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Sample records for abuse teenage pregnancy

  1. The Relationship of Childhood Sexual Abuse to Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roosa, Mark W.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Reinholtz, Cindy; Angelini, Patricia Jo

    1997-01-01

    Examined the sexual history of 2,003 young women to determine whether childhood sexual abuse contributed to a greater risk for teenage pregnancy. Results indicate that sexual abuse alone was not related to the incidence of teenage pregnancy, but sexual precocity was related to much higher incidences of teenage pregnancy. (RJM)

  2. Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Mary C.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews the problems of teenage pregnancy, including the costs to society, the challenge to educators, and the types of preventive programs developing across the country. Programs dealing strictly with reproduction and contraception are the least effective deterrents to teenage pregnancy. (MD)

  3. Teenage Pregnancy and Drug Abuse: Sources of Problem Behaviors. ERIC/CUE Digest No. 58.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bempechat, Janine; And Others

    Drug and alcohol abuse and teenage pregnancy are two behaviors manifested by at-risk children that are both a cause and a result of their lack of success in school and possible subsequent dropping out. The distinction between substance use and abuse may be determined using the following criteria: (1) age of onset; (2) physiological responses; (3)…

  4. Physical and emotional abuse in pregnancy: a comparison of adult and teenage women.

    PubMed

    Parker, B; McFarlane, J; Soeken, K; Torres, S; Campbell, D

    1993-01-01

    A sample of 691 African American, Hispanic, and white pregnant teenage and adult women were interviewed in the prenatal setting. On their first prenatal visit, 182 (26%) women reported physical or sexual abuse within the past year. There were significant differences between the teens and adults, with a higher percentage of teens (31.6%) reporting abuse during the prior year than adults (23.6%). The rate of abuse during pregnancy was 21.7% for teens and 15.9% for adult women. Adult women scored significantly higher than teens on two measures of mental abuse. Mental abuse was significantly correlated with physical abuse for all subjects. PMID:8506167

  5. Teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Murdock, N H

    1998-03-01

    Pregnancy among women under age 15 years is unusual, but not rare. About one third of the approximately 3 million total pregnancies which occur each year in the US are to teenagers. However, only about 30% of all pregnant adolescents receive adequate prenatal care, even though it is women in that age group who most need such care. Teen mothers have a higher rate of anemia and pregnancy-induced hypertension, most probably related to diet. Infants born to teen mothers are more likely to be premature and of low birth weight. Infants born to teen mothers are also more predisposed to mental retardation, brain damage, and birth injuries. Teen mothers are more likely to have poor weight gain, premature labor, abruptio placentae, and preeclampsia. The psychosocial reasons why teenage women become pregnant are considered, as well as the relevant media influences. While teenage pregnancy remains a major problem in the US, 1996 statistics indicate an overall 4% decline to 54.7 births/1000 among women aged 15-19 years. Teenage women need to be taught that there are many options in life other than pregnancy.

  6. Preventing unintended teenage pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Peckham, S

    1993-03-01

    A review of the literature on unplanned and teenage pregnancies was undertaken for four District Health Authorities. This work was carried out within a national context of increasing conception rates for teenage women aged 16 and under and in the knowledge that pregnant teenagers and their children tend to have poor life chances. The Health of the Nation White Paper has now focused attention on this by the inclusion of a target to reduce pregnancies to under 16-year-old women by half. To achieve this, health authorities need some understanding of the types of services which might be effective. Whilst there is limited evaluative work on the effectiveness of services for young people in this country, international comparisons suggest that some methods for reducing unintended teenage pregnancies may be more effective than others. The specific service issues identified are the need for advice and support pre-conceptually, during pregnancy and after abortion/birth; the need for easier access to contraception; the need for improved information on risky behaviour--particularly relating to pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS and substance abuse, and the need for improved medical and social care for pregnant teenage women. The most effective approaches for preventing unintended teenage pregnancy would appear to be the development of comprehensive advisory and family planning services, including sex education and the commitment by central and local government to tackle the adverse socio-economic factors which are associated with teenage pregnancy.

  7. Teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Molina Cartes, Ramiro; González Araya, Electra

    2012-01-01

    Teen pregnancy is a social problem not resolved in developing and some developed countries. Adolescent fecundity has become the most exact bio-demographic and health indicator of development. In developing countries that are expected to follow the sexual behaviour patterns of developed countries, without offering the levels of education and services for adolescents, the consequences will be adolescent fecundity and STI prevalence increase. The ignorance about sexuality and reproduction both in parents, teachers and adolescents increases the early initiation of coital relations and of unwanted pregnancies. Extreme poverty and being the son or daughter of an adolescent mother are risk factors of repeating the early pregnancy model. The application of predictive risk criteria in pregnant adolescents to facilitate the rational use of Health Services to diminish the maternal and perinatal mortality is discussed as well as the social factors associated with adolescent pregnancy as socioeconomic levels, structure - types and characteristics of the family, early leaving school, schooling after delivery, female employment, lack of sexual education, parental and family attitudes in different periods of adolescent pregnancy, adolescent decisions on pregnancy and children, unstable partner relationship and adoption as an option. Social consequences are analyzed as: incomplete education, more numerous families, difficulties in maternal role, abandonment by the partner, fewer possibilities of having a stable, qualified and well-paid job, greater difficulty in improving their socioeconomic level and less probability of social advancement, lack of protection of the recognition of the child. Finally, based on evidence, some measures that can reduce adverse consequences on adolescent mothers, fathers and their children are suggested.

  8. Teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Molina Cartes, Ramiro; González Araya, Electra

    2012-01-01

    Teen pregnancy is a social problem not resolved in developing and some developed countries. Adolescent fecundity has become the most exact bio-demographic and health indicator of development. In developing countries that are expected to follow the sexual behaviour patterns of developed countries, without offering the levels of education and services for adolescents, the consequences will be adolescent fecundity and STI prevalence increase. The ignorance about sexuality and reproduction both in parents, teachers and adolescents increases the early initiation of coital relations and of unwanted pregnancies. Extreme poverty and being the son or daughter of an adolescent mother are risk factors of repeating the early pregnancy model. The application of predictive risk criteria in pregnant adolescents to facilitate the rational use of Health Services to diminish the maternal and perinatal mortality is discussed as well as the social factors associated with adolescent pregnancy as socioeconomic levels, structure - types and characteristics of the family, early leaving school, schooling after delivery, female employment, lack of sexual education, parental and family attitudes in different periods of adolescent pregnancy, adolescent decisions on pregnancy and children, unstable partner relationship and adoption as an option. Social consequences are analyzed as: incomplete education, more numerous families, difficulties in maternal role, abandonment by the partner, fewer possibilities of having a stable, qualified and well-paid job, greater difficulty in improving their socioeconomic level and less probability of social advancement, lack of protection of the recognition of the child. Finally, based on evidence, some measures that can reduce adverse consequences on adolescent mothers, fathers and their children are suggested. PMID:22846537

  9. [Teenage pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Mora-Cancino, María; Hernández-Valencia, Varcelino

    2015-05-01

    In Mexico, 20% of the annual births are presented in women younger than 20 years old. Pregnancy in adolescents puts at risk mother and child health. This risk is major while the woman is younger, especially when the social and economic conditions are not favorable, which is decisive in later psychosocial development. It has been pointed out that the youths with low education, with minor academic and laboral expectations, with low self-esteem and assertiveness, tend to begin early their active sexual life, to use less frequently contraceptives, and in the case of younger women, to be pregnant, with the risk of abortion because they cannot to make the best decision. It is important to take into account the social context and the special characteristics of the family to understand situation of adolescent at risk of pregnancy. PMID:26233975

  10. Australian teenagers and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Siedlecky, S

    1984-01-01

    Trends in teenage pregnancy in Australia between 1971-83 and some of the factors which may account for these trends are described. In view of the continuing public controversy surrounding the provision of contraceptive services for teenagers, providers of health education and contraceptive services should carefully evaluate the impact of their programs on teenage pregnancy rates. In the decade prior to 1971, the age-specific birth rate for those aged 15-19 continued to increase while the rate for women between 20-29 years of age declined. The teenage rate peaked in 1971 at 55.2. After 1971, the rate for teenagers began declining, and between 1971-82, the rate declined by 50.3%. In the early 1970's the availability of contraceptive services for teenagers was markedly increased. The trend toward increased services may have followed or paralleled the decline in the teenage birth. The decline in the age-specific birth rate for teenagers was marked between 1971-78 (55.2-28.5). The decline then flattened out between 1978-82 (28.5-27.4). These birth rates must be examined in the context of pregnancy and abortion rates. Abortion data is not routinely collected at the national level. In South Australia abortion reporting is mandatory. Rates for the nation were estimated on the basis of these reports. The estimates indicate that between 1978-82, for those aged 15-19, the number of abortions/1000 females increased from 12.3-21.2 while the number of pregnancies/1000 declined from 66.6-48.5. Two thirds of the decline in the pregnancy rate was attributed to increased contraceptive use and 1/3 to increased reliance on abortion. Between 1971-82, among teenagers, there was a marked decline in the number of maritally conceived pregnancies and in the number of premarital conceptions later legitimatized by marriage. In 1981, among the 28,781 premarital conceptions among teenagers, 49% ended in abortion; 39% in premarital births; and 12% in marital births. Data from South Australia for

  11. Childhood and teenage pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Leishman, June

    Childhood and teenage pregnancy poses a significant social and health problem in the UK and it has implications for nurses across a wide range of disciplines. This article aims to raise awareness of the issue and help nurses to identify the risks of early sexual activity and pregnancy for young people. It includes the views of a group of first year, undergraduate nurses who took part in discussions on the topic while taking a module concerned with current health priorities.

  12. Teenaged Pregnancy. Matrix No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Janet B.

    The purposes of this paper are (1) to highlight some of the complex issues involved in teenage pregnancy and its consequences; (2) to comment on some of the problems that make solutions difficult to achieve; and (3) to indicate areas in which further research is of critical importance. Among the issues of teenage pregnancy discussed are the…

  13. Antecedents of teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klein, L

    1978-12-01

    Antecedent factors operative in the causation of adolescent pregnancy include: The sexuality of contemporary society, especially the media. Prolongation of educational any vocational preparation in industrialized western society. Normal physical maturation at an early age. Peer and social pressure. Low expectations of life among minority and economically poor individuals. The conspiracy of silence surrounding sexuality and the inability of society to admit and deal realistically with the sexual activity of adolescents. Failure to provide sex education, clarification of values, family-life education, preparation for parenthood, and knowledge of birth-control and family-planning services targeted to teenagers, including adolescent males. Psychological and emotional problems. Failure to provide available and accessible early pregnancy-detection services with adequate counseling and support services. Failure to provide abortion services. Failure to provide supportive services to adolescents who have a child in order to prevent repeated pregnancy. Pregnancy, childbearing, and motherhood represent ultimate feminine fulfillment to many in our society, and unless attainable expectations and desirable alternatives are available, adolescents will continue to see little reason to postpone pregnancy and childbearing.

  14. Reducing the Risks of Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, M. Faith

    1984-01-01

    Reviews the medical and social risks of teenage pregnancy and describes two successful programs dealing with pregnancy and parenting: the St. Paul Maternal and Infant Care Project in Minnesota and the Teenage Pregnancy and Parenting Project in San Francisco. (SK)

  15. Teenage Pregnancy: A Family Life Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theriot, Rosemary; Bruce, Becky

    1988-01-01

    Looks at issues surrounding teenage pregnancy and describes different school-based approaches to sex education. Stresses that parental involvement is critical to the success of any effective program for reducing teenage pregnancy. (RWB)

  16. Teenage pregnancies and abortion.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, J E

    1984-01-01

    The issue of abortion, except when it is rendered moot because the fetus endangers the life of the mother, is not really a medical issue. The physician's role is to help patients achieve and maintain their maximum potential for physical, mental, and social well-being. To accomplish this, the physician must acquire a constantly evolving database of scientific knowledge, must evaluate this information in a critical and ethical manner, and must be prepared to apply what is learned. In the realm of applied ethics, no particular religion, profession, culture, class, or sex should be thought of as having all the answers in the realm of applied ethics. This physician's actions are predicated on the belief that, to a large extent, ethical precepts reflect the broader social and economic issues of the period in which they are articulated. If this is the case, then in today's world the population explosion, the postindustrial society, the women's rights movement, inequality of access, and the ability to perform prenatal diagnosis are all factors which have molded the approach to the issue of abortion. Only the last 3 of these can in any way be considered as medical. When considering the role of a physician in dealing with the issue of abortion in the adolescent, this individual relies on the concept articulated by the World Health Association (WHA): promoting the physical, emotional, and social well-being of one's patients. Each year in the US over 1 million 15-19 year olds become pregnant, resulting in over 600,000 births. Most of these pregnancies are unintentional, yet approximately 90% of the infants are kept in the home by mothers who are ill prepared to be parents. What is most disturbing is that the pregnancy rate for the younger mother, 16 years or under, is accounting for an ever increasing percentage of the total. Studies at the Adolescent Health Center of the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City as well as national studies suggest that the younger teens are more

  17. Teenage Pregnancy. Opposing Viewpoints Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Stephen P.

    Books in the Opposing Viewpoints series challenge readers to question their own opinions and assumptions. By reading carefully balanced views, readers confront new ideas on the topic of interest. Although some experts believe that the problem of teenage pregnancy has been overstated, other recent studies have led many people to believe that…

  18. Teenage Pregnancy in Canada and Quebec

    PubMed Central

    Guilbert, Edith; Forget, Gilles

    1991-01-01

    In 1987, there were 36 694 known pregnancies in Canada among women aged 15 to 19. Although the Canadian teenage pregnancy rate decreased from 1980 to 1987, it remains three times higher than that of the industrialized country with the lowest rate. Health professionals, social workers, and educators can have an important role in preventing teenage pregnancy. PMID:21229025

  19. Teenage Pregnancy in the Texas Panhandle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galvez-Myles, Rosa; Myles, Thomas D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study compares rural and small-city teenage and adult pregnancies, with respect to complication rates and pregnancy outcomes. Methods: Chart review of Medicaid patients (513 teenage [under 20 years] and 174 adult controls [ages 25-34]) delivered (excluding multiple gestation) in Amarillo, Texas, from January 1999 to April 2001.…

  20. A film about teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smith, S

    1989-01-01

    "Consequences," a film on teenage pregnancy, was made in Africa with support from the Pathfinder Fund, an American foundation, International Planned Parenthood Federation, and the Ford foundation. Its messages are the repercussions of pregnancy, the use of contraception (especially condoms, as they help to stop the transmission of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), and the need for teenagers to communicate with their parents. The abortion issue was handled by making the points that it is illegal and dangerous. Harriet Masembe, a Ugandan folk lorist helped develop the story line. A Zimbabwean, Olley Mauma, wrote the dialogue and directed the film. Segun Oyekunle, a Nigerian script writer, commented on the draft script. The story is that Rita, a 16- year-old African is bright and has a steady boy friend. She will soon graduate from high school and go on to university. Then she discovers her pregnancy. Her relationship with Richard, her boy friend, breaks down. Her school performance deteriorates. Both Rita and Rick get expelled from school. Rita is sent to her mother's village to have a child. She finds this is very hard, and includes a lot of responsibility. She comes home a year later, but finds it difficult to relate to her friends. The boy friend suddenly returns home, too. At the end of the 54-minute film, we are left wondering what will happen to Rita and Richard. The film was pretested with 250 teenagers in Kenya, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe, and others in London and the US. The script was translated into French, Shona, and Sindebele. A Swahili version is being made. The film is being placed with nongovernmental organizations and their agencies. There has been much publicity and the film has won 2 international awards. Parts of the film were shown on German television. Distribution began in May, 1988. Since then some 300 copies and 600 videos have been sent out. There is a copy in each of the 45 agencies affiliated with International Planned Parenthood

  1. Physical abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, D E; Cecutti, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of physical abuse during late pregnancy and to investigate how abused and nonabused pregnant women differ in demographic characteristics, health habits, psychologic distress and attitudes about fetal health. DESIGN: Survey of women attending for prenatal health care or admitted to hospital for delivery. The information was obtained on one occasion from self-report questionnaires, completed with the option of anonymity. SETTINGS: Community-based prenatal clinic, private obstetricians' offices in a large city, private family physicians' offices in a large city, family physicians' offices in a small town, and a university teaching hospital. PATIENTS: English-speaking women at 20 weeks' or more gestation attending or admitted consecutively. INTERVENTIONS: Three self-report questionnaires: the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ), the Fetal Health Locus of Control (FHLC) and the study questionnaire. RESULTS: Thirteen women (2.4%) refused to participate in the survey. Of the 548 women who completed the questionnaires 36 (6.6%) reported physical abuse during the current pregnancy and 60 (10.9%) before it. There were no significant differences in rates of abuse between settings. Of the women abused during the pregnancy 23 (63.9%) reported increased abuse during the pregnancy, and 28 (77.8%) remained with the abuser. Twenty-four pregnant women (66.7%) received medical treatment for abuse, but only 1 (2.8%) told her prenatal care provider of the abuse. Factor analysis revealed three factors associated with physical abuse in pregnancy: "social instability" (comprising low age, unmarried status, lower level of education, unemployment and unplanned pregnancy), "unhealthy lifestyle" (comprising poor diet, alcohol use, illicit drug use and emotional problems) and "physical health problems" (comprising health problems and prescription drug use). The GHQ scores showed that the abused women were significantly more emotionally distressed than the

  2. [Pregnancy and induced abortion among teenagers].

    PubMed

    Tado, S

    1985-11-01

    The number of pregnancies and induced abortions among Japanese teenagers has recently increased. 2 of 5 pregnant single women whom social workers assist are teenagers. The teenagers fall into 2 groups: those under 18, who are in a sexually awakening period, or 18 and older, who are maturing. Those under 18, despite a strong tendency toward sexual activity, are predominantly insecure and run away from home to escape adversity and seek friendship among members of the opposite sex. After becoming pregnant, they go home only to embarrass their parents. Ultimately, they choose abortion or, because of their own inability, their babies are taken care of by their families or in foster homes. Those 18 or older, despite their knowledge of the relationship between sexual intercourse and pregnancy, typically did not take it seriously. Consequently, their reaction to their pregnancies tends toward shock and panic. Many try to keep their pregnancy from their parents. Though they do not want abortion, their circumstances may force them to it. Behind the increase of unexpected pregnancy and unwanted abortion in both age groups are several factors: the lack of sexual education suitable to their level of their physical maturity; a lack of responsibility by the male teenagers, who cannot relate their own actions to their partners' pregnancies; and the ignorance of pregnant teenagers, who cannot see that abortions may hurt them not only physically but mentally in the long run. PMID:3854863

  3. Family Change during an Unwed Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervera, Neil

    1994-01-01

    Sixteen white intact families with unwed teenage daughters completed two measures of family adaptability and alliance at six and eight months during the pregnancy and one month after the baby's birth. Most families became more cohesive and had improved family functioning after the pregnancy. (SLD)

  4. Teenage Pregnancy in South Carolina: Everybody's Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia.

    This publication examines in detail the problem of teenage pregnancy in South Carolina. Following the executive summary and a listing of eight recommendations based on the report, chapter 1 presents tables of selected vital statistics related to teen pregnancy in South Carolina. All statistics are shown by county and by Department of Health and…

  5. Teenage pregnancy: massive education effort needed.

    PubMed

    Green, C P

    1977-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy has reached epidemic proportions in the U.S., and it is clearly the result of nonuse, or sporadic use of contraception. Teenagers are poorly informed about the risks of pregnancy, and often cannot locate contraceptive services. To increase public awareness of this problem, Zero Population Growth initiated "Love Carefully Day," celebrated on February 14. The issue of teenage pregnancy should receive a great amount of media coverage, and be well publicized by community groups and public campaigns. To assist in planning activities ZPG has prepared a packet of activity suggestions which is sent free of charge to requesters. The address is: ZPG, 1346 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036. PMID:12277856

  6. Black Teenage Pregnancy in South Africa: Some Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Peter W.; Boult, Brenda E.

    1996-01-01

    Asserts black teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases in South Africa are at threatening levels. Outlines selected consequences based on the assertion that teenage pregnancy is multi-causational. Hypothesizes teenage pregnancy needs reexamination in terms of the pheronomal climate's impact on prepuberial girls; and nature's way of…

  7. Teenage Pregnancy: Issues and Strategies for School Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolle, George E.; And Others

    Many school administrators view teenage pregnancy as a top problems facing their school systems. Programs designed to reduce the teenage pregnancy rate must address multiple factors connected with teenage pregnancy. School-based clinic programs provide comprehensive primary health care for low income youth, require parental consent, provide mental…

  8. Cocaine abuse during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Cressman, Alex M; Natekar, Aniket; Kim, Eunji; Koren, Gideon; Bozzo, Pina

    2014-07-01

    Cocaine abuse during pregnancy is a significant public health problem but is infrequently discussed between physicians and patients. The impact of in utero cocaine exposure on pregnancy and the baby has received significant media attention in preceding decades because of fears of teratogenicity, long-term health consequences, and poor cognitive and neurodevelopmental outcomes. We sought to review the medical literature examining these phenomena. We identified risks to the pregnancy and baby in women abusing cocaine during pregnancy. These include preterm birth, placenta-associated syndromes (e.g., placental abruption, preeclampsia, and placental infarction), and impaired fetal growth. Long-term neurodevelopmental and cognitive deficits include (but are not limited to) poorer language development, learning and perceptual reasoning, behavioural problems, and adverse effects on memory and executive function. However, these results should be interpreted cautiously because cocaine abuse may be accompanied by many other maternal and sociodemographic risk factors, so it is difficult to ascertain the effect of cocaine alone. Therefore, it is critical to counsel patients about potential risk, and perhaps more importantly, to treat addiction and to better understand, and advocate for improvements to, these patients' high-risk environment.

  9. Report on Nutrition and Teenage Pregnancy Hearings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narins, Dorice M.; Hill, Virginia R.

    Because of the importance of nutrition during teenage pregnancies, the Illinois State Council on Nutrition held public hearings in Chicago and in Carbondale, areas having a high incidence of infant mortality. Several issues were identified: (1) effects on nutrition of low income, poor nutrition habits, and lack of understanding of the increased…

  10. Pregnancy Intentions and Teenage Pregnancy Among Latinas: A Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Corinne H.; Doherty, Irene; Padian, Nancy S.; Hubbard, Alan E.; Minnis, Alexandra M.

    2010-01-01

    CONTEXT The extent to which pregnancy intentions mediate the relationship between individual, familial and cultural characteristics and adolescent pregnancy is not well understood. The role of intentions may be particularly important among Latina teenagers, whose attitudes toward pregnancy are more favorable than those of other groups and whose pregnancy rates are high. METHODS Prospective, time-varying data from 2001–2004 were used to investigate whether two measures of pregnancy intentions, wantedness and happiness, mediated associations between risk factors and pregnancy among 213 Latina adolescents in San Francisco. Participants were tested for pregnancy and interviewed about pregnancy intentions, partnerships, family characteristics and activities every six months for two years. Associations and mediation were examined using logistic regression. RESULTS Neither pregnancy intention variable mediated relationships between participant characteristics and pregnancy. After adjustment for other measures, wantedness was strongly associated with pregnancy (odds ratio, 2.6), while happiness was not. Having a strong family orientation was associated with happiness (3.7) but unrelated to pregnancy. Low sexual relationship power with a main partner was associated with an elevated risk of pregnancy (3.3). If the pregnancy intentions of all participants were changed to definitely not wanting pregnancy, the estimated decline in pregnancy risk would be 16%. CONCLUSIONS Pregnancy intentions were important not as mediators but rather as independent risk factors for pregnancy. Differences in pregnancy rates between groups of Latinas may be less a function of intentional choice than of situational factors. Interventions and research should focus on identifying and targeting factors that hinder effective contraceptive use among teenagers who want to avoid pregnancy. PMID:20887287

  11. Psychosocial variables associated with teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Morgan, C; Chapar, G N; Fisher, M

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated whether psychosocial factors differentiate sexually active teenagers who become pregnant from those who do not. Data were collected from 64 unmarried adolescents who attended a suburban health clinic for a pregnancy test or for contraceptive care. Thirty-nine percent of the sample had been or were now pregnant, and 61% had never been pregnant. Each teenager completed a questionnaire and three self-report measures (Life Events Checklist, Self-Worth, Health Locus of Control) prior to her medical visit. Information about family, medical, and psychosocial history was obtained from chart review. When girls who had positive pregnancy tests, and sexually active girls who had never been pregnant were compared, no significant differences emerged on socioeconomic status, race, religion, age or psychological variables. However, when adolescents with a previous or current history of pregnancy (N = 25) were compared with girls who had never been pregnant (N = 39), using the Mann Whitney test, two significant differences were found: adolescents with a history of pregnancy had first intercourse at the mean age of 15 rather than 16 (p < .02) and scored higher than never-pregnant teenagers on the "Powerful Other" Health Locus of Control subscale, a measure of strong belief in external control by others (p < .01). No significant differences were detected between the groups for self-worth or life events perceived as stressful during the past year. These data indicate that in a middle-class suburban population of sexually active teenagers, earlier age at first intercourse and the influence of powerful others are important variables associated with pregnancy. PMID:7676866

  12. PREDICTORS AND CONSEQUENCES OF ADOLESCENTS’ NORMS AGAINST TEENAGE PREGNANCY

    PubMed Central

    Mollborn, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    African American and Latino teenagers and communities are frequently assumed to have weaker norms against teenage pregnancy than whites. Despite their importance, adolescents’ norms about teenage pregnancy have not been measured or their correlates and consequences documented. This study examines individual-level and contextual variation in adolescents’ embarrassment at the prospect of a teenage pregnancy and its relationship with subsequent teenage pregnancy. Descriptive analyses find that norms vary by gender and individual- and neighborhood-level race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status (SES). In multivariate analyses, neighborhood-level racial/ethnic associations with embarrassment are explained by neighborhood-level SES. Embarrassment is associated with a lower likelihood of subsequent teenage pregnancy but does not mediate racial, ethnic, or socioeconomic influences, underscoring the importance of both norms and structural factors for understanding teenage fertility. PMID:21921969

  13. [Support for teenage pregnancies and early emotional deprivation].

    PubMed

    Andro, Gwénäelle

    2016-01-01

    The perinatal psychology and psychiatry unit of Caen university hospital has put in place two systematic intervention protocols relating to pregnancy: teenage pregnancy and denial of pregnancy. Professionals are particularly concerned with teenagers with a history of early emotional deprivation and mistreatment, with the spectre of repetition. A partnership with a motherhood centre helps all concerned to work together to build resilience. PMID:27444534

  14. [The social problem of pregnancy in teenagers].

    PubMed

    del Rey Calero, Juan

    2005-01-01

    Pregnancy in teenagers in an important problem due to its human, health and social implication, and the World Health Organization considers them as high-risk pregnancies. About one-third to one-half of teenagers assume high risk sex behaviours. Fecundity rates among teenagers have risen up 19 per 1,000. Birth from adolescents mothers (11,284 in the year 2,000) have not increased due to abortion (rate of 9,8 per 1,000) and the percentage of adolescents pregnant girls who have an abortion, 50% (in 2003). Sexual education campaigns have failed. Odds ratio for became pregnant was 3.2 among those girls who consulted about oral contraceptives, 2.9 in those who use oral contraceptives, and 2.7 in those who used contraceptive sheath. These data indicate that information per se is not enough is not accompanied by ah round training of the personality as to values, self-control and responsability.

  15. Childhood victimization and subsequent risk for promiscuity, prostitution, and teenage pregnancy: a prospective study.

    PubMed Central

    Widom, C S; Kuhns, J B

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the extent to which being abused and/or neglected in childhood increases a person's risk for promiscuity, prostitution, and teenage pregnancy. METHODS: A prospective cohorts design was used to match, on the basis of age, race, sex, and social class, cases of abused and/or neglected children from 1967 to 1971 with nonabused and nonneglected children; subjects were followed into young adulthood. From 1989 to 1995 1196 subjects (676 abused and/or neglected and 520 control subjects were located and interviewed. RESULTS: Early childhood abuse and/or neglect was a significant predictor of prostitution for females (odds ratio [OR] = 2.96). For females, sexual abuse (OR = 2.54) and neglect (OR = 2.58) were associated with prostitution, whereas physical abuse was only marginally associated. Childhood abuse and neglect were not associated with increased risk for promiscuity or teenage pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS: These findings strongly support a relationship between childhood victimization and subsequent prostitution. The presumed causal sequence between childhood victimization and teenage pregnancy may need to be reevaluated. PMID:8916528

  16. Interventions Addressing the Social Determinants of Teenage Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Adam; Harden, Angela; Brunton, Ginny; Oakley, Ann; Bonell, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The limited evidence of effectiveness of existing teenage pregnancy strategies which focus on sex education, together with growing evidence that factors such as poor school ethos, disaffection, truancy, poor employment prospects and low expectations are associated with teenage pregnancy, has increased interest in interventions which…

  17. Abuse during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... depressed, eat unhealthy foods, or pick up bad habits such as smoking or drinking . An abusive partner may try to ... depressed, eat unhealthy foods, or pick up bad habits such as smoking or drinking . An abusive partner may try to ...

  18. Nutrition in Teenage Pregnancy. A Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gans, Dian

    This package of nutrition lessons was developed for teaching pregnant teenagers and teenaged parents enrolled in School-Aged Maternity (SAM) Programs in Wisconsin about nutrition. This guide provides a set of flexible lessons and resources for the SAM teacher (and for any person involved in teaching pregnant teenagers or teenaged parents) to…

  19. Improving Schooling to Reduce Teenage Pregnancy. ERIC/CUE Digest, Number 28.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Carol

    This brief digest discusses teenage pregnancy and various educational strategies that appear to affect pregnancy rates. While pregnancy among white teenagers has increased since the 1970s, the birthrate among black teenagers is still five to eight times higher. Teenage mothers and fathers have lower educational attainment and income than their…

  20. Why is the number of pregnancies among teenagers decreasing?

    PubMed

    Powell, M G; Deber, R B

    1982-09-15

    The issue of pregnancy among adolescent women has received considerable attention from the media. Contrary to common belief, both the numbers and the rates of such pregnancies, even when data on abortion are included, have been declining. Patterns of contraception may account for some of the decrease; however, more study is required. In the past, unmarried teenagers who became pregnant either got married or put the baby up for adoption. Now they can either have an abortion or keep the baby. Solutions to the problems of pregnancy among teenagers must therefore be addressed to these altered social consequences rather than to misleading comments about "epidemics", with their suggestion of increased rates of pregnancy.

  1. Teenage pregnancy: a comparative study of the outcome and complications.

    PubMed

    Thekkekkara, Tina; Veenu, J

    2009-01-01

    This study compares the outcome and complications of pregnancy among teenagers with those above 19 years of age. This retrospective study conducted in a maternity hospital in rural Karnataka, under the guidance of the department of community medicine, St Johns National Academy of Health Sciences, Bangalore, included 221 women who delivered between February 2003 and April 2003. The data was tabulated in excel spreadsheet and analysed using epi 6 programme. Anaemia among teenage multigravidae was found to be a significant health problem. There were no statistically significant differences between the gestational age at delivery and the mode of delivery in the different age groups. Teenage pregnancy was not found to be associated with an increased risk for antenatal complications or postnatal complications. There was no increased incidence of low birth weight or congenital anomalies among the babies of teenage mothers. Mortality was not found to be increased both among the teenage mothers as well as their babies. PMID:19588686

  2. Pregnancy and Substance Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... If you smoke, use alcohol or take illegal drugs, so does your unborn baby. First, don't ... Smoking during pregnancy passes nicotine and cancer-causing drugs to your baby. Smoke also keeps your baby ...

  3. Trends and pattern of drug abuse deaths in Maryland teenagers.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Zhang, Xiang; Levine, Berry; Li, Guohua; Zielke, H Ronald; Fowler, David R

    2011-07-01

    The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of Maryland recorded a total of 149 drug abuse deaths of teenagers aged 13-19 years between 1991 and 2006. Of these deaths, 96 (64.4%) were caused by the use of narcotic drugs only, 29 (19.5%) by both narcotics and cocaine, four (2.7%) by both narcotics and methylenedioxymethamphetamine, six (4.0%) by cocaine only, and 14 (9.4%) by volatile substances (e.g., butane, Freon, nitrous oxide, and propane). The annual death rate from drug abuse for teenagers increased from 1.4 deaths per 100,000 population in 1991 to 2.7 deaths per 100,000 population in 2006 (chi-square test for time trend, p<0.01). The increase in teenager drug abuse deaths occurred in 1999 and since has remained at a higher rate. Further analysis revealed that the increase in drug abuse deaths was attributable to a large degree to narcotic drugs, particularly heroin/morphine and methadone, and was confined to teenagers residing in the suburban and rural areas. PMID:21392003

  4. Trends and pattern of drug abuse deaths in Maryland teenagers.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Zhang, Xiang; Levine, Berry; Li, Guohua; Zielke, H Ronald; Fowler, David R

    2011-07-01

    The Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of Maryland recorded a total of 149 drug abuse deaths of teenagers aged 13-19 years between 1991 and 2006. Of these deaths, 96 (64.4%) were caused by the use of narcotic drugs only, 29 (19.5%) by both narcotics and cocaine, four (2.7%) by both narcotics and methylenedioxymethamphetamine, six (4.0%) by cocaine only, and 14 (9.4%) by volatile substances (e.g., butane, Freon, nitrous oxide, and propane). The annual death rate from drug abuse for teenagers increased from 1.4 deaths per 100,000 population in 1991 to 2.7 deaths per 100,000 population in 2006 (chi-square test for time trend, p<0.01). The increase in teenager drug abuse deaths occurred in 1999 and since has remained at a higher rate. Further analysis revealed that the increase in drug abuse deaths was attributable to a large degree to narcotic drugs, particularly heroin/morphine and methadone, and was confined to teenagers residing in the suburban and rural areas.

  5. Substance Use and Abuse among Children and Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Michael D.; Bentler, Peter M.

    1989-01-01

    Although child or teenage drug use is an individual behavior, it is embedded in a sociocultural context that strongly determines its character and manifestations. Examines drug use and abuse from a multidimensional perspective that includes aspects of the stimulus, organism, response, and consequences. Discusses epidemiology, etiology, prevention,…

  6. Facts about teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted disease, and birth control.

    PubMed

    1995-07-01

    This patient update presents information about teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and contraception. In the US, one million teenagers become pregnant each year, and 85% of these pregnancies are unplanned. Pregnancy can occur the first time a person has sexual intercourse, and, without the use of contraception, 90% of sexually active teenagers will become pregnant within a year. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) can be transmitted during first intercourse, and about 25% of sexually active teenagers (three million) get an STD each year. The best protection against STDs and AIDS is abstinence, followed by use of a latex male condom or a female condom. It is known that many teenagers are afraid to use contraceptives because they fail to realize that contraception is safer than pregnancy and delivery. Common fears about oral contraceptives (that the body need a "rest" from their use and that they cause cancer, weight gain, future problems with pregnancy, and birth defects) arise from misinformation. In fact, this type of contraception has many beneficial effects. Similarly, fears about the condom (it is not effective, it may break, it will interfere with pleasure), contraceptive implants (they will hurt, they are not safe, they can break in the arm), and injectables (they are not effective, they cause heavy menstrual bleeding, and they cause cancer) are also ill-founded. This patient information sheet provides accurate information in each case.

  7. Trends in teenage pregnancy in Australia, 1971-1981.

    PubMed

    Siedlecky, S

    1983-08-01

    Between 1971 and 1981 the age-specific birth rate among Australian teenagers declined by 49%, faster than in any other age group. This is a reflection of several trends--a decline in the total number of pregnancies indicating better use of contraception, a marked decline in marital births as both the planned births and the ex-nuptially conceived births fell, and a rise in the rates of abortion among teenagers. Since nuptial births declined faster than ex-nuptial births the proportion of ex-nuptial births among teenagers rose from 32% to 57%. However, unmarried teenagers have consistently shown lower rates of ex-nuptial births than other age groups. The options available to young women faced with unplanned pregnancy appear to be changing in emphasis--abortion or single parenthood rather than adoption or forced marriage. The decline may have halted since 1980 and several social factors which may be contributing to the various trends are discussed.

  8. [The physical impact of pregnancy on a teenager].

    PubMed

    Audinet, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy in a teenager may be an expression of her angst. From a lack of contraception or its failure, to the desire to be pregnant, she may be expressing her wish to acquire the status of an adult or to offset depression and anxiety resulting from abandonment. The situation is further compounded by the physical changes she undergoes. Providing the teenager with global support is essential. PMID:27444531

  9. Management of Teenage Pregnancies in Three Different Health Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatelbaum, Robert

    1978-01-01

    This paper reports a retrospective study undertaken to determine if differences existed in obstetric outcome, contraceptive usage, and repeat pregnancy rates of teenage patients cared for in three different health care settings: the Rochester Adolescent Maternity Project (RAMP), a traditional obstetric clinic, and a neighborhood health center.…

  10. Teenage Pregnancy: The Problem That Hasn't Gone Away.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alan Guttmacher Inst., New York, NY.

    This document gives information about teenage pregnancy and related issues. The document is divided into 10 sections and then further subdivided into components. The components contain prose summaries with statistical charts. Section 1, Sexuality Activity and Marriage, provides data on trends in premarital sex and marriage rates for black and…

  11. Teenage Pregnancy Prevention and Related Issues. Memo No. 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, Richard; Russell, Pam

    This memo is an update of a previous memo to the Special Committee on Teenage Pregnancy Prevention and Related Issues. It lists the suggestions that have been submitted by Committee members to staff as of February 21, 1991; and includes suggestions made since the January 24, 1991 meeting of the Special Committee. The suggestions are broken down…

  12. Teenage Pregnancy: A Continuing Problem Defies Easy Solution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beachum-Bilby, Sheila

    1997-01-01

    The goals, grantmaking strategies, and interests of the Mott Foundation with regard to identifying problems and developing programs for adolescent women are reviewed in a brief introduction. Four articles address various aspects of the problem of teenage pregnancy. The title article provides a review of recent statistics on a decline in the teen…

  13. Teenage Pregnancy and Sex and Relationship Education: Myths and (Mis)conceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Kerry

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the role of sex and relationship education (SRE) in reducing teenage pregnancy rates. It critically examines some of the assumptions underlying the emphasis placed on SRE within the teenage pregnancy strategy ( SEU, 1999)--in particular, the view that ignorance of sexual matters plays a key part in teenage conception. An…

  14. Unrecognized "crack" cocaine abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D; Parr, M J; Shutt, L E

    1996-10-01

    We report a case of "crack" cocaine abuse in a pregnant patient associated with haematuria, proteinuria, haemolytic anaemia, renal impairment, thrombocytopenia and pulmonary oedema. The case illustrates the problems for clinicians where unrecognized cocaine abuse interferes with the diagnosis and management of a complicated pregnancy. In addition, we discuss the principles for the safe conduct of anaesthesia in the pregnant cocaine abuser.

