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Sample records for abuse-related behavioral effects

  1. Behavioral evaluation of modafinil and the abuse-related effects of cocaine in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Newman, Jennifer L; Negus, S Stevens; Lozama, Anthony; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Mello, Nancy K

    2010-10-01

    Modafinil is a central nervous system stimulant used to promote wakefulness, and it is being evaluated clinically as an agonist medication for treating stimulant abuse. This is the first report of the effects of modafinil on the abuse-related effects of cocaine in nonhuman primates. The behavioral effects of modafinil were examined in three studies. First, the discriminative stimulus effects of modafinil (3.2-32 mg/kg) were evaluated in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) trained to discriminate either low (0.18 mg/kg, IM) or high (0.4 mg/kg, IM) doses of cocaine from saline. Modafinil dose-dependently substituted for cocaine in 6 of 7 monkeys. In the second study, the effects of chronically administered modafinil (32-56 mg/kg/day, IV) on food- and cocaine-maintained (0.001-0.1 mg/kg/inj) operant responding were examined. Modafinil was administered 3 times/hr for 23 hr/day to ensure stable drug levels. Chronic treatment with 32 mg/kg/day modafinil selectively reduced responding maintained by intermediate and peak reinforcing doses of cocaine, but responding maintained by higher doses of cocaine was unaffected. Food-maintained behavior did not change during chronic modafinil treatment. In a third study, modafinil (32 and 56 mg/kg/day, IV) was examined in a reinstatement model. Modafinil transiently increased responding during extinction. These findings indicate that modafinil shares discriminative stimulus effects with cocaine and selectively reduces responding maintained by reinforcing doses of cocaine. In addition, modafinil reinstated cocaine-seeking behavior, which may reflect its cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects. These data support clinical findings and indicate that these preclinical models may be useful for predicting the effectiveness of agonist medications for drug abuse treatment. PMID:20939643

  2. Effects of the Trace Amine Associated Receptor 1 Agonist RO5263397 on Abuse-Related Behavioral Indices of Methamphetamine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Li; Zhang, Yanan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Methamphetamine is a major drug of abuse with no effective pharmacotherapy available. Trace amine associated receptor 1 is implicated in cocaine addiction and represents a potential therapeutic target. However, the effects of trace amine associated receptor 1 agonists on addiction-related behavioral effects of methamphetamine are unknown. Methods: This study examined the effects of a trace amine associated receptor 1 agonist RO5263397 on methamphetamine-induced behavioral sensitization, methamphetamine self-administration, cue- and methamphetamine-induced reinstatement of drug seeking, and cue-induced reinstatement of sucrose-seeking behaviors in rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used to examine the effects of methamphetamine alone and in combination with the trace amine associated receptor 1 agonist RO5263397 (3.2–10mg/kg). Results: RO5263397 dose-dependently attenuated the expression of behavioral sensitization to methamphetamine, reduced methamphetamine self-administration, and decreased both cue- and a priming dose of methamphetamine-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking behaviors. However, RO5263397 did not alter cue-induced reinstatement of sucrose-seeking behavior. Conclusions: Taken together, trace amine associated receptor 1 agonists attenuate some abuse-related behavioral effects of methamphetamine, strongly suggesting that drugs activating trace amine associated receptor 1 may be potentially useful for the treatment of methamphetamine addiction and warrant further studies. PMID:25522401

  3. Emotional valence and context of social influences on drug abuse-related behavior in animal models of social stress and prosocial interaction

    PubMed Central

    Neisewander, J.L.; Peartree, N.A.; Pentkowski, N.S.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Social factors are important determinants of drug dependence and relapse. Objectives We reviewed preclinical literature examining the role of social experiences from early life through the development of drug dependence and relapse, emphasizing two aspects of these experiences: 1) whether the social interaction is appetitive or aversive and 2) whether the social interaction occurs within or outside of the drug-taking context. Methods The models reviewed include neonatal care, isolation, social defeat, chronic subordination, and prosocial interactions. We review results from these models in regard to effects on self-administration and conditioned place preference established with alcohol, psychostimulants, and opiates. Results We suggest that in general, when the interactions occur outside of the drug-taking context, prosocial interactions are protective against drug abuse-related behaviors whereas social stressors facilitate these behaviors. By contrast, positive or negative social interactions occurring within the drug-taking context may interact with other risk factors to enhance or inhibit these behaviors. Conclusions Despite differences in the nature and complexity of human social behavior compared to other species, the evolving animal literature provides useful models for understanding social influences on drug abuse-related behavior that will allow for research on the behavioral and biological mechanisms involved. The models have contributed to understanding social influences on initiation and maintenance of drug use, but more research is needed to understand social influences on drug relapse. PMID:22955569

  4. Pharmacological classification of the abuse-related discriminative stimulus effects of trichloroethylene vapor

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Keith L.; Nicholson, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Inhalants are distinguished as a class primarily based upon a shared route of administration. Grouping inhalants according to their abuse-related in vivo pharmacological effects using the drug discrimination procedure has the potential to provide a more relevant classification scheme to the research and treatment community. Mice were trained to differentiate the introceptive effects of the trichloroethylene vapor from air using an operant procedure. Trichloroethylene is a chlorinated hydrocarbon solvent once used as an anesthetic as well as in glues and other consumer products. It is now primarily employed as a metal degreaser. We found that the stimulus effects of trichloroethylene were similar to those of other chlorinated hydrocarbon vapors, the aromatic hydrocarbon toluene and the vapor anesthetics methoxyflurane and isoflurane. The stimulus effects of trichloroethylene overlapped with those of the barbiturate methohexital, to a lesser extent the benzodiazepine midazolam and to ethanol. NMDA antagonists, the kappa opioid agonist U50,488 and the mixed 5-HT agonist mCPP largely failed to substitute for trichloroethylene. These data suggest that stimulus effects of chlorinated hydrocarbon vapors are mediated at least partially by GABAA receptor positive modulatory effects. PMID:25202471

  5. Protracted withdrawal from cocaine self-administration flips the switch on 5-HT1B receptor modulation of cocaine-abuse related behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Pentkowski, Nathan S.; Cheung, Tim H.C.; Toy, William A.; Adams, Matthew D.; Neumaier, John F.; Neisewander, Janet L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of serotonin-1B receptors (5-HT1BRs) in modulating cocaine abuse-related behaviors has been controversial due to discrepancies between pharmacological and gene knockout approaches, and opposite influences on cocaine selfadministration versus cocaine-seeking behavior. We hypothesized that modulation of these behaviors via 5-HT1BRs in the mesolimbic pathway may vary depending on the stage of the addiction cycle. Methods To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of increasing 5-HT1BR production by microinfusing a viral vector expressing either green fluorescent protein (GFP) and 5-HT1BR or GFP alone into the medial nucleus accumbens shell of rats either during maintenance of cocaine self-administration (i.e. active drug use) or during protracted withdrawal. Results 5-HT1BR-gene transfer during maintenance shifted the dose–response curve for cocaine self-administration upward and to the left and increased break points and cocaine intake on a progressive ratio (PR) schedule, consistent with enhanced reinforcing effects of cocaine. In contrast, following 21 days of forced abstinence 5-HT1BR-gene transfer attenuated break points and cocaine intake on a PR schedule of reinforcement, as well as cue- and cocaine-primed reinstatement of cocaineseeking behavior. Conclusions This unique pattern of effects suggests that mesolimbic 5-HT1BRs differentially modulate cocaine abuse-related behaviors, with a facilitative influence during periods of active drug use in striking contrast to an inhibitory influence during protracted withdrawal. These findings suggest that targeting 5-HT1BRs may lead to a novel treatment for cocaine dependence and that the therapeutic efficacy of these treatments may vary depending on the stage of the addiction cycle. PMID:22541946

  6. Modification of pharmacokinetic and abuse-related effects of cocaine by human-derived cocaine hydrolase in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Schindler, Charles W.; Justinova, Zuzana; Lafleur, David; Woods, Doug; Roschke, Viktor; Hallak, Hussein; Sklair-Tavron, Liora; Redhi, Godfrey H.; Yasar, Sevil; Bergman, Jack; Goldberg, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Although substantial research effort has focused on developing pharmacological treatments for cocaine abuse, no effective medications have been developed. Recent studies show that enzymes that metabolize cocaine in the periphery, forestalling its entry into the brain, can prevent cocaine toxicity and its behavioral effects in rodents. Here we report on effects of one such enzyme (Albu-CocH) on the pharmacokinetic and behavioral effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys. Albu-CocH was developed from successive mutations of human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) and has 1000-fold greater catalytic activity against cocaine than naturally occurring BChE. Pharmacokinetic studies showed that Albu-CocH (5 mg/kg) had a half-life of 56.6 hours in squirrel monkeys. In these studies, plasma levels of cocaine following i.v. 1 mg/kg cocaine were reduced two hours after administration of Albu-CocH, whereas plasma levels of the cocaine metabolite ecgonine methyl ester were increased. These effects were still evident 72 hrs following Albu-CocH administration. In behavioral experiments in monkeys, pretreatment with 5 mg/kg Albu-CocH dramatically decreased self-administration of a reinforcing dose of i.v. cocaine (30 μg/kg/injection) for over 24 hours. Pretreatment with 5 mg/kg Albu-CocH also attenuated the reinstatement of extinguished cocaine self-administration by an i.v. priming injection of cocaine (0.1 or 0.3 mg/kg) and, in separate studies, attenuated the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine. The ability of Albu-CocH to attenuate the abuse-related effects of cocaine in squirrel monkeys indicates that further investigation of BChE mutants as potential treatment for cocaine abuse and toxicity is warranted. PMID:22264200

  7. Abuse-Related Neurochemical Effects of Para-Substituted Methcathinone Analogs in Rats: Microdialysis Studies of Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine and Serotonin.

    PubMed

    Suyama, Julie A; Sakloth, Farhana; Kolanos, Renata; Glennon, Richard A; Lazenka, Matthew F; Negus, S Stevens; Banks, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Methcathinone (MCAT) is a monoamine releaser and parent compound to a new class of designer drugs that includes the synthetic cathinones mephedrone and flephedrone. Using MCAT and a series of para-substituted (or 4-substituted) MCAT analogs, it has been previously shown that expression of abuse-related behavioral effects in rats correlates both with the volume of the para substituent and in vitro neurochemical selectivity to promote monoamine release via the dopamine (DA) versus serotonin (5-HT) transporters in rat brain synaptosomes. The present study used in vivo microdialysis to determine the relationship between these previous measures and the in vivo neurochemical selectivity of these compounds to alter nucleus accumbens (NAc) DA and 5-HT levels. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with bilateral guide cannulae targeting the NAc. MCAT and five para-substituted analogs (4-F, 4-Cl, 4-Br, 4-CH3, and 4-OCH3) produced dose- and time-dependent increases in NAc DA and/or 5-HT levels. Selectivity was determined as the dose required to increase peak 5-HT levels by 250% divided by the dose required to increase peak DA levels by 250%. This measure of in vivo neurochemical selectivity varied across compounds and correlated with 1) in vivo expression of abuse-related behavioral effects (r = 0.89, P = 0.02); 2) in vitro selectivity to promote monoamine release via DA and 5-HT transporters (r = 0.95, P < 0.01); and 3) molecular volume of the para substituent (r = -0.85, P = 0.03). These results support a relationship between these molecular, neurochemical, and behavioral measures and support a role for molecular structure as a determinant of abuse-related neurochemical and behavioral effects of MCAT analogs.

  8. Serotonin 2A Receptors Differentially Contribute to Abuse-Related Effects of Cocaine and Cocaine-Induced Nigrostriatal and Mesolimbic Dopamine Overflow in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Murnane, Kevin S.; Winschel, Jake; Schmidt, Karl T.; Stewart, LaShaya M.; Rose, Samuel J.; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C.

    2013-01-01

    Two of the most commonly used procedures to study the abuse-related effects of drugs in laboratory animals are intravenous drug self-administration and reinstatement of extinguished behavior previously maintained by drug delivery. Intravenous self-administration is widely accepted to model ongoing drug-taking behavior, whereas reinstatement procedures are accepted to model relapse to drug taking following abstinence. Previous studies indicate that 5-HT2A receptor antagonists attenuate the reinstatement of cocaine-maintained behavior but not cocaine self-administration in rodents. Although the abuse-related effects of cocaine have been closely linked to brain dopamine systems, no previous study has determined whether this dissociation is related to differential regulation of dopamine neurotransmission. To elucidate the neuropharmacological and neuroanatomical mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, we evaluated the effects of the selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 on intravenous cocaine self-administration and drug- and cue-primed reinstatement in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). In separate subjects, we evaluated the role of 5-HT2A receptors in cocaine-induced dopamine overflow in the nucleus accumbens (n = 4) and the caudate nucleus (n = 5) using in vivo microdialysis. Consistent with previous studies, M100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.m.) significantly attenuated drug- and cue-induced reinstatement but had no significant effects on cocaine self-administration across a range of maintenance doses. Importantly, M100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.m.) attenuated cocaine-induced (1.0 mg/kg, i.v.) dopamine overflow in the caudate nucleus but not in the nucleus accumbens. These data suggest that important abuse-related effects of cocaine are mediated by distinct striatal dopamine projection pathways. PMID:23946394

  9. Serotonin 2A receptors differentially contribute to abuse-related effects of cocaine and cocaine-induced nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopamine overflow in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Murnane, Kevin S; Winschel, Jake; Schmidt, Karl T; Stewart, LaShaya M; Rose, Samuel J; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Howell, Leonard L

    2013-08-14

    Two of the most commonly used procedures to study the abuse-related effects of drugs in laboratory animals are intravenous drug self-administration and reinstatement of extinguished behavior previously maintained by drug delivery. Intravenous self-administration is widely accepted to model ongoing drug-taking behavior, whereas reinstatement procedures are accepted to model relapse to drug taking following abstinence. Previous studies indicate that 5-HT2A receptor antagonists attenuate the reinstatement of cocaine-maintained behavior but not cocaine self-administration in rodents. Although the abuse-related effects of cocaine have been closely linked to brain dopamine systems, no previous study has determined whether this dissociation is related to differential regulation of dopamine neurotransmission. To elucidate the neuropharmacological and neuroanatomical mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, we evaluated the effects of the selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist M100907 on intravenous cocaine self-administration and drug- and cue-primed reinstatement in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). In separate subjects, we evaluated the role of 5-HT2A receptors in cocaine-induced dopamine overflow in the nucleus accumbens (n = 4) and the caudate nucleus (n = 5) using in vivo microdialysis. Consistent with previous studies, M100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.m.) significantly attenuated drug- and cue-induced reinstatement but had no significant effects on cocaine self-administration across a range of maintenance doses. Importantly, M100907 (0.3 mg/kg, i.m.) attenuated cocaine-induced (1.0 mg/kg, i.v.) dopamine overflow in the caudate nucleus but not in the nucleus accumbens. These data suggest that important abuse-related effects of cocaine are mediated by distinct striatal dopamine projection pathways. PMID:23946394

  10. Abuse-related effects of dual dopamine/serotonin releasers with varying potency to release norepinephrine in male rats and rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Bauer, Clayton T; Blough, Bruce E; Rothman, Richard B; Partilla, John S; Baumann, Michael H; Negus, S Stevens

    2014-06-01

    d-Amphetamine selectively promotes release of both dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) versus serotonin (5HT), and chronic d-amphetamine treatment decreases cocaine-taking behavior in rats, nonhuman primates, and humans. However, abuse liability limits the clinical utility of amphetamine maintenance for treating cocaine abuse. One strategy to improve safety and efficacy of monoamine releasers as candidate anticocaine medications has been to develop dual DA/5HT releasers like 1-napthyl-2-aminopropane (PAL-287), but the pharmacology of this class of compounds has not been extensively examined. In particular, PAL-287 has similar potencies to release DA, 5HT, and NE, and the role of manipulating NE release potency on abuse-related or anticocaine effects of dual DA/5HT releasers is not known. To address this issue, the present study compared effects of four novel DA/5HT releasers that varied >800-fold in their selectivities to release DA/5HT versus NE: [1-(5-chloro-1H-indol-3-yl)propan-2-amine (PAL-542), 1-(5-fluoro-1H-indol-3-yl)propan-2-amine (PAL-544), 1-(1H-indol-5-yl)propan-2-amine (PAL-571), and (R)-1-(1H-indol-1-yl)propain-2-amine (PAL-569). Abuse-related effects of all four compounds were evaluated in assays of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rats and cocaine discrimination in rats and monkeys, and none of the compounds reliably facilitated ICSS or substituted for cocaine. Anticocaine effects of the compound with highest selectivity to release DA/5HT versus NE (PAL-542) were tested in an assay of cocaine versus food choice in rhesus monkeys, and PAL-542 failed to reduce cocaine choice. These results suggests that potency to release NE has minimal influence on abuse liability of dual DA/5HT releasers, and reducing relative potency to release NE versus DA/5HT does not improve anticocaine efficacy. PMID:24796848

  11. Abuse-related effects of mu opioid analgesics in an assay of intracranial self-stimulation in rats: modulation by chronic morphine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Altarifi, Ahmad A.; Rice, Kenner C.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2013-01-01

    Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) is an operant procedure in which responding is maintained by electrical brain stimulation. Stimulation frequency can be rapidly varied to maintain a wide range of baseline response rates, and drugs effects can be simultaneously evaluated on both low ICSS rates maintained by low stimulation frequencies and high ICSS rates maintained by high stimulation frequencies. ICSS “facilitation” denotes drug-induced increases in low ICSS rates and is often interpreted as an abuse-related effect, whereas ICSS “depression” denotes decreases in high ICSS rates and may indicate abuse-limiting effects. This study examined the roles of drug efficacy and of prior mu agonist exposure as determinants of mu agonist effects on ICSS in rats with electrodes implanted in the medial forebrain bundle. The high-, intermediate- and low-efficacy mu agonists methadone, fentanyl and nalbuphine were tested during escalating regimens of morphine exposure (Vehicle, 3.2, 18 mg/kg/day). During vehicle treatment, methadone and fentanyl primarily depressed ICSS, whereas nalbuphine produced weak facilitation that was not dose-dependent. Chronic morphine produced tolerance to ICSS depression and increased expression of ICSS facilitation. These results suggest that mu agonist exposure increases expression of abuse-related ICSS facilitation by mu agonists with a broad range of efficacies at mu receptors. PMID:23881045

  12. Abuse-related effects of µ-opioid analgesics in an assay of intracranial self-stimulation in rats: modulation by chronic morphine exposure.

    PubMed

    Altarifi, Ahmad A; Rice, Kenner C; Negus, S Stevens

    2013-09-01

    Intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) is an operant procedure in which responding is maintained by electrical brain stimulation. Stimulation frequency can be varied rapidly to maintain a wide range of baseline response rates, and drugs' effects can be evaluated simultaneously on both low ICSS rates maintained by low stimulation frequencies and high ICSS rates maintained by high stimulation frequencies. ICSS 'facilitation' indicates drug-induced increases in low ICSS rates and is often considered an abuse-related effect, whereas ICSS 'depression' indicates decreases in high ICSS rates and may indicate abuse-limiting effects. This study examined the roles of µ-agonist efficacy and of previous µ-agonist exposure as determinants of µ-agonist effects on ICSS in rats with electrodes implanted into the medial forebrain bundle. The high-efficacy, intermediate-efficacy, and low-efficacy µ agonists methadone, fentanyl, and nalbuphine were tested during escalating regimens of morphine exposure (vehicle, 3.2, and 18 mg/kg/day). During vehicle treatment, methadone and fentanyl primarily depressed ICSS, whereas nalbuphine produced weak facilitation that was not dose dependent. Chronic morphine produced tolerance to ICSS depression and increased expression of ICSS facilitation. These results suggest that µ-agonist exposure increases the expression of abuse-related ICSS facilitation by µ agonists with a broad range of efficacies at µ receptors.

  13. Potential therapeutic strategy to treat substance abuse related disorders.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sulie L

    2013-12-01

    The "Potential Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Substance Abuse Related Disorders" session was chaired by Dr. Sulie Chang, director of NeuroImmune Phamacology at Seton University. The four presenters (and their topics) were: Dr. Wen-zhe Ho (Miniway to stop HIV/HCV), Dr. Ru-Band Lu (Low dose of memantine in the treatment of opioid dependence in human), Dr. Ping Zhang (Treatment of alcohol-related disorders-Learning from stem/progenitor cell), and Chia-Hsiang Chen (Treatment of methamphetamine abuse: an antibody-based immunotherapy approach).

  14. Potential therapeutic strategy to treat substance abuse related disorders.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sulie L

    2013-12-01

    The "Potential Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Substance Abuse Related Disorders" session was chaired by Dr. Sulie Chang, director of NeuroImmune Phamacology at Seton University. The four presenters (and their topics) were: Dr. Wen-zhe Ho (Miniway to stop HIV/HCV), Dr. Ru-Band Lu (Low dose of memantine in the treatment of opioid dependence in human), Dr. Ping Zhang (Treatment of alcohol-related disorders-Learning from stem/progenitor cell), and Chia-Hsiang Chen (Treatment of methamphetamine abuse: an antibody-based immunotherapy approach). PMID:25267886

  15. The Abuse-Related Beliefs Questionnaire for Survivors of Childhood Sexual Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginzburg, Karni; Arnow, Bruce; Hart, Stacey; Gardner, William; Koopman, Cheryl; Classen, Catherine C.; Giese-Davis, Janine; Spiegel, David

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of a new measure, the Abuse-Related Beliefs Questionnaire (ARBQ), designed to assess abuse-related beliefs among adult survivors of childhood sexual abuse (CSA). Study 1 examined the structure of the scale, and Study 2 evaluated its reliability and validity. Method: One hundred and seventy female…

  16. Behavioral effects of microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S.

    1980-01-01

    Microwaves can produce sensations of warmth and sound in humans. In other species, they also can serve as cues, they may be avoided, and they can disrupt ongoing behavior. These actions appear to be due to heat produced by energy absorption. The rate of absorption depends on the microwave parameters and the electrical and geometric properties of the subject. We therefore, cannot predict the human response to microwaves based on data from other animals without appropriate scaling considerations. At low levels of exposure, microwaves can produce changes in behavior without large, or even measureable, changes in body temperature. Thermoregulatory behavior may respond to those low levels of heat, and thereby affect other behavior occurring concurrently. There are no data that demonstrate that behavioral effects of microwaves depend on any mechanism other than reactions to heat. Our interpretation of whether a reported behavioral effect indicates that microwaves may be hazardous depends on our having a complete description of the experiment and on our criteria of behavioral toxicity.

  17. Therapeutic Alliance, Negative Mood Regulation, and Treatment Outcome in Child Abuse-Related Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cloitre, Marylene; Chase Stovall McClough,K.; Miranda, Regina; Chemtob, Claude M.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the related contributions of the therapeutic alliance and negative mood regulation to the outcome of a 2-phase treatment for childhood abuse-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Phase 1 focused on stabilization and preparatory skills building, whereas Phase 2 was comprised primarily of imaginal exposure to traumatic…

  18. Psychological Sequelae of Childhood Sexual Abuse: Abuse-Related Characteristics, Coping Strategies, and Attributional Style

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steel, Jennifer; Sanna, Lawrence; Hammond, Barbara; Whipple, James; Cross, Herbert

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to test a model predicting the contribution of abuse-related characteristics and mediating variables such as coping and attributional style in the development of psychological sequelae in adults reporting a history of child sexual abuse (CSA). Methodology: Two hundred and eighty-five males and females from…

  19. Effective strategies for behavior change.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Mary Thoesen; Pasternak, Ryan H

    2012-06-01

    Strategies that are most effective in both prevention and management of chronic disease consider factors such as age, ethnicity, community, and technology. Most behavioral change strategies derive their components from application of the health belief model, the theory of reasoned action/theory of planned behavior, transtheoretical model, and social cognitive theory. Many tools such as the readiness ruler and personalized action plan form are available to assist health care teams to facilitate healthy behavior change. Primary care providers can support behavior changes by providing venues for peer interventions and family meetings and by making new partnerships with community organizations.

  20. Effective strategies for behavior change.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Mary Thoesen; Pasternak, Ryan H

    2012-06-01

    Strategies that are most effective in both prevention and management of chronic disease consider factors such as age, ethnicity, community, and technology. Most behavioral change strategies derive their components from application of the health belief model, the theory of reasoned action/theory of planned behavior, transtheoretical model, and social cognitive theory. Many tools such as the readiness ruler and personalized action plan form are available to assist health care teams to facilitate healthy behavior change. Primary care providers can support behavior changes by providing venues for peer interventions and family meetings and by making new partnerships with community organizations. PMID:22608867

  1. The Involvement of Norepinephrine in Behaviors Related to Psychostimulant Addiction.

    PubMed

    Zaniewska, Magdalena; Filip, Małgorzata; Przegalinski, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that the abuse-related effects of amphetamines and cocaine result from the activation of the brain dopaminergic (DA) system, the psychostimulants also alter other neurotransmitter systems. In particular, they increase extracellular levels of norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin by inhibiting respective plasma membrane transporters and/or inducing release. The present review will discuss the preclinical findings on the effects of the NE system modulation (lesions, pharmacological and genetic approaches) on behaviors (locomotor hyperactivity, behavioral sensitization, modification of intracranial self-stimulation, conditioned place preference, drug self-administration, extinction/reinstatement of drug seeking behavior) related to the psychostimulant addiction. PMID:26411968

  2. The Involvement of Norepinephrine in Behaviors Related to Psychostimulant Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Zaniewska, Magdalena; Filip, Małgorzata; Przegaliński, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that the abuse-related effects of amphetamines and cocaine result from the activation of the brain dopaminergic (DA) system, the psychostimulants also alter other neurotransmitter systems. In particular, they increase extracellular levels of norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin by inhibiting respective plasma membrane transporters and/or inducing release. The present review will discuss the preclinical findings on the effects of the NE system modulation (lesions, pharmacological and genetic approaches) on behaviors (locomotor hyperactivity, behavioral sensitization, modification of intracranial self-stimulation, conditioned place preference, drug self-administration, extinction/reinstatement of drug seeking behavior) related to the psychostimulant addiction. PMID:26411968

  3. The Involvement of Norepinephrine in Behaviors Related to Psychostimulant Addiction.

    PubMed

    Zaniewska, Magdalena; Filip, Małgorzata; Przegalinski, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that the abuse-related effects of amphetamines and cocaine result from the activation of the brain dopaminergic (DA) system, the psychostimulants also alter other neurotransmitter systems. In particular, they increase extracellular levels of norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin by inhibiting respective plasma membrane transporters and/or inducing release. The present review will discuss the preclinical findings on the effects of the NE system modulation (lesions, pharmacological and genetic approaches) on behaviors (locomotor hyperactivity, behavioral sensitization, modification of intracranial self-stimulation, conditioned place preference, drug self-administration, extinction/reinstatement of drug seeking behavior) related to the psychostimulant addiction.

  4. Effects of Sugar (Sucrose) on Children's Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Lee A.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined effects of sugar on behavior of 45 preschool and elementary school children. Provided all children with basic breakfast that included drink containing either 50 g of sucrose, a comparably sweet placebo, or very little sucrose. Found some small behavior changes in high-sucrose group. All effects were small in magnitude and not considered…

  5. Site effects on seismic behavior of pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, J.W.; Sun, S.

    1996-12-01

    Post-earthquake investigations and earthquake observations have shown that the site conditions have spectacular effects on seismic behavior of pipelines. In this paper, an updated and detailed review of the site effects on seismic behavior of pipelines is presented, and research needs are pointed out. 90 refs.

  6. Chemogenomics knowledgebased polypharmacology analyses of drug abuse related G-protein coupled receptors and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiang-Qun; Wang, Lirong; Liu, Haibin; Ouyang, Qin; Fang, Cheng; Su, Weiwei

    2014-01-01

    Drug abuse (DA) and addiction is a complex illness, broadly viewed as a neurobiological impairment with genetic and environmental factors that influence its development and manifestation. Abused substances can disrupt the activity of neurons by interacting with many proteins, particularly G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). A few medicines that target the central nervous system (CNS) can also modulate DA related proteins, such as GPCRs, which can act in conjunction with the controlled psychoactive substance(s) and increase side effects. To fully explore the molecular interaction networks that underlie DA and to effectively modulate the GPCRs in these networks with small molecules for DA treatment, we built a drug-abuse domain specific chemogenomics knowledgebase (DA-KB) to centralize the reported chemogenomics research information related to DA and CNS disorders in an effort to benefit researchers across a broad range of disciplines. We then focus on the analysis of GPCRs as many of them are closely related with DA. Their distribution in human tissues was also analyzed for the study of side effects caused by abused drugs. We further implement our computational algorithms/tools to explore DA targets, DA mechanisms and pathways involved in polydrug addiction and to explore polypharmacological effects of the GPCR ligands. Finally, the polypharmacology effects of GPCRs-targeted medicines for DA treatment were investigated and such effects can be exploited for the development of drugs with polypharmacophore for DA intervention. The chemogenomics database and the analysis tools will help us better understand the mechanism of drugs abuse and facilitate to design new medications for system pharmacotherapy of DA. PMID:24567719

  7. Chemogenomics knowledgebased polypharmacology analyses of drug abuse related G-protein coupled receptors and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiang-Qun; Wang, Lirong; Liu, Haibin; Ouyang, Qin; Fang, Cheng; Su, Weiwei

    2013-01-01

    Drug abuse (DA) and addiction is a complex illness, broadly viewed as a neurobiological impairment with genetic and environmental factors that influence its development and manifestation. Abused substances can disrupt the activity of neurons by interacting with many proteins, particularly G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). A few medicines that target the central nervous system (CNS) can also modulate DA related proteins, such as GPCRs, which can act in conjunction with the controlled psychoactive substance(s) and increase side effects. To fully explore the molecular interaction networks that underlie DA and to effectively modulate the GPCRs in these networks with small molecules for DA treatment, we built a drug-abuse domain specific chemogenomics knowledgebase (DA-KB) to centralize the reported chemogenomics research information related to DA and CNS disorders in an effort to benefit researchers across a broad range of disciplines. We then focus on the analysis of GPCRs as many of them are closely related with DA. Their distribution in human tissues was also analyzed for the study of side effects caused by abused drugs. We further implement our computational algorithms/tools to explore DA targets, DA mechanisms and pathways involved in polydrug addiction and to explore polypharmacological effects of the GPCR ligands. Finally, the polypharmacology effects of GPCRs-targeted medicines for DA treatment were investigated and such effects can be exploited for the development of drugs with polypharmacophore for DA intervention. The chemogenomics database and the analysis tools will help us better understand the mechanism of drugs abuse and facilitate to design new medications for system pharmacotherapy of DA. PMID:24567719

  8. Combinatorial effects of odorants on mouse behavior

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Luis R.; Kondoh, Kunio; Ye, Xiaolan; Yoon, Kyoung-hye; Hernandez, Marcus; Buck, Linda B.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which odors induce instinctive behaviors are largely unknown. Odor detection in the mouse nose is mediated by >1, 000 different odorant receptors (ORs) and trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs). Odor perceptions are encoded combinatorially by ORs and can be altered by slight changes in the combination of activated receptors. However, the stereotyped nature of instinctive odor responses suggests the involvement of specific receptors and genetically programmed neural circuits relatively immune to extraneous odor stimuli and receptor inputs. Here, we report that, contrary to expectation, innate odor-induced behaviors can be context-dependent. First, different ligands for a given TAAR can vary in behavioral effect. Second, when combined, some attractive and aversive odorants neutralize one another’s behavioral effects. Both a TAAR ligand and a common odorant block aversion to a predator odor, indicating that this ability is not unique to TAARs and can extend to an aversive response of potential importance to survival. In vitro testing of single receptors with binary odorant mixtures indicates that behavioral blocking can occur without receptor antagonism in the nose. Moreover, genetic ablation of a single receptor prevents its cognate ligand from blocking predator odor aversion, indicating that the blocking requires sensory input from the receptor. Together, these findings indicate that innate odor-induced behaviors can depend on context, that signals from a single receptor can block innate odor aversion, and that instinctive behavioral responses to odors can be modulated by interactions in the brain among signals derived from different receptors. PMID:27208093

  9. Childhood abuse related to nicotine, illicit and prescription drug use by women: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Cathy L; Vanhorn, Daniel R; Wilson, Josephine F; Martorano, Lisa M; Venema, Jana M; Kennedy, Sarah M

    2008-10-01

    A sample of 811 women ages 18 to 59 (M=26.0, SD=6.5) responded to an advertisement by telephone. Inquiries were made about childhood abuse status and adult use of alcohol, nicotine, and prescription and illicit drugs. Significant associations were noted for reported sexual, physical, and emotional childhood abuse with use of nicotine, marijuana, and antidepressants in adulthood. Reported childhood physical and emotional abuses were also significantly associated with use of cocaine and anxiolytics, and sexual abuse with antipsychotic use in adulthood. Only childhood emotional abuse was associated with the use of sleeping pills. Number of types of abuse was significantly related with use of nicotine, marijuana, cocaine, antidepressants, antipsychotics, and anxiolytics. Alcohol use was not related to any type of abuse. The long-term effects of childhood emotional abuse may be just as severe as physical or sexual abuse. PMID:19102471

  10. Development, maternal effects, and behavioral plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Jill M

    2014-11-01

    Behavioral, hormonal, and genetic processes interact reciprocally, and differentially affect behavior depending on ecological and social contexts. When individual differences are favored either between or within environments, developmental plasticity would be expected. Parental effects provide a rich source for phenotypic plasticity, including anatomical, physiological, and behavioral traits, because parents respond to dynamic cues in their environment and can, in turn, influence offspring accordingly. Because these inter-generational changes are plastic, parents can respond rapidly to changing environments and produce offspring whose phenotypes are well suited for current conditions more quickly than occurs with changes based on evolution through natural selection. I review studies on developmental plasticity and resulting phenotypes in Belding's ground squirrels (Urocitellus beldingi), an ideal species, given the competing demands to avoid predation while gaining sufficient weight to survive an upcoming hibernation, and the need for young to learn their survival behaviors. I will show how local environments and perceived risk of predation influence not only foraging, vigilance, and anti-predator behaviors, but also adrenal functioning, which may be especially important for obligate hibernators that face competing demands on the storage and mobilization of glucose. Mammalian behavioral development is sensitive to the social and physical environments provided by mothers during gestation and lactation. Therefore, maternal effects on offspring's phenotypes, both positive and negative, can be particularly strong. PMID:24820855

  11. The Effects of Pornography on Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Lauri L.

    This document reviews existing empirical research on the effect of pornography on aggressive behavior. Two types of pornography are distinguished: aggressive pornography and non-aggressive pornography. Conclusions drawn from the research review are presented, including: (1) aggressive pornograpy consistently increases aggressive attitudes and…

  12. Reinforcement, Behavior Constraint, and the Overjustification Effect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Bruce W.

    1980-01-01

    Four levels of the behavior constraint-reinforcement variable were manipulated: attractive reward, unattractive reward, request to perform, and a no-reward control. Only the unattractive reward and request groups showed the performance decrements that suggest the overjustification effect. It is concluded that reinforcement does not cause the…

  13. Treatment compliance and effectiveness in complex PTSD patients with co-morbid personality disorder undergoing stabilizing cognitive behavioral group treatment: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Dorrepaal, Ethy; Thomaes, Kathleen; Smit, Johannes H.; Veltman, Dick J.; Hoogendoorn, Adriaan W.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.; Draijer, Nel

    2013-01-01

    Background In the empirical and clinical literature, complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and personality disorders (PDs) are suggested to be predictive of drop-out or reduced treatment effectiveness in trauma-focused PTSD treatment. Objective In this study, we aimed to investigate if personality characteristics would predict treatment compliance and effectiveness in stabilizing complex PTSD treatment. Method In a randomized controlled trial on a 20-week stabilizing group cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) for child-abuse-related complex PTSD, we included 71 patients of whom 38 were randomized to a psycho-educational and cognitive behavioral stabilizing group treatment. We compared the patients with few PD symptoms (adaptive) (N=14) with the non-adaptive patients (N=24) as revealed by a cluster analysis. Results We found that non-adaptive patients compared to the adaptive patients showed very low drop-out rates. Both non-adaptive patients, classified with highly different personality profiles “withdrawn” and “aggressive,” were equally compliant. With regard to symptom reduction, we found no significant differences between subtypes. Post-hoc, patients with a PD showed lower drop-out rates and higher effect sizes in terms of complex PTSD severity, especially on domains that affect regulation and interpersonal problems. Conclusions Contrary to our expectations, these preliminary findings indicate that this treatment is well tolerated by patients with a variety of personality pathology. Larger sample sizes are needed to study effectiveness for subgroups of complex PTSD patients. PMID:24224077

  14. Behavioral Function Effects on Intervention Acceptability and Effectiveness for Self-Injurious Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, Richard P.; Boulton, Holly V. N.; Monzani, Louisa C.; Tombs, Anna K. H.

    2004-01-01

    A variety of variables have been found to augment perceived social validity of behavioral interventions. In the present study, potential effects of behavioral function were evaluated. Sixty students inexperienced in work with people with mental retardation, and 60 experienced staff watched one of two carefully matched acted videos depicting…

  15. Effect of evaluation threat on procrastination behavior.

    PubMed

    Bui, Ngoc H

    2007-06-01

    The author evaluated the effects of evaluation apprehension and trait procrastination on behaviors. The author examined private university students from southern California (N = 72) on two independent variables: evaluation threat (manipulated) and trait procrastination (nonmanipulated). The author found a significant interaction effect between type of evaluation threat and level of trait procrastination on the number of days to complete an assigned essay. Post hoc analyses showed high trait procrastinators in the high evaluation threat group significantly delayed returning essays compared with those in the low evaluation threat group. Also, in the low evaluation threat group, low trait procrastinators delayed more than did high trait procrastinators. These results suggest that educators can reduce behavioral delays by increasing evaluation threat, depending on a student's level of trait procrastination.

  16. Human chromosomes: Structure, behavior, and effects

    SciTech Connect

    Therman, E.; Susman, M.

    1993-12-31

    The book `Human Chromosomes: Structure, Behavior, and Effects` covers the most important topics regarding human chromosomes and current research in cytogenetics. Attention is given both to structure and function of autosomes and sex chromosomes, as well as definitions and causes of chromosomal aberrations. This often involves discussion about various aspects of the cell cycle (both mitosis and meiosis). Methods and techniques involved in researching and mapping human chromosomes are also discussed.

  17. Behavioral interventions--rationale, measurement, and effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Zenilman, Jonathan M

    2005-06-01

    Effective STD and HIV prevention requires synergism of individual-based prevention behaviors and societal/structural supports that will promote and maintain these behaviors. We should also expect the unexpected. STD rates in gay men have risen after effective prevention of HIV/STD in gay men and effective antiretroviral therapy. New drugs of abuse, such as methamphetamine ("crystal meth"), have induced risky sexual behaviors in gay and heterosexual communities. Economic dislocation in Eastern Europe has resulted in trafficking of commercial sex workers to Europe, the Mideast, and Asia, all with the potential for STD and HIV spread. James Curran, formerly director of the HIV epidemiology and prevention effort at the CDC, has written: It is ironic that the two clearest examples of large-scale success in HIV prevention-reduction in HIV transmission in gay men in the United States and national declines in HIV incidence in Thailand-arise in societies/communities known in their own way for sexual openness....the openness in both communities provided the environment to make the powerful revolutionary changes needed. In Africa, the powerful voice of President Museveni of Uganda has also encouraged candor about sexual risk-taking and facilitated that nation's encouraging early success in reducing HIV prevalence...Unfortunately, most of the world remains unable or unwilling to deal frankly and consistently with sexuality despite the considerable risks of HIV infection in many communities. There is a worldwide sexual hangup hampering HIV prevention efforts. PMID:15963887

  18. Aspartame: effects on learning, behavior, and mood.

    PubMed

    Saravis, S; Schachar, R; Zlotkin, S; Leiter, L A; Anderson, G H

    1990-07-01

    The effect of aspartame on the learning, behavior, and mood of children was evaluated in two experiments. After an overnight fast and a standard breakfast, 20 healthy 9- to 10-year-old children were given the treatments in a double-blind crossover design at 10:30 AM. Lunch was served at 12:00 noon. In experiment 1, the treatment consisted of an ice slurry of strawberry Kool-Aid containing 1.75 g/kg of carbohydrate (polycose) plus either aspartame (34 mg/kg) or the equivalent sweetness as sodium cyclamate and amino acids as alanine. In experiment 2, the treatment consisted of a drink of cold unsweetened strawberry Kool-Aid, containing either 1.75 g/kg of sucrose or 9.7 mg/kg of aspartame. Measures of associative learning, arithmetic calculation, activity level, social interaction, and mood were unaffected by treatment in experiment 1. In experiment 2, the only significant treatment effect was that on the frequency of minor and gross motor behaviors, which were less frequent after the consumption of sucrose than after aspartame. Thus, the effect of aspartame on the short-term behavior of healthy 9- to 10-year-old children appears to be related to its absence of metabolic consequences rather than to its amino acid composition and putative neurochemical impact.

  19. Behavioral characteristics of effective crew leaders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginnett, Robert C.

    1989-01-01

    The behaviors of effective versus less effective captains as they form and lead their crews in line operations are analyzed. The research examines real work groups in an actual organization with a specific and consequential task to perform and is based on a normative model of work group effectiveness. Selection of captains is outlined, as well as data collection over the course of six months of crew and cockpit observations including over 300 hours of direct crew observations and 110 hours of actual flight time. Common characteristics of the effective leaders as well as the deviations of the less effective are described, and organizational implications are assessed. The concept of 'shells' depicted as a series of concentric circles moving outward from the group's task execution at the center is introduced and discussed.

  20. Effects of the Good Behavior Game on Challenging Behaviors in School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flower, Andrea; McKenna, John W.; Bunuan, Rommel L.; Muething, Colin S.; Vega, Ramon, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Challenging behavior at school remains a concern for teachers and administrators. Thus classroom management practices to prevent challenging behavior are sorely needed. The Good Behavior Game (GBG) has been found to be useful to positively change student behavior. However, previous reviews of the GBG have not quantified effects, have not focused…

  1. Effects of the triple monoamine uptake inhibitor amitifadine on pain-related depression of behavior and mesolimbic dopamine release in rats.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence L; Leitl, Michael D; Banks, Matthew L; Blough, Bruce E; Negus, S Stevens

    2015-01-01

    Pain-related depression of behavior and mood is a key therapeutic target in the treatment of pain. Clinical evidence suggests a role for decreased dopamine (DA) signaling in pain-related depression of behavior and mood. Similarly, in rats, intraperitoneal injection of dilute lactic acid (IP acid) serves as a chemical noxious stimulus to produce analgesic-reversible decreases in both (1) extracellular DA levels in nucleus accumbens (NAc) and (2) intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS), an operant behavior reliant on NAc DA. Intraperitonial acid-induced depression of ICSS is blocked by DA transporter (DAT) inhibitors, but clinical viability of selective DAT inhibitors as analgesics is limited by abuse potential. Drugs that produce combined inhibition of both DA and serotonin transporters may retain efficacy to block pain-related behavioral depression with reduced abuse liability. Amitifadine is a "triple uptake inhibitor" that inhibits DAT with approximately 5- to 10-fold weaker potency than it inhibits serotonin and norepinephrine transporters. This study compared amitifadine effects on IP acid-induced depression of NAc DA and ICSS and IP acid-stimulated stretching in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Amitifadine blocked IP acid-induced depression of both NAc DA and ICSS and IP acid-stimulated stretching. In the absence of the noxious stimulus, amitifadine increased NAc levels of both DA and serotonin, and behaviorally, amitifadine produced significant but weak abuse-related ICSS facilitation. Moreover, amitifadine was more potent to block IP acid-induced depression of ICSS than to facilitate control ICSS. These results support consideration of amitifadine and related monoamine uptake inhibitors as candidate analgesics for treatment of pain-related behavioral depression.

  2. Effect of surfactant phase behavior on emulsification.

    PubMed

    Kaizu, Kazuhiro; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2016-03-15

    In order to improve our understanding of the effects that the equilibrium phase behavior and structure of amphiphiles have on the emulsification process and the properties of emulsions stabilized by these amphiphiles, we have exploited the known phase behavior of polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene-polyoxyethylene (POE-POP-POE) amphiphilic block copolymers (Pluronics) in the presence of two immiscible solvents. Specifically, we considered ternary systems consisting of Pluronic F38, L64, P84, P104, or L121 with water and p-xylene which exhibit a very rich phase behavior, including a variety of water-continuous and oil-continuous lyotropic liquid crystalline (LLC) phases. We prepared emulsions having the same (final) compositions but through different emulsification paths, and evaluated the emulsions on the basis of homogeneity and droplet size. We found finer and more homogenous emulsions to result when O/lamellar gel structures (as revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering) were formed during the emulsification process, or when the emulsification path traversed the lamellar LLC phase. This can be attributed to the favorable properties of the lamellar structure: high oil solubilization capacity with concurrent facile dispersibility in water, relatively low interfacial tension, and relatively low viscosity. The findings reported here are relevant to the preparation of emulsions for diverse applications such as skin-care products, pharmaceuticals, food products, coatings, inks, agrochemicals, oil dispersants, and nanomaterials synthesis. PMID:26724700

  3. Effect of surfactant phase behavior on emulsification.

    PubMed

    Kaizu, Kazuhiro; Alexandridis, Paschalis

    2016-03-15

    In order to improve our understanding of the effects that the equilibrium phase behavior and structure of amphiphiles have on the emulsification process and the properties of emulsions stabilized by these amphiphiles, we have exploited the known phase behavior of polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene-polyoxyethylene (POE-POP-POE) amphiphilic block copolymers (Pluronics) in the presence of two immiscible solvents. Specifically, we considered ternary systems consisting of Pluronic F38, L64, P84, P104, or L121 with water and p-xylene which exhibit a very rich phase behavior, including a variety of water-continuous and oil-continuous lyotropic liquid crystalline (LLC) phases. We prepared emulsions having the same (final) compositions but through different emulsification paths, and evaluated the emulsions on the basis of homogeneity and droplet size. We found finer and more homogenous emulsions to result when O/lamellar gel structures (as revealed by small-angle X-ray scattering) were formed during the emulsification process, or when the emulsification path traversed the lamellar LLC phase. This can be attributed to the favorable properties of the lamellar structure: high oil solubilization capacity with concurrent facile dispersibility in water, relatively low interfacial tension, and relatively low viscosity. The findings reported here are relevant to the preparation of emulsions for diverse applications such as skin-care products, pharmaceuticals, food products, coatings, inks, agrochemicals, oil dispersants, and nanomaterials synthesis.

  4. The Effects of Token Reinforcement on Delinquents' Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Michael M.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    The effects of a token reinforcement program on the classroom behavior of 19 delinquent boys in a correctional institution were investigated. Findings suggest that the use of global, composite measures may mask program effects on important component behaviors. (Author)

  5. Effects of the delta-opioid agonist SNC80 on the abuse liability of methadone in rhesus monkeys: a behavioral economic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Matthew L.; Roma, Peter G.; Folk, John E.; Rice, Kenner C.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Delta-opioid agonists enhance the antinociceptive efficacy of methadone and other mu-opioid agonists. However, relatively little is known about the degree to which delta agonists might enhance the abuse-related effects of mu agonists. Objective This study used a behavioral economic approach to examine effects of the delta agonist SNC80 [(+)-4-[(αR)-α-((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxy-benzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide] on the reinforcing effects of methadone in a drug self-administration assay. Interactions between SNC80 and cocaine were also examined for comparison. Methods Rhesus monkeys (n=4), surgically implanted with indwelling intravenous catheters, were tested in two phases. In phase 1, drug self-administration dose-effect curves for methadone (0.0032–0.1 mg/kg/injection (inj)) and cocaine (0.0032–0.32 mg/kg/inj) alone were determined under a fixed-ratio 10 (FR 10) schedule of reinforcement. In phase 2, FR values were increased every 3 days (FR 1–FR 1800) during availability of methadone alone (0.032 mg/kg/inj) and in combination with varying proportions of SNC80 (0.1:1, 0.3:1, and 0.9:1 SNC80/methadone) or of cocaine alone (0.032 mg/kg/inj) and in combination with varying proportions of SNC80 (0.33:1, 1:1, and 3:1 SNC80/ cocaine). Demand curves related drug intake to FR price, and measures of reinforcement were derived. Results Methadone and cocaine alone each functioned as a reinforcer. SNC80 did not alter measures of reinforcement for either methadone or cocaine. Conclusions SNC80 at proportions previously shown to enhance methadone-induced antinociception did not enhance the abuse-related effects of methadone. These results support the proposition that delta agonists may selectively enhance mu agonist analgesic effects without enhancing mu agonist abuse liability. PMID:21369752

  6. Behavioral momentum and the law of effect.

    PubMed

    Nevin, J A; Grace, R C

    2000-02-01

    In the metaphor of behavioral momentum, the rate of a free operant in the presence of a discriminative stimulus is analogous to the velocity of a moving body, and resistance to change measures an aspect of behavior that is analogous to its inertial mass. An extension of the metaphor suggests that preference measures an analog to the gravitational mass of that body. The independent functions relating resistance to change and preference to the conditions of reinforcement may be construed as convergent measures of a single construct, analogous to physical mass, that represents the effects of a history of exposure to the signaled conditions of reinforcement and that unifies the traditionally separate notions of the strength of learning and the value of incentives. Research guided by the momentum metaphor encompasses the effects of reinforcement on response rate, resistance to change, and preference and has implications for clinical interventions, drug addiction, and self-control. In addition, its principles can be seen as a modern, quantitative version of Thorndike's (1911) Law of Effect, providing a new perspective on some of the challenges to his postulation of strengthening by reinforcement.

  7. Effective Intervention for Behavior with a Daily Behavior Report Card: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannest, Kimberly J.; Davis, John L.; Davis, Cole R.; Mason, Benjamin A.; Burke, Mack D.

    2010-01-01

    The Daily Behavior Report Card is an intervention showing promise in various formats and in multiple settings. A meta-analysis evaluated the size of effects obtained from Daily Behavior Report Card interventions within single case research designs, investigating six potential moderators of treatment effects: student age, target behavior,…

  8. Differential Effects of a Tier Two Behavior Intervention Based on Function of Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Kent; Campbell, Amy L.; Carter, Deborah Russell; Dickey, Celeste Rossetto

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a tier two daily behavior card intervention and differential effects based on function of problem behavior. The participants were 36 elementary school students nominated for additional intervention beyond universal School-Wide Positive Behavior Support. Measures included…

  9. The Longitudinal Effects of Behavioral Problems on Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vu, Phuong Anna

    2012-01-01

    Students' behavior and emotional well being are instrumental for their success in the school setting. The present study examined the effects of behavioral problems on the academic performance of students three years later. The behavioral problems consisted of individual externalizing, internalizing, and inattentive behaviors. Next, this study…

  10. The Effects of Jogging on the Rates of Selected Target Behaviors of Behaviorally Disordered Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yell, Mitchell L.

    1988-01-01

    Investigated were the effects of a jogging program on talking out and out of seat behaviors exhibited by six elementary-aged behaviorally disordered students in a resource room setting. Results indicate a decrease in the occurrence of both behaviors following jogging for five of the six students. (Author/JDD)

  11. The Effects of Positive Behavior Interventions and Support on Changing the Behavior of Red Zone Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Fredrick

    2012-01-01

    In order to improve culture, safety, and climate, numerous schools nationwide are implementing Positive Behavior Interventions and Support (PBIS). The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of the Positive Behavior Interventions and Support (PBIS) model for reducing high-risk behaviors of students identified as red zone. The…

  12. Moving Behavioral Science from Efficacy to Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallfors, Denise; Cho, Hyunsan

    2007-01-01

    The gap between scientific knowledge and real world practice continues to be a major conundrum for the behavioral sciences. This paper briefly reviews the development of behavioral research and describes problems that have arisen in meeting the goal of improving behavioral interventions through science. Based on published literature and personal…

  13. Clinical Effects of Naltrexone on Autistic Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingarelli, Gene; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Eight young adults (ages 19-39) with autism were given the opiate antagonist naltrexone to control self-injurious behavior and maladaptive idiosyncratic mannerisms. Although one subject appeared to have partial decreases in maladaptive behaviors, the drug did not clearly reduce the self-injurious and other maladaptive behaviors of the subjects.…

  14. Alcohol involvement in opioid pain reliever and benzodiazepine drug abuse-related emergency department visits and drug-related deaths - United States, 2010.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher M; Paulozzi, Leonard J; Mack, Karin A

    2014-10-10

    The abuse of prescription drugs has led to a significant increase in emergency department (ED) visits and drug-related deaths over the past decade. Opioid pain relievers (OPRs) and benzodiazepines are the prescription drugs most commonly involved in these events. Excessive alcohol consumption also accounts for a significant health burden and is common among groups that report high rates of prescription drug abuse. When taken with OPRs or benzodiazepines, alcohol increases central nervous system depression and the risk for overdose. Data describing alcohol involvement in OPR or benzodiazepine abuse are limited. To quantify alcohol involvement in OPR and benzodiazepine abuse and drug-related deaths and to inform prevention efforts, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and CDC analyzed 2010 data for drug abuse-related ED visits in the United States and drug-related deaths that involved OPRs and alcohol or benzodiazepines and alcohol in 13 states. The analyses showed alcohol was involved in 18.5% of OPR and 27.2% of benzodiazepine drug abuse-related ED visits and 22.1% of OPR and 21.4% of benzodiazepine drug-related deaths. These findings indicate that alcohol plays a significant role in OPR and benzodiazepine abuse. Interventions to reduce the abuse of alcohol and these drugs alone and in combination are needed.

