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Sample records for abutment screw loosening

  1. Effect of surface coating on the screw loosening of dental abutment screws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chan-Ik; Choe, Han-Cheol; Chung, Chae-Heon

    2004-12-01

    Regardless of the type of performed restoration, in most cases, a screw connection is employed between the abutment and implant. For this reason, implant screw loosening has remained a problem in restorative practices. The purpose of this study was to compare the surface of coated/plated screws with titanium and gold alloy screws and to evaluate the physical properties of coated/plated material after scratch tests via FE-SEM (field emission scanning electron microscopy) investigation. GoldTite, titanium screws provided by 3i (Implant Innovation, USA) and TorqTite, titanium screws by Steri-Oss (Nobel Biocare, USA) and gold screws and titanium screws by AVANA (Osstem Implant, Korea) were selected for this study. The surface, crest, and root of the abutment screws were observed by FE-SEM. A micro-diamond needle was also prepared for the scratch test. Each abutment screw was fixed, and a scratch on the surface of the head region was made at constant load and thereafter the fine trace was observed with FE-SEM. The surface of GoldTite was smoother than that of other screws and it also had abundant ductility and malleability compared with titanium and gold screws. The scratch tests also revealed that teflon particles were exfoliated easily in the screw coated with teflon. The titanium screw had rough surface and low ductility. The clinical use of gold-plated screws is recommended as a means of preventing screw loosening.

  2. Influence of the implant abutment types and the dynamic loading on initial screw loosening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun-Sook

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study examined the effects of the abutment types and dynamic loading on the stability of implant prostheses with three types of implant abutments prepared using different fabrication methods by measuring removal torque both before and after dynamic loading. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three groups of abutments were produced using different types of fabrication methods; stock abutment, gold cast abutment, and CAD/CAM custom abutment. A customized jig was fabricated to apply the load at 30° to the long axis. The implant fixtures were fixed to the jig, and connected to the abutments with a 30 Ncm tightening torque. A sine curved dynamic load was applied for 105 cycles between 25 and 250 N at 14 Hz. Removal torque before loading and after loading were evaluated. The SPSS was used for statistical analysis of the results. A Kruskal-Wallis test was performed to compare screw loosening between the abutment systems. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was performed to compare screw loosening between before and after loading in each group (α=0.05). RESULTS Removal torque value before loading and after loading was the highest in stock abutment, which was then followed by gold cast abutment and CAD/CAM custom abutment, but there were no significant differences. CONCLUSION The abutment types did not have a significant influence on short term screw loosening. On the other hand, after 105 cycles dynamic loading, CAD/CAM custom abutment affected the initial screw loosening, but stock abutment and gold cast abutment did not. PMID:23509006

  3. Retrieval of a stripped abutment screw: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Maalhagh-Fard, Ahmad; Jacobs, Leyvee Cabanilla

    2010-10-01

    Mechanical complications, such as loosening or damaging of the prosthetic components of an osseointegrated implant, may occur. Stripping of the implant abutment screw head can be a serious problem which can render an implant unusable. This report describes a clinical situation involving a patient who presented with a fractured screw-retained interim crown. Upon further examination, it was determined that the abutment screw head was stripped. There was limited access and visibility in this situation since the implant was a bone-level implant. The procedure used for the removal of the stripped abutment screw head is described in detail in this clinical report.

  4. [Loosening of a Calcaneo-Stop Screw after Trampolining].

    PubMed

    Trieb, K; Fingernagel, T; Petershofer, A; Hofstaetter, S G

    2015-06-01

    Flexible flatfoot is a common malalignment in the paediatric population. Arthroereisis with a calcaneo-stop screw is an effective surgical procedure for treating juvenile flexible flatfoot after conservative measures have been fully exploited. In the present report, we describe the case of a loosening of a calcaneo-stop screw in a 12-year-old youth after excessive trampolining.

  5. A modified technique for removing a failed abutment screw from an implant with a custom guide tube.

    PubMed

    Taira, Yohsuke; Sawase, Takashi

    2012-04-01

    Fracture of abutment screw is a serious prosthodontic complication. When the abutment screw is fractured at the junction of the screw shank and screw thread, removal of the fractured screw fragment from the screw hole can be difficult. This article describes a modified technique for removing the failed abutment screw with a custom guide tube and tungsten carbide bur. The failed screw can be removed speedily without damaging the screw hole of the implant body or the screw threads.

  6. Fracture resistance of abutment screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone, and carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Eduardo Aloisio Fleck; Villar, Cristina Cunha; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2014-01-01

    Fractured abutment screws may be replaced; however, sometimes, the screw cannot be removed and the entire implant must be surgically removed and replaced. The aim of this study was to compare the fracture resistance of abutment retention screws made of titanium, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK, using an external hexagonal implant/UCLA-type abutment interface assembly. UCLA-type abutments were fixed to implants using titanium screws (Group 1), polyetheretherketone (PEEK) screws (Group 2), and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (Group 3). The assemblies were placed on a stainless steel holding apparatus to allow for loading at 45o off-axis, in a universal testing machine. A 200 N load (static load) was applied at the central point of the abutment extremity, at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/minute, until failure. Data was analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's range test. The titanium screws had higher fracture resistance, compared with PEEK and 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (p < 0.05). In contrast, no statistically significant difference was observed between the fracture resistance of the PEEK and the 30% carbon fiber-reinforced PEEK screws (p> 0.05). Finally, visual analysis of the fractions revealed that 100% of them occurred at the neck of the abutment screw, suggesting that this is the weakest point of this unit. PEEK abutment screws have lower fracture resistance, in comparison with titanium abutment screws.

  7. The Effects of Spinopelvic Parameters and Paraspinal Muscle Degeneration on S1 Screw Loosening

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Bum; Lee, Young-Seok; Nam, Taek-Kyun; Park, Yong-Sook; Kim, Young-Baeg

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate risk factors for S1 screw loosening after lumbosacral fusion, including spinopelvic parameters and paraspinal muscles. Methods We studied with 156 patients with degenerative lumbar disease who underwent lumbosacral interbody fusion and pedicle screw fixation including the level of L5-S1 between 2005 and 2012. The patients were divided into loosening and non-loosening groups. Screw loosening was defined as a halo sign larger than 1 mm around a screw. We checked cross sectional area of paraspinal muscles, mean signal intensity of the muscles on T2 weight MRI as a degree of fatty degeneration, spinopelvic parameters, bone mineral density, number of fusion level, and the characteristic of S1 screw. Results Twenty seven patients showed S1 screw loosening, which is 24.4% of total. The mean duration for S1 screw loosening was 7.3±4.1 months after surgery. Statistically significant risk factors were increased age, poor BMD, 3 or more fusion levels (p<0.05). Among spinopelvic parameters, a high pelvic incidence (p<0.01), a greater difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordotic angle preoperatively (p<0.01) and postoperatively (p<0.05). Smaller cross-sectional area and high T2 signal intensity in both multifidus and erector spinae muscles were also significant muscular risk factors (p<0.05). Small converging angle (p<0.001) and short intraosseous length (p<0.05) of S1 screw were significant screw related risk factors (p<0.05). Conclusion In addition to well known risk factors, spinopelvic parameters and the degeneration of paraspinal muscles also showed significant effects on the S1 screw loosening. PMID:26587190

  8. Removal torque evaluation of three different abutment screws for single implant restorations after mechanical cyclic loading

    PubMed Central

    PAEPOEMSIN, T.; REICHART, P. A.; CHAIJAREENONT, P.; STRIETZEL, F. P.; KHONGKHUNTHIAN, P.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the removal torque of three different abutment screws and pull out strength of implant-abutment connection for single implant restorations after mechanical cyclic loading. Methods The study was performed in accordance with ISO 14801:2007. Three implant groups (n=15) were used: group A, PW Plus® with flat head screw; group B, PW Plus® with tapered screw; and group C, Conelog® with flat head screw. All groups had the same implant-abutment connection feature: cone with mandatory index. All screws were tightened with manufacturer’s recommended torque. Ten specimens in each group underwent cyclic loading (1×106 cycles, 10 Hz, and 250 N). Then, all specimens were un-tightened, measured for the removal torque, and underwent a tensile test. The force that dislodged abutment from implant fixture was recorded. The data were analysed using independent sample t-test, ANOVA and Tukey HSD test. Results Before cyclic loading, removal torque in groups A, B and C were significantly different (B> A> C, P<.05). After cyclic loading, removal torque in all groups decreased significantly (P<.05). Group C revealed significantly less removal torque than groups A and B (P<.005). Tensile force in all groups significantly increased after cyclic loading (P<.05), group A had significantly less tensile force than groups B and C (P<.005). Conclusions Removal torque reduced significantly after cyclic loading. Before cyclic loading, tapered screws maintained more preload than did flat head screws. After cyclic loading, tapered and flat head screws maintained even amounts of preload. The tensile force that dislodged abutment from implant fixture increased immensely after cyclic loading. PMID:28042450

  9. Noninvasive method for retrieval of broken dental implant abutment screw

    PubMed Central

    Gooty, Jagadish Reddy; Palakuru, Sunil Kumar; Guntakalla, Vikram Reddy; Nera, Mahipal

    2014-01-01

    Dental implants made of titanium for replacement of missing teeth are widely used because of ease of technical procedure and high success rate, but are not free of complications and may fail. Fracturing of the prosthetic screw continues to be a problem in restorative practice and great challenge to remove the fractured screw conservatively. This case report describes and demonstrates the technique of using an ultrasonic scaler in the removal of the fracture screw fragment as a noninvasive method without damaging the hex of implants. PMID:24963261

  10. The Effect of Lumbar Lordosis on Screw Loosening in Dynesys Dynamic Stabilization: Four-Year Follow-Up with Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chao-Hung; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Fay, Li-Yu; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of Dynesys dynamic stabilization (DDS) on clinical and radiographic outcomes, including spinal pelvic alignment. Method. Consecutive patients who underwent 1- or 2-level DDS for lumbar spondylosis, mild degenerative spondylolisthesis, or degenerative disc disease were included. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by Visual Analogue Scale for back and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index, and the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Radiographic outcomes were assessed by radiographs and computed tomography. Pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis (LL) were also compared. Results. In 206 patients with an average follow-up of 51.1 ± 20.8 months, there were 87 screws (8.2%) in 42 patients (20.4%) that were loose. All clinical outcomes improved at each time point after operation. Patients with loosened screws were 45 years older. Furthermore, there was a higher risk of screw loosening in DDS involving S1, and these patients were more likely to have loosened screws if the LL failed to increase after the operation. Conclusions. The DDS screw loosening rate was overall 8.2% per screw and 20.4% per patient at more than 4 years of follow-up. Older patients, S1 involvement, and those patients who failed to gain LL postoperatively were at higher risk of screw loosening. PMID:26779532

  11. Effect of retorque on loosening torque of prosthetic screws under two levels of fit of implant-supported dentures.

    PubMed

    Spazzin, Aloísio Oro; Henrique, Guilherme Elias Pessanha; Nóbilo, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of retorque on loosening torque (Lt) of prosthetic screws in implant-supported dentures with different fit levels. Ten mandibular implant-supported dentures were fabricated and then 20 cast models were then prepared using prosthetic structures to create 2 fit levels: passive fit (Pf) and misfit (Mf). Two tightening techniques were also evaluated: initial torque only (T1); and initial torque and retorque after 10 min (T2). Gold or titanium screws were used, resulting in 4 groups to each one: Pf/T1, Pf/T2, Mf/T1, Mf/T2. The Lt was measured 24 h after the tightening torque using digital torque meter. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05), separately for each screw material. For titanium screws, no significant difference (p>0.05) was found between Pf/T1 and Pf/T2, or between Pf/T2 and Mf/T2. However, statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was found between Pf/T1 and Mf/T1, and between Mf/T1 and Mf/T2. Mf reduced the Lt using T1, while and T2 increased the Lt for Mf. Retorque and fit were shown to have no significant influence on the Lt of the gold screws. Retorque application made insignificant the misfit effect on the Lt of the titanium screws, suggesting that this procedure should be performed routinely during the screw tightening in multi-unit dentures.

  12. Effect of abutment screw length and cyclic loading on removal torque in external and internal hex implants

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Hnd Hadi; Lee, Jin-Han; Bae, Ji-Myung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of abutment screw length and cyclic loading on the removal torque (RTV) in external hex (EH) and internal hex (IH) implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty screw-retained single crowns were connected to external and internal hex implants. The prepared titanium abutment screws were classified into 8 groups based on the number of threads (n = 5 per group): EH 12.5, 6.5, 3.5, 2.5 and IH 6.5, 5, 3.5, 2.5 threads. The abutment screws were tightened with 20 Ncm torque twice with 10-minute intervals. After 5 minutes, the initial RTVs of the abutment screws were measured with a digital torque gauge (MGT12). A customized jig was constructed to apply a load along the implant long axis at the central fossa of the maxillary first molar. The post-loading RTVs were measured after 16,000 cycles of mechanical loading with 50 N at a 1-Hz frequency. Statistical analysis included one-way analysis of variance and paired t-tests. RESULTS The post-loading RTVs were significantly lower than the initial RTVs in the EH 2.5 thread and IH 2.5 thread groups (P<.05). The initial RTVs exhibited no significant differences among the 8 groups, whereas the post-loading RTVs of the EH 6.5 and EH 3.5 thread groups were higher than those of the IH 3.5 thread group (P<.05). CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this study, the external hex implants with short screw lengths were more advantageous than internal hex implants with short screw lengths in torque maintenance after cyclic loading. PMID:26949489

  13. Double-Step Image Superimposition Technique for Fabricating a Drilling Guide to Access the Abutment Screw in Implant Prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mai, Hang-Nga; Kim, Kyung-Rok; Lee, Du-Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Limited retrievability is a major disadvantage of cement-retained implant restorations. Despite great progress in locating the abutment screw within crowns, the existing techniques are based on prior data or prefabricated devices and require significant work. This study introduces a new procedure for fabricating a guide template to drill a screw access hole using a double-step superimposition technique that incorporates intraoral optical scanning, cone beam computed tomography, and dental design software. The double-step superimposition technique with computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacturing technology can enhance the convenience and accuracy of drilling the screw-access hole.

  14. Nonlinear contact analysis of preload in dental implant screws.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, R L; Borgersen, S E

    1995-01-01

    Clinical studies indicate that loosening or fracture of dental implant prostheses occurs in 5% to 45% of cases during the first year. The nature of loosening or displacement of prosthetic components is complex, since it involves cycling fatigue, oral fluids, and varied chewing patterns and loads. A finite element contact analysis method was used to study the load-transfer mechanism between prosthetic components caused by torque application to the threaded fasteners used for assembly. Screw elongation is achieved while allowing for elastic recovery of the screw to produce a clamping force on the fastened elements. Clamping forces were additive along the axis of the prosthetic components. When the gold retaining screw is fastened into the abutment screw, clamping force on the implant is increased at the expense of decreasing the clamping force at the abutment screw-abutment interface by 50%. Maximum tensile stresses in the screws after preload were less than 55% of the yield stress.

  15. Observations on an in-vivo failure of a titanium dental implant/abutment screw system: a case report.

    PubMed

    Manda, Marianthi G; Psyllaki, Pandora P; Tsipas, Dimitrios N; Koidis, Petros T

    2009-04-01

    Titanium and its alloys are widely used in prosthetic dentistry, due to their biocompatibility, excellent mechanical and anti-corrosion behavior. However, delayed fracture of dental prosthetics is frequently encountered. Mechanisms leading to fracture are not generic but are strongly related to the particular environmental (quality of biological fluids) and mechanical loading conditions (mastication habits, presence of prosthetic metallic/ceramic components) in the patients' oral cavity. In this study, a commercially pure titanium implant-screw system has failed after 15 years of operation in the oral cavity of an old female. The system was retrieved in three pieces: the upper part of the implant, part of the abutment screw, and the apical part of the implant to which a part of the screw was embedded. This is considered as a rare case, where the whole dental assembly was retrieved after fracture allowing the extensive fractographic analysis of the conjugate pieces and the establishment of a thorough in-vivo failure scenario. Scanning electron microscopy observations performed on all three retrieved parts indicated a synergistic effect of distinct mechanisms, which led to total failure under extrinsic common fatigue loading. The principal mechanism was the propagation of a main crack, which was previously initiated in the body of the implant and affected by a wedging mechanism due to Ca/P aggregates developed within the crack. Because of the strong fixation between the implant and the abutment screw, this main crack was transferred to the latter causing eventually total failure of the assembly.

  16. Evaluation of stability of interface between CCM (Co-Cr-Mo) UCLA abutment and external hex implant

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ki-Joon; Park, Young-Bum; Choi, Hyunmin; Cho, Youngsung; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study is to evaluate the stability of interface between Co-Cr-Mo (CCM) UCLA abutment and external hex implant. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixteen external hex implant fixtures were assigned to two groups (CCM and Gold group) and were embedded in molds using clear acrylic resin. Screw-retained prostheses were constructed using CCM UCLA abutment and Gold UCLA abutment. The external implant fixture and screw-retained prostheses were connected using abutment screws. After the abutments were tightened to 30 Ncm torque, 5 kg thermocyclic functional loading was applied by chewing simulator. A target of 1.0 × 106 cycles was applied. After cyclic loading, removal torque values were recorded using a driving torque tester, and the interface between implant fixture and abutment was evaluated by scanning electronic microscope (SEM). The means and standard deviations (SD) between the CCM and Gold groups were analyzed with independent t-test at the significance level of 0.05. RESULTS Fractures of crowns, abutments, abutment screws, and fixtures and loosening of abutment screws were not observed after thermocyclic loading. There were no statistically significant differences at the recorded removal torque values between CCM and Gold groups (P>.05). SEM analysis revealed that remarkable wear patterns were observed at the abutment interface only for Gold UCLA abutments. Those patterns were not observed for other specimens. CONCLUSION Within the limit of this study, CCM UCLA abutment has no statistically significant difference in the stability of interface with external hex implant, compared with Gold UCLA abutment. PMID:28018564

  17. An esthetic solution for single-implant restorations - type III porcelain veneer bonded to a screw-retained custom abutment: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Magne, Pascal; Magne, Michel; Jovanovic, Sascha A

    2008-01-01

    A new esthetic solution to restore dental implants in combination with limited interdental, facial or labial, or interocclusal space is presented. This article describes the translational application of novel-design porcelain veneers and adhesive restorative principles in the implant realm. A patient is presented who was treated with a single implant-supported restoration replacing a missing mandibular lateral incisor and partially collapsed interdental space. A screw-retained custom metal ceramic abutment was combined with a bonded porcelain restoration. This unique design was motivated by the limited restorative space and subgingival implant shoulder. It was also developed as a solution to the interference of the screw-access channel with the incisal edge, therefore providing the surgeon with more options during implant axis selection. The porcelain-to-porcelain adhesive approach was used instead of traditional principles of retention and resistance form of the abutment.

  18. Adjacent-Level Hypermobility and Instrumented-Level Fatigue Loosening With Titanium and PEEK Rods for a Pedicle Screw System: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Aakas; Ingels, Marcel; Kodigudla, Manoj; Momeni, Narjes; Goel, Vijay; Agarwal, Anand K

    2016-05-01

    Adjacent-level disease is a common iatrogenic complication seen among patients undergoing spinal fusion for low back pain. This is attributed to the postsurgical differences in stiffness between the spinal levels, which result in abnormal forces, stress shielding, and hypermobility at the adjacent levels. In addition, as most patients undergoing these surgeries are osteoporotic, screw loosening at the index level is a complication that commonly accompanies adjacent-level disease. Recent studies indicate that a rod with lower rigidity than that of titanium may help to overcome these detrimental effects at the adjacent level. The present study was conducted in vitro using 12 L1-S1 specimens divided into groups of six, with each group instrumented with either titanium rods or PEEK (polyetheretherketone) rods. The test protocol included subjecting intact specimens to pure moments of 10 Nm in extension and flexion using an FS20 Biomechanical Spine Test System (Applied Test Systems) followed by hybrid moments on the instrumented specimens to achieve the same L1-S1 motion as that of the intact specimens. During the protocol's later phase, the L4-L5 units from each specimen were segmented for cyclic loading followed by postfatigue kinematic analysis to highlight the differences in motion pre- and postfatigue. The objectives included the in vitro comparison of (1) the adjacent-level motion before and after instrumentation with PEEK and titanium rods and (2) the pre- and postfatigue motion at the instrumented level with PEEK and titanium rods. The results showed that the adjacent levels above the instrumentation caused increased flexion and extension with both PEEK and titanium rods. The postfatigue kinematic data showed that the motion at the instrumented level (L4-L5) increased significantly in both flexion and extension compared to prefatigue motion in titanium groups. However, there was no significant difference in motion between the pre- and postfatigue data in the PEEK

  19. Long-term cumulative survival and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos Implants: focus on the abutment neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the cumulative survival rate (CSR) and mechanical complications of single-tooth Ankylos® implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS This was a retrospective clinical study that analyzed 450 single Ankylos® implants installed in 275 patients between December 2005 and December 2012. The main outcomes were survival results CSR and implant failure) and mechanical complications (screw loosening, fracture, and cumulative fracture rate [CFR]). The main outcomes were analyzed according to age, sex, implant length or diameter, bone graft, arch, and position. RESULTS The 8-year CSR was 96.9%. Thirteen (2.9%) implants failed because of early osseointegration failure in 3, marginal bone loss in 6, and abutment fracture in 4. Screw loosening occurred in 10 implants (2.2%), and 10 abutment fractures occurred. All abutment fractures were located in the neck, and concurrent screw fractures were observed. The CSR and rate of screw loosening did not differ significantly according to factors. The CFR was higher in middle-aged patients (5.3% vs 0.0% in younger and older patients); for teeth in a molar position (5.8% vs 0.0% for premolar or 1.1% for anterior position); and for larger-diameter implants (4.5% for 4.5 mm and 6.7% for 5.5 mm diameter vs 0.5% for 3.5 mm diameter) (all P<.05). CONCLUSION The Ankylos® implant is suitable for single-tooth restoration in Koreans. However, relatively frequent abutment fractures (2.2%) were observed and some fractures resulted in implant failures. Middle-aged patients, the molar position, and a large implant diameter were associated with a high incidence of abutment fracture. PMID:26813443

  20. Effects of different abutment connection designs on the stress distribution around five different implants: a 3-dimensional finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Balik, Ali; Karatas, Meltem Ozdemir; Keskin, Haluk

    2012-09-01

    The stability of the bone-implant interface is required for the long-term favorable clinical outcome of implant-supported prosthetic rehabilitation. The implant failures that occur after the functional loading are mainly related to biomechanical factors. Micro movements and vibrations due to occlusal forces can lead to mechanical complications such as loosening of the screw and fractures of the abutment or implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the strain distributions in the connection areas of different implant-abutment connection systems under similar loading conditions. Five different implant-abutment connection designs from 5 different manufacturers were evaluated in this study. The investigation was performed with software using the finite element method. The geometrical modeling of the implant systems was done with CATIA virtual design software. The MSC NASTRAN solver and PATRAN postprocessing program were used to perform the linear static solution. According to the analysis, the implant-abutment connection system with external hexagonal connection showed the highest strain values, and the internal hexagonal implant-abutment connection system showed the lowest strain values. Conical + internal hexagonal and screw-in implant abutment connection interface is more successful than other systems in cases with increased vertical dimension, particularly in the posterior region.

  1. THE INFLUENCE OF SCREW TYPE, ALLOY AND CYLINDER POSITION ON THE MARGINAL FIT OF IMPLANT FRAMEWORKS BEFORE AND AFTER LASER WELDING

    PubMed Central

    Castilio, Daniela; Pedreira, Ana Paula Ribeiro do Vale; Rossetti, Paulo Henrique Orlato; Rossetti, Leylha Maria Nunes; Bonachela, Wellington Cardoso

    2006-01-01

    Misfit at the abutment-prosthetic cylinder interface can cause loss of preload, leading to loosening or fracture of gold and titanium screws. Objectives: To evaluate the influence of screw type, alloy, and cylinder position on marginal fit of implant frameworks before and after laser welding. Methods: After Estheticone-like abutments were screwed to the implants, thirty plastic prosthetic cylinders were mounted and waxed-up to fifteen cylindrical bars. Each specimen had three interconnected prosthetic components. Five specimens were one-piece cast in titanium and five in cobalt-chromium alloy. On each specimen, tests were conducted with hexagonal titanium and slotted gold screws separately, performing a total of thirty tested screws. Measurements at the interfaces were performed using an optical microscope with 5 μm accuracy. After sectioning, specimens were laser welded and new measurements were obtained. Data were submitted to a four-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparisons test (α =0.05). Results: Slotted and hexagonal screws did not present significant differences regarding to the fit of cylinders cast in titanium, either in one-piece casting framework or after laser welding. When slotted and hexagonal screws were tested on the cobalt-chromium specimens, statistically significant differences were found for the one-piece casting condition, with the slotted screws presenting better fit (24.13μm) than the hexagonal screws (27.93 μm). Besides, no statistically significant differences were found after laser welding. Conclusions: 1) The use of different metal alloys do exert influence on the marginal fit, 2) The slotted and hexagonal screws play the exclusive role of fixing the prosthesis, and did not improve the fit of cylinders, and 3) cylinder position did not affect marginal fit values. PMID:19089035

  2. Fixation Strength of Caudal Pedicle Screws after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion with the Modified Cortical Bone Trajectory Screw Method

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Toshitada; Yamashita, Tomoya; Kuroda, Yusuke; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Clinical case series. Purpose In the posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedure in our institute, the cephalad screw trajectory follows a mediolateral and caudocephalad directed path according to the original cortical bone trajectory (CBT) method. However, the starting point of the caudal screw is at the medial border of the pedicle on an articular surface of the superior articular process, and the trajectory takes a mediolateral path parallel to the cephalad endplate. The incidence of caudal screw loosening after PLIF with this modified CBT screw method was investigated, and significant risk factors for caudal screw loosening were evaluated. Overview of Literature A biomechanical study of this modified caudal screw trajectory using the finite element method reported about a 20% increase in uniaxial yield pullout load compared with the traditional trajectory. However, there has been no clinical study concerning the fixation strength of this modified caudal screw trajectory. Methods The subjects were 193 consecutive patients who underwent single-level PLIF with modified CBT screw fixation. Caudal screw loosening was checked in computed tomography at 6 months after surgery, and screw loosening was defined as a radiolucency of 1 mm or more at the bone-screw interface. Results The incidence of caudal screw loosening after lumbosacral PLIF (46.2%) was significantly higher than that after floating PLIF (6.0%). No significant differences in sex, brand of the instruments, and diameter and length of the caudal screw were evident between patients with and without caudal screw loosening. Patients with caudal screw loosening were significantly older at the time of surgery than patients without caudal screw loosening. Conclusions Fixation strength of the caudal screw after floating PLIF with this modified CBT screw technique was sufficiently acceptable. Fixation strength after the lumbosacral procedure was not. PMID:27559442

  3. Effect of mechanical cycling on screw torque in external hexagon implants with and without platform switching.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Bruno Andrade Cantharino; Vedovatto, Eduardo; de Carvalho, Paulo Sérgio Perri; Mazaro, José Vitor Quinelli; Falcón-Antenucci, Rosse Mary

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of mechanical cycling on the torque of retaining screw in external hexagon implants with platform switching (PS), regular platform (RP) and wide platform (WP). A total of 30 specimens were equally divided into 3 groups: PS, PR and WP. Each specimen was prepared with implants: 3.75 x 10 mm for RP group and 5.0x10 mm for PS and WP groups and its respective abutment with 32 Ncm torque. All groups were subjected to 106 cycles with 100 N (corresponding to about 40 months of chewing). The results were obtained with the reverse torque of each specimen and data were evaluated using ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). The PS group showed statistically significant difference in screw removal torque (30.06±5.42) compared with RP (23.75±2.76) and WP (21.32±3.53) (p<0.05) groups; the RP and WP groups showed no statistically significant difference between them. It was concluded that the PS group showed higher reverse torque value, suggesting lower susceptibility of the abutment screw loosening.

  4. Passage of an Anterior Odontoid Screw through Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, L.; Brückmann, C. I.; Gilg, M. M.; Bratschitsch, G.; Radl, R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Anterior screw fixation has become a popular surgical treatment method for instable odontoid fractures. Screw loosening and migration are a rare, severe complication following anterior odontoid fixation, which can lead to esophagus perforation and requires revision operation. Methods. We report a case of screw loosening and migration after anterior odontoid fixation, which perforated the esophagus and was excreted without complications in a 78-year-old male patient. Results. A ventral dislocated anterior screw perforated through the esophagus after eight years after implantation and was excreted through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. At a 6-month follow-up after the event the patient was asymptomatic. Conclusion. Extrusion via the GI tract is not safe enough to be considered as a treatment option for loosened screws. Some improvements could be implemented to prevent such an incident. Furthermore, this case is a fine example that recent preoperative imaging is mandatory before revision surgery for screw loosening. PMID:28194180

  5. Simplified abutment tooth extrusion using a mini-implant.

    PubMed

    Kook, Yoon-Ah; Bayome, Mohamed; Kim, Seong-Hun; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Yoon-Ji; Kim, Seok-Gyu

    2010-01-01

    This is the report of a patient with an anterior four-unit fixed partial denture in whom a screw was used to extrude a too-short abutment tooth. Due to the mini-implant, fewer teeth needed to be bonded, thereby keeping more teeth out of harm's way.

  6. A 16-year study of the microgap between 272 human titanium implants and their abutments.

    PubMed

    Scarano, Antonio; Assenza, Bartolomeo; Piattelli, Maurizio; Iezzi, Giovanna; Leghissa, Giulio C; Quaranta, Alessandro; Tortora, Pietro; Piattelli, Adriano

    2005-01-01

    A microgap has been described at the level of the implant-abutment connection. This microgap can be colonized by bacteria, and this fact could have relevance on the remodeling of the peri-implant crestal bone and on the long-term health of the peri-implant tissues. The authors report on 272 implants with screw- or cement-retained abutments retrieved from humans for different causes during a 16-year period. In the implants with screw-retained abutments, a 60-microm microgap was present at the level of implant-abutment connection. In some areas the titanium had sheared off from the surface and from the internal threads. The contact between the threads of the implant and those of the abutment was limited to a few areas. Bacteria were often present in the microgaps between implant and abutment and in the internal portion of the implants. In implants with cement-retained abutments, a 40-microm microgap was found at the level of the implant-abutment connection. No mechanical damage was observed at the level of the implant or of the abutment. All the internal voids were always completely filled by the cement. No bacteria were observed in the internal portion of the implants or at the level of the microgap. The differences in the size of the microgap between the two groups were statistically significant (P < .05). In conclusion, in screw-retained abutments the microgap can be a critical factor for colonization of bacteria, whereas in cement-retained abutments all the internal spaces were filled by cement. In these retrieved implants, the size of the microgap was markedly variable and much larger than that observed in vitro.

  7. Mechanical and biological complication rates of the modified lateral-screw-retained implant prosthesis in the posterior region: an alternative to the conventional Implant prosthetic system

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The modified lateral-screw-retained implant prosthesis (LSP) is designed to combine the advantages of screw- and cement-retained implant prostheses. This retrospective study evaluated the mechanical and biological complication rates of implant-supported single crowns (ISSCs) inserted with the modified LSP in the posterior region, and determined how these complication rates are affected by clinical factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS Mechanical complications (i.e., lateral screw loosening [LSL], abutment screw loosening, lateral screw fracture, and ceramic fracture) and biological complications (i.e., peri-implant mucositis [PM] and peri-implantitis) were identified from the patients' treatment records, clinical photographs, periapical radiographs, panoramic radiographs, and clinical indices. The correlations between complication rates and the following clinical factors were determined: gender, age, position in the jaw, placement location, functional duration, clinical crown-to-implant length ratio, crown height space, and the use of a submerged or nonsubmerged placement procedure. RESULTS Mechanical and biological complications were present in 25 of 73 ISSCs with the modified LSP. LSL (n=11) and PM (n=11) were the most common complications. The incidence of mechanical complications was significantly related to gender (P=.018). The other clinical factors were not significantly associated with mechanical and biological complication rates. CONCLUSION Within the limitations of this study, the incidence of mechanical and biological complications in the posterior region was similar for both modified LSP and conventional implant prosthetic systems. In addition, the modified LSP is amenable to maintenance care, which facilitates the prevention and treatment of mechanical and biological complications. PMID:27141260

  8. Preload loss and bacterial penetration on different implant-abutment connection systems.

    PubMed

    Ricomini Filho, Antônio Pedro; Fernandes, Frederico Silva de Freitas; Straioto, Fabiana Gouveia; da Silva, Wander José; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2010-01-01

    Preload loss can favor the occurrence of implant-abutment interface misfit, and bacterial colonization at this interface may lead to implant failure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the preload loss and bacterial penetration through the implant-abutment interface of conical and external hexagon connection systems subjected to thermal cycling and mechanical fatigue (TM). Four different implant-abutment connection systems were evaluated (n=6): external hexagon with universal post, Morse taper with universal post, Morse taper with universal post through bolt, and locking taper with standard abutment. The assemblies (implant-abutment) were subjected to a thermal cycling regimen (1,000 cycles of 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C) and to mechanical fatigue (1.0 million cycles, 1.0 Hz, 120 N). The assemblies were immersed in Tryptic Soy + Yeast Extract broth containing Streptococcus sanguinis and incubated at 37 degrees C and 10% CO(2) for 72 h. Detorque values were recorded. The bacterial penetration was assessed and the abutments were observed by scanning electron microscopy. The preload data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. All screw abutment systems showed significantly higher (p<0.05) detorque values when subjected to TM and all conical systems presented bacterial penetration. The results show no relationship between the preload loss and the bacterial penetration.

  9. 17. DETAIL, WEST ABUTMENT, FROM NORTH, SHOWING CONCRETE ABUTMENT, L0 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL, WEST ABUTMENT, FROM NORTH, SHOWING CONCRETE ABUTMENT, L0 JOINT AND BEARING, AND BEARING SEAT OF WEST ABUTMENT - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  10. Mechanical behavior of single-layer ceramized zirconia abutments for dental implant prosthetic rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Melendo, Manuel; Llena-Blasco, Oriol; Bruguera, August; Llena-Blasco, Jaime; Yáñez-Vico, Rosa-María; García-Calderón, Manuel; Vaquero-Aguilar, Cristina; Velázquez-Cayón, Rocío; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was undertaken to characterize the mechanical response of bare (as-received) and single-layer ceramized zirconia abutments with both internal and external connections that have been developed to enhanced aesthetic restorations. Material and Methods: Sixteen zirconia implant abutments (ZiReal Post®, Biomet 3i, USA) with internal and external connections have been analyzed. Half of the specimens were coated with a 0.5mm-thick layer of a low-fusing fluroapatite ceramic. Mechanical tests were carried out under static (constant cross-head speed of 1mm/min until fracture) and dynamic (between 100 and 400N at a frequency of 1Hz) loading conditions. The failure location was identified by electron microscopy. The removal torque of the retaining screws after testing was also evaluated. Results: The average fracture strength was above 300N for all the abutments, regardless of connection geometry and coating. In most of the cases (94%), failure occurred by abutment fracture. No significant differences were observed either in fatigue behavior and removal torque between the different abutment groups. Conclusions: Mechanical behavior of Zireal zirconia abutments is independent of the type of internal/external connection and the presence/absence of ceramic coating. This may be clinically valuable in dental rehabilitation to improve the aesthetic outcome of zirconia-based dental implant systems. Key words:Dental implant, zirconia, ceramic structure, mechanical properties. PMID:25674313

  11. Effect of Vertical Misfit on Screw Joint Stability of Implant-Supported Crowns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Delben, Juliana Aparecida; Tabata, Lucas Fernando; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Gomes, Érica Alves

    2011-08-01

    The passive fit between prosthesis and implant is a relevant factor for screw joint stability and treatment success. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of vertical misfit in abutment-implant interface on preload maintenance of retention screw of implant-supported crowns. The crowns were fabricated with different abutments and veneering materials and divided into 5 groups ( n = 12): Gold UCLA abutments cast in gold alloy veneered with ceramic (Group I) and resin (Group II), UCLA abutments cast in titanium veneered with ceramic (Group III) and resin (Group IV), and zirconia abutments with ceramic veneering (Group V). The crowns were attached to implants by gold retention screws with 35-N cm insertion torque. Specimens were submitted to mechanical cycling up to 106 cycles. Measurements of detorque and vertical misfit in abutment-implant interface were performed before and after mechanical cycling. ANOVA revealed statistically significant difference ( P < 0.05) among groups for vertical misfit measured before and after mechanical cycling. The abutments cast in titanium exhibited the highest misfit values. Pearson correlation test did not demonstrate significant correlation ( P > 0.05) between vertical misfit and detorque value. It was concluded that vertical misfit did not influence torque maintenance and the abutments cast in titanium exhibited the highest misfit values.

  12. Minimally Invasive Technique for PMMA Augmentation of Fenestrated Screws

    PubMed Central

    Kogias, Evangelos; Sircar, Ronen; Krüger, Marie T.; Volz, Florian; Scheiwe, Christian; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To describe the minimally invasive technique for cement augmentation of cannulated and fenestrated screws using an injection cannula as well as to report its safety and efficacy. Methods. A total of 157 cannulated and fenestrated pedicle screws had been cement-augmented during minimally invasive posterior screw-rod spondylodesis in 35 patients from January to December 2012. Retrospective evaluation of cement extravasation and screw loosening was carried out in postoperative plain radiographs and thin-sliced triplanar computed tomography scans. Results. Twenty-seven, largely prevertebral cement extravasations were detected in 157 screws (17.2%). None of the cement extravasations was causing a clinical sequela like a new neurological deficit. One screw loosening was noted (0.6%) after a mean follow-up of 12.8 months. We observed no cementation-associated complication like pulmonary embolism or hemodynamic insufficiency. Conclusions. The presented minimally invasive cement augmentation technique using an injection cannula facilitates convenient and safe cement delivery through polyaxial cannulated and fenestrated screws during minimally invasive screw-rod spondylodesis. Nevertheless, the optimal injection technique and design of fenestrated screws have yet to be identified. This trial is registered with German Clinical Trials DRKS00006726. PMID:26075297

  13. A technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns in conjunction with implant surgery.

    PubMed

    McRory, M Eric; Cagna, David R

    2014-06-01

    This article presents an intraoral technique for fabricating single screw-retained implant-supported interim crowns immediately after surgical implant placement in extraction sites. The technique may be used with any implant system that provides a provisional abutment or an open-tray impression coping that can be modified for use as a provisional abutment.

  14. Thoracic Aortic Stent-Graft Placement for Safe Removal of a Malpositioned Pedicle Screw

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Hongtao; Shin, Ji Hoon Hwang, Jae-Yeon; Cho, Young Jun; Ko, Gi-Young; Yoon, Hyun-Ki

    2010-10-15

    We describe a case of percutaneous placement of a thoracic aortic stent-graft for safe removal of a malpositioned pedicle screw in a 52-year-old man. The patient had undergone posterior thoracic spinal instrumentation for pyogenic spondylitis and spinal deformity 8 months previously. Follow-up CT images showed a malpositioned pedicle screw which was abutting the thoracic aorta at the T5 level. After percutaneous stent-graft placement, the malpositioned pedicle screw was safely and successfully removed.

  15. Catalysts of plant cell wall loosening

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The growing cell wall in plants has conflicting requirements to be strong enough to withstand the high tensile forces generated by cell turgor pressure while selectively yielding to those forces to induce wall stress relaxation, leading to water uptake and polymer movements underlying cell wall expansion. In this article, I review emerging concepts of plant primary cell wall structure, the nature of wall extensibility and the action of expansins, family-9 and -12 endoglucanases, family-16 xyloglucan endotransglycosylase/hydrolase (XTH), and pectin methylesterases, and offer a critical assessment of their wall-loosening activity PMID:26918182

  16. Dynamic fatigue performance of implant-abutment assemblies with different tightening torque values.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dandan; Lin, Hong; Yuan, Shenpo; Bai, Wei; Zheng, Gang

    2014-01-01

    Implant-abutment assemblies are usually subject to long-term cyclic loading. To evaluate the dynamic fatigue performance of implant-abutment assemblies with different tightening torque values, thirty implant-abutment assemblies (Zimmer Dental, Carlsbad, CA, USA) were randomly assigned to three tightening groups (24 Ncm; 30 Ncm; 36 Ncm), each consisted of 10 implants. Five specimens from each group were unscrewed, and their reverse torque values recorded. The remaining specimens were subjected to a load between 30 N~300 N at a loading frequency of 15 Hz for 5 × 10(6) cycles. After fatigue tests, residual reverse torque values were recorded if available. In the 24 Ncm tightening group, all the implants fractured at the first outer thread of the implant after fatigue loading, with fatigue crack propagation at the fractured surface showed by SEM observation. For the 30 Ncm and 36 Ncm tightening groups, a statistical significant difference (p<0.05) between the unloaded and loaded groups was revealed. Compared with the unloaded specimens, the specimens went through fatigue loading had decreased reverse torque values. It was demonstrated that insufficient torque will lead to poor fatigue performance of dental implant-abutment assemblies and abutment screws should be tightened to the torque recommended by the manufacturer. It was also concluded that fatigue loading would lead to preload loss.

  17. Spline-Screw Payload-Fastening System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Payload handed off securely between robot and vehicle or structure. Spline-screw payload-fastening system includes mating female and male connector mechanisms. Clockwise (or counter-clockwise) rotation of splined male driver on robotic end effector causes connection between robot and payload to tighten (or loosen) and simultaneously causes connection between payload and structure to loosen (or tighten). Includes mechanisms like those described in "Tool-Changing Mechanism for Robot" (GSC-13435) and "Self-Aligning Mechanical and Electrical Coupling" (GSC-13430). Designed for use in outer space, also useful on Earth in applications needed for secure handling and secure mounting of equipment modules during storage, transport, and/or operation. Particularly useful in machine or robotic applications.