  15. Unrecognized "crack" cocaine abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D; Parr, M J; Shutt, L E

    1996-10-01

    We report a case of "crack" cocaine abuse in a pregnant patient associated with haematuria, proteinuria, haemolytic anaemia, renal impairment, thrombocytopenia and pulmonary oedema. The case illustrates the problems for clinicians where unrecognized cocaine abuse interferes with the diagnosis and management of a complicated pregnancy. In addition, we discuss the principles for the safe conduct of anaesthesia in the pregnant cocaine abuser. PMID:8942348

  16. Teenagers' Perceived and Actual Probabilities of Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Namerow, Pearila Brickner; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Explored adolescent females' (N=425) actual and perceived probabilities of pregnancy. Subjects estimated their likelihood of becoming pregnant the last time they had intercourse, and indicated the dates of last intercourse and last menstrual period. Found that the distributions of perceived probability of pregnancy were nearly identical for both…

  17. "Planned" Teenage Pregnancy: Perspectives of Young Women from Disadvantaged Backgrounds in England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Lester; Cater, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    The reduction of teenage pregnancy has attracted much interest in research, practice and social policy. Little is known about teenagers who report their pregnancies as "planned." Forty-one in-depth interviews were undertaken, in six different parts of England, among young women who reported their pregnancy as "planned". The mean age at conception…

  18. School-based model for preventing teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schinke, S P

    1982-01-01

    Social workers in the schools can take positive and immediate action to address teenage pregnancy through the use of interventive models that help teenagers avoid the risk of unwanted pregnancy. The present article describes and empirically supports 1 such school-based model. The author 1st delineates the major problems associated with teenage pregnancy and then relates the preventive model to prior research and details its implementation in school settings. A discussion of reslults from the model's field evaluation is followed with implications for school social workers. The model reported here is directed to all adolescents rather than focusing on a "high-risk" population. The risk of pregnancy is assumed to be a normal part of adolescent development. Grounded in an intterpersonal conceptualization of teenage pregnancy and in related empirical research, the school-based model helps young men and women acquire the requisite skills for preventing unwanted pregnancy. The program requires school social workers to meet with 12-18 teenage students of both sexes and to provide them with basic information on human sexuality, reproduction and contraception. These topics are covered by lectures, demostrations, discussion and audiovisual presentations. Through instruction, feedback and reinforcement, student learn how to talk about sensitive topics, stand up for their rights and be convincing and effective when carrying out decisions. Homework assignments are designed to develop the students'skills in interactions with dating partners, parents and friends. The clinical applicability and effectiveness of this prevention training model is documented through a study conducted in an urban high school. 36 informed and consenting sophomores of both sexes were randomly assigned either to an interventive group or to a non-treatment control group. Compared to the latter, the former had more accurate knowledge of human reproduction and contraception after the intervention

  19. Teenage Pregnancy: Epidemic or Statistical Hoax?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasun, Jacqueline

    1978-01-01

    The pamphlet, "What Can Be Done About the Epidemic of Adolescent Pregnancies in the United States?" is critically examined. The author attempts to correct statistical distortions, thereby challenging the much-decried epidemic, and takes a look at the administration of the Planned Parenthood/Guttmacher Institute in terms of its objectives. (RK)

  20. Preventing Teenage Pregnancy: Contributions from Attachment Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pistole, M. Carole

    1999-01-01

    Efforts to prevent unintended teen pregnancy seem to have ignored emotional motivations in romantic relationships. Proposes a model that may provide mental-health counselors with a theoretical-research base for interventions and programming designed to enhance teens' romantic relationships while simultaneously preventing unwanted consequences such…

  1. Is education the best contraception: the case of teenage pregnancy in England?

    PubMed

    Girma, Sourafel; Paton, David

    2015-04-01

    This paper examines potential explanations for recent declines in teenage pregnancy in England. We estimate panel data models of teenage conception, birth and abortion rates from regions in England. Although point estimates are consistent with the promotion of long acting reversible contraception (LARC) having a negative impact on teenage pregnancy rates, the effects are generally small and statistically insignificant. In contrast, improvements in educational achievement and, to a lesser extent, increases in the non-white proportion of the population are associated with large and statistically significant reductions in teenage pregnancy. PMID:25748109

  2. Is education the best contraception: the case of teenage pregnancy in England?

    PubMed

    Girma, Sourafel; Paton, David

    2015-04-01

    This paper examines potential explanations for recent declines in teenage pregnancy in England. We estimate panel data models of teenage conception, birth and abortion rates from regions in England. Although point estimates are consistent with the promotion of long acting reversible contraception (LARC) having a negative impact on teenage pregnancy rates, the effects are generally small and statistically insignificant. In contrast, improvements in educational achievement and, to a lesser extent, increases in the non-white proportion of the population are associated with large and statistically significant reductions in teenage pregnancy.

  3. Teenage Pregnancy and Female Educational Underachievement: A Prospective Study of a New Zealand Birth Cohort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fergusson, David M.; Woodward, Lianne J.

    2000-01-01

    Study examined the relationship between teenage pregnancy and educational underachievement in a sample of women studied from birth to 21 years. Findings suggest that rates of teenage pregnancy might be elevated among women who leave school early, rather than rates of early school leaving being elevated among women who become pregnant. (Author/JDM)

  4. Parental Support for Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Programmes in South Carolina Public Middle Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, India; Prince, Mary; Flynn, Shannon; Kershner, Sarah; Taylor, Doug

    2014-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy is a major public health issue in the USA; this is especially true in the state of South Carolina (SC). Research shows that well developed, good-quality teenage pregnancy prevention (TPP) programmes can be effective in modifying young people's sexual behaviour. While several quantitative studies have examined parents'…

  5. Prevention of the Teenage Pregnancy Epidemic: A Social Learning Theory Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagenhoff, Carol; And Others

    1987-01-01

    The review provides a social learning model for explaining adolescent sexual behavior and use/nonuse of contraceptives. The model explains behavior patterns responsible for epidemic rates of teenage pregnancies, suggests research that will result in prevention of teenage pregnancies, and incorporates a range of social/cultural factors. (DB)

  6. Teenage Pregnancy from a Black Perspective: Some Reflections on Its Prevention. Occasional Paper No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendricks, Leo E.; Montgomery, Teresa A.

    This paper focuses on the causes, consequences and prevention of the alarming number of pregnancies among black teenagers. Teenage pregnancy is a symptom of the failure to have one's basic spiritual, intellectual/emotional, and physical needs met. Unmet infantile needs cause adolescents to search for romantic relationships in which they can…

  7. Teenage pregnancy in developed countries: determinants and policy implications.

    PubMed

    Jones, E F; Forrest, J D; Goldman, N; Henshaw, S K; Lincoln, R; Rosoff, J I; Westoff, C F; Wulf, D

    1985-01-01

    Because of the high adolescent fertility rates in the US, the Alan Guttmacher Institute (AGI) conducted a 1985 study of adolescent pregnancy and childbearing in 37 developed countries. This was an effort to unveil those factors responsible for determining teenage reproductive behavior. This article presents the data from that study. Birthrates were collected and separated into 2 age groups: for those under 18 and those women 18 to 19 years of age. A 42 variable questionnaire was sent to the public affairs officer of the American embassy and family planning organization in each foreign country to provide additional socioeconomic, behavioral, and educational data. Childbearing was found to be positively correlated with agricultural work, denoting a socioeconomic influence. Adolescent birthrates showed a positive correlation with levels of maternity leaves and benefits offered in the country. The lowest birthrates were found in those countries with the most liberal attitudes toward sex as demonstrated through media representation of female nudity, extent of nudity on public beaches, sales of sexually explicit literature, and media advertising of condoms. A negative correlation was seen for equitable distribution of income and the under 18 birthrate. The older teenage birthrate was found to be lower for countries with higher minimum ages for marriage. They also suggested a responsiveness to government efforts to increase fertility. Some general patterns emerged to explain the high teenage birthrate for the US: it is less open about sexual matters than countries with lower adolescent birthrates and the income in the US is distributed to families of low economic status. A more subtle factor is that although contraception is available, it is not that accessible to young men and women because of the cost. Case studies were presented to provide a more detailed understanding of the reasons for the high adolescent birthrates. Examined are desire for pregnancy, exposure to

  8. Abuse of over-the-counter dextromethorphan by teenagers.

    PubMed

    Murray, S; Brewerton, T

    1993-10-01

    Dextromethorphan, the d-isomer of the opiate agonist levorphanol, has none of the analgesic or sedative effects associated with the opiates and is approved for over-the-counter use as an antitussive. It is available, in various combinations with other medications, in nonprescription cough suppressant and common cold formulations, and its availability in the United States is not controlled. In this paper we have reported two cases of recreational use of dextromethorphan-containing cough syrup by two unrelated teenage boys. Despite the safety of this medication when used at the recommended dosage, there have been cases of "recreational" use of dextromethorphan as well as death by overdose. Although usually thought to be nonaddictive, dextromethorphan produces a substance dependence syndrome, and physicians should be aware of its abuse potential, particularly by youths. PMID:8211334

  9. The effect of social policies on teenage pregnancy and childbearing.

    PubMed

    Plotnick, R D

    1993-06-01

    A review of recent research findings suggests that social policies have a significant effect on adolescent pregnancy and its outcomes. Excluded from the analysis were studies that did not control for the influence of personal, familial, and environmental factors on adolescent sexual behavior. Policies most likely to prevent undesired outcomes are those offering tangible family planning services and improving both the access to and affordability of abortion. Most effective in improving contraceptive use among teenagers appear to be comprehensive community-based programs with links to local schools. There is no evidence that efforts to promote values such as abstinence or enhance self-esteem are successful. However, job training, guaranteed student loans, and other measures that improve the educational and earnings opportunities of adolescents may have an indirect impact on reducing teenage pregnancy and childbearing by providing an incentive for deferred parenthood. The research concerning the impact of AFDC benefits is inconclusive, but higher welfare benefits appear to discourage marriage. In addition, the deteriorating economic status of young males over the past 15 years has increased the proportion of out-of-wedlock births.

  10. Understanding teenage pregnancy in a post-apartheid South African township.

    PubMed

    Mkhwanazi, Nolwazi

    2010-05-01

    Although South Africa's total fertility rate is one of the lowest in sub-Saharan Africa, high rates of early childbearing remain a concern. Most teenage pregnancies occur among poor black and coloured South Africans. The majority of these pregnancies are said to be unwanted and unplanned and the teenager's relationships, unstable. Becoming a mother during one's teenage years is perceived to be socially, economically and physically deleterious for the teenager and her baby. This paper presents ethnographic data collected over a five-year period in the South African township of Nyanga East in the Western Cape. It draws attention to the circumstances that surround teenage pregnancy and discusses reactions to teenage pregnancies in this community. Findings highlight that despite the negative perception of teenage pregnancy within the township, particular social and cultural circumstances provided fertile ground for its occurrence. Furthermore, the paper argues that in this particular community the management of a teenage pregnancy played a functional and critical role in maintaining and reproducing social norms and ideals regarding intergenerational relationships, which ultimately ensured that the rates of early childbearing remained high.

  11. Understanding teenage pregnancy in a post-apartheid South African township.

    PubMed

    Mkhwanazi, Nolwazi

    2010-05-01

    Although South Africa's total fertility rate is one of the lowest in sub-Saharan Africa, high rates of early childbearing remain a concern. Most teenage pregnancies occur among poor black and coloured South Africans. The majority of these pregnancies are said to be unwanted and unplanned and the teenager's relationships, unstable. Becoming a mother during one's teenage years is perceived to be socially, economically and physically deleterious for the teenager and her baby. This paper presents ethnographic data collected over a five-year period in the South African township of Nyanga East in the Western Cape. It draws attention to the circumstances that surround teenage pregnancy and discusses reactions to teenage pregnancies in this community. Findings highlight that despite the negative perception of teenage pregnancy within the township, particular social and cultural circumstances provided fertile ground for its occurrence. Furthermore, the paper argues that in this particular community the management of a teenage pregnancy played a functional and critical role in maintaining and reproducing social norms and ideals regarding intergenerational relationships, which ultimately ensured that the rates of early childbearing remained high. PMID:20162476

  12. Seven years of teenage pregnancy in an inner London genitourinary medicine service - a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hegazi, Aseel; Daley, Natalie; Williams, Elizabeth; McLeod, Felicity; Rafiezadeh, Saba; Prime, Katia

    2014-12-01

    Young people attending genitourinary medicine services are at high risk of unplanned pregnancy. We performed a retrospective cohort study to identify characteristics of pregnant teenagers accessing an inner London genitourinary medicine service. There were 481 pregnancies in 458 teenagers with 54 previous pregnancies and 46 previous terminations of pregnancy. The under-18 and under-16 teenage pregnancy rates were 92.1 and 85.8 per 1000 age-matched clinic attendees, respectively. Median age was 17.1 years. 'Black Other' teenagers ('Black British', 'Mixed White-Black Caribbean' and 'Mixed White-Black African') were over-represented, compared to our clinic population, while those of White ethnicity were under-represented. Few pregnancies (1.5%) were planned with the majority (64%) intending terminations of pregnancy. Most teenagers did not use consistent contraception. Two-thirds of patients had attended genitourinary medicine services in the past and sexually transmitted infection prevalence at presentation was high. Effectively targeting the sexual and reproductive health needs of teenage genitourinary medicine clinic attendees may have a significant impact on reducing sexually transmitted infections, unplanned pregnancy and terminations of pregnancy in this group.

  13. A New Look at Teenage Pregnancy in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Heilborn, Maria Luiza; Cabral, Cristiane S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper brings a synthesis of some of the main results provided by GRAVAD survey (Teenage pregnancy: multicentric study about youth, sexuality and reproduction in Brazil). GRAVAD is a study about sexual and reproductive behavior among Brazilian youth that interviewed 4,634 individuals in a population survey with a random sample. Women and men between 18 and 24 years old were interviewed in three capitals—Porto Alegre, Rio de Janeiro and Salvador. “Teen pregnancy” is not the consequence of promiscuous sexual activities, as popular beliefs currently state. It is often ignored that amidst the poorer social segments parenthood is seen as a sign of social status, given the lack of professional perspectives. Among the middle class, other sociocultural horizons give parenthood the status of an experience to be lived in later moments of live, when one's professional and financial lives have been consolidated. PMID:21912748

  14. Sexualities, Teenage Pregnancy and Educational Life Histories in Portugal: Experiencing Sexual Citizenship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fonseca, Laura; Araujo, Helena C.; Santos, Sofia A.

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on Portuguese working-class teenage girls' voices and experiences concerning sexuality and pregnancy. Within a sociological, feminist and educational framework, it explores the girls' perspective on sexual and intimate citizenship as evidence of fairer forms of regulation of teenage sexualities. Through building life histories…

  15. Teenagers Who Have Terminated Pregnancies: The Young Young and the Old Young.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshleman, J. Ross

    Pregnancies, abortions, and births to unmarried women occur frequently in the United States; these are of particular concern when they occur to teenagers. This study examined the effects of age on the decision to have an abortion for teenagers (N=256) at a clinic serving a predominantly white clientele from several mid-size cities and the…

  16. Gender Differences in Ayrshire Teenagers' Attitudes to Sexual Relationships, Responsibility, and Unintended Pregnancies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooke, Alister; Capewell, Simon; Whyte, Meg

    2000-01-01

    Examines attitudes of 129 teenagers concerning teenage pregnancy and early sex. Results indicate that 73% of girls advocated joint responsibility for contraceptive protection compared with only 46% of boys. Significantly more boys than girls saw nothing wrong with casual sex and significantly less boys than girls upheld the virtue of commitment in…

  17. Determinants of teenage pregnancies: the case of Busia District in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Were, Maureen

    2007-07-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has one of the highest levels of teenage pregnancies in the world. In spite of that, there is paucity of empirical research on causes of teenage pregnancies in African countries. This paper investigates the determinants of teenage pregnancies based on a case study of Busia District in Kenya. The data are from a household survey conducted in 1998/1999. Empirical results indicate that girls' education level has significant influence on the probability of teenage birth, with non-schooling adolescents and those with primary school level education being more vulnerable. Among the variables used as proxies for access to sex education, availability of church forums that educate adolescents about sex and family life issues reduce probability of teenage pregnancy. Age is positively related to teenage pregnancies, with older adolescents being more predisposed to pregnancies. Though use of contraceptives is found to have a positive effect, only a small proportion of adolescents were using modern contraceptives and, supply side factors such as quality and availability were not accounted for. Other key factors as outlined by the adolescents themselves include peer pressure and social environment-related factors like inappropriate forms of recreation, which act as rendezvous for pre-marital sex, as well as lack of parental guidance and counselling. Overall, lack of access to education opportunities, sex education and information regarding contraceptives, as well the widespread poverty predispose girls to teenage pregnancies. The problem of teenage pregnancies should be viewed within the broader socio-economic and socio-cultural environment in which the adolescents operate. For instance, lack of parental guidance on issues of sexuality and sex education was reinforced by cultural taboos that inhibit such discussions. Adolescents should be equipped with the relevant knowledge to enable them make informed choices regarding sexual relationships. This should be

  18. Association between functional gastrointestinal diseases and exposure to abuse in teenagers.

    PubMed

    Devanarayana, Niranga Manjuri; Rajindrajith, Shaman; Perera, Madushanka S; Nishanthanie, Samudu W; Karunanayake, Amaranath; Benninga, Marc A

    2014-10-01

    Abdominal pain-predominant functional gastrointestinal diseases (AP-FGD) are common in children and commonly attributed to exposure to child abuse. However, this relationship has not been studied in teenagers, and the main objective of the current study was to assess it. Teenagers were recruited from four randomly selected schools in Western province of Sri Lanka. Data were collected using a validated self-administered questionnaire. AP-FGD were diagnosed using Rome III criteria. A total of 1850 teenagers aged 13-18 years were included. Three hundred and five (16.5%) had AP-FGD. AP-FGD were significantly higher in those exposed to sexual (34.0%), emotional (25.0%) and physical (20.2%) abuse, than in those not abused (13.0%, p < 0.001). Those with AP-FGD exposed to abuse had a higher severity score for bowel symptoms (30.8% vs. 24.7% in not abused, p < 0.05). This study highlights the importance of identifying exposure to abuse in management of teenagers with AP-FGD.

  19. Methamphetamine abuse during pregnancy: outcome and fetal effects.

    PubMed

    Little, B B; Snell, L M; Gilstrap, L C

    1988-10-01

    Methamphetamines are a popular class of recreational drugs sometimes abused by women of childbearing age. The effects of methamphetamine abuse on pregnancy outcome and embryofetal development are not known. In this study, we compared pregnancy and fetal outcome in 52 women who abused methamphetamines with a randomly selected control group of 52 non-drug-abusing women. Body weight, length, and head circumference were significantly decreased in neonates born to mothers who abused methamphetamines during pregnancy. However, the frequency of congenital anomalies was not significantly increased in this group.

  20. Targetting Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernard van Leer Foundation Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue of the Bernard van Leer Foundation newsletter focuses on the problem of teenage pregnancy and teenage parenthood in developing and developed nations, and examines the problems that teenage mothers face in different societies. It explores societal norms and values related to teenage parenting; the effects of teenage parents on…

  1. "Someone of Your Own to Love": Experiences of Being Looked after as Influences on Teenage Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Abigail; Chase, Elaine; Aggleton, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Previous research has shown that children and young people who are looked after are vulnerable to poor life outcomes, including early pregnancy. This paper examines how experiences of being looked after may contribute to teenage pregnancy. Using in-depth interviews, data were collected from 63 young people recently looked after who are aged 15-24…

  2. An Evaluation of a School-Based Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Program Using a Logic Model Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulton, Linda J.

    2007-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy and the subsequent social morbidities associated with unintended pregnancies are complex issues facing school nurses in their daily work. In contemporary practice, school nurses are being held to higher standards of accountability and being asked to demonstrate the effective outcomes of their interventions. The purpose of this…

  3. Teenage Pregnancy as Moral Panic: Reflections on the Marginalization of Girls' Feelings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cockett, Lynn S.; Knetzer, Sarah

    1998-01-01

    Suggests that library media centers and public libraries are among the main institutions responsible for providing information on teenage pregnancy. Argues that the treatment of teen pregnancy as an "epidemic" by the United States government and the media, and the representation of pregnant girls in young adult fiction contribute to gender…

  4. Does Father Absence Place Daughters at Special Risk for Early Sexual Activity and Teenage Pregnancy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Bruce J.; Bates, John E.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Fergusson, David M.; Horwood, L. John; Pettit, Gregory S.; Woodward, Lianne

    2003-01-01

    Longitudinal studies in two countries investigated impact of father absence on girls' early sexual activity (ESA) and teenage pregnancy. Findings indicated that greater exposure to father absence strongly related to elevated ESA and adolescent pregnancy risk. Elevated risk was not explained (U.S. sample) or only partly explained (New Zealand…

  5. Race differences in teenage sexuality, pregnancy, and adolescent childbearing.

    PubMed

    Furstenberg, F F

    1987-01-01

    This article has examined the origin and consequences of racial differences in teen sexuality, pregnancy, and childbearing. Black/white differences in rates of early and out-of-wedlock childbearing have been declining in the past several decades though the incidence of nonmartial fertility among younger teens is still about five times as high for blacks as for whites. Early sexual behavior, irregular use of contraception, and a much lower probability of marrying prior to having a birth all contribute to the racial differential. Evidence suggests that both normative and socioeconomic differences may account for these demographic patterns. Black teens show markedly higher tolerance for childbearing before marriage. They also express much greater reservations about the viability of marriage, especially at an early age, than do whites. These views may affect their willingness to risk early pregnancy and initiate intercourse at an early age. Several types of interventions that might reduce black/white differences in teen childbearing were reviewed. The most promising of these involved simultaneously strengthening the community sanctions that discourage early parenthood while expanding social opportunities. Presently, poor, especially poor minority youth, may feel that they have little to lose by entering parenthood prematurely. Unless we are able to persuade these youth that they have a larger stake in the future, we are unlikely to see a dramatic decline in the incidence of early childbearing among blacks. This does not necessarily mean that racial differences are destined to persist. Increasingly, white youth are subject to many of the same conditions that have produced high rates of early and out-of-wedlock childbearing among blacks. Thus, racial differences may decline not because the situation of blacks is improving but because white youth are less willing to defer sexual activity or less able to marry when pregnancy occurs. This may at least change the perception

  6. A survey of attitudes concerning contraception and the resolution of teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rinck, C; Rudolph, J A; Simkins, L

    1983-01-01

    This study reports the results of a survey of 498 respondents in a large midwestern community concerning their attitudes toward making contraceptive services available to teenagers and the manner in which a teenage pregnancy should be resolved. The results indicated that the large majority of respondents approved of the practice of making contraceptives available to teenagers but there were also significant differences in attitudes expressed which were dependent upon demographic characteristics of the respondent. There was also considerable variability in the attitudes expressed concerning the resolution of a teenage pregnancy. The preferred method of resolution depended again on the demographic characteristics of the respondent. Keeping the baby and placing the baby for adoption were the most frequent choices. These results are discussed with relation to the present strong political conservative movement in the nation.

  7. Internet Abuse among Teenagers and Its Relations to Internet Usage Patterns and Demographics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gencer, Suzan Lema; Koc, Mustafa

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on exploring Internet abuse among teenagers and its relations to some Internet usage patterns and demographic characteristics in a digitalizing country, Turkey. It was designed as a cross-sectional research on three types of school that differ in their academic performances. The data were collected from 1380 high school students…

  8. Classroom Activities in Nutrition in Teenage Pregnancy. Bulletin No. 91140.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gans, Gian; Hetzel, Barbara A.

    The lessons developed in this guide were designed for pregnant teenagers and teenage parents enrolled in the Wisconsin School-Age Parent (SAPAR) Program. The lessons can also be adapted for use in non-SAPAR courses such as family and consumer education, health, and language arts. The guide has eight chapters: Introduction (a preliminary lesson…

  9. The Effect of School-Based Health Clinics on Teenage Pregnancy and Parenting Outcomes: An Integrated Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strunk, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy outcomes have become an increasing concern in the United States. Education and support of pregnant teens are critical factors that may determine good or poor pregnancy outcomes. Poor outcomes may include low birth weight, developmental delays, and poor academic performance. Although the number of teenagers experiencing pregnancy…

  10. Beyond the discourse of reproductive choice: narratives of pregnancy resolution among Latina/o teenage parents.

    PubMed

    Mann, Emily S; Cardona, Vanessa; Gómez, Cynthia A

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that the US teenage birth rate has declined dramatically in recent years, teen births among Latinas are higher than any other racial/ethnic group. Most studies focus on the causes and consequences of early motherhood among Latina teenagers, neglecting other important dimensions of the issue. This study examines how Latina/o teenage parents living in California narrate their experiences with unintended pregnancy resolution. Qualitative analysis reveals three central themes. First, participants expressed shock upon learning they or their partner was pregnant, followed by acceptance about their impending parenthood. Second, participants' views of abortion and adoption largely foreclosed these options as pathways by which to resolve their unintended pregnancies. Third, participants recounted numerous stories of the messages they received from parents, other family members and male partners that were frequently directive regarding how to resolve their pregnancies. These findings have implications for young people's reproductive health and rights, and for reproductive justice more broadly.

  11. Beyond the discourse of reproductive choice: narratives of pregnancy resolution among Latina/o teenage parents.

    PubMed

    Mann, Emily S; Cardona, Vanessa; Gómez, Cynthia A

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fact that the US teenage birth rate has declined dramatically in recent years, teen births among Latinas are higher than any other racial/ethnic group. Most studies focus on the causes and consequences of early motherhood among Latina teenagers, neglecting other important dimensions of the issue. This study examines how Latina/o teenage parents living in California narrate their experiences with unintended pregnancy resolution. Qualitative analysis reveals three central themes. First, participants expressed shock upon learning they or their partner was pregnant, followed by acceptance about their impending parenthood. Second, participants' views of abortion and adoption largely foreclosed these options as pathways by which to resolve their unintended pregnancies. Third, participants recounted numerous stories of the messages they received from parents, other family members and male partners that were frequently directive regarding how to resolve their pregnancies. These findings have implications for young people's reproductive health and rights, and for reproductive justice more broadly. PMID:25953108

  12. Risk of teen-age pregnancy in a rural community of India.

    PubMed

    Pratinidhi, A; Shrotri, A; Shah, U

    1990-01-01

    In India, there has been a declining trend in teenage pregnancy between 1977-79 and 1981-84. Teenage pregnancy tends to occur within marriages, often arranged by parents, and few pregnancies occur among unmarried teenagers. There are nevertheless concerns about the higher rates of nutritional and obstetric problems associated with adolescent pregnancy and the ignorance and immaturity which can result in higher morbidity and mortality among mothers and babies. The change to a minimum age of 18 years for marriage has been suggested as a means of reducing the number of adolescent pregnancies. The study sample included 5994 deliveries in the rural health district area of Sirur, Maharashtra state, India, between 1981 and 1984. Adolescent pregnancies (to women under 20 years old) amounted to 598 deliveries, or 10% of deliveries. The perinatal mortality rate among teenage first births to high-risk mothers (238) under 18 years old was 67.2 per 100 births; the neonatal mortality rate was 61.4. Risk factors such as prolonged labor, short stature, and anemia were associated more with women under 18 years old. Statistically significant differences were found in the rate of low birth weight infants, stillbirths, and late neonatal deaths among women aged under 18 years compared to other women. The perinatal mortality rate was 7-16 times greater when associated risk factors, except anemia, were present. The neonatal mortality rate was 2.5-18 times greater when associated risk factors, except anemia and edema, were present. Late neonatal mortality was 2.2 times higher among infants with mothers under 18 years old. Recommendations were to provide general health education about risks of teenage pregnancy, strictly enforce the minimum age at marriage law, screen all pregnant mothers for risk factors, and provide at-risk mothers with education about child bearing and rearing and referral to a hospital for safe delivery. Referrals are particularly important among first pregnancies

  13. Anabolic Steroid Abuse among Teenage Girls: An Illusory Problem?

    PubMed Central

    Kanayama, Gen; Boynes, Matthew; Hudson, James I.; Field, Alison E.; Pope, Harrison G.

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent media reports have portrayed an alarming increase in apparent anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) use among American teenage girls; Congress even held hearings on the subject in June 2005. We questioned whether AAS use among teenage girls was as widespread as claimed. Methods We reviewed four large national surveys and many smaller surveys examining the prevalence of AAS use among teenage girls. Virtually all of these surveys used anonymous questionnaires. We asked particularly whether the language of survey questions might generate false-positive responses among girls who misinterpreted the term “steroid.” We also reviewed data from other countries, together with results from the only recent study (to our knowledge) in which investigators personally interviewed female AAS users. Results The surveys produced remarkably disparate findings, with the lifetime prevalence of AAS use estimated as high as 7.3% among ninth-grade girls in one study, but only 0.1% among teenage girls in several others. Upon examining the surveys reporting an elevated prevalence, it appeared that most used questions that failed to distinguish between anabolic steroids, corticosteroids, and over-the-counter supplements that respondents might confuse with “steroids.” Other features in the phrasing of certain questions also seemed likely to further bias results in favor of false-positive responses. Conclusions Many anonymous surveys, using imprecise questions, appear to have greatly overestimated the lifetime prevalence of AAS use among teenage girls; the true lifetime prevalence may well be as low as 0.1%. Future studies can test this impression by using a carefully phrased question regarding AAS use. PMID:17127018

  14. Trends in teenage smoking during pregnancy. Washington State: 1984 through 1988.

    PubMed

    Davis, R L; Tollestrup, K; Milham, S

    1990-12-01

    Smoking rates in the United States have decreased since 1963, but this trend is less apparent in adolescents, especially girls. Using data on birth certificates from 1984 through 1988, we analyzed smoking trends during pregnancy in teenagers in Washington State. There was a small but significant increase in the overall smoking prevalence during pregnancy between 1984 (32%) and 1988 (37%). Smoking rates varied by mother's age, race and ethnicity, marital status, and prenatal care. Whites had the highest smoking prevalence, and native Americans showed the largest increase in smoking prevalence over time. In the 5 years studied, unmarried pregnant teenagers had a smoking prevalence of 42.8%, compared with a rate of 31.7% in married teenagers. Compared with other studies of smoking rates in nonpregnant teenagers, pregnant teenagers in Washington State had a much higher smoking prevalence than their nonpregnant peers, and the differences between these two groups did not appear to diminish over time. This study suggests that there is little movement toward meeting the 1990 Health Objectives for the Nation regarding smoking in Washington State teenagers who become pregnant.

  15. Turning Points: A Resource Guide on Teenagers, Pregnancy, Alcohol, and Other Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankston, Karen; Strong, Sherrill

    This resource guide was written for teachers; school counselors and nurses; principals and school administrators; other professionals in health care, family planning, alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) prevention and treatment; and community agencies who work with pregnant teenagers and their partners. It is designed to help these practitioners…

  16. Where Inequality Lives in the Body: Teenage Pregnancy, Public Pedagogies and Individual Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luttrell, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    This paper is concerned with how inequality is lived in the body. I have written elsewhere about how teenage pregnancy--as both a public discourse and an individual experience--provides a compelling example of the ways that inequality is carried in bodies, minds, and hearts. The aim of this paper is to revisit my earlier analysis and consider more…

  17. Teenage Pregnancy and Primary Prevention: New Approaches to an Old Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, David J., Jr.; Knight, Susan

    This document describes the Parents Too Soon (PTS) program, a project which integrated a comprehensive array of services for teenagers in an effort to help prevent premature and unwanted pregnancies. Four components of the PTS program are listed: (1) comprehensive family planning medical services including provision of contraceptives; (2) social…

  18. Teenage Pregnancy and Parenting Project. 1983-84 Annual Report and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Francisco Family Service Agency, CA.

    The Teenage Pregnancy and Parenting Project (TAPP) of San Francisco is a city-wide interagency service system coordinated by the city's Family Service Agency and Unified School District. Clients participate in pre- or post-natal service systems that provide free, personal, and continuous counseling for up to three years. Case managers identify and…

  19. Hawaii Demonstration Project to Avert Unintended Teenage Pregnancy: 1978-1982. Final Report. Executive Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levitt-Merin, Marta; Sutter, Sharon Kingdon

    This final report provides a descriptive overview of three approaches which the Hawaii Demonstration Project initiated to reduce unintended teenage pregnancies. Project evaluation findings are summarized; both qualitative and quantitative data are presented for a comprehensive picture of the project and its input. Project limitations and successes…

  20. A Survey of Attitudes concerning Contraception and the Resolution of Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rinck, Christine; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Surveyed 498 Kansas City residents to determine their attitudes regarding contraception and resolution of teenage pregnancy. Results showed 80 percent favored contraceptives for adolescents. Over half favored keeping the baby or placing it for adoption, while 40 percent favored abortion. Responses showed significant demographic differences. (JAC)

  1. Experiences of Peer Evaluation of the Leicester Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, Jennie; Chong, Hannah Goodman; Skinner, Alison

    2009-01-01

    The Centre for Social Action was commissioned by the Leicester City Council to evaluate its Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Strategy. This was a multi-stage project with a central element of consulting with young people. This article outlines the process that was followed in order to recruit, train and support young people through the process of…

  2. Selected Resources in the Areas of Adolescent Sexuality and Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glimps, Blanche E.

    This annotated bibliography of resources is suggested for use by school guidance counselors, health educators, teachers, and school nurses who provide supportive counseling and education to teenagers. It includes a general review of some of the problems associated with adolescent pregnancy and childbirth, and presents a list of selected books,…

  3. The Younger Siblings of Teenage Mothers: A Follow-up of Their Pregnancy Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East, Patricia L.; Jacobson, Leanne J.

    2001-01-01

    Followed for 1.5 years younger siblings of parenting and nonparenting teenagers. Found that relative to other youths, sisters of parenting teens exhibited a sharp increase in drug and alcohol use and partying behavior across time and had the highest pregnancy rate at Time 2. For girls, many hours spent caring for their sisters' children related to…

  4. Teenage Pregnancy and Motherhood: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps-Yonas, Susan

    1980-01-01

    The literature is reviewed in terms of medical studies: who becomes pregnant, teenagers who choose to abort, psychological considerations, contraceptive utilization, attitudes of male adolescents, and the children of adolescents. The effectiveness of special programs for pregnant adolescents and their offspring and implications for policy and…

  5. Characteristics of the Mother and Child in Teenage Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garn, Stanley M.; Petzold, Audrey S.

    1983-01-01

    Data from nearly 30,000 pregnant and third decade (20-29 years) mothers show that small infant size among teenage mothers is consistent with the mother's size and not directly related to early age at conception. Third decade mothers of comparable size give birth to infants with essentially the same characteristics and problems. (Author/GC)

  6. A comparative study of pregnancy outcome in teenage girls and mature women.

    PubMed

    Thame, M; Wilks, R; Matadial, L; Forrester, T E

    1999-06-01

    The objective was to compare the pregnancy outcome of teenage girls and mature women. The design was a retrospective study of births from January to December 1990, based on the antenatal clinic and the labour ward, University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica. Teenage mothers, 13 to 19 years old, and a control group of mothers, 22 to 23 years old, were selected from the records of 2,394 live, singleton births between 200 and 305 days' gestation. The main outcome measures were birth weight, crown heel length, head circumference, head circumference:length ratio, ponderal index and placental weight. The results showed that in the teenage group, weight, body mass index at booking, haemoglobin concentration in each trimester, and minimum haemoglobin level during pregnancy were lower than in the control group. Systolic blood pressure in the first and the second trimesters was lower than in controls, but there was no significant difference in the third trimester nor in the delivery systolic blood pressure. Babies of teenage mothers had lower birth weights and smaller head circumferences than the babies of the control group, but there was no significant difference between the groups in crown heel length, ponderal index, head circumference:length ratio, and placental weight. These data support the hypothesis that teenaged girls are not physically mature and, as a consequence, their offspring have lower birth weights and smaller head circumferences. PMID:10492605

  7. Social Context, Sensation Seeking, and Teen-age Alcohol Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thombs, Dennis L; And Others

    1994-01-01

    An anonymous questionnaire examined alcohol use, the social context of drinking, and sensation seeking among rural seventh through 12th graders. The sensation-seeking trait proved of moderate importance in distinguishing among different alcohol abuse practices. Social context measures were effective in distinguishing among levels on each indicant…

  8. Intimate Partner Violence during Pregnancy and Mothers' Child Abuse Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casanueva, Cecilia E.; Martin, Sandra L.

    2007-01-01

    This research examines whether women who have experienced intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy have a higher child abuse potential than women who have not experienced IPV. Data were analyzed from a longitudinal investigation of IPV during pregnancy. This study recruited 88 pregnant women during prenatal care and followed them for 1 1/2…

  9. Teenage Pregnancy: A New Beginning [and] Working with Childbearing Adolescents. A Guide for Use with Teenage Pregnancy: A New Beginning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barr, Linda; Monserrat, Catherine

    These materials for a classroom or individualized learning setting comprise a curriculum for parenting education for school-age parents. The student textbook covers these topics: pregnant teenager's self-image, questions, and concerns; reproductive cycle and fetal development; prenatal changes and care; preparation for labor and delivery;…

  10. Identification and management of prescription drug abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Worley, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Prescription drug abuse is a growing problem in the United States and many other countries. Estimates of prescription drug abuse rates during pregnancy range from 5% to 20%. The primary prescription drugs designated as controlled drugs with abuse potential in pregnancy are opiates prescribed for pain, benzodiazepines prescribed for anxiety, and stimulants prescribed for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Prescription drugs are obtained for abuse through diversion methods, such as purchasing them from others or by doctor shopping. The use of prescription drugs puts both the mother and the fetus at high risk during pregnancy. Identification of women who are abusing prescription drugs is important so that treatment can be ensured. It is crucial for healthcare professionals to use a multidisciplinary approach and be supportive and maintain a good rapport with pregnant women who abuse prescription drugs. Management includes inpatient hospitalization for detoxification and withdrawal symptoms, and in the case of opiate abuse, opiate maintenance is recommended for pregnant women for the duration of their pregnancy to reduce relapse rates and improve maternal and fetal outcomes. Other recommendations include referral for support groups and supportive housing. PMID:25062521

  11. Identification and management of prescription drug abuse in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Worley, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Prescription drug abuse is a growing problem in the United States and many other countries. Estimates of prescription drug abuse rates during pregnancy range from 5% to 20%. The primary prescription drugs designated as controlled drugs with abuse potential in pregnancy are opiates prescribed for pain, benzodiazepines prescribed for anxiety, and stimulants prescribed for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Prescription drugs are obtained for abuse through diversion methods, such as purchasing them from others or by doctor shopping. The use of prescription drugs puts both the mother and the fetus at high risk during pregnancy. Identification of women who are abusing prescription drugs is important so that treatment can be ensured. It is crucial for healthcare professionals to use a multidisciplinary approach and be supportive and maintain a good rapport with pregnant women who abuse prescription drugs. Management includes inpatient hospitalization for detoxification and withdrawal symptoms, and in the case of opiate abuse, opiate maintenance is recommended for pregnant women for the duration of their pregnancy to reduce relapse rates and improve maternal and fetal outcomes. Other recommendations include referral for support groups and supportive housing.

  12. Teenage Pregnancy Prevention and Adolescents' Sexual Outcomes: An Experiential Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Cheryl L.

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of an experiential approach to teen pregnancy (TP) prevention called "Baby Think It Over," a computerized infant simulator, on adolescents' attitudes and behaviors regarding teen pregnancy and sexuality. Recently, a more realistic model called "Real Care Baby" was developed. The small amount of research on…

  13. Teen-Age Pregnancy: The Case for National Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wattleton, Faye

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the national impact of adolescent pregnancy with emphasis on the Black community. Criticizes the mass media for exploiting sexual behavior. Proposes a national agenda incorporating comprehensive sex education, family planning services, and educational, economic, and social opportunities. (FMW)

  14. Ameliorating the impact of teen-age pregnancy on parent and child.

    PubMed

    Bell, C A; Casto, G; Daniels, D S

    1983-01-01

    The increase in teen-age pregnancy creates a growing population of young mothers unable to care adequately for themselves or their children. Responding to budget cuts in Utah, the authors report on a program that combines the resources of an agency and a university program to teach mothers child care and self-sufficiency, promotes the healthy development of their children, and gives field training to social work students.