  15. [Behavioral effects of a new antidepressant, setiptiline].

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Furukawa, T

    1991-01-01

    Behavioral effects of setiptiline, a new tetracyclic compound (1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-methyl-9H-dibenzo [3,4:6,7] cyclohepta [1,2-C] pyridine maleate), were investigated to determine its pharmacological characteristics as an antidepressant in rats and mice, as compared with amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, and promethazine, a neuroleptic possessing an antihistaminic profile. Setiptiline exerted a weak stimulatory action on ambulation, spontaneous motor-activity, observed by the open field method in rats and potentiated the stimulatory effects of methamphetamine. Setiptiline also shortened the duration of immobility in rats forced to swim and inhibited catalepsy induced by haloperidol, yawning by physostigmine, body shaking as well as head twitch by 5-hydroxytryptophan in combination with Ro4-4602 and body shaking by morphine-withdrawal in rats. On the other hand, the drug did not exhibit an antagonistic effect on the hypothermia produced by reserpine in mice. From the results, it is suggested that setiptiline seems to have antidepressive activities that are pharmacologically dissimilar to those of tricyclic antidepressants.

  16. The effect of rules on differential reinforcement of other behavior.

    PubMed

    Watts, Amanda C; Wilder, David A; Gregory, Meagan K; Leon, Yanerys; Ditzian, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    Previous research on the treatment of problem behavior has shown differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) to be an effective behavior-reduction procedure. However, the extent to which presession descriptions of the DRO contingency enhance intervention effects has not been examined. In the current study, we compared a condition in which a presession rule that described the DRO contingency was given to a condition in which no rule was given for 4 participants. The target behavior was toy play, which served as an analogue to problem behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement. Results showed that DRO was more efficient for 1 participant and more effective for 2 participants when a rule was given.

  17. Effects of light on brain and behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainard, George C.

    1994-01-01

    It is obvious that light entering the eye permits the sensory capacity of vision. The human species is highly dependent on visual perception of the environment and consequently, the scientific study of vision and visual mechanisms is a centuries old endeavor. Relatively new discoveries are now leading to an expanded understanding of the role of light entering the eye in addition to supporting vision, light has various nonvisual biological effects. Over the past thirty years, animal studies have shown that environmental light is the primary stimulus for regulating circadian rhythms, seasonal cycles, and neuroendocrine responses. As with all photobiological phenomena, the wavelength, intensity, timing and duration of a light stimulus is important in determining its regulatory influence on the circadian and neuroendocrine systems. Initially, the effects of light on rhythms and hormones were observed only in sub-human species. Research over the past decade, however, has confirmed that light entering the eyes of humans is a potent stimulus for controlling physiological rhythms. The aim of this paper is to examine three specific nonvisual responses in humans which are mediated by light entering the eye: light-induced melatonin suppression, light therapy for winter depression, and enhancement of nighttime performance. This will serve as a brief introduction to the growing database which demonstrates how light stimuli can influence physiology, mood and behavior in humans. Such information greatly expands our understanding of the human eye and will ultimately change our use of light in the human environment.

  18. Time Dependent Behavior in the Weissenberg Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degen, Michael M.; Andereck, C. David

    1997-03-01

    The Weissenberg effect is the climb of a non-Newtonian fluid up a rotating rod. We have found novel transitional effects in the behavior of a particular climbing fluid, STP(STP Oil Treatment distributed by First Brands Corporation.). The first state is a time-independent axisymmetric concave climb. As the rotation rate of the rod is increased, the first transition is to an axisymmetric climb with an ``onion dome'' shape. At higher rotation rates, the flow undergoes a symmetry breaking bifurcation to a time-dependent state. This time-dependent state exhibits an oscillation with a single frequency. Upon further increase of the rod rotation rate, the oscillation becomes modulated by a second frequency. The nature of each transition will be characterized, including the measurement of oscillation amplitudes and the frequency (or frequencies) of the time dependent states. These results will be compared with previous work.(G.S. Beavers, D.D. Joseph, J. Fluid Mech. 69), 475 (1975).(D.D. Joseph, R.L. Fosdick, Arch. Rational Mech. 49), 321 (1973).

  19. A Follow-up Study of a Multisite, Randomized, Controlled Trial for Children with Sexual Abuse-Related PTSD Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deblinger, Esther; Mannarino, Anthony P.; Cohen, Judith A.; Steer, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain whether the differential responses that previously have been found between trauma-focused, cognitive-behavioral therapy (TF-CBT), and child-centered therapy (CCT) for treating posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and related problems in children who had been sexually abused would persist following treatment and to examine…

  20. Effects of Certain Counselor Behaviors on Perceived Expertness and Attractiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barak, Azy; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Examined effects and relative contribution of three counselor behaviors (nonverbal behavior, jargon, and attire) on perceived expertise and attractiveness. Results revealed that all three independent variables significantly affected the two rated dimensions. Nonverbal behavior accounted for most of the variance and differentially affected ratings…

  1. The Effects of Meal Schedule and Quantity on Problematic Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wacker, David P.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Two case examples (a toddler with severe developmental delays and a 7-year old with severe mental retardation) illustrating effects of meal schedule and food quantity on displays of problematic behavior are offered. Brief functional analyses of aberrant behavior provided useful information for interpreting distinct patterns of behavior. (DB)

  2. Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral-Theory-Based Skill Training on Academic Procrastination Behaviors of University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toker, Betül; Avci, Rasit

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral theory (CBT) psycho-educational group program on the academic procrastination behaviors of university students and the persistence of any training effect. This was a quasi-experimental research based on an experimental and control group pretest, posttest, and followup test model.…

  3. The Effect of Corporal Punishment on Antisocial Behavior in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grogan-Kaylor, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effect of corporal punishment on antisocial behavior of children using stronger statistical controls than earlier literature in this area; to examine whether the effect of corporal punishment on antisocial behavior is nonlinear; and to investigate whether the effects of corporal punishment on antisocial…

  4. Unpacking links between fathers' antisocial behaviors and children's behavior problems: direct, indirect, and interactive effects.

    PubMed

    Coley, Rebekah Levine; Carrano, Jennifer; Lewin-Bizan, Selva

    2011-08-01

    Building upon previous evidence for the intergenerational transmission of antisocial behaviors, this research assessed and compared three models seeking to explain links between fathers' antisocial behaviors and children's behavior problems. A representative sample of children from low-income families (N=261) was followed from age 3 through age 9. Lagged OLS regression models assessed both short-term (1½  years) and longer-term (5½  years) prospective links between fathers' antisocial behaviors and children's behavior problems. Results supported a direct effects model: fathers' antisocial behaviors predicted growth in children's externalizing and internalizing behavior problems, with links stronger among resident-father families. Limited evidence of indirect effects emerged, with links between fathers' antisocial behaviors and children's behavior problems only slightly attenuated controlling for related risk factors and for parenting quality, showing limited evidence of mediation. A new interactive model was proposed and supported, with high levels of harsh discipline exacerbating negative links between fathers' antisocial behaviors and children's internalizing problems. Results suggest caution in policies and programs which seek to universally increase marriage or father involvement without attention to fathers' behaviors.

  5. Transgenerational effects of environmental enrichment on repetitive motor behavior development.

    PubMed

    Bechard, Allison R; Lewis, Mark H

    2016-07-01

    The favorable consequences of environmental enrichment (EE) on brain and behavior development are well documented. Much less is known, however, about transgenerational benefits of EE on non-enriched offspring. We explored whether transgenerational effects of EE might extend to the development of repetitive motor behaviors in deer mice. Repetitive motor behaviors are invariant patterns of movement that, across species, can be reduced by EE. We found that EE not only attenuated the development of repetitive behavior in dams, but also in their non-enriched offspring. Moreover, maternal behavior did not seem to mediate the transgenerational effect we found, although repetitive behavior was affected by reproductive experience. These data support a beneficial transgenerational effect of EE on repetitive behavior development and suggest a novel benefit of reproductive experience.

  6. Transgenerational effects of environmental enrichment on repetitive motor behavior development.

    PubMed

    Bechard, Allison R; Lewis, Mark H

    2016-07-01

    The favorable consequences of environmental enrichment (EE) on brain and behavior development are well documented. Much less is known, however, about transgenerational benefits of EE on non-enriched offspring. We explored whether transgenerational effects of EE might extend to the development of repetitive motor behaviors in deer mice. Repetitive motor behaviors are invariant patterns of movement that, across species, can be reduced by EE. We found that EE not only attenuated the development of repetitive behavior in dams, but also in their non-enriched offspring. Moreover, maternal behavior did not seem to mediate the transgenerational effect we found, although repetitive behavior was affected by reproductive experience. These data support a beneficial transgenerational effect of EE on repetitive behavior development and suggest a novel benefit of reproductive experience. PMID:27059336

  7. Benzodiazepines - Effects on Human Performance and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Drummer, O H

    2002-02-01

    There exist a large number of drugs belonging to the benzodiazepine family. These include the 1,4-benzodiazepines such as diazepam, temazepam and oxazepam, the often more potent diazolo- and triazolo-groups represented by alprazolam, midazolam, triazolam etc. These drugs represent a large range of potencies from submilligram doses to over 100 mg and a range of polarities. Consequently, blood or plasma concentrations associated with prescribed use range from sub-nanogram per mL to near-microgram per mL. Their medical use varies, but they are predominantly used as hypnotics and sedatives. Some members are also used in the treatment of post-traumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders, alcohol withdrawal, muscle spasm, and seizures. Recreationally, drug users favor these drugs to reduce the symptoms of withdrawal and unpleasant effects of heroin and cocaine. They are also commonly used as "date-rape" drugs to render a victim incapable of resisting an attack. Benzodiazepines elicit a large number of physiological and psychological responses in humans that often can lead to significant behavioral changes and adverse effects on skills required for safe driving. These include reduced lane control, increased reaction times, reduced hand-eye coordination and cognitive impairment. Impairment can exceed that seen with 0.05 g% ethanol. In high doses benzodiazepines can cause persons to exhibit classical features of CNS-depressant drugs such as nystagmus, ataxia, slurred speech, and impaired divided attention skills. As one would expect with hypnotics and sedatives, any sleep deprivation, or situations involving monotonous driving can lead to a reduced ability to concentrate and maintain vigilance. Adverse effects on REM and NREM sleep patterns will exacerbate fatigue-related components to driving. Persons with sleep abnormalities, e.g., sleep apnea, may be more likely to be affected by benzodiazepines than those with normal sleep patterns. Ethanol and narcotic

  8. Effects of Anxiety on Spontaneous Ritualized Behavior.

    PubMed

    Lang, Martin; Krátký, Jan; Shaver, John H; Jerotijević, Danijela; Xygalatas, Dimitris

    2015-07-20

    Environmental uncertainty and uncontrollability cause psycho-physiological distress to organisms, often impeding normal functioning. A common response involves ritualization, that is, the limitation of behavioral expressions to predictable stereotypic and repetitive motor patterns. In humans, such behaviors are also symptomatic of psychopathologies like obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Although these reactions might be mediated by different neural pathways, they serve to regain a sense of control over an uncertain situation by engaging in behavioral patterns characterized by redundancy (superfluous actions that exceed the functional requirements of a goal), repetitiveness (recurrent behaviors or utterances), and rigidity (emphasis on fidelity and invariance). We examined whether ritualized behavior will manifest spontaneously as a dominant behavioral strategy in anxiogenic situations. Manipulating anxiety, we used motion-capture technology to quantify various characteristics of hand movements. We found that induced anxiety led to an increase in repetitiveness and rigidity, but not redundancy. However, examination of both psychological and physiological pathways revealed that repetitiveness and rigidity were predicted by an increase in heart rate, while self-perceived anxiety was a marginally significant predictor of redundancy. We suggest that these findings are in accordance with an entropy model of uncertainty, in which anxiety motivates organisms to return to familiar low-entropy states in order to regain a sense of control. Our results might inform a better understanding of ritual behavior and psychiatric disorders whose symptoms include over-ritualization. PMID:26096971

  9. Behavioral effects of bidirectional selection for behavior towards human in virgin and lactate Norway rats.

    PubMed

    Konoshenko, Maria Yu; Plyusnina, Irina Z

    2012-06-01

    Although numerous studies have demonstrated strong differences in behavioral, hormonal and neurobiological characteristics between male rats selected for elimination (tame) and enhancement (aggressive) of aggressiveness towards humans, few studies have examined changes in female behavior under this selection. The objective of the current work was to evaluate the effects of bidirectional selection for aggressiveness towards humans on behavioral profiles of virgin and lactating rats compared with the behavior in tame, aggressive and unselected (wild-type) females. The behavior of virgin females was studied using the light-dark box, the startle response test and the modified glove test. Tame females were less anxious and more tolerant towards humans than unselected and aggressive rats. Principal component analysis of all behavioral parameters produced three independent factors, explaining 66.37% of the total variability. The measures of behavior towards humans and the measures of anxiety mainly loaded on PC1 (first principal component) which separated the tame females from the unselected and aggressive ones. These data suggest the genetic correlation between the selected behavior towards humans and anxiety-related behavior in virgin rats. No significant effect of line was found for PC2 scores, associated with risk assessment behavior. Measurements of freezing behavior mainly loaded on PC3, and this component separated rats of different genetic groups from each other. The behavior of lactating rats was studied in maternal defense and pup retrieval tests. Females of selected lines did not significantly differ in behavioral measurements of these tests and were characterized by higher maternal motivation than unselected rats. It is suggested that long-term breeding of tame and aggressive rats in captivity has reduced the threshold for maternal behavior.

  10. Effects of prosocial video games on prosocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Greitemeyer, Tobias; Osswald, Silvia

    2010-02-01

    Previous research has documented that playing violent video games has various negative effects on social behavior in that it causes an increase in aggressive behavior and a decrease in prosocial behavior. In contrast, there has been much less evidence on the effects of prosocial video games. In the present research, 4 experiments examined the hypothesis that playing a prosocial (relative to a neutral) video game increases helping behavior. In fact, participants who had played a prosocial video game were more likely to help after a mishap, were more willing (and devoted more time) to assist in further experiments, and intervened more often in a harassment situation. Results further showed that exposure to prosocial video games activated the accessibility of prosocial thoughts, which in turn promoted prosocial behavior. Thus, depending on the content of the video game, playing video games not only has negative effects on social behavior but has positive effects as well. PMID:20085396

  11. Effects of prosocial video games on prosocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Greitemeyer, Tobias; Osswald, Silvia

    2010-02-01

    Previous research has documented that playing violent video games has various negative effects on social behavior in that it causes an increase in aggressive behavior and a decrease in prosocial behavior. In contrast, there has been much less evidence on the effects of prosocial video games. In the present research, 4 experiments examined the hypothesis that playing a prosocial (relative to a neutral) video game increases helping behavior. In fact, participants who had played a prosocial video game were more likely to help after a mishap, were more willing (and devoted more time) to assist in further experiments, and intervened more often in a harassment situation. Results further showed that exposure to prosocial video games activated the accessibility of prosocial thoughts, which in turn promoted prosocial behavior. Thus, depending on the content of the video game, playing video games not only has negative effects on social behavior but has positive effects as well.

  12. Behavioral effects of carbon monoxide: Meta analyses and extrapolations

    SciTech Connect

    Benignus, V.A.

    1993-03-16

    In the absence of reliable data, the present work was performed to estimate the dose effect function of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) on behavior in humans. By meta analysis, a COHb-behavior dose-effects functions was estimated for rats and corrected for effects of hypothermia (which accompanies COHb increases in rats but not in humans). Using pulmonary function models and blood-gas equations, equivalent COHb values were calculated for data in the literature on hypoxic hypoxia (HH) and behavior. Another meta analysis was performed to fit a dose-effects function to the equivalent-COHb data and to correct for the behavioral effects of hypocapnia (which usually occurs during HH but not with COHb elevation). The two extrapolations agreed closely and indicated that for healthy, sedentary persons, it would require 18-25% COHb to produce a 10% decrement in behavior. Confidence intervals were computed to characterize the uncertainty. Frequent reports of lower-level effects were discussed.

  13. Oxytocin during Development: Possible Organizational Effects on Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Travis V.; Caldwell, Heather K.

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin (Oxt) is a neurohormone known for its physiological roles associated with lactation and parturition in mammals. Oxt can also profoundly influence mammalian social behaviors such as affiliative, parental, and aggressive behaviors. While the acute effects of Oxt signaling on adult behavior have been heavily researched in many species, including humans, the developmental effects of Oxt on the brain and behavior are just beginning to be explored. There is evidence that Oxt in early postnatal and peripubertal development, and perhaps during prenatal life, affects adult behavior by altering neural structure and function. However, the specific mechanisms by which this occurs remain unknown. Thus, this review will detail what is known about how developmental Oxt impacts behavior as well as explore the specific neurochemicals and neural substrates that are important to these behaviors. PMID:26042087

  14. Immediate and Distal Effects of the Good Behavior Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Jeanne M.; Wiskow, Katie M.; Soto, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG) has been demonstrated to reduce disruptive student behavior during implementation. The effects of playing the GBG on disruption immediately before and after the GBG are unknown. The current study evaluated the effects of the GBG on disruption in 5 kindergarten classes immediately before, during, and after GBG…

  15. Effectiveness of a Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment on the Social Behaviors of Children with Asperger Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopata, Christopher; Thomeer, Marcus L.; Volker, Martin A.; Nida, Robert E.

    2006-01-01

    The current study presents preliminary data from an ongoing research project evaluating a summer treatment program for children with Asperger disorder (AD). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral treatment program on the social behaviors of 6- to 13-year-old children with AD. Overall program…

  16. Teacher Perceptions of Level System Effectiveness on the Behavior of Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Daniel T.; Smith, Stephen W.; Brownell, Mary T.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 172 teachers of students with emotional/behavioral disorders found that 71% reported they currently use level systems for behavioral management. Analysis notes similarities and differences between level system users and nonusers, characteristics common to level systems, and inconsistencies in perceptions of effectiveness and…

  17. Effect of Training Different Classes of Verbal Behavior to Decrease Aberrant Verbal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandbakk, Monica; Arntzen, Erik; Gisnaas, Arnt; Antonsen, Vidar; Gundhus, Terje

    2012-01-01

    Inappropriate verbal behavior that is labeled "psychotic" is often described as insensitive to environmental contingencies. The purpose of the current study was to establish different classes of rational or appropriate verbal behavior in a woman with developmental disabilities and evaluate the effects on her psychotic or aberrant vocal verbal…

  18. Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy for Depressive Mothers of Children with Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hye Ha, Eun

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBT) for depressed mothers of children between 5-12 years old, with behavior problems and to examine the effectiveness of the program. The CBT group met 8 times in total (2-hour weekly sessions for 8 weeks), followed by a booster session 3 months after the program was…

  19. Using the Effective Behavior Supports Survey to Guide Development of Schoolwide Positive Behavior Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Safran, Stephen P.

    2006-01-01

    As the use of school-based positive behavior support (PBS) spreads nationwide, the development of assessment strategies to identify intervention priorities becomes more critical. This study addresses the validity of the Effective Behavior Supports Survey (Lewis & Sugai, 1999) by examining reliability, determining whether rating differences exist…

  20. The Effectiveness of Two Universal Behavioral Supports for Children with Externalizing Behavior in Head Start Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Sandra Covington; Lewis, Timothy J.; Stormont, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    To add to the emerging early intervention research on universal supports for children, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an intervention designed to increase teachers' use of two universal behavioral supports on target children's behavior. The children targeted for this study were at elevated risk for problem…

  1. TEACHER BEHAVIORS AND EFFECTIVENESS OF REINFORCEMENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BALDWIN, THELMA L.; JOHNSON, THOMAS J.

    VARIATIONS IN THE PROPERTIES OF INSTRUCTIONAL REINFORCEMENT WERE STUDIED UNDER TWO ASPECTS OF TEACHER BEHAVIOR, PUNITIVENESS AND EXPERTISE, TO IDENTIFY TECHNIQUES FOR AFFECTING OPERANT RESPONSE RATE IN A VERBAL CONDITIONING SITUATION. PUNITIVENESS AND EXPERTISE WERE MANIPULATED BY USING PREARRANGED TAPE RECORDINGS OF A SIMULATED SOCIAL STUDIES…

  2. Teaching Behaviors Effective in Mainstream Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munroe, Mary Jeanne

    Acceptance of handicapped students by their peers is a major component of success in the mainstreamed classroom. How teachers plan for interactions and lessons determines the degree to which social acceptance is achieved. The teacher's behavior models desired social acceptance, and the structure of learning activities evidence academic…

  3. Effects of selected behavioral enrichment devices on behavior of Western Lowland Gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla).

    PubMed

    Rooney, M B; Sleeman, J

    1998-01-01

    Environmental complexity plays an integral role in the activity and psychological well-being of primates. The experiment described in this article evaluates the effects of nonintrusive, inexpensive, and easily managed behavioral enrichment devices on the behavior of a group of captive Western lowland gorillas. Devices used included cardboard boxes containing food items, paper bags containing food items, burlap rags, and willow and maple browse. The enrichment devices increased foraging, social play, and solitary play behaviors. Sedentary behaviors decreased. Rags, bags, browse, and boxes did not statistically decrease the incidence of regurgitation/reingestation or coprophagy. Depending on the type of enrichment item used, the effects on agonism and manipulation of enrichment item were variable. To make informed management decisions about the psychological well-being of captive animals, it is important to objectively quantify and examine the influences on their behavior.

  4. Behavior therapy and callous-unemotional traits: effects of a pilot study examining modified behavioral contingencies on child behavior.

    PubMed

    Miller, Natalie V; Haas, Sarah M; Waschbusch, Daniel A; Willoughby, Michael T; Helseth, Sarah A; Crum, Kathleen I; Coles, Erika K; Pelham, William E

    2014-09-01

    The conduct problems of children with callous-unemotional (CU) traits (i.e., lack of empathy, lack of guilt/lack of caring behaviors) are particularly resistant to current behavioral interventions, and it is possible that differential sensitivities to punishment and reward may underlie this resistance. Children with conduct problems and CU (CPCU) are less responsive to behavioral punishment techniques (e.g., time-out), whereas reward techniques (e.g., earning points for prizes or activities) are effective for reducing conduct problems. This study examined the efficacy of modified behavioral interventions, which de-emphasized punishment (Condition B) and emphasized reward techniques (Condition C), compared with a standard behavioral intervention (Condition A). Interventions were delivered through a summer treatment program over 7 weeks with an A-B-A-C-A-BC-A design to a group of 11 children (7-11 years; 91% male). All children were diagnosed with either oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder, in addition to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Results revealed the best treatment response occurred during the low-punishment condition, with rates of negative behavior (e.g., aggression, teasing, stealing) increasing over the 7 weeks. However, there was substantial individual variability in treatment response, and several children demonstrated improvement during the modified intervention conditions. Future research is necessary to disentangle treatment effects from order effects, and implications of group treatment of CPCU children (i.e., deviancy training) are discussed.

  5. Behavior therapy and callous-unemotional traits: effects of a pilot study examining modified behavioral contingencies on child behavior.

    PubMed

    Miller, Natalie V; Haas, Sarah M; Waschbusch, Daniel A; Willoughby, Michael T; Helseth, Sarah A; Crum, Kathleen I; Coles, Erika K; Pelham, William E

    2014-09-01

    The conduct problems of children with callous-unemotional (CU) traits (i.e., lack of empathy, lack of guilt/lack of caring behaviors) are particularly resistant to current behavioral interventions, and it is possible that differential sensitivities to punishment and reward may underlie this resistance. Children with conduct problems and CU (CPCU) are less responsive to behavioral punishment techniques (e.g., time-out), whereas reward techniques (e.g., earning points for prizes or activities) are effective for reducing conduct problems. This study examined the efficacy of modified behavioral interventions, which de-emphasized punishment (Condition B) and emphasized reward techniques (Condition C), compared with a standard behavioral intervention (Condition A). Interventions were delivered through a summer treatment program over 7 weeks with an A-B-A-C-A-BC-A design to a group of 11 children (7-11 years; 91% male). All children were diagnosed with either oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder, in addition to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Results revealed the best treatment response occurred during the low-punishment condition, with rates of negative behavior (e.g., aggression, teasing, stealing) increasing over the 7 weeks. However, there was substantial individual variability in treatment response, and several children demonstrated improvement during the modified intervention conditions. Future research is necessary to disentangle treatment effects from order effects, and implications of group treatment of CPCU children (i.e., deviancy training) are discussed. PMID:25022772

  6. Behavior therapy and callous-unemotional traits: Effects of a pilot study examining modified behavioral contingencies on child behavior

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Natalie V.; Haas, Sarah M.; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Willoughby, Michael T.; Helseth, Sarah A.; Crum, Kathleen I.; Coles, Erika K.; Pelham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    The conduct problems of children with callous-unemotional traits (i.e., lack of empathy, guilt/lack of caring behaviors) (CU) are particularly resistant to current behavioral interventions, and it is possible that differential sensitivities to punishment and reward may underlie this resistance. Children with conduct problems and CU (CPCU) are less responsive to behavioral punishment techniques (e.g., time-out), however reward techniques (e.g., earning points for prizes or activities) are effective for reducing conduct problems. This study examined the efficacy of modified behavioral interventions, which de-emphasized punishment (condition B) and emphasized reward techniques (condition C), compared to a standard behavioral intervention (condition A). Interventions were delivered through a Summer Treatment Program over seven weeks with an A-B-A-C-A-BC-A design to a group of eleven children (7–11 years; 91% male). All children were diagnosed with either oppositional defiant disorder or conduct disorder, in addition to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Results revealed the best treatment response occurred during the low punishment condition, with rates of negative behavior (e.g., aggression, teasing, stealing) increasing over the seven weeks. However, there was substantial individual variability in treatment response, and several children demonstrated improvement during the modified intervention conditions. Future research is necessary to disentangle treatment effects from order effects, and implications of group treatment of CPCU children (i.e., deviancy training) are discussed. PMID:25022772

  7. Effect of information transmission on cooperative behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jin-Tu; Wang, Sheng-Jun; Huang, Zi-Gang; Yang, Lei; Do, Younghae; Wang, Ying-Hai

    2010-06-01

    Considering the fact, in the real world, that information is transmitted with a time delay, we study an evolutionary spatial prisoner's dilemma game where agents update strategies according to certain information that they have learned. In our study, the game dynamics are classified by the modes of information learning as well as game interaction, and four different combinations, i.e. the mean-field case, case I, case II and local case, are studied comparatively. It is found that the time delay in case II smoothes the phase transition from the absorbing states of C (or D) to their mixing state, and promotes cooperation for most parameter values. Our work provides insights into the temporal behavior of information and the memory of the system, and may be helpful in understanding the cooperative behavior induced by the time delay in social and biological systems.

  8. Effects of Postnatal Estrogen Manipulations on Juvenile Alloparental Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Adam N.; Carter, C. Sue; Cushing, Bruce S.

    2015-01-01

    Sex- and species-specific patterns of estrogen receptor (ER)-α expression are established early in development, which may contribute to sexual differentiation of behavior and determine male social organization. The current study investigated the effects of ERα and ERβ activation during the second postnatal week on subsequent alloparental behavior and ERα expression in juvenile prairie voles. Male and female pups were treated daily with 17β-estradiol (E2, ERα/ERβ agonist), PPT (selective ERα agonist), DPN (selective ERβ agonist), or the oil vehicle on postnatal days (PD) 8-14. Alloparental behavior and ERα expression were examined at PD21. PPT treatment inhibited prosocial motivation in males and increased pup-directed aggression in both sexes. E2 and DPN had no apparent effect on behavior in either sex. PPT-treated males had increased ERα expression in the medial preoptic area (MPN), medial amygdala (MEApd) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTpr). DPN treatment also increased ERα expression in males, but only in the BSTpr. Female ERα expression was unaffected by treatment. These results support the hypothesis that ERα activation in early life is associated with less prosocial patterns of central ERα expression and alloparental behavior in males. The lack of an effect of E2 on behavior suggests that ERβ may antagonize the effects of ERα on alloparental behavior. The results in DPN-treated males suggest that ERα in the MEApd, and not the BSTpr, may be a primary determinant of alloparental behavior in males. PMID:26222494

  9. Dynamic Paired-Behaviors in Effective Clinical Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Philip D.; Velasquez, Benito

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pedagogical strategies related to clinical instruction are needed to improve students' education in the clinical setting. Description: In this article, we use the relevant literature to identify and define "effective" clinical instructor behaviors in athletic training. In addition, we propose a pairing of behaviors as a cueing strategy…

  10. The Casual Effects of Emotion on Couples' Cognition and Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tashiro, Ty; Frazier, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    The authors conducted 2 translational studies that assessed the causal effects of emotion on maladaptive cognitions and behaviors in couples. Specifically, the authors examined whether negative emotions increased and positive emotions decreased partner attributions and demand-withdraw behaviors. Study 1 (N=164) used video clips to assess the…

  11. Effects of Nonverbal Behavior on Perceptions of Power Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguinis, Herman; Simonsen, Melissa M.; Pierce, Charles A.

    1998-01-01

    Manipulates three types of nonverbal behaviors and examines their effects on perceptions of power bases. Reports that a relaxed facial expression increased the ratings for five of the selected power bases; furthermore, direct eye contact yielded higher credibility ratings. Provides evidence that various nonverbal behaviors have only additive…

  12. Effects of postnatal estrogen manipulations on juvenile alloparental behavior.

    PubMed

    Perry, Adam N; Sue Carter, C; Cushing, Bruce S

    2015-09-01

    Sex- and species-specific patterns of estrogen receptor (ER)-α expression are established early in development, which may contribute to sexual differentiation of behavior and determine male social organization. The current study investigated the effects of ERα and ERβ activation during the second postnatal week on subsequent alloparental behavior and ERα expression in juvenile prairie voles. Male and female pups were treated daily with 17β-estradiol (E2, ERα/ERβ agonist), PPT (selective ERα agonist), DPN (selective ERβ agonist), or the oil vehicle on postnatal days (PD) 8-14. Alloparental behavior and ERα expression were examined at PD21. PPT treatment inhibited prosocial motivation in males and increased pup-directed aggression in both sexes. E2 and DPN had no apparent effect on behavior in either sex. PPT-treated males had increased ERα expression in the medial preoptic area (MPN), medial amygdala (MEApd) and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTpr). DPN treatment also increased ERα expression in males, but only in the BSTpr. Female ERα expression was unaffected by treatment. These results support the hypothesis that ERα activation in early life is associated with less prosocial patterns of central ERα expression and alloparental behavior in males. The lack of an effect of E2 on behavior suggests that ERβ may antagonize the effects of ERα on alloparental behavior. The results in DPN-treated males suggest that ERα in the MEApd, and not the BSTpr, may be a primary determinant of alloparental behavior in males. PMID:26222494

  13. The Effects of Microtraining for Attending Behaviors in Adult Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Stephen S.; Jahns, Irwin R.

    It has been the experience of most adult basic education teachers that their students are apprehensive about taking tests. The study evaluates the effects of training adult basic education teachers in behavioral attending skills. Two basic questions were investigated: (1) Would the training of instructors in the use of behavior attending skills…

  14. Better Choices: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Behavior Management Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acuna, Miguel T.

    2011-01-01

    Managing student behavior is often looked upon as a sidebar in teaching. The lack of formal classroom management training in teacher education programs reveals the low importance placed on this skill. As a result, teachers are often very well prepared to instruct, but in terms of effectively understanding the behavior of students--particularly…

  15. Effects of Behavior and Family Structure on Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganong, Lawrence; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Effects of information about an adolescent's family structure and behavior on perceptions of education majors were studied for 45 male and 98 female college students. College students made subtle judgments based on this minimal information, but how strongly such judgments affect perceptions and behavior toward adolescents is not known. (SLD)

  16. Children's Illnesses: Their Beneficial Effects on Behavioral Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmelee, Arthur H. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses potential beneficial effects of children's illnesses on their behavioral development. It is argued, on the basis of clinical experience and related research, that minor illnesses give children many opportunities to increase knowledge of self, other, prosocial behavior, and empathy and to realistically understand the sick role. (Author/RH)

  17. Effect of solvent on melting gel behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degnah, Ahmed Abdulaziz

    Melting gel and hybrid glass are organic-inorganic materials derived from sol gel processing. The behavior of the melting gel is that it is a solid at room temperature, but when the melting gel is reheated to 110°C (T1) it becomes fluid. The melting gel has reversible behavior due to incomplete crosslinking between polysiloxane chains. When the melting gel is heated to its consolidation temperature of 150°C (T2) the gel no longer softens (T2>T1), because crosslinking is completed. The melting gel at the consolidation temperature becomes hybrid glass. Melting gel coatings were applied to titanium alloy substrates. Melting gels were prepared containing phenyl substitutions with 1.0 mole Phenyltrimethoxysilane (PhTMS) in ratio to 0.25 moles of Diphenyldimethoxysilane (DPhDMS). The methanol to DPhDMS ratio was varied to change the thickness of the coatings. The coatings were inspected visually to see that there is good adhesion between the coating and the substrate. Nanoindenter tests were performed to determine hardness. The coated samples were placed in an oven and heated to 150ºC for 24, 48 or 96 hours before cooling back to room temperature, which took about 4 hours. The measurements of the hardness on samples containing 3 levels of solvent and heat treatment were collected by indentation technique. The best combination of solvent and temperature was 1:8 PhTMS:MeOH for all temperatures.

  18. Incentives for cost-effective physician behavior.

    PubMed

    Maynard, A

    1987-04-01

    The objective of the National Health Service is to maximise improvements in the health status of patients regardless of their willingness and ability to pay. To achieve this objective it is necessary to identify those procedures which maximise improvements in health or quality adjusted life years (QALYs) and direct scarce resources to those therapies with the best cost-QALY characteristics. Unfortunately in the NHS and elsewhere cost-QALY characteristics are largely unknown and the structure of the health service and its provider remuneration systems are such that objectives are vague, behavior perverse due to the haphazard construction of incentive systems, and health status outcomes often unknown due to the failure to evaluate input-outcome relationships. To reform the NHS, in particular ensure more efficient practice by physicians, existing perverse incentives will have to be replaced by the use of buyer (NHS) power and by budgeting mechanisms which induce economizing behavior. It is not clear which type of incentive mechanism will produce outcomes consistent with NHS goals. To remedy this ignorance experimentation with careful evaluation would seem appropriate. PMID:10312074

  19. Effects of prenatal tobacco exposure on preschoolers' behavior.

    PubMed

    Day, N L; Richardson, G A; Goldschmidt, L; Cornelius, M D

    2000-06-01

    This is a longitudinal study of the relationship between prenatal tobacco exposure and the development of behavior problems in 672 children at the age of 3 years. Women from a prenatal clinic were interviewed about substance use at the end of each trimester of their pregnancy and at 3 years postpartum. Children were assessed at the age of 3 years with maternal ratings of behavior problems, activity, and attention. The prevalence of tobacco use was high in this cohort; 54.3% and 52.3% of the women smoked tobacco in the first and third trimesters of pregnancy, respectively. At 3 years postpartum, 61.6% of the women were smokers. There were significant effects of prenatal tobacco exposure on the children's behavior at age 3 years. Increases in scores on the Oppositional Behavior, Immaturity, Emotional Instability, Physical Aggression, and Activity scales and in the total score on the Toddler Behavior Checklist (TBC) were significantly associated with prenatal tobacco exposure. Smoking one pack of tobacco cigarettes per day during the third trimester of pregnancy was associated with an increase of 6 points in the total problem behavior score. Among the subscales of the TBC, tobacco exposure had the largest effect on oppositional behavior. Impulsivity and peer problems were associated with both prenatal and current tobacco exposure. Only current tobacco exposure predicted attention problems. Prenatal tobacco exposure had a significant negative effect on the development of behavior problems among preschoolers. PMID:10883878

  20. Relationship between discriminative stimulus effects and plasma methamphetamine and amphetamine levels of intramuscular methamphetamine in male rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Smith, Douglas A; Kisor, David F; Poklis, Justin L

    2016-02-01

    Methamphetamine is a globally abused drug that is metabolized to amphetamine, which also produces abuse-related behavioral effects. However, the contributing role of methamphetamine metabolism to amphetamine in methamphetamine's abuse-related subjective effects is unknown. This preclinical study was designed to determine 1) the relationship between plasma methamphetamine levels and methamphetamine discriminative stimulus effects and 2) the contribution of the methamphetamine metabolite amphetamine in the discriminative stimulus effects of methamphetamine in rhesus monkeys. Adult male rhesus monkeys (n=3) were trained to discriminate 0.18mg/kg intramuscular (+)-methamphetamine from saline in a two-key food-reinforced discrimination procedure. Time course of saline, (+)-methamphetamine (0.032-0.32mg/kg), and (+)-amphetamine (0.032-0.32mg/kg) discriminative stimulus effects were determined. Parallel pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in the same monkeys to determine plasma methamphetamine and amphetamine levels after methamphetamine administration and amphetamine levels after amphetamine administration for correlation with behavior in the discrimination procedure. Both methamphetamine and amphetamine produced full, ≥90%, methamphetamine-like discriminative stimulus effects. Amphetamine displayed a slightly, but significantly, longer duration of action than methamphetamine in the discrimination procedure. Both methamphetamine and amphetamine behavioral effects were related to methamphetamine and amphetamine plasma levels by a clockwise hysteresis loop indicating acute tolerance had developed to the discriminative stimulus effects. Furthermore, amphetamine levels after methamphetamine administration were absent when methamphetamine stimulus effects were greatest and peaked when methamphetamine discriminative stimulus effects returned to saline-like levels. Overall, these results demonstrate the methamphetamine metabolite amphetamine does not contribute to

  1. Effects of cocaine on maternal behavior and neurochemistry.

    PubMed

    Nephew, Benjamin C; Febo, Marcelo

    2012-03-01

    Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing disorder that involves drug seeking and abuse despite the negative social and health consequences. While the potential effects of cocaine on child development have been extensively studied over the last 30 years, few researchers have focused on the effects of cocaine on maternal behavior, which includes offspring care and maternal aggression towards an unfamiliar individual. In humans, maternal cocaine use can lead to child neglect, abuse, and disrupt the mother-child bond. While it has been argued the developmental effects of maternal cocaine use on children were initially overstated, it is clear that disruptions of typical maternal behavior (i.e. postpartum depression, anxiety disorders) are detrimental to the physical and emotional health of offspring. Cocaine use in mothers is commonly associated with psychological disorders, including depression and anxiety, and it is postulated that many of the negative effects of maternal cocaine use on offspring are mediated through changes in maternal behavior. This review will summarize research on cocaine and maternal behavior in animal and human studies, discuss potential mechanisms, and suggest therapeutic strategies for treating cocaine-affected maternal behavior which may improve the physical and behavioral health of both mother and child. The primary objective is to stimulate future communication, cooperation, and collaboration between researchers who use animals and humans to study cocaine and maternal behavior. PMID:22942878

  2. The Effects of Training, Feedback, and Participant Involvement in Behavioral Safety Observations on Office Ergonomic Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasson, Joseph R.; Austin, John

    2005-01-01

    Eleven computer terminal operators participated in an experiment that assessed effects of several interventions aimed at increasing safe ergonomic performance. All participants received ergonomics training and performance feedback while six of them collected observations of safe behavior among the remaining five participants. Effects of…

  3. Estimating Peer Effects in Sexual Behavior among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Mir M.; Dwyer, Debra S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we seek to empirically quantify the role of peer social networks in influencing sexual behavior among adolescents. Using data of a nationally representative sample of adolescents we utilize a multivariate structural model with school-level fixed effects to account for the problems of contextual effects, correlated effects and peer…

  4. Osmotic behavior of bacterial protoplasts: temperature effects.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, A D; Corner, T R

    1973-06-01

    Among protoplasts released from cells of Bacillus megaterium grown at 20, 30, or 37 C, osmotic swelling in NaCl solution at a given external osmotic pressure was greatest for protoplasts from cells grown at 20 C and least for protoplasts from cells grown at 37 C. Protoplasts from cells grown at lower temperaturs were also less stable to osmotic shock and lysed at higher external osmotic pressures than did protoplasts from cells grown at higher temperatures. But for cells grown at any one temperature, osmotic stabilization was itself temperature dependent so that the higher the ambient incubation temperature, the higher the osmotic pressure needed to prevent lysis of a given fraction of the input protoplast population. However, comparison of the osmotic stability of protoplasts from cells grown at different temperatures at various ambient incubation temperatures revealed that, except at 5 C where no differences were discerned, protoplasts from cells grown at lower temperatures still lysed at higher osmotic pressures than did those from cells grown at higher temperatures. The apparent internal osmolality (28 to 31 atm) did not vary significantly among whole cells from the three growth temperatures. Therefore, the observed differences in osmotic behavior could not be attributed to changes in internal osmotic pressure. Rather, it seemed likely that the differences were due to changes in membrane properties. PMID:4197267

  5. Adaptive Controller Effects on Pilot Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Gregory, Irene M.; Hempley, Lucas E.

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive control provides robustness and resilience for highly uncertain, and potentially unpredictable, flight dynamics characteristic. Some of the recent flight experiences of pilot-in-the-loop with an adaptive controller have exhibited unpredicted interactions. In retrospect, this is not surprising once it is realized that there are now two adaptive controllers interacting, the software adaptive control system and the pilot. An experiment was conducted to categorize these interactions on the pilot with an adaptive controller during control surface failures. One of the objectives of this experiment was to determine how the adaptation time of the controller affects pilots. The pitch and roll errors, and stick input increased for increasing adaptation time and during the segment when the adaptive controller was adapting. Not surprisingly, altitude, cross track and angle deviations, and vertical velocity also increase during the failure and then slowly return to pre-failure levels. Subjects may change their behavior even as an adaptive controller is adapting with additional stick inputs. Therefore, the adaptive controller should adapt as fast as possible to minimize flight track errors. This will minimize undesirable interactions between the pilot and the adaptive controller and maintain maneuvering precision.

  6. Stimulating cost effective behavior in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Neuhauser, D

    1987-04-01

    Types of influence on the delivery of medical care are divided into monetary and other. These incentives effect care at the system, hospital, care team, physician and patient levels. Selected examples, primarily from the USA, are discussed. PMID:10312075

  7. Peer Effects in Unethical Behavior: Standing or Reputation?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent empirical evidence shows that working in an unsupervised, isolated situation under competition, can increase dishonest behavior to achieve prestige. However, could working in a common space, in the presence of colleagues affect cheating? Here, we examine how familiar-peer influence, supervision and social incentives affect worker performance and dishonest behavior. First, we show that working in the presence of peers is an effective mechanism to constrain honest/dishonest behavior compared to an isolated work situation (experiment 1). Second, we demonstrate that the mere suspicion of dishonesty from another peer is not enough to affect individual cheating behavior (experiment 2), suggesting that reputation holds great importance in a worker’s self-image acting as a strong social incentives. Third, we show that when the suspicion of dishonesty increases with multiple peers behaving dishonestly, the desire to increase standing is sufficient to nudge individuals’ behavior back to cheating at the same levels as isolated situations (experiment 3). PMID:25853716

  8. The effect of resist material composition on development behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minegishi, Shinya; Itani, Toshiro

    2015-03-01

    The relation between resist composition and its development behavior was evaluated. The effect of a hydrophobic unit on a resist and on its development behavior was systematically investigated. The resist was exposed to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) or electron beam (EB) exposure, and the development behavior of the film was observed by high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM). The introduction of a hydrophobic group in the resist resulted in diminished swelling behavior and uniform dissolution. The resist resin cluster shape was also altered by the introduction of the hydrophobic group. These behaviors imply that the resin-resin and resin-tetramethylammonium hydroxide solution interactions differ. EUV lithography suffers from the photon issue that causes stochastic uniformity; however, in this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of achieving a better uniformity of resist patterning by altering the resist formulation.

  9. Effect of DC voltage pulses on memristor behavior.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Brian R.

    2013-10-01

    Current knowledge of memristor behavior is limited to a few physical models of which little comprehensive data collection has taken place. The purpose of this research is to collect data in search of exploitable memristor behavior by designing and implementing tests on a HP Labs Rev2 Memristor Test Board. The results are then graphed in their optimal format for conceptualizing behavioral patterns. This series of experiments has concluded the existence of an additional memristor state affecting the behavior of memristors when pulsed with positively polarized DC voltages. This effect has been observed across multiple memristors and data sets. The following pages outline the process that led to the hypothetical existence and eventual proof of this additional state of memristor behavior.

  10. Effectiveness of Cognitive-Behavioral Treatments in Reducing Type A Behavior among University Faculty--One Year Later.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurman, Christopher W.

    1985-01-01

    Reports follow-up evaluations of effectiveness of cognitive-behavior modification (CBM) and cognitive-behavior modification plus assertion training (CBM/AT) treatments in reducing Type A behavior among university faculty. CBM and CBM/AT groups continued to report significantly less Type A behavior, less speed and impatience. No differences were…

  11. Surfactant effects on environmental behavior of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2008-01-01

    The potential effects of adjuvants, including surfactants used in pesticide formulation, have been extensively studied for many small organic chemicals, but similar investigation on pesticides is limited in most cases. Solubilizing effects leading to the apparently increased water solubility of a pesticide are commonly known through the preparation of formulations, but fundamental profiles, especially for a specific monodisperse surfactant, are not fully studied. Reduced volatilization of a pesticide from the formulation can be explained by analogy of a very simple organic chemical, but the actual mechanism for the pesticide is still obscure. In contrast, from the point of view of avoiding groundwater contamination with a pesticide, adsorption/desorption profiles in the presence of surfactants and adjuvants have been examined extensively as well as pesticide mobility in the soil column. The basic mechanism in micelle-catalyzed hydrolysis is well known, and theoretical approaches including the PPIE model have succeeded in explaining the observed effects of surfactants, but its application to pesticides is also limited. Photolysis, especially in an aqueous phase, is in the same situation. The dilution effect in the real environment would show these effects on hydrolysis and photolysis to be much less than expected from the laboratory basic studies, but more information is necessary to examine the practical extent of the effects in an early stage of applying a pesticide formulation to crops and soil. Many adjuvants, including surfactants, are biodegradable in the soil environment, and thus their effects on the biodegradation of a pesticide in soil and sediment may be limited, as demonstrated by field trials. Not only from the theoretical but also the practical aspect, the foliar uptake of pesticide in the presence of adjuvants has been investigated extensively and some prediction on the ease of foliar uptake can be realized in relation to the formulation technology

  12. Mood and organizational citizenship behavior: the effects of positive affect on employee organizational citizenship behavior intentions.

    PubMed

    Williams, S; Shiaw, W T

    1999-11-01

    This study, involving 139 employees from a variety of industries, organizations, and positions in Singapore, measured the effects of mood on the intentions of employees to contribute actions that are organizationally desirable but are not part of their formal job requirements (organizational citizenship behavior). After effects of established patterns of historical organizational citizenship behavior, demographic characteristics, and employee positive and negative affectivity had been controlled, stepwise regression analysis revealed that the amount of positive affect currently experienced by an employee significantly influenced the employee's intention to perform specific acts of organizational citizenship.

  13. Effects of rubberized flooring on Asian elephant behavior in captivity.

    PubMed

    Meller, Camie L; Croney, Candace C; Shepherdson, David

    2007-01-01

    Six Asian elephants at the Oregon Zoo were observed to determine the effects of a poured rubber flooring substrate on captive Asian elephant behavior. Room utilization also was evaluated in seven rooms used for indoor housing, including Front and Back observation areas. Data were collected in three phases. Phase I (Baseline Phase) examined elephant behavior on old concrete floors. In Phase II (Choice Phase), elephant behavior was observed in the Back observation area where room sizes were comparable and when a choice of flooring substrates was available. Phase III (Final Phase) examined elephant behavior when all rooms in both observation areas, Front and Back, were converted to rubberized flooring. Room use in both observation areas remained stable throughout the study, suggesting that flooring substrate did not affect room use choice. However, there was a clear pattern of decreased discomfort behaviors on the new rubber flooring. Normal locomotion as well as stereotypic locomotion increased on the new rubber flooring. In addition, resting behavior changed to more closely reflect the resting behavior of wild elephants, which typically sleep standing up, and spend very little time in lateral recumbence. Overall, these findings suggest that the rubber flooring may have provided a more comfortable surface for locomotion as well as standing resting behavior. It is suggested that poured rubber flooring may be a beneficial addition to similar animal facilities. Zoo Biol 0:1-11, 2007. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Effects of Managed Care on Southern Youths' Behavioral Services Use

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Robert C.; Heflinger, Craig Anne

    2004-01-01

    Children and adolescents' access to Medicaid-financed behavioral health services was examined over 8 years in Tennessee (managed care) and Mississippi (fee-for-service [FFS]) using logistic regression. Managed care reduced access to behavioral care overall, overnight services (e.g., inpatient), and specialty outpatient services. Managed care also restricted the relative use of overnight and specialty outpatient for children and adolescents. However, managed care had pronounced effects on use of case management services. We also document differences in access and mix of behavioral services used over time by race, sex, age, and Medicaid enrollment category. PMID:15776698

  15. Effects of nonverbal behavior on perceptions of power bases.

    PubMed

    Aguinis, H; Simonsen, M M; Pierce, C A

    1998-08-01

    Among a sample of U.S. students, the effects of 3 forms of nonverbal behavior (facial expression, visual behavior, and body posture) on perceptions of power bases (reward, coercive, legitimate, referent, expert, and credibility) were investigated. In contrast to previous investigations of nonverbal behavior and power, a precise construct definition and reliable and valid operational definitions of power were used, and specific perceptions of power bases were examined. A relaxed facial expression, compared with a nervous facial expression, increased the ratings for referent, reward, legitimate, expert, and credibility power bases. Also, direct eye contact yielded higher credibility ratings than indirect eye contact.

  16. A Review of Behavioral Foundations of Effective Autism Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Karsten, Amanda M; Andrade, Meca; Cividini-Motta, Catia; Conde, Kerry A; Donnelly, Maeve G; McConnell, Kelly; Moore, Keira; Peters, Lindsay; Roberts, Kylie; Stocco, Corey; Sveinbjornsdottir, Berglind; Vanselow, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Behavior analysts must base their practices on both the conceptual foundations and the validated technologies of our field. In recognition of these important facets of effective practice, Mayville and Mulick (2011) have produced an edited book aimed at “developing the conceptually sound and procedurally innovative behavior analysts that are so badly needed” (p. x) within the burgeoning field of autism treatment. We summarize the content of this book and evaluate its utility to practitioners working with people with autism spectrum disorders.

  17. Maternal effects in quail and zebra finches: Behavior and hormones.

    PubMed

    Adkins-Regan, Elizabeth; Banerjee, Sunayana B; Correa, Stephanie M; Schweitzer, Cécile

    2013-09-01

    Maternal effects are influences of parents on offspring phenotype occurring through pathways other than inherited DNA. In birds, two important routes for such transmission are parental behavior and non-DNA egg constituents such as yolk hormones. Offspring traits subject to parental effects include behavior and endocrine function. Research from the Adkins-Regan lab has used three avian species to investigate maternal effects related to hormones and behavior. Experiments with chickens and Japanese quail have shown that maternal sex steroids can influence sex determination to produce biased offspring sex ratios. Because all birds have a ZZ/ZW chromosomal sex determining system in which the female parent determines the sex of the offspring, these results raise the possibility that maternal steroids can influence the outcome of sex chromosome meiosis. Learning has been shown to influence egg investment by female quail in ways that are likely to alter offspring phenotype. In quail, embryonic and exogenous sex steroids have well established and long-lasting effects on sexual differentiation of behavior during a critical period in ovo, but elevated yolk testosterone has long-term effects on behavior that do not seem to be occurring through an alteration in sexual differentiation. In biparental zebra finches, removal of mothers alters not only later behavior, but also the adult response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to an environmental stressor, as indicated by plasma corticosterone. Birds raised only by fathers have lower levels of mRNA for both glucocorticoid receptors in several brain regions as adults. These studies add to the evidence that one generation influences the behavioral or endocrine phenotype of the next through routes other than transmission of DNA. Additional research will be required to understand the adaptive significance of these effects.