  18. Comparison of the fracture resistance of dental implants with different abutment taper angles.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Geng, Jianping; Jones, David; Xu, Wei

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of abutment taper angles on the fracture strength of dental implants with TIS (taper integrated screwed-in) connection. Thirty prototype cylindrical titanium alloy 5.0mm-diameter dental implants with different TIS-connection designs were divided into six groups and tested for their fracture strength, using a universal testing machine. These groups consisted of combinations of 3.5 and 4.0 mm abutment diameter, each with taper angles of 6°, 8° or 10°. 3-Dimensional finite element analysis (FEA) was also used to analyze stress states at implant-abutment connection areas. In general, the mechanical tests found an increasing trend of implant fracture forces as the taper angle enlarged. When the abutment diameter was 3.5 mm, the mean fracture forces for 8° and 10° taper groups were 1638.9 N ± 20.3 and 1577.1 N ± 103.2, respectively, both larger than that for the 6° taper group of 1475.0 N ± 24.4, with the largest increasing rate of 11.1%. Furthermore, the difference between 8° and 6° taper groups was significant, based on Tamhane's multiple comparison test (P<0.05). In 4.0 mm-diameter abutment groups, as the taper angle was enlarged from 6° to 8° and 10°, the mean fracture value was increased from 1066.7 N ± 56.1 to 1241.4 N ± 6.4 and 1419.3 N ± 20.0, with the largest increasing rate of 33.1%, and the differences among the three groups were significant (P<0.05). The FEA results showed that stress values varied in implants with different abutment taper angles and supported the findings of the static tests. In conclusion, increases of the abutment taper angle could significantly increase implant fracture resistance in most cases established in the study, which is due to the increased implant wall thickness in the connection part resulting from the taper angle enlargement. The increasing effects were notable when a thin implant wall was present to accommodate wide abutments.

  19. An in vivo assessment of the effects of using different implant abutment occluding materials on implant microleakage and the peri-implant microbiome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, Caroline

    Microleakage may be a factor in the progression of peri-implant pathology. Microleakage in implant dentistry refers to the passage of bacteria, fluids, molecules or ions between the abutment-implant interface to and from the surrounding periodontal tissues. This creates a zone of inflammation and reservoir of bacteria at the implant-abutment interface. Bone loss typically occurs within the first year of abutment connection and then stabilizes. It has not yet been definitively proven that the occurrence of microleakage cannot contribute to future bone loss or impede the treatment of peri-implant disease. Therefore, strategies to reduce or eliminate microleakage are sought out. Recent evidence demonstrates that the type of implant abutment channel occluding material can affect the amount of microleakage in an in vitro study environment. Thus, we hypothesize that different abutment screw channel occluding materials will affect the amount of observed microleakage, vis-a-vis the correlation between the microflora found on the abutment screw channel occluding material those found in the peri-implant sulcus. Additional objectives include confirming the presence of microleakage in vivo and assessing any impact that different abutment screw channel occluding materials may have on the peri-implant microbiome. Finally, the present study provides an opportunity to further characterize the peri-implant microbiome. Eight fully edentulous patients restored with at dental implants supporting screw-retained fixed hybrid prostheses were included in the study. At the initial appointment (T1), the prostheses were removed and the implants and prostheses were cleaned. The prostheses were then inserted with polytetrafluoroethylene tape (PTFE, TeflonRTM), cotton, polyvinyl siloxane (PVS), or synthetic foam as the implant abutment channel occluding material and sealed over with composite resin. About six months later (T2), the prostheses were removed and the materials collected. Paper

  20. Implant Fixture Heat Transfer During Abutment Preparation.

    PubMed

    Aleisa, Khalil; Alkeraidis, Abdullah; Al-Dwairi, Ziad Nawaf; Altahawi, Hamdi; Lynch, Edward

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of water flow rate on the heat transmission in implants during abutment preparation using a diamond bur in a high-speed dental turbine. Titanium-alloy abutments (n = 32) were connected to a titanium-alloy implant embedded in an acrylic resin within a water bath at a controlled temperature of 37°C. The specimens were equally distributed into 2 groups (16 each) according to the water flow rate used during the preparation phase. Group 1 had a water flow rate of 24 mL/min, and group 2 had a water flow rate of 40 mL/min. Each abutment was prepared in the axial plane for 1 minute and in the occlusal plane for 1 minute with a coarse tapered diamond bur using a high-speed dental handpiece. Thermocouples embedded at the cervix of the implant surface were used to record the temperature of heat transmission from the abutment preparation. Heat generation was measured at 3 distinct times (immediately and 30 seconds and 60 seconds after the end of preparation). Statistical analyses were carried out using 2-way analysis of variance and the Student t test. Water flow rates (24 mL vs 40 mL) and time interval had no statistically significant effect on the implant's temperature change during the abutment preparation stage (P = .431 and P = .064, respectively). Increasing the water flow rate from 24 to 40 mL/min had no influence on the temperature of the implant fixture recorded during preparation of the abutment.

  1. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant abutment. 872.3630... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic...

  2. 6. View of east side abutment and wing wall. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View of east side abutment and wing wall. The detail of this abutment and wing wall is the same for the similar abutment treatment at the west side. - Tipp-Elizabeth Road Bridge, Spanning Great Miami River, Tipp City, Miami County, OH

  3. Cell Wall Loosening in the Fungus, Phycomyces blakesleeanus

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Joseph K. E.; Truong, Jason T.; Munoz, Cindy M.; Ramirez, David G.

    2015-01-01

    A considerable amount of research has been conducted to determine how cell walls are loosened to produce irreversible wall deformation and expansive growth in plant and algal cells. The same cannot be said about fungal cells. Almost nothing is known about how fungal cells loosen their walls to produce irreversible wall deformation and expansive growth. In this study, anoxia is used to chemically isolate the wall from the protoplasm of the sporangiophores of Phycomyces blakesleeanus. The experimental results provide direct evidence of the existence of chemistry within the fungal wall that is responsible for wall loosening, irreversible wall deformation and elongation growth. In addition, constant-tension extension experiments are conducted on frozen-thawed sporangiophore walls to obtain insight into the wall chemistry and wall loosening mechanism. It is found that a decrease in pH to 4.6 produces creep extension in the frozen-thawed sporangiophore wall that is similar, but not identical, to that found in frozen-thawed higher plant cell walls. Experimental results from frozen-thawed and boiled sporangiophore walls suggest that protein activity may be involved in the creep extension. PMID:27135318

  4. Stability of the prosthetic screws of three types of craniofacial prostheses retention systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the stability of prosthetic screws from three types of craniofacial prostheses retention systems (bar-clip, ball/O-ring, and magnet) when submitted to mechanical cycling. Materials and Methods Twelve models of acrylic resin were used with implants placed 20 mm from each other and separated into three groups: (1) bar-clip (Sistema INP, São Paulo, Brazil), (2) ball/O-ring (Sistema INP), and (3) magnet (Metalmag, São Paulo, Brazil), with four samples in each group. Each sample underwent a mechanical cycling removal and insertion test (f=0.5 Hz) to determine the torque and the detorque values of the retention screws. A servo-hydraulic MTS machine (810-Flextest 40; MTS Systems, Eden Prairie, MN, USA) was used to perform the cycling with 2.5 mm and a displacement of 10 mm/s. The screws of the retention systems received an initial torque of 30 Ncm and the torque values required for loosening the screw values were obtained in three cycles (1,080, 2,160, and 3,240). The screws were retorqued to 30 Ncm before each new cycle. Results The sample was composed of 24 screws grouped as follows: bar-clip (n=8), ball/O-ring (n=8), and magnet (n=8). There were significant differences between the groups, with greater detorque values observed in the ball/O-ring group when compared to the bar-clip and magnet groups for the first cycle. However, the detorque value was greater in the bar-clip group for the second cycle. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that all prosthetic screws will loosen slightly after an initial tightening torque, also the bar-clip retention system demonstrated greater loosening of the screws when compared with ball/O-ring and magnet retention systems. PMID:28053905

  5. Cemented and screw-retained implant-supported single-tooth restorations in the molar mandibular region: A retrospective comparison study after an observation period of 1 to 4 years

    PubMed Central

    Peñarrocha-Diago, Miguel; Pradíes, Guillermo; Sola-Ruiz, María-Fernanda; Agustín-Panadero, Rubén

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival and compare the appearance of different mechanical and biological complications, in screw-retained and cemented-retained single-tooth implant-supported restorations localized in the molar mandibular region, over a period of 1 to 4 years. Material and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out with a total of eighty implant-supported restorations, which were placed in eighty patients for prosthetic rehabilitation of a mandibular molar. Forty patients were rehabilitated with a cemented-retained restoration and the other forty with a screw-retained restoration. The presence of the following complications was recorded for both types of prostheses: Fractures of the ceramic veneering, loosening screws, mucositis and peri-implantitis. Debonding of the restoration was analyzed in the cemented-retained restoration group. The clinical survival of crowns was analyzed with a Kaplan-Meier test and the clinical complications were compared, using a Student t test and Log-rank test. Results: 27 patients registered some complication. The average rate of complications was 37,5% for cemented-retained restorations and 30% for screw-retained restorations. The complications more common in the cemented-retained restoration were the presence of mucositis (14,87%), while in the screw-retained restorations was the loosening screw (20%). Student t test and Log-Rank test found significant differences (p=0,001) between the screw loosening and presence of mucositis. Conclusions: The cemented-retained restorations seem to prevent screw loosening, but the presence of cement seem to increase the complications around the soft tissues, however in the screw-retained restorations the presence of mucositis and peri-implantitis are lower than cemented-retained restorations. The incidence of fracture of ceramic veneering was similar in both groups. Key words:Screw-retained restorations, cemented-retained restorations, screw loosening

  6. Mechanical properties of resin glass fiber-reinforced abutment in comparison to titanium abutment

    PubMed Central

    Andreasi Bassi, Mirko; Bedini, Rossella; Pecci, Raffella; Ioppolo, Pietro; Lauritano, Dorina; Carinci, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: So far, definitive implant abutments have been performed with high elastic modulus materials, which prevented any type of shock absorption of the chewing loads and as a consequence, the protection of the bone-fixture interface. This is particularly the case when the esthetic restorative material chosen is ceramic rather than composite resin. The adoption of an anisotropic abutment, characterized by an elastic deformability, could allow decreasing the impulse of chewing forces transmitted to the crestal bone. Materials and Methods: According to research protocol, the mechanical resistance to cyclical load was evaluated in a tooth-colored fiber-reinforced abutment (TCFRA) prototype and compared to that of a titanium abutment (TA), thus eight TCFRAs and eight TAs were adhesively cemented on as many titanium implants. The swinging that the two types of abutments showed during the application of sinusoidal load was also analyzed. Results: In the TA group, both fracture and deformation occurred in 12.5% of samples while debonding 62.5%. In the TCFRA group, only debonding was present in 37.5% of samples. In comparison to the TAs, the TCFRAs exhibited a greater swinging during the application of sinusoidal load. In the TA group, the extrusion prevailed, whereas in the TCFRA group, the intrusion was more frequent. Conclusion: The greater elasticity of TCFRA to the flexural load allows absorbing part of the transversal load applied on the fixture during the chewing function, thus reducing the stress on the bone-implant interface. PMID:26229266

  7. The suitability of head-of-implant and conventional abutment impression techniques for implant-retained three unit bridges: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, David W; Greenwood, Russell; Howe, Leslie

    2002-12-01

    This study compares the accuracy of master casts produced from impressions of implants using an abutment or a head-of-implant technique. The method used a Tandem Scanning Confocal Microscope to measure the dimensions of the gap between master casts produced by the two impression techniques and a custom made bridge. The median gap of 14 microns (interquartile range 10-17.9 microns) on the non-screwed side of the abutment impression was greater than the median gap of 7.5 microns (5-17.6 microns) for the head-of-implant impression and this difference was statistically significant (P < 0.005). In addition, the median gap on the screwed down side of the abutment impression of 10 microns, (6.3-12.1 microns) was greater than that of the head-of-implant of 5.5 microns (0.0-8.0 microns) and this difference was also statistically significant (P < 0.001). The head-of-implant impression produced a more accurate fit than the conventional abutment impression.

  8. [Particle disease--aseptic loosening of the total hip endoprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Kolundzić, Robert; Orlić, Dubravko

    2008-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) improves the ability and quality of life in patients with hip dysfunction due to different causes. Aseptic loosening is the major cause of the late hip endoprosthesis failure. It results from aseptic inflammatory reaction induced by the implant wear debris accumulating at the prosthesis interface, and is mediated by numerous cellular and humoral factors. Due to presence of wear debris we call aseptic loosening of the total hip endoprosthesis as "particle disease". In the most important of factors affecting the risk of aseptic instability include patient's age, sex, body mass index, underlying morbidity (reason for THA), endoprosthetic material and surgeon's skill. However, taken together, all these factors explain only a minor part of variability of this phenomenon. Factors that are decisive for the occurrence of aseptic instability are still largely unknown. The existence of "individual disposition" for development of aseptic instability that is not determined by demographic or biomechanical factors is well recognized.

  9. Development of Anti-Loosening Performance of Hyper Lock Nut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shuji; Migita, Hiroaki; Kataoka, Mitumasa; Nakasaki, Nobuyuki; Murano, Kohshi

    Bolted joints are widely used in mechanical structures as they allow easy disassembly for maintenance without high cost. However, vibration-induced loosening due to dynamic loading remains a long-unresolved issue. We have developed a new type of nut named the hyper lock nut (HLN) that offers anti-loosening performance without a complicated tightening process and tools. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of joints bolted with the HLN, and tightening behavior was analyzed using the three-dimensional finite element method. The analytical results were compared with the experimental results for the HLN, and close qualitative agreement was observed between the two with respect to displacement, tightening force and tightening torque. We found a number of new aspects and plus points for joints bolted with the HLN in comparison to those fastened with JIS standard nuts. It was found that the tightening torque of the HLN is higher than that of JIS standard nuts, and that satisfactory anti-loosening performance can be realized through the thread contact force at the slit region and the angular face of the bearing surface.

  10. 6. SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT AT CALVERT STREET, SHOWING LEON HERMANT ALLEGORICAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT AT CALVERT STREET, SHOWING LEON HERMANT ALLEGORICAL RELIEF OF TRANSPORTATION BY AUTOMOBILE - Calvert Street Bridge, Spanning Rock Creek & Potomac Parkway, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  11. Structural details below roadway, looking north from south abutment. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Structural details below roadway, looking north from south abutment. - Pleasantville Covered Bridge, Spanning Little Manatawny Creek at Covered Bridge Road (State Route 1030), Manatawny, Berks County, PA

  12. Apparatus for connecting aligned abutted tubes

    DOEpatents

    Williams, R.E.

    1984-11-29

    An apparatus for connecting abutted tubes and for maintaining their rotary alignment during connection. The apparatus comprises first and second tubes, a rotation prevention element, a collar and a retainer. Each tube has inside and outside walls, and first and second ends, each end having an inside and outside edge. The first tube has portions defining a first plurality of cavities located at the outside edge of its first end. An external threaded portion is on the outside wall of the first tube and next to the first plurality of cavities. The second tube has portions defining a second plurality of cavities located at the outside edge of its first end. The first plurality has a different number than the second plurality. The first ends of the first and second tubes have substantially the same outside diameter and are abutted during connection so that an orifice is formed whenever first and second tube cavities substantially overlap. A rotation prevension element is placed in the orifice to prevent rotation of the first and second tubes. A collar with an internal threaded portion is slidably disposed about the second tube. The internal threaded portion engages the external threaded portion of the first tube to connect the tubes. A lip connected to the collar prevents separation of the collar from the second tube.

  13. 23. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM AND TOWARD LEFT ABUTMENT OF DAM. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. VIEW LOOKING UPSTREAM AND TOWARD LEFT ABUTMENT OF DAM. NOTE FORMS FOR LEFT GRAVITY ABUTMENT AT UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF PICTURE. ARCHES 3, 4, 5, AND 7 COMPLETED TO ELEVATION 1795. 5 OR 7.5 FEET BELOW TOP OF PARAPET WALL. November 29, 1938 - Bartlett Dam, Verde River, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component directly connected to the endosseous dental implant and is intended for use as an aid in...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component directly connected to the endosseous dental implant and is intended for use as an aid in...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component directly connected to the endosseous dental implant and is intended for use as an aid in...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3630 - Endosseous dental implant abutment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3630 Endosseous dental implant abutment. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant abutment is a premanufactured prosthetic component directly connected to the endosseous dental implant and is intended for use as an aid in...

  18. Role of cytokines in gonarthrosis and knee prosthesis aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Loria, Maria Paola; Dambra, Porzia; Moretti, Biagio; Patella, Vittorio; Capuzzimati, Laura; Cavallo, Elsa; Nettis, Eustachio; Pesce, Vito; Dell'Osso, Adriana; Simone, Carmelo; Tursi, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    Cytokines, which have been demonstrated in synovial fluids during various joint diseases, play an important role in mediating synovial inflammation and in regulating the immune response of many inflammatory processes. We studied synovial fluid, serum, and synovial fragments obtained from 33 patients--10 affected by serious gonarthrosis re-quiring a prosthetic implant, 8 with knee prosthesis aseptic loosening, and (as controls) 15 affected by degenerative meniscopathies--to evaluate the degree of inflammation and level of interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10) and interferon gamma secretion. Histological analysis revealed slightly more infiltration by inflammatory cells in the synovial tissue of patients with gonarthrosis and knee prosthesis aseptic loosening than in that of the control group, with a high prevalence of macrophages. Moreover, we observed enhanced production of the studied cytokines, especially in synovial fluid as compared to serum, indicating that in the pathological conditions examined the inflammatory events are mainly localized. Because the role of these cytokines is to modulate inflammation, better knowledge of the involvement of cells and their soluble mediators in articular damage could guide immunomodulating treatment.

  19. An intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire: an aid for facial bone fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Good; Yoo, Roh-Eul; Chang, Hak; Kwon, Sung-Tack; Baek, Rong-Min; Minn, Kyung-Won

    2009-07-01

    We have devised a new technique to improve stabilization of fractured facial bone fractures (frontal sinus fractures, zygomatic fractures, mandibular condyle fractures) by intermaxillary fixation screw traction wires (stainless steel wires through intermaxillary fixation screws). A retrospective study evaluating intermaxillary fixation screw traction wires was performed. We have used this technique for 3 cases of frontal sinus fractures, 9 cases of zygomatic fractures, and 7 cases of mandibular condyle fractures. After dissection of a fractured site, a hole is drilled on the fractured bone where it does not interfere with positioning the plate across the fracture line. After an intermaxillary fixation screw is inserted, a stainless steel wire is tied through a hole in the screw head. By the aid of wire for traction, the displaced fractured bone is easily aligned to the proper position. Plates and screws are applied readily on the predetermined area. A retrospective study on 19 patients using intermaxillary fixation screw traction wires was performed. The diagnoses and associated complications of the cases were recorded. No associated complication as a result of using this technique was identified. The use of intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire enhances stabilization and visualization without possible risk for surrounding soft tissue injury using, a sharp traction device like a bone hook. An intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire is an useful aid for visualization and stabilization during facial bone fracture reduction, particularly where exposure is difficult such as in the condylar region of the mandible. And unlike a classic traction wire, the intermaxillary fixation screw traction wire has almost no risk of having it loosened from the screw.

  20. Non-Radiological Method for Fabrication of a Screw-Channel Drilling Guide in Cement-Retained Implant Restorations Using Intraoral Digital Scanning and Imaging Superimposition: A Clinical Report.

    PubMed

    Mai, Hang-Nga; Kim, Kyung-Rok; Lee, Du-Hyeong

    2017-01-01

    The difficulty of retrieving the abutment screw is a major disadvantage of cement-retained implant restorations. Conventional methods for locating the screw-access hole are based largely on radiography or manual labor, which limits accuracy and clinical feasibility. This clinical report describes a non-radiological method for fabricating an accurate drilling guide for location of the screw channel using intraoral optical scanning, 3D superimposition, and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technologies. The present technique not only improves the guide fabrication process and the accuracy of screw-channel drilling, but also has wide indications for implant restorations.

  1. Accuracy combining different brands of implants and abutments

    PubMed Central

    Selva-Otaolaurruchi, Eduardo; Senent-Vicente, Gisela; González-de-Cossio, Inés; Amigó-Borrás, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the vertical misfit between different brands of dental implants and prosthetic abutments, with or without mechanical torque, and to study their possible combination. Study design: Five different brands of implant were used in the study: Biofit (Castemaggiore, Italy), Bioner S.A. (Barcelona, Spain), 3i Biomet (Palm Beach, U.S.A.), BTI (Alava, Spain) and Nobel Biocare (Göteborg, Sweden), with standard 4.1 mm heads and external hexagons, and their respective machined prosthetic abutments. The implant-to-abutment fit/misfit was evaluated at four points (vestibular, lingual/palatine, mesial and distal) between implants and abutments of the same brand and different brands, with or without mechanical torque, using SEM micrographs at 5000X. Image analysis was performed using NIS-Elements software (Nikon Instruments Europe B.V.). Results: Before applying torque, vertical misfit (microgaps) of the different combinations tested varied between 1.6 and 5.4 microns and after applying torque, between 0.9 and 5.9 microns, an overall average of 3.46±2.96 microns. For manual assembly without the use of mechanical torque, the best results were obtained with the combination of the 3i implant and the BTI abutment. The Nobel implant and Nobel abutment, 3i-3i and BTI-BTI and the combination of 3i implant with BTI or Nobel abutment provided the best vertical fit when mechanical torque was applied. Conclusions: The vertical fits obtained were within the limits considered clinically acceptable. The application of mechanical torque improved outcomes. There is compatibility between implants and abutments of different brand and so their combination is a clinical possibility. Key words:Vertical fit, implant, prosthetic abutment, combination. PMID:23229250

  2. Prosthetic management of malpositioned implant using custom cast abutment

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Aishwarya; Ragher, Mallikarjuna; Patil, Sanket; Chatterjee, Debopriya; Dandekeri, Savita; Prabhu, Vishnu

    2015-01-01

    Two cases are reported with malpositioned implants. Both the implants were placed 6–7 months back. They had osseointegrated well with the surrounding bone. However, they presented severe facial inclination. Case I was restored with custom cast abutment with an auto polymerizing acrylic gingival veneer. Case II was restored with custom cast UCLA type plastic implant abutment. Ceramic was directly fired on the custom cast abutments. The dual treatment strategy resulted in functional and esthetic restorations despite facial malposition of the implants. PMID:26538957

  3. Allergic contact stomatitis caused by a titanium nitride-coated implant abutment: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Pil; Lee, Kwang-Min; Koh, Young-Il; Park, Sang-Won

    2012-10-01

    A patient developed contact mucositis after being treated with a titanium nitride implant abutment. Patch testing disclosed a positive reaction to titanium nitride. After removal of the titanium nitride-coated abutment and placement of an uncoated abutment, all signs and symptoms disappeared. This clinical report suggests that titanium nitride-coated abutments may be a potential allergen in some patients.

  4. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  5. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Compliant Ball Screw Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is adapted to receive an input torque and in response rotates and supplies a drive force. The ball screw extends through the ball nut and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw receives the drive force from the ball nut and in response selectively translates between a retract position and a extend position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw proximate the first end to translate therewith. The ball screw stop engages the ball nut when the ball screw is in the extend position, translates, with compliance, a predetermined distance toward the first end upon engaging the ball nut, and prevents further rotation of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  6. Does screw-bone interface modelling matter in finite element analyses?

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Alisdair R; Pankaj, Pankaj; Simpson, A Hamish R W

    2012-06-01

    The effect of screw-bone interface modelling strategies was evaluated in the setting of a tibial mid-shaft fracture stabilised using locking plates. Three interface models were examined: fully bonded interface; screw with sliding contact with bone; and screw with sliding contact with bone in an undersized pilot hole. For the simulation of the last interface condition we used a novel thermal expansion approach to generate the pre-stress that the bone would be exposed to during screw insertion. The study finds that the global load-deformation response is not influenced by the interface modelling approach employed; the deformation varied by less than 1% between different interaction models. However, interface modelling is found to have a considerable impact on the local stress-strain environment within the bone in the vicinity of the screws. Frictional and tied representations did not have significantly different peak strain values (<5% difference); the frictional interface had higher peak compressive strains while the tied interface had higher tensile strains. The undersized pilot hole simulation produced the largest strains. The peak minimum principal strains for the frictional interface were 26% of those for the undersized pilot hole simulation at a load of 770 N. It is concluded that the commonly used tie constraint can be used effectively when the only interest is the global load-deformation behaviour. Different contact interface models, however, alter the mechanical response around screw holes leading to different predictions for screw loosening, bone damage and stress shielding.

  7. Scintigraphic and x-ray arthrographic diagnosis of femoral prosthesis loosening: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Uri, G.; Wellman, H.; Capello, W.; Robb, J.; Greenman, G.

    1984-06-01

    In order to determine loosening of femoral components of conventional total hip arthroplasties, a comparison of radionuclide (RA) and radiographic arthrograms (XA) was performed. The hips of 29 patients were studied with radiographic contrast and intraarticular Tc-99m sulfur colloid. The XAs were positive for loosening in 10/29 studies, whereas the RAs were positive in 19/29 studies. In five of ten in which both studies were positive, the RA showed femoral prosthesis loosening more clearly than the XA. By surgical follow-up, there were four false-negative XAs. The data suggest that the RA is valuable in determining femoral component loosening.

  8. Oblique view showing western abutment, looking ENE along main line. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Oblique view showing western abutment, looking ENE along main line. Septa commuter train in foreground. - Pennsylvania Railroad, Whitford Bridge, Spanning Amtrak tracks at Whitford Road, Whitford, Chester County, PA

  9. 11. UNDERSIDE FROM SOUTH ABUTMENT SHOWING FLOOR SYSTEM, WALKWAY, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. UNDERSIDE FROM SOUTH ABUTMENT SHOWING FLOOR SYSTEM, WALKWAY, AND FIRST PIER. LOOKING NORTH. - Rue Road Bridge, Rue Road, spanning Matchaponix Brook, .35 mile east of intersection with Route 613, Jamesburg, Middlesex County, NJ

  10. CRIB DAM, LOOKING ALONG DAM FROM WEST ABUTMENT, SHOWING PLANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CRIB DAM, LOOKING ALONG DAM FROM WEST ABUTMENT, SHOWING PLANK SHEATHING IN FOREGROUND. VIEW TO EAST - Kachess Dam, 1904 Cascade Canal Company Crib Dam, Kachess River, 1.5 miles north of Interstate 90, Easton, Kittitas County, WA

  11. 27. Otter Creek Bridge #5. Detail of the interior abutment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Otter Creek Bridge #5. Detail of the interior abutment wall. Wingwall, and facade thickness. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  12. 9. 64 foot pony truss south west bearing abutment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. 64 foot pony truss - south west bearing abutment of the first pony, truss, showing the sheet piling and the added 'I' beam support. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  13. DETAIL OF NORTHEAST CUT STONE ABUTMENT FROM SOUTHWEST. Cataract ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF NORTHEAST CUT STONE ABUTMENT FROM SOUTHWEST. - Cataract Falls Bridge, Spanning Mill Creek, bypassed section of CR 279 (Cataract Falls Unit of Leiber State Recreation Area), Cataract, Owen County, IN

  14. 17. Underside of bridge and abutment with large boulder looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Underside of bridge and abutment with large boulder looking ENE. - Great Smoky Mountains National Park Roads & Bridges, Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail, Between Cherokee Orchard Road & U.S. Route 321, Gatlinburg, Sevier County, TN

  15. 12. VIEW OF RIGHT ABUTMENT TIE AT LEFT, CONCRETE PLACEMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. VIEW OF RIGHT ABUTMENT TIE AT LEFT, CONCRETE PLACEMENT LINES AT CENTER, POWER PLANT NEARING COMPLETION, AND AGGREGATE OPERATION AT CENTER RIGHT December 16, 1926 - Horse Mesa Dam, Salt River, 65 miles East of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  16. 7. DETAIL OF EAST ABUTMENT, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. The easternmost bridge ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL OF EAST ABUTMENT, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. The easternmost bridge span to shore was removed in the Spring of 1987. - Annisquam Bridge, Spanning Lobster Cove between Washington & River Streets, Gloucester, Essex County, MA

  17. 9. South abutment, detail of collapsed east wing wall; also ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. South abutment, detail of collapsed east wing wall; also detail of bottom lateral bracing and stringers; looking southeast - Dodd Ford Bridge, County Road 147 Spanning Blue Earth River, Amboy, Blue Earth County, MN

  18. 6. Pedlar Gap Run Aqueduct, detail of north abutment showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Pedlar Gap Run Aqueduct, detail of north abutment showing evidence of trough framing, looking NE - North River Canal System, Pedlar Gap Run Aqueduct, West side of Buena Vista, Buena Vista, Roanoke City, VA

  19. 5. Pedlar Gap Run Aqueduct, detail of north abutment showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Pedlar Gap Run Aqueduct, detail of north abutment showing evidence of trough framing, looking N - North River Canal System, Pedlar Gap Run Aqueduct, West side of Buena Vista, Buena Vista, Roanoke City, VA

  20. Detail view of the rusticated abutment and pedestrian railing of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of the rusticated abutment and pedestrian railing of the promenade. - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  1. Detail view of substructure, view looking at the south abutments ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of substructure, view looking at the south abutments and the pedestrian promenade - Spring Creek Bridge, Spanning Spring Creek at Milepoint 253.98 on Oregon to California Highway (US Route 97), Chiloquin, Klamath County, OR

  2. 7. DETAIL VIEW OF WEST SIDE OF WEST BRIDGE ABUTMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL VIEW OF WEST SIDE OF WEST BRIDGE ABUTMENT AND UNKNOWN STRUCTURE FROM BELOW, FACING NORTHWEST - West Branch Bridge, South Carolina Road S-569 spanning West Branch of Pacolet River, Pacolet, Spartanburg County, SC

  3. 59. SECOND FLOOR, STEEL OVERHEAD CONVEYOR SUPPORT FRAMEWORK ABUTTING FOOTBRIDGE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    59. SECOND FLOOR, STEEL OVERHEAD CONVEYOR SUPPORT FRAMEWORK ABUTTING FOOTBRIDGE, BAY 18, TO SOUTHEAST - Ford Motor Company Edgewater Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 309 River Road, Edgewater, Bergen County, NJ

  4. 23. DETAIL VIEW OF THE NORTHWEST ABUTMENT, SHOWING AN ORIGINAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. DETAIL VIEW OF THE NORTHWEST ABUTMENT, SHOWING AN ORIGINAL LIGHT FIXTURE AND THE 'HISTORICAL TABLET,' LOOKING NORTH-NORTHEAST FROM BELOW Ryan - Benton Street Bridge, Spanning Iowa River at Benton Street, Iowa City, Johnson County, IA

  5. 5. LOOKING DUE WEST, THIS ELEVATION SHOWS THE ABUTMENTS, ARCH, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. LOOKING DUE WEST, THIS ELEVATION SHOWS THE ABUTMENTS, ARCH, DECORATED SPANDRELS, THE BALLISTERS AND THE 25' RAISE IN GRADE WHICH WAS ACCOMPLISHED WITH BORROWED FILL. - Vandalia Railroad Bridge, Spanning U.S. Route 40, Indianapolis, Marion County, IN

  6. 8. BENT NO. 4 AND ABUTMENT NO. 2. VIEW TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. BENT NO. 4 AND ABUTMENT NO. 2. VIEW TO NORTHWEST - Milwaukee Road Railroad Overpass, Spanning Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul, & Pacific Railroad Grade (Milwaukee Road) at Orange Street, Missoula, Missoula County, MT

  7. 14. BRIDGE ABUTMENT AND ARCH TRUSS MOUNTING PLATE SHOWING EYEBAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. BRIDGE ABUTMENT AND ARCH TRUSS MOUNTING PLATE SHOWING EYE-BAR CONNECTION AND EYE-BAR PIN LOCATION - Spruce Street Bridge, East Spruce Street, 500 Block, spanning Power Canal, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  8. Anchor Casting and Portal Strut at West Bank Abutment, Endpost ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Anchor Casting and Portal Strut at West Bank Abutment, Endpost Base and Granite Plinth - Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Bollman Bridge, Spanning Potomac River at Harpers Ferry, Harpers Ferry, Jefferson County, WV

  9. 69. View of downstream face from west or right abutment. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. View of downstream face from west or right abutment. Photographer Mark Durben. Source: Salt River Project. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  10. 39. Pleasant Dam from east abutment with spillway visible at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    39. Pleasant Dam from east abutment with spillway visible at center. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  11. 3. View north of spillway and abutment on Lake Whitney ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View north of spillway and abutment on Lake Whitney Dam. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Lake Whitney Dam, East side of Whitney Avenue near intersection with Armory Street, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  12. 2. View west of spillway and abutment on Lake Whitney ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View west of spillway and abutment on Lake Whitney Dam. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Lake Whitney Dam, East side of Whitney Avenue near intersection with Armory Street, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  13. 4. Contextual oblique view to southsouthwest from near north abutment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Contextual oblique view to south-southwest from near north abutment in Jacob Meyer Park, showing upstream (east) side of bridge in setting. - Stanislaus River Bridge, Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway at Stanislaus River, Riverbank, Stanislaus County, CA

  14. SOUTHEAST SIDE, TAKEN FROM LOWER PARKING LOT, WITH ABUTTING FACILITY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHEAST SIDE, TAKEN FROM LOWER PARKING LOT, WITH ABUTTING FACILITY 346 IN FOREGROUND. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Joint Intelligence Center, Makalapa Drive in Makalapa Administration Area, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. 9. LOOKING NORTHWEST, A VIEW OF THE NORTH ABUTMENT, THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. LOOKING NORTHWEST, A VIEW OF THE NORTH ABUTMENT, THE DITCH AND THE EAST SIDE OF THE STRUCTURE FROM BELOW. - Wells County Bridge No. 74, Spanning Rock Creek Ditch at County Road 400, Bluffton, Wells County, IN

  16. 2. VIEW SOUTH, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTH, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON WEST SIDE OF PA ROUTE 56 - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  17. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, PERSPECTIVE OF ABUTMENT AND INCLINED PLANE ON WEST SIDE OF PA ROUTE 56 - Laurel Hill Quarry, Incline Plane, Both sides of State Route 56, 2.4 miles East of State Route 711, Seward, Westmoreland County, PA

  18. 9. DETAIL (WITH SCALE) OF CLOSED SPANDREL CONCRETE ARCH, ABUTMENT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. DETAIL (WITH SCALE) OF CLOSED SPANDREL CONCRETE ARCH, ABUTMENT, RAILINGS AND ENDPOST; VIEW TO WEST. - Pleasants Valley Road Bridge, Spanning Pleasants Creek at Pleasants Valley Road, Vacaville, Solano County, CA

  19. 9. CABLE ANCHORAGE DETAIL, NORTHWEST ABUTMENT (NOTE MOSSCOVERED CONCRETE ANCHOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. CABLE ANCHORAGE DETAIL, NORTHWEST ABUTMENT (NOTE MOSS-COVERED CONCRETE ANCHOR LEFT OF ANCHOR BOLTS) - Nisqually Suspension Bridge, Spanning Nisqually River on Service Road, Longmire, Pierce County, WA

  20. Patient-specific gingiva-colored abutments: a case series.

    PubMed

    Sumi, Takashi; Takeshita, Kenji; Takeichi, Takuro; Coelho, Paulo G; Jimbo, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present a case series of gingiva-colored abutments utilized to meet patients, esthetic needs. The color of the abutment was determined by evaluating the color of the patients, marginal gingiva using a digital shade guide. Thereafter, anodic oxidation was performed on computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture abutments. The baseline digital color information was compared with the color of the gingiva after 1.5 years in three patients. The gingival colors as well as the marginal bone and soft tissue levels after 1.5 years were comparable to the baseline values. Thus, the gingiva-colored abutments obtained by anodic oxidation provided improved esthetics, especially for patients with thin gingival biotypes.

  1. 8. View east. East abutment, showing bearings on concrete pads, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. View east. East abutment, showing bearings on concrete pads, drainage pipes for approach, and scupper downspouts. - Walpole-Westminster Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River between Walpole, NH & Westminster, VT, Walpole, Cheshire County, NH

  2. 22. DETAIL, WEST ABUTMENT AND SHOE, WEST ARCH, UPSTREAM SIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. DETAIL, WEST ABUTMENT AND SHOE, WEST ARCH, UPSTREAM SIDE File photo, Caltrans Office of Structures Maintenance, August, 1953. Photographer unknown. Photocopy of photograph. - San Roque Canyon Bridge, State Highway 192, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara County, CA

  3. 16. DETAIL OF SOUTH ABUTMENT, SHOWING GIRDER, CYLINDRICAL FIXED BEARING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. DETAIL OF SOUTH ABUTMENT, SHOWING GIRDER, CYLINDRICAL FIXED BEARING SHOE AND LATERAL BRACING. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Rio Puerco Bridge, Mainline Road, spanning Rio Puerco, Holbrook, Navajo County, AZ

  4. Mechanical testing of thin-walled zirconia abutments

    PubMed Central

    CANULLO, Luigi; COELHO, Paulo G.; BONFANTE, Estevam A.

    2013-01-01

    Although the use of zirconia abutments for implant-supported restorations has gained momentum with the increasing demand for esthetics, little informed design rationale has been developed to characterize their fatigue behavior under different clinical scenarios. However, to prevent the zirconia from fracturing, the use of a titanium connection in bicomponent aesthetic abutments has been suggested. Objective: Mechanical testing of customized thin-walled titanium-zirconia abutments at the connection with the implant was performed in order to characterize the fatigue behavior and the failure modes for straight and angled abutments. Material and Methods: Twenty custom-made bi-component abutments were tested according to ISO 14801:2007 either at a straight or a 25º angle inclination (n=10 each group). Fatigue was conducted at 15 Hz for 5 million cycles in dry conditions at 20ºC±5ºC. Mean values and standard deviations were calculated for each group. All comparisons were performed by t-tests assuming unequal variances. The level of statistical significance was set at p≤0.05. Failed samples were inspected in a polarized-light and then in a scanning electron microscope. Results: Straight and angled abutments mean maximum load was 296.7 N and 1,145 N, the dynamic loading mean Fmax was 237.4 N and 240.7 N, respectively. No significant differences resulted between the straight and angled bi-component abutments in both static (p=0.253) and dynamic testing (p=0.135). A significant difference in the bending moment required for fracture was detected between the groups (p=0.01). Fractures in the angled group occurred mainly at the point of load application, whereas in the straight abutments, fractures were located coronally and close to the thinly designed areas at the cervical region. Conclusion: Angled or straight thin-walled zirconia abutments presented similar Fmax under fatigue testing despite the different bending moments required for fracture. The main implication is

  5. Creep and shrinkage effects on integral abutment bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munuswamy, Sivakumar

    Integral abutment bridges provide bridge engineers an economical design alternative to traditional bridges with expansion joints owing to the benefits, arising from elimination of expensive joints installation and reduced maintenance cost. The superstructure for integral abutment bridges is cast integrally with abutments. Time-dependent effects of creep, shrinkage of concrete, relaxation of prestressing steel, temperature gradient, restraints provided by abutment foundation and backfill and statical indeterminacy of the structure introduce time-dependent variations in the redundant forces. An analytical model and numerical procedure to predict instantaneous linear behavior and non-linear time dependent long-term behavior of continuous composite superstructure are developed in which the redundant forces in the integral abutment bridges are derived considering the time-dependent effects. The redistributions of moments due to time-dependent effects have been considered in the analysis. The analysis includes nonlinearity due to cracking of the concrete, as well as the time-dependent deformations. American Concrete Institute (ACI) and American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) models for creep and shrinkage are considered in modeling the time dependent material behavior. The variations in the material property of the cross-section corresponding to the constituent materials are incorporated and age-adjusted effective modulus method with relaxation procedure is followed to include the creep behavior of concrete. The partial restraint provided by the abutment-pile-soil system is modeled using discrete spring stiffness as translational and rotational degrees of freedom. Numerical simulation of the behavior is carried out on continuous composite integral abutment bridges and the deformations and stresses due to time-dependent effects due to typical sustained loads are computed. The results from the analytical model are compared with the

  6. [Immune competence of human tissue lymphocytes in contact with loosened hip joint prostheses. On the topic of cellular or humoral rejection reaction as the mechanism of loosening].

    PubMed

    Peters, K M; Löer, F; Hofstädter, F; Casser, H R

    1991-05-01

    In several investigations rejections were accused of being a possible cause for the loosening of hip endoprostheses. Using immunocytochemical techniques we studied the number and type of lymphocytes in the tissue adjacent to loosened hip endoprostheses. Tissue samples were taken from 18 patients being reoperated for a loosened endoprostheses. Impressive lymphocyte infiltrates were found in 4 of 18 patients (22%). These infiltrates only consisted of T-cells. In the other samples only few lymphocytes were detected belonging to T- and B-lymphocyte population, respectively. In our patients T-cell mediated rejections were of minor importance for the loosening of total hip replacement. B-cell accumulations were detected in none of the samples.

  7. Effects of screw eccentricity on the initial stability of the acetabular cup in artificial foam bone of different qualities.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jui-Ting; Lin, Dan-Jae

    2010-01-01

    Acetabular cup loosening is one of the major failure models of total hip replacement (THR), which is mostly due to insufficient initial stability of the cup. Previous studies have demonstrated that cup stability is affected by the quality of the host bone and the surgical skill when inserting screws. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects on the initial stability of the acetabular cup of eccentric screws in bone of different qualities. In this study, hemispherical cups were fixed into bone specimens constructed from artificial foam with three elastic moduli using one to three screws. The effects of two types of screw eccentricity (offset and angular) on the stability of the acetabular cup were also evaluated. The experimental results indicate that in the presence of ideal screwing, the cup was stable in bone specimens constructed from foam with the highest elastic modulus. In addition, increasing the number of ideal screws enhanced the cup stability, especially in bone specimens constructed from soft foam. Moreover, the cup stability was most affected by offset eccentric screw(s) in the hard-foam bone specimens and by angular eccentric screw(s) in the soft-foam bone specimens. The reported results indicate that the presence of screw eccentricity affects the initial stability of the acetabular cup. Surgeons should keep this in mind when performing screw insertions in THR. However, care is necessary when translating these results to the intraoperative situation due to the experiments being conducted under laboratory conditions, and hence, future studies should attempt to replicate the results reported here in vivo.