  15. The underrated benefits of oral contraception: consequences of pregnancy and induced abortion in teenagers.

    PubMed

    Dreyfus, R

    1992-01-01

    If complications occur within a pregnancy planned and brought to term, they often can be dealt with and accepted. They are even more traumatic when they occur in an unwanted pregnancy that could have been prevented through contraception. Teenagers, because of their physical and psychological immaturity and also because of their social environment, seem to suffer with undue frequency from the complications of induced abortion. Its result, for the teenager, is a handicapped future in comparison to other women. Hence, access to contraception is important for all women, and especially for teenagers, in order to avoid such prejudicial situations. It is important, then, to prescribe oral contraception for its efficacy and its short- and long-term innocuousness. Because of her immaturity, the pregnant teenager is at risk: of spontaneous abortion, pre-eclampsia, anemia, hemorrhage, and prematurity. She is also at risk because of the social difficulties she will be facing. This is particularly true in families from developing countries. From birth, the child is also at risk: of low birth weight for the term, mortality in the first year of life, and all risks linked to abandonment, or education by a third party. In a proportion of 13 to 30% in western countries and in a proportion of 3% in East Asia or in Northwest Africa (Maghreb), induced abortions are a reflection of the following: early sexual activity without contraception even if fertility is still low in very young teenagers, absence of social protection or social independence, refusal of forced marriage, and presence or absence of liberal legislation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. The Response of the Schools to Teenage Pregnancy and Parenthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellman, Gail L.

    Local education agency responses to student pregnancy and parenthood are constrained by narrow definitions of the problem, opposition to sex education, contraception, and abortion, disagreement about the appropriate school role, lack of expertise, and lack of incentives to develop programs. Nationwide field studies were conducted to assess 12…

  17. Exclusion from School: Teenage Pregnancy and the Denial of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lall, Marie

    2007-01-01

    There is an unrecognised crisis in the education of pregnant schoolgirls and schoolgirl mothers. Girls leaving school due to pregnancy are not reported in official statistics. This has serious consequences in terms of resource allocation and planning of service provision. This article examines how girls are forced out of the mainstream education…

  18. Teenage Pregnancy among Latinas: Examining Risk and Protective Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan-Ates, Aysun; Carrion-Basham, Carla Y.

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the role of three groups of risk and protective factors (e.g., individual, family, and extrafamilial) that are associated with teen pregnancy. Two groups of Latina adolescents (aged 15 to 19), nonpregnant/ nonparenting (NP; N = 48) and pregnant/parenting (P; N = 46), completed a demographic survey, an adolescent profile…

  19. Teen-Age Pregnancy Legislation in the States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bustos, Patrick D.

    1988-01-01

    Examined are recent legislative initiatives related to the problem of adolescent pregnancy and parenting. A 50-state survey was conducted by the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), and each state's legislative research agency provided information on bills and acts from the 1986 and 1987 legislative sessions, as well as programs and…

  20. Experiences of pregnancy and motherhood among teenage mothers in a suburb of Accra, Ghana: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Gyesaw, Nana Yaa Konadu; Ankomah, Augustine

    2013-01-01

    Background The proportion of teenage girls who are mothers or who are currently pregnant in sub-Saharan African countries is staggering. There are many studies regarding teenage pregnancy, unsafe abortions, and family planning among teenagers, but very little is known about what happens after pregnancy, ie, the experience of teenage motherhood. Several studies in Ghana have identified the determinants of early sexual activity, contraception, and unsafe abortion, with teenage motherhood only mentioned in passing. Few studies have explored the experiences of adolescent mothers in detail with regard to their pregnancy and childbirth. This qualitative study explores the experiences of adolescent mothers during pregnancy, childbirth, and care of their newborns. Methods This qualitative study was based on data from focus group discussions and indepth interviews with teenage mothers in a suburb in Accra. Participants were recruited from health facilities as well as by snowball sampling. Results Some of the participants became pregnant as a result of transactional sex in order to meet their basic needs, while others became pregnant as a result of sexual violence and exploitation. A few others wanted to become pregnant to command respect from people in society. In nearly all cases, parents and guardians of the adolescent mothers were upset in the initial stages when they heard the news of the pregnancy. One key finding, quite different from in other societies, was how often teenage pregnancies are eventually accepted, by both the young women and their families. Also observed was a rarity of willingness to resort to induced abortion. Conclusion Special programs should be initiated by the government and the various responsible departments to address ignorance on sexual matters, and the challenges and risks associated with pregnancy and parenting by adolescents. Parenting techniques should be taught in sex education programs. PMID:24250233

  1. Teenage pregnancy among African-Americans: a qualitative examination of maternal education, teenage pregnancy, family dynamics, and conflict resolution.

    PubMed

    Mims, Barbara; Biordi, Diana L

    2003-06-01

    This qualitative study is derived from interviews conducted during a larger quantitative study that examined facilitators and barrier to communication and negotiations in African American families whose teen daughters had one or more unwed teen pregnancies. Based on the larger study's findings that the education of the teens mother was a statistically significant factor in teen pregnancy, 17 robust interviews were analyzed in this study and sorted on variables of maternal education and teen pregnancies. From the analysis of the data, seven themes emerged. Findings indicated that almost all girls reported a lack of contact with a father and girls of higher educated mothers tended to have more supportive family structures than did girls of lower educated mothers. Most of the families rejected the teen pregnancy, although later some accepted the infant. In comparison to mothers with a higher level of education, mothers with a lower level of education leaned toward more absolutist and negative solutions without full discussions about ideas of sex with their teens. Discussion indicated the need for interventions based on negotiation principles and tactics. PMID:15259995

  2. [Teenage pregnancy in Madagascar: impact on the health of mother and child].

    PubMed

    Binet, Clotilde; Gastineau, Bénédicte; Rakotoson, Lina

    2009-01-01

    In committing itself to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, Madagascar committed itself to reducing maternal and infant mortality. Teenagers must be a target for activities to improve maternal and child health, for analyses of survey data show clearly that teenager pregnancies present a risk to the health of both young mothers and their children; in particular, both have a higher risk of death than older mothers and their children. These differences can be explained both by biological factors and socioeconomic variables (place of residence, educational level, etc). The issue of abortion is also important, for it is an important cause of maternal mortality, especially among young girls. Beyond the actions of prevention, post-abortion care could help to reduce the complications of abortions and thus mortality among women.

  3. Mixed Abuse of Alcohol and Drugs in Teenagers in Sweden vs. a Group from the General Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutzell, Sture

    1995-01-01

    Examined the subsequent life and development of teenagers under probation who abused alcohol and drugs. Suggests that regardless of the social environment in which they grow up, children, both boys and girls, are in a risk zone if they use alcohol and drugs, and there is an enormous gap in their social adjustment compared with children that do…

  4. The Family Festival Prevention Model: Findings from a Pilot of a Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Programme Conceptualised by and for Mexican American Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy-Erby, Yvette; Stauss, Kim; Koh, Eun

    2015-01-01

    Despite an overall reduction in teenage pregnancy rates in the USA, the decrease for young women of Mexican heritage in the USA has been less significant than the decrease for their White and African-American peers. Furthermore, the availability of teenage pregnancy prevention models that are conceptualised specifically for people of Mexican…

  5. Woman abuse and pregnancy outcome among women in Khoram Abad, Islamic Republic of Iran.

    PubMed

    Khodakarami, N; Naji, H; Dashti, M G; Yazdjerdi, M

    2009-01-01

    We carried out a descriptive analysis on the pregnancy outcome in 313 pregnant women abused, 160 non-abused). Abuse was statistically significantly correlated with mean weight gain during pregnancy, mean frequency of the prenatal care, prolonged labour (dystocia), premature rupture of membrane, low mean birth weight and mean gestational age at birth. Given the high likelihood that a woman will access health care services during her pregnancy, physicians providing prenatal care are in a strategic position to screen for partner abuse.

  6. Being targeted: Young women's experience of being identified for a teenage pregnancy prevention programme.

    PubMed

    Sorhaindo, Annik; Bonell, Chris; Fletcher, Adam; Jessiman, Patricia; Keogh, Peter; Mitchell, Kirstin

    2016-06-01

    Research on the unintended consequences of targeting 'high-risk' young people for health interventions is limited. Using qualitative data from an evaluation of the Teens & Toddlers Pregnancy Prevention programme, we explored how young women experienced being identified as at risk for teenage pregnancy to understand the processes via which unintended consequences may occur. Schools' lack of transparency regarding the targeting strategy and criteria led to feelings of confusion and mistrust among some young women. Black and minority ethnic young women perceived that the assessment of their risk was based on stereotyping. Others felt their outgoing character was misinterpreted as signifying risk. To manage these imposed labels, stigma and reputational risks, young women responded to being targeted by adopting strategies, such as distancing, silence and refusal. To limit harmful consequences, programmes could involve prospective participants in determining their need for intervention or introduce programmes for young people at all levels of risk. PMID:27088658

  7. Awareness of prevention of teenage pregnancy amongst secondary school learners in Makhado municipality

    PubMed Central

    Radzilani-Makatu, Makondelele; Takalani, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Sexuality plays a very significant role in the lives of both boys and girls. It is, therefore, considered important for schools to recognise and accept sexuality as part of the development process of the child. Professor Kader Asmal (previous South African Minister of Education) suggested that the earlier the school begins to teach learners about sexuality, the better because they can be easily misled by their peers if proper guidance regarding their sexuality is not given. Aim The current study was conducted to assess the awareness of teenagers on the prevention of teenage pregnancy (TP) in six secondary school learners situated in the Soutpansberg-West circuit, Makhado Municipality in Limpopo province. Setting The study was conducted at six secondary schools situated in the Soutpansberg-West circuit, Makhado Municipality in Limpopo province in 2014. Methodology A quantitative descriptive survey study was conducted where data were collected, using self-administered questionnaires, from 381 systematically sampled participants from six secondary schools situated in the Soutpansberg-West circuit, Makhado Municipality in Limpopo province. Data were analysed descriptively using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software, version 22.0. Necessary approval procedures and ethical clearance were obtained prior to data collection. Results Ninety-four percent of participants agreed that TP can be prevented through abstaining from sex, whilst 65% of participants agreed that TP could be prevented by using contraceptives such as pills and injections. Eighty-three percent of participants agreed that TP could be prevented through the use of condoms. Seventy-four percent participants disagreed that bathing after sex prevents teenage pregnancies. Furthermore, 28% participants agreed that TP can be prevented by oral sex. Conclusion The conclusion drawn was that learners are aware of the measures for preventing TP. PMID:27380836

  8. Drug abuse and dependency during pregnancy: anaesthetic issues.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, J; Christmas, T; Paech, M J; Orr, B

    2007-12-01

    Drug abuse is a significant social problem that can lead to serious obstetric complications, some of which may be confused with pregnancy-related disease states. Substance abuse poses a number of challenges with respect to the management of pain and the conduct of anaesthesia in the peripartum period. This review was based on information from a literature search of epidemiological, research and review papers on substance abuse during pregnancy, obtained for the purpose of preparing a background paper for the Ministerial Council on Drug Strategy, Commonwealth Government of Australia. Given that almost 80% of substance-abusing parturients require anaesthetic services in the perinatal period, early antenatal referral for anaesthetic review is recommended. To optimise the care of these vulnerable patients, obstetricians, general practitioners and midwives should attempt to identify substance-abusing parturients and refer them to an anaesthetist. A careful anaesthetic evaluation with non-judgemental questioning is essential, with management tailored to individual patient needs and the urgency of obstetric intervention for vaginal delivery or caesarean section. Opioid-dependent women, in particular, benefit from antenatal pain management planning. Patients recovering from drug addiction should also have a well-documented analgesic strategy. A multidisciplinary approach will involve obstetricians, anaesthetists and staff of the Drug and Alcohol Service. In acute admissions of women by whom antenatal care was not accessed, a high index of suspicion for illicit drug use should arise. Because illicit substance use is so prevalent, if untoward reactions occur during an otherwise uneventful anaesthetic, the possibility of drug abuse should be considered.

  9. Views of teenagers on termination of pregnancy at Muyexe high school in Mopani District, Limpopo Province, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lebese, Tsakani R.; Maputle, Sonto M.; Mulaudzi, Lindiwe

    2016-01-01

    Background Teenage pregnancy is a global social health concern especially because of the HIV and AIDS pandemic, sexually transmitted infections, high rate of termination of pregnancy (TOP), adolescents’ parenthood and decreased level of contraceptives. Aim To explore the views of teenagers on the TOP at Muyexe high school in a rural village of Mopani District, Limpopo Province. Setting Muyexe high school in a rural village of Mopani District, Limpopo Province, in South Africa. Methodology A qualitative method using explorative and descriptive designs was used to find in-depth description and understanding of teenagers’ views on TOP. The target population was girls aged 15–19 years at Muyexe high school in Mopani District. Non-probability, convenient sampling was used to select high school teenage girls who had undergone TOP for the study. Data were collected using individual self-report technique (interview). Tesch’s eight steps of qualitative data analysis were used. Measures to ensure trustworthiness and ethical considerations were observed. Results Two major themes were revealed: (1) Views of teenagers regarding TOP (poverty, relationship problems and single parenthood, negative impact on the teen’s life while attending school) and (2) teenager’s fears regarding pregnancy (stigma, fear of parents and friends, rape and incest and fear of giving birth). Conclusion Majority of participants had knowledge about TOP; some had experiences about TOP while others held inadequate knowledge. Recommendations were based on the findings by teaching dangers of TOP and various contraceptive methods to prevent unwanted pregnancies and TOP. PMID:27380849

  10. Female Adolescents with a History of Sexual Abuse: Risk Outcome and Protective Factors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandy, Joseph M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the school performance, suicidal involvement, disordered eating behaviors, pregnancy risk, and chemical use of female teenagers with a history of sexual abuse. Found that they reported higher rates of adverse outcomes than did teenagers without a background of abuse. Lists protective factors and risk factors that influenced outcomes. (RJM)

  11. Teenage Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... prenatal care Taking your prenatal vitamins for your health and to prevent some birth defects Avoiding smoking, alcohol, and drugs Using a condom, if you are having sex, to prevent sexually transmitted diseases that could hurt your baby

  12. Teenage pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... friend that you are pregnant, talk with your school nurse or school counselor. They can help you find prenatal care ... and after you give birth. Talk with your school counselor if you need help with child care or tutoring. Your education will give you skills to be a better ...

  13. Teenage Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in doubt. Perhaps they are personally opposed to abortion. Or they know deep in their hearts that ... in life and therefore wish to have an abortion. Most girls, though, agonize over this difficult decision, ...

  14. Differences in pregnancy outcomes, prenatal care utilization, and maternal complications between teenagers and adult women in Korea: A nationwide epidemiological study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hyung; Lee, Seung Mi; Lim, Nam Gu; Kim, Hyun Joo; Bae, Sung-Hee; Ock, Minsu; Kim, Un-Na; Lee, Jin Yong; Jo, Min-Woo

    2016-08-01

    Teenage mothers are at high risk for maternal and neonatal complications. This study aimed to evaluate the socioeconomic circumstances of teenage pregnancy, and determine whether these increased risks remained after adjustment for socioeconomic circumstances in Korea. Using the National Health Insurance Corporation database, we selected women who terminated pregnancy, by delivery or abortion, from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2010. Abortion, delivery type, and maternal complications were defined based on the International Classification of Diseases-10th Revision. We compared teenagers (13-19 years at the time of pregnancy termination) with other age groups and investigated differences based on socioeconomic status, reflected by Medical Aid (MA) and National Health Insurance (NHI) beneficiaries. We used multivariate analysis to define the factors associated with preterm delivery. Among 463,847 pregnancies, 2267 (0.49%) involved teenagers. Teenage mothers were more likely to have an abortion (33.4%) than deliver a baby when compared with other age groups (20.8%; P < 0.001). About 14.4% of teenage mothers had never received prenatal care throughout pregnancy. Among teenage mothers, 61.7% of MA recipients made fewer than 4 prenatal care visits (vs 38.8% of NHI beneficiaries) (P < 0.001). Teenage mothers more often experienced preterm delivery and perineal laceration (P < 0.001). Teenage mothers (<20 years) were 2.47 times more likely to have preterm delivery than older mothers (20-34 years; P < 0.001). Teenage mothers had higher risk of inadequate prenatal care and subsequently of preterm delivery, which remained significantly higher after adjusting for socioeconomic confounding variables and adequacy of prenatal care in Korean teenagers (P < 0.001). PMID:27559960

  15. Zinc supplementation during pregnancy in low-income teenagers of Mexican descent: effects on selected blood constituents and on progress and outcome of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hunt, I F; Murphy, N J; Cleaver, A E; Faraji, B; Swendseid, M E; Browdy, B L; Coulson, A H; Clark, V A; Settlage, R H; Smith, J C

    1985-11-01

    As a follow-up of our study of pregnant women, we report effects of zinc supplementation during pregnancy in another population of 138 Hispanic teenagers in Los Angeles. Teenagers were randomized (double-blind) to a control or zinc-supplemented group and received similar daily vitamin and mineral supplements except for 20 mg zinc added to the zinc-supplemented group's capsules. Initially, mean dietary zinc intakes of both groups were about 50% of the Recommended Dietary Allowance and their mean serum zinc levels did not differ significantly (69.8 +/- 11.2 micrograms/dl in control and 69.0 +/- 11.4 micrograms/dl in zinc-supplemented group). Zinc supplementation did not maintain mean serum zinc levels during pregnancy but, as in our earlier study, it reduced (p = 0.018) the number of low serum zinc values (less than or equal to 53 micrograms/dl) in late pregnancy. Zinc supplementation did not affect outcome of pregnancy but serum zinc levels were lower (p = 0.038) in teenagers with pregnancy-induced hypertension than in normotensives. PMID:4061343

  16. Violence Against Women in Mexico: A Study of Abuse Before and During Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Roberto; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Ruiz, Agustin

    2003-01-01

    Objective. We identified the prevalence and types of violence experienced by pregnant women, the ways victimization changed during pregnancy from the year prior to pregnancy, and factors associated with violence during pregnancy. Methods. We interviewed 914 pregnant women treated in health clinics in Mexico about violence during and prior to pregnancy, violence during childhood and against their own children, and other socioeconomic indicators. Results. Approximately one quarter of the women experienced violence during pregnancy. The severity of emotional violence increased during pregnancy, whereas physical and sexual violence decreased. The strongest predictors of abuse were violence prior to pregnancy, low socioeconomic status, parental violence witnessed by women in childhood, and violence in the abusive partner’s childhood. The probability of violence during pregnancy for women experiencing all of these factors was 61%. Conclusions. Violence is common among pregnant women, but pregnancy does not appear to be an initiating factor. Intergenerational violence is highly predictive of violence during pregnancy. PMID:12835194

  17. Using Young Adult Realistic Literature to Help Troubled Teenagers: Something New, Tried and True, and Recommended Nonfiction (Young Adult Literature).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaywell, Joan F.

    1997-01-01

    Describes a seven-step process that uses young adult literature to help teenagers understand and deal with their troubles. Offers brief annotations of five young adult titles in each of nine areas: alienation and identity; divorce; dropouts, delinquency, and gangs; poverty; teenage pregnancy; abused children; alcohol and drugs; homosexuality; and…

  18. Psychosocial Characteristics of Pregnancy Women with and without a History of Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcenko, Maureen O.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined psychosocial characteristics and service needs of pregnant women with substance abuse histories. Interviewed 225 pregnant women defined as having high-risk pregnancies for psychosocial reasons. Compared to non-substance-abusing women, those with admitted history of substance abuse were significantly older, had more children, were more…

  19. Screening for "substance abuse" among school-based youth in Mexico using the Problem Oriented Screening Instrument (POSIT) for Teenagers.

    PubMed

    Latimer, William W; O'Brien, Megan S; McDouall, Jorge; Toussova, Olga; Floyd, Leah J; Vazquez, Marco

    2004-01-01

    Indices of classification accuracy of the Substance Use/Abuse scale of a Spanish-language version of the Problem Oriented Screening Instrument for Teenagers (POSIT) were evaluated among school-based youth in Mexico. Participants were 1203 youth attending one middle school (N = 619) and one high school (N = 584) in the third largest city of Coahuila, a northern border state in Mexico in May 1998. More than 94% of youth enrolled in the participating middle school and 89% of youth enrolled in the participating high school completed the International Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent Health. Indices of classification accuracy of the POSIT Substance Use/Abuse scale were evaluated against a "drug abuse" problem severity criterion that combined youth meeting DSM-IV criteria for alcohol abuse/dependence disorders with youth having used other illicit drugs five or more times in their lifetime. The present study findings suggest that using a cut score of one or two on the POSIT Substance Use/Abuse scale generally yields optimal classification accuracy indices that vary somewhat by gender and school subgroups. Further, classification accuracy indices of the POSIT Substance Use/Abuse scale are slightly better when used among high school males due, in part, to the higher base rate of serious involvement among this group compared to others.

  20. Abuse during pregnancy: associations with maternal health and infant birth weight.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, J; Parker, B; Soeken, K

    1996-01-01

    A stratified, prospective cohort analysis was completed on 1,203 African American, Hispanic, and white women. All women were assessed for abuse at the first prenatal visit and twice more during pregnancy. They were also assessed for risk factors of low birth weight using Institute of Medicine correlates. Prevalence of physical or sexual abuse during pregnancy was 16% (1 of 6). Abused women were twice as likely to begin prenatal care during the third trimester, with abuse preceding late entry. Abuse was recurrent, with 60% of the women reporting repeated episodes. More severe abuse was significantly correlated with lower infant birth weights for all three ethnic groups. Abuse during pregnancy was a significant risk for low birth weight as well as maternal low weight gain, infections, anemia, smoking, and use of alcohol and drugs. When compared to women who were not abused, women abused during pregnancy delivered infants averaging 133 g less. Abused white women delivered infants with the greatest reduction in birth weight. PMID:8570420

  1. Use of Brief Interventions for Drug Abusing Teenagers within a Middle and High School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Ken C.; Leitten, Willa; Wagner, Eric; Tevyaw, Tracy O'Leary

    2007-01-01

    Background: Promising and encouraging results have been recently reported on the use of briefer interventions for adolescent drug abusers. Because middle- and high-school-based drug abuse intervention programs have grown in popularity over the past several decades, the use of brief interventions (BIs) in school settings merits consideration.…

  2. Physical abuse, smoking, and substance use during pregnancy: prevalence, interrelationships, and effects on birth weight.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, J; Parker, B; Soeken, K

    1996-05-01

    Using a prospective cohort analysis, this study established the singular and combined occurrence of smoking, physical abuse, and substance use during pregnancy and its effect on birth weight among African American, Hispanic, and White women. The sample consisted of 1203 African American (n = 414), Hispanic (n = 412), and White (n = 377) pregnant women from urban public prenatal clinics in Houston and Baltimore. In the results, occurrence of physical abuse was 16%; smoking, 29.5%; and alcohol/illicit drug usage, 11.9%. Among African American and White women, significant relationships existed between physical abuse and smoking. About 33.7% of African American women, who were not abused, smoked compared with 49.5% of women who were abused. Alcohol/illicit drug use was 20.8% for nonabused women compared with 42.1% for abused women. Moreover, the three characteristics--physical abuse, smoking, and alcohol/illicit drug use--were significantly related to birth weight. The results indicate that abuse during pregnancy is associated with increased smoking, and use of alcohol and illicit drugs. Thus, clinical protocols integrating assessment and intervention for physical abuse, smoking, and substance use are needed to achieve healthy outcomes for pregnant women and their infants. PMID:8708832

  3. Improving Outcomes for Teenage Pregnancy and Early Parenthood for Young People in Out-of-Home Care: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendes, Philip

    2009-01-01

    Young people leaving out-of-home care are overrepresented among teenage parents. This paper examines the research literature and identifies key factors that contribute to early pregnancy and parenthood for care leavers, the challenges of early parenting and the positive effects of early parenting. The implications for out-of-home care policy and…

  4. Engaging Parents in Parentline Plus' Time to Talk Community Programme as Part of England's Teenage Pregnancy Strategy: Lessons for Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Mairi Ann; Davis, Liz; Lindsay, Geoff; Davis, Hilton

    2012-01-01

    Based on 65 interviews with professionals and parents conducted during 2007-2008, this 16-month, mainly qualitative evaluation of Parentline Plus' Time to Talk Community Programme (a preventative initiative within England's teenage pregnancy strategy) found that a community development approach and an ethos of partnership with parents and…

  5. Teenage Pregnancy Prevention Programs: What Have We Learned? Meeting Highlights and Background Briefing Report. Report of a Family Impact Seminar (Washington, D.C., May 26, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ooms, Theodora; Herendeen, Lisa

    This report contains highlights from a seminar on teenage pregnancy prevention programs. Comments by these panelists are summarized: Kristin Moore, senior research associate, Child Trends, Inc.; Dennis McBride, consultant for the Adolescent Family Life Office; Susan Newcomer, consultant for the National Institute of Child Health and Development;…

  6. Random Behaviour or Rational Choice? Family Planning, Teenage Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Infections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paton, David

    2006-01-01

    Rational choice models of teenage sexual behaviour lead to radically different predictions than do models that assume such behaviour is random. Existing empirical evidence has not been able to distinguish conclusively between these competing models. I use regional data from England between 1998 and 2001 to examine the impact of recent increases in…

  7. Fetal Abuse and the Criminalization of Behavior during Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, Kathryn Ann

    1995-01-01

    Discusses efforts to criminalize fetal abuse, harm caused from a pregnant woman's use of illegal drugs. Such efforts have typically failed to withstand judicial scrutiny. Suggests that criminal prosecution for fetal abuse relies on questionable procedures, is unevenly applied, and may keep women from seeking drug treatment or prenatal care. (LKS)

  8. Exploring how residential mobility and migration influences teenage pregnancy in five rural communities in California: youth and adult perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lara, Diana; Decker, Martha J; Brindis, Claire D

    2016-09-01

    Teenage birth rates among young people aged 15-19 years in California, USA, have declined from 47 births per 1000 in 2000 to 24 per 1000 in 2013. Nevertheless, the US counties with the highest teenage birth rates are predominantly rural and have a high proportion of Latinos/as. We conducted 42 interviews with key stakeholders and 12 focus groups with 107 young people in five rural communities to better understand local migration patterns and their influence on intermediate and proximate variables of pregnancy, such as interaction with role models and barriers to access contraception. The migration patterns identified were: residential mobility due to seasonal jobs, residential mobility due to economic and housing changes and migration from other countries to California. These patterns affect young people and families' interactions with school and health systems and other community members, creating both opportunities and barriers to prevent risky sexual behaviours. In rural areas, residential mobility and migration to the USA interconnect. As a result, young people dually navigate the challenges of residential mobility, while also adapting to the dominant US culture. It is important to promote programmes that support the integration of immigrant youth to reduce their sense of isolation, as well as to assure access to sexual health education and reproductive health services. PMID:27439657

  9. Exploring how residential mobility and migration influences teenage pregnancy in five rural communities in California: youth and adult perceptions.

    PubMed

    Lara, Diana; Decker, Martha J; Brindis, Claire D

    2016-09-01

    Teenage birth rates among young people aged 15-19 years in California, USA, have declined from 47 births per 1000 in 2000 to 24 per 1000 in 2013. Nevertheless, the US counties with the highest teenage birth rates are predominantly rural and have a high proportion of Latinos/as. We conducted 42 interviews with key stakeholders and 12 focus groups with 107 young people in five rural communities to better understand local migration patterns and their influence on intermediate and proximate variables of pregnancy, such as interaction with role models and barriers to access contraception. The migration patterns identified were: residential mobility due to seasonal jobs, residential mobility due to economic and housing changes and migration from other countries to California. These patterns affect young people and families' interactions with school and health systems and other community members, creating both opportunities and barriers to prevent risky sexual behaviours. In rural areas, residential mobility and migration to the USA interconnect. As a result, young people dually navigate the challenges of residential mobility, while also adapting to the dominant US culture. It is important to promote programmes that support the integration of immigrant youth to reduce their sense of isolation, as well as to assure access to sexual health education and reproductive health services.

  10. Teenage parents and their offspring.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, J

    1996-06-18

    Teenage parents are cast into adult roles before the role experimentation and identity development tasks of middle adolescence can be completed. Understanding the etiology of this social problem requires an ecological perspective encompassing individual characteristics, person-context variables, and societal factors such as race and social class. Risk factors identified in the literature on adolescent pregnancy in the US include: absence of a future orientation or aspirations, lack of assertiveness and interpersonal skills to control physical intimacy, low socioeconomic status and minority group membership, growing up in a single-parent family, a history of sexual abuse, five or more siblings, a sister or friend who became a teenage mother, lax parental supervision of dating and free time, low self-esteem, and dropping out or failing in school. The limited data on adolescent fathers suggest they have histories of substance use, delinquency, failure to graduate from high school, financial difficulty, and exposure to family violence. The offspring of adolescent parents show a higher incidence of developmental delays and mild mental retardation than children of adults and are at increased risk of child abuse and neglect. Teen parents raised in dysfunctional families tend to perpetuate destructive methods of child rearing and have unrealistic, age-inappropriate expectations for infants and toddlers. Teenage parents' lack of competence can be mitigated, however, by positive living arrangements, a supportive family of origin, peer support groups, quality child care, school-based services, and accurate information about parenting and child development. PMID:8669783

  11. Educational outcomes in teenage pregnancy and parenting programs: results from a demonstration.

    PubMed

    Warrick, L; Christianson, J B; Walruff, J; Cook, P C

    1993-01-01

    A comparison of five in-school educational and service approaches offered at seven sites in Arizona to 789 pregnant and parenting teenagers shows that except for those who enroll in a program in their third trimester, pregnant and parenting teenagers who attend a comprehensive, school-based, community-linked program are significantly more likely to continue in school than are those who have no access to a special program. The comprehensive program's impact is greatest among Hispanic students, younger students, those in grades 9-10, those who are living with their partner and those who enter the program in the first trimester. Two of the program components--strong outreach efforts and case management-are believed to have an especially favorable impact on continuation in school. PMID:8405340

  12. Can Parents Provide Brief Intervention Services to Their Drug-Abusing Teenager?

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Ken C.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of parents as “interventionists” is supported by reviews of the treatment literature (e.g., Smit, Verdurmen, Monshouwer, & Smit, 2008; Winters, Botzet, Fahnhorst, & Koskey, 2009) as well as the emerging science that home-based initiatives by parents can contribute to desired health changes in adolescents (Fearnow, Chassin, Presson, & Sherman, 1998; Jackson & Dickinson, 2006). Parental influences on an adolescent can include reducing initiation, as well as altering its maintenance if it has started. This paper describes a project aimed helping parents to deal with a teenager who has already started to use alcohol or other drugs. Home Base is a home-based, parent-led program aimed at reversing the trajectory of drug use in an already drug-using adolescent. The program’s content is organized around motivational enhancement and cognitive behavioral techniques. The ongoing study will also be discussed. PMID:25866459

  13. Teenage pregnancy with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia and documented ICD discharges.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aziez; Phillips, John R

    2016-04-01

    We report the first case of pregnancy in a pediatric patient with catecholiminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). Pregnant adolescents with CPVT are at high risk for NSVT and malignant VT during pregnancy, despite antiarrhythmic medication. They may receive multiple implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapies. Such patients require close monitoring with special care during the first trimester. PMID:27099728

  14. Sexual Attitudes and Behavior of Guatemalan Teenagers: Considerations for Prevention of Adolescent Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berganza, Carlos E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Conducted 2 studies to explore prevalence of adolescence pregnancy in Guatemala and identify level of contraception. In first study found 89 percent of male and 38 percent of female adolescents (N=850) had experienced coitus. In the second study found pregnancy rate of minors (N=551) in a gynecology clinic was highest for adolescents aged 13-14.…

  15. The pediatrician's role in assisting teenagers to avoid the consequences of adolescent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rauh, J L

    1993-02-01

    There are ways in which the practicing pediatrician can help adolescent prevent pregnancy or improve the outcome of pregnancy. Clearly, each practitioner will have to decide what services will work best within his or her practice as well as for the community.

  16. Orphaned and Abused Youth Are Vulnerable to Pregnancy and Suicide Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zapata, Lauren B.; Kissin, Dmitry M.; Bogoliubova, Olga; Yorick, Roman V.; Kraft, Joan Marie; Jamieson, Denise J.; Marchbanks, Polly A.; Hillis, Susan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about the magnitude and consequences of violence against children for those living outside family care. We sought to estimate the frequency of childhood abuse and examine its association with lifetime pregnancy involvement (LPI) and past year suicide ideation among orphaned youth. Methods: We analyzed data collected via…

  17. Design and development of a film-based intervention about teenage men and unintended pregnancy: applying the Medical Research Council framework in practice.

    PubMed

    Aventin, Áine; Lohan, Maria; O'Halloran, Peter; Henderson, Marion

    2015-04-01

    Following the UK Medical Research Council's (MRC) guidelines for the development and evaluation of complex interventions, this study aimed to design, develop and optimise an educational intervention about young men and unintended teenage pregnancy based around an interactive film. The process involved identification of the relevant evidence base, development of a theoretical understanding of the phenomenon of unintended teenage pregnancy in relation to young men, and exploratory mixed methods research. The result was an evidence-based, theory-informed, user-endorsed intervention designed to meet the much neglected pregnancy education needs of teenage men and intended to increase both boys' and girls' intentions to avoid an unplanned pregnancy during adolescence. In prioritising the development phase, this paper addresses a gap in the literature on the processes of research-informed intervention design. It illustrates the application of the MRC guidelines in practice while offering a critique and additional guidance to programme developers on the MRC prescribed processes of developing interventions. Key lessons learned were: (1) know and engage the target population and engage gatekeepers in addressing contextual complexities; (2) know the targeted behaviours and model a process of change; and (3) look beyond development to evaluation and implementation.

  18. Design and development of a film-based intervention about teenage men and unintended pregnancy: applying the Medical Research Council framework in practice.

    PubMed

    Aventin, Áine; Lohan, Maria; O'Halloran, Peter; Henderson, Marion

    2015-04-01

    Following the UK Medical Research Council's (MRC) guidelines for the development and evaluation of complex interventions, this study aimed to design, develop and optimise an educational intervention about young men and unintended teenage pregnancy based around an interactive film. The process involved identification of the relevant evidence base, development of a theoretical understanding of the phenomenon of unintended teenage pregnancy in relation to young men, and exploratory mixed methods research. The result was an evidence-based, theory-informed, user-endorsed intervention designed to meet the much neglected pregnancy education needs of teenage men and intended to increase both boys' and girls' intentions to avoid an unplanned pregnancy during adolescence. In prioritising the development phase, this paper addresses a gap in the literature on the processes of research-informed intervention design. It illustrates the application of the MRC guidelines in practice while offering a critique and additional guidance to programme developers on the MRC prescribed processes of developing interventions. Key lessons learned were: (1) know and engage the target population and engage gatekeepers in addressing contextual complexities; (2) know the targeted behaviours and model a process of change; and (3) look beyond development to evaluation and implementation. PMID:25483572

  19. Anabolic Steroid Use: Federal Efforts to Prevent and Reduce Anabolic Steroid Abuse among Teenagers. Report to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, House of Representatives. GAO-08-15

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Government Accountability Office, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The abuse of anabolic steroids by teenagers--that is, their use without a prescription--is a health concern. Anabolic steroids are synthetic forms of the hormone testosterone that can be taken orally, injected, or rubbed on the skin. Although a 2006 survey funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) found that less than 3 percent of 12th…

  20. Teenage pregnancies that end in abortion: what can they tell us about contraceptive risk-taking?

    PubMed

    Hoggart, Lesley; Phillips, Joan

    2011-04-01

    BACKGROUND and methodology In 1999, the Government set the ambitious target of halving the number of under-18 conceptions by 2010. It is now clear that this target will not be met. Much media and policy attention has been paid to teenage mothers, and yet approximately 50% of teenage conceptions end in abortion not motherhood. In London, where the present research was based, the percentage is significantly higher. The research into teenage abortion and repeat abortion, though based in London, generated insights that could potentially help different areas reduce the number of under-18 conceptions ending in abortion. A qualitative research methodology was adopted and a wide range of interviews were conducted with young women, and professionals, in 10 London primary care trusts. RESULTS Our analysis adds to a substantial body of qualitative research that points to the complexity of sexual decision-making for young women. Contraceptive risk-taking was evident as some young women spoke of the difficulties they experienced with user-dependent methods (primarily the condom and the pill) in often unplanned, sexual encounters. They were also generally poorly informed about different contraceptive methods. Misunderstandings about fertility also emerged as an important issue that can lead young women to draw the wrong conclusions if they do not become pregnant following unprotected sex. CONCLUSIONS Young people need improved access to, and informed understanding of, the full range of contraceptive methods available to them. In addition, efforts should be made to enable young women to have a better understanding of their own likely fertility.

  1. Feasibility trial of a film-based educational intervention for increasing boys' and girls' intentions to avoid teenage pregnancy: Study protocol.

    PubMed

    Lohan, Maria; Aventin, Aine; Maguire, Lisa; Clarke, Mike; Linden, Mark; McDaid, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organisation, amongst others, recognises that adolescent men have a vital yet neglected role in reducing teenage pregnancies and that there is a pressing need for educational interventions designed especially for them. This study seeks to fill this gap by determining the feasibility of conducting an effectiveness trial of the If I Were Jack intervention in post-primary schools. This 4-week intervention aims to increase teenagers' intentions to avoid unintended pregnancy and addresses gender inequalities in sex education by explicitly focusing on young men. A cluster randomised feasibility trial with embedded process evaluation will determine: recruitment, participation and retention rates; quality of implementation; acceptability and feasibility of the intervention and trial procedures; and costs. PMID:25284956

  2. Drugs and Pregnancy: The Effects of Nonmedical Use of Drugs on Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Neonates. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Issues 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Patricia, Ed.; And Others

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse presents this report as the fifth in a series intended to summarize the empirical research findings and major theoretical approaches relating to the the issues of drug use and abuse. Included in this volume are summaries of the major research findings concerning the effects of nonmedical drug use on pregnancy.…

  3. Psychosocial aspects of Mexican-American, white, and black teenage pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Felice, M E; Shragg, G P; James, M; Hollingsworth, D R

    1987-07-01

    This study assesses whether pregnant Mexican-American adolescents have psychosocial characteristics different from their pregnant white or black peers. The study population consisted of 199 consecutive Mexican-American, white, and black pregnant adolescents, ages 11-19 years, followed prospectively at the University of California San Diego Medical Center Teen Obstetric Clinic from 1978 to 1981 (79 whites, 76 Mexican-Americans, and 44 blacks). Although all three groups had the same chronologic age (X = 16.4 +/- 1.4 years), and the same number of years of schooling, pregnant black adolescents were more likely to be in school at the time of registration for prenatal care (p less than 0.01). Mexican-American teens were more likely to be married at conception and/or delivery (p less than 0.001), and to breastfeed their infants (p less than 0.05). The fathers of the Mexican-American babies were more likely than other fathers to be full-time students or employed (p less than 0.001). Although pregnant Mexican-American teens came from the largest families (p less than 0.001), black teenagers most frequently reported a good mother-daughter relationship (p less than 0.05). White pregnant teens most frequently reported a family history of psychiatric illness (p less than 0.01), parental death (p less than 0.05), or runaway behavior (p less than 0.01). These data suggest that pregnant teenagers from these three racial/ethnic backgrounds have different psychosocial profiles and hence different psychosocial problems and needs. PMID:3610738

  4. Tracking the trends. Year-end review of state actions on reproductive health policy. Teenage pregnancy prevention.

    PubMed

    Sollom, T

    1995-12-01

    Adolescent pregnancy prevention programs in the US pertain to sex education about reproduction, condom availability in schools, and outreach. This review of state actions on reproductive health policy in 1995 shows that, of the more than 100 bills introduced in 41 states, 16 bills were enacted. Some states eliminated condom and sex education programs in schools. 64 bills related to sexuality education in 30 states. 75% of these bills aimed to eliminate or restrict the scope of comprehensive sexuality education. The five laws enacted were identified as receiving a comprehensive analysis in the "State Reproductive Health Monitor," Vol.6, No.2, June 1995. The conservative states of North Carolina, Oklahoma, and Texas enacted new laws, which eliminated the teacher requirement for providing pregnancy prevention and disease education. These states retained education about sexually transmitted diseases and sexuality education. North Carolina and Texas granted parents the right to remove students from these classes, and schools must inform parents of their rights. Oklahoma required parental consent for attendance in these classes. Most proposed legislation about condom distribution in schools attempts to prohibit condom access. In 1995, there were 11 measures on prohibiting condom access proposed in 9 states, but none were enacted. Massachusetts is the only state where the State Board of Education policy recommends that schools consider condom availability as part of their HIV/AIDS prevention education efforts. This action was upheld in the Massachusetts Supreme Court. Four bills, out of 50 bills introduced in 1995, were enacted on unintended teenage pregnancy prevention issues. Opponents to sexuality education tend to promote abstinence-only education and an emphasis on the immorality and negative consequences of sexual intercourse. Opponents also tend to remove information from the curricula on pregnancy prevention and disease prevention on the grounds that it promotes

  5. Parental Attitudes about Teenage Pregnancy: Impact on Sexual Risk Behaviour of African-American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annang, Lucy; Lian, Brad; Fletcher, Faith E.; Jackson, Dawnyéa

    2014-01-01

    African-American youth suffer disproportionately from sexual risk consequences including unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. Parents educating young people about sex may be one approach to reduce sexual risk behaviour among this population. The purpose of this study was to determine young people's perceptions of…

  6. "Walkin' about at Night": The Background to Teenage Pregnancy in a Remote Aboriginal Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senior, Kate A.; Chenhall, Richard D.