  18. Gravitational Effects on Brain and Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Laurence R.

    1991-01-01

    Visual, vestibular, tactile, proprioceptive, and perhaps auditory clues are combined with knowledge of commanded voluntary movement to produce a single, usually consistent, perception of spatial orientation. The recent Spacelab flights have provided especially valuable observations on the effects of weightlessness and space flight. The response of the otolith organs to weightlessness and readapting to Earth's gravitation is described. Reference frames for orientation are briefly discussed.

  19. Neighborhood Effects, Mental Illness and Criminal Behavior: A Review.

    PubMed

    Freedman, David; Woods, George W

    2013-09-01

    This paper briefly reviews the social science on "neighborhood effects" as an independent force in shaping poor outcomes, specifically mental illness and criminal behavior, before discussing the implications of that research for understanding the relationship between neighborhoods, race and class. Neighborhood effects research has proliferated in recent years with extensive attention again being focused on the social context of family and individual development and life course. Moreover, recent work has suggested the need to consider the developmental effects of neighborhoods that persist across life-span. This paper will focus specifically on mental illness and criminal behavior as outcomes for understanding neighborhood effects, but will also consider what the structural causes of individual behavior and functioning mean for clinical assessment, especially forensic assessment.

  20. Neighborhood Effects, Mental Illness and Criminal Behavior: A Review.

    PubMed

    Freedman, David; Woods, George W

    2013-09-01

    This paper briefly reviews the social science on "neighborhood effects" as an independent force in shaping poor outcomes, specifically mental illness and criminal behavior, before discussing the implications of that research for understanding the relationship between neighborhoods, race and class. Neighborhood effects research has proliferated in recent years with extensive attention again being focused on the social context of family and individual development and life course. Moreover, recent work has suggested the need to consider the developmental effects of neighborhoods that persist across life-span. This paper will focus specifically on mental illness and criminal behavior as outcomes for understanding neighborhood effects, but will also consider what the structural causes of individual behavior and functioning mean for clinical assessment, especially forensic assessment. PMID:25250101

  1. Effects of Classroom Lighting on the Behavior of Exceptional Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Donna

    1983-01-01

    The effects of classroom lighting methods on activity level, achievement, visual acuity/fatigue, and health of nonhandicapped and handicapped students are reviewed. Effects of different levels of illumination on behavior also are discussed. Methodological deficiencies and lack of replication have resulted in few tenable conclusions. (Author/CL)

  2. Psychological and Behavioral Effects of Anabolic-Androgenic Steroids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bahrke, Michael S.

    This review of the literature on the psychological and behavioral effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AS) first looks at aspects of the history and prevalence of AS use in competitive sports. Research suggests that one-quarter to one-half million adolescents in the United States have used, or are currently using AS. Some effects of androgens…

  3. Effects of local information on group behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Roychowdhury, S.; Arora, N.; Sen, S.

    1996-12-31

    Researchers in the field of Distributed Artificial Intelligence have studied the effects of local decision-making on overall system performance in both cooperative and self-interested agent groups. The performance of individual agents depends critically on the quality of information available to it about local and global goals and resources. Whereas in general it is assumed that the more accurate and up-to-date the available information, the better is the expected performance of the individual and the group, this conclusion can be challenged in a number of scenarios.

  4. Behavioral and neurochemical effects of prenatal halothane

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Robert E.; Smith, Robert F.

    1977-01-01

    Permanent neurobehavioral toxicological effects have been theorized to occur at the lowest doses of a toxic agent if exposure occurs during early development compared to exposure during adulthood. Data are reviewed showing the exposure to 10 ppm of halothane from conception to day 60 of life post-partum led to adult rats (≥ 135 days of age) which were hyperalgesic to electric footshock and which committed 30% more errors learning a light-dark discrimination to escape footshock, or learning the shortest path to a food reward in a maze. Exposure only during adulthood to 10 ppm of halothane (from day 60 of life onwards) had no effects. To determine prenatal periods sensitive to halothane, rats were exposed to 12,500 ppm of halothane (with 35% oxygen) on day 3, 10, or 17 of gestation. As adults (≥ 75 days of age) day 3- and day 10-exposed rats, but not day 17-exposed rats, were hyperalgesic and committed 40% more errors in learning a visual discrimination to escape footshock. Food and water consumption, body weight, and running wheel activity were unaffected. Finally, adult rats exposed to 10, 50, or 100 ppm of halothane from conception to day 28 postpartum had 15% less 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in brain, but normal 5-hydroxytryptophan, noradrenalin, and dopamine. The possibility is discussed that the hyperalgesia noted above results from a permanently reduced turnover of brain serotonin produced by halothane present in brain at days 10-15 of gestation. PMID:612445

  5. The Aberrant Behavior Checklist: A Behavior Rating Scale for the Assessment of Treatment Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aman, Michael G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The development of a scale to assess drug and other treatment effects on severely mentally retarded individuals is described. Separate factor analyses of the data from two samples resulted in a five-factor scale: (1) Irritability, Agitation, Crying; (2) Lethargy, Social Withdrawal; (3) Stereotypic Behavior; (4) Hyperactivity, Noncompliance; and…

  6. Complex effects of reward upshift on consummatory behavior.

    PubMed

    Annicchiarico, Ivan; Glueck, Amanda C; Cuenya, Lucas; Kawasaki, Katsuyoshi; Conrad, Shannon E; Papini, Mauricio R

    2016-08-01

    Exposing rats to an upshift from a small reward to a larger reward sometimes yields evidence of consummatory successive positive contrast (cSPC), an effect that could be a suitable animal model of positive emotion. However, cSPC is an unreliable effect. Ten experiments explored the effects of an upshift in sucrose or saccharin concentration on consummatory behavior under several conditions. There was occasional evidence of cSPC, but mostly a combination of increased consummatory behavior relative to preshift reward concentrations and a reduced behavioral level relative to unshifted controls. Such a pattern is consistent with processes causing opposite changes on behavior. Reward upshift may induce processes that suppress behavior, such as taste neophobia (induced by an intense sucrose taste) and generalization decrement (induced by novelty in reward conditions after the upshift). An experiment tested the role of such novelty-related effects by preexposing animals to either the upshift concentration (12% sucrose) or water during three days before the start of the experiment. Sucrose-preexposed animals drank significantly more than water-preexposed animals during the upshift, but just as much as unshifted controls (i.e., no evidence of cSPC). These results suggest that cSPC may be difficult to obtain reliably because reward upshift induces opposing processes. However, they also seriously question the ontological status of cSPC. PMID:27298234

  7. Stress effects on the neural substrates of motivated behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hollon, Nick G; Burgeno, Lauren M; Phillips, Paul E M

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to stress has profound, but complex, actions on motivated behavior and decision-making. These effects are central to core symptoms of a number of psychiatric disorders that are precipitated or augmented by stress, such as depressive disorders and substance use disorders. Studying the neural substrates of stress’s effects on motivation has revealed that stress affects multiple targets on circuits throughout the brain using diverse molecular signaling processes. Moreover, stress does not have unitary effects on motivated behavior, but differences in the intensity, duration, intermittency, controllability and nature of the stressor produce qualitatively and quantitatively different behavioral endpoints. Unsurprisingly, the results of neuroscientific investigations into stress and motivation often open more questions than they resolve. Here we discuss contemporary results pertaining to the neural mechanisms by which stress alters motivation, identify points of contention and highlight integrative areas for continuing research into these multifaceted complexities. PMID:26404715

  8. Effects of Switching Behavior for the Attraction on Pedestrian Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Jaeyoung; Jo, Hang-Hyun; Luttinen, Tapio; Kosonen, Iisakki

    2015-01-01

    Walking is a fundamental activity of our daily life not only for moving to other places but also for interacting with surrounding environment. While walking on the streets, pedestrians can be aware of attractions like shopping windows. They can be influenced by the attractions and some of them might shift their attention towards the attractions, namely switching behavior. As a first step to incorporate the switching behavior, this study investigates collective effects of switching behavior for an attraction by developing a behavioral model. Numerical simulations exhibit different patterns of pedestrian behavior depending on the strength of the social influence and the average length of stay. When the social influence is strong along with a long length of stay, a saturated phase can be defined at which all the pedestrians have visited the attraction. If the social influence is not strong enough, an unsaturated phase appears where one can observe that some pedestrians head for the attraction while others walk in their desired direction. These collective patterns of pedestrian behavior are summarized in a phase diagram by comparing the number of pedestrians who visited the attraction to the number of passersby near the attraction. Measuring the marginal benefits with respect to the strength of the social influence and the average length of stay enables us to identify under what conditions enhancing these variables would be more effective. The findings from this study can be understood in the context of the pedestrian facility management, for instance, for retail stores. PMID:26218430

  9. Effects of Switching Behavior for the Attraction on Pedestrian Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Jaeyoung; Jo, Hang-Hyun; Luttinen, Tapio; Kosonen, Iisakki

    2015-01-01

    Walking is a fundamental activity of our daily life not only for moving to other places but also for interacting with surrounding environment. While walking on the streets, pedestrians can be aware of attractions like shopping windows. They can be influenced by the attractions and some of them might shift their attention towards the attractions, namely switching behavior. As a first step to incorporate the switching behavior, this study investigates collective effects of switching behavior for an attraction by developing a behavioral model. Numerical simulations exhibit different patterns of pedestrian behavior depending on the strength of the social influence and the average length of stay. When the social influence is strong along with a long length of stay, a saturated phase can be defined at which all the pedestrians have visited the attraction. If the social influence is not strong enough, an unsaturated phase appears where one can observe that some pedestrians head for the attraction while others walk in their desired direction. These collective patterns of pedestrian behavior are summarized in a phase diagram by comparing the number of pedestrians who visited the attraction to the number of passersby near the attraction. Measuring the marginal benefits with respect to the strength of the social influence and the average length of stay enables us to identify under what conditions enhancing these variables would be more effective. The findings from this study can be understood in the context of the pedestrian facility management, for instance, for retail stores. PMID:26218430

  10. Effects and Side Effects of DRO as Treatment for Self-Injurious Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowdery, Glynnis Edwards; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This case study presents a 9-year-old boy who exhibited severe stereotypic self-injurious behavior. An escalating differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior schedule, mediated through token reinforcement, eliminated self-injurious behavior quickly for up to 30-minute periods, and was more effective than social reinforcement. Crying behavior…

  11. Beliefs and environmental behavior: the moderating effect of emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Luzón, Maria Carmen; Calvo-Salguero, Antonia; Salinas, Jose Maria

    2014-12-01

    Recent decades have seen a proliferation of studies aiming to explain how pro-environmental behavior is shaped by attitudes, values and beliefs. In this study, we have included an aspect in our analysis that has been rarely touched upon until now, that is, the intelligent use of emotions as a possible component of pro-environmental behavior. We applied the Trait Meta Mood Scale-24 (TMMS-24) and the New Environmental Paradigm scale to a sample of 184 male and female undergraduate students. We also carried out correlation and hierarchical regression analyses of blocks. The results show the interaction effects of the system of environmental beliefs and the dimensions of emotional intelligence on glass recycling attitudes, intentions and behavior. The results are discussed from the perspective of research on how the management of emotions guides thought and behavior.

  12. Differential maternal treatment of infant twins: effects of infant behaviors.

    PubMed

    DiLalla, L F; Bishop, E G

    1996-11-01

    This project utilized twins to study differential mother-sibling interactions. The use of twins circumvented the traditional confounds of studying siblings of different ages or at two points in time. When the twins were 7 and 9 months of age, mothers spent 2.5 min alone with each infant in an attempt to elicit child vocalizations. The mother and infant behaviors were coded both microanalytically and globally. The infant attention behaviors were influenced primarily by unique environment, whereas the temperament behaviors were influenced by both unique environmental and genetic effects. Mothers tended to treat both children similarly, regardless of zygosity, suggesting that maternal characteristics drove the mother-infant interactions. Thus, even though identical twins were more similar on some measures than fraternal twins, mothers tended to treat both types of twins comparably regardless of infant characteristics or behaviors.

  13. Effects of guest feeding programs on captive giraffe behavior.

    PubMed

    Orban, David A; Siegford, Janice M; Snider, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Zoological institutions develop human-animal interaction opportunities for visitors to advance missions of conservation, education, and recreation; however, the animal welfare implications largely have yet to be evaluated. This behavioral study was the first to quantify impacts of guest feeding programs on captive giraffe behavior and welfare, by documenting giraffe time budgets that included both normal and stereotypic behaviors. Thirty giraffes from nine zoos (six zoos with varying guest feeding programs and three without) were observed using both instantaneous scan sampling and continuous behavioral sampling techniques. All data were collected during summer 2012 and analyzed using linear mixed models. The degree of individual giraffe participation in guest feeding programs was positively associated with increased time spent idle and marginally associated with reduced time spent ruminating. Time spent participating in guest feeding programs had no effect on performance of stereotypic behaviors. When time spent eating routine diets was combined with time spent participating in guest feeding programs, individuals that spent more time engaged in total feeding behaviors tended to perform less oral stereotypic behavior such as object-licking and tongue-rolling. By extending foraging time and complexity, guest feeding programs have the potential to act as environmental enrichment and alleviate unfulfilled foraging motivations that may underlie oral stereotypic behaviors observed in many captive giraffes. However, management strategies may need to be adjusted to mitigate idleness and other program consequences. Further studies, especially pre-and-post-program implementation comparisons, are needed to better understand the influence of human-animal interactions on zoo animal behavior and welfare.

  14. Effects of guest feeding programs on captive giraffe behavior.

    PubMed

    Orban, David A; Siegford, Janice M; Snider, Richard J

    2016-01-01

    Zoological institutions develop human-animal interaction opportunities for visitors to advance missions of conservation, education, and recreation; however, the animal welfare implications largely have yet to be evaluated. This behavioral study was the first to quantify impacts of guest feeding programs on captive giraffe behavior and welfare, by documenting giraffe time budgets that included both normal and stereotypic behaviors. Thirty giraffes from nine zoos (six zoos with varying guest feeding programs and three without) were observed using both instantaneous scan sampling and continuous behavioral sampling techniques. All data were collected during summer 2012 and analyzed using linear mixed models. The degree of individual giraffe participation in guest feeding programs was positively associated with increased time spent idle and marginally associated with reduced time spent ruminating. Time spent participating in guest feeding programs had no effect on performance of stereotypic behaviors. When time spent eating routine diets was combined with time spent participating in guest feeding programs, individuals that spent more time engaged in total feeding behaviors tended to perform less oral stereotypic behavior such as object-licking and tongue-rolling. By extending foraging time and complexity, guest feeding programs have the potential to act as environmental enrichment and alleviate unfulfilled foraging motivations that may underlie oral stereotypic behaviors observed in many captive giraffes. However, management strategies may need to be adjusted to mitigate idleness and other program consequences. Further studies, especially pre-and-post-program implementation comparisons, are needed to better understand the influence of human-animal interactions on zoo animal behavior and welfare. PMID:26910772

  15. Vulnerability Factors for the Psychiatric and Behavioral Effects of Cannabis

    PubMed Central

    Bortolato, Marco; Bini, Valentina; Tambaro, Simone

    2010-01-01

    Cogent evidence shows that cannabis plays a variable role on behavioral regulation and the pathophysiology of most psychiatric conditions. Accordingly, cannabis has been alternatively shown to exacerbate or ameliorate mental symptoms, depending on its composition and route of consumption, as well as specific individual and contextual characteristics. The vulnerability to the psychological effects of cannabis is influenced by a complex constellation of genetic and environmental factors. In the present article, we will review the current evidence on the pharmacological, individual and situational factors that have been documented to affect the behavioral and psychiatric effects of cannabinoids. PMID:27713377

  16. The aberrant behavior checklist: a behavior rating scale for the assessment of treatment effects.

    PubMed

    Aman, M G; Singh, N N; Stewart, A W; Field, C J

    1985-03-01

    The development of a scale to assess drug and other treatment effects on severely mentally retarded individuals was described. In the first stage of the project, an initial scale encompassing a large number of behavior problems was used to rate 418 residents. The scale was then reduced to an intermediate version, and in the second stage, 509 moderately to profoundly retarded individuals were rated. Separate factor analyses of the data from the two samples resulted in a five-factor scale comprising 58 items. The factors of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist have been labeled as follows: (I) Irritability, Agitation, Crying; (II) Lethargy, Social Withdrawal; (III) Stereotypic Behavior; (IV) Hyperactivity, Noncompliance; and (V) Inappropriate Speech. Average subscale scores were presented for the instrument, and the results were compared with empirically derived rating scales of childhood psychopathology and with factor analytic work in the field of mental retardation.

  17. The aberrant behavior checklist: a behavior rating scale for the assessment of treatment effects.

    PubMed

    Aman, M G; Singh, N N; Stewart, A W; Field, C J

    1985-03-01

    The development of a scale to assess drug and other treatment effects on severely mentally retarded individuals was described. In the first stage of the project, an initial scale encompassing a large number of behavior problems was used to rate 418 residents. The scale was then reduced to an intermediate version, and in the second stage, 509 moderately to profoundly retarded individuals were rated. Separate factor analyses of the data from the two samples resulted in a five-factor scale comprising 58 items. The factors of the Aberrant Behavior Checklist have been labeled as follows: (I) Irritability, Agitation, Crying; (II) Lethargy, Social Withdrawal; (III) Stereotypic Behavior; (IV) Hyperactivity, Noncompliance; and (V) Inappropriate Speech. Average subscale scores were presented for the instrument, and the results were compared with empirically derived rating scales of childhood psychopathology and with factor analytic work in the field of mental retardation. PMID:3993694

  18. The effects of proton exposure on neurochemistry and behavior.

    PubMed

    Shukitt-Hale, B; Szprengiel, A; Pluhar, J; Rabin, B M; Joseph, J A

    2004-01-01

    Future space missions will involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth, where astronauts will be exposed to radiation hazards such as those that arise from galactic cosmic rays. Galactic cosmic rays are composed of protons, alpha particles, and particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles). Research by our group has shown that exposure to HZE particles, primarily 600 MeV/n and 1 GeV/n 56Fe, can produce significant alterations in brain neurochemistry and behavior. However, given that protons can make up a significant portion of the radiation spectrum, it is important to study their effects on neural functioning and on related performance. Therefore, these studies examined the effects of exposure to proton irradiation on neurochemical and behavioral endpoints, including dopaminergic functioning, amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion learning, and spatial learning and memory as measured by the Morris water maze. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a dose of 0, 1.5, 3.0 or 4.0 Gy of 250 MeV protons at Loma Linda University and were tested in the different behavioral tests at various times following exposure. Results showed that there was no effect of proton irradiation at any dose on any of the endpoints measured. Therefore, there is a contrast between the insignificant effects of high dose proton exposure and the dramatic effectiveness of low dose (<0.1 Gy) exposures to 56Fe particles on both neurochemical and behavioral endpoints. PMID:15803624

  19. The effects of proton exposure on neurochemistry and behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukitt-Hale, B.; Szprengiel, A.; Pluhar, J.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Future space missions will involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth, where astronauts will be exposed to radiation hazards such as those that arise from galactic cosmic rays. Galactic cosmic rays are composed of protons, α particles, and particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles). Research by our group has shown that exposure to HZE particles, primarily 600 MeV/n and 1 GeV/n 56Fe, can produce significant alterations in brain neurochemistry and behavior. However, given that protons can make up a significant portion of the radiation spectrum, it is important to study their effects on neural functioning and on related performance. Therefore, these studies examined the effects of exposure to proton irradiation on neurochemical and behavioral endpoints, including dopaminergic functioning, amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion learning, and spatial learning and memory as measured by the Morris water maze. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a dose of 0, 1.5, 3.0 or 4.0 Gy of 250 MeV protons at Loma Linda University and were tested in the different behavioral tests at various times following exposure. Results showed that there was no effect of proton irradiation at any dose on any of the endpoints measured. Therefore, there is a contrast between the insignificant effects of high dose proton exposure and the dramatic effectiveness of low dose (<0.1 Gy) exposures to 56Fe particles on both neurochemical and behavioral endpoints.

  20. The effects of proton exposure on neurochemistry and behavior.

    PubMed

    Shukitt-Hale, B; Szprengiel, A; Pluhar, J; Rabin, B M; Joseph, J A

    2004-01-01

    Future space missions will involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth, where astronauts will be exposed to radiation hazards such as those that arise from galactic cosmic rays. Galactic cosmic rays are composed of protons, alpha particles, and particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles). Research by our group has shown that exposure to HZE particles, primarily 600 MeV/n and 1 GeV/n 56Fe, can produce significant alterations in brain neurochemistry and behavior. However, given that protons can make up a significant portion of the radiation spectrum, it is important to study their effects on neural functioning and on related performance. Therefore, these studies examined the effects of exposure to proton irradiation on neurochemical and behavioral endpoints, including dopaminergic functioning, amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion learning, and spatial learning and memory as measured by the Morris water maze. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a dose of 0, 1.5, 3.0 or 4.0 Gy of 250 MeV protons at Loma Linda University and were tested in the different behavioral tests at various times following exposure. Results showed that there was no effect of proton irradiation at any dose on any of the endpoints measured. Therefore, there is a contrast between the insignificant effects of high dose proton exposure and the dramatic effectiveness of low dose (<0.1 Gy) exposures to 56Fe particles on both neurochemical and behavioral endpoints.

  1. Effects of mixing in threshold models of social behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmetzhanov, Andrei R.; Worden, Lee; Dushoff, Jonathan

    2013-07-01

    We consider the dynamics of an extension of the influential Granovetter model of social behavior, where individuals are affected by their personal preferences and observation of the neighbors’ behavior. Individuals are arranged in a network (usually the square lattice), and each has a state and a fixed threshold for behavior changes. We simulate the system asynchronously by picking a random individual and we either update its state or exchange it with another randomly chosen individual (mixing). We describe the dynamics analytically in the fast-mixing limit by using the mean-field approximation and investigate it mainly numerically in the case of finite mixing. We show that the dynamics converge to a manifold in state space, which determines the possible equilibria, and show how to estimate the projection of this manifold by using simulated trajectories, emitted from different initial points. We show that the effects of considering the network can be decomposed into finite-neighborhood effects, and finite-mixing-rate effects, which have qualitatively similar effects. Both of these effects increase the tendency of the system to move from a less-desired equilibrium to the “ground state.” Our findings can be used to probe shifts in behavioral norms and have implications for the role of information flow in determining when social norms that have become unpopular in particular communities (such as foot binding or female genital cutting) persist or vanish.

  2. Left brain cortical activity modulates stress effects on social behavior

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunee; Hong, Jiso; Park, Young-Gyun; Chae, Sujin; Kim, Yong; Kim, Daesoo

    2015-01-01

    When subjected to stress, some individuals develop maladaptive symptoms whereas others retain normal behavior. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is known to control these adaptive responses to stress. Here, we show that mPFC neurons in the left hemisphere control stress effects on social behavior. Mice made socially avoidant by the stress of chronic social defeats showed depressed neural activity in the left mPFC. Photoactivation of these neurons reversed social avoidance and restored social activity. Despite social defeats, resilient mice with normal sociability showed normal firing rates in the left mPFC; however, photoinhibition of these neurons induced social avoidance. The same photomodulation administered to the right mPFC caused no significant effects. These results explain how stressed individuals develop maladaptive behaviors through left cortical depression, as reported in mood and anxiety disorders. PMID:26302668

  3. Novel Polymer Ferroelectric Behavior via Crystal Isomorphism and Nanoconfinement Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lei

    2014-03-01

    Despite comprehensive understanding of novel ferroelectric [i.e., relaxor ferroelectric (RFE) and antiferroelectric (AFE)] behaviors for ceramics, RFE and double hysteresis loop (DHL) behaviors have just emerged for ferroelectric crystalline polymers since the past 15 years. A number of applications such as electrostriction, electric energy storage, and electrocaloric cooling have been realized by utilizing these novel ferroelectric properties. However, the fundamental understanding is still lacking. In this invited talk, we intend to unravel the basic physics behind these novel ferroelectric behaviors via systematic studies of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)]-based terpolymers and e-beam irradiated copolymers. It is found that both crystal internal structure and crystal-amorphous interaction are important for achieving the RFE and DHL behaviors. For the crystal internal structure effect, friction-free dipole switching and nanodomain formation by pinning the polymer chains are essential, and they can be achieved via the mechanism of crystal repeating unit isomorphism. Physical pinning [e.g., in P(VDF-TrFE)-based terpolymers] induces a reversible RFE <-->FE phase transition and thus the DHL behavior, whereas chemical pinning [e.g., in e-beam irradiated P(VDF-TrFE)] results in the RFE behavior. Finally, the crystal-amorphous interaction (or the nanoconfinement effect) results in a competition between the polarization and depolarization local fields. When the depolarization field becomes stronger than the polarization field, a DHL behavior can also be observed. Obviously, the physics is different from ceramics and can be largely attributed to the long chain nature of semicrystalline ferroelectric polymers. This understanding will help us design new ferroelectric polymers with improved electroactive properties and/or better applications. This work is supported by NSF DMR-0907580.

  4. Behavioral Vision Training for Myopia: Stimulus Specificity of Training Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Jin-Pang

    1988-01-01

    The study assessed transfer of visual training for myopia using two different training stimuli and a single subject A-B-C-A design with a male student volunteer. A procedure including stimulus fading and reinforcement (positive verbal feedback) was used to effectively improve performance on both behavioral acuity tests during the training phases…

  5. The Effects of a Team Charter on Student Team Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aaron, Joshua R.; McDowell, William C.; Herdman, Andrew O.

    2014-01-01

    The authors contribute to growing evidence that team charters contribute positively to performance by empirically testing their effects on key team process outcomes. Using a sample of business students in a team-based task requiring significant cooperative and coordinative behavior, the authors compare emergent team norms under a variety of team…

  6. Cognitive Effects on the Child's Internalization of Altruistic Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, George W.

    Cognitive effects in children's learning of altruistic behavior were tested with an adaptation of Aronfreed's test design and machine. Children in grades 1-4 were presented with a machine with 2 levers. One lever, when pressed, released bubble gum, and the other turned on a light. For two of the three groups the experimenter exclaimed delightedly…

  7. Differential Effectiveness of Two Behavior Change Approaches with Hyperactive Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugental, Daphne Blunt; And Others

    Evaluated was the effectiveness of a self control program as opposed to a traditional social reinforcement program on the behavior of two groups of 18 hyperactive boys (7-12 years old). Ss in the self control group were exposed to a tutor who modeled self controlling speech and self reinforcement on a task requiring focused concentration. Ss in…

  8. Effect of Maternal Depression on Child Behavior: A Sensitive Period?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagner, Daniel M.; Pettit, Jeremy W.; Lewinsohn, Peter M.; Seeley, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of maternal depression during the child's first year of life (i.e., sensitive period) on subsequent behavior problems. Method: Participants were 175 mothers participating in the Oregon Adolescent Depression Project (OADP) who met lifetime diagnostic criteria for major depressive…

  9. Preventing Challenging Behaviors in Preschool: Effective Strategies for Classroom Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Janelle C.; Crosby, Megan G.; Irwin, Heather K.; Dennis, Lindsay R.; Simpson, Cynthia G.; Rose, Chad A.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides practical strategies and techniques that early childhood educators can implement in their classrooms to effectively manage challenging behaviors. The specific strategies addressed fall under the following categories: (a) classroom management, (b) reinforcement, and (c) communication. Suggestions are made for how parents can…

  10. Fetal Alcohol Effects in Children: Cognitive, Educational, and Behavioral Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Sheldon

    The effects of alcohol on the developing fetus are examined. Noted is the existence of both structural problems (such as microcephaly and cardiac anomalies) and behavioral problems (such as mental retardation and speech and language deficits). The potential damage of alcohol at a very early stage of fetal development is discussed. It is thought…

  11. Effects of Behavioral and Pharmacological Treatment on Smokeless Tobacco Users.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatsukami, Dorothy; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Examined the effects of 2 mg of nicotine polacrilex versus placebo gum and a group behavioral treatment versus minimal contact on cessation of smokeless tobacco use. Participants (n=210) were randomly assigned 1 of the 4 treatment conditions. Withdrawal symptoms were assessed throughout the treatment. Discusses findings. (KW)

  12. Effects of Expectancy on Verbal Behavior of Mentally Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Patty; Lazar, Alfred L.

    Examined were the effects of high expectancy and non-expectancy conditions on the verbal behavior of 12 moderately and mildly retarded children (3-16 years old). Six experimental Ss were exposed to a condition in which experimenters expressed expectation of achievement on the Children's Apperception Test. Comparisons of verbalization revealed…

  13. The Effects of Conjoint Behavioral Consultation in Early Childhood Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, Susan M.; Clarke, Brandy L.; Knoche, Lisa L.; Edwards, Carolyn Pope

    2006-01-01

    Conjoint behavioral consultation (CBC) is an ecological model of service delivery that brings together parents and educators to collaboratively address shared concerns for a child. This study provides exploratory data investigating the effects of CBC on home and school concerns for 48 children aged 6 and younger. Single-subject methods were used…

  14. The Effects of Developing Teacher Commitment to Behavioral Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devlin-Scherer, Roberta; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Seventeen K-12 teachers were trained in the Stallings Effective Use of Time Program. A comparison of pre- and post-classroom observations indicated that teachers who had publicly stated their commitment to teaching behavior changes tended to follow through and make the changes. Implications for teacher education programs are discussed. (Author/MT)

  15. The Behavioral Effects of Crowding: Definitions and Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Larry M.; And Others

    Crews of 18 U.S. Navy combat vessels rated their living and working conditions aboard ship, including degree of crowding. In order to better understand the behavioral effects of crowding, three different types of measures, corresponding to different definitions of crowding, were constructed. These separate crowding measures correlated uniquely…

  16. Effects of Interviewer Behavior on Accuracy of Children's Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparling, Jessica; Wilder, David A.; Kondash, Jennifer; Boyle, Megan; Compton, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that certain interviewer behaviors can evoke inaccurate answers by children. In the current study, we examined the effects of approving and disapproving statements on the accuracy of 3 children's answers to questions in an interview (Experiment 1). We then evaluated 3 questioning techniques that may be used by…

  17. Feingold Diet Effect on Reading Achievement and Classroom Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chernick, Eleanor

    The effect of the Feingold diet (elimination of artificial colors, flavors, or foods with natural salicylates to reduce hyperactivity) on the reading achievement scores, behavior, and impulsivity/reflectivity of 13 children (ages 6 to 12 years) was evaluated. Six months after the experimental group adopted the Feingold diet there were no…

  18. Effects of Video Modeling on Treatment Integrity of Behavioral Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGennaro-Reed, Florence D.; Codding, Robin; Catania, Cynthia N.; Maguire, Helena

    2010-01-01

    We examined the effects of individualized video modeling on the accurate implementation of behavioral interventions using a multiple baseline design across 3 teachers. During video modeling, treatment integrity improved above baseline levels; however, teacher performance remained variable. The addition of verbal performance feedback increased…

  19. Intellectual Disability Modifies Gender Effects on Disruptive Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einfeld, Stewart L.; Gray, Kylie M.; Ellis, Louise A.; Taffe, John; Emerson, Eric; Tonge, Bruce J.; Horstead, Sian K.

    2010-01-01

    In typically developing children, boys are more commonly diagnosed than girls with disruptive behavior disorders, namely, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, conduct disorder, and oppositional defiant disorder. For children with intellectual disability (ID), the evidence for this gender effect is less clear. In this report we examine gender…

  20. Neurotoxic behavioral effects of Lake Ontario salmon diets in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzler, D.R. )

    1990-03-01

    Six experiments were conducted to examine possible neurotoxic effects of the exposure to contaminants in Lake Ontario salmon administered through the diets of rats. Rats were fed different concentrations of fish (8%, 15% or 30%) in one of three diet conditions: Lake Ontario salmon, Pacific Ocean salmon, or laboratory rat chow only. Following 20 days on the diets, rats were tested for five minutes per day in a modified open field for one or three days. Lake Ontario salmon diets consistently produced significantly lower activity, rearing, and nosepoke behaviors in comparison with ocean salmon or rat chow diet conditions. A dose-response effect for concentration of lake salmon was obtained, and the attenuation effect occurred in males, females, adult or young animals, and postweaning females, with fish sampled over a five-year period. While only two of several potential contaminants were tested, both fish and brain analyses of mirex and PCBs relate to the behavioral effects.

  1. Effect of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention on Responses to Anger by Middle School Students with Chronic Behavior Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, T. Rowand; Smith, Stephen W.; Miller, M. David

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-two middle school students with emotional/behavioral disorders placed in an alternative school were exposed to a cognitive-behavioral intervention which decreased the inappropriate external responses to anger and increased anger control as measured by student self-reports and teacher behavioral checklists. No effect was found for internal…

  2. Self-administration of cocaine-antihistamine combinations: super-additive reinforcing effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhixia; Woolverton, William L

    2007-02-28

    Histamine H1 receptor antagonists have some behavioral effects that predict abuse liability. In the present study, diphenhydramine and cocaine each maintained i.v. self-administration under a progressive-ratio schedule in rhesus monkeys. When cocaine and DPH were combined in a 1:1 ratio of the ED50s, the combination was super-additive in all monkeys. The data predict that the combination of cocaine and histamine H1 receptor antagonists would have enhanced potential for abuse relative to either drug alone. PMID:17196194

  3. Behavioral effects of developmental methylmercury drinking water exposure in rodents.

    PubMed

    Bisen-Hersh, Emily B; Farina, Marcelo; Barbosa, Fernando; Rocha, Joao B T; Aschner, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Early methylmercury (MeHg) exposure can have long-lasting consequences likely arising from impaired developmental processes, the outcome of which has been exposed in several longitudinal studies of affected populations. Given the large number of newborns at an increased risk of learning disabilities associated with in utero MeHg exposure, it is important to study neurobehavioral alterations using ecologically valid and physiologically relevant models. This review highlights the benefits of using the MeHg drinking water exposure paradigm and outlines behavioral outcomes arising from this procedure in rodents. Combination treatments that exacerbate or ameliorate MeHg-induced effects, and possible molecular mechanisms underlying behavioral impairment are also discussed.

  4. Behavioral effects of a calcium channel antagonist: nifedipine.

    PubMed

    Tazi, A; Farh, M; Hakkou, F

    1991-01-01

    A series of experiments investigated the behavioral effects of a calcium channel antagonist, nifedipine. This antagonist has facilitatory effects on learning and memory as assessed by the active and passive avoidance tests respectively. In the forced swimming test, nifedipine at a dose of 5 mg/kg had an inhibitory effect on immobilization. Finally, nifedipine (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg) induced an anxiolytic effect in the water consumption test in a novel environment. These findings are discussed with respect to other findings in the same field and to the neurochemical changes known to be induced by calcium channel antagonists.

  5. Effects of embryonic cyclosporine exposures on brain development and behavior.

    PubMed

    Clift, Danielle E; Thorn, Robert J; Passarelli, Emily A; Kapoor, Mrinal; LoPiccolo, Mary K; Richendrfer, Holly A; Colwill, Ruth M; Creton, Robbert

    2015-04-01

    Cyclosporine, a calcineurin inhibitor, is successfully used as an immunosuppressant in transplant medicine. However, the use of this pharmaceutical during pregnancy is concerning since calcineurin is thought to play a role in neural development. The risk for human brain development is difficult to evaluate because of a lack of basic information on the sensitive developmental times and the potentially pleiotropic effects on brain development and behavior. In the present study, we use zebrafish as a model system to examine the effects of embryonic cyclosporine exposures. Early embryonic exposures reduced the size of the eyes and brain. Late embryonic exposures did not affect the size of the eyes or brain, but did lead to substantial behavioral defects at the larval stages. The cyclosporine-exposed larvae displayed a reduced avoidance response to visual stimuli, low swim speeds, increased resting, an increase in thigmotaxis, and changes in the average distance between larvae. Similar results were obtained with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506, suggesting that most, but not all, effects on brain development and behavior are mediated by calcineurin inhibition. Overall, the results show that cyclosporine can induce either structural or functional brain defects, depending on the exposure window. The observed functional brain defects highlight the importance of quantitative behavioral assays when evaluating the risk of developmental exposures.

  6. Effects of embryonic cyclosporine exposures on brain development and behavior

    PubMed Central

    Clift, Danielle E.; Thorn, Robert J.; Passarelli, Emily A.; Kapoor, Mrinal; LoPiccolo, Mary K.; Richendrfer, Holly A.; Colwill, Ruth M.; Creton, Robbert

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine, a calcineurin inhibitor, is successfully used as an immunosuppressant in transplant medicine. However, the use of this pharmaceutical during pregnancy is concerning, since calcineurin is thought to play a role in neural development. The risk for human brain development is difficult to evaluate, because of a lack of basic information on the sensitive developmental times and the potentially pleiotropic effects on brain development and behavior. In the present study, we use zebrafish as a model system to examine the effects of embryonic cyclosporine exposures. Early embryonic exposures reduced the size of the eyes and brain. Late embryonic exposures did not affect the size of the eyes or brain, but did lead to substantial behavioral defects at the larval stages. The cyclosporine-exposed larvae displayed a reduced avoidance response to visual stimuli, low swim speeds, increased resting, an increase in thigmotaxis, and changes in the average distance between larvae. Similar results were obtained with the calcineurin inhibitor FK506, suggesting that most, but not all, effects on brain development and behavior are mediated by calcineurin inhibition. Overall, the results show that cyclosporine can induce either structural or functional brain defects, depending on the exposure window. The observed functional brain defects highlight the importance of quantitative behavioral assays when evaluating the risk of developmental exposures. PMID:25591474

  7. Microstructural effects on the ignition behavior of HMX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welle, E. J.; Molek, C. D.; Wixom, R. R.; Samuels, P.

    2014-05-01

    The detonation physics community has embraced the idea that initiation of high explosives proceeds from an ignition event through subsequent growth to steady detonation. A weakness of all the commonly used ignition and growth models is that microstructural characteristics are not explicitly incorporated in their ignition and terms. This is the case in spite of a demonstrated, but not well-understood, empirical link between morphology and initiation of energetic materials. Morphological effects have been parametrically studied in many ways, with the majority of efforts focused on establishing a tie between bulk powder metrics and ignition of the pressed beds. More recently, there has been a shift toward characterizing the microstructure of pressed beds in order to understand the underlying mechanisms governing behavior. We have assessed the utility of using a modified James' model as a tool to quantify effects of bed microstructure on ignition behavior. Using this construct, we have studied the ignition behavior of two types of HMX materials in an attempt to quantify effects of microstructure (i.e. mesoscale features) on continuum level ignition behavior. Microstructures of the two HMX materials were characterized using ion bombardment cross sectioning techniques that expose the microstructure of pellets studied in the ignition experiments.

  8. Effects of tourists on behavior and demography of Olympic marmots.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Suzanne C; Valois, Tanguy; Taper, Mark L; Scott Mills, L

    2007-08-01

    If changes in animal behavior resulting from direct human disturbance negatively affect the persistence of a given species or population, then these behavioral changes must necessarily lead to reduced demographic performance. We tested for the effects of human disturbance on Olympic marmots (Marmota olympus), a large ground-dwelling squirrel that has disappeared from several areas where recreation levels are high. We assessed the degree to which antipredator and foraging behavior and demographic rates (survival and reproduction) differed between sites with high recreation levels (high use) and those with little or no recreation (low use). Compared with the marmots at low-use sites, marmots at high-use sites displayed significantly reduced responses to human approach, which could be construed as successful accommodation of disturbance or as a decrease in predator awareness. The marmots at high-use sites also looked up more often while foraging, which suggests an increased wariness. Marmots at both types of sites had comparable reproductive and survival rates and were in similar body condition. Until now, the supposition that marmots can adjust their behavior to avoid negative demographic consequences when confronted with heavy tourism has been based on potentially ambiguous behavioral data. Our results support this hypothesis in the case of Olympic marmots and demonstrate the importance of considering demographic data when evaluating the impacts of recreation on animal populations. PMID:17650256

  9. Effects of tourists on behavior and demography of Olympic marmots.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Suzanne C; Valois, Tanguy; Taper, Mark L; Scott Mills, L

    2007-08-01

    If changes in animal behavior resulting from direct human disturbance negatively affect the persistence of a given species or population, then these behavioral changes must necessarily lead to reduced demographic performance. We tested for the effects of human disturbance on Olympic marmots (Marmota olympus), a large ground-dwelling squirrel that has disappeared from several areas where recreation levels are high. We assessed the degree to which antipredator and foraging behavior and demographic rates (survival and reproduction) differed between sites with high recreation levels (high use) and those with little or no recreation (low use). Compared with the marmots at low-use sites, marmots at high-use sites displayed significantly reduced responses to human approach, which could be construed as successful accommodation of disturbance or as a decrease in predator awareness. The marmots at high-use sites also looked up more often while foraging, which suggests an increased wariness. Marmots at both types of sites had comparable reproductive and survival rates and were in similar body condition. Until now, the supposition that marmots can adjust their behavior to avoid negative demographic consequences when confronted with heavy tourism has been based on potentially ambiguous behavioral data. Our results support this hypothesis in the case of Olympic marmots and demonstrate the importance of considering demographic data when evaluating the impacts of recreation on animal populations.

  10. On the effects of testosterone on brain behavioral functions

    PubMed Central

    Celec, Peter; Ostatníková, Daniela; Hodosy, Július

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone influences the brain via organizational and activational effects. Numerous relevant studies on rodents and a few on humans focusing on specific behavioral and cognitive parameters have been published. The results are, unfortunately, controversial and puzzling. Dosing, timing, even the application route seem to considerably affect the outcomes. In addition, the methods used for the assessment of psychometric parameters are a bit less than ideal regarding their validity and reproducibility. Metabolism of testosterone contributes to the complexity of its actions. Reduction to dihydrotestosterone by 5-alpha reductase increases the androgen activity; conversion to estradiol by aromatase converts the androgen to estrogen activity. Recently, the non-genomic effects of testosterone on behavior bypassing the nuclear receptors have attracted the interest of researchers. This review tries to summarize the current understanding of the complexity of the effects of testosterone on brain with special focus on their role in the known sex differences. PMID:25741229

  11. Ferromagnetic behavior and exchange bias effect in akaganeite nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Tadic, Marin; Milosevic, Irena; Motte, Laurence; Kralj, Slavko; Saboungi, Marie-Louise

    2015-05-04

    We report ferromagnetic-like properties and exchange bias effect in akaganeite (β-FeOOH) nanorods. They exhibit a Néel temperature T{sub N} = 259 K and ferromagnetic-like hysteresis behavior both below and above T{sub N}. An exchange bias effect is observed below T{sub N} and represents an interesting behavior for akaganeite nanorods. These results are explained on the basis of a core-shell structure in which the core has bulk akaganeite magnetic properties (i.e., antiferromagnetic ordering) while the shell exhibits a disordered spin state. Thus, the nanorods show ferromagnetic properties and an exchange bias effect at the same time, increasing their potential for use in practical applications.

  12. Mental and behavioral effects of parasitic infections: a review.

    PubMed

    Jasti, Anisha; Ojha, Suvash Chandra; Singh, Yengkokpam Ibotomba

    2007-03-01

    Whether parasitic diseases-and in particular helminth infections because they are extensive and widespread--have an effect on mental functions and educational attainment is by no mean a new question. Concern about the possibility was evident in the early decades of the century, and the results of investigations designed to discover whether the effects of parasite infections had consequences on school children. Many species of helminth have been reported as causing infections in humans. Of the nematode infections, both soil transmitted helminthiasis and lymphatic filariasis are public health problem in the country. Any of these infections may result in morbidity, malnutrition, and iron-deficiency anaemia. Their possible contribution to impaired cognitive function and educational achievement is by the association between iron deficiency anaemia and malnutrition. Research on the effects of parasitic infection has focused on school-age children. Not only are these children the most vulnerable to parasitic infections--they are also the population group most likely to experience the impact of infection on cognitive function. This review paper discusses the mental and behavioral effects of parasitic infection on child's health. Infected children are less active; their behavior is said to be sluggish and both mental and physical activities and processes appear dulled and slow. A reduction in available energy is likely to cause a cascade of effects running through most aspects of the host's daily mental life and behavior.

  13. [Rheological behavior of tomato concentrates: effect of temperature and concentration].

    PubMed

    Barreiro, J A; Sandoval, A J; Guédez, A; Luciani, Y

    1996-09-01

    The rheological properties of various brands of double concentrated tomato paste manufactured in Venezuela were studied. The effect of temperature (30, 40, 50, 60 degrees C) and concentration (15, 20, 25 and 30% total solids) was determined. A concentric cylinders viscometer Haake Rotovisco RV-2 was used for this purpose. A psudoplastic behaviour that followed the power law was found. The rheological parameters (consistency and behavior indexes) that characterize each paste were determined for the conditions of the study. According to the statistical analyses done the consistency index (K) diminished with an increase in temperature and increased as the concentration increased. An equation to determine the consistency index as a function of temperature and concentration was obtained. Likewise, it was found that temperature did not have a significant effect on the behavior index (n) in the range from 30 to 50 degrees C, however this effect was significant for some of the pastes at 60 degrees C. On the other hand, concentration levels above 20% total solids did not have a significant effect on the behavior index, but a significant effect was determined for 15% total solids.

  14. Effects of cage density on behavior in young adult mice.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lauren P; Chedester, Alan L; Cole, Marlene N

    2007-08-01

    Optimal housing conditions for mice can be achieved by minimizing environmental variables, such as those that may contribute to anxiety-like behavior. This study evaluated the effects of cage size on juvenile mice through assessment of differences in weaning weight, locomotor skills, and anxiety-like behavior. Eighteen pairs of male and pregnant female Swiss-Webster (Cr:SW) mice were housed in 3 different caging scenarios, providing 429, 505, or 729 cm2 of space. Litters were standardized to 10 pups per litter in each cage. Mice reared in each caging scenario were assessed with the open-field, light-dark exploration, and elevated plus-maze tests. No differences in weaning weight were noted. Mice reared in the 505- and 729-cm2 cages explored a significantly larger area of the open-field arena than did those in the 429-cm2 cages. Those reared in the 505-cm2 cages spent more time in the center of the open field than did those in the 729-cm2 cages, suggesting that anxiety-like behavior may be increased in the animals housed in the larger cages. This study did not establish a consistent link between decreased floor space and increased anxiety-like behavior; neither does there appear to be a consistent effect of available floor area on the development of locomotor skills on mouse pups.

  15. Effects of stress during pregnancy on maternal behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Meek, L R; Dittel, P L; Sheehan, M C; Chan, J Y; Kjolhaug, S R

    2001-03-01

    The effects of stress experienced during pregnancy and raising stressed offspring on maternal behavior were investigated in Swiss-Webster mice. Dams were either stressed or not stressed during pregnancy, and raised either prenatally stressed or nonstressed cross-fostered pups. Maternal behaviors such as grooming, nursing, pup retrieval and maternal aggression were assessed during the first 4 days after birth. Nonstressed dams raising stressed pups and stressed dams raising nonstressed pups groomed and nursed their pups significantly less than did control dams (stressed dams raising stressed pups and nonstressed dams raising nonstressed pups). Nonstressed dams raising stressed pups were also the slowest to retrieve both the first and last pup in retrieval tests. Nonstressed dams raising nonstressed pups were significantly less aggressive than other dams. In contrast, stressed dams raising stressed pups exhibited high levels of nursing and grooming, retrieved their pups rapidly and were very aggressive towards an intruder. These results indicate that raising stressed pups, or experiencing stress during a pregnancy can have significant effects on maternal behaviors. Stressed dams raising stressed pups exhibit maternal care comparable to that of nonstressed dams raising nonstressed pups at least for nesting/nurturing behaviors, and show increased levels of aggression and pup retrieval.

  16. Neurochemical and Behavioral Effects of Chronic Unpredictable Stress

    PubMed Central

    Matuszewich, Leslie; McFadden, Lisa M.; Friedman, Ross D.; Frye, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress can influence behaviors associated with medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) function, such as cognition and emotion regulation. Dopamine in the mPFC is responsive to stress and modulates its behavioral effects. The current study tested whether exposure to 10 days of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) altered the effects of acute elevation stress on dopamine release in the mPFC and on spatial recognition memory. Male rats previously exposed to CUS or non-stressed controls were tested behaviorally, and underwent microdialysis to assess mPFC dopamine or had blood sampled for corticosterone analysis. Dopamine in the mPFC significantly increased in both groups during acute elevation stress compared to baseline levels but was attenuated in CUS rats compared to controls. Control rats exposed to elevation stress immediately prior to the T-maze showed impaired performance, whereas CUS rats did not. No group differences were observed in general motor activity or plasma corticosterone following elevation stress. The present results indicate that prior exposure to this particular CUS procedure reduced dopamine release in the mPFC during acute elevation stress and prevented the impairment of performance on a spatial recognition test following an acute stressor. These findings may contribute to an understanding the complex behavioral consequences of stress. PMID:25003946

  17. Psychological aspects of diabetes care: Effecting behavioral change in patients.

    PubMed

    Chew, Boon-How; Shariff-Ghazali, Sazlina; Fernandez, Aaron

    2014-12-15

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) need psychological support throughout their life span from the time of diagnosis. The psychological make-up of the patients with DM play a central role in self-management behaviors. Without patient's adherence to the effective therapies, there would be persistent sub-optimal control of diseases, increase diabetes-related complications, causing deterioration in quality of life, resulting in increased healthcare utilization and burden on healthcare systems. However, provision of psychosocial support is generally inadequate due to its challenging nature of needs and demands on the healthcare systems. This review article examines patient's psychological aspects in general, elaborates in particular about emotion effects on health, and emotion in relation to other psychological domains such as cognition, self-regulation, self-efficacy and behavior. Some descriptions are also provided on willpower, resilience, illness perception and proactive coping in relating execution of new behaviors, coping with future-oriented thinking and influences of illness perception on health-related behaviors. These psychological aspects are further discussed in relation to DM and interventions for patients with DM. Equipped with the understanding of the pertinent nature of psychology in patients with DM; and knowing the links between the psychological disorders, inflammation and cardiovascular outcomes would hopefully encourages healthcare professionals in giving due attention to the psychological needs of patients with DM.

  18. Psychological aspects of diabetes care: Effecting behavioral change in patients

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Boon-How; Shariff-Ghazali, Sazlina; Fernandez, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) need psychological support throughout their life span from the time of diagnosis. The psychological make-up of the patients with DM play a central role in self-management behaviors. Without patient’s adherence to the effective therapies, there would be persistent sub-optimal control of diseases, increase diabetes-related complications, causing deterioration in quality of life, resulting in increased healthcare utilization and burden on healthcare systems. However, provision of psychosocial support is generally inadequate due to its challenging nature of needs and demands on the healthcare systems. This review article examines patient’s psychological aspects in general, elaborates in particular about emotion effects on health, and emotion in relation to other psychological domains such as cognition, self-regulation, self-efficacy and behavior. Some descriptions are also provided on willpower, resilience, illness perception and proactive coping in relating execution of new behaviors, coping with future-oriented thinking and influences of illness perception on health-related behaviors. These psychological aspects are further discussed in relation to DM and interventions for patients with DM. Equipped with the understanding of the pertinent nature of psychology in patients with DM; and knowing the links between the psychological disorders, inflammation and cardiovascular outcomes would hopefully encourages healthcare professionals in giving due attention to the psychological needs of patients with DM. PMID:25512782

  19. Characterization of behavioral and endocrine effects of LSD on zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Leah; Utterback, Eli; Stewart, Adam; Gaikwad, Siddharth; Chung, Kyung Min; Suciu, Christopher; Wong, Keith; Elegante, Marco; Elkhayat, Salem; Tan, Julia; Gilder, Thomas; Wu, Nadine; Dileo, John; Cachat, Jonathan; Kalueff, Allan V

    2010-12-25

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a potent hallucinogenic drug that strongly affects animal and human behavior. Although adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) are emerging as a promising neurobehavioral model, the effects of LSD on zebrafish have not been investigated previously. Several behavioral paradigms (the novel tank, observation cylinder, light-dark box, open field, T-maze, social preference and shoaling tests), as well as modern video-tracking tools and whole-body cortisol assay were used to characterize the effects of acute LSD in zebrafish. While lower doses (5-100 microg/L) did not affect zebrafish behavior, 250 microg/L LSD increased top dwelling and reduced freezing in the novel tank and observation cylinder tests, also affecting spatiotemporal patterns of activity (as assessed by 3D reconstruction of zebrafish traces and ethograms). LSD evoked mild thigmotaxis in the open field test, increased light behavior in the light-dark test, reduced the number of arm entries and freezing in the T-maze and social preference test, without affecting social preference. In contrast, LSD affected zebrafish shoaling (increasing the inter-fish distance in a group), and elevated whole-body cortisol levels. Overall, our findings show sensitivity of zebrafish to LSD action, and support the use of zebrafish models to study hallucinogenic drugs of abuse.

  20. Separate and combined effects of methylphenidate and a behavioral intervention on disruptive behavior in children with mental retardation.