  8. Magnesium inference screw supports early graft incorporation with inhibition of graft degradation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaonong; Chai, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    Patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery commonly encounters graft failure in the initial phase of rehabilitation. The inhibition of graft degradation is crucial for the successful reconstruction of the ACL. Here, we used biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) screws in the rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screws as a control and analyzed the graft degradation and screw corrosion using direct pull-out tests, microCT scanning, and histological and immunohistochemical staining. The most noteworthy finding was that tendon graft fixed by HP Mg screws exhibited biomechanical properties substantially superior to that by Ti screws and the relative area of collagen fiber at the tendon-bone interface was much larger in the Mg group, when severe graft degradation was identified in the histological analysis at 3 weeks. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical results further elucidated that the MMP-13 expression significantly decreased surrounding HP Mg screws with relatively higher Collagen II expression. And HP Mg screws exhibited uniform corrosion behavior without displacement or loosening in the femoral tunnel. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Mg screw inhibited graft degradation and improved biomechanical properties of tendon graft during the early phase of graft healing and highlighted its potential in ACL reconstruction. PMID:27210585

  9. Magnesium inference screw supports early graft incorporation with inhibition of graft degradation in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pengfei; Han, Pei; Zhao, Changli; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Zhang, Xiaonong; Chai, Yimin

    2016-05-01

    Patients after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction surgery commonly encounters graft failure in the initial phase of rehabilitation. The inhibition of graft degradation is crucial for the successful reconstruction of the ACL. Here, we used biodegradable high-purity magnesium (HP Mg) screws in the rabbit model of ACL reconstruction with titanium (Ti) screws as a control and analyzed the graft degradation and screw corrosion using direct pull-out tests, microCT scanning, and histological and immunohistochemical staining. The most noteworthy finding was that tendon graft fixed by HP Mg screws exhibited biomechanical properties substantially superior to that by Ti screws and the relative area of collagen fiber at the tendon-bone interface was much larger in the Mg group, when severe graft degradation was identified in the histological analysis at 3 weeks. Semi-quantitative immunohistochemical results further elucidated that the MMP-13 expression significantly decreased surrounding HP Mg screws with relatively higher Collagen II expression. And HP Mg screws exhibited uniform corrosion behavior without displacement or loosening in the femoral tunnel. Therefore, our results demonstrated that Mg screw inhibited graft degradation and improved biomechanical properties of tendon graft during the early phase of graft healing and highlighted its potential in ACL reconstruction.

  10. Helical screw viscometer

    DOEpatents

    Aubert, J.H.; Chapman, R.N.; Kraynik, A.M.

    1983-06-30

    A helical screw viscometer for the measurement of the viscosity of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids comprising an elongated cylindrical container closed by end caps defining a circular cylindrical cavity within the container, a cylindrical rotor member having a helical screw or ribbon flight carried by the outer periphery thereof rotatably carried within the cavity whereby the fluid to be measured is confined in the cavity filling the space between the rotor and the container wall. The rotor member is supported by axle members journaled in the end caps, one axle extending through one end cap and connectable to a drive source. A pair of longitudinally spaced ports are provided through the wall of the container in communication with the cavity and a differential pressure meter is connected between the ports for measuring the pressure drop caused by the rotation of the helical screw rotor acting on the confined fluid for computing viscosity.

  11. Early clinical results with cortically based pedicle screw trajectory for fusion of the degenerative lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Glennie, R Andrew; Dea, Nicolas; Kwon, Brian K; Street, John T

    2015-06-01

    This study reviews the outcomes and revision rates of degenerative lumbar fusion surgery using cortical trajectory pedicle screws in lieu of traditional pedicle screw instrumentation. Pedicle screw fixation can be a challenge in patients with low bone mineral density. Wide posterior approaches to the lumbar spine exposing lateral to the facet joints and onto transverse processes causes an additional degree of muscular damage and blood loss not present with a simple laminectomy. A cortical bone trajectory pedicle screw has been proposed as an alternative to prevent screw pullout and decrease the morbidity associated with the wide posterior approach to the spine. We present a series of eight consecutive patients using a cortical bone trajectory instead of traditional pedicle screw fixation for degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine. A retrospective review of our institutional registry data identified eight patients who had cortical screws placed with the assistance of O-arm Stealth navigation (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) from 2010-2013. We analyzed the need for revision, the maintenance of reduction and the incidence of screw pullout or breakage. Our review demonstrated that two of eight patients were revised at an average of 12months. The reasons for these revisions were pseudarthrosis and caudal adjacent segment failure. All patients who were revised had frank screw loosening. We present early clinical results of a new technique that has been shown to have a better fixation profile in laboratory testing. Our less than favorable early clinical results should be interpreted with caution and highlight important technical issues which should be considered.

  12. Fatigue of the cement/bone interface: the surface texture of bone and loosening.

    PubMed

    Arola, D; Stoffel, K A; Yang, D T

    2006-02-01

    Loosening is recognized as one of the primary sources of total hip replacement (THR) failure. In this study the influence of the bone surface texture on loosening of the cement/bone interface was studied. Model cemented hip replacements were prepared and subjected to cyclic loads that induced pure shear fatigue of the cement/bone interface. The femoral canals were textured with the use of specific cutting tools to achieve a desired surface topography. Loosening of the implant with cyclic loading was characterized in terms of the initial migration (Region I), steady-state loosening (Region II), and unstable loosening (Region III). Results from the experiments showed that the initial migration and rate of steady-state loosening were dependent upon the bone surface topography. The apparent fatigue strength ranged from 0.8 to 5.1 MPa, and denotes the cyclic shear stress required for loosening of 1 mm within 10 million cycles. Regardless of the bone surface topography the ratio of apparent fatigue strength and ultimate shear strength of the interfaces was approximately 0.24. In general, the apparent fatigue strength increased proportional to the average surface roughness of the femoral canal and the corresponding volume available for cement interdigitation. In addition, there was a strong correlation between the normalized initial migration and the apparent fatigue strength (i.e., specimens with the highest initial migration exhibited the lowest fatigue strength).

  13. Development of a non-invasive diagnostic technique for acetabular component loosening in total hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Alshuhri, Abdullah A; Holsgrove, Timothy P; Miles, Anthony W; Cunningham, James L

    2015-08-01

    Current techniques for diagnosing early loosening of a total hip replacement (THR) are ineffective, especially for the acetabular component. Accordingly, new, accurate, and quantifiable methods are required. The aim of this study was to investigate the viability of vibrational analysis for accurately detecting acetabular component loosening. A simplified acetabular model was constructed using a Sawbones(®) foam block. By placing a thin silicone layer between the acetabular component and the Sawbones block, 2- and 4-mm soft tissue membranes were simulated representing different loosening scenarios. A constant amplitude sinusoidal excitation with a sweep range of 100-1500 Hz was used. Output vibration from the model was measured using an accelerometer and an ultrasound probe. Loosening was determined from output signal features such as the number and relative strength of observed harmonic frequencies. Both measurement methods were sufficient to measure the output vibration. Vibrational analysis reliably detected loosening corresponding to both 2 and 4 mm tissue membranes at driving frequencies between 100 and 1000 Hz (p < 0.01) using the accelerometer. In contrast, ultrasound detected 2-mm loosening at a frequency range of 850-1050 Hz (p < 0.01) and 4-mm loosening at 500-950 Hz (p < 0.01).

  14. Findings of a Four-Year Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Two-Piece and One-Piece Zirconia Abutments Supporting Single Prosthetic Restorations in Maxillary Anterior Region

    PubMed Central

    Paolantoni, Guerino; Marenzi, Gaetano; Blasi, Andrea; Mignogna, Jolanda; Sammartino, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled study is to investigate the clinical results obtained over four years and incidence of complications associated with one- versus two-piece custom made zirconia anchorages, in single tooth implant-supported restorations of the maxillary anterior region. Sixty-five patients, with a total of 74 missing maxillary teeth, were selected in the period from February 2007 to July 2010. Two different ways of custom made zirconia abutment and final prosthetic restoration were evaluated: a standard zirconia abutment associated with a pressed layer of lithium disilicate with an all-ceramic cemented restoration versus one-piece restoration with the facing porcelain fired and pressed straight to the custom made zirconia abutment. In 29 cases, the restoration consisted of an all-ceramic restoration for cementation (two pieces); in 45 cases the restoration was a screw-retained restoration (one piece). Three all-ceramic restorations broke during the observation time. Two one-piece restorations fractured after 26 months. At follow-up examination there were no significant differences between one-piece and two-piece groups regarding the PI, BI, and MBL. Awaiting studies with longer follow-up times, a careful conclusion is that zirconia anchorages for single-implant restorations seem to demonstrate good short-term technical and biological results. PMID:27027093

  15. Findings of a Four-Year Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial Comparing Two-Piece and One-Piece Zirconia Abutments Supporting Single Prosthetic Restorations in Maxillary Anterior Region.

    PubMed

    Paolantoni, Guerino; Marenzi, Gaetano; Blasi, Andrea; Mignogna, Jolanda; Sammartino, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this randomized controlled study is to investigate the clinical results obtained over four years and incidence of complications associated with one- versus two-piece custom made zirconia anchorages, in single tooth implant-supported restorations of the maxillary anterior region. Sixty-five patients, with a total of 74 missing maxillary teeth, were selected in the period from February 2007 to July 2010. Two different ways of custom made zirconia abutment and final prosthetic restoration were evaluated: a standard zirconia abutment associated with a pressed layer of lithium disilicate with an all-ceramic cemented restoration versus one-piece restoration with the facing porcelain fired and pressed straight to the custom made zirconia abutment. In 29 cases, the restoration consisted of an all-ceramic restoration for cementation (two pieces); in 45 cases the restoration was a screw-retained restoration (one piece). Three all-ceramic restorations broke during the observation time. Two one-piece restorations fractured after 26 months. At follow-up examination there were no significant differences between one-piece and two-piece groups regarding the PI, BI, and MBL. Awaiting studies with longer follow-up times, a careful conclusion is that zirconia anchorages for single-implant restorations seem to demonstrate good short-term technical and biological results.

  16. Non-rigid connector: The wand to allay the stresses on abutment

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Saurav; Khongshei, Arlingstone; Gupta, Tapas; Banerjee, Ardhendu

    2011-01-01

    The use of rigid connectors in 5-unit fixed dental prosthesis with a pier abutment can result in failure of weaker retainer in the long run as the pier abutment acts as a fulcrum. Non-rigid connector placed on the distal aspect of pier seems to reduce potentially excess stress concentration on the pier abutment. PMID:22346166

  17. A technique to eliminate subgingival cement adhesion to implant abutments by using polytetrafluoroethylene tape.

    PubMed

    Hess, Timothy A

    2014-08-01

    Residual excess cement adhered subgingivally to an implant abutment has the potential to cause periimplant mucositis or periimplant disease. This article describes a procedure in which polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape is used to protect dental cements from adhering to the implant abutment. This technique ensures complete removal of cement from the implant abutment after seating of the crown.

  18. 4. Prefabricated concrete panel portion of Snowshed 29 abutting west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Prefabricated concrete panel portion of Snowshed 29 abutting west portal of Tunnel 41, view to east, 135mm lens. Function of the elevated portion is unknown, but it may help to channel exhaust fumes out of the shed and the two-mile long tunnel. - Central Pacific Transcontinental Railroad, Tunnel No. 41, Milepost 193.3, Donner, Placer County, CA

  19. 11. 100 foot through truss north east bearing abutment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. 100 foot through truss - north east bearing abutment of the second through truss, showing that the bearing point is to the backmost position of the concrete pier. This bearing point is on a concrete extension of the original bearing point now covered by rock and soil. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  20. 21. Photocopy of drawing, Plan of Abutments for Bridge No. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of drawing, Plan of Abutments for Bridge No. 79B at Main & Washington Sts., South Norwalk, N.Y. Div., N.Y., N.H. and H.R.R., dated November 22, 1895. Original on file with Metro North Commuter Railroad. - South Norwalk Railroad Bridge, South Main & Washington Streets, Norwalk, Fairfield County, CT

  1. 12. DETAIL OF NORTH ABUTMENT (EAST SIDE) AND PIER. LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. DETAIL OF NORTH ABUTMENT (EAST SIDE) AND PIER. LOOKING NORTH. - Route 31 Bridge, New Jersey Route 31, crossing disused main line of Central Railroad of New Jersey (C.R.R.N.J.) (New Jersey Transit's Raritan Valley Line), Hampton, Hunterdon County, NJ

  2. 5. GENERAL VIEW FROM EAST ABUTMENT ALONG AXIS OF DAM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. GENERAL VIEW FROM EAST ABUTMENT ALONG AXIS OF DAM SHOWING STEEL SHEET PILE CUTOFF WALL COMPLETED, AND EMBANKMENT MATERIAL BEING COMPACTED INTO POSITION. Volume XVI, No. 11, July 21, 1939. - Prado Dam, Embankment, Santa Ana River near junction of State Highways 71 & 91, Corona, Riverside County, CA

  3. RUINS OF FOUNDATIONS AND NORTH ABUTMENT OF OR & L ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RUINS OF FOUNDATIONS AND NORTH ABUTMENT OF OR & L RAILWAY TRESTLE ON DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BRIDGE NO. 3A, VIEW FROM THE SOUTHEAST - Oahu Railway & Land Company Trestle Ruins, Spanning Makaha Stream between Makaha Beach & Farrington Highway, near Kili Drive, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  4. RUINS OF NORTH ABUTMENT OF OR & L RAILWAY TRESTLE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RUINS OF NORTH ABUTMENT OF OR & L RAILWAY TRESTLE ON DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BRIDGE NO. 3A, VIEW FROM THE EAST - Oahu Railway & Land Company Trestle Ruins, Spanning Makaha Stream between Makaha Beach & Farrington Highway, near Kili Drive, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  5. RUINS OF FOUNDATIONS AND SOUTH ABUTMENT OF OR & L ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RUINS OF FOUNDATIONS AND SOUTH ABUTMENT OF OR & L RAILWAY TRESTLE ON DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BRIDGE NO. 3, VIEW FROM THE NORTHWEST FROM BRIDGE NO. 3 - Oahu Railway & Land Company Trestle Ruins, Spanning Makaha Stream between Makaha Beach & Farrington Highway, near Kili Drive, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  6. RUINS OF FOUNDATIONS AND SOUTH ABUTMENT OF OR & L ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    RUINS OF FOUNDATIONS AND SOUTH ABUTMENT OF OR & L RAILWAY TRESTLE ON DOWNSTREAM SIDE OF BRIDGE NO. 3A, VIEW FROM THE SOUTH - Oahu Railway & Land Company Trestle Ruins, Spanning Makaha Stream between Makaha Beach & Farrington Highway, near Kili Drive, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Trestle #1, detail of southwest abutment upper timbers and gabion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Trestle #1, detail of southwest abutment upper timbers and gabion basket. View to west - Promontory Route Railroad Trestles, S.P. Trestle 779.91, One mile southwest of junction of State Highway 83 and Blue Creek, Corinne, Box Elder County, UT

  8. Trestle #1, detail of southwest abutment lower sill and gabion ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Trestle #1, detail of southwest abutment lower sill and gabion baskets. View to west - Promontory Route Railroad Trestles, S.P. Trestle 779.91, One mile southwest of junction of State Highway 83 and Blue Creek, Corinne, Box Elder County, UT

  9. 5. View of bearing on north abutment and first panel ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. View of bearing on north abutment and first panel point, note eye bar construction of chord and pin connection of panel point - Bridge No. 2.4, Spanning Boiling Fork Creek at Railroad Milepost JC-2.4, Decherd, Franklin County, TN

  10. Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Remains of abutments for Bridge No. 1575 at MD Rt. 51 in Spring Gap, Maryland, looking northeast. (Compare with HAER MD-115 photos taken 1988). - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  11. 6. DETAIL OF SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT, SHOWING MANUFACTURER'S NAME ('PHOENIXUSA') ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. DETAIL OF SOUTHEAST ABUTMENT, SHOWING MANUFACTURER'S NAME ('PHOENIX-USA') ON HORIZONTAL MEMBER LEFT OF CENTER. - North Branch Quantico Creek Bridge, Prince William Forest Park, on NPS Route 406 spanning north branch of Quantico Creek, Dumfries, Prince William County, VA

  12. 29. SECTION DRAWINGS OF HEADGATE IN RIGHT (WEST) ABUTMENT, SPILLWAY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. SECTION DRAWINGS OF HEADGATE IN RIGHT (WEST) ABUTMENT, SPILLWAY, AND PENSTOCK Sections and profiles of dam and pipe line, Exhibit J(3). Prepared by C. F. Uhden, electrical engineer, for the Okanogan Valley Power Company, 1916. - Enloe Dam, On Similkameen River, Oroville, Okanogan County, WA

  13. 29. View of construction shops and housing from west abutment. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. View of construction shops and housing from west abutment. River bed, foreground, downstream from dam site, being excavated for aggregate material. Photographer unknown, 1927. Source: MWD. - Waddell Dam, On Agua Fria River, 35 miles northwest of Phoenix, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  14. 35. VIEW SOUTHEAST, WEST ABUTMENT OF OPERATING MACHINERY BASCULE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. VIEW SOUTHEAST, WEST ABUTMENT OF OPERATING MACHINERY - BASCULE LEAF RAISED - LARGE GEAR AT LEFT CENTER IS 'D' - REFER TO STRAUSS SHEETS #15 AND #18 FOR POWER TRAIN RELATIONSHIPS - Tomlinson Bridge, Spanning Quinnipiac River at Forbes Street (U.S. Route 1), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  15. 33. EAST ABUTMENT, VIEW NORTHEAST OF OPERATING MACHINERY SMALL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. EAST ABUTMENT, VIEW NORTHEAST OF OPERATING MACHINERY - SMALL GEAR IS IDENTIFIED AS 'C' - LARGE GEAR IS 'B' REFER TO GEARING DIAGRAMS - STRAUSS SHEET #15 FOR POWER TRAIN RELATIONSHIPS - Tomlinson Bridge, Spanning Quinnipiac River at Forbes Street (U.S. Route 1), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  16. 27. VIEW NORTHEAST, EAST ABUTMENT SHOWING DRIVE GEAR 'D' IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. VIEW NORTHEAST, EAST ABUTMENT SHOWING DRIVE GEAR 'D' IN LOWER CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH AND RACKS ON CENTER BASCULE GIRDERS 'B' AND 'C' AT LEFT CENTER - Tomlinson Bridge, Spanning Quinnipiac River at Forbes Street (U.S. Route 1), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  17. 34. VIEW SOUTHEAST, WEST ABUTMENT OF OPERATING MACHINERY LARGE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. VIEW SOUTHEAST, WEST ABUTMENT OF OPERATING MACHINERY - LARGE GEAR AT LEFT CENTER IS 'D' - REFER TO STRAUSS SHEETS #15 AND #18 FOR POWER TRAIN RELATIONSHIPS - Tomlinson Bridge, Spanning Quinnipiac River at Forbes Street (U.S. Route 1), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  18. 28. VIEW SOUTHWEST, EAST ABUTMENT SHOWING BASCULE LEAF IN RAISED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. VIEW SOUTHWEST, EAST ABUTMENT SHOWING BASCULE LEAF IN RAISED POSITION WITH THE EXTREME UPPER PORTION OF THE BASCULE RACK GEAR SHOWING IN THE LOWER RIGHT PORTION OF THE PHOTOGRAPH - Tomlinson Bridge, Spanning Quinnipiac River at Forbes Street (U.S. Route 1), New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  19. 25. A QUIRK ON THE FACING OF THE NORTHEASTERN ABUTMENT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. A QUIRK ON THE FACING OF THE NORTHEASTERN ABUTMENT. IT HAS BEEN CAST IN PLACE, THE GHOSTS OF THE WOODEN FORMERS CAN BE SEEN. EVEN THE MITRES WITHIN THE SUNK PORTIONS OF THE CASTING ARE VISIBLE. POISON IVY AND TRUMPET VINE CLING WELL TO THE ROUGH CONCRETE. - Main Street Bridge, Spanning East Fork Whitewater River, Richmond, Wayne County, IN

  20. "No. 146. Looking west along dam. East side abutment." Note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    "No. 146. Looking west along dam. East side abutment." Note sluiceway and headgates at center rear of photograph; cofferdam at center right; and the screening and mixing plant at lower right. Rail cars are on the railroad grade in background - Grand Valley Diversion Dam, Half a mile north of intersection of I-70 & Colorado State Route 65, Cameo, Mesa County, CO

  1. 9. Terminal connection of arch structural member to concrete abutment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Terminal connection of arch structural member to concrete abutment on east of south end of bridge. Slightly oblique detail view west-northwest (from beside bridge). 150 mm lens. - Gault Bridge, Spanning Deer Creek at South Pine Street, Nevada City, Nevada County, CA

  2. DETAIL OF THE UNDERSIDE OF THE BRIDGE, ABUTMENT, AND WING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE UNDERSIDE OF THE BRIDGE, ABUTMENT, AND WING WALL ON THE EAST SIDE OF THE NORTH END OF THE BRIDGE. 38 - Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railroad, Cajon Subdivision, Structure No. 61.5X, between Cajon Summit and Keenbrook, Devore, San Bernardino County, CA

  3. NUT SCREW MECHANISMS

    DOEpatents

    Glass, J.A.F.

    1958-07-01

    A reactor control mechanism is described wherein the control is achieved by the partial or total withdrawal of the fissile material which is in the form of a fuel rod. The fuel rod is designed to be raised and lowered from the reactor core area by means of two concentric ball nut and screw assemblies that may telescope one within the other. These screw mechanisms are connected through a magnetic clutch to a speed reduction gear and an accurately controllable prime motive source. With the clutch energized, the fuel rod may be moved into the reactor core area, and fine adjustments may be made through the reduction gearing. However, in the event of a power failure or an emergency signal, the magnetic clutch will become deenergized, and the fuel rod will drop out of the core area by the force of gravity, thus shutting down the operation of the reactor.

  4. A capillary Archimedes' screw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbois Texier, Baptiste; Dorbolo, Stephane

    2014-11-01

    As used by Egyptians for irrigation and reported by Archimedes, a screw turning inside a hollow pipe can pull out a fluid againt gravity. At a centimetric scale, an analagous system can be found with a drop pending on a rotating spiral which is tilted toward the horizontal. The ascent of the drop to the top of the spiral is considered and a theoretical model based on geometrical considerations is proposed. The climb of the drop is limited by the fluid deposition on the screw at high capillary number and by a centrifugation phenomenon. We find out the range of fluid proprities and spiral characteristics for which an ascending motion of the drop is possible. Finally we discuss the efficiency of such system to extract a fluid from a bath at a centrimetric scale.

  5. Loosening detection of the femoral component of hip prostheses with extracorporeal shockwaves: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rieger, Johannes S; Jaeger, Sebastian; Kretzer, Jan Philippe; Rupp, Rüdiger; Bitsch, Rudi G

    2015-02-01

    The diagnosis of aseptic loosening of hip implants is often challenging. A vibrational analysis of the bone-implant interface could be an alternative method to analyze the fixation of endoprostheses. We assessed an innovative and new approach for excitation by using extracorporeal shockwaves in this study. In three cadaver specimens total hip arthroplasty was performed bilaterally. Four different states of implant loosening were simulated. Three accelerometers were fixed at the medial condyle, the greater trochanter, and the crest of the ilium. The bone-implant compound was excited with highly standardized extracorporeal shock waves. Resonance spectra between 100 Hz and 5000 Hz were recorded. This technique permitted a good adaptation to varying soft tissue conditions. The main resonance frequency of the hip joints occurred at about 2000 Hz. The analysis of the measured spectra showed an interrelation between the state of loosening and the frequency values of the resonances. In case of a stem loosening, there were significant shifts of the resonance into the lower frequency area between 386 Hz and 847 Hz. With this novel technique the degree of stem loosening could be assessed in a soft tissue considering configuration. This study forms a first step for future establishment of a non-invasive, non-radiological and fast applicable diagnostic procedure for early detection of endoprostheses loosening before manifest presence of clinical signs.

  6. Drill Free Screws: a new form of osteosynthesis screw.

    PubMed

    Heidemann, W; Gerlach, K L; Gröbel, K H; Köllner, H G

    1998-06-01

    Although the application of self-tapping and non self-tapping screws is virtually universal in cranio-maxillofacial surgery, the inevitable, time consuming procedure of drilling a pilot hole has some potential disadvantages, such as damage to nerves, tooth roots or tooth germs, thermal necrosis of the bone and drill bit breakage. Drill Free Screws (DFS) are a recently developed type of osteosynthesis screws, having a tip like a cork screw and specially formed cutting flutes which enable insertion of the screws without drilling. DFS 1.5 and 2 mm were inserted into discs of wood, polyvinylchloride (PVC) and porcine mandibular bone of varying thicknesses between 2 and 4 mm. The values of insertion torque and maximum torque were recorded using an electric torque tester. Thereafter, the screws were inserted with a fixed torque and uniaxial pull out tests were performed. In comparison with this, the same procedure was performed using 1.5 and 2 mm self-tapping titanium screws. Ten trials for each screw-material-combination were conducted to determine insertion torque, maximum torque and pull out analysis. The results showed that the holding power of DFS lay between 70 and 104% of the holding power of self-tapping titanium screws; only in PVC was the difference more than 15%.

  7. Low noise lead screw positioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Gerald S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A very precise and low noise lead screw positioner, for positioning a retroreflector in an interferometer is described. A gas source supplies inert pressurized gas, that flows through narrow holes into the clearance space between a nut and the lead screw. The pressurized gas keeps the nut out of contact with the screw. The gas flows axially along the clearance space, into the environment. The small amount of inert gas flowing into the environment minimizes pollution. By allowing such flow into the environment, no seals are required between the end of the nut and the screw.

  8. Clinical Effects of the Probing Method with Depth Gauge for Determining the Screw Depth of Locking Proximal Humeral Plate

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Lin; Guo, Jialiang; Guo, Junfei; Yin, Yingchao; Zhang, Yingze

    2016-01-01

    Background. The use of locking plates has gained popularity to treat proximal humeral fractures. However, the complication rates remain high. Biomechanical study suggested that subchondral screw-tip abutment significantly increased the stability of plant. We present a simple method to obtain the proper screw length through the depth gauge in elderly patients and compared the clinical effects with traditional measuring method. Methods. 40 patients were separated into two groups according to the two surgical methods: the probing method with depth gauge and the traditional measuring method. The intraoperative indexes and postoperative complications were recorded. The Constant and Murley score was used for the functional assessment in the 12th month. Results. Operative time and intraoperative blood loss indicated no statistical differences. X-ray exposure time and the patients with screw path penetrating the articular cartilage significantly differed. Postoperative complications and Constant and Murley score showed no statistical differences. Conclusions. Probing method with depth gauge is an appropriate alternative to determine the screw length, which can make the screw-tip adjoin the subchondral bone and keep the articular surface of humeral head intact and at the same time effectively avoid frequent X-ray fluoroscopy and adjusting the screws. PMID:27975055

  9. A novel in silico method to quantify primary stability of screws in trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Juri A; Christen, Patrik; Affentranger, Remo; Ferguson, Stephen J; van Lenthe, Gerrit Harry

    2017-02-27

    Insufficient primary stability of screws in bone leads to screw loosening and failure. Unlike conventional continuum finite-element models, micro-CT based finite-element analysis (micro-FE) is capable of capturing the patient-specific bone micro-architecture, providing accurate estimates of bone stiffness. However, such in silico models for screws in bone highly overestimate the apparent stiffness. We hypothesized that a more accurate prediction of primary implant stability of screws in bone is possible by considering insertion-related bone damage. We assessed two different screw types and loading scenarios in 20 trabecular bone specimens extracted from 12 cadaveric human femoral heads (N = 5 for each case). In the micro-FE model, we predicted specimen-specific Young's moduli of the peri-implant bone damage region based on morphometric parameters such that the apparent stiffness of each in silico model matched the experimentally measured stiffness of the corresponding in vitro specimen as closely as possible. The standard micro-FE models assuming perfectly intact peri-implant bone overestimated the stiffness by over 330%. The consideration of insertion related damaged peri-implant bone corrected the mean absolute percentage error down to 11.4% for both loading scenarios and screw types. Cross-validation revealed a mean absolute percentage error of 14.2%. We present the validation of a novel micro-FE modeling technique to quantify the apparent stiffness of screws in trabecular bone. While the standard micro-FE model overestimated the bone-implant stiffness, the consideration of insertion-related bone damage was crucial for an accurate stiffness prediction. This approach provides an important step toward more accurate specimen-specific micro-FE models. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  10. Numerical Studies on Time-Varying Stiffness of Disk-Drum Type Rotor with Bolt Loosening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhaoye; Chu, Fulei

    2015-07-01

    Disk-drum type rotors are widely used in industry for their high stiffness and low weight properties. In disk-drum type rotors, the adjacent disks and drums are commonly connected by bolted joints. Those rotating joint interfaces are subjected to numerous combinations of loads during normal operation, where loosening of the connecting bolts might occur. The bolt loosening will change the local stiffness of the rotor, which in turn affect the rotor dynamics and even result in structural failures. In this paper, the local stiffness of a disk- drum rotor with bolt loosening is investigated numerically. A three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) model for the bolted disk-drum joint is established in ANSYS, where the bolt loosening is simulated by reducing the preloads of certain bolts, and removing those bolts as the limiting case. Simulations are performed on the FE model to evaluate the joint behaviour under static loads. Periodic variations of the joint deflections with respect to the rotation angle of the shaft are obtained, which implies the appearance of the time-varying local stiffness in the rotor system. The studies in this paper help accurate prediction of the rotor dynamics and early detection of bolt loosening.

  11. Expression of tenascin-C in aseptic loosening of total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Konttinen, Y.; Li, T.; Michelsson, O.; Xu, J.; Sorsa, T.; Santavirta, S.; Imai, S.; Virtanen, I.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess if the bonding interlayer between the implant and bone in aseptic loosening of total hip replacement (THR) is qualitatively deteriorated by excessive accumulation of anti-adhesive glycoprotein, tenascin-C.
METHODS—Alkaline phosphatase-anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) method was used for immunohistochemical staining of tenascin-C in interface tissue and control synovial tissue.
RESULTS—Tenascin-C was found to be a major component of the extracellular matrix at a hitherto unrecognised site, namely the synovial membrane-like interface tissue between implant and bone in aseptic loosening of THR. The overall tenascin-C staining (median score 4.0) was greatly increased in aseptic loosening compared with synovial membrane (median score 2.0; p<0.001) and fibrous capsule (median score 2.0; p<0.001) from primary THR operations. Topological analysis disclosed that tenascin-C was also found at the critical implant-interface and interface-bone surfaces.
CONCLUSION—Local tenascin-C expression is increased as a result of a chronic foreign body type reaction associated with excessive cytokine production and tissue injury mediated by microtrauma and neutral endoproteinases. This qualitative and topological deterioration of the bonding interlayer by an increase of anti-adhesive tenascin-C expression may inadvertantly contribute to loosening.

 Keywords: tenascin; aseptic loosening; total hip replacement PMID:9893574

  12. Evaluation of master cast techniques for multiple abutment implant prostheses.

    PubMed

    Vigolo, P; Millstein, P L

    1993-01-01

    This study compared the accuracy of three techniques used to fabricate master casts for implant prostheses. A metal model with six implants and standard abutments and a matching template were fabricated. Impressions of the model were made in Impregum and cast in Die Keen. The casts were divided into three groups of 15 casts: group A--solid casts; group B--Pindex; and group C--Zeiser system. Each cast was visually evaluated for fit of the template. Positional accuracy of the abutments was numerically assessed using an optical comparator. Visual analysis showed that only casts sectioned with the Zeiser system allowed a passive fit of the template. Statistical analysis of numerical findings indicated that casts made with the Zeiser system were significantly more accurate than solid casts, which in turn were more accurate than those made with the Pindex system.

  13. 10. 100 foot through truss north west bearing abutment ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. 100 foot through truss - north west bearing abutment of the second through truss, showing the diagonal sway bracing to its alternate pier. This bearing point is on a concrete extension of the original bearing point now covered by rock and soil. Note that the bearing point is to the backmost position on the concrete pier. - Weidemeyer Bridge, Spanning Thomes Creek at Rawson Road, Corning, Tehama County, CA

  14. Improving fixation strength of pedicle screw by microarc oxidation treatment: an experimental study of osteoporotic spine in sheep.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lei; Wang, Ling; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Zheng; Wu, Zi-xiang; Liu, Da; Gao, Ming-xuan; Chen, Huan; Fu, Suo-chao; Lei, Wei

    2012-08-01

    Failure of fixation caused by loosening of pedicle screws in osteoporosis is a problem in spinal surgery. We compared the in vivo fixation strength between pedicle screws treated with microarc oxidation (MAO) and untreated screws in an osteoporotic model of ovariectomized sheep. The MAO treated and untreated screws were placed in lumbar vertebral bodies. After 3 months of implantation, biomechanical tests, micro-CT analysis, and histological observations were conducted to examine the performance of the two groups. At time 0, no significant difference was found between the two groups in biomechanical tests (p > 0.05); 3 months later, higher pull-out strength and load with less displacement were detected in the MAO-treated group (p < 0.05). Micro-CT analysis showed that the tissue mineral density, bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness, and trabecular number in the MAO-treated group were all higher than those in untreated group (p < 0.05), and trabecular spacing was smaller (p < 0.05). Histologically, the bone-implant interface in the MAO-treated group was better than that in untreated group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, pedicle screws with a bioactive surface treated by MAO can improve screw fixation strength in osteoporotic spines in sheep.

  15. Measuring abutment convergence angles using stereovision dental image processing system

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hong-Seok; Park, Ji-Man; Han, Jung-Suk; Lee, Jai-Bong; Kim, Sung-Hun

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to develop a dental image processing system using a three-dimensional (3D) camera and stereovision technology. The reliability of the system for measuring axial wall convergence angles was evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS The new system predicted 3D coordinate points from 2D images and calculated distances and angles between points. Two examiners measured axial wall convergence angles for seven artificial abutments using a traditional tracing-based method (TBM) and the stereovision-based method (SVBM). Five wax abutment models of simplified abutment forms were made and axial wall convergence angles of wax models were measured by both methods. The data were statistically analyzed at the level of significance, 0.05. RESULTS Intraclass correlation coefficients showed excellent intra-examiner and inter-examiner reliabilities for both methods. Bland-Altman plots and paired t-tests showed significant differences between measurements and true values using TBM; differences were not significant with SVBM. CONCLUSION This study found that the SVBM reflected true angle values more accurately than a TMB and illustrated an example of 3D computer science applied to clinical dentistry. PMID:25177468

  16. Outcomes of C1 and C2 posterior screw fixation for upper cervical spine fusion.

    PubMed

    De Iure, F; Donthineni, R; Boriani, S

    2009-06-01

    To achieve stable fixation of the upper cervical spine in posterior fusions, the occiput is often included. With the newer techniques, excluding fixation to the occiput will retain the occiput-cervical motion, while still allowing a stable fixation. Harms's technique has been adapted at our institution and its effectiveness for indications such as C2 complex fractures and tumors using C1 or C2 as endpoints of a posterior fixation are reviewed. Fourteen cases were identified, consisting of one os odontoideum; four acute fractures and four non-unions of the odontoid; three tumors and two complex fractures of C2 vertebral body, and one C2-C3 post-traumatic instability. One misplaced screw without clinical consequences was the only complication recorded. Screw loosening or migration was not observed at follow-up, showing a stable fixation.

  17. An investigation of the aseptic loosening of an AISI 316L stainless steel hip prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Godec, Matjaz; Kocijan, Aleksandra; Dolinar, Drago; Mandrino, Djordje; Jenko, Monika; Antolic, Vane

    2010-08-01

    The total replacement of joints by the implantation of permanently indwelling prosthetic components has been one of the major successes of modern surgery in terms of relieving pain and correcting deformity. However, the aseptic loosening of a prosthetic-joint component is the most common reason for joint-revision surgery. Furthermore, it is thought that wear particles are one of the major contributors to the development and perpetuation of aseptic loosening. The aim of the present study was to identify the factors related to the aseptic loosening of an AISI 316L stainless steel total hip prosthesis. The stem was evaluated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, with polished and rough regions being analyzed in order to establish the differences in the chemical compositions of both regions. Specific areas were examined using scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and light microscopy.

  18. Reactivation of a tuberculous coxitis due to loosening of a total hip endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Fink, B; Casser, H R; Zilkens, K W; Rüther, W

    1995-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman who suffered from juvenile tuberculous coxitis at the age of 4 is presented. Her hip joint replacement lasted for 18 years and then needed replacing. Intraoperatively removed caseous soft tissue and an opalescent secretion histologically resembled a tuberculous focus, and bacteriological culture grew a Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain. Four months after the replacement, the patient suffered from a tuberculosis-induced septic loosening of the newly replaced hip joint endoprosthesis. The tuberculosis relapse was probably due to aseptic loosening of the first hip joint endoprosthesis.

  19. Carbon nanotube Archimedes screws.

    PubMed

    Oroszlány, László; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J

    2010-12-28

    Recently, nanomechanical devices composed of a long stationary inner carbon nanotube and a shorter, slowly rotating outer tube have been fabricated. In this paper, we study the possibility of using such devices as nanoscale transducers of motion into electricity. When the outer tube is chiral, we show that such devices act like quantum Archimedes screws, which utilize mechanical energy to pump electrons between reservoirs. We calculate the pumped charge from one end of the inner tube to the other, driven by the rotation of a chiral outer nanotube. We show that the pumped charge can be greater than one electron per 360° rotation, and consequently, such a device operating with a rotational frequency of 10 MHz, for example, would deliver a current of ≈1 pAmp.

  20. Split spline screw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A split spline screw type payload fastener assembly, including three identical male and female type split spline sections, is discussed. The male spline sections are formed on the head of a male type spline driver. Each of the split male type spline sections has an outwardly projecting load baring segment including a convex upper surface which is adapted to engage a complementary concave surface of a female spline receptor in the form of a hollow bolt head. Additionally, the male spline section also includes a horizontal spline releasing segment and a spline tightening segment below each load bearing segment. The spline tightening segment consists of a vertical web of constant thickness. The web has at least one flat vertical wall surface which is designed to contact a generally flat vertically extending wall surface tab of the bolt head. Mutual interlocking and unlocking of the male and female splines results upon clockwise and counter clockwise turning of the driver element.

  1. Spline screw autochanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1993-06-01

    A captured nut member is located within a tool interface assembly and being actuated by a spline screw member driven by a robot end effector. The nut member lowers and rises depending upon the directional rotation of the coupling assembly. The captured nut member further includes two winged segments which project outwardly in diametrically opposite directions so as to engage and disengage a clamping surface in the form of a chamfered notch respectively provided on the upper surface of a pair of parallel forwardly extending arm members of a bifurcated tool stowage holster which is adapted to hold and store a robotic tool including its end effector interface when not in use. A forward and backward motion of the robot end effector operates to insert and remove the tool from the holster.

  2. Effect of Steam Autoclaving on the Tensile Strength of Resin Cements Used for Bonding Two-Piece Zirconia Abutments.

    PubMed

    Fadanelli, Marcos Alexandre; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho do; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Turssi, Cecilia Pedroso; Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of steam autoclave sterilization on the tensile strength of two types of resin cements used to bond customized CAD/CAM zirconia abutments onto titanium bases. Forty sets of zirconia abutments cemented to screwed titanium bases of implants analogs were divided into 4 groups (n = 10). Two groups were treated with a conventional chemically activated resin cement (ML, Multilink Ivoclar Vivadent) and the other two groups with a self-adhesive dual resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). One group from each cement was submitted to steam autoclaving. The autoclave sterilization cycle was performed after 72 hours of cementation for 15 minutes at 121°C and 2.1 Kgf/cm(2). The samples were subjected to tensile strength testing in a universal testing machine (200 Kgf, 0.5 mm/min), from which the means and standard deviations were obtained in Newtons. Results showed (via ANOVA and Tukey's test; α = 0.05) that in the absence of steam autoclaving, no difference was observed in tensile strength between the cements tested: ML: 344.87 (93.79) and U200: 280 (92.42) (P = .314). Steam autoclaving, however, significantly increased tensile strength for the ML: 465.42 (87.87) compared to U200: 289.10 (49.02) (P < .001). Despite the significant increase in the ML samples (P = .013), autoclaving did not affect the tensile strength of the U200 samples (P > 0.05). The authors concluded that steam autoclaving increases the mean tensile strength of the chemically activated cement compared to the dual-cure self-adhesive cement. The performance of both cements evaluated was similar if the sterilization step was disconsidered.

  3. Characteristics of implant-CAD/CAM abutment connections of two different internal connection systems.

    PubMed

    Sumi, T; Braian, M; Shimada, A; Shibata, N; Takeshita, K; Vandeweghe, S; Coelho, P G; Wennerberg, A; Jimbo, R

    2012-05-01

    Titanium or zirconium computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing abutments are now widely used for aesthetic implant treatments; however, information regarding microscopic structural differences that may influence the biological and mechanical outcomes of different implant systems is limited. Therefore, the characteristics of different connection systems were investigated. Optical microscopic observation and scanning electron microscopy showed different characteristics of two internal systems, namely the Astra Tech and the Replace Select system, and for different materials. The scanning electron microscopic observation showed for the Astra Tech that the implant-abutment interface seemed to be completely sealed for both titanium and zirconium abutments, both horizontally and sagittally; however, the first implant-abutment contact was below the fixture top, creating a microgap, and fixtures connected with titanium abutments showed significantly larger values (23·56μm±5·44 in width, and 168·78μm±30·39 in depth, P<0·001). For Replace Select, scanning electron microscopy in the sagittal direction showed that the sealing of titanium and zirconium abutments differed. The seal between the implant-titanium and implant-zirconium abutments seemed to be complete at the butt-joint interface; however, the displacement of the abutment in relation to the fixture in the lateral direction was evident for both abutments with no statistical differences (P>0·70), creating an inverted microgap. Thus, microscopy evaluation of two commonly used internal systems connected to titanium or zirconium abutments showed that the implant-abutment interface was perfectly sealed under no-loading conditions. However, an inverted microgap was seen in both systems, which may result in bacterial accumulation as well as alteration of stress distribution at the implant-abutment interface.

