patients had NLP-identified BED only, 1354 had EDNOS only, and 68 had both BED and EDNOS. Patient characteristics were similar between the groups. This is the first study to use NLP as a method to identify BED patients from EHR data and will allow further epidemiological study of patients with BED in systems with adequate clinical notes. PMID:24201026

  3. Ultrasound-guided trans-hepatic embolization of a renal artery pseudoaneurysm in a patient with acquired solitary kidney and with chronic renal failure secondary to phenacetin abuse.

    PubMed

    Ferramosca, Emiliana; Serra, Carla; Di Felice, Antonio; Mandreoli, Marcora; Brunocilla, Eugenio; Santoro, Antonio

    2014-03-01

    A patient with a pseudoaneurysm of the right renal artery underwent treatment with percutaneous approach. No complications were observed. Based on the experience described in this report, a percutaneous ultrasound guided approach can be proposed in selected patients. Renal insufficiency and allergic reactions are potential contraindications to angiography with conventional ionic iodinated contrast dye in patients who need endovascular stent-graft placement. Real-time contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) guided endovascular procedures may provide an alternative to overcome these limitations. We report an endovascular renal artery repair in a solitary kidney patient with an asymptomatic infrarenal aortic aneurysm and renal insufficiency due to phenacetin abuse. The precise placement of the stent-graft was performed with CEUS and intraprocedural angiographic fluoroscopy without the use of any nephrotoxic contrast dye. During follow-up, CEUS was used to exclude endoleaks, stent-graft failure or malposition.

  4. Using a Patient Portal to Transmit Patient Reported Health Information into the Electronic Record: Workflow Implications and User Experience

    PubMed Central

    Sorondo, Barbara; Allen, Amy; Bayleran, Janet; Doore, Stacy; Fathima, Samreen; Sabbagh, Iyad; Newcomb, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This project implemented an integrated patient self-reported screening tool in a patient portal and assessed clinical workflow and user experience in primary care practices. Methods: An electronic health risk assessment based on the CMS Annual Wellness Visit (AWV) was developed to integrate self-reported health information into the patient’s electronic health record (EHR). Patients enrolled in care coordination tested the implementation. The evaluation plan included quantitative and qualitative measures of patient adoption, provider adoption, workflow impact, financial impact, and technology impact. Findings: Seventy-two patients completed the sample AWV, and 80% of the questionnaires had clinical findings that required provider follow-up. Patients expressed satisfaction with the portal, as it enabled them to view their health record and enter information. Implementation did not reduce office staff time. Providers and office staff agreed that an electronic system for adding information to their record would increase patient satisfaction, but they expressed concern with the need to promptly review the information and the time involved to accomplish this prior to an office visit. Discussion: Despite satisfaction among patients, portal adoption is still low, due to technological limitations and to the lack of adaptability to primary care practice workflow. Notwithstanding those barriers, the use of the portal for completion of repetitive tasks, such as screening tools, should be encouraged. Conclusions: Patients can effectively use portals to complete the patient reported section of the CMS AWV. However, if the information is not completed during the same day of the office visit, the time required to address health findings outside of a regular office visit is uncompensated, and diminished the enthusiasm for this process among primary care practice staff. PMID:27683669

  5. Mental Health and Substance Use Characteristics of Flight Attendants Enrolled in an In-Patient Substance Abuse Treatment Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Gail; Diaz, Naelys; McIlveen, John; Weiner, Michael; Mullaney, Donald

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence rates of co-occurring mental health problems among 70 flight attendants in substance abuse treatment. Results indicated that flight attendants in treatment were more likely to experience alcohol dependency than drug dependency. A high proportion of participants reported clinical levels of…

  6. New drugs of abuse.

    PubMed

    Rech, Megan A; Donahey, Elisabeth; Cappiello Dziedzic, Jacqueline M; Oh, Laura; Greenhalgh, Elizabeth

    2015-02-01

    Drug abuse is a common problem and growing concern in the United States, and over the past decade, novel or atypical drugs have emerged and have become increasingly popular. Recognition and treatment of new drugs of abuse pose many challenges for health care providers due to lack of quantitative reporting and routine surveillance, and the difficulty of detection in routine blood and urine analyses. Furthermore, street manufacturers are able to rapidly adapt and develop new synthetic isolates of older drugs as soon as law enforcement agencies render them illegal. In this article, we describe the clinical and adverse effects and purported pharmacology of several new classes of drugs of abuse including synthetic cannabinoids, synthetic cathinones, salvia, desomorphine, and kratom. Because many of these substances can have severe or life-threatening adverse effects, knowledge of general toxicology is key in recognizing acute intoxication and overdose; however, typical toxidromes (e.g., cholinergic, sympathomimetic, opioid, etc.) are not precipitated by many of these agents. Medical management of patients who abuse or overdose on these drugs largely consists of supportive care, although naloxone may be used as an antidote for desomorphine overdose. Symptoms of aggression and psychosis may be treated with sedation (benzodiazepines, propofol) and antipsychotics (haloperidol or atypical agents such as quetiapine or ziprasidone). Other facets of management to consider include treatment for withdrawal or addiction, nutrition support, and potential for transmission of infectious diseases.

  7. Parental Substance Abuse and the Nature of Child Maltreatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Famularo, Richard; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Randomly selected juvenile court records (n=190) of cases of child maltreatment found that 67 percent involved parents who were substance abusers. Specific associations were found between (1) alcohol abuse and physical maltreatment, and (2) cocaine abuse and sexual maltreatment. (Author/DB)

  8. Drug abuse and stroke.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Ana Catarina; Ferro, José M

    2013-02-01

    Cerebrovascular disorders contribute to the morbidity and disability associated with illicit drug use. Drug abusers have an increased risk of both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke. In geographic areas with a high prevalence of illicit drug use, drug abuse is a frequent cause of stroke in the young adult. The illicit drugs more commonly associated with stroke are psychomotor stimulants, such as amphetamine and cocaine. Less commonly implicated are opioids and psychotomimetic drugs, including cannabis. Toxicology screening for illicit drugs should be done in young patients with stroke with no obvious cause, or if suggested by history or examination. Although in some patients the mechanism of stroke is identified using neuroimaging and other modern diagnostic tools, in a sizeable fraction of cases the mechanism of stroke remains unclear. Further studies are needed to elucidate the role of hemodynamic and immunologic mechanisms in these cases.

  9. Spousal Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Gullattee, Alyce C.

    1979-01-01

    Spouse abuse is being discussed and agonized over more frequently than in past years. Although interpousal and intrafamilial violence have been behaviors of note and considerable consequence, they have been attributable, almost exclusively, to the lower socioeconomic classes. Many hypotheses have been proposed concerning the etiology of violence. The author discusses some of the more general sociopolitical theories of violence and proposes three areas of significant moment to behaviorists. PMID:439165

  10. 42 CFR 2.19 - Disposition of records by discontinued programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disposition of records by discontinued programs. 2.19 Section 2.19 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.19 Disposition...

  11. 42 CFR 2.19 - Disposition of records by discontinued programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disposition of records by discontinued programs. 2.19 Section 2.19 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.19 Disposition...

  12. Develop security architecture for both in-house healthcare information systems and electronic patient record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Chen, Xiaomeng; Zhuang, Jun; Jiang, Jianrong; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Dongqing; Huang, H. K.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper, we presented a new security approach to provide security measures and features in both healthcare information systems (PACS, RIS/HIS), and electronic patient record (EPR). We introduced two security components, certificate authoring (CA) system and patient record digital signature management (DSPR) system, as well as electronic envelope technology, into the current hospital healthcare information infrastructure to provide security measures and functions such as confidential or privacy, authenticity, integrity, reliability, non-repudiation, and authentication for in-house healthcare information systems daily operating, and EPR exchanging among the hospitals or healthcare administration levels, and the DSPR component manages the all the digital signatures of patient medical records signed through using an-symmetry key encryption technologies. The electronic envelopes used for EPR exchanging are created based on the information of signers, digital signatures, and identifications of patient records stored in CAS and DSMS, as well as the destinations and the remote users. The CAS and DSMS were developed and integrated into a RIS-integrated PACS, and the integration of these new security components is seamless and painless. The electronic envelopes designed for EPR were used successfully in multimedia data transmission.

  13. Structured data entry in a workflow-enabled electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Webster, C; Copenhaver, J

    2001-01-01

    Touch-screen technology is used with a structured data entry system for electronic patient records. This article describes a program that coordinates pre-set screens for detailed history, physical examination, treatment and prescription modules. It also presents "pick lists" that allow further customization and individualization of data inputs.

  14. A Quantitative Exploration of the Relationship between Patient Health and Electronic Personal Health Records

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Denise Williams

    2009-01-01

    The use of electronic personal health records is becoming increasingly more popular as healthcare providers, healthcare and government leaders, and patients are seeking ways to improve healthcare quality and to decrease costs (Abrahamsen, 2007). This quantitative, descriptive correlational study examined the relationship between the degree of…

  15. 42 CFR 2.14 - Minor patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... treatment until the minor patient consents to the disclosure necessary to obtain reimbursement, but refusal... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minor patients. 2.14 Section 2.14 Public Health... ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.14 Minor patients. (a) Definition of...

  16. 42 CFR 2.14 - Minor patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... treatment until the minor patient consents to the disclosure necessary to obtain reimbursement, but refusal... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minor patients. 2.14 Section 2.14 Public Health... ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.14 Minor patients. (a) Definition of...

  17. 42 CFR 2.14 - Minor patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... treatment until the minor patient consents to the disclosure necessary to obtain reimbursement, but refusal... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minor patients. 2.14 Section 2.14 Public Health... ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.14 Minor patients. (a) Definition of...

  18. Child Abuse: Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Timothy L.-Y.

    The purpose of this paper was to elaborate on the definitions of child abuse in order to improve the understanding of child abuse. The definitions given by the U.S. House Joint Committee on Child Abuse in the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, and in research by Holden (1984), are cited. These definitions refer to the nature of abusive acts…

  19. Identifying the substance abuser in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Bell, K

    1992-01-01

    Illicit drugs are used regularly by 14.5 million Americans. By identifying patients who abuse substances, the nurse will be better able to provide for the treatment interventions needed and omit ineffective treatment interventions. The patient will benefit by receiving timely and appropriate care. To identify substance abusers, the nurse must know effects of commonly abused drugs, their routes of administration, withdrawal signs, and the physical assessments that should be performed. The most common drugs abused are narcotics, depressants, antidepressants, anti-anxiety drugs, stimulants, hallucinogens, and marijuana.

  20. Do Electronic Health Records Standards Help Implementing Patient Bill of Rights in Hospitals?

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi, Shirin; Ferdosi, Masoud

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Patient bill of rights (PBR) calls for equal rights to access health services for all patients. It makes a foundation for preserving good relationships between patients, doctors and other healthcare staffs. Third Edition of national PBR was published in Iran in 2009. On the other hand, developing national wide Electronic Health Records (EHR) is now one of the strategic goals of Iran Ministry of Health and Medical Education. EHR as a basic repository for all related information provides access to the necessary data to organize, store and manage them. It also makes an additional support to the legal aspects of healthcare services, increases staff information about patient rights, and raises them to respect these rights. This article reviews how EHR standards can help to institutionalize the PBR. Methods To do that, we have collected some important topics of PBR in Iran. Then we used some valid references on Electronic health record standards like ASTM, ISO, HL7 and CEN to review existing standards. The Main issues regarding patient rights derived from these standards were: privacy, confidentiality, and secrecy, access levels to patient information, medical care in emergency situations, patient autonomy and authentication (electronic signature). In each topic, the most relevant standard phrases are marked. Results Developing EHR creates an opportunity to establish patient rights in its structure. To internalize them, there are some reliable EHR standards like ASTM and ISO 13606-1 that implementing them could be very fruitful. PMID:23572856

  1. Wireless connection of continuous glucose monitoring system to the electronic patient record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Alexandre; Gutierrez, Marco A.; Lage, Silvia G.; Rebelo, Marina S.; Granja, Luiz A. R.; Ramires, Jose A. F.

    2005-04-01

    The control of blood sugar level (BSL) at near-normal levels has been documented to reduce both acute and chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. Recent studies suggested, the reduction of mortality in a surgical intensive care unit (ICU), when the BSL are maintained at normal levels. Despite of the benefits appointed by these and others clinical studies, the strict BSL control in critically ill patients suffers from some difficulties: a) medical staff need to measure and control the patient"s BSL using blood sample at least every hour. This is a complex and time consuming task; b) the inaccuracy of standard capillary glucose monitoring (fingerstick) in hypotensive patients and, if frequently used to sample arterial or venous blood, may lead to excess phlebotomy; c) there is no validated procedure for continuously monitoring of BSL levels. This study used the MiniMed CGMS in ill patients at ICU to send, in real-time, BSL values to a Web-Based Electronic Patient Record. The BSL values are parsed and delivered through a wireless network as an HL7 message. The HL7 messages with BSL values are collected, stored into the Electronic Patient Record and presented into a bed-side monitor at the ICU together with other relevant patient information.

  2. Methylphenidate abuse in Texas, 1998-2004.

    PubMed

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2006-06-01

    Methylphenidate is a stimulant used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and is subject to abuse. This study describes the patterns of methylphenidate abuse and drug identification (ID) calls received by several poison control centers in Texas. Cases were calls involving methylphenidate received by Texas poison control centers during 1998-2004. Drug ID and drug abuse calls were assessed by call year and geographic location. Drug abuse calls were then compared to all other human exposure (nonabuse) calls with respect to various factors. Of 6798 calls received involving methylphenidate, 35% were drug IDs and 56% human exposures. Of the human exposures, 9% involved abuse. The number of drug ID calls and drug abuse calls received per year both declined during the first part of 7-yr period but then increased. Male patients accounted for approximately 60% of both drug abuse and nonabuse calls. Adolescent patients comprised 55% of drug abuse calls and children less than 13 yr old comprised 62% of nonabuse calls. Although the majority of both types of human exposures occurred at the patient's own residence, drug abuse calls were more likely than non-abuse calls to involve exposures at school (15% vs. 6%) and public areas (3% vs. 0.4%). While drug abuse calls were less likely than nonabuse calls to present with no clinical effects (29% vs. 52%), they were more likely to show more serious medical outcomes. Methylphenidate abusers are more likely to be adolescents. Methylphenidate abuse as compared to other exposures is more likely to occur outside of the person's home and to involve more serious medical outcomes.

  3. Comorbidity of Schizophrenia and Substance Abuse: Implications for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueser, Kim T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reviews substance abuse disorders in schizophrenia patients, including prevalence of comorbid disorders, assessment, hypothesized mechanisms underlying abuse, and clinical effects of abuse on course of illness and cognitive functioning. Outlines principles of treatment for dual-diagnosis schizophrenia patients, noting limitations of existing…

  4. Drug abuse in slum population

    PubMed Central

    Ghulam, Ram; Verma, Kamal; Sharma, Pankaj; Razdan, Monica; Razdan, Rahul Anand

    2016-01-01

    Substance abuse is an important health problem throughout the world including India, but prevalence and pattern of abuse varies from country to country and in different types of population. Slums have their own social and economic problems so that substance abuse may be different in this population and might be related with these problems. The aim of the present study was to study the prevalence and pattern substances in slum population. Prakash Chandra Sethi Nagar slum area of Indore district was selected for the purpose of this study. In first phase of the study, first a camp was organized to sensitize local leaders, key persons, and local inhabitants about drug abuse at Chandra Prakash Sethi Nagar. After that basic information was gathered with the key persons in Chandra Prakash Sethi Nagar. In second phase by house-to-house survey, all members of the family were interviewed in detail and information was recorded on semi-structured proforma. We observed prevalence rate of 560/1000 populations, 78.2% were males, 28.2% were females, and two-third abusers were laborers (72%). In order of frequency, tobacco was the most common substance abused in 53.9% population followed by gutka (nontobacco pan masala). Other drugs in order of frequency were alcohol 46.5%, cannabis 8.9%, opiates 4.9%, sedative and hypnotic 2.0%, solvents 1.0%, and cocaine in 0.1%. Slum population has higher prevalence rates than general population. PMID:26985110

  5. Developing image-based electronic patient records for collaborative medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Sun, Jianyong; Yong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Xiaomeng; Yu, Fenghai; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Lian, Ping; Sun, Kun; Huang, H. K.

    2004-04-01

    We developed a Web-based system to interactively display image-based electronic patient records (EPR) for intranet and Internet collaborative medical applications. The system consists of four major components: EPR DICOM gateway (EPR-GW), Image-based EPR repository server (EPR-Server), Web Server and EPR DICOM viewer (EPR-Viewer). We have successfully used this system two times for the teleconsultation on Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Shanghai Xinhua Hospital and Shanghai Infection Hospital. During the consultation, both the physicians in infection control area and the experts outside the control area could interactively study, manipulate and navigate the EPR of the SARS patients to make more precise diagnosis on images with this system assisting. This presentation gave a new approach to create and manage image-based EPR from actual patient records, and also presented a way to use Web technology and DICOM standard to build an open architecture for collaborative medical applications.

  6. A detailed description and assessment of outcomes of patients with hospital recorded QTc prolongation.

    PubMed

    Laksman, Zachary; Momciu, Bogdan; Seong, You Won; Burrows, Patricia; Conacher, Susan; Manlucu, Jaimie; Leong-Sit, Peter; Gula, Lorne J; Skanes, Allan C; Yee, Raymond; Klein, George J; Krahn, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Corrected QT (QTc) interval prolongation has been shown to be an independent predictor of mortality in many clinical settings and is a common finding in hospitalized patients. The causes and outcomes of patients with extreme QTc interval prolongation during a hospital admission are poorly described. The aim of this study was to prospectively identify patients with automated readings of QTc intervals >550 ms at 1 academic tertiary hospital. One hundred seventy-two patients with dramatic QTc interval prolongation (574 ± 53 ms) were identified (mean age 67.6 ± 15.1 years, 48% women). Most patients had underlying heart disease (60%), predominantly ischemic cardiomyopathy (43%). At lease 1 credible and presumed reversible cause associated with QTc interval prolongation was identified in 98% of patients. The most common culprits were QTc interval-prolonging medications, which were deemed most responsible in 48% of patients, with 25% of these patients taking ≥2 offending drugs. Two patients were diagnosed with congenital long-QT syndrome. Patients with electrocardiograms available before and after hospital admission demonstrated significantly lower preadmission and postdischarge QTc intervals compared with the QTc intervals recorded in the hospital. In conclusion, in-hospital mortality was high in the study population (29%), with only 4% of patients experiencing arrhythmic deaths, all of which were attributed to secondary causes.

  7. Worldwide telemedicine services based on distributed multimedia electronic patient records by using the second generation Web server hyperwave.

    PubMed Central

    Quade, G.; Novotny, J.; Burde, B.; May, F.; Beck, L. E.; Goldschmidt, A.

    1999-01-01

    A distributed multimedia electronic patient record (EPR) is a central component of a medicine-telematics application that supports physicians working in rural areas of South America, and offers medical services to scientists in Antarctica. A Hyperwave server is used to maintain the patient record. As opposed to common web servers--and as a second generation web server--Hyperwave provides the capability of holding documents in a distributed web space without the problem of broken links. This enables physicians to browse through a patient's record by using a standard browser even if the patient's record is distributed over several servers. The patient record is basically implemented on the "Good European Health Record" (GEHR) architecture. Images Figure 1 PMID:10566494

  8. Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Whether they're using street drugs or medications, drug abusers often have trouble at school, at home, with ... a short period of time may make a drug abuser aggressive or paranoid. Although stimulant abuse might not ...

  9. Youth Alcohol Use and Dating Abuse Victimization and Perpetration: A Test of the Relationships at the Daily Level in a Sample of Pediatric Emergency Department Patients Who Use Alcohol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothman, Emily F.; Stuart, Gregory L.; Winter, Michael; Wang, Na; Bowen, Deborah J.; Bernstein, Judith; Vinci, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study retrospectively examined the daily-level associations between youth alcohol use and dating abuse (DA) victimization and perpetration for a 6-month period. Method: Timeline Followback (TLFB) interview data were collected from 397 urban emergency department patients, ages 17 to 21 years. Patients were eligible if they reported…

  10. Honoring Dental Patients' Privacy Rule Right of Access in the Context of Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Ramoni, Rachel B; Asher, Sheetal R; White, Joel M; Vaderhobli, Ram; Ogunbodede, Eyitope O; Walji, Muhammad F; Riedy, Christine; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2016-06-01

    A person's right to access his or her protected health information is a core feature of the U.S. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule. If the information is stored electronically, covered entities must be able to provide patients with some type of machine-readable, electronic copy of their data. The aim of this study was to understand how academic dental institutions execute the Privacy Rule's right of access in the context of electronic health records (EHRs). A validated electronic survey was distributed to the clinical deans of 62 U.S. dental schools during a two-month period in 2014. The response rate to the survey was 53.2% (N=33). However, three surveys were partially completed, and of the 30 completed surveys, the 24 respondents who reported using axiUm as the EHR at their dental school clinic were the ones on which the results were based (38.7% of total schools at the time). Of the responses analyzed, 86% agreed that clinical modules should be considered part of a patient's dental record, and all agreed that student teaching-related modules should not. Great variability existed among these clinical deans as to whether administrative and financial modules should be considered part of a patient record. When patients request their records, close to 50% of responding schools provide the information exclusively on paper. This study found variation among dental schools in their implementation of the Privacy Rule right of access, and although all the respondents had adopted EHRs, a large number return records in paper format.

  11. Patient Core Data Set. Standard for a longitudinal health/medical record.

    PubMed

    Renner, A L; Swart, J C

    1997-01-01

    Blue Chip Computers Company, in collaboration with Wright State University-Miami Valley College of Nursing and Health, with support from the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, Public Health Service, completed Small Business innovative Research research to design a comprehensive integrated Patient information System. The Wright State University consultants undertook the development of a Patient Core Data Set (PCDS) in response to the lack of uniform standards of minimum data sets, and lack of standards in data transfer for continuity of care. The purpose of the Patient Core Data Set is to develop a longitudinal patient health record and medical history using a common set of standard data elements with uniform definitions and coding consistent with Health Level 7 (HL7) protocol and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. The PCDS, intended for transfer across all patient-care settings, is essential information for clinicians, administrators, researchers, and health policy makers.

  12. Electronic Health Record Logs Indicate That Physicians Split Time Evenly Between Seeing Patients And Desktop Medicine.

    PubMed

    Tai-Seale, Ming; Olson, Cliff W; Li, Jinnan; Chan, Albert S; Morikawa, Criss; Durbin, Meg; Wang, Wei; Luft, Harold S

    2017-04-01

    Time spent by physicians is a key resource in health care delivery. This study used data captured by the access time stamp functionality of an electronic health record (EHR) to examine physician work effort. This is a potentially powerful, yet unobtrusive, way to study physicians' use of time. We used data on physicians' time allocation patterns captured by over thirty-one million EHR transactions in the period 2011-14 recorded by 471 primary care physicians, who collectively worked on 765,129 patients' EHRs. Our results suggest that the physicians logged an average of 3.08 hours on office visits and 3.17 hours on desktop medicine each day. Desktop medicine consists of activities such as communicating with patients through a secure patient portal, responding to patients' online requests for prescription refills or medical advice, ordering tests, sending staff messages, and reviewing test results. Over time, log records from physicians showed a decline in the time allocated to face-to-face visits, accompanied by an increase in time allocated to desktop medicine. Staffing and scheduling in the physician's office, as well as provider payment models for primary care practice, should account for these desktop medicine efforts.