    2008-01-01

    In Australia, Indigenous young women are more likely to become pregnant while in their teens than non-Indigenous young women. Factors such as poverty, educational outcomes and unemployment play a major role; however, there is little understanding of the attitudes of young women themselves with regards to pregnancy. This paper explores young…

  7. Education and Labor Market Consequences of Teenage Childbearing: Evidence Using the Timing of Pregnancy Outcomes and Community Fixed Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Jason M.; Wolfe, Barbara L.

    2009-01-01

    The question of whether giving birth as a teenager has negative economic consequences for the mother remains controversial despite substantial research. In this paper, we build upon existing literature, especially the literature that uses the experience of teenagers who had a miscarriage as the appropriate comparison group. We show that…

  8. Meconium Indicators of Maternal Alcohol Abuse during Pregnancy and Association with Patient Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Goecke, Tamme W.; Burger, Pascal; Fasching, Peter A.; Bakdash, Abdulsallam; Engel, Anne; Häberle, Lothar; Voigt, Franziska; Faschingbauer, Florian; Raabe, Eva; Maass, Nicolai; Rothe, Michael; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Pragst, Fritz

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Identification of women with moderate alcohol abuse during pregnancy is difficult. We correlated self-reported alcohol consumption during pregnancy and patient characteristics with objective alcohol indicators measured in fetal meconium. Methods. A total of 557 women singleton births and available psychological tests, obstetric data and meconium samples were included in statistical analysis. Alcohol metabolites (fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) and ethyl glucuronide (EtG)), were determined from meconium and correlated with patient characteristics. Results. We found that 21.2% of the 557 participants admitted low-to-moderate alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Of the parameters analyzed from meconium, only EtG showed an association with alcohol history (P < 0.01). This association was inverse in cases with EtG value above 120 ng/g. These values indicate women with most severe alcohol consumption, who obviously denied having consumed alcohol during pregnancy. No other associations between socioeconomic or psychological characteristics and the drinking status (via meconium alcohol metabolites) could be found. Conclusion. Women who drink higher doses of ethanol during pregnancy, according to metabolite measures in meconium, might be less likely to admit alcohol consumption. No profile of socioeconomic or psychological characteristics of those women positively tested via meconium could be established. PMID:24800249

  9. Feasibility trial of a film-based educational intervention for increasing boys’ and girls’ intentions to avoid teenage pregnancy: Study protocol☆

    PubMed Central

    Lohan, Maria; Aventin, Áine; Maguire, Lisa; Clarke, Mike; Linden, Mark; McDaid, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The World Health Organisation, amongst others, recognises that adolescent men have a vital yet neglected role in reducing teenage pregnancies and that there is a pressing need for educational interventions designed especially for them. This study seeks to fill this gap by determining the feasibility of conducting an effectiveness trial of the If I Were Jack intervention in post-primary schools. This 4-week intervention aims to increase teenagers’ intentions to avoid unintended pregnancy and addresses gender inequalities in sex education by explicitly focusing on young men. A cluster randomised feasibility trial with embedded process evaluation will determine: recruitment, participation and retention rates; quality of implementation; acceptability and feasibility of the intervention and trial procedures; and costs. PMID:25284956

  10. Efficacy of additional psychosocial intervention in reducing low birth weight and preterm birth in teenage pregnancy: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sukhato, Kanokporn; Wongrathanandha, Chathaya; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Dellow, Alan; Horsuwansak, Pornpot; Anothaisintawee, Thunyarat

    2015-10-01

    This systematic review aimed to assess the efficacy of psychosocial interventions in reducing risk of low birth weight (LBW) and preterm birth (PTB) in teenage pregnancy. Relevant studies were identified from Medline, Scopus, CINAHL, and CENTRAL databases. Randomized controlled trials investigating effect of psychosocial interventions on risk of LBW and PTB, compared to routine antenatal care (ANC) were eligible. Relative risks (RR) of LBW and PTB were pooled using inverse variance method. Mean differences of birth weight (BW) between intervention and control groups were pooled using unstandardized mean difference (USMD). Five studies were included in the review. Compared with routine ANC, psychosocial interventions significantly reduced risk of LBW by 40% (95%CI: 8%,62%) but not for PTB (pooled RR = 0.67, 95%CI: 0.42,1.05). Mean BW of the intervention group was significantly higher than that of the control group with USMD of 200.63 g (95% CI: 21.02, 380.25). Results of our study suggest that psychosocial interventions significantly reduced risk of LBW in teenage pregnancy.

  11. Fetal Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kent, Lindsey; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Five cases of fetal abuse by mothers suffering from depression are discussed. Four of the women had unplanned pregnancies and had considered termination of the pregnancy. Other factors associated with fetal abuse include pregnancy denial, pregnancy ambivalence, previous postpartum depression, and difficulties in relationships. Vigilance for…

  12. Variables related to romanticism and self-esteem in pregnant teenagers.

    PubMed

    Medora, N P; Goldstein, A; von der Hellen, C

    1993-01-01

    In this study, the Dean Romanticism Scale and the Bachman Self-esteem Scale were administered to 121 teenagers between the ages of 12 and 19 in Southern California to investigate their degree of romanticism and self-esteem. The study also explored whether there was any relationship between the dependent variables of romanticism and self-esteem and ten independent variables--age, race, place of residence during pregnancy, age when first sexual intercourse occurred, age when pregnancy occurred, incidence of sexual abuse, incidence of abortion, adoption considerations, whether the subject was currently sexually active, and whether the teenager planned to have a child with the father of the baby. The results indicated that two variables were significantly related to feelings of romanticism--adoption considerations and whether the adolescent planned to have a child with the baby's father. In addition, two variables were significantly related to self-esteem--the incidence of sexual abuse and the incidence of abortion. PMID:8456604

  13. Pregnancy Counseling for Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, John; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Outlines a structured interview process to help school counselors deal with pregnant adolescent students. The process includes developing rapport, aspects of legality and confidentiality, affective empathy, directive versus nondirective approaches, gathering background information and considering alternatives. (JAC)

  14. [Teenage pregnancies, legal aspects].

    PubMed

    Rogue, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    Minor girls are legally considered as incapable, under the authority of their parents. Difficulties can arise when a minor becomes pregnant. The law takes account of this situation: under certain conditions, she can decide by herself to undertake certain actions, medical or otherwise, without the consent of her parents. These include access to contraception, abortion or anonymous birth.

  15. [Teenage pregnancies, legal aspects].

    PubMed

    Rogue, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    Minor girls are legally considered as incapable, under the authority of their parents. Difficulties can arise when a minor becomes pregnant. The law takes account of this situation: under certain conditions, she can decide by herself to undertake certain actions, medical or otherwise, without the consent of her parents. These include access to contraception, abortion or anonymous birth. PMID:27444530

  16. Diabetes mellitus and drug abuse during pregnancy and the risk for orofacial clefts and related abnormalities 1

    PubMed Central

    Trindade-Suedam, Ivy Kiemle; von Kostrisch, Lília Maria; Pimenta, Luiz André Freire; Negrato, Carlos Antônio; Franzolin, Solange Braga; Trindade, Alceu Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to assessed the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and drug abuse in mothers of children with orofacial clefts (OFC). Methods: 325 women who had children (0-3y) with clefts were interviewed. Data regarding type of diabetes, use of legal/illegal drugs during pregnancy, waist girth and fasting blood sugar at the first prenatal consult were collected. Results: twenty seven percent of the women had DM, out of these, 89% had gestational DM, 5,5% type 1 DM and 5,5% type 2 DM. The prevalence of DM in mothers of children with OFC was 27%, it is significantly higher than the average Brazilian population which is 7.6% (p<0.01) (OR=4.5, 95%CI=3.5-5.8). Regarding drug abuse during pregnancy, 32% of the mothers used drugs and a significant positive correlation was observed between drug abuse and the occurrence of clefts and other craniofacial anomalies (p=0.028) (OR=2.87; 95%CI=1.1-7.4). Conclusions: DM and drug abuse during pregnancy increases the risk for OFC and related anomalies and early diagnosis of DM and prevention of drug abuse, especially in pregnant women, should be emphasized. PMID:27508899

  17. Adolescent Pregnancy: Effects of Family Support, Education, and Religion on the Decision to Carry or Terminate among Puerto Rican Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Carmen G.; Nuttall, Ena Vazquez

    1987-01-01

    Examined the influence of family relationships and support, religion, and education on the Puerto Rican pregnant teenager's decision to carry or to abort. Found girls who carried were more significantly influenced and supported by family and friends, especially by mothers, than were those in abort group. Abort group girls reported greater…

  18. Teenage Parents and Teens at Risk of Pregnancy: Federal Welfare, Social Services, and Related Programs to Serve Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kristin A.

    Faced with tight budgets and important changes in welfare policies, few States and local agencies have been able to focus on teenage mothers and their special needs. Yet their needs are different from those of older mothers, and their potential for long-term welfare dependency is high. This paper briefly describes some of the policies, programs,…

  19. The Perspectives of Young Men and Their Teenage Partners on Maternity and Health Services during Pregnancy and Early Parenthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Nicola J.; Church, Stephanie; Hill, Malcolm; Seaman, Pete; Roberts, Tom

    2012-01-01

    This study discusses young couples' interactions with maternity and health services paying particular attention to men's perspectives. Findings are based on research conducted in Scotland with men (aged 16-25) and their teenage partners (aged 16-19). Most young men were very involved in their child's life and provided support and care to their…

  20. Being and becoming a body: moral implications of teenage pregnancy in a shantytown in Porto Alegre, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sax, Lila

    2010-04-01

    Most literature concerning unintended pregnancy in Brazil highlights a link between 'adolescent pregnancy', poverty, marginality and gender inequality. Young women are seen to suffer disadvantages in the course of their lives due to unplanned pregnancies at an early age. This paper questions this picture, emphasising the ways in which adolescent pregnancy is socially constructed and wrongly portrayed as being the main difficulty facing young women in marginalised communities. Instead, it suggests that anthropological and public health debates should focus on how terms such as adolescence and pregnancy are understood and defined by the populations in question.

  1. Contraceptives for teenagers.

    PubMed

    Bullough, B; Bullough, V

    1991-01-01

    The contraceptive options suitable for teenagers are presented and discussed. Condoms have the advantage of preventing the spread of sexually transmitted diseases, and oral contraceptives are probably the most effective in preventing pregnancy. Other options include the barrier contraceptives available to women, spermicides, sponges, intrauterine devices, periodic abstinence, and the morning after pill.

  2. A Criminological Perspective on the Prenatal Abuse of Substances during Pregnancy and the Link to Child Abuse in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ovens, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The increase in drug abuse in South Africa has had major social implications in the country. Problems associated with drug dependency are poverty, unemployment, a heavier burden on the health care system, the disintegration of family systems and drug-related crimes. Another area of concern is the link between drug abuse and child abuse. While…

  3. [Consumption of fruit juices and beverages by Spanish children and teenagers: health implications of their poor use and abuse].

    PubMed

    2003-06-01

    In the last few decades, the consumption of soft drinks (fruit juices and beverages) in Spain has increased considerably. From 1991 to 2001, consumption of soft drinks increased by 41.5 %, that of extract-based drinks by 62.1 % and that of juices by 26.7 %. Consumption increases with age, with teenagers drinking twice as much (740 ml/day) as pre-school children (388 ml/day). High consumption of soft drinks may lead to underconsumption of foods and drinks of high nutritional quality, such as milk. Multiple studies relate this phenomenon with the risk of growth retardation, failure of non-organic growth, diarrhea produced by alterations in carbohydrate absorption, allergy, pharmacological interactions, obesity, atherothrombotic lipidic profile, alterations in glucose and bone mineral metabolism and negative effects on dental health. Because excessive consumption of soft drinks favors a diet of low nutritional quality, intervention and prevention strategies should be established to promote water and milk as the basic drink in children's and teenagers' diets while soft-drinks should be consumed only occasionally.

  4. More than Poverty—Teen Pregnancy Risk and Reports of Child Abuse Reports and Neglect

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Gerassi; Melissa, Jonson-Reid; Katie, Plax; Brett, Drake

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare risk for teen pregnancies between children living in poverty with no Child Protection Services (CPS) report history, and those in poverty with a history of CPS report. Methods Children selected from families in poverty, both with and without CPS report histories were prospectively followed from 1993–2009 using electronic administrative records from agencies including child protective services, emergency departments, Medicaid services and juvenile courts. A total of 3281 adolescent females were followed until age 18. Results For teens with history of poverty only, 16.8% had been pregnant at least once by age 17. In teens with history of both poverty and report of child abuse or neglect, 28.9% had been pregnant at least once by age 17. While multivariate survival analyses revealed several other significant factors at the family and youth services levels, a report of maltreatment remained significant (about a 66% higher risk). Conclusions Maltreatment is a significant risk factor for teen pregnancy among low income youth even after controlling for neighborhood disadvantage, other caregiver risks and indicators of individual emotional and behavioral problems. PMID:26206437

  5. Reaching Teenagers with Sex Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Margaret

    The problem of teenage pregnancy can be viewed as endemic, a part of American culture not easy to change. Although the number of girls under 15 who are becoming pregnant is not very large (13,000 in 1978), the cost of pregnancy to the girls themselves, their families, and society is very great. Results of data analyses from action research,…

  6. Adolescent Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, Craig R.; DeBlassie, Richard R.

    1985-01-01

    Cummings (1979), citing evidence from the National Institute of Drug Abuse, reports that one of every eleven adult Americans suffers from a severe addictive problem. Drug addiction is epidemic among teenagers; one of every six teenagers suffers from a severe addictive problem. This paper focuses on adolescent drug/substance abuse. (Author)

  7. Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... also may fall prey to strangers who take advantage of their cognitive impairment. Types of abuse Signs ... property) to his or her disadvantage or the advantage of someone else Sexual abuse: touching, fondling or ...

  8. The effects of childhood sexual abuse on cortisol trajectories in pregnancy are moderated by current family functioning.

    PubMed

    Bublitz, Margaret H; Parade, Stephanie; Stroud, Laura R

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this study was to understand the roles of maternal history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA) and current family functioning on the cortisol awakening response (CAR) in pregnancy. Participants were 185 pregnant women (ages 18-40) who completed items from the Adverse Childhood Experiences scale to measure child maltreatment history and the Family Assessment Device to measure current family functioning. Participants provided saliva samples at wake-up and 30min after wake-up at 25, 29, and 35 weeks gestation to measure CAR. A moderation effect was found such that participants with more severe CSA histories and poorer perceived family functioning had increasing CAR in pregnancy compared to participants with less severe CSA histories and better family functioning. These findings highlight the importance of considering stress in both childhood and current environments in predicting maternal cortisol in pregnancy.

  9. Juvenile Delinquency and Teenage Pregnancy: A Comparison of Ecological Risk Profiles among Midwestern White and Black Female Juvenile Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khurana, Atika; Cooksey, Elizabeth C.; Gavazzi, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined ecological risk factors associated with teen pregnancy with a sample of 1,190 court-involved female juvenile offenders between 11 and 18 years of age. Data were obtained from five Midwestern juvenile county courts using a recently developed youth risk assessment instrument called the global risk assessment device (GRAD). In…

  10. Report on Adolescent Pregnancy in Fort Worth, Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tees, Sandra

    Teenage pregnancy is an overwhelming problem in Fort Worth, Texas. To examine the problem of teenage pregnancy, figures on total live births by age, race, repeat pregnancy, and at-risk infants were gathered from 1981 and 1982 Department of Public Health data. In addition, consequences of teenage pregnancy and motivation factors were examined. An…

  11. [The concept of identity in relation to motherhood in the discourse of teenagers who attend a pregnancy from a linguistic and psychoanalytical perspective].

    PubMed

    Pardo, María L

    2013-01-01

    My aim in this paper is to briefly discuss the notion of identity and how can unify the Psychoanalytical concept with the discursive, in order to carry out multidisciplinary research on this topic. This work is based on life stories collected in the Hospital Larcade, from 2008 to 2011, from teenagers who attend a pregnancy. Through the linguistic analysis of the guarantees, following the model of Toulmin (17), as it has been redefined by Pardo (14) and Molina (12), I intend to give an account of the discursive and psychological bases of what will then form an identity for these young women on maternity. They live in extreme poverty in the Buenos Aires suburbs and are combined with a large dose of family violence that links their identities as mothers to the image (or identities of the other) who have over their own mothers, parents, couples in these contexts of violence. These data are also confronted with domestic violence cases that appear in the media and how they are dealt with discursively at these. Thus realizes the contradictions imposed the cultural identity of a group (the viewers or readers of means, which are a large part of society) against the experience of violence of these mothers. This research has as theoretical framework the Critical Discourse Analysis and the methodology is qualitative.

  12. Pregnant Teenagers' Knowledge of Infant Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Ann S.

    This study investigated pregnant teenagers' knowledge about infant development during the period of their pregnancy. The sample consisted of 98 teenagers between 14 and 19 years old who were pregnant with their first child; all were planning to keep their babies. The group was approximately 50% black and 50% white, 50% middle class and 50% working…

  13. Intervention Now To Eliminate Repeat Unintended Pregnancy in Teenagers (INTERUPT): a systematic review of intervention effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, qualitative and realist synthesis of implementation factors and user engagement

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Rh; Hendry, M; Booth, A; Carter, B; Charles, J; Craine, N; Edwards, R T; Lyons, M; Noyes, J; Pasterfield, D; Rycroft-Malone, J; Williams, N

    2014-01-01

    Background The UK has the highest rate of teenage pregnancies in Western Europe, a fifth are repeat pregnancies. Unintended conceptions can result in emotional, psychological and educational harm to teenage girls, often with enduring implications for their life chances. Babies of teenage mothers have increased mortality in their first year and increased risk of poverty, educational underachievement and unemployment later in life, with associated societal costs. Methods and analysis We will conduct a streamed, mixed-methods systematic review to find and evaluate interventions designed to reduce repeat unintended teen pregnancies. Our aims are to identify  Who is at greater risk of repeat unintended pregnancies? Which interventions are effective, cost-effective, how they work, in what setting and for whom? What are the barriers and facilitators to intervention uptake? Traditional electronic database searches will be augmented by targeted searches for evidence ‘clusters’ and guided by an advisory group of experts and stakeholders. To address the topic's inherent complexities, we will use a highly structured, innovative and iterative approach combining methodological techniques tailored to each stream of evidence. Quantitative data will be synthesised with reference to Cochrane guidelines for public health interventions. Qualitative evidence addressing facilitators and barriers to the uptake of interventions, experience and acceptability of interventions will be synthesised thematically. We will apply the principles of realist synthesis to uncover theories and mechanisms underpinning interventions. We will conduct an integration and overarching narrative of findings authenticated by client group feedback. Ethics and dissemination We will publish the complete review in ‘Health Technology Assessment’ and sections in specialist peer-reviewed journals. We will present at national and international conferences in the fields of public health, reproductive medicine

  14. [Pregnancy and motherhood in adolescence].

    PubMed

    Desaunay, Pierre; Perrin, Anne-Sophie; Gérardin, Priscille

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence and pregnancy are two periods which involve major psychological and identity changes. Teenage pregnancies are often considered to be a result of a confusion between these periods. The circumstances of teenage pregnancies and early motherhood are diverse and sit within the wider context of the psychopathology of adolescence, the heterogeneity of family configurations and evolutions in society. PMID:27444529

  15. Family structure and child abuse.

    PubMed

    Oliver, William J; Kuhns, Lawrence R; Pomeranz, Elaine S

    2006-03-01

    Knowledge of the characteristics of family structure may be helpful to the pediatrician for predicting child abuse. During the past several decades progressive shifts from the classic family unit of two biological parents and their children to a variety of parental living arrangements have occurred. Most notable are the increases in teenage pregnancies, unmarried motherhood, divorce rates approximating 50% of marriage rates, and frequency of unrelated surrogate parents, most often male, cohabitating in the home. In these settings, identifiable characteristics of the mother, the father or surrogate, the child, the family history, and the immediate neighborhood of the family have been associated with a greater likelihood of child and/or spousal abuse. The accumulated information may be used for preventative intervention. PMID:16528430

  16. Pubertal Timing and Early Sexual Intercourse in the Offspring of Teenage Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Genna, Natacha M.; Larkby, Cynthia; Cornelius, Marie D.

    2011-01-01

    Early puberty is associated with stressful family environments, early sexual intercourse, and teenage pregnancy. We examined pubertal timing and sexual debut among the 14-year-old offspring of teenage mothers. Mothers (71% Black, 29% White) were recruited as pregnant teenagers (12-18 years old). Data were collected during pregnancy and when…

  17. [Metaphorical/metonymical analysis of public health thinking vis-à-vis teenage pregnancy in the 1960s

    PubMed

    Reis

    1998-03-30

    This article is an analytical essay on a historical moment in the formation of public health thinking vis-à-vis adolescent pregnancy: the 1960s. Its relevance lies in the fact that several assertions produced then still bear great influence on ideas and models concerning adolescent maternity in current public health thinking. From the technical and methodological point of view, one can assume two levels: an explicit one pertaining to the documentary record, consisting of messages clearly communicated by authors of scientific texts, and an implicit one, with elements that could only surface in text discourse through stylistic effects. Based on such assumptions, we explored the specialized literature using a metaphorical/metonymical analysis in search of such implicit dimensions.

  18. What Teenagers Want to Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinsohn, Florence; Kelly, G. Lombard

    One of a series of illustrated books written by physicians for their patients, this publication, aimed at te teenager, points out some biological and psychological changes which occur in adolescence. The first few chapters deal with sex drives, male anatomy, female anatomy, conception and pregnancy. Sociological and controversial aspects of…

  19. The Troubled Teenager

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Domeena

    1983-01-01

    Problems that may bring teenagers to the family physician's office include bizarre behavior such as drug or alcohol intoxication, psychosis, panic or anxiety attacks and stealing; being dangerous to themselves or to others; sexual emergencies including pregnancy, rape and incest; a crisis involving key people such as parents' divorce or illness; school phobia, and anxiety or other reactions to sickness, surgery or death. When evaluating troubled teens and their families, the physician should first see adolescents alone, so he is not biased by parents' complaints that prevent `accused' teens from expressing themselves. An evaluation should end with the teenager and adults together so the physician can summarize what happened in the interview and give treatment plans. The doctor should anticipate that he will need extra time in counselling teens about their problems, because it is also important to inform, support and direct parents, teachers and counsellors. PMID:21283424

  20. Street Drugs and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ... drugs that are abused How can street drugs harm your pregnancy? Using street drugs can cause problems ...

  1. The Use of Drugs During Pregnancy; Hearing Before the Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House.

    This record of the Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control contains testimonies concerning the use of drugs and drug addiction during pregnancy. The physiological and psychological effects of various drugs on a pregnant woman and her developing fetus are discussed. Various programs created to care for pregnant addicts are described by…

  2. The Pregnant Teen-Ager: A Medical, Educational, and Social Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osofsky, Howard J.

    Concerned with teen-aged pregnancy, the text includes discussions of premarital pregnancy, the pregnant teen as a member of the poor, as nonwhite, and as a teen-ager, obstetrical concepts, pregnancy results, factors which influence medical prognosis, and solutions to minimize medical risk. Additional areas of concern are a research review and a…

  3. Are Adolescents Who Report Prior Sexual Abuse at Higher Risk for Pregnancy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainey, David Y.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The reproductive and sexual histories of 200 sexually active females, ages 13 through 18, were assessed. Forty adolescents reported sexual abuse, and compared to nonabused peers, they were more often trying to conceive, had boyfriends pressuring them to conceive, and had fears about infertility. No intergroup differences were found in median age…

  4. Prenatal Drug Abuse: Prevalence and Effects on Pregnancy Outcomes, Child Survival and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Feroz

    1992-01-01

    Reviews literature on prenatal drug abuse to (1) estimate mothers' drug use and exposure of infants; (2) document the relationship between prenatal drug use and adverse birth outcomes; and (3) examine effects of maternal drug use on birth defects. Argues for more treatment facilities and greater prevention efforts. (SLD)

  5. Adolescent Alcohol Abuse. Fastback Series No. 217.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Lowell

    This booklet examines the problem of alcohol use among American teenagers. The role that alcohol plays in adult society is presented and its potential danger for causing teenage alcohol addiction is considered. A discussion on why some teenagers abuse alcohol focuses on familial, peer, sociocultural, environmental, personality, and behavioral…

  6. Primary prevention of adolescent pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Schinke, S P; Blythe, B J; Gilchrist, L D; Burt, G A

    1981-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy is associated with many health, emotional and socioeconomic problems including higher rates of anemia, labor complications, mortality, legal and social struggles and hhigher divorce rates. Professional social workers need strategies to help teenagers avoid early, unwanted pregnancy. This paper offers promising experential and research backing for a primary prevention group work strategy for all adolescents. Social and health programs overlook educational, cognitive anc interpersonal factors biasing youths' ability to comprehend and regulate contraception. Primary prevention to assist adolescents in thinking analytically about their sexual behavior must stress problem solving and decision-making as well as facts about human reproduction and birth control. To implement decisions, youths also need interpersonal communication skills. Small groups are ideal for delivering cognitive-behavioral primary prevention. This approach is based on the premise that youths become pregnant not because of a lack of relevant information, but because they lack cognitive and behavioral skills necessary to use information. Group work involving role-playing helps develop communication skills. Results from 2 field studies describe short-term and longitudinal benefits of the prevention strategy. Professionals can reach significant numbers of youth in this way. By treating sexual issues and the risk of pregnancy as normal in adolescence, social workers can introduce information and pertinent skills to all teenagers. No one is singled out as deviant and the group format enables young people to discuss taboo topics, discovering what the norms are and gradually learning how to deal with peers, family members, techers and others. Adolescents in primary prevention groups gained knowledge, cognitive skills and communication acumen. Improved attitudes toward family planning, increased regular contraception and less unsafe sex resulted from this cognitive-behavioral approach

  7. Consumption of Substances of Abuse during Pregnancy Increases Consumption in Offspring: Possible Underlying Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Kinning; Leibowitz, Sarah F.

    2016-01-01

    Correlative human observational studies on substances of abuse have been highly dependent on the use of rodent models to determine the neuronal and molecular mechanisms that control behavioral outcomes. This is particularly true for gestational exposure to non-illicit substances of abuse, such as excessive dietary fat, ethanol, and nicotine, which are commonly consumed in our society. Exposure to these substances during the prenatal period has been shown in offspring to increase their intake of these substances, induce other behavioral changes, and affect neurochemical systems in several brain areas that are known to control behavior. More importantly, emerging studies are linking the function of the immune system to these neurochemicals and ingestion of these abused substances. This review article will summarize the prenatal rodent models used to study developmental changes in offspring caused by prenatal exposure to dietary fat, ethanol, or nicotine. We will discuss the various techniques used for the administration of these substances into rodents and summarize the published outcomes induced by prenatal exposure to these substances. Finally, this review will cover some of the recent evidence for the role of immune factors in causing these behavioral and neuronal changes. PMID:27148536

  8. Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... each trimester are described below. 1 First Trimester (Week 1 to Week 12) The events that lead to pregnancy begin ... and oxygen to the fetus. 2 Second Trimester (Week 13 to Week 28) At 16 weeks, and ...

  9. Impact of Teenage Motherhood on the Academic Performance in Public Primary Schools in Bungoma County, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barmao-Kiptanui, Catherine; Kindiki, Jonah Nyaga; Lelan, Joseph K.

    2015-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy and motherhood is a concern in both developed and developing countries and is a complex reality of contemporary society however the re-entry of teenage mothers into the school system continues to demand attention as society's negative attitude towards pregnant girls and teenage mothers persists. Those who do return to school…

  10. The Preschool Home Literacy Environment Provided by Teenage Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy is an issue receiving a growing amount of attention in the United States, with approximately one million children born to teenage mothers annually. Teen mothers tend to function less effectively in numerous realms than their peers who delay child-rearing, and the children of teen mothers are at greater risk of school failure. In…

  11. Employment Status among Parenting Teenage Mothers Enrolled in High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Wilson, Kelly L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Many programs emphasize subsequent pregnancy prevention and high school graduation among teenage mothers; however, less is known about their ability to increase financial earnings from employment opportunities while concurrently enrolled in school. This study evaluates factors influencing employment status among teenage mothers after…

  12. Qualitative evaluation of the Teenage Mothers Project in Uganda: a community-based empowerment intervention for unmarried teenage mothers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A large proportion of unmarried teenage mothers in Uganda face physical, psychological, and social problems after pregnancy and childbirth, such as obstetric complications, lack of education, and stigmatisation in their communities. The Teenage Mothers Project (TMP) in Eastern Uganda empowers unmarried teenage mothers to cope with the consequences of early pregnancy and motherhood. Since 2000, 1036 unmarried teenage mothers, their parents, and community leaders participated in economic and social empowerment interventions. The present study explored the changes resulting from the TMP as well as factors that either enabled or inhibited these changes. Methods Semi-structured interviews (N = 23) were conducted with former teenage mothers , community leaders, and project implementers, and lifeline histories were obtained from former teenage mothers (N = 9). Quantitative monitoring data regarding demographic and social characteristics of teenage mother participants (N = 1036) were analysed. Results The findings suggest that, overall, the TMP seems to have contributed to the well-being of unmarried teenage mothers and to a supportive social environment. It appears that the project contributed to supportive community norms towards teenage mothers’ position and future opportunities, increased agency, improved coping with early motherhood and stigma, continued education, and increased income generation by teenage mothers. The study findings also suggest limited change in disapproving community norms regarding out-of-wedlock sex and pregnancy, late active enrolment of teenage mothers in the project (i.e., ten months after delivery of the child), and differences in the extent to which parents provided support. Conclusions It is concluded that strengths of the community-based TMP seem to be its socio-ecological approach, the participatory planning with community leaders and other stakeholders, counselling of parents and unmarried teenage mothers, and

  13. Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... also be tired and need more rest. Your body will change as your baby grows during the nine months of your pregnancy. Don't hesitate to call your health care provider if you think you have a problem or something is bothering or worrying you.

  14. Reflections of a Group of South African Teenage Mothers: Sexual Health Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Shakila; Hamid, Alvi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: In the context of women's vulnerability to sexual violence, HIV infection and unintended pregnancy in South Africa, this paper explores the ways in which teenage mothers who are in school reflect on their experiences of pregnancy and motherhood. We attempt to understand how teenage mothers reflect on their experiences within the…

  15. Teenagers and Family Planning: A Case of Special Needs. Fact Sheet Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Center for Early Education and Development.

    Facts on teenage pregnancy, particularly with reference to Minnesota, are discussed. Contents discuss the following topics: Teenage pregnancy is a significant problem in the United States; adolescents' stage of development influences their views on sexuality; many sexually active adolescents do not use contraceptives; adolescent males have special…

  16. Approaches to adolescent pregnancy prevention.

    PubMed

    Haffner, D; Casey, S

    1986-09-01

    The US has one of the highest teenage pregnancy rates in the industrialized world, over 1,000,000 a year. This can add to social problems including poverty, unemployment, family breakup, juvenile crime, school dropouts, and child abuse. In several studies various approaches have been developed and it is concluded that teens must not only be given the knowledge to avoid teen pregnancies, but the motivation to do so. Sex education is an important part of pregnancy prevention, but few programs go beyond the facts of reproduction and less than 14% of them are 40 hours long. Studies have shown mixed results as to the effect of education on teen pregnancy. There are many programs that have been developed by different communities, including computer programs and youth service agencies. Religious groups also play an important part in sex education and they have some distinct advantages in affecting teens' sexual values and activities. Education programs for teen's parents appear to be very important since studies show when sexuality is discussed at home, the teens begin activity later and use birth control more. Clinics have had difficulty recruiting and retaining teen patients and devote special attention to establishing a rapport with them. The school-based clinic is becoming increasingly popular and can provide birth control counseling, contraceptives, family planning clinic referral, examinations, pregnancy testing, and prenatal care. There success is due to confidentiality, convenience, and comprehensive service. However, since nearly all efforts on teen pregnancy prevention are directed at girls, 1/2 of those involved in teen pregnancies--males--are not participating in programs. This must change for longterm success of these programs and also the involvement of the community and media.

  17. Effectiveness of Secondary Pregnancy Prevention Programs: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Jacqueline; Pillai, Vijayan K.

    2007-01-01

    Because subsequent pregnancy in teen parents often worsens the impact of adolescent parenting; therefore, a common goal of teenage parent programs has been to reduce repeat pregnancy. To examine the impact of this goal, a meta-analysis was conducted on 16 control-comparison group studies that evaluated the effect of teenage pregnancy and parenting…

  18. Educational Summaries 1, 2, and 3: A Summary for Parents and Students on the Subject of Teenage Drug Abuse, Stop the 'Street Market' Suppliers, and Diseases and Disorders That May Result from Drug Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1971

    Contained are three brochures designed to provide understandable information on the drugs, narcotics, and chemicals that are being most frequently abused. They also portray the illegal "street market," and how the user will look, act, and be harmed as a result of drug use. The first brochure summarizes some characteristics and effects of…

  19. Repeat Pregnancies among Adolescent Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillmore, Mary Rogers; Lewis, Steven M.; Lohr, Mary Jane; Spencer, Michael S.; White, Rachelle D.

    1997-01-01

    Reports the results of an event history analysis of rapidly repeated pregnancies among a sample of 170 adolescents. Results show that the best fitting model for these girls included two proximate determinants of pregnancy, contraceptive use, and other factors. Findings indicate that such pregnancies among teenagers are somewhat predictable. (RJM)

  20. Gender Differences Regarding Peer Influence and Attitude toward Substance Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rienzi, Beth M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    To investigate gender differences in acceptance of substance abuse behavior among adolescents, 968 students were administered a questionnaire to assess their perceptions. Results show that both genders felt that boys would be more approving of teenage substance abuse. Most students were disapproving of a teenager driving after drinking. Other…

  1. Abuses of the girl child in some African societies: implications for nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Doris Deedei

    2006-01-01

    The definition of a child in African societies varies. From the moment the girl child can talk and walk, she is allocated responsibilities within the family. Westernized cultures view such responsibilities as forms of abuse. Thus, various reports had been written about girl children and had been critical of African societies without acknowledging that Africa is a very large continent. This paper sets out to identify, explore, and present potential areas of abuse of the girl child, for example, female circumcision, child slaves, rape survivors, child soldiers, child prostitution, teenage pregnancy, and arranged marriages. This paper suggests strategies that healthcare professionals could initiate in situations where a girl child is being abused. PMID:16512869

  2. Youths and Alcohol Abuse: A Continuing Phenomenon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torres, Donald A.

    1982-01-01

    Defines problem drinking and alcoholism, and differentiates normal drinking escapes from alcohol abuse by teenagers and other youths. Suggests teenagers consume alcohol for a myriad of reasons and this behavior often leads to alcohol dependence which can cause interference in normal relationships with others. (Author)

  3. The First Lady Talks about Drug Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Mrs. Reagan discusses effects of drug use among teenagers and offers suggestions to teachers, parents, and students for combating drug abuse. She stresses parent involvement and the formation of parent peer groups, as well as teachers' responsibilities. (NJ)

  4. Paths Leading to Teenage Psychiatric Symptoms and Substance Use: Developmental Epidemiological Studies in Woodlawn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellam, Sheppard G.; And Others

    Early predictors of two major areas of teenage outcome -- substance use and psychiatric symptoms -- were analyzed and specific developmental paths leading to each teenage outcome were identified in this long-term, follow-up study. Substance "use" rather than "abuse" and psychiatric "symptoms" rather than "illness" were investigated. Interviews…

  5. [A sociological study of factors affecting reproductive health of female teenagers and young women].

    PubMed

    Nizamov, I G; Chechulina, O V

    2003-01-01

    The reproductive health of teenagers deserves a special attention and must be regarded from the viewpoint of their future prospects as well as their social and cultural media. The mentioned social-and-cultural factors affecting the teenagers' attitude towards sexuality and preconditioning their access to information and services of healthcare have an impact on the status of their reproductive health and on their general well-being, including the ability of teenagers to avoid an undesired pregnancy or sexually transmitted diseases.

  6. School-age pregnancy: why hasn't prevention worked?

    PubMed

    Males, M

    1993-12-01

    Adolescent pregnancy or sexually transmitted disease (STD) reduction has not occurred, despite sexuality education and abstinence programs, and intensive publicity and community initiatives. An obstacle to adolescent pregnancy, STD, and childbearing prevention is the assumption that adolescent sexuality is a closed system of activity among peers. When a nation is consumed with the preoccupation of condoms versus chastity debates, and is ignoring high poverty levels and abuse of the young, adolescent girls will seek escape from harsh childhoods in early family formation with young adult men. There is a high correlation between poverty rates and teenage birth, AIDS, and STD rates. Schools are not able to produce magical solutions to teenage pregnancy when adult lawmakers abnegate their responsibility to provide for youth well-being. Adolescent pregnancy will occur regardless of the expansion of curative programs such as school-based clinics; fundamental changes in assumptions, attitudes, and policies are needed. Beneficial aspects of programming appear to be fact-based sexuality and contraceptive education, counseling and referrals for youths with histories of child abuse, and child care classes and flexible school schedules for parenting students. A statistical profile in California indicates that 85% of all fathers of babies born to girls between ages of 11 and 18 years were adults. More than 50% of mothers aged 11-15 years were impregnated by adult men. Fathers' average age for births among junior high school mothers was 15-26 years, when the youngest and the oldest 2.5% of fathers are eliminated. There is a greater likelihood that a man older than 23 years will impregnate a junior high girl than will a junior high boy. The partner age gap is greatest among the very young girls. The California profile of father's age is similar to birth patterns in other states and similar to the national average. An examination of STDs shows a higher rate of STDs among females

  7. [FIRST CONSULTATION IN TEENAGERS FOR CONTRACEPTION PRESCRIPTION].