  4. Comparative soft and hard tissue responses to titanium and polymer healing abutments.

    PubMed

    Koutouzis, Theofilos; Richardson, Joseph; Lundgren, Tord

    2011-03-01

    Limited information exists regarding soft tissue and hard tissue responses to abutments with different material composition. The aim of this study is to evaluate soft and hard tissue responses to titanium and polymer healing abutments over a 3-month period. Sixteen patients were included in this prospective trial. Implants were provisionalized with either titanium or polymer healing abutments. Changes of marginal bone level and soft tissue dimensions were recorded at implant installation and at 3 months.

  5. Loosening of Total Knee Arthroplasty after Brucellosis Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sazegari, Mohammad Ali; Bahramian, Fateme; Mirzaee, Fateme; Zafarani, Zohreh; Aslani, Hamidreza

    2017-01-01

    In this report we describe a 78-year-old man whose total knee arthroplasty showed the symptoms of infection with brucella with radiographic signs of loosening 5 years after the index surgery. The patient was treated successfully after a 2-stage revision arthroplasty surgery along with using rifampicin and doxycycline for 8 weeks. PMID:28271092

  6. Detection of bolt loosening in C C composite thermal protection panels: II. Experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinkyu; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2006-04-01

    The research presented in this paper is motivated by the need for reliable inspection technology for the detection of bolt loosening in carbon-carbon (C-C) thermal protection system (TPS) panels using minimal human intervention. Based on the diagnostic scheme proposed in part I of the study, a new PZT (lead zirconate titanate)-embedded sensor washer was developed to constitute the sensor network. The sensor suite was included in the C-C TPS prototype without jeopardizing the integrity of the original fastening components. The sensor-embedded washer enhances the remote sensing capability and achieves sufficient sensitivity by guiding the diagnostic waves to propagate primarily through the inspection areas. After evolution of the sensor design and appropriate algorithm development, the verification tests were conducted using a shaker which simulated the acoustic environments during the re-entry process. The test results revealed that the proposed system successfully identified the loss of the preload for the bolted joints under loosening and gave the correct diagnostic results. The sensors were found to be durable under cyclic mechanical loads without major failures, and the diagnostic scheme was capable of locating a loosened bracket as well as discriminating major failure modes 1 and 2: panel and bracket loosening in the bracket.

  7. Detection of bolt loosening in C C composite thermal protection panels: I. Diagnostic principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinkyu; Chang, Fu-Kuo

    2006-04-01

    A concept demonstrator of the structural health monitoring (SHM) system was developed to autonomously detect the degradation of the mechanical integrity of the standoff carbon-carbon (C-C) thermal protection system (TPS) panels. This system enables us to identify the location of the loosened bolts, as well as to predict the torque levels of those bolts accordingly. In the process of building the proposed SHM prototype, efforts have been focused primarily on developing a trustworthy diagnostic scheme and a responsive sensor suite. In part I of the study, an attenuation-based diagnostic method was proposed to assess the fastener integrity by observing the attenuation patterns of the resultant sensor signals. The attenuation-based method is based on the damping phenomena of ultrasonic waves across the bolted joints. The major advantage of the attenuation-based method over the conventional diagnostic methods is its local sensing capability of loosened brackets. The method can further discriminate the two major failure modes within a bracket: panel-joint loosening and bracket-joint loosening. The theoretical explanation of the attenuation-based method is performed using micro-contact theory and structural/internal damping principles, followed by parametric model studies and appropriate hypothesis testing.

  8. Bolt-loosening identification of bolt connections by vision image-based technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tuan-Cuong; Huynh, Thanh-Canh; Ryu, Joo-Young; Park, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Jeong-Tae

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an algorithm using image processing techniques is proposed to identify bolt-loosening in bolted connections of steel structures. Its basic concept is to identify rotation angles of nuts from a pictured image, and is mainly consisted of the following 3 steps: (1) taking a picture for a bolt joint, (2) segmenting the images for each nut by image processing techniques, and (3) identifying rotation angle of each nut and detecting bolt-loosening. By using the concept, an algorithm is designed for continuous monitoring and inspection of the bolt connections. As a key imageprocessing technique, Hough transform is used to identify rotation angles of nuts, and then bolt-loosening is detected by comparing the angles before and after bolt-loosening. Then the applicability of the proposed algorithm is evaluated by experimental tests for two lab-scaled models. A bolted joint model which consists of a splice plate and 8 sets of bolts and nuts with 2×4 array is used to simulate inspection of bridge connections, and a model which is consisted of a ring flange and 32 sets of bolt and nut is used to simulate continuous monitoring of bolted connections in wind turbine towers.

  9. Esthetic and Clinical Performance of Implant-Supported All-Ceramic Crowns Made with Prefabricated or CAD/CAM Zirconia Abutments.

    PubMed

    Wittneben, J G; Gavric, J; Belser, U C; Bornstein, M M; Joda, T; Chappuis, V; Sailer, I; Brägger, U

    2017-02-01

    Patients' esthetic expectations are increasing, and the options of the prosthetic pathways are currently evolving. The objective of this randomized multicenter clinical trial was to assess and compare the esthetic outcome and clinical performance of anterior maxillary all-ceramic implant crowns (ICs) based either on prefabricated zirconia abutments veneered with pressed ceramics or on CAD/CAM zirconia abutments veneered with hand buildup technique. The null hypothesis was that there is no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. Forty implants were inserted in sites 14 to 24 (FDI) in 40 patients in 2 centers, the Universities of Bern and Geneva, Switzerland. After final impression, 20 patients were randomized into group A, restored with a 1-piece screw-retained single crown made of a prefabricated zirconia abutment with pressed ceramic as the veneering material using the cut-back technique, or group B using an individualized CAD/CAM zirconia abutment (CARES abutment; Institut Straumann AG) with a hand buildup technique. At baseline, 6 mo, and 1 y clinical, esthetic and radiographic parameters were assessed. Group A exhibited 1 dropout patient and 1 failure, resulting in a survival rate of 94.7% after 1 y, in comparison to 100% for group B. No other complications occurred. Clinical parameters presented stable and healthy peri-implant soft tissues. Overall, no or only minimal crestal bone changes were observed with a mean DIB (distance from the implant shoulder to the first bone-to-implant contact) of -0.15 mm (group A) and 0.12 mm (group B) at 1 y. There were no significant differences at baseline, 6 mo, and 1 y for DIB values between the 2 groups. Pink esthetic score (PES) and white esthetic score (WES) values at all 3 examinations indicated stability over time for both groups and pleasing esthetic outcomes. Both implant-supported prosthetic pathways represent a valuable treatment option for the restoration of single ICs in the anterior maxilla

  10. Fixed reconstructions in partially edentulous patients using two-part ITI implants (Bonefit) as abutments.

    PubMed

    Brägger, U; Hämmerle, C; Weber, H P

    1990-12-01

    Fixed reconstructions on implant abutments may be a welcome modality in the treatment of partially edentulous patients following the principles of a prophylactically oriented comprehensive care. The option to create artificial tissue integrated abutments widens the range of indications for fixed reconstructions. Risky long-span bridges as well as the preparation of intact teeth for bridge abutments may frequently be avoided. Never should the contours of the prosthesis interfere with the patient's performance of optimal plaque control. Furthermore, supportive periodontal therapy with regular maintenance visits must be provided to optimize a long-term prognosis of the dention as well as the tissue-integrated artificial abutments.

  11. Pathways of macrophage apoptosis within the interface membrane in aseptic loosening of prostheses.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Wu, Wen; Cao, Lei; Huang, Yan; Zhu, Zhenan; Tang, Tingting; Dai, Kerong

    2011-12-01

    Aseptic loosening is a major cause of failure of total hip arthroplasty (THA). Macrophage apoptosis in interface membrane has been proved to play an important role in the pathogenesis of aseptic loosening. The purpose of current study was to identify the apoptotic mechanism of macrophages in the interface membrane of aseptic loosening. We collected periprosthetic interface membrane from 23 patients undergoing the revision operations for aseptic loosening of hip joint prostheses. To serve as the control group, samples of capsule were collected from 18 patients undergoing the primary hip arthroplasties for osteoarthritis (OA). The ultrastructure of interface membrane was examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and in situ apoptotic macrophage identification was performed by TUNEL staining. Furthermore, using immunohistochemical methods we investigated the expression of some apoptosis-related markers such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), cleaved caspase-3/4/8/9, cytochrome c, glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78), and growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene 153 (GADD153) in macrophages. These markers were regarded as apoptotic inducers or specific indicators of different apoptotic pathways such as death receptor pathway, mitochondrial pathway and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway. TEM showed that a great deal of wear debris was phagocytosed by macrophages, which displayed morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis. The results of TUNEL staining demonstrated that there were more apoptotic macrophages in interface membrane. The expression levels of iNOS, ONOO(-), cleaved caspase-3/4/8/9, cytochrome c, GRP78 and GADD153 in macrophages in interface membrane were significantly higher than those in the control samples (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that death receptor pathway, mitochondria/cytochrosome c caspase-dependent pathway and ER stress pathway are involved in the process of macrophage apoptosis. A

  12. Study of displacements of a bridge abutment using FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wymysłowski, Michał; Kurałowicz, Zygmunt

    2016-06-01

    Steel sheet piles are often used to support excavations for bridge foundations. When they are left in place in the permanent works, they have the potential to increase foundation bearing capacity and reduce displacements; but their presence is not usually taken into account in foundation design. In this article, the results of finite element analysis of a typical abutment foundation, with and without cover of sheet piles, are presented to demonstrate these effects. The structure described is located over the Więceminka river in the town of Kołobrzeg, Poland. It is a single-span road bridge with reinforced concrete slab.

  13. The development and evaluation of individualized templates to assist transoral C2 articular mass or transpedicular screw placement in TARP-IV procedures: adult cadaver specimen study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Shi; Wu, Zeng-Hui; Xia, Hong; Ma, Xiang-Yang; Ai, Fu-Zhi; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Jian-Hua; Mai, Xiao-Hong; Yin, Qing-Shui

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate system treats irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation from transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-I to transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-III. However, this system has demonstrated problems associated with screw loosening, atlantoaxial fixation and concealed or manifest neurovascular injuries. This study sought to design a set of individualized templates to improve the accuracy of anterior C2 screw placement in the transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-IV procedure. METHODS: A set of individualized templates was designed according to thin-slice computed tomography data obtained from 10 human cadavers. The templates contained cubic modules and drill guides to facilitate transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate positioning and anterior C2 screw placement. We performed 2 stages of cadaveric experiments with 2 cadavers in stage one and 8 in stage two. Finally, guided C2 screw placement was evaluated by reading postoperative computed tomography images and comparing the planned and inserted screw trajectories. RESULTS: There were two cortical breaching screws in stage one and three in stage two, but only the cortical breaching screws in stage one were ranked critical. In stage two, the planned entry points and the transverse angles of the anterior C2 screws could be simulated, whereas the declination angles could not be simulated due to intraoperative blockage of the drill bit and screwdriver by the upper teeth. CONCLUSIONS: It was feasible to use individualized templates to guide transoral C2 screw placement. Thus, these drill templates combined with transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-IV, may improve the accuracy of transoral C2 screw placement and reduce related neurovascular complications. PMID:25518033

  14. Deep reclamation loosening of soils: State of the problem, results of research, prospects of application, and degradation changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidel'man, F. R.

    2016-09-01

    The efficiency of deep reclamation loosening used for soils of different types on the main parent rocks in the Nonchernozemic zone (mantle and moraine loams, Permian and varved loamy clays, and clays) is assessed basing on the results of long-term stationary and analytical investigations. The long-term aftereffect of the deep loosening on the density, porosity, water permeability, and the main elements of the soil water regime and factors limiting the use of deep loosening are considered. Over 6-12 years after the deep loosening, in the area, where active and passive loosening by a plough was made, a zone of elevated water permeability is preserved at the depth of 40-75 cm. Based on this phenomenon, a new technology of deep reclamation loosening, which restores the hydraulic connection between the arable and deeper soil layers, is proposed. The data on active deep rippers that provide soil loosening to the depth of 0.9-1.0 m are presented. Some agroecological aspects related to the duration of deep loosening effects on the soils and their productivity are discussed. Recommendations on the application of passive and active loosening and moling of heavy-textured gleyed soils are suggested for the European part of the Nonchernozemic zone in the Russian Federation. Field and laboratory works on estimating the efficiency of deep loosening continued for 15 years (1976-1990) for heavy-textured soils on the loess-like, fine-stratified varved clays, as well as on acid moraine and calcareous Permian clays and loamy clays in Moscow, Vologda, Novgorod, and Kirov oblasts.

  15. Evaluation of different methods to clean titanium abutments. A scanning electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Speelman, J A; Collaert, B; Klinge, B

    1992-09-01

    The cleaning effectiveness of different treatment methods for titanium abutments was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). In the mandible of 4 beagle dogs, 25 titanium abutments were installed (modum Brånemark). After 16 weeks of plaque accumulation, mineralized deposits had formed on 23 abutments. Each of these abutments was subjected to one of the following treatment methods: scaling with (1) metal, (2) plastic, or (3) ultrasonic instruments; (4) air-polishing, (5) weekly rubber cup polishing or (6) daily brushing with a conventional toothbrush. Fourteen abutments were removed immediately after treatment. On 9 abutments, the scaling procedures and air-polishing were repeated after another 16 weeks of plaque accumulation. The abutments were prepared for SEM, and each of them was viewed and photographed at 3 different magnifications. The photomicrographs were evaluated by 3 examiners who, guided by reference pictures, gave each abutment a "cleanliness" score, ranking from 0 to 5. Regular rubber cup polishing and regular brushing resulted in the highest surface cleanliness, while the air-polishing procedure showed the lowest cleanliness score. None of the 3 scaling methods created a cleanliness score better than 3. The 3 scaling methods were considered equal in their cleaning effectiveness. No differences could be observed between surfaces treated 1 x or 2 x. Taken the present findings and those of other studies concerning the effects of scaling on the surface roughness and biocompatibility into consideration, it was concluded that plastic scalers may be the instruments of choice for debridement of titanium implant surfaces.

  16. The upper bound of abutment scour defined by selected laboratory and field data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, Stephen; Caldwell, Andral W.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Transportation, conducted a field investigation of abutment scour in South Carolina and used that data to develop envelope curves defining the upper bound of abutment scour. To expand upon this previous work, an additional cooperative investigation was initiated to combine the South Carolina data with abutment-scour data from other sources and evaluate the upper bound of abutment scour with the larger data set. To facilitate this analysis, a literature review was made to identify potential sources of published abutment-scour data, and selected data, consisting of 446 laboratory and 331 field measurements, were compiled for the analysis. These data encompassed a wide range of laboratory and field conditions and represent field data from 6 states within the United States. The data set was used to evaluate the South Carolina abutment-scour envelope curves. Additionally, the data were used to evaluate a dimensionless abutment-scour envelope curve developed by Melville (1992), highlighting the distinct difference in the upper bound for laboratory and field data. The envelope curves evaluated in this investigation provide simple but useful tools for assessing the potential maximum abutment-scour depth in the field setting.

  17. Mechanical resistance of zirconium implant abutments: A review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero-Aguilar, Cristina; Torres-Lagares, Daniel; Jiménez-Melendo, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José L.

    2012-01-01

    The increase of aesthetic demands, together with the successful outcome of current implants, has renewed interest in the search for new materials with enough mechanical properties and better aesthetic qualities than the materials customarily used in implanto-prosthetic rehabilitation. Among these materials, zirconium has been used in different types of implants, including prosthetic abutments. The aim of the present review is to analyse current scientific evidence supporting the use of this material for the above mentioned purposes. We carried out the review of the literature published in the last ten years (2000 through 2010) of in vitro trials of dynamic and static loading of zirconium abutments found in the databases of Medline and Cochrane using the key words zirconium abutment, fracture resistance, fracture strength, cyclic loading. Although we have found a wide variability of values among the different studies, abutments show favourable clinical behaviour for the rehabilitation of single implants in the anterior area. Such variability may be explained by the difficulty to simulate daily mastication under in vitro conditions. The clinical evidence, as found in our study, does not recommend the use of implanto-prosthetic zirconium abutments in the molar area. Key words: Zirconium abutment, zirconium implant abutment, zirconia abutment, fracture resistance, fracture strength, cyclic loading. PMID:22143702

  18. Non-Rigid Connector for Managing Pier Abutment in FPD: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kodgi, Ashwin

    2014-01-01

    A frequent clinical situation, either in the maxillary or mandibular arch, is of a missing first premolar and first molar, resulting in fixed partial denture design in which the canine and the second molar act as terminal abutments and second premolar act as a pier abutment. It has been postulated that the tendency of terminal abutments to intrude during function results in a teetering movements, where the pier abutment act as a fulcrum. These movements will eventually result in debonding of the less retentive terminal retainer. In order to overcome this potential risk, utilization of non rigid connectors has been advised. This clinical case report describes incorporation of non rigid connector to rehabilitate pier abutment case. PMID:25177650

  19. Do nit removal formulations and other treatments loosen head louse eggs and nits from hair?

    PubMed

    Burgess, I F

    2010-03-01

    Eggs of the head louse, Pediculus capitis De Geer (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae), are difficult to remove because the female louse fixes them to hairs using a proteinaceous secretion that hardens within seconds. The persistent eggshells are harmless but unsightly and are often mistaken for an active infestation. Combing with a fine comb (nit comb) does not readily remove the eggs or empty eggshells because of the resilience of the fixative and both folk remedies and medical products have claimed to facilitate their removal. Measurement of the force required to initiate sliding of the egg fixative using a slip-peel tester was unable to detect evidence that any of three products which claimed to have egg-loosening properties (Step 2 Nit Removal System, Clear Lice Egg Remover, RID Lice Egg Loosener Gel) had any activity or exerted any effect on the egg fixative beyond the lubricating effects conveyed by water or conventional hair conditioner.

  20. The effect of hydroxyapatite coated screw in the lateral fragility fractures of the femur. A prospective randomized clinical study.

    PubMed

    Pesce, V; Maccagnano, G; Vicenti, G; Notarnicola, A; Moretti, L; Tafuri, S; Vanni, D; Salini, V; Moretti, B

    2014-01-01

    Due to a growing numbers of lateral fragility fractures of the femur and their high social costs the need to work out an effective strategy in order to find a better solution for these patients is warranted. From January 2010 to July 2011, we carried out a prospective randomized clinical study comparing the results of patients with femoral lateral fractures treated by nail and cephalic hydroxyapatite coated screws (study group including 27 patients) compared to the patients with the same fractures treated with nail and head standard screws (control group including 27 patients). We defined the two parts of the femoral neck as ROI 1 (under the head screw) and ROI 2 (above the femoral screw) on the AP view. The bone density of the two areas was calculated using DEXA at T0 (1st day post-surgery), at T1 (40th day post-surgery), at T2 (3 months later), at T3 (1 year later). The clinical-radiography evaluations were based on the Harris Hip Score (HHS), ADL test and x-ray views of the hip. As far as the bone mineral density average of ROI 1 and ROI 2 is concerned, we found a significant statistical increase at T1 and T3 in the study group, while it was not significant in the control group. We could account for this data through the higher mechanical stability of hydroxyapatite coated screws than standard screws. In fact, this material was responsible for improved implant osteointegration. Thanks to a 1 year follow-up we were able to demonstrate the implant utility associated with augmentation and the importance of densitometry exams such as easily repeatable and low cost diagnostics to prevent the onset of complications linked to screw loosening.

  1. A Novel RFID-Based Sensing Method for Low-Cost Bolt Loosening Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Cui, Xingmei; Xu, Yunpeng

    2016-01-01

    In coal mines, bolt loosening in the cage guide is affected by the harsh environmental factors and cage hoist vibration, leading to significant threats to work safety. It is crucial, to this effect, to successfully detect the status of multipoint bolts of guide structures. This paper proposes a system to monitor bolt status in harsh environments established based on the RFID technique. A proof-of-concept model was demonstrated consisting of a bolt gearing system, passive UHF RFID tags, a reader, and monitoring software. A tinfoil metal film is fixed on the retaining plate and an RFID tag bonded to a large gear, with the bolt to be detected fixed in the center of a smaller gear. The radio-frequency signal cannot be received by the reader if the tag is completely obscured by the tinfoil, and if the bolt is loose, the tag’s antenna is exposed when the gear revolves. A radio-frequency signal that carries corresponding bolt’s information is transmitted by the RFID tag to the RFID reader due to coil coupling, identifying loose bolt location and reporting them in the software. Confirmatory test results revealed that the system indeed successfully detects bolt loosening and comparative test results (based on a reed switch multipoint bolt loosening monitor system) provided valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed system. PMID:26828498

  2. Investigation of a Passive Sensor Array for Diagnosis of Loosening of Endoprosthetic Implants

    PubMed Central

    Ruther, Cathérine; Schulze, Christian; Boehme, Andrea; Nierath, Hannes; Ewald, Hartmut; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer; Kluess, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Currently, imaging methods are used to diagnose loosening of endoprosthetic implants, but fail to achieve 100% accuracy. In this study, a passive sensor array which is based on the interaction between magnetic oscillators inside the implant and an excitation coil outside the patient was investigated. The excited oscillators produce sound in the audible range, which varies according to the extent of loosening. By performing several experimental tests, the sensor array was optimized to guarantee reproducible and selective excitation of the sound emission. Variation in the distance between the oscillators demonstrated a definite influence on the quality of the generated sound signal. Furthermore, a numerical design analysis using the boundary element method was generated for consideration of the magnetic field and the selectivity of the oscillators during excitation. The numerical simulation of the coil showed the higher selectivity of a coil with a C-shape compared to a cylindrical coil. Based on these investigations, the passive sensor system reveals the potential for detection of implant loosening. Future aims include the further miniaturization of the oscillators and measurements to determine the sensitivity of the proposed sensor system. PMID:23344370

  3. In vivo cell wall loosening by hydroxyl radicals during cress seed germination and elongation growth.

    PubMed

    Müller, Kerstin; Linkies, Ada; Vreeburg, Robert A M; Fry, Stephen C; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Leubner-Metzger, Gerhard

    2009-08-01

    Loosening of cell walls is an important developmental process in key stages of the plant life cycle, including seed germination, elongation growth, and fruit ripening. Here, we report direct in vivo evidence for hydroxyl radical ((*)OH)-mediated cell wall loosening during plant seed germination and seedling growth. We used electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to show that (*)OH is generated in the cell wall during radicle elongation and weakening of the endosperm of cress (Lepidium sativum; Brassicaceae) seeds. Endosperm weakening precedes radicle emergence, as demonstrated by direct biomechanical measurements. By (3)H fingerprinting, we showed that wall polysaccharides are oxidized in vivo by the developmentally regulated action of apoplastic (*)OH in radicles and endosperm caps: the production and action of (*)OH increased during endosperm weakening and radicle elongation and were inhibited by the germination-inhibiting hormone abscisic acid. Both effects were reversed by gibberellin. Distinct and tissue-specific target sites of (*)OH attack on polysaccharides were evident. In vivo (*)OH attack on cell wall polysaccharides were evident not only in germinating seeds but also in elongating maize (Zea mays; Poaceae) seedling coleoptiles. We conclude that plant cell wall loosening by (*)OH is a controlled action of this type of reactive oxygen species.

  4. Investigation of a passive sensor array for diagnosis of loosening of endoprosthetic implants.

    PubMed

    Ruther, Cathérine; Schulze, Christian; Boehme, Andrea; Nierath, Hannes; Ewald, Hartmut; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer; Kluess, Daniel

    2012-12-20

    Currently, imaging methods are used to diagnose loosening of endoprosthetic implants, but fail to achieve 100% accuracy. In this study, a passive sensor array which is based on the interaction between magnetic oscillators inside the implant and an excitation coil outside the patient was investigated. The excited oscillators produce sound in the audible range, which varies according to the extent of loosening. By performing several experimental tests, the sensor array was optimized to guarantee reproducible and selective excitation of the sound emission. Variation in the distance between the oscillators demonstrated a definite influence on the quality of the generated sound signal. Furthermore, a numerical design analysis using the boundary element method was generated for consideration of the magnetic field and the selectivity of the oscillators during excitation. The numerical simulation of the coil showed the higher selectivity of a coil with a C-shape compared to a cylindrical coil. Based on these investigations, the passive sensor system reveals the potential for detection of implant loosening. Future aims include the further miniaturization of the oscillators and measurements to determine the sensitivity of the proposed sensor system.

  5. A Novel RFID-Based Sensing Method for Low-Cost Bolt Loosening Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian; Cui, Xingmei; Xu, Yunpeng

    2016-01-28

    In coal mines, bolt loosening in the cage guide is affected by the harsh environmental factors and cage hoist vibration, leading to significant threats to work safety. It is crucial, to this effect, to successfully detect the status of multipoint bolts of guide structures. This paper proposes a system to monitor bolt status in harsh environments established based on the RFID technique. A proof-of-concept model was demonstrated consisting of a bolt gearing system, passive UHF RFID tags, a reader, and monitoring software. A tinfoil metal film is fixed on the retaining plate and an RFID tag bonded to a large gear, with the bolt to be detected fixed in the center of a smaller gear. The radio-frequency signal cannot be received by the reader if the tag is completely obscured by the tinfoil, and if the bolt is loose, the tag's antenna is exposed when the gear revolves. A radio-frequency signal that carries corresponding bolt's information is transmitted by the RFID tag to the RFID reader due to coil coupling, identifying loose bolt location and reporting them in the software. Confirmatory test results revealed that the system indeed successfully detects bolt loosening and comparative test results (based on a reed switch multipoint bolt loosening monitor system) provided valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed system.

  6. Bone Cement-Augmented Percutaneous Screw Fixation for Malignant Spinal Metastases: Is It Feasible?

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pius; Kim, Seok Won

    2017-01-01

    Objective We evaluated the validity of bone cement-augmented percutaneous screw fixation for treating malignant spinal metastases. Methods Between 2011 and 2015, 14 patients (eight men and six women) who underwent bone cement-augmented percutaneous screw fixation for malignant spinal metastases were enrolled in this study. Their life expectancy was considered to be more than one month and less than one year, based on the revised Tokuhashi scoring system. Clinical findings including the back pain scale score, functional outcome, procedure related complications, and survival were assessed preoperatively, postoperatively, and then six months after the procedure. Results Twelve of the patients (86%) survived up to six months after the procedure. Three required mini-open decompressive laminectomy for severe epidural compression. Bone cement-augmented percutaneous screw fixation was performed one level above, one level below, and at the pathologic level itself. The mean operation time was 60 minutes (45–180) and blood loss was less than 100 mL. Prior to surgery, the mean pain score on the visual analogue scale was 8.8, while one month after the procedure, it had reduced to 3.0; this improvement was maintained until the six-month assessment in the surviving patients. All patients were able to sit within the first two days after surgery, and no patient experienced neurological deterioration at the one-month follow up after the surgery. No patient experienced screw loosening during the six months of follow-up. Asymptomatic cement leakage into the epidural space was observed in two patients, but no major complications were observed. Conclusion For selected patients with malignant spinal metastases, bone cement-augmented percutaneous screw fixation can provide significant pain relief and improve quality of life. PMID:28264239

  7. 1. West portal of the mudshed abutting the west portal ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. West portal of the mudshed abutting the west portal of Tunnel 5, view to the northwest, 135mm lens. The flat-roofed reinforced concrete mudsheds, rocksheds, and snowsheds are a common feature of the Natron Cutoff over the summit of the Cascades. With the railroad located on a sidehill bench cut into the precipitous slopes, the sheds protect the track from rock and mud slides, as well as from avalanches. With a solid wall on the uphill side and a series of columns on the downhill side, they form a gallery-like effect from within. This mudshed was built concurrent with the tunnel, in 1927. Though none of the mudsheds on the line are scheduled to be modified, this shed was documented as an integral element of Tunnel 5. - Southern Pacific Railroad Natron Cutoff, Tunnel 5, Milepost 545.2, McCredie Springs, Lane County, OR

  8. The use of definitive implant abutments for the fabrication of provisional crowns: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Bilhan, Hakan; Mumcu, Emre

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The anterior region is a challenge for most clinicians to achieve optimal esthetics with dental implants. The provisional crown is a key factor in the success of obtaining pink esthetics around restorations with single implants, by soft tissue and inter-proximal papilla shaping. Provisional abutments bring additional costs and make the treatment more expensive. Since one of the aims of the clinician is to reduce costs and find more economic ways to raise patient satisfaction, this paper describes a practical method for chair-side fabrication of non-occlusal loaded provisional crowns used by the authors for several years successfully. Methods Twenty two patients (9 males, 13 females; mean age, 36,72 years) with one missing anterior tooth were treated by using the presented method. Metal definitive abutments instead of provisional abutments were used and provisional crowns were fabricated on the definitive abutments for all of the patients. The marginal fit was finished on a laboratory analogue and temporarily cemented to the abutments. The marginal adaptation of the crowns was evaluated radiographically. Results The patients were all satisfied with the final appearance and no complications occurred until the implants were loaded with permanent restorations. Conclusions The use of the definitive abutments for provisional crowns instead of provisional abutments reduces the costs and the same results can be obtained. PMID:22087416

  9. Metallurgical examination of gun barrel screws

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, E.L.; Clift, T.L.

    1996-06-01

    The examination was conducted to determine the extent of degradation that had occurred after a series of firings; these screws prevent live rounds of ammunition from being loaded into the firing chamber. One concern is that if the screw tip fails and a live round is accidentally loaded into the chamber, a live round could be fired. Another concern is that if the blunt end of the screw begins to degrade by cracking, pieces could become small projectiles during firing. All screws used in firing 100 rounds or more exhibited some degree degradation, which progressively worsened as the number of rounds fired increased. (SEM, metallography, x-ray analysis, and microhardness were used.) Presence of cracks in these screws after 100 fired rounds is a serious concern that warrants the discontinued use of these screws. The screw could be improved by selecting an alloy more resistant to thermal and chemical degradation.

  10. Assessment of the NCHRP abutment scour prediction equations with laboratory and field data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, Stephen T.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in coopeation with nthe National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) is assessing the performance of several abutment-scour predcition equations developed in NCHRP Project 24-15(2) and NCHRP Project 24-20. To accomplish this assssment, 516 laboratory and 329 fiels measurements of abutment scor were complied from selected sources and applied tto the new equations. Results will be used to identify stregths, weaknesses, and limitations of the NCHRP abutment scour equations, providing practical insights for applying the equations. This paper presents some prelimiray findings from the investigation.

  11. Metal debris concentrations in soft tissues adjacent to loosened femoral stems is higher in uncemented than cemented implants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are still many questions related to aseptic femoral stem loosening. Systemic and local immune responses to the implanted “foreign body” is one of the reasons for loosening. The purpose of the study was to measure metal ion concentration (Ti, Co, Cr, Mo, Ni, Al) around loosened femoral stems and compare their levels around uncemented and cemented implants. Methods This paper reports 50 hips operated for isolated stem loosening, in 50 patients at the mean age of 57 years (from 21 to 87). There were 25 cemented (Co,Cr29,Mo,Ni) and 25 uncemented (Ti, Al) stems. The mean follow-up from primary hip replacement to revision was 10.1 years (from 0.5 to 17). During the procedure, scar tissue around the stem was taken for analysis of metal ions. Results The concentrations of titanium and aluminium in soft tissues around uncemented loosened stems were higher than cemented ones (p < 0.001, p < 0.001 respectively). However, no statistically significant differences were observed between both types of stems in terms of ions of the metal of which cemented implants had been made of (Co, Cr, Mo, Ni). Conclusions In soft tissue around a loosened stem, the concentrations of metal ions from implants are much higher in case of uncemented stems than of cemented ones. Metal ions from vitalium femoral heads were found around uncemented stems in similar values to cemented streams. PMID:25098913

  12. Effect of screw access hole preparation on fracture load of implant-supported zirconia-based crowns: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtarpour, Hadi; Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Mahshid, Minoo; Tabatabaian, Farhad; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fracture load of implant-supported restorations is an important factor in clinical success. This study evaluated the effect of two techniques for screw access hole preparation on the fracture load of cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based crowns. Methods. Thirty similar cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based maxillary central incisor crowns were evaluated in three groups of 10. Group NH: with no screw access holes for the control; Group HBS: with screw access holes prepared with a machine before zirconia sintering; Group HAS: with screw access holes prepared manually after zirconia sintering. In group HBS, the access holes were virtually designed and prepared by a computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing system. In group HAS, the access holes were manually prepared after zirconia sintering using a diamond bur. The dimensions of the screw access holes were equal in both groups. The crowns were cemented onto same-size abutments and were then subjected to thermocycling. The fracture load values of the crowns were measured using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey test (P < 0.05). Results. The mean fracture load value for the group NH was 888.37 ± 228.92 N, which was the highest among the groups, with a significant difference (P < 0.0001). The fracture load values were 610.48 ± 125.02 N and 496.74 ± 104.10 Nin the HBS and HAS groups, respectively, with no significant differences (P = 0.44). Conclusion. Both techniques used for preparation of screw access holes in implant-supported zirconia-based crowns decreased the fracture load. PMID:27651885

  13. Effect of screw access hole preparation on fracture load of implant-supported zirconia-based crowns: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Mokhtarpour, Hadi; Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Mahshid, Minoo; Tabatabaian, Farhad; Alikhasi, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background. Fracture load of implant-supported restorations is an important factor in clinical success. This study evaluated the effect of two techniques for screw access hole preparation on the fracture load of cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based crowns. Methods. Thirty similar cement-screw-retained implant-supported zirconia-based maxillary central incisor crowns were evaluated in three groups of 10. Group NH: with no screw access holes for the control; Group HBS: with screw access holes prepared with a machine before zirconia sintering; Group HAS: with screw access holes prepared manually after zirconia sintering. In group HBS, the access holes were virtually designed and prepared by a computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing system. In group HAS, the access holes were manually prepared after zirconia sintering using a diamond bur. The dimensions of the screw access holes were equal in both groups. The crowns were cemented onto same-size abutments and were then subjected to thermocycling. The fracture load values of the crowns were measured using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey test (P < 0.05). Results. The mean fracture load value for the group NH was 888.37 ± 228.92 N, which was the highest among the groups, with a significant difference (P < 0.0001). The fracture load values were 610.48 ± 125.02 N and 496.74 ± 104.10 Nin the HBS and HAS groups, respectively, with no significant differences (P = 0.44). Conclusion. Both techniques used for preparation of screw access holes in implant-supported zirconia-based crowns decreased the fracture load.

  14. Regulation of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling Proteins by Osteoblasts in Titanium Nanoparticle-Induced Aseptic Loosening Model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing; Hou, Yanhua; Fu, Na; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Li, Guo; Peng, Qiang; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-10-01

    Titanium (Ti)-wear particles, formed at the bone-implant interface, are responsible for aseptic loosening, which is a main cause of total joint replacement failure. There have been many studies on Ti particle-induced function changes in mono-cultured osteoblasts and synovial cells. However, little is known on extracellular matrix remodeling displayed by osteoblasts when in coexistence with Synovial cells. To further mimic the bone-implant interface environment, we firstly established a nanoscaled-Ti particle-induced aseptic loosening system by co-culturing osteoblasts and Synovial cells. We then explored the impact of the Synovial cells on Ti particle-engulfed osteoblasts in the mimicked flamed niche. The matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases expression levels, two protein families which are critical in osseointegration, were examined under induction by tumor necrosis factor-alpha. It was found that the co-culture between the osteoblasts and Synovial cells markedly increased the migration and proliferation of the osteoblasts, even in the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts. Importantly, the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts, induced by TNF-alpha after the co-culture, enhanced the release of the matrix metalloproteinases and reduced the expressions of lysyl oxidases. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling at the protein level was further assessed by investigations on gene expression of the matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases, which also suggested that the regulation started at the genetic level. Our research work has therefore revealed the critical role of multi cell-type interactions in the extracellular matrix remodeling within the peri-prosthetic tissues, which provides new insights on aseptic loosening and brings new clues about incomplete osseointegration between the implantation materials and their surrounding bones.

  15. The pedicle screw-rod system is an acceptable method of reconstructive surgery after resection of sacroiliac joint tumours

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi-Jun; Yunus, Akbar; Tian, Zheng; Chen, Jiang-Tao; Wang, Chong; Xu, Lei-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Hemipelvic resections for primary bone tumours require reconstruction to restore weight bearing along anatomic axes. However, reconstruction of the pelvic arch remains a major surgical challenge because of the high rate of associated complications. We used the pedicle screw-rod system to reconstruct the pelvis, and the purpose of this investigation was to assess the oncology, functional outcome and complication rate following this procedure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the operative indications and technique of the pedicle screw-rod system in reconstruction of the stability of the sacroiliac joint after resection of sacroiliac joint tumours. The average MSTS (Musculoskeletal Tumour Society) score was 26.5 at either three months after surgery or at the latest follow-up. Seven patients had surgery-related complications, including wound dehiscence in one, infection in two, local necrosis in four (including infection in two), sciatic nerve palsy in one and pubic symphysis subluxation in one. There was no screw loosening or deep vein thrombosis occurring in this series. Using a pedicle screw-rod after resection of a sacroiliac joint tumour is an acceptable method of pelvic reconstruction because of its reduced risk of complications and satisfactory functional outcome, as well as its feasibility of reconstruction for type IV pelvis tumour resection without elaborate preoperative customisation. Level of evidence: Level IV, therapeutic study. PMID:27095944

  16. NORTH ABUTMENT DETAIL. AveryBartholomew Patent Railroad Iron Bridge, Town ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTH ABUTMENT DETAIL. - Avery-Bartholomew Patent Railroad Iron Bridge, Town park south of Route 222, west of Owasco Inlet (moved from Elm Street Extension spanning Fall Creek, Nubia, NY), Groton, Tompkins County, NY

  17. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF EMBANKMENT-GROUNDS FOR ABUTMENT CONFINED BY FILLS ON EXPRESSWAYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hirotake; Yokota, Seiya

    The number of abutments confined by fills constructed on expressways have increased to utilize materials generated on-site and reduce costs. An abutment confined by fill is an abutment constructed on an embankment-ground and supported by piles. In order to build abutments on embankment-grounds, the embankment-ground requires good ground resistance. But, up to now, there is no established method for its design and construction. Accordingly, it became necessary to establish a method. To do this, we have studied 107 cases of embankment-ground constructions on expressways. This report shows their deformation characteristics, settlement characteristics, and the impact of earthquakes on piles constructed in embankment-grounds, and describes how the standards for the design and construction management of embankment-grounds were established based on the findings.

  18. Replacement of missing anterior tooth using screw retained implant prosthesis in the esthetic zone: a case report with 3 years of follow up.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Manawar; Dhanasekar, B; Aparna, I N; Naim, Hina

    2014-09-01

    As more and more dental practitioners are focusing on implant-supported fixed restorations, some clinicians favor the use of cement retained restorations while others consider screw-retained prosthesis to be the best choice. As both types of prostheses have certain advantages and disadvantages, clinicians should be aware of the limitations of each type. Screw-retained implant restorations have an advantage of predictable retention, retrievability and lack of potentially retained sub-gingival cement. However, a few disadvantages exist such as precise placement of the implant for optimal and esthetic location of the screw access hole and obtaining passive fit. On the other hand, cement retained restorations eliminates unaesthetic screw access holes; have passive fit of castings; reduce stress to splinted implants because of minor misfit of the framework; reduced complexity of lab procedures; enhanced esthetics; reduced cost factors and non disrupted morphology of the occlusal table. This case report presents the replacement of missing left central incisor using screw-retained implant prosthesis due to palatal trajectory of the implant placement and inadequate abutment height for retention of cement retained prosthesis.

  19. Screw-fed pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Sprouse, Kenneth M

    2014-11-25

    A pump system includes a pump that includes a first belt and a second belt that are spaced apart from each other to provide generally straight sides of a passage there between. There is an inlet at one end of the passage and an outlet at an opposite end of the passage, with a passage length that extends between the inlet and the outlet. The passage defines a gap distance in a width direction between the straight sides at the passage inlet. A hopper includes an interior space that terminates at a mouth at the passage inlet. At least one screw is located within the interior space of the hopper and includes a screw diameter in the width direction that is less than or equal to the gap distance.

  20. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  1. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R.

    1982-01-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  2. Influence of superstructure geometry on the mechanical behavior of zirconia implant abutments: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Geringer, Alexander; Diebels, Stefan; Nothdurft, Frank P

    2014-12-01

    To predict the clinical performance of zirconia abutments, it is crucial to examine the mechanical behavior of different dental implant-abutment connection configurations. The international standard protocol for dynamic fatigue tests of dental implants (ISO 14801) allows comparing these configurations using standardized superstructure geometries. However, from a mechanical point of view, the geometry of clinical crowns causes modified boundary conditions. The purpose of this finite element (FE) study was to evaluate the influence of the superstructure geometry on the maximum stress values of zirconia abutments with a conical implant-abutment connection. Geometry models of the experimental setup described in ISO 14801 were generated using CAD software following the reconstruction of computerized tomography scans from all relevant components. These models served as a basis for an FE simulation. To reduce the numerical complexity of the FE model, the interaction between loading stamp and superstructure geometry was taken into account by defining the boundary conditions with regard to the frictional force. The results of the FE simulations performed on standardized superstructure geometry and anatomically shaped crowns showed a strong influence of the superstructure geometry and related surface orientations on the mechanical behavior of the underlying zirconia abutments. In conclusion, ISO testing of zirconia abutments should be accompanied by load-bearing capacity testing under simulated clinical conditions to predict clinical performance.