  13. Can routine information from electronic patient records predict a future diagnosis of alcohol use disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Lid, Torgeir Gilje; Eide, Geir Egil; Dalen, Ingvild; Meland, Eivind

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore whether information regarding potentially alcohol-related health incidents recorded in electronic patient records might aid in earlier identification of alcohol use disorders. Design We extracted potentially alcohol-related information in electronic patient records and tested if alcohol-related diagnoses, prescriptions of codeine, tramadol, ethylmorphine, and benzodiazepines; elevated levels of gamma-glutamyl-transferase (GGT), and mean cell volume (MCV); and new sick leave certificates predicted specific alcohol use disorder. Setting Nine general practitioner surgeries with varying size and stability. Subjects Totally 20,764 patients with active electronic patient record until data gathering and with a history of at least four years without a specific alcohol use disorder after turning 18 years of age. Methods The Cox proportional hazard analysis with time-dependent covariates of potential accumulated risks over the previous four years. Main outcome measures Time from inclusion until the first specific alcohol use disorder, defined by either an alcohol specific diagnostic code or a text fragment documenting an alcohol problem. Results In the unadjusted and adjusted Cox-regression with time-dependent covariates all variables were highly significant with adjusted hazard ratios ranging from 1.25 to 3.50. Addictive drugs, sick leaves, GGT, MCV and International Classification for Primary Care version 2 (ICPC-2), and International Classification of Diseases version 10 (ICD-10) diagnoses were analyzed. Elevated GGT and MCV, ICD-10-diagnoses, and gender demonstrated the highest hazard ratios. Conclusions Many frequent health problems are potential predictors of an increased risk or vulnerability for alcohol use disorders. However, due to the modest hazard ratios, we were unable to establish a clinically useful tool. Key Points Alcohol is potentially relevant for many health problems, but current strategies for identification and intervention in

  14. IV pentazocine/methylphenidate abuse--the clinical toxicity of another Ts and blues combination.

    PubMed

    Carter, H S; Watson, W A

    1994-01-01

    Abuse of intravenous crushed Talwin (pentazocine) and Ritalin (methylphenidate) tablets has not been fully described. The objective of this study was to characterize intravenous pentazocine/methylphenidate abuse in emergency department patients and compare its clinical toxicity to pentazocine/tripelennamine. Cases of intravenous pentazocine/methylphenidate abuse presenting to the Truman Medical Center Emergency Department between August 1987 and November 1992 were identified. Information regarding patient demographics, drug abuse, chief complaints, evaluation, treatment, and disposition were obtained from the emergency department record. The clinical presentation was compared to 104 published cases of pentazocine/tripelennamine abuse. Twenty nine patients were treated 34 times. They were 32 +/- 9 years of age, 48% male, and 52% black. Patients' chief complaints were cardiovascular/pulmonary (N = 8), central nervous system (N = 7), localized infection (N = 7), gastrointestinal (N = 5), malaise (N = 5), trauma (N = 1), and gynecologic (N = 1). Treatment was primarily supportive and included supplemental oxygen and intravenous fluids. The clinical findings were similar to those reported for pentazocine/tripelennamine; 58% had the typical symptom complex of chest pain, anxiety, muscle spasm, dizziness, and nausea.

  15. Methamphetamine abuse and dentistry.

    PubMed

    Hamamoto, D T; Rhodus, N L

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine is a highly addictive powerful stimulant that increases wakefulness and physical activity and produces other effects including cardiac dysrhythmias, hypertension, hallucinations, and violent behavior. The prevalence of methamphetamine use is estimated at 35 million people worldwide and 10.4 million people in the United States. In the United States, the prevalence of methamphetamine use is beginning to decline but methamphetamine trafficking and use are still significant problems. Dental patients who abuse methamphetamine can present with poor oral hygiene, xerostomia, rampant caries ('Meth mouth'), and excessive tooth wear. Dental management of methamphetamine users requires obtaining a thorough medical history and performing a careful oral examination. The most important factor in treating the oral effects of methamphetamine is for the patient to stop using the drug. Continued abuse will make it difficult to increase salivary flow and hinder the patient's ability to improve nutrition and oral hygiene. Local anesthetics with vasoconstrictors should be used with care in patients taking methamphetamine because they may result in cardiac dysrhythmias, myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular accidents. Thus, dental management of patients who use methamphetamine can be challenging. Dentists need to be aware of the clinical presentation and medical risks presented by these patients.

  16. A multicenter, primary care-based, open-label study to identify behaviors related to prescription opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion in opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain

    PubMed Central

    Setnik, Beatrice; Roland, Carl L; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Pixton, Glenn C; Berke, Robert; Calkins, Anne; Goli, Veeraindar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the investigator assessment of patient risk for prescription opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion with patient self-reports of these activities in a population with chronic pain. Methods As a secondary objective of an open-label, multicenter, primary care-based clinical study to evaluate the success of converting opioid-experienced patients with chronic pain to morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride, risk for misuse, abuse, and diversion was assessed using two nonvalidated questionnaires: one was completed by the investigator and another by the patient (Self-Reported Misuse, Abuse, and Diversion [SR-MAD]). In addition, the validated Current Opioid Misuse Measure (COMM) test and urine drug test were used. Results Of the 684 patients assessed by the investigators, 537 returned the self-assessment, SR-MAD. Most patients were assigned by the investigator as low risk for misuse (84.2%), abuse (89.3%), and diversion (94.3%). Of the patients who returned SR-MAD, 60% indicated having taken more opioids than prescribed and 10.9% reported chewing or crushing their opioids in the past. Of the patients who completed COMM, 40.6% were deemed as having aberrant behaviors. COMM results correlated with the risk levels from the investigator assessment. One-third of patients (33.8%) had at least one abnormal urine drug test result. Conclusion More research is needed to better understand the gap between the investigator assessment of potential risk for misuse, abuse, and diversion and the actual extent of these behaviors among patients with chronic pain. PMID:26185467

  17. Understanding Emergency Department 72-Hour Revisits Among Medicaid Patients Using Electronic Healthcare Records.

    PubMed

    Ryan, James; Hendler, James; Bennett, Kristin P

    2015-12-01

    Electronic Healthcare Records (EHRs) have the potential to improve healthcare quality and to decrease costs by providing quality metrics, discovering actionable insights, and supporting decision-making to improve future outcomes. Within the United States Medicaid Program, rates of recidivism among emergency department (ED) patients serve as metrics of hospital performance that help ensure efficient and effective treatment within the ED. We analyze ED Medicaid patient data from 1,149,738 EHRs provided by a hospital over a 2-year period to understand the characteristics of the ED return visits within a 72-hour time frame. Frequent flyer patients with multiple revisits account for 47% of Medicaid patient revisits over this period. ED encounters by frequent flyer patients with prior 72-hour revisits in the last 6 months are thrice more likely to result in a readmit than those of infrequent patients. Statistical L1-logistic regression and random forest analyses reveal distinct patterns of ED usage and patient diagnoses between frequent and infrequent patient encounters, suggesting distinct opportunities for interventions to improve efficacy of care and streamline ED workflow. This work forms a foundation for future development of predictive models, which could flag patients at high risk of revisiting.

  18. Accuracy of the electronic patient record in a first opinion veterinary practice.

    PubMed

    Jones-Diette, Julie; Robinson, Natalie J; Cobb, Malcolm; Brennan, Marnie L; Dean, Rachel S

    2016-11-23

    The use of electronic patient records (EPRs) in veterinary research is becoming more common place. To date no-one has investigated how accurately and completely they represent the clinical interactions that happen between veterinary professionals, and their clients and patients. The aim of this study was to compare data extracted from consultations within EPRs with data gathered by direct observation of the same consultation. A secondary aim was to establish the inter-rater reliability of two researchers who examined the data extracted from the EPRs. A convenience sample of 36 small animal consultations undertaken by 2 veterinary surgeons (83% by one veterinary surgeon) at a mixed veterinary practice in the United Kingdom was studied. All 36 consultations were observed by a single researcher using a standardised data collection tool. The information recorded in the EPRs was extracted from the Practice Management Software (PMS) systems using a validated XML schema. The XML extracted data was then converted into the same format as the observed data by two independent researchers who examined the extracted information and recorded their findings using the same tool as for the observation. The issues discussed and any action taken relating to those problems recorded in the observed and extracted datasets were then compared. In addition the inter-rater reliability of the two researchers who examined the extracted data was assessed. Only 64.4% of the observed problems discussed during the consultations were recorded in the EPR. The type of problem, who raised the problem and at what point in the consultation the problem was raised significantly affected whether the problem was recorded or not in the EPR. Only 58.3% of observed actions taken during the consultations were recorded in the EPR and the type of action significantly affected whether it would be recorded or not. There was moderate agreement between the two researchers who examined the extracted data. This is the

  19. Methamphetamine abuse.

    PubMed

    Winslow, Bradford T; Voorhees, Kenton I; Pehl, Katherine A

    2007-10-15

    Methamphetamine is a stimulant commonly abused in many parts of the United States. Most methamphetamine users are white men 18 to 25 years of age, but the highest usage rates have been found in native Hawaiians, persons of more than one race, Native Americans, and men who have sex with men. Methamphetamine use produces a rapid, pleasurable rush followed by euphoria, heightened attention, and increased energy. Possible adverse effects include myocardial infarction, stroke, seizures, rhabdomyolysis, cardiomyopathy, psychosis, and death. Chronic methamphetamine use is associated with neurologic and psychiatric symptoms and changes in physical appearance. High-risk sexual activity and transmission of human immunodeficiency virus are also associated with methamphetamine use. Use of methamphetamine in women who are pregnant can cause placental abruption, intrauterine growth retardation, and preterm birth, and there can be adverse consequences in children exposed to the drug. Treatment of methamphetamine intoxication is primarily supportive. Treatment of methamphetamine abuse is behavioral; cognitive behavior therapy, contingency management, and the Matrix Model may be effective. Pharmacologic treatments are under investigation.

  20. A Guide for Pain Management in Low and Middle Income Communities. Managing the Risk of Opioid Abuse in Patients with Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pergolizzi, Joseph V.; Zampogna, Gianpietro; Taylor, Robert; Gonima, Edmundo; Posada, Jose; Raffa, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Most patients who present with cancer have advanced disease and often suffer moderate to severe pain. Opioid therapy can be safe and effective for use in cancer patients with pain, but there are rightful concerns about inappropriate opioid use even in the cancer population. Since cancer patients live longer than ever before in history (and survivors may have long exposure times to opioid therapy), opioid misuse among cancer patients is an important topic worthy of deeper investigation. Cancer patients with pain must be evaluated for risk factors for potential opioid misuse and aberrant drug-taking behaviors assessed. A variety of validated screening tools should be used. Of particular importance is the fact that pain in cancer patients changes frequently, whether it is related to their underlying disease (progression or remission), pain related to treatment (such as painful chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy), and concomitant pain unrelated to cancer (such as osteoarthritis, headache, or back pain). Fortunately, clinicians can use universal precautions to help reduce the risk of opioid misuse while still assuring that cancer patients get the pain therapy they need. Another important new “tool” in this regard is the emergence of abuse-deterrent opioid formulations. PMID:26973529

  1. Information on functioning found in the medical records of patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haejung; Seo, Sunghwa; Song, Jumin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To explore data on functioning in the medical records of patients with stroke by linking them to the ICF. [Subjects and Methods] The admission and discharge summaries of patients’ electronic medical records (EMRs) were investigated. Information on functioning included in the summaries were mapped into the ICF. Each of the linked categories of ICF was analyzed using frequency and percentage analysis. [Results] Thirty stroke patients’ records were evaluated. A total of 1,832 items on functioning in the EMRs were found to be linked to eighty-five categories of the ICF. The majority of those categories (52.9%) belonged to the body function domain, whereas only 8.2% were environment factors. Categories in the domain of activity and participation, and body structure were found to be 22.4% and 16.5% respectively. In each domain, the most frequently found categories were muscle power function (b730), structure of brain (s110), walking (d450), and products or substances for personal consumption (e110). [Conclusion] It was found that the admission and discharge summary in the current medical records of patients with stroke contained much noticeable information on functioning and the data on functioning may be linked to the ICF. Further study is needed to adapt ICF in Korean clinical settings. PMID:27821922

  2. The contribution of health anxiety to retrospectively-recalled emergency department visits within a sample of patients in residential substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Fergus, Thomas A; Bardeen, Joseph R; Gratz, Kim L; Fulton, Jessica J; Tull, Matthew T

    2015-01-01

    With the burden of emergency department (ED) use increasing, research examining the factors associated with ED visits among individuals who use the ED most frequently is needed. Given that substance use is strongly linked to ED visits, this study sought to examine the factors associated with greater ED visits among patients with substance use disorders (SUD). More precisely, we examined whether health anxiety incrementally contributes to the prediction of ED visits for medical care among adult patients (N = 118) in a residential substance abuse disorder treatment facility. As predicted, health anxiety was significantly positively correlated with ED visits during the past year. Furthermore, health anxiety remained a significant predictor of ED visits after accounting for sociodemographic variables, frequency of substance use, and physical health status. These results suggest that health anxiety may contribute to increased ED visits for medical care among individuals with SUD.

  3. Lack of weight recording in patients being administered narrow therapeutic index antibiotics: a prospective cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Charani, Esmita; Gharbi, Myriam; Hickson, Mary; Othman, Shokri; Alfituri, Aisha; Frost, Gary; Holmes, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Patient weight is a key measure for safe medication management and monitoring of patients. Here we report the recording of patient's body weight on admission in three hospitals in West London and its relationship with the prescription of antibiotic drugs where it is essential to have the body weight of the patient. Methods A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in three teaching hospitals in West London. Data were collected during March 2011–September 2011 and July 2012–August 2012, from adult admissions units, medical and surgical wards. Data from each ward were collected on a single day to provide a point prevalence data on weight recording. Patient medication charts, nursing and medical notes were reviewed for evidence of weight and height recording together with all the medication prescribed for the patients. An observational study collecting data on the weight recording process was conducted on two randomly selected wards to add context to the data. Results Data were collected on 1012 patients. Weight was not recorded for 46% (474) of patients. Eighty-nine patients were prescribed a narrow therapeutic antibiotic, in 39% (35/89) of these weight was not recorded for the patient. Intravenous vancomycin was the most commonly prescribed antibiotic requiring therapeutic monitoring. In total 61 patients were receiving intravenous vancomycin and of these 44% (27/61) did not have their weight recorded. In the observational study, the most frequently identified barrier to weight not being recorded was interruptions to the admission process. Conclusions Despite the clinical importance of body weight measurement it is poorly recorded in hospitalised patients, due to interruptions to the workflow and heavy staff workloads. In antibiotics a correct, recent patient weight is required for accurate dosing and to keep drugs within the narrow therapeutic index, to ensure efficacy of prescribing and reduce toxicity. PMID:25838504

  4. Healthtrak(tm): Technology Enhanced Human Interface to the Computerized Patient Record

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-07-01

    Jan 2003 THIS PAGE IS UNCLASSIFIED AD Award Number: DAMD17-02-C-0032 TITLE: HealthTrakM : Technology Enhanced Human Interface to the Computerized...Patient Record PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Azad M. Madni, Ph.D. Doctor Weiwen Lin Carla C. Madni CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Intelligent Systems Technology ...Intelligent Systems Technology , Incorporated For a period of five (5) years after completion of the project from which the data was generated, the

  5. Managing integration work in an NHS electronic patient record (EPR) project.

    PubMed

    Martin, David; Mariani, John; Rouncefield, Mark

    2007-03-01

    This article uses an ethnographic study of the design and deployment of an electronic patient record (EPR) system in the UK NHS to document some of the difficulties of integrating new IT systems with existing and developing practices, technologies and regulatory requirements. It highlights that 'integration' in this situation produces a variety of different but connected and potentially competing requirements that create difficulties in achieving artful and successful system deployment.

  6. Feasibility of utilizing a commercial eye tracker to assess electronic health record use during patient simulation.

    PubMed

    Gold, Jeffrey Allen; Stephenson, Laurel E; Gorsuch, Adriel; Parthasarathy, Keshav; Mohan, Vishnu

    2016-09-01

    Numerous reports describe unintended consequences of electronic health record implementation. Having previously described physicians' failures to recognize patient safety issues within our electronic health record simulation environment, we now report on our use of eye and screen-tracking technology to understand factors associated with poor error recognition during an intensive care unit-based electronic health record simulation. We linked performance on the simulation to standard eye and screen-tracking readouts including number of fixations, saccades, mouse clicks and screens visited. In addition, we developed an overall Composite Eye Tracking score which measured when, where and how often each safety item was viewed. For 39 participants, the Composite Eye Tracking score correlated with performance on the simulation (p = 0.004). Overall, the improved performance was associated with a pattern of rapid scanning of data manifested by increased number of screens visited (p = 0.001), mouse clicks (p = 0.03) and saccades (p = 0.004). Eye tracking can be successfully integrated into electronic health record-based simulation and provides a surrogate measure of cognitive decision making and electronic health record usability.

  7. Transforming patient care by introducing an electronic medical records initiative in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Shuaib, Waqas; Suarez, Julia Marielly; Romero, Juan David; Pamello, Carlos Dillon; Alweis, Richard; Khan, Aizaaz Ali; Shah, Syed Raza; Shahid, Hassan; PierreCharles, Serge B; Sanchez, Laura Rosemary

    2016-12-01

    The incorporation of an electronic medical record into patient care is a priority in developed countries, but faces significant obstacles for adoption in developing countries. The goal of our study was to define and assess the efficiency of a personalized intervention on village physicians' use of electronic medical records in rural community health services of underprivileged areas. Six towns were selected with two bordering local health stations from each town. One was randomly given to the intervention group and the other to the control group. A structured on-site intervention was provided to village physicians in the intervention group, for 7 months. The results showed that in the intervention group, the percentage of households with complete records increased. The percentage of clinic medical records and complete child vaccination in the intervention group also increased from 2 to 14 percent (p = <0.05) and from 10 to 23 percent (p = 0.05), respectively. Our investigation demonstrated that on-site education, supervision, and technical support directly correlate with improved use of electronic medical record. Our results report the challenges in implementing such a system and the steps being taken to enhance likelihood of sustainability.

  8. A contextual role-based access control authorization model for electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Motta, Gustavo H M B; Furuie, Sergio S

    2003-09-01

    The design of proper models for authorization and access control for electronic patient record (EPR) is essential to a wide scale use of EPR in large health organizations. In this paper, we propose a contextual role-based access control authorization model aiming to increase the patient privacy and the confidentiality of patient data, whereas being flexible enough to consider specific cases. This model regulates user's access to EPR based on organizational roles. It supports a role-tree hierarchy with authorization inheritance; positive and negative authorizations; static and dynamic separation of duties based on weak and strong role conflicts. Contextual authorizations use environmental information available at access time, like user/patient relationship, in order to decide whether a user is allowed to access an EPR resource. This enables the specification of a more flexible and precise authorization policy, where permission is granted or denied according to the right and the need of the user to carry out a particular job function.

  9. The consumer's view of the electronic health record: engaging patients in EHR adoption.

    PubMed

    Cox, Barbara; Thornewill, Judah

    2008-01-01

    The consumer/patient perspective is often forgotten as it pertains to the electronic health record. This paper focused on engaging the patient in the adoption of EHRs. The Louisville Health Information Exchange (LouHIE) recently completed an extensive research study on this topic, using several data gathering techniques to capture the interest, benefits, concerns and payment choices of the community. This article focuses on the findings of the study and the steps LouHIE will take to ensure consumer perspectives are being heard. Specific elements of the article include explaining the consumer research study and results; discussing the patient-related benefits of an EHR, the barriers, interests and the payment choices as described by the research group; and discussing action steps needed to continue engaging the consumer/patient in the adoption process.

  10. "Community vital signs": incorporating geocoded social determinants into electronic records to promote patient and population health.

    PubMed

    Bazemore, Andrew W; Cottrell, Erika K; Gold, Rachel; Hughes, Lauren S; Phillips, Robert L; Angier, Heather; Burdick, Timothy E; Carrozza, Mark A; DeVoe, Jennifer E

    2016-03-01

    Social determinants of health significantly impact morbidity and mortality; however, physicians lack ready access to this information in patient care and population management. Just as traditional vital signs give providers a biometric assessment of any patient, "community vital signs" (Community VS) can provide an aggregated overview of the social and environmental factors impacting patient health. Knowing Community VS could inform clinical recommendations for individual patients, facilitate referrals to community services, and expand understanding of factors impacting treatment adherence and health outcomes. This information could also help care teams target disease prevention initiatives and other health improvement efforts for clinic panels and populations. Given the proliferation of big data, geospatial technologies, and democratization of data, the time has come to integrate Community VS into the electronic health record (EHR). Here, the authors describe (i) historical precedent for this concept, (ii) opportunities to expand upon these historical foundations, and (iii) a novel approach to EHR integration.

  11. [Electronic patient records and teleophthalmology. Part 2: concrete projects in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Schargus, M; Michelson, G; Grehn, F

    2011-07-01

    Electronic storage of patient-related data will replace paper-based patient records in the near future. Because of the high visualization needed in ophthalmology integrated electronic data storage and usage will be very useful. Chronic diseases like glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy would benefit from long-term data storage and analysis. Unfortunately there are nearly no widely accepted systems available providing these options. Another important point is the simplification of existing diagnostic procedures and nomenclature on an international level. Increasing mobility of patients requires a better portability of existing medical examination data between different physicians. This is the only way to provide continuously high levels of quality in patient care and to simultaneously reduce costs and prevent unnecessary secondary examinations.

  12. A technique to stabilize record bases for Gothic arch tracings in patients with implant-retained complete dentures.

    PubMed

    Raigrodski, A J; Sadan, A; Carruth, P L

    1998-12-01

    Clinicians have long expressed concern about the accuracy of the Gothic arch tracing for recording centric relation in edentulous patients. With the use of dental implants to assist in retaining complete dentures, the problem of inaccurate recordings, made for patients without natural teeth, can be significantly reduced. This article presents a technique that uses healing abutments to stabilize the record bases so that an accurate Gothic arch tracing can be made.

  13. Electronic medical records and communication with patients and other clinicians: are we talking less?

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ann S; Cohen, Genna R; Grossman, Joy M

    2010-04-01

    Commercial electronic medical records (EMRs) both help and hinder physician interpersonal communication--real-time, face-to-face or phone conversations--with patients and other clinicians, according to a new Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) study based on in-depth interviews with clinicians in 26 physician practices. EMRs assist real-time communication with patients during office visits, primarily through immediate access to patient information, allowing clinicians to talk with patients rather than search for information from paper records. For some clinicians, however, aspects of EMRs pose a distraction during visits. Moreover, some indicated that clinicians may rely on EMRs for information gathering and transfer at the expense of real-time communication with patients and other clinicians. Given time pressures already present in many physician practices, EMR and office-work flow modifications could help ensure that EMRs advance care without compromising interpersonal communication. In particular, policies promoting EMR adoption should consider incorporating communication-skills training for medical trainees and clinicians using EMRs.

  14. Word search performance for diagnoses of equine surgical colics in free-text electronic patient records.

    PubMed

    Estberg, L; Case, J T; Walters, R F; Cardiff, R D; Galuppo, L D

    1998-02-27

    The objectives of the current project were to: (1) identify limitations of search sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV) for free-text surgical diagnoses included in electronic patient records maintained at the University of California, Davis, Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital (VMTH), (2) develop procedural or programmable recommendations for removing these limitations, and (3) provide guidelines for effective search strategies for users performing aggregate searches using the VMTH clinical information system. Search sensitivity corresponds to detection sensitivity (the capacity of a search term to 'identify' a relevant document) and search PPV indicates the proportion of retrieved documents that are relevant. All horses submitted to the VMTH for a gastrointestinal (GI) disorder requiring surgical intervention in 1995 were identified using procedure codes for billing purposes and stored in the electronic patient record. Patient records and surgical reports were reviewed for causes of GI disorders, and variation in naming of these disorders. Key word searches were performed for four GI disorders, and search performance was evaluated by estimating search sensitivity and PPV. Search sensitivity ranged from 33% to 98%, and PPV ranged from 2% to 74%. The procedural recommendation that would likely have the greatest influence on minimizing these search limitations would be more uniform naming of GI disorders. This would free searchers from having to anticipate all of the exact word combinations that could be used in the relevant documents, and also minimize retrieval of irrelevant documents.