    PubMed Central

    Blum, N J; Mauk, J E; McComas, J J; Mace, F C

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the separate and combined effects of a behavioral intervention and methylphenidate (Ritalin) on disruptive behavior and task engagement in 3 children with severe to profound mental retardation. The behavioral intervention involved differential reinforcement of appropriate behavior and guided compliance. All 3 children demonstrated decreased disruptive behavior and improved task engagement in response to the response to the behavioral intervention. Two of the 3 children demonstrated similar improvement in response to methylphenidate. Although both interventions were highly effective for these 2 participants, the relative efficacy of the interventions varied between the 2 children. There was no evidence of an additive or synergistic effect of the two interventions, but the high efficacy of each intervention alone limited our ability to detect such effects. PMID:8926223

  1. Separate and combined effects of methylphenidate and a behavioral intervention on disruptive behavior in children with mental retardation.

    PubMed

    Blum, N J; Mauk, J E; McComas, J J; Mace, F C

    1996-01-01

    We investigated the separate and combined effects of a behavioral intervention and methylphenidate (Ritalin) on disruptive behavior and task engagement in 3 children with severe to profound mental retardation. The behavioral intervention involved differential reinforcement of appropriate behavior and guided compliance. All 3 children demonstrated decreased disruptive behavior and improved task engagement in response to the response to the behavioral intervention. Two of the 3 children demonstrated similar improvement in response to methylphenidate. Although both interventions were highly effective for these 2 participants, the relative efficacy of the interventions varied between the 2 children. There was no evidence of an additive or synergistic effect of the two interventions, but the high efficacy of each intervention alone limited our ability to detect such effects.

  2. INSTITUTIONS AND BEHAVIOR: EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE ON THE EFFECTS OF DEMOCRACY

    PubMed Central

    Bó, Pedro Dal; Foster, Andrew; Putterman, Louis

    2013-01-01

    A novel experiment is used to show that the effect of a policy on the level of cooperation is greater when it is chosen democratically by the subjects than when it is exogenously imposed. In contrast to the previous literature, our experimental design allows us to control for selection effects (e.g. those who choose the policy may be affected differently by it). Our finding implies that democratic institutions may affect behavior directly in addition to having effects through the choice of policies. Our findings have implications for the generalizability of the results of randomized policy interventions. PMID:25076785

  3. The effects of proton exposure on neurochemistry and behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shukitt-Hale, B.; Szprengiel, A.; Pluhar, J.; Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.

    2004-01-01

    Future space missions will involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth, where astronauts will be exposed to radiation hazards such as those that arise from galactic cosmic rays. Galactic cosmic rays are composed of protons, alpha particles, and particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles). Research by our group has shown that exposure to HZE particles, primarily 600 MeV/n and 1 GeV/n 56Fe, can produce significant alterations in brain neurochemistry and behavior. However, given that protons can make up a significant portion of the radiation spectrum, it is important to study their effects on neural functioning and on related performance. Therefore, these studies examined the effects of exposure to proton irradiation on neurochemical and behavioral endpoints, including dopaminergic functioning, amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion learning, and spatial learning and memory as measured by the Morris water maze. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a dose of 0, 1.5, 3.0 or 4.0 Gy of 250 MeV protons at Loma Linda University and were tested in the different behavioral tests at various times following exposure. Results showed that there was no effect of proton irradiation at any dose on any of the endpoints measured. Therefore, there is a contrast between the insignificant effects of high dose proton exposure and the dramatic effectiveness of low dose (<0.1 Gy) exposures to 56Fe particles on both neurochemical and behavioral endpoints. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  4. Self-reported impulsivity, but not behavioral choice or response impulsivity, partially mediates the effect of stress on drinking behavior.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Ansell, Emily B; Reynolds, Brady; Potenza, Marc N; Sinha, Rajita

    2013-01-01

    Stress and impulsivity contribute to alcohol use, and stress may also act via impulsivity to increase drinking behavior. Impulsivity represents a multi-faceted construct and self-report and behavioral assessments may effectively capture distinct clinically relevant factors. The present research investigated whether aspects of impulsivity mediate the effect of stress on alcohol use. A community-based sample of 192 men and women was assessed on measures of cumulative stress, alcohol use, self-reported impulsivity, and behavioral choice and response impulsivity. Data were analyzed using regression and bootstrapping techniques to estimate indirect effects of stress on drinking via impulsivity. Cumulative adversity exhibited both direct effects and indirect effects (via self-reported impulsivity) on drinking behavior. Additional models examining specific types of stress indicated direct and indirect effects of trauma and recent life events, and indirect effects of major life events and chronic stressors on drinking behavior. Overall, cumulative stress was associated with increased drinking behavior, and this effect was partially mediated by self-reported impulsivity. Self-reported impulsivity also mediated the effects of different types of stress on drinking behavior. These findings highlight the value of mediation models to examine the pathways through which different types of stress increase drinking behavior. Treatment and prevention strategies should focus on enhancing stress management and self-control.

  5. Effects of elastic anisotropy on mechanical behavior of intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of the deformation and fracture behavior of ordered intermetallic compounds are examined within the framework of linear anisotropic elasticity theory of dislocations and cracks. The orientation dependence and the tension/compression asymmetry of yield stress are explained in terms of the anisotropic coupling effect of non-glide stresses to the glide strain. The anomalous yield behavior is related to the disparity (edge/screw) of dislocation mobility and the critical stress required for the dislocation multiplication mechanism of Frank-Read type. The slip-twin conjugate relationship, extensive faulting, and pseudo-twinning (martensitic transformation) at a crack tip can be enhanced also by the anisotropic coupling effect, which may lead to transformation toughening of shear type.

  6. The effects of music on animal physiology, behavior and welfare.

    PubMed

    Alworth, Leanne C; Buerkle, Shawna C

    2013-02-01

    Physiological and psychological effects of listening to music have been documented in humans. The changes in physiology, cognition and brain chemistry and morphology induced by music have been studied in animal models, providing evidence that music may affect animals similarly to humans. Information about the potential benefits of music to animals suggests that providing music may be used as a means of improving the welfare of laboratory animals, such as through environmental enrichment, stress relief and behavioral modification. The authors review the current research on music's effect on animals' physiology and behavior and discuss its potential for improving animal welfare. They conclude that the benefits of providing music to laboratory animals depend on the species and the type of music.

  7. The protective role of prosocial behaviors on antisocial behaviors: the mediating effects of deviant peer affiliation.

    PubMed

    Carlo, Gustavo; Mestre, Maria Vicenta; McGinley, Meredith M; Tur-Porcar, Ana; Samper, Paula; Opal, Deanna

    2014-06-01

    Prosocial behaviors, actions intended to help others, may serve a protective function against association with deviant peers and subsequent delinquent and antisocial behaviors. The present study examined the relations among specific types of prosocial behaviors, deviant peer affiliation, and delinquent and aggressive behaviors. Six hundred and sixty-six adolescents (46% girls; M age = 15.33, SD = .47) from Valencia, Spain completed questionnaires of prosocial behaviors, affiliation with deviant peers, antisocial behaviors, and aggression. Results showed that antisocial behaviors were negatively related only to specific forms of prosocial behaviors. Further analyses showed that deviant peer affiliation mediated the relations between compliant prosocial behavior and delinquency and aggression. Although altruism was not directly related to delinquency and aggression, it was indirectly linked to the behaviors via deviant peer affiliation. Discussion focuses on the relevance of specific forms of prosocial behaviors to antisocial behaviors and the risk of deviant peers for prosocial youth.

  8. Differential Effectiveness of Interdependent and Dependent Group Contingencies in Reducing Disruptive Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Kelsey; Gresham, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Disruptive behavior in the classroom negatively affects all students' academic engagement, achievement, and behavior. Group contingencies have been proven effective in reducing disruptive behavior as part of behavior interventions in the classroom. The Good Behavior Game is a Tier 1 classwide intervention that utilizes an interdependent group…

  9. Effects of Supervisor Performance Feedback on Increasing Preservice Teachers' Positive Communication Behaviors with Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathel, Jeanna Marie; Drasgow, Erik; Christle, Christine C.

    2008-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the effects of supervisor performance feedback on preservice teachers' rates of positive and negative communication behaviors with students with emotional and behavioral disorders and the effects of the intervention on the preservice teachers' perceptions of classroom management and climate. The authors…

  10. Effectiveness of a Response Cost Raffle Procedure on the Disruptive Classroom Behavior of Adolescents with Behavior Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proctor, Mary Anne; Morgan, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    The effectiveness of a behavior management procedure--the response cost raffle--was studied with three male eighth graders and one female ninth grader in special education with mild to moderate behavior problems. Results indicate that the response cost raffle can be an effective and a practical classroom technique for increasing appropriate…

  11. Effects of background gravity stimuli on gravity-controlled behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccoy, D. F.

    1976-01-01

    Physiological and developmental effects of altered gravity were researched. The stimulus properties of gravity have been found to possess reinforcing and aversive properties. Experimental approaches taken, used animals placed into fields of artificial gravity, in the form of parabolic or spiral centrifuges. Gravity preferences were noted and it was concluded that the psychophysics of gravity and background factors which support these behaviors should be further explored.

  12. The effects of proton exposure on neurochemistry and behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukitt-Hale, B.; Joseph, J.; Rabin, B.

    Future space missions will involve long-term travel beyond the magnetic field of the Earth, where astronauts will be exposed to radiation hazards such as those that arise from galactic cosmic rays. Galactic cosmic rays are composed of protons, alpha particles, and particles of high energy and charge (HZE particles). Research by our group has shown that exposure to HZE particles, primarily 600 MeV/n and 1 GeV/n 56Fe, can produce significant alterations in brain neurochemistry and behavior. However, given that protons can make up a significant portion of the radiation spectrum, it is important to study their effects on neural functioning and on related performance. Therefore, these studies exa mined the effects of exposure to proton irradiation on neurochemical and behavioral endpoints, including dopaminergic functioning, amphetamine-induced conditioned taste aversion learning, operant conditioning, and spatial learning and memory as measured by the Morris water maze. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received a dose of 0, 1.5, 3.0 or 4.0 Gy of 250MeV protons at Loma Linda University and were tested in the different behavioral tests at various times following exposure. Results showed that there was no e fect of protonf irradiation at any dose on any of the endpoints measured. Therefore, there is a contrast between the insignificant effects of high dose proton exposure and the dramatic effectiveness of low dose (<0.1 Gy) exposures to 56Fe particles on both neurochemical and behavioral endpoints. Supported by N.A.S.A. Grant NAG9-1190.

  13. EFFECTS OF VIDEO MODELING ON TREATMENT INTEGRITY OF BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTIONS

    PubMed Central

    DiGennaro-Reed, Florence D; Codding, Robin; Catania, Cynthia N; Maguire, Helena

    2010-01-01

    We examined the effects of individualized video modeling on the accurate implementation of behavioral interventions using a multiple baseline design across 3 teachers. During video modeling, treatment integrity improved above baseline levels; however, teacher performance remained variable. The addition of verbal performance feedback increased treatment integrity to 100% for all participants, and performance was maintained 1 week later. Teachers found video modeling to be more socially acceptable with performance feedback than alone, but rated both positively. PMID:21119903

  14. Effect of silicone finishes on the burning behavior of polyester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyon, Julien Xavier Eric

    Polyester fibers are widely used as filling in home applications such as pillows or comforters. Silicone finishes can be used to reduce friction between fibers during processing or as softeners to impart a pleasant down like hand on the fibers. However, it has been reported that these added silicone-based finishes may have a negative effect on the burning behavior of polyester. This research examined the possible mechanisms that can modify the response of polyester fibers when subjected to a flame source. In this study, a spunbond needled polyester nonwoven substrate was treated with different commercial silicone-based finishes. A vertical flame test was used to compare the effect of silicone finishes on the burning behavior of polyester to the inherent burning behavior of untreated polyester. Thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) were performed on spunbond polyester fabric samples to investigate the influence of silicone finishes on the thermal degradation of polyester in air. Residues from TGA were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with elemental analysis. Vertical flammability testing showed that even at a low level, the application of silicone-based finishes on a polyester substrate resulted in a dramatic increase of the flame propagation by preventing its inherent response to heat. Thermograms suggested that the silicone finishes had little or no effect on the thermal degradation of polyester substrates.

  15. On effective temperature in network models of collective behavior.

    PubMed

    Porfiri, Maurizio; Ariel, Gil

    2016-04-01

    Collective behavior of self-propelled units is studied analytically within the Vectorial Network Model (VNM), a mean-field approximation of the well-known Vicsek model. We propose a dynamical systems framework to study the stochastic dynamics of the VNM in the presence of general additive noise. We establish that a single parameter, which is a linear function of the circular mean of the noise, controls the macroscopic phase of the system-ordered or disordered. By establishing a fluctuation-dissipation relation, we posit that this parameter can be regarded as an effective temperature of collective behavior. The exact critical temperature is obtained analytically for systems with small connectivity, equivalent to low-density ensembles of self-propelled units. Numerical simulations are conducted to demonstrate the applicability of this new notion of effective temperature to the Vicsek model. The identification of an effective temperature of collective behavior is an important step toward understanding order-disorder phase transitions, informing consistent coarse-graining techniques and explaining the physics underlying the emergence of collective phenomena. PMID:27131488

  16. Effects of consumer motives on search behavior using internet advertising.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kenneth C C

    2004-08-01

    Past studies on uses and gratifications theory suggested that consumer motives affect how they will use media and media contents. Recent advertising research has extended the theory to study the use of Internet advertising. The current study explores the effects of consumer motives on their search behavior using Internet advertising. The study employed a 2 by 2 between-subjects factorial experiment design. A total of 120 subjects were assigned to an experiment condition that contains an Internet advertisement varying by advertising appeals (i.e., rational vs. emotional) and product involvement levels (high vs. low). Consumer search behavior (measured by the depth, breadth, total amount of search), demographics, and motives were collected by post-experiment questionnaires. Because all three dependent variables measuring search behavior were conceptually related to each other, MANCOVA procedures were employed to examine the moderating effects of consumer motives on the dependent variables in four product involvement-advertising appeal conditions. Results indicated that main effects for product involvements and advertising appeals were statistically significant. Univariate ANOVA also showed that advertising appeals and product involvement levels influenced the total amount of search. Three-way interactions among advertising appeals, product involvement levels, and information motive were also statistically significant. Implications and future research directions are discussed. PMID:15331030

  17. Effects of consumer motives on search behavior using internet advertising.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kenneth C C

    2004-08-01

    Past studies on uses and gratifications theory suggested that consumer motives affect how they will use media and media contents. Recent advertising research has extended the theory to study the use of Internet advertising. The current study explores the effects of consumer motives on their search behavior using Internet advertising. The study employed a 2 by 2 between-subjects factorial experiment design. A total of 120 subjects were assigned to an experiment condition that contains an Internet advertisement varying by advertising appeals (i.e., rational vs. emotional) and product involvement levels (high vs. low). Consumer search behavior (measured by the depth, breadth, total amount of search), demographics, and motives were collected by post-experiment questionnaires. Because all three dependent variables measuring search behavior were conceptually related to each other, MANCOVA procedures were employed to examine the moderating effects of consumer motives on the dependent variables in four product involvement-advertising appeal conditions. Results indicated that main effects for product involvements and advertising appeals were statistically significant. Univariate ANOVA also showed that advertising appeals and product involvement levels influenced the total amount of search. Three-way interactions among advertising appeals, product involvement levels, and information motive were also statistically significant. Implications and future research directions are discussed.

  18. On effective temperature in network models of collective behavior.

    PubMed

    Porfiri, Maurizio; Ariel, Gil

    2016-04-01

    Collective behavior of self-propelled units is studied analytically within the Vectorial Network Model (VNM), a mean-field approximation of the well-known Vicsek model. We propose a dynamical systems framework to study the stochastic dynamics of the VNM in the presence of general additive noise. We establish that a single parameter, which is a linear function of the circular mean of the noise, controls the macroscopic phase of the system-ordered or disordered. By establishing a fluctuation-dissipation relation, we posit that this parameter can be regarded as an effective temperature of collective behavior. The exact critical temperature is obtained analytically for systems with small connectivity, equivalent to low-density ensembles of self-propelled units. Numerical simulations are conducted to demonstrate the applicability of this new notion of effective temperature to the Vicsek model. The identification of an effective temperature of collective behavior is an important step toward understanding order-disorder phase transitions, informing consistent coarse-graining techniques and explaining the physics underlying the emergence of collective phenomena.

  19. On effective temperature in network models of collective behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porfiri, Maurizio; Ariel, Gil

    2016-04-01

    Collective behavior of self-propelled units is studied analytically within the Vectorial Network Model (VNM), a mean-field approximation of the well-known Vicsek model. We propose a dynamical systems framework to study the stochastic dynamics of the VNM in the presence of general additive noise. We establish that a single parameter, which is a linear function of the circular mean of the noise, controls the macroscopic phase of the system—ordered or disordered. By establishing a fluctuation-dissipation relation, we posit that this parameter can be regarded as an effective temperature of collective behavior. The exact critical temperature is obtained analytically for systems with small connectivity, equivalent to low-density ensembles of self-propelled units. Numerical simulations are conducted to demonstrate the applicability of this new notion of effective temperature to the Vicsek model. The identification of an effective temperature of collective behavior is an important step toward understanding order-disorder phase transitions, informing consistent coarse-graining techniques and explaining the physics underlying the emergence of collective phenomena.

  20. Aspen shaving versus chip bedding: effects on breeding and behavior.

    PubMed

    Jackson, E; Demarest, K; Eckert, W J; Cates-Gatto, C; Nadav, T; Cates, L N; Howard, H; Roberts, A J

    2015-01-01

    The choice of laboratory cage bedding material is often based on both practical and husbandry issues, whereas behavioral outcomes rarely appear to be considered. It has been noted that a breeding success difference appears to be associated with the differential use of aspen chip and aspen shaving bedding in our facility; therefore, we sought to analyze breeding records maintained over a 20-month period. In fact, in all four mouse strains analyzed, shaving bedding was associated with a significant increase in average weanlings per litter relative to chip bedding. To determine whether these bedding types also resulted in differences in behaviors associated with wellbeing, we examined nest building, anxiety-like, depressive-like (or helpless-like), and social behavior in mice housed on chip versus shaving bedding. We found differences in the nests built, but no overall effect of bedding type on the other behaviors examined. Therefore, we argue that breeding success, perhaps especially in more challenging strains, is improved on shaving bedding and this is likely due to improved nest-building potential. For standard laboratory practices, however, these bedding types appear equivalent.

  1. Memory Effects on Movement Behavior in Animal Foraging

    PubMed Central

    Bracis, Chloe; Gurarie, Eliezer; Van Moorter, Bram; Goodwin, R. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    An individual’s choices are shaped by its experience, a fundamental property of behavior important to understanding complex processes. Learning and memory are observed across many taxa and can drive behaviors, including foraging behavior. To explore the conditions under which memory provides an advantage, we present a continuous-space, continuous-time model of animal movement that incorporates learning and memory. Using simulation models, we evaluate the benefit memory provides across several types of landscapes with variable-quality resources and compare the memory model within a nested hierarchy of simpler models (behavioral switching and random walk). We find that memory almost always leads to improved foraging success, but that this effect is most marked in landscapes containing sparse, contiguous patches of high-value resources that regenerate relatively fast and are located in an otherwise devoid landscape. In these cases, there is a large payoff for finding a resource patch, due to size, value, or locational difficulty. While memory-informed search is difficult to differentiate from other factors using solely movement data, our results suggest that disproportionate spatial use of higher value areas, higher consumption rates, and consumption variability all point to memory influencing the movement direction of animals in certain ecosystems. PMID:26288228

  2. The Effect of Behavioral Family Intervention on Knowledge of Effective Parenting Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Leanne; Morawska, Alina; Sanders, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    There is a paucity of research considering the effect of behavioral family intervention (BFI) on parenting knowledge and the relative importance of both knowledge and parent confidence in reducing parenting dysfunction and problematic child behavior is unclear. In this study ninety-one parents (44 mothers, 47 fathers) of children aged 2-10 years…

  3. Adrafinil: effects on behavior and cognition in aged canines.

    PubMed

    Siwak, C T; Callahan, H; Milgram, N W

    2000-07-01

    1. Adrafmil is a novel vigilance promoting agent developed in France by Louis Lafon Laboratories. 2. Adrafinil causes increased locomotion without producing stereotypical activity in canines tested in an open field. 3. The effectiveness of a single treatment is long-lasting, and the effectiveness persists over repeated treatments. 4. Acquisition of a size discrimination problem is enhanced by adrafinil. This may be linked to performance motivation. 5. Adrafinil causes a long-lasting increase in high frequency electroencephalographic activity recorded from cortical electrodes. 6. These results indicate that adrafinil is novel behavioral stimulant with cognitive enhancing potential. The underlying mechanisms of action are still unknown. PMID:11191710

  4. Behaviorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, J.

    2011-01-01

    Early forms of psychology assumed that mental life was the appropriate subject matter for psychology, and introspection was an appropriate method to engage that subject matter. In 1913, John B. Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the…

  5. Investigating the Collateral Effects of Behavior Management on Early Literacy Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gage, Nicholas A.; MacSuga-Gage, Ashley S.; Prykanowski, Debra; Coyne, Michael; Scott, Terrance M.

    2015-01-01

    Effective behavior management is necessary to ensure students are engaged with instruction. Students cannot learn if they are not engaged. Although the relationship between effective behavior management and positive student behavior is well established, the relationship between behavior management and increased academic achievement, including…

  6. Long-Term Effects of a Token Economy on Target and Off-Task Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Theodore H.; Vogrin, Daniel J.

    1979-01-01

    Examined the effects of a token economy on off-task behavior occurring concurrently with the reinforcement of target behavior. Results indicated that while the token economy maintained effectiveness in terms of increasing the frequency of target behaviors, the frequency of off-task or inappropriate behaviors also increased as the year progressed.…

  7. The effect of color priming on infant brain and behavior.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, Teresa; Hirshkowitz, Amy; Hawkins, Laura; Boas, David A

    2014-01-15

    Behavioral studies have identified select experiences that can prime infants to attend to color information as the basis for individuating objects prior to the time they do so spontaneously. For example, viewing pretest events in which the color of an object predicts the function in which it will engage leads 9-month-olds (who typically do not attend to color differences) to demonstrate increased sensitivity to color information in a subsequent individuation task (Wilcox and Chapa, 2004). In contrast, viewing pretest events in which the color of an object predicts distinct object motions, but the motions are not functionally relevant, does not produce color priming. The purpose of the present research was to identify the cortical underpinnings of these behavioral effects. Infants aged 8 and 9 months viewed function or motion pretest events and then their capacity to individuate-by-color was assessed in an object individuation task. Behavioral and neuroimaging data were collected. Two main findings emerged. First, as predicted, the infants who viewed the function but not the motion pretest events showed prolonged looking to the test event, a behavioral indicator of object individuation. In addition, they evidenced increased activation in anterior temporal cortex, thought to be a cortical signature of object individuation. A second and unexpected finding was that viewing either type of pretest events led to increased activation in the posterior temporal cortex, as compared to infants who did not see pretest events, revealing that prior exposure to the motion pretest events does influence infants' processing of the test event, even though it is not evident in the behavioral results. The cognitive processes involved, and the cortical structures that mediate these processes, are discussed.

  8. BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS OF GAMMA-HYDROXYBUTYRATE (GHB) IN HUMANS

    PubMed Central

    Oliveto, Alison; Gentry, W. Brooks; Pruzinsky, Rhonda; Gonsai, Kishorchandra; Kosten, Thomas R.; Martell, Bridget; Poling, James

    2010-01-01

    Despite the therapeutic use and abuse potential of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB or Xyrem), relatively few studies have examined the behavioral effects of GHB in humans under controlled laboratory conditions. Thus, this eight-session study examined in 10 non substance-abusing volunteers the behavioral effects of GHB at each of the following doses: 0, 0.32, 0.56, 0.75, 1.0, 1.8, 2.4, 3.2 g/70 kg, p.o.. Order of dose testing was random, except that the first two participants received active doses in ascending order and 2.4 g/70 kg was always tested before 3.2 g/70 kg. Prior to drug administration and at several post-drug time points, self-report, observer-report, physiological, and psychomotor performance measures were obtained. Analyses based on area under the curve showed that GHB produced dose-related increases in subjective ratings of sedative-like, stimulant-like, positive mood, and dissociative effects, but no changes in psychomotor performance measures or blood pressure. Analyses based on peak effects generally showed dose-related increases in ratings indicating sedative-like, dissociative, and drug liking, although some measures showed U-shaped dose-related changes. These initial findings suggest that GHB at doses of 0.32–3.2 g/70 kg produces dissociative, sedating and some stimulant-like effects in humans without a history of sedative abuse. PMID:20526195

  9. Intergenerational Continuity in Parenting Behavior: Mediating Pathways and Child Effects

    PubMed Central

    Neppl, Tricia K.; Conger, Rand D.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Ontai, Lenna L.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective, longitudinal investigation examined mechanisms proposed to explain continuities in parenting behavior across two generations (G1, G2). Data came from 187 G2 adults, their mothers (G1), and their children (G3). Prospective information regarding G2 was collected both during adolescence and early adulthood. G1 data were collected during G2’s adolescence and G3 data were generated during the preschool years. Assessments included both observational and self-report measures. The results indicated a direct relationship between G1 and G2 harsh parenting and between G1 and G2 positive parenting. As predicted, specific mediators accounted for intergenerational continuity in particular types of parenting behavior. G2 externalizing behavior mediated the relationship between G1 and G2 harsh parenting, while G2 academic attainment mediated the relationship between G1 and G2 positive parenting. In addition, the hypothesized mediating pathways remained statistically significant after taking into account possible G2 effects on G1 parenting and G3 effects on G2 parenting. PMID:19702389

  10. Selective blockade of 2-arachidonoylglycerol hydrolysis produces cannabinoid behavioral effects

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jonathan Z.; Li, Weiwei; Booker, Lamont; Burston, James J.; Kinsey, Steven G.; Schlosburg, Joel E.; Pavón, Franciso J.; Serrano, Antonia M.; Selley, Dana E.; Parsons, Loren H.; Lichtman, Aron H.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.

    2008-01-01

    2-Arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and anandamide are endocannabinoids that activate cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. Endocannabinoid signaling is terminated by enzymatic hydrolysis, a process that, for anandamide, is mediated by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) and, for 2-AG, is thought to involve monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). FAAH inhibitors produce a select subset of the behavioral effects observed with CB1 agonists, intimating a functional segregation of endocannabinoid signaling pathways in vivo. Testing this hypothesis, however, requires specific tools to independently block anandamide and 2-AG metabolism. Here, we report a potent and selective inhibitor of MAGL, JZL184, that, upon administration to mice, raises brain 2-AG by 8-fold without altering anandamide. JZL184-treated mice exhibited a broad array of CB1-dependent behavioral effects, including analgesia, hypothermia, and hypomotility. These data indicate that 2-AG endogenously modulates several behavioral processes classically associated with the pharmacology of cannabinoids and point to overlapping and unique functions for 2-AG and anandamide in vivo. PMID:19029917

  11. Social Influences on Neurobiology and Behavior: Epigenetic Effects During Development

    PubMed Central

    Curley, JP; Jensen, CL; Mashoodh, R; Champagne, FA

    2010-01-01

    The quality of the social environment can have profound influences on the development and activity of neural systems with implications for numerous behavioral and physiological responses, including the expression of emotionality. Though social experiences occurring early in development may be particularly influential on the developing brain, there is continued plasticity within these neural circuits amongst juveniles and into early adulthood. In this review, we explore the evidence derived from studies in rodents which illustrates the social modulation during development of neural systems, with a particular emphasis on those systems in which a long-term effect is observed. One possible explanation for the persistence of dynamic changes in these systems in response to the environment is the involvement of epigenetic mechanisms, and here we discuss recent studies which support the role of these mechanisms in mediating the link between social experiences, gene expression, neurobiological changes, and behavioral variation. This literature raises critical questions about the interaction between neural systems, the concordance between neural and behavioral changes, sexual dimorphism in effects, the importance of considering individual differences in response to the social environment, and the potential of an epigenetic perspective in advancing our understanding of the pathways leading to variations in mental health. PMID:20650569

  12. Blending Effective Behavior Management and Literacy Strategies for Preschoolers Exhibiting Negative Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Sometimes students will exhibit various aggressive behaviors in the preschool classroom. Early childhood educators need to have behavior management strategies to manage the students' negative behaviors within the classroom setting. This article will provide a rationale for embedding literacy instruction within behavior management strategies to…

  13. Variety support and exercise adherence behavior: experimental and mediating effects.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, Benjamin D; Standage, Martyn; McEwan, Desmond; Wolf, Svenja A; Lubans, David R; Eather, Narelle; Kaulius, Megan; Ruissen, Geralyn R; Crocker, Peter R E; Zumbo, Bruno D; Beauchamp, Mark R

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which the provision of variety (i.e., variety support) is related to exercise behavior among physically inactive adults and the extent to which the 'experience of variety' mediates those effects. One hundred and twenty one inactive university students were randomly assigned to follow a high or low variety support exercise program for 6 weeks. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 3- and 6-weeks. Participants in the high variety support condition displayed higher levels of adherence to the exercise program than those in the low variety support condition [F(1, 116) = 5.55, p = .02, η(p)(2) = .05] and the relationship between variety support and adherence was mediated by perceived variety (β = .16, p < .01). Exercise-related variety support holds potential to be an efficacious method for facilitating greater exercise adherence behaviors of previously inactive people by fostering perceptions of variety.

  14. Effects of dialect on merger perception: ERP and behavioral correlates.

    PubMed

    Conrey, Brianna; Potts, Geoffrey F; Niedzielski, Nancy A

    2005-12-01

    Native speakers of a language are often unable to consciously perceive, and have altered neural responses to, phonemic contrasts not present in their language. This study examined whether speakers of dialects of the same language with different phoneme inventories also show measurably different neural responses to contrasts not present in their dialect. Speakers with (n=11) and without (n=11) an American English I/E (pin/pen) vowel merger in speech production were asked to discriminate perceptually between minimal pairs of words that contrasted in the critical vowel merger and minimal pairs of control words while their event-related potential (ERPs) were recorded. Compared with unmerged dialect speakers, merged dialect speakers were less able to make behavioral discriminations and exhibited a reduced late positive ERP component (LPC) effect to incongruent merger vowel stimuli. These results indicate that between dialects of a single language, the behavioral response differences may reflect neural differences related to conscious phonological decision processes.

  15. Effects of permafrost on stream channel behavior in Arctic Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Kevin M.

    1978-01-01

    Sites with drainage areas ranging from 88 to 12,200 sq km were monitored on five streams in northern Alaska during the breakup in 1976 to determine (1) the effects of frozen bed and bank material on channel behavior, and (2) the importance of the annual breakup flood in forming the channels of arctic streams. The thawing and concomitant erosion of channels varied with changes in bed-material size, channel pattern, drainage area, and climate. The response of channels to breakup flooding ranged from total permafrost control of channel processes, including both bed scour and lateral erosion, to only brief restriction of channel behavior early in the rise of the flooding. The watershed characteristic that appears to explain much of this variation is size of drainage area. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Behavioral suppression using intracranial reward and punishment: effects of benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Moriyama, M; Ichimaru, Y; Gomita, Y

    1984-11-01

    Rats were chronically implanted with electrodes aimed at the lateral hypothalamus (LH) and the dorsal central gray (DCG) and trained to press a lever that delivered rewarding stimulation of the LH and punishing stimulation of the DCG. In this situation, both diazepam (5-20 mg/kg, PO) and bromazepam (2-10 mg/kg, PO) caused a marked dose-dependent increase of the lever pressing response in the punished period. In addition, the facilitation of lever pressing in unpunished period was also seen in diazepam (5 and 10 mg/kg). These results show that behavioral suppression on lever pressing maintained self-stimulation reward is inducible following DCG stimulation, and that benzodiazepines exhibit an anti-behavioral suppression effect in this situation.

  17. Stress Ratio Effect on Ratcheting Behavior of AISI 4340 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya Bharathi, K.; Dutta, K.

    2016-02-01

    Ratcheting is known as accumulation of plastic strain during asymmetric cyclic loading of metallic materials under non-zero mean stress. This phenomenon reduces fatigue life of engineering materials and thus limits the life prediction capacity of Coffin-Manson relationship. This study intends to investigate the ratcheting behavior in AISI 4340 steel which is mainly used for designing of railway wheel sets, axles, shafts, aircraft components and other machinery parts. The effect of stress ratio on the ratcheting behaviour in both annealed and normalised conditions were investigated for investigated steel. Ratcheting tests were done at different stress ratios of -0.4, -0.6 and -0.8. The results showed that the material responds to hardening behavior and nature of strain accumulation is dependent on the magnitude of stress ratio. The post ratcheted samples showed increase in tensile strength and hardness which increases with increasing stress ratio and these variations in tensile properties are correlated with the induced cyclic hardening.

  18. Effects and side effects of DRO as treatment for self-injurious behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Cowdery, G E; Iwata, B A; Pace, G M

    1990-01-01

    A three-part controlled case study is presented in which severe and longstanding self-injurious behavior exhibited by a 9-year-old-boy was treated successfully with differential reinforcement of other behavior. In Phase 1, an experimental analysis demonstrated that the boy's scratching was not maintained by environmental contingencies; instead, it appeared that the self-injurious behavior was a stereotypic (automatically reinforced) response. In Phase 2, the effects of an escalating differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior schedule mediated through token reinforcement (pennies) were evaluated in a reversal design. Results showed that differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior eliminated self-injurious behavior very quickly and for periods of time as long as 30 min. A noteworthy side effect observed during Phase 2 was the occurrence of crying behavior following the nondelivery of reinforcement. In Phase 3, the token program was gradually extended in 30-min increments throughout the day. Additionally, results of a brief multielement manipulation showed that the effects of token reinforcement were superior to those of a more easily administered differential reinforcement of other behavior based on social reinforcement, which differed little from baseline. PMID:2074238

  19. Reversing the testing effect by feedback: Behavioral and electrophysiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Pastötter, Bernhard; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz T

    2016-06-01

    The testing effect refers to the finding that retrieval practice of previously studied information enhances its long-term retention more than restudy practice does. Recent work showed that the testing effect can be dramatically reversed when feedback is provided to participants during final recall testing (Storm, Friedman, Murayama, & Bjork, 2014). Following this prior work, in this study, we examined the reversal of the testing effect by investigating oscillatory brain activity during final recall testing. Twenty-six healthy participants learned cue-target word pairs and underwent a practice phase in which half of the items were retrieval practiced and half were restudy practiced. Two days later, two cued recall tests were administered, and immediate feedback was provided to participants in Test 1. Behavioral results replicated the prior work by showing a testing effect in Test 1, but a reversed testing effect in Test 2. Extending the prior work, EEG results revealed a feedback-related effect in alpha/lower-beta and retrieval-related effects in slow and fast theta power, with practice condition modulating the fast theta power effect for items that were not recalled in Test 1. The results indicate that the reversed testing effect can arise without differential strengthening of restudied and retrieval-practiced items via feedback learning. Theoretical implications of the findings, in particular with respect to the distribution-based bifurcation model of testing effects (Kornell, Bjork, & Garcia, 2011), are discussed.

  20. Toxic waste: behavioral effects of an environmental stressor.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, J; Stefanko, M

    1989-01-01

    This study examines the stress-related behavioral effects that may be associated with living near an ambient stressor: a toxic-waste landfill. Results are based on a telephone survey of 426 persons living in three distance strata from the landfill (within 1 1/2 miles, 1 1/2 to 5 miles, and 5 to 10 miles). The instrument was adapted from the Hopkins Life Checklist (SCL-90) and from surveys used by researchers studying the effects of the Three Mile Island nuclear accident. No significant differences were found across area or amount of stimuli exposure on the dependent variables of bodily effects, anger-hostility, and demoralization. Scattered effects across age, sex, educational level, and home ownership (v rental) occurred; however, these could not be attributed solely to the landfill. PMID:2923989

  1. Mephedrone: Public health risk, mechanisms of action, and behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Dybdal-Hargreaves, Nicholas F; Holder, Nicholas D; Ottoson, Paige E; Sweeney, Melanie D; Williams, Tyisha

    2013-08-15

    The recent shortage of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, Ecstasy) has led to an increased demand for alternative amphetamine-like drugs such as the synthetic cathinone, 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone). Despite the re-classification of mephedrone as a Class B restricted substance by the United Kingdom and restrictive legislation by the United States, international policy regarding mephedrone control is still developing and interest in synthetic amphetamine-like drugs could drive the development of future mephedrone analogues. Currently, there is little literature investigating the mechanism of action and long-term effects of mephedrone. As such, we reviewed the current understanding of amphetamines, cathinones, and cocaine emphasizing the potentially translational aspects to mephedrone, as well as contrasting with the work that has been done specifically on mephedrone in order to present the current state of understanding of mephedrone in terms of its risks, mechanisms, and behavioral effects. Emerging research suggests that while there are structural and behavioral similarities of mephedrone with amphetamine-like compounds, it appears that serotonergic signaling may mediate more of mephedrone's effects unlike the more dopaminergic dependent effects observed in traditional amphetamine-like compounds. As new designer drugs are produced, current and continuing research on mephedrone and other synthetic cathinones should help inform policymakers' decisions regarding the regulation of novel 'legal highs.'

  2. The effect of an abuse-deterrent opioid formulation (OxyContin) on opioid abuse-related outcomes in the postmarketing setting.

    PubMed

    Coplan, P M; Chilcoat, H D; Butler, S F; Sellers, E M; Kadakia, A; Harikrishnan, V; Haddox, J D; Dart, R C

    2016-09-01

    An extended-release opioid analgesic (OxyContin, OC) was reformulated with abuse-deterrent properties to deter abuse. This report examines changes in abuse through oral and nonoral routes, doctor-shopping, and fatalities in 10 studies 3.5 years after reformulation. Changes in OC abuse from 1 year before to 3 years after OC reformulation were calculated, adjusted for prescription changes. Abuse of OC decreased 48% in national poison center surveillance systems, decreased 32% in a national drug treatment system, and decreased 27% among individuals prescribed OC in claims databases. Doctor-shopping for OC decreased 50%. Overdose fatalities reported to the manufacturer decreased 65%. Abuse of other opioids without abuse-deterrent properties decreased 2 years later than OC and with less magnitude, suggesting OC decreases were not due to broader opioid interventions. Consistent with the formulation, decreases were larger for nonoral than oral abuse. Abuse-deterrent opioids may mitigate abuse and overdose risks among chronic pain patients.

  3. Considerations in the analysis and treatment of dietary effects on behavior: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bird, B L; Russo, D C; Cataldo, M F

    1977-12-01

    Scientific and public interest in the effects of diet of behavior disorders has recently increased. This paper argues that (1) the experimental analysis of behavior offers an effective scientific methodology for assessing the effects of dietary substances on behavior problems, and that (2) such analysis permits behavioral consequences to be considered as an alternative treatment to dietary control. A case study of a 9-year-old retarded boy with autistic behaviors is presented. Suspected dietary substances were demonstrated to be effective influences on the child's behavior, whereas a simple behavior modification program improved his problem behaviors. Also discussed are issues and problems which arise in research on dietary effects on behavior and in selection of effective and ethical treatments. PMID:599137

  4. Fabrication of biomimetic nanomaterials and their effect on cell behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porri, Teresa Jane

    Cells in vivo respond to an intricate combination of chemical and mechanical signals. The corneal epithelium, a structure which prevents the admission of bacteria and undesirable molecules into the eye, grows on a basement membrane which presents both nanoscale topographic and adhesive chemical signals. An effective approach to biomaterials design takes advantage of the synergistic effects of the multiple cellular inputs which are available to engineer cell-substrate interactions. We have previously demonstrated the effects of nanoscale topography on a variety of corneal epithelial cell behaviors. To gain a better understanding of cell-level control in vivo, we employ a systems-level approach which looks at the effect of nanoscale topography in conjunction with a biomimetic surface chemistry. First, we discuss a novel method of fabricating nanoscale topography through templated electroless deposition of gold into PVP-coated polycarbonate membranes. This technique creates nanowires of gold with an uniform outer diameter that is dependent upon the size of the pores in the membrane used, and a nanowire length that is dependent upon the extent of etching into the polymer membrane. The gold nanowires can be modified with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols. Using these substrates, we study the effect of topographic length scale and surface chemistry on cells attached to a discontinuous nanoscale topography, and find a transition in cellular behavior at a length scale (between 600 and 2000 nm inter-wire spacing) that is commensurate with the transition length scale seen on surfaces presenting continuous grooves and ridges. Secondly, we study the effect of non-fouling peptide-modified SAMs on cellular behavior. We examine the effect of co-presented RGD and AG73 peptides and show that cell spreading is a function of the relative ratios of RGD and AG73 present on the surface. Finally, we explore the combinatorial effects of biologically relevant chemistry with

  5. Quinine enhances the behavioral stimulant effect of cocaine in mice.

    PubMed

    Huertas, Adriana; Wessinger, William D; Kucheryavykh, Yuri V; Sanabria, Priscila; Eaton, Misty J; Skatchkov, Serguei N; Rojas, Legier V; Maldonado-Martínez, Gerónimo; Inyushin, Mikhail Y

    2015-02-01

    The Na(+)-dependent dopamine transporter (DAT) is primarily responsible for regulating free dopamine (DA) concentrations in the brain by participating in the majority of DA uptake; however, other DA transporters may also participate, especially if cocaine or other drugs of abuse compromise DAT. Recently, such cocaine-insensitive low-affinity mono- and poly-amine OCT transporters were described in astrocytes which use DA as a substrate. These transporters are from a different transporter family and while insensitive to cocaine, they are specifically blocked by quinine and some steroids. Quinine is inexpensive and is often found in injected street drugs as an "adulterant". The present study was designed to determine the participation of OCTs in cocaine dependent behavioral and physiological changes in mice. Using FVB mice we showed, that daily single injections of quinine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) co-administered with cocaine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) for 10 days significantly enhanced cocaine-induced locomotor behavioral sensitization. Quinine had no significant effect on the time course of behavioral activation. In astrocytes from the ventral tegmental area of mice, transporter currents of quinine-sensitive monoamine transporters were also augmented after two weeks of cocaine administration. The importance of low-affinity high-capacity transporters for DA clearance is discussed, explaining the known ability of systemically administered DAT inhibitors to anomalously increase DA clearance.

  6. Effects of habitual anger on employees' behavior during organizational change.

    PubMed

    Bönigk, Mareike; Steffgen, Georges

    2013-12-01

    Organizational change is a particularly emotional event for those being confronted with it. Anger is a frequently experienced emotion under these conditions. This study analyses the influence of employees' habitual anger reactions on their reported behavior during organizational change. It was explored whether anger reactions conducive to recovering or increasing individual well-being will enhance the likelihood of functional change behavior. Dysfunctional regulation strategies in terms of individual well-being are expected to decrease the likelihood of functional change behavior-mediated by the commitment to change. Four hundred and twelve employees of different organizations in Luxembourg undergoing organizational change participated in the study. Findings indicate that the anger regulation strategy venting, and humor increase the likelihood of deviant resistance to change. Downplaying the incident's negative impact and feedback increase the likelihood of active support for change. The mediating effect of commitment to change has been found for humor and submission. The empirical findings suggest that a differentiated conceptualization of resistance to change is required. Specific implications for practical change management and for future research are discussed. PMID:24287849

  7. Effects of sucrose ingestion on the behavior of hyperactive boys.

    PubMed

    Wolraich, M; Milich, R; Stumbo, P; Schultz, F

    1985-04-01

    A challenge design was used in two separate studies to investigate the effects of sucrose ingestion on the behavior and learning of hyperactive boys. In both studies, 16 boys were admitted to a clinical research center for 3 successive days, on each of which they were given a sucrose-free diet. On day 1, baseline levels on the learning tasks were established; on days 2 and 3 a challenge drink of either sucrose 1.75 gm/kg or a placebo (aspartame in equivalent sweetness) was presented, in a counterbalanced order. In the first study the challenge drink was administered 1 hour after lunch; in the second study it was given in the morning after an overnight fast. On days 2 and 3 of both studies, 37 behavioral (playroom observation and examiner ratings) and cognitive (learning and memory tasks) measures were collected, starting 1/2 hour after ingestion of the drink. The results of both studies revealed no differences between the boys' performance on the two challenge days. These findings undermine the hypothesis that sucrose plays a major role in accounting for the inappropriate behavior of hyperactive boys.

  8. The Effects of a Token Economy on First Grade Students Inappropriate Social Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shook, Suzan C.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Studies the effectiveness of a token economy on specific inappropriate social behaviors of three first grade students. Suggests that token economy systems can be very effective in decreasing disruptive behaviors of primary aged students. (MG)

  9. Addressing Disruptive Behaviors in an after School Program Classroom: The Effects of the Daily Behavior Report Card

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCorvey, Zamecia J.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to address behavior discipline problems in special and general education setting classrooms. Disruptive behaviors are a major concern as they create excessive stress and demands for classroom teachers and school administrators to address them. Effective interventions are needed to properly address them. Moreover, classroom…

  10. The Effect of Preteaching Reading Skills on the on-Task Behavior of Children Identified with Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Michelle; Burns, Matthew K.; Lau, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Research has consistently demonstrated that preteaching activities led to increased academic outcomes and increased academic outcomes improve behavioral variables. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a preteaching intervention on time spent on task for children identified with a behavioral disorder (BD). A single-subject…

  11. Preventive Effects of Treatment of Disruptive Behavior Disorder in Middle Childhood on Substance Use and Delinquent Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zonnevylle-Bender, Marjo J. S.; Matthys, Walter; van de Wiel, Nicolle M. H.; Lochman, John E.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) is a well-known risk factor for substance abuse and delinquent behavior in adolescence. Therefore, the long-term preventive effects of treatment of DBD in middle childhood on beginning substance use and delinquency in early adolescence were investigated. Method: Children with DBD (8-13 years old) had…

  12. Effects of fictive reward on rat's choice behavior.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ko-Un; Huh, Namjung; Jang, Yunsil; Lee, Daeyeol; Jung, Min Whan

    2015-01-27

    Choices of humans and non-human primates are influenced by both actually experienced and fictive outcomes. To test whether this is also the case in rodents, we examined rat's choice behavior in a binary choice task in which variable magnitudes of actual and fictive rewards were delivered. We found that the animal's choice was significantly influenced by the magnitudes of both actual and fictive rewards in the previous trial. A model-based analysis revealed, however, that the effect of fictive reward was more transient and influenced mostly the choice in the next trial, whereas the effect of actual reward was more sustained, consistent with incremental learning of action values. Our results suggest that the capacity to modify future choices based on fictive outcomes might be shared by many different animal species, but fictive outcomes are less effective than actual outcomes in the incremental value learning system.

  13. Effects of fictive reward on rat's choice behavior

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ko-Un; Huh, Namjung; Jang, Yunsil; Lee, Daeyeol; Jung, Min Whan

    2015-01-01

    Choices of humans and non-human primates are influenced by both actually experienced and fictive outcomes. To test whether this is also the case in rodents, we examined rat's choice behavior in a binary choice task in which variable magnitudes of actual and fictive rewards were delivered. We found that the animal's choice was significantly influenced by the magnitudes of both actual and fictive rewards in the previous trial. A model-based analysis revealed, however, that the effect of fictive reward was more transient and influenced mostly the choice in the next trial, whereas the effect of actual reward was more sustained, consistent with incremental learning of action values. Our results suggest that the capacity to modify future choices based on fictive outcomes might be shared by many different animal species, but fictive outcomes are less effective than actual outcomes in the incremental value learning system. PMID:25623929

  14. Hydrostatic Stress Effect On the Yield Behavior of Inconel 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

    2002-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic stress has no effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Recent reexaminations of classical theory have revealed a significant effect of hydrostatic stress on the yield behavior of notched geometries. New experiments and nonlinear finite element analyses (FEA) of Inconel 100 (IN 100) equal-arm bend and double-edge notch tension (DENT) test specimens have revealed the effect of internal hydrostatic tensile stresses on yielding. Nonlinear FEA using the von Mises (yielding is independent of hydrostatic stress) and the Drucker-Prager (yielding is linearly dependent on hydrostatic stress) yield functions was performed. In all test cases, the von Mises constitutive model, which is independent of hydrostatic pressure, overestimated the load for a given displacement or strain. Considering the failure displacements or strains, the Drucker-Prager FEMs predicted loads that were 3% to 5% lower than the von Mises values. For the failure loads, the Drucker Prager FEMs predicted strains that were 20% to 35% greater than the von Mises values. The Drucker-Prager yield function seems to more accurately predict the overall specimen response of geometries with significant internal hydrostatic stress influence.

  15. Behavioral effects following repeated exposure to hexachloronaphthalene in rats.

    PubMed

    Kilanowicz, Anna; Wiaderna, Dorota; Lutz, Piotr; Szymczak, Wieslaw

    2012-06-01

    Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs), including hexachloronaphthalene (HxCN), are widespread global environmental contaminants. Our experiments were aimed at assessing HxCN effects on motor behavior, long-term memory, pain sensitivity, magnitude of stress-induced analgesia, auditory function and sensorimotor gating, following repeated intragastric administration (28 days) of HxCN at 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg body weight. Three weeks after the exposure termination, male Wistar rats were subjected to the neurobehavioral tests battery performed in the following order: open-field test, passive avoidance test, hot-plate test and acoustic startle response test. Repeated administration of HxCN induced disorders of motivational processes manifested by: anorectic effect caused by aphagia and adipsia; significantly reduced motor activity (hypokinesia); impaired long-term memory and acquired passive avoidance reaction; reduced pain threshold and shortened duration of anxiety reaction after pain stimulus (sensory neglect). Some of these neurobehavioral effects (impaired long-term memory, reduced pain threshold and stress-induced analgesia) were observed at 0.3 mgHxCN/kg body weight without any signs of overt toxicity. The outcome of our study shows that HxCN, like other compounds of the persistent organic pollutants (POPs) group, creates a potential risk of behavioral changes in the central nervous system in the general population as a result of environmental exposure.

  16. Hydrostatic Stress Effect on the Yield Behavior of Inconel 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Phillip A.; Wilson, Christopher D.

    2003-01-01

    Classical metal plasticity theory assumes that hydrostatic stress has negligible effect on the yield and postyield behavior of metals. Recent reexaminations of classical theory have revealed a significant effect of hydrostatic stress on the yield behavior of various geometries. Fatigue tests and nonlinear finite element analyses (FEA) of Inconel 100 (IN100) equal-arm bend specimens and new monotonic tests and nonlinear finite element analyses of IN100 smooth tension, smooth compression, and double-edge notch tension (DENT) test specimens have revealed the effect of internal hydrostatic tensile stresses on yielding. Nonlinear FEA using the von Mises (yielding is independent of hydrostatic stress) and the Drucker-Prager (yielding is linearly dependent on hydrostatic stress) yield functions were performed. A new FEA constitutive model was developed that incorporates a pressure-dependent yield function with combined multilinear kinematic and multilinear isotropic hardening using the ABAQUS user subroutine (UMAT) utility. In all monotonic tensile test cases, the von Mises constitutive model, overestimated the load for a given displacement or strain. Considering the failure displacements or strains for the DENT specimen, the Drucker-Prager FEM s predicted loads that were approximately 3% lower than the von Mises values. For the failure loads, the Drucker Prager FEM s predicted strains that were up to 35% greater than the von Mises values. Both the Drucker-Prager model and the von Mises model performed equally-well in simulating the equal-arm bend fatigue test.

  17. Behavioral assay for assessing effects of pollutants on fish chemoreception

    SciTech Connect

    Lemly, A.D.; Smith, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    Behavioral assays are sensitive to sublethal levels of pollution but they usually require highly trained personnel and long observation periods. We describe a system that combines the sensitivity of a behavioral assay with commercially available automated monitoring equipment. The observation system consists of a special aquarium coupled to a recirculating water system, and an Opto-Varimex-Aqua activity tracking meter (Columbus Instruments, Columbus, Ohio) interfaced to a microcomputer. The tracking meter forms an intersecting, planar grid of light beams which, when interrupted by fish movements, is translated into a digitized signal and fed to the computer. The assay is based on the response of fish to natural chemical stimuli such as food odors or pheromones. When these stimulus solutions are injected into the water circulation the response of the fish is monitored by the computer system, which is capable of discriminating and quantifying changes in eight parameters. Normal responses to stimuli are compared with the response of fish that have been exposed to pollutants. We have successfully used this technique to examine effects of reduced pH on the response of fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, to chemical feeding stimuli. The system should be easily adapted to any laboratory concerned with testing for effects of toxic substances, and will identify effects of pollution that have thus far been difficult or impossible to assess.