  3. Ibandronate and periprosthetic bone mass: new therapeutic approach in periprosthetic loosening prevention

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Quarta, Laura; Grimaldi, Antonella; Orgiani, Antonio; Marsilio, Antonio; Rollo, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    A prosthetic implant modifies the physiological transmission of loads to the bone, initiating a remodeling process. Studies of the mechanisms responsible for periprosthetic bone loss contributed to the definition of new pharmacological strategies that may prevent aseptic implant loosening. Bisphosphonates are a class of drugs useful to this purpose, and have been shown to be effective in reducing periprosthetic resorption during the first year after the implant. We aimed to assess the inhibitory effect on periprosthetic osteolysis of ibandronate, a highly potent aminobisphosphonate, administered orally and IV with an extended interval between doses and optimal treatment adherence. In view of the fact that periprosthetic remodeling takes place during the first 6-12 months after surgery and is ultimately responsible for prosthesis longevity, we may conclude that the administration of high dosage ibandronate postsurgery by IV bolus and subsequently as cyclic oral treatment reduced cortical osteopenia in the metaphyseal region, and in the calcar region of the proximal femur. This therapy might therefore be used as preventive measure against postsurgical osteopenia and probably also against aseptic loosening. PMID:22461804

  4. SIRT1 protects osteoblasts against particle-induced inflammatory responses and apoptosis in aseptic prosthesis loosening.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhantao; Wang, Zhenheng; Jin, Jiewen; Wang, Yong; Bao, Nirong; Gao, Qian; Zhao, Jianning

    2017-02-01

    We hypothesized that SIRT1 downregulation in osteoblasts induced by wear particles was one of the reasons for particle-induced osteolysis (PIO) in total joint arthroplasty failure. In the present study, the expression of SIRT1 was examined in osteoblasts treated with TiAl6V4 particles (TiPs) and CoCrMo particles (CoPs) from materials used in prosthetics and specimens from PIO animal models. To address whether SIRT1 downregulation triggers inflammatory responses and apoptosis in osteoblasts, the effect of a SIRT1 activator, resveratrol on the expression of inflammatory cytokines and apoptosis in particle-treated osteoblasts was tested. The results demonstrated that SIRT1 expression was significantly downregulated in particle-treated osteoblasts and PIO animal models. Both pharmacological activation and overexpression of SIRT1 dramatically reduced the particle-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and osteoblast apoptosis through NF-κB and p53 signaling, respectively. Furthermore, in PIO animal models, resveratrol significantly reduced the severity of osteolysis. Collectively, the results of the present study indicated that SIRT1 plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of aseptic loosening, and further treatment targeted at SIRT1 possibly lead to novel approaches for prevention of aseptic prosthesis loosening.

  5. Shock-Absorbent Ball-Screw Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirr, Otto A., Jr.; Meneely, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Actuator containing two ball screws in series employs Belleville springs to reduce impact loads, thereby increasing life expectancy. New application of springs increases reliability of equipment in which ball screws commonly used. Set of three springs within lower screw of ball-screw mechanism absorbs impacts that result when parts reach their upper and lower limits of movement. Mechanism designed with Belleville springs as shock-absorbing elements because springs have good energy-to-volume ratio and easily stacked to attain any stiffness and travel.

  6. Determination of Abutment Pressure in Coal Mines with Extremely Thick Alluvium Stratum: A Typical Kind of Rockburst Mines in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Sitao; Feng, Yu; Jiang, Fuxing

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the abutment pressure distribution in coal mines with extremely thick alluvium stratum (ETAS), which is a typical kind of mines encountering frequent intense rockbursts in China. This occurs due to poor understanding to abutment pressure distribution pattern and the consequent inappropriate mine design. In this study, a theoretical computational model of abutment pressure for ETAS longwall panels is proposed based on the analysis of load transfer mechanisms of key stratum (KS) and ETAS. The model was applied to determine the abutment pressure distribution of LW2302S in Xinjulong Coal Mine; the results of stress and microseismic monitoring verified the rationality of this model. The calculated abutment pressure of LW2302S was also used in the terminal mining line design of LW2301N for rockburst prevention, successfully protecting the main roadway from the adverse influence of the abutment pressure.

  7. A Biomechanical Comparison of Expansive Pedicle Screws for Severe Osteoporosis: The Effects of Screw Design and Cement Augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Ching-Lung; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Lai, Po-Liang; Chen, Yi-Lu; Liu, Mu-Yi; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Expansive pedicle screws significantly improve fixation strength in osteoporotic spines. However, the previous literature does not adequately address the effects of the number of lengthwise slits and the extent of screw expansion on the strength of the bone/screw interface when expansive screws are used with or without cement augmentation. Herein, four designs for expansive pedicle screws with different numbers of lengthwise slits and different screw expansion levels were evaluated. Synthetic bones simulating severe osteoporosis were used to provide a comparative platform for each screw design. The prepared specimens were then tested for axial pullout failure. Regardless of screw design, screws with cement augmentation demonstrated significantly higher pullout strength than pedicle screws without cement augmentation (p < 0.001). For screws without cement augmentation, solid screws exhibited the lowest pullout strength compared to the four expansive groups (p < 0.01). No significant differences in pullout strength were observed between the expansive screws with different designs (p > 0.05). Taken together, our results show that pedicle screws combined with cement augmentation may greatly increase screw fixation regardless of screws with or without expansion. An increase in both the number of slits and the extent of screw expansion had little impact on the screw-anchoring strength. Cement augmentation is the most influential factor for improving screw pullout strength. PMID:26720724

  8. Three-dimensional accuracy of implant and abutment level impression techniques: effect on marginal discrepancy.

    PubMed

    Alikhasi, Marzieh; Siadat, Hakimeh; Monzavi, Abbas; Momen-Heravi, Fatemeh

    2011-12-01

    Impression techniques should precisely represent the 3-dimensional status of implants to allow for the fabrication of passively fitting prostheses and subsequently the elimination of strain on supporting implant components and surrounding bone. The aim of this study was to compare the accuracy of an abutment level impression method with that of an implant level (direct and indirect) impression method using polyether impression material to obtain precise definitive casts and prostheses. A reference acrylic resin dentoform with 2 internal connection implants (Implantium) was made. A total of 21 medium-consistency polyether impressions of the dentoform, including 7 direct implant level, 7 indirect implant level, and 7 abutment level (after 2 straight abutments were secured), were made. Impressions were poured with American Dental Association (ADA) type IV stone, and the positional accuracy of the implant replica heads and abutment analogs in each dimension of x-, y-, and z-axes, as well as angular displacement (Δθ), was evaluated using a coordinate measuring machine. Noble alloy 3-unit castings were fabricated and seated on the abutments in 3 groups; marginal discrepancies were measured at 4 points between prostheses and abutments. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Kruskal-Wallis tests. In comparisons of different impression techniques, only significant statistical Δθ differences were noted between the abutment level method and other techniques (P < .001). Results of this study reveal that although the implant level impression method could better transfer the angular position of the implants (Δθ), the impression method could not affect Δy, Δx, and Δz coordinates of the implants or marginal discrepancy of the 3-unit fixed partial dentures (FPD).

  9. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) prevents periprosthetic inflammatory loosening through FBXL2-TRAF6 ubiquitination pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiang; Zhao, Gangsheng; Shi, Zhongli; Zhou, Chenhe; Chen, Yunlin; Hu, Bin; Yan, Shigui

    2017-04-05

    Previous studies have shown that Low intensity pulsed ultrasound(LIPUS) prevents polyethylene-debris-induced periprosthetic loosening in vivo, but the details of the mechanism by which it does so remain unclear. In this article, we used polyethylene debris induced RAW 264.7 cells as the in vitro model, and tested the effect of LIPUS on this model. Changes in the level of inflammatory cytokines, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were assessed. Gene overexpression and siRNA technique were applied, and the levels of expression of FBXL2, TRAF6, ERK, and related inflammatory cytokines were also measured. Results indicated that FBXL2-mediated TRAF6 ubiquitination and degradation also plays an important role in aseptic periprosthetic loosening process, and LIPUS prevents such loosening by strengthening this pathway.

  10. Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) prevents periprosthetic inflammatory loosening through FBXL2-TRAF6 ubiquitination pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiang; Zhao, Gangsheng; Shi, Zhongli; Zhou, Chenhe; Chen, Yunlin; Hu, Bin; Yan, Shigui

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Low intensity pulsed ultrasound(LIPUS) prevents polyethylene-debris-induced periprosthetic loosening in vivo, but the details of the mechanism by which it does so remain unclear. In this article, we used polyethylene debris induced RAW 264.7 cells as the in vitro model, and tested the effect of LIPUS on this model. Changes in the level of inflammatory cytokines, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were assessed. Gene overexpression and siRNA technique were applied, and the levels of expression of FBXL2, TRAF6, ERK, and related inflammatory cytokines were also measured. Results indicated that FBXL2-mediated TRAF6 ubiquitination and degradation also plays an important role in aseptic periprosthetic loosening process, and LIPUS prevents such loosening by strengthening this pathway. PMID:28378753

  11. A digital approach to fabricating an abutment replica to control cement volume in a cement-retained implant prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju-Hyoung; Park, In-Sook; Sohn, Dong-Seok

    2016-07-01

    If a cement-retained implant prosthesis is placed on an abutment, excess cement should be minimized or removed to prevent periimplant inflammation. Various methods for fabricating an abutment replica have been introduced to maintain tissue health and reduce clean-up time. The purpose of this article is to present an alternative technique for fabricating an abutment replica with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology.

  12. True anteroposterior view pedicle screw insertion technique

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jia-yue; Zhang, Wei; An, Ji-long; Sun, Ya-peng; Ding, Wen-yuan; Shen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Background The wide use of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) surgery in the treatment of degenerative disc disease of lumbar spine in spinal surgery highlights the gradual decrease in the use of traditional pedicle screw insertion technology. This study aims to analyze the accuracy of the true anteroposterior view pedicle screw insertion technique in MIS-TLIF surgery, compare it with conventional pedicle screw insertion technology, and discuss its clinical application value. Methods Fifty-two patients undergoing true anteroposterior view (group A) and 87 patients undergoing conventional pedicle screw insertion (group B) were diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation or lumbar spinal stenosis. Time for screw placement, intraoperative irradiation exposure, accuracy rate of pedicle screw insertion, and incidence of neurovascular injury were compared between the two groups. Results The time for screw placement and intraoperative irradiation exposure was significantly less in group A. Penetration rates of the paries lateralis of vertebral pedicle, medial wall of vertebral pedicle, and anterior vertebral wall were 1.44%, 0%, and 2.40%, respectively, all of which were significantly lower than that in group B. No additional serious complications caused by the placement of screw were observed during the follow-up period in patients in group A, but two patients with medial penetration underwent revision for unbearable radicular pain. Conclusion The application of true anteroposterior view pedicle screw insertion technique in MIS-TLIF surgery shortens time for screw placement and reduces the intraoperative irradiation exposure along with a higher accuracy rate of screw placement, which makes it a safe, accurate, and efficient technique. PMID:27418828

  13. A Novel Technique for Immediate Loading Single Root Form Implants With an Interim CAD/CAM Milled Screw-Retained Crown.

    PubMed

    Proussaefs, Periklis

    2016-08-01

    A technique is described where an interim abutment and crown are fabricated in the laboratory by utilizing computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology and placed the day of dental implant surgery. The design and contours of the interim crown are designed by the computer software to be identical to the contours of the tentatively designed definitive prosthesis. The interim crown satisfies esthetics immediately after dental implant surgery while allowing the tissue to heal and obtain contours similar to the contours of the definitive prosthesis. The interim crown can be either cement retained or screw retained. The presented technique describes fabrication of a screw-retentive interim crown. After osseointegration is confirmed, a definitive impression is made with a CAD/CAM impression coping. The definitive prosthesis is then fabricated.

  14. Mechanical resistance of zirconium implant abutments: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Cayón, R; Vaquero-Aguilar, C; Torres-Lagares, D; Jiménez-Melendo, M; Gutiérrez-Pérez, J-L

    2012-03-01

    The increase of aesthetic demands, together with the successful outcome of current implants, has renewed interest in the search for new materials with enough mechanical properties and better aesthetic qualities than the materials customarily used in implanto-prosthetic rehabilitation. Among these materials, zirconium has been used in different types of implants, including prosthetic abutments. The aim of the present review is to analyse current scientific evidence supporting the use of this material for the above mentioned purposes. We carried out the review of the literature published in the last ten years (2000 through 2010) of in vitro trials of dynamic and static loading of zirconium abutments found in the databases of Medline and Cochrane using the key words zirconium abutment, fracture resistance, fracture strength, cyclic loading. Although we have found a wide variability of values among the different studies, abutments show favourable clinical behaviour for the rehabilitation of single implants in the anterior area. Such variability may be explained by the difficulty to simulate daily mastication under in vitro conditions. The clinical evidence, as found in our study, does not recommend the use of implanto-prosthetic zirconium abutments in the molar area.

  15. Twin screw granulation: steps in granule growth.

    PubMed

    Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2012-11-15

    The present work focuses on the study of the progression of granules in different compartments along the length of screws in a twin screw granulator (TSG). The effects of varying powder feed rate; liquid to solid ratio and viscosity of granulation liquid on properties of granules was studied. The bigger granules produced at the start of the process were found to change in terms of size, shape and strength along the screw length at all the conditions investigated. The granules became more spherical and their strength increased along the screw length. Tracer granules were also introduced in order to understand the role of kneading and conveying elements in the TSG. The kneading elements promoted consolidation and breakage while the conveying elements led to coalescence, breakage and some consolidation. The results presented here help to provide a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the twin screw granulation process.

  16. Biomechanics of open Bankart and coracoid abutment procedures in a human cadaveric shoulder model.

    PubMed

    Clavert, Philippe; Kempf, Jean-François; Kahn, Jean-Luc

    2009-01-01

    The specific aims of this experiment were (1) to develop a clinically relevant model of anteroinferior shoulder dislocation in the apprehension position to compare the biomechanics of the intact anterior capsuloligamentous structures, and (2) to evaluate the initial strength of an open Bankart and of a coracoid abutment procedure. Fifteen shoulders from deceased donors were used. For the intact shoulders, mean peak load was 486 N, and stiffness was 26,7 N/mm. For the Bankart repair, the mean peak load was 264 N, and mean stiffness was 14.1 N/mm. Transosseous repairs failed by suture pullout through soft tissues. For the coracoid abutment repair, the mean peak load was 607 N and stiffness was 25.57 N/mm. This study reveals that the biomechanical performance of the Bankart and coracoid abutment repairs fails to reproduce the properties of the natural intact state.

  17. Contributions of human tissue analysis to understanding the mechanisms of loosening and osteolysis in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Jiri; Vaculova, Jana; Goodman, Stuart B.; Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic loosening and osteolysis are the most frequent late complications of total hip arthroplasty (THA) leading to revision of the prosthesis. This review aims to demonstrate how histopathological studies contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of aseptic loosening/osteolysis development. Only studies analysing periprosthetic tissues retrieved from failed implants in humans were included. Data from 101 studies (5532 patients with failure of THA implants) published in English or German between 1974 and 2013 were included. “Control” samples were reported in 45 of the 101 studies. The most frequently examined tissues were the bone-implant interface membrane and pseudosynovial tissues. Histopathological studies contribute importantly to determination of key cell populations underlying the biological mechanisms of aseptic loosening and osteolysis. The studies demonstrated the key molecules of the host response at the protein level (chemokines, cytokines, nitric oxide metabolites, metalloproteinases). However, these studies also have important limitations. Tissues harvested at revision surgery reflect specifically end-stage failure and may not adequately reveal the evolution of pathophysiological events that lead to prosthetic loosening and osteolysis. One possible solution is to examine tissues harvested from stable total hip arthroplasties that have been revised at various time periods due to dislocation or periprosthetic fracture in multicenter studies. PMID:24525037

  18. Long-term effects of deep soil loosening on root distribution and soil physical parameters in compacted lignite mine soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badorreck, Annika; Krümmelbein, Julia; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil compaction is a major problem of soils on dumped mining substrates in Lusatia, Germany. Deep ripping and cultivation of deep rooting plant species are considered to be effective ways of agricultural recultivation. Six years after experiment start, we studied the effect of initial deep soil loosening (i.e. down to 65 cm) on root systems of rye (Secale cereale) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa) and on soil physical parameters. We conducted a soil monolith sampling for each treatment (deep loosened and unloosened) and for each plant species (in three replicates, respectively) to determine root diameter, length density and dry mass as well as soil bulk density. Further soil physical analysis comprised water retention, hydraulic conductivity and texture in three depths. The results showed different reactions of the root systems of rye and alfalfa six years after deep ripping. In the loosened soil the root biomass of the rye was lower in depths of 20-40 cm and the root biomass of alfalfa was also decreased in depths of 20-50 cm together with a lower root diameter for both plant species. Moreover, total and fine root length density was higher for alfalfa and vice versa for rye. The soil physical parameters such as bulk density showed fewer differences, despite a higher bulk density in 30-40cm for the deep loosened rye plot which indicates a more pronounced plough pan.

  19. Examination of the Position Accuracy of Implant Abutments Reproduced by Intra-Oral Optical Impression

    PubMed Central

    Odaira, Chikayuki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Kondo, Hisatomo

    2016-01-01

    An impression technique called optical impression using intraoral scanner has attracted attention in digital dentistry. This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of the optical impression, comparing a virtual model reproduced by an intraoral scanner to a working cast made by conventional silicone impression technique. Two implants were placed on a master model. Working casts made of plaster were fabricated from the master model by silicone impression. The distance between the ball abutments and the angulation between the healing abutments of 5 mm and 7 mm height at master model were measured using Computer Numerical Control Coordinate Measuring Machine (CNCCMM) as control. Working casts were then measured using CNCCMM, and virtual models via stereo lithography data of master model were measured by a three-dimensional analyzing software. The distance between ball abutments of the master model was 9634.9 ± 1.2 μm. The mean values of trueness of the Lava COS and working casts were 64.5 μm and 22.5 μm, respectively, greater than that of control. The mean of precision values of the Lava COS and working casts were 15.6 μm and 13.5 μm, respectively. In the case of a 5-mm-height healing abutment, mean angulation error of the Lava COS was greater than that of the working cast, resulting in significant differences in trueness and precision. However, in the case of a 7-mm-height abutment, mean angulation errors of the Lava COS and the working cast were not significantly different in trueness and precision. Therefore, distance errors of the optical impression were slightly greater than those of conventional impression. Moreover, the trueness and precision of angulation error could be improved in the optical impression using longer healing abutments. In the near future, the development of information technology could enable improvement in the accuracy of the optical impression with intraoral scanners. PMID:27706225

  20. Multiobjective optimization design of spinal pedicle screws using neural networks and genetic algorithm: mathematical models and mechanical validation.

    PubMed

    Amaritsakul, Yongyut; Chao, Ching-Kong; Lin, Jinn

    2013-01-01

    Short-segment instrumentation for spine fractures is threatened by relatively high failure rates. Failure of the spinal pedicle screws including breakage and loosening may jeopardize the fixation integrity and lead to treatment failure. Two important design objectives, bending strength and pullout strength, may conflict with each other and warrant a multiobjective optimization study. In the present study using the three-dimensional finite element (FE) analytical results based on an L25 orthogonal array, bending and pullout objective functions were developed by an artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm, and the trade-off solutions known as Pareto optima were explored by a genetic algorithm (GA). The results showed that the knee solutions of the Pareto fronts with both high bending and pullout strength ranged from 92% to 94% of their maxima, respectively. In mechanical validation, the results of mathematical analyses were closely related to those of experimental tests with a correlation coefficient of -0.91 for bending and 0.93 for pullout (P < 0.01 for both). The optimal design had significantly higher fatigue life (P < 0.01) and comparable pullout strength as compared with commercial screws. Multiobjective optimization study of spinal pedicle screws using the hybrid of ANN and GA could achieve an ideal with high bending and pullout performances simultaneously.

  1. Pelvic Girdle Reconstruction Based on Spinal Fusion and Ischial Screw Fixation in a Case of Aneurysmal Bone Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Westphal, Florian; Carrero, Volker; Morlock, Michael; Schwieger, Karsten; Hille, Ekkehard; Delling, G.

    2003-01-01

    A case of lytic lesion of the pelvis in a 23-year-old woman is presented. A biopsy led to the diagnosis aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC). Due to the histologically very aggressive growth of the tumor, a low malignant osteosarcoma could not be excluded. In an initial operation the tumour, affecting the sacrum, the iliac crest and the lower lumbar spine was resected. Temporary restabilisation of the pelvic ring was achieved by a titanium plate. The histological examination of the entire tumour confirmed the diagnosis ABC. After 6 months, the MRI showed no recurrence. The observed tilt of the spine to the operated side on the sacral base prompted a second surgical procedure: a transpedicular fixation of L5 and L4 was connected via bent titanium stems to the ischium, where the fixation was achieved by two screws. This construction allowed the correction of the base angle and yielded a stable closure of the pelvic ring. The patient has now been followed for 6 years: the bone grafts have been incorporated and, in spite of radiological signs of screw loosening in the ischium, the patient is fully rehabilitated and free of symptoms. Pedicle screws in the lower spine can be recommended for fixation of a pelvic ring discontinuity. PMID:18521384

  2. Pelvic girdle reconstruction based on spinal fusion and ischial screw fixation in a case of aneurysmal bone cyst.

    PubMed

    Honl, Matthias; Westphal, Florian; Carrero, Volker; Morlock, Michael; Schwieger, Karsten; Hille, Ekkehard; Delling, G

    2003-01-01

    A case of lytic lesion of the pelvis in a 23-year-old woman is presented. A biopsy led to the diagnosis aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC). Due to the histologically very aggressive growth of the tumor, a low malignant osteosarcoma could not be excluded. In an initial operation the tumour, affecting the sacrum, the iliac crest and the lower lumbar spine was resected. Temporary restabilisation of the pelvic ring was achieved by a titanium plate. The histological examination of the entire tumour confirmed the diagnosis ABC. After 6 months, the MRI showed no recurrence. The observed tilt of the spine to the operated side on the sacral base prompted a second surgical procedure: a transpedicular fixation of L5 and L4 was connected via bent titanium stems to the ischium, where the fixation was achieved by two screws. This construction allowed the correction of the base angle and yielded a stable closure of the pelvic ring. The patient has now been followed for 6 years: the bone grafts have been incorporated and, in spite of radiological signs of screw loosening in the ischium, the patient is fully rehabilitated and free of symptoms. Pedicle screws in the lower spine can be recommended for fixation of a pelvic ring discontinuity.

  3. Fabrication of a customized tray for preventing fracture of isolated abutment teeth in definitive casts.

    PubMed

    Isobe, Akio; Sato, Yuji; Kitagawa, Noboru; Shimodaira, Osamu

    2015-08-01

    Isolated abutment teeth with advanced bone resorption on definitive casts for a partial removable dental prosthesis can fracture when the definitive cast is removed from the impression or during subsequent laboratory procedures. This report describes a technique that avoids fracture of the definitive cast during its fabrication. A separating line is formed on the custom tray, which enables removal of the definitive cast without fracturing the isolated tooth. In addition, if the cervical line is sharp and appears compromised, then the impression can be trimmed at the clinical cervical line to enlarge the abutment diameter and increase its resistance to fracture without altering the shape of critical areas.

  4. C1-c2 pedicle screw fixation for treatment of old odontoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Qi, Lei; Li, Mu; Zhang, Shuai; Si, Haipeng; Xue, Jingsong

    2015-02-01

    Nonunion and C1-C2 instability of odontoid fractures usually result from delayed diagnosis and inappropriate treatment. However, the available treatment options for odontoid fractures remain controversial. The authors evaluated the effectiveness of internal screw fixation via the C1 and C2 pedicle in cases of old odontoid fractures. This retrospective study included 21 patients with old odontoid fractures (13 men and 8 women; mean age, 46.5 years; range, 24-69 years). Internal screw fixation via the C1 and C2 pedicle was performed in all patients. Fracture reduction and C1-C2 fusion were assessed with imaging. The neck pain visual analog scale score and cervical spinal cord functional Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (for those who had cervical spinal cord injury) were used to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. Postoperative complications were recorded. Postoperative imaging showed that the C1-C2 dislocation was satisfactorily repositioned in all patients. Bone fusion was observed 1 year after surgery in all patients. No loosening or breaking of internal fixation occurred. The preoperative neck pain visual analog scale score was 5.9±1.5 and improved significantly to 1.8±0.8 after surgery (P<.001). The Japanese Orthopaedic Association score in patients with cervical spinal injury (n=14) was 9.2±1.9 and also significantly improved to 13.8±1.9 at the last follow-up examination (P<.001), with an average improvement rate of 61.0%. No iatrogenic vertebral artery injury or severe spinal cord injury occurred. Screw fixation via the C1 and C2 pedicle was found to be an effective and safe surgical approach for the treatment of old odontoid fractures with C1-C2 dislocation or instability.

  5. Feasibility of detecting orthopaedic screw overtightening using acoustic emission.

    PubMed

    Pullin, Rhys; Wright, Bryan J; Kapur, Richard; McCrory, John P; Pearson, Matthew; Evans, Sam L; Crivelli, Davide

    2017-03-01

    A preliminary study of acoustic emission during orthopaedic screw fixation was performed using polyurethane foam as the bone-simulating material. Three sets of screws, a dynamic hip screw, a small fragment screw and a large fragment screw, were investigated, monitoring acoustic-emission activity during the screw tightening. In some specimens, screws were deliberately overtightened in order to investigate the feasibility of detecting the stripping torque in advance. One set of data was supported by load cell measurements to directly measure the axial load through the screw. Data showed that acoustic emission can give good indications of impending screw stripping; such indications are not available to the surgeon at the current state of the art using traditional torque measuring devices, and current practice relies on the surgeon's experience alone. The results suggest that acoustic emission may have the potential to prevent screw overtightening and bone tissue damage, eliminating one of the commonest sources of human error in such scenarios.

  6. Fixed-angle screws vs standard screws in acetabular prosthesis fixation: a cadaveric biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Hugate, Ronald R; Dickey, Ian D; Chen, Qingshan; Wood, Christina M; Sim, Franklin H; Rock, Michael G

    2009-08-01

    Secure fixation of acetabular components in total hip arthroplasty can be challenging. The purpose of this study was to perform biomechanical analysis of cup fixation strength using fixed-angle vs standard screw fixation. Multihole, porous-backed acetabular prostheses were implanted in both acetabuli of 8 cadaveric pelves using standard press-fit techniques. Fixed-angle screws were used on the left side, and standard cancellous screws were used in the right. The use of fixed-angle screws enhanced acetabular fixation substantially under subfailure cyclic loading conditions and load-to-failure. The triradiate screw configuration increases the bending moment required to fail the specimens as well. Fixed-angle screws may be useful for achieving rigid fixation of acetabular prostheses in challenging clinical scenarios.

  7. Screw-released roller brake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A screw-released roller brake including an input drive assembly, an output drive assembly, a plurality of locking sprags, a mechanical tripper nut for unlocking the sprags, and a casing therefor. The sprags consist of three dimensional (3-D) sprag members having pairs of contact surface regions which engage respective pairs of contact surface regions included in angular grooves or slots formed in the casing and the output drive assembly. The sprags operate to lock the output drive assembly to the casing to prevent rotation thereof in an idle mode of operation. In a drive mode of operation, the tripper is either self actuated or motor driven and is translated linearly up and down against a spline and at the limit of its travel rotates the sprags which unlock while coupling the input drive assembly to the output drive assembly so as to impart a turning motion thereto in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

  8. Vertical-Screw-Auger Conveyer Feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Otis (Inventor); Vollmer, Hubert J. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A conical feeder is attached to a vertically conveying screw auger. The feeder is equipped with scoops and rotated from the surface to force-feed regolith the auger. Additional scoops are possible by adding a cylindrical section above the conical funnel section. Such then allows the unit to collect material from swaths larger in diameter than the enclosing casing pipe of the screw auger. A third element includes a flexible screw auger. All three can be used in combination in microgravity and zero atmosphere environments to drill and recover a wide area of subsurface regolith and entrained volatiles through a single access point on the surface.

  9. Effect of Off-Axis Screw Insertion, Insertion Torque, and Plate Contouring on Locked Screw Strength

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Bethany; Silva, Matthew J.; Ricci, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study quantifies the effects of insertion torque, off-axis screw angulation, and plate contouring on the strength of locking plate constructs. Methods Groups of locking screws (n = 6–11 screws) were inserted at 50%, 100%, 150%, and 200% of the manufacturer-recommended torque (3.2 Nm) into locking compression plates at various angles: orthogonal (control), 5-degree angle off-axis, and 10-degree angle off-axis. Screws were loaded to failure by a transverse force (parallel to the plate) either in the same (“+”) or opposite direction (“−”) of the initial screw angulation. Separately, locking plates were bent to 5 and 10-degree angles, with the bend apex at a screw hole. Locking screws inserted orthogonally into the apex hole at 100% torque were loaded to failure. Results Orthogonal insertion resulted in the highest average load to failure, 2577 ± 141 N (range, 2413–2778 N), whereas any off-axis insertion significantly weakened constructs (165–1285 N, at 100% torque) (P < 0.05). For “+” loading, torque beyond 100% did not increase strength, but 50% torque reduced screw strength (P < 0.05). Loading in the “−” direction consistently resulted in higher strengths than “+” loading (P < 0.05). Plate contouring of 5-degree angle did not significantly change screw strength compared with straight plates but contouring of 10-degree angle significantly reduced load to failure (P < 0.05). Conclusions To maximize the screw plate interface strength, locking screws should be inserted without cross-threading. The mechanical stability of locked screws is significantly compromised by loose insertion, off-axis insertion, or severe distortion of the locking mechanism. PMID:24343255

  10. Squatting-Related Tibiofemoral Shear Reaction Forces and a Biomechanical Rationale for Femoral Component Loosening

    PubMed Central

    Thambyah, Ashvin

    2014-01-01

    Previous gait studies on squatting have described a rapid reversal in the direction of the tibiofemoral joint shear reaction force when going into a full weight-bearing deep knee flexion squat. The effects of such a shear reversal have not been considered with regard to the loading demand on knee implants in patients whose activities of daily living require frequent squatting. In this paper, the shear reversal effect is discussed and simulated in a finite element knee implant-bone model, to evaluate the possible biomechanical significance of this effect on femoral component loosening of high flexion implants as reported in the literature. The analysis shows that one of the effects of the shear reversal was a switch between large compressive and large tensile principal strains, from knee extension to flexion, respectively, in the region of the anterior flange of the femoral component. Together with the known material limits of cement and bone, this large mismatch in strains as a function of knee position provides new insight into how and why knee implants may fail in patients who perform frequent squatting. PMID:24982995

  11. Sutural loosening and skeletal flexibility during growth: determination of drop-like shapes in sea urchins.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amy S; Ellers, Olaf; Lemire, Jim; Minor, Melissa; Leddy, Holly A

    2002-02-07

    The shape of sea urchins may be determined mechanically by patterns of force analogous to those that determine the shape of a water droplet. This mechanical analogy implies skeletal flexibility at the time of growth. Although comprised of many rigid calcite plates, sutural collagenous ligaments could confer such flexibility if the sutures between plates loosened and acted as joints at the time of growth. We present experimental evidence of such flexibility associated with weight gain and growth. Over 13-, 4-, and 2-week periods, fed urchins (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) gained weight and developed looser sutures than unfed urchins that maintained or lost weight. Further, skeletons of fed urchins force-relaxed more than did those of unfed urchins and urchins with loose sutures force-relaxed more than those with tight sutures. Urchins (Strongylocentrotus franciscanus) fed for two and a half weeks, gained weight, also had looser skeletons and deposited calcite at sutural margins, whereas unfed ones did not. In field populations of S. droebachiensis the percentage having loose sutures varied with urchin diameter and reflected their size-specific growth rate. The association between feeding, weight gain, calcite deposition, force relaxation and sutural looseness supports the hypothesis that urchins deform flexibly while growing, thus determining their drop-like shapes.

  12. Sutural loosening and skeletal flexibility during growth: determination of drop-like shapes in sea urchins.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amy S; Ellers, Olaf; Lemire, Jim; Minor, Melissa; Leddy, Holly A

    2002-01-01

    The shape of sea urchins may be determined mechanically by patterns of force analogous to those that determine the shape of a water droplet. This mechanical analogy implies skeletal flexibility at the time of growth. Although comprised of many rigid calcite plates, sutural collagenous ligaments could confer such flexibility if the sutures between plates loosened and acted as joints at the time of growth. We present experimental evidence of such flexibility associated with weight gain and growth. Over 13-, 4-, and 2-week periods, fed urchins (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) gained weight and developed looser sutures than unfed urchins that maintained or lost weight. Further, skeletons of fed urchins force-relaxed more than did those of unfed urchins and urchins with loose sutures force-relaxed more than those with tight sutures. Urchins (Strongylocentrotus franciscanus) fed for two and a half weeks, gained weight, also had looser skeletons and deposited calcite at sutural margins, whereas unfed ones did not. In field populations of S. droebachiensis the percentage having loose sutures varied with urchin diameter and reflected their size-specific growth rate. The association between feeding, weight gain, calcite deposition, force relaxation and sutural looseness supports the hypothesis that urchins deform flexibly while growing, thus determining their drop-like shapes. PMID:11839189

  13. Adhesion molecules in gonarthrosis and knee prosthesis aseptic loosening follow-up: possible therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Dambra, P; Loria, M P; Moretti, B; D'Oronzio, L; Patella, V; Pannofino, A; Cavallo, E; Pesce, V; Dell'Osso, A; Simone, C

    2003-05-01

    The involvement of the synovium is common in phlogistic processes of various joint diseases. Apart from synoviocytes and the other cells in the synovial tissue, circulating cells recruited from peripheral blood also participate in the phlogistic process. The increased expression of adhesion molecules on both circulating and endothelial cell surface may further this recruitment. We studied 15 patients affected by serious gonarthrosis requiring a prosthetic implant (GPI) and 7 with knee prosthesis aseptic loosening (KPL) to evaluate adhesion molecule expression and phlogistic infiltration in the synovium using immunohistochemistry and microscopic analysis. As control we studied 10 subjects affected by degenerative meniscopathies undergoing a selective arthroscopic surgical meniscectomy. Analysis with Kruskal-Wallis test showed no statistical significant differences in the expression of CD54, CD11a, CD11b and CD18 in three groups examined. The model of variance analysis (Friedman test), showed that CD54 expression is greater in patients with GPI and KPL in comparison with the other molecules. Adhesion molecules and their functions are important in arthropathies not only because their evaluation can allow us to identify the degree of inflammation and to predict its evolution, but also because pharmacological control of their expression could have important therapeutic implications.

  14. Simplified digital workflow for dental implant restoration on a stock abutment using an intraoral scanner: A dental technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Park, Ji-Hyun; Moon, Hong-Seok; Shim, June-Sung

    2017-02-17

    A straightforward digital restorative method based on a library of stock abutments is presented. Precisely scanned data of laboratory analog components of the stock abutment were obtained using a tabletop scanner to produce the library. The stock abutment and surrounding teeth, opposing arch, and occlusal information were recorded using an intraoral scanner. After transferring the scanned data to computer-aided design software, an appropriate library file for the abutment connected within the mouth was matched in order to design the prosthesis.

  15. Sealing Capability and SEM Observation of the Implant-Abutment Interface.

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, Fabio C; Coelho, Paulo G; Bonfante, Gerson; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Silva, Nelson R F A; Suzuki, Marcelo; Silva, Thelma Lopes; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the sealing capability of external hexagon implant systems and assess the marginal fit, two groups (n = 10 each) were employed: SIN (Sistema de Implantes Nacional, Brazil) and Osseotite, (Biomet 3i, USA). Sealing capability was determined by placing 0.7 μL of 1% acid-red solution in the implant wells before the torque of their respective abutments. Specimens were then placed into 2.5 mL vials filled with 1.3 mL of distilled water with the implant-abutment interface submerged. Three samples of 100 μL water were collected at previously determinate times. The absorbance was measured with a spectrophotometer, and the data were analyzed by Two-way ANOVA (P < .05) and Tukey's test. Marginal fit was determined using SEM. Leakage was observed for both groups at all times and was significantly higher at 144 hrs. SEM analysis depicted gaps in the implant-abutment interface of both groups. Gaps in the implant-abutment interface were observed along with leakage increased at the 144 hrs evaluation period.

  16. The effect of mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants during healing abutment replacement.

    PubMed

    Nissan, J; Zenziper, E; Rosner, O; Kolerman, R; Chaushu, L; Chaushu, G

    2015-10-01

    Soft tissue shrinkage during the course of restoring dental implants may result in biological and prosthodontic difficulties. This study was conducted to measure the continuous shrinkage of the mucosal cuff around dental implants following the removal of the healing abutment up to 60 s. Individuals treated with implant-supported fixed partial dentures were included. Implant data--location, type, length, diameter and healing abutments' dimensions--were recorded. Mucosal cuff shrinkage, following removal of the healing abutments, was measured in bucco-lingual direction at four time points--immediately after 20, 40 and 60 s. anova was used to for statistical analysis. Eighty-seven patients (49 women and 38 men) with a total of 311 implants were evaluated (120 maxilla; 191 mandible; 291 posterior segments; 20 anterior segments). Two-hundred and five (66%) implants displayed thick and 106 (34%) thin gingival biotype. Time was the sole statistically significant parameter affecting mucosal cuff shrinkage around dental implants (P < 0.001). From time 0 to 20, 40 and 60 s, the mean diameter changed from 4.1 to 4.07, 3.4 and 2.81 mm, respectively. The shrinkage was 1%, 17% and 31%, respectively. The gingival biotype had no statistically significant influence on mucosal cuff shrinkage (P = 0.672). Time required replacing a healing abutment with a prosthetic element should be minimised (up to 20/40 s), to avoid pain, discomfort and misfit.

  17. A technique to facilitate the fabrication of provisional restorations for ITI solid abutments.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Murat; Güler, Ahmet Umut; Erkoçak, Ayça; Sanal, Fatma Ayşe

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this technique report was to present a procedure for the fabrication of provisional restorations for ITI solid abutments using impression caps in the laboratory with a number of advantages over intraoral techniques. There may be no need for cementation, and elimination of cementation may assist tissue healing.

  18. 31. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST TO CORNER WHERE SAMPLING/CRUSHING ADDITIONS ABUT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST TO CORNER WHERE SAMPLING/CRUSHING ADDITIONS ABUT CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN. INTACT BARREN SOLUTION TANK VISIBLE IN FRONT OF CRUSHED ORE BIN. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  19. Sealing Capability and SEM Observation of the Implant-Abutment Interface

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzoni, Fabio C.; Coelho, Paulo G.; Bonfante, Gerson; Carvalho, Ricardo M.; Silva, Nelson R. F. A.; Suzuki, Marcelo; Silva, Thelma Lopes; Bonfante, Estevam A.

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the sealing capability of external hexagon implant systems and assess the marginal fit, two groups (n = 10 each) were employed: SIN (Sistema de Implantes Nacional, Brazil) and Osseotite, (Biomet 3i, USA). Sealing capability was determined by placing 0.7 μL of 1% acid-red solution in the implant wells before the torque of their respective abutments. Specimens were then placed into 2.5 mL vials filled with 1.3 mL of distilled water with the implant-abutment interface submerged. Three samples of 100 μL water were collected at previously determinate times. The absorbance was measured with a spectrophotometer, and the data were analyzed by Two-way ANOVA (P < .05) and Tukey's test. Marginal fit was determined using SEM. Leakage was observed for both groups at all times and was significantly higher at 144 hrs. SEM analysis depicted gaps in the implant-abutment interface of both groups. Gaps in the implant-abutment interface were observed along with leakage increased at the 144 hrs evaluation period. PMID:21754934

  20. 18. DETAIL, L0 JOINT AND BEARING SEAT AT WEST ABUTMENT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. DETAIL, L0 JOINT AND BEARING SEAT AT WEST ABUTMENT, FROM NORTH, SHOWING RIVETED CONNECTION OF BOTTOM CHORD AND END POST AT JOINT, AND FIXED SHOE - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  1. Additional Drive Circuitry for Piezoelectric Screw Motors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, Robert; Palmer, Dean; Gursel, Yekta; Reder, Leonard; Savedra, Raymond

    2004-01-01

    Modules of additional drive circuitry have been developed to enhance the functionality of a family of commercially available positioning motors (Picomotor . or equivalent) that provide linear motion controllable, in principle, to within increments .30 nm. A motor of this type includes a piezoelectric actuator that turns a screw. Unlike traditional piezoelectrically actuated mechanisms, a motor of this type does not rely on the piezoelectric transducer to hold position: the screw does not turn except when the drive signal is applied to the actuator.

  2. Helical rotary screw expander power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R. A.; Sprankle, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    An energy converter for the development of wet steam geothermal fields is described. A project to evaluate and characterize a helical rotary screw expander for geothermal applications is discussed. The helical screw expander is a positive displacement machine which can accept untreated corrosive mineralized water of any quality from a geothermal well. The subjects of corrosion, mineral deposition, the expansion process, and experience with prototype devices are reported.

  3. Ball Screw Actuator Including a Stop with an Integral Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Perek, John (Inventor); Geck, Kellan (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An actuator includes a housing assembly, a ball nut, a ball screw, and a ball screw stop. The ball nut is rotationally mounted in the housing assembly, is adapted to receive an input torque, and is configured, upon receipt thereof, to rotate and supply a drive force. The ball screw is mounted within the housing assembly and extends through the ball nut. The ball screw has a first end and a second end, and is coupled to receive the drive force from the ball nut. The ball screw is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively translate between a stow position and a deploy position. The ball screw stop is mounted on the ball screw to translate therewith and is configured to at selectively engage the housing assembly while the ball screw is translating, and engage the ball nut when the ball screw is in the deploy position.

  4. [First results with a resorbable MgYREZr compression screw in unstable scaphoid fractures show extensive bone cysts].