  15. Emergency department evaluation of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Leetch, Aaron N; Woolridge, Dale

    2013-08-01

    Child abuse presents commonly to emergency departments. Emergency providers are confronted with medical, social, and legal dilemmas with each case. A solid understanding of the definitions and risk factors of victims and perpetrators aids in identifying abuse cases. Forensic examination should be performed only after the child is medically stable. Emergency providers are mandatory reporters of a reasonable suspicion of abuse. The role of the emergency provider is to identify abuse, facilitate a thorough investigation, treat medical needs, protect the patient, provide an unbiased medical consultation to law enforcement, and to provide an ethical testimony if called to court.

  16. Comparison of Conventional Mercury Thermometer and Continuous TherCom® Temperature Recording in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dakappa, Pradeepa H; Bhat, Gopalkrishna K; Bolumbu, Ganaraja; Rao, Sathish B; Adappa, Sushma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Detection of accurate body temperature fluctu-ations in hospitalized patients is crucial for appropriate clinical decision-making. The accuracy and reliability of body temperature assessment may significantly affect the proper treatment. Aim To compare the conventional and continuous body temperature recordings in hospitalized patients. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out at a tertiary care centre and study included 55 patients aged between 18-65 years with a history of fever admitted to a tertiary care hospital. A noninvasive continuous temperature recording was done using TherCom® device through tympanic temperature probe at tympanic site at one-minute intervals for 24 hours. The conventional temperatures were recorded in the axilla using mercury thermometer at specific time intervals at 12:00 noon, 8:00 PM and 5:00 AM. Peak temperature differences between continuous and conventional methods were compared by applying Independent sample t-test. Intra class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) test was performed to assess the reliability between two temperature-monitoring methods. A p<0.05 was considered as significant. Results The average peak temperature by non-invasive continuous recording method was 39.07°C ±0.76°C while it was 37.55°C ±0.62°C by the conventional method. A significant temperature difference of 1.52°C [p<0.001;95% CI(1.26-1.78)] was observed between continuous and conventional temperature methods. Intra class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) between continuous and conventional temperature readings at 12:00 noon was α= 0.540, which had moderate reliability. The corresponding coefficients at 8:00 PM and 5:00 AM were α=0.425 and 0.435, respectively, which had poor reliability. Conclusion The conventional recording of temperature is routinely practiced and does not reflect the true temperature fluctuations. However, the continuous non-invasive temperature recording is simple, inexpensive and a better tool

  17. Abuse and misuse of antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth A; Sullivan, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    Background Rates of prescription drug abuse have reached epidemic proportions. Large-scale epidemiologic surveys of this under-recognized clinical problem have not included antidepressants despite their contribution to morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this review is to look specifically at the misuse of antidepressants and how this behavior may fit into the growing crisis of nonmedical use of prescription drugs. Methods We conducted a comprehensive search on PubMed, Medline, and PsycINFO using the search terms “antidepressant”, “abuse”, “misuse”, “nonmedical use”, “dependence”, and “addiction”, as well as individual antidepressant classes (eg, “SSRI”) and individual antidepressants (eg, “fluoxetine”) in various combinations, to identify articles of antidepressant misuse and abuse. Results A small but growing literature on the misuse and abuse of antidepressants consists largely of case reports. Most cases of antidepressant abuse have occurred in individuals with comorbid substance use and mood disorders. The most commonly reported motivation for abuse is to achieve a psychostimulant-like effect. Antidepressants are abused at high doses and via a variety of routes of administration (eg, intranasal, intravenous). Negative consequences vary based upon antidepressant class and pharmacology, but these have included seizures, confusion, and psychotic-like symptoms. Conclusion The majority of individuals prescribed antidepressants do not misuse the medication. However, certain classes of antidepressants do carry abuse potential. Vulnerable patient populations include those with a history of substance abuse and those in controlled environments. Warning signs include the presence of aberrant behaviors. Physicians should include antidepressants when screening for risky prescription medication use. When antidepressant misuse is detected, a thoughtful treatment plan, including referral to an addiction specialist, should be developed and

  18. Towards the Prevention of Alcohol Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Facy, FranCoise; Rabaud, Myriam

    2006-01-01

    Mortality resulting from alcohol abuse in young French people is too high in spite of prevention campaigns for road safety in particular. There are problems in identifying alcohol abuse in young people in preventive medicine or alcohol care services. This study was carried out in alcohol centres; data from patients under 25 are analysed and…

  19. Outcome and Cost of Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irazuzta, Jose E.; McJunkin, James E.; Danadian, Kapriel; Arnold, Forest; Zhang, Jianliang

    1997-01-01

    A study compared the health care costs, severity of illness (SI), and mortality of child abuse cases (n=13) with other admissions (n=924) in a pediatric intensive care unit. The child abuse patients were younger, had a higher SI, had greater hospitalization charges, and a higher mortality rate than others. (Author/CR)

  20. Adolescent Drug Abuse: Etiological and Treatment Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amini, Fariboz; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Issues involved in treating adolescent drug abusers and literature describing abuser personality traits are examined. The Youth Service at Langley Porter Institute and the problems encountered and solutions attempted there are discussed. The importance of residential as opposed to outpatient treatment and honesty in staff-patient relationships is…

  1. Incidence and types of preventable adverse events in elderly patients: population based review of medical records

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Eric J; Brennan, Troyen A

    2000-01-01

    Objective To determine the incidence and types of preventable adverse events in elderly patients. Design Review of random sample of medical records in two stage process by nurses and physicians to detect adverse events. Two study investigators then judged preventability. Setting Hospitals in US states of Utah and Colorado, excluding psychiatric and Veterans Administration hospitals. Subjects 15 000 hospitalised patients discharged in 1992. Main outcome measures Incidence of preventable adverse events (number of preventable events per 100 discharges) in elderly patients (⩾65 years old) and non-elderly patients (16-64 years). Results When results were extrapolated to represent all discharges in 1992 in both states, non-elderly patients had 8901 adverse events (incidence 2.80% (SE 0.18%)) compared with 7419 (5.29% (0.37%)) among elderly patients (P=0.001). Non-elderly patients had 5038 preventable adverse events (incidence 1.58% (0.14%)) compared with 4134 (2.95% (0.28%)) in elderly patients (P=0.001). Elderly patients had a higher incidence of preventable events related to medical procedures (such as thoracentesis, cardiac catheterisation) (0.69% (0.14%) v 0.13% (0.04%)), preventable adverse drug events (0.63% (0.14%) v 0.17% (0.05%)), and preventable falls (0.10% (0.06%) v 0.01% (0.02%)). In multivariate analyses, adjusted for comorbid illnesses and case mix, age was not an independent predictor of preventable adverse events. Conclusions Preventable adverse events were more common among elderly patients, probably because of the clinical complexity of their care rather than age based discrimination. Preventable adverse drug events, events related to medical procedures, and falls were especially common in elderly patients and should be targets for efforts to prevent errors. PMID:10720355

  2. Self-reported, interview-assisted diet records underreport energy intake in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Bryan B; Bross, Rachelle; Morrison, Gillian; Zadeh, Kalantar; Kopple, Joel D

    2015-01-01

    Objective Studies suggest that maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients report dietary energy intakes (EI) that are lower than what is actually ingested. Data supporting this conclusion have several important limitations. The present study introduces a novel approach of assessing underreporting of EI in MHD patients. Design Comparisons of EI of free-living MHD patients determined from food records to their measured energy needs. Setting Metabolic research ward. Subjects 13 clinically stable MHD patients with unchanging weights whose EI was assessed by dietitian-interview-assisted 3-day food records. Intervention EI was compared to 1) patients’ resting energy expenditure (REE), measured by indirect calorimetry, and estimated total energy expenditure (TEE), and 2) patients’ dietary energy requirements (DER) measured while patients underwent nitrogen balance studies and consumed a constant energy diet in a research ward for a mean duration of 89.5 days. DER was calculated as the actual EI during the research study corrected for changes in body fat and lean body mass measured by Dual X-Ray Absorptiometry (DEXA). Main Outcome Measure Underreporting of energy intake was determined by an EI:REE ratio <1.27 and an EI:TEE ratio or EI:DEE ratio <1.0. Results Seven of the 13 MHD patients studied were male. Patient’s ages were 47.7±SD 9.7 years; BMI averaged 25.4±2.8 kg/m2, and dialysis vintage was 53.3±37.1 months. The EI:REE ratio (1.03±0.23) was significantly less than the cut-off value for under-reporting of 1.27 (p=0.001); 12 of 13 patients had EI:REE ratios <1.27. The mean EI:TEE ratio was significantly less than the cut-off value of 1.0 (0.73±0.17, p<0.0001), and 12 MHD patients had EI:TEE ratios <1.0. The EI:DER ratio was also less than 1.0 (0.83±0.25, p=0.012), and 10 MHD had EI:DER ratios <1.0. Conclusion Dietitian interview-assisted diet records by MHD patients substantially underestimate the patient’s dietary energy intake. PMID:25682334

  3. A review of approaches to identifying patient phenotype cohorts using electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Shivade, Chaitanya; Raghavan, Preethi; Fosler-Lussier, Eric; Embi, Peter J; Elhadad, Noemie; Johnson, Stephen B; Lai, Albert M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarize literature describing approaches aimed at automatically identifying patients with a common phenotype. Materials and methods We performed a review of studies describing systems or reporting techniques developed for identifying cohorts of patients with specific phenotypes. Every full text article published in (1) Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, (2) Journal of Biomedical Informatics, (3) Proceedings of the Annual American Medical Informatics Association Symposium, and (4) Proceedings of Clinical Research Informatics Conference within the past 3 years was assessed for inclusion in the review. Only articles using automated techniques were included. Results Ninety-seven articles met our inclusion criteria. Forty-six used natural language processing (NLP)-based techniques, 24 described rule-based systems, 41 used statistical analyses, data mining, or machine learning techniques, while 22 described hybrid systems. Nine articles described the architecture of large-scale systems developed for determining cohort eligibility of patients. Discussion We observe that there is a rise in the number of studies associated with cohort identification using electronic medical records. Statistical analyses or machine learning, followed by NLP techniques, are gaining popularity over the years in comparison with rule-based systems. Conclusions There are a variety of approaches for classifying patients into a particular phenotype. Different techniques and data sources are used, and good performance is reported on datasets at respective institutions. However, no system makes comprehensive use of electronic medical records addressing all of their known weaknesses. PMID:24201027

  4. Signal averaging technique for noninvasive recording of late potentials in patients with coronary artery disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abboud, S.; Blatt, C. M.; Lown, B.; Graboys, T. B.; Sadeh, D.; Cohen, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced non invasive signal averaging technique was used to detect late potentials in two groups of patients: Group A (24 patients) with coronary artery disease (CAD) and without sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT) and Group B (8 patients) with CAD and sustained VT. Recorded analog data were digitized and aligned using a cross correlation function with fast Fourier transform schema, averaged and band pass filtered between 60 and 200 Hz with a non-recursive digital filter. Averaged filtered waveforms were analyzed by computer program for 3 parameters: (1) filtered QRS (fQRS) duration (2) interval between the peak of the R wave peak and the end of fQRS (R-LP) (3) RMS value of last 40 msec of fQRS (RMS). Significant change was found between Groups A and B in fQRS (101 -/+ 13 msec vs 123 -/+ 15 msec; p < .0005) and in R-LP vs 52 -/+ 11 msec vs 71-/+18 msec, p <.002). We conclude that (1) the use of a cross correlation triggering method and non-recursive digital filter enables a reliable recording of late potentials from the body surface; (2) fQRS and R-LP durations are sensitive indicators of CAD patients susceptible to VT.

  5. Embedded-structure template for electronic records affects patient note quality and management for emergency head injury patients: An observational pre and post comparison quality improvement study.

    PubMed

    Sonoo, Tomohiro; Iwai, Satoshi; Inokuchi, Ryota; Gunshin, Masataka; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu

    2016-10-01

    Along with article-based checklists, structured template recording systems have been reported as useful to create more accurate clinical recording, but their contributions to the improvement of the quality of patient care have been controversial. An emergency department (ED) must manage many patients in a short time. Therefore, such a template might be especially useful, but few ED-based studies have examined such systems.A structured template produced according to widely used head injury guidelines was used by ED residents for head injury patients. The study was conducted by comparing each 6-month period before and after launching the system. The quality of the patient notes and factors recorded in the patient notes to support the head computed tomography (CT) performance were evaluated by medical students blinded to patient information.The subject patients were 188 and 177 in respective periods. The numbers of patient notes categorized as "CT indication cannot be determined" were significantly lower in the postintervention term (18% → 9.0%), which represents the patient note quality improvement. No difference was found in the rates of CT performance or CT skip without clearly recorded CT indication in the patient notes.The structured template functioned as a checklist to support residents in writing more appropriately recorded patient notes in the ED head injury patients. Such a template customized to each clinical condition can facilitate standardized patient management and can improve patient safety in the ED.

  6. Confirmation of childhood abuse in child and adolescent cases of multiple personality disorder and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified.

    PubMed

    Coons, P M

    1994-08-01

    The diagnostic validity of multiple personality disorder (MPD) and its association to trauma have been questioned because corroboration of child abuse in studies of patients with MPD is scant. The purpose of this study was to determine on a retrospective basis whether external corroboration of child abuse could be found in a group of patients with MPD and dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. A group of child and adolescent psychiatric inpatients and outpatients was chosen because of the extensive number of collateral records collected on them in a tertiary care setting. This group was also chosen because of the intense interest paid by child protective services and courts to child abuse during the past 15 years. This retrospective chart review confirmed child abuse in eight of nine patients with MPD and in all 12 cases of dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. This study provides further evidence of the association of severe dissociative disorders with trauma, particularly child abuse. Future studies should be prospective and blinded to avoid the possibility of investigator bias, and should include a control group for comparison of base rate of child abuse.

  7. Mono- versus polydrug abuse patterns among publicly funded clients.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Satish; Sell, Marie A; Relyea, George

    2007-11-08

    To examine patterns of mono- versus polydrug abuse, data were obtained from intake records of 69,891 admissions to publicly funded treatment programs in Tennessee between 1998 and 2004. While descriptive statistics were employed to report frequency and patterns of mono- and polydrug abuse by demographic variables and by study years, bivariate logistic regression was applied to assess the probability of being a mono- or polydrug abuser for a number of demographic variables. The researchers found that during the study period 51.3% of admissions reported monodrug abuse and 48.7% reported polydrug abuse. Alcohol, cocaine, and marijuana were the most commonly abused substances, both alone and in combination. Odds ratio favored polydrug abuse for all but one drug category-other drugs. Gender did not affect drug abuse patterns; however, admissions for African Americans and those living in urban areas exhibited higher probabilities of polydrug abuse. Age group also appeared to affect drug abuse patterns, with higher odds of monodrug abuse among minors and adults over 45 years old. The discernable prevalence of polydrug abuse suggests a need for developing effective prevention strategies and treatment plans specific to polydrug abuse.

  8. An approach to assessing elder abuse and neglect in the dental office.

    PubMed

    Osei, Anthony D

    2009-07-01

    Elder abuse and neglect is a complex phenomenon with no clear markers identified as both reliable and valid in the dental operatory. Applying the concepts and definition of abuse and attention to risk factors for abuse could lead the clinician, as the head of the care team to situations where abuse of an elder could be suspected. Once abuse is suspected, direct questioning and comprehensive assessment of an elders' physical, emotional, and emotional state could be recorded as part of social history in their dental records. A multidisciplinary team approach is encouraged to combat elder abuse. In Texas, state statutes on suspected abuse mandate reporting to appropriate Adult Protective Services within your region with stipulated penalties for failure to report suspected abuse or neglect. Elder abuse hotlines are (800) 252-5400 or (512) 834-3784 (elder abuse domestic or community).

  9. Perceptions of Abuse in the Long-Term Care Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, D.; And Others

    Although elder abuse has received much attention in recent years, little is known about long-term care staff perceptions of active and passive abuse. Health care professionals (N=72) responsible for direct care of patients within a 275-bed skilled nursing facility completed questionnaires on elder abuse. Responses were from physicians (N=6),…

  10. Sexual, Physical, Verbal/Emotional Abuse and Unexplained Chest Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eslick, Guy D.; Koloski, Natasha A.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Approximately one third of patients with non cardiac chest pain (NCCP) report a history of abuse, however no data exists on the prevalence of abuse among people with unexplained chest pain in the general population. We aimed to determine if there is a relationship between childhood sexual, physical, emotional abuse and unexplained…

  11. Integrating electronic health record genotype and phenotype datasets to transform patient care

    PubMed Central

    Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Joshua C.

    2015-01-01

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009 mandates the development and implementation of electronic health record (EHR) systems across the country. While a primary goal is to improve the care of individual patients, EHRs are also key enabling resources for a vision of individualized (or personalized or precision) medicine: the aggregation of multiple EHRs within or across healthcare systems should allow discovery of patient subsets that have unusual and definable clinical trajectories that deviate importantly from the expected response in a “typical” patient. The spectrum of such personalized care can then extend from prevention to choice of medication to intensity or nature of follow up. PMID:26667791

  12. 42 CFR 2.15 - Incompetent and deceased patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Incompetent and deceased patients. 2.15 Section 2... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.15 Incompetent and deceased patients. (a) Incompetent patients other than minors—(1) Adjudication of incompetence. In the case of...

  13. 42 CFR 2.15 - Incompetent and deceased patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Incompetent and deceased patients. 2.15 Section 2... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.15 Incompetent and deceased patients. (a) Incompetent patients other than minors—(1) Adjudication of incompetence. In the case of...

  14. 42 CFR 2.15 - Incompetent and deceased patients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Incompetent and deceased patients. 2.15 Section 2... CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.15 Incompetent and deceased patients. (a) Incompetent patients other than minors—(1) Adjudication of incompetence. In the case of...

  15. Analysis of free text in electronic health records for identification of cancer patient trajectories.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kasper; Soguero-Ruiz, Cristina; Oyvind Mikalsen, Karl; Lindsetmo, Rolv-Ole; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene; Girolami, Mark; Olav Skrovseth, Stein; Magne Augestad, Knut

    2017-04-07

    With an aging patient population and increasing complexity in patient disease trajectories, physicians are often met with complex patient histories from which clinical decisions must be made. Due to the increasing rate of adverse events and hospitals facing financial penalties for readmission, there has never been a greater need to enforce evidence-led medical decision-making using available health care data. In the present work, we studied a cohort of 7,741 patients, of whom 4,080 were diagnosed with cancer, surgically treated at a University Hospital in the years 2004-2012. We have developed a methodology that allows disease trajectories of the cancer patients to be estimated from free text in electronic health records (EHRs). By using these disease trajectories, we predict 80% of patient events ahead in time. By control of confounders from 8326 quantified events, we identified 557 events that constitute high subsequent risks (risk > 20%), including six events for cancer and seven events for metastasis. We believe that the presented methodology and findings could be used to improve clinical decision support and personalize trajectories, thereby decreasing adverse events and optimizing cancer treatment.

  16. Analysis of free text in electronic health records for identification of cancer patient trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kasper; Soguero-Ruiz, Cristina; Oyvind Mikalsen, Karl; Lindsetmo, Rolv-Ole; Kouskoumvekaki, Irene; Girolami, Mark; Olav Skrovseth, Stein; Magne Augestad, Knut

    2017-01-01

    With an aging patient population and increasing complexity in patient disease trajectories, physicians are often met with complex patient histories from which clinical decisions must be made. Due to the increasing rate of adverse events and hospitals facing financial penalties for readmission, there has never been a greater need to enforce evidence-led medical decision-making using available health care data. In the present work, we studied a cohort of 7,741 patients, of whom 4,080 were diagnosed with cancer, surgically treated at a University Hospital in the years 2004–2012. We have developed a methodology that allows disease trajectories of the cancer patients to be estimated from free text in electronic health records (EHRs). By using these disease trajectories, we predict 80% of patient events ahead in time. By control of confounders from 8326 quantified events, we identified 557 events that constitute high subsequent risks (risk > 20%), including six events for cancer and seven events for metastasis. We believe that the presented methodology and findings could be used to improve clinical decision support and personalize trajectories, thereby decreasing adverse events and optimizing cancer treatment. PMID:28387314

  17. Incorporating Patient Perspectives into the Personal Health Record: Implications for Care and Caring

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Peggy J; Howard, Shalon M; Bentley, Douglas R; Seol, Yoon-Ho; Sodomka, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Electronic personal health records (ePHRs) can potentially maximize access and coordination of health information and improve patient/clinician collaboration, patient self-management, and health outcomes. Most ePHRs are designed by vendors, physicians, and other proprietary partners and have neglected the patient perspective. This study sought to incorporate patient feedback into an existing ePHR system. Patients participated in a semistructured interview after one to two weeks of using an ePHR. Interviews addressed strengths and weaknesses of the PHR. Two iterations of interviews, referred to as Wave 1 and Wave 2, occurred sequentially. An iterative process of theme identification was used, and three theme categories (User, System Acceptance, and Technology) were identified in the two waves. Seven technology themes with 40 specific questions were identified and were rank ordered by importance and feasibility, and 20 suggestions were subsequently implemented into the ePHR. Thus, incorporating patient feedback on specific utilities and functionality into an existing ePHR is possible. PMID:21063546

  18. Prolonged manometric recordings of oesophagus and lower oesophageal sphincter in achalasia patients

    PubMed Central

    van Herwaarden, M A; Samsom, M; Smout, A

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Conventional short term manometry is a valuable tool in the diagnosis of achalasia but the technique may fail to detect intermittent motor events. The aim of this study was to investigate the pattern of lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS) and oesophageal pressures during prolonged recording in patients with achalasia.
METHODS—Eleven patients with idiopathic achalasia were studied. Prolonged combined oesophageal pH and manometric recordings of the pharynx, LOS, and stomach were performed using a pH glass electrode and a multiple lumen assembly incorporating a Dent sleeve connected to a portable water perfused manometric system.
RESULTS—LOS pressure varied during the day. Postprandial LOS pressures were lower than those recorded preprandially (1.2 v 1.8 kPa; p=0.005) and basal LOS pressures were significantly higher during phase III of the migrating motor complex than during the subsequent phase I (3.3 v 1.8 kPa; p=0.028). Complete LOS relaxations were occasionally observed in seven patients (0.48/h). Complete LOS relaxations were longer in duration than incomplete LOS relaxations (10.8 v 2.8 s; p=0.01) and 57% of complete relaxations fulfilled the criteria of a transient LOS relaxation (TLOSR). Complete LOS relaxations were associated with oesophageal pressure waves with higher amplitudes and longer durations. In addition, a higher proportion of these oesophageal pressure waves were spontaneous (55.6% v 0%; p<0.02) and multipeaked (72.7% v 0%). During prolonged manometry, high amplitude oesophageal pressure waves (>10 kPa) were recorded in six patients and retrograde oesophageal pressure waves in four, phenomena which were not observed during short term manometry.
CONCLUSION—In contrast with short term stationary manometry, prolonged manometry in achalasia patients revealed the occurrence of complete LOS relaxations, TLOSRs, variations in LOS pressure associated with a meal or phase III, and high amplitude and retrograde

  19. One positive impact of health care reform to physicians: the computer-based patient record.

    PubMed

    England, S P

    1993-11-01

    The health care industry is an information-dependent business that will require a new generation of health information systems if successful health care reform is to occur. We critically need integrated clinical management information systems to support the physician and related clinicians at the direct care level, which in turn will have linkages with secondary users of health information such as health payors, regulators, and researchers. The economic dependence of health care industry on the CPR cannot be underestimated, says Jeffrey Ritter. He sees the U.S. health industry as about to enter a bold new age where our records are electronic, our computers are interconnected, and our money is nothing but pulses running across the telephone lines. Hence the United States is now in an age of electronic commerce. Clinical systems reform must begin with the community-based patient chart, which is located in the physician's office, the hospital, and other related health care provider offices. A community-based CPR and CPR system that integrates all providers within a managed care network is the most logical step since all health information begins with the creation of a patient record. Once a community-based CPR system is in place, the physician and his or her clinical associates will have a common patient record upon which all direct providers have access to input and record patient information. Once a community-level CPR system is in place with a community provider network, each physician will have available health information and data processing capability that will finally provide real savings in professional time and effort. Lost patient charts will no longer be a problem. Data input and storage of health information would occur electronically via transcripted text, voice, and document imaging. All electronic clinical information, voice, and graphics could be recalled at any time and transmitted to any terminal location within the health provider network. Hence

  20. Tilidine abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Trojan, A; Beil, H W

    1978-11-01

    Tilidine (Valoron) is a new strong analgesic which was introduced into the market in West Germany in 1970. In February 1978 tilidine was placed under the regulations of the German Narcotics Act because it had rapidly become an easily acquired substitute for opiates on the drug scene. Cases have become known where tilidine dependence developed during the treatment of pain in patients without any preceding addiction to other drugs. The relevant literature on tilidine is reviewed in regard to pharmacological, epidemiological and clinical aspects of tilidine dependence and abuse.