  18. Relative reward effects on operant behavior: Incentive contrast, induction and variety effects

    PubMed Central

    Webber, E.S.; Chambers, N. E.; Kostek, J.A.; Mankin, D.E; Cromwell, H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Comparing different rewards automatically produces dynamic relative outcome effects on behavior. Each new outcome exposure is to an updated version evaluated relative to alternatives. Relative reward effects include incentive contrast, positive induction and variety effects. The present study utilized a novel behavioral design to examine relative reward effects on a chain of operant behavior using auditory cues. Incentive contrast is the most often examined effect and focuses on increases or decreases in behavioral performance after value upshifts (positive) or downshifts (negative) relative to another outcome. We examined the impact of comparing two reward outcomes in a repeated measures design with three sessions: a single outcome and a mixed outcome and a final single outcome session. Relative reward effects should be apparent when comparing trials for the identical outcome between the single and mixed session types. An auditory cue triggered a series of operant responses (nosepoke-leverpress-food retrieval), and we measured possible contrast effects for different reward magnitude combinations. We found positive contrast for trials with the greatest magnitude differential but positive induction or variety effects in other combinations. This behavioral task could be useful for analyzing environmental or neurobiological factors involved in reward comparisons, decision-making and choice during instrumental, goal-directed action. PMID:25979604

  19. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Sari M; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L

    2015-11-10

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to "sex differences" in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology. PMID:26504229

  20. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men

    PubMed Central

    van Anders, Sari M.; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to “sex differences” in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology. PMID:26504229

  1. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Sari M; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L

    2015-11-10

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to "sex differences" in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology.

  2. Counteractive effects of cannabinoid and nicotine-addictive behavior.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Liu, Zhiqiang; Ren, Wei; Zhang, Xia

    2011-03-01

    Our recent results suggest that cannabinoid exposure induces conditioned place preference (CPP) through facilitated induction of synaptic long-term depression at dopamine circuitry of the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA). Here, we show that chronic nicotine exposure also induces CPP, but facilitates the induction of synaptic long-term potentiation in the VTA. Coadministration of cannabinoid and nicotine leads to a blockade of facilitated long-term depression and long-term potentiation induction in these neurons and elimination of CPP. These findings point to counteractive effects of cannabinoid and nicotine-addictive behavior through opposite changes in synaptic plasticity of dopamine circuitry of the VTA.

  3. Effect of suspension property on granule morphology and compaction behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hae-Weon Lee, Guesup Song, In-Sik Suk

    1995-12-31

    Granule morphology is an important factor during dry pressing, since it has great influences on die flowability, compaction ratio, and resulting green microstructure. Granule morphology and packing structure of ultrafine Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} particles in the granule were optimized during spray drying by adjusting the suspension structure. The particle packing structure of spray-dried granule was investigated with suspension structure. The effects of granule morphology and its particle packing structure on compaction and resultant sintering behavior were evaluated.

  4. Inhibition of eating behavior: negative cognitive effects of dieting.

    PubMed

    Hart, K E; Chiovari, P

    1998-06-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that dieters would score higher than nondieters in terms of food rumination. Two hundred and thirty one college undergraduates completed the Eating Obsessive-Compulsiveness Scale (EOCS) and responded to a questionnaire that inquired about dieting status. Subjects also completed measures that tapped neuroticism and social desirability. Results showed that current dieters were significantly more obsessed with thoughts of eating and food than were nondieters. Neither dieting status nor EOCS scale scores were related to neuroticism or social desirability. These results are consistent with previous theory and research suggesting that inhibition of appetitive behaviors can have negative cognitive effects. Moreover, they indicate a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  5. Artificial emotion triggered stochastic behavior transitions with motivational gain effects for multi-objective robot tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dağlarli, Evren; Temeltaş, Hakan

    2007-04-01

    This paper presents artificial emotional system based autonomous robot control architecture. Hidden Markov model developed as mathematical background for stochastic emotional and behavior transitions. Motivation module of architecture considered as behavioral gain effect generator for achieving multi-objective robot tasks. According to emotional and behavioral state transition probabilities, artificial emotions determine sequences of behaviors. Also motivational gain effects of proposed architecture can be observed on the executing behaviors during simulation.

  6. On their best behavior: how animal behavior can help determine the combined effects of species interactions and climate change.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Jason P; Barton, Brandon T

    2013-09-01

    The increasingly appreciated link between climate change and species interactions has the potential to help us understand and predict how organisms respond to a changing environment. As this connection grows, it becomes even more important to appreciate the mechanisms that create and control the combined effect of these factors. However, we believe one such important set of mechanisms comes from species' behavior and the subsequent trait-mediated interactions, as opposed to the more often studied density-mediated effects. Behavioral mechanisms are already well appreciated for mitigating the separate effects of the environment and species interactions. Thus, they could be at the forefront for understanding the combined effects. In this review, we (1) show some of the known behaviors that influence the individual and combined effects of climate change and species interactions; (2) conceptualize general ways behavior may mediate these combined effects; and (3) illustrate the potential importance of including behavior in our current tools for predicting climate change effects. In doing so, we hope to promote more research on behavior and other mechanistic factors that may increase our ability to accurately predict climate change effects.

  7. Unpacking Links between Fathers' Antisocial Behaviors and Children's Behavior Problems: Direct, Indirect, and Interactive Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coley, Rebekah Levine; Carrano, Jennifer; Lewin-Bizan, Selva

    2011-01-01

    Building upon previous evidence for the intergenerational transmission of antisocial behaviors, this research assessed and compared three models seeking to explain links between fathers' antisocial behaviors and children's behavior problems. A representative sample of children from low-income families (N = 261) was followed from age 3 through age…

  8. Effectively Utilizing the "Behavioral" in Cognitive-Behavioral Group Therapy of Sex Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Jerry L.; Deming, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Although cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is touted as the predominant approach in sex offender-specific group treatment, a review of the field shows that the "behavioral" part of CBT has become minimal in relation to that which is cognitive. The authors show how a revitalized "behavioral sensibility" may help to enhance…

  9. Learning Behaviors Mediating the Effects of Behavior Problems on Academic Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escalon, Ximena Dominguez; Greenfield, Daryl

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between behavior problems, learning behaviors, and educational outcomes for at-risk preschool children. A sample of Head Start children (N = 196) was selected in the southeast United States. Behavior problems were assessed using the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment (LeBuffe & Naglieri, 1999) and learning…

  10. The Sensorial Effect: Dynamics of Emotion in Pro-Environmental Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipolito, Joana

    2011-01-01

    In this article, sensorial effects are introduced as emotional stimuli for shaping environmentally significant behaviors. This research provides a link between sensorial effect as ubiquitous environmental behavior feedback and the effect of sensorial stimuli on emotions that trigger individuals' pro-environment behavior. A case study of using…

  11. Effects of Prenatal Cocaine Exposure on Early Sexual Behavior: Gender Difference in Externalizing Behavior as a Mediator

    PubMed Central

    Min, Meeyoung O.; Minnes, Sonia; Lang, Adelaide; Yoon, Susan; Singer, Lynn T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE) is associated with increased risk for externalizing behavior problems; childhood externalizing behavior problems are linked with subsequent early sexual behavior. The present study examined the effects of PCE on early sexual initiation (sexual intercourse prior to age 15) and whether externalizing behavior in preadolescence mediated the relationship. Methods Three hundred fifty-four (180 PCE and 174 non-cocaine exposed; 192 girls, 142 boys), primarily African-American, low socioeconomic status, 15-year old adolescents participated in a prospective longitudinal study. Adolescents’ sexual behavior was assessed at 15 years using the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System. Externalizing behavior was assessed at 12 years using the Youth Self-Report. Results Logistic regression models indicated that adolescents with PCE (n=69, 38%) were 2.2 times more likely (95% CI= 1.2 – 4.1, p < .01) to engage in early sexual intercourse than non-exposed peers (n=49, 28%) controlling for covariates. This relationship was fully mediated by self-reported externalizing behavior in girls but not in boys, suggesting childhood externalizing behavior as a gender moderated mediator. Blood lead level during preschool years was also related to a greater likelihood of early sexual intercourse (OR=2.6, 95% CI=1.4 – 4.7, p < .002). Greater parental monitoring decreased the likelihood of early sexual intercourse, while violence exposure increased the risk. Conclusions PCE is related to early sexual intercourse, and externalizing behavior problems mediate PCE effects in female adolescents. Interventions targeting externalizing behavior may reduce early sexual initiation and thereby reduce HIV risk behaviors and early, unplanned pregnancy in girls with PCE. PMID:26088698

  12. Toward Proper Specification of the Effects of Leader Punitive Behavior: A Research Note.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bateman, Thomas S.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Tested the impact of leader punitive behavior on employee satisfaction in 457 hospital employees. Controlling for leader reward behavior, there was no direct positive effect of leader punitive behavior, and no moderating impact of role ambiguity. Discusses the importance of considering spuriousness in leader punitive behavior research. (WAS)

  13. Effect of Behavioral Activation Treatment on Chronic Fibromyalgia Pain: Replication and Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Talley, Chris; Buermann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A multiple-baseline-across two behavior sets and positions (reclined, upright) was used to experimentally examine the effect of Behavioral Activation Treatment for Pain (BAT-P) on pain-related behavior of a 44-year-old woman with a 22-year history of fibromyalgia (FM). BAT-P, based on the matching law, is comprised of Behavioral Relaxation…

  14. The Effects of Function-Based Self-Management Interventions on Student Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Blake D.; Wills, Howard P.; Kamps, Debra M.; Greenwood, Charles R.

    2014-01-01

    Children with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) struggle to achieve social and academic outcomes. Many studies have demonstrated self-management interventions to be effective at reducing problem behavior and increasing positive social and academic behaviors. Functional behavior assessment (FBA) information may be used in designing…

  15. Gateway Health Behaviors in College Students: Investigating Transfer and Compensation Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nigg, Claudio Renato; Lee, Hye-ryeon; Hubbard, Amy E.; Min-Sun, Kim

    2009-01-01

    Objective: There is a dearth of studies on the mechanisms of multiple risk behaviors, even though these behaviors are significant public health issues. The authors investigated whether health behavior interventions have transfer or compensatory effects on other health behaviors. Participants and Methods: The authors looked at transfer and…

  16. Sublethal landrin toxicity: Behavioral and physiological effects on captive vultures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forthman-Quick, D.L.; Hill, E.F.

    1988-01-01

    Use of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) has been proposed to reduce consumption of California condor (Gymnogyps californianus) eggs by ravens (Corvus corax). Although landrin has induced aversions in ravens and other birds, no data were available on behavioral and physiological effects of landrin on condors, non-target birds that might consume treated eggs. Because condors are endangered, we selected taxonomically related surrogates to approximate the effects on condors of acute oral doses of landrin. Seven black vultures (Coragyps atratus), 2 turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), and 2 king vultures (Sarcoramphus papa) received landrin and placebo treatments 1 week apart. Plasma cholinesterase (ChE) activity was monitored at zero, 3, and 24 hours posttreatment, and behavioral observations were made for 2 hours posttreatment. The doses tested were nonlethal, and ChE levels approached normal within 24 hours after treatment. Only the frequency of vomiting differed statistically between the placebo and landrin treatment. We conclude that with appropriate precautions, landrin can be used in applications of CTA to discourage consumption of condor eggs by ravens, while posing no apparent risk to reintroduced condors.

  17. The Effect of Impingement on Transitional Behavior in Underexpanded Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inman, Jennifer A.; Danehy, Paul M.; Nowak, Robert J.; Alderfer, David W.

    2009-01-01

    An investigation into the development of flow unsteadiness in impinging axisymmetric underexpanded jets has been conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. The study has examined the effect of an impingement target placed at various distances and angles on transitional behavior of such jets. Two nozzles, with exit Mach numbers of 1.0 and 2.6, were used in this investigation. Planar laser-induced fluorescence of nitric oxide (NO PLIF) has been used to identify flow unsteadiness and to image transitional and turbulent flow features. Measurements of the location of the onset of various degrees of unsteady flow behavior have been made using these PLIF images. Both qualitative and quantitative comparisons are presented to demonstrate the observed effects of impingement and flow parameters on the process of the transition to turbulence. The presence of the impingement target was found to significantly shorten the distance to transition to turbulence by up to a factor of approximately three, with closer targets resulting in slightly shorter distance to transition and turbulence. The location at which the flow first exhibits unsteadiness was found to have a strong dependence on the presence and location of key flow structures. This paper presents quantitative results on transition criteria for free and impinging jets.

  18. Behavioral activating effects of adrafinil in aged canines.

    PubMed

    Siwak, C T; Gruet, P; Woehrlé, F; Schneider, M; Muggenburg, B A; Murphey, H L; Callahan, H; Milgram, N W

    2000-06-01

    Adrafinil, a vigilance enhancing pharmaceutical, was administered to aged dogs for 14 consecutive days at doses of 10, 20, 30, or 40 mg/kg using a crossover design. The effects on spontaneous behavior in a 10-min canine open-field test were systematically recorded every fourth day, starting with day 1 of treatment. The open field tests were given 2 or 10 h following oral administration of capsules containing either adrafinil or lactose, the placebo control. Adrafinil caused an increase in locomotor activity at the three highest doses at both the 2- and 10-h intervals and during both the first (days 1 and 5) and second treatment week (days 9 and 13). Adrafinil also caused a transient increase in directed sniffing. At the highest dose level, adrafinil caused a decrease in urination frequency. The increased locomotion was generally unaccompanied by stereotypical behavior in the test session. There was some variability; a subpopulation of animals showed either no effect, or decreased locomotion. The individual differences were correlated with changes in serum levels of adrafinil 10 h following treatment. PMID:10880681

  19. Effects of mazindol on behavior maintained or occasioned by cocaine.

    PubMed

    Mansbach, R S; Balster, R L

    1993-01-01

    The effects of mazindol, cocaine and D-amphetamine were studied in rhesus monkeys trained to self-administer cocaine, and in rats and squirrel monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline. Non-contingent intravenous drug injections were administered to monkeys responding under a session consisting of a 5-min period during which lever-pressing produced food reinforcement and a 60-min session in which responding produced i.v. cocaine infusions (10 or 33 micrograms/kg per infusion). Acute i.v. injections of cocaine (0.1-1.7 mg/kg), D-amphetamine (0.1-1 mg/kg) and the dopamine re-uptake inhibitor mazindol (0.03-0.56 mg/kg) given 5 min before the session decreased self-administration of cocaine, but also decreased rates of behavior maintained by the presentation of food. In both rats and squirrel monkeys trained to discriminate cocaine from saline in a two-lever, food-maintained procedure, mazindol, cocaine and D-amphetamine substituted for cocaine in a dose-related manner. Despite a lack of selectivity to decrease cocaine self-administration as compared to behavior maintained by food, the present data provide some rationale for further consideration of mazindol as a potential pharmacotherapy for stimulant abuse, due to its relatively low abuse liability and cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects. PMID:8436063

  20. Effects of methaqualone on punished and nonpunished behavior.

    PubMed

    Witkin, J M; Katz, J L; Barrett, J E

    1981-07-01

    Effects of methaqualone were studied on the key pecking of pigeons maintained under various schedules of food presentation. One group of pigeons responded under a multiple fixed-ratio, fixed-interval schedule. Methaqualone (3.0--10.0 mg/kg) decreased the relatively low rates of responding under the fixed-interval schedule but left unchanged the higher rates under the fixed-ratio schedule. Higher doses of methaqualone decreased responding under both schedules. Another group of pigeons responded under a fixed-interval schedule in which responding was suppressed (punished) by electric shock presented according to a fixed-ratio schedule. Suitable doses of methaqualone increased punished responding. A 2-fold change in shock intensity produced little change in rates and patterns of responding, yet methaqualone produced much greater increases in responding punished by the lower intensity shock. Regardless of whether or not responding was punished, the effects of methaqualone on fixed-interval performance depended on the rate of responding in the absence of drug; low rates of responding in the early periods of the fixed-interval were increased by doses that increased less or decreased the higher response rates in the later periods. These rate-dependent effects of methaqualone were modulated by the shock intensity; the rate-increasing effects obtained at the lower intensity shock were uniformly greater than those obtained at the higher intensity. The behavioral effects of methaqualone were generally qualitatively similar to effects reported for many sedative hypnotics.

  1. Surface effect on the elastic behavior of static bending nanowires.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; Lilley, Carmen M

    2008-07-01

    The surface effect from surface stress and surface elasticity on the elastic behavior of nanowires in static bending is incorporated into Euler-Bernoulli beam theory via the Young-Laplace equation. Explicit solutions are presented to study the dependence of the surface effect on the overall Young's modulus of nanowires for three different boundary conditions: cantilever, simply supported, and fixed-fixed. The solutions indicate that the cantilever nanowires behave as softer materials when deflected while the other structures behave like stiffer materials as the nanowire cross-sectional size decreases for positive surface stresses. These solutions agree with size dependent nanowire overall Young's moduli observed from static bending tests by other researchers. This study also discusses possible reasons for variations of nanowire overall Young's moduli observed.

  2. Effects of Website Interactivity on Online Retail Shopping Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Hafizul

    Motivations to engage in retail online shopping can include both utilitarian and hedonic shopping dimensions. To cater to these consumers, online retailers can create a cognitively and esthetically rich shopping environment, through sophisticated levels of interactive web utilities and features, offering not only utilitarian benefits and attributes but also providing hedonic benefits of enjoyment. Since the effect of interactive websites has proven to stimulate online consumer’s perceptions, this study presumes that websites with multimedia rich interactive utilities and features can influence online consumers’ shopping motivations and entice them to modify or even transform their original shopping predispositions by providing them with attractive and enhanced interactive features and controls, thus generating a positive attitude towards products and services offered by the retailer. This study seeks to explore the effects of Web interactivity on online consumer behavior through an attitudinal model of technology acceptance.

  3. Surface effect on the elastic behavior of static bending nanowires.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; Lilley, Carmen M

    2008-07-01

    The surface effect from surface stress and surface elasticity on the elastic behavior of nanowires in static bending is incorporated into Euler-Bernoulli beam theory via the Young-Laplace equation. Explicit solutions are presented to study the dependence of the surface effect on the overall Young's modulus of nanowires for three different boundary conditions: cantilever, simply supported, and fixed-fixed. The solutions indicate that the cantilever nanowires behave as softer materials when deflected while the other structures behave like stiffer materials as the nanowire cross-sectional size decreases for positive surface stresses. These solutions agree with size dependent nanowire overall Young's moduli observed from static bending tests by other researchers. This study also discusses possible reasons for variations of nanowire overall Young's moduli observed. PMID:18510370

  4. Effects of edge restraint on slab behavior. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Guice, L.K.

    1986-02-01

    This study was performed in conjunction with a Federal Emergency Management Agency program to plan, design, and construct keyworker blast shelters which would be used in high-risk areas of the country during and after a nuclear attack. The shelters considered in this study were box-type structures in which damage is much more likely to occur in the roof slab than in the walls or floor. In this part of the program, the effect of edge restraint on slab behavior was investigated. The primary objective was to determine the effects of partial rotational restraint on slab strength, ductility, and mechanism of failure. Sixteen one-way, reinforced concrete plate elements were tested in a reaction structure under uniform static water pressure.

  5. Effects of organizational justice on organizational citizenship behaviors: mediating effects of institutional trust and affective commitment.

    PubMed

    Guh, Wei-Yuan; Lin, Shang-Ping; Fan, Chwei-Jen; Yang, Chin-Fang

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the mediating role of institutional trust and affective commitment on the relationship between organizational justice and organizational citizenship behaviors. The study participants were 315 faculty members at 67 public/private universities of technology and vocational colleges in Taiwan. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the relationships between the variables and assess the goodness of fit of the overall model. Organizational justice was positively related to institutional trust and there was an indirect effect of organizational justice on affective commitment through institutional trust. In addition, the relation between institutional trust and affective commitment was positive and affective commitment was shown to have a positive relation to organizational citizenship behaviors. Institutional trust was found to indirectly affect organizational citizenship behaviors through affective commitment. Most importantly, this study suggested a mediating effect of institutional trust and affective commitment on the relation between organizational justice and organizational citizenship behaviors. Implications, limitations, and future research were also discussed.

  6. Behavioral and Neurophysiological Effects of Transdermal Rotigotine in Atypical Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Davide Vito; Binetti, Giuliano; Zanetti, Orazio; Frisoni, Giovanni Battista

    2014-01-01

    Effective therapies for the so-called atypical parkinsonian syndrome (APS) such as multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), or corticobasal syndrome (CBS) are not available. Dopamine agonists (DA) are not often used in APS because of inefficacy and in a minority of case, their side effects, like dyskinesias, impairment of extrapyramidal symptoms or the appearance of psychosis, and REM sleep behavioral disorders (RBD). Transdermal rotigotine (RTG) is a non-ergot dopamine agonist indicated for use in early and advanced Parkinson’s disease with a good tolerability and safety. Moreover, its action on a wide range of dopamine receptors, D1, D2, D3, unlike other DA, could make it a good option in APS, where a massive dopamine cell loss is documented. In this pilot, observational open-label study we evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of RTG in patients affected by APS. Thirty-two subjects with diagnosis of APS were treated with transdermal RTG. APS diagnosis was: MSA parkinsonian type (MSA-P), MSA cerebellar type (MSA-C), PSP, and CBS. Patients were evaluated by UPDRS-III, neuropsychiatric inventory, mini mental state examination at baseline, and after 6, 12, and 18 months. The titration schedule was maintained very flexible, searching the major clinical effect and the minor possible adverse events (AEs) at each visit. AEs were recorded. APS patients treated with RTG show an overall decrease of UPDRS-III scores without increasing behavioral disturbances. Only three patients were dropped out of the study. Main AEs were hypotension, nausea, vomiting, drowsiness, and tachycardia. The electroencephalographic recording power spectra analysis shows a decrease of theta and an increase of low alpha power. In conclusion, transdermal RTG seems to be effective and well tolerated in APS patients. PMID:24926284

  7. NT79: A novel neurotensin analog with selective behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Boules, Mona; Liang, Yanqi; Briody, Siobhan; Miura, Tomofumi; Fauq, Irfan; Oliveros, Alfredo; Wilson, Mina; Khaniyev, Shaheen; Williams, Katrina; Li, Zhimin; Qi, Yanfei; Katovich, Michael; Richelson, Elliott

    2010-01-13

    Neurotensin, a tridecapeptide, is widely distributed in the brain and gastrointestinal tract. It possesses analgesic, hypothermic, and antipsychotic-like properties. Neurotensin's effects are mediated mainly through two receptor subtypes, NTS1 and NTS2. Activation of NTS1 has been implicated in most of the pharmacological effects of neurotensin but is associated with hypothermia and hypotension. We report on a novel neurotensin analog with higher selectivity to NTS2, namely, NT79, which exhibits selective behavioral effects. NT79 was tested in animal models for pain (thermal-hot plate test; visceral-acetic acid-induced writhing test), and in animal models that are predictive of antipsychotic-like effects (apomorphine-induced climbing; d-amphetamine-induced hyperactivity; disruption of prepulse inhibition). Its effects on body temperature and on blood pressure were also determined. Neurochemical changes in extracellular neurotransmitters were measured using in vivo microdialysis while the rats were simultaneously evaluated for acetic acid-induced writhing with and without pretreatment with NT79. Binding data at molecularly cloned hNTS1 and hNTS2 suggest selectivity for hNTS2. NT79 blocked the acetic acid-induced writhing with an ED(50) of 0.14 microg/kg while having no effect on thermal nociception. The writhing was paralleled by an increase in 5-HT which was attenuated by NT79. NT79 demonstrated antipsychotic-like effects by blocking apomorphine-induced climbing, d-amphetamine-induced hyperactivity, and reducing d-amphetamine- and DOI-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition. Uniquely, it caused no significant hypothermia and was without effect on blood pressure. NT79, with its higher selectivity to NTS2, may be potentially useful to treat visceral pain, and psychosis without concomitant side effects of hypothermia or hypotension.

  8. Behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of injected leptin.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Darakhshan J; Haque, Zeba; Inam, Qurrat-ul-Aen; Ikram, Huma; Haleem, Muhammad Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Leptin is viewed as an important target for developing novel therapeutics for obesity, depression/anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. The present study therefore concerns behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of systemically injected leptin. Pharmacological doses (100 and 500 μg/kg) of leptin injected systemically decreased 24h cumulative food intake and body weight in freely feeding rats and improved acquisition and retention of memory in Morris water maze test. Potential anxiety reducing, hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of the peptide hormone were determined in a separate experiment. Animals injected with 100 or 500 μg/kg leptin were tested for anxiety in an elevated plus maze test 1h later. A significant increase in the number of entries and time passed in open arm of the elevated plus maze in leptin injected animals suggested pronounced anxiety reducing effect. Moreover, circulating levels of leptin correlated significantly with anxiety reducing effects of the peptide hormone. Serum serotonin increased and ghrelin decreased in leptin injected animals and correlated, positively and negatively respectively, with circulating leptin. Corticosterone increased at low dose and levels were normal at higher dose. Serotonin metabolism in the hypothalamus and hippocampus decreased only at higher dose of leptin. The results support a role of leptin in the treatment of obesity, anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. It is suggested that hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of leptin can alter treatment efficacy in particularly comorbid conditions.

  9. Separate and Combined Effects of Methylphenidate and a Behavioral Intervention on Disruptive Behavior in Children with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Nathan J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This study examined the effects of methylphenidate drug therapy and differential reinforcement on the disruptive behavior and task engagement of 3 children (ages 6 through 11) with mental retardation. Results indicated that both interventions were effective for two of the children. No evidence of an additive or synergistic effects of the two…

  10. Effects of Check and Connect on Attendance, Behavior, and Academics: A Randomized Effectiveness Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Kjellstrand, Elizabeth K.; Thompson, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined the effects of Check & Connect (C&C) on the attendance, behavior, and academic outcomes of at-risk youth in a field-based effectiveness trial. Method: A multisite randomized block design was used, wherein 260 primarily Hispanic (89%) and economically disadvantaged (74%) students were randomized to treatment…

  11. A VACCINE AGAINST METHAMPHETAMINE ATTENUATES ITS BEHAVIORAL EFFECTS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiaoyun Y.; Kosten, Therese A.; Lopez, Angel Y.; Kinsey, Berma M.; Kosten, Thomas R.; Orson, Frank M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Vaccines have treatment potential for methamphetamine (MA) addiction. We tested whether a conjugate vaccine against MA (succinyl-methamphetamine–keyhole limpet hemocyanin carrier protein; SMA-KLH) would generate MA antibodies and alter MA-induced behaviors. METHODS Mice were injected with SMA-KLH and received booster administrations 3-and 20-weeks later. Serum antibody titers reached peak levels by 4–6 weeks, remained at a modest level through 18-weeks, peaked again at 22-wks after the second boost, and were still elevated at 35-weeks. At 7 weeks, groups of vaccinated and non-vaccinated mice were administered one of three MA doses (1, 2, or 3 mg/kg) to assess locomotor activity. RESULTS Non-vaccinated mice showed dose-dependent effects of MA with hypolocomotion at the lowest dose and elevated activity levels at the highest dose. Both dose effects were reduced in SMA-KLH groups, particularly low dose-induced hypolocomotion at later times post MA administration. Separate groups of vaccinated and non-vaccinated mice were trained in MA place conditioning at 30-weeks with either 0 (vehicle) or 0.5 mg/kg MA. Although times spent in the MA-paired side did not differ between groups on Test vs. Baseline sessions, SMA-KLH mice conditioned with MA showed reduced conditioned approach behaviors and decreased conditioned activity levels compared to control groups. CONCLUSION These data suggest SMA-KLH attenuates the ability of MA to support place conditioning and reduces or delays its locomotor effects. Overall, results support SMA-KLH as a candidate MA vaccine. PMID:23022610

  12. Smoked marijuana effects on tobacco cigarette smoking behavior.

    PubMed

    Kelly, T H; Foltin, R W; Rose, A J; Fischman, M W; Brady, J V

    1990-03-01

    The effects of marijuana smoke exposure on several measures of tobacco cigarette smoking behavior were examined. Eight healthy adult male volunteers, who smoked both tobacco and marijuana cigarettes, participated in residential studies, lasting 10 to 15 days, designed to measure the effects of marijuana smoke exposure on a range of behavioral variables. Tobacco cigarettes were available throughout the day (9:00 A.M. until midnight). Each day was divided into a private period (9:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.), during which subjects were socially isolated, and a social period (5:00 P.M. to midnight), during which subjects could interact. Under blind conditions, subjects smoked placebo and active marijuana cigarettes (0%, 1.3%, 2.3%, or 2.7% delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol) four times daily (9:45 A.M., 1:30 P.M., 5:00 P.M. and 8:30 P.M.). Each subject was exposed to both placebo and one active dose over 2- to 5-consecutive-day intervals, and dose conditions (i.e., placebo or active) alternated throughout the study. Active marijuana smoking significantly decreased the number of daily tobacco smoking bouts, increased inter-bout intervals and decreased inter-puff intervals. Marijuana decreased the number of tobacco smoking bouts by delaying the initiation of tobacco cigarette smoking immediately after marijuana smoking, whereas decreases in inter-puff intervals were unrelated to the time of marijuana smoking. No consistent interactions between marijuana effects and social or private periods (i.e., time of day) were observed.

  13. Molecular Mechanism: ERK Signaling, Drug Addiction, and Behavioral Effects.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei-Lun; Quizon, Pamela M; Zhu, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Addiction to psychostimulants has been considered as a chronic psychiatric disorder characterized by craving and compulsive drug seeking and use. Over the past two decades, accumulating evidence has demonstrated that repeated drug exposure causes long-lasting neurochemical and cellular changes that result in enduring neuroadaptation in brain circuitry and underlie compulsive drug consumption and relapse. Through intercellular signaling cascades, drugs of abuse induce remodeling in the rewarding circuitry that contributes to the neuroplasticity of learning and memory associated with addiction. Here, we review the role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase, and its related intracellular signaling pathways in drug-induced neuroadaptive changes that are associated with drug-mediated psychomotor activity, rewarding properties and relapse of drug seeking behaviors. We also discuss the neurobiological and behavioral effects of pharmacological and genetic interferences with ERK-associated molecular cascades in response to abused substances. Understanding the dynamic modulation of ERK signaling in response to drugs may provide novel molecular targets for therapeutic strategies to drug addiction. PMID:26809997

  14. Behavioral analysis of marijuana effects on food intake in humans.

    PubMed

    Foltin, R W; Brady, J V; Fischman, M W

    1986-09-01

    Nine male research volunteers, in three groups of three subjects each, resided in a residential laboratory for up to 25 days. All contact with the experimenter was through a networked computer system and subjects' behaviors including food intake were continuously recorded. Subjects brought their own activities such as model-making, and these in combination with those provided by the laboratory resulted in rich behavior repertoires. During the first part of the day, subjects remained in their private rooms doing planned work activities, and during the remainder of the day, they were allowed to socialize. Cigarettes containing active marijuana (1.84% THC) or placebo were smoked prior to the private work period and during the social access period. A single active marijuana cigarette prior to the private work period had no effect on food intake. The administration of two or three active marijuana cigarettes during the social access period increased average daily caloric intake. The increased intake was due to an augmentation of calories consumed as between-meal snack items rather than an increase in meal size per se.

  15. Effects of Habitual Anger on Employees’ Behavior during Organizational Change

    PubMed Central

    Bönigk, Mareike; Steffgen, Georges

    2013-01-01

    Organizational change is a particularly emotional event for those being confronted with it. Anger is a frequently experienced emotion under these conditions. This study analyses the influence of employees’ habitual anger reactions on their reported behavior during organizational change. It was explored whether anger reactions conducive to recovering or increasing individual well-being will enhance the likelihood of functional change behavior. Dysfunctional regulation strategies in terms of individual well-being are expected to decrease the likelihood of functional change behavior—mediated by the commitment to change. Four hundred and twelve employees of different organizations in Luxembourg undergoing organizational change participated in the study. Findings indicate that the anger regulation strategy venting, and humor increase the likelihood of deviant resistance to change. Downplaying the incident’s negative impact and feedback increase the likelihood of active support for change. The mediating effect of commitment to change has been found for humor and submission. The empirical findings suggest that a differentiated conceptualization of resistance to change is required. Specific implications for practical change management and for future research are discussed. PMID:24287849

  16. Systemic and Behavioral Effects of Intranasal Administration of Silver Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Laurie L.; Hsieh, Heidi; Eppert, Bryan L.; Carreira, Vinicius S.; Krishan, Mansi; Ingle, Taylor; Howard, Paul C.; Williams, Michael T.; Vorhees, Charles V.; Genter, Mary Beth

    2015-01-01

    Use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for their antimicrobial properties is widespread. Much of the previous work on the toxicity of AgNPs has been conducted in vitro or following oral or intravenous administration in vivo. Intranasal (IN) instillation of AgNPs mimics inhalation exposure and allows further exploration of the toxicity of these particles via respiratory tract exposure. The present study involved 1) single-dose exposures to assess tissue distribution and toxicity and 2) repeated exposures to assess behavioral effects of IN AgNP exposure (nominally uncoated 25 nm AgNP). AgNP deposition was localized in the liver, gut-associated lymphoid tissue, and brain. Decrease cellularity in spleen follicles was observed in treated mice, along with changes in cell number and populations in the spleen. The splenic GSH:GSSG ratio was also reduced following AgNP exposure. Expression of the oxidative stress-responsive gene Hmox1 was elevated in the hippocampus, but not cortex of treated mice, as was the level of HMOX1 protein. Mice receiving 7 days of IN exposure to 50 mg/kg AgNPs exhibited similar learning- and memory-related behaviors to control mice, except that treated mice spent significantly less time in the target quadrant of the Morris Water Maze during the acquisition phase probe trial. These findings indicate systemic distribution and toxicity following IN administration of AgNPs. PMID:26340819

  17. Intranasal administration of oxytocin: behavioral and clinical effects, a review.

    PubMed

    Veening, Jan G; Olivier, Berend

    2013-09-01

    The intranasal (IN-) administration of substances is attracting attention from scientists as well as pharmaceutical companies. The effects are surprisingly fast and specific. The present review explores our current knowledge about the routes of access to the cranial cavity. 'Direct-access-pathways' from the nasal cavity have been described but many additional experiments are needed to answer a variety of open questions regarding anatomy and physiology. Among the IN-applied substances oxytocin (OT) has an extensive history. Originally applied in women for its physiological effects related to lactation and parturition, over the last decade most studies focused on their behavioral 'prosocial' effects: from social relations and 'trust' to treatment of 'autism'. Only very recently in a microdialysis study in rats and mice, the 'direct-nose-brain-pathways' of IN-OT have been investigated directly, implying that we are strongly dependent on results obtained from other IN-applied substances. Especially the possibility that IN-OT activates the 'intrinsic' OT-system in the hypothalamus as well needs further clarification. We conclude that IN-OT administration may be a promising approach to influence human communication but that the existing lack of information about the neural and physiological mechanisms involved is a serious problem for the proper understanding and interpretation of the observed effects.

  18. Directly Observable Behavioral Effects of Lorcaserin in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Serafine, Katherine M.; Rice, Kenner C.

    2015-01-01

    (1R)-8-chloro-1-methyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (lorcaserin) is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treating obesity, and its therapeutic effects are thought to result from agonist activity at serotonin (5-HT)2C receptors. Lorcaserin has affinity for other 5-HT receptor subtypes, although its activity at those subtypes is not fully described. The current study compared the behavioral effects of lorcaserin (0.0032–32.0 mg/kg) to the effects of other 5-HT receptor selective agonists in rats (n = 8). The 5-HT2C receptor selective agonist 1-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazine (mCPP, 0.032–1.0 mg/kg) and lorcaserin induced yawning which was attenuated by the 5-HT2C receptor selective antagonist 6-chloro-5-methyl-N-(6-[(2-methylpyridin-3-yl)oxy]pydidin-3-yl)indoline-1-carboxamide (1.0 mg/kg). The 5-HT2A receptor selective agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-methylamphetamine (0.1–3.2 mg/kg) induced head twitching, which was attenuated by the 5-HT2A receptor selective antagonist R-(+)-2,3-dimethoxyphenyl-1-[2-(4-piperidine)-methanol] (MDL 100907, 0.01 mg/kg), lorcaserin (3.2 mg/kg), and mCPP (3.2 mg/kg). In rats pretreated with MDL 100907 (1.0 mg/kg), lorcaserin also induced head twitching. At larger doses, lorcaserin produced forepaw treading, which was attenuated by the 5-HT1A receptor selective antagonist N-(2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl)-N-(2-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide (0.178 mg/kg). While the behavioral effects of lorcaserin in rats are consistent with it having agonist activity at 5-HT2C receptors, these data suggest that at larger doses it also has agonist activity at 5-HT2A and possibly 5-HT1A receptors. Mounting evidence suggests that 5-HT2C receptor agonists might be effective for treating drug abuse. A more complete description of the activity of lorcaserin at 5-HT receptor subtypes will facilitate a better understanding of the mechanisms that mediate its therapeutic effects. PMID:26384326

  19. The effectiveness of feedback in improving safe behaviors: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Baker, N A

    1998-01-01

    Reducing unsafe behaviors in the work place is of primary concern in industry. Unsafe behaviors seem to be shaped both by a subtle reinforcement of these behaviors by the work culture and by management's failure to define what constitutes unsafe behavior. Thus, any program to change these behaviors must focus both on defining and reinforcing safe behaviors. This paper reviews some of the literature associated with feedback and its effectiveness in increasing worker safety. The Theory of Planned Behavior is discussed as one possible mechanism for explaining the positive results achieved.

  20. The effectiveness of feedback in improving safe behaviors: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Baker, N A

    1998-01-01

    Reducing unsafe behaviors in the work place is of primary concern in industry. Unsafe behaviors seem to be shaped both by a subtle reinforcement of these behaviors by the work culture and by management's failure to define what constitutes unsafe behavior. Thus, any program to change these behaviors must focus both on defining and reinforcing safe behaviors. This paper reviews some of the literature associated with feedback and its effectiveness in increasing worker safety. The Theory of Planned Behavior is discussed as one possible mechanism for explaining the positive results achieved. PMID:24441557

  1. Chronic caffeine produces sexually dimorphic effects on amphetamine-induced behavior, anxiety and depressive-like behavior in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Sarah M; Townsend, Shannon E; Dixon, Rushell S; Hickman, Emma T; Lee, Sabrina M

    2016-04-01

    Caffeine consumption has been increasing rapidly in adolescents; however, most research on the behavioral effects of caffeine has been conducted in adults. Two experiments were conducted in which adolescent male and female rats were treated with a moderate dose of caffeine (0.25 g/l) in their drinking water beginning on P26-28. In the first experiment, animals were maintained on caffeinated drinking water or normal tap water for 14 days and were then tested for behavioral and striatal c-Fos response to amphetamine (1.5 mg/kg). In the second experiment, rats were maintained on caffeinated drinking water or normal tap water beginning on P28 and were tested for novel object recognition, anxiety in the light/dark test (L/D) and elevated plus maze (EPM), and depressive like behavior in the forced swim test (FST) beginning on the 14th day of caffeine exposure. Caffeine decreased amphetamine-induced rearing in males, but had no effect in females; however, this behavioral effect was not accompanied by changes in striatal c-Fos, which was increased by amphetamine but not altered by caffeine. No effects of caffeine were observed on novel object recognition or elevated plus maze behavior. However, in the L/D test, there was a sex by caffeine interaction on time spent in the light driven by a caffeine-induced increase in light time in the males but not the females. On the pretest day of the FST, sex by caffeine interactions were observed for swimming and struggling; caffeine decreased struggling behavior and increased swimming behavior in males and caffeine-treated females demonstrated significantly more struggling and significantly less swimming than caffeine-treated males. A similar pattern was observed on the test day in which caffeine decreased immobility overall and increased swimming. These data reveal sex dependent effects of caffeine on behavior in adolescent rats.

  2. Effects of interviewer behavior on accuracy of children's responses.

    PubMed

    Sparling, Jessica; Wilder, David A; Kondash, Jennifer; Boyle, Megan; Compton, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that certain interviewer behaviors can evoke inaccurate answers by children. In the current study, we examined the effects of approving and disapproving statements on the accuracy of 3 children's answers to questions in an interview (Experiment 1). We then evaluated 3 questioning techniques that may be used by interviewers during a forensic interview in which a child provides eyewitness testimony (Experiment 2). All participants responded with more inaccurate answers when approving statements followed inaccurate information and disapproving statements followed accurate information in Experiment 1. During Experiment 2, 1 participant responded most inaccurately when she was requestioned after providing an initial answer, whereas the remaining 2 participants responded most inaccurately when the interviewer provided cowitness information and suggestive questions. PMID:21941387

  3. Effects of torrefaction on hemicellulose structural characteristics and pyrolysis behaviors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shurong; Dai, Gongxin; Ru, Bin; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Xiaoliu; Zhou, Jinsong; Luo, Zhongyang; Cen, Kefa

    2016-10-01

    The effects of torrefaction on hemicellulose characteristics and its pyrolysis behaviors were studied in detail. The oxygen content decreased significantly after torrefaction, leading to the increase of high heating value. Two-dimensional perturbation correlation analysis based on diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was performed to characterize the structural evolutions. It was found the dehydration of hydroxyls and the dissociation of branches were the main reactions at low torrefaction temperature. When the temperature further increased, the depolymerization of hemicellulose and the fragmentation of monosaccharide residues occurred. The distributed activation energy model with double Gaussian functions based on reaction-order model was used to investigate the pyrolysis kinetics. The results showed that torrefaction enhanced the activation energy for degradation reactions while lowered that for condensation reactions, and increased the devolatilization contribution of condensation reactions. Besides, torrefaction decreased the yields of typical pyrolytic products, such as acids, furans, alicyclic ketones and so on. PMID:27469091

  4. EFFECTS OF INTERVIEWER BEHAVIOR ON ACCURACY OF CHILDREN'S RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Sparling, Jessica; Wilder, David A; Kondash, Jennifer; Boyle, Megan; Compton, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has shown that certain interviewer behaviors can evoke inaccurate answers by children. In the current study, we examined the effects of approving and disapproving statements on the accuracy of 3 children's answers to questions in an interview (Experiment 1). We then evaluated 3 questioning techniques that may be used by interviewers during a forensic interview in which a child provides eyewitness testimony (Experiment 2). All participants responded with more inaccurate answers when approving statements followed inaccurate information and disapproving statements followed accurate information in Experiment 1. During Experiment 2, 1 participant responded most inaccurately when she was requestioned after providing an initial answer, whereas the remaining 2 participants responded most inaccurately when the interviewer provided cowitness information and suggestive questions. PMID:21941387

  5. Effects of stress on the adhesive behavior of photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Geng; Wei, Zhang; Hou, Changlun; Bai, Jian

    2009-05-01

    In this paper, the effects of stress on the adhesive behavior of photoresist are described. The sources of internal stress of photoresist could be the shrinkage of photoresist during curing process and the shrinkage difference between the photoresist and the substrate. Due to high exothermicity of resin curing process, the temperature of photoresist is not uniform, which causes shrinkage difference in photoresist. Further more, when the substrate cools down, the difference of thermal expansion coefficients between the substrate and the photoresist would cause more stress. A digital phase-shifting interferometer is used to measure the curvature of substrate and then Stoney´s Formula is adopted to calculate stress. Then, a 2-D model is used to simulate temperature distribution, photoresist deformation and stress. Our results show that there is huge stress at the interface between photoresist and substrate and the stress can be reduced by anneal.

  6. Effects of torrefaction on hemicellulose structural characteristics and pyrolysis behaviors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shurong; Dai, Gongxin; Ru, Bin; Zhao, Yuan; Wang, Xiaoliu; Zhou, Jinsong; Luo, Zhongyang; Cen, Kefa

    2016-10-01

    The effects of torrefaction on hemicellulose characteristics and its pyrolysis behaviors were studied in detail. The oxygen content decreased significantly after torrefaction, leading to the increase of high heating value. Two-dimensional perturbation correlation analysis based on diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was performed to characterize the structural evolutions. It was found the dehydration of hydroxyls and the dissociation of branches were the main reactions at low torrefaction temperature. When the temperature further increased, the depolymerization of hemicellulose and the fragmentation of monosaccharide residues occurred. The distributed activation energy model with double Gaussian functions based on reaction-order model was used to investigate the pyrolysis kinetics. The results showed that torrefaction enhanced the activation energy for degradation reactions while lowered that for condensation reactions, and increased the devolatilization contribution of condensation reactions. Besides, torrefaction decreased the yields of typical pyrolytic products, such as acids, furans, alicyclic ketones and so on.

  7. Pharmacological effects and behavioral interventions on memory consolidation and reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Baratti, C M; Boccia, M M; Blake, M G

    2009-02-01

    In this article, we will review some behavioral, pharmacological and neurochemical studies from our laboratory on mice, which might contribute to our understanding of the complex processes of memory consolidation and reconsolidation. We discuss the post-training (memory consolidation) and post-reactivation (memory reconsolidation) effects of icv infusions of hemicholinium, a central inhibitor of acetylcholine synthesis, of intraperitoneal administration of L-NAME, a non-specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, of intrahippocampal injections of an inhibitor of the transcription factor NF-kappaB, and the exposure of mice to a new learning situation on retention performance of an inhibitory avoidance response. All treatments impair long-term memory consolidation and retrieval-induced memory processes different from extinction, probably in accordance with the 'reconsolidation hypothesis'.

  8. The effects of pathological gaming on aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, Jeroen S; Valkenburg, Patti M; Peter, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that pathological involvement with computer or video games is related to excessive gaming binges and aggressive behavior. Our aims for this study were to longitudinally examine if pathological gaming leads to increasingly excessive gaming habits, and how pathological gaming may cause an increase in physical aggression. For this purpose, we conducted a two-wave panel study among 851 Dutch adolescents (49% female) of which 540 played games (30% female). Our analyses indicated that higher levels of pathological gaming predicted an increase in time spent playing games 6 months later. Time spent playing violent games specifically, and not just games per se, increased physical aggression. Furthermore, higher levels of pathological gaming, regardless of violent content, predicted an increase in physical aggression among boys. That this effect only applies to boys does not diminish its importance, because adolescent boys are generally the heaviest players of violent games and most susceptible to pathological involvement. PMID:20549320

  9. Bauschinger effect and springback behavior of dual phase sheet steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hongwei

    2007-09-01

    the three-point bending tests, an FE model was effectively established to simulate the springback under different pin sizes. In order to investigate the Bauschinger effect on springback behavior, the deep-draw bending test was simulated using finite element method and showed improvement of simulation accuracy with the incorporation of the Bauschinger effect.

  10. Autism and Externalizing Behaviors: Buffering Effects of Parental Emotion Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Beverly J.; Berg, Jessica L.; Zurawski, Megan E.; King, Kathleen A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between parental emotion coaching and externalizing behaviors in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Children with ASD often exhibit externalizing behaviors, particularly emotionally driven externalizing behaviors, at a higher rate than their typically developing peers. An…

  11. The Good Behavior Game: A Classroom-Behavior Intervention Effective across Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Julene D.; Houlihan, Daniel; Wanzek, Megan; Jenson, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Few classroom behavioral interventions have been thoroughly studied using culturally and linguistically diverse populations, international student populations, or those from diverse socio-economic backgrounds. Yet, having such tools for school psychologists and teachers is critical for behavior management in the classroom. One important exception…

  12. The Mediating Effects of Parenting Behaviors on Maternal Affect and Reports of Children's Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karazsia, Bryan T.; Wildman, Beth G.

    2009-01-01

    Parenting behaviors have received ample support as a mediator of the relationship between maternal affect and child behavior problems. The majority of these research efforts were based on a uni-dimensional conceptualization of maternal mood, even though decades of theory and research suggest that mood is multidimensional. We examined the mediating…

  13. The Effects of a Peer-Mediated Positive Behavior Support Program on Socially Appropriate Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Lynnette; Young, K. Richard; Marchant, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    This study explored the results of aligning functional behavioral assessment (FBA) information with positive behavior support plans (PBS plans) designed with consideration for teacher acceptability. The independent variable had the three major components of a package, including assessment and planning (FBA), training (teachers, students, and…

  14. The Effect of Parenting Behaviors on Subsequent Child Behavior Problems in Autistic Spectrum Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, Lisa A.; McHugh, Louise; Saunders, Jo; Reed, Phil

    2008-01-01

    The current research explored the relationship between parenting behaviors in parents of children with Autistic Spectrum Conditions (ASC) and subsequent child behavior problems. The sample consisted of 72 children (aged 5-16 years) and their parents, who were assessed over a period of 9-10 months. There was a relationship between parenting…

  15. Protection against both lethal and behavioral effects of soman.

    PubMed

    Harris, L W; McDonough, J H; Stitcher, D L; Lennox, W J

    1984-01-01

    This work developed two drug mixtures which alone had no effect on performance of a criterion behavior but when given as a pretreatment would protect against organophosphate-induced lethality and incapacitation. Candidate drugs (alone and together) were given to rats trained to respond on a two-component Fixed Ratio 10 - Extinction (FR10-EXT) schedule. After generating dose response curves for each cholinolytic drug, mixtures of atropine (A) + mecamylamine (M) + pyridostigmine (Py) or physostigmine (Ph) were prepared and a combination of doses that produced no effects on operant performance was determined (Mix I:A = .78, M = .78, Py = .056 mg/kg; Mix II:A = .78, M = .78, Ph = .026 mg/kg). Both pretreatment mixtures provided equivalent protection against the lethal effects of the organophosphate soman; however only Mix II was capable of reversing soman-induced physical incapacitation (PI) as assessed by performance on an accelerating rotarod or FR10 responding. Pretreatment of animals with Mix II resulted in significantly higher levels of brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) than Mix I pretreated subjects 4 hrs after 1.3 LD50 soman, although peripheral AChE levels were not different. The results indicate organophosphate-induced PI can be attenuated by pretreatment with tertiary carbamates which protect significant amounts of brain AChE from irreversible inhibition.

  16. Comparison of behavioral effects after single and repeated administrations of four benzodiazepines in three mice behavioral models.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Hascoet, M; Mansouri, B; Colombel, M C; Bradwejn, J

    1992-06-01

    The behavioral and clinical profiles of various benzodiazepines after acute and chronic treatment are not well defined and may differ. The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavioral profiles of alprazolam, bromazepam, diazepam and lorazepam in mice after single and repeated (every half-life for seven half-lives) administrations using a stimulation-sedation test (actimeter), a myorelaxation test (rotarod), and an anxiolysis test ("four plates"). A dose range from 0.03 to 4 mg/kg was used. A single administration of alprazolam showed stimulating and anxiolytic effects which diminished after repeated administration. Lorezapam's sedative effect diminished but its anxiolytic effect increased upon repeated administration. Except for lorazepam, the myorelaxing effect of all four drugs increased after repeated treatment. These results suggest that the behavioral profile of benzodiazepines may not be identical during acute and chronic treatment. These differences may be present in clinical treatment and warrant investigation in humans.

  17. Comparison of behavioral effects after single and repeated administrations of four benzodiazepines in three mice behavioral models.

    PubMed Central

    Bourin, M; Hascoet, M; Mansouri, B; Colombel, M C; Bradwejn, J

    1992-01-01

    The behavioral and clinical profiles of various benzodiazepines after acute and chronic treatment are not well defined and may differ. The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavioral profiles of alprazolam, bromazepam, diazepam and lorazepam in mice after single and repeated (every half-life for seven half-lives) administrations using a stimulation-sedation test (actimeter), a myorelaxation test (rotarod), and an anxiolysis test ("four plates"). A dose range from 0.03 to 4 mg/kg was used. A single administration of alprazolam showed stimulating and anxiolytic effects which diminished after repeated administration. Lorezapam's sedative effect diminished but its anxiolytic effect increased upon repeated administration. Except for lorazepam, the myorelaxing effect of all four drugs increased after repeated treatment. These results suggest that the behavioral profile of benzodiazepines may not be identical during acute and chronic treatment. These differences may be present in clinical treatment and warrant investigation in humans. PMID:1637802

  18. Effects of moderate prenatal ethanol exposure and age on social behavior, spatial response perseveration errors and motor behavior.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Derek A; Barto, Daniel; Rodriguez, Carlos I; Magcalas, Christy M; Fink, Brandi C; Rice, James P; Bird, Clark W; Davies, Suzy; Savage, Daniel D

    2014-08-01

    Persistent deficits in social behavior are among the major negative consequences associated with exposure to ethanol during prenatal development. Prior work from our laboratory has linked deficits in social behavior following moderate prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) in the rat to functional alterations in the ventrolateral frontal cortex [21]. In addition to social behaviors, the regions comprising the ventrolateral frontal cortex are critical for diverse processes ranging from orofacial motor movements to flexible alteration of behavior in the face of changing consequences. The broader behavioral implications of altered ventrolateral frontal cortex function following moderate PAE have, however, not been examined. In the present study we evaluated the consequences of moderate PAE on social behavior, tongue protrusion, and flexibility in a variant of the Morris water task that required modification of a well-established spatial response. PAE rats displayed deficits in tongue protrusion, reduced flexibility in the spatial domain, increased wrestling, and decreased investigation, indicating that several behaviors associated with ventrolateral frontal cortex function are impaired following moderate PAE. A linear discriminant analysis revealed that measures of wrestling and tongue protrusion provided the best discrimination of PAE rats from saccharin-exposed control rats. We also evaluated all behaviors in young adult (4-5 months) or older (10-11 months) rats to address the persistence of behavioral deficits in adulthood and possible interactions between early ethanol exposure and advancing age. Behavioral deficits in each domain persisted well into adulthood (10-11 months), however, there was no evidence that aging enhances the effects of moderate PAE within the age ranges that were studied. PMID:24769174

  19. Effects of caregiver-implemented aggression reduction procedure on problem behavior of dogs.

    PubMed

    Echterling-Savage, Kristyn; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D; Miller, L Keith; Savage, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Problem behavior of companion animals poses a threat to caregivers, other targets of problem behavior (e.g., strangers, other nonhuman animals), and those animals engaging in problem behavior. This study examined the effects of an aggression reduction procedure (ARP) on dog problem behavior. After a baseline condition showing caregivers were unsuccessful in reducing dog aggression and the behaviors preceding aggression, caregivers were trained to implement a procedure to address dog problem behavior in relatively simple contexts. Generalization programming then was used to target caregiver plan implementation and dog problem behavior in more complex contexts. The ARP effectively reduced dog aggression for all dogs. A slight reduction and increased variability in dog precursor behavior was observed when the ARP was implemented. In addition, caregivers and experts rated the goals, procedures, and effects as acceptable. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  20. Effects of caregiver-implemented aggression reduction procedure on problem behavior of dogs.