    PubMed

    Meier, Reinhard; Panzica, Martin

    2017-03-08

    Osteosynthesis with headless compression screws is an established treatment option for unstable scaphoid fractures. Common implants are made of titanium alloy or steel and usually remain in place. Due to implant density and ferromagnetic properties, artefacts are common in postoperative imaging procedures, e.g. MRI. Now resorbable implants made of magnesium alloy (MgYREZr) have become available. They have biomechanical properties equivalent to human bone and may be used as an alternative to the nonresorbable screw systems.5 patients with acute scaphoid fractures were treated with a double-threaded screw made of MgYREZr. The fractures included three type A2 fractures, one type B2 fracture, and one type B3 fracture. All patients underwent clinical and radiological follow-up postoperatively, 6 weeks, 3 and 6 months and 1 year after surgery. ROM, gross grip strength and pain (VAS) were documented. The Modified Mayo Wrist Score was used. Standard X-rays of the wrist were taken preoperatively and at all follow-up visits. A CT scan was performed at least before and three months after surgery. In all X-rays malunion, resorption of the implant, implant loosening, cysts and bone healing (bridging trabecular structures) were described.All patients had a very good wrist score (95-100 points) after one year. There were no clinical complications. However, the X-rays revealed extensive resorption cysts in 3 out of the 5 patients. It was only after 6 months that the fractures were consolidated enough to allow physical work. Due to this considerable osteolysis, we did not include any further patients. Due to the observed extensive bone cysts and the long time period for bone healing, MgYREZr compression screws are currently not recommended for clinical use in scaphoid fractures. Further fundamental research is necessary.

  5. Insertion Profiles of 4 Headless Compression Screws

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Adam; Harvey, Edward J.; Lefebvre, Louis-Philippe; Barthelat, Francois; Rabiei, Reza; Martineau, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In practice, the surgeon must rely on screw position (insertion depth) and tactile feedback from the screwdriver (insertion torque) to gauge compression. In this study, we identified the relationship between interfragmentary compression and these 2 factors. Methods The Acutrak Standard, Acutrak Mini, Synthes 3.0, and Herbert-Whipple implants were tested using a polyurethane foam scaphoid model. A specialized testing jig simultaneously measured compression force, insertion torque, and insertion depth at half-screw-turn intervals until failure occurred. Results The peak compression occurs at an insertion depth of −3.1 mm, −2.8 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.5 mm for the Acutrak Mini, Acutrak Standard, Herbert-Whipple, and Synthes screws respectively (insertion depth is positive when the screw is proud above the bone and negative when buried). The compression and insertion torque at a depth of −2 mm were found to be 113 ± 18 N and 0.348 ± 0.052 Nm for the Acutrak Standard, 104 ± 15 N and 0.175 ± 0.008 Nm for the Acutrak Mini, 78 ± 9 N and 0.245 ± 0.006 Nm for the Herbert-Whipple, and 67 ± 2N, 0.233 ± 0.010 Nm for the Synthes headless compression screws. Conclusions All 4 screws generated a sizable amount of compression (> 60 N) over a wide range of insertion depths. The compression at the commonly recommended insertion depth of −2 mm was not significantly different between screws; thus, implant selection should not be based on compression profile alone. Conically shaped screws (Acutrak) generated their peak compression when they were fully buried in the foam whereas the shanked screws (Synthes and Herbert-Whipple) reached peak compression before they were fully inserted. Because insertion torque correlated poorly with compression, surgeons should avoid using tactile judgment of torque as a proxy for compression. Clinical relevance Knowledge of the insertion profile may improve our understanding of the implants, provide a better basis for comparing screws

  6. Intraoperative stimulation of pedicle screws: a new method for verification of screw placement.

    PubMed

    Young, W F; Morledge, D E; Martin, W; Park, K B

    1995-12-01

    Pedicular fixation of the lumbosacral spine has become a popular procedure for improving fusion rates. Even in experienced hands, it can be associated with a significant rate of screw malpositioning and potential nerve root injury. In this report, we describe a technique for improving screw localization utilizing evoked electromyography responses from direct stimulation of pedicle instrumentation.

  7. The rate of screw misplacement in segmental pedicle screw fixation in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose There are no reports in the literature on the influence of learning on the pedicle screw insertion. We studied the effect of learning on the rate of screw misplacement in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis treated with segmental pedicle screw fixation. Method We retrospectively evaluated low-dose spine computed tomography of 116 consecutive patients (aged 16 (12–24) years, 94 females) who were operated during 4 periods over 2005–2009 (group 1: patients operated autumn 2005–2006; group 2: 2007; group 3: 2008; and group 4: 2009). 5 types of misplacement were recorded: medial cortical perforation, lateral cortical perforation, anterior cortical perforation of the vertebral body, endplate perforation, and perforation of the neural foramen. Reslts 2,201 pedicle screws were evaluated, with an average of 19 screws per patient. The rate of screw misplacement for the whole study was 14%. The rate of lateral and medial cortical perforation was 7% and 5%. There was an inverse correlation between the occurrence of misplacement and the patient number, i.e. the date of operation (r = –0.35; p < 0.001). The skillfulness of screw insertion improved with reduction of the rate of screw misplacement from 20% in 2005–2006 to 11% in 2009, with a breakpoint at the end of the first study period (34 patients). Interpretation We found a substantial learning curve; cumulative experience may have contributed to continued reduction of misplacement rate. PMID:21189100

  8. Case report of early aseptic loosening of total hip arthroplasty in monostotic paget disease, a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Crego-Vita, Diana; Aedo-Martín, Daniel; Sánchez-Pérez, Coral

    2016-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone is a localised chronic osteopathy which produces bone deformities, bone hypervascularity, structural weakness and altered joint biomechanics. Although radiological diagnosis of Paget's disease of bone is usually straightforward, monostotic cases may potentially raise specific problems which require invasive and expensive procedures such as bone biopsies. The pelvis and upper femur are frequently affected, resulting in disabling hip disease that may require total hip arthroplasty. We report a case of Paget disease of bone in an 84-year-old woman, which was initially identified as avascular necrosis of the hip, reason for which she underwent total hip arthroplasty. During follow up, the patient complained about hip pain and in a few months she was not able to walk because of an early loosening with bone destruction. Radiological and laboratory exams were carried out with normal results except for alkaline phosphatase (AP). After treatment with biphosphonates hip pain relieved but hip reconstruction was not possible. In this paper we present an early aseptic loosening of hip arthroplasty due to monostotic Paget's disease of bone, a rare ethiology of loosening which poses particular diagnostic difficulties prompting an excessive use of excisional biopsies.

  9. Standard Waste Box Lid Screw Removal Option Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Anast, Kurt Roy

    2016-03-11

    This report provides results from test work conducted to resolve the removal of screws securing the standard waste box (SWB) lids that hold the remediated nitrate salt (RNS) drums. The test work evaluated equipment and process alternatives for removing the 42 screws that hold the SWB lid in place. The screws were secured with a red Loctite thread locker that makes removal very difficult because the rivets that the screw threads into would slip before the screw could be freed from the rivet, making it impossible to remove the screw and therefore the SWB lid.

  10. A method for using solid modeling CAD software to create an implant library for the fabrication of a custom abutment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Rimei; Ren, Guanghui; Zhang, Xiaojie

    2017-02-01

    This article describes a method that incorporates the solid modeling CAD software Solidworks with a dental milling machine to fabricate individual abutments in house. This process involves creating an implant library with 3-dimensional (3D) models and manufacturing a base, scan element, abutment, and crown anatomy. The 3D models can be imported into any dental computer-aided design and computer-aided (CAD-CAM) manufacturing system. This platform increases abutment design flexibility, as the base and scan elements can be designed to fit several shapes as needed to meet clinical requirements.

  11. Comparison of The Effect of Implant Abutment Surface Modifications on Retention of Implant-Supported Restoration with A Polymer Based Cement

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Nabaprakash; Lakshmi, Namratha; Azhagarasan, N.S.; Agnihotri, Yoshaskam; Rajan, Manoj; Hariharan, Ramasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    Background: In cement-retained implant-supported restoration it is important to gain adequate retention of definitive restoration as well as retrievability of prosthesis. The surface of the abutment, alloy of the restoration and the type of cement used influences the retention of the restoration. There is a need to analyze the influence of surface modifications of abutments on the retentive capabilities of provisional implant cements. Purpose of study: To compare the effect of implant abutment surface modifications on retention of implant-supported restoration cemented with polymer based cement. Materials and method: Thirty solid titanium implant abutments (ADIN), 8mm height, were divided into 3 groups. Ten abutments with retentive grooves (Group I) as supplied by the manufacturer, Ten abutments milled to 20 taper circumferentially (Group II), and Ten abutments milled and air-abraded with 110 μm aluminum oxide (Group III) were used in this study. Ni-Cr coping were casted for each abutment and polymer based cement was used to secure them to the respective abutments. Using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 cm/minute, tensile bond strength was recorded (N). Results: Mean tensile bond strength of Group I, II and III were found to be 408.3, 159.9 and 743.8 Newton respectively. The values were statistically different from each other (p<0.001). Conclusion: Abutments with milled and sandblasted surface provide the highest retention followed by abutments with retentive grooves and then by abutments with milled surface when cast copings were cemented to implant abutments with polymer based cement. Clinical implications: Retention of restoration depends on the surface of the abutment as well as the luting agents used. Incorporation of retentive grooves or particle abrasion can enhance retention especially in situation of short clinical crown. PMID:24596785

  12. Xyloglucan endotransglycosylase, a new wall-loosening enzyme activity from plants.

    PubMed

    Fry, S C; Smith, R C; Renwick, K F; Martin, D J; Hodge, S K; Matthews, K J

    1992-03-15

    cutting and rejoining intermicrofibrillar xyloglucan chains and that it thus causes the wall-loosening required for plant cell expansion.

  13. Pedicle screw fixation combined with intermediate screw at the fracture level for treatment of thoracolumbar fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kunpeng; Zhang, Wen; Liu, Dan; Xu, Hui; Geng, Wei; Luo, Dawei; Ma, Jinzhu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Use of a pedicle screw at the level of fracture, also known as an intermediate screw, has been shown to improve clinical results in managing thoracolumbar(TL) fractures, but there is a paucity of powerful evidence to support the claim. The aim of this study was to compare outcomes between pedicle screw fixation combined with intermediate screw at the fracture level and conventional pedicle screw fixation (one level above and one level below the fracture level) for thoracolumbar (TL) fractures. Methods: A meta-analysis of cohort studies was conducted between pedicle screw fixation combined with intermediate screw at the fracture level (combined screw group) and conventional pedicle screw fixation (conventional group) for the treatment of TL fractures from their inception to December 2015. An extensive search of studies was performed in PubMed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane library. The following outcome measures were extracted: visual analogue scale (VAS), operation time and intraoperative blood loss, Cobb angle and anterior vertebral height (AVH), and complications. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.3.5. Results: From 10 relevant studies identified, 283 patients undergoing pedicle screw fixation combined with intermediate screw at the fracture level were compared with 285 conventional pedicle screw procedures. The pooled analysis showed that there was statistically significant difference in terms of postoperative Cobb angle (95% confidence interval (CI), −3.00, −0.75; P = 0.001) and AVH (95% CI, 0.04, 12.23; P = 0.05), correction loss (Cobb angle: P < 0.0001; AVH: P < 0.0001) and implant failure rate (95% CI, 0.06, 0.62; P = 0.006), and blood loss (W 95% CI, 2.22, 23.60; P = 0.02) between 2 groups. But in terms of other complications, there were no differences between 2 groups (95% CI, 0.23, 2.04; P = 0.50). No difference was found in operation time (95% CI, −5.36, 14.67; P = 0.36) and VAS scores (95% CI, −0.44, 0

  14. Twin screw wet granulation: Binder delivery.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Mohammed F; Dhenge, Ranjit M; Cartwright, James J; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2015-06-20

    The effects of three ways of binder delivery into the twin screw granulator (TSG) on the residence time, torque, properties of granules (size, shape, strength) and binder distribution were studied. The binder distribution was visualised through the transparent barrel using high speed imaging as well as quantified using offline technique. Furthermore, the effect of binder delivery and the change of screw configuration (conveying elements only and conveying elements with kneading elements) on the surface velocity of granules across the screw channel were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The binder was delivered in three ways; all solid binder incorporated with powder mixture, 50% of solid binder mixed with powder mixture and 50% mixed with water, all the solid binder dissolved in water. Incorporation of all solid binder with powder mixture resulted in the relatively longer residence time and higher torque, narrower granule size distribution, more spherical granules, weaker big-sized granules, stronger small-sized granules and better binder distribution compared to that in other two ways. The surface velocity of granules showed variation from one screw to another as a result of uneven liquid distribution as well as shown a reduction while introducing the kneading elements into the screw configuration.

  15. The use of CAD/CAM technology to fabricate a custom ceramic implant abutment: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Martinna de Mendonça e; Kempen, Juan; Lourenço, Eduardo José Veras; Telles, Daniel de Moraes

    2014-05-01

    Well-placed dental implants are a prerequisite of functional and esthetically successful dental implant-supported crowns. The presence of soft tissue is essential for excellent esthetics because the dental implant or titanium abutment may become visible if the soft-tissue contour is not acceptable. This clinical report describes the use of a custom ceramic implant abutment designed with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology by milling a zirconia framework that was cemented extraorally to a prefabricated titanium abutment with a reduced diameter. This ceramic abutment has the strength and precise fit of a titanium interface and also the esthetic advantages of shaded custom-milled zirconia, with no visible metal.

  16. [Cement augmentation of pedicle screws : Pros and cons].

    PubMed

    Schnake, K J; Blattert, T R; Liljenqvist, U

    2016-09-01

    Cement augmentation of pedicle screws biomechanically increases screw purchase in the bone. However, clinical complications may occur. The pros and cons of the technique are discussed from different clinical perspectives.

  17. Impact of screw configuration on the particle size distribution of granules produced by twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, J; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-02-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) has been reported by different research groups as an attractive technology for continuous wet granulation. However, in contrast to fluidized bed granulation, granules produced via this technique typically have a wide and multimodal particle size distribution (PSD), resulting in suboptimal flow properties. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of granulator screw configuration on the PSD of granules produced by TSG. Experiments were performed using a 25 mm co-rotating twin screw granulator, being part of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line from GEA Pharma Systems). Besides the screw elements conventionally used for TSG (conveying and kneading elements), alternative designs of screw elements (tooth-mixing-elements (TME), screw mixing elements (SME) and cutters) were investigated using an α-lactose monohydrate formulation granulated with distilled water. Granulation with only conveying elements resulted in wide and multimodal PSD. Using kneading elements, the width of the PSD could be partially narrowed and the liquid distribution was more homogeneous. However, still a significant fraction of oversized agglomerates was obtained. Implementing additional kneading elements or cutters in the final section of the screw configuration was not beneficial. Furthermore, granulation with only TME or SME had limited impact on the width of the PSD. Promising results were obtained by combining kneading elements with SME, as for these configurations the PSD was narrower and shifted to the size fractions suitable for tableting.

  18. Screw expander for light duty diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary selection and sizing of a positive displacement screw compressor-expander subsystem for a light-duty adiabatic diesel engine; development of a mathematical model to describe overall efficiencies for the screw compressor and expander; simulation of operation to establish overall efficiency for a range of design parameters and at given engine operating points; simulation to establish potential net power output at light-duty diesel operating points; analytical determination of mass moments of inertia for the rotors and inertia of the compressor-expander subsystem; and preparation of engineering layout drawings of the compressor and expander are discussed. As a result of this work, it was concluded that the screw compressor and expander designed for light-duty diesel engine applications are viable alternatives to turbo-compound systems, with acceptable efficiencies for both units, and only a moderate effect on the transient response.

  19. A technique to create an interocclusal bite registration using in situ implant healing abutments.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Russell; Ahuja, Swati; Jain, Vinay; Ferreira, Cimara Fortes

    2013-01-01

    Obtaining an accurate interocclusal record which relates the upper and lower jaws to one another is critical in the laboratory production of dental restorations. This may be particularly challenging when the configuration of missing teeth dictate that such records are dependent on the remaining mucosal tissues for support. This article presents a practical and time saving method of using implant healing abutments, located within an edentulous distal extension space, to serve as vertical stops for an interocclusal record.

  20. Comparison of implant-abutment interface misfits after casting and soldering procedures.

    PubMed

    Neves, Flávio Domingues das; Elias, Gisele Araújo; da Silva-Neto, João Paulo; de Medeiros Dantas, Lucas Costa; da Mota, Adérito Soares; Neto, Alfredo Júlio Fernandes

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare vertical and horizontal adjustments of castable abutments after conducting casting and soldering procedures. Twelve external hexagonal implants (3.75 × 10 mm) and their UCLA abutments were divided according their manufacturer and abutment type: PUN (plastic UCLA, Neodent), PUC (plastic UCLA, Conexão), PU3i (plastic UCLA, Biomet 3i), and PUTN (plastic UCLA with Tilite milled base, Neodent). Three infrastructures of a fixed partial implant-supported bridge with 3 elements were produced for each group. The measurements of vertical (VM) and horizontal (HM) misfits were obtained via scanning electron microscopy after completion of casting and soldering. The corresponding values were determined to be biomechanically acceptable to the system, and the results were rated as a percentage. Statistical analysis establishes differences between groups by chi-square after procedures, and McNeman's test was applied to analyze the influence of soldering over casting (α ≤ .05). For the values of VM and HM, respectively, when the casting process was complete, it was observed that 83.25% and 100% (PUTN), 33.3% and 27.75% (PUN), 33.3% and 88.8% (PUC), 33.3% and 94.35% (PU3i) represented acceptable values. After completing the requisite soldering, acceptable values were 50% and 94.35% (PUTN), 16.6% and 77.7% (PUN), 38.55% and 77.7% (PUC), and 27.75% and 94.35% (PU3i). Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the premachined abutments presented more acceptable VM values. The HM values were within acceptable limits before and after the soldering procedure for most groups. Further, the soldering procedure resulted in an increase of VM in all groups.

  1. Trends of Abutment-Scour Prediction Equations Applied to 144 Field Sites in South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, Stephen T.; Deshpande, Nikhil; Aziz, Nadim M.; Conrads, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration in which predicted abutment-scour depths computed with selected predictive equations were compared with field measurements of abutment-scour depth made at 144 bridges in South Carolina. The assessment used five equations published in the Fourth Edition of 'Evaluating Scour at Bridges,' (Hydraulic Engineering Circular 18), including the original Froehlich, the modified Froehlich, the Sturm, the Maryland, and the HIRE equations. An additional unpublished equation also was assessed. Comparisons between predicted and observed scour depths are intended to illustrate general trends and order-of-magnitude differences for the prediction equations. Field measurements were taken during non-flood conditions when the hydraulic conditions that caused the scour generally are unknown. The predicted scour depths are based on hydraulic conditions associated with the 100-year flow at all sites and the flood of record for 35 sites. Comparisons showed that predicted scour depths frequently overpredict observed scour and at times were excessive. The comparison also showed that underprediction occurred, but with less frequency. The performance of these equations indicates that they are poor predictors of abutment-scour depth in South Carolina, and it is probable that poor performance will occur when the equations are applied in other geographic regions. Extensive data and graphs used to compare predicted and observed scour depths in this study were compiled into spreadsheets and are included in digital format with this report. In addition to the equation-comparison data, Water-Surface Profile Model tube-velocity data, soil-boring data, and selected abutment-scour data are included in digital format with this report. The digital database was developed as a resource for future researchers and is especially valuable for evaluating the reasonableness of future equations that may be developed.

  2. Microscopical and chemical surface characterization of CAD/CAM zircona abutments after different cleaning procedures. A qualitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To describe and characterize the surface topography and cleanliness of CAD/CAM manufactured zirconia abutments after steaming and ultrasonic cleaning. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total of 12 ceramic CAD/CAM implant abutments of various manufacturers were produced and randomly divided into two groups of six samples each (control and test group). Four two-piece hybrid abutments and two one-piece abutments made of zirconium-dioxide were assessed per each group. In the control group, cleaning by steam was performed. The test group underwent an ultrasonic cleaning procedure with acetone, ethyl alcohol and antibacterial solution. Groups were subjected to scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to verify and characterize contaminant chemical characterization non-quantitatively. RESULTS All zirconia CAD/CAM abutments in the present study displayed production-induced wear particles, debris as well as organic and inorganic contaminants. The abutments of the test group showed reduction of surface contamination after undergoing an ultrasonic cleaning procedure. However, an absolute removal of pollutants could not be achieved. CONCLUSION The presence of debris on the transmucosal surface of CAD/CAM zirconia abutments of various manufacturers was confirmed. Within the limits of the study design, the results suggest that a defined ultrasonic cleaning process can be advantageously employed to reduce such debris, thus, supposedly enhancing soft tissue healing. Although the adverse long-term influence of abutment contamination on the biological stability of peri-implant tissues has been evidenced, a standardized and validated polishing and cleaning protocol still has to be implemented. PMID:25932314

  3. Repeatability and reproducibility of individual abutment impression, assessed with a blue light scanner

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Yeon; Lee, Jae-Jun; Kim, Ji-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We assessed the repeatability and reproducibility of abutment teeth dental impressions, digitized with a blue light scanner, by comparing the discrepancies in repeatability and reproducibility values for different types of abutment teeth. MATERIALS AND METHODS To evaluate repeatability, impressions of the canine, first premolar, and first molar, prepared for ceramic crowns, were repeatedly scanned to acquire 5 sets of 3-dimensional data via stereolithography (STL) files. Point clouds were compared and the error sizes were measured (n=10, per type). To evaluate reproducibility, the impressions were rotated by 10-20° on the table and scanned. These data were compared to the first STL data and the error sizes were measured (n=5, per type). One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the repeatability and reproducibility of the 3 types of teeth, and Tukey honest significant differences (HSD) multiple comparison test was used for post hoc comparisons (α=.05). RESULTS The differences with regard to repeatability were 4.5, 2.7, and 3.1 µm for the canine, premolar, and molar, indicating the poorest repeatability for the canine (P<.001). For reproducibility, the differences were 6.6, 5.8, and 11.0 µm indicating the poorest reproducibility for the molar (P=.007). CONCLUSION Our results indicated that impressions of individual abutment teeth, digitized with a blue light scanner, had good repeatability and reproducibility. PMID:27350856

  4. Correction of Malpositioned Implants through Periodontal Surgery and Prosthetic Rehabilitation Using Angled Abutment

    PubMed Central

    de Avila, Érica Dorigatti; de Barros-Filho, Luiz Antônio Borelli; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi; Mollo, Francisco de Assis; de Barros, Luiz Antônio Borelli

    2014-01-01

    When dental implants are malpositioned in relation to the adjacent teeth and alveolar bone or in an excessive buccal or lingual position, the final prosthesis rehabilitation impairs the peri-implant health of the gingival tissues and the aesthetics of the patient. Thus, the purpose of this case was to report and discuss a multidisciplinary protocol for the treatment of a compromised maxillary tooth in a patient with an abscess in his right central incisor due to an excessive buccal implant position. The patient presented with an implant-supported provisional restoration on his right maxillary central incisor and a traumatic injury in his left central incisor. The treatment protocol consisted in (i) abutment substitution to compensate the incorrect angulation of the implant, (ii) clinical crown lengthening, (iii) atraumatic extraction of the left central incisor, and (iv) immediate implant placement. Finally, (v) a custom abutment was fabricated to obtain a harmonious gingival contour around the prosthetic crown. In conclusion, when implants are incorrectly positioned in relation to the adjacent teeth, associated with soft-tissue defects, the challenge to create a harmonious mucogingival contours may be achieved with an interdisciplinary approach and with the placement of an appropriate custom abutment. PMID:24955259

  5. Implant-abutment gap versus microbial colonization: Clinical significance based on a literature review.

    PubMed

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Gressler May, Liliana; Faria, Renata; Özcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Microorganisms from the oral cavity may settle at the implant-abutment interface (IAI). As a result, tissue inflammation could occur around these structures. The databases MEDLINE/PubMed and PubMed Central were used to identify articles published from 1981 through 2012 related to the microbial colonization in the implant-abutment gap and its consequence in terms of crest bone loss and osseointegration. The following considerations could be put forward, with respect to the clinical importance of IAI: (a) the space present at the IAI seems to allow bacterial leakage to occur, in spite of the size of this space; (b) bacterial leakage seems to occur at the IAI, irrespective of the type of connection. More studies are necessary to clarify the relationship between leakage at IAI and abutment connection designs; (c) losses at the peri-implant bone crests cannot be related to the IAI size, since few studies have shown no relationship. Also, the microbial leakage at the IAI cannot be related to the bone crest loss, since there are no articles reporting this relationship; remains controversial the influence of the IAI position on the bone crest losses.

  6. Spline-Screw Multiple-Rotation Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Mechanism functions like combined robotic gripper and nut runner. Spline-screw multiple-rotation mechanism related to spline-screw payload-fastening system described in (GSC-13454). Incorporated as subsystem in alternative version of system. Mechanism functions like combination of robotic gripper and nut runner; provides both secure grip and rotary actuation of other parts of system. Used in system in which no need to make or break electrical connections to payload during robotic installation or removal of payload. More complicated version needed to make and break electrical connections. Mechanism mounted in payload.

  7. A further finite element stress analysis of angled abutments for an implant placed in the anterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dong; Tian, Kebin; Chen, Jiang; Jin, Hua; Huang, Wenxiu; Liu, Yuyu

    2015-01-01

    To systematically measure and compare the stress distribution on the bone around an implant in the anterior maxilla using angled abutments by means of finite element analysis, three-dimensional finite element simplified patient-specific models and simplified models were created and analyzed. Systematically varied angled abutments were simulated, with angulation ranging from 0° to 60°. The materials in the current study were assumed to be homogenous, linearly elastic, and isotropic. Force of 100 N was applied to the central node on the top surface of the abutments to simulate the occlusal force. To simulate axial and oblique loading, the angle of loading was 0°, 15°, and 20° to the long axis of implant, respectively. There was the strong resemblance between the response curves for simplified patient-specific models and simplified models. Response curves under oblique loading were similar in both models. With abutments angulation increased, maximum von Mises stress firstly decreased to minimum point and then gradually increased to higher level. From a biomechanical point of view, favorable peri-implant stress levels could be induced by angled abutments under oblique loading if suitable angulation of abutments was selected.

  8. The Influence of Implant Abutment Surface Roughness and the Type of Cement on Retention of Implant Supported Crowns

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, M. Sushender; Reddy, C. Rajaneesh; Pithani, Padmaja; R, Santosh Kumar; Kulkarni, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To provide relative data on the retentive characters of the commonly used cements on different implant abutment surfaces. Materials and Methods: A total of 20 implant abutments were divided into 2 groups. Ten implants were unaltered and ten were air borne particle abraded with 50μ aluminium oxide. Three luting agents (Tempbond, IRM and ImProv) were used to secure the crowns to abutments. All the crowns were removed from the abutment with an Instron machine at 0.5mm per minute and tensile bond strengths were recorded. Statistical analysis was performed using Anova, Paired t-test and Post-Hoc tests. Results: IRM showed the highest mean tensile strength among the three cements when used with treated and untreated implant abutment surfaces. Change in the abutment surface roughness had no effect on the mean tensile bond strength of TempBond and IRM cements, whereas ImProv cement showed reduced tensile strength with sandblasted surface. Conclusion: When increased retention is required IRM cement with either sandblasted or milled surface could be used and when retrievability is required cements of choice could be either TempBond or ImProv. PMID:25954694

  9. Soft Tissue Response to Titanium Abutments with Different Surface Treatment: Preliminary Histologic Report of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Canullo, Luigi; Dehner, Jan Friedrich; Penarrocha, David; Checchi, Vittorio; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary prospective RCT was to histologically evaluate peri-implant soft tissues around titanium abutments treated using different cleaning methods. Sixteen patients were randomized into three groups: laboratory customized abutments underwent Plasma of Argon treatment (Plasma Group), laboratory customized abutments underwent cleaning by steam (Steam Group), and abutments were used as they came from industry (Control Group). Seven days after the second surgery, soft tissues around abutments were harvested. Samples were histologically analyzed. Soft tissues surrounding Plasma Group abutments predominantly showed diffuse chronic infiltrate, almost no acute infiltrate, with presence of few polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes, and a diffuse presence of collagenization bands. Similarly, in Steam Group, the histological analysis showed a high variability of inflammatory expression factors. Tissues harvested from Control Group showed presence of few neutrophil granulocytes, moderate presence of lymphocytes, and diffuse collagenization bands in some sections, while they showed absence of acute infiltrate in 40% of sections. However, no statistical difference was found among the tested groups for each parameter (p > 0.05). Within the limit of the present study, results showed no statistically significant difference concerning inflammation and healing tendency between test and control groups. PMID:27366741

  10. Color variation induced by abutments in the superior anterior maxilla: an in vitro study in the pig gingiva

    PubMed Central

    Atash, Ramin

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this work is to evaluate different types of materials used for making implant abutments, by means of an in vitro study and a review of the literature, in order to identify the indications for a better choice of an implant-supported restoration in the anterior section. MATERIALS AND METHODS 5 implant abutments were tested in a random order in the superior anterior maxilla of pig gingiva (n = 8): titanium dioxide (Nobel Biocare); zirconium dioxide, Standard BO shade (Nobel Biocare, Kloten, Switzerland); zirconium dioxide, Light BI shade (Nobel Biocare); zirconium dioxide, Intense A 3.5 shade (Nobel Biocare); and aluminium oxide. Each abutment was tested for 2 mm and 3 mm thickness. To determine color variation, VITA Easyshade Advance spectrophotometer (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Sackingen, Germany) was used. RESULTS Results showed that the color variation induced by the abutment would be affected by the abutment material and gingival thickness, when the gingival thickness is 2 mm. All materials except zirconium dioxide (Standard shade) caused a visible change of color. Then, as the thickness of the gingiva increased to 3 mm, the color variation was attenuated in a significant manner and became invisible for all types of abutments, except those made of aluminium oxide. CONCLUSION Zirconium dioxide is the material causing the lowest color variation at 2 mm and at 3 mm, whereas aluminium oxide causes the highest color variation no matter the thickness. PMID:28018559

  11. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  12. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  13. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  14. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  15. 21 CFR 872.4880 - Intraosseous fixation screw or wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. 872.4880... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Surgical Devices § 872.4880 Intraosseous fixation screw or wire. (a) Identification. An intraosseous fixation screw or wire is a metal device intended to be...

  16. Fatigue strength of common tibial intramedullary nail distal locking screws

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Lanny V; Harris, Robert M; Zubak, Joseph J

    2009-01-01

    Background Premature failure of either the nail and/or locking screws with unstable fracture patterns may lead to angulation, shortening, malunion, and IM nail migration. Up to thirty percent of all unreamed nail locking screws can break after initial weight bearing is allowed at 8–10 weeks if union has not occurred. The primary problem this presents is hardware removal during revision surgery. The purposes of our study was to evaluate the relative fatigue resistance of distal locking screws and bolts from representative manufacturers of tibial IM nail systems, and develop a relative risk assessment of screws and materials used. Evaluations included quantitative and qualitative measures of the relative performance of these screws. Methods Fatigue tests were conducted to simulate a comminuted fracture that was treated by IM nailing assuming that all load was carried by the screws. Each screw type was tested ten times in a single screw configuration. One screw type was tested an additional ten times in a two-screw parallel configuration. Fatigue tests were performed using a servohydraulic materials testing system and custom fixturing that simulated screws placed in the distal region of an appropriately sized tibial IM nail. Fatigue loads were estimated based on a seventy-five kilogram individual at full weight bearing. The test duration was one million cycles (roughly one year), or screw fracture, whichever occurred first. Failure analysis of a representative sample of titanium alloy and stainless steel screws included scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and quantitative metallography. Results The average fatigue life of a single screw with a diameter of 4.0 mm was 1200 cycles, which would correspond roughly to half a day of full weight bearing. Single screws with a diameter of 4.5 mm or larger have approximately a 50 percent probability of withstanding a week of weight bearing, whereas a single 5.0 mm diameter screw has greater than 90 percent probability of

  17. Improvements to the single screw extruder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiemenz, C.; Ziegmann, G.; Franzkoch, B.; Hoffmanns, W.; Michaeli, W.

    1977-01-01

    The extrusion on a single screw extruder is examined. The process is divided into several steps: the dosage of the materials to be conveyed; the modification of the shape of the feeding opening which influences the feeding process and consequently the throughput of the extruder; optimizing the shape of the feeding zone to meet the specific material requirements; and plasticizing and homogenizing.

  18. Nylon screws make inexpensive coil forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aucoin, G.; Rosenthal, C.

    1978-01-01

    Standard nylon screws act as coil form copper wire laid down in spiral thread. Completed coil may be bonded to printed-circuit board. However, it is impossible to tune coil by adjusting spacing between windings, technique sometimes used with air-core coils.

  19. Improvements In Ball-Screw Linear Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iskenderian, Theodore; Joffe, Benjamin; Summers, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Report describes modifications of design of type of ball-screw linear actuator driven by dc motor, with linear-displacement feedback via linear variable-differential transformer (LVDT). Actuators used to position spacecraft engines to direct thrust. Modifications directed toward ensuring reliable and predictable operation during planned 12-year cruise and interval of hard use at end of cruise.

  20. Initial strength of highpressed extrusion poly-L-lactide screw.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, T; Nakamura, K; Shiro, R; Takazawa, H; Tsuji, K; Kurokawa, T

    2000-01-01

    We developed a poly-L-lactide material strengthened by a highpressed extrusion technique. The bending strength of a rod made of that material is higher than that of the same size rods made of poly-L-lactide strengthened by drawing technique, which has been used in clinical cases. The purposes of this study were, first to clarify if the initial strength of extrusion-strengthened poly-L-lactide screws is higher than that of draw-strengthened poly-L-lactide screws, and, secondly to investigate the safe torque for driving the screws in clinical usage. In accordance with AO screw design, five kinds of screws were manufactured. In a pull-out test and a twisting test using a DYRACON blocks, the strength of the highpressed extrusion-strengthened poly-L-lactide material was also higher than that of the draw-strengthened poly-L-lactide material after milling into screws. In the simulation using minipig bones and the 4.5 mm psi cortical screws, when the thickness was below 0.5 mm, between 0.5 and 2 mm or over 3 mm, the break locations were in the cortical bone, the thread of the screw and the under head fillet respectively. In the simulation using minipig bones and the 4.0 mm psi cancellous screws, breakage occurred not on the screws but on the cancellous bone in all screws.

  1. Surgical screw segmentation for mobile C-arm CT devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Joseph; Brehler, Michael; Franke, Jochen; Wolf, Ivo; Vetter, Sven Y.; Grützner, Paul A.; Meinzer, Hans-Peter; Nabers, Diana

    2014-03-01

    Calcaneal fractures are commonly treated by open reduction and internal fixation. An anatomical reconstruction of involved joints is mandatory to prevent cartilage damage and premature arthritis. In order to avoid intraarticular screw placements, the use of mobile C-arm CT devices is required. However, for analyzing the screw placement in detail, a time-consuming human-computer interaction is necessary to navigate through 3D images and therefore to view a single screw in detail. Established interaction procedures of repeatedly positioning and rotating sectional planes are inconvenient and impede the intraoperative assessment of the screw positioning. To simplify the interaction with 3D images, we propose an automatic screw segmentation that allows for an immediate selection of relevant sectional planes. Our algorithm consists of three major steps. At first, cylindrical characteristics are determined from local gradient structures with the help of RANSAC. In a second step, a DBScan clustering algorithm is applied to group similar cylinder characteristics. Each detected cluster represents a screw, whose determined location is then refined by a cylinder-to-image registration in a third step. Our evaluation with 309 screws in 50 images shows robust and precise results. The algorithm detected 98% (303) of the screws correctly. Thirteen clusters led to falsely identified screws. The mean distance error for the screw tip was 0.8 +/- 0.8 mm and for the screw head 1.2 +/- 1 mm. The mean orientation error was 1.4 +/- 1.2 degrees.

  2. Surgeon's view of pedicle screw implantation for the monitoring neurophysiologist.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, Siddharth B; Mehbod, Amir A

    2012-12-01

    Pedicle screws have become the gold standard of spinal instrumentation over the past decade owing to their biomechanical superiority. Despite their advantages, pedicle screw instrumentation is potentially dangerous, and surgeons wish to improve accuracy of screw placement to avoid complications associated with screw misplacement. The anatomy of the pedicles is variable throughout the spine, and several landmarks and trajectories have been suggested to aid safe placement of pedicle screws in the spine. Several techniques such as x-ray and computed tomography scan imaging coupled with computer-aided navigation are available to improve accuracy of screw insertion. Intraoperative neuromonitoring with the help of triggered electromyographic recordings has evolved as an objective evidence of assessing pedicle breach and proximity of the screw to neural structures. While all imaging and electrophysiological modalities should be applied on an individualized basis, finally no adjunctive technique can fully replace the need for surgical expertise and experience.

  3. Soft tissue cell adhesion to titanium abutments after different cleaning procedures: Preliminary results of a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Canullo, Luigi; Peñarrocha-Oltra, David; Marchionni, Silvia; Bagán, Leticia; Micarelli, Costanza

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: A randomized controlled trial was performed to assess soft tissue cell adhesion to implant titanium abutments subjected to different cleaning procedures and test if plasma cleaning can enhance cell adhesion at an early healing time. Study Design: Eighteen patients with osseointegrated and submerged implants were included. Before re-opening, 18 abutments were divided in 3 groups corresponding to different clinical conditions with different cleaning processes: no treatment (G1), laboratory customization and cleaning by steam (G2), cleaning by plasma of Argon (G3). Abutments were removed after 1 week and scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze cell adhesion to the abutment surface quantitatively (percentage of area occupied by cells) and qualitatively (aspect of adhered cells and presence of contaminants). Results: Mean percentages of area occupied by cells were 17.6 ± 22.7%, 16.5 ± 12.9% and 46.3 ± 27.9% for G1, G2 and G3 respectively. Differences were statistically significant between G1 and G3 (p=0.030), close to significance between G2 and G3 (p=0.056), and non-significant between G1 and G2 (p=0.530). The proportion of samples presenting adhered cells was homogeneous among the 3 groups (p-valor = 1.000). In all cases cells presented a flattened aspect; in 2 cases cells were less efficiently adhered and in 1 case cells presented filipodia. Three cases showed contamination with cocobacteria. Conclusions: Within the limits of the present study, plasma of Argon may enhance cell adhesion to titanium abutments, even at the early stage of soft tissue healing. Further studies with greater samples are necessary to confirm these findings. Key words:Connective tissue, dental abutments, randomized controlled trial, clinical research, glow discharged abutment, plasma cleaning. PMID:24121917

  4. The effects of the coupling of titanium implants and dissimilar metal abutments on osteoblast differentiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J C; Anderson, G I; Sutow, E J; Driscoll, C F; Mackey, D C

    1999-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of titanium endosseous dental implants coupled to dissimilar materials on the capacity of preosteoblasts in bone marrow culture to differentiate, to form alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies, and to mineralize. Ten UCLA abutments were cast in each of 4 alloys: Type III gold, ceramometal gold, commercially pure grade I titanium, and titanium-aluminum-vanadium (Ti-6Al-4V); 10 ceramic abutments and 30 sterile Brånemark System implants were also used. Five abutments of each material and 5 implants were incubated individually in rat bone marrow culture, as were 5 of each abutment attached to an implant; bone marrow cultures not containing test samples were used as controls. Following 17 days of culture, the solution potentials of individual abutments (except ceramic), the implant, and the implant-abutment couples were measured in the test medium. One dish of each group of 5 was then stained for bone nodule mineralization; the remainder were quantified by area for alkaline phosphatase staining. Statistical analysis of measured in vitro potentials showed that the uncoupled samples formed 2 groups, and coupled samples formed 3 groups. Analysis of variance for alkaline phosphatase-positive area values showed no significant differences between coupled or uncoupled groups and the control. Normal cell differentiation and morphology as well as a lack of zones of inhibition, were observed. Bone nodule mineralization was evident in all groups. It was concluded that the presence of these commonly used implant abutment biomaterials coupled to titanium endosseous dental implants had no adverse effects on the in vitro capacity of preosteoblasts in marrow to differentiate and to form mineralized bone nodules, despite measured differences in solution potentials.

  5. Isolation and characterization of beta-glucan synthase: A potential biochemical regulator of gravistimulated differential cell wall loosening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmanoff, K. M.

    1984-01-01

    In plants, gravity stimulates differential growth in the upper and lower halves of horizontally oriented organs. Auxin regulation of cell wall loosening and elongation is the basis for most models of this phenomenon. Auxin treatment of pea stem tissue rapidly increases the activity of Golgi-localized Beta-1,4-glucan synthase, an enzyme involved in biosynthesis of wall xyloglucan which apparently constitutes the substrate for the wall loosening process. The primary objective is to determine if auxin induces de novo formation of Golgi glucan synthase and increases the level of this glucan synthase mRNA. This shall be accomplished by (a) preparation of a monoclonal antibody to the synthase, (b) isolation, and characterization of the glucan synthase, and (c) examination for cross reactivity between the antibody and translation products of auxin induced mRNAs in pea tissue. The antibody will also be used to localize the glucan synthase in upper and lower halves of pea stem tissue before, during and after the response to gravity.