  1. Case-based reasoning using electronic health records efficiently identifies eligible patients for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Miotto, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a cost-effective, case-based reasoning framework for clinical research eligibility screening by only reusing the electronic health records (EHRs) of minimal enrolled participants to represent the target patient for each trial under consideration. Materials and Methods The EHR data—specifically diagnosis, medications, laboratory results, and clinical notes—of known clinical trial participants were aggregated to profile the “target patient” for a trial, which was used to discover new eligible patients for that trial. The EHR data of unseen patients were matched to this “target patient” to determine their relevance to the trial; the higher the relevance, the more likely the patient was eligible. Relevance scores were a weighted linear combination of cosine similarities computed over individual EHR data types. For evaluation, we identified 262 participants of 13 diversified clinical trials conducted at Columbia University as our gold standard. We ran a 2-fold cross validation with half of the participants used for training and the other half used for testing along with other 30 000 patients selected at random from our clinical database. We performed binary classification and ranking experiments. Results The overall area under the ROC curve for classification was 0.95, enabling the highlight of eligible patients with good precision. Ranking showed satisfactory results especially at the top of the recommended list, with each trial having at least one eligible patient in the top five positions. Conclusions This relevance-based method can potentially be used to identify eligible patients for clinical trials by processing patient EHR data alone without parsing free-text eligibility criteria, and shows promise of efficient “case-based reasoning” modeled only on minimal trial participants. PMID:25769682

  2. Integration of healthcare information: from enterprise PACS to patient centered multimedia health record.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Enrique; Plazzotta, Fernando; Campos, Fernando; Kaminker, Diego; Cancio, Alfredo; Aguilera Díaz, Jerónimo; Luna, Daniel; Seehaus, Alberto; Carcía Mónaco, Ricardo; de Quirós, Fernán González Bernaldo

    2010-01-01

    Every single piece of healthcare information should be fully integrated and transparent within the electronic health record. The Italian Hospital of Buenos Aires initiated the project Multimedia Health Record with the goal to achieve this integration while maintaining a holistic view of current structure of the systems of the Hospital, where the axis remains are the patient and longitudinal history, commencing with section Computed Tomography. Was implemented DICOM standard for communication and image storage and bought a PACS. It was necessary adapt our generic reporting system for live up to the commercial RIS. The Computerized Tomography (CT) Scanners of our hospital were easily integrated into the DICOM network and all the CT Scans generated by our radiology service were stored in the PACS, reported using the Structured Reporting System (we installed diagnostic terminals equipped with 3 monitors) and displayed in the EHR at any point of HIBA's healthcare network.

  3. Hybridity as a process of technology's 'translation': customizing a national Electronic Patient Record.

    PubMed

    Petrakaki, Dimitra; Klecun, Ela

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores how national Electronic Patient Record (EPR) systems are customized in local settings and, in particular, how the context of their origin plays out with the context of their use. It shows how representations of healthcare organizations and of local clinical practice are built into EPR systems within a complex context whereby different stakeholder groups negotiate to produce an EPR package that aims to meet both local and generic needs. The paper draws from research into the implementation of the National Care Record Service, a part of the National Programme for Information Technology (NPfIT), in the English National Health Service (NHS). The paper makes two arguments. First, customization of national EPR is a distributed process that involves cycles of 'translation', which span across geographical, cultural and professional boundaries. Second, 'translation' is an inherently political process during which hybrid technology gets consolidated. The paper concludes, that hybrid technology opens up possibilities for standardization of healthcare.

  4. Proximal scalloped custom-made Relay® stent graft in chronic type B dissection: endovascular repair in a drug abuser patient

    PubMed Central

    Szeberin, Zoltán; Nemes, Balázs; Csobay-Novák, Csaba; Mihály, Zsuzsa; Entz, László

    2016-01-01

    The best solution for enlarging chronic type B aortic dissection is not known. Hybrid surgical and endovascular procedures offer a reliable solution in such circumstances, but technically complex stent-graft designs are sometimes needed when the treatment segment of the aorta presents anatomical challenges. We report a case of a proximally scalloped custom-made stent-graft implantation following left subclavian artery transposition in a formerly cocaine-abuser patient. The one-month follow-up computed tomography angiography showed a proximal endoleak (type Ia) which was successfully solved by coil embolization. Proximally scalloped stent grafts offer a reliable solution in complex aortic dissections involving the supra-aortic branches. PMID:28250982

  5. Prescription drug abuse in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Martin, Caren McHenry

    2008-12-01

    The increased use of prescription drugs has brought pain relief too many and often improved the quality of life of elderly patients. But the increase in use and availability of prescription medications-especially controlled substances-brings with it an increased potential for abuse. Studies have shown that intentional abuse of prescription drugs is increasing among all age groups. As the number of persons 65 years of age and older skyrockets with the aging of the baby boomers, experts predict that prescription drug abuse among the elderly also will rise significantly. Efforts to increase awareness of drug abuse among elderly patients, caregivers, and health care practitioners, as well as research into how best to prevent and treat the elderly drug abuser, will be necessary to thwart what could become a significant public health problem.

  6. Childhood sexual abuse and health risk behaviors in patients with HIV and a history of injection drug use.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Sarah M; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Hendriksen, Ellen S; Bullis, Jacqueline R; Stein, Michael; Safren, Steven A

    2011-10-01

    Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is related to poorer health outcomes, associated with increased risk for HIV acquisition, and prevalent among HIV risk groups. Links between CSA and health behavior are an important health concern. We examined the relationship between CSA and transmission risk behavior and medication adherence in 119 HIV-infected individuals with an injection drug use history. 47% reported CSA, with no gender difference. Individuals who experienced CSA were more likely to report sexual HIV transmission risk behavior in the past 6 months, more sexual partners, use of heroin in the past 30 days, and worse adherence to HIV medication than those who did not. These findings confirm that rates of CSA are high in this population, and suggest that a history of CSA may place people managing both HIV and opioid dependence at increased risk for HIV transmission, poor adherence to medication, and vulnerability to substance use relapse.

  7. Electronic Health Records: An Enhanced Security Paradigm to Preserve Patient's Privacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamanig, Daniel; Stingl, Christian

    In recent years, demographic change and increasing treatment costs demand the adoption of more cost efficient, highly qualitative and integrated health care processes. The rapid growth and availability of the Internet facilitate the development of eHealth services and especially of electronic health records (EHRs) which are promising solutions to meet the aforementioned requirements. Considering actual web-based EHR systems, patient-centric and patient moderated approaches are widely deployed. Besides, there is an emerging market of so called personal health record platforms, e.g. Google Health. Both concepts provide a central and web-based access to highly sensitive medical data. Additionally, the fact that these systems may be hosted by not fully trustworthy providers necessitates to thoroughly consider privacy issues. In this paper we define security and privacy objectives that play an important role in context of web-based EHRs. Furthermore, we discuss deployed solutions as well as concepts proposed in the literature with respect to this objectives and point out several weaknesses. Finally, we introduce a system which overcomes the drawbacks of existing solutions by considering an holistic approach to preserve patient's privacy and discuss the applied methods.

  8. Network Analysis of Foramen Ovale Electrode Recordings in Drug-resistant Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-García, Ancor; Vega-Zelaya, Lorena; Pastor, Jesús; Torres, Cristina V.; Sola, Rafael G.; Ortega, Guillermo J.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 30% of epilepsy patients are refractory to antiepileptic drugs. In these cases, surgery is the only alternative to eliminate/control seizures. However, a significant minority of patients continues to exhibit post-operative seizures, even in those cases in which the suspected source of seizures has been correctly localized and resected. The protocol presented here combines a clinical procedure routinely employed during the pre-operative evaluation of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients with a novel technique for network analysis. The method allows for the evaluation of the temporal evolution of mesial network parameters. The bilateral insertion of foramen ovale electrodes (FOE) into the ambient cistern simultaneously records electrocortical activity at several mesial areas in the temporal lobe. Furthermore, network methodology applied to the recorded time series tracks the temporal evolution of the mesial networks both interictally and during the seizures. In this way, the presented protocol offers a unique way to visualize and quantify measures that considers the relationships between several mesial areas instead of a single area. PMID:28060326

  9. Advanced patient records: some ethical and legal considerations touching medical information space.

    PubMed

    Kluge, E H

    1993-04-01

    The application of advanced computer-based information technology to patient records presents an opportunity for expanding the informational resource base that is available to health-care providers at all levels. Consequently, it has the potential for fundamentally restructuring the ethics of the physician/patient relationship and the ethos of contemporary health-care delivery. At the same time, the technology raises several important ethical problems. This paper explores some of these implications. It suggests that the fundamental ethical issue at stake in these developments is the status of the electronic record which functions as the analog of the health-care consumer in health-care decision making. Matters such as control and patient dignity are implicated. Other important ethical issues requiring solution include data ownership, data liability, informed consent to use and retrieval, security and access. The paper suggests that the ethical problems that arise cannot be solved in piecemeal fashion and on a purely national basis. They should be addressed in a coordinated international fashion and receive appropriate legal expression in the relevant countries and be incorporated into appropriate codes of ethics.

  10. How patients want to engage with their personal health record: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, John William; Krist, Alexander H; Longo, Daniel R; Kuzel, Anton J; Woolf, Steven H

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess factors related to use and non-use of a sophisticated interactive preventive health record (IPHR) designed to promote uptake of 18 recommended clinical preventive services; little is known about how patients want to use or be engaged by such advanced information tools. Design Descriptive and interpretive qualitative analysis of transcripts and field notes from focus groups of the IPHR users and of patients who were invited but did not use the IPHR (non-users). Grounded theory techniques were then applied via an editing approach for key emergent themes. Setting Primary care patients in eight practices of the Virginia Ambulatory Care Outcomes Research Network (ACORN). Participants Three focus groups involved a total of 14 IPHR users and two groups of non-users totalled 14 participants. Outcomes/results For themes identified (relevance, trust and functionality) participants indicated that endorsement and use of the IPHR by their personal clinician was vital. In particular, participants’ comments linked the IPHR use to: (1) integrating the IPHR into current care, (2) promoting effective patient–clinician encounters and communication and (3) their confidence in the accuracy, security and privacy of the information. Conclusions In addition to patients’ stated desires for advanced functionality and information accuracy and privacy, successful adoption of the IPHRs by primary care patients depends on such technology's relevance, and on its promotion via integration with primary care practices’ processes and the patient–clinician relationship. Accordingly, models of technological success and adoption, when applied to primary care, may need to include the patient–clinician relationship and practice workflow. These findings are important for healthcare providers, the information technology industry and policymakers who share an interest in encouraging patients to use personal health records. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT

  11. Characterizing the sexual abuse experiences of young adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Negriff, Sonya; Schneiderman, Janet U.; Smith, Caitlin; Schreyer, Justine K.; Trickett, Penelope K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to: (a) compare the demographics of maltreated youth initially labeled as sexually abused by the Department of Child and Family Services (DCFS) to maltreated youth classified as sexually abused using current and past case records, (b) identify differences in sexual abuse experiences and types of perpetrators between boys and girls, and (c) provide a detailed description of the sexual abuse experiences for boys and girls. Participants were youth ages 9–12 years old with a recent maltreatment allegation. The Maltreatment Case Record Abstraction Instrument (MCRAI) was used to code child welfare records of 303 maltreated youth of whom 60 experienced sexual abuse. Perpetrators were classified by gender into four categories (biological parent, parental figure, relative, and unrelated) and type of abuse was classified into three categories (penetrative, contact without penetration, and non-contact). Using Chi-Square tests, perpetrator categories and sexual abuse types were compared by child gender for significant differences. Only 23 (38.3%) of the 60 sexually abused youth were labeled as sexually abused in the most recent DCFS report when they entered the study. About three-quarters of the sexually abused youth experienced non-penetrative physical contact, 40% experienced penetration, and 15% experienced sexual abuse without physical contact. Most youth (91.7%) were victimized by a male, and 21.7% were abused by a female. Youth experienced a large range of sexual abuse experiences, the details of which may be important for exploration of consequences of childhood sexual abuse. PMID:24095179

  12. Use of digital patient photographs and electronic medical record data as diagnostic tools in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Koichi; Suzuki, Muneoh; Araki, Kenji

    2012-10-01

    An electronic medical record (EMR) system was introduced to the University of Miyazaki Hospital, in Japan, in 2006. This hospital is the only one in Japan to store digital photographs of patients within EMRs. In this paper, we report on the utility of these digital photographs for disease diagnosis. Digital photographs of patients were taken at the time of hospitalization, and have been used for patient identification by medical staff. More than 20,000 digital photographs have been saved, along with examination data and medical history classified by disease, since the introduction of EMR. In the first part of the present study, we analyzed the facial cheek color of patients using photographs taken at the time of hospitalization in relation to diagnoses in six disease categories that were considered to lead to characteristic facial skin characteristics. We verified the presence or absence of a characteristic color for each disease category. Next, we focused on four diseases, Analysis of the facial skin color of 1268 patients found the same patterns of characteristic color. Overall, we found significant differences in complexion according to disease type, based on the analysis of color from digital photos and other EMR information. We propose that color analysis data should become an additional item of information stored in EMRs.

  13. Toward best practice: leveraging the electronic patient record as a clinical data warehouse.

    PubMed

    Ledbetter, C S; Morgan, M W

    2001-01-01

    Automating clinical and administrative processes via an electronic patient record (EPR) gives clinicians the point-of-care tools they need to deliver better patient care. However, to improve clinical practice as a whole and then evaluate it, healthcare must go beyond basic automation and convert EPR data into aggregated, multidimensional information. Unfortunately, few EPR systems have the established, powerful analytical clinical data warehouses (CDWs) required for this conversion. This article describes how an organization can support best practice by leveraging a CDW that is fully integrated into its EPR and clinical decision support (CDS) system. The article (1) discusses the requirements for comprehensive CDS, including on-line analytical processing (OLAP) of data at both transactional and aggregate levels, (2) suggests that the transactional data acquired by an OLTP EPR system must be remodeled to support retrospective, population-based, aggregate analysis of those data, and (3) concludes that this aggregate analysis is best provided by a separate CDW system.

  14. The place of SGML and HTML in building electronic patient records.

    PubMed

    Pitty, D; Gordon, C; Reeves, P; Capey, A; Vieyra, P; Rickards, T

    1997-01-01

    The authors are concerned that, although popular, SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language) is only one approach to capturing, storing, viewing and exchanging healthcare information and does not provide a suitable paradigm for solving most of the problems associated with paper based patient record systems. Although a discussion of the relative merits of SGML, HTML (HyperText Markup Language) may be interesting, we feel such a discussion is avoiding the real issues associated with the most appropriate way to model, represent, and store electronic patient information in order to solve healthcare problems, and therefore the medical informatics community should firstly concern itself with these issues. The paper substantiates this viewpoint and concludes with some suggestions of how progress can be made.

  15. Performance Evaluation of JPEG 2000 for Specialized Electronic Patient Record Exchanges.

    PubMed

    Puentes, J; Garcia Lorenzo, D

    2005-01-01

    Distant diagnostic services require the exchange of medical images and medical data in the form of specialized patient records. Given that multiple images for one patient are often used by these services, considerable demands are placed on support applications implementation, because of the processing and transmission infrastructure limitations found on isolated rural areas. This work proposes to evaluate the performance of medical image compression for such constrained scenario, based on the JPEG 2000 compression standard, in order to improve distant diagnostic services usability. Separate groups of 1 to 15 high resolution gray scale and color cytology images of fixed dimensions were compressed in one file, applying different possible bitrates, tile size and code-block size, for six discrete wavelet decomposition levels. Experimental results show that the adjustment of these parameters, allows compressing the worst data load case (135 MB with moderate lossy compression) in around two minutes, on an average current PC.

  16. Moving towards an electronic patient record: a survey to assess the needs of community family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Strasberg, H. R.; Tudiver, F.; Holbrook, A. M.; Geiger, G.; Keshavjee, K. K.; Troyan, S.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the needs of community family physicians regarding electronic patient records (EPRs). DESIGN: A comprehensive survey was sent to 101 community family physicians in Hamilton, Ontario, who had expressed an interest in EPRs. RESULTS: 46 physicians responded (46%). 87% felt that an EPR would result in their providing better patient care. A wide variety of items were deemed to be important to be included on the EPR "front page". Desired functionality emphasized labs, medications, consultation, hospital follow-up and health maintenance. Family physicians tended to prefer templates to other data entry methods such as typing and dictating. Respondents were more willing to view information from the hospital than to let the hospital view information from their own offices. CONCLUSION: This survey provided useful information on the perceived EPR needs of community-based family physicians. It will be repeated post-computerization. PMID:9929216

  17. Are cardiac transplant patients more likely to have periodontitis? A case record study.

    PubMed

    Lessem, Jan; Drisko, Connie; Greenwell, Henry; Persson, Rutger; Newman, Hubert; Smart, Graham; Hopkins, Lydia; Parameshwar, Jayan; Fishbein, Daniel; Partridge, C; Bhat, G; Goldsmith, J

    2002-07-01

    In several large epidemiological studies chronic periodontitis has been implicated as an additional risk factor, independent of other risk factors, for the development of ischaemic heart disease. The underlying mechanism is thought to be a localised infection giving rise to an inflammatory host response, and some experimental data agree with this hypothesis. Recently, however, some studies have questioned the post dated relationship between the two diseases. The current case-record study was undertaken to evaluate the prevalence of chronic periodontitis and the severity of such periodontal disease in a heart transplant population, assuming the latter represented a relatively severely compromised cardiovascular patient population. The study demonstrated that 76% of the patients had various degrees of periodontal disease prior to undergoing a heart transplant. Thus, it is possible that a relationship between cardiovascular disease and periodontal disease exists, but further, large intervention studies will be needed to confirm such a conclusion.

  18. Time-domain scanning optical mammography: I. Recording and assessment of mammograms of 154 patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosenick, Dirk; Moesta, K. Thomas; Möller, Michael; Mucke, Jörg; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Gebauer, Bernd; Stroszczynski, Christian; Wassermann, Bernhard; Schlag, Peter M.; Rinneberg, Herbert

    2005-06-01

    Using a triple wavelength (670 nm, 785 nm, 843/884 nm) scanning laser-pulse mammograph we recorded craniocaudal and mediolateral projection optical mammograms of 154 patients, suspected of having breast cancer. From distributions of times of flight of photons recorded at typically 1000-2000 scan positions, optical mammograms were derived displaying (inverse) photon counts in selected time windows, absorption and reduced scattering coefficients or total haemoglobin concentration and blood oxygen saturation. Optical mammograms were analysed by comparing them with x-ray and MR mammograms, including results of histopathology, attributing a subjective visibility score to each tumour assessed. Out of 102 histologically confirmed tumours, 72 tumours were detected retrospectively in both optical projection mammograms, in addition 20 cases in one projection only, whereas 10 tumours were not detectable in any projection. Tumour contrast and contrast-to-noise ratios of mammograms of the same breast, but derived from measured DTOFs by various methods were quantitatively compared. On average, inverse photon counts in selected time windows, including total photon counts, provide highest tumour contrast and contrast-to-noise ratios. Based on the results of the present study we developed a multi-wavelength, multi-projection scanning time-domain optical mammograph with improved spectral and spatial (angular) sampling, that allows us to record entire mammograms simultaneously at various offsets between the transmitting fibre and receiving fibre bundle and provides first results for illustration.

  19. An ontology-based approach facilitating unified querying of biosignals and patient records.

    PubMed

    Kokkinaki, Alexandra; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Maglaveras, Nicos

    2008-01-01

    Electrocardiography serves as the gold standard for the noninvasive diagnosis of heart disease. Comparison and review between current and previous ECG recordings and clinical data may considerably leverage the physician's diagnostic accuracy. However, clinical data and ECGs are located in heterogeneous and disparate computer systems. On top of this, the plethora of different and mainly proprietary formats for ECG recording and storing, impedes the efforts towards aggregation of medical information. In this paper we propose an approach towards the seamless integration of and access to disparate and heterogeneous sources of medical information, through a semantically enhanced platform called SCP-ECG Integrated Access (SEIA). SEIA provides the means to contextualize SCP-ECG biosignals, by semantically structuring the clinical information they contain. The semantic annotation procedure is enhanced with further processing of the biosignal, including waveform recognition and feature extraction, for automatic or semiautomatic insertion of annotations where missing. Diagnosis and evaluation of a patient's clinical condition is facilitated through integrated temporal comparison of the medical information derived from successive ECGs, in terms of their features and annotations, along with clinical data and measurements originating from the Electronic Medical Record (EMR).

  20. Abuse potential of dronabinol (Marinol).

    PubMed

    Calhoun, S R; Galloway, G P; Smith, D E

    1998-01-01

    Dronabinol is an oral form of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol indicated for treatment of anorexia associated with weight loss in individuals with AIDS, and nausea and vomiting associated with cancer chemotherapy. The authors reviewed the literature and conducted surveys and interviews among addiction medicine specialists, oncologists, researchers in cancer and HIV treatment, and law enforcement personnel to determine the abuse liability of dronabinol. There is no evidence of abuse or diversion of dronabinol. Available prescription tracking data indicates that use remains within the therapeutic dosage range over time. Healthcare professionals have detected no indication of "scrip-chasing" or "doctor-shopping" among the patients for whom they have prescribed dronabinol. Cannabis-dependent populations, such as those treated in our Clinic and seen by the addiction medicine specialists we interviewed, have demonstrated no interest in abuse of dronabinol. There is no street market for dronabinol, and no evidence of any diversion of dronabinol for sale as a street drug. Furthermore, dronabinol does not provide effects that are considered desirable in a drug of abuse. The onset of action is slow and gradual, it is at most only weakly reinforcing, and the overwhelming majority of reports of users indicate that its effects are dysphoric and unappealing. This profile of effects gives dronabinol a very low abuse potential.

  1. Exploring the Relationships between the Electronic Health Record System Components and Patient Outcomes in an Acute Hospital Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiggley, Shirley L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the electronic health record system components and patient outcomes in an acute hospital setting, given that the current presidential administration has earmarked nearly $50 billion to the implementation of the electronic health record. The relationship between the…

  2. Three models of child abuse consultations: A qualitative study of inpatient child abuse consultation notes.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Heather T; Campbell, Kristine A

    2015-05-01

    Child abuse pediatricians have multiple roles in caring for abused children, including prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and, when needed, expert legal opinion. The child physical abuse consultation differs from the traditional medical consultation in that it has medical, investigative and legal audiences, all of whom have different information needs. How child abuse pediatricians approach their cases and how they document their initial inpatient consultations that will be used by such a diverse audience is currently unexplored. We used content analysis to examine 37 child physical abuse consultation notes from a national sample of child abuse pediatricians in order to understand physicians' approaches to these consultations. Three commonly used models of child physical abuse consultation were identified in the data that we named the base model, the investigative model, and the family-dynamic model. While model types overlap, each is distinguished by key features including the approach used to gather information, the information recorded, and the language used in documentation. The base model most closely mirrors the traditional medical approach; the investigative model concentrates on triangulation of sources of information; and, the family-dynamic model concentrates on physician perceptions of family relationships. The three models of consultations for child physical abuse mirror the areas of child abuse pediatrics: diagnostic, forensic and therapeutic. These models are considered in relationship to best practice from other medical specialties with forensic components.