    PubMed

    Echterling-Savage, Kristyn; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D; Miller, L Keith; Savage, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Problem behavior of companion animals poses a threat to caregivers, other targets of problem behavior (e.g., strangers, other nonhuman animals), and those animals engaging in problem behavior. This study examined the effects of an aggression reduction procedure (ARP) on dog problem behavior. After a baseline condition showing caregivers were unsuccessful in reducing dog aggression and the behaviors preceding aggression, caregivers were trained to implement a procedure to address dog problem behavior in relatively simple contexts. Generalization programming then was used to target caregiver plan implementation and dog problem behavior in more complex contexts. The ARP effectively reduced dog aggression for all dogs. A slight reduction and increased variability in dog precursor behavior was observed when the ARP was implemented. In addition, caregivers and experts rated the goals, procedures, and effects as acceptable. Implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25401975

  1. Infrared photometric behavior and opposition effect of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erard, S.; Bibring, J-P.; Drossart, P.

    1992-01-01

    Although the instrument wasn't designed for this purpose, data from the imaging spectrometer ISM may be used for studying photometric variations of Mars reflectance, that are related to the surface materials and aerosols physical properties. ISM flew aboard the Phobos-2 spacecraft which orbited Mars from January to March, 1989. About 40,000 spectra were acquired in 128 channels ranging from 0.76 to 3.16 micro-m, with a spatial resolution of 25 km and a signal-to-noise ratio ranging up to 1000. Analysis of the results leads to the following conclusions: width variations of the opposition surge can be related to differences in porosity or grain size distribution on the various domains, with little or no effect from suspended dust. As the biggest effects are observed on dark and bright materials, intermediate behaviors on average-bright regions cannot result from a mixing process, but are more likely to come from either cementation processes or modification of the grain size distribution under the influence of wind, which under Martian conditions preferentially removes the biggest particles. Thus, a surface dust consisting in big bright and small dark grains could explain the observations.

  2. Effects of pterostilbene and resveratrol on brain and behavior.

    PubMed

    Poulose, Shibu M; Thangthaeng, Nopporn; Miller, Marshall G; Shukitt-Hale, Barbara

    2015-10-01

    Age is the greatest universal risk factor for neurodegenerative diseases. During aging, these conditions progress from minor loss of function to major disruptions in daily life, loss of independence and ultimately death. Because approximately 25% of the world population is expected to be older than age 65 by 2050, and no treatments exist to halt or reverse ongoing neurodegeneration, the need for effective prevention strategies is more pressing that ever before. A growing body of research supports the role of diet in healthy aging, particularly diets rich in bioactive phytochemical compounds. Recently, stilbenes such as resveratrol (3, 5, 4'-trans-trihydroxystilbene) and its analogue, pterostilbene, have gained a significant amount of attention for their potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anticarcinogenic properties. However, evidence for the beneficial effects of stilbenes on cerebral function is just beginning to emerge. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of resveratrol and pterostilbene in improving brain health during aging, with specific focus on antioxidant and anti-inflammatory signaling and behavioral outcomes.

  3. Aging and the Effects of Exploratory Behavior on Spatial Memory.

    PubMed

    Varner, Kaitlin M; Dopkins, Stephen; Philbeck, John W

    2016-03-01

    The present research examined the effect of encoding from multiple viewpoints on scene recall in a group of younger (18-22 years) and older (65-80 years) adults. Participants completed a visual search task, during which they were given the opportunity to examine a room using two sets of windows that partitioned the room differently. Their choice of window set was recorded, to determine whether an association between these choices and spatial memory performance existed. Subsequently, participants were tested for spatial memory of the domain in which the search task was completed. Relative to younger adults, older adults demonstrated an increased tendency to use a single set of windows as well as decreased spatial memory for the domain. Window-set usage was associated with spatial memory, such that older adults who relied more heavily on a single set of windows also had better performance on the spatial memory task. These findings suggest that, in older adults, moderation in exploratory behavior may have a positive effect on memory for the domain of exploration.

  4. Effect of Surface Nanocrystallization on Fatigue Behavior of Pure Titanium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Sun, Qiaoyan; Xiao, Lin; Sun, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The high-cycle fatigue behavior was investigated in pure titanium after surface nanocrystallization (SNC Ti). Compared with the coarse-grained titanium (CG Ti) samples, the SNC Ti samples exhibit an improved fatigue life. The SNC has a remarkable influence on the fatigue cracks initiation and growth of pure titanium. The results show that, because the free-surface cracking is suppressed by the surface nanogradient structure in the SNC Ti, the fatigue cracks initiation sites change from the free surface to the subsurface. Meanwhile, the fatigue crack growth rate decreases due to the microstructural feature and residual compressive stress. The deformation twins in the subsurface of SNC Ti have a marked effect on the fatigue crack initiation and the crack growth. The former effect is due to the twin boundaries being preferential sites for crack initiation, while the latter is associated with the barriers that the twin boundaries pose to the propagation of dislocations. Furthermore, microstructural analysis indicates that the dislocation distribution in SNC Ti gradually becomes homogenous as fatigue processes. This homogeneous microstructure is also beneficial to the improvement of fatigue life.

  5. Effects of embryonic methylmercury exposure on larval behavior of mummichogs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, T.; Weis, J.S.; Weis, P.

    1995-12-31

    Fundulus heteroclitus embryos were exposed to 5 and 10 ug/l meHg throughout development. Larvae were maintained in clean seawater and tested regularly for prey capture and predator avoidance. Experimentals captured significantly fewer prey (Artemia nauplii) than controls, although differences disappeared after about one week. However, 2-wk posthatch larvae showed significantly more miscues than controls. Differences were seen between controls from different populations. Fish from Hg-polluted Piles Creek (Linden NJ) which have impaired predation as adults, showed higher prey capture rate as larvae, although they exhibited more miscues than the reference population (from East Hampton, NY). Differences were also seen in the response to meHg: Piles Creek fish, which were previously found to be more resistant to teratogenic effects of higher concentrations of meHg, appeared to be more resistant than the reference population to these behavioral effects as well. In other studies, meHg-exposed larvae (from the reference population) swam greater distances than controls in a test of swimming performance. This difference also disappeared over time. Despite their increased swimming performance, exposed larvae were more vulnerable to predation by the grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, due perhaps to their higher overall level of activity.

  6. Early behavioral effects of lead perinatal exposure in rat pups.

    PubMed

    De Marco, Marion; Halpern, Ricardo; Barros, Helena M T

    2005-07-01

    Acoustic analysis of infants crying, a sensitive and selective index for measuring the effect of pre and perinatal lead exposure, may provide an early marker for central nervous system damage produced by the toxic. The present study evaluated the effects of exposure to low lead levels during perinatal and early postnatal periods on ultrasonic vocalization (USV), an early behavior of rat pups essential to their development. Non-sexually experienced females were gavaged daily with 8, 16 or 24 mg/kg of lead acetate or the control solution (1 ml/kg) for 30 days prior to breeding and until their pups were weaned. After crossover of dams, pups had been exposed to lead during pregnancy+lactation, pregnancy or lactation. The physiological variables measured on postnatal days 7 or 14 were USV, locomotion, rectal temperature, body weight and blood lead levels. Lead exposition during pregnancy+lactation, pregnancy or lactation induced a significant dose-dependent decrease of USV of 7-day-old pups. On the contrary, lead exposition during the different phases of pregnancy induced a significant dose-dependent increase of USV in 14-day-old rat pups. Blood lead levels varied from 5.7 to 36.5 microg/dl in pups. Body weight and temperature were not influenced by lead exposition. Lead-exposed 14-day-old pups were significantly more active. This study provides evidence of developmental changes in USV emission in rat pups exposed with low lead levels.

  7. Multistress effects on goldfish (Carassius auratus) behavior and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gandar, Allison; Jean, Séverine; Canal, Julie; Marty-Gasset, Nathalie; Gilbert, Franck; Laffaille, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Crossed effects between climate change and chemical pollutions were identified on community structure and ecosystem functioning. Temperature rising affects the toxic properties of pollutants and the sensitiveness of organisms to chemicals stress. Inversely, chemical exposure may decrease the capacity of organisms to respond to environmental changes. The aim of our study was to assess the individual and crossed effects of temperature rising and pesticide contamination on fish. Goldfish, Carassius auratus, were exposed during 96 h at two temperatures (22 and 32 °C) to a mixture of common pesticides (S-metolachlor, isoproturon, linuron, atrazine-desethyl, aclonifen, pendimethalin, and tebuconazol) at two environmentally relevant concentrations (total concentrations MIX1 = 8.4 μg L(-1) and MIX2 = 42 μg L(-1)). We investigated the sediment reworking behavior, which has a major ecological functional role. We also focused on three physiological traits from the cellular up to the whole individual level showing metabolic status of fish (protein concentration in liver and muscle, hepatosomatic index, and Fulton's condition factor). Individual thermal stress and low concentrations of pesticides decreased the sediment reworking activity of fish and entrained metabolic compensation with global depletion in energy stores. We found that combined chemical and thermal stresses impaired the capacity of fish to set up an efficient adaptive response. Our results strongly suggest that temperature will make fish more sensitive to water contamination by pesticides, raising concerns about wild fish conservation submitted to global changes.

  8. Effect of alcohol on behavioral and autonomic thermoregulation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, C.J.; Stead, A.G.

    1986-01-01

    Male, BALB/c mice were injected intraperitoneally with ethyl alcohol (ethanol) in dosages of 0, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, or 3.0 g/kg and then placed in a temperature gradient that permitted the measurement of preferred ambient temperature (Ta). The 3 g/kg dosage of ethanol resulted in a slight lowering of the preferred Ta during the first 30 min of placement in the gradient. However, there was no overall statistically significant effect of alcohol dosage on preferred Ta. In another experiment, BALB/c mice were treated with the aforementioned ethanol dosages while metabolic rate (MR), evaporative water loss (EWL), and colonic temperature were measured 60 min post-injection at Ta's of 20, 30, and 35 C a dosage of 3 g/kg caused a significant decrease in MR, EWL, and colonic temperature. At a Ta of 30 C this same dosage caused significant reduction in colonic temperature, however; at Ta of 35 C ethanol had no effect on these parameters. In spite of the significant decrease in colonic temperature at a Ta of 30 C, which approximates the normal preferred Ta, the behavioral thermal preference was marginally affected. It is not clear whether or not ethanol injection results in a decrease in the set-point body temperature.

  9. Multistress effects on goldfish (Carassius auratus) behavior and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gandar, Allison; Jean, Séverine; Canal, Julie; Marty-Gasset, Nathalie; Gilbert, Franck; Laffaille, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Crossed effects between climate change and chemical pollutions were identified on community structure and ecosystem functioning. Temperature rising affects the toxic properties of pollutants and the sensitiveness of organisms to chemicals stress. Inversely, chemical exposure may decrease the capacity of organisms to respond to environmental changes. The aim of our study was to assess the individual and crossed effects of temperature rising and pesticide contamination on fish. Goldfish, Carassius auratus, were exposed during 96 h at two temperatures (22 and 32 °C) to a mixture of common pesticides (S-metolachlor, isoproturon, linuron, atrazine-desethyl, aclonifen, pendimethalin, and tebuconazol) at two environmentally relevant concentrations (total concentrations MIX1 = 8.4 μg L(-1) and MIX2 = 42 μg L(-1)). We investigated the sediment reworking behavior, which has a major ecological functional role. We also focused on three physiological traits from the cellular up to the whole individual level showing metabolic status of fish (protein concentration in liver and muscle, hepatosomatic index, and Fulton's condition factor). Individual thermal stress and low concentrations of pesticides decreased the sediment reworking activity of fish and entrained metabolic compensation with global depletion in energy stores. We found that combined chemical and thermal stresses impaired the capacity of fish to set up an efficient adaptive response. Our results strongly suggest that temperature will make fish more sensitive to water contamination by pesticides, raising concerns about wild fish conservation submitted to global changes. PMID:26272290

  10. Effects of exposure to different types of radiation on behaviors mediated by peripheral or central systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Erat, S.

    1998-01-01

    The effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on behavior may result from effects on peripheral or on central systems. For behavioral endpoints that are mediated by peripheral systems (e.g., radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion or vomiting), the behavioral effects of exposure to heavy particles (56Fe, 600 MeV/n) are qualitatively similar to the effects of exposure to gamma radiation (60Co) and to fission spectrum neutrons. For these endpoints, the only differences between the different types of radiation are in terms of relative behavioral effectiveness. For behavioral endpoints that are mediated by central systems (e.g., amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning), the effects of exposure to 56Fe particles are not seen following exposure to lower LET gamma rays or fission spectrum neutrons. These results indicate that the effects of exposure to heavy particles on behavioral endpoints cannot necessarily be extrapolated from studies using gamma rays, but require the use of heavy particles.

  11. Effects of exposure to different types of radiation on behaviors mediated by peripheral or central systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Erat, S.

    The effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on behavior may result from effects on peripheral or on central systems. For behavioral endpoints that are mediated by peripheral systems (e.g., radiation-induced conditioned taste aversion or vomiting), the behavioral effects of exposure to heavy particles (^56Fe, 600 MeV/n) are qualitatively similar to the effects of exposure to gamma radiation (^60Co) and to fission spectrum neutrons. For these endpoints, the only differences between the different types of radiation are in terms of relative behavioral effectiveness. For behavioral endpoints that are mediated by central systems (e.g., amphetamine-induced taste aversion learning), the effects of exposure to ^56Fe particles are not seen following exposure to lower LET gamma rays or fission spectrum neutrons. These results indicate that the effects of exposure to heavy particles on behavioral endpoints cannot necessarily be extrapolated from studies using gamma rays, but require the use of heavy particles.

  12. Effects of prepartal stress on postpartal nursing behavior, litter development and adult sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Herrenkohl, L R; Whitney, J B

    1976-12-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to the stress of restraint, heat and bright lights three times daily from Days 14 to 22 of gestation. Because prepartal stress did not markedly disturb the mother's retrieving and crouching behavior, disturbances in postpartal nursing behavior do not seem to account for the abnormal sexual behavior of male offspring as adults. The most significant finding was that litter weights were reduced, not only at birth, but for 3 weeks thereafter, suggesting that prepartal stress not only altered the pups in utero but also affected postpartal milk synthesis. The possibility emerges that prepartal stress may alter adult sexual behavior in males by modifications in fetal and/or maternal pituitary glands.

  13. Effects of Check & Connect on Attendance, Behavior, and Academics: A Randomized Effectiveness Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynard, Brandy R.; Kjellstrand, Elizabeth K.; Thompson, Aaron M.

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluates the effectiveness of Check & Connect (C&C) in a randomly assigned sample of students who were all receiving Communities in Schools (CIS) services. The research questions for the study include: Are there differences in attendance, academics, and behavior for CIS students who also receive C&C compared to…

  14. Behavioral effects of congenital ventromedial prefrontal cortex malformation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A detailed behavioral profile associated with focal congenital malformation of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) has not been reported previously. Here we describe a 14 year-old boy, B.W., with neurological and psychiatric sequelae stemming from focal cortical malformation of the left vmPFC. Case Presentation B.W.'s behavior has been characterized through extensive review Patience of clinical and personal records along with behavioral and neuropsychological testing. A central feature of the behavioral profile is severe antisocial behavior. He is aggressive, manipulative, and callous; features consistent with psychopathy. Other problems include: egocentricity, impulsivity, hyperactivity, lack of empathy, lack of respect for authority, impaired moral judgment, an inability to plan ahead, and poor frustration tolerance. Conclusions The vmPFC has a profound contribution to the development of human prosocial behavior. B.W. demonstrates how a congenital lesion to this cortical region severely disrupts this process. PMID:22136635

  15. Effects of the Good Behavior Game on classwide off-task behavior in a high school basic algebra resource classroom.

    PubMed

    Flower, Andrea; McKenna, John; Muething, Colin S; Bryant, Diane Pedrotty; Bryant, Brian R

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the Good Behavior Game (GBG) on classwide off-task behavior in two ninth-grade basic algebra resource classes. Ten students with a variety of disabilities, in two classrooms, and their special education resource teacher participated in this study. A reversal design was employed, in which the special education teacher implemented GBG compared to typical practice-algebra readiness instruction. Results showed that classwide off-task behavior decreased in the GBG conditions compared to the baseline and reversal conditions. Fidelity measures indicated that the teacher implemented GBG with fidelity. Students and the teacher rated GBG favorably. Overall findings support the use of GBG for reducing classwide off-task behavior. Implications for practice and future research directions are presented.

  16. Effects of Dark Brooders on Behavior and Fearfulness in Layers

    PubMed Central

    Riber, Anja B.; Guzman, Diego A.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Chicks require heat to maintain body temperature during the first weeks after hatch. Heat is normally provided by use of heating lamps or whole-house heating, but an alternative is dark brooders, i.e. horizontal heating elements equipped with curtains. The effects of providing layer chicks with dark brooders during the brooding period on behavior and fearfulness were investigated. Brooders resulted in chicks showing less locomotive activity, feather pecking and fleeing. Also, a long-term reduction of fearfulness in brooder birds was found. Results support the suggestion that rearing with dark brooders can be a successful method of reducing or preventing some of the major welfare problems in layers. Abstract Chicks require heat to maintain body temperature during the first weeks after hatch. This may be provided by dark brooders; i.e., horizontal heating elements equipped with curtains. The objective was to test effects of rearing layer chicks with dark brooders on time budget and fearfulness. Behavioral observations were performed during the first six weeks of age. Three different fear tests were conducted when the birds were age 3–6, 14–15 and 26–28 weeks. During the first four days, brooder chicks rested more than control chicks whereas they spent less time drinking, feather pecking and on locomotion (p ≤ 0.009). On days 16, 23, 30 and 42, brooder chicks spent less time on feather pecking, locomotion and fleeing (p ≤ 0.01) whereas foraging and dust bathing occurred more often on day 42 (p ≤ 0.032). Brooder birds had shorter durations of tonic immobility at all ages (p = 0.0032), moved closer to the novel object at age 15 weeks (p < 0.0001), and had shorter latencies to initiate locomotion in the open-field test at age 28 weeks (p < 0.0001). Results support the suggestion that dark brooders can be a successful method of reducing or preventing fear and feather pecking in layers. PMID:26751482

  17. Thermal Effects on the Bearing Behavior of Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Sandra Polesky

    2001-01-01

    Thermal effects on the pin-bearing behavior of an IM7/PET15 composite laminate are studied comprehensively. A hypothesis presents factors influencing a change in pin-bearing strength with a change in temperature for a given joint design. The factors include the change in the state of residual cure stress, the material properties, and the fastener fit with a change in temperature. Experiments are conducted to determine necessary lamina and laminate material property data for the IM7/PET15 being utilized in this study. Lamina material properties are determined between the assumed stress free temperature of 460 F down to -200 F. Laminate strength properties are determined for several lay-ups at the operating temperatures of 350 F, 70 F, and -200 F. A three-dimensional finite element analysis model of a composite laminate subject to compressive loading is developed. Both the resin rich layer located between lamina and the thermal residual stresses present in the laminate due to curing are determined to influence the state of stress significantly. Pin-bearing tests of several lay-ups were conducted to develop an understanding on the effect of temperature changes on the pin-bearing behavior of the material. A computational study investigating the factors influencing pin-bearing strength was performed. A finite element model was developed and used to determine the residual thermal cure stresses in the laminate containing a hole. Very high interlaminar stress concentrations were observed two elements away from the hole boundary at all three operating temperatures. The pin-bearing problem was modeled assuming a rigid frictionless pin and restraining only radial displacements at the hole boundary. A uniform negative pressure load was then applied to the straight end of the model. A solution, where thermal residual stresses were combined with the state of stress due to pin-bearing loads was evaluated. The presence of thermal residual stresses intensified the interlaminar

  18. Differential effectiveness of behavioral parent-training and cognitive-behavioral therapy for antisocial youth: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    McCart, Michael R; Priester, Paul E; Davies, W Hobart; Azen, Razia

    2006-08-01

    Extended the findings from previous meta-analytic work by comparing the effectiveness of behavioral parent-training (BPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for youth with antisocial behavior problems. Youth demographic variables were also examined as potential moderators of the effectiveness of these 2 types of interventions. Thirty BPT studies and 41 CBT studies met inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis. The weighted mean effect size (ES) for all interventions was 0.40. Youth age was found to moderate the outcome of the 2 interventions, with BPT having a stronger effect for preschool and school-aged youth and CBT having a stronger effect for adolescents. The results also indicate that there may be systematic differences in the outcomes associated with BPT and CBT when the setting of the intervention is considered, suggesting the need to carefully consider the effect of setting in future research. This study also highlights the need for outcome research dealing with more diverse populations and the better classification of research participants on different developmental trajectories of antisocial behavior.

  19. The Effects of Behavioral Modification Based on Client Center Program to Health Behaviors among Obese University Students

    PubMed Central

    Intarakamhang, Ungsinun; Malarat, Anan

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to examine the effectiveness of Health Behavioral Modification based on the Client Center Program (HBMCCP) and to study behavioral change in relation to self – efficacy, self- regulation, self-care behaviors and body weight. The sample was 59 undergraduate students, who were selected by cluster random sampling. 29 participated in the HBMCCP for 8 weeks, and were followed up 4 weeks after the program, and 30 students in the control group. Data was collected 3 times, before, immediately after and 4 weeks after the program, by 6 scale – questionnaires which had high reliability of Cronbach’s alpha-coefficient between .81 to .94. The stratified variables were psycho-social variables, being a positive attitude towards health behavior and social support. Data were analyzed by MANOVA and ANCOVA. Results showed that 1) Obese students in the experimental group with HBMCCP had self – efficacy, self- regulation and self-care behavior at immediately after and 4 weeks later program significantly higher scores than before the program (p<0.000). For body weights at immediately after program were significantly lower scores than before the program (p=0.02), 2) Obese students in the program had self – efficacy, self- regulation and self-care behavior scores at immediately after and 4 weeks after the program significantly higher than obese students in the control group (p=0.009) and significantly lower body weights than obese students in the control group (p=0.026), and 3) No three - way interaction among positive attitude towards health behavior, social support and the program was found, although there was a two-way interaction between positive attitude towards health behavior and the program (p=0.001) and effect size=0.272. PMID:24373262

  20. The effects of behavioral modification based on client center program to health behaviors among obese university students.

    PubMed

    Intarakamhang, Ungsinun; Malarat, Anan

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to examine the effectiveness of Health Behavioral Modification based on the Client Center Program (HBMCCP) and to study behavioral change in relation to self - efficacy, self- regulation, self-care behaviors and body weight. The sample was 59 undergraduate students, who were selected by cluster random sampling. 29 participated in the HBMCCP for 8 weeks, and were followed up 4 weeks after the program, and 30 students in the control group. Data was collected 3 times, before, immediately after and 4 weeks after the program, by 6 scale - questionnaires which had high reliability of Cronbach's alpha-coefficient between .81 to.94. The stratified variables were psycho-social variables, being a positive attitude towards health behavior and social support. Data were analyzed by MANOVA and ANCOVA. Results showed that 1) Obese students in the experimental group with HBMCCP had self - efficacy, self- regulation and self-care behavior at immediately after and 4 weeks later program significantly higher scores than before the program (p<0.000). For body weights at immediately after program were significantly lower scores than before the program (p=0.02), 2) Obese students in the program had self - efficacy, self- regulation and self-care behavior scores at immediately after and 4 weeks after the program significantly higher than obese students in the control group (p=0.009) and significantly lower body weights than obese students in the control group (p=0.026), and 3) No three - way interaction among positive attitude towards health behavior, social support and the program was found, although there was a two- way interaction between positive attitude towards health behavior and the program (p=0.001) and effect size=0.272.

  1. The Effects of Safety Discrimination Training and Frequent Safety Observations on Safety-Related Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Matthew A.; Alvero, Alicia M.

    2012-01-01

    The intent of the present study was to assess the effects of discrimination training only and in combination with frequent safety observations on five participants' safety-related behavior in a simulated office setting. The study used a multiple-baseline design across safety-related behaviors. Across all participants and behavior, safety improved…

  2. Effective Use of Behavior-Specific Praise: A Middle School Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haydon, Todd; Musti-Rao, Shobana

    2011-01-01

    One simple and naturalistic strategy shown to have positive effects on both academic and behavioral outcomes is teachers' use of praise statements. Praise statements can be broadly categorized as general praise and behavior-specific praise (BSP). In a general praise statement, a teacher delivers verbal praise without describing the behavior for…

  3. Effect of glycemic load on eating behavior self-efficacy during weight loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High eating behavior self-efficacy may contribute to successful weight loss. Diet interventions that maximize eating behavior self-efficacy may therefore improve weight loss outcomes. However, data on the effect of diet composition on eating behavior self-efficacy are sparse. To determine the eff...

  4. The Relationship between Neighborhood Characteristics and Effective Parenting Behaviors: The Role of Social Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrnes, Hilary F.; Miller, Brenda A.

    2012-01-01

    Neighborhood characteristics have been linked to healthy behavior, including effective parenting behaviors. This may be partially explained through the neighborhood's relation to parents' access to social support from friends and family. The current study examined associations of neighborhood characteristics with parenting behaviors indirectly…

  5. Behavior Therapy and the Transdermal Nicotine Patch: Effects on Cessation Outcome, Affect, and Coping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cinciripini, Paul M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Process and outcome of a smoking cessation program using behavior therapy along (BT) or behavior therapy plus the nicotine patch (BTP) was studied in 64 participants. Abstinence was significantly higher for the BTP group from the end of behavioral treatment (79% vs. 63%) through the three-month follow-up, with the effects weakening at the six- and…

  6. Informant Effects on Behavioral and Academic Associations: A Latent Variable Longitudinal Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konold, Timothy R.; Shukla, Kathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Discrepancies among informants' ratings of a given child's behavior complicate the study of linkages between child behavior and academic achievement. In the current study, we examined the potential moderating effect of informant type on associations between behavior and two types of achievement in a longitudinal growth model that…

  7. Effects of signaling invasive procedures on a hospitalized infant's affective behaviors.

    PubMed Central

    Derrickson, J G; Neef, N A; Cataldo, M F

    1993-01-01

    We report the effects of using a visual and auditory stimulus signaling impending painful medical procedures versus "safe" periods on the affective behavior of a hospitalized infant. The results of a reversal design suggested that the signaling procedures increased positive behaviors and decreased negative behaviors during both noninvasive and invasive caregiver events. PMID:8473252

  8. Effects of Content Acquisition Podcasts to Develop Preservice Teachers' Knowledge of Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Michael J.; Thomas, Cathy Newman

    2012-01-01

    A critical issue facing the field of education is the need to improve teachers' preparation to effectively manage student behavior in the classroom. Many pre- and in-service teachers receive exposure to evidence-based behavioral interventions, such as schoolwide positive behavioral interventions and supports, during teacher preparation programs;…

  9. Effects of leader contingent and noncontingent reward and punishment behaviors on subordinate performance and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Podsakoff, P M; Todor, W D; Skov, R

    1982-12-01

    This study investigated the nature of the relationships between leader reward and punishment behaviors and subordinate performance and satisfaction. Only performance-contingent reward behavior was found to affect subordinate performance significantly. Positive relationships were found between leader contingent reward behavior and employee satisfaction. Contingent punishment had no effects on subordinate performance or satisfaction. PMID:10257766

  10. The Effects of Child Behavior Problems on the Maintenance of Intervention Fidelity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnachie, Gene; Carr, Edward G.

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the effects of child behavior problems on teachers' (N=3) intervention fidelity across two intervention protocols: escape extinction and functional communication training. Results indicate that a high rate of behavior problems during escape extinction appeared to punish teachers' efforts. A low rate of behavior problems was evident…

  11. Effectiveness of Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Component Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Judith A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Evaluated effects of group behavioral therapy including aerobic exercise, behavioral therapy alone, and aerobic exercise alone on pain and physical and psychological disability among mildly disabled chronic low-back-pain patients (n=96). The combined behavioral therapy and exercise group improved significantly more pretreatment to posttreatment…

  12. Spontaneous Recovery of Previously Extinguished Behavior as an Alternative Explanation for Extinction-Related Side Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Raymond J.; Mays, Nicole M.

    2007-01-01

    Extinction is accepted as a viable intervention for behaviors that are hypothesized to be maintained by contingent attentional reinforcement. However, it is frequently acknowledged that extinction has potential numerous side effects, including the generation of aggressive behavior. This explanation does not provide a behavioral conceptualization…

  13. Improving Classroom Behavior through Effective Instruction: An Illustrative Program Example Using "SRA FLEX Literacy"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martella, Ronald C.; Marchand-Martella, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Research has demonstrated a strong positive correlation between behavior problems and low academic achievement. Student success and/or failures are in large part determined by how well teachers provide effective instruction to their students. This article overviews key behavior-management approaches related to academic and behavioral success that…

  14. Effects of leader contingent and noncontingent reward and punishment behaviors on subordinate performance and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Podsakoff, P M; Todor, W D; Skov, R

    1982-12-01

    This study investigated the nature of the relationships between leader reward and punishment behaviors and subordinate performance and satisfaction. Only performance-contingent reward behavior was found to affect subordinate performance significantly. Positive relationships were found between leader contingent reward behavior and employee satisfaction. Contingent punishment had no effects on subordinate performance or satisfaction.

  15. The effects of differential negative reinforcement of other behavior and noncontingent escape on compliance.

    PubMed

    Kodak, Tiffany; Miltenberger, Raymond G; Romaniuk, Cathryn

    2003-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of noncontingent escape and differential negative reinforcement of other behavior in reducing problem behaviors and increasing compliance in 2 children with disabilities. Results showed that both methods reduced problem behavior and increased compliance for both children.

  16. Teacher Classroom Management Practices: Effects on Disruptive or Aggressive Student Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Regina M.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Reschly, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the large research base grounded in behavioral theory for strategies to increase appropriate behavior and prevent or decrease inappropriate behavior in the classroom, a systematic review of multi-component universal classroom management research is necessary to establish the effects of teachers' universal classroom management approaches.…

  17. Effect of prepubertal versus postpubertal castration on sexual and aggressive behavior in male horses.

    PubMed

    Line, S W; Hart, B L; Sanders, L

    1985-02-01

    Males horses castrated prepubertally occasionally display stallion-like sexual and aggressive behavior as adults. A retrospective survey of 140 horse owners was undertaken to compare the effectiveness of prepubertal versus postpubertal castration on objectionable sexual and aggressive behavior. Of 94 geldings that had been castrated prepubertally (before 2 years of age), 20% to 30% displayed stallion-like sexual behavior and aggression toward horses, and 5% were aggressive toward people in a stallion-like manner. This occurrence of problem behavior was not significantly different from the occurrence of these behavioral patterns in 46 geldings that had been castrated as stallions (over 3 years of age). When castration was examined as a therapeutic measure to eliminate sexual and aggressive behavior in stallions in which the behavior had become objectionable, it was found that the operation was effective on sexual behavior and aggression toward people in 60% to 70% of horses and on aggression toward horses in 40% of horses. PMID:4038698

  18. Effects of school-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports and fidelity of implementation on problem behavior in high schools.

    PubMed

    Flannery, K B; Fenning, P; Kato, M McGrath; McIntosh, K

    2014-06-01

    High school is an important time in the educational career of students. It is also a time when adolescents face many behavioral, academic, and social-emotional challenges. Current statistics about the behavioral, academic, and social-emotional challenges faced by adolescents, and the impact on society through incarceration and dropout, have prompted high schools to direct their attention toward keeping students engaged and reducing high-risk behavioral challenges. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SW-PBIS) on the levels of individual student problem behaviors during a 3-year effectiveness trial without random assignment to condition. Participants were 36,653 students in 12 high schools. Eight schools implemented SW-PBIS, and four schools served as comparison schools. Results of a multilevel latent growth model showed statistically significant decreases in student office discipline referrals in SW-PBIS schools, with increases in comparison schools, when controlling for enrollment and percent of students receiving free or reduced price meals. In addition, as fidelity of implementation increased, office discipline referrals significantly decreased. Results are discussed in terms of effectiveness of a SW-PBIS approach in high schools and considerations to enhance fidelity of implementation.

  19. Effective Resources Supporting Healthy Sexual Behavior in Formerly Incarcerated Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senteio, Charles; Collins, Summer Wright; Jackson, Rachael; Welk, Stacy; Zhang, Shun

    2010-01-01

    The sexual health behavior of formerly incarcerated persons (FIPs) not only affects the FIP, their sex partners, and their significant others, but also affects their families and the communities in which they live. Certain health conditions, which are overrepresented in incarcerated populations, are directly impacted by sexual health behavior.…

  20. Effects of Motivation on Students' Ratings of Tutor Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gijselaers, Wim H.; Nuy, Herman

    This study, which took place in Maastricht (Netherlands), examined whether motivation affects the reliability of students' ratings about tutor behavior and whether different types of students have different expectations about tutor behavior. Four types of motivation were measured: intrinsic, extrinsic, and achievement motivation, and fear of…

  1. Effects of Positive Unified Behavior Support on Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, John S.; White, Richard; Algozzine, Bob; Algozzine, Kate

    2009-01-01

    "Positive Unified Behavior Support" (PUBS) is a school-wide intervention designed to establish uniform attitudes, expectations, correction procedures, and roles among faculty, staff, and administration. PUBS is grounded in the general principles of positive behavior support and represents a straightforward, practical implementation model. When…

  2. Effects of Classroom Management Training on Student Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Carolyn V.

    2013-01-01

    Documentation of classroom disruptions caused by student behavior has steadily increased over the past 70 years. Researchers have theorized that professional development training for teachers slows the disruptions caused by student behavior, allowing all students to learn; however, there is a paucity of research on whether teachers implement the…

  3. Some Effects on Human Behavior of Aversive Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Steven D.; And Others

    Two studies were done to examine aggressive behavior in humans. In Experiment One, adults working on a plunger pulling task could receive a 3.5 ma shock at 75% probability every two minutes. The shock was unrelated to their plunger pulling behavior. Subjects could press a toggle switch to deliver electric shock to the experimenter, who was in the…

  4. The Effect of Individual Differences on Adolescents' Impulsive Buying Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Chuang, Shin-Chieh

    2005-01-01

    This study posits a relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Impulsive Buying Tendency (IBT). A survey of 574 adolescents found that high-EI adolescents manifested less impulsive behavior than did low-EI adolescents, and high-IBT adolescents were more likely to engage in more impulsive buying behavior than were low-IBT adolescents.…

  5. Increasing Behavior Management Effectiveness through Problem Analysis and Individualization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Bernard W.

    To reduce disciplinary cases without using suspension or alienating teachers and parents is a challenging task for principals. Forcing teachers to tolerate unruly student behavior is no solution. When both teachers and principals experience failure in eliciting desirable student attitudes and behavior, some relief measures are appropriate. This…

  6. Effects of zinc supplementation on sexual behavior of male rats

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, DMAB; Wijesinghe, PS; Ratnasooriya, WD; Wimalasena, S

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: Effects of zinc on male sexual competence are poorly understood. AIM: To study the effects of different doses of zinc on the sexual competence of males using a rat model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three subsets (eight in each subset) of sexually experienced adult male rats were supplemented with three different oral doses of zinc sulphate (a daily dose of 1 mg, 5 mg and 10 mg respectively) for two weeks. A subset of eight animals without zinc supplementation was used as the control group Sexual behavior was observed by placing them individually in cages with receptive females. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Data analysis was done using SPSS v10 for windows computer software. RESULTS: Supplementation of 5 mg of zinc/day for two weeks led to a prolongation of ejaculatory latency; 711.6 sec. (SEM 85.47) vs. 489.50 sec. (SEM 67.66), P < 0.05 and an increase in number of penile thrusting; 52.80 (SEM 11.28) vs. 26.50 (SEM 6.17), P < 0.05, compared to controls. The same group had elevated prolactin (PRL) and testosterone (T) levels compared to controls at the end of treatment period; PRL- 7.22 ng/dl (SEM 3.68) vs. 2.90 ng/dl (SEM 0.34) and T- 8.21 ng/ml (SEM 6.09) vs. 2.39 ng/ml (SEM 1.79), P < 0.05. In contrast, reduction of libido was evident in the same group, but this effect was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). However, partner preference index was positive and 5 mg zinc supplementation did not exert a significant adverse effect on the muscle strength and co-ordination. The subset of rats supplemented with 1 mg/day did not show a difference from the control group while supplementation with 10 mg/day led to a reduction of the libido index, number of mounts and intromissions. CONCLUSIONS: Zinc therapy improves sexual competence of male rats; the effect is dose dependent. Increase in the T levels is beneficial in this regard. However, increase in PRL is responsible for the reduced libido index. Further studies on pigs and monkeys are needed to evaluate the

  7. Risky behaviors: effects of Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culicidae) predator on the behavior of three mosquito species.

    PubMed

    Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Fadzly, Nik; Yusof, Nur Aishah; Dieng, Hamady

    2015-01-01

    Viable biocontrol agents for mosquito control are quite rare, therefore improving the efficacy of existing biological agents is an important study. We need to have a better understanding of the predation-risk behavioral responses toward prey. This research examined prey choices by Toxorhynchites splendens by monitoring the behavioral responses of Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, and Anopheles sinensis larvae when exposed to the predator. The results show that Tx. splendens prefers to consume Ae. aegypti larvae. The larvae exhibited different behavioral responses when Tx. splendens was present which suggest vulnerability in the presence of predators. "Thrashing" and "browsing" activities were greater in Ae. aegypti larvae. Such active and risky movements could cause vulnerability for the Ae. aegypti larvae due to increasing of water disturbance. In contrast, Ae. albopictus and An. sinensis larvae exhibited passive, low-risk behaviors, spending most of the time on the "wall" position near the edges of the container. We postulated that Ae. aegypti has less ability to perceive cues from predation and could not successfully alter its behavior to reduce risk of predation risk compared with Ae. albopictus and An. sinensis. Our results suggest that Tx. splendens is a suitable biocontrol agent in controlling dengue hemorrhagic vector, Ae. aegypti.

  8. Risky Behaviors: Effects of Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culicidae) Predator on the Behavior of Three Mosquito Species

    PubMed Central

    Zuharah, Wan Fatma; Fadzly, Nik; Yusof, Nur Aishah; Dieng, Hamady

    2015-01-01

    Viable biocontrol agents for mosquito control are quite rare, therefore improving the efficacy of existing biological agents is an important study. We need to have a better understanding of the predation-risk behavioral responses toward prey. This research examined prey choices by Toxorhynchites splendens by monitoring the behavioral responses of Aedes aegypti, Aedes albopictus, and Anopheles sinensis larvae when exposed to the predator. The results show that Tx. splendens prefers to consume Ae. aegypti larvae. The larvae exhibited different behavioral responses when Tx. splendens was present which suggest vulnerability in the presence of predators. “Thrashing” and “browsing” activities were greater in Ae. aegypti larvae. Such active and risky movements could cause vulnerability for the Ae. aegypti larvae due to increasing of water disturbance. In contrast, Ae. albopictus and An. sinensis larvae exhibited passive, low-risk behaviors, spending most of the time on the “wall” position near the edges of the container. We postulated that Ae. aegypti has less ability to perceive cues from predation and could not successfully alter its behavior to reduce risk of predation risk compared with Ae. albopictus and An. sinensis. Our results suggest that Tx. splendens is a suitable biocontrol agent in controlling dengue hemorrhagic vector, Ae. aegypti. PMID:26386041

  9. Photoperiod effects on ethanol hypothermia in behaviorally thermoregulating mice

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, C.S.; Crawshaw, L.I. )

    1989-02-09

    Male mice, maintained on a 12:12 L:D photoperiod (lights on at 7:00, off at 19:00) were injected with 2.6g 7.5% E+OH (in 0.9% NaCl) per kg, or with an equivalent volume of 0.9% NaCl at 24:00, 4:00, 8:00, 12:00, 16:00, and 20:00 hours. Nine mice at each condition were run in tubular temperature gradients (9-40C). Temperature preferences were monitored with an imaging system, and internal temperatures were monitored with implanted telemetry devices. Mean internal temperatures at all 6 times of day for the 40 min period after injection of E+OH (36.0 {plus minus} .1C, range 35.8-36.1C) or NaCl (37.2 {plus minus} .1C, range 37.0-37.4C), an well as mean preferred temperatures for the same 6 times after E+OH (30.6 {plus minus} .2C, range 29.8-31.0C) or NaCl (31.3 {plus minus} .3C, range 30.7-32.1C) showed little difference. This indicates that, in our system, photoperiod exerts but a small effect on the response of behaviorally thermoregulating mice to moderate doses of E+OH.

  10. Effect of Crystal Orientation on Nanoindentation Behavior in Magnesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somekawa, Hidetoshi; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of crystal orientation on nanoindentation behavior at both quasi-static and high strain rates was investigated using single-crystalline magnesium oriented in basal and prismatic configurations. Both the basal and prismatic planes had similar activation volumes, 55 and 73 b 3 for deformation at room temperature, as well as a small temperature dependence up to 423 K (150 °C). Microstructural observations beneath the indentations revealed that { 10bar{1}2 } type deformation twins were formed in both orientations irrespective of testing temperature. With twins forming beneath the indenter and multiple orientations of loading, it is believed that cross-slip and/or multiple slip are likely rate-controlling for global deformation, which also aligns with observations on nanoindentation of polycrystalline coarse-grained magnesium. The locations of the twins were consistent with expectations based on indentation mechanics as assessed by finite element simulations. The finite element simulations also predicted that an indenter tip with a shaper tip radius would tend to promote { 10bar{1}2 } twins.

  11. Effect of Electrode Configuration on Nitric Oxide Gas Sensor Behavior.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ling; Murray, Erica P

    2015-01-01

    The influence of electrode configuration on the impedancemetric response of nitric oxide (NO) gas sensors was investigated for solid electrochemical cells [Au/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Au)]. Fabrication of the sensors was carried out at 1050 °C in order to establish a porous YSZ electrolyte that enabled gas diffusion. Two electrode configurations were studied where Au wire electrodes were either embedded within or wrapped around the YSZ electrolyte. The electrical response of the sensors was collected via impedance spectroscopy under various operating conditions where gas concentrations ranged from 0 to 100 ppm NO and 1%-18% O₂ at temperatures varying from 600 to 700 °C. Gas diffusion appeared to be a rate-limiting mechanism in sensors where the electrode configuration resulted in longer diffusion pathways. The temperature dependence of the NO sensors studied was independent of the electrode configuration. Analysis of the impedance data, along with equivalent circuit modeling indicated the electrode configuration of the sensor effected gas and ionic transport pathways, capacitance behavior, and NO sensitivity. PMID:26404312

  12. Effect of Electrode Configuration on Nitric Oxide Gas Sensor Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ling; Murray, Erica P.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of electrode configuration on the impedancemetric response of nitric oxide (NO) gas sensors was investigated for solid electrochemical cells [Au/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/Au)]. Fabrication of the sensors was carried out at 1050 °C in order to establish a porous YSZ electrolyte that enabled gas diffusion. Two electrode configurations were studied where Au wire electrodes were either embedded within or wrapped around the YSZ electrolyte. The electrical response of the sensors was collected via impedance spectroscopy under various operating conditions where gas concentrations ranged from 0 to 100 ppm NO and 1%–18% O2 at temperatures varying from 600 to 700 °C. Gas diffusion appeared to be a rate-limiting mechanism in sensors where the electrode configuration resulted in longer diffusion pathways. The temperature dependence of the NO sensors studied was independent of the electrode configuration. Analysis of the impedance data, along with equivalent circuit modeling indicated the electrode configuration of the sensor effected gas and ionic transport pathways, capacitance behavior, and NO sensitivity. PMID:26404312

  13. Effects of nonlinear reservoir compaction on casing behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chia, Y.P.; Bradley, D.A.

    1988-08-01

    Depletion of overpressured, undercompacted reservoirs can cause large reservoir pressure drops and sediment compaction, which may result in casing deformation and well failure. To predict soil and casing deformation during depletion, a finite-element model was developed. Nonlinear elastic and plastic behavior of the soils and slippage along the wellbore boundary are major advancements in this study. This axisymmetric model is composed of casing wall, cement column, slippage interface, and sediments from 11,400 to 13,200 ft (3475 to 4025 m) in depth with a radius of 3,400 ft (1035 m). This study features a process of concurrent fluid flow, nonlinear elastic and plastic soil deformation, slippage from the wellbore boundary, and casing deformation. The modeling results show that the decline in near-wellbore reservoir pressure during depletion causes vertical compaction in both the sand reservoirs and the confining shale formations. Slippage next to the wellbore decreases the axial shear load placed on the casing by the sediments. Nonlinear elastic and plastic soils show a greater tendency for casing deformation with depletion than do linear elastic soils. Axial strains in the casing above the yield strain eventually developed as near-wellbore reservoir pressure was allowed to decline to a minimum. Because this effect is quantified, the production rate may be held to a safe maximum so that the operating limits of the casing are not exceeded. Criteria are given to improve both completion design and production rate specification.

  14. Behavioral effects of longitudinal training in cognitive reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    Denny, Bryan T.; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2014-01-01

    While recent emotion regulation research has identified effective regulatory strategies that participants can employ during single experimental sessions, a critical but unresolved question is whether one can increase the efficacy with which one can deploy these strategies through repeated practice. To address this issue we focused on one strategy, reappraisal, which involves cognitively reframing affective events in ways that modulate one's emotional response to them. With a commonly used reappraisal task, we assessed the behavioral correlates of four laboratory sessions of guided practice in down-regulating responses to aversive photos. Two groups received practice in one of two different types of reappraisal tactics: psychological distancing and reinterpretation. A third no-regulation control group viewed images in each session without instructions to regulate. Three key findings were observed. First, both distancing and reinterpretation training resulted in reductions over time in self-reported negative affect. Second, distancing participants also showed a reduction over time in negative affect on baseline trials where they responded naturally. Only distancing group participants showed such a reduction over and above the reduction observed in the no-regulation control group, indicating that it was not attributable to habituation. Third, only participants who distanced reported less perceived stress in their daily lives. The present results provide the first evidence for the longitudinal trainability of reappraisal in healthy adults using short courses of reappraisal practice, particularly using psychological distancing. PMID:24364856

  15. Occurrence, behavior and effects of nanoparticles in the environment.

    PubMed

    Nowack, Bernd; Bucheli, Thomas D

    2007-11-01

    The increasing use of engineered nanoparticles (NP) in industrial and household applications will very likely lead to the release of such materials into the environment. Assessing the risks of these NP in the environment requires an understanding of their mobility, reactivity, ecotoxicity and persistency. This review presents an overview of the classes of NP relevant to the environment and summarizes their formation, emission, occurrence and fate in the environment. The engineered NP are thereby compared to natural products such as soot and organic colloids. To date only few quantitative analytical techniques for measuring NP in natural systems are available, which results in a serious lack of information about their occurrence in the environment. Results from ecotoxicological studies show that certain NP have effects on organisms under environmental conditions, though mostly at elevated concentrations. The next step towards an assessment of the risks of NP in the environment should therefore be to estimate the exposure to the different NP. It is also important to notice that most NP in technical applications are functionalized and therefore studies using pristine NP may not be relevant for assessing the behavior of the NP actually used. PMID:17658673

  16. Aspartame's effects on behavioral thermoregulation in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Vitulli, W F; McAleer, J E; Rockwell, A C; Granade, C R; Parman, D L; Benoit, C; Quinn, J M

    1996-08-01

    Aspartame (L-aspartyl-L-phenylalanine methyl ester) was administered intraperitoneally to 9 Sprague-Dawley rats partitioned into 2 studies (4 in Study 1 and 5 for a replication in Study 2) over a two-year period using a within-subjects, repeated-measures reversal design. Behavioral thermoregulation was assessed in a cold Skinner Box using 5-sec. exposures of microwave radiation [Specific Absorption Rate = 0.34 Watts/kg/(mW/cm2)] as reinforcing stimuli under a fixed-interval 2-min. schedule of positive reinforcement. Two factorial analyses of variance [5 (doses) x 8 (hours)] indicated that the main effect for the doses of aspartame (2, 4, 8, 16 mg/kg, and saline control) was not significant; yet, the interaction (dose x hours) was significant (p < .05). Tentatively, aspartame should not cause an uncomfortable rise in body temperature (as sugar can do) when consumed in common substances such as soft drinks, yogurt, tea, coffee, etc., in doses commensurate with "hedonic" sweetness.

  17. Priming Effects of Television Food Advertising on Eating Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jennifer L.; Bargh, John A.; Brownell, Kelly D.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Health advocates have focused on the prevalence of advertising for calorie-dense low-nutrient foods as a significant contributor to the obesity epidemic. This research tests the hypothesis that exposure to food advertising during television viewing may also contribute to obesity by triggering automatic snacking of available food. Design In Experiments 1a and 1b, elementary-school-aged children watched a cartoon that contained either food advertising or advertising for other products and received a snack while watching. In Experiment 2, adults watched a television program that included food advertising that promoted snacking and/or fun product benefits, food advertising that promoted nutrition benefits or no food advertising. The adults then tasted and evaluated a range of healthy to unhealthy snack foods in an apparently separate experiment. Main Outcome Measures Amount of snack foods consumed during and after advertising exposure. Results Children consumed 45% more when exposed to food advertising. Adults consumed more of both healthy and unhealthy snack foods following exposure to snack food advertising compared to the other conditions. In both experiments, food advertising increased consumption of products not in the presented advertisements, and these effects were not related to reported hunger or other conscious influences. Conclusion These experiments demonstrate the power of food advertising to prime automatic eating behaviors and thus influence far more than brand preference alone. PMID:19594263

  18. The Effect of Contracted Abstinence on College Students' Behavior toward Alcohol Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blum, Steven B.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Assessed the relative effects of contracted abstinence and a class in alcoholism on college students' attitudes and behavior toward alcohol use. The alcohol class was effective in modifying self-reported drinking behavior,while contracted abstinence was an effective tool when used in the context of an alcohol class. (Author)

  19. Drink Refusal Training as Part of a Combined Behavioral Intervention: Effectiveness and Mechanisms of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witkiewitz, Katie; Donovan, Dennis M.; Hartzler, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Many trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral interventions for alcohol dependence, yet few studies have examined why particular treatments are effective. This study was designed to evaluate whether drink refusal training was an effective component of a combined behavioral intervention (CBI) and whether change…

  20. Advance Organizers in Secondary Special Education Resource Classrooms: Effects on Student Engagement Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Student engagement and appropriate behaviors are essential for effective instruction in secondary special education classrooms. Research suggests that proactive engagement strategies and interventions can have a greater effect on overall classroom behaviors than negative consequences. A single case experiment measured the effects of…

  1. The behavioral and neural effects of language on motion perception.

    PubMed

    Francken, Jolien C; Kok, Peter; Hagoort, Peter; de Lange, Floris P

    2015-01-01

    Perception does not function as an isolated module but is tightly linked with other cognitive functions. Several studies have demonstrated an influence of language on motion perception, but it remains debated at which level of processing this modulation takes place. Some studies argue for an interaction in perceptual areas, but it is also possible that the interaction is mediated by "language areas" that integrate linguistic and visual information. Here, we investigated whether language-perception interactions were specific to the language-dominant left hemisphere by comparing the effects of language on visual material presented in the right (RVF) and left visual fields (LVF). Furthermore, we determined the neural locus of the interaction using fMRI. Participants performed a visual motion detection task. On each trial, the visual motion stimulus was presented in either the LVF or in the RVF, preceded by a centrally presented word (e.g., "rise"). The word could be congruent, incongruent, or neutral with regard to the direction of the visual motion stimulus that was presented subsequently. Participants were faster and more accurate when the direction implied by the motion word was congruent with the direction of the visual motion stimulus. Interestingly, the speed benefit was present only for motion stimuli that were presented in the RVF. We observed a neural counterpart of the behavioral facilitation effects in the left middle temporal gyrus, an area involved in semantic processing of verbal material. Together, our results suggest that semantic information about motion retrieved in language regions may automatically modulate perceptual decisions about motion.