  6. Micro-leakage at the implant-abutment interface with different tightening torques in vitro

    PubMed Central

    da SILVA-NETO, João Paulo; PRUDENTE, Marcel Santana; CARNEIRO, Thiago de Almeida Prado Naves; NÓBILO, Mauro Antônio de Arruda; PENATTI, Mario Paulo Amante; NEVES, Flávio Domingues das

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the microleakage at the implant/abutment interface of external hexagon (EH) implants and abutments with different amounts of bacteria and tightening torques. Material and Methods A bacterial suspension was prepared to inoculate the implants. The first phase of this study used nine EH implants and abutments that were divided into three groups with different amounts of bacterial suspension (n=3): V0.5: 0.5 µL; V1.0: 1.0 µL e V1.5: 1.5 µL, and tightened to the manufacturer's recommended torque. The second phase of this experiment used 27 assemblies that were similar to those used in the first phase. These samples were inoculated with 0.5 µL of bacterial suspension and divided into three groups (n=9). T10: 10 Ncm; T20: 20 Ncm and T32: 32 Ncm. The samples were evaluated according to the turbidity of the broth every 24 hours for 14 days, and the bacteria viability was tested after that period. The statistical evaluation was conducted by Kruskal-Wallis testing (p<.05). Results During the first phase, groups V1.0 and V1.5 was presented with bacterial contamination in all samples after 24 h. During the second phase, two samples from group T10 and one from T20 presented positive results for bacterial contamination. Different amounts of bacterial solution led to overflow and contamination during the first 24 h of the experiment. The tightening torques did not statistically affect the microleakage in the assemblies. However, the group that was tightened to 32 Ncm torque did not show any bacterial contamination. Conclusion After 14 days of experimentation, the bacteria were proven to remain viable inside the implant internal cavity. PMID:23138747

  7. Bacterial contamination along implant-abutment interface in external and internal-hex dental implants

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Greison Rabelo; Olate, Sergio; Pozzer, Leandro; Cavalieri-Pereira, Lucas; Rodrigues-Chessa, Jaime G; Albergaría-Barbosa, José Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate bacterial contamination along the implant-abutment interface in relation to the size of the interface. 80 brand name implants were used, 40 internal-hex and 40 external-hex. The implants were handled in a sterile atmosphere inside a box, where they were inoculated with 0.3 μl of the Streptococcus sanguis ATCC10556 bacterium in the interior and the abutment was immediately installed with a torque of 30 Ncm for the external-hex and 20 Ncm for the internal-hex; the system was included in an Eppendorf control for 30 seconds and then placed in an Eppendorf control for 30 days. The implants were removed and assessed under a scanning electron microscope while the Eppendorf controls were bred in blood agar to analyze the colonies formed. The data were analyzed using the Chi-squared, Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests, considering a value of p<0.05 to obtain statistical significance. Five implants were excluded due to probable external contamination. Microspaces of up to 86.8 μm were observed in the external-hex implants and up to 53.9 μm in the internal-hex implants with no significant differences between the different systems being observed (p>0.05). The contamination observed was produced mainly in the external-hex implants and statistically significant differences were observed between the different hex systems from the same company. No significant differences were observed between interface size and bacterial contamination. Within our limitations, there was no relation between the size of the implant-abutment interface and bacterial contamination with Streptococcus sanguis ATCC10556. PMID:24753751

  8. Biocompatibility study of lithium disilicate and zirconium oxide ceramics for esthetic dental abutments

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The increasing demand for esthetically pleasing results has contributed to the use of ceramics for dental implant abutments. The aim of this study was to compare the biological response of epithelial tissue cultivated on lithium disilicate (LS2) and zirconium oxide (ZrO2) ceramics. Understanding the relevant physicochemical and mechanical properties of these ceramics will help identify the optimal material for facilitating gingival wound closure. Methods Both biomaterials were prepared with 2 different surface treatments: raw and polished. Their physicochemical characteristics were analyzed by contact angle measurements, scanning white-light interferometry, and scanning electron microscopy. An organotypic culture was then performed using a chicken epithelium model to simulate peri-implant soft tissue. We measured the contact angle, hydrophobicity, and roughness of the materials as well as the tissue behavior at their surfaces (cell migration and cell adhesion). Results The best cell migration was observed on ZrO2 ceramic. Cell adhesion was also drastically lower on the polished ZrO2 ceramic than on both the raw and polished LS2. Evaluating various surface topographies of LS2 showed that increasing surface roughness improved cell adhesion, leading to an increase of up to 13%. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that a biomaterial, here LS2, can be modified using simple surface changes in order to finely modulate soft tissue adhesion. Strong adhesion at the abutment associated with weak migration assists in gingival wound healing. On the same material, polishing can reduce cell adhesion without drastically modifying cell migration. A comparison of LS2 and ZrO2 ceramic showed that LS2 was more conducive to creating varying tissue reactions. Our results can help dental surgeons to choose, especially for esthetic implant abutments, the most appropriate biomaterial as well as the most appropriate surface treatment to use in accordance with specific clinical

  9. Laparoscopic vs computerized tomography-guided radiofrequency ablation for large hepatic hemangiomas abutting the diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun; Kong, Jian; Ding, Xue-Mei; Ke, Shan; Niu, Hai-Gang; Xin, Zong-Hai; Ning, Chun-Min; Guo, Shi-Gang; Li, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Long; Dong, Yong-Hong; Sun, Wen-Bing

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare safety and therapeutic efficacy of laparoscopic radiofrequency (RF) ablation vs computed tomography (CT)-guided RF ablation for large hepatic hemangiomas abutting the diaphragm. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed our sequential experience of treating 51 large hepatic hemangiomas abutting the diaphragm in 51 patients by CT-guided or laparoscopic RF ablation due to either the presence of symptoms and/or the enlargement of hemangioma. Altogether, 24 hemangiomas were ablated via a CT-guided percutaneous approach (CT-guided ablation group), and 27 hemangiomas were treated via a laparoscopic approach (laparoscopic ablation group). RESULTS: The mean diameter of the 51 hemangiomas was 9.6 ± 1.8 cm (range, 6.0-12.0 cm). There was no difference in the diameter of hemangiomas between the two groups (P > 0.05). RF ablation was performed successfully in all patients. There was no difference in ablation times between groups (P > 0.05). There were 23 thoracic complications in 17 patients: 15 (62.5%, 15/24) in the CT-guided ablation group and 2 (7.4%, 2/27) in the laparoscopic ablation group (P < 0.05). According to the Dindo-Clavien classification, two complications (pleural effusion and diaphragmatic rupture grade III) were major in two patients. All others were minor (grade I). Both major complications occurred in the CT-guided ablation group. The minor complications were treated successfully with conservative measures, and the two major complications underwent treatment by chest tube drainage and thoracoscopic surgery, respectively. Complete ablation was achieved in 91.7% (22/24) and 96.3% (26/27) in the CT-guided and the laparoscopic ablation groups, respectively (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic RF ablation therapy should be used as the first-line treatment option for large hepatic hemangiomas abutting the diaphragm. It avoids thermal injury to the diaphragm and reduces thoracic complications. PMID:26019459

  10. Radiologic Evaluation of Bone Loss at Implants with Biocide Coated Titanium Abutments: A Study in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    López-Píriz, Roberto; Solá-Linares, Eva; Granizo, Juan J.; Díaz-Güemes, Idohia; Enciso, Silvia; Bartolomé, José F.; Cabal, Belén; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate bone loss at implant abutments coated with a soda-lime glass containing silver nanoparticles subjected to experimental peri-implantitis. Five beagle dogs were used in the experiments, 3 implants were installed in each quadrant of the mandibles. Glass/n-Ag coted abutments were connected to implant platform. Cotton floss ligatures were placed in a submarginal position around the abutment necks and the animals were subject to a diet which allowed plaque accumulation, and after 15 weeks the dogs were sacrificed. Radiographs of all implant sites were obtained at the beginning and at the end of the experimentally induced peri-implantitis. The radiographic examination indicated that significant amounts of additional bone loss occurred in implants without biocide coating, considering both absolute and relative values of bone loss. Percentages of additional bone loss observed in implants dressed with a biocide coated abutment were about 3 times lower (p<0.006 distal aspect; and p<0.031 at mesial aspect) than the control ones. Within the limits of the present study it seems promising the use of soda-lime glass/nAg coatings on abutments to prevent peri-implant diseases. PMID:23285206

  11. Custom abutments alone will not eliminate the clinical effects of poor cementation techniques around dental implants.

    PubMed

    Piñeyro, Alfonso; Ganeles, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    With proper planning, placement, prosthetic treatment, and maintenance, dental implants have been shown to be a predictable and reliable treatment option with a high success rate. Clinicians who place cement-retained implant restorations, however, should be aware of the potential and sometimes irreversible biological complications associated with residual excess cement and should be prepared to consider using different practices that may reduce the problem. The present case reports describe the use of custom abutments to restore deeply placed implants with the intent of minimizing residual excess cement.

  12. Impact of screw elements on continuous granulation with a twin-screw extruder.

    PubMed

    Djuric, Dejan; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2008-11-01

    The influence of different screw element types on wet granulation process with a twin-screw extruder was investigated. Lactose granules were prepared with different screw configurations such as conveying, combing mixer and kneading elements. The use of kneading blocks led to an almost complete agglomeration of lactose, whereas kneading and combing mixer elements resulted in smaller granules in comparison. Granule porosity varied between 17.4% and 50.6%. Granule friability values ranged from 1.2% to 38.5%. Conveying elements led to the most porous and friable granules, whereas kneading blocks produced the densest and least friable granules. Combing mixer elements produced granules with median properties. A linear correlation between granule porosity and the natural logarithm of granule friability was detected. Flowability of granules was also influenced by the element type. Compressed granules with higher granule porosities resulted in tablets with higher tensile strength values and vice versa. Twin-screw extruders proved to be a versatile tool for wet granulation. By the choice of a suitable screw element granule and tablet characteristics were influenced.

  13. Analysis of Modeling Parameters on Threaded Screws.

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, Miquela S.; Brake, Matthew Robert; Vangoethem, Douglas

    2015-06-01

    Assembled mechanical systems often contain a large number of bolted connections. These bolted connections (joints) are integral aspects of the load path for structural dynamics, and, consequently, are paramount for calculating a structure's stiffness and energy dissipation prop- erties. However, analysts have not found the optimal method to model appropriately these bolted joints. The complexity of the screw geometry cause issues when generating a mesh of the model. This paper will explore different approaches to model a screw-substrate connec- tion. Model parameters such as mesh continuity, node alignment, wedge angles, and thread to body element size ratios are examined. The results of this study will give analysts a better understanding of the influences of these parameters and will aide in finding the optimal method to model bolted connections.

  14. Twin screw granulation - review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M R

    2015-01-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) is a new process of interest to the pharmaceutical community that can continuously wet granulate powders, doing so at lower liquid concentrations and with better product consistency than found by a high shear batch mixer. A considerable body of research has evolved over the short time since this process was introduced but generally with little comparison of results. A certain degree of confidence has been developed through these studies related to how process variables and many attributes of machinery configuration will affect granulation but some major challenges still lay ahead related to scalability, variations in the processing regimes related to degree of channel fill and the impact of wetting and granulation of complex powder formulations. This review examines the current literature for wet granulation processes studied in twin screw extrusion machinery, summarizing the influences of operational and system parameters affecting granule properties as well as strives to provide some practical observations to newly interested users of the technique.

  15. Biomechanical analysis of expansion screws and cortical screws used for ventral plate fixation on the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, Bernhard; Huber, Gerd; Morlock, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    Compared to bicortical screws, the surgical risk of injuring intraspinal structures can be minimized with the use of monocortical screws. However, this reduction should not be achieved at the expense of the stability of the fixation. With monocortical stabilization, the expansion screws have the potential of absorbing high loads. Therefore, they are expected to be a suitable alternative to bicortical screws for revision surgeries and in osteoporotic bone. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the stiffness of the two screw-plate systems used for ventral stabilization of the cervical spine, by focusing on the suitability of expansion screws as tools for revision treatments. The study was conducted in ten functional units of human cervical spines. The device sample stiffness was determined for four conditions using a turning moment of 2.25 N m each around one of the three principle axes. The conditions were native, destabilized, primarily stabilized with one of the screw-plate systems, followed by secondary stabilization using the expansion screw implant. The stabilized samples achieved a comparable, in most cases higher stiffness than the native samples. The samples undergoing secondary stabilization using expansion screws tend to display greater stiffness for all three axes compared to the primarily stabilized samples. The achieved tightening moment of the screws was higher than the one achieved with primary fixation. Both plates revealed similar primary stability. Revision surgeries with secondary instrumentation achieve a high stiffness of the screwed up segments. Monocortical expansion screws combined with a trapezoidal plate allow ventral stabilization of the cervical spine that is comparable to the plate fixation using bicortical screws. PMID:19588171

  16. Assessment of the stress transmitted to dental implants connected to screw-retained bars using different casting techniques.

    PubMed

    Haselhuhn, Klaus; Marotti, Juliana; Tortamano, Pedro; Weiss, Claudia; Suleiman, Lubna; Wolfart, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Passive fit of the prosthetic superstructure is important to avoid complications; however, evaluation of passive fit is not possible using conventional procedures. Thus, the aim of this study was to check and locate mechanical stress in bar restorations fabricated using two casting techniques. Fifteen patients received four implants in the interforaminal region of the mandible, and a bar was fabricated using either the cast-on abutment or lost-wax casting technique. The fit accuracy was checked according to the Sheffield's test criteria. Measurements were recorded on the master model with a gap-free, passive fit using foil strain gauges both before and after tightening the prosthetic screws. Data acquisition and processing was analyzed with computer software and submitted to statistical analysis (ANOVA). The greatest axial distortion was at position 42 with the cast-on abutment technique, with a mean distortion of 450 μm/m. The lowest axial distortion occurred at position 44 with the lost-wax casting technique, with a mean distortion of 100 μm/m. The minimal differences between the means of axial distortion do not indicate any significant differences between the techniques (P = 0.2076). Analysis of the sensor axial distortion in relation to the implant position produced a significant difference (P < 0.0001). Significantly higher measurements were recorded in the axial distortion analysis of the distal sensors of implants at the 34 and 44 regions than on the mesial positions at the 32 and 42 regions (P = 0.0481). The measuring technique recorded axial distortion in the implant-supported superstructures. Distortions were present at both casting techniques, with no significant difference between the sides.

  17. Pullout strength of fixation screws from polymethylmethacrylate bone cement.

    PubMed

    Flahiff, C M; Gober, G A; Nicholas, R W

    1995-05-01

    Polymethylmethacrylate bone cement is often used to fill voids and increase the strength of osteoporotic and pathological bone. However, it is unclear as to which method of cement augmentation provides optimal screw fixation. This study was conducted to determine which of the current cement augmentation techniques provides the strongest construct when used in association with orthopaedic fixation screws. Pullout strength was determined for screws placed in sawbones with no cement, soft cement, doughy cement and hard cement after drilling and tapping. All cement-screw constructs were significantly stronger than the no cement group. Screws placed in doughy cement had a significantly higher pullout force than those placed in hard cement. Pullout strength of screws placed in soft cement was intermediate between the other cement techniques but not significantly different from either group.

  18. The usefulness of electrical stimulation for assessing pedicle screw placements.

    PubMed

    Toleikis, J R; Skelly, J P; Carlvin, A O; Toleikis, S C; Bernard, T N; Burkus, J K; Burr, M E; Dorchak, J D; Goldman, M S; Walsh, T R

    2000-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to further establish the efficacy of pedicle screw stimulation as a monitoring technique to avoid nerve root injury during screw placement. The study population consisted of 662 patients in whom 3,409 pedicle screws were placed and tested by electrical stimulation. If stimulation resulted in a myogenic response at a stimulation intensity of 10 mA or less, the placement of the screw was inspected. Inspection was necessary for 3.9% of the screw placements in 15.4% of the study population. None of the patients in the study experienced any new postoperative neurologic deficits. These findings provide guidelines for the interpretation of stimulation data and support the use of this technique as an easy, inexpensive, and quick method to reliably assess screw placements and protecting neurological function.

  19. Research on an intelligent ball-screw measuring instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Pan; Chen, Yong-Le; Zeng, Quan-Kun; Xiang, Lin-Kui

    1993-09-01

    Ball screw are widely used in the steering-gear of automobile, aero-mechanism, machine tools and precision instrument. Since the thread form is referred to as a Gothic arch, so it is difficult to measure the ball screw. The traditional screw measuring method is "three wire" method or "three ball" method. The weakness of these methods is that the measuring process is too complicated or the measuring precision is not high. We have developed an intelligent ball screw measuring instrument. The instrument can measure the ball center diameter of ball screw. Using a new measuring method("two wire and one ball" method), the instrument has high measuring precision, high reliability and it is easy to operate.The 8098 microcomputer system in the instrument can control the measuring process and accomplish data collecting and processing automatically. This measuring instrument can be used on the production site for fast and precise measurement of ball screw.

  20. Assessment of human gingival fibroblast interaction with dental implant abutment materials.

    PubMed

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Bukelskiene, Virginija; Sabaliauskas, Vaidotas; Balciunas, Evaldas; Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Baltriukiene, Daiva

    2015-04-01

    The biocompatibility of dental implant abutment materials depends on numerous factors including the nature of the material, its chemical composition, roughness, texture, hydrophilicity and surface charge. The aim of the present study was to compare the viability and adhesion strength of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) grown on several dental materials used in implant prosthodontics. Surfaces of the tested materials were assessed using an optical imaging profiler. For material toxicity and cellular adhesion evaluation, primary human gingival fibroblast cells were used. To evaluate the strength of cellular adhesion, gingival fibroblasts were cultured on the tested materials and subjected to lateral shear forces by applying 300 and 500 rpm shaking intensities. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) expression and phosphorylation in cells grown on the specimens were registered by cell-based ELISA. There was a tendency of fibroblast adhesion strength to decrease in the following order: sandblasted titanium, polished titanium, sandblasted zirconium oxide, polished zirconium oxide, gold-alloy, chrome-cobalt alloy. Higher levels of total as well as phospho-FAK protein were registered in HGFs grown on roughened titanium. Material type and surface processing technique have an impact on gingival fibroblast interaction with dental implant abutment materials.

  1. LES of the flow field around a 45 wing-wall abutment in different scour conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressan, Filippo; Armenio, Vincenzo; Ballio, Francesco

    2008-11-01

    Scouring process around bridge abutment is one of the main causes leading to the hydraulic structure failure, thus the determination of the maximum scour depth assumes a central role. Resolved LES of the turbulent flow field around a 45 wing wall abutment are carried out for three main scouring conditions: Initial phase (flat bed), logarithmic phase of scouring and equilibrium scour depth. The bathymetry and the flow parameters are taken from data of a laboratory experiment. Mean flow field, secondary flows and turbulent quantities such as Reynolds stresses and turbulent kinetic energy are calculated and compared for the three cases. The purpose of this study is to understand how the statistics of the wall stresses change with the increase of the scour depth. Preliminary results indicate that the bottom stresses decrease as the scour hole increases and that the bed deforms itself in order to minimize the effect of the obstacle on the Bernoulli trinomial. The results of this research will help in finding new erosion models based on the knowledge of turbulence-bed interaction.

  2. The effect of platform switching on the levels of metal ion release from different implant–abutment couples

    PubMed Central

    Alrabeah, Ghada O; Knowles, Jonathan C; Petridis, Haralampos

    2016-01-01

    The improved peri-implant bone response demonstrated by platform switching may be the result of reduced amounts of metal ions released to the surrounding tissues. The aim of this study was to compare the levels of metal ions released from platform-matched and platform-switched implant–abutment couples as a result of accelerated corrosion. Thirty-six titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V) and cobalt–chrome alloy abutments were coupled with titanium cylinders forming either platform-switched or platform-matched groups (n=6). In addition, 18 unconnected samples served as controls. The specimens were subjected to accelerated corrosion by static immersion in 1% lactic acid for 1 week. The amount of metal ions ion of each test tube was measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and energy dispersive spectroscopy X-ray analyses were performed pre- and post-immersion to assess corrosion at the interface. The platform-matched groups demonstrated higher ion release for vanadium, aluminium, cobalt, chrome, and molybdenum compared with the platform-switched groups (P<0.05). Titanium was the highest element to be released regardless of abutment size or connection (P<0.05). SEM images showed pitting corrosion prominent on the outer borders of the implant and abutment platform surfaces. In conclusion, implant–abutment couples underwent an active corrosion process resulting in metal ions release into the surrounding environment. The highest amount of metal ions released was recorded for the platform-matched groups, suggesting that platform-switching concept has a positive effect in reducing the levels of metal ion release from the implant–abutment couples. PMID:27357323

  3. A comparison of retentive strength of implant cement depending on various methods of removing provisional cement from implant abutment

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Eun-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the effectiveness of various methods for removing provisional cement from implant abutments, and what effect these methods have on the retention of prosthesis during the definitive cementation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty implant fixture analogues and abutments were embedded in resin blocks. Forty cast crowns were fabricated and divided into 4 groups each containing 10 implants. Group A was cemented directly with the definitive cement (Cem-Implant). The remainder were cemented with provisional cement (Temp-Bond NE), and classified according to the method for cleaning the abutments. Group B used a plastic curette and wet gauze, Group C used a rubber cup and pumice, and Group D used an airborne particle abrasion technique. The abutments were observed using a stereomicroscope after removing the provisional cement. The tensile bond strength was measured after the definitive cementation. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance test (α=.05). RESULTS Group B clearly showed provisional cement remaining, whereas the other groups showed almost no cement. Groups A and B showed a relatively smooth surface. More roughness was observed in Group C, and apparent roughness was noted in Group D. The tensile bond strength tests revealed Group D to have significantly the highest tensile bond strength followed in order by Groups C, A and B. CONCLUSION A plastic curette and wet gauze alone cannot effectively remove the residual provisional cement on the abutment. The definitive retention increased when the abutments were treated with rubber cup/pumice or airborne particle abraded to remove the provisional cement. PMID:24049563

  4. Bone Turnover Markers Correlate with Implant fixation in a Rat Model Using LPS Doped Particles to Induced Implant Loosening1

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuo; Virdi, Amarjit S.; Sena, Kotaro; Hughes, W. Frank; Sumner, Dale R.

    2011-01-01

    Revision surgery for particle-induced implant loosening in total joint replacement is expected to increase dramatically over the next few decades. This study was designed to investigate if local tissue and serum markers of bone remodeling reflect implant fixation following administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-doped polyethylene (PE) particles in a rat model. 24 rats received bilateral implantation of intramedullary titanium rods in the distal femur, followed by weekly bilateral intra-articular injection of either LPS-doped PE particles (n = 12) or vehicle which contained no particles (n= 12) for 12 weeks. The group in which the particles were injected had increased serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen, decreased serum osteocalcin, increased peri-implant eroded surface, decreased peri-implant bone volume, and decreased mechanical pull-out strength compared to the controls. Implant fixation strength was positively correlated with peri-implant bone volume and serum osteocalcin and inversely correlated with serum C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen, while energy to yield was positively correlated with serum osteocalcin and inversely correlated with the number of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase positive cells at the interface and the amount of peri-implant eroded surface. There was no effect on trabecular bone volume at a remote site. Thus, the particle-induced impaired fixation in this rat model was directly associated with local and serum markers of elevated bone resorption and depressed bone formation, supporting the rationale of exploring both anti-catabolic and anabolic strategies to treat and prevent particle-related implant osteolysis and loosening and indicating that serum markers may prove useful in tracking implant fixation. PMID:22275163

  5. Screws, Propellers and Fans Based on a Mobius Strip

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, John M.; Backley, Floyd D.; Gilinsky, Mikhail

    1998-01-01

    A Mobius strip concept is intended for improving the working efficiency of propellers and screws. Applications involve cooling, boat propellers, mixing in appliance, blenders, and helicopters. Several Mobius shaped screws for the average size kitchen mixers have been made and tested. The tests have shown that the mixer with the Mobius shaped screw pair is most efficient, and saves more than 30% of the electric power by comparison with the standard. The created video film about these tests illustrates efficiency of Mobius shaped screws.

  6. The Efficacy of Hydroxyapatite for Screw Augmentation in Osteoporotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sang Hoon; Lee, June Ho; Cho, Ji Young; Lee, Ho-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The stability of screw constructs is of considerable importance in determining the outcome, especially in spinal osteoporosis. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) has been proven as an effective material for increasing the pullout strength of pedicle screws inserted into the osteoporotic bones. However, PMMA has several disadvantages, such as its exothermic properties, the risk of neural injury in the event of extravasation, and difficulties in performing revision surgery. In the current study, we used hydroxyapatite (HA) cement for screw augmentation in spinal osteoporosis. We conclude that HA cement is a useful tool for screw augmentation and recommend it as a promising option for spinal instrumentation in osteoporotic patients. PMID:24201099

  7. Use of prefabricated titanium abutments and customized anatomic lithium disilicate structures for cement-retained implant restorations in the esthetic zone.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Shao; Harris, Bryan T; Zandinejad, Amirali; Martin, William C; Morton, Dean

    2014-03-01

    This report describes the fabrication of customized abutments consisting of prefabricated 2-piece titanium abutments and customized anatomic lithium disilicate structures for cement-retained implant restorations in the esthetic zone. The heat-pressed lithium disilicate provides esthetic customized anatomic structures and crowns independently of the computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing process.

  8. Finite element analysis of osteosynthesis screw fixation in the bone stock: an appropriate method for automatic screw modelling.

    PubMed

    Wieding, Jan; Souffrant, Robert; Fritsche, Andreas; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The use of finite element analysis (FEA) has grown to a more and more important method in the field of biomedical engineering and biomechanics. Although increased computational performance allows new ways to generate more complex biomechanical models, in the area of orthopaedic surgery, solid modelling of screws and drill holes represent a limitation of their use for individual cases and an increase of computational costs. To cope with these requirements, different methods for numerical screw modelling have therefore been investigated to improve its application diversity. Exemplarily, fixation was performed for stabilization of a large segmental femoral bone defect by an osteosynthesis plate. Three different numerical modelling techniques for implant fixation were used in this study, i.e. without screw modelling, screws as solid elements as well as screws as structural elements. The latter one offers the possibility to implement automatically generated screws with variable geometry on arbitrary FE models. Structural screws were parametrically generated by a Python script for the automatic generation in the FE-software Abaqus/CAE on both a tetrahedral and a hexahedral meshed femur. Accuracy of the FE models was confirmed by experimental testing using a composite femur with a segmental defect and an identical osteosynthesis plate for primary stabilisation with titanium screws. Both deflection of the femoral head and the gap alteration were measured with an optical measuring system with an accuracy of approximately 3 µm. For both screw modelling techniques a sufficient correlation of approximately 95% between numerical and experimental analysis was found. Furthermore, using structural elements for screw modelling the computational time could be reduced by 85% using hexahedral elements instead of tetrahedral elements for femur meshing. The automatically generated screw modelling offers a realistic simulation of the osteosynthesis fixation with screws in the adjacent

  9. Magnesium Alloys as a Biomaterial for Degradable Craniofacial Screws

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Verdelis, Konstantinos; Maiti, Spandan; Pal, Siladitya; Chung, William L.; Chou, Da-Tren; Kumta, Prashant N.; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, magnesium (Mg) alloys have received significant attention as a potential biomaterial for degradable implants, and this study was directed at evaluating the suitability of Mg for craniofacial bone screws. The objective was to implant screws fabricated from commercially available Mg-alloys (pure Mg and AZ31) in-vivo in a rabbit mandible. First, Mg-alloy screws were compared to stainless steel screws in an in-vitro pull-out test and determined to have a similar holding strength (~40N). A finite element model of the screw was created using the pull-out test data, and the model can be used for future Mg-alloy screw design. Then, Mg-alloy screws were implanted for 4, 8, and 12 weeks, with two controls of an osteotomy site (hole) with no implant and a stainless steel screw implanted for 12 weeks. MicroCT (computed tomography) was used to assess bone remodeling and Mg-alloy degradation, both visually and qualitatively through volume fraction measurements for all time points. Histologic analysis was also completed for the Mg-alloys at 12 weeks. The results showed that craniofacial bone remodeling occurred around both Mg-alloy screw types. Pure Mg had a different degradation profile than AZ31, however bone growth occurred around both screw types. The degradation rate of both Mg-alloy screw types in the bone marrow space and the muscle were faster than in the cortical bone space at 12 weeks. Furthermore, it was shown that by alloying Mg, the degradation profile could be changed. These results indicate the promise of using Mg-alloys for craniofacial applications. PMID:24384125

  10. Nutrients and bioactive compounds content of Baillonella toxisperma, Trichoscypha abut and Pentaclethra macrophylla from Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Fungo, Robert; Muyonga, John; Kaaya, Archileo; Okia, Clement; Tieguhong, Juius C; Baidu-Forson, Jojo J

    2015-01-01

    Baillonella toxisperma, Pentaclethra macrophylla and Trichoscypha abut are important foods for communities living around forests in Cameroon. Information on the nutritional value and bioactive content of these foods is required to establish their contribution to the nutrition and health of the communities. Samples of the three foods were obtained from four villages in east and three villages in south Cameroon. The foods were analyzed for proximate composition, minerals and bioactive content using standard chemical analysis methods. T. abut was found to be an excellent source of bioactive compounds; flavonoids (306 mg/100 g), polyphenols (947 mg/100 g), proanthocyanins (61.2 mg/100 g), vitamin C (80.05 mg/100 g), and total oxalates (0.6 mg/100 g). P. macrophylla was found to be a rich source of total fat (38.71%), protein (15.82%) and total fiber (17.10%) and some bioactive compounds; vitamin E (19.4 mg/100 g) and proanthocyanins (65.0 mg/100 g). B. toxisperma, was found to have high content of carbohydrates (89.6%), potassium (27.5 mg/100 g) and calcium (37.5 mg/100 g). Flavonoids, polyphenols, vitamins C and E are the main bioactive compounds in these forest foods. The daily consumption of some of these fruits may coffer protection against some ailments and oxidative stress. Approximately 200 g of either B. toxisperma or P. macrophylla, can supply 100% iron and zinc RDAs for children aged 1–3 years, while 300 g of the two forest foods can supply about 85% iron and zinc RDAs for non-pregnant non-lactating women. The three foods provide 100% daily vitamins C and E requirements for both adults and children. The results of this study show that Baillonella toxisperma, Pentaclethra macrophylla and Trichoscypha abut can considerably contribute towards the human nutrient requirements. These forest foods also contain substantial levels of health promoting phytochemicals notably flavonoids, polyphenols, vitamins C and E. These foods therefore have

  11. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion using unilateral pedicle screws and a translaminar screw

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sandra; Vaidya, Rahul

    2008-01-01

    Lumbar spinal fusion is advancing with minimally invasive techniques, bone graft alternatives, and new implants. This has resulted in significant reductions of operative time, duration of hospitalization, and higher success in fusion rates. However, costs have increased as many new technologies are expensive. This study was carried out to investigate the clinical outcomes and fusion rates of a low implant load construct of unilateral pedicle screws and a translaminar screw in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) which reduced the cost of the posterior implants by almost 50%. Nineteen consecutive patients who underwent single level TLIF with this construct were included in the study. Sixteen patients had a TLIF allograft interbody spacer placed, while in three a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage was used. Follow-up ranged from 15 to 54 months with a mean of 32 months. A clinical and radiographic evaluation was carried out preoperatively and at multiple time points following surgery. An overall improvement in Oswestry scores and visual analogue scales for leg and back pain (VAS) was observed. Three patients underwent revision surgery due to recurrence of back pain. All patients showed radiographic evidence of fusion from 9 to 26 months (mean 19) following surgery. This study suggests that unilateral pedicle screws and a contralateral translaminar screw are a cheaper and viable option for single level lumbar fusion. PMID:19015896

  12. Wet granulation in a twin-screw extruder: implications of screw design.

    PubMed

    Thompson, M R; Sun, J

    2010-04-01

    Wet granulation in twin-screw extrusion machinery is an attractive technology for the continuous processing of pharmaceuticals. The performance of this machinery is integrally tied to its screw design yet little fundamental knowledge exists in this emerging field for granulation to intelligently create, troubleshoot, and scale-up such processes. This study endeavored to systematically examine the influence of different commercially available screw elements on the flow behavior and granulation mechanics of lactose monohydrate saturated at low concentration (5-12%, w/w) with an aqueous polyvinyl-pyrrolidone binder. The results of the work showed that current screw elements could be successfully incorporated into designs for wet granulation, to tailor the particle size as well as particle shape of an agglomerate product. Conveying elements for cohesive granular flows were shown to perform similar to their use in polymer processing, as effective transport units with low specific mechanical energy input. The conveying zones provided little significant change to the particle size or shape, though the degree of channel fill in these sections had a significant influence on the more energy-intensive mixing elements studied. The standard mixing elements for this machine, kneading blocks and comb mixers, were found to be effective for generating coarser particles, though their mechanisms of granulation differed significantly.

  13. Proximal femoral reconstruction after aseptic loosening following proximal femoral replacement for Ewing sarcoma: a case report with one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Schoof, Benjamin; Jakobs, Oliver; Gehrke, Thorsten; Gebauer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 30-year-old patient initially treated for a proximal femoral Ewing's sarcoma when 12 years old. Index treatment comprised tumour resection and total hip arthroplasty. Two years later revision for aseptic loosening was performed. Subsequently, six further surgical revisons were performed for varying causes. At the age of 23 years the proximal femur was resected and a proximal femoral endoprosthesis implanted.Eighteen years after initial diagnosis the patient presented with recurrent aseptc loosening. Both the proximal femur and acetabulum were reconstructed. For acetabular reconstruction a structural allograft and a tantalum cup were utilised. Reconstruction of the femur utilsed extensive wire mesh and circlage wiring with impaction bone allograft into which a femoral stem was implanted.At one-year follow-up the patient was pain free, had no evidence of infection with satisfactory radiographs and no evidence of implant loosening. This is the first case reporting an extended proximal femoral reconstruction with a wire mesh in combination with impaction bone grafting in an aseptic loosened proximal femoral replacement following Ewing's Sarcoma.

  14. Effect of abutment angulation in the retention and durability of three overdenture attachment systems: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Ustrell, Raul; Mendes, Jose Manuel; Braga, Ana Cristina; Berastegui, Esther

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This in vitro study investigated and compared the durability and retention of three types of attachments. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three commercially available attachments were investigated: Clix®, Dalbo-Plus® and Locator®. In total, 72 samples of these attachments were placed in the acrylic resin forms and subjected to mechanical testing (5400 cycles of insertion and removal) over the respective ball or Locator abutments immersed in artificial saliva at pH 7 and 37℃. The abutments were placed at angulations of 0°, 10° and 20°. The retention force was recorded at the beginning and after 540, 1080, 2160, 3240, 4320 and 5400 insertion-removal cycles. RESULTS The results revealed that there were significant differences in the average values of the insertion/removal force due to angulation (F (2.48) = 343619, P<.05) and the type of attachment (F (7.48) = 23.220, P<.05). CONCLUSION Greater angulation of the abutments was found to influence the retention capacity of the attachments, and the fatigue test simulating 5 years of denture insertion and removal did not produce wear in the metal abutments. PMID:26949484

  15. Injection of coal by screw feed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of the screw feeder for injecting solids through a 20 to 30 psi barrier is common practice in the cement making industry. An analytical extrapolation of that design, accounting for pressure holding characteristics of a column of solids, shows that coal can be fed to zones at several hundred psi with minimal or no loss of gas. A series of curves showing the calculated pressure gradient through a moving column of solids is presented. Mean particle size, solids velocity, and column length are parameters. Further study of this system to evaluate practicality is recommended.

  16. Roller screw electric motor ventricular assist device.

    PubMed

    Richenbacher, W E; Pae, W E; Magovern, J A; Rosenberg, G; Snyder, A J; Pierce, W S

    1986-01-01

    The roller screw electric VAD is easier to manufacture and 25% lighter than the previously described drum cam model. This device requires 12 to 15 W to pump 6 to 8 l/min with minimal hemolysis. The motor drive has functioned for periods up to 93 days in vivo with no measurable wear. The compliance chamber volume varies by 100 cc during VAD function but does so while maintaining pressure variations below 15 mmHg. Compliance chamber volume loss of 2 to 5 cc/day is explained by gas transport through SPU. The subcutaneous sampling port provides ready access to the sealed system.

  17. Translaminar screws of the axis--an alternative technique for rigid screw fixation in upper cervical spine instability.

    PubMed

    Meyer, D; Meyer, F; Kretschmer, Th; Börm, W

    2012-04-01

    C2 pedicle screws or transarticular atlantoaxial screws are technically demanding and carry an increased risk of vertebral artery injury. In up to 20% of cases, pedicle and transarticular screw placement is not possible due to a high-riding vertebral artery or very small C2 pedicles in addition to other anatomical variations. Translaminar screws have been reported to rigidly capture posterior elements of C2 and therefore appear to be a suitable alternative. We present our first experiences and clinical results with this new method in two neurosurgical spine centers. Twenty-seven adult patients were treated between 2007 and 2010 in two neurosurgical spine departments with C2 translaminar screw fixation for upper cervical spine instability of various origins (e.g., trauma, tumor, dens pseudarthrosis). Eight patients were men and 19 were women. Mean age was 68.9 years. In most cases, translaminar screws were used because of contraindications for pedicle or transarticular screws as a salvage technique. All patients were clinically assessed and had CT scans postoperatively to verify correct screw placement. Follow-up was performed with reexamination on an ambulatory basis. Mean follow-up was 7.6 months for all patients. In 27 patients, 52 translaminar screws were placed. There were no intraoperative complications. Postoperatively, we identified four screw malpositions using a new accuracy grading scale. One screw had to be revised because of violation of the spinal canal >4 mm. None of the patients had additional neurological deficits postoperatively, and all showed stable cervical conditions at follow-up. Two patients died due to causes not associated with the stabilization technique. The fusion rate for patients with C1/C2 fixation is 92.9%. Translaminar screws can be used at least as an additional technique for cases of upper cervical spine instability when pedicle screw placement is contraindicated or not possible. The current data suggest comparable

  18. Plastic temporary abutments with provisional restorations in immediate loading procedures: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Mijiritsky, Eitan

    2006-09-01

    A provisional restoration in combination with an implant-retained restoration provides many of the same benefits as nonimplant-retained fixed restorations. Provisional restorations serve as a diagnostic tool to confirm esthetics, contours, accessibility for oral hygiene, and can be used to duplicate the definitive restoration. A provisional restoration allows for communication between the patient, dentist, and technician. The soft tissue around the implants can heal according to the contours of the provisional restoration. However, implant-retained treatment can require an extended period of osseointegration, and provisional treatment can be a challenge if a removable prosthesis is provided because adjustments of the denture may become necessary during healing. This article presents a case report that describes the simultaneous placement of implants with the connection of fixed provisional restorations to prefabricated plastic provisional abutments.

  19. Periodic Stresses in Gyroscopic Bodies, with Applications to Air Screws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F

    1918-01-01

    Report discusses periodic stresses in gyroscopic bodies with applications to air screws caused by particle mass. Report concludes that all modern air screws obey the laws found for plane groups of particles. In particular the two-bladers exert on the shaft a rhythmic gyroscopic torque; the multibladers a steady one; both easily calculable for any given conditions of motion and mass distribution.

  20. Photon and electron collimator effects on electron output and abutting segments in energy modulated electron therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Olofsson, Lennart; Karlsson, Magnus G.; Karlsson, Mikael

    2005-10-15

    In energy modulated electron therapy a large fraction of the segments will be arranged as abutting segments where inhomogeneities in segment matching regions must be kept as small as possible. Furthermore, the output variation between different segments should be minimized and must in all cases be well predicted. For electron therapy with add-on collimators, both the electron MLC (eMLC) and the photon MLC (xMLC) contribute to these effects when an xMLC tracking technique is utilized to reduce the x-ray induced leakage. Two add-on electron collimator geometries have been analyzed using Monte Carlo simulations: One isocentric eMLC geometry with an isocentric clearance of 35 cm and air or helium in the treatment head, and one conventional proximity geometry with a clearance of 5 cm and air in the treatment head. The electron fluence output for 22.5 MeV electrons is not significantly affected by the xMLC if the shielding margins are larger than 2-3 cm. For small field sizes and 9.6 MeV electrons, the isocentric design with helium in the treatment head or shielding margins larger than 3 cm is needed to avoid a reduced electron output. Dose inhomogeneity in the matching region of electron segments is, in general, small when collimator positions are adjusted to account for divergence in the field. The effect of xMLC tracking on the electron output can be made negligible while still obtaining a substantially reduced x-ray leakage contribution. Collimator scattering effects do not interfere significantly when abutting beam techniques are properly applied.

  1. A simple model of throughput calculation for single screw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béreaux, Yves; Charmeau, Jean-Yves; Moguedet, Maël

    2007-04-01

    To be able to predict the throughput of a single-screw extruder or the metering time of an injection moulding machine for a given screw geometry, set of processing conditions and polymeric material is important both for practical and designing purposes. Our simple model show that the screw geometry is the most important parameter, followed by polymer rheology and processing conditions. Melting properties and length seem to intervene to a lesser extent. The calculations hinges on the idea of viewing the entire screw as a pump, conveying a solid and a molten fraction. The evolution of the solid fraction is the essence of the plastication process, but under particular circumstances, its influence on the throughput is nil. This allows us to get a very good estimate on the throughput and pressure development along the screw. Our calculations are compared to different sets of experiments available from the literature. We have consistent agreement both in throughput and pressure with published data.

  2. A four lumen screwing device for multiparametric brain monitoring.

    PubMed

    Feuerstein, T H; Langemann, H; Gratzl, O; Mendelowitsch, A

    2000-01-01

    We describe multiparametric monitoring in severe head trauma using a new screwing device. Our aim was to create a screw which would make the implantation of the probes and thus multiparametric monitoring easier. The new screw allows us to implant 3 probes (microdialysis, Paratrend and an intracranial pressure device) through one burr hole. The screw has four channels, the fourth being for ventricular drainage. We monitored 13 patients with severe head trauma (GCS = 3-8) for up to 7 days. Brain tissue pO2, pCO2, pH, and temperature were measured on-line with the Paratrend 7 machine. The microdialytic parameters glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glutamate were determined semi on-line with a CMA 600 enzymatic analyser. There were no complications in any of the patients that could be ascribed to the screw.

  3. Ball Screw Actuator Including an Axial Soft Stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul T. (Inventor); Forrest, Steven Talbert (Inventor); Abel, Steve (Inventor); Woessner, George (Inventor); Hanlon, Casey (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An actuator includes an actuator housing, a ball screw, and an axial soft stop assembly. The ball screw extends through the actuator housing and has a first end and a second end. The ball screw is coupled to receive a drive force and is configured, upon receipt of the drive force, to selectively move in a retract direction and an extend direction. The axial soft stop assembly is disposed within the actuator housing. The axial soft stop assembly is configured to be selectively engaged by the ball screw and, upon being engaged thereby, to translate, with compliance, a predetermined distance in the extend direction, and to prevent further movement of the ball screw upon translating the predetermined distance.