    PubMed

    Béliard, A

    2016-01-01

    Adequate contraception prescription is mandatory for teenagers to avoid any unwanted pregnancy. Counselling and description of side effect improve compliance. Use of condom is important to avoid sexually transmitted infections. Combined estroprogestin contraception has multiple non-contraceptive benefits, e.g. dysmenorrhea improvement. Familial and personal history is needed before contraception prescription. Further consultation 3 months later has to be planned to evaluate compliance, side effects and to adapt contraception if needed.

  8. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... This means that their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or ... brain, and other organs. Drinking during pregnancy can harm your baby. Alcohol also increases the risk of ...

  9. Emerging Answers: Research Findings on Programs To Reduce Teen Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Douglas

    This report summarizes three bodies of research on teenage pregnancy and programs to reduce the risk of teenage pregnancy. Studies included in this report were completed in 1980 or later, conducted in the United States or Canada, targeted adolescents, employed an experimental or quasi-experimental design, had a sample size of at least 100 in the…

  10. Sex and America's Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alan Guttmacher Inst., New York, NY.

    Although sexual activity is common among teenagers, it is not as widespread, and does not begin as early, as most adults believe. This report provides detailed data and analysis of sex among adolescents. Adolescent sexual activity is grouped in ten categories: (1) Rites of passage; (2) The context of adolescents' lives; (3) Sex among teenagers;…

  11. NUTRITIONAL HEALTH OF TEENAGERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HILL, MARY

    SURVEYS HAVE SHOWN THAT SOME TEENAGERS HAVE FOOD INTAKES THAT FAIL TO SUPPLY THE RECOMMENDED DIETARY ALLOWANCE FOR EACH OF THE NUTRIENTS. HOWEVER, THE NUMBER OF TEENAGERS CLASSIFIED AS HAVING INADEQUATE NUTRIENT INTAKES DEPENDS UPON WHICH REVISION OF THE RECOMMENDED DIETARY ALLOWANCES HAS BEEN USED AS A BASE FOR EVALUATION. IN EXAMINING THE…

  12. Nutrition in pregnancy and lactation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Optimal maternal health during pregnancy reduces the risk of suboptimal fetal development. Obesity prevalence is increasing among women of childbearing age in both developed and developing countries. Although teenage pregnancies remain common in some countries, generally women are getting pregnant a...

  13. Teen Pregnancy Prevention. A Legislator's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiden, Mary

    This publication presents an overview of adolescent pregnancy, including national and state statistical information; funding sources for teen pregnancy prevention programs; examples of the effects of teen pregnancy prevention on society; illustrations of teenagers' perspectives on the issue; recent developments and initiatives in the arena of teen…

  14. Preparticipation Exams: How to Detect a Teenage Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Parnell

    1990-01-01

    Sport-specific preparticipation examinations do not address social problems (drug abuse, suicide, murder, accidents, and sex) epidemic among teenagers, but they are often the only contact these youth have with a physician. This article discusses these risk factors and presents methods for assessing them during preparticipation exams. (SM)

  15. Helping Teenagers into Adulthood: A Guide for the Next Generation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, George R.

    Noting that the current generation of adolescents is experiencing more stressful and negative experiences at an earlier age than previous generations, and that the consequences include drug abuse, delinquency, and mental illness, this book provides caregivers and parents with specific tactics to move teenagers successfully through adolescence. The…

  16. Self-Injury: The Secret Language of Pain for Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Len; Kortum, Julie

    2004-01-01

    Why would students purposefully harm themselves? Why would they cut their own wrists, yet not be suicidal? These questions are addressed in this article that explores the myths and types of self-injury in which children and teenagers engage. Research indicates a connection between self-injurers and home abuse, and anorexia. This article discusses…

  17. Adolescent Pregnancy and Childbearing: Findings from Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chilman, Catherine S.; And Others

    Issues and trends related to adolescent pregnancy and childbearing in the United States are discussed in the 12 papers collected in this publication. Chapters I and II delineate trends in teenage childbearing and explore aspects of psychosocial development and social problems associated with teenage illegitimacy. Chapters III and IV describe…

  18. Nutrition during pregnancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The optimal nutritional support of a mother and her developing fetus begins before conception. This poses a challenge for pediatricians caring for pregnant adolescents. Approximately 1 million teenagers become pregnant in the United States each year. Of these pregnancies, 51% end in live births, 35%...

  19. Prescription Drug Abuse and Youth. Information Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. National Drug Intelligence Center.

    Prescription drugs, a category of psychotherapeutics that comprises prescription-type pain relievers, tranquilizers, stimulants, and sedatives, are among the substances most commonly abused by young people in the United States. Prescription drugs are readily available and can easily be obtained by teenagers who abuse these drugs to experience a…

  20. American Public Opinion Toward Sex Education and Contraception for Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, Paul A.

    A study was undertaken to determine American attitudes toward sex education and contraceptive services to adolescents and toward the related topics of teenage pregnancy and related welfare and medical costs. The study was based on the premise that policy decisions regarding whether to offer sex education and contraceptive services to adolescents…

  1. Child Physical Abuse and Concurrence of Other Types of Child Abuse in Sweden--Associations with Health and Risk Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annerback, E. M.; Sahlqvist, L.; Svedin, C. G.; Wingren, G.; Gustafsson, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the associations between child physical abuse executed by a parent or caretaker and self-rated health problems/risk-taking behaviors among teenagers. Further to evaluate concurrence of other types of abuse and how these alone and in addition to child physical abuse were associated with bad health status and risk-taking…

  2. Data Archive on Adolescent Pregnancy and Pregnancy Prevention (DAAPPP). Catalog of Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sociometrics Corp., Los Altos, CA.

    This catalog of products from the Data Archive on Adolescent Pregnancy and Pregnancy Prevention (DAAPPP) contains a list of DAAPPP social science Data Sets on topics related to teenage pregnancy and family planning. Each Data Set listing contains the following information: (1) name of study or program; (2) name of investigator or sponsoring…

  3. Pregnancy in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Black, Amanda Y; Fleming, Nathalie A; Rome, Ellen S

    2012-04-01

    Adolescent pregnancy remains a public health issue with significant medical, emotional, and societal consequences for the adolescent mother, her child, and her family. Teenage pregnancies are at higher risk of many adverse outcomes, including preterm delivery, low birth weight, and neonatal and infant mortality. Teen pregnancy and motherhood may have detrimental effects on the teen mother and her child; antenatal and postpartum care need to be adapted to meet the special needs of pregnant adolescents because standard obstetrical environments may not do so. This comprehensive review of adolescent pregnancy will highlight global statistics, factors contributing to adolescent pregnancy, social implications of adolescent pregnancy, obstetrical and neonatal outcomes, and the importance of multidisciplinary antenatal and postnatal care.

  4. DENGUE INFECTION IN PREGNANCY.

    PubMed

    Khamim, Kriangsak; Khamim, Boonluck; Pengsaa, Krisana

    2015-01-01

    While dengue infection is still on the increase in adults in Thailand, it also affects pregnant women, especially pregnant teenagers. This study was designed to investigate dengue infection during pregnancy. Seven cases of dengue infection in pregnant women were admitted to Ban Pong Hospital, Ratchaburi, Thailand, between 2008 and 2012. Dengue infection presented in all pregnancy trimesters. There were two severe cases: one was dengue hemorrhagic fever in the first trimester, and the second was at a critical stage of the infection during labor. There were three cases of abortion. These three cases included one complete, one incomplete, and one threatened abortion, with rising hematocrits of 22.8%, 17.1%, and 14.7%, respectively. Two out of the three teenage pregnancies experienced complete and threatened abortions, while the third abortion case was a threatened abortion pregnancy at the critical stage of infection during intrapartum. Leukopenia was identified in six out of seven women. Low baseline hematocrit and low maximum hematocrit were laboratory findings. Clinical management involved administration of intravenous fluids and antipyretics. Favorable outcomes can be obtained through early diagnosis and supportive treatment. The morbidity profile can be more serious in teenage pregnancies. Additional studies should be conducted to establish whether low baseline hematocrit, low percentages of rising hematocrit in pregnant women with dengue infection, and abortions (with a high degree of increasing hematocrit during the critical stage of the disease) are typical clinical signs.

  5. DENGUE INFECTION IN PREGNANCY.

    PubMed

    Khamim, Kriangsak; Khamim, Boonluck; Pengsaa, Krisana

    2015-01-01

    While dengue infection is still on the increase in adults in Thailand, it also affects pregnant women, especially pregnant teenagers. This study was designed to investigate dengue infection during pregnancy. Seven cases of dengue infection in pregnant women were admitted to Ban Pong Hospital, Ratchaburi, Thailand, between 2008 and 2012. Dengue infection presented in all pregnancy trimesters. There were two severe cases: one was dengue hemorrhagic fever in the first trimester, and the second was at a critical stage of the infection during labor. There were three cases of abortion. These three cases included one complete, one incomplete, and one threatened abortion, with rising hematocrits of 22.8%, 17.1%, and 14.7%, respectively. Two out of the three teenage pregnancies experienced complete and threatened abortions, while the third abortion case was a threatened abortion pregnancy at the critical stage of infection during intrapartum. Leukopenia was identified in six out of seven women. Low baseline hematocrit and low maximum hematocrit were laboratory findings. Clinical management involved administration of intravenous fluids and antipyretics. Favorable outcomes can be obtained through early diagnosis and supportive treatment. The morbidity profile can be more serious in teenage pregnancies. Additional studies should be conducted to establish whether low baseline hematocrit, low percentages of rising hematocrit in pregnant women with dengue infection, and abortions (with a high degree of increasing hematocrit during the critical stage of the disease) are typical clinical signs. PMID:26506742

  6. Everything You Need To Know about Teen Pregnancy. Revised Edition. The Need To Know Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Tracy

    Every year one million teenage girls become pregnant. Eight out of 10 are unintended pregnancies. Primarily targeting pregnant teenagers, this book address many of the different issues and decisions that a pregnant teenager must face. Letters supplement text to highlight feelings of pregnant teens and provide advice from friends, counselors, and…

  7. Physical Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    Navigation Physical Abuse Sexual Abuse Domestic Violence Psychological Abuse Financial Abuse Neglect Critical Issues What Communities Can Do The Role of Professionals and Concerned Citizens Help for Victims ...

  8. Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    Navigation Physical Abuse Sexual Abuse Domestic Violence Psychological Abuse Financial Abuse Neglect Critical Issues What Communities Can Do The Role of Professionals and Concerned Citizens Help for Victims ...

  9. Exposure to tobacco, alcohol and drugs of abuse during pregnancy. A study of prevalence among pregnant women in Malaga (Spain).

    PubMed

    Blasco-Alonso, Marta; González-Mesa, Ernesto; Gálvez Montes, Milagros; Lozano Bravo, Isabel; Merino Galdón, Federico; Cuenca Campos, Francisco; Marín Schiaffino, Gema; Pérez Torres, Sergio; Herrera Peral, José; Bellido Estévez, Inmaculada

    2015-06-17

    The prevalence of substance abuse in women who become pregnant is similar to that of the general population, resulting in a high fetal exposure rate during the most vulnerable period regarding neurodevelopment and organogenesis. The present study was intended to assess the level of prenatal exposure to tobacco, alcohol or illicit drugs in the city of Málaga (Spain). It was designed as a cross-sectional study, and based on the anonymous self-reports of participants. A total of 451 pregnant women were recruited in the first, second or third trimester. The prevalence in each of the quarters respectively was 21.2%, 18.5% and 13.3% for smoking, 40.7%, 23.1% and 17.1% for alcohol and 4.8%, 1.9% and 1.2% for cannabis. We also found that a higher educational level was associated with a lower consumption of tobacco (RR 0.659 [0.537-0.810] p<0.0001) and greater exposure to alcohol (RR 1.87 [1.30-2.69] p<0.0007). These results, particularly in regard to alcohol intake, are sufficiently alarming to alert obstetric care providers about the need to implement preventive measures.

  10. Exposure to tobacco, alcohol and drugs of abuse during pregnancy. A study of prevalence among pregnant women in Malaga (Spain).

    PubMed

    Blasco-Alonso, Marta; González-Mesa, Ernesto; Gálvez Montes, Milagros; Lozano Bravo, Isabel; Merino Galdón, Federico; Cuenca Campos, Francisco; Marín Schiaffino, Gema; Pérez Torres, Sergio; Herrera Peral, José; Bellido Estévez, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of substance abuse in women who become pregnant is similar to that of the general population, resulting in a high fetal exposure rate during the most vulnerable period regarding neurodevelopment and organogenesis. The present study was intended to assess the level of prenatal exposure to tobacco, alcohol or illicit drugs in the city of Málaga (Spain). It was designed as a cross-sectional study, and based on the anonymous self-reports of participants. A total of 451 pregnant women were recruited in the first, second or third trimester. The prevalence in each of the quarters respectively was 21.2%, 18.5% and 13.3% for smoking, 40.7%, 23.1% and 17.1% for alcohol and 4.8%, 1.9% and 1.2% for cannabis. We also found that a higher educational level was associated with a lower consumption of tobacco (RR 0.659 [0.537-0.810] p<0.0001) and greater exposure to alcohol (RR 1.87 [1.30-2.69] p<0.0007). These results, particularly in regard to alcohol intake, are sufficiently alarming to alert obstetric care providers about the need to implement preventive measures. PMID:26132299

  11. Infant health consequences of childbearing by teenagers and older mothers.

    PubMed

    Ventura, S J; Hendershot, G E

    1984-01-01

    The association of childbearing at early and late ages with various adverse outcomes of pregnancy was explored in data collected in the 1980 National Natality and Fetal Mortality Surveys. The characteristics of interest for teenage mothers were marital status at conception and the trimester of pregnancy in which prenatal care was begun. For married mothers aged 30 years and older, the variables considered were employment status and occupation during the year preceding childbirth and smoking status before and during pregnancy. The pregnancy outcome variables analyzed were the same for both groups of mothers: fetal loss, low birth weight, and low 1-minute Apgar scores. Although more than half of all births to teenage mothers were to unmarried women, an additional one-quarter of these births were to women who married between the time of conception and the birth of the child. Generally there was little difference in outcomes for teenage mothers who were married at the time of delivery, regardless of their marital status at the time of conception. Pregnancy outcomes for teenagers who did not marry prior to delivery were considerably less favorable. Nearly 90 percent of women aged 30-34 years who had a first birth in 1980 were employed during the year before delivery, an extraordinarily high labor force participation rate. More than half of these employed mothers were in professional occupations, consistent with their very high levels of educational attainment. Although the analysis is limited by the small numbers of births involved, it appears that professionally employed women generally have the best pregnancy outcomes. When mother's smoking status is taken into account,nonsmokers had more favorable outcomes, with births to professionally employed mothers generally most favored.

  12. Teen Pregnancy and School-Based Health Clinics. A Family Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosbacker, Barrett

    To combat the problem of teenage pregnancy, public health clinics have made birth control counseling and free contraceptives available to minors and many public schools have implemented sex education programs. Despite the development and implementation of these programs, teenage sexual activity and pregnancy have increased. The increase in…

  13. Teenage Cohabitation, Marriage, and Childbearing

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Wendy D.; Cohen, Jessica A.

    2014-01-01

    Cohabitation is an integral part of family research; however, little work examines cohabitation among teenagers or links between cohabitation and teenage childbearing. Drawing on the National Survey of Family Growth (2006–10), we examine family formation activities (i.e., cohabitation, marriage, and childbearing) of 3,945 15–19 year old women from the mid 1990s through 2010. One-third (34%) of teenagers cohabit, marry, or have a child. Teenage cohabitation and marriage are both positively associated with higher odds of having a child. The vast majority of single pregnant teenagers do not form a union before the birth of their child; only 22% cohabit and 5% marry. Yet most single pregnant teenagers eventually cohabit, 59% did so by the child’s third birthday and about 9% marry. Cohabitation is an important part of the landscape of the adolescent years, and many teenage mothers described as “single mothers” are actually in cohabiting relationships. PMID:25972620

  14. Teenagers, Media, Taste!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lund, Doris

    An example of the influence of television on the reading interests of teenagers may be seen in the popularity of the book "Eric," the true story of a boy's four-and-a-half-year battle with leukemia, which began just two days before he entered college. Although the television adaptation was inaccurate in many details concerning Eric's life,…

  15. Teenage Nutrition and Physique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huenemann, Ruth L.; And Others

    Body size, composition, and conformation in a teen-age population, and associated factors were studied to obtain useful data for planning programs in public health nutrition. This book describes the purpose, methods, and findings of this four-year longitudinal and cross-sectional study conducted in Berkeley, California, during the years 1961 to…

  16. Split Ends: Teenage Stepchildren.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Ruth

    Noting that family members need to work together to find ways of relating that feel comfortable, this book is intended to help teenage stepchildren understand stepfamily life and to find ways to make it happier. The chapters are: (1) "Divided Loyalty," including being a go-between for divorcing parents and where to live; (2) "Can Access Be Fun?"…

  17. Teenagers' Explanations of Bullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornberg, Robert; Knutsen, Sven

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore how teenagers explain why bullying takes place at school, and whether there were any differences in explaining bullying due to gender and prior bullying experiences. One hundred and seventy-six Swedish students in Grade 9 responded to a questionnaire. Mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative methods)…

  18. Bold Books for Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallo, Don

    2005-01-01

    "Bold Books for Teenagers" provides dynamic, informative viewpoints on important issues in publishing and teaching contemporary literature, especially literature for adolescents. Reviews of young adult literature also appear in this column. This article examines how English teachers can help students explore their interests without promoting any…

  19. Summer Options for Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ware, Cindy

    This guide to more than 1,000 summer programs for teenagers encompasses recreational and academic programs sponsored by colleges, universities, independent schools, foundations, museums, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit businesses. Every program listed accepts students age 13-18; some programs also accept participants older or younger.…

  20. Endometriosis in teenagers.

    PubMed

    Sarıdoğan, Ertan

    2015-08-01

    Endometriosis affects a significant proportion of teenagers. Published studies suggest that laparoscopically confirmed endometriosis could be found in over 60% of adolescent girls undergoing laparoscopic investigation for pain, in 75% of girls with chronic pelvic pain resistant to treatment and in 70% of girls with dysmenorrhea and in approximately 50% of girls with chronic pelvic pain not necessarily resistant to treatment. Both early and advanced forms, including deep endometriosis have been reported to be present in teenagers. It has recently been claimed that deep endometriosis has its roots in teenage years. Risk factors include obstructive mullerian anomalies, family history, early menarche and early onset dysmenorrhea. Both surgical and medical treatment approaches are used for treatment in this age group, but care should be taken when treatment with GnRHa and progestins is being considered due to their potential impact on bone formation. Further studies are urgently needed to determine whether early diagnosis and treatment of teenage endometriosis lead to better long term outcomes or simply increase number of interventions without preventing progression of the disease.

  1. Teenagers and Satanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bredenberg, Alice M.

    The background of Satanism and typical Satanic activities are described. It is noted that contemporary Satanism has three forms: solitary Satanists, outlaw cults, and neo-Satanic churches. Included in a description of Satanic activities are Heavy Metal music and fantasy games, both of which are intensely interesting to teenagers. The next section…

  2. Let's talk about sex (again): advancing the conversation around long-acting reversible contraception for teenagers.

    PubMed

    Satterwhite, Catherine Lindsey; Ramaswamy, Megha

    2015-11-01

    Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) has incredible potential for decreasing teenage pregnancy rates in the USA, but use among adolescents remains low. LARC methods, including intrauterine devices and implants, are recommended as first-line choices for teenagers by multiple medical professional associations. Barriers at the system, provider and patient level persist, but new demonstration projects, in addition to provisions of the Affordable Care Act, show great promise in facilitating LARC use. A renewed national discourse should acknowledge the reality that many US teenagers have sex, that LARC is safe and effective and that LARC offers an opportunity to prevent teenage pregnancy. By encouraging widespread access and use, a large, positive impact across multiple health and economic sectors can be achieved.

  3. School-based adolescent pregnancy classes.

    PubMed

    Podgurski, M J

    1993-01-01

    School-based adolescent pregnancy classes provide the childbirth educator with a unique opportunity to be visible to students. Attitudes about sexuality and pregnancy can be changed within the mainstream population by the presence of prepared childbirth classes at schools. The problems of absenteeism and denial of pregnancy that result in late reporting to health care providers can be minimized. The expectant teen-ager can be encouraged to attend school and given self-confidence in assuming the role of a parent after birth. Support can be engendered from faculty, students, and the teen-ager's support person.

  4. Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Additional Resources Return to: What is Elder Abuse? Elder Abuse and Substance Abuse Substance abuse has been identified ... the most frequently cited risk factor associated with elder abuse and neglect. It may be the victim and/ ...

  5. Adolescent Pregnancy in an Urban Environment: Issues, Programs, and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Janet B.; Zabin, Laurie Schwab

    An in-depth discussion of national and local statistics regarding teenage and adolescent pregnancy and the developmental issues involved opens this analysis. Problems and adverse consequences of adolescent pregnancy in an urban setting are explored using a city-wide random sample of adolescent births. A model pregnancy and parenting program and…

  6. Reducing the Risk: Building Skills To Prevent Pregnancy. Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Richard P.

    This document is a student workbook for a program which focuses on ways to prevent teenage pregnancy by teaching and practicing the interpersonal skills necessary to help teenagers abstain or utilize effective contraception methods. It includes worksheets, homework assignments, role plays, quizzes, handouts, and forms to be used in conjunction…

  7. Reducing the Risk: Building Skills To Prevent Pregnancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Richard P.

    This teacher's guide focuses on ways to prevent teenage pregnancy by teaching and practicing the interpersonal skills necessary to help teenagers abstain or utilize effective contraception methods. The practice in this carefully-tested, 15-lesson curriculum comes in the form of role plays, class discussions, and homework assignments that focus on…

  8. [A sociological study of factors affecting reproductive health of female teenagers and young women].

    PubMed

    Nizamov, I G; Chechulina, O V

    2003-01-01

    The reproductive health of teenagers deserves a special attention and must be regarded from the viewpoint of their future prospects as well as their social and cultural media. The mentioned social-and-cultural factors affecting the teenagers' attitude towards sexuality and preconditioning their access to information and services of healthcare have an impact on the status of their reproductive health and on their general well-being, including the ability of teenagers to avoid an undesired pregnancy or sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:12882120

  9. Positive experiences of teenage motherhood: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Seamark, Clare J; Lings, Pamela

    2004-01-01

    Background: Teenage pregnancy is seen as a cause for concern in the United Kingdom (UK). However, there has been little research from primary care looking at teenage motherhood and its implications. Aim: To investigate the experiences of teenage mothers in relation to their role as mothers and their expectations of their futures. Design of study: Qualitative study. Setting: East Devon, England. Methods: Nine women who had conceived their first child while still a teenager agreed to participate. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken, audiotaped, transcribed, and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Results: The women expressed positive attitudes to being mothers and described how it had affected their lives. For some, motherhood had been the impetus to change direction and consider a career, because they had someone else for whom they were responsible. They recognised that they were still young enough to enter further education or other aspects of employment as their children grew up. Conclusions: For the women in this study, having been a teenage mother did not mean that their life and future were all over. Motherhood and bringing up children were valued in their own right. The women were realistic about their futures, often making plans to develop their careers. PMID:15527606

  10. Adolescent Pregnancy Decision-Making: Are Parents Important?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Raye Hudson

    1980-01-01

    This paper examines the extent to which teenagers involve their parents in decision making on the resolution of unwanted conceptions, even though legalization of abortion allows them to terminate their pregnancies without parental knowledge. (RMH)

  11. Sexual health, teenage responsibility.

    PubMed

    1995-10-01

    The Planned Parenthood Association of South Africa in 1992, published a manual on ¿Responsible Teenage Sexuality¿. It deals comprehensively and frankly with issues of teenage sexuality in an easy-to-use module format. With increasing emphasis on the need for sex education at school and in the home, this manual provides essential information for teachers, youth leaders, and health professionals. The modules take cognizance of the sensitive issues that concern young people. The open approach enables counselors to provide the answers that young people seek in an honest and comfortable way. Compiled by the youth counselors of the Cape Town Planned Parenthood Association of South Africa, the manual is based on their knowledge and experience of providing sex education to young people from all communities over the past 10 years.

  12. Adolescent Substance Abuse: Risk Factors and Prevention Strategies. Maternal & Child Health Technical Information Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Mark J.

    The high prevalence of alcohol and substance abuse by adolescents poses a significant threat to the wellness of youth. Adolescents appear to use drugs for a variety of reasons. In addition to the multiple etiologic and risk factors present for substance abuse, there are many pathways teenagers may follow on their way to substance abuse. The…

  13. Teenage Childbearing among Youth Born to Teenage Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildsmith, Elizabeth; Manlove, Jennifer; Jekielek, Susan; Moore, Kristin Anderson; Mincieli, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, this article examined how early maternal characteristics, an adolescent's family environment, and the adolescent's own attitudes and behaviors were associated with the odds of a nonmarital teenage birth among youth born to teenage mothers. Multivariate analyses indicated that these domains…

  14. Reader-Responses of Pregnant Adolescents and Teenage Mothers to Young Adult Novels Portraying Protagonists with Problems Similar and Dissimilar to the Readers'.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poe, Elizabeth Ann

    Applying reader response theory, a study explored the responses of 19 pregnant adolescents and teenage mothers to two dissimilar young adult novels, one about teenage pregnancy and one about adolescent alcoholism. Quantitative analysis, using a modified version of the Purves-Rippere (1968) system, and qualitative analysis of written answers to…

  15. Early Childbearing: Perspectives of Black Adolescents on Pregnancy, Abortion, and Contraception. Sage Library of Social Research 192.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Ellen W.; Rickels, Karl

    This book reports on the Penn Study of Teenage Pregnancy, which examined issues surrounding adolescent pregnancy, abortion, and childbearing. Participants were African-American teenagers between the ages of 13 and 17 from disadvantaged urban backgrounds. Based on individual interviews over 2 years in the early 1980s, the study provided details…

  16. Pregnancy testing and counseling.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, J N

    1989-06-01

    Pregnancy testing and counseling are increasingly accepted as necessary services for adolescents within the primary care setting. For teenagers in need of a pregnancy test, the easy-to-perform, highly sensitive and specific enzyme immunoassay analysis for measuring beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-HCG) is ideal. However, no single beta-HCG analysis should be taken as absolute evidence for the presence or absence of pregnancy. Instead, an integrated approach using all of the health care professional's skills in adolescent health care should be taken. In some cases a careful history and physical examination will confirm the pregnancy. At other times serial quantitative serum HCG titers, pelvic ultrasonography, and culdocentesis may be necessary to rule out the possibility of ectopic pregnancy or threatened abortion. For more than three quarters of pregnant adolescents the pregnancy is unplanned and may represent a major conflict for themselves, their partner, and their families. When such an event occurs the health care professional will frequently be sought as a resource. Successful pregnancy counseling has many components. The adolescent will need to visualize the counselor as an available, sensitive, nonjudgmental individual who believes in the right of the pregnant teenager ultimately to progress to her own decision. The counseling process should be firmly based on an understanding of adolescent psychosocial and biologic development, crises intervention techniques, and family dynamics. The counselor needs to be a reliable information source. If the adolescent decides to go to term, programs offering comprehensive prenatal services to teenagers should be identified. Information concerning high-quality, low-cost abortion services also will need to be available for those who wish to terminate. It is important to monitor the quality of care given in prenatal and abortion service referrals. Few adolescents currently choose to place their babies for adoption

  17. Dangerous Liaisons: Substance Abuse and Sex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    This report takes a comprehensive look at the connections between alcohol, drug use, and sex. Two national data sets on more than 34,000 teenagers and two sets on arrested and incarcerated sex offenders were analyzed. A review of the literature, interviews with experts, and an examination of programs aimed at prevention of abuse were included in…

  18. Childhood Sexual Abuse in Pregnant and Parenting Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilson, Kathryn J.; Lancaster, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine childhood sexual abuse in Australian childbearing adolescents and the contribution of abuse variables (sexual and physical abuse) to antenatal and postpartum depression and anxiety in adolescents. Methods: Seventy-nine adolescents proceeding with a pregnancy for the first time were surveyed about abuse experiences and were…

  19. Teenage Employment and Career Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Kaylin M.; Staff, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Most American youth hold a job at some point during adolescence, but should they work? This article presents a broad overview of teenage employment in the United States. It begins by describing which teenagers work and for how long and then focuses attention on the consequences (both good and bad) of paid work in adolescence. It then presents…

  20. Factors Affecting Teenager Cyber Delinquency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joo, Young Ju; Lim, Kyu Yon; Cho, Sun Yoo; Jung, Bo Kyung; Choi, Se Bin

    2013-01-01

    The study aims to investigate structural relationships among teenagers' peer attachment, self-control, academic stress, internet usage time, and cyber delinquency. The data source was the Korea Youth Panel Survey, and the responses from 920 teenagers in the 12th grade provided the study data. Structural equation modeling was used for the analysis.…

  1. Strategies for Supporting Teenage Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Robin A.; Thompson, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Programs for teenage mothers provided through school districts or community agencies often have their own curricular agenda for teaching teenage mothers about the proper care of and nutrition for infants and the typical stages of child development, but not all programs are successful in supporting the development of positive early relationships…

  2. Why schools should make condoms available to teenagers.

    PubMed

    Singer, A

    1994-10-01

    The controversy surrounding sex education and condom availability programs in schools in New York City and throughout the US continues because parents worry that such programs encourage teenagers to engage in sexual behavior. But the reality is that more and more teenagers are engaging in sexual behavior anyway. The Carnegie Council on Adolescent Development found the 17% of girls and 29% of boys engaged in sexual intercourse by the time they were 16 years old. Many parents are ready to blame sex education and condom availability programs for these figures; these parents issue calls for "chastity education." Opponents of sex education also believe that these programs violate the rights of parents to education their children about moral behavior and religious values. But the truth is that these programs do not preclude the right of a parents to teach a child anything. They simply prevent the use of the public schools to impose religious beliefs on students. Those who argue that the mandate of schools is only to teach academic subjects forget that public high schools are the best place for sex education and condom availability programs because the schools are full of teenagers and of adults who are trained and willing to counsel them. Few educators would argue that schools should not teach values, and sex education and condom availability programs provide an excellent way to help teenagers understand not only human sexuality, reproduction, and the spread of disease but also social relationships, the development of cultural norms, and the role of responsible citizens. At the same time that we encourage sexual abstinence among young people, we must also teach about sexual responsibility. Sexual responsibility today means using a condom to prevent pregnancy and disease. If teenagers are embarrassed in their efforts to acquire condoms, pregnancy and diseases will be the result, not abstinence. PMID:12287913

  3. Ectopic Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Ectopic Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Ectopic Pregnancy Page ... Ectopic Pregnancy FAQ155, August 2011 PDF Format Ectopic Pregnancy Pregnancy What is an ectopic pregnancy? Who is ...

  4. The teenage job hunter.

    PubMed

    Dunning, R E

    1975-03-01

    Job hunting is a significant aspect of occupational behavior and a task that recurs at intervals during the lifespan. Adolescents constitute a vulnerable population-at-risk in their efforts to enter the labor market. Their self-esteem, mastery, and sense of competency are at stake. This paper describes an adaptation of a method currently being used by business management firms that counsel executive clients in the job-hunting process. The method described is tailored to the needs of teenagers and is presented so that occupational therapists can use or modify the method for clients who lack confidence or experience in job hunting. PMID:1115215

  5. Teen pregnancy. Why it remains a serious social, economic, and educational problem in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Caldas, S J

    1994-01-01

    Although there are fewer teenage pregnancies in the US today than was the case prior to 1970, this fact should not be used to claim that the problem of adolescent pregnancy has been exaggerated. In the earlier period, the majority of adolescent pregnancies were to married couples; moreover, early childbearing was a social norm. In the present period, the availability of effective contraception and legal abortion has enabled women to postpone marriage and childbearing into their late twenties or early thirties and to focus instead on education that enhances their marketability and wages. Under prevailing social norms, teen pregnancy represents a clear deviation. By 1990, 68% of births to women under 20 years of age involved unmarried mothers. Under current socioeconomic conditions, unmarried adolescent mothers are likely to live in poverty and their offspring are at high risk of learning disabilities, child abuse, and foster care placements. Although young people are bombarded with images of sexuality in the mass media, school-based sex education programs tend to promote abstinence and withhold information on or access to contraception. It is essential that material on human sexuality is integrated into the curriculum as early as kindergarten if the teen pregnancy rate and the intergenerational transmission of early childbearing under conditions of poverty are to be reduced.

  6. Little Adults: Child and Teenage Commercial Sexual Exploitation in Contemporary Brazilian Cinema

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    da Silvia, Antonio Marcio

    2016-01-01

    This current study explores three contemporary Brazilian films' depiction of commercial sexual exploitation of young girls and teenagers. It points out how the young female characters cope with the abuses they suffer and proposes that these filmic representations of the characters' experiences expose a significant social problem of contemporary…

  7. Communicative Daily Life Stories and Focus Groups: Proposals for Overcoming Gender Violence among Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aubert, Adriana; Melgar, Patricia; Valls, Rosa

    2011-01-01

    The scientific literature has identified an attraction toward models of masculinity marked by abuse and domination in teenagers' sexual and affective relationships. Given this reality, greater insight is needed on the mechanisms that lead young people to choose this type of relationship. In theory, different authors argue that as a result of the…

  8. Too Little, Too Late: Services for Teenage Parents. An Examination of Some Major Programs Now Operating in the United States to Serve Teenage Parents and Their Children, Including a Look at the Range and Quality of Available Services and Candid Comments by Service Providers. Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Elizabeth A.

    This report contains the findings of a 1982 survey conducted to examine existing programs for providing assistance to pregnant teenagers, young parents, and their children. The report is based on data collected through telephone interviews, site visits, personal consultations, and a review of the literature on teenage pregnancy. Sex by trial and…

  9. [Teenagers and age of first drinking: A disturbing precocity?].

    PubMed

    Picherot, G; Urbain, J; Dreno, L; Caldagues, E; Caquard, M; Pernel, A-S; Amar, M

    2010-05-01

    Age of first drink in France and Western countries is early. National and international surveys confirm this early onset. Drunkenness, which is the most obvious drinking outcome, seems to rise amongst young adolescents. Consequences of this precocity are considerable. At short-term, drunk teenagers are more frequently victims of accidents. In addition, they are more vulnerable to sexual abuses, as victims but also as perpetrators. At medium- and long-terms, the early development of alcohol use is linked to higher levels of later drinking dependence. Three explanatory ways for this precocity are developed: family's influence, role of advertising and media, and role of peers. When alcohol meets adolescence, it is sometimes a real storm. Prevention is uneasy because of the very commonplace of alcohol at home. It can concern family level or society level. As for tobacco, society intervention is needed to delay age of first drink and limit teenager alcohol use but this should not involved adolescents condemnation. PMID:20137903

  10. Evaluation of Information Imparted in a Sexual-Contraceptive Educational Program for Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, Paul A.; Werley, Harriet H.

    Many of today's teenagers are sexually experienced but lack the knowledge they need to avoid the emotional and physical problems resulting from unwanted pregnancy and veneral disease. With this fact in mind, a study was conducted in collaboration with the Planned Parenthood League Inc., of Detroit in order to generate specific content-oriented…

  11. Evaluating a Nutrition Education Program for Pregnant Teen-Agers: Cognitive vs. Behavioral Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkin, Judy

    1983-01-01

    A manual on nutrition during pregnancy and lactation was developed and used with pregnant teenagers. Evaluation of the program showed that, while participants' knowledge of nutrition improved, their eating habits did not. The need for behavioral assessment of nutrition education programs is pointed out. (Author/PP)

  12. A Survey of English Teenagers' Sexual Experience and Preferences for School-Based Sex Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Katie; Wallace, Louise M.; Dunn, Orla; Brown, Katherine E.

    2012-01-01

    Rates of sexually transmitted infections and teenage pregnancy amongst the under-16s are causing increasing concern. There is limited evidence about the sexual behaviour and sex education preferences of this age group, especially of those from Black and minority ethnic groups. This study aimed to provide data on early heterosexual risk behaviour,…

  13. Working with the Pregnant Teenager: A Guide for Nutrition Educators. Program Aid Number 1303.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This guide is designed primarily for nutritionists and other health providers who work with pregnant adolescents, aged 17 or younger. The guide lists psychosocial, educational, and health implications of early pregnancy, and discusses the nutritional risks and requirements of pregnant teenagers. The guide then identifies counseling and educational…

  14. Working with Pregnant and Parenting Teenage Clients. A Resource Guide for Human Service Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervera, Neil, Ed.; Videka-Sherman, Lynn, Ed.

    Each year in the United States, approximately one million adolescents become pregnant. This guide, the seventh in a series of resource guides for human service professionals, features a collection of articles that explores and explains the different facets of teenage pregnancy, while offering strategies for intervention. The volume begins with an…

  15. Ectopic Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Ectopic Pregnancy KidsHealth > For Parents > Ectopic Pregnancy Print A A ... lower back pain continue What Causes an Ectopic Pregnancy? An ectopic pregnancy usually happens because a fertilized ...

  16. Adolescent Pregnancy and Parenthood. Highlights: An ERIC/CAPS Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danziger, Sandra; Farber, Naomi

    This digest reviews trends in adolescent sexual activity and discusses conceptual and programmatic approaches to pregnancy prevention. It discusses a pregnant adolescent's choices for resolving an unplanned pregnancy (i.e. abortion, adoption, keeping the baby, and marriage), and the challenges faced by teenage parents. The final section touches on…

  17. Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention: Strategies for the '80's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Elizabeth T.; Bassoff, Betty Z.

    Most efforts at combating teenage pregnancy have focused on cognitive/educational levels felt by concerned adults to be of greatest importance. However, recent research has demonstrated the connection between lack of career goals, low self-esteem, perception of narrow options, and risk-taking behavior as factors leading to pregnancy. A 3-year…

  18. Pregnancy risk among the younger sisters of pregnant and childbearing adolescents.

    PubMed

    East, P L; Felice, M E

    1992-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that younger sisters of childbearing teenagers are at increased risk for adolescent childbearing. We critically review this research and discuss three plausible theoretical explanations (social modeling, shared parenting influences, and shared societal risk) why the younger sisters of childbearing adolescents would themselves be at risk for teenage pregnancy. Considerations for preventive interventions aimed at the younger sisters of pregnant teenagers and directions for future research are discussed. PMID:1577959

  19. Adolescent pregnancy: an interpersonal skill training approach to prevention.

    PubMed

    Schinke, S P; Gilchrist, L D

    1977-01-01

    The research literature reports numerous negative consequences of adolescent pregnancy. Unfortunately, contemporary approaches to preventing teenage pregnancies have been largely unsuccessful. Recent evidence, however, suggests that interpersonal communication skill training may represent an important step in helping adolescents deal with their sexual and contraceptive behavior. This describes a pilot study of an interpersonal skill training model for sexually active inner-city teenagers. Results show that this training model is a feasible and attractive approach to modifying the youths' communication patterns. Findings indicate that such training is a fruitful direction for future pregnancy prevention research with the adolescent target population.