  2. Frequency effects on the scale and behavior of acoustic streaming.

    PubMed

    Dentry, Michael B; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic streaming underpins an exciting range of fluid manipulation phenomena of rapidly growing significance in microfluidics, where the streaming often assumes the form of a steady, laminar jet emanating from the device surface, driven by the attenuation of acoustic energy within the beam of sound propagating through the liquid. The frequencies used to drive such phenomena are often chosen ad hoc to accommodate fabrication and material issues. In this work, we seek a better understanding of the effects of sound frequency and power on acoustic streaming. We present and, using surface acoustic waves, experimentally verify a laminar jet model that is based on the turbulent jet model of Lighthill, which is appropriate for acoustic streaming seen at micro- to nanoscales, between 20 and 936 MHz and over a broad range of input power. Our model eliminates the critically problematic acoustic source singularity present in Lighthill's model, replacing it with a finite emission area and enabling determination of the streaming velocity close to the source. At high acoustic power P (and hence high jet Reynolds numbers ReJ associated with fast streaming), the laminar jet model predicts a one-half power dependence (U∼P1/2∼ ReJ) similar to the turbulent jet model. However, the laminar model may also be applied to jets produced at low powers-and hence low jet Reynolds numbers ReJ-where a linear relationship between the beam power and streaming velocity exists: U∼P∼ReJ2. The ability of the laminar jet model to predict the acoustic streaming behavior across a broad range of frequencies and power provides a useful tool in the analysis of microfluidics devices, explaining peculiar observations made by several researchers in the literature. In particular, by elucidating the effects of frequency on the scale of acoustically driven flows, we show that the choice of frequency is a vitally important consideration in the design of small-scale devices employing acoustic streaming

  3. The lack of behavioral effects of fenbendazole: a medication for pinworm infection.

    PubMed

    Keen, Richard; Macinnis, Mika; Guilhardi, Paulo; Chamberland, Karen; Church, Russell

    2005-03-01

    Pinworm infection in rodent laboratories is common and often treated with fenbendazole, which is effective and has a low toxicity level. However, very little is known about the behavioral effects of the drug. The purpose of this study was to determine the behavioral effects of fenbendazole on rats tested by using various conditioning and timing procedures. These behavioral effects were examined both between animals (i.e., control versus medicated treatments) and within animals (baseline-treatment-baseline design). Fenbendazole reduced the detection of pinworm eggs, and it had no significant behavioral effects across multiple levels of analysis (e.g., from overall response rates to response patterns to interresponse intervals). All behavioral differences (e.g., discrimination ratios) were a result of task variables. These results suggest that behavioral studies are unlikely to be influenced by fenbendazole treatment given before or during a study.

  4. An evaluation of persistence of treatment effects during long-term treatment of destructive behavior.

    PubMed

    Wacker, David P; Harding, Jay W; Berg, Wendy K; Lee, John F; Schieltz, Kelly M; Padilla, Yaniz C; Nevin, John A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2011-09-01

    Eight young children who displayed destructive behavior maintained, at least in part, by negative reinforcement received long-term functional communication training (FCT). During FCT, the children completed a portion of a task and then touched a communication card attached to a microswitch to obtain brief breaks. Prior to and intermittently throughout FCT, extinction probes were conducted within a withdrawal design in which task completion, manding, and destructive behavior were placed on extinction to evaluate the relative persistence of appropriate and destructive behavior over the course of treatment. FCT continued until appropriate behavior persisted and destructive behavior failed to recur at baseline levels during extinction probes. The completion of FCT was followed by four challenges to the persistence of treatment effects conducted within mixed- or multiple-schedule designs: (a) extended extinction sessions (from 5 to 15 min), (b) introduction of a novel task, (c) removal of the microswitch and communication card, and (d) a mixed schedule of reinforcement in which both appropriate and destructive behavior produced reinforcement. The results showed that although FCT often resulted in quick reductions in destructive behavior and increases in appropriate behavior, destructive behavior often recurred during the extinction probes conducted during the initial treatment. When the effects of treatment persisted during the extinction probes, the remaining challenges to treatment effects resulted in only mild to moderate disruptions in behavior. These results are consistent with the quantitative predictions of behavioral momentum theory and may provide an alternative definition of maintenance as constituting behavioral persistence.

  5. An evaluation of persistence of treatment effects during long-term treatment of destructive behavior.

    PubMed

    Wacker, David P; Harding, Jay W; Berg, Wendy K; Lee, John F; Schieltz, Kelly M; Padilla, Yaniz C; Nevin, John A; Shahan, Timothy A

    2011-09-01

    Eight young children who displayed destructive behavior maintained, at least in part, by negative reinforcement received long-term functional communication training (FCT). During FCT, the children completed a portion of a task and then touched a communication card attached to a microswitch to obtain brief breaks. Prior to and intermittently throughout FCT, extinction probes were conducted within a withdrawal design in which task completion, manding, and destructive behavior were placed on extinction to evaluate the relative persistence of appropriate and destructive behavior over the course of treatment. FCT continued until appropriate behavior persisted and destructive behavior failed to recur at baseline levels during extinction probes. The completion of FCT was followed by four challenges to the persistence of treatment effects conducted within mixed- or multiple-schedule designs: (a) extended extinction sessions (from 5 to 15 min), (b) introduction of a novel task, (c) removal of the microswitch and communication card, and (d) a mixed schedule of reinforcement in which both appropriate and destructive behavior produced reinforcement. The results showed that although FCT often resulted in quick reductions in destructive behavior and increases in appropriate behavior, destructive behavior often recurred during the extinction probes conducted during the initial treatment. When the effects of treatment persisted during the extinction probes, the remaining challenges to treatment effects resulted in only mild to moderate disruptions in behavior. These results are consistent with the quantitative predictions of behavioral momentum theory and may provide an alternative definition of maintenance as constituting behavioral persistence. PMID:21909168

  6. Limbic system seizures and aggressive behavior (superkindling effects).

    PubMed

    Andy, O J; Velamati, S

    1978-01-01

    This study was done to further analyze the neural mechanisms underlying aggressive behavior associated with psychomotor or temporal lobe seizures. The studies revealed that superkindling the aggressive system by sequential stimulations at seizure-inducing thresholds, of two or more sites in the limbic, hypothalamic, and basal ganglia structures facilitated the production of aggressive seizures. Aggressive behavior in the freely moving cat was evaluated in relation to the occurrence of hissing and growling during stimulation, after-discharge and postictal period. The behavior was correlated with the frequency of the elicited seizures and the seizure durations. Aggression did develop as a component behavioral manifestation of the limbic (psychomotor) seizure. Development of aggressive seizures was facilitated by "priming" the aggressive system. Optimum levels of aggressive behavior occurred with seizures of medium duration. Catecholamine blockers tended to attentuate the occurrence of aggression, whereas the agonist tended to facilitate it. Once the aggressive system was rendered hyperexcitable, exteroceptive stimuli also evoked aggressive attack behavior. It was concluded that repeatedly recurring limbic system seizures through superkindling mechanisms can eventually render the limbic-basal ganglia-preoptico-hypothalamic aggressive system hyper-responsive to both recurring seizures and to exteroceptive stimuli with resulting aggressive behavior with or without an accompanying seizure. PMID:571080

  7. The role of cognition in cost-effectiveness analyses of behavioral interventions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Behavioral interventions typically focus on objective behavioral endpoints like weight loss and smoking cessation. In reality, though, achieving full behavior change is a complex process in which several steps towards success are taken. Any progress in this process may also be considered as a beneficial outcome of the intervention, assuming that this increases the likelihood to achieve successful behavior change eventually. Until recently, there has been little consideration about whether partial behavior change at follow-up should be incorporated in cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs). The aim of this explorative review is to identify CEAs of behavioral interventions in which cognitive outcome measures of behavior change are analyzed. Methods Data sources were searched for publications before May 2011. Results Twelve studies were found eligible for inclusion. Two different approaches were found: three studies calculated separate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios for cognitive outcome measures, and one study modeled partial behavior change into the final outcome. Both approaches rely on the assumption, be it implicitly or explicitly, that changes in cognitive outcome measures are predictive of future behavior change and may affect CEA outcomes. Conclusion Potential value of cognitive states in CEA, as a way to account for partial behavior change, is to some extent recognized but not (yet) integrated in the field. In conclusion, CEAs should consider, and where appropriate incorporate measures of partial behavior change when reporting effectiveness and hence cost-effectiveness. PMID:22380627

  8. Parent Attachment, Childrearing Behavior, and Child Attachment: Mediated Effects Predicting Preschoolers' Externalizing Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskam, Isabelle; Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Stievenart, Marie

    2011-01-01

    Attachment theory provides an interesting background for thinking about externalizing behavior (EB) in early childhood and for understanding how parenting influences the child's outcomes. The study examined how attachment and parenting could be combined to explain preschoolers' EB. Data were collected from 117 preschoolers aged from 4 to 6…

  9. The Effects of Exercise on Selected Classroom Behaviors of Behaviorally Disordered Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, William H.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Six behaviorally disordered sixth, seventh, and eighth graders participated in jogging and outdoor reading sessions. Three Ss also engaged in winning and losing football contests. An examination of the data indicated that a decrease in talk-outs and increase in teacher ratings and problems completed were associated with vigorous exercise.…

  10. Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention on the School Performance of Students with Emotional or Behavioral Disorders and Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Naomi A.; Mathur, Sarup R.

    2009-01-01

    Despite widespread treatment success in clinical settings, anxiety disorders are rarely targeted for intervention in students with emotional or behavioral disorders (EBD) who exhibit them. This study examined the effects of a school-based anxiety intervention on the performance of 3 students attending school in a self-contained EBD setting. Using…

  11. Effective Behavior and Instructional Support: A District Model for Early Identification and Prevention of Reading and Behavior Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadler, Carol; Sugai, George

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development and 10-year implementation of the effective behavior and instructional support model in a midsized northwestern Oregon school district. The district experienced a sustained reduction in students' discipline referral rates, an increase in the percentage of students on track for early…

  12. The effects of harvest regulations on behaviors of duck hunters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugen, Matthew T.; Powell, Larkin A.; Vrtiska, Mark P.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Uncertainty exists as to how duck harvest regulations influence waterfowl hunter behavior. We used the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Parts Collection Survey to examine how harvest regulations affected behaviors of Central Flyway duck hunters. We stratified hunters into ranked groups based on seasonal harvest and identified three periods (1975–1984, 1988–1993, 2002–2011) that represented different harvest regulations (moderate, restrictive, and liberal, respectively; season length and daily bag limits smallest in restrictive seasons and largest in liberal seasons). We examined variability of seven measures of duck hunter behaviors across the periods: days harvesting ducks, daily harvest, hunter mobility, mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) selectivity, gender selectivity, daily female mallard harvest, and timing of harvest. Hunters reported harvesting ducks on more days, at a higher efficiency, and in slightly more counties during liberal seasons relative to restrictive and moderate seasons. We provide evidence to suggest that future regulation change will affect hunter behaviors.

  13. Rodent Habitat On ISS: Spaceflight Effects On Mouse Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, A. E.; Moyer, E. L.; Talyansky, Y.; Padmanabhan, S.; Choi, S.; Gong, C.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Decadal Survey (2011), Recapturing a Future for Space Exploration: Life and Physical Sciences Research for a New Era, emphasized the importance of expanding NASA life sciences research to long duration, rodent experiments on the International Space Station (ISS). To accomplish this objective, flight hardware, operations, and science capabilities supporting mouse studies in space were developed at NASA Ames Research Center. The first flight experiment carrying mice, Rodent Research Hardware and Operations Validation (Rodent Research-1), was launched on Sept 21, 2014 in an unmanned Dragon Capsule, SpaceX4, exposing the mice to a total of 37 days in space. Ground control groups were maintained in environmental chambers at Kennedy Space Center. Mouse health and behavior were monitored for the duration of the experiment via video streaming. Here we present behavioral analysis of two groups of five C57BL/6 female adult mice viewed via fixed camera views compared with identically housed Ground Controls. Flight (Flt) and Ground Control (GC) mice exhibited the same range of behaviors, including eating, drinking, exploratory behavior, self- and allo-grooming, and social interactions at similar or greater levels of occurrence. Mice propelled themselves freely and actively throughout the Habitat using their forelimbs to push off or by floating from one cage area to another, and they quickly learned to anchor themselves using tails and/or paws. Overall activity was greater in Flt as compared to GC mice, with spontaneous ambulatory behavior including the development of organized ‘circling’ or ‘race-tracking’ behavior that emerged within the first few days of flight and encompassed the primary dark cycle activity for the remainder of the experiment. We quantified the bout frequency, duration and rate of circling with respect to characteristic behaviors observed in the varying stages of the progressive development of circling: flipping utilizing two sides of the

  14. Effects of implementing a token economy on teacher attending behavior.

    PubMed

    Breyer, N L; Allen, G J

    1975-01-01

    After systematic attempts to increase a teacher's positive responding to her first-grade students, a token-economy system was implemented as a "last resort". On-task student behavior and relative frequency of positive and negative teacher comments were systematically observed. Data indicated that institution of the token system was associated with a relatively higher percentage of positive than negative comments. Termination and re-implementation of the token system caused reversals of the teacher's behavior.

  15. Nanostructuration Effect on the Thermal Behavior of Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ana S M C; Santos, Luís M N B F

    2016-05-18

    This work shows how the nanostructuration of ionic liquids (ILs) governs the glass and melting transitions of the bistriflimide imidazolium-based [Cn C1 im][NTf2 ] and [Cn Cn im][NTf2 ] series, which highlights the trend shift that occurs at the critical alkyl size (CAS) of n=6. An initial increase in the glass temperature (Tg ) with an increase in the alkyl side chain was observed due to the intensification of the dispersive interactions (van der Waals). Above the CAS, the -CH2 - increment has the same effect in both glass and liquid states, which leads to a plateau in the glass transition after nanostructuration. The melting temperature (Tm ) of the [Cn C1 im][NTf2 ] and [Cn Cn im][NTf2 ] series presents a V-shaped profile. For the short-alkyl ILs, the -CH2 - increment affects the electrostatic ion pair interactions, which leads to an increase in the conformational entropy. The -CH2 - increment disturbs the packing ability of the ILs and leads to a higher entropy value (ΔslSm○ ) and consequently a decrease in Tm . Above the CAS, the -CH2 - contribution to the melting temperature becomes more regular, as a consequence of the nanostructuration of the IL into polar and nonpolar domains. The dependence of the alkyl chain on the temperature, enthalpy, and entropy of melting in the ILs above the CAS is very similar to the one observed for the alkane series, which highlights the importance of the nonpolar alkyl domains on the ILs thermal behavior.

  16. Effect of behavior modification on patient compliance in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Richter, D D; Nanda, R S; Sinha, P K; Smith, D W; Currier, G F

    1998-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a reward system for improving patient compliance in orthodontic treatment. The sample consisted of 144 orthodontic patients (63 male, 81 female, average age 12.8 years), 6 to 12 months into their treatment. The sample was divided into above-average and below-average compliers, based on the orthodontic patient cooperation scale (OPCS). Each group was further divided into three subgroups: (a) a control group, which received only standard instructions; (b) an award group, which received compliance instructions and a written evaluation of compliance; and (c) a reward group, which received compliance instructions, a report card, and eligibility to receive rewards for adherent behavior. Two measurements of patient compliance were used: (1) the OPCS, which divided the sample into high and low compliers and was used to compare compliance before and after the 6-month experimental period; and (2) a clinical evaluation of compliance that was based on oral hygiene, appointment punctuality, appliance wear, and appliance maintenance. Evaluations were completed at each monthly appointment. Average compliance scores of above-average compliers showed no significant improvement with rewards. The average scores of patients with below-average compliance did not improve significantly. Only oral hygiene scores in the low compliance reward group were better than in the low compliance control group. Academic performance in school was found to be correlated (p < 0.001) with compliance. Above-average compliers remained above average in their compliance. The award/reward system may help motivate below-average compliers to comply with prescribed instructions.

  17. [The effect of cognitive appraisal and emotional experience on interpersonal behavior in situations arousing gratitude].

    PubMed

    Kuranaga, Hitomi; Higuchi, Masataka

    2013-10-01

    People tend to show some types of interpersonal behavior after feeling gratitude: reciprocal behavior, expression of apology, expression of thanks, and prosocial behavior. We examined the mechanism of these behaviors in 304 undergraduate students who were presented with three types of situations that produce gratitude: receiving help, receiving gifts, or imposing on others. We asked participants to rate three types of cognitive appraisals (receiving favor, cost to benefactor, naturalness of the situation), two types of emotional experiences of gratitude (contentment, apologetic emotion), and four types of interpersonal behavior. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that receiving benefit basically facilitated reciprocal behavior, prosocial behavior, and expression of thanks. Furthermore, the cost to the benefactor basically facilitated expression of apology. However, some effects of cognitive appraisal and emotional expression on behaviors differed among the types of situations. In particular, the results for imposing on others were different from the other situations. These results are discussed related to the different characteristics of the types of situations.

  18. Acute and chronic cocaine behavioral effects in novel versus familiar environments: open-field familiarity differentiates cocaine locomotor stimulant effects from cocaine emotional behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Carey, Robert J; DePalma, Gail; Damianopoulos, Ernest

    2005-03-30

    Cocaine is a potent stimulant drug, but its stimulant effects can be substantially modulated by environmental novelty versus familiarity. In this report, we varied exposures to a novel environment as a way to assess the impact of environmental familiarity versus novelty upon the locomotor activation induced by acute and chronic cocaine treatments. In experiment 1, the effects of 1 (PE1) versus 0 (PE0) pre-exposures to the test environment were compared for their impact upon the locomotor stimulant, central zone entry and grooming effects induced by an acute cocaine (10 mg/kg) treatment. In experiment 2, the effects of 10 (PE10) versus 0 (PE0) pre-exposures upon the cocaine effects were compared. Experiment 3 assessed the effects of nine cocaine treatments (10.0 mg/kg) initiated in a novel environment (PE0) versus familiar environment (PE10). In all experiments, cocaine had a potent locomotor stimulant effect in a novel environment, which was attenuated by environmental familiarity such that in PE10 groups, cocaine did not reliably induce an acute locomotor stimulant effect. Environmental novelty/familiarity, however, did not reliably alter cocaine effects upon central zone penetration, grooming behavior, or the neurochemical effects induced by cocaine. In the chronic treatment regimen, the PE0 group exhibited a tolerance-like decrease in locomotor activation, but the PE10 group exhibited a sensitization-like increase in locomotor activation. Despite the marked directional changes in the locomotor stimulant effects of cocaine treatments, initiated in a novel (PE0) versus familiar (PE10) environment, the same asymptotic levels of locomotor activation were achieved. In contrast, the behavioral measures of central zone activity progressively increased with repeated treatments regardless of whether the environment was initially novel (PE0) or familiar (PE10). Thus, habituation factors can profoundly alter the locomotor stimulant effects of cocaine and can induce pseudo

  19. The effects of prompting and reinforcement on safe behavior of bicycle and motorcycle riders.

    PubMed

    Okinaka, Takeru; Shimazaki, Tsuneo

    2011-01-01

    A reversal design was used to evaluate the effects of vocal and written prompts as well as reinforcement on safe behavior (dismounting and walking bicycles or motorcycles on a sidewalk) on a university campus. Results indicated that an intervention that consisted of vocal and written prompts and reinforcement delivered by security guards was effective at increasing safe behavior exhibited by bicycle and motorcycle riders. No differences were observed between vehicle type or gender with regard to engagement in safe behavior.

  20. THE EFFECTS OF PROMPTING AND REINFORCEMENT ON SAFE BEHAVIOR OF BICYCLE AND MOTORCYCLE RIDERS

    PubMed Central

    Okinaka, Takeru; Shimazaki, Tsuneo

    2011-01-01

    A reversal design was used to evaluate the effects of vocal and written prompts as well as reinforcement on safe behavior (dismounting and walking bicycles or motorcycles on a sidewalk) on a university campus. Results indicated that an intervention that consisted of vocal and written prompts and reinforcement delivered by security guards was effective at increasing safe behavior exhibited by bicycle and motorcycle riders. No differences were observed between vehicle type or gender with regard to engagement in safe behavior. PMID:21941403

  1. Effective Teaching, Effective Living: A Review of Behavior Analysis for Effective Teaching by Julie S. Vargas

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Jennifer L; Soeda, Jennifer M

    2009-01-01

    Elevated academic standards and expectations, along with competing contingencies outside the classroom, have given the teaching profession new and demanding challenges with which to contend. Although previous textbooks have addressed behavior analytic techniques specifically directed for the classroom environment, few have done so with comprehensive overviews of both instructional and basic behavioral strategies from a teacher's perspective. This review describes Julie Vargas' book in terms of its contribution to the educational field, as well as its impressive style for reaching its target audience.

  2. Transgenerational effects of social stress on social behavior, corticosterone, oxytocin, and prolactin in rats.

    PubMed

    Babb, Jessica A; Carini, Lindsay M; Spears, Stella L; Nephew, Benjamin C

    2014-04-01

    Social stressors such as depressed maternal care and family conflict are robust challenges which can have long-term physiological and behavioral effects on offspring and future generations. The current study investigates the transgenerational effects of an ethologically relevant chronic social stress on the behavior and endocrinology of juvenile and adult rats. Exposure to chronic social stress during lactation impairs maternal care in F0 lactating dams and the maternal care of the F1 offspring of those stressed F0 dams. The overall hypothesis was that the male and female F2 offspring of stressed F1 dams would display decreased social behavior as both juveniles and adults and that these behavioral effects would be accompanied by changes in plasma corticosterone, prolactin, and oxytocin. Both the female and male F2 offspring of dams exposed to chronic social stress displayed decreased social behavior as juveniles and adults, and these behavioral effects were accompanied by decreases in basal concentrations of corticosterone in both sexes, as well as elevated juvenile oxytocin and decreased adult prolactin in the female offspring. The data support the conclusion that social stress has transgenerational effects on the social behavior of the female and male offspring which are mediated by changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. Social stress models are valuable resources in the study of the transgenerational effects of stress on the behavioral endocrinology of disorders such as depression, anxiety, autism, and other disorders involving disrupted social behavior.

  3. Effects of Treatment Integrity Failures during Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior: A Translational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pipkin, Claire St. Peter; Vollmer, Timothy R.; Sloman, Kimberly N.

    2010-01-01

    Differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) is used frequently as a treatment for problem behavior. Previous studies on treatment integrity failures during DRA suggest that the intervention is robust, but research has not yet investigated the effects of different types of integrity failures. We examined the effects of two types of…

  4. Forward-Thinking Teens: The Effects of College Costs on Adolescent Risky Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Benjamin W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the effect of college costs on teenagers' engagement in risky behaviors before they are old enough to attend college. Individuals with brighter prospects for future schooling attainment may engage in less drug and alcohol use and risky sexual activity because they have more to lose if such behaviors have harmful effects in…

  5. Effects of Decision-Making Styles of School Administrators on General Procrastination Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ugurlu, Celai Teyyar

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: Lack of habits such as effective time management, determination of priorities, and effective and productive use of time is one of several reasons for procrastination behaviors. Personality traits along with incorrect cognitive loads about the self and the environment are other reasons for procrastination behaviors. At this…

  6. Comparing Main and Collateral Effects of Extinction and Differential Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petscher, Erin Seligson; Bailey, Jon S.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects and collateral effects of extinction (EXT) and differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) interventions with inappropriate vocalizations and work refusal. Both interventions have been used frequently to reduce problem behaviors. The benefits of these interventions have been established yet may be…

  7. Teacher Effects on Social and Behavioral Skills in Early Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jennings, Jennifer L.; DiPrete, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Although many recognize that social and behavioral skills play an important role in educational stratification, no studies have attempted to estimate teachers' effects on these outcomes. Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K), the authors estimate teacher effects on social and behavioral skills as well…

  8. The Effects of Fixed-Time Escape on Inappropriate and Appropriate Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, Rachael D.; Higbee, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have explored the effects of fixed-time (FT) reinforcement on escape-maintained behavior of students in a classroom setting. We measured the effects of an FT schedule on the disruptive and appropriate academic behaviors of 2 junior high students in a public school setting. Results demonstrated that FT escape from tasks resulted in a…

  9. Effects of Caffeine on Classroom Behavior, Sustained Attention, and a Memory Task in Preschool Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Ruth A.

    1987-01-01

    The investigation of the effect of normative amounts of caffeine on the behavior of six normal kindergarten children found that caffeine exerted only small and inconsistent effects on such classroom behaviors as time off-task and gross motor activity. (Author/DB)

  10. Web-Based Instruction, Learning Effectiveness and Learning Behavior: The Impact of Relatedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shieh, Chich-Jen; Liao, Ying; Hu, Ridong

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to discuss the effects of Web-based Instruction and Learning Behavior on Learning Effectiveness. Web-based Instruction contains the dimensions of Active Learning, Simulation-based Learning, Interactive Learning, and Accumulative Learning; and, Learning Behavior covers Learning Approach, Learning Habit, and Learning Attitude. The…

  11. An Examination of Behavioral History Effects on Preference for Choice in Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haberlin, Alayna T.

    2010-01-01

    The current investigation examined the effects of behavioral history on elementary students' preference for making a choice in two studies. Previous research on choice has focused on the arrangement of current contingencies and has not accounted for the effects of behavioral history. Study 1 examined participants' preference for two options (i.e.,…

  12. Another Test of the Effect of Group Composition on Member Behavior Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bixenstine, V. Edwin; Abascal, Juan

    1985-01-01

    Examined the effects of personal warmth and success modeling on behavior change among females experiencing assertion deficits. Results indicated both confederate warmth and success modeling influenced the level of assertion change behavior reported by group members. Attributions for influence to effect change and change performance are discussed.…

  13. Effects of Vibroacoustic Music on Challenging Behaviors in Individuals with Autism and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov; Andersson, Gunilla; Viding, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Vibroacoustic music has been proposed to be an effective treatment for individuals with developmental disorders and challenging behaviors. The present study experimentally tested the effects of vibroacoustic music on self-injurious, stereotypical, and aggressive destructive behaviors in 20 individuals with autism spectrum disorders and…

  14. The Effects of Video Self-Modeling on High School Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disturbances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Szu-Yin; Baker, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Video self-modeling has been proven to be effective with other populations with challenging behaviors, but only a few studies of video self-modeling have been conducted with high school students with emotional and behavioral disorders. This study aimed to focus on analyzing the effects of video self-modeling on four high school students with…

  15. The Moderating Effects of Parenting Styles on African-American and Caucasian Children's Suicidal Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greening, Leilani; Stoppelbein, Laura; Luebbe, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Given that parenting practices have been linked to suicidal behavior in adolescence, examining the moderating effect of parenting styles on suicidal behavior early in development could offer potential insight into possible buffers as well as directions for suicide prevention and intervention later in adolescence. Hence, the moderating effects of…

  16. Effects of Interventions Based in Behavior Analysis on Motor Skill Acquisition: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alstot, Andrew E.; Kang, Minsoo; Alstot, Crystal D.

    2013-01-01

    Techniques based in applied behavior analysis (ABA) have been shown to be useful across a variety of settings to improve numerous behaviors. Specifically within physical activity settings, several studies have examined the effect of interventions based in ABA on a variety of motor skills, but the overall effects of these interventions are unknown.…

  17. Changes in behavior as side effects in methylphenidate treatment: review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Konrad-Bindl, Doris Susanne; Gresser, Ursula; Richartz, Barbara Maria

    2016-01-01

    Background Our review of the scientific literature focused on an analysis of studies describing instances of methylphenidate treatment leading (or not) to behavioral changes in the pediatric, adolescent, and adult populations. Materials and methods We conducted a literature search in PubMed, Medline, and Google using the keywords “methylphenidate”, “behavioral changes”, “adverse effects”, and “side effects”. A total of 44 studies were identified as reporting on the effects and adverse effects of methylphenidate administration, and were included in the analysis. Results Five studies specifically set out to study, record, and discuss changes in behavior. Eight studies did not set out to study behavioral effects, but record and discuss them. A total of 28 studies recorded behavioral effects, but failed to discuss these further. Three studies did not include behavioral effects. Conclusion This review records what data have been published in respect of changes in behavior in association with the use of methylphenidate. While there is some evidence to suggest that methylphenidate causes changes in behavior, the majority of the studies reviewed paid little or no attention to this issue. Based on the available data, it is impossible to determine the point at which such behavioral effects occur. The frequency of occurrence of behavioral effects is also impossible to determine with certainty. Based on the available data, it is not possible to rule out whether behavioral effects may persist or not persist once treatment is discontinued. In conclusion, despite countless publications and extensive administration, especially to children, we have insufficient data to judge the long-term effects and risks of methylphenidate taking. PMID:27789952

  18. Mediation and moderation of divorce effects on children's behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Jennifer M; Schofield, Thomas J

    2015-02-01

    Using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, we examined children's internalizing and externalizing behavior problems from age 5 to 15 years in relation to whether they had experienced a parental divorce. Children from divorced families had more behavior problems compared with a propensity-score-matched sample of children from intact families, according to both teachers and mothers. They exhibited more internalizing and externalizing problems at the first assessment after the parents' separation and at the last available assessment (age 11 years for teacher reports, or 15 years for mother reports). Divorce also predicted both short-term and long-term rank-order increases in behavior problems. Associations between divorce and child behavior problems were moderated by family income (assessed before the divorce) such that children from families with higher incomes prior to the separation had fewer internalizing problems than children from families with lower incomes prior to the separation. Higher levels of predivorce maternal sensitivity and child IQ also functioned as protective factors for children of divorce. Mediation analyses showed that children were more likely to exhibit behavior problems after the divorce if their postdivorce home environment was less supportive and stimulating, their mother was less sensitive and more depressed, and their household income was lower. We discuss avenues for intervention, particularly efforts to improve the quality of home environments in divorced families.

  19. Effect of DHEA therapy on sexual behavior in female rats.

    PubMed

    Pluchino, Nicola; Giannini, Andrea; Cela, Vito; Santoro, Anna N; Carnevale, Gianluca; Zavatti, Manuela; Di Viesti, Vittoria; Benelli, Augusta; Genazzani, Andrea R; Zanoli, Paola

    2013-05-01

    Delta-5 androgen therapies seem to enhance the sexual response in experimental animal models and in clinical trial. This study analyzed the influence of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) administration on receptive and proceptive components of female rat sexual behavior. Ovariectomized (OVX) adult rats were divided in six groups submitted to the following treatments for 4 weeks: DHEA 0.5 and 5 mg/kg, by oral gavage, alone or in combination with estradiol benzoate 3 µg/rat; EB 3 and 10 µg/rat as control groups. All animals received progesterone (500 µg/rat) 4 h before the behavioral tests. All animals were tested for the following: receptivity and proceptivity weekly for 4 weeks; partner preference and paced mating behavior at the end of the treatments. Oral administration of DHEA at 5 mg/kg in EB primed rats was able to significantly increase proceptive behaviors, already after 1 week of treatment. The increase was more marked after 3 and 4 weeks of treatment. Behavioral changes were associated to modifications of circulating and brain level of allopregnanolone and beta-endorphin, although circulating hormonal levels were within a physiological range. Hormonal treatment using physiological doses of delta-5 androgens (DHEA) positively affects sexual motivation in OVX rats.

  20. Rapid effects of estrogens on behavior: environmental modulation and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Laredo, Sarah A.; Landeros, Rosalina Villalon; Trainor, Brian C.

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol can modulate neural activity and behavior via both genomic and nongenomic mechanisms. Environmental cues have a major impact on the relative importance of these signaling pathways with significant consequences for behavior. First we consider how photoperiod modulates nongenomic estrogen signaling on behavior. Intriguingly, short days permit rapid effects of estrogens on aggression in both rodents and song sparrows. This highlights the importance of considering photoperiod as a variable in laboratory research. Next we review evidence for rapid effects of estradiol on ecologically-relevant behaviors including aggression, copulation, communication, and learning. We also address the impact of endocrine disruptors on estrogen signaling, such as those found in corncob bedding used in rodent research. Finally, we examine the biochemical mechanisms that may mediate rapid estrogen action on behavior in males and females. A common theme across these topics is that the effects of estrogens on social behaviors vary across different environmental conditions. PMID:24685383

  1. The effect of learning styles and study behavior on success of preclinical students in pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Asci, Halil; Kulac, Esin; Sezik, Mekin; Cankara, F. Nihan; Cicek, Ekrem

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of learning styles and study behaviors on preclinical medical students’ pharmacology exam scores in a non-Western setting. Materials and Methods: Grasha–Reichmann Student Learning Study Scale and a modified Study Behavior Inventory were used to assess learning styles and study behaviors of preclinical medical students (n = 87). Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the independent effect of gender, age, learning style, and study behavior on pharmacology success. Results: Collaborative (40%) and competitive (27%) dominant learning styles were frequent in the cohort. The most common study behavior subcategories were study reading (40%) and general study habits (38%). Adequate listening and note-taking skills were associated with pharmacology success, whereas students with adequate writing skills had lower exam scores. These effects were independent of gender. Conclusions: Preclinical medical students’ study behaviors are independent predictive factors for short-term pharmacology success. PMID:26997716

  2. The Causal Effect of Education on Health: What is the Role of Health Behaviors?

    PubMed

    Brunello, Giorgio; Fort, Margherita; Schneeweis, Nicole; Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the causal effect of education on health and the part of it that is attributable to health behaviors by distinguishing between short-run and long-run mediating effects: whereas, in the former, only behaviors in the immediate past are taken into account, in the latter, we consider the entire history of behaviors. We use two identification strategies: instrumental variables based on compulsory schooling reforms and a combined aggregation, differencing, and selection on an observables technique to address the endogeneity of both education and behaviors in the health production function. Using panel data for European countries, we find that education has a protective effect for European men and women aged 50+. We find that the mediating effects of health behaviors-measured by smoking, drinking, exercising, and the body mass index-account in the short run for around a quarter and in the long run for around a third of the entire effect of education on health.

  3. Crossover behavior of the anomalous Hall effect and anomalous nernst effect in itinerant ferromagnets.

    PubMed

    Miyasato, T; Abe, N; Fujii, T; Asamitsu, A; Onoda, S; Onose, Y; Nagaosa, N; Tokura, Y

    2007-08-24

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) are experimentally investigated in a variety of ferromagnetic metals including pure transition metals, oxides, and chalcogenides, whose resistivities range over 5 orders of magnitude. For these ferromagnets, the transverse conductivity sigma{xy} versus the longitudinal conductivity sigma{xx} shows a crossover behavior with three distinct regimes in accordance qualitatively with a recent unified theory of the intrinsic and extrinsic AHE. We also found that the transverse Peltier coefficient alpha{xy} for the ANE obeys the Mott rule. These results offer a coherent and semiquantitative understanding of the AHE and ANE to an issue of controversy for many decades.

  4. The Effects of Extended Pain on Behavior: Recent Progress.

    PubMed

    Usdin, Ted B; Dimitrov, Eugene L

    2016-10-01

    Chronic pain is frequently associated with anxiety, depression, and cognitive dysfunction. This review discusses recent work in rodents that contributes to the understanding of their neurobiological links. Brain regions that contain circuits that mediate persistent changes in behavior that are caused by nerve injury or joint inflammation include the rostral anterior cingulate and other parts of the medial prefrontal cortex, the basolateral and central nucleus of the amygdala, and the nucleus accumbens. Functional changes, including increases in the activity within specific neuronal pathways and in the levels of specific synaptic components, that are associated with the behavior changes, or are in some cases necessary for them, have recently been identified. Broadly projecting modulatory systems and widely expressed factors such as cytokines and growth factors also contribute to pain-associated behavior. Integrating these observations and determining their causal relationships is now critical for the identification of therapeutic targets and the design of appropriate interventions. PMID:27621368

  5. The effects of peer influence on disordered eating behavior.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Tiffany A; Gast, Julie

    2008-02-01

    Peer influence has been found to be correlated with a host of harmful health behaviors. However, little research has been conducted investigating the relationship between peer influence and disordered eating. The present study surveyed 6th-, 7th-, and 8th-grade girls and boys using the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) and Inventory of Peer Influence (I-PIEC). This study found a significant positive correlation between peer influence and disordered eating. Multiple regression analyses revealed that peer influence was equally present in both males and females. There were no significant differences between males and females and EDI or I-PIEC scores. The likeability construct of peer influence was the most significant predictor of disordered eating in this study. School nurses are in a unique position to educate both male and female students about the dangers of disordered eating behaviors as well as identify students who may be at risk for these behaviors.

  6. Behavioral effects of environmental enrichment on harbor seals (Phoca vitulina concolor) and gray seals (Hafichoerus grypus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, S.A.; Bay, M.S.; Martin, M.L.; Hatfield, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Zoos and aquariums have been incorporating environmental enrichment into their animal care programs for the past 30 years to increase mental stimulation and promote natural behaviors. However, most attempts to document the effects of enrichment on animal behavior have focused on terrestrial mammals. Staff at the National Aquarium in Baltimore conducted an investigation of the behavioral effects of enrichment on the seven harbor seals and two gray seals housed in the aquarium's outdoor seal exhibit. We expected that enrichment would change the amount of time the animals spent engaged in specific behaviors. The behaviors recorded were: resting in water, resting hauled out, maintenance, breeding display, breeding behavior, aggression, pattern swimming, random swimming, exploration, and out of sight. Activity levels (random swimming and exploration) were expected to increase, while stereotypic behaviors (pattern swimming) were expected to decrease. The frequency and duration of behaviors were documented for 90 hr in both the control phase (without enrichment) and the experimental phase (with enrichment). Statistically significant differences (P<0.05) in the time spent in pattern swimming, random swimming, exploration, and out of sight were observed between the two phases. With enrichment, pattern swimming and out of sight decreased, while random swimming and exploration behavior increased. These findings demonstrate that enrichment can promote behaviors (random swimming and exploration) that are likely to be normal for phocids in the wild, and that may contribute to the behavioral complexity of these seals in captivity.

  7. Behavioral effects of environmental enrichment on harbor seals (Phoca vitulina concolor) and gray seals (Halichoerus grypus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, S.A.; Bay, M.S.; Martin, M.L.; Hatfield, J.S.

    2002-01-01

    Zoos and aquariums have been incorporating environmental enrichment into their animal care programs for the past 30 years to increase mental stimulation and promote natural behaviors. However, most attempts to document the effects of enrichment on animal behavior have focused on terrestrial mammals. Staff at the National Aquarium in Baltimore conducted an investigation of the behavioral effects of enrichment on the seven harbor seals and two gray seals housed in the aquarium's outdoor seal exhibit. We expected that enrichment would change the amount of time the animals spent engaged in specific behaviors. The behaviors recorded were: resting in water, resting hauled out, maintenance, breeding display, breeding behavior, aggression, pattern swimming, random swimming, exploration, and out of sight. Activity levels (random swimming and exploration) were expected to increase, while stereotypic behaviors (pattern swimming) were expected to decrease. The frequency and duration of behaviors were documented for 90 hr in both the control phase (without enrichment) and the experimental phase (with enrichment). Statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) in the time spent in pattern swimming, random swimming, exploration, and out of sight were observed between the two phases. With enrichment, pattern swimming and out of sight decreased, while random swimming and exploration behavior increased. These findings demonstrate that enrichment can promote behaviors (random swimming and exploration) that are likely to be normal for phocids in the wild, and that may contribute to the behavioral complexity of these seals in captivity. ?? 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Seemingly irrational driving behavior model: The effect of habit strength and anticipated affective reactions.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yi-Shih

    2015-09-01

    An increasing amount of evidence suggests that aberrant driving behaviors are not entirely rational. On the basis of the dual-process theory, this study postulates that drivers may learn to perform irrational aberrant driving behaviors, and these behaviors could be derived either from a deliberate or an intuitive decision-making approach. Accordingly, a seemingly irrational driving behavior model is proposed; in this model, the theory of planned behavior (TPB) was adopted to represent the deliberate decision-making mechanism, and habit strength was incorporated to reflect the intuitive decision process. A multiple trivariate mediation structure was designed to reflect the process through which driving behaviors are learned. Anticipated affective reactions (AARs) were further included to examine the effect of affect on aberrant driving behaviors. Considering the example of speeding behaviors, this study developed scales and conducted a two-wave survey of students in two departments at a university in Northern Taiwan. The analysis results show that habit strength consists of multiple aspects, and frequency of past behavior cannot be a complete repository for accumulating habit strength. Habit strength appeared to be a crucial mediator between intention antecedents (e.g., attitude) and the intention itself. Including habit strength in the TPB model enhanced the explained variance of speeding intention by 26.7%. In addition, AARs were different from attitudes; particularly, young drivers tended to perform speeding behaviors to reduce negative feelings such as regret. The proposed model provides an effective alternative approach for investigating aberrant driving behaviors; corresponding countermeasures are discussed.

  9. Examining the effects of turnover intentions on organizational citizenship behaviors and deviance behaviors: A psychological contract approach.

    PubMed

    Mai, Ke Michael; Ellis, Aleksander P J; Christian, Jessica Siegel; Porter, Christopher O L H

    2016-08-01

    Although turnover intentions are considered the most proximal antecedent of organizational exit, there is often temporal separation between thinking about leaving and actual exit. Using field data from 2 diverse samples of working adults, we explore a causal model of the effects of turnover intentions on employee behavior while they remain with the organization, focusing specifically on organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) and deviance behaviors (DBs). Utilizing expectancy theory as an explanatory framework, we argue that turnover intentions result in high levels of transactional contract orientation and low levels of relational contract orientation, which in turn lead to a decrease in the incidence of OCBs and an increase in the incidence of DBs. We first used a pilot study to investigate the direction of causality between turnover intentions and psychological contract orientations. Then, in Study 1, we tested our mediated model using a sample of employees from a large drug retailing chain. In Study 2, we expanded our model by arguing that the mediated effects are much stronger when the organization is deemed responsible for potential exit. We then tested our full model using a sample of employees from a large state-owned telecommunications corporation in China. Across both studies, results were generally consistent and supportive of our hypotheses. We discuss the implications of our findings for future theory, research, and practice regarding the management of both the turnover process and discretionary behaviors at work. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27077526

  10. Effects of combining methylphenidate and a classroom token system in modifying hyperactive behavior.

    PubMed

    Christensen, D E

    1975-11-01

    The combined effects of methylphenidate and a token reinforcement program in controlling a classroom behavior of 16 hyperactive, institutionalized retarded youngsters was investigated. A within-subject, placebo-controlled, double-blind design was employed. The results indicated that the behavior-modification procedures in the presence of placebo medication produced significant increases in work-oriented and related decreased in disruptive behavior. Few effects from the addition of active medication to the treatment program were found on any of the dependent measures. The findings suggest behavior modification to be a viable alternative to drug therapy for hyperactivity in retarded persons. PMID:1103623

  11. Moderating effect of nurses' customer-oriented perception between organizational citizenship behaviors and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching Sheng; Chang, Hae Ching

    2010-08-01

    This study investigates whether organizational citizenship behaviors enhance job satisfaction among nursing personnel, while exploring whether customer-oriented perception has a moderating effect between nursing personnel's organizational citizenship behaviors and job satisfaction.The authors used a cross-sectional survey sent to 500 nurses with 232 valid responses. According to the research findings, nurses' organizational citizenship behaviors have a positive and significant influence on job satisfaction. Results also indicated that the moderating effect of nurses' customer-oriented perception on the relationship between their organizational citizenship behaviors and job satisfaction was stronger for high customer-oriented perception than it was low customer-oriented perception. PMID:20693338

  12. The Effects of Group Contingent Reinforcement on Student Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Henry B.; Williams, Robert L.

    Nine seventh- and eighth-grade students who had a history of poor math achievement were selected to participate in the study. Base rate data was gathered which indicated the percent of time the students were engaged in behaviors relevant to the assigned academic tasks. During treatment a clock buzzer apparatus was placed in the room, and the…

  13. The Effect of Urbanization on the Behavior of Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whiting, Beatrice B.

    Settings influence children's behavior. There are three relevant aspects of a setting, the space and contents of the space, as in the set of a play, the cast of characters who are present on the set, and the activities which occur on the set involving the cast of characters. The author and her associates have studied children in Okinawa, the…

  14. The Effect of Brand Identification on Alumni Supportive Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Amber L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of brand identification and supportive behaviors for alumni of a medium-sized state-run public institution of higher education in the mid-Atlantic region of the US. The research examined the perceptions of donor and non-donor alumni of a state-run public institution of higher education to…

  15. The Effects of Pathological Gaming on Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemmens, Jeroen S.; Valkenburg, Patti M.; Peter, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Studies have shown that pathological involvement with computer or video games is related to excessive gaming binges and aggressive behavior. Our aims for this study were to longitudinally examine if pathological gaming leads to increasingly excessive gaming habits, and how pathological gaming may cause an increase in physical aggression. For this…

  16. Effects of Early Seizures on Later Behavior and Epileptogenicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Gregory L.

    2004-01-01

    Both clinical and laboratory studies demonstrate that seizures early in life can result in permanent behavioral abnormalities and enhance epileptogenicity. Understanding the critical periods of vulnerability of the developing nervous system to seizure-induced changes may provide insights into parallel or divergent processes in the development of…

  17. Learning and Behavior (I): Effects of Pituitary Hormones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marx, Jean L.

    1975-01-01

    Describes research which indicates that a number of peptide hormones act directly on the brain to affect learning and behavior. Investigations are currently being conducted to determine if these substances can be used to treat learning disorders or to improve the memories of normal people. (MLH)

  18. Effectiveness of Hypnosis as an Adjunct to Behavioral Weight Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolocofsky, David N.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Subjects (N=109) completed a behavioral weight-management program either with or without the addition of hypnosis. Both interventions resulted in significant weight reduction. At the eight-month and two-year follow-ups, the hypnosis clients showed significant additional weight loss and were more likely to have achieved and maintained their…

  19. The Effects of Peer Influence on Disordered Eating Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Tiffany A.; Gast, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Peer influence has been found to be correlated with a host of harmful health behaviors. However, little research has been conducted investigating the relationship between peer influence and disordered eating. The present study surveyed 6th-, 7th-, and 8th-grade girls and boys using the Eating Disorder Inventory (EDI) and Inventory of Peer…

  20. Intergenerational Continuity in Parenting Behavior: Mediating Pathways and Child Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neppl, Tricia K.; Conger, Rand D.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Ontai, Lenna L.

    2009-01-01

    This prospective, longitudinal investigation examined mechanisms proposed to explain continuities in parenting behavior across 2 generations (G1, G2). Data came from 187 G2 adults, their mothers (G1), and their children (G3). Prospective information regarding G2 was collected both during adolescence and early adulthood. G1 data were collected…

  1. Effects of Behavioral History on Resistance to Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Adam H.; Cirino, Sergio; Mayfield, Kristin H.; da Silva, Stephanie P.; Okouchi, Hiroto; Lattal, Kennon A.

    2005-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether differential resistance to change would occur under identical variable-interval schedules as a function of a differential behavioral history. In Experiment 1, each of 3 pigeons first pecked at different rates under a multiple variable-ratio differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate schedule. In a subsequent condition,…

  2. The effectiveness of mass communication to change public behavior.

    PubMed

    Abroms, Lorien C; Maibach, Edward W

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the ways in which mass communication has been used -- or can be used -- to promote beneficial changes in behavior among members of populations. We use an ecological perspective to examine the ways in which mass media interventions can be used to influence public behavior both directly and indirectly. Mass media interventions that seek to influence people directly -- by directly targeting the people burdened by the public health problem of concern and/or the people who influence them -- have a long basis in public health history, and recent reviews have clarified our expectations about what can be expected from such approaches. Mass media interventions that seek to influence people indirectly -- by creating beneficial changes in the places (or environments) in which people live and work -- have equal if not greater potential to promote beneficial changes in population health behaviors, but these are currently less explored options. To have the greatest possible beneficial influence on public behavior with the public health resources available, we recommend that public health program planners assess their opportunities to use media to target both people and places in a manner that complements and extends other investments being made in population health enhancement. PMID:18173391

  3. Increasing the Effectiveness of In-Home Behavior Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Bruce W.

    This report summarizes in-home behavioral interventions carried out with 18 individuals (ages 3 to 43) with developmental disabilities in the San Diego and North Los Angeles County Regional Centers during 1990-1991. The report focuses on client characteristics, problems that were addressed, intervention procedures used, and results. The paper…

  4. The Effects of Noise Reduction on Social Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carbone, Vincent J.; Duncan, Phillip K.

    1986-01-01

    The study found no relationship between improved social behavior in a group of juveniles residing at a county shelter care facility and decreased frequency and duration of disruptions above 85 decibels. Subjects did reduce noise levels when stereo listening was made contingent on reduced noise. (Author/DB)

  5. Effectiveness of a teacher-based indicated prevention program for preschool children with externalizing problem behavior.

    PubMed

    Plueck, Julia; Eichelberger, Ilka; Hautmann, Christopher; Hanisch, Charlotte; Jaenen, Nicola; Doepfner, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    Externalizing behavior is common in preschool children and shows stability over the lifespan implying that strategies for early intervention and prevention are needed. Improving parenting reduces child behavior problems but it is unproven whether the effects transfer to kindergarten. Strategies implemented directly by teachers in the kindergarten may be a promising approach. The effectiveness of the teacher's module of the Prevention Program for Externalizing Problem Behavior (PEP-TE) was investigated in a study using a within-subject control group design. Each of the 144 teachers enrolled identified one child with externalizing problem behavior (aged 3-6 years) and rated that child's behavior problems [broadband externalizing, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder] as well as their own behavior (attending skills) and burden by the child. Changes in child symptoms and teacher behavior or burden during the 3-month waiting period (control) and 3-month treatment period were compared. Stability of treatment effects at both 3- and 12-months follow-up after treatment was examined. Multilevel modeling analyses showed that, despite a reduction in externalizing behavior and ADHD scores during the waiting period, all child problem behavior scores decreased during the treatment period compared with the waiting period. The teacher's behavior also improved and their burden decreased. These treatment effects were stable during follow-up for the subsample remaining in the kindergarten for up to 1 year. This study shows that a teacher-based intervention alone is associated with improvements in both the externalizing behavior of preschoolers and teacher behavior and burden. Indications of long-term stability of effects were found.

  6. Effectiveness of a teacher-based indicated prevention program for preschool children with externalizing problem behavior.

    PubMed

    Plueck, Julia; Eichelberger, Ilka; Hautmann, Christopher; Hanisch, Charlotte; Jaenen, Nicola; Doepfner, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    Externalizing behavior is common in preschool children and shows stability over the lifespan implying that strategies for early intervention and prevention are needed. Improving parenting reduces child behavior problems but it is unproven whether the effects transfer to kindergarten. Strategies implemented directly by teachers in the kindergarten may be a promising approach. The effectiveness of the teacher's module of the Prevention Program for Externalizing Problem Behavior (PEP-TE) was investigated in a study using a within-subject control group design. Each of the 144 teachers enrolled identified one child with externalizing problem behavior (aged 3-6 years) and rated that child's behavior problems [broadband externalizing, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder] as well as their own behavior (attending skills) and burden by the child. Changes in child symptoms and teacher behavior or burden during the 3-month waiting period (control) and 3-month treatment period were compared. Stability of treatment effects at both 3- and 12-months follow-up after treatment was examined. Multilevel modeling analyses showed that, despite a reduction in externalizing behavior and ADHD scores during the waiting period, all child problem behavior scores decreased during the treatment period compared with the waiting period. The teacher's behavior also improved and their burden decreased. These treatment effects were stable during follow-up for the subsample remaining in the kindergarten for up to 1 year. This study shows that a teacher-based intervention alone is associated with improvements in both the externalizing behavior of preschoolers and teacher behavior and burden. Indications of long-term stability of effects were found. PMID:24752568

  7. The effects of goal involvement on moral behavior in an experimentally manipulated competitive setting.

    PubMed

    Sage, Luke; Kavussanu, Maria

    2007-04-01

    In this experiment we examined the effects of task and ego involvement on three measures of moral behavior--prosocial choice, observed prosocial behavior, and observed antisocial behavior--in a competitive setting. We also investigated sex differences in moral behavior. Male (n = 48) and female (n = 48) college students were randomly assigned to a task-involving, an ego-involving, or a control condition. Participants played two 10-min games of table soccer and completed measures of prosocial choice, goal involvement, goal orientation, and demographics. The two games were recorded, and frequencies of prosocial and antisocial behavior were coded. Players assigned to the task-involving condition were higher in prosocial choice than those in the ego-involving or control conditions. Individuals in the ego-involving condition displayed more antisocial behaviors than those in the task-involving or control conditions. Finally, females displayed more prosocial behaviors than males.