  3. Detecting elder abuse and neglect: assessment and intervention.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Robert M; Polson, Michol

    2014-03-15

    Elder mistreatment includes intentional or neglectful acts by a caregiver or trusted person that harm a vulnerable older person. It can occur in a variety of settings. One out of 10 older adults experiences some form of abuse or neglect by a caregiver each year, and the incidence is expected to increase. Although the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force found insufficient evidence that screening for elder abuse reduces harm, physicians in most states have professional and legal obligations to appropriately diagnose, report, and refer persons who have been abused. Screening or systematic inquiry can detect abuse. A detailed medical evaluation of patients suspected of being abused is necessary because medical and psychiatric conditions can mimic abuse. Signs of abuse may include specific patterns of injury. Interviewing patients and caregivers separately is helpful. Evaluation for possible abuse should include assessment of cognitive function. The Elder Abuse Suspicion Index is validated to screen for abuse in cognitively intact patients. A more detailed two-step process is used to screen patients with cognitive impairment. The National Center on Elder Abuse website provides detailed, state-specific reporting and resource information for family physicians.

  4. Expert systems, security and quality assurance: implications of patient records as data-space.

    PubMed

    Kluge, E H

    2001-01-01

    The concept of data-space is fruitful in trying to understand the ethical rights and duties that surround the treatment of patient records. However, it also provides a solution to three apparently unconnected problems: the construction of expert diagnostic systems, the development of an internal security element within the sphere of permitted data-access for health care professionals, and the development of a professional quality assurance mechanism. This paper presents a model of how these diverse aims may be achieved. It does so by developing the notion of the logical form of data within a data-space and by showing how the path taken by a health care professional through a profession-relative data-space can provide checks for the security, quality and appropriateness of the path itself. The result is important in that it provides an integrated method for information specialists to meet their fiduciary obligations towards the patients whose records are in their care, and towards the institutions that employ them.

  5. Using text-mining techniques in electronic patient records to identify ADRs from medicine use.

    PubMed

    Warrer, Pernille; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Juhl-Jensen, Lars; Aagaard, Lise

    2012-05-01

    This literature review included studies that use text-mining techniques in narrative documents stored in electronic patient records (EPRs) to investigate ADRs. We searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts without restrictions from origin until July 2011. We included empirically based studies on text mining of electronic patient records (EPRs) that focused on detecting ADRs, excluding those that investigated adverse events not related to medicine use. We extracted information on study populations, EPR data sources, frequencies and types of the identified ADRs, medicines associated with ADRs, text-mining algorithms used and their performance. Seven studies, all from the United States, were eligible for inclusion in the review. Studies were published from 2001, the majority between 2009 and 2010. Text-mining techniques varied over time from simple free text searching of outpatient visit notes and inpatient discharge summaries to more advanced techniques involving natural language processing (NLP) of inpatient discharge summaries. Performance appeared to increase with the use of NLP, although many ADRs were still missed. Due to differences in study design and populations, various types of ADRs were identified and thus we could not make comparisons across studies. The review underscores the feasibility and potential of text mining to investigate narrative documents in EPRs for ADRs. However, more empirical studies are needed to evaluate whether text mining of EPRs can be used systematically to collect new information about ADRs.

  6. Towards iconic language for patient records, drug monographs, guidelines and medical search engines.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Duclos, Catherine; Hamek, Saliha; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Kerdelhué, Gaetan; Darmoni, Stefan; Favre, Madeleine; Falcoff, Hector; Simon, Christian; Pereira, Suzanne; Serrot, Elisabeth; Mitouard, Thierry; Hardouin, Etienne; Kergosien, Yannick; Venot, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Practicing physicians have limited time for consulting medical knowledge and records. We have previously shown that using icons instead of text to present drug monographs may allow contraindications and adverse effects to be identified more rapidly and more accurately. These findings were based on the use of an iconic language designed for drug knowledge, providing icons for many medical concepts, including diseases, antecedents, drug classes and tests. In this paper, we describe a new project aimed at extending this iconic language, and exploring the possible applications of these icons in medicine. Based on evaluators' comments, focus groups of physicians and opinions of academic, industrial and associative partners, we propose iconic applications related to patient records, for example summarizing patient conditions, searching for specific clinical documents and helping to code structured data. Other applications involve the presentation of clinical practice guidelines and improving the interface of medical search engines. These new applications could use the same iconic language that was designed for drug knowledge, with a few additional items that respect the logic of the language.

  7. Engaging in job-related activities is associated with reductions in employment problems and improvements in quality of life in substance abusing patients.

    PubMed

    Petry, Nancy M; Andrade, Leonardo F; Rash, Carla J; Cherniack, Martin G

    2014-03-01

    Reinforcement-based interventions are highly efficacious in the treatment of substance use disorders, and their benefits can extend to other areas of functioning as well. In particular, reinforcing participation in job-related activities may be useful for improving employment outcomes, which in turn may enhance quality of life and decrease substance use. These secondary analyses compared substance abusing patients randomized with reinforcement interventions (N = 185) who selected and completed two or more job-related activities during treatment versus those who did not. Patients who completed two or more job-related activities during treatment had significantly greater reductions in employment-related problems and improvements in quality of life than those who completed only one or no job-related activities, even after controlling for baseline differences that may impact employment outcomes. Further, patients who completed employment activities remained in treatment significantly longer and achieved greater durations of abstinence than those who did not. These data suggest that reinforcing job-attainment activities may have broad beneficial effects. Reinforcement interventions should be considered for enhancing employment skills training acquisition more generally.

  8. Child Abuse Services at a Children's Hospital in Cape Town, South Africa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Argent, Andrew C.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    All child abuse-related patients (n=503) seen at 1 Cape Town (South Africa) hospital over a 1-year period were reviewed. Abuse was confirmed in 389 cases (160 physical abuse and 229 sexual abuse). Most (81 percent) of the young children were seen by residents with minimal pediatric training. Lack of staff speaking Xhosa (spoken by 134 of the…

  9. 45 CFR 96.126 - Capacity of treatment for intravenous substance abusers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., for the purposes of treating injecting drug abusers, establish a waiting list that includes a unique patient identifier for each injecting drug abuser seeking treatment including those receiving interim... awareness among injecting drug abusers about the relationship between injecting drug abuse and...

  10. [Documentation of electronic patient records (EPRS) in German general practices: a telephone survey].

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Regine; Himmel, Wolfgang; Böckmann, Harro; Hummers-Pradier, Eva; Kochen, Michael M; Niebling, Wilhelm; Rogausch, Anja; Sigle, Jörg; Wetzel, Dirk; Scheidt-Nave, Christa

    2005-01-01

    In Germany, use and contents of EPRs are largely unknown and expected to be highly variable, due to missing standards. We conducted a telephone survey to describe and compare computer documentation habits in general practices. Specifically, we were interested in: (1) the type of medical data recorded; and (2) which factors influence the extent to which doctors used the EPR while seeing their patients. The sampling frame consisted of family physicians participating in a general practice research project: 32% (145/452) of family physicians in the district of Göttingen, Lower Saxony, and 63% (52/83) of physicians from a quality assurance network of family practices in the district of Freiburg, Baden-Württemberg. With the exception of two practices in Göttingen, all practices (n = 165 of 167) took part in this survey. Diagnoses, digital codes for service fees, and prescriptions were computerized in nearly all practices, although doctors were significantly more involved in Freiburg than in Göttingen. Clinical symptoms and findings were recorded in 80% of Freiburg and 52% of Göttingen practices (p = 0.008). Overall, in 74% of Freiburg and 51% of Göttingen practices, the physicians opened the EPR while seeing patients (p = 0.022). Nearly half of the Göttingen practices (49%) and 24% of the Freiburg practices (p < 0.05) entered digital codes for service fees and diagnoses on paper before entering them electronically. In multivariate models adjusting for sex, target group and training specialty, internet access in the office was independently predictive of 'EPR-activity' (OR: 2.23; 95%-confidence interval: 1.12-4.43). There seems to be room for improvement in terms of degree and intensity of recording of clinically-relevant data. Technical interest, i.e., internet access in the office, seems to enhance electronic documentation activities.

  11. vMon-mobile provides wireless connection to the electronic patient record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Pedro P., Jr.; Rebelo, Marina; Pilon, Paulo E.; Gutierrez, Marco A.; Tachinardi, Umberto

    2002-05-01

    This work presents the development of a set of tools to help doctors to continuously monitor critical patients. Real-time monitoring signals are displayed via a Web Based Electronic Patient Record (Web-EPR) developed at the Heart Institute. Any computer on the Hospital's Intranet can access the Web-EPR that will open a browser plug-in called vMon. Recently vMon was adapted to wireless mobile devices providing the same real-time visualization of vital signals of its desktop counterpart. The monitoring network communicates with the hospital network through a gateway using HL7 messages and has the ability to export waveforms in real time using the multicast protocol through an API library. A dedicated ActiveX component was built that establishes the streaming of the biomedical signals under monitoring and displays them on an Internet Explorer 5.x browser. The mobile version - called vMon-mobile - will parse the browser window and deliver it to a PDA device connected to a local area network. The result is a virtual monitor presenting real-time data on a mobile device. All parameters and signals acquired from the moment the patient is connected to the monitors are stored for a few days. The most clinically relevant information is added to patient's EPR.

  12. Decoding of motor intentions from epidural ECoG recordings in severely paralyzed chronic stroke patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spüler, M.; Walter, A.; Ramos-Murguialday, A.; Naros, G.; Birbaumer, N.; Gharabaghi, A.; Rosenstiel, W.; Bogdan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Objective. Recently, there have been several approaches to utilize a brain-computer interface (BCI) for rehabilitation with stroke patients or as an assistive device for the paralyzed. In this study we investigated whether up to seven different hand movement intentions can be decoded from epidural electrocorticography (ECoG) in chronic stroke patients. Approach. In a screening session we recorded epidural ECoG data over the ipsilesional motor cortex from four chronic stroke patients who had no residual hand movement. Data was analyzed offline using a support vector machine (SVM) to decode different movement intentions. Main results. We showed that up to seven hand movement intentions can be decoded with an average accuracy of 61% (chance level 15.6%). When reducing the number of classes, average accuracies up to 88% can be achieved for decoding three different movement intentions. Significance. The findings suggest that ipsilesional epidural ECoG can be used as a viable control signal for BCI-driven neuroprosthesis. Although patients showed no sign of residual hand movement, brain activity at the ipsilesional motor cortex still shows enough intention-related activity to decode different movement intentions with sufficient accuracy.

  13. Magnetocardiograms of patients with left ventricular overloading recorded with a second-derivative SQUID gradiometer.

    PubMed

    Fujino, K; Sumi, M; Saito, K; Murakami, M; Higuchi, T; Nakaya, Y; Mori, H

    1984-07-01

    Magnetocardiograms (MCGs) were recorded by means of a second-derivative SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) magnetometer in 60 normal subjects and 95 patients with left ventricular overloading to determine the clinical value of the MCG. In patients with left ventricular overloading, the Q or S wave was increased in the upper anterior part of the thorax, and the R wave was increased in the left lower part of the thorax, indicating increased leftward force due to left ventricular overloading. For detection of left ventricular hypertrophy or dilatation from echocardiographic measurements, the sensitivity and specificity of the MCG were similar to those of the standard ECG, or slightly better. In patients with left ventricular systolic overloading, the Q wave was decreased in the lower anterior part of the thorax, indicating a decreased septal vector. Inversion of the T wave was seen more frequently in the MCGs than in the ECGs of patients with left ventricular overloading, suggesting that the MCG is useful for detecting early abnormalities of repolarization. These results suggest that the MCG may provide information that is difficult to obtain from the standard 12-lead ECG.

  14. Caveats of bisphosphonate abuse

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Sanjay; Agashe, Vikas M; Shetty, Vivek; Mohrir, Ganesh; Moonot, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bisphosphonates (BPs) are the common drugs used for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Short term benefits of the BPs are well known. However, there are concerns regarding their long term use. The aim of the study was to analyze the association between atypical femoral fractures and BP misuse/abuse as well as study the outcome of management of these fractures. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of a prospectively studied patients who presented with atypical femoral fractures between January 2010 and August 2012 and were followed up upto June 2014. The cohort consisted of nine female patients (12 fractures) with an average age of 71 years (range 58-85 years). Analysis was done for the indications, duration of BP use, configuration of associated fractures and method of treatment. Results: The mean duration of BP use was 6.6 years (range 4-10 years). BP treatment was initiated without sufficient indication and continued without proper review and followup in most cases. Most patients did not followup and continued to consume BPs without any review by the doctors. All patients had prodromal thigh pain of various duration, which was inadequately investigated and managed before the presentation. Two cases with an incomplete fracture and no thigh pain were managed successfully with conservative treatment. The rest were treated by surgery with intramedullary nailing. The average union time was longer and two fractures went into nonunion which required further surgical intervention. Conclusion: Atypical femoral fractures appear to be strongly related to abuse of BPs. Great care is to be exercised at initiation as well as the continuation of BP therapy, and regular review is required. There is a need for improved awareness among physicians about the possibility of such fractures, and interpretation of thigh pain and radiological findings, especially if the patient has been on BPs therapy. Internal fixation for complete fractures and for

  15. Security of the distributed electronic patient record: a case-based approach to identifying policy issues.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J G

    2000-11-01

    The growth of managed care and integrated delivery systems has created a new commodity, health information and the technology that it requires. Surveys by Deloitte and Touche indicate that over half of the hospitals in the US are in the process of implementing electronic patient record (EPR) systems. The National Research Council has established that industry spends as much as $15 billion on information technology (IT), an amount that is expanding by 20% per year. The importance of collecting, electronically storing, and using the information is undisputed. This information is needed by consumers to make informed choices; by physicians to provide appropriate quality clinical care: and by health plans to assess outcomes, control costs and monitor quality. The collection, storage and communication of a large variety of personal patient data, however, present a major dilemma. How can we provide the data required by the new forms of health care delivery and at the same time protect the personal privacy of patients? Recent debates concerning medical privacy legislation, software regulation, and telemedicine suggest that this dilemma will not be easily resolved. The problem is systemic and arises out of the routine use and flow of information throughout the health industry. Health care information is primarily transferred among authorized users. Not only is the information used for patient care and financial reimbursement, secondary users of the information include medical, nursing, and allied health education, research, social services, public health, regulation, litigation, and commercial purposes such as the development of new medical technology and marketing. The main threats to privacy and confidentiality arise from within the institutions that provide patient care as well as institutions that have access to patient data for secondary purposes.

  16. The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association protocol, auricular acupuncture to support patients with substance abuse and behavioral health disorders: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Stuyt, Elizabeth B; Voyles, Claudia A

    2016-01-01

    The National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA)-standardized 3- to 5-point ear acupuncture protocol, born of a community-minded response to turbulent times not unlike today, has evolved into the most widely implemented acupuncture-assisted protocol, not only for substance abuse, but also for broad behavioral health applications. This evolution happened despite inconsistent research support. This review highlights the history of the protocol and the research that followed its development. Promising, early randomized-controlled trials were followed by a mixed field of positive and negative studies that may serve as a whole to prove that NADA, despite its apparent simplicity, is neither a reductive nor an independent treatment, and the need to refine the research approaches. Particularly focusing on the last decade and its array of trials that elucidate aspects of NADA application and effects, the authors recommend that, going forward, research continues to explore the comparison of the NADA protocol added to accepted treatments to those treatments alone, recognizing that it is not a stand-alone procedure but a psychosocial intervention that affects the whole person and can augment outcomes from other treatment modalities. PMID:27994492

  17. Distal and proximal factors related to aggression severity among patients in substance abuse treatment: family history, alcohol use and expectancies.

    PubMed

    Chermack, Stephen T; Wryobeck, John M; Walton, Maureen A; Blow, Frederic C

    2006-05-01

    This study examined the relationships among distal (paternal and maternal family history of alcohol problems and violence) and proximal (general alcohol use, acute use associated with conflict incidents, alcohol-aggression expectancies) factors and physical aggression severity among 125 men and 125 women recruited from substance abuse treatment. Paternal alcohol problem history (PA) was related to alcohol-aggression expectancies, but no family history factors were related to general or acute alcohol use. Separate analyses examining predictors of aggression were conducted, one with general alcohol use and one with acute alcohol use. In both analyses, alcohol use and the maternal violence (MV) by PA interaction were significant. Specifically, MV was associated with aggression severity for those with a history of PA. The general alcohol use model also revealed significant alcohol by expectancy and MV by gender interactions. The findings suggest that expectancies are not the primary mediator of the alcohol-aggression relationship, alcohol use measurement issues may impact whether expectancies are observed to moderate the alcohol-aggression relationship, and that both maternal and paternal family history factors appear to impact aggression severity.

  18. Leveraging electronic healthcare record standards and semantic web technologies for the identification of patient cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Breis, Jesualdo Tomás; Maldonado, José Alberto; Marcos, Mar; Legaz-García, María del Carmen; Moner, David; Torres-Sospedra, Joaquín; Esteban-Gil, Angel; Martínez-Salvador, Begoña; Robles, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    Background The secondary use of electronic healthcare records (EHRs) often requires the identification of patient cohorts. In this context, an important problem is the heterogeneity of clinical data sources, which can be overcome with the combined use of standardized information models, virtual health records, and semantic technologies, since each of them contributes to solving aspects related to the semantic interoperability of EHR data. Objective To develop methods allowing for a direct use of EHR data for the identification of patient cohorts leveraging current EHR standards and semantic web technologies. Materials and methods We propose to take advantage of the best features of working with EHR standards and ontologies. Our proposal is based on our previous results and experience working with both technological infrastructures. Our main principle is to perform each activity at the abstraction level with the most appropriate technology available. This means that part of the processing will be performed using archetypes (ie, data level) and the rest using ontologies (ie, knowledge level). Our approach will start working with EHR data in proprietary format, which will be first normalized and elaborated using EHR standards and then transformed into a semantic representation, which will be exploited by automated reasoning. Results We have applied our approach to protocols for colorectal cancer screening. The results comprise the archetypes, ontologies, and datasets developed for the standardization and semantic analysis of EHR data. Anonymized real data have been used and the patients have been successfully classified by the risk of developing colorectal cancer. Conclusions This work provides new insights in how archetypes and ontologies can be effectively combined for EHR-driven phenotyping. The methodological approach can be applied to other problems provided that suitable archetypes, ontologies, and classification rules can be designed. PMID:23934950

  19. Giving rheumatology patients online home access to their electronic medical record (EMR): advantages, drawbacks and preconditions according to care providers.

    PubMed

    van der Vaart, Rosalie; Drossaert, Constance H C; Taal, Erik; van de Laar, Mart A F J

    2013-09-01

    Technology enables patients home access to their electronic medical record (EMR), via a patient portal. This study aims to analyse (dis)advantages, preconditions and suitable content for this service, according to rheumatology health professionals. A two-phase policy Delphi study was conducted. First, interviews were performed with nurses/nurse practitioners (n = 9) and rheumatologists (n = 13). Subsequently, collected responses were quantified, using a questionnaire among the interviewees. The following advantages of patient home access to the EMR were reported: (1) enhancement of patient participation in treatment, (2) increased knowledge and self-management, (3) improved patient-provider interaction, (4) increased patient safety, and (5) better communication with others. Foreseen disadvantages of the service included: (1) problems with interpretation of data, (2) extra workload, (3) a change in consultation content, and (4) disturbing the patient-provider interaction. Also, the following preconditions emerged from the data: (1) optimal security, (2) no extra record, but a patient-accessible section, (3) no access to clinical notes, and (4) a lag time on the release of lab data. Most respondents reported that data on diagnosis, medication, treatment plan and consultations could be released to patients. On releasing more complex data, such as bodily examinations, lab results and radiological images the opinions differed considerably. Providing patients home access to their medical record might be a valuable next step into patient empowerment and in service towards the patient, provided that security is optimal and content and presentation of data are carefully considered.

  20. How to Handle Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Happening en español Cómo manejar el abuso Grown-ups are usually there to help and ... to understand the different types of abuse: physical, sexual, verbal or emotional, and neglect. Physical abuse: Physical ...

  1. Students and Drug Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todays Educ, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Introduction to "Students and Drug Abuse, prepared by the Public Information Branch and Center for Studies of Narcotic and Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, in cooperation with the staff of Today's Education.

  2. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes ... groups. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

  3. Prescription Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... from what the doctor prescribed, it is called prescription drug abuse. It could be Taking a medicine that was prescribed for someone else Taking a ... at higher doses or when taken with other medicines. NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse

  4. Child abuse - physical

    MedlinePlus

    ... way Uses harsh discipline Was abused as a child Alcohol or drug problems Emotional problems or mental illness ... Physical abuse - children References Berkowitz CD, Stewart ST. Child maltreatment. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. ...

  5. Elder Abuse among African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tauriac, Jesse J.; Scruggs, Natoschia

    2006-01-01

    Perceptions of extreme, moderate, and mild forms of elder abuse among African-American women (n=25) and men (n=10) were examined. African-American respondents emphasized physical abuse when giving examples of extremely abusive behavior. Along with physical abuse, verbal abuse was the most frequently identified form of abuse, and was significantly…

  6. Child Abuse: Educator's Responsibilities. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Office of the Attorney General, Sacramento. Crime Prevention Center.

    This document presents the educator with a guide to child abuse. A section defining child abuse examines the issues of physical abuse, physical neglect, sexual abuse, and emotional maltreatment. Areas discussed for these types of abuse include abuse indicators, location of injury, history, behavioral indicators, and types of injury. Incestuous and…

  7. Elder abuse: a call to action.

    PubMed

    Bird, P E; Harrington, D T; Barillo, D J; McSweeney, A; Shirani, K Z; Goodwin, C W

    1998-01-01

    An estimated 2 million people a year are victims of elder abuse, which ranges from neglect and mistreatment to physical abuse. By the year 2020, a full 22% of the population will be aged 65 or older. This demographic explosion demands that we identify and protect those at risk. To investigate the incidence of elder abuse or neglect (EAN) and to determine clinician awareness of associated risk factors, we conducted a 1-year retrospective review of thermally injured patients aged 60 or older. Data included age, total body surface area burned, mechanism of injury, length of hospital stay, mortality, abuse or neglect risk factors, and referral to the appropriate social agency. We found that our elderly patients (n = 28) were poorly screened for EAN. While 64% to 96% of patients were screened for cognitive impairment, overall health, and financial resources, none were screened for risk factors of emotional isolation. None of the patient's caregivers, including any spouses, roommates, or guardians, were screened for risk factors of substance abuse, familial violence, dependency needs, or external stresses. With the use of available data, we were able to place 11 patients on the following levels of abuse or neglect: 1) low risk for abuse; 2) self-neglect; 3) neglect; and 4) abuse. By this scale, 7 patients (64%) were victims of self-neglect, 3 patients (27%) were victims of neglect, and 1 patient (9%) was a victim of abuse. Adult Protective Services intervened in 2 cases. Recognizing that all cases of EAN should be preventable, we cannot accept the socioeconomic impact of this entity. The 11 patients identified as victims of neglect, self-neglect, or abuse accounted for 135 hospital days and 8 fatalities. Before we can address EAN, health care personnel must be made aware of the problem and routine screening for risk factors must be implemented. The true incidence of EAN is likely underestimated because health care providers have difficulty recognizing its features. A

  8. Feasibility of ensuring confidentiality and security of computer-based patient records. Council on Scientific Affairs, American Medical Association.

    PubMed

    1993-05-01

    Legal and ethical precepts that apply to paper-based medical records, including requirements that patient records be kept confidential, accurate and legible, secure, and free from unauthorized access, should also apply to computer-based patient records. Sources of these precepts include federal regulations, state medical practice acts, licensing statutes and the regulations that implement them, accreditation standards, and professional codes of ethics. While the legal and ethical principles may not change, the risks to confidentiality and security of patient records appear to differ between paper- and computer-based records. Breaches of system security, the potential for faulty performance that may result in inaccessibility or loss of records, the increased technical ability to collect, store, and retrieve large quantities of data, and the ability to access records from multiple and (sometimes) remote locations are among the risk factors unique to computer-based record systems. Managing these risks will require a combination of reliable technological measures, appropriate institutional policies and governmental regulations, and adequate penalties to serve as a dependable deterrent against the infringement of these precepts.