  20. Eating for pregnancy and breast-feeding.

    PubMed

    Theobald, Hannah E

    2007-01-01

    Good nutrition is essential to help support a successful pregnancy and breast-feeding. Women planning a pregnancy should follow a balanced nutrient-rich diet and consume a daily folic acid supplement up until the end of the first trimester. Many pregnancies, especially amongst teenagers, are unplanned, and educating women of childbearing age about the need to take folic acid to prevent neural tube defects is important. Maintaining a healthy body weight and weight gain is also important: if the mother is underweight, overweight or obese this can harm the health of both mother and fetus. Care should be taken to monitor the nutritional status of vulnerable groups (e.g. teenagers, vegans, women who are underweight, and those at risk of too little vitamin D) to ensure a healthy pregnancy outcome. During breast-feeding the mother needs to eat a sufficient and nutrient-rich diet to provide enough energy and nutrients to support milk production. PMID:17476978

  1. Norms about Nonmarital Pregnancy and Willingness to Provide Resources to Unwed Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mollborn, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    Contested social norms underlie public concern about adults' and teenagers' nonmarital pregnancy. The original, vignette-based National Pregnancy Norms Survey (N = 812) measures these norms and related sanctions. Descriptive analyses report embarrassment at the prospect of a nonmarital pregnancy by age and gender of hypothetical prospective…

  2. The drug abuse problem in Peninsular Malaysia: parent and child differences in knowledge, attitudes and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Low, W Y; Zulkifli, S N; Yusof, K; Batumalail, S; Aye, K W

    1996-10-01

    A survey was carried out to gather information on knowledge, attitudes and perception of parents and their children in relation to drug abuse matters. Significantly more teenagers knew more of the cause of drug addiction, as well as places for treatment and rehabilitation. Both teenagers and parents were also aware of reasons why drug addicts find it difficult to change their habits, mainly lacking motivation to stop taking drugs and that drug addicts do not have the power to control themselves. Teenagers were significantly more aware of effects of negative parental attitudes contributing to drug abuse, apart from school factors. Personal experiences before abusing drugs such as knowledge of pleasurable effects of drugs and where to obtain them has also a role to play in leading to drug abuse. There was also agreement that unfulfilled needs such as 'not being respected recognised for ones capabilities' and 'not being loved or treated fairly by parents', were causes of drug abuse. Significantly more teenagers knew of the ways of abusing drugs, mainly by injection, smoking and sniffing, and also sources of information via the mass media, social clubs, rehabilitation centres and schools. However, both the parents and teenagers were relatively ignorant of the long term effects of abusing drugs.

  3. The drug abuse problem in Peninsular Malaysia: parent and child differences in knowledge, attitudes and perceptions.

    PubMed

    Low, W Y; Zulkifli, S N; Yusof, K; Batumalail, S; Aye, K W

    1996-10-01

    A survey was carried out to gather information on knowledge, attitudes and perception of parents and their children in relation to drug abuse matters. Significantly more teenagers knew more of the cause of drug addiction, as well as places for treatment and rehabilitation. Both teenagers and parents were also aware of reasons why drug addicts find it difficult to change their habits, mainly lacking motivation to stop taking drugs and that drug addicts do not have the power to control themselves. Teenagers were significantly more aware of effects of negative parental attitudes contributing to drug abuse, apart from school factors. Personal experiences before abusing drugs such as knowledge of pleasurable effects of drugs and where to obtain them has also a role to play in leading to drug abuse. There was also agreement that unfulfilled needs such as 'not being respected recognised for ones capabilities' and 'not being loved or treated fairly by parents', were causes of drug abuse. Significantly more teenagers knew of the ways of abusing drugs, mainly by injection, smoking and sniffing, and also sources of information via the mass media, social clubs, rehabilitation centres and schools. However, both the parents and teenagers were relatively ignorant of the long term effects of abusing drugs. PMID:8889409

  4. Early Fatherhood: A Mapping of the Evidence Base Relating to Pregnancy Prevention and Parenting Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trivedi, D.; Brooks, F.; Bunn, F.; Graham, M.

    2009-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy prevention programmes targeted at young women have received considerable attention from researchers and programme developers. However, to date, relatively limited information is available on preventing teenage fatherhood or improving outcomes for young fathers. A notable gap is concerned with understanding the forms of sexual…

  5. Success for Every Teen: Programs that Help Adolescents Avoid Pregnancy, Gangs, Drug Abuse, and School Drop-Out. An Ounce of Prevention Fund Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ounce of Prevention Fund.

    This booklet describes two prevention programs, Peer Power, a program for girls, and Awareness and Development for Adolescent Males (ADAM), a program for boys. It is noted that these programs, designed to reach students before high school age, help young adolescents stay in school, delay sexual activity and pregnancy, and develop realistic career…

  6. Nutrition & Adolescent Pregnancy: A Selected Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Agricultural Library (USDA), Washington, DC.

    This annotated bibliography on nutrition and adolescent pregnancy is intended to be a source of technical assistance for nurses, nutritionists, physicians, educators, social workers, and other personnel concerned with improving the health of teenage mothers and their babies. It is divided into two major sections. The first section lists selected…

  7. Teen pregnancy: progress meets politics.

    PubMed

    Saul, R

    1999-06-01

    Recent data demonstrate the continuation of a trend of declining teen pregnancy rates in the US. Between 1995 and 1996, the national teenage pregnancy rate fell 4% to 97.3 pregnancies/1000 women aged 15-19 years, contributing to a 17% decline since the rate peaked in 1990. Birth and abortion rates also fell during the same time period. Pregnancy rates declined for younger and older teens, Blacks, Whites, and throughout the country during the first half of this decade. However, rates vary widely by state, and the pregnancy rates among Hispanic teens increased during 1990-92, and then fell off slightly. While these new data are encouraging, the US still has one of the developed world's highest teen pregnancy rates, with almost 1 million pregnancies occurring each year among women aged 15-19 years. Most of the observed decline in teen pregnancy rates in the US is due to the somewhat more consistent and significantly more effective use of contraception among sexually active teens, although about 20% of the decline can be attributed to increased abstinence and the delayed onset of sexual intercourse. Sexually active teens' access to a range of contraceptive methods has been key to their avoiding pregnancy. The conservatives' threat to minors' access to contraceptives, teens and the need for confidentiality, and public policy implications are considered.

  8. Sexual Activity, Contraceptive Use, and Childbearing of Teenagers Aged 15-19 in the United States. NCHS Data Brief. Number 209

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Gladys M.; Abma, Joyce C.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring sexual activity and contraceptive use among U.S. adolescents is important for understanding differences in their risk of pregnancy. In 2013, the U.S. birth rate for teenagers aged 15-19 dropped 57% from its peak in 1991, paralleling a decline in the teen "pregnancy" rate. But these rates are still higher than those in other…

  9. Pounamu: E Hine: access to contraception for indigenous Mãori teenage mothers.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Beverley; Makowharemahihi, Charrissa; Cram, Fiona; Robson, Bridget; Ngata, Tina

    2016-03-01

    INTRODUCTION Timely and equitable access to contraception enables teenage mothers to make informed choices about their sexual and reproductive health. This study aimed to identify barriers and facilitators to contraception for Māori teenagers who become mothers. METHODS 'E Hine' is a longitudinal qualitative Kaupapa Māori (by Māori for Māori) study involving Māori women (aged 14-19 years), following them through pregnancy (n = 44) and the birth of their babies until their babies' first birthdays (n = 41). This analysis focusses on contraception access pre-and post-pregnancy. FINDINGS Pre-pregnancy most participants accessed contraception or advice. Contraception use was compromised by a lack of information, negative side effects, and limited follow up. All reported their subsequent pregnancies as unplanned. Participants gave considerable thought to post-pregnancy contraception. Despite this many experienced clinical and service delays, financial barriers, and negative contraceptive side effects. There was little focus on contraception initiation and a lack of integrated care between midwives and other primary care services, leaving many participants without timely effective contraception. The system worked well when there was a contraception plan that included navigation, free access, and provision of contraception. CONCLUSION The majority of participants actively sought contraception pre- and post-conception. Despite a publicly funded system, a lack of health sector integration resulted in multiple missed opportunities to meet the needs of these teenagers for effective contraception. Health service funding formulas should define the goal as initiation of contraception rather than advice and provide funding to improve timely access to long acting reversible contraception. KEYWORDS Indigenous teenage pregnancy; contraception; barriers to contraception; Māori mothers. PMID:27477375

  10. A Subcultural Theory of Teenage Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    1987-01-01

    The concept of "subcultures" is applied to depressed and suicidal teenagers. A case example is presented of a group of five teenagers, three of whom killed themseles. The characteristics of the group members are described in order to pinpoint the defining values of a teenage suicidal subculture. (Author)

  11. Teenagers Talking about Reading and Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snowball, Clare

    2008-01-01

    Past research has shown teenagers to be reluctant to read and less likely to visit libraries than younger children. These conclusions are debated and further investigation is needed. Difficulties abound in researching teenagers' opinions. Teenagers can be reluctant to participate in activities and peer support is often very important in…

  12. Life Interpretation and Religion among Icelandic Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnarsson, Gunnar J.

    2009-01-01

    Does religion play any specific part in Icelandic teenagers' life interpretation? This paper examines Icelandic teenagers' talk about religion and presents some of the findings in interviews with teenagers in a qualitative research project. The focus is especially on how three individuals express themselves about the influence of religion on their…

  13. Attributions and Coping in Sexually Abused Adolescents Referred for Group Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daigneault, Isabelle; Hebert, Martine; Tourigny, Marc

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to assess the predictive value of two sets of variables, self-attributions, and coping behaviors, on sexually abused (SA) teenagers' functioning, while controlling for abuse-related and family variables. A total of 103 female adolescents completed self-report measures to assess their psychological functioning in terms of anxiety,…

  14. Why Do Teachers Choose to Implement or Reject Drug Abuse Prevention Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, James Reed; Swanchak, John

    State and local school systems have developed comprehensive drug abuse prevention programs that appear to have little influence on the rising tide of teenage drug abuse. Classroom teachers, as implementors of such programs, frequently veto them or change them considerably. Forty secondary teachers were selected as research subjects to examine this…

  15. Childhood victimization: relationship to adolescent pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Stevens-Simon, C; McAnarney, E R

    1994-07-01

    Childhood sexual abuse is a common antecedents of adolescent pregnancy. We studied the pregnancies of 127 poor, black, 12- to 18-year-olds; 42 (33%) of whom reported that they had been physically or sexually abused prior to conception. We hypothesized that during pregnancy: (a) Previously abused adolescents report more stress and depression and less adequate social support than do nonabused adolescents; and (b) Previously abused adolescents obtain less prenatal care, gain less weight, engage in more substance abuse, and give birth to smaller babies than do nonabused adolescents. Consistent with the first study hypothesis, we found that abused adolescents scored significantly higher on stress and depression scales and rated their families as less supportive than did nonabused adolescents. Although there were no group differences in the rate of weight gain or the quantity of prenatal care obtained during pregnancy, abused adolescents were more likely to report substance use during pregnancy and gave birth to significantly smaller, (2,904 +/- 676 vs. 3,198 +/- 443 grams; p = .01), less mature (38.0 +/- 3.4 vs. 39.1 +/- 1.7 weeks; p = .05) infants. Our finding demonstrate the importance of asking pregnant adolescents about abuse. PMID:7922731

  16. Discovering Teenage Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Staring for the equivalent of every night for two weeks at the same little patch of sky with ESO's Very Large Telescope, an international team of astronomers has found the extremely faint light from teenage galaxies billions of light years away. These galaxies, which the research team believes are the building blocks of normal galaxies like our Milky Way, had eluded detection for three decades, despite intensive searches. ESO PR Photo 52/07 ESO PR Photo 52/07 A 92-hour long spectrum Two-dimensional spectrum obtained in 92 hours of exposure time, showing the line emitter candidates. The quasar absorption lines are visible close to the centre of the image. The team, led by Martin Haehnelt of the University of Cambridge, UK, Michael Rauch and George Becker of the Observatories of the Carnegie Institution, USA, and Andy Bunker of the Anglo-Australian Observatory, reports their results in the 1 March 2008 issue of the Astrophysical Journal. "This is the first time that the sky has been searched to this depth and the unrivalled sensitivity of the picture taken with the VLT was key to succeeding," says Haehnelt. Experts have long speculated that galaxies like ours were created by the amalgamation of proto-galaxies early in the history of the Universe, but the light from these fragments was so faint that astronomers had struggled to prove they were there at all. Astronomers thought that the teenage galaxies must be out there because they were blocking part of the light from objects even further away in space. "Previous attempts have usually been frustrated by the difficulty of detecting extremely faint objects: the amount of time required even with an 8-metre class telescope like the VLT considerably exceeds typical observing time awards. We have thus exploited the periods of less good weather with the FORS2 spectrograph at the VLT, taking advantage of the service observing mode," says Becker. In service mode, ESO staff astronomers at Paranal are responsible for carrying

  17. Ectopic pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Tubal pregnancy; Cervical pregnancy; Tubal ligation - ectopic pregnancy ... In most pregnancies, the fertilized egg travels through the fallopian tube to the womb (uterus). If the movement of the egg ...

  18. Education and childbearing among teenagers.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, J; Radish, E S

    1982-01-01

    While a recent study showed a considerable increase in school attendance among adolescent mothers following changes in federal law which made it illegal to expel such women from public schools, analysis of the June 1980 Current Population Survey provide a context for this finding. Because women who do not give birth as teenagers are also remaining in school longer, teenage mothers have not gained any ground relative to women who postpone birth or remain childless. Thus the absolute level of education among adolescent mothers has improved but their disadvantage relative to other women has not changed. PMID:6889540

  19. Seasonality of birth and conception to teenagers in Texas.

    PubMed

    Scafetta, N; Restrepo, E; West, B J

    2003-01-01

    We study the births to teenagers during the years 1964-2000 and analyze separately the three main racial/ethnic groups in Texas (White, Hispanic, and African American), as well as married and unmarried teens during the years 1994-2000. By using traditional statistical methods of analysis and a filter based on the multiresolution wavelet analysis, we draw inferences about the times of the year when adolescent females of different racial/ethnic and marital groups have the highest probability for pregnancy ending in live birth. Multiple factors influencing teen pregnancy are identified and associated with temporal features of social, cultural, educational, and familial processes. In particular, we detect links between unmarried teen conception times and school terms, and weekly birth patterns associated with scheduled c-sections that differ according to racial/ethnic groups. PMID:15510535

  20. Abusive Relationships

    MedlinePlus

    ... relationships and friendships. Emotional abuse (stuff like teasing, bullying, and humiliating others) can be difficult to recognize ... How to Break Up Respectfully Abuse Dealing With Bullying Date Rape Getting Over a Break-Up Posttraumatic ...

  1. Teenage Suicide: A Critical Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NJEA Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Suicide and attempted suicide among teenagers has risen dramatically since 1960, especially among girls. Three theories of the causes of suicide (emotional crises, brain chemistry and nonexpression of grief) are discussed. Depression and other first stage warning signals, and the nature of second stage "cries for help," are considered. (CM)

  2. Who's Minding the Teenage Brain?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monastersky, Richard

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how researchers study the adolescent brain--a subject of inquiry that did not exist a generation ago. Any parent of a teenager knows that adolescents often have difficulty navigating through their world. Now scientists are starting to find out why. Peering into the minds of maturing youngsters, researchers are…

  3. Safety for Teen-Agers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pounds, Elenore T.; And Others

    This booklet is designed for teenage students and discusses safety and first aid. The first part of the booklet covers safety instruction, causes of accidents, what it means to be safety-minded, and discusses experimental safe-car design and testing programs. The second part presents basic descriptions for first aid treatment of common injuries…

  4. Social Consequences of Teenage Childbearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presser, Harriet B.

    Most research on teenage parenthood is concerned with illegitimacy and its determinants such as attitudes toward sex, contraceptive knowledge and practice, family relationships, and cultural factors. Empirical studies on the consequences of illegitimacy are generally limited to problems of recidivism, school dropouts, and welfare dependency.…

  5. Teenage Parents: A Global Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crews, Kimberly A.

    This instructional packet consists of an essay, a wall poster, and a teacher's guide that provide information and statistics about teenage parents throughout the world. The purpose of these materials is to give junior high and high school students an overview of the health, social, psychological, economic, and demographic effects of teenage…

  6. Sextalk for Parents and Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, June

    Most parents want to prepare their adolescents for sexual relationships, but find it difficult to discuss sex with their teenagers. This books aims to help families improve communication and presents in a short-story format, factual information on sexuality. It is intended as an introduction to the subject of sex and as a quick reference tool for…

  7. The Problem of Teenage Unemployment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Alan A.

    The study examines teenage unemployment within an historical, theoretical, and empirical context. Explanations for trends in unemployment and labor force participation are analyzed in terms of economic theory and the mechanisms by which these factors might operate in labor markets. It is demonstrated that the trend of increasing unemployment began…

  8. Adoption of an Evidence-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Curriculum: A Case Study in a South Carolina School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Lauren M.; Flynn, Shannon; Kenison, Kelli; Prince, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Continued efforts are needed to reduce teenage pregnancy in the United States. Implementation of evidence-based curricula in schools is one strategy toward meeting this goal. In 2010, the South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (SC Campaign) received funding to implement a teen pregnancy prevention (TPP) curriculum. Congruent with South…

  9. Conduct Disorder Symptoms and Subsequent Pregnancy, Child-Birth and Abortion: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Willy; Mastekaasa, Arne

    2011-01-01

    Research on teenage pregnancy and abortion has primarily focused on socio-economic disadvantage. However, a few studies suggest that risk of unwanted pregnancy is related to conduct disorder symptoms. We examined the relationship between level of conduct disorder symptoms at age 15 and subsequent pregnancy, child-birth and abortion. A…

  10. Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug ...

  11. Child Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... or become violent. An older child may use drugs or alcohol, try to run away or abuse others. Child abuse is a serious problem. If you suspect a child is being abused or neglected, call the police or your local child welfare agency.

  12. The Education of Most Worth: Preventing Drug and Alcohol Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, Lowell

    1988-01-01

    Combating the teenage substance abuse problem will require total school and community effort. This article presents guidelines for school action, including recognizing alcohol's dominant role in our society, dealing with mixed messages to youngsters, debunking myths about adolescent alcohol use, using available resources in new ways, and creating…

  13. Preventing Abuse of Drugs, Alcohol, and Tobacco by Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falco, Mathea

    From the mid-1960s until 1980, adolescent drug use rose sharply. Although use has declined somewhat since, adolescent cocaine use remains at peak levels, and crack presents a major threat. Treatment for compulsive drug or alcohol use is needed by 5 to 15 percent of the teenagers who experiment with drugs and alcohol. Drug abuse experts now believe…

  14. Teen Pregnancy: Why It Remains a Serious Social, Economic, and Educational Problem in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldas, Stephen J.

    1994-01-01

    Disagrees with several points in Mike Males's teenage pregnancy article in the March 1993 "Kappan." Males emphasized that family formation among teenagers mirrors larger societal trends. Recent evidence shows otherwise. The economic and societal costs of early childbearing are worsening; 60% of teen families live in poverty. Providing adolescents…

  15. Do Teenagers Respond to HIV Risk Information? Evidence from a Field Experiment in Kenya. NBER Working Paper No. 14707

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupas, Pascaline

    2009-01-01

    I use a randomized experiment to test whether information can change sexual behavior among teenagers in Kenya. Providing information on the relative risk of HIV infection by partner's age led to a 28% decrease in teen pregnancy, an objective proxy for the incidence of unprotected sex. Self-reported sexual behavior data suggests substitution away…

  16. Maternal patterns of marijuana use and early sexual behavior in offspring of teenage mothers.

    PubMed

    De Genna, Natacha M; Goldschmidt, Lidush; Cornelius, Marie D

    2015-03-01

    Teenage mothers use marijuana more frequently than older mothers, and marijuana use may predict HIV risk behavior in offspring. Our goals were to (1) describe trajectories of marijuana use in teenage mothers and (2) determine if these trajectories were associated with early sexual behavior in their offspring. Pregnant adolescents (12-18 years) were recruited at a prenatal clinic and interviewed during pregnancy, at delivery, and during follow-up visits when offspring were 6, 10, 14 and 16 years old. At 16 years, 332 women (71 % Black, 29 % White) and their offspring were assessed. Mothers were asked about their marijuana use at each time point. Offspring reported on their sexual behavior at age 14. Trajectory analyses using growth mixture models revealed four maternal patterns of marijuana use: no use, only at the 6 year follow-up, quit by the 16 year follow-up, and used across most of the time points. The children of chronic users were more likely to have early sex. The maternal marijuana trajectory group variable remained a statistically significant predictor in multivariate models controlling for race, gender, socioeconomic status, child pubertal timing, child externalizing behavior problems, and child marijuana use. These findings suggest that a minority of teenage mothers continue to use marijuana over time. Chronic maternal marijuana use across a decade was associated with early sex in offspring (oral or vaginal sex by age 14). Early sexual behavior places these children at significantly higher risk of teenage pregnancy and HIV risk behaviors.

  17. Adolescent pregnancy and substance use.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, P; Kokotailo, P

    1999-03-01

    The question of just what is the relationship of early pregnancy and childbearing and substance use among adolescents remains unanswered. From a public health perspective, both behaviors are unwanted, and populations that are at risk are often at high risk for both. Perhaps prevention of one behavior may be expected to prevent the other. This, however, may be too simplistic a notion, grounded in misconception of the role of early pregnancy and specific cultural context. Furthermore, several studies have documented a decline of drug use during pregnancy and just after delivery among adolescent mothers. Does this trend continue through the parenting years? If so, for whom? What are the individual maternal, child, and family environmental characteristics that predict a decline in use or continued abstinence after early childbearing? Within the context of poverty, lower educational attainment, minority status, and high prevalence of alcohol and drug use, pregnancy may play a positive role. With a change in role, young women may be less likely than nonparenting peers and less likely than prior to their own pregnancy to become deeply involved in the negative behaviors, such as smoking, drinking, and substance use. Perhaps this is a potential opportunity to intervene. To summarize, the health risk behaviors of substance use and adolescent pregnancy and childbearing appear to be linked. Youths who become pregnant before they complete high school represent a particular group of young women who may be at higher risk than the general population for substance use, at least cigarettes, alcohol, and marijuana. Yet, most pregnant teenagers are not substance users. Among those who are, frequency and amounts of use in most samples were low compared with adult samples of pregnant women. Furthermore, there is evidence that teenagers perceive substance use as a risk to their pregnancies and their unborn children. Among users, there is a decrease in use and increase in quit rates

  18. Does early sexual debut reduce teenagers' participation in tertiary education? Evidence from the SHARE longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Parkes, Alison; Wight, Daniel; Henderson, Marion; West, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Negative effects of early sexual debut on academic outcomes can extend beyond secondary school, although concurrent changes in other psychosocial risk factors have not been investigated. Data from three waves of a longitudinal survey of Scottish teenagers were used to examine associations between early sexual debut (first heterosexual intercourse) and both expectations for (N = 5,061) and participation in (N = 2,130) tertiary education at college or university. Early debut was associated with reduced tertiary education, after adjusting for academic performance and wave 1 confounders relating to social background, attitudes and behaviours. Pregnancy/partner pregnancy did not explain all of this finding, as many sexually experienced teenagers opted out of tertiary education after leaving school early for other reasons. Changes in other psychosocial risk factors between waves 1 and 2 mediated much of the association found. Early sexual experience may predict disengagement from tertiary education, although further research is needed to explore causal pathways. PMID:19897236

  19. Does the economy affect teenage substance use?

    PubMed

    Arkes, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    This research examines how teenage drug and alcohol use responds to changes in the economy. In contrast to the recent literature confirming pro-cyclical alcohol use among adults, this research offers strong evidence that a weaker economy leads to greater teenage marijuana and hard-drug use and some evidence that a weaker economy also leads to higher teenage alcohol use. The findings are based on logistic models with state and year fixed effects, using teenagers from the NLSY-1997. The evidence also indicates that teenagers are more likely to sell drugs in weaker economies. This suggests one mechanism for counter-cyclical drug use - that access to illicit drugs is easier when the economy is weaker. These results also suggest that the strengthening economy in the 1990s mitigated what would otherwise have been much larger increases in teenage drug use.

  20. Labor and delivery complications among teenage mothers.

    PubMed

    Lopoo, Leonard M

    2011-01-01

    A broad set of academic literatures shows that childbearing is associated with a variety of negative health outcomes for teenage mothers. Many researchers question whether teenage childbearing is the causal explanation for the negative outcomes (i.e., whether there is a biological effect of teenage childbearing or whether the relationship is due to other factors correlated with health and teenage childbearing). This study investigates the relationship between teenage childbearing and labor and delivery complications using a panel of confidential birth certificate data over the period from 1994 to 2003 from the state of Texas. Findings show that compared to mothers aged 25 to 29 having their first child, teenager mothers appear to have superior health in most--but not all--labor and delivery outcomes.

  1. [Healthcare for teenagers: are we working together?].

    PubMed

    Derksen-Lubsen, G; Jambroes, M; Essink-Bot, M L

    2016-01-01

    There are about 1.8 million children between 10 and 18 years of age in the Netherlands in 2016. These teenagers account for approximately 10% of the total population. Teenagers are relatively healthy and do not make much use of curative care. However, they are an important group in terms of public health, because a basis for good health in later life is created in the teenage years. Good health in teenagers is also important for education, relationships and employment, and their health has an influence on the health of the next generation. Child and adolescent healthcare plays an important part in preventive care for teenagers. Better cooperation and exchange of information between paediatricians, specialists in child and adolescent healthcare and general practitioners are important in order to optimise care for teenagers. PMID:27581869

  2. [Healthcare for teenagers: are we working together?].

    PubMed

    Derksen-Lubsen, G; Jambroes, M; Essink-Bot, M L

    2016-01-01

    There are about 1.8 million children between 10 and 18 years of age in the Netherlands in 2016. These teenagers account for approximately 10% of the total population. Teenagers are relatively healthy and do not make much use of curative care. However, they are an important group in terms of public health, because a basis for good health in later life is created in the teenage years. Good health in teenagers is also important for education, relationships and employment, and their health has an influence on the health of the next generation. Child and adolescent healthcare plays an important part in preventive care for teenagers. Better cooperation and exchange of information between paediatricians, specialists in child and adolescent healthcare and general practitioners are important in order to optimise care for teenagers.

  3. Spiritual abuse.

    PubMed

    Purcell, B C

    1998-01-01

    Spiritual abuse is the act of making people believe--whether by stating or merely implying--that they are going to be punished in this life and/or tormented in hell-fire forever for failure to live life good enough to please God and thus earn admission to heaven. Spiritual terrorism is the most extreme form of spiritual abuse and may cause serious mental health problems. Those people who have not been spiritually terrorized have not necessarily been spared from spiritual abuse and therefore may still be in need of competent, spiritual counseling. Spiritual abuse, which may be active or passive, can best be conceptualized on a continuum from terroristic to zero abuse. Severity is determined by intensity, age of onset, duration, and individual reaction. The underlying issue in all forms of abuse is control. PMID:9729974

  4. Identification of Sexually Abused Female Adolescents at Risk for Suicidal Ideations: A Classification and Regression Tree Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brabant, Marie-Eve; Hebert, Martine; Chagnon, Francois

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the clinical profiles of 77 female teenager survivors of sexual abuse and examined the association of abuse-related and personal variables with suicidal ideations. Analyses revealed that 64% of participants experienced suicidal ideations. Findings from classification and regression tree analysis indicated that depression,…

  5. Ultrasound pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; Placenta previa - ultrasound; Multiple ...

  6. Adolescent pregnancy in the United States: a review and recommendations for clinicians and research needs.

    PubMed

    Fielding, J E; Williams, C A

    1991-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy, often unplanned and unwanted, has a negative impact on the physical, emotional, educational, and economic condition of the pregnant teenager. Forty percent of the one million adolescents who became pregnant in 1986 chose abortion, and, of the remainder, 61% were unmarried. Teenage mothers in greater numbers and at younger ages are opting to keep and raise their children. In 1987 over $19 billion in federal monies were expended on families begun when the mother was a teenager. The preferred approach to this problem is prevention of teenage pregnancy rather than abortion, with emphasis on sex education and access to family planning information and contraceptive devices for both females and males. Sex education in schools is presented in widely varying formats; in fact, prevention of pregnancy may not even be presented. Family planning clinics are subject to the whims and biases of the funding agencies. Clinicians have an important role in providing guidance for teenage patients and their parents, but can also influence school and community leadership to ensure that all teenagers receive sound sex education in school programs and that family planning agencies are permitted to counsel teenagers and provide contraceptive devices. PMID:1867899

  7. Adolescent pregnancy in the United States: a review and recommendations for clinicians and research needs.

    PubMed

    Fielding, J E; Williams, C A

    1991-01-01

    Adolescent pregnancy, often unplanned and unwanted, has a negative impact on the physical, emotional, educational, and economic condition of the pregnant teenager. Forty percent of the one million adolescents who became pregnant in 1986 chose abortion, and, of the remainder, 61% were unmarried. Teenage mothers in greater numbers and at younger ages are opting to keep and raise their children. In 1987 over $19 billion in federal monies were expended on families begun when the mother was a teenager. The preferred approach to this problem is prevention of teenage pregnancy rather than abortion, with emphasis on sex education and access to family planning information and contraceptive devices for both females and males. Sex education in schools is presented in widely varying formats; in fact, prevention of pregnancy may not even be presented. Family planning clinics are subject to the whims and biases of the funding agencies. Clinicians have an important role in providing guidance for teenage patients and their parents, but can also influence school and community leadership to ensure that all teenagers receive sound sex education in school programs and that family planning agencies are permitted to counsel teenagers and provide contraceptive devices.

  8. How Australian Female Adolescents Prioritize Pregnancy Protection: A Grounded Theory Study of Contraceptive Histories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jennifer L.; Skinner, S. Rachel; Fenwick, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Grounded theory principles were systematically employed to reveal key differences in pregnancy risk and underlying disparities in contraceptive use in (a) never-pregnant (b) pregnant-terminated and (c) pregnant-continued teenagers. Analysis of 69 semistructured interviews revealed a bicausal model of pregnancy protection that accounted for…

  9. Factors that Adolescent Males Take into Account in Decisions about an Unplanned Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corkindale, Carolyn J.; Condon, John T.; Russell, Alan; Quinlivan, Julie A.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about what factors adolescent males consider important when making decisions concerning the resolution of an unplanned pregnancy with a teenage partner. Young men's influence on pregnancy outcome decisions can play an important part in the subsequent psychological adjustment of the female. The present report draws on data from a…

  10. A Measure for Evaluating the Effectiveness of Teen Pregnancy Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Cheryl L.; Johnson, Stephanie A.; Sawilowksy, Shlomo S.

    2002-01-01

    The Teen Attitude Pregnancy Scale (TAPS) was developed to measure teen attitudes and intentions regarding teenage pregnancy. The model demonstrated good internal consistency and concurrent validity for the samples in this study. Analysis revealed evidence of validity for this model. (JDM)

  11. Teenage Sexual Health Needs: Asking the Consumers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Carolyn; Allan, Alexandra

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: In response to rising prevalence of sexually transmitted infection (STI) among teenagers, this study was designed to examine teenage perceptions of sex education, access to services, and attitudes relevant to STI. Design/methodology/approach: A focus group study was conducted in three schools to discuss the sexual health needs of…

  12. The Shopping Mall: A Teenager Hangout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anthony, Kathryn H.

    1985-01-01

    Investigated teenagers' use of the shopping mall as a "hangout" through interviews with 51 adolescents using the mall, and 10 hours of behavioral observations. Results indicated that many teenagers visit the shopping center regularly to watch members of the opposite sex, play video games, see friends, shop, and people-watch. (Author/NRB)

  13. Teaching the At-Risk Teenage Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Sheryl

    2007-01-01

    While all teenage behavior and character traits can be challenging, the issues facing the at-risk teenager are particularly thorny. Anger, aggression, and a lack of good decision-making may happen on a minute-to-minute basis, as teachers try to guide these young adults. Unlocking the key to keeping them in school and facilitating proficiency in…

  14. New Literacies Practices of Teenage "Twitter" Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    This study is an empirical study into the new literacy practices of five teenage "Twitter" users on Twitter. Qualitative methods were used to describe the most prominent ways of participating on "Twitter." Results indicate that teenagers used "Twitter" for self-expression, communication, friendship maintenance, and…

  15. Understanding Teenage Girls: Culture, Identity and Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Horace R.; Brown-Thirston, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    "Understanding Teenage Girls: Culture, Identity and Schooling" focuses on a range of social phenomenon that impact the lives of adolescent females of color. The authors highlight the daily challenges that African-American, Chicana, and Puerto Rican teenage girls face with respect to peer and family influences, media stereotyping, body image,…

  16. Teenage sexual attitudes and behaviour in China: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Juping

    2012-11-01

    China is the most populated of any country in the world. Social norms and values pertaining to love and marriage have changed considerably since the launch of its open-door policy and economic reforms of the 1980s. Attitudes to sex have become more open, while the negative consequences of early sexual intercourse have become issues of health and social concern. The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the teenage sexual attitudes and behaviour in contemporary China. A literature review was conducted between 2000 and 2010, using both English (Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ASSIA) and Chinese language databases (China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang database). Thirty-six studies were included and reviewed. It was found that young people reported poor sexual knowledge, especially in relation to reproductive matters and sexually transmitted infections. The media, such as television, magazines and the Internet, were seen as their main sources of information on sex. Despite the frequently reported liberal attitudes to sexual behaviour, only a small number of young people had already lost their virginity or been involved in pregnancies. Young men were more likely than young women to report having had sex, while respondents at vocational high schools were less likely to remain virgins than those at common/key high schools. Although the prevalence of sexual intercourse among Chinese teenagers was still lower than that reported in studies conducted in most western countries, the findings do reflect some changes in sexual values and behaviour of young people within the country. They also suggest the need to develop more comprehensive sex education programmes in co-operation with young people, schools, health organisations, families and communities and to make sexual and reproductive health services accessible to teenagers and unmarried young people throughout China. PMID:22404303

  17. Teenage sexual attitudes and behaviour in China: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Yu, Juping

    2012-11-01

    China is the most populated of any country in the world. Social norms and values pertaining to love and marriage have changed considerably since the launch of its open-door policy and economic reforms of the 1980s. Attitudes to sex have become more open, while the negative consequences of early sexual intercourse have become issues of health and social concern. The aim of this study is to provide an overview of the teenage sexual attitudes and behaviour in contemporary China. A literature review was conducted between 2000 and 2010, using both English (Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ASSIA) and Chinese language databases (China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang database). Thirty-six studies were included and reviewed. It was found that young people reported poor sexual knowledge, especially in relation to reproductive matters and sexually transmitted infections. The media, such as television, magazines and the Internet, were seen as their main sources of information on sex. Despite the frequently reported liberal attitudes to sexual behaviour, only a small number of young people had already lost their virginity or been involved in pregnancies. Young men were more likely than young women to report having had sex, while respondents at vocational high schools were less likely to remain virgins than those at common/key high schools. Although the prevalence of sexual intercourse among Chinese teenagers was still lower than that reported in studies conducted in most western countries, the findings do reflect some changes in sexual values and behaviour of young people within the country. They also suggest the need to develop more comprehensive sex education programmes in co-operation with young people, schools, health organisations, families and communities and to make sexual and reproductive health services accessible to teenagers and unmarried young people throughout China.

  18. Teenage Pregnancy Prevention and Related Issues. Memo No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Pam

    This memo provides information on staffing and services provided at the North Division High School adolescent health clinic for two phases of the clinic's operation: calendar year 1989, when the Milwaukee Comprehensive Community Health (MCCH), Inc. operated the clinic; and from July 1 to December 31, 1990, when the clinic was under the…

  19. Personality Factors Related to Black Teenage Pregnancy and Abortion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Ruth; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Compared Black pregnant adolescents who applied for therapeutic abortions (TAs) with those who planned to have their babies (Terms). Suggests Terms seemed to be trying to fill a void and assume an adult role. Results indicated controls were most socialized, followed by TAs, then Terms. (Author/JAC)

  20. Intentional Teenage Pregnancy: Correlates of Children Who Want Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruchman, Miriam Reitman; Jemmott, John B., III; Jemmott, Loretta Sweet

    This study explored the differences between African American and Latina female adolescents who desire to become pregnant and those who do not. Five hundred and thirty-one sexually experienced, never pregnant adolescents completed surveys containing questions about demographics, sexual behavior and contraceptive use, sexual and contraceptive…

  1. Risking the Future. Adolescent Sexuality, Pregnancy, and Childbearing. Volume I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Cheryl D., Ed.

    This book examines in detail the complex, controversial problem of teenage pregnancy in the United States. Compiled by a panel of distinguished experts, it is a comprehensive review of data on such issues as sex education in the schools, contraception, abortion, adoption, prenatal and pediatric care, child support enforcement, and Aid to Families…

  2. Adolescent Sexuality: Pregnancy, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santelli, John S.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Special edition discusses adolescent sexuality, focusing on pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and prevention. The articles focus on demographics, risk factors, school-based risk reduction programs, contraception, early intervention, options, school-based prenatal and postpartum care programs, teenage parenting, abortion, HIV and AIDS,…

  3. Adolescent Pregnancy: An Inventory of Relevant Federal Programs and Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kristin A.

    This paper provides an overview of Federal programs related to teenage pregnancy. Primary prevention and ameliorative services are explained to assist fund raisers, counselors, and policymakers in developing appropriate programs. Information is given about legislative background, purpose, eligibility, and disbursement. Programs which provide…

  4. Understanding Adolescents' Motivation To Prevent Pregnancy: A Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sugland, Barbara W.; Wilder, Kathleen J.; Chandra, Anita

    Recent efforts targeting teenage pregnancy in the United States have marked a renewed conviction to reduce the level of childbearing among adolescents. Some of the behavioral, psychosocial, and ethnographic studies that explore the underlying motivation to delay sex and to effectively use contraception are the focus of this literature review.…

  5. Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy: A Role for Social Work Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelman, Marion Wright

    1988-01-01

    For poor and minority teenagers the lack of adequate life options may increase their desire for early pregnancy. Since teen mothers face probable poverty and single parenthood, it is imperative that schools and school social workers provide counseling, health services, and work preparation as well as academic skills training. (VM)

  6. An "Epidemic" of Adolescent Pregnancy? Some Historical and Policy Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinovskis, Maris A.

    Adolescent pregnancy (AP) is explored from historical and policy perspectives. The "epidemic" of AP, with 4 out of every 10 teenage girls becoming pregnant, is typically portrayed as a recent and unprecedented problem that requires massive federal intervention, but the problem is not new. Chapter 1 analyzes adolescent sexuality, AP, and…

  7. Genetic and perinatal effects of abused substances

    SciTech Connect

    Brande, M.C.; Zimmerman, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the effects of several abused drugs, including opiates, cannabinoids, alcohol, nicotine, and cocaine, with special emphasis on the actions of these substances at the molecular and cellular levels. The first half deals with genetic effects, including molecular genetics, biochemical genetics, pharmacogenetics, cytogenetics, and genetic toxicity. The second half focuses on perinatal effects and covers: drug abuse during pregnancy; biochemical aspects of marihuana on male reproduction; and long-term behavioral and neuroendocrine effects of perinatal alcohol exposure.