  8. Effect of playing violent video games cooperatively or competitively on subsequent cooperative behavior.

    PubMed

    Ewoldsen, David R; Eno, Cassie A; Okdie, Bradley M; Velez, John A; Guadagno, Rosanna E; DeCoster, Jamie

    2012-05-01

    Research on video games has yielded consistent findings that violent video games increase aggression and decrease prosocial behavior. However, these studies typically examined single-player games. Of interest is the effect of cooperative play in a violent video game on subsequent cooperative or competitive behavior. Participants played Halo II (a first-person shooter game) cooperatively or competitively and then completed a modified prisoner's dilemma task to assess competitive and cooperative behavior. Compared with the competitive play conditions, players in the cooperative condition engaged in more tit-for-tat behaviors-a pattern of behavior that typically precedes cooperative behavior. The social context of game play influenced subsequent behavior more than the content of the game that was played.

  9. Construal level theory and theory of planned behavior: time frame effects on salient belief generation.

    PubMed

    Lutchyn, Yuliya; Yzer, Marco

    2011-07-01

    This study tests implications of different time specifications in behavioral definitions as used in belief-elicitation research. Using construal level theory and the theory of planned behavior as complementary frameworks, the authors examined temporal frame effects on beliefs about eating fruits and vegetables and beliefs about condom use generated in a belief-elicitation study. Consistent with propositions from construal level theory, the authors found that temporal perspective (performing the behavior tomorrow, in 3 months, in 6 months, or in 5 years) affects the type of salient behavioral beliefs, such that individuals generate more feasibility (efficacy) beliefs when thinking about proximal behaviors, but more desirability (attitudinal and normative) beliefs when the behavior in question is distal. The authors' results indicate the importance of time frame in behavioral definitions in belief-elicitation research.

  10. Effect of playing violent video games cooperatively or competitively on subsequent cooperative behavior.

    PubMed

    Ewoldsen, David R; Eno, Cassie A; Okdie, Bradley M; Velez, John A; Guadagno, Rosanna E; DeCoster, Jamie

    2012-05-01

    Research on video games has yielded consistent findings that violent video games increase aggression and decrease prosocial behavior. However, these studies typically examined single-player games. Of interest is the effect of cooperative play in a violent video game on subsequent cooperative or competitive behavior. Participants played Halo II (a first-person shooter game) cooperatively or competitively and then completed a modified prisoner's dilemma task to assess competitive and cooperative behavior. Compared with the competitive play conditions, players in the cooperative condition engaged in more tit-for-tat behaviors-a pattern of behavior that typically precedes cooperative behavior. The social context of game play influenced subsequent behavior more than the content of the game that was played. PMID:22489544

  11. Effects of Prosocial, Neutral, and Violent Video Games on Children's Helpful and Hurtful Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muniba; Anderson, Craig A; Gentile, Douglas A

    2012-01-01

    Recent research reveals that playing prosocial video games increases prosocial cognitions, positive affect, and helpful behaviors [Gentile et al., 2009; Greitemeyer and Osswald, 2009, 2010, 2011]. These results are consistent with the social-cognitive models of social behavior such as the general learning model [Buckley and Anderson, 2006]. However, no experimental studies have examined such effects on children. Previous research on violent video games suggests that short-term effects of video games are largely based on priming of existing behavioral scripts. Thus, it is unclear whether younger children will show similar effects. This research had 9-14 years olds play a prosocial, neutral, or violent video game, and assessed helpful and hurtful behaviors simultaneously through a new tangram measure. Prosocial games increased helpful and decreased hurtful behavior, whereas violent games had the opposite effects. PMID:25363697

  12. Effects of Prosocial, Neutral, and Violent Video Games on Children's Helpful and Hurtful Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Muniba; Anderson, Craig A; Gentile, Douglas A

    2012-01-01

    Recent research reveals that playing prosocial video games increases prosocial cognitions, positive affect, and helpful behaviors [Gentile et al., 2009; Greitemeyer and Osswald, 2009, 2010, 2011]. These results are consistent with the social-cognitive models of social behavior such as the general learning model [Buckley and Anderson, 2006]. However, no experimental studies have examined such effects on children. Previous research on violent video games suggests that short-term effects of video games are largely based on priming of existing behavioral scripts. Thus, it is unclear whether younger children will show similar effects. This research had 9-14 years olds play a prosocial, neutral, or violent video game, and assessed helpful and hurtful behaviors simultaneously through a new tangram measure. Prosocial games increased helpful and decreased hurtful behavior, whereas violent games had the opposite effects.

  13. Marijuana-laced brownies: behavioral effects, physiologic effects, and urinalysis in humans following ingestion.

    PubMed

    Cone, E J; Johnson, R E; Paul, B D; Mell, L D; Mitchell, J

    1988-01-01

    Five drug-free male subjects ingested marijuana-laced brownies in a double-blind crossover study designed to test for behavioral effects, physiologic effects, and urinary cannabinoid metabolites produced as a result of consumption of marijuana plant material cooked in foodstuff. On three separate occasions, each subject consumed two brownies which contained 1.6 g of marijuana plant material. Placebo marijuana plant material (0% THC) was mixed with marijuana plant material (2.8% THC) so that each subject ingested equivalent marijuana plant material of 0, 1, and 2 marijuana cigarettes (2.8% THC). Subjects scored significantly higher on behavioral measures after consumption of brownies containing THC than with placebo; however, the effects were slow to appear and variable. Peak effects occurred 2.5 to 3.5 h after dosing. Modest changes in pulse and blood pressure also were noted. Urinalyses by EMIT d.a.u. assay and Abuscreen RIA for cannabinoids and GC/MS assay for THCCOOH indicated that substantial amounts of marijuana-related metabolites were excreted over a period of 3 to 14 days. No positives were produced as a result of ingestion of placebo brownies.

  14. Actors conform, observers react: the effects of behavioral synchrony on conformity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ping; Dai, Xianchi; Wyer, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    Engaging in synchronous behavior can induce a more general disposition to copy others, which increases the tendency to conform to others' preferences in an unrelated choice situation. In contrast, observing others perform synchronous behavior can induce psychological reactance and decrease conformity to others' preferences. Five experiments confirmed these different effects and circumscribed the conditions in which they occurred. Actors typically focus their attention on the goal to which their synchronous behavior is directed, inducing a copying-others mindset that generalizes to later situations. In contrast, observers focus on the actors' behavior independently of the goal to which it pertains. Consequently, they become sensitive to the restrictions on freedom that synchronous behavior requires and experience reactance. However, changing the relative attention that actors and observers pay to these factors can reverse the effects of the actors' synchronous behavior on conformity.

  15. The effects of a good behavior game on the disruptive behavior of Sundanese elementary school students.

    PubMed

    Saigh, P A; Umar, A M

    1983-01-01

    An endemic version of the Good Behavior Game was applied in a rural Sudanese second-grade classroom. Official letters of commendation, extra time for recess, victory tags, and a winner's chart were used as backup reinforcers. The class was divided into two teams, and the teacher indicated she would place a check on the board after every rule violation. The students were also told that the team with the fewest marks would win the game and receive the aforementioned prizes. After an initial adaptation period, the rate of disruption was charted across four treatment phases: viz., baseline I, introduction of the game, baseline II, and reintroduction of the game. It was observed that the game phases were associated with marked decreases in the rate of seat leaving, talking without permission, and aggression. The teacher, principal, parents, and students were consequently individually interviewed, and their comments spoke strongly for the social validity of the game. PMID:6643325

  16. The effects of a good behavior game on the disruptive behavior of Sundanese elementary school students.

    PubMed

    Saigh, P A; Umar, A M

    1983-01-01

    An endemic version of the Good Behavior Game was applied in a rural Sudanese second-grade classroom. Official letters of commendation, extra time for recess, victory tags, and a winner's chart were used as backup reinforcers. The class was divided into two teams, and the teacher indicated she would place a check on the board after every rule violation. The students were also told that the team with the fewest marks would win the game and receive the aforementioned prizes. After an initial adaptation period, the rate of disruption was charted across four treatment phases: viz., baseline I, introduction of the game, baseline II, and reintroduction of the game. It was observed that the game phases were associated with marked decreases in the rate of seat leaving, talking without permission, and aggression. The teacher, principal, parents, and students were consequently individually interviewed, and their comments spoke strongly for the social validity of the game.

  17. Behavioral effects of hashish in mice. IV. Social dominance, food dominance, and sexual behavior within a group of males.

    PubMed

    Sieber, B; Frischknecht, H R; Waser, P G

    1981-01-01

    Within groups of three adult male mice the acute and subchronic effects of hashish extract (20 mg delta 9-THC/kg) on social dominance, food dominance, and sexual interactions with a female were investigated. An initial drug treatment of only the dominant male weakened his social position, but dominance was regained after treatment 2 or 3. In contrast, a persistent change in dominance was found when only the male which was dominant in the feeding test was treated with the extract. Simultaneous drug treatment of all three males did not affect the social dominance relationship but resulted in a reversible change in food dominance. The original feeding order was reestablished after drug treatment 3. Upon meeting an estrous female, no male of the group was distinctly dominant in mating. After treatment 1 was given to all members of the group, all types of behavior were impaired and total activity was significantly reduced. After treatment 2, animals showed tolerance to the sedative effects, and after treatment 3, sexual behavior was even more frequent in drugged animals than in controls. The results are discussed in relation to a possible dependence of behavioral drug effects and tolerance development on the experimental situation.

  18. Effects of combat deployment on risky and self-destructive behavior among active duty military personnel.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Cynthia J; Stander, Valerie A; McWhorter, Stephanie K; Rabenhorst, Mandy M; Milner, Joel S

    2011-10-01

    Although research has documented negative effects of combat deployment on mental health, few studies have examined whether deployment increases risky or self-destructive behavior. The present study addressed this issue. In addition, we examined whether deployment effects on risky behavior varied depending on history of pre-deployment risky behavior, and assessed whether psychiatric conditions mediated effects of deployment on risky behavior. In an anonymous survey, active duty members of the U.S. Marine Corps and U.S. Navy (N = 2116) described their deployment experiences and their participation in risky recreational activities, unprotected sex, illegal drug use, self-injurious behavior, and suicide attempts during three time frames (civilian, military pre-deployment, and military post-deployment). Respondents also reported whether they had problems with depression, anxiety, or PTSD during the same three time frames. Results revealed that risky behavior was much more common in civilian than in military life, with personnel who had not deployed, compared to those who had deployed, reporting more risky behavior and more psychiatric problems as civilians. For the current time period, in contrast, personnel who had deployed (versus never deployed) were significantly more likely to report both risky behavior and psychiatric problems. Importantly, deployment was associated with increases in risky behavior only for personnel with a pre-deployment history of engaging in risky behavior. Although psychiatric conditions were associated with higher levels of risky behavior, psychiatric problems did not mediate associations between deployment and risky behavior. Implications for understanding effects of combat deployment on active duty personnel and directions for future research are discussed.

  19. Effects of combination birth control on estrous behavior in captive western lowland gorillas, Gorilla gorilla gorilla.

    PubMed

    Sarfaty, Anna; Margulis, Susan W; Atsalis, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    Combination birth control pills (CBC) are one of the most common birth control methods used for western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) housed in zoos. Since zoos are interested in maintaining as many natural behaviors as possible, it is important to know how contraception may affect social and sexual interactions among group members. Although some data are available regarding the influence of the pill on sexual behavior in human females, no data are available on its effects on gorilla estrous behavior. We examined temporal trends of estrous, aggressive, affiliative, and activity budget data in four females on CBC at the Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago, IL. Behavioral data were collected using point sampling, all-occurrence records, and one-zero sampling. Estrous behavior occurred in less than 1% of observations. Using all-occurrence and one-zero sampling, estrous behavior occurred more frequently in week one of the cycle than any other week. The focal females exhibited affiliative, aggressive, and activity budget data evenly across their cycles. There were also no temporal trends in proximity to the silverback. Females varied by the types of estrous behavior they exhibited. We give a hormonal explanation for the prevalence of estrous behaviors in week one, and recommendations for effective behavioral sampling of gorilla estrous behavior.

  20. Effects of adaptive protective behavior on the dynamics of sexually transmitted infections.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Michael A L; Eisenberg, Marisa C

    2016-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) continue to present a complex and costly challenge to public health programs. The preferences and social dynamics of a population can have a large impact on the course of an outbreak as well as the effectiveness of interventions intended to influence individual behavior. In addition, individuals may alter their sexual behavior in response to the presence of STIs, creating a feedback loop between transmission and behavior. We investigate the consequences of modeling the interaction between STI transmission and prophylactic use with a model that links a Susceptible-Infectious-Susceptible (SIS) system to evolutionary game dynamics that determine the effective contact rate. The combined model framework allows us to address protective behavior by both infected and susceptible individuals. Feedback between behavioral adaptation and prevalence creates a wide range of dynamic behaviors in the combined model, including damped and sustained oscillations as well as bistability, depending on the behavioral parameters and disease growth rate. We found that disease extinction is possible for multiple regions where R0>1, due to behavior adaptation driving the epidemic downward, although conversely endemic prevalence for arbitrarily low R0 is also possible if contact rates are sufficiently high. We also tested how model misspecification might affect disease forecasting and estimation of the model parameters and R0. We found that alternative models that neglect the behavioral feedback or only consider behavior adaptation by susceptible individuals can potentially yield misleading parameter estimates or omit significant features of the disease trajectory. PMID:26362102

  1. Minimizing deviant behavior in healthcare organizations: the effects of supportive leadership and job design.

    PubMed

    Chullen, C Logan; Dunford, Benjamin B; Angermeier, Ingo; Boss, R Wayne; Boss, Alan D

    2010-01-01

    In an era when healthcare organizations are beset by intense competition, lawsuits, and increased administrative costs, it is essential that employees perform their jobs efficiently and without distraction. Deviant workplace behavior among healthcare employees is especially threatening to organizational effectiveness, and healthcare managers must understand the antecedents of such behavior to minimize its prevalence. Deviant employee behavior has been categorized into two major types, individual and organizational, according to the intended target of the behavior. Behavior directed at the individual includes such acts as harassment and aggression, whereas behavior directed at the organization includes such acts as theft, sabotage, and voluntary absenteeism, to name a few (Robinson and Bennett 1995). Drawing on theory from organizational behavior, we examined two important features of supportive leadership, leader-member exchange (LMX) and perceived organizational support (POS), and two important features of job design, intrinsic motivation and depersonalization, as predictors of subsequent deviant behavior in a sample of over 1,900 employees within a large US healthcare organization. Employees who reported weaker perceptions of LMX and greater perceptions of depersonalization were more likely to engage in deviant behavior directed at the individual, whereas employees who reported weaker perceptions of POS and intrinsic motivation were more likely to engage in deviant behavior directed at the organization. These findings give rise to specific prescriptions for healthcare managers to prevent or minimize the frequency of deviant behavior in the workplace.

  2. The effect of parole on methadone patient behavior.

    PubMed

    Anglin, M D; McGlothlin, W H; Speckart, G

    1981-01-01

    A 7-year followup of three male samples of 1971-1973 methadone maintenance admissions was conducted: a random sample of 100; a sample of 136 who had a minimum of 30 months remaining on civil addict parole status at the time of methadone entry; and a matched sample of 136 not on parole. Ninety percent of those not decreased were interviewed. The overall sample spent 58% of the nonincarcerated follow-up interval on methadone. This resulted in a large decline in daily heroin use and associated criminal behavior measures. The addition of parole supervision with urine testing resulted in only marginal improvements in behavior over that attributable to maintenance alone; however, the parole status did significantly reduce the length of intervals of daily heroin use both prior and subsequent to methadone entry.

  3. Effects of ratio reinforcement schedules on choice behavior.

    PubMed

    Huang, I N; Melvin, J N

    1990-01-01

    Choice behavior under a concurrent VR-FR schedule of reinforcement was investigated in two experiments to test a molar theory of maximization. Hunger-motivated albino rats pressed two bars, one on an FR10 and the other on a VR10 schedule, for a food reward. With the total number of experiences with each bar equated and interalternative switching eliminated during training, the study showed that during the choice test, the animals made significantly more responses to the VR than to the FR alternative, allocating about 75% of their responses to the VR alternative. The results suggest that, given an equal return of reward in the long run, the animals preferred a variable to a constant alternative in a choice situation. The findings are discussed in terms of a molar theory of maximization and a schedule-appropriate behavior interpretation of choice.

  4. Anthropogenic effects on winter behavior of ferruginous hawks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plumpton, D.L.; Andersen, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    Little information is known about the ecology of ferruginous hawks (Buteo regalis) in winter versus the breeding season and less about how the species adapts to fragmented grassland habitats. Accordingly, we studied the behavior of 38 radiotagged ferruginous hawks during 3 winters from 1992 to 1995. We used 2 adjacent sites in Colorado that were characterized by low and high levels of anthropogenic influence and habitat fragmentation: the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge (RMANWR; low-level influence), and several adjacent Denver suburbs (high-level influence). Relative abundance of ferruginous hawks differed by treatment area and year (P 0.05) at RMANWR and suburban sites. Ferruginous hawks appear to modify their behavior in fragmented, largely human-altered habitats, provided some foraging habitats with adequate populations of suitable prey species are present.

  5. Some effects of procedural variables on operant choice behavior.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jay

    2010-05-01

    Procedural variables are concerned with the way subjects contact stimulus, response, and reinforcer variables and relations in an experiment. Procedural variables may therefore be understood as tools that allow researchers and theorists to explore the generality of their conceptions of independent variables, behavioral processes, and quantitative laws of behavior. The present article reviews data from several studies showing how procedural variables can influence the outcome of operant choice experiments, even when nominal independent variables remain constant. An important theoretical issue raised by these data is whether researchers have most usefully identified the independent variables that they incorporate into their quantitative models. Particular attention is paid to how procedural variables can influence the measure of reinforcement frequency over time that best correlates with the distribution of choice responding over time.

  6. Effect of a perfume on prosocial behavior of pedestrians.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, N

    2001-06-01

    Several studies have shown that perfumes encourage prosocial behavior of people from whom help is requested in the street. Implicit requests for help were studied. On a pedestrian walk, a woman confederate, with or without a heavy perfume, walked by the subject while dropping a packet of paper handkerchiefs or a glove apparently without noticing. Results show that the confederate was warned more often when wearing a perfume.

  7. Effect of phase behavior on bypassing in enriched gas floods

    SciTech Connect

    Burger, J.E.; Bhogeswara, R.; Mohanty, K.K. )

    1994-05-01

    Enriched gas floods incorporate a complex interaction of heterogeneity, fingering, multiphase flow, and phase behavior. Experiments and simulations indicate that the optimum solvent enrichment in high-viscosity-ratio secondary gas floods can be below minimum miscibility enrichment (MME). The compositional path and resulting mobility profile in multidimensional multiple-contact miscible (MCM) or immiscible floods are different from their 1D counterparts for high-viscosity-ratio floods in heterogeneous media.

  8. Effect of nonlinear electromechanical interaction upon wind power generator behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selyutskiy, Yury D.; Klimina, Liubov A.

    2014-12-01

    A mathematical model is developed for describing a small horizontal axis wind turbine with electric generator, such that the electromechanical interaction is non-linear in current. Dependence of steady regimes of the system upon parameters of the model is studied. In particular, it is shown that increase of wind speed causes qualitative restructuring of the set of steady regimes, which leads to considerable change in behavior of the wind power generator. The proposed model is verified against data obtained in experiments.

  9. The Effects of Four Nursery Rearing Strategies on Infant Behavioral Development in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Rommeck, Ina; Gottlieb, Daniel H; Strand, Sarah C; McCowan, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Nursery rearing is the single most important risk factor in the development of severe forms of abnormal behavior, such as self-biting, in rhesus macaques. This practice is common in research laboratories and typically involves continuous pair housing of infants without maternal contact. We examined the effects of variation in peer socialization on the behavioral development of rhesus infants by exposing 32 newborn infants to 4 different socialization routines: continuously paired; intermittently paired; continuously paired rotationally (partners rotated within the group once a week); and intermittently paired rotationally. Analyses revealed that infants paired intermittently exhibited ‘floating limb’ and self-biting behavior at significantly higher frequencies than those reared by using any other strategy. Results also suggested that continuous pairing was most effective in reducing the development of abnormal behaviors (that is, self-bite and floating limb), whereas intermittent pairing significantly reduced partner clinging and geckering. A principal component analysis revealed that floating limb behavior and self-biting are strongly associated. Self-biting began as early as 32 d of age, and a negative binomial regression on data of floating limb and self-biting revealed that early development of floating limb behavior predicts self-biting behavior later in development. Despite the significant effects of rearing strategies on the frequency of abnormal behaviors, we note that animals in all 4 treatment groups developed these traits to some degree. We suspect that the solitary incubator environment may be a trigger for the development of abnormal behaviors. PMID:19653949

  10. Eat or heat? The effects of poverty on children's behavior.

    PubMed

    da Fonseca, Marcio A

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, there were 46.2 million people in the US in poverty (15 percent of the population). The rate for children under 18 years of age was 22 percent, the highest of all age groups. Poverty is strongly linked to adverse socio-emotional outcomes and poor health in children, which influence adult socioeconomic advancement. It affects specific neurocognitive processes disproportionately such as working memory, cognitive control, and especially language and memory. Poor children are frequently exposed to household chaos, maternal depression, neighborhood violence, food insecurity and housing instability. They also experience little social support and have parents who are less responsive, more authoritarian and less involved in school activities than those of higher socioeconomic levels. Their diet is rich in sugar, which may contribute to behavioral disturbances. Children from a disadvantaged background have a poor ability to cope with stress and tend to show aggressive, withdrawn and anxious/depressive behaviors as well as poor academic outcomes. Dental professionals who care for poor children must understand they live under stressful physical and emotional conditions, which will impact their behavior in the dental office. PMID:24717751

  11. Eat or heat? The effects of poverty on children's behavior.

    PubMed

    da Fonseca, Marcio A

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, there were 46.2 million people in the US in poverty (15 percent of the population). The rate for children under 18 years of age was 22 percent, the highest of all age groups. Poverty is strongly linked to adverse socio-emotional outcomes and poor health in children, which influence adult socioeconomic advancement. It affects specific neurocognitive processes disproportionately such as working memory, cognitive control, and especially language and memory. Poor children are frequently exposed to household chaos, maternal depression, neighborhood violence, food insecurity and housing instability. They also experience little social support and have parents who are less responsive, more authoritarian and less involved in school activities than those of higher socioeconomic levels. Their diet is rich in sugar, which may contribute to behavioral disturbances. Children from a disadvantaged background have a poor ability to cope with stress and tend to show aggressive, withdrawn and anxious/depressive behaviors as well as poor academic outcomes. Dental professionals who care for poor children must understand they live under stressful physical and emotional conditions, which will impact their behavior in the dental office.

  12. Contextual Influences on Distress Intolerance: Priming Effects on Behavioral Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Szuhany, Kristin L.; Otto, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Distress intolerance (DI), the inability to tolerate stressful experiences, has been linked to multiple psychiatric conditions and maladaptive coping patterns. Although DI is often considered a trait-like variable, evidence indicates that self-report and behavioral indices of DI can be manipulated by contextual factors. Understanding such contextual influences is important given evidence of unexpected variability in these presumed trait-like measures over brief intervals. The current study examined the influence of context (manipulated by priming concepts of “Interminability” and “Brevity”) in predicting behavioral persistence, in relation to self-reported DI. Results indicated that priming Brevity was associated with terminating a cold-pressor task more quickly. Self-reported DI was linked to earlier termination, but there was no interaction between self-reported DI and priming condition. Results indicate that contextual cues modulate performance on behavioral measures of DI. Hence, models of DI should consider both trait-like and contextual factors in understanding variability in DI measures. PMID:26366022

  13. Effects of eszopiclone and zolpidem on sleep-wake behavior, anxiety-like behavior and contextual memory in rats

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Max P.; Radadia, Kushan; Macone, Brian W.; Auerbach, Sanford H.; Datta, Subimal

    2010-01-01

    At present, eszopiclone and zolpidem are the most commonly prescribed drugs for treating insomnia. Despite the established relationship between sleep disturbance and anxiety, it remains unknown whether targeted treatment for insomnia may affect acute anxiety. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the effects of three different doses (1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) of eszopiclone and zolpidem on the states of sleep and wakefulness, levels of anxiety-like behavior, and long-term contextual memory in footshock-induced anxious rats. The results of this study demonstrated that the administration of eszopiclone and zolpidem both were equally effective in attenuating footshock stressor-induced suppression of slow-wave sleep (SWS). The administration of eszopiclone at 1 mg/kg or zolpidem at 1 and 3 mg/kg doses showed a tendency for attenuating stressor-induced suppression of REM sleep. However, the REM sleep attenuating effects of these drugs disappeared when they were administered at higher doses. The administration of eszopiclone at 3 and 10 mg/kg doses and zolpidem at all three doses reduced the power of electroencephalographic theta band frequencies during wakefulness. In addition, the administration of eszopiclone at 1 and 3 mg/kg doses suppressed stressor-induced anxiety-like behavior. The administration of zolpidem at 1, 3, or 10 mg/kg doses was not effective in attenuating stressor-induced anxiety-like behavior. Contextual memory after administration of eszopiclone at 1 mg/kg dose had no effects, but was reduced significantly with increased dosage. Contextual memory after administration of zolpidem, at all three doses, was severely disrupted. The results of this study suggest that eszopiclone at a low dose could be used effectively to control anxiety and anxiety-induced insomnia. PMID:20153782

  14. Preliminary evaluation of porcine zona pellucida (PZP) immunocontraception for behavioral effects in feral horses (Equus caballus).

    PubMed

    Powell, D M

    1999-01-01

    Successful management of captive populations of wild animals requires effective control of reproduction. Contraception is one tool for controlling reproduction of animals in zoos; however, the options available to the animal manager are limited. Contraceptives vary in efficacy, reversibility, and side effects, and thus may not be suitable for widespread use. One consideration when selecting a contraceptive is its potential for side effects on behavior, especially given the fact that reproduction plays such a prominent role in the biology of any species. To date, there have been few evaluations of contraceptives for behavioral effects, and those that have been conducted have focused on hormone-based contraceptives. This study sought to evaluate a novel method of population control, immunocontraception, for behavioral effects in a population of feral horses. Porcine zona pellucida (PZP) immunocontraception prevents fertilization of ova and does not alter normal hormone secretion patterns. It therefore should leave the animal behaviorally intact in terms of reproductive behavior. The study examined the behavior of 43 sexually mature mares on Assateague Island during the 1997 breeding season and, with help from Earthwatch volunteers, collected observations over a 3-month period. The study found no significant differences between treated and untreated mares in general activity budget, aggression given or received, and spatial relationships relative to the stallion. These preliminary findings indicate that PZP contraception seems to have no acute behavioral effects on the behavior of individuals. The study findings also suggest that PZP could be a desirable and effective management tool for captive species in which social behavior plays an integral role in group dynamics. Analyses of group level effects and population level effects are continuing.

  15. Preliminary evaluation of porcine zona pellucida (PZP) immunocontraception for behavioral effects in feral horses (Equus caballus).

    PubMed

    Powell, D M

    1999-01-01

    Successful management of captive populations of wild animals requires effective control of reproduction. Contraception is one tool for controlling reproduction of animals in zoos; however, the options available to the animal manager are limited. Contraceptives vary in efficacy, reversibility, and side effects, and thus may not be suitable for widespread use. One consideration when selecting a contraceptive is its potential for side effects on behavior, especially given the fact that reproduction plays such a prominent role in the biology of any species. To date, there have been few evaluations of contraceptives for behavioral effects, and those that have been conducted have focused on hormone-based contraceptives. This study sought to evaluate a novel method of population control, immunocontraception, for behavioral effects in a population of feral horses. Porcine zona pellucida (PZP) immunocontraception prevents fertilization of ova and does not alter normal hormone secretion patterns. It therefore should leave the animal behaviorally intact in terms of reproductive behavior. The study examined the behavior of 43 sexually mature mares on Assateague Island during the 1997 breeding season and, with help from Earthwatch volunteers, collected observations over a 3-month period. The study found no significant differences between treated and untreated mares in general activity budget, aggression given or received, and spatial relationships relative to the stallion. These preliminary findings indicate that PZP contraception seems to have no acute behavioral effects on the behavior of individuals. The study findings also suggest that PZP could be a desirable and effective management tool for captive species in which social behavior plays an integral role in group dynamics. Analyses of group level effects and population level effects are continuing. PMID:16363936

  16. Parental genetic effects in a cavefish adaptive behavior explain disparity between nuclear and mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Masato; Ashida, Go; Jeffery, William R

    2012-09-01

    Epigenetic parental genetic effects are important in many biological processes but their roles in the evolution of adaptive traits and their consequences in naturally evolving populations remain to be addressed. By comparing two divergent blind cave-dwelling cavefish populations with a sighted surface-dwelling population (surface fish) of the teleost Astyanax mexicanus, we report here that convergences in vibration attraction behavior (VAB), the lateral line sensory receptors underlying this behavior, and the feeding benefits of this behavior are controlled by parental genetic effects, either maternal or paternal inheritance. From behavioral studies and mathematical evolutionary simulations, we further demonstrate that disparity in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA in one of these cavefish populations that has hybridized with surface fish can be explained by paternal inheritance of VAB. The results suggest that parental genetic effects in adaptive behaviors may be important factors in biasing mitochondrial DNA inheritance in natural populations that are subject to introgression. PMID:22946818

  17. Lateral cascade of indirect effects in food webs with different types of adaptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Kamran-Disfani, Ahmad R; Golubski, Antonio J

    2013-12-21

    It is widely recognized that indirect effects due to adaptive behaviors can have important effects on food webs. One consequence may be to change how readily perturbations propagate through the web, because species' behaviors as well as densities may respond to perturbations. It is not well understood which types of behavior are more likely to facilitate versus inhibit propagation of disturbances through a food web, or how this might be affected by the shape of a food web or the patterns of interaction strengths within it. We model two simple, laterally expanded food webs (one with three trophic levels and one with four), and compare how various adaptive behaviors affect the potential for a newly introduced predator to change the equilibrium densities of distant species. Patterns of changes in response to the introduction were qualitatively similar across most models, as were the ways in which patterns of direct interaction strengths affected those responses. Depending on both the web structure and the specific adaptive behavior, the potential for density changes to propagate through the web could be either increased or diminished relative to the no-behavior model. Two behaviors allowed density changes to propagate through a four-level web that precluded such propagation in the no-behavior model, and each of these two behaviors led to qualitatively different patterns of density changes. In the one model (diet choice) in which density changes were able to propagate in both web structures, patterns of density changes differed qualitatively between webs. Some of our results flowed from the fact that behaviors did not interact directly in the systems we considered, so that indirect effects on distant species had to be at least partly density-mediated. Our models highlight this as an inherent limitation of considering in isolation behaviors that are strictly foraging-related or strictly defense-related, making a case for the value of simultaneously considering multiple

  18. Individual and combined effects of noncontingent reinforcement and response blocking on automatically reinforced problem behavior.

    PubMed

    Saini, Valdeep; Greer, Brian D; Fisher, Wayne W; Lichtblau, Katherine R; DeSouza, Andresa A; Mitteer, Daniel R

    2016-09-01

    Noncontingent reinforcement (NCR) and response blocking are 2 common interventions for problem behavior maintained by automatic reinforcement. We implemented NCR and blocking with 1 boy and found this combined intervention to be effective at decreasing high rates of automatically reinforced pica. With another child, we compared the effects of blocking alone to the combined intervention. With the third child, we compared NCR alone and blocking alone to the combined intervention. Results showed that the combined intervention was effective at reducing automatically reinforced problem behavior while moderate to high levels of item engagement maintained. When evaluated individually, neither NCR nor blocking was sufficient to reduce problem behavior to clinically significant levels. PMID:27029496

  19. Examining the Reliability and Validity of the Effective Behavior Support Self-Assessment Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Benjamin G.; Tobin, Kevin G.; Schutte, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The Effective Behavior Support Self-Assessment Survey (SAS; Sugai, Horner, & Todd, 2003) is designed to measure perceived Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) implementation and identify priorities for improvement. Despite its longevity, little published research exists documenting its reliability or validity for these purposes.…

  20. Effective Reinforcement Techniques in Elementary Physical Education: The Key to Behavior Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downing, John; Keating, Tedd; Bennett, Carl

    2005-01-01

    The ability to shape appropriate behavior while extinguishing misbehavior is critical to teaching and learning in physical education. The scientific principles that affect student learning in the gymnasium also apply to the methods teachers use to influence social behaviors. Research indicates that reinforcement strategies are more effective than…

  1. Effects of Contraceptive Education on Adolescent Male Contraceptive Behavior and Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mary E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between contraceptive education and teenage male contraceptive behavior was investigated. Findings indicated that brief or moderately in-depth contraceptive education had little effect on contraceptive behavior. The teenage pregnancy and other sex-related problems may make parents and schools more amenable to comprehensive…

  2. The Effect of Emotional Feedback on Behavioral Intention to Use Computer Based Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terzis, Vasileios; Moridis, Christos N.; Economides, Anastasios A.

    2012-01-01

    This study introduces emotional feedback as a construct in an acceptance model. It explores the effect of emotional feedback on behavioral intention to use Computer Based Assessment (CBA). A female Embodied Conversational Agent (ECA) with empathetic encouragement behavior was displayed as emotional feedback. More specifically, this research aims…

  3. Effective Teaching Behaviors in the College Classroom: A Critical Incident Technique from Students' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khandelwal, Kanika Aggarwal

    2009-01-01

    Teaching is a multidimensional, complex activity. The use of the Critical Incident Technique (CIT) has the potential to be effective in improving teaching as it reveals successful behaviors by identifying key actions associated between excellent/poor performances. The present study sought to identify teaching behaviors that differentiate excellent…

  4. Effects of White Noise on Off-Task Behavior and Academic Responding for Children with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Andrew; Bradley-Johnson, Sharon; Johnson, C. Merle

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of white noise played through headphones on off-task behavior, percentage of items completed, and percentage of items completed correctly for 3 students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Headphones plus white noise were associated with decreases in off-task behavior relative to baseline and…

  5. A Longitudinal Study of the Effects of OPAC Screen Changes on Searching Behavior and Searcher Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blecic, Deborah D.; Dorsch, Josephine L.; Koenig, Melissa H.; Bangalore, Nimala S.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a longitudinal study of four sets of OPAC (online public access catalog) transaction logs that examined the effects of screen changes in helping searchers improve their search behavior. Results show that while screen changes initially had a positive impact on search behavior, they were not always sustained over time. (Author/LRW)

  6. The Effect of Residence Hall Judicial Policies on Attitudes towards Rule Violating Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triplet, Rodney G.; And Others

    Control over environmental events has been shown to reduce the behavioral and psychological impact of environmental stress. To assess the effect of residence hall judicial policies on attitudes toward rule violating behavior, 93 college freshmen (36 males, 56 females, 1 unreported), randomly assigned to one of four dormitories (social contract or…

  7. The Territorial Prior-Residence Effect and Children's Behavior in Social Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Ru; Li, Shu; Shi, Jian-Nong

    2009-01-01

    Research on territorial behavior has focused on animal populations, and relatively little has dealt with territoriality in humans, except in the area of human sports. This study was an investigation of the prior-residence effect on children's behavior in social dilemmas. The analysis was carried out by means of research designed for preschool…

  8. The effect of simulated ostracism on physical activity behavior in children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Assess the effects of simulated ostracism on children’s physical activity behavior, time allocated to sedentary behavior, and liking of physical activity. Methods: Nineteen (N=11 males, 8 females) children (11.7±1.3 years) completed two experimental sessions. During each session childre...

  9. Frogs Sell Beer: The Effects of Beer Advertisements on Adolescent Drinking Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Douglas A.; Walsh, David A.; Bloomgren, Barry W., Jr.; Atti, Jule A.; Norman, Jessica A.

    This present research reveals how beer advertising affects adolescents' knowledge of beer brands, drinking attitudes, and drinking behaviors. In addition to traditional psychological approaches for measuring media effects on alcohol-related behaviors and attitudes, market research advertising tracking methods were included to permit a clearer and…

  10. The Effects of a School-Based Functional Analysis on Subsequent Classroom Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Tonya N.; Durand, Shannon; Fuentes, Lisa; Dacus, Sharon; Blenden, Kara

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the effects of conducting a school-based functional analysis on subsequent classroom behavior. Each participant was observed in the classroom during activities that were reported by teachers to result in high levels of challenging behavior. Participants were observed during (a) baseline, prior to the administration of a…

  11. Direct Behavioral Consultation in Head Start to Increase Teacher Use of Praise and Effective Instruction Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufrene, Brad A.; Parker, Kizzy; Menousek, Kathryn; Zhou, Qi; Harpole, Lauren Lestremau; Olmi, D. Joe

    2012-01-01

    Chronic disruptive behaviors during early childhood are associated with many poor developmental outcomes including, but not limited to, school dropout and conduct disorder during adolescence. Much is known regarding effective intervention procedures for disruptive classroom behaviors by preschool children. Unfortunately, evidence-based…

  12. Relative Effects of Daily Feedback and Weekly Feedback on Customer Service Behavior at a Gas Station

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Yongjoon; Lee, Kyehoon; Oah, Shezeen

    2013-01-01

    The relative effects of daily and weekly feedback on customer service behavior at a gas station were assessed using an ABC within-subjects design. Four critical service behaviors were identified and measured daily. After baseline (A), weekly feedback (B) was introduced, and daily feedback (C) was introduced in the next phase. The results indicated…

  13. Effect of Behavioral Activation Treatment on Fibromyalgia-Related Pain Anxiety Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundervold, Duane A.; Talley, Chris; Buermann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Effects of Behavioral Activation Treatment (BAT) on pain anxiety, depression, and pain interference on a 43-year-old female with an 11-year history of chronic fibromyalgia pain are described. Analgesic, anxyiolytic, and antidepressant medications were stabilized prior to participation. Dependent measures were the Behavioral Relaxation Scale, a…

  14. Systematic Review of School-based Interventions to Modify Dietary Behavior: Does Intervention Intensity Impact Effectiveness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Racey, Megan; O'Brien, Charlene; Douglas, Sabrina; Marquez, Olivia; Hendrie, Gilly; Newton, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    Background: Owing to the associations between diet and health, it is important that effective health promotion strategies establish healthful eating behaviors from an early age. We reviewed the intensity of school-based interventions aimed to modify dietary behavior in preadolescent and adolescents and related intervention characteristics to…

  15. Studies in the Self-Regulation of Behavior: Effects of Contingent Cognitive and Affective Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, John C.; Santrock, John W.

    1976-01-01

    The hypothesis tested was that the evaluations and affective responses which accompany ongoing behavior may operate as reinforcers and punishers, thus exercising control over the persistence of those behaviors. Results indicate potent systematic effects due to the differing content of such evaluations and the associated affect or affective tone.…

  16. Effects of Matching Instruction Difficulty to Reading Level for Students with Escape-Maintained Problem Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanford, Amanda K.; Horner, Robert H.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of a literacy intervention matching student skill level with academic performance demands were examined through a multiple baseline across participants design. The dual dependent variables were problem behavior and academic engagement. Four students in Grades 2 or 3 who exhibited low academic performance and problem behavior during…

  17. Comparison of behavioral effects of the NMDA receptor channel blockers memantine and ketamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Kotermanski, Shawn E; Johnson, Jon W; Thiels, Edda

    2013-08-01

    Memantine and ketamine block N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors with similar affinity and kinetics, yet their behavioral consequences differ: e.g., memantine is used to alleviate symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, whereas ketamine reproduces symptoms of schizophrenia. The two drugs exhibit different pharmacokinetics, which may play a principal role in their differential behavioral effects. To gain insight into the drugs' behavioral consequences, we treated adult male rats acutely with varying doses (0-40 mg/kg i.p.) of memantine or ketamine and assessed exploratory behavior and spatial working memory. To examine the importance of pharmacokinetics, we assessed behavior either 15 or 45 min after drug administration. Both drugs decreased ambulation, fine movements, and rearing at the beginning of the exploratory activity test; however, at the end of the test, high doses of only memantine increased ambulation and fine movements. High doses of both drugs disrupted spontaneous alternation, a measure of working memory, but high doses of only memantine elicited perseverative behavior. Surprisingly, ketamine's effects were influenced by the delay between drug administration and testing no more frequently than were memantine's. Our findings show that, regardless of test delay, memantine and ketamine evoke similar behavioral effects at lower doses, consistent with NMDA receptors being both drugs' principal site of action, but can have divergent effects at higher doses. Our results suggest that the divergence of memantine's and ketamine's behavioral consequences is likely to result from differences in mechanisms of NMDA receptor antagonism or actions at other targets.

  18. Benzodiazepine Behavioral Side Effects: Review and Implications for Individuals with Mental Retardation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalachnik, John E.; Hanzel, Thomas E.; Sevenich, Robert; Harder, Stuart R.

    2002-01-01

    A literature review found behavioral side effects occurred for 13% of 446 individuals with mental retardation who were prescribed benzodiazepine for either behavioral or psychiatric conditions (n=138, 17.4%), epilepsy (n=20, 15.4%), or other medical conditions such as myoclonus or cerebral palsy (n=100, 2%). Implications of nonrecognition are…

  19. Child Disruptive Behavior and Parenting Efficacy: A Comparison of the Effects of Two Models of Insights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Erin; Rodriguez, Eileen; Cappella, Elise; Morris, Jordan; McClowry, Sandee

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the effectiveness of INSIGHTS into Children's Temperament (INSIGHTS), a temperament-based preventive intervention, in reducing the disruptive behavior problems of young children from low-income, urban families. Results indicate that children enrolled in INSIGHTS evidenced a decrease in disruptive behavior problems…

  20. Literacy Objects as Cultural Tools: Effects on Children's Literacy Behaviors in Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.; Roskos, Kathy

    A study examined the effects of literacy-enriched play settings on preschoolers' literacy behaviors in spontaneous free play. Subjects were 91 children, ages 3-5, from 2 urban day care centers. Prior to, and following the intervention, the frequency of each child's handling, reading and writing behaviors in play was assessed through direct…

  1. The Effectiveness of Social Stories on Decreasing Disruptive Behaviors of Children with Autism: Three Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdemir, Selda

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of social stories on decreasing the disruptive behaviors of children with autism. Social stories were created for three participants, ages 7 and 9, to decrease three target disruptive behaviors, using a loud voice in class, chair tipping, and cutting in lunch line. Using a…

  2. Effects of Language of Instruction on Response Accuracy and Challenging Behavior in a Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Russell; Rispoli, Mandy; Sigafoos, Jeff; Lancioni, Giulio; Andrews, Alonzo; Ortega, Lilia

    2011-01-01

    Discrete trial training was delivered using English and Spanish languages to a student with autism from a Spanish-speaking family. An alternating treatments design was used to examine the effects of language of instruction on the child's response accuracy and challenging behavior. More correct responses and fewer challenging behaviors occurred…

  3. Effects of a Breakfast Program on On-Task Behaviors of Vocational High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bro, Robert T.

    1996-01-01

    This study examined whether an in-school breakfast program could increase on-task behaviors of 18 high school students. Vocational and academic students participated in the program and completed surveys. Teachers collected observational data. Results indicated that the program effectively increased on-task behaviors in both settings, and that…

  4. Attitudes Toward Retarded Children: Effects of Labeling and Behavioral Aggressiveness. Volume 4, Number 74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottlieb, Jay

    Effects of the label "mentally retarded" on attitudes of peers were examined among 48 third grade pupils. Half of the Ss were shown a videotape of an actor displaying acting out behavior, while the remaining Ss were shown a videotape with the same actor engaging in passive behavior. Half of the Ss in each group were told that the actor was a…

  5. Cognitive-Behavioral and Pharmacological Interventions for Hyperactive Boys: Comparative and Combined Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinshaw, Stephen P.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Assessed the effects of two interventions on hyperactive children's (N=24) social behavior. Results indicated that both methylphenidate (Ritalin) and reinforced self-evaluation were superior to the contrast treatments. Medication plus cognitive-behavioral self-evaluation proved optimal, and placebo plus reinforcement alone was significantly worse…

  6. Gender Effects on Challenging Behaviors in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozlowski, Alison M.; Matson, Johnny L.; Rieske, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    Challenging behaviors are extremely prevalent within the autism spectrum disorder (ASD) population. To date, numerous factors affecting the rates of challenging behaviors within the ASD population have been examined including age, gender, ethnicity, and intellectual functioning. Controversy has arisen in regard to the effect of gender on…

  7. Effecting Behavioral Modification in the Mentally Handicapped Student: Operant Conditioning and the Teacher's Role.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. for Handicapped Children.

    Presented are nine short papers concerning teacher role in effecting behavioral modification in the mentally handicapped student. The paper on functional analysis of behavior discusses use of reinforcers, changing reinforcer strength, reinforcement schedules, and discriminative stimuli. A continuation paper on functional analysis of behavior…

  8. Effects of Organizational Citizenship Behaviors on Selection Decisions in Employment Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podsakoff, Nathan P.; Whiting, Steven W.; Podsakoff, Philip M.; Mishra, Paresh

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on an experiment examining the effects of job candidates' propensity to exhibit organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs) on selection decisions made in the context of a job interview. We developed videos that manipulated candidate responses to interview questions tapping task performance and citizenship behavior content in…

  9. The Effects of Check & Connect on the School-Related Violent Behaviors of African American Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaton, Angela T.

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of a modified version of Check & Connect, a comprehensive student engagement intervention, on the attendance, behavior, and academic performance of secondary African American females with violent and aggressive behavior problems. In addition, the Student Engagement Instrument (SEI) was used to assess cognitive…

  10. Effects of Prevent-Teach-Reinforce on Academic Engagement and Disruptive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeJager, Brett W.; Filter, Kevin J.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of prevent-teach-reinforce (P-T-R), a functional behavioral assessment-based intervention for students with behavior problems, using an A-B-A-B design with follow-up. Participants included three students in kindergarten, fourth grade, and fifth grade in a rural Midwestern school district. P-T-R interventions…

  11. Behavior Change and Perceptions of Change: Evaluating the Effectiveness of a Token Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitman, David, Ph.D.

    2004-01-01

    Token economies often reduce problematic classroom behavior in preschool settings. In the present study, direct observation and teacher ratings of child behavior and treatment acceptability were utilized to evaluate the effectiveness of a token economy in a Head Start classroom. Because many teachers express concerns about the effort required to…

  12. Helping Each Other: The Effects of Cost, Need and Contextual Features Upon Preschoolers' Helping Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodd, Jillian

    1988-01-01

    Investigated effects of variation of personal cost to the helper and perceived neediness of the person helped upon the helping behavior of 96 children of 43-67 months. Data indicated that the helping stimulus, the absence of behavior by the person helped, and cost contributed to the prediction of helping response type. (RJC)

  13. Teachers as Bystanders: The Effect of Teachers' Perceptions on Reporting Bullying Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uale, Beth P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the role of educators as it relates to the reporting process of bullying incidents. Since bullying behaviors have negative effects on student health and educators have regular contact with students, this study looks at teacher perceptions of bullying behaviors and how these perceptions influence the reporting process. Using the…

  14. Neonatal behavioral assessment scale as a biomarker of the effects of environmental agents on the newborn

    SciTech Connect

    Tronick, E.Z.

    1987-10-01

    The organization of the newborn's brain and the nature of the effects of toxins and pollutants conspire to produce complex and difficult problems for the assessment of the behavioral effects of environmental agents. The newborn's brain can be characterized as relatively undifferentiated, and more vulnerable to, but potentially more capable of recovery from, the effects of environmental agents specific to this time period than it will be later in development. Environmental agents tend to have nonspecific, possibly subtle, effects that invade many areas of newborn functioning. These characteristics of the newborn and the behavioral effects of teratogens make assessment at this point in development difficult. Further exacerbating this difficulty is the nature of development. Development is critically dependent on the care the newborn receives. Distortions of a newborn's behavior can produce disturbances in the caretaking environment, and these caretaking disturbances can amplify the original behavioral distortion and produce other distortions. Attention to these types of effects must be built into an assessment. These considerations lead to the conclusion that an apical assessment of newborn behavior is required. The most standardized, valid, and reliable instrument currently available is the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale developed by Brazelton. It assesses the integrated actions of the infant that function to regulate simultaneously the infant's internal state and exchanges with the animate (caretaking) and inanimate environment. The scale uses a set of reflex and behavioral items to assess the critical domains of infant functioning (e.g., the infant's ability to control his states of consciousness). 52 references.

  15. Identifying peer effects using spatial analysis: the role of peers on risky sexual behavior

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the role of peer effects on early sexual debut for a sample of adolescents using data from the National Longitudinal Study on Adolescent Health (Add Health). Most studies analyzing peer influences ignore the “reflection” problem that occurs with studying peer effects. To address the reflection problem, this paper employs a spatial econometric approach to estimate a social interactions model. This is the first study in the literature on adolescent risky sexual behavior to use this approach to estimate peer effects. Similar to other research on peer effects and adolescent risky sexual behavior, this paper finds the existence of peer effects. However, the more vital outcome from this study is that older and male peers increase the likelihood of adolescent early sexual debut, while peers whose mothers are more open about sexual activity decrease adolescent risky sexual behavior. This methodology can help further our knowledge about the social context that influences adolescent sexual behavior. PMID:26300714

  16. A Systematic Review of Effective Interventions for Reducing Multiple Health Risk Behaviors in Adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald-Yau, Natasha; Viner, Russell Mark

    2014-01-01

    We systematically searched 9 biomedical and social science databases (1980–2012) for primary and secondary interventions that prevented or reduced 2 or more adolescent health risk behaviors (tobacco use, alcohol use, illicit drug use, risky sexual behavior, aggressive acts). We identified 44 randomized controlled trials of universal or selective interventions and were effective for multiple health risk behaviors. Most were school based, conducted in the United States, and effective for multiple forms of substance use. Effects were small, in line with findings for other universal prevention programs. In some studies, effects for more than 1 health risk behavior only emerged at long-term follow-up. Integrated prevention programs are feasible and effective and may be more efficient than discrete prevention strategies. PMID:24625172

  17. Comparing main and collateral effects of extinction and differential reinforcement of alternative behavior.

    PubMed

    Petscher, Erin Seligson; Bailey, Jon S

    2008-07-01

    This study evaluated the effects and collateral effects of extinction (EXT) and differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DRA) interventions with inappropriate vocalizations and work refusal. Both interventions have been used frequently to reduce problem behaviors. The benefits of these interventions have been established yet may be outweighed by the reported negative side effects that result. However, these collateral effects have rarely been measured or reported. DRA produced the most rapid reductions in behavior for 4 of the 5 participants. Other behaviors were measured for changes and showed that the desirable collateral effect of academic engagement tended to be higher during EXT than DRA. No evidence of EXT bursts was present with any participant, although EXT-induced aggression occurred with 1 participant.

  18. A systematic review of effective interventions for reducing multiple health risk behaviors in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Hale, Daniel R; Fitzgerald-Yau, Natasha; Viner, Russell Mark

    2014-05-01

    We systematically searched 9 biomedical and social science databases (1980-2012) for primary and secondary interventions that prevented or reduced 2 or more adolescent health risk behaviors (tobacco use, alcohol use, illicit drug use, risky sexual behavior, aggressive acts). We identified 44 randomized controlled trials of universal or selective interventions and were effective for multiple health risk behaviors. Most were school based, conducted in the United States, and effective for multiple forms of substance use. Effects were small, in line with findings for other universal prevention programs. In some studies, effects for more than 1 health risk behavior only emerged at long-term follow-up. Integrated prevention programs are feasible and effective and may be more efficient than discrete prevention strategies. PMID:24625172

  19. Amphetamine Abuse Related Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, O'Dene; Kumar, Rajan; Yeruva, Sri Lakshmi Hyndavi; Curry, Bryan H.

    2016-01-01

    Amphetamine abuse is a global problem. The cardiotoxic manifestations like acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure, or arrhythmia related to misuse of amphetamine and its synthetic derivatives have been documented but are rather rare. Amphetamine-related AMI is even rarer. We report two cases of men who came to emergency department (ED) with chest pain, palpitation, or seizure and were subsequently found to have myocardial infarction associated with the use of amphetamines. It is crucial that, with increase in amphetamine abuse, clinicians are aware of this potentially dire complication. Patients with low to intermediate risk for coronary artery disease with atypical presentation may benefit from obtaining detailed substance abuse history and urine drug screen if deemed necessary. PMID:26998366

  20. Effects of food deprivation upon behavioral patterns and time budgeting of Aplysia fasciata.

    PubMed

    Susswein, A J

    1984-11-01

    Effects of food deprivation upon time devoted to different behaviors in Aplysia fasciata were investigated. Time invested in mating, egg-laying, swimming, and movement in place was increased, and time spent immobile and crawling was decreased. Time of occurrence of behaviors was highly synchronized, but differed from that seen when food was available. Changes in behavior seem to be adaptive to conditions in which food is scarce: increased motility may lead to finding sites where food is present, while increased egg-laying and mating may ensure survival of progeny. Behavioral changes can be readily accounted for by removal of postingestive stimuli signaling satiation.