  9. Many physicians are willing to use patients' electronic personal health records, but doctors differ by location, gender, and practice.

    PubMed

    Wynia, Matthew K; Torres, Gretchen Williams; Lemieux, Josh

    2011-02-01

    Electronic personal health records could become important tools for patients to use in managing and monitoring their health information and communicating with clinicians. With the emergence of new products and federal incentives that might indirectly encourage greater use of personal health records, policy makers should understand the views of physicians on using these records. In a national survey of physicians in 2008-09, we found that although 64 percent have never used a patient's electronic personal health record, 42 percent would be willing to try. Strikingly, rural physicians expressed much more willingness to use such records compared to urban or suburban physicians. Female physicians were significantly less willing to use these tools than their male peers (34 percent versus 46 percent). Physicians broadly have concerns about the impact on patients' privacy, the accuracy of underlying data, their potential liability for tracking all of the information that might be entered into a personal health record, and the lack of payment to clinicians for using or reviewing these patient records.

  10. Discrepancies between dental and medical records of cardiac patients in AlHada Armed Forces Hospital, Taif, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al Hibshi, Sana M.; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa M.; Assery, Mansour K.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: This study aims to estimate the prevalence of medical information discrepancies between dental and medical records of cardiac patients at AlHada Armed Forces Hospital in Taif and to identify the factors contributing to these information discrepancies. Materials and Methods: The study applied a descriptive retrospective medical and dental records review of a stratified proportional sample of 289 cardiac patients, which was extracted from 1154 cardiac patients who visited both the cardiology and dental clinics at the AlHada Armed Forces Hospital between 2007 and June 2012. Data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 19. Results: The main results of this study are the following: The mean and standard deviation of patient's age was 56 ± 16.9, female patients represented 47.8% of the study population. A total of 78.5% of dental records were documented by dental residents whereas 48.4% of the dentists had more than 6 years of experience. Two hundred and seventy-nine (96.5%) of the 289 dental records had medical information discrepancies compared to the corresponding medical records. One hundred percent of systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatic fever cases were not documented in the dental records followed by 93% of medications, 92% of stroke, and 88.5% of hyperlipidemia, whereas the least prevalent were cardiac disease (26%) and diabetes mellitus (22.2%). Conclusion: Approximately 75% of the patients who directly or indirectly accessed the dental services showed discrepancies. The researcher concludes that critical information gaps exist between dental and medical records that mostly attributed to system level problems. A well-established model for efficient communication among medical and dental care providers caring for cardiac patients does not appear to exist. The absence of such a model can threaten the overall health of patients. PMID:28032050

  11. Analysis of clinical records of dental patients attending Jordan University Hospital: Documentation of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections

    PubMed Central

    Dar-Odeh, Najla; Ryalat, Soukaina; Shayyab, Mohammad; Abu-Hammad, Osama

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze clinical records of dental patients attending the Dental Department at the University of Jordan Hospital: a teaching hospital in Jordan. Analysis aimed at determining whether dental specialists properly documented the drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections given to their patients. Methods: Dental records of the Dental Department at the Jordan University Hospital were reviewed during the period from April 3rd until April 26th 2007 along with the issued prescriptions during that period. Results: A total of 1000 records were reviewed with a total of 53 prescriptions issued during that period. Thirty records documented the prescription by stating the category of the prescribed drug. Only 13 records stated the generic or the trade names of the prescribed drugs. Of these, 5 records contained the full elements of a prescription. As for local anesthetic injections, the term “LA used” was found in 22 records while the names and quantities of the local anesthetics used were documented in only 13 records. Only 5 records documented the full elements of a local anesthetic injection. Conclusion: The essential data of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections were poorly documented by the investigated group of dental specialists. It is recommended that the administration of the hospital and the dental department implement clear and firm guidelines for dental practitioners in particular to do the required documentation procedure. PMID:19209291

  12. Organizational strategies for promoting patient and provider uptake of personal health records

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Susan; Rozenblum, Ronen; Park, Andrea; Dunn, Marie; Bates, David W

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate organizational strategies to promote personal health records (PHRs) adoption with a focus on patients with chronic disease. Methods Using semi-structured interviews and a web-based survey, we sampled US health delivery organizations which had implemented PHRs for at least 12 months, were recognized as PHR innovators, and had scored highly in national patient satisfaction surveys. Respondents had lead positions for clinical information systems or high-risk population management. Using grounded theory approach, thematic categories were derived from interviews and coupled with data from the survey. Results Interviews were conducted with 30 informants from 16 identified organizations. Organizational strategies were directed towards raising patient awareness via multimedia communications, and provider acceptance and uptake. Strategies for providers were grouped into six main themes: organizational vision, governance and policies, work process redesign, staff training, information technology (IT) support, and monitoring and incentives. Successful organizations actively communicated their vision, engaged leaders at all levels, had clear governance, planning, and protocols, set targets, and celebrated achievement. The most effective strategy for patient uptake was through health professional encouragement. No specific outreach efforts targeted patients with chronic disease. Registration and PHR activity was routinely measured but without reference to a denominator population or high risk subpopulations. Discussion and conclusion Successful PHR implementation represents a social change and operational project catalyzed by a technical solution. The key to clinician acceptance is making their work easier. However, organizations will likely not achieve the value they want from PHRs unless they target specific populations and monitor their uptake. PMID:25326601

  13. Elder Abuse Awareness Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Kathleen; Morrow, Marilyn J.

    1985-01-01

    The Elder Abuse Awareness Project was undertaken: (1) to determine the incidence of abuse and neglect in seven Illinois counties; and (2) to develop, produce, and distribute educational materials on elder abuse for the service provider and for senior citizens. Results are presented and discussed. (MT)

  14. Elder Abuse in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arai, Mizuho

    2006-01-01

    Perceptions of elder abuse were examined in Japanese women (n =100) and men (n =46). Japanese women and men both emphasized physical aggression, followed by neglect and blaming, when giving examples of extremely abusive behavior. Physical aggression was also the most frequently mentioned type of moderate elder abuse, followed by neglect, economic…

  15. Elder Abuse Awareness Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Marilyn J.; Doyle, Kathleen

    The Elder Abuse Awareness Project was developed to determine the incidence of abuse and neglect of elderly people in several rural counties in central Illinois. A primary purpose of the study was to survey service providers as to their actual encounters with elder abuse and neglect. Each provider was asked about warning signs or cues that were…

  16. Substance Abuse. Policy Statement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Collaboration for Youth, Washington, DC.

    This paper presents the policy statement on substance abuse from the National Collaboration for Youth (NCY). The policy statement section lists programs and activities supported by the NCY. A section on background includes a statement of the issue of substance abuse. Areas examined in this section include alcohol abuse and drunk driving among…

  17. Enhancing Practice Efficiency and Patient Care by Sharing Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Keller, Megan E; Kelling, Sarah E; Cornelius, Douglas C; Oni, Hafusat A; Bright, David R

    2015-01-01

    One primary function of community pharmacies is to dispense medications to patients. In doing so, pharmacists frequently communicate with physicians' offices to clarify prescription orders and obtain additional information to ensure the safe and accurate dispensing of medications. Such communication is often done by telephone or fax, which is inefficient for both the pharmacy and the physician's office. This problem was highlighted in a recent American Medical Association resolution defining certain pharmacy inquiries as "interference with the practice of medicine and unwarranted." As a result, many are seeking to understand how to balance the needs of the patient care process with the need for operational efficiency in the physician's office and pharmacy. This study presents one example of a health information technology-based solution involving shared access to an electronic health record (EHR), and describes a case in which a physician's office and a community pharmacy experimented with this model to promote practice efficiency while also providing enhanced access to clinical information in both directions. The rationale behind the process change, a brief description of how the new process came into existence, and a description of how information sharing can be helpful in related clinical situations are provided. Similar models that involve sharing of EHRs may create valuable opportunities for collaboration between physicians and pharmacists to enhance patient care and improve workflow efficiency.

  18. An electronic health record to support patients and institutions of the health care system.

    PubMed

    Uckert, Frank; Müller, Marcel Lucas; Bürkle, Thomas; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich

    2004-08-24

    The department of Medical Informatics of the University Hospital Münster and the Gesakon GmbH (an university offspring) initiated the cooperative development of an electronic health record (EHR) called "akteonline.de" in 2000. From 2001 onwards several clinics of the university hospital have already offered this EHR (within pilot projects) as an additional service to selected subsets of their patients. Based on the experiences of those pilot projects the system architecture and the basic data model underwent several evolutionary enhancements, e.g. implementations of electronic interfaces to other clinical systems (considering for example data interchange methods like the Clinical Document Architecture - standardized within the HL7 group - and also interfacing architectures of German GP systems, such as VCS and D2D). "akteonline.de" in its current structure supports patients as well as health care professionals and aims at providing a collaborative health information system which perfectly supports the clinical workflow even across institutional boundaries and including the patient himself. Since such an EHR needs to strictly fulfill high data security and data protection requirements, a complex authorization and access control component has been included. Furthermore the EHR data are encrypted within the database itself and during their transfer across the internet.

  19. Auditory evoked responses in a comparison between schizophrenia patients with and without premorbid history of drug abuse: report of pilot results.

    PubMed

    Boutros, Nash N; Korzyukov, Oleg; Oliwa, Glen; Struve, Frederick; Jansen, Ben H

    2004-10-01

    Evidence for a role for drugs of abuse in the development of chronic psychotic syndromes is scattered throughout 40 years of literature. Electrophysiological studies examining groups believed to have chronic drug-induced psychotic symptoms yielded interesting findings. To our knowledge, no studies directly compared schizophrenia patients whose drug use preceded and those whose drug use followed the onset of psychotic symptoms. Twenty-six schizophrenia patients and 10 healthy control subjects were recruited for the study. Based on the SCID interview, schizophrenia subjects were classified into a Psychosis First (Psy 1st) group (N=11), Drugs First (Drugs 1st; N=8), and No Drug Use (No Drugs; N=7). Schizophrenia subjects were administered the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS). The P300 evoked response and sensory gating were measured for all subjects. Despite the small sample sizes significant differences were found between the groups. Most significantly, the P300 amplitude was smallest in the Drugs 1st as compared to the No Drugs groups, while sensory gating deficit was worst in the Psy 1st group. The data suggest that significant clinical and electrophysiological differences between these groups can be identified. Further research to better define these differences seems warranted.

  20. Modafinil treatment of amphetamine abuse in adult ADHD.

    PubMed

    Mann, N; Bitsios, P

    2009-06-01

    Substance abuse is a frequent co-morbid condition of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Treatment with conventional psychostimulants in adult ADHD with co-morbid stimulant abuse may be problematic. In this study, we report the case of a patient with adult ADHD with co-morbid amphetamine abuse who was treated successfully with the non-stimulant alertness-promoting drug modafinil. The drug resolved both the inattention/hyperactivity symptoms as well as the amphetamine abuse. Modafinil may be a suitable candidate treatment for adults with ADHD and stimulant abuse.

  1. Abuse of the elderly--the hidden agenda. I. The caretakers and the categories of abuse.

    PubMed

    Kimsey, L R; Tarbox, A R; Bragg, D F

    1981-10-01

    An overview of the problem of abuse of the elderly is presented in an effort to guide future research. Categories of caretakers for the aged include formal (i.e., institutional settings) and informal (e.g., family, neighbors, sitters). Data are presented from a task force report on the status of nursing homes in the State of Texas. Categories of abuse are discussed under four divisions: physical, psychologic, material, and fiscal. Deliberate physical abuse by formal caretakers was the least common; physical neglect was far more common, e.g., the development of decubitus ulcers, inadequate nutrition, improper medication, and vermin infestation. Psychologic abuse was most frequent in the area of benign neglect, with patients regarded as "going to die anyway." A tendency toward infantilization by formal caretakers was observed. Material abuse included primarily theft, chiefly of personal items rather than medication items. Fiscal abuse included embezzlement of patients' trust funds, improper charges for service, failure to notify the State of the death or departure of a patient, abuse for drugs, and artificial upgrading of Medicaid recipients' classifications. Possible causes of abuse are reviewed.

  2. Child sexual abuse: seven years in practice.

    PubMed

    Bahali, Kayhan; Akçan, Ramazan; Tahiroglu, Aysegul Y; Avci, Ayse

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the socio-demographic characteristics of sexually abused children. The records of 101 cases of child sexual abuse (CSA) were retrospectively evaluated. Socio-demographic characteristics of the victims, type of sexual abuse, and psychiatric diagnosis were studied. Of the victims, 56.4% (n = 57) were female and 43.6% (n = 44) were male. The mean age was 9.57 +/- 3.5, with a range of 4-17 years. Ninety-three (92.1%) of the victims had been admitted as part of the legal process. The majority (66.3%) of the victims had been abused by an acquaintance, while 33.7% had been abused by a stranger. Anal or vaginal penetration was reported in 48.5% of the cases. Post-traumatic stress disorder was the most common (54.5%) psychiatric diagnosis established after sexual abuse. Descriptive data related to the abused children and an understanding of the consequences of CSA will help authorities in planning prevention.

  3. Comparison of MMPI Scores of Drug Abusers and Mayo Clinic Normative Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patalano, Frank

    1980-01-01

    Compared MMPIs of 80 male and 80 female drug abusers with MMPIs of 550 male and 695 female medical patients. Male drug abusers obtained significantly higher scores than male medical patients on all clinical scales. Female drug abusers obtained significantly higher scores than female medical patients on seven scales. (Author)

  4. Guidelines for management of HIV infection with computer-based patient's record.

    PubMed

    Safran, C; Rind, D M; Davis, R B; Ives, D; Sands, D Z; Currier, J; Slack, W V; Makadon, H J; Cotton, D J

    1995-08-05

    Computers are steadily being incorporated in clinical practice. We conducted a nonrandomised, controlled, prospective trial of electronic messages designed to enhance adherence to clinical practice guidelines. We studied 126 physicians and nurse practitioners who used electronic medical records when caring for 349 patients with HIV infection in a primary care practice. We analysed the response times of clinicians to the situations that triggered alerts and reminders, the number of ambulatory visits, and hospitalisation. The median response times to 303 alerts in the intervention group and 388 alerts in the control group were 11 and 52 days (p < 0.0001), respectively. The median response time to 432 reminders in the intervention group was 114 days and that for 360 reminders in the control group was over 500 days (p < 0.0001). There was no effect on visits to the primary care practice. There was, however, a significant increase in the rate of visits outside the primary care practice (p = 0.02), which is explained by the increased frequency of visits to ophthalmologists. There were no differences in admission rates (p = 0.47), in admissions for pneumocystosis (p = 0.09), in visits to the emergency ward (p = 0.24), or in survival (p = 0.19). We conclude that the electronic medical record was effective in helping clinicians adhere to practice guidelines.

  5. Evaluation of patient-centered electronic health record to overcome digital divide.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Mayani, A; Modi, S; Kim, Y; Soh, C

    2005-01-01

    Advances and wide acceptance of information and communication technology (ICT) have made development and implementation of web-based electronic personal health records (PHRs) more feasible than ever before, and previous studies have demonstrated some of its potential and promises. However, this type of ICT-dependent approach inherits its own vulnerabilities of exposing the society to digital divide, commonly described as the gap that exists among individuals and communities with regards to the haves and have-nots of information and modern communications technologies. To address these concerns and improve healthcare outcomes, we have developed and customized a web-based patient-centered electronic PHR, named the Personal Health Information Management System (PHIMS), and evaluated the system at the Everett Housing Authority, which provides housings for low-income ncome families and elderly or disabled populations. A preliminary study demonstrates that 92% of the participating residents are satisfied with the PHIMS system in general. Some of the residents found PHIMS records very useful for their clinic visits.

  6. Evaluation of patient-centered electronic health record to overcome digital divide.

    PubMed

    Kim, E; Mayani, A; Modi, S; Kim, Y; Soh, C

    2005-01-01

    Advances and wide acceptance of information and communication technology (ICT) have made development and implementation of web-based electronic personal health records (PHRs) more feasible than ever before, and previous studies have demonstrated some of its potential and promises. However, this type of ICT-dependent approach inherits its own vulnerabilities of exposing the society to "digital divide", commonly described as the gap that exists among individuals and communities with regards to the 'haves' and 'have-nots' of information and modern communications technologies. To address these concerns and improve healthcare outcomes, we have developed and customized a web-based patient-centered electronic PHR, named the Personal Health Information Management System (PHIMS), and evaluated the system at the Everett Housing Authority, which provides housings for low-income families and elderly or disabled populations. A preliminary study demonstrates that 92% of the participating residents are satisfied with the PHIMS system in general. Some of the residents found PHIMS records very useful for their clinic visits.

  7. Object-oriented analysis and design: a methodology for modeling the computer-based patient record.

    PubMed

    Egyhazy, C J; Eyestone, S M; Martino, J; Hodgson, C L

    1998-08-01

    The article highlights the importance of an object-oriented analysis and design (OOAD) methodology for the computer-based patient record (CPR) in the military environment. Many OOAD methodologies do not adequately scale up, allow for efficient reuse of their products, or accommodate legacy systems. A methodology that addresses these issues is formulated and used to demonstrate its applicability in a large-scale health care service system. During a period of 6 months, a team of object modelers and domain experts formulated an OOAD methodology tailored to the Department of Defense Military Health System and used it to produce components of an object model for simple order processing. This methodology and the lessons learned during its implementation are described. This approach is necessary to achieve broad interoperability among heterogeneous automated information systems.

  8. The development and design of an electronic patient record using open source web-based technology.

    PubMed

    Syed-Mohamad, Sharifa Mastura; Ali, Siti Hawa; Mat-Husin, Mohd Nazri

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the method used to develop the One Stop Crisis Centre (OSCC) Portal, an open source web-based electronic patient record system (EPR) for the One Stop Crisis Center, Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) in Kelantan, Malaysia. Features and functionalities of the system are presented to demonstrate the workflow. Use of the OSCC Portal improved data integration and data communication and contributed to improvements in care management. With implementation of the OSCC portal, improved coordination between disciplines and standardisation of data in HUSM were noticed. It is expected that this will in turn result in improved data confidentiality and data integrity. The collected data will also be useful for quality assessment and research. Other low-resource centers with limited computer hardware and access to open-source software could benefit from this endeavour.

  9. Internet integrated in the daily medical practice within an electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Lovis, C; Baud, R H; Scherrer, J R

    1998-09-01

    Healthcare enters the information age and professionals are finding an ever-growing role for computers in the daily practice of medicine. However, a number of problematic issues are associated with electronic publications, especially through Internet. Whilst access to any information has been improved, access to specific information has become more and more difficult [1], due to the lack of a general meta-knowledge allowing to structure Internet resources. Physicians have to learn and adapt themselves to computers and Internet, but Internet has to meet the specific requirements of Healthcare. Important issues must therefore be addressed to allow a real and daily use of Internet in the medical practice. The paper discusses most of these issues and proposes a solution developed at the University Hospital of Geneva that integrates an Electronic Patient Record with Internet, without compromises on security or on performances and that runs on standard PCs'.

  10. Traceability of patient records usage: barriers and opportunities for improving user interface design and data management.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Correia, Ricardo; Lapão, Luís; Rodrigues, Pedro Pereira

    2011-01-01

    Although IT governance practices (like ITIL, which recommends on the use of audit logs for proper service level management) are being introduced in many Hospitals to cope with increasing levels of information quality and safety requirements, the standard maturity levels of hospital IT departments is still not enough to reach the level of frequent use of audit logs. This paper aims to address the issues related to the existence of AT in patient records, describe the Hospitals scenario and to produce recommendations. Representatives from four hospitals were interviewed regarding the use of AT in their Hospital IS. Very few AT are known to exist in these hospitals (average of 1 per hospital in an estimate of 21 existing IS). CIOs should to be much more concerned with the existence and maintenance of AT. Recommendations include server clock synchronization and using advanced log visualization tools.

  11. Bringing electronic patient records into health professional education: software architecture and implementation.

    PubMed

    Joe, Ronald S; Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Armstrong, Brian; Otto, Tony; Ho, Kendall

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an Electronic Medical Record (EMR) which has been redesigned specifically for the purposes of teaching medical and other health professional students. Currently available EMR software is designed specifically for use in actual practice settings and not for the needs of students and educators. The authors identified many unique requirements of an EMR in order to satisfy the educational goals unique to the electronic medium. This paper describes the specific architecture and many of the unique features of the EMR implemented for the University of British Columbia (UBC) Medical School program for teaching medical students. This implementation describes 200 participating students participating in a hands-on use of an EMR with a single standardized patient case. The participating students were distributed across three physical sites in the Province of British Columbia UBC curricula in December, 2007.

  12. Acute cervico-facial infection in Scotland 2010: patterns of presentation, patient demographics and recording of systemic involvement.

    PubMed

    Byers, J; Lowe, T; Goodall, C A

    2012-10-01

    Acute bacterial cervicofacial infection is a common problem that is most often secondary to dental infection. Most cases present as localised abscesses but some may be associated with serious morbidity including scarring, embarrassment of the airway, SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome), and sepsis syndrome. Fourteen oral surgery or maxillofacial surgery units in Scotland took part in a clinical audit of acute infection during two four-week cycles (August and November) in 2010. Information regarding the patients, signs and symptoms, and management was recorded. Training material was distributed between cycles with information on SIRS, sepsis, and the prescription of antibiotics. Overall, 140 patients presented with acute infection. There was an equal sex distribution and ages ranged from 5 to 87 years. There was an association with deprivation and 36% of patients were from the lowest socioeconomic quintile. Most infections were dental (n=120, 86%), and patients presented with pain and swelling (n=120, 86% and n=134, 96%, respectively) Twenty-three patients (16%) met the criteria for SIRS. A further 23 (16%) had at least one positive SIRS marker with incomplete recording of the remaining markers. Twenty-six patients (19%) had no recorded SIRS markers. Cervicofacial infection can be associated with serious morbidity and mortality, which may be better managed if the systemic signs and symptoms of sepsis are recognised and recorded at presentation. This study showed that the recording of signs of sepsis was variable even with training. Further training of junior staff to recognise severe acute bacterial infection may improve management.

  13. Inviting patients and care partners to read doctors' notes: OpenNotes and shared access to electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jennifer L; Darer, Jonathan D; Berger, Andrea; Clarke, Deserae; Green, Jamie A; Stametz, Rebecca A; Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Jan

    2016-08-07

    We examined the acceptability and effects of delivering doctors' visit notes electronically (via OpenNotes) to patients and care partners with authorized access to patients' electronic medical records. Adult patients and care partners at Geisinger Health System were surveyed at baseline and after 12 months of exposure to OpenNotes. Reporting on care partner access to OpenNotes, patients and care partners stated that they had better agreement about patient treatment plans and more productive discussions about their care. At follow-up, patients were more confident in their ability to manage their health, felt better prepared for office visits, and reported understanding their care better than at baseline. Care partners were more likely to access and use patient portal functionality and reported improved communication with patients' providers at follow-up. Our findings suggest that offering patients and care partners access to doctors' notes is acceptable and improves communication and patients' confidence in managing their care.

  14. Displays of authority in the clinical consultation: a linguistic ethnographic study of the electronic patient record.

    PubMed

    Swinglehurst, Deborah

    2014-10-01

    The introduction of computers into general practice settings has profoundly changed the dynamics of the clinical consultation. Previous research exploring the impact of the computer (in what has been termed the 'triadic' consultation) has shown that computer use and communication between doctor and patient are intricately coordinated and inseparable. Swinglehurst et al. have recently been critical of the ongoing tendency within health communication research to focus on 'the computer' as a relatively simple 'black box', or as a material presence in the consultation. By re-focussing on the electronic patient record (EPR) and conceptualising this as a complex collection of silent but consequential voices, they have opened up new and more nuanced possibilities for analysis. This orientation makes visible a tension between the immediate contingencies of the interaction as it unfolds moment-by-moment and the more standardised, institutional demands which are embedded in the EPR ('dilemma of attention'). In this paper I extend this work, presenting an in-depth examination of how participants in the consultation manage this tension. I used linguistic ethnographic methods to study 54 video recorded consultations from a dataset collected between 2007 and 2008 in two UK general practices, combining microanalysis of the consultation with ethnographic attention to the wider organisational and institutional context. My analysis draws on the theoretical work of Erving Goffman and Mikhail Bakhtin, incorporating attention to the 'here and now' of the interaction as well as an appreciation of the 'distributed' nature of the EPR, its role in hosting and circulating new voices, and in mediating participants' talk and social practices. It reveals - in apparently fleeting moments of negotiation and contestation - the extent to which the EPR shapes the dynamic construction, display and circulation of authority in the contemporary consultation.