  8. Pregnant and Parenting Black Teenagers: Some Educational Preventors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascher, Carol

    Black teenage girls have more than half the babies born to single teenagers, and as they are more frequently poor as well, they are more susceptible to the negative effects early childbearing has on future schooling and jobs. Studies show that teenage mothers are far less likely to complete high school or enter the work force than other teenagers.…

  9. Drug Use Among the Young: As Teenagers See It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herzog, Elizabeth; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Reports responses of 205 students to a children's Bureau inquiry on teenage drug usage. Youth were asked how teenagers feel about use of various kinds of drugs, what makes some teenagers use drugs and keeps others from using them, and what adults should do about teenage drug usage. (NH)

  10. Naturalistic Assessment of Novice Teenage Crash Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suzanne E.; Simons-Morton, Bruce G.; Klauer, Sheila E.; Ouimet, Marie Claude; Dingus, Thomas A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Crash risk is highest during the first months after licensure. Current knowledge about teenagers’ driving exposure and the factors increasing their crash risk is based on self-reported data and crash database analyses. While these research tools are useful, new developments in naturalistic technologies have allowed researchers to examine newly-licensed teenagers’ exposure and crash risk factors in greater detail. The Naturalistic Teenage Driving Study (NTDS) described in this paper is the first study to follow a group of newly-licensed teenagers continuously for 18 months after licensure. The goals of this paper are to compare the crash and near-crash experience of drivers in the NTDS to national trends, to describe the methods and lessons learned in the NTDS, and to provide initial data on driving exposure for these drivers. Methods A data acquisition system was installed in the vehicles of 42 newly-licensed teenage drivers 16 years of age during their first 18 months of independent driving. It consisted of cameras, sensors (accelerometers, GPS, yaw, front radar, lane position, and various sensors obtained via the vehicle network), and a computer with removable hard drive. Data on the driving of participating parents was also collected when they drove the instrumented vehicle. Findings The primary findings after 18 months included the following: (1) crash and near-crash rates among teenage participants were significantly higher during the first six months of the study than the final 12 months, mirroring the national trends; (2) crash and near-crash rates were significantly higher for teenage than adult (parent) participants, also reflecting national trends; (3) teenaged driving exposure averaged between 507-710 kilometers (315-441 miles) per month over the study period, but varied substantially between participants with standard errors representing 8-14 percent of the mean; and (4) crash and near-crash types were very similar for male and female

  11. ADHD treatment and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Besag, Frank M C

    2014-06-01

    There is increasing recognition that ADHD is a common condition, not only in children and teenagers but also in adults. This has led to a rapid rise in the number of women of childbearing age who are being treated for this condition. Against the background of concerns about the use of medication of any kind during pregnancy and breastfeeding, it is remarkable that there is so little information available on the effects of ADHD medication on the fetus and newborn. The impulsivity associated with ADHD might lead to an increased rate of unplanned pregnancy. Although treating ADHD during pregnancy and lactation might have negative effects on the baby, suspension of treatment or inadequate treatment could also place both mother and baby at risk. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic changes during pregnancy could affect both the efficacy and the concentration of medication. Again, there is almost no guidance available. The US Food and Drug Administration has classified ADHD medications as being "pregnancy category C", implying that there is insufficient information to confirm either harm or lack of harm. From the limited information that has been published, it would appear that the risk of fetal malformation, at least with methylphenidate, is very low and that the amounts of medication excreted in breast milk and consumed by the infant are very small. Three questions that both clinicians and patients are likely to ask are the following. Should ADHD medication be stopped before, during or after pregnancy, or should it be continued throughout? Should ADHD medication doses be adjusted during the course of the pregnancy or after delivery? Should breastfeeding be encouraged or discouraged? Discontinuing ADHD treatment could put both mother and baby at risk. This has to be balanced against the possible risks to the baby of continuing treatment. Although the data remain inadequate, the risk of the latter appears to be quite small, at least for methylphenidate. However, there is

  12. Video game addiction: Impact on teenagers' lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Mahindru, Poornima

    2015-01-01

    Use of video games as a leisure-time activity has increased among teenagers. Excessive use of video games is associated with psychosocial dysfunctions in the user's life. Two teenagers came for consultation to our Service for Healthy Use of Technology (SHUT) clinic for management of addiction due to video games. They were assessed using a clinical interview as well as the General Health Questionnaire and Griffith criteria for video games. The cases emphasize the addictive potential of video games and their association with lifestyle changes. Addiction to video games has implications for screening and intervention among teenagers. PMID:27294452

  13. Video game addiction: Impact on teenagers' lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoj Kumar; Mahindru, Poornima

    2015-01-01

    Use of video games as a leisure-time activity has increased among teenagers. Excessive use of video games is associated with psychosocial dysfunctions in the user's life. Two teenagers came for consultation to our Service for Healthy Use of Technology (SHUT) clinic for management of addiction due to video games. They were assessed using a clinical interview as well as the General Health Questionnaire and Griffith criteria for video games. The cases emphasize the addictive potential of video games and their association with lifestyle changes. Addiction to video games has implications for screening and intervention among teenagers.

  14. Everyone deserves a second chance: a decade of supports for teenage mothers.

    PubMed

    Hudgins, Rebekah; Erickson, Steve; Walker, Dion

    2014-05-01

    Georgia had the third highest 2010 repeat teenage birth rate in the United States and has had one of the worst rates for years. Since 2001, Georgia's Second Chance Home Network, administered by the Georgia Campaign for Adolescent Power and Potential, has provided housing and support to parenting teenagers--almost two-thirds of whom were in custody of and referred by Georgia's Department of Children and Family Services--to help them become nurturing and self-sufficient parents, to avoid repeat teenage pregnancies, and to promote healthy development of their children. Data were collected from each resident at intake, discharge, and three follow-up points at three, 12, and 24 months after discharge. Evaluation has consistently revealed improvements in several key outcomes, including education, housing, income, self-sufficiency, parenting, repeat pregnancy, and child outcomes. The 2012 evaluation revealed benefits in all these areas and found that those who stayed longer demonstrated better outcomes, especially related to the core outcomes of educational status, employment, and stable residence. Methods and findings about these outcomes are featured in this article. PMID:24946426

  15. Maternal Exposure to Intimate Partner Abuse before Birth Is Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Offspring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Andrea L.; Lyall, Kristen; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.; Ascherio, Alberto; Weisskopf, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    We sought to determine whether maternal (a) physical harm from intimate partner abuse during pregnancy or (b) sexual, emotional, or physical abuse before birth increased risk of autism spectrum disorder. We calculated risk ratios for autism spectrum disorder associated with abuse in a population-based cohort of women and their children (54,512…

  16. Pregnancy and childbirth among females aged 10-19 years - United States, 2007-2010.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Stephanie J; Hamilton, Brady E; Mathews, T J

    2013-11-22

    Pregnancy and childbirth among females aged <20 years have been the subject of long-standing concern among the public, the public health community, and policy makers. Teenagers who give birth are much more likely than older women to deliver a low birthweight or preterm infant, and their babies are at higher risk for dying in infancy. The annual public costs associated with births among teenage girls are an estimated $10.9 billion. According to the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), an estimated 77% of births to teenagers aged 15-19 years were unintended.

  17. [Teenager].

    PubMed

    Altamirano-Bustamante, Nelly; Altamirano-Bustamante, Myriam M

    2016-09-01

    The bone mass peak is the maximum bone quantity to be achieved through bone modeling. About 40% of the total bone mass is achieved at puberty; therefore, adolescence is critical on the skeletal development. This paper is about the transfunctional analysis of nutrition, mineral metabolism, endocrinology and life style in adolescence. Core factors to achieve the maximum potential of bone modeling through puberty and prevent osteoporosis from a pediatric stage are addressed. PMID:27603884

  18. Ectopic Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... woman is pregnant. If you have an ectopic pregnancy, the fertilized egg grows in the wrong place, ... tubes. The result is usually a miscarriage. Ectopic pregnancy can be a medical emergency if it ruptures. ...

  19. Applying Intervention Mapping to Develop a Community-Based Intervention Aimed at Improved Psychological and Social Well-Being of Unmarried Teenage Mothers in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leerlooijer, Joanne N.; Kok, Gerjo; Weyusya, Joseph; Bos, Arjan E. R.; Ruiter, Robert A. C.; Rijsdijk, Liesbeth E.; Nshakira, Nathan; Bartholomew, Leona K.

    2014-01-01

    Out-of-wedlock pregnancy among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa is a major concern, because of its association with health, social, psychological, economic and demographic factors. This article describes the development of the Teenage Mothers Project, a community-based intervention to improve psychological and social well-being of unmarried…

  20. Videogames, Television Violence, and Aggression in Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominick, Joseph R.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated relationships relative to teenagers' videogame playing, watching violent television programs, antisocial behavior, and self-esteem. Concluded that videogame playing is neither the menace critics portray it nor without possible negative consequences. (PD)

  1. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  2. Smoking in Teenagers: Some Psychological Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooreman, J.; Perdrizet, S.

    1980-01-01

    The influences of home and school environment on teenage smoking were assessed according to sex differences, age differences, influence of adults, socioeconomic status, and coeducation v same sex grouping. (Author/DB)

  3. Acoustic Trauma - Hearing Loss in Teenagers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Acoustic Trauma - Hearing Loss in Teenagers Page Content Article ... temporary or permanent hearing loss. This is called acoustic trauma. How loud is 85 decibels? Surprisingly, not ...

  4. Teenage Childbearing and Its Life Cycle Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotz, V. Joseph; McElroy, Susan Williams; Sanders, Seth G.

    2005-01-01

    The results that are associated with the study conducted on teenage childbearing, in the United States conducted by the social scientists using innovative methods, are presented. Some concluding comments, on the findings of the study, are also mentioned.

  5. Consumer-Homemaking for Teenage Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Jackie Roger; Edenfield, Myrtice

    1977-01-01

    Describes a successful Jefferson County, Georgia, pilot program for teenage parents. The program for male and female high school students includes a counseling component and curriculum focus on prenatal-postnatal care, child care and development, and health services. (JT)

  6. [A case-control study of factors associated with repeat teen pregnancy based on a sample from a university maternity hospital].

    PubMed

    Silva, Andréa de Albuquerque Arruda; Coutinho, Isabela C; Katz, Leila; Souza, Alex Sandro Rolland

    2013-03-01

    Repeat teen pregnancy is a frequent issue and is considered an aggravating factor for increased maternal and fetal morbidity and social problems. The aim of the study was to identify factors associated with repeat teen pregnancy. A case-control study was conducted in 90 postpartum adolescents with more than one pregnancy (cases) and 90 adult women with a history of only one pregnancy during adolescence (controls). Statistical analysis used hierarchical logistic regression with 5% significance. Early sexual initiation (< 15 years), early age at first pregnancy (< 16 years), not raising the children themselves, and low family income (< one minimum wage) were associated with repeat teenage pregnancy, while partner change was inversely associated. Repeat teen pregnancy was mainly associated with reproductive and socioeconomic factors. Partner change appeared as a protective factor. Measures should be adopted during the postpartum period of teenage mothers in order to avoid repeat pregnancy.

  7. Alcohol and Metropolitan Black Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gay, John E.

    1981-01-01

    Data from a sample of Blacks aged 11 to 16 indicated drinkers were more likely to report health problems. The correlation between drinking and poor health was most noted among young males and older females. Drinkers reported more sleep disturbances. Tobacco use was a predictor of drinking and pregnancy. (Author)

  8. A Comparison of Selected Characteristics of Teenage Mothers and Teenagers Who Have No Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimerson, Pat; Burns, John L.

    To broaden the knowledge base of factors related to rapid subsequent births among teenage mothers, subsequently pregnant mothers (N=5), one-time mothers (N=5), and non-pregnant teenagers (N=10), between the ages of 14 and 22, were compared on use of contraceptives, educational goals, and family relationships. All subjects completed a personal…

  9. Psychiatric disorders, spouse abuse and child abuse.

    PubMed

    Bland, R C; Orn, H

    1986-01-01

    The results of 2000 standardized psychiatric diagnostic interviews of randomly selected adult household residents of Edmonton showed that having had any psychiatric diagnosis increased the risk for being involved in spouse and child abuse, particularly for those with alcohol abuse/dependence plus anti-social personality or depression. Altogether 56% of spouse abusers and 69% of child abusers had a lifetime psychiatric diagnosis.

  10. Psychiatric disorders and characteristics of abuse in sexually abused children and adolescents with and without intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Soylu, Nusret; Alpaslan, Ahmet Hamdi; Ayaz, Muhammed; Esenyel, Selcen; Oruç, Mücahit

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare sexually abused children and adolescents, with and without intellectual disabilities (ID), in terms of post-abuse psychiatric disorders, features of the sexual abuse, and sociodemographic characteristics. The study included sexually abused children aged 6-16 years, who were sent to three different child mental health units for forensic evaluation; there were 102 cases (69 girls and 33 boys) with ID and 154 cases (126 girls and 28 boys) without ID. Researchers retrospectively examined the files, social examination reports, and the judicial reports of the cases. It was determined that in the group with ID, sexual abuse types including penetration and contact had higher rates, they were exposed to more frequent repeated abuses, the abuses were revealed with their own reports at a later period and lower rates, and post-abuse pregnancies were more frequent. It was also determined that the abuser was a familiar person and a family member at lower rates and more than one abuser was encountered more frequently, compared to the group without ID. While no difference was determined between the two groups in terms of the frequency of post-abuse post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and major depressive disorder (MDD), conduct disorder (CD) was observed more frequently in the group with ID. This study emphasizes that sexual abuse, which is an important problem in individuals with ID, has different features and effects.

  11. Preventing unwanted pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Pearson, J F

    1991-09-14

    This editorial comments on the recent report of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists on unplanned pregnancy. This report followed up an earlier report which recommended that the NHS make freely available contraceptive services. Even though this came to fruition, abortion rates continued to rise. In 1990, 174,000 legal abortions were performed in England and Wales, of which 33% were women 20 years. The current report reviewed education and contraceptive services with particular emphasis on teenagers. Unwanted teenage pregnancy was attributed to the lack of education on family planning and related issues in schools. The proposal is for a flexible sex education curriculum with specially trained teachers. Curriculum would be established in national guidelines. A suggested improvement was the addition of seminars for parents and school governors on sex education, even though this means competing with GCSE's. The media should take responsibility for focusing on contraception as a benefit if it continues to promote the delights of sexual intercourse. It is pointed out the emergency contraceptive knowledge is poor. A Family Planning Association (FPA) survey reports that only 1 out of 2 pharmacists receives requests about emergency contraception. Another FPA unpublished study shows that 500 out of 1000 women receiving legal abortions did not use any form of contraception before conception. The need for emergency contraception an appropriate clinic facilities is emphasized. The report also strongly disagrees with the closing of clinics which has been ongoing since the 1974 transfer of FPA clinics to the NHS. The district health authorities must function on a restricted budget while general practitioners in FP are paid from unrestricted funds. Community family planning clinics and general practitioners in the NHS differ considerably in the services offered. Practitioners offer oral contraceptives generally, while clinics provide a wide range of methods. NHS

  12. Preventing unwanted pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Pearson, J F

    1991-09-14

    This editorial comments on the recent report of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists on unplanned pregnancy. This report followed up an earlier report which recommended that the NHS make freely available contraceptive services. Even though this came to fruition, abortion rates continued to rise. In 1990, 174,000 legal abortions were performed in England and Wales, of which 33% were women 20 years. The current report reviewed education and contraceptive services with particular emphasis on teenagers. Unwanted teenage pregnancy was attributed to the lack of education on family planning and related issues in schools. The proposal is for a flexible sex education curriculum with specially trained teachers. Curriculum would be established in national guidelines. A suggested improvement was the addition of seminars for parents and school governors on sex education, even though this means competing with GCSE's. The media should take responsibility for focusing on contraception as a benefit if it continues to promote the delights of sexual intercourse. It is pointed out the emergency contraceptive knowledge is poor. A Family Planning Association (FPA) survey reports that only 1 out of 2 pharmacists receives requests about emergency contraception. Another FPA unpublished study shows that 500 out of 1000 women receiving legal abortions did not use any form of contraception before conception. The need for emergency contraception an appropriate clinic facilities is emphasized. The report also strongly disagrees with the closing of clinics which has been ongoing since the 1974 transfer of FPA clinics to the NHS. The district health authorities must function on a restricted budget while general practitioners in FP are paid from unrestricted funds. Community family planning clinics and general practitioners in the NHS differ considerably in the services offered. Practitioners offer oral contraceptives generally, while clinics provide a wide range of methods. NHS

  13. Extreme Economics: Teaching Children and Teenagers about Money. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babbage, Keen J.

    2009-01-01

    What Financial future awaits the current generation of children and teenagers in the United States? Our children and teenagers did not cause the financial problems that confront the nation and impacts their families, but they will pay part of the price for these financial problems. What should children and teenagers know about personal finance?…

  14. Correlates of Teenage Drinking Behavior in Two Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjepkes, Phyllis Kathleen; Hayden, Davis C.

    A survey of research literature on teenage alcohol use will reveal many variables related to teenage drinking. This study compared these variables in two separate communities to ascertain their global validity. To investigate factors leading to teenage alcohol use, 218 high school seniors from Washington and Iowa were surveyed. Dependent variables…

  15. How Some Art Museums Can Appeal to Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Striepe, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a case study that explores the question of how some art museums can appeal to teenagers. The significance of teenagers as the most underrepresented age demographic to visit museums is relevant to current museum practice where visitor studies have assumed increasing importance. As teenagers mature into adults, the long-term…

  16. Skateboarding Alone? Making Social Capital Discourse Relevant to Teenagers' Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Susie

    2006-01-01

    Bound to the notion of teenage apathy is the concern that young people are increasingly disengaged from political and community issues and lacking in social capital. Voting is often regarded as the ultimate form of civic engagement, which implicitly excludes young teenagers from consideration through their status as non-voters. Teenagers'…

  17. Relating to Adolescents: Educators in a Teenage World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Susan Eva

    2009-01-01

    Teaching teenagers can be very rewarding; it can also be very challenging. Relating to Adolescents helps adults who work with teenagers to understand what happens in their dynamic with students. From the "Five Things Teens Need from Grown-Ups" to the "Seven Grown-Up Skills," this book covers all aspects of the adult-teenager relationship and…

  18. Teenagers' Web Questions Compared with a Sexuality Curriculum: An Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Juliette D. G.; McCutchen, Lisa E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Teenagers need information about their changing bodies. Many young people do not receive adequate or accurate puberty/sexuality education from their parents or school, so many teenagers are going online to have their sexuality questions answered. Purpose: This research examines teenagers' web questions on sexuality, and an example of…

  19. Elevated germline mutation rate in teenage fathers

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Peter; Hohoff, Carsten; Dunkelmann, Bettina; Schürenkamp, Marianne; Pfeiffer, Heidi; Neuhuber, Franz; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Men age and die, while cells in their germline are programmed to be immortal. To elucidate how germ cells maintain viable DNA despite increasing parental age, we analysed DNA from 24 097 parents and their children, from Europe, the Middle East and Africa. We chose repetitive microsatellite DNA that mutates (unlike point mutations) only as a result of cellular replication, providing us with a natural ‘cell-cycle counter’. We observe, as expected, that the overall mutation rate for fathers is seven times higher than for mothers. Also as expected, mothers have a low and lifelong constant DNA mutation rate. Surprisingly, however, we discover that (i) teenage fathers already set out from a much higher mutation rate than teenage mothers (potentially equivalent to 77–196 male germline cell divisions by puberty); and (ii) ageing men maintain sperm DNA quality similar to that of teenagers, presumably by using fresh batches of stem cells known as ‘A-dark spermatogonia’. PMID:25694621

  20. Urban female teenagers' perceptions of medical communication.

    PubMed

    Clowers, M

    2000-01-01

    Although it is clear that health care must be age-appropriate to be effective, little is known about the care-related preferences of adolescent females. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to examine teenagers' preferences in regard to medical communication, so that care providers in a number of disciplines can make their interactions with young females more satisfactory and successful. Specifically, examples of female teenagers' best and worst encounters with physicians are reported. It was found that female teenagers prefer physicians who comfort, use humor, are understanding, and explain procedures. Physicians who rush, behave rudely, or are "too personal" are viewed negatively. It was concluded that relational communication skill development must be a priority of educators and service providers if caregiving is to be maximized with this important patient group.

  1. The Relationship between Prenatal Care, Personal Alcohol Abuse and Alcohol Abuse in the Home Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grekin, Emily R.; Ondersma, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Nearly one-fourth of African-American women receive no prenatal care during the first trimester of pregnancy. The aim of the current study is to identify factors that underlie inadequate prenatal care among African-American women. Maternal alcohol abuse has been examined as one risk factor for inadequate prenatal care, but findings have been…

  2. Child Abuse: Definition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Timothy L.-Y.

    The purpose of this paper was to elaborate on the definitions of child abuse in order to improve the understanding of child abuse. The definitions given by the U.S. House Joint Committee on Child Abuse in the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, and in research by Holden (1984), are cited. These definitions refer to the nature of abusive acts…

  3. Intimate Partner Violence and Miscarriage: Examination of the Role of Physical and Psychological Abuse and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morland, Leslie A.; Leskin, Gregory A.; Block, Carolyn Rebecca; Campbell, Jacquelyn C.; Friedman, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    Despite research documenting high rates of violence during pregnancy, few studies have examined the impact of physical abuse, psychological abuse, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on miscarriage. Secondary analysis of data collected by the Chicago Women's Health Risk Study permitted an exploration of the relationships among physical abuse,…

  4. Personal and interpersonal characteristics related to resilient developmental pathways of sexually abused adolescents.

    PubMed

    Daigneault, Isabelle; Hébert, Martine; Tourigny, Marc

    2007-04-01

    Childhood sexual abuse is a prevalent and important social problem. In this article the authors' main objective is the exploration of resilience among sexually abused adolescents under child protection services care in Quebec, Canada. The introduction provides an overview of the impact of childhood sexual abuse and conceptualizations of trauma, resilience, recovery, and factors linked to resilience profiles. The remainder of the article discusses a study of resilience and factors predicting resilience over a 5-month period for a sample of 86 teenage girls under child protection services care. PMID:17349516

  5. Childhood bullying as a predictor for becoming a teenage mother in Finland.

    PubMed

    Lehti, Venla; Sourander, Andre; Klomek, Anat; Niemelä, Solja; Sillanmäki, Lauri; Piha, Jorma; Kumpulainen, Kirsti; Tamminen, Tuula; Moilanen, Irma; Almqvist, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the association between bullying behaviour at the age of 8 and becoming a mother under the age of 20. This birth cohort study included 2,867 Finnish girls at baseline in 1989. Register-based follow-up data on births was collected until the end of 2001. Information, both on the main exposure and outcome, was available for 2,507 girls. Both bullies and victims had an increased risk of becoming a teenage mother independent of family-related risk factors. When controlled for childhood psychopathology, however, the association remained significant for bullies (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.1) and bully-victims (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.05-3.2), but not for pure victims. Reports of bullying and victimisation from the girls themselves, their parents and their teachers were all associated with becoming a teenage mother independent of each other. There is a predictive association between being a bully in childhood and becoming a mother in adolescence. It may be useful to target bullies for teenage pregnancy prevention. PMID:21136277

  6. Treatment compliance among prenatal care patients with substance abuse problems.

    PubMed

    Clark, K A; Dee, D L; Bale, P L; Martin, S L

    2001-02-01

    There is an insufficient number of substance abuse treatment programs available to pregnant women; however, even when women do enroll in treatment, they often choose not to comply with particular components of their treatment. To better understand what factors are associated with a woman's likelihood of compliance with treatment, this study assesses 244 pregnant, substance-using women enrolled in a specialized substance abuse treatment program. Women who complied with treatment referrals are compared with those who did not comply with referrals on various factors including their sociodemographic characteristics, types of substance use before and during pregnancy, experiences of violence before and during pregnancy, and prior substance use treatment. Bivariate analysis found that outpatient treatment compliance was more likely among women who smoked cigarettes before pregnancy, women who had received previous substance abuse treatment, and women whose partner had received previous substance abuse treatment. Outpatient treatment compliance did not vary by sociodemographic characteristics, any other type of substance use, or the women's experiences of violence. Inpatient treatment compliance was more likely among women who received prior substance abuse treatment; however, no other characteristic was found to be associated with inpatient treatment compliance. Logistic regression analyses, which controlled for various factors, suggested that past experiences with substance abuse treatment by the woman or her partner were significantly associated with treatment referral compliance. These findings suggest that the previous treatment experiences of women and their partners are important factors in shaping a successful substance abuse treatment program for pregnant women.

  7. Women's lived experiences of domestic violence during pregnancy (1).

    PubMed

    Baird, Kathleen

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study, which explored women's experiences of domestic violence before, during and after pregnancy. During pregnancy the women were physically attacked, including blows and kicks to the pregnant abdomen; they were punched, slapped, kicked, bitten, pushed around, held by the throat and attempts at strangulation occurred for two of the women. The women were sexually abused, experienced enforced isolation and financial hardship. They experienced extreme psychological distress, including depression before, during and after pregnancy. Feelings of vulnerability about themselves and their unborn babies were intensified by their partners' continuing violence and abuse. The findings from this research will support midwives to recognise the warning signs of domestic violence and abuse during pregnancy and to be able to offer an appropriate response. PMID:26349329

  8. Teenage Prostitution and Child Pornography. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Select Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session (April 23 and June 24, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    This document contains the transcript of hearings on teenage prostitution and child pornography. The first day of the hearings focuses on the testimony of six witnesses who are experts in dealing with and combatting sexual abuse of children. Their remarks to the committee are transcribed and copies of their prepared statements are provided…

  9. Estimating Local Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ards, Sheila

    1989-01-01

    Three conceptual approaches to estimating local child abuse rates using the National Incidence Study of Child Abuse and Neglect data set are evaluated. All three approaches yield estimates of actual abuse cases that exceed the number of reported cases. (SLD)

  10. Child Sexual Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... victim of prolonged sexual abuse usually develops low self-esteem, a feeling of worthlessness and an abnormal or ... can help abused children regain a sense of self-esteem, cope with feelings of guilt about the abuse, ...

  11. How to Handle Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... them. Another word for hurting someone is "abuse." Child abuse (say: ah-BYOOS) can affect all kinds of ... a babysitter, teacher, coach, or a bigger kid. Child abuse can happen anywhere — at home, school, childcare, or ...

  12. "Chicks and Hunks:" Teenagers and Sex Equity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novogrodsky, Myra; Wells, Margaret

    1989-01-01

    Looks at issues of gender equity that are important to teenagers, showing how students' thoughts and feelings can be used as reference points in the social studies classroom. Suggests class discussions on work equity, gender communication, and intervention strategies. Reminds teachers that they must act as positive role models. (LS)

  13. Still Developing: Teenagers, Brains, and the Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Claire Annelise

    2011-01-01

    In seeking an understanding of the teenage brain, this author was struck by the interplay between the development of executive functioning and the development of the system that controls emotions and memory. This in turn has impacted her work as a member of faculty at a seminary with responsibilities for both directing a program with high school…

  14. Teenage Technological Experts' Views of Schooling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Nicola F.

    2009-01-01

    Utilising Pierre Bourdieu's formula for studying social practice, this study explored the construction of technological expertise amongst a heterogeneous group of New Zealand teenagers. The qualitative study employed observations and interviews with five boys and three girls aged 13-17, who considered themselves to be technological experts; their…

  15. The Musical Culture of an "Inuk" Teenager

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piercey, Mary E.

    2008-01-01

    This article uses music as a point of entry into the understanding of Inuit culture. I demonstrate how the analysis of the song repertoire of an Inuk teenager reveals some functions and meanings that her song choices have for her in the particular Inuit culture of Arviat, Nunavut. I present four informally learned songs from my informant Gara…

  16. Internal and External Constraints on Teenage Mothering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Ramona T.

    This paper reports findings of an exploratory field study of the teenager's first year of motherhood. Twelve subjects, aged 14-19, were interviewed a number of times during that year. Interviews were largely unstructured, allowing mothers to express their concerns and feelings. Data for analysis were: (1) narrative style protocols that were…

  17. Handling Stress. Teenage Health Teaching Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    The Teenage Health Teaching Modules (THTM) program is a health education curriculum for adolescents. Each THTM module frames an adolescent health task emphasizing development of self-assessment, communication, decision making, health advocacy, and self-management. This module attempts to help adolescents understand the meaning of stress in their…

  18. Teenage Drinking in Rural Middle Tennessee.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mookherjee, Harsha N.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the extent to which alcoholic beverages are consumed by high school teenagers (N=622) in rural communities of middle Tennessee. Results showed that about 63 percent of the subjects do drink alcoholic beverages, and that most of the drinking is done in the company of friends. (LLL)

  19. Being Fit. Teenage Health Teaching Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    The Teenage Health Teaching Modules (THTM) program is a health education curriculum for adolescents. Each THTM module frames an adolescent health task emphasizing development of self-assessment, communication, decision making, health advocacy, and self-management. This module provides information on the many physical and psychological benefits of…

  20. Uncommon Sense for Parents with Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riera, Michael

    This guide to parenting high school-age adolescents is intended to help parents restructure the typically adversarial relationship between parent and teenager by replacing the "parent as manager" role with the "parent as consultant" role. The text is question-driven, comprised of a series of responses to questions commonly asked by parents and…

  1. Nutrition Lessons Improve Hispanic Teenage Girls' Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neyman, Michelle R.; Block, Gladys; Morris, Jennifer L.; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2000-01-01

    Nutrition knowledge and dietary intake among 184 Hispanic teenage girls were assessed before and after a nutrition education intervention involving five weekly lessons. Intervention participants increased their nutrition knowledge by 50 percent and showed modest improvement in dietary behavior. Contains 16 references and data on subjects' dietary…

  2. [Partnership around difficult teenagers in Brest].

    PubMed

    Saint-André, Stéphane; Botbol, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The issues surrounding difficult teenagers results in professionals formalising a partnership. Certain areas of focus are identified such as getting to know each other better in order to understand each other better, working in a "common language", understanding professional identities, or embracing long term partnership. Pressure to assess and rationalise spending, as well as political challenges, must be taken into consideration.

  3. Why Troubled Teenagers Might Turn to Satanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, David K.

    1989-01-01

    Adolescent involvement in satanism is a symptom, not the actual ailment. Having counseling or mental health personnel in a high school allows needy students to refer themselves for counseling. Musical preference is a weak predictor of teenagers' attitudes toward the occult and satanism. (MLF)

  4. Pre-Teenage Children's Experiences with Alcohol

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, James; MacDonald, Fiona; McKeganey, Neil

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on the drinking experiences and motivations of 77 pre-teenage children. The main reason which the children gave for occasional or regular drinking was the pleasure which they derived both from the effects of the alcohol and from the social interaction which accompanied the activity. Several of the children claimed that they…

  5. Starting with "I": Personal Essays by Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estepa, Andrea, Ed.; Kay, Philip, Ed.

    In personal essays, teenagers express their views on serious subjects like violence, racism, and teen parenting, and discuss common teen experiences like dating, getting a job, and starting college. This collection contains the following: (1) "Brotherly Love" (Jessica Vicuna); (2) "How To Survive Shopping with Mom" (Chris Kanarick); (3) "A…

  6. Emergent Subjectivity in Caring Institutions for Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severinsson, Susanne; Nord, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    We investigate how different mealtime situations help shape teenager and staff subjectivities in two Swedish residential care homes and a special school for girls and boys, 12-15 years old, with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties. Three mealtime networks are analysed using concepts from actor-network theory, treating architectural…

  7. How to Keep Your Teenage Driver Alive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Fred

    1983-01-01

    Ideas parents can use to instill safe driving habits in teenagers are discussed. Among them are tips for dealing with impatience and traffic congestion, avoiding rollovers, and being alert to other hazards, such as wet brakes, distractions, and driving after drinking. (PP)

  8. Parenting Teenagers in the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Bob

    Parents who are having difficulty coping with their child's behavior need to understand the reasons for their child's behavior and to feel confident in their way of handling the situation. This book explains how to make, maintain, repair and strengthen relationships with teenagers. It encourages parents to take control of the parenting situation…

  9. The Underground Guide to Teenage Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basso, Michael J.

    Teenagers need straight talk about sex, yet many teens are reluctant to discuss sex and love with their parents or other adults. Answers to many of their questions are provided in this book. The text draws on the actual questions that high school students have asked about sex, anatomy, love, and other related issues. The book is divided into 12…

  10. Factors Associated with Teenage Ecstasy Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mccrystal, Patrick; Percy, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this article was to investigate the factors associated with ecstasy use in school-aged teenagers. Methods: This was a longitudinal study of adolescent drug use, which was undertaken in three towns in Northern Ireland. A questionnaire was administered annually to participants. In this article ecstasy use patterns amongst a cohort…

  11. Tattoos & Teenagers: An Art Educator's Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Lorrie

    2007-01-01

    For many North Americans, tattoos reflect hopes, values, or beliefs and act as vehicles to communicate those beliefs to others. For some, tattoos offer a means to reclaim a sense of ownership and control over their body. Tattoos are particularly popular with teenagers who explore their identity through experimentation with their outward…

  12. Parents Matter: Tips for Raising Teenagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, Washington, DC.

    It is easy for parents to feel that they have lost their influence over their children once children reach adolescence. Several organizations with different focuses but with the same goal of helping parents raise their teenagers banded together to develop this publication. Their message is that parents can do many things to foster their children's…

  13. Teenagers: Employment and Contributions to Family Spending.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, David S.; Lino, Mark

    2000-01-01

    One-third of all teenagers were employed during 1997 98. Adolescents were more likely to be employed if one or both parents worked. The average family income of employed teens was greater than that of unemployed teens. Most working adolescents' earnings do not go toward family necessities. (Contains 24 notes and references.) (SK)

  14. Childhood abuse is associated with increased hair cortisol levels among urban pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Schreier, Hannah M C; Enlow, Michelle Bosquet; Ritz, Thomas; Gennings, Chris; Wright, Rosalind J

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis activity is known to be altered following events such as childhood abuse. However, despite potential adverse consequences for the offspring of women who have experienced abuse, very little is known about altered HPA axis activity during pregnancy. Methods During pregnancy, 180 women from diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds reported on their exposure to emotional, physical and/or sexual abuse before the age of 11, and general post-traumatic stress symptoms (ie, not limited to childhood years or abuse experiences). Around delivery, they provided hair samples for the assessment of cortisol levels during pregnancy. Hair cortisol was assessed for each pregnancy trimester. The effect of childhood abuse on hair cortisol was assessed using mixed-effects analyses of covariance models allowing for within-subject correlated observations, and were first performed in the entire sample and subsequently stratified by race/ethnicity. Results Controlling for post-traumatic stress symptoms, hair cortisol levels varied by history of child abuse, F(2,166)=3.66, p=0.028. Childhood physical and/or sexual abuse was associated with greater hair cortisol levels, t(166)=2.65, p=0.009, compared with no history of abuse. Because childhood rates of abuse and hair cortisol levels varied by race/ethnicity, analyses were stratified by race/ethnicity. The associations between history of abuse and cortisol levels were only significant among black women, F(2,23)=5.37, p=0.012. Conclusions Childhood abuse, especially physical and/or sexual abuse, is associated with differences in cortisol production during pregnancy, particularly among black women. Future research should investigate how these differences impact physical and mental health outcomes among offspring of affected women. PMID:26219886

  15. Features of migraine aura in teenagers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complex migraine aura in teenagers can be complicated to diagnose. The aim of this study was to present detailed features of migraine aura in teenage migraineurs. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in the period from 2008 till 2013. A total number of 40 teenage migraineurs (20 females and 20 males) met criteria for this study. The patients were interviewed using a specially designed questionnaire for collecting data about migraine aura features. Main outcome measures were frequency of visual, somatosensory and higher cortical dysfunction (HCD) symptoms in teenage migraineurs population during the aura, and also within each individual. Results Visual aura was reported in every attack, followed by somatosensory (60%) and dysphasic (36.4%) aura. Scintillating scotoma and blurry vision were mostly reported and predominant visual symptoms. The most common somatosensory symptom was numbness in hand. HCD were reported by 22 (55%) patients. Slowed speech was mostly reported symptom of HCD, followed by dyslexia, déjà vu phenomenon, color dysgnosia, and dyspraxia. In patients with HCD, aura frequency per year (6.18 ± 3.17 vs. 3.33 ± 2.03, p = 0.003) and prevalence of somatosensory symptoms (77.3% vs. 38.9%, p = 0.014) were significantly higher than in patients without HCD. Conclusions Aura symptoms vary to a great extent in complexity in teenage migraineurs. Consequently, results obtained in this study provide useful information for clinicians when faced with unusual migraine aura. PMID:25496701

  16. Risk and Protective Factors Predictive of Adolescent Pregnancy: A Longitudinal, Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East, Patricia L.; Khoo, Siek Toon; Reyes, Barbara T.

    2006-01-01

    One hundred twenty-eight Latina and African American girls from high-risk environments (e.g., poverty, family history of teen parenting, etc.) were studied from age 13 through age 19 to prospectively identify the protective factors that might guard against teenage pregnancy. Results indicated that involved and strict parenting during early…

  17. Roles for School Nurses in Adolescent Pregnancy: Prevention, Intervention and Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iverson, Carol J.; Klahn, Julie K.

    The 1994 Nebraska Governor's round table subcommittee established the goal of lowering teenage pregnancies in the state by the year 2000. School nurses are in key positions to provide continuous support and surveillance of adolescent health through graduation. This publication presents guidelines and resources to encourage and assist school nurses…

  18. Review of Interventions in the Field of Prevention of Adolescent Pregnancy. Preliminary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dryfoos, Joy G.

    This report presents an overview of programs that may have a potential for prevention of teenage pregnancy. The report starts with a summary of expert opinions on the dimensions of and solutions to the problem and then describes several relatively successful programs. Following this is an overview of interventions with an analysis of program…

  19. Predictive Ability and Stability of Adolescents’ Pregnancy Intentions in a Predominantly Latino Community

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Corinne H.; Hubbard, Alan E.; Johnson-Hanks, Jennifer; Padian, Nancy S.; Minnis, Alexandra M.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from a prospective cohort of 555 adolescent girls and boys from a predominantly Latino neighborhood of San Francisco, we examined how well four survey questionnaire items measuring pregnancy intentions predicted the incidence of pregnancy. We also compared consistency of responses among items and assessed how intentions fluctuated over time. Girls experienced 72 pregnancies over two years (six-month cumulative incidence = 8 percent), and boys reported being responsible for 50 pregnancies (six-month cumulative incidence = 10 percent). Although the probability of becoming pregnant generally increased with higher intention to do so, the risk of becoming pregnant was elevated only at the highest response categories for each item. Most pregnancies occurred among teenagers reporting the lowest levels of intention: for instance, 73 percent of pregnancies occurred among girls who reported that they definitely did not want to become pregnant. Considerable change in respondents’ intentions were found over short periods of time: 18 percent and 41 percent of responses to the wantedness and happiness items, respectively, changed between six-month survey visits. The development of appropriate strategies to reduce pregnancy among adolescents would benefit from a more nuanced understanding of how teenagers view the prospect of pregnancy and what determines whether they actively protect themselves from unintended pregnancy. PMID:21469271

  20. Predictive ability and stability of adolescents' pregnancy intentions in a predominantly Latino community.

    PubMed

    Rocca, Corinne H; Hubbard, Alan E; Johnson-Hanks, Jennifer; Padian, Nancy S; Minnis, Alexandra M

    2010-09-01

    Using data from a prospective cohort of 555 adolescent girls and boys from a predominantly Latino neighborhood of San Francisco, we examined how well four survey questionnaire items measuring pregnancy intentions predicted the incidence of pregnancy. We also compared consistency of responses among items and assessed how intentions fluctuated over time. Girls experienced 72 pregnancies over two years (six-month cumulative incidence = 8 percent), and boys reported being responsible for 50 pregnancies (six-month cumulative incidence = 10 percent). Although the probability of becoming pregnant generally increased with higher intention to do so, the risk of becoming pregnant was elevated only at the highest response categories for each item. Most pregnancies occurred among teenagers reporting the lowest levels of intention: for instance, 73 percent of pregnancies occurred among girls who reported that they definitely did not want to become pregnant. Considerable change in respondents' intentions were found over short periods of time: 18 percent and 41 percent of responses to the wantedness and happiness items, respectively, changed between six-month survey visits. The development of appropriate strategies to reduce pregnancy among adolescents would benefit from a more nuanced understanding of how teenagers view the prospect of pregnancy and what determines whether they actively protect themselves from unintended pregnancy. PMID:21469271

  1. ''A Burden in Your Heart'': Lessons of Disclosure from Female Preadolescent and Adolescent Survivors of Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staller, Karen M.; Nelson-Gardell, Debra

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To enhance understanding of the sexual abuse disclosure process from the perspective of preteen and teenage survivors. To reconsider prominent models of the disclosure process in light of our findings. Methods: We conducted a secondary analysis of data from four focus groups in which 34 preadolescent and adolescent female survivors of…

  2. During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... During Pregnancy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this Page Preventing Problems Genetics and Family History Other Concerns Things to Think About Before ...