  15. Drug abuse. Its relationship to dental practice.

    PubMed

    Aston, R

    1984-07-01

    Drug abuse appears destined to become an exacerbating cultural phenomenon despite intrinsic dangers to the abuser and accelerating costs to society. Dentists cannot afford to ignore the problem or its sequelae either in terms of their personal involvement or in terms of the clinical implications of such a practice for their patients. Abuse of agents, such as opioids and amphetamines, by the dental practitioner leads to devastating personal, social, and professional consequences. The abuser jeopardizes his or her reputation, family relationships, professional practice, and, not uncommonly, his or her very life through accidental overdose of drugs or by suicide. Nitrous oxide abuse is particularly prevalent among dentists and, although producing no psychological dependence, may result in long-term myeloneuropathy and physical disability making continued dental practice impossible. The dentist's responsibilities in this area lie within clinical and social domains. Clinically, the dentist must (1) learn to detect those physical and behavioral signs in patients that are indicators of drug abuse; (2) become familiar with tactics employed by drug abusers to obtain drugs for themselves or for further criminal diversion, and be prepared to defend against such tactics; (3) understand and make clinical allowance for therapeutic complications that may arise in the treatment of drug-abuse patients. The dentist's social role as an informed, concerned, and empathic counselor in matters of drug abuse must be assumed as a personal imperative and not viewed as an intellectual abstraction. Whenever we are made aware of the drug-related devastation or death of a friend, colleague, or student, we discern the immediacy of an ethical responsibility of social dimensions, so eloquently expressed over 350 years ago, by John Donne in his "Devotions XVII": "No man is an island, ... Any man's death diminishes me, because I am involved in Mankind; And therefore never send to know for whom the

  16. 42 CFR 2.23 - Patient access and restrictions on use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... patient's written consent or other authorization under these regulations in order to provide such access... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Patient access and restrictions on use. 2.23... PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.23 Patient...

  17. 42 CFR 2.23 - Patient access and restrictions on use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... patient's written consent or other authorization under these regulations in order to provide such access... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Patient access and restrictions on use. 2.23... PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.23 Patient...

  18. 42 CFR 2.23 - Patient access and restrictions on use.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... patient's written consent or other authorization under these regulations in order to provide such access... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patient access and restrictions on use. 2.23... PROVISIONS CONFIDENTIALITY OF ALCOHOL AND DRUG ABUSE PATIENT RECORDS General Provisions § 2.23 Patient...

  19. Electronic Health Record Based Algorithm to Identify Patients with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pei; Bochenek, Joseph; Doshi-Velez, Finale; Manning-Courtney, Patty; Bickel, Julie; Wildenger Welchons, Leah; Reinhold, Judy; Bing, Nicole; Ni, Yizhao; Barbaresi, William; Mentch, Frank; Basford, Melissa; Denny, Joshua; Vazquez, Lyam; Perry, Cassandra; Namjou, Bahram; Qiu, Haijun; Connolly, John; Abrams, Debra; Holm, Ingrid A.; Cobb, Beth A.; Lingren, Nataline; Solti, Imre; Hakonarson, Hakon; Kohane, Isaac S.; Harley, John; Savova, Guergana

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cohort selection is challenging for large-scale electronic health record (EHR) analyses, as International Classification of Diseases 9th edition (ICD-9) diagnostic codes are notoriously unreliable disease predictors. Our objective was to develop, evaluate, and validate an automated algorithm for determining an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) patient cohort from EHR. We demonstrate its utility via the largest investigation to date of the co-occurrence patterns of medical comorbidities in ASD. Methods We extracted ICD-9 codes and concepts derived from the clinical notes. A gold standard patient set was labeled by clinicians at Boston Children’s Hospital (BCH) (N = 150) and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and Medical Center (CCHMC) (N = 152). Two algorithms were created: (1) rule-based implementing the ASD criteria from Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Diseases 4th edition, (2) predictive classifier. The positive predictive values (PPV) achieved by these algorithms were compared to an ICD-9 code baseline. We clustered the patients based on grouped ICD-9 codes and evaluated subgroups. Results The rule-based algorithm produced the best PPV: (a) BCH: 0.885 vs. 0.273 (baseline); (b) CCHMC: 0.840 vs. 0.645 (baseline); (c) combined: 0.864 vs. 0.460 (baseline). A validation at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia yielded 0.848 (PPV). Clustering analyses of comorbidities on the three-site large cohort (N = 20,658 ASD patients) identified psychiatric, developmental, and seizure disorder clusters. Conclusions In a large cross-institutional cohort, co-occurrence patterns of comorbidities in ASDs provide further hypothetical evidence for distinct courses in ASD. The proposed automated algorithms for cohort selection open avenues for other large-scale EHR studies and individualized treatment of ASD. PMID:27472449

  20. Stratifying Risk for Renal Insufficiency Among Lithium-Treated Patients: An Electronic Health Record Study.

    PubMed

    Castro, Victor M; Roberson, Ashlee M; McCoy, Thomas H; Wiste, Anna; Cagan, Andrew; Smoller, Jordan W; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F; Ostacher, Michael; Perlis, Roy H

    2016-03-01

    Although lithium preparations remain first-line treatment for bipolar disorder, risk for development of renal insufficiency may discourage their use. Estimating such risk could allow more informed decisions and facilitate development of prevention strategies. We utilized electronic health records from a large New England health-care system between 2006 and 2013 to identify patients aged 18 years or older with a lithium prescription. Renal insufficiency was identified using the presence of renal failure by ICD9 code or laboratory-confirmed glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min. Logistic regression was used to build a predictive model in a random two-thirds of the cohort, which was tested in the remaining one-third. Risks associated with aspects of pharmacotherapy were also examined in the full cohort. We identified 1445 adult lithium-treated patients with renal insufficiency, matched by risk set sampling 1 : 3 with 4306 lithium-exposed patients without renal insufficiency. In regression models, features associated with risk included older age, female sex, history of smoking, history of hypertension, overall burden of medical comorbidity, and diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (p<0.01 for all contrasts). The model yielded an area under the ROC curve exceeding 0.81 in an independent testing set, with 74% of renal insufficiency cases among the top two risk quintiles. Use of lithium more than once daily, lithium levels greater than 0.6 mEq/l, and use of first-generation antipsychotics were independently associated with risk. These results suggest the possibility of stratifying risk for renal failure among lithium-treated patients. Once-daily lithium dosing and maintaining lower lithium levels where possible may represent strategies for reducing risk.

  1. Patient characteristics associated with venous thromboembolic events: a cohort study using pooled electronic health record data

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Wendy; Gilder, Jason; Love, Thomas E; Jain, Anil K

    2012-01-01

    Objective To demonstrate the potential of de-identified clinical data from multiple healthcare systems using different electronic health records (EHR) to be efficiently used for very large retrospective cohort studies. Materials and methods Data of 959 030 patients, pooled from multiple different healthcare systems with distinct EHR, were obtained. Data were standardized and normalized using common ontologies, searchable through a HIPAA-compliant, patient de-identified web application (Explore; Explorys Inc). Patients were 26 years or older seen in multiple healthcare systems from 1999 to 2011 with data from EHR. Results Comparing obese, tall subjects with normal body mass index, short subjects, the venous thromboembolic events (VTE) OR was 1.83 (95% CI 1.76 to 1.91) for women and 1.21 (1.10 to 1.32) for men. Weight had more effect then height on VTE. Compared with Caucasian, Hispanic/Latino subjects had a much lower risk of VTE (female OR 0.47, 0.41 to 0.55; male OR 0.24, 0.20 to 0.28) and African-Americans a substantially higher risk (female OR 1.83, 1.76 to 1.91; male OR 1.58, 1.50 to 1.66). This 13-year retrospective study of almost one million patients was performed over approximately 125 h in 11 weeks, part time by the five authors. Discussion As research informatics tools develop and more clinical data become available in EHR, it is important to study and understand unique opportunities for clinical research informatics to transform the scale and resources needed to perform certain types of clinical research. Conclusions With the right clinical research informatics tools and EHR data, some types of very large cohort studies can be completed with minimal resources. PMID:22759621

  2. Stratifying Risk for Renal Insufficiency Among Lithium-Treated Patients: An Electronic Health Record Study

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Victor M; Roberson, Ashlee M; McCoy, Thomas H; Wiste, Anna; Cagan, Andrew; Smoller, Jordan W; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F; Ostacher, Michael; Perlis, Roy H

    2016-01-01

    Although lithium preparations remain first-line treatment for bipolar disorder, risk for development of renal insufficiency may discourage their use. Estimating such risk could allow more informed decisions and facilitate development of prevention strategies. We utilized electronic health records from a large New England health-care system between 2006 and 2013 to identify patients aged 18 years or older with a lithium prescription. Renal insufficiency was identified using the presence of renal failure by ICD9 code or laboratory-confirmed glomerular filtration rate below 60 ml/min. Logistic regression was used to build a predictive model in a random two-thirds of the cohort, which was tested in the remaining one-third. Risks associated with aspects of pharmacotherapy were also examined in the full cohort. We identified 1445 adult lithium-treated patients with renal insufficiency, matched by risk set sampling 1 : 3 with 4306 lithium-exposed patients without renal insufficiency. In regression models, features associated with risk included older age, female sex, history of smoking, history of hypertension, overall burden of medical comorbidity, and diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder (p<0.01 for all contrasts). The model yielded an area under the ROC curve exceeding 0.81 in an independent testing set, with 74% of renal insufficiency cases among the top two risk quintiles. Use of lithium more than once daily, lithium levels greater than 0.6 mEq/l, and use of first-generation antipsychotics were independently associated with risk. These results suggest the possibility of stratifying risk for renal failure among lithium-treated patients. Once-daily lithium dosing and maintaining lower lithium levels where possible may represent strategies for reducing risk. PMID:26294109

  3. Inhalant Abuse and Dextromethorphan.

    PubMed

    Storck, Michael; Black, Laura; Liddell, Morgan

    2016-07-01

    Inhalant abuse is the intentional inhalation of a volatile substance for the purpose of achieving an altered mental state. As an important, yet underrecognized form of substance abuse, inhalant abuse crosses all demographic, ethnic, and socioeconomic boundaries, causing significant morbidity and mortality in school-aged and older children. This review presents current perspectives on epidemiology, detection, and clinical challenges of inhalant abuse and offers advice regarding the medical and mental health providers' roles in the prevention and management of this substance abuse problem. Also discussed is the misuse of a specific "over-the-counter" dissociative, dextromethorphan.

  4. Risk of individual malignant neoplasms in patients with sickle cell disease: English national record linkage study

    PubMed Central

    Seminog, Olena O; Ogunlaja, Oyindamola I; Yeates, David

    2016-01-01

    Objective Case reports suggest that there may be an increased risk of some cancers associated with sickle cell disease. However, population-based studies are scarce and there is no comprehensive enumeration of the risks across the whole range of site-specific cancers. Our aim was to provide this. Design We used an English national dataset of linked statistical records of hospital admissions and deaths from 1999 to 2011 to undertake a retrospective cohort study. Setting England. Participants Records of all hospital admissions in England with SCD or with conditions included in the control cohort. Main outcome measures Rate ratios were calculated comparing rates of cancer in a sickle cell disease cohort and a control cohort, confining the analyses to people whose ethnicity was recorded as Black. Results Comparing the sickle cell disease cohort with the cohort without sickle cell disease, the rate ratio for all cancers combined was 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.7–2.5). There were significantly high rate ratios for haematological malignancies, including Hodgkin’s lymphoma (rate ratio 3.7, 1.5–8.4), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (2.6, 1.3–4.8), multiple myeloma (5.5, 2.8–10.1), lymphoid leukaemia (3.3, 1.3–8.0) and myeloid leukaemia (10.0, 4.6–21.5). Four solid tumours showed elevated rate ratios: colon cancer (2.8, 1.2–5.5), non-melanoma skin cancer (4.4, 1.3–12.2), kidney cancer (5.4, 2.3–11.5) and thyroid cancer (5.1, 1.3–15.4). Conclusions The risk of some malignancies may be raised in patients with sickle cell disease. However, this study was based on administrative data without the scope to validate these against patients’ full clinical records. Our findings need confirmation or refutation. If confirmed, work to elucidate, at the genetic and molecular level, why people with sickle cell disease have elevated risks of individual cancers might make contributions to the fundamental understanding of carcinogenesis. PMID:27325377

  5. Casebook: a virtual patient iPad application for teaching decision-making through the use of electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Virtual Patients are a well-known and widely used form of interactive software used to simulate aspects of patient care that students are increasingly less likely to encounter during their studies. However, to take full advantage of the benefits of using Virtual Patients, students should have access to multitudes of cases. In order to promote the creation of collections of cases, a tablet application was developed which makes use of electronic health records as material for Virtual Patient cases. Because electronic health records are abundantly available on hospital information systems, this results in much material for the basis of case creation. Results An iPad-based Virtual Patient interactive software system was developed entitled Casebook. The application has been designed to read specially formatted patient cases that have been created using electronic health records, in the form of X-ray images, electrocardiograms, lab reports, and physician notes, and present these to the medical student. These health records are organised into a timeline, and the student navigates the case while answering questions regarding the patient along the way. Each health record can also be annotated with meta-information by the case designer, such as insight into the thought processes and the decision-making rationale of the physician who originally worked with the patient. Students learn decision-making skills by observing and interacting with real patient cases in this simulated environment. This paper discusses our approach in detail. Conclusions Our group is of the opinion that Virtual Patient cases, targeted at undergraduate students, should concern patients who exhibit prototypical symptoms of the kind students may encounter when beginning their first medical jobs. Learning theory research has shown that students learn decision-making skills best when they have access to multitudes of patient cases and it is this plurality that allows students to develop their

  6. Advisory Committee Report on Drug Abuse: Summations and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Governor's Citizen Advisory Committee on Drugs, Salt Lake City, UT.

    A citizen's Drug Abuse Evaluation Committee was formed in Utah to evaluate past research and gather new data on basic questions concerning the drug problem. This booklet provides information based on the Committee's research, hearings, and an investigation of the current drug abuse problem in Utah. Data was also obtained from recorded testimony of…

  7. Developmental Experiences of Child Sexual Abusers and Rapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Dominique A.; Wurtele, Sandy K.; Durham, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to identify the distinct developmental experiences associated with child sexual abuse and rape. Method: For 269 sexual offenders (137 rapists and 132 child sexual abusers), developmental experiences were recorded from a behavioral checklist, a parental-bonding survey, and a sexual history questionnaire. Offender…

  8. Qualities and Characteristics of the Child Abusing Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breiner, Sander J.

    Most child abuse has a violent quality. A review of the research on child abusers reveals some interesting psychosocial and historical characteristics. Research has shown violence to be more likely in less stable populations, in persons with poor driving records and histories of severe accidents, and in those who are undereducated and unsuccessful…

  9. Prevalence of abusive encounters in the workplace of family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; Hamilton, Ryan; Lambert-Lanning, Anita; Tatemichi, Sue R.; Lemire, Francine; Manca, Donna; Ramsden, Vivian R.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To examine the career prevalence of abusive encounters for family physicians in Canada. DESIGN A 7-page cross-sectional mailed survey in English and French. SETTING Canada. PARTICIPANTS A total of 3802 randomly selected practising family physicians who were members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Demographic characteristics of survey participants, career prevalence of abusive encounters, and perpetrators of abuse. MAIN FINDINGS Twenty percent (20.4%) of the surveys (n = 774) were returned. Of the respondents, 44% were men and 56% were women. Most were in private practice in urban settings. The average number of years in practice was 15. The career prevalence of abusive encounters was divided into “minor,” “major,” and “severe” incidents. Of all the respondents, 98% had experienced at least 1 incident of minor abuse, 75% had experienced at least 1 incident of major abuse, and 39% had experienced at least 1 incident of severe abuse. Using χ2 analysis, a number of demographic variables were found to be significantly associated with abuse including the physician’s race and sex. Patients were the most common perpetrators of abuse. Ninety percent of family physicians surveyed reported that they had been abused by patients, while 70% reported that they had been abused by family members of patients. CONCLUSION Approximately 2 in 5 family physicians surveyed were subjected to a considerable amount of severe abuse during practice. Abuse in the office setting might have grave consequences for the health and well-being of the victimized physicians and might hinder service retention where the risk of abuse is greatest. PMID:20228289

  10. Routes of abuse of prescription opioid analgesics: a review and assessment of the potential impact of abuse-deterrent formulations.

    PubMed

    Gasior, Maciej; Bond, Mary; Malamut, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics are an important treatment option for patients with chronic pain; however, misuse, abuse and diversion of these medications are a major global public health concern. Prescription opioid analgesics can be abused via intended and non-intended routes of administration, both intact or after manipulation of the original formulation to alter the drug-delivery characteristics. Available data indicate that ingestion (with or without manipulation of the prescribed formulation) is the most prevalent route of abuse, followed by inhalation (snorting, smoking and vaping) and injection. However, reported routes of abuse vary considerably between different formulations. A number of factors have been identified that appear to be associated with non-oral routes of abuse, including a longer duration of abuse, younger age, male sex and a rural or socially deprived location. The development of abuse-deterrent formulations of prescription opioid analgesics is an important step toward reducing abuse of these medications. Available abuse-deterrent formulations aim to hinder extraction of the active ingredient, prevent administration through alternative routes and/or make abuse of the manipulated product less attractive, less rewarding or even aversive. There are currently five opioid analgesics with a Food and Drug Administration abuse-deterrent label, and a number of other products are under review. A growing body of evidence suggests that introduction of abuse-deterrent opioid analgesics in the USA has been associated with decreased rates of abuse of these formulations. The availability of abuse-deterrent formulations therefore appears to represent an important step toward curbing the epidemic of abuse of prescription opioid analgesics, while ensuring the availability of effective pain medications for patients with legitimate medical need.

  11. [The physician, the drug abuser and drug abuse].

    PubMed

    Størksen, P

    1990-09-20

    Drug abusers have a low tolerance for unpleasant and painful emotions and experience a need for chemical relief through use of narcotics, tranquilizers and analgesics. Physicians may show a tendency to comply with their request for such drugs, partly because they give way under pressure (threats, violence) and partly because of their own unconscious need for acceptance and appreciation from the patients. The use of prescribed drugs may inspire an illusion that drug therapy is a "solution" and withdraw attention from other therapies. The prescription of medicaments may represent an extension of already existing abuse. Physicians must be aware of these problems of prescription and of the problems connected to patients' use of threats and violence.

  12. Patients' Online Access to Their Primary Care Electronic Health Records and Linked Online Services: Implications for Research and Practice.

    PubMed

    Mold, Freda; de Lusignan, Simon

    2015-12-04

    Online access to medical records and linked services, including requesting repeat prescriptions and booking appointments, enables patients to personalize their access to care. However, online access creates opportunities and challenges for both health professionals and their patients, in practices and in research. The challenges for practice are the impact of online services on workload and the quality and safety of health care. Health professionals are concerned about the impact on workload, especially from email or other online enquiry systems, as well as risks to privacy. Patients report how online access provides a convenient means through which to access their health provider and may offer greater satisfaction if they get a timely response from a clinician. Online access and services may also result in unforeseen consequences and may change the nature of the patient-clinician interaction. Research challenges include: (1) Ensuring privacy, including how to control inappropriate carer and guardian access to medical records; (2) Whether online access to records improves patient safety and health outcomes; (3) Whether record access increases disparities across social classes and between genders; and (4) Improving efficiency. The challenges for practice are: (1) How to incorporate online access into clinical workflow; (2) The need for a business model to fund the additional time taken. Creating a sustainable business model for a safe, private, informative, more equitable online service is needed if online access to records is to be provided outside of pay-for-service systems.

  13. [The medical records of home health care patients: a complement or alternative to an electronic file?].

    PubMed

    Perrot, P; Baudier, F; Schmitt, B

    2005-06-01

    Home health care services for dependant people involve participation and interventions of professionals from the health care, medico-social and social sectors. In order to ensure quality care, the flow of information must appropriately circulate between all of the various care providers. The establishment of an electronic medical file for these patients is a possible solution which has been proposed to be conducted in next years. A paper medical record is the property of the patient and offers the possibility of an alternative and complementary solution. The electronic file would use the existing available file as a starting point, and without any additional organisational structures being implicated, it allows for better coordination of the health, medical and social activities. An experimental implementation of this in the Franch-Comte region of France demonstrated the advantages and benefits of such a tool based on a logic centered upon the individual and the open sharing of practices between professionals in the medical and social sectors.

  14. Does case mix matter for substance abuse treatment? A comparison of observed and case mix-adjusted readmission rates for inpatient substance abuse treatment in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    PubMed Central

    Phibbs, C S; Swindle, R W; Recine, B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a case mix model for inpatient substance abuse treatment to assess the effect of case mix on readmission across Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: The computerized patient records from the 116 VAMCs with inpatient substance abuse treatment programs between 1987 and 1992. STUDY DESIGN: Logistic regression was used on patient data to model the effect of demographic, psychiatric, medical, and substance abuse factors on readmission to VAMCs for substance abuse treatment within six months of discharge. The model predictions were aggregated for each VAMC to produce an expected number of readmissions. The observed number of readmissions for each VAMC was divided by its expected number to create a measure of facility performance. Confidence intervals and rankings were used to examine how case mix adjustment changed relative performance among VAMCs. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS: Ward where care was provided and ICD-9-CM diagnosis codes were used to identify patients receiving treatment for substance abuse (N = 313,886). PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The case mix model explains 36 percent of the observed facility level variation in readmission. Over half of the VAMCs had numbers of readmissions that were significantly different than expected. There were also noticeable differences between the rankings based on actual and case mix-adjusted readmissions. CONCLUSIONS: Secondary data can be used to build a reasonably stable case mix model for substance abuse treatment that will identify meaningful variation across facilities. Further, case mix has a large effect on facility level readmission rates for substance abuse treatment. Uncontrolled facility comparisons can be misleading. Case mix models are potentially useful for quality assurance efforts. PMID:9018215

  15. [Substance abuse in older adults].

    PubMed

    Bitar, Raoul; Dürsteler, Kenneth M; Rösner, Susanne; Grosshans, Martin; Herdener, Marcus; Mutschler, Jochen

    2014-09-03

    In respect of demographic change, the number of older patients with substance abuse and addiction is on the raise. In this review we present important clinical and therapeutic aspects of substance abuse and addiction in the elderly and focus on alcohol, benzodiazepines and opioids. Daily and risky alcohol consumption is common among older people. They also have an increased risk getting alcohol-related complications. For early detection, laboratory parameters and questionnaires such as the AUDIT-C are suitable. Therapeutically brief interventions have been proved successful. Also, abuse of benzodiazepines, especially low-dose addiction, is widespread among older persons, although often overlooked, and patients often do not recognize their addiction. The physician has to know the correct indication, adequate dosage and pharmacological interactions. A slow-dose reduction is recommended in case of addiction. Thanks to opioid substitution therapy, patients with an opioidaddiction can reach a higher age. Age influences the effects of the substitute, which may require an adjustment of the dosage. Treatment of elderly patients should be based on their needs and resources and is usually very effective.