  3. Multiple Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... is called multiple pregnancy . If more than one egg is released during the menstrual cycle and each ... fraternal twins (or more). When a single fertilized egg splits, it results in multiple identical embryos. This ...

  4. Pregnancy Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hCG. hCG is made when a fertilized egg implants in the uterus. This usually happens about ... conception (when the man's sperm fertilizes the woman's egg). 1 Some home pregnancy tests are more sensitive ...

  5. Pregnancy Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... chills, fever, sweats UTIs are treated with antibiotics . Yeast infection An infection caused by an overgrowth of bacteria normally found in the vagina . Yeast infections are more common during pregnancy than in ...

  6. Denied pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Habek, Dubravko

    2010-06-01

    Two cases of non-psychotic denied pregnancy are presented and discussed. Following obstetric expertise, the forensic-criminal evaluation should investigate the reported crimes of denied pregnancy associated infanticide or criminal abortion as well as the potential involvement of other persons in these crimes. All this would require close collaboration between obstetricians, psychiatrists and crime investigation experts in the forensic expertise of these criminal offences.

  7. Teenage motherhood: its relationship to undetected learning problems.

    PubMed

    Rauch-Elnekave, H

    1994-01-01

    This study describes characteristics of a group of 64 adolescent mothers and their infants who participated in a program for teenage mothers run by a local health department. A majority of the girls for whom California Achievement Test (CAT) scores were available scored one or more years below grade level in reading and in language skills. Relative delays in infant development (language and social domains) were also documented. High levels of self-esteem as well as general social acceptance (by adults and peers) of early out-of-wedlock parenting suggest that early motherhood may represent an alternative avenue to experiencing success for girls who are having academic difficulties. These findings, which suggest the likelihood of a high incidence of undetected learning problems in this population, indicate that these difficulties may have a significant relationship to the high rate of school dropout associated with adolescent motherhood. The findings bring into question the notion of "unintended pregnancies" and the wisdom of current federal policies for preventing adolescent parenthood that rely on the promotion of abstinence.

  8. [Early pregnancy risk: development and validation of a predictive instrument].

    PubMed

    Burrows, R; Rosales, M E; Díaz, M; Muzzo, S

    1994-06-01

    An early pregnancy risk scale, with scores ranging from 11 to 66 points from lower to higher risk, was constructed using variables associated with teenager's pregnancy. This scale was applied to 3000 female teenagers, coming from Metropolitan Santiago public schools. The sample was divided in three risk groups: group A (high risk) with scores equal or over 35 points, group B (low risk) with scores equal or below 20 points and group B (intermediate risk) with scores between 20.1 and 34.9 points. These girls were followed during 2 years. During this period, 84 girls became pregnant, 24 of 184 (13%) in group A, 60 of 2332 (2.6%) in group C and none of 307 in group B. There were 104 school desertions in group A and 37 in group B. To study associations and analyze risk, the sample was divided in two risk groups: high, with scores over 27 and low, with scores below 27. There was a high association between pregnancy risk score and the occurrence of pregnancy (RR 5.25 p < 0.0001) and school desertion (RR 3.32 p < 0.0001). Pregnancy was predicted with a 78% sensitivity and 55.6% specificity. School desertion was predicted with a 74% sensitivity and 56% specificity. The importance variable weighing using multiple regression models, to improve the predictor's sensitivity and specificity, is discussed.

  9. [Early pregnancy risk: development and validation of a predictive instrument].

    PubMed

    Burrows, R; Rosales, M E; Díaz, M; Muzzo, S

    1994-06-01

    An early pregnancy risk scale, with scores ranging from 11 to 66 points from lower to higher risk, was constructed using variables associated with teenager's pregnancy. This scale was applied to 3000 female teenagers, coming from Metropolitan Santiago public schools. The sample was divided in three risk groups: group A (high risk) with scores equal or over 35 points, group B (low risk) with scores equal or below 20 points and group B (intermediate risk) with scores between 20.1 and 34.9 points. These girls were followed during 2 years. During this period, 84 girls became pregnant, 24 of 184 (13%) in group A, 60 of 2332 (2.6%) in group C and none of 307 in group B. There were 104 school desertions in group A and 37 in group B. To study associations and analyze risk, the sample was divided in two risk groups: high, with scores over 27 and low, with scores below 27. There was a high association between pregnancy risk score and the occurrence of pregnancy (RR 5.25 p < 0.0001) and school desertion (RR 3.32 p < 0.0001). Pregnancy was predicted with a 78% sensitivity and 55.6% specificity. School desertion was predicted with a 74% sensitivity and 56% specificity. The importance variable weighing using multiple regression models, to improve the predictor's sensitivity and specificity, is discussed. PMID:7732221

  10. Recognition and prevention of inhalant abuse.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Carrie E; Loomis, Glenn A

    2003-09-01

    Inhalant abuse is a prevalent and often overlooked form of substance abuse in adolescents. Survey results consistently show that nearly 20 percent of children in middle school and high school have experimented with inhaled substances. The method of delivery is inhalation of a solvent from its container, a soaked rag, or a bag. Solvents include almost any household cleaning agent or propellant, paint thinner, glue, and lighter fluid. Inhalant abuse typically can cause a euphoric feeling and can become addictive. Acute effects include sudden sniffing death syndrome, asphyxia, and serious injuries (e.g., falls, burns, frostbite). Chronic inhalant abuse can damage cardiac, renal, hepatic, and neurologic systems. Inhalant abuse during pregnancy can cause fetal abnormalities. Diagnosis of inhalant abuse is difficult and relies almost entirely on a thorough history and a high index of suspicion. No specific laboratory tests confirm solvent inhalation. Treatment is generally supportive, because there are no reversal agents for inhalant intoxication. Education of young persons and their parents is essential to decrease experimentation with inhalants. PMID:13678134

  11. Parent Abuse: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennair, Nicola; Mellor, David

    2007-01-01

    A recent focus of research and clinical practice has been on the issue of abuse of parents by their children (parent abuse). This paper reviews the literature on this phenomenon. While parent abuse falls under the umbrella of family violence, it appears to be qualitatively different from other forms of intra-family abuse. Research has primarily…

  12. Counseling Abused Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFadden, Emily Jean

    This guide on counseling abused children was written to help counselors meet the needs of children and adolescents and to provide ways of working with the child's family. Chapter 1 presents an overview of child maltreatment by identifying types of maltreatment (neglect, physical abuse, sexual abuse and exploitation, and emotional abuse or neglect)…

  13. Bundles of Norms About Teen Sex and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mollborn, Stefanie; Sennott, Christie

    2015-09-01

    Teen pregnancy is a cultural battleground in struggles over morality, education, and family. At its heart are norms about teen sex, contraception, pregnancy, and abortion. Analyzing 57 interviews with college students, we found that "bundles" of related norms shaped the messages teens hear. Teens did not think their communities encouraged teen sex or pregnancy, but normative messages differed greatly, with either moral or practical rationalizations. Teens readily identified multiple norms intended to regulate teen sex, contraception, abortion, childbearing, and the sanctioning of teen parents. Beyond influencing teens' behavior, norms shaped teenagers' public portrayals and post hoc justifications of their behavior. Although norm bundles are complex to measure, participants could summarize them succinctly. These bundles and their conflicting behavioral prescriptions create space for human agency in negotiating normative pressures. The norm bundles concept has implications for teen pregnancy prevention policies and can help revitalize social norms for understanding health behaviors.

  14. Personality and adolescent pregnancy outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Harville, Emily W.; Madkour, Aubrey Spriggs; Xie, Yiqiong

    2014-01-01

    Aims To examine the relationship between personality, pregnancy and birth outcomes in adolescents Background Personality has been shown to be a strong predictor of many health outcomes. Adolescents who become pregnant have worse birth outcomes than adults. Design Cross-sectional study using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (baseline, 1994-1995; follow-up, 2007-2008). Methods The study sample was 6529 girls, 820 of whom reported on pregnancy outcomes for a teenage birth. Personality data was taken from the Mini International Personality Item Pool personality tool, which measures the five-factor personality traits of neuroticism, conscientiousness, intellect/imagination, extraversion and agreeableness. Logistic regression was used to predict teen pregnancy and linear regression was used to predict birth weight and gestational age with adjustment for confounders and stratification by race. Results Agreeableness and intellect/imagination were associated with a reduced likelihood of becoming pregnant as an adolescent, while neuroticism, conscientiousness and extraversion were all associated with an increased likelihood of becoming pregnant. Higher neuroticism was associated with lower birth weight and gestational age among Black girls, but not non-Black. Conscientiousness was associated with lower gestational age among non-Black girls. No relationships were found with extraversion or agreeableness and birth outcomes. Receiving late or no prenatal care was associated with higher intellect/imagination. Conclusions Personality is understudied with respect to pregnancy and birth outcomes compared with other health outcomes. Such research could help professionals and clinicians design and target programs that best fit the characteristics of the population most likely to need them, such as those with high neuroticism. PMID:25040691

  15. Expanding policy options for educating teenagers.

    PubMed

    Stern, David

    2009-01-01

    David Stern argues that some basic features of the American high school must be modified if it is to serve all students successfully. He notes, for example, that only three-quarters of U.S. high school students graduate four years after beginning ninth grade and that the National Assessment of Educational Progress found no improvement in reading or mathematics for seventeen-year-olds between 1971 and 2004. The nation's system for educating teenagers, says Stern, seems to be stuck, despite the constant efforts of teachers and repeated waves of reform. Citing two widely accepted public purposes of educating teenagers-preparation for civic participation and for economic self-sufficiency-Stern proposes four new strategies to achieve those goals. He draws on empirical evidence suggesting that these are promising directions for research and policy, but acknowledges that existing studies provide only limited guidance. First, he says, schools should continue the current trend toward integrating educational options to provide young people with skills and experiences that pave the way to both college and careers. Second, states and districts should tie education funding not simply to the number of students attending school, but also to what young people learn, whether they graduate, and whether they find jobs or enroll in postsecondary education. Such a move, he argues, would encourage teaching and learning formats that use students' time more effectively. Third, more adults in addition to classroom teachers should be involved in educating teenagers. Other adults acting as academic advisers, learning coaches, student advocates, internship supervisors, mentors, and college counselors could help guide the education of teenagers inside and outside of school and provide some relief for the chronic shortage of teachers. Fourth, schools should expand the options for educating teenagers outside of geographically fixed schools. Combining improved Internet-based curriculum with

  16. Expanding policy options for educating teenagers.

    PubMed

    Stern, David

    2009-01-01

    David Stern argues that some basic features of the American high school must be modified if it is to serve all students successfully. He notes, for example, that only three-quarters of U.S. high school students graduate four years after beginning ninth grade and that the National Assessment of Educational Progress found no improvement in reading or mathematics for seventeen-year-olds between 1971 and 2004. The nation's system for educating teenagers, says Stern, seems to be stuck, despite the constant efforts of teachers and repeated waves of reform. Citing two widely accepted public purposes of educating teenagers-preparation for civic participation and for economic self-sufficiency-Stern proposes four new strategies to achieve those goals. He draws on empirical evidence suggesting that these are promising directions for research and policy, but acknowledges that existing studies provide only limited guidance. First, he says, schools should continue the current trend toward integrating educational options to provide young people with skills and experiences that pave the way to both college and careers. Second, states and districts should tie education funding not simply to the number of students attending school, but also to what young people learn, whether they graduate, and whether they find jobs or enroll in postsecondary education. Such a move, he argues, would encourage teaching and learning formats that use students' time more effectively. Third, more adults in addition to classroom teachers should be involved in educating teenagers. Other adults acting as academic advisers, learning coaches, student advocates, internship supervisors, mentors, and college counselors could help guide the education of teenagers inside and outside of school and provide some relief for the chronic shortage of teachers. Fourth, schools should expand the options for educating teenagers outside of geographically fixed schools. Combining improved Internet-based curriculum with

  17. Abstinence-only education and teen pregnancy rates: why we need comprehensive sex education in the U.S.

    PubMed

    Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F; Hall, David W

    2011-01-01

    The United States ranks first among developed nations in rates of both teenage pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. In an effort to reduce these rates, the U.S. government has funded abstinence-only sex education programs for more than a decade. However, a public controversy remains over whether this investment has been successful and whether these programs should be continued. Using the most recent national data (2005) from all U.S. states with information on sex education laws or policies (N = 48), we show that increasing emphasis on abstinence education is positively correlated with teenage pregnancy and birth rates. This trend remains significant after accounting for socioeconomic status, teen educational attainment, ethnic composition of the teen population, and availability of Medicaid waivers for family planning services in each state. These data show clearly that abstinence-only education as a state policy is ineffective in preventing teenage pregnancy and may actually be contributing to the high teenage pregnancy rates in the U.S. In alignment with the new evidence-based Teen Pregnancy Prevention Initiative and the Precaution Adoption Process Model advocated by the National Institutes of Health, we propose the integration of comprehensive sex and STD education into the biology curriculum in middle and high school science classes and a parallel social studies curriculum that addresses risk-aversion behaviors and planning for the future.

  18. Adolescent pregnancy: networking and the interdisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Canada, M J

    1986-01-01

    The networking approach to providing needed services to pregnant and parenting teenagers has numerous merits. An historical overview of the formation of the Brooklyn Teen Pregnancy Network highlights service agency need for information and resource sharing, and improved client referral systems as key factors in the genesis of the Network. The borough-wide approach and its spread as an agency model throughout New York City's other boroughs and several other northeastern cities is also attributed to its positive client impact, including: improved family communication and cooperation; early prenatal care with its concomitant improved pregnancy outcomes; financial support for teens; continued teen education; and parenting skills development. Resource information is provided regarding networks operating in the Greater New York metropolitan area. A planned Eastern Regional network initiative is under development. PMID:3745501

  19. Poor education linked with teen pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Westall, J

    1997-02-22

    Two reports concerning socioeconomic factors associated with adolescent pregnancy have been released: a study from the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination at the University of York; and a survey from the Alan Guttmacher Institute, a non-profit reproductive health analysis organization in New York. The first report associates truancy, low academic achievement and poor sex education with the high pregnancy rate in Britain among women 15-19 years old. The rate is the highest in western Europe, although the rate of conceptions in Britain among women 16-19 years old has declined since 1990 and is currently 56.8 per 1000. For girls under 16 years old, a group targeted by the British government's Health of the Nation strategy to achieve a conception rate of 4.8 per 1000 by the year 2000, the rate has remained steady for the last 20 years and stands at 8.3 per 1000. The report calls for better school-based sex education and for improved access to confidential contraceptive services for young people. The second report, an international survey, shows that the number of teenage pregnancies worldwide is declining (although 15 million babies, 10% unplanned, are born annually to teenage mothers), and that women with a higher education level tend to delay marriage and childbearing. A figure compares the percentages of women 20-24 years old who gave birth by age 20 for 4 educational levels (less than 7 years, greater than or equal to 7 years, less than 12 years, greater than or equal to 12 years) for Ghana, Kenya, Zimbabwe, Bangladesh, Egypt, Indonesia, the Philippines, Bolivia, Brazil, Columbia, Mexico, France, Japan, and the United States. Teenage pregnancy in both reports was associated with poor social, economic, and health outcomes for mother and child. According to the second report, the risk of maternal death during childbirth is 2-4 times greater for mothers 17 and younger, in comparison to mothers age 20 and older. Dr. Kathleen Kiernan, a senior research fellow at

  20. The abuse of dextromethorphan-based cough syrup: a pilot study of the community of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Darboe, M N; Keenan, G R; Richards, T K

    1996-01-01

    Drug abuse has been a national social problem in the United States for decades and is often complicated by the emergence of new types of abused drugs or new forms of abuse. In the late 1980s, the community of Waynesboro, Pennsylvania began to detect behavior among its teenagers that suggested a new form of drug abuse and thus a new social problem. The drug was dextromethorphan, used in cough syrup-principally Robitussin DM. The form of abuse is often referred to as "roboing" or "robo-copping." This paper presents the results of the first phase of a comprehensive investigation of this phenomenon in the Waynesboro school district. Data from a survey of school personnel indicate that abuse of cough syrup (Robitussin or other brands) has increased over the years and is increasingly perceived as a problem by the community.

  1. Postterm pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Galal, M.; Symonds, I.; Murray, H.; Petraglia, F.; Smith, R.

    2012-01-01

    Postterm pregnancy is a pregnancy that extends to 42 weeks of gestation or beyond. Fetal, neonatal and maternal complications associated with this condition have always been underestimated. It is not well understood why some women become postterm although in obesity, hormonal and genetic factors have been implicated. The management of postterm pregnancy constitutes a challenge to clinicians; knowing who to induce, who will respond to induction and who will require a caesarean section (CS). The current definition and management of postterm pregnancy have been challenged in several studies as the emerging evidence demonstrates that the incidence of complications associated with postterm pregnancy also increase prior to 42 weeks of gestation. For example the incidence of stillbirth increases from 39 weeks onwards with a sharp rise after 40 weeks of gestation. Induction of labour before 42 weeks of gestation has the potential to prevent these complications; however, both patients and clinicians alike are concerned about risks associated with induction of labour such as failure of induction and increases in CS rates. There is a strong body of evidence however that demonstrates that induction of labour at term and prior to 42 weeks of gestation (particularly between 40 & 42 weeks) is associated with a reduction in perinatal complications without an associated increase in CS rates. It seems therefore that a policy of induction of labour at 41 weeks in postterm women could be beneficial with potential improvement in perinatal outcome and a reduction in maternal complications. PMID:24753906

  2. Pregnancy and Medicines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy and medicines fact sheet ePublications Pregnancy and medicines fact sheet Print this fact sheet Pregnancy and ... pregnancy and medicines Is it safe to use medicine while I am pregnant? There is no clear- ...

  3. Skin Conditions during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... during pregnancy? • What is pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy (PUPPP)? • What is prurigo of pregnancy? • ... itchy skin. What is pruritic urticarial papules and plaques of pregnancy (PUPPP)? In this condition, small, red ...

  4. Alcohol during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Is it safe? > Alcohol during pregnancy Alcohol during pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. How does drinking alcohol during pregnancy affect your baby's health? Drinking alcohol ...

  5. Back Pain During Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Back Pain During Pregnancy Home For Patients Search FAQs Back ... Pain During Pregnancy FAQ115, January 2016 PDF Format Back Pain During Pregnancy Pregnancy What causes back pain during ...

  6. Planning your pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... March of Dimes Premature Birth Report Card Grades Cities, Counties; Focuses on Racial and Ethnic Disparities March ... Pregnancy > Before or between pregnancies > Planning your pregnancy Planning your pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ...

  7. Early Pregnancy Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... is called early pregnancy loss , miscarriage , or spontaneous abortion . How common is early pregnancy loss? Early pregnancy ... testes that can fertilize a female egg. Spontaneous Abortion: The medical term for early pregnancy loss. Trimester: ...

  8. Weight Gain during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Global Map Premature birth report card Careers Archives Pregnancy Before or between pregnancies Nutrition, weight & fitness Prenatal ... Zika virus and pregnancy Microcephaly Medicine safety and pregnancy Birth defects prevention Learn how to help reduce ...

  9. Cosmetics, skin care, and appearance in teenagers.

    PubMed

    Marcoux, D

    1999-09-01

    Adolescence is a period of tremendous transformation in the appearance of the body and the evolution of the mind that will eventually lead to adulthood. "Yesterday's child" will need to assume and exert control over these changes. Therefore his/her appearance becomes a means of communication, a language to express his/her pursuit of self-identity. The cosmetic industry has identified teenagers as "powerful" consumers, and offers them various toiletry and skin care products that should fulfill their needs, such as cleansing, hydrating, and photoprotective agents. Certain decorative cosmetics, especially for hair and nails, are attractive to them also. For some teenagers, the expression of individualism is through body art such as tattooing and body piercing. Areas of concern are the lack of motivation for sun protection and the risky behavior associated with body piercing and tattooing.

  10. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Seema; Shaffer, Lemuel; Cavens, Paula; Blankstein, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term and was successfully treated with postpartum therapeutic plasma exchange. Patient also developed several other complications related to her substantial hypertriglyceridemia including preeclampsia, chylous ascites, retinal detachment, pleural effusion, and chronic pericarditis. This patient had no previous family or personal history of lipid abnormality and had four successful prior pregnancies without developing gestational hypertriglyceridemia. Such a severe hypertriglyceridemia is usually seen in patients with familial chylomicronemia syndromes where hypertriglyceridemia is exacerbated by the pregnancy, leading to fatal complications such as acute pancreatitis. PMID:24995138

  11. How the economy affects teenage weight.

    PubMed

    Arkes, Jeremy

    2009-06-01

    Much research has focused on the proximate determinants of weight gain and obesity for adolescents, but not much information has emerged on identifying which adolescents might be at risk or on prevention. This research focuses on a distal determinant of teenage weight gain, namely changes in the economy, which may help identify geographical areas where adolescents may be at risk and may provide insights into the mechanisms by which adolescents gain weight. This study uses a nationally representative sample of individuals, between 15 and 18 years old from the 1997 US National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, to estimate a model with state and year fixed effects to examine how within-state changes in the unemployment rate affect four teenage weight outcomes: an age- and gender-standardized percentile in the body-mass-index distribution and indicators for being overweight, obese, and underweight. I found statistically significant estimates, indicating that females gain weight in weaker economic periods and males gain weight in stronger economic periods. Possible causes for the contrasting results across gender include, among other things, differences in the responsiveness of labor market work to the economy and differences in the types of jobs generally occupied by female and male teenagers.

  12. Beverages in the diets of American teenagers.

    PubMed

    Guenther, P M

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of beverages, particularly soft drinks, in the diets of American teenagers by analyzing data collected in the Nationwide Food Consumption Survey, 1977-78. Interviewers obtained 24-hour recalls of dietary intake, and respondents completed diet records for the following 2 days. Variation in beverage intake was examined by eating occasion, season, day of the week, region, urbanization, race, age, sex, and household income. Soft drink and milk intakes were negatively correlated (r = -.22). Soft drinks were just as likely to be drunk at lunch or supper as for snacks. Those results suggest that teenagers may have substituted soft drinks for milk at meals. The nutritional impact of soft drink consumption was assessed by determining the part correlations of soft drink intake with intakes of energy and 14 nutrients, while controlling for 19 variables related to time, location, and personal and household characteristics. The negative part correlations of soft drink intake with intakes of calcium (-0.11), magnesium (-0.06), riboflavin (-0.09), vitamin A (-0.08), and ascorbic acid (-0.06) indicate that soft drinks may contribute to low intakes of those nutrients by some teenagers.

  13. Social networking patterns/hazards among teenagers.

    PubMed

    Machold, C; Judge, G; Mavrinac, A; Elliott, J; Murphy, A M; Roche, E

    2012-05-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNSs) have grown substantially, posing new hazards to teenagers. This study aimed to determine general patterns of Internet usage among Irish teenagers aged 11-16 years, and to identify potential hazards, including; bullying, inappropriate contact, overuse, addiction and invasion of users' privacy. A cross-sectional study design was employed to survey students at three Irish secondary schools, with a sample of 474 completing a questionnaire. 202 (44%) (n = 460) accessed the Internet using a shared home computer. Two hours or less were spent online daily by 285(62%), of whom 450 (98%) were unsupervised. 306 (72%) (n = 425) reported frequent usage of SNSs, 403 (95%) of whom were Facebook users. 42 (10%) males and 51 (12%) females experienced bullying online, while 114 (27%) reported inappropriate contact from others. Concerning overuse and the risk of addiction, 140 (33%) felt they accessed SNSs too often. These patterns among Irish teenagers suggest that SNS usage poses significant dangers, which are going largely unaddressed. PMID:22803496

  14. Social networking patterns/hazards among teenagers.

    PubMed

    Machold, C; Judge, G; Mavrinac, A; Elliott, J; Murphy, A M; Roche, E

    2012-05-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNSs) have grown substantially, posing new hazards to teenagers. This study aimed to determine general patterns of Internet usage among Irish teenagers aged 11-16 years, and to identify potential hazards, including; bullying, inappropriate contact, overuse, addiction and invasion of users' privacy. A cross-sectional study design was employed to survey students at three Irish secondary schools, with a sample of 474 completing a questionnaire. 202 (44%) (n = 460) accessed the Internet using a shared home computer. Two hours or less were spent online daily by 285(62%), of whom 450 (98%) were unsupervised. 306 (72%) (n = 425) reported frequent usage of SNSs, 403 (95%) of whom were Facebook users. 42 (10%) males and 51 (12%) females experienced bullying online, while 114 (27%) reported inappropriate contact from others. Concerning overuse and the risk of addiction, 140 (33%) felt they accessed SNSs too often. These patterns among Irish teenagers suggest that SNS usage poses significant dangers, which are going largely unaddressed.

  15. Naturalistic Teenage Driving Study: Findings and Lessons Learned

    PubMed Central

    Simons-Morton, Bruce G.; Klauer, Sheila G.; Ouimet, Marie Claude; Guo, Feng; Albert, Paul S.; Lee, Suzanne E.; Ehsani, Johnathon P.; Pradhan, Anuj K.; Dingus, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Problem This paper summarizes the findings on novice teenage driving outcomes (e.g., crashes and risky driving behaviors) from the Naturalistic Teenage Driving Study. Method Survey and driving data from a data acquisition system (Global Positioning System, accelerometers, cameras) were collected from 42 newly-licensed teenage drivers and their parents during the first 18 months of teenage licensure; stress responsivity was also measured in teenagers. Result Overall teenage crash and near crash (CNC) rates declined over time, but were >4 times higher among teenagers than adults. Contributing factors to teenage CNC rates included secondary task engagement (e.g., distraction), kinematic risky driving, low stress responsivity, and risky social norms. Conclusion The data support the contention that the high novice teenage CNC risk is due both to inexperience and risky driving behavior, particularly kinematic risky driving and secondary task engagement. Practical Applications Graduated driver licensing policy and other prevention efforts should focus on kinematic risky driving, secondary task engagement, and risky social norms. PMID:26403899

  16. Adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse: suggestions for perinatal caregivers.

    PubMed

    Roussillon, J A

    1998-11-01

    As many as 1 in 4 women are survivors of childhood sexual abuse. This traumatic life event profoundly influences the care that advanced practice nurses provide throughout the life cycle, and particularly the care that is provided during times of physical and emotional stress. Despite the prevalence of sexual abuse, there has been little research on the experiences of survivors during the perinatal period, and few suggestions for interventions. This article reviews the literature on the implications of sexual abuse on a woman's experience of pregnancy, birth, and breastfeeding. It emphasizes the importance of routine screening for abuse, as well as assessment of a survivor's stage in the recovery process. Finally, this article suggests topics for appropriate perinatal anticipatory guidance for women who have a history of sexual abuse.

  17. Nine Tips To Help Faith Leaders and Their Communities Address Teen Pregnancy = Nueve consejos para ayudar a lideres espirituales y sus comunidades a hacerle frente al problema del embarazo en la adolescencia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Campaign To Prevent Teen Pregnancy, Washington, DC.

    To support faith communities in protecting teenage boys and girls from too-early sexual activity and teen pregnancy, the National Campaign To Prevent Teen Pregnancy's Task Force on Religion and Public Values has compiled these nine tips which summarize a wealth of experience and advice from faith leaders around the country. The members of the Task…

  18. The Effect(s) of Teen Pregnancy: Reconciling Theory, Methods, and Findings.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Christina J; Fiel, Jeremy E

    2016-02-01

    Although teenage mothers have lower educational attainment and earnings than women who delay fertility, causal interpretations of this relationship remain controversial. Scholars argue that there are reasons to predict negative, trivial, or even positive effects, and different methodological approaches provide some support for each perspective. We reconcile this ongoing debate by drawing on two heuristics: (1) each methodological strategy emphasizes different women in estimation procedures, and (2) the effects of teenage fertility likely vary in the population. Analyses of the Child and Young Adult Cohorts of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 3,661) confirm that teen pregnancy has negative effects on most women's attainment and earnings. More striking, however, is that effects on college completion and early earnings vary considerably and are most pronounced among those least likely to experience an early pregnancy. Further analyses suggest that teen pregnancy is particularly harmful for those with the brightest socioeconomic prospects and who are least prepared for the transition to motherhood.

  19. A public health success: understanding policy changes related to teen sexual activity and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Brindis, Claire D

    2006-01-01

    Teenage pregnancy prevention has long been on the American public health agenda. Over the past decade, a number of concurrent federal, state, and local policies have responded to the myriad and diverse needs of adolescents, from supporting adolescents who have not initiated sexual intercourse to strategies aimed at avoiding a repeat pregnancy among teenage parents. Key policies, including comprehensive family life education, access to contraceptive care, and youth development, have resulted in delays in sexual debut, improved contraceptive use, and have achieved reductions in pregnancies, abortions, and births. Although improvements are documented across all ethnic and racial subgroups, substantial health disparities continue to exist. Synergistic policy approaches represent a substantial change from the past when narrow, single-issue strategies were adopted and were limited in their effectiveness. Renewed efforts to implement narrow policy approaches (e.g., abstinence-until-marriage or restrictions to contraceptive access) need to be considered in light of existing research findings.

  20. The Effects of Gender-based Violence on Women's Unwanted Pregnancy and Abortion.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Laura A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this research is to understand how gender-based violence across the life-course affects the likelihood of abortion. Women outpatients (n = 309) revealed their exposure to four different forms of gender-based abuse: child sexual abuse (25.7 percent), teenage physical dating violence (40.8 percent), intimate partner violence (43.1 percent), and sexual assault outside an intimate relationship (22 percent). Logistic regressions revealed that no single form of gender-based abuse predicted abortion. The cumulative effect of multiple forms of abuse did increase the odds of having an abortion (OR = 1.39, CI = 1.13-1.69). Child sexual abuse predicted intimate partner violence (OR = 6.71, CI = 3.36-13.41). The cumulative effect of gender-based violence on women's reproductive health warrants further research. Priority should be given to screening for multiple forms of victimization in reproductive healthcare settings.

  1. The Effects of Gender-based Violence on Women's Unwanted Pregnancy and Abortion.

    PubMed

    McCloskey, Laura A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this research is to understand how gender-based violence across the life-course affects the likelihood of abortion. Women outpatients (n = 309) revealed their exposure to four different forms of gender-based abuse: child sexual abuse (25.7 percent), teenage physical dating violence (40.8 percent), intimate partner violence (43.1 percent), and sexual assault outside an intimate relationship (22 percent). Logistic regressions revealed that no single form of gender-based abuse predicted abortion. The cumulative effect of multiple forms of abuse did increase the odds of having an abortion (OR = 1.39, CI = 1.13-1.69). Child sexual abuse predicted intimate partner violence (OR = 6.71, CI = 3.36-13.41). The cumulative effect of gender-based violence on women's reproductive health warrants further research. Priority should be given to screening for multiple forms of victimization in reproductive healthcare settings. PMID:27354842

  2. The Effects of Gender-based Violence on Women’s Unwanted Pregnancy and Abortion

    PubMed Central

    McCloskey, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to understand how gender-based violence across the life-course affects the likelihood of abortion. Women outpatients (n = 309) revealed their exposure to four different forms of gender-based abuse: child sexual abuse (25.7 percent), teenage physical dating violence (40.8 percent), intimate partner violence (43.1 percent), and sexual assault outside an intimate relationship (22 percent). Logistic regressions revealed that no single form of gender-based abuse predicted abortion. The cumulative effect of multiple forms of abuse did increase the odds of having an abortion (OR = 1.39, CI = 1.13-1.69). Child sexual abuse predicted intimate partner violence (OR = 6.71, CI = 3.36-13.41). The cumulative effect of gender-based violence on women’s reproductive health warrants further research. Priority should be given to screening for multiple forms of victimization in reproductive healthcare settings. PMID:27354842

  3. Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Cold Medicine Abuse DrugFacts: Cough and Cold Medicine Abuse Email Facebook Twitter Revised May 2014 Some ... diverted for abuse. How Are Cough and Cold Medicines Abused? Cough and cold medicines are usually consumed ...

  4. Clinical, Ethical, and Legal Considerations in Pregnant Women With Opioid Abuse.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Mallory E; Arora, Kavita Shah

    2015-09-01

    The rising prevalence of women with opioid addiction in pregnancy necessitates understanding of medical, ethical, and legal considerations on the part of obstetricians. In addition to briefly reviewing the medical care of opioid abuse in pregnancy, we offer a careful consideration of the stigmatization of addiction and resultant medicolegal sequelae. We advocate for improved access to opioid maintenance therapy and social services as a means of improving healthful pregnancy outcomes and decry recent trends in the criminalization of addiction nationwide. PMID:26244538

  5. Uxoricide in pregnancy: ancient Greek domestic violence in evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Deacy, Susan; McHardy, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies of ancient Greek examples of uxoricide in pregnancy have concluded that the theme is used to suggest tyrannical abuse of power and that the violence is a product of the patriarchal nature of ancient society. This article uses evolutionary analyses of violence during pregnancy to argue that the themes of sexual jealousy and uncertainty over paternity are as crucial as the theme of power to an understanding of these examples and that the examples can be seen as typical instances of spousal abuse as it occurs in all types of society. PMID:24153380

  6. Uxoricide in pregnancy: ancient Greek domestic violence in evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Deacy, Susan; McHardy, Fiona

    2013-10-24

    Previous studies of ancient Greek examples of uxoricide in pregnancy have concluded that the theme is used to suggest tyrannical abuse of power and that the violence is a product of the patriarchal nature of ancient society. This article uses evolutionary analyses of violence during pregnancy to argue that the themes of sexual jealousy and uncertainty over paternity are as crucial as the theme of power to an understanding of these examples and that the examples can be seen as typical instances of spousal abuse as it occurs in all types of society.

  7. Characteristics of Pregnant Teen Substance Abuse Treatment Admissions

    MedlinePlus

    ... consequences of teen pregnancy (2nd ed.). Washington, DC: Urban Institute Press. 3. Pinto, S. M., Dodd, S., Walkinshaw, S. A., ... Health, 22 (1), 50-55. 6. Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, Children’s Bureau, ICF International. (2009). Protecting ...

  8. Sexual Abuse Experiences of Women in Peru: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deboer, Rebekah E.; Tse, Luke M.

    2010-01-01

    This ethnographic study relied primarily on case notes and interviews with the president of Centro Prenatal Vida Nueva, a pregnancy center in Lima, Peru, to study the sexual abuse experiences of 33 Peruvian women. Given the language limitations of the researchers, the analyses were completed in collaboration with the president of the center, a…

  9. Teenagers and Reading: Factors that Shape the Quality of Teenagers' Reading Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manuel, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the key findings of a range of research on teenagers and reading, focusing on the implications for classroom practice and student engagement. There is a particular emphasis on addressing the needs of underachieving and reluctant readers and the ways in which promoting reading for pleasure and enjoyment can contribute to student…

  10. Males and Morals: Teenage Contraceptive Behavior Amid the Double Standard

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scales, Peter

    1977-01-01

    This paper reviews literature on teenage contraceptive behavior and teenage contraceptive decision making. The paper describes the persistence of a sexual double standard in terms of moral motivation to use contraception and in terms of the relative lack of communication about contraception among young partners. (Author)

  11. Implementing a teenage health service in primary care.

    PubMed

    Green, Elizabeth; Larcombe, J; Horbury, I

    The health of teenagers is currently a priority of the NHS, with many schemes and projects being developed. There are documented difficulties for teenagers in accessing health care, especially within general practice. This article describes the development and evaluation of a tailor-made clinic in the primary care setting. PMID:16209395

  12. Increasing the Involvement of Teenage Cigarette Smokers in Antismoking Campaigns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Marvin E.; Gorn, Gerald J.

    1982-01-01

    Results suggest that older teenagers may cut down on their own smoking when they are involved in efforts to change the smoking behavior of younger teens. Concludes that an antismoking campaign within the context of a school curriculum might be effective in changing the smoking behavior of teenagers. (PD)

  13. Relationships of Teenage Smoking to Educational Aspirations and Parents' Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldron, Ingrid; Lye, Diane

    Past research has shown that teenagers with less educated parents and teenagers with lower academic aspirations are more likely than their peers to smoke. This study was conducted to provide additional descriptive data concerning the relationships of smoking to parents' education and students' educational aspirations and to provide preliminary…

  14. Teenage Childbearing, Marital Status, and Depressive Symptoms in Later Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalil, Ariel; Kunz, James

    2002-01-01

    This longitudinal study tested the contribution of age and marital status at first birth to depressive symptomatology in early adulthood. Findings indicated that unmarried teenage childbearers displayed higher levels of depressive symptoms than women who first gave birth as married adults. The psychological health of married teenage mothers in…

  15. Understanding Teenage Depression: A Guide to Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Empfield, Maureen; Bakalar, Nicholas

    The incidence of teenage depression has increased all over the world. In some populations it is has been accompanied by suicide, but suicide remains rare. Clinical depression, which entails many debilitating physical and psychological symptoms, is a serious disease that can do terrible and even permanent damage to a teenager's developmental…

  16. A Comparative Analysis of Teenagers Who Smoke Different Cigarette Brands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enomoto, Carl E.

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes and compares the survey responses of teenagers who smoke different cigarette brands, specifically Marlboro, Camel, and Newport. Differences were seen across brands but teen smokers had similar opinions about quitting. Given the differences across brands, more flexible approaches may be needed to address teenage smoking. (Author/MKA)

  17. Teenage Nonviolence: How Do We Define and Measure It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayton, Daniel M., II

    With the rise of violent teenage crime, with an alarming number of child soldiers across the globe, and with the continually increasing number of children and adolescents who are victimized by violence and war, an instrument that measures nonviolent tendencies would be very useful. The Teenage Nonviolence Test (TNT) was recently developed and…

  18. Brief Report: Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Pregnant Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitsuhiro, Sandro Sendin; Chalem, Elisa; Barros, Marina Carvalho Moraes; Guinsburg, Ruth; Laranjeira, Ronaldo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prevalence of ICD-10 psychiatric disorders in a population of pregnant teenage women from a Brazilian public hospital. Method: 1000 pregnant teenage women were evaluated using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, a structured interview which establishes diagnoses according to the International Classification…

  19. A Critical Evaluation of Nicotine Replacement Therapy for Teenage Smokers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Christi A.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates the appropriateness and feasibility of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) in teenage smokers. Available forms of NRT, theoretical rationale and efficacy of NRT, ethical considerations, and the feasibility of NRT in teenage smokers are addressed. Several characteristics similar to adult nicotine dependent smokers have been found in teen…

  20. The Unacceptable "Flaneur": The Shopping Mall as a Teenage Hangout.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Hugh; Taylor, Mark; Percy-Smith, Barry; Limb, Melanie

    2000-01-01

    Examines attitudes toward the role of the shopping mall as a place for congregating. Notes that adult attitudes reflect a discomfort with teenagers being in a place where they have no clear role, while teenagers transgress and question the spatial hegemony of adulthood, creating a "thirdspace" reflecting their place between adulthood and childhood…