  16. Dual Diagnosis Motivational Interviewing: a modification of Motivational Interviewing for substance-abusing patients with psychotic disorders

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Steve; Carroll, Kathleen; Kostas, Demetrios; Perkins, Jennifer; Rounsaville, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a brief treatment approach for helping patients develop intrinsic motivation to change addictive behaviors. While initially developed to target primary substance using populations, professionals are increasingly recognizing the promise this approach has for addressing the motivational dilemmas faced by patients who have co-occurring psychiatric and psychoactive substance use disorders. Unfortunately, this recognition has not lead to a clear explication of how MI might be adopted for specific diagnostic populations of dually diagnosed patients. In this article we describe how we have applied the principles and practices of MI to patients who have psychotic disorders and co-occurring drug or alcohol use problems. Specifically, we provide two supplemental guidelines to augment basic MI principles (adopting an integrated dual diagnosis approach, accommodating cognitive impairments and disordered thinking). We present recommended modifications to primary MI skill sets (simplifying open-ended questions, refining reflective listening skills, heightening emphasis on affirmations, integrating psychiatric issues into personalized feedback and decisional balance matrices). Finally, we highlight other clinical considerations (handling psychotic exacerbation and crisis events, recommended professional qualifications) when using MI with psychotic disordered dually diagnosed patients. PMID:12495791

  17. Quantitative analysis of continuous intracranial pressure recordings in symptomatic patients with extracranial shunts

    PubMed Central

    Eide, P

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the outcome of management of possible shunt related symptoms using intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring, and to identify potential methodological limitations with the current strategies of ICP assessment. Methods: The distribution of persistent symptoms related to extracranial shunt treatment was compared before and after management of shunt failure in 69 consecutive hydrocephalic cases. Management was heavily based on ICP monitoring (calculation of mean ICP and visual determination of plateau waves). After the end of patient management, all ICP curves were re-evaluated using a quantitative method and software (SensometricsTM pressure analyser). The ICP curves were presented as a matrix of numbers of ICP elevations (20 to 35 mm Hg) or depressions (-10 to -5 mm Hg) of different durations (0.5, 1, or 5 minutes). The numbers of ICP elevations/depressions standardised to 10 hours recording time were calculated to allow comparisons of ICP between individuals. Results: After ICP monitoring and management of the putative shunt related symptoms, the symptoms remained unchanged in as many as 58% of the cases, with the highest percentages in those patients with ICP considered normal or too low at the time of ICP monitoring. The quantitative analysis revealed a high frequency of ICP elevations (20 to 35 mm Hg lasting 0.5 to 1 minute) and ICP depressions (-10 to -5 mm Hg lasting 0.5, 1, or 5 minutes), particularly in patients with ICP considered normal. Conclusions: The value of continuous ICP monitoring with ICP analysis using current criteria appears doubtful in the management of possible shunt related symptoms. This may reflect limitations in the strategies of ICP analysis. Calculation of the exact numbers of ICP elevations and depressions may provide a more accurate description of the ICP profile. PMID:12531957

  18. Electronic Health Record Patient Portal Adoption by Health Care Consumers: An Acceptance Model and Survey

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The future of health care delivery is becoming more citizen centered, as today’s user is more active, better informed, and more demanding. Worldwide governments are promoting online health services, such as electronic health record (EHR) patient portals and, as a result, the deployment and use of these services. Overall, this makes the adoption of patient-accessible EHR portals an important field to study and understand. Objective The aim of this study is to understand the factors that drive individuals to adopt EHR portals. Methods We applied a new adoption model using, as a starting point, Ventkatesh's Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology in a consumer context (UTAUT2) by integrating a new construct specific to health care, a new moderator, and new relationships. To test the research model, we used the partial least squares (PLS) causal modelling approach. An online questionnaire was administrated. We collected 360 valid responses. Results The statistically significant drivers of behavioral intention are performance expectancy (beta=.200; t=3.619), effort expectancy (beta=.185; t=2.907), habit (beta=.388; t=7.320), and self-perception (beta=.098; t=2.285). The predictors of use behavior are habit (beta=0.206; t=2.752) and behavioral intention (beta=0.258; t=4.036). The model explained 49.7% of the variance in behavioral intention and 26.8% of the variance in use behavior. Conclusions Our research helps to understand the desired technology characteristics of EHR portals. By testing an information technology acceptance model, we are able to determine what is more valued by patients when it comes to deciding whether to adopt EHR portals or not. The inclusion of specific constructs and relationships related to the health care consumer area also had a significant impact on understanding the adoption of EHR portals. PMID:26935646

  19. Task and error analysis balancing benefits over business of electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Deborah Sater; Rodriguez, Walter; Wood, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    Task and error analysis research was performed to identify: a) the process for healthcare organisations in managing healthcare for patients with mental illness or substance abuse; b) how the process can be enhanced and; c) if electronic medical records (EMRs) have a role in this process from a business and safety perspective. The research question is if EMRs have a role in enhancing the healthcare for patients with mental illness or substance abuse. A discussion on the business of EMRs is addressed to understand the balancing act between the safety and business aspects of an EMR.

  20. Confidentiality of the medical records of HIV-positive patients in the United Kingdom – a medicolegal and ethical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the legal and ethical issues that surround the confidentiality of medical records, particularly in relation to patients who are HIV positive. It records some historical background of the HIV epidemic, and considers the relative risks of transmission of HIV from individual to individual. It explains the law as it pertains to confidentiality, and reports the professional guidance in these matters. It then considers how these relate to HIV-positive individuals in particular. PMID:22312224

  1. Talc lung in a drug abuser.

    PubMed

    Hill, A D; Toner, M E; FitzGerald, M X

    1990-05-01

    We report a case of intravenous talcosis in a 36 year old woman. Although she initially denied drug abuse clinical suspicion was aroused by the finding of obliterated peripheral veins, a pleural rub and a peripheral nodular lesion on chest x-ray. Diagnosis of intravenous talcosis was confirmed by finding birefringent particles on transbronchial biopsy. Confronted with this evidence the patient admitted long-standing drug abuse, including intravenous injection of crushed methadone tablets which contain talc filler.

  2. Alcohol abuse in sickle cell disease: the Pisces Project.

    PubMed

    Levenson, James L; McClish, Donna K; Dahman, Bassam A; Penberthy, Lynne T; Bovbjerg, Viktor E; Aisiku, Imoigele P; Roseff, Susan D; Smith, Wally R

    2007-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is common in patients with chronic painful medical disorders, but it has not been studied in sickle cell disease (SCD). In a prospective cohort study of SCD adults, 31.4% were identified as abusing alcohol. There were no significant differences between alcohol abusers and nonabusers on demographics, biological variables, depression, anxiety, measures of crisis and noncrisis pain, or opioid use, but abusers reported more pain relief from opioids than nonabusers did. Alcohol abusers had fewer unscheduled clinic visits, emergency room visits, hospital days, and any health care utilization for SCD, but this was only significant for emergency room visits. Quality of life was similar between both groups, except that alcohol abusers unexpectedly had better overall physical summary scores. Alcohol abusers were more likely to report coping by ignoring pain, diverting attention, and using particular self-statements.

  3. The Relationship of Animal Abuse to Violence and Other Forms of Antisocial Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arluke, Arnold; Levin, Jack; Luke, Carter; Ascione, Frank

    1999-01-01

    Criminal records of 153 animal abusers and 153 control participants were tracked and compared. Animal abusers were more likely to commit property offenses, drug offenses, and public disorder offenses. Thus, results show an association between animal abuse and a variety of antisocial behavior, but not violence alone. Implications of these findings…

  4. Anabolic steroid abuse and dependence.

    PubMed

    Brower, Kirk J

    2002-10-01

    Anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are mainly used to treat androgen deficiency syndromes and, more recently, catabolic states such as AIDS-associated wasting. There is no evidence in the reviewed literature that AAS abuse or dependence develops from the therapeutic use of AAS. Conversely, 165 instances of AAS dependence have been reported among weightlifters and bodybuilders who, as part of their weight training regimens, chronically administered supraphysiologic doses, often including combinations of injected and oral AAS as well as other drugs of abuse. A new model is proposed in which both the "myoactive" and psychoactive effects of AAS contribute to the development of AAS dependence. The adverse consequences of AAS are reviewed, as well as their assessment by means of a history and physical, mental status examination, and laboratory testing. When patients with AAS use disorders are compared with patients with other substance use disorders, both similarities and differences become apparent and have implications for treatment.

  5. Acoustic analysis of snoring sounds recorded with a smartphone according to obstruction site in OSAS patients.

    PubMed

    Koo, Soo Kweon; Kwon, Soon Bok; Kim, Yang Jae; Moon, J I Seung; Kim, Young Jun; Jung, Sung Hoon

    2017-03-01

    Snoring is a sign of increased upper airway resistance and is the most common symptom suggestive of obstructive sleep apnea. Acoustic analysis of snoring sounds is a non-invasive diagnostic technique and may provide a screening test that can determine the location of obstruction sites. We recorded snoring sounds according to obstruction level, measured by DISE, using a smartphone and focused on the analysis of formant frequencies. The study group comprised 32 male patients (mean age 42.9 years). The spectrogram pattern, intensity (dB), fundamental frequencies (F 0), and formant frequencies (F 1, F 2, and F 3) of the snoring sounds were analyzed for each subject. On spectrographic analysis, retropalatal level obstruction tended to produce sharp and regular peaks, while retrolingual level obstruction tended to show peaks with a gradual onset and decay. On formant frequency analysis, F 1 (retropalatal level vs. retrolingual level: 488.1 ± 125.8 vs. 634.7 ± 196.6 Hz) and F 2 (retropalatal level vs. retrolingual level: 1267.3 ± 306.6 vs. 1723.7 ± 550.0 Hz) of retrolingual level obstructions showed significantly higher values than retropalatal level obstruction (p < 0.05). This suggests that the upper airway is more severely obstructed with retrolingual level obstruction and that there is a greater change in tongue position. Acoustic analysis of snoring is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that can be easily applied at a relatively low cost. The analysis of formant frequencies will be a useful screening test for the prediction of occlusion sites. Moreover, smartphone can be effective for recording snoring sounds.

  6. Electronic medical records and the transgender patient: recommendations from the World Professional Association for Transgender Health EMR Working Group.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Madeline B; Green, Jamison; Keatley, JoAnne; Mayer, Gal; Hastings, Jennifer; Hall, Alexandra M

    2013-01-01

    Transgender patients have particular needs with respect to demographic information and health records; specifically, transgender patients may have a chosen name and gender identity that differs from their current legally designated name and sex. Additionally, sex-specific health information, for example, a man with a cervix or a woman with a prostate, requires special attention in electronic health record (EHR) systems. The World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) is an international multidisciplinary professional association that publishes recognized standards for the care of transgender and gender variant persons. In September 2011, the WPATH Executive Committee convened an Electronic Medical Records Working Group comprised of both expert clinicians and medical information technology specialists, to make recommendations for developers, vendors, and users of EHR systems with respect to transgender patients. These recommendations and supporting rationale are presented here.

  7. A Comprehensive Electronic Health Record Based Patient Navigation Module Including Technology Driven Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Education.

    PubMed

    Ajeesh, Sunny; Luis, Rustveld

    2017-02-10

    The purpose of this concept paper is to propose an innovative multifaceted patient navigation module embedded in the Electronic Health Record (EHR) to address barriers to efficient and effective colorectal cancer (CRC) care. The EHR-based CRC patient navigation module will include several patient navigation features: (1) CRC screening registry; (2) patient navigation data, including CRC screening data, outcomes of patient navigation including navigation status (CRC screening referrals, fecal occult blood test (FOBT) completed, colonoscopy scheduled and completed, cancelations, reschedules, and no-shows); (3) CRC counseling aid; and 4) Web-based CRC education application including interactive features such as a standardized colonoscopy preparation guide, modifiable CRC risk factors, and links to existing resources. An essential component of health informatics is the use of EHR systems to not only provide a system for storing and retrieval of patient health data but can also be used to enhance patient decision-making both from a provider and patient perspective.

  8. Impact of telemedicine on the quality of forensic sexual abuse examinations in rural communities.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Sheridan; Dharmar, Madan; Boyle, Cathy; Yang, Nikki H; MacLeod, Kristen; Rogers, Kristen; Nesbitt, Thomas; Marcin, James P

    2014-09-01

    To assess the quality and diagnostic accuracy of pediatric sexual abuse forensic examinations conducted at rural hospitals with access to telemedicine compared with examinations conducted at similar hospitals without telemedicine support. Medical records of children less than 18 years of age referred for sexual abuse forensic examinations were reviewed at five rural hospitals with access to telemedicine consultations and three comparison hospitals with existing sexual abuse programs without telemedicine. Forensic examination quality and accuracy were independently evaluated by expert review of state mandated forensic reporting forms, photo/video documentation, and medical records using two structured implicit review instruments. Among the 183 patients included in the study, 101 (55.2%) children were evaluated at telemedicine hospitals and 82 (44.8%) were evaluated at comparison hospitals. Evaluation of state mandatory sexual abuse examination reporting forms demonstrated that hospitals with telemedicine had significantly higher quality scores in several domains including the general exam, the genital exam, documentation of examination findings, the overall assessment, and the summed total quality score (p<0.05 for each). Evaluation of the photos/videos and medical records documenting the completeness and accuracy of the examinations demonstrated that hospitals with telemedicine also had significantly higher scores in several domains including photo/video quality, completeness of the examination, and the summed total completeness and accuracy score (p<0.05 for each). Rural hospitals using telemedicine for pediatric sexual abuse forensic examination consultations provided significantly higher quality evaluations, more complete examinations, and more accurate diagnoses than similar hospitals conducting examinations without telemedicine support.

  9. Skin manifestations of child abuse.

    PubMed

    Ermertcan, Aylin Turel; Ertan, Pelin

    2010-01-01

    Child abuse is a major public health problem all over the world. There are four major types of abuse: physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse and neglect. The most common manifestations of child abuse are cutaneous and their recognition; and differential diagnosis is of great importance. Clinicians, especially dermatologists, should be alert about the skin lesions of child abuse. In the diagnosis and management of child abuse, a multidisciplinary approach with ethical and legal procedures is necessary. In this manuscript, cutaneous manifestations of physical, sexual, emotional abuse and neglect are reviewed and discussed.

  10. Child Abuse Amendments of 1983.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    The booklet presents the report of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Education and Labor regarding the 1983 Child Abuse Amendments to the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act and the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment and Adoption Reform Act of 1978. The Amendment expands the definition of child abuse to include abuse by…

  11. Patient-Held Maternal and/or Child Health Records: Meeting the Information Needs of Patients and Healthcare Providers in Developing Countries?

    PubMed

    Turner, Kathleen E; Fuller, Sherrilynne

    2011-01-01

    Though improvements in infant and maternal mortality rates have occurred over time, women and children still die every hour from preventable causes. Various regional, social and economic factors are involved in the ability of women and children to receive adequate care and prevention services. Patient-held maternal and/or child health records have been used for a number of years in many countries to help track health risks, vaccinations and other preventative health measures performed. Though these records are primarily designed to record patient histories and healthcare information and guide healthcare workers providing care, because the records are patient-held, they also allow families a greater ability to track their own health and prevention strategies. A LITERATURE SEARCH WAS PERFORMED TO ANSWER THESE QUESTIONS: (1) What are maternal information needs regarding pregnancy, post-natal and infant healthcare, especially in developing countries? (2) What is known about maternal information seeking behavior in developing countries? (3) What is the history and current state of maternal and/or child patient-held healthcare records, do they provide for the information needs of the healthcare provider and what are the effects and outcomes of patient-held records in general and for maternal and/or child health in particular? Specific information needs of pregnant women and mothers are rarely studied. The small numbers of maternal information behavior results available indicate that mothers, in general, prefer to receive health information directly from their healthcare provider as opposed to from other sources (written, etc.) Overall, in developing countries, patient-held maternal and/or child healthcare records have a mostly positive effect for both patient and care provider. Mothers and children with records tend to have better outcomes in healthcare and preventative measures. Further research into the information behaviors of pregnant women and mothers to determine

  12. Reported child sexual abuse in Bahrain: 2000-2009

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mahroos, Fadheela; Al-Amer, Eshraq

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a common problem with severe short and long-term consequences to the abused child, the family and to society. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of CSA, and demographic and other characteristics of the abused and their families. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective and descriptive study based on a review of medical records of CSA cases from 2000-2009 at Sulmaniya Medical Complex, the main secondary and tertiary medical care facility in Bahrain. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The review included demographic data, child and family characteristics, manifestations and interventions. RESULTS: The 440 children diagnosed with CSA had a mean age of 8 years (range, 9 months to 17 years); 222 were males (50.5%) and 218 were females (49.5%). There was a steady increase in cases from 31 per year in 2000 to 77 cases in 2009. Children disclosed abuse in 26% of cases, while health sector professionals recognized 53% of the cases. Genital touching and fondling (62.5%) were the most common form of CSA, followed by sodomy in 39%. Gonorrhea was documented in 2% of the cases and pregnancy in 4% of the females. The illiteracy rate among the fathers and mothers was 9% and 12%, respectively, which is higher than the rate among the adult general population. Children came from all socio-economic classes. There was referral to police in 56%, public prosecution in 31% of the cases, but only 8% reached the court. CONCLUSION: During ten years there has been a 2.5% increase in reported cases of CSA. Improving the skill of professionals in identifying CSA indicators and a mandatory reporting law might be needed to improve the rate of recognition and referral of CSA cases. Further general population-based surveys are needed to determine more accurately the scope of CSA and the risk and protective factors in the family and community. PMID:21808114

  13. A Role for Semantic Web Technologies in Patient Record Data Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogbuji, Chimezie

    Business Process Management Systems (BPMS) are a component of the stack of Web standards that comprise Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). Such systems are representative of the architectural framework of modern information systems built in an enterprise intranet and are in contrast to systems built for deployment on the larger World Wide Web. The REST architectural style is an emerging style for building loosely coupled systems based purely on the native HTTP protocol. It is a coordinated set of architectural constraints with a goal to minimize latency, maximize the independence and scalability of distributed components, and facilitate the use of intermediary processors.Within the development community for distributed, Web-based systems, there has been a debate regarding themerits of both approaches. In some cases, there are legitimate concerns about the differences in both architectural styles. In other cases, the contention seems to be based on concerns that are marginal at best. In this chapter, we will attempt to contribute to this debate by focusing on a specific, deployed use case that emphasizes the role of the Semantic Web, a simple Web application architecture that leverages the use of declarative XML processing, and the needs of a workflow system. The use case involves orchestrating a work process associated with the data entry of structured patient record content into a research registry at the Cleveland Clinic's Clinical Investigation department in the Heart and Vascular Institute.

  14. Analysis of time-domain optical mammograms recorded from more than 150 patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosenick, D.; Moesta, K. T.; Moller, M.; Wabnitz, H.; Mucke, J.; Gebauer, B.; Wassermann, B.; Wubbeler, G.; Macdonald, R.; Schlag, P. M.; Rinneberg, H.

    2005-04-01

    We used a scanning laser pulse mammograph to record craniocaudal and mediolateral projection optical mammograms of 154 patients suspected to have breast cancer. Optical mammograms were analyzed by comparing them with x-ray and MR mammograms, including results of histopathology. Out of 102 histologically confirmed carcinomas, 92 carcinomas were visible in at least one of the two projection mammograms. On average optical mammograms based on photon counts in a late time window exhibited the carcinomas with highest contrast compared to mammograms displaying absorption coefficients or hemoglobin concentration. Optical properties of carcinomas visible in optical mammograms were determined employing the model of diffraction of photon density waves by a spherical inhomogeneity, located in an otherwise homogeneous tissue slab. On average, tumor absorption coefficients exceeded those of surrounding healthy breast tissue by a factor of about 2.5 at the shortest wavelength used (670 nm), whereas tumor reduced scattering coefficients were larger by about 20% at this wavelength. Total hemoglobin concentration was observed to be systematically larger in tumors compared to healthy breast tissue. In contrast, blood oxygen saturation was found to be a poor discriminator for tumors and healthy breast tissue.

  15. Using frames to influence consumer willingness to pay for the patient health record: a randomized experiment.

    PubMed

    Vishwanath, Arun

    2009-07-01

    The American College of Medical Informatics rated the lack of willingness to pay for the patient health record (PHR) as the biggest obstacles to its rapid diffusion. Extending research propositions from the decision sciences and political communication, this study tests the influence of different types of emphasis frames on increasing consumer willingness to pay for the PHR. Using a randomized experiment embedded within a probability survey, the effects of 3 different types of emphasis frames (individual-focused, collective-focused, and joint), along with a no-frames control, are tested on a sample of early and later technology adopters. The results indicate a significant relationship between the type of frame and the type of adopter. Early adopters were more susceptible to individual-focused frames that made causal attributions at the individual level, whereas later adopters were significantly influenced by collective-focused frames that made causal attributions at the societal level. Interestingly, the framing effect continued and significantly influenced both early and later adopters' willingness to pay for the PHR. The findings demonstrate the need to carefully communicate the value of a technology to adopters and suggest the possibility of using frames to spur the diffusion of PHRs.

  16. [Fatal child abuse in Japan and Germany. Comparative retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Ohtsuji, M; Ohshima, T; Kondo, T; Godoy, M R; Oehmichen, M

    1998-01-01

    In this study a record for comparative international epidemiological studies on autopsy cases of child abuse is introduced. The form was proved in a retrospective comparative survey of cases of fatal child abuse at the Department of Legal Medicine in Kanazawa (Japan) and Institute of Legal Medicine of Lübeck (Germany). A total of 33 cases were included. The following data were evaluated: age and gender of victims and assailants, relationship between victims and assailants, causes and methods of abuse, chief autopsy findings, and causes of death. The results were leading into two directions between Kanazawa and Lübeck: (1) In the years of 1981-1996 in Kanazawa 23 cases of fatal child abuse were autopsied while during the same period in Lübeck only 10 cases were registered. (2) While sexual abuse was not registered in Kanazawa, it was recorded twice in Lübeck.

  17. Criminal Prosecution of Child Sexual Abuse Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martone, Mary; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This study of police and hospital records for 451 intrafamilial/caretaker child sexual abuse allegations in Chicago, Illinois, found that few children had to appear as witnesses, as 95% of cases were resolved through plea bargaining. Trial resolution took 12 to 16 months. Of 77 felony complaints initiated, 48 ended in convictions, with 43 convicts…

  18. Selected Materials on Drug Abuse and Misuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vigo County Public Library, Terre Haute, IN.

    The Vigo County Public Library has a Center for Drug Information which contains pamphlets, leaflets, newsletters, realia kits, films, records, cassettes, slides, educational aids and other materials on drug use, abuse and education. The materials in this list were selected for their relevance to the needs of local groups and organizations in…

  19. Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Substance Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Dimeff, Linda A.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2008-01-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is a well-established treatment for individuals with multiple and severe psychosocial disorders, including those who are chronically suicidal. Because many such patients have substance use disorders (SUDs), the authors developed DBT for Substance Abusers, which incorporates concepts and modalities designed to promote abstinence and to reduce the length and adverse impact of relapses. Among these are dialectical abstinence, “clear mind,” and attachment strategies that include off-site counseling as well as active attempts to find patients who miss sessions. Several randomized clinical trials have found that DBT for Substance Abusers decreased substance abuse in patients with borderline personality disorder. The treatment also may be helpful for patients who have other severe disorders co-occurring with SUDs or who have not responded to other evidence-based SUD therapies. PMID:18497717

  20. Change in amplitude distributions of Doppler spectrograms recorded below the aortic valve in patients with a valvular aortic stenosis.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, G; Lemire, F; Durand, L G; Latour, Y; Jarry, M; Solignac, A; Langlois, Y E

    1991-01-01

    Amplitude distributions of Doppler spectrograms were characterized in a group of 22 patients having no aortic pressure gradient and another group of 26 patients having a stenotic aortic valve. Specifically, for each patient, the ratios of the mean amplitude in three normalized frequency bands (low, middle and high) to the mean amplitude of the Doppler spectrogram computed in selected portions of the systolic period were considered. Pulsed-wave Doppler spectrograms were recorded by positioning the sample volume in the left ventricular outflow tract, approximately 1 cm below the aortic valve. Statistically significant differences were found between the middle (p = 0.041) and high (p = 0.028) frequency bands of Doppler signals recorded from the two groups of patients. The differences observed are believed to be attributed to blood flow eddies generated below the stenotic aortic heart valve and to changes in blood flow orientation.