  4. Asymmetric distribution in twin screw granulation.

    PubMed

    Chan Seem, Tim; Rowson, Neil A; Gabbott, Ian; de Matas, Marcel; Reynolds, Gavin K; Ingram, Andy

    2016-09-01

    Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) was successfully employed to validate measured transverse asymmetry in material distribution in the conveying zones of a Twin Screw Granulator (TSG). Flow asymmetry was established to be a property of the granulator geometry and dependent on fill level. The liquid distribution of granules as a function of fill level was determined. High flow asymmetry at low fill level negatively affects granule nucleation leading to high variance in final uniformity. Wetting of material during nucleation was identified as a critical parameter in determining final granule uniformity and fill level is highlighted as a crucial control factor in achieving this. Flow asymmetry of dry material in conveying zones upstream of binder fluid injection leads to poor non-uniform wetting at nucleation and results in heterogeneous final product. The granule formation mechanism of 60°F kneading blocks is suggested to be primarily breakage of agglomerates formed during nucleation. Optimisation of screw configuration would be required to provide secondary growth. This work shows how fill dependent flow regimes affect granulation mechanisms.

  5. Bone Loss at Implant with Titanium Abutments Coated by Soda Lime Glass Containing Silver Nanoparticles: A Histological Study in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Arturo; Guitián, Francisco; López-Píriz, Roberto; Bartolomé, José F.; Cabal, Belén; Esteban-Tejeda, Leticia; Torrecillas, Ramón; Moya, José S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate bone loss at implants connected to abutments coated with a soda-lime glass containing silver nanoparticles, subjected to experimental peri-implantitis. Also the aging and erosion of the coating in mouth was studied. Five beagle dogs were used in the experiments. Three implants were placed in each mandible quadrant: in 2 of them, Glass/n-Ag coated abutments were connected to implant platform, 1 was covered with a Ti-mechanized abutment. Experimental peri-implantitis was induced in all implants after the submarginal placement of cotton ligatures, and three months after animals were euthanatized. Thickness and morphology of coating was studied in abutment cross-sections by SEM. Histology and histo-morphometric studies were carried on in undecalfied ground slides. After the induced peri-implantitis: 1.The abutment coating shown losing of thickness and cracking. 2. The histometry showed a significant less bone loss in the implants with glass/n-Ag coated abutments. A more symmetric cone of bone resorption was observed in the coated group. There were no significant differences in the peri-implantitis histological characteristics between both groups of implants. Within the limits of this in-vivo study, it could be affirmed that abutments coated with biocide soda-lime-glass-silver nanoparticles can reduce bone loss in experimental peri-implantitis. This achievement makes this coating a suggestive material to control peri-implantitis development and progression. PMID:24466292

  6. Stress distribution difference between Lava Ultimate full crowns and IPS e.max CAD full crowns on a natural tooth and on tooth-shaped implant abutments.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Ivo; Daher, René

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this short communication is to present finite element analysis comparison of the stress distribution between CAD/CAM full crowns made of Lava Ultimate and of IPS e.max CAD, adhesively luted to natural teeth and to implant abutments with the shape of natural teeth. Six 3D models were prepared using a 3D content-creating software, based on a micro-CT scan of a human mandibular molar. The geometry of the full crown and of the abutment was the same for all models representing Lava Ultimate full crowns (L) and IPS e.max CAD full crowns (E) on three different abutments: prepared natural tooth (n), titanium abutment (t) and zirconia abutment (z). A static load of 400 N was applied on the vestibular and lingual cusps, and fixtures were applied to the base of the models. After running the static linear analysis, the post-processing data we analyzed. The stress values at the interface between the crown and the abutment of the Lt and Lz groups were significantly higher than the stress values at the same interface of all the other models. The high stress concentration in the adhesive at the interface between the crown and the abutment of the Lava Ultimate group on implants might be one of the factors contributing to the reported debondings of crowns.

  7. Stock Versus CAD/CAM Customized Zirconia Implant Abutments – Clinical and Patient‐Based Outcomes in a Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Henny J.A.; Kerdijk, Wouter; Raghoebar, Gerry M.; Cune, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Single‐tooth replacement often requires a prefabricated dental implant and a customized crown. The benefits of individualization of the abutment remain unclear. Purpose This randomized controlled clinical trial aims to study potential benefits of individualization of zirconia implant abutments with respect to preservation of marginal bone level and several clinical and patient‐based outcome measures. Material and Methods Fifty participants with a missing premolar were included and randomly assigned to standard (ZirDesign, DentsplySirona Implants, Mölndal, Sweden) or computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) customized (Atlantis, DentsplySirona Implants, Mölndal, Sweden) zirconia abutment therapy. Peri‐implant bone level (primary outcome), Plaque‐index, calculus formation, bleeding on probing, gingiva index, probing pocket depth, recession, appearance of soft tissues and patients' contentment were assessed shortly after placement and one year later. Results No implants were lost and no complications related to the abutments were observed. Statistically significant differences between stock and CAD/CAM customized zirconia abutments could not be demonstrated for any of the operationalized variables. Conclusion The use of a CAD/CAM customized zirconia abutment in single tooth replacement of a premolar is not associated with an improvement in clinical performance or patients' contentment when compared to the use of a stock zirconia abutment. PMID:27476829

  8. Investigation of factors affecting loosening of Ilizarov ring-wire external fixator systems at the bone-wire interface.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Finn E; Pankaj, Pankaj; Simpson, A Hamish R W

    2012-05-01

    The potential for peri-implant bone yielding and subsequent loosening of Ilizarov ring-wire external fixation systems was investigated using non-linear finite element (FE) analyses. A strain-based plasticity model was employed to simulate bone yielding. FE models also incorporated contact behavior at the wire-bone interface, orthotropic elasticity, and periosteal-endosteal variation of bone properties. These simulations were used to determine the extent and location of yielding with change in age-related bone structure and properties for the bone-Ilizarov construct at the tibial midshaft. At critical wire-bone interfaces, the predicted volume of yielded bone with four wires (on either side of the fracture) was ∼40% of that with two wires. Old-aged cases showed considerably greater bone yielding at the wire-bone interface than young cases (1.7-2.2 times greater volumes of yielded bone). The volume of yielded bone at all wire-bone interfaces decreased with an increase in wire pre-tension. The absence of continuous through-thickness yielding offers an explanation for the clinical observation that Ilizarov ring-wire fixation can provide stable fracture fixation even in bone with high porosity.

  9. Loosening of the total knee arthroplasty: detection by radionuclide bone scanning. [/sup 99m/Tc-methylene diphosphonate

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, J.C.; Hattner, R.S.; Murray, W.R.; Genant, H.K.

    1980-07-01

    Pain after total knee arthroplasty is a common clinical problem in orthopedics, and prosthetic loosening, often requiring surgical revision, is usually the etiology. Since standard clinical and radiographic diagnostic measures have not proven totally satisfactory, a study of the utility of bone scintigraphy to assess stability of the knee prosthesis was done. Thirty-five patients with 39 prostheses were studied. Seventeen patients with 21 total knee arthroplasties served as controls and were asymptomatic, were stable at surgery, or improved with conservative management. Eighteen knees in 18 symptomatic patients composed the experimental group. Of these, 11 knees were loose at surgery and seven have had surgery recommended. Scintigrams of the knees were obtained using /sup 99m/Tc-MDP, and ranked 0-3 corresponding to increasingly abnormal localization by three observers. Highly significant differences were observed between the abnormal and control groups (p<0.001). Reciprocal changes in sensitivity and specificity with increasingly stringent criteria were shown. While it is apparent that the bone scan cannot be used as the sole diagnostic method for evaluation of prosthetic stability, it does seem to be a useful adjunct along with clinical criteria and radiographic studies.

  10. Structural health monitoring for bolt loosening via a non-invasive vibro-haptics human-machine cooperative interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekedis, Mahmut; Mascerañas, David; Turan, Gursoy; Ercan, Emre; Farrar, Charles R.; Yildiz, Hasan

    2015-08-01

    For the last two decades, developments in damage detection algorithms have greatly increased the potential for autonomous decisions about structural health. However, we are still struggling to build autonomous tools that can match the ability of a human to detect and localize the quantity of damage in structures. Therefore, there is a growing interest in merging the computational and cognitive concepts to improve the solution of structural health monitoring (SHM). The main object of this research is to apply the human-machine cooperative approach on a tower structure to detect damage. The cooperation approach includes haptic tools to create an appropriate collaboration between SHM sensor networks, statistical compression techniques and humans. Damage simulation in the structure is conducted by releasing some of the bolt loads. Accelerometers are bonded to various locations of the tower members to acquire the dynamic response of the structure. The obtained accelerometer results are encoded in three different ways to represent them as a haptic stimulus for the human subjects. Then, the participants are subjected to each of these stimuli to detect the bolt loosened damage in the tower. Results obtained from the human-machine cooperation demonstrate that the human subjects were able to recognize the damage with an accuracy of 88 ± 20.21% and response time of 5.87 ± 2.33 s. As a result, it is concluded that the currently developed human-machine cooperation SHM may provide a useful framework to interact with abstract entities such as data from a sensor network.

  11. [Management of Odontoid Fractures with Compression Screw and Anterior Transarticular Screw Fixation in Elderly Patients].

    PubMed

    Kočiš, J; Kelbl, M; Veselý, R; Kočiš, T

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY In the management of dens axis fractures in patients older than 65 years of age the posterior approach is preferred due to osteoporosis and the risk of a failure of anterior osteosynthesis. The posterior approach, however, is associated with a higher incidence of complications. A combination of anterior transarticular fixation of C1/2 (ATS) with compression osteosynthesis of dens axis significantly increases the stability of osteosynthesis. MATERIAL AND METHODS In the period from 2009 to 2015 our hospital admitted 13 patients older than 65 years of age with a diagnosed type III dens axis fracture based on AO classification. 8 patients sustained a dens axis fracture combined with a stable atlas fracture. The cohort consisted of 13 women aged 67 to 90 years, with the mean age of 82.3 years. None of the female patients were affected neurologically. The dens axis fracture was treated by anterior approach. Once the screw was inserted in the dens axis, two more screws were added, the entrance points of those screws were medial and lateral to the odontoid screw and direction was divergently via C1/2 joints in order to reinforce stability. The patients were monitored at 6-week, 3-, 6- and 12-month follow-ups. Bone healing was confirmed by CT scan. RESULTS No complications were recorded during the surgery in any of the 13 patients. In one female patient the stabilization failed in the early postoperative period. A reoperation from anterior approach with the use of the same method was necessary. In eleven patients bone healing occurred after 6 to 12 months. In two patients pseudoarthrosis was formed with no clinical symptoms. No neurological deterioration or a patient s death was reported in the monitored period within 12 months after the treatment. DISCUSSION Where dens axis fractures in elderly patients are managed operatively, the posterior approach and transarticular fixation of C1/2 with sublaminar loop are preferred. This procedure is considered

  12. Effect of abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type on the final shade of zirconia all-ceramic restorations: in vitro study of color masking ability

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seon-Hee

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type on the final shade of zirconia all-ceramic restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three different types of disk-shaped zirconia coping specimens (Lava, Cercon, Zirkonzahn: ø10 mm × 0.4 mm) were fabricated and veneered with IPS e.max Press Ceram (shade A2), for total thicknesses of 1 and 1.5 mm. A total of sixty zirconia restoration specimens were divided into six groups based on their coping types and thicknesses. The abutment specimens (ø10 mm × 7 mm) were prepared with gold alloy, base metal (nickel-chromium) alloy, and four different shades (A1, A2, A3, A4) of composite resins. The average L*, a*, b* values of the zirconia specimens on the six abutment specimens were measured with a dental colorimeter, and the statistical significance in the effects of three variables was analyzed by using repeated measures analysis of variance (α=.05).The average shade difference (ΔE) values of the zirconia specimens between the A2 composite resin abutment and other abutments were also evaluated. RESULTS The effects of zirconia specimen thickness (P<.001), abutment shade (P<.001), and type of zirconia copings (P<.003) on the final shade of the zirconia restorations were significant. The average ΔE value of Lava specimens (1 mm) between the A2 composite resin and gold alloy abutments was higher (close to the acceptability threshold of 5.5 ΔE) than th ose between the A2 composite resin and other abutments. CONCLUSION This in-vitro study demonstrated that abutment shade, ceramic thickness, and coping type affected the resulting shade of zirconia restorations. PMID:26576252

  13. The effect of screw preload and framework material on the success of cementable fixed partial prostheses: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Istabrak; Keilig, Ludger; Bourauel, Christoph; Lückerath, Walter

    2015-05-01

    The rigidity of framework materials and overload of the implant system directly affect the final transferred load of the bone around implants. The aim of the present study has been to analyse the influence of framework materials on the transferred load to the implant system and the surrounding bone. A finite element model of a long-span cementable implant-supported fixed prosthesis was created with two coping layers (gold and hybrid composite) to optimise the fitting of the prosthesis to the abutments. Three framework materials were analysed: titanium, gold alloy, and zirconia. The connection screws were first preloaded with 200 N. The framework was then loaded with 500 N vertically and at 30° to the framework long axis. Two loading conditions were considered: at the mesial and distal boundaries of the framework and at the centre of the framework. The stresses and strains within the framework materials and bone bed around the supporting implants were analysed. The region and angle of load applications showed an obvious effect on the values of the stresses and strains within the framework itself and, consequently, their distribution in the implant system and surrounding bone. A correlation of the framework material and stresses of the coping materials was observed as well. The gold framework showed acceptable values of stress within the cortical bone (92 MPa and 89 MPa with 30° loading at two points and at the centre, respectively) in comparison to titanium (92 MPa and 113 MPa) and zirconia (88 MPa and 115 MPa).

  14. Economics of water injected air screw compressor systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venu Madhav, K.; Kovačević, A.

    2015-08-01

    There is a growing need for compressed air free of entrained oil to be used in industry. In many cases it can be supplied by oil flooded screw compressors with multi stage filtration systems, or by oil free screw compressors. However, if water injected screw compressors can be made to operate reliably, they could be more efficient and therefore cheaper to operate. Unfortunately, to date, such machines have proved to be insufficiently reliable and not cost effective. This paper describes an investigation carried out to determine the current limitations of water injected screw compressor systems and how these could be overcome in the 15-315 kW power range and delivery pressures of 6-10 bar. Modern rotor profiles and approach to sealing and cooling allow reasonably inexpensive air end design. The prototype of the water injected screw compressor air system was built and tested for performance and reliability. The water injected compressor system was compared with the oil injected and oil free compressor systems of the equivalent size including the economic analysis based on the lifecycle costs. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that water injected screw compressor systems could be designed to deliver clean air free of oil contamination with a better user value proposition than the oil injected or oil free screw compressor systems over the considered range of operations.

  15. Midline Lumbar Fusion with Cortical Bone Trajectory Screw

    PubMed Central

    MIZUNO, Masaki; KURAISHI, Keita; UMEDA, Yasuyuki; SANO, Takanori; TSUJI, Masanori; SUZUKI, Hidenori

    2014-01-01

    A novel cortical bone trajectory (CBT) screw technique provides an alternative fixation technique for lumbar spine. Trajectory of CBT screw creates a caudo-cephalad path in sagittal plane and a medio-lateral path in axial plane, and engages cortical bone in the pedicle. The theoretical advantage is that it provides enhanced screw grip and interface strength. Midline lumbar fusion (MIDLF) is composed of posterior mid-line approach, microsurgical laminectomy, and CBT screw fixation. We adopted the MIDLF technique for lumbar spondylolisthesis. Advantages of this technique include that decompression and fusion are available in the same field, and it minimizes approach-related damages. To determine whether MIDLF with CBT screw is as effective as traditional approach and it is minimum invasive technique, we studied the clinical and radiological outcomes of MIDLF. Our results indicate that MIDLF is effective and minimum invasive technique. Evidence of effectiveness of MIDLF is that patients had good recovery score, and that CBT screw technique was safety in clinical and stable in radiological. MIDLF with CBT screw provides the surgeon with additional options for fixation. This technique is most likely to be useful for treating lumbar spondylolisthesis in combination with midline decompression and insertion of an interbody graft, such as the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion or posterior lumbar interbody fusion techniques. PMID:25169139

  16. Scaphoid Proximal Pole Fracture Following Headless Screw Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Rancy, Schneider K.; Zelken, Jonathan A.; Lipman, Joseph D.; Wolfe, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Headless screw fixation of scaphoid fractures and nonunions yields predictably excellent outcomes with a relatively low complication profile. However, intramedullary implants affect the load to failure and stress distribution within bone and may be implicated in subsequent fracture. Case Description We describe a posttraumatic fracture pattern of the scaphoid proximal pole originating at the previous headless screw insertion site in three young male patients with healed scaphoid nonunions. Each fracture was remarkably similar in shape and size, comprised the volar proximal pole, and was contiguous with the screw entry point. Treatment was challenging but successful in all cases. Literature Review Previous reports have posited that stress-raisers secondary to screw orientation may be implicated in subsequent peri-implant fracture of the femoral neck. Repeat scaphoid fracture after screw fixation has also been reported. However, the shape and locality of secondary fracture have not been described, nor has the potential role of screw fixation in the production of distinct fracture patterns. Clinical Relevance Hand surgeons must be aware of this difficult complication that may follow antegrade headless screw fixation of scaphoid fracture nonunion, and of available treatment strategies. PMID:26855840

  17. Fracture mechanisms of retrieved titanium screw thread in dental implant.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Ken'ichi; Ichikawa, Tetsuo; Murakami, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Youji; Asaoka, Kenzo

    2002-06-01

    Titanium and its alloy are increasingly attracting attention for use as biomaterials. However, delayed fracture of titanium dental implants has been reported, and factors affecting the acceleration of corrosion and fatigue have to be determined. The fractured surface of a retrieved titanium screw and metallurgical structures of a dental implant system were analyzed. The outer surface of the retrieved screw had a structure different from that of the as-received screw. It was confirmed that a shear crack initiated at the root of the thread and propagated into the inner section of the screw. Gas chromatography revealed that the retrieved screw had absorbed a higher amount of hydrogen than the as-received sample. The grain structure of a titanium screw, immersed in a solution known to induce hydrogen absorption, showed features similar to those of the retrieved screw. It was concluded that titanium in a biological environment absorbs hydrogen and this may be the reason for delayed fracture of a titanium implant.

  18. Optically driven Archimedes micro-screws for micropump applications: multiple blade design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldeck, Patrice L.; Lin, Chih-Lang; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Chin-Te; Chung, Tien-Tung; Bouriau, Michel; Vitrant, Guy

    2011-10-01

    We study the rotation of photo-driven Archimedes screw with multiple blades. The micron-sized Archimedes screws are readily made by the two-photon polymerization technique. Free-floating screws that are trapped by optical tweezers align in the laser irradiation direction, and rotate spontaneously. In this study we demonstrate that the rotation speeds of two-blade-screws is twice the rotation speed of one-blade-screw. However, more complex 3-blade-screws rotate slower than 2-blade-screws due to their limited geometry resolution at this micron scale.

  19. Vibration analysis of three-screw pumps under pressure loads and rotor contact forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wanyou; Lu, Hanfeng; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Chuan; Lu, Xiqun; Shuai, Zhijun

    2016-01-01

    Two main vibration sources in three-screw pumps, the fluid exciting force and the screw contact force, are studied to provide the basis for vibration control in this paper. A fluid exciting force model and a screw contact model are proposed to calculate these forces. An experimental test is carried out to obtain the vibration response of a three-screw pump. A calibrated finite element model of the three-screw pump is used to verify the vibration response under the fluid exciting force and the screw contact force obtained from the proposed models. The results show that the screw contact force is more dominant than the fluid exciting force.

  20. Preliminary Design on Screw Press Model of Palm Oil Extraction Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firdaus, Muhammad; Salleh, S. M.; Nawi, I.; Ngali, Z.; Siswanto, W. A.; Yusup, E. M.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of the screw press is to compress the fruit bunch between the main screw and travelling cones to extract the palm oil. Visual inspection, model development and simulation of screw press by using Solidworks 2016 and calculation of design properties were performed to support the investigation. The project aims to analyse different design of screw press which improves in reducing maintenance cost and increasing lifespan. The currently existing of screw press can endure between 500 to 900 hours and requires frequent maintenance. Different configurations have been tried in determination of best design properties in screw press. The results specify that screw press with tapered inner shaft has more total lifespan (hours) compared existing screw press. The selection of the screw press with tapered inner shaft can reduce maintenance cost and increase lifespan of the screw press.

  1. Spline-locking screw fastening strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1992-01-01

    A fastener was developed by NASA Goddard for efficiently performing assembly, maintenance, and equipment replacement functions in space using either robotics or astronaut means. This fastener, the 'Spline Locking Screw' (SLS) would also have significant commercial value in advanced space manufacturing. Commercial (or DoD) products could be manufactured in such a way that their prime subassemblies would be assembled using SLS fasteners. This would permit machines and robots to disconnect and replace these modules/parts with ease, greatly reducing life cycle costs of the products and greatly enhancing the quality, timeliness, and consistency of repairs, upgrades, and remanufacturing. The operation of the basic SLS fastener is detailed, including hardware and test results. Its extension into a comprehensive fastening strategy for NASA use in space is also outlined. Following this, the discussion turns toward potential commercial and government applications and the potential market significance of same.

  2. Spline-Locking Screw Fastening Strategy (SLSFS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    1991-01-01

    A fastener was developed by NASA Goddard for efficiently performing assembly, maintenance, and equipment replacement functions in space using either robotic or astronaut means. This fastener, the 'Spline Locking Screw' (SLS) would also have significant commercial value in advanced manufacturing. Commercial (or DoD) products could be manufactured in such a way that their prime subassemblies would be assembled using SLS fasteners. This would permit machines and robots to disconnect and replace these modules/parts with ease, greatly reducing life cycle costs of the products and greatly enhancing the quality, timeliness, and consistency of repairs, upgrades, and remanufacturing. The operation of the basic SLS fastener is detailed, including hardware and test results. Its extension into a comprehensive fastening strategy for NASA use in space is also outlined. Following this, the discussion turns toward potential commercial and government applications and the potential market significance of same.

  3. Analysis of Material Flow in Screw Extrusion of Aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Haugen, Bjoern; Oernskar, Magnus; Welo, Torgeir; Wideroee, Fredrik

    2010-06-15

    Screw extrusion of aluminum is a new process for production of aluminum profiles. The commercial potential could be large. Little experimental and numerical work has been done with respect to this process.The material flow of hot aluminum in a screw extruder has been analyzed using finite element formulations for the non-Newtonian Navier-Stokes equations. Aluminum material properties are modeled using the Zener-Holloman material model. Effects of stick-slip conditions are investigated with respect to pressure build up and mixing quality of the extrusion process.The numerical results are compared with physical experiments using an experimental screw extruder.

  4. Combination gene therapy targeting on interleukin-1β and RANKL for wear debris-induced aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Jia, T-H; Zacharias, N; Gong, W; Du, H-X; Wooley, P H; Yang, S-Y

    2013-02-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a combination gene therapy to repress interleukin-1 (IL-1) and receptor activator of nuclear factor NF-kappa B ligand (RANKL) for the treatment of particulate debris-induced aseptic loosening, and tried to explore the molecular mechanism of the exogenous gene modifications on osteoclastogenesis. RAW cells activated by titanium particles were transduced with DFG-IL-1Ra (retroviral vector encoding IL-1 receptor antagonist) and AAV-OPG (adeno-associated viral vectors-osteoprotegerin) individually or in combination for 4 weeks. Pro-inflammatory cytokines in culture media were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and gene expressions of RANK, IL-1β, c-Fos, TRAF6, JNK1 and CPK were examined using real-time PCR. An established knee-implant-failure mouse model was employed to evaluate the efficacy of the in vivo double-gene therapy. The surgical implantation of a titanium alloy pin into the proximal tibia was followed by monthly challenge with titanium debris. Peri-implant gene transfers of IL-1Ra and OPG (respectively or in combination) were given 3 weeks after surgery. The combination of OPG and IL-1Ra gene transfer exhibited strong synergetic effects in blockage of inflammation and osteoclastogenesis at 8 weeks after gene modification. The combination therapy reversed peri-implant bone resorption and restored implant stability when compared with either single gene transduction. Real-time PCR data indicated that the action of IL-1Ra gene therapy may be mediated via the JNK1 pathway, while the reduction of osteoclastogenesis by OPG gene modification may be regulated by c-Fos expression. In addition, both gene modifications resulted in significant diminishment of TRAF6 expression.

  5. Bone scan usefulness in patients with painful hip or knee prosthesis: 10 situations that can cause pain, other than loosening and infection.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Sofia; Ferreira, Teresa C; Salgado, Lucília; Paycha, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, with the higher median life expectancy, the number of hip and knee replacements has increased. Clinical examination and morphological studies are essential to evaluate patients with a painful arthroplasty. Nuclear medicine examinations also play an important role, their main usefulness being the exclusion of prosthesis complications. Nevertheless, conventional examinations, namely bone scan and white blood cell scintigraphy, can also identify complications, such as loosening and infection. This study describes the normal and pathologic patterns of a bone scan and exemplifies ten common situations that can cause pain in patients with hip or knee arthroplasty, other than loosening and infection, which can be disclosed on a bone scintigraphy. The ten situations that should be considered and looked for when analysing a bone scan are: referred pain, patellofemoral pain syndrome, fractures, fissures, abscess/haematoma, bone insert behaviour, heterotopic ossification, greater trochanter pseudarthrosis, osteoarthritis extension in a knee with an unicompartmental prosthesis, and systemic disease with bone involvement.

  6. Effects on Subtalar Joint Stress Distribution After Cannulated Screw Insertion at Different Positions and Directions.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cheng-song; Chen, Wan; Chen, Chen; Yang, Guang-hua; Hu, Chao; Tang, Kang-lai

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects on subtalar joint stress distribution after cannulated screw insertion at different positions and directions. After establishing a 3-dimensional geometric model of a normal subtalar joint, we analyzed the most ideal cannulated screw insertion position and approach for subtalar joint stress distribution and compared the differences in loading stress, antirotary strength, and anti-inversion/eversion strength among lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion, traditional screw insertion, and ideal cannulated screw insertion. The screw insertion approach allowing the most uniform subtalar joint loading stress distribution was lateral screw insertion near the border of the talar neck plus medial screw insertion close to the ankle joint. For stress distribution uniformity, antirotary strength, and anti-inversion/eversion strength, lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion was superior to traditional double-screw insertion. Compared with ideal cannulated screw insertion, slightly poorer stress distribution uniformity and better antirotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength were observed for lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion. Traditional single-screw insertion was better than double-screw insertion for stress distribution uniformity but worse for anti-rotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength. Lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion was slightly worse for stress distribution uniformity than was ideal cannulated screw insertion but superior to traditional screw insertion. It was better than both ideal cannulated screw insertion and traditional screw insertion for anti-rotary strength and anti-inversion/eversion strength. Lateral-medial antiparallel screw insertion is an approach with simple localization, convenient operation, and good safety.

  7. Maxillomandibular relationship record for complete arch/mouth implant restorations using putty-elastomeric occlusion rim at healing abutment level

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Pravinkumar G.; Nimbalkar-Patil, Smita

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Recording of the maxillomandibular relationship (MMR) in implant complete arch restorations usually necessitates removal of the healing abutments to attach the record bases, which makes the procedures tedious and time-consuming. Materials and Methods: This article describes the procedure of recording of MMR for complete mouth rehabilitation with the help of the putty elastomeric record base cum occlusion rim reinforced with the acrylic resin framework. This technique records the MMR without removing the healing abutments from mouth and without attaching the acrylic-resin record base with wax occlusion rim. Results: The use of putty-elastomeric occlusion rim provides stable interocclusal records for implant supported complete arch (or mouth) rehabilitation. Conclusion: Maxillomandibular relationship records made with the present technique is less time-consuming and accurate with less chances of distortion of the MMR records. PMID:26321828

  8. Strontium-doped calcium polyphosphate/ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene composites: A new class of artificial joint components with enhanced biological efficacy to aseptic loosening.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhipeng; Huang, Bingxue; Li, Yiwen; Tian, Meng; Li, Li; Yu, Xixun

    2016-04-01

    To enhance implant stability and prolong the service life of artificial joint component, a new approach was proposed to improve the wear resistance of artificial joint component and endow artificial joint component with the biological efficacy of resistance to aseptic loosening. Strontium calcium polyphosphate (SCPP) were interfused in ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) by a combination of liquid nitrogen ball-milling and flat-panel curing process to prepare the SCPP/UHMWPE composites. The micro-structure, mechanical characterization, tribological characterization and bioactivities of various SCPP/UHMWPE composites were investigated. The results suggested that this method could statistically improve the wear resistance of UHMWPE resulting from a good SCPP particle dispersion. Moreover, it is also observed that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites-wear particles could promote the production of OPG by osteoblasts and decrease the production of RANKL by osteoblasts, and then increase the OPG/RANKL ratio. This indicated that the SCPP/UHMWPE composites had potential efficacy to prevent and treat aseptic loosening. Above all, the SCPP/UHMWPE composites with a suitable SCPP content would be the promising materials for fabricating artificial joint component with ability to resist aseptic loosening.

  9. Effect of using nano and micro airborne abrasive particles on bond strength of implant abutment to prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Rismanchian, Mansour; Davoudi, Amin; Shadmehr, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Connecting prostheses to the implant abutments has become a concern and achieving a satisfactory retention has been focused in cement-retention prostheses recently. Sandblasting is a method to make a roughened surface for providing more retention. The aim of this study was to compare effects of nano and micro airborne abrasive particles (ABAP) in roughening surface of implant abutments and further retention of cemented copings. Thirty Xive abutments and analogues (4.5 D GH1) were mounted vertically in self-cured acrylic blocks. Full metal Ni-Cr copings with a loop on the top were fabricated with appropriate marginal adaptation for each abutment. All samples were divided into 3 groups: first group (MPS) was sandblasted with 50 µm Al2O3 micro ABAP, second group (NSP) was sandblasted with 80 nm Al2O3 nano ABAP, and the third group (C) was assumed as control. The samples were cemented with provisional cement (Temp Bond) and tensile bond strength of cemented copings was evaluated by a universal testing machine after thermic cycling. The t test for independent samples was used for statistical analysis by SPSS software (version 15) at the significant level of 0.05. Final result showed significant difference among all groups (p<0.001) and MPS manifested the highest mean retention (207.88 ± 45.61 N) with significant difference among other groups (p<0.001). The control group showed the lowest bond strength as predicted (48.95 ± 10.44 N). Using nano or micro ABAP is an efficient way for increasing bond strengths significantly, but it seems that micro ABAP was more effective.

  10. Clear-water abutment and contraction scour in the Coastal Plain and Piedmont Provinces of South Carolina, 1996-99

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benedict, Stephen T.

    2016-01-01

    Data from this study have been compiled into a database that includes photographs, figures, observed scour depths, theoretical scour depths, limited basin characteristics, limited soil data, and theoretical hydraulic data. The database can be used to compare studied sites with unstudied sites to assess the potential for scour at the unstudied sites. In addition, the database can be used to assess the performance of various theoretical methods for predicting clear-water abutment and contraction scour.

  11. [The use of blade plate and dynamic screw plate osteosynthesis].

    PubMed

    Oestern, H J; Gänsslen, A

    2010-02-01

    Osteosynthesis in fracture treatment and in some reconstructive procedures with blade plates or dynamic screw systems was the standard procedure for several decades. In this review, the current options and concepts using blade plate osteosynthesis, stabilization of proximal and distal femur fractures and reconstructive procedures with the dynamic hip screw or the dynamic condylar blade are discussed. On the basis of a literature review, the present indications, results and region-specific complications are reported and discussed.Blade plates are used mainly in the context of reconstructive procedures, as well as in the treatment of pseudoarthroses. The Pauwel procedure in femoral neck non-unions is one of the best known indications. In contrast, the dynamic hip screw is the gold standard for stabilization of femoral neck and most pertrochanteric fractures, whereas the dynamic condylar screw is still an alternative to internal fixators for proximal and distal femoral fracture fixations.

  12. Screw pumps cost effective for heavy crude operations

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.R. )

    1992-12-21

    This paper reports that in petroleum production, screw pumps fulfill the requirements for pumping crude oil with an API gravity of 20[degrees] or less (0.93 sp gr or greater). In many cases, these pumps provide more efficiency than centrifugal and reciprocating pumps. Heavy crude oils typically have viscosities at pumping temperatures in excess of 500 SSU (100 cSt). While screw pumps can handle viscosities ranging from fractional centistokes to millions of centistokes, the normal range for crude oil, from cost and efficiency viewpoints, is above 100 SSU (20 cSt). Bitumens can also be handled by screw pumps. Invented in 1922, rotary, positive-displacement multiple-screw pumps have been used for pumping fuel for burning, lubricating oil, fluid power, process feed, food, chemicals, synthetic-fiber slurries, general transfer, and many other applications.

  13. 21. NBS SUIT LAB. THREE GLOVES, HELMET, AND SCREW DRIVER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. NBS SUIT LAB. THREE GLOVES, HELMET, AND SCREW DRIVER TORQUE WRENCH FOR ASSEMBLY AND REPAIR OF BOTH. - Marshall Space Flight Center, Neutral Buoyancy Simulator Facility, Rideout Road, Huntsville, Madison County, AL

  14. IN VITRO EVALUATION OF THE PRECISION OF WORKING CASTS FOR IMPLANT-SUPPORTED RESTORATION WITH MULTIPLE ABUTMENTS

    PubMed Central

    Castilho, Anderson Almeida; Kojima, Alberto Noriyuki; Pereira, Sarina Maciel Braga; de Vasconcellos, Diego Klee; Itinoche, Marcos Koiti; Faria, Renata; Bottino, Marco Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of two working cast fabrication techniques using strain- gauge analysis. Methods: Two working cast fabrication methods were evaluated. Based on a master model, 20 working casts were fabricated by means of an indirect impression technique using polyether after splinting the square transfer copings with acrylic resin. Specimens were assigned to 2 groups (n=10): Group A (GA): type IV dental stone was poured around the abutment analogs in the conventional way; Group B (GB), the dental stone was poured in two stages. Spacers were used over the abutment analogs (rubber tubes) and type IV dental stone was poured around the abutment analogs in the conventional way. After the stone had hardened completely, the spacers were removed and more stone was inserted in the spaces created. Six strain-gauges (Excel Ltd.), positioned in a cast bar, which was dimensionally accurate (perfect fit) to the master model, recorded the microstrains generated by each specimen. Data were analyzed statistically by the variance analysis (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (α= 5%). Results: The microstrain values (με) were (mean±SD): GA: 263.7±109.07με, and GB: 193.73±78.83με. Conclusion: There was no statistical difference between the two methods studied. PMID:19089137

  15. Safety identifying of integral abutment bridges under seismic and thermal loads.

    PubMed

    Easazadeh Far, Narges; Barghian, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Integral abutment bridges (IABs) have many advantages over conventional bridges in terms of strength and maintenance cost. Due to the integrity of these structures uniform thermal and seismic loads are known important ones on the structure performance. Although all bridge design codes consider temperature and earthquake loads separately in their load combinations for conventional bridges, the thermal load is an "always on" load and, during the occurrence of an earthquake, these two important loads act on bridge simultaneously. Evaluating the safety level of IABs under combination of these loads becomes important. In this paper, the safety of IABs--designed by AASHTO LRFD bridge design code--under combination of thermal and seismic loads is studied. To fulfill this aim, first the target reliability indexes under seismic load have been calculated. Then, these analyses for the same bridge under combination of thermal and seismic loads have been repeated and the obtained reliability indexes are compared with target indexes. It is shown that, for an IAB designed by AASHTO LRFD, the indexes have been reduced under combined effects. So, the target level of safety during its design life is not provided and the code's load combination should be changed.

  16. Enhancing current-induced torques by abutting additional spin polarizer layer to nonmagnetic metal layer.

    PubMed

    Go, Gyungchoon; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Young Keun

    2017-04-04

    Recently, the switching of a perpendicularly magnetized ferromagnet (FM) by injecting an in-plane current into an attached non-magnet (NM) has become of emerging technological interest. This magnetization switching is attributed to the spin-orbit torque (SOT) originating from the strong spin-orbit coupling of the NM layer. However, the switching efficiency of the NM/FM structure itself may be insufficient for practical use, as for example, in spin transfer torque (STT)-based magnetic random access memory (MRAM) devices. Here we investigate spin torque in an NM/FM structure with an additional spin polarizer (SP) layer abutted to the NM layer. In addition to the SOT contribution, a spin-polarized current from the SP layer creates an extra spin chemical potential difference at the NM/FM interface and gives rise to a STT on the FM layer. We show that, using typical parameters including device width, thickness, spin diffusion length, and the spin Hall angle, the spin torque from the SP layer can be much larger than that from the spin Hall effect (SHE) of the NM.

  17. Enhancing current-induced torques by abutting additional spin polarizer layer to nonmagnetic metal layer

    PubMed Central

    Go, Gyungchoon; Lee, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Young Keun

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the switching of a perpendicularly magnetized ferromagnet (FM) by injecting an in-plane current into an attached non-magnet (NM) has become of emerging technological interest. This magnetization switching is attributed to the spin-orbit torque (SOT) originating from the strong spin-orbit coupling of the NM layer. However, the switching efficiency of the NM/FM structure itself may be insufficient for practical use, as for example, in spin transfer torque (STT)-based magnetic random access memory (MRAM) devices. Here we investigate spin torque in an NM/FM structure with an additional spin polarizer (SP) layer abutted to the NM layer. In addition to the SOT contribution, a spin-polarized current from the SP layer creates an extra spin chemical potential difference at the NM/FM interface and gives rise to a STT on the FM layer. We show that, using typical parameters including device width, thickness, spin diffusion length, and the spin Hall angle, the spin torque from the SP layer can be much larger than that from the spin Hall effect (SHE) of the NM. PMID:28374805

  18. Efficacy of a new implant-abutment connection to minimize microbial contamination: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    MANCINI, G.E.; GIANNI’, A.B.; CURA, F.; ORMANIER, Z.; CARINCI, F.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose The aim of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of Ditron implants abutment connection (IAC) to sealing the gap between two pieces. Materials and methods To identify the efficacy of a new IAC, the passage of genetically modified bacteria across IAC was evaluated. A total of five Ditron Implants were used. All implants were immerged in a bacterial culture for forty-eight hours and then bacteria amount was measured inside and outside IAC with Real-time PCR. Bacterial quantification was performed by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction using the absolute quantification with the standard curve method. Results In all the tested implants, bacteria were found in the inner side, with a median percentage of 1.35%. The analysis revealed that, in untreated implants, bacteria grew (internally and externally). Moreover, the difference between outer and inner bacteria concentration was statistically significant at each time point. Conclusions Ditron Implant IAC (MPI, Ditron Dental, Israel) is efficacy in reducing bacterial leakage. PMID:28042437

  19. Safety Identifying of Integral Abutment Bridges under Seismic and Thermal Loads

    PubMed Central

    Easazadeh Far, Narges; Barghian, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Integral abutment bridges (IABs) have many advantages over conventional bridges in terms of strength and maintenance cost. Due to the integrity of these structures uniform thermal and seismic loads are known important ones on the structure performance. Although all bridge design codes consider temperature and earthquake loads separately in their load combinations for conventional bridges, the thermal load is an “always on” load and, during the occurrence of an earthquake, these two important loads act on bridge simultaneously. Evaluating the safety level of IABs under combination of these loads becomes important. In this paper, the safety of IABs—designed by AASHTO LRFD bridge design code—under combination of thermal and seismic loads is studied. To fulfill this aim, first the target reliability indexes under seismic load have been calculated. Then, these analyses for the same bridge under combination of thermal and seismic loads have been repeated and the obtained reliability indexes are compared with target indexes. It is shown that, for an IAB designed by AASHTO LRFD, the indexes have been reduced under combined effects. So, the target level of safety during its design life is not provided and the code's load combination should be changed. PMID:25405232

  20. Custom CAD-CAM healing abutment and impression coping milled from a poly(methyl methacrylate) block and bonded to a titanium insert.

    PubMed

    Proussaefs, Periklis

    2016-11-01

    This article describes a technique in which a custom-made computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) healing abutment milled from a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) block is fabricated and bonded to a titanium metal insert. An impression is made during dental implant surgery, and the CAD-CAM custom-made healing abutment is fabricated before second-stage surgery while appropriate healing time is allowed for the dental implant to osseointegrate. The contours of the healing abutment are based on the contours of a tentatively designed definitive prosthesis. The healing tissue obtains contours that will be compatible with the contours of the definitive prosthesis. After the milling process is complete, a titanium metal insert is bonded to the healing abutment. Placement of the custom-made CAD-CAM healing abutment at second-stage surgery allows the tissue to obtain contours similar to those of the definitive prosthesis. A custom-made CAD-CAM impression coping milled from a PMMA block and with a titanium insert is used for the definitive impression after the soft tissue has healed. This technique allows guided soft tissue healing by using a custom-made CAD-CAM healing abutment and impression coping.

  1. Fracture resistance and analysis of stress distribution of implant-supported single zirconium ceramic coping combination with abutments made of different materials.

    PubMed

    Firidinoğlu, Kadir; Toksavul, Suna; Toman, Muhittin; Sarikanat, Mehmet; Nergiz, Ibrahim

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the fracture resistance and fracture mode of single implant-zirconium coping combinations using zirconium and titanium abutments and to analyze the stress distribution pattern using three-dimensional finite elements analysis. Twenty implants with titanium and zirconium abutments were randomly divided into two groups (n = 10) and into resin blocks. Zirconium copings were cemented onto the abutments. The specimens were loaded with 135° angles to the long axis and the load values at the moment of failure were recorded using a universal test machine. Stress levels were calculated according to the maximum Von Mises criteria. The fracture resistances for titanium and zirconium abutment groups were 525.65 N and 514.05 N, respectively. No significant differences were observed between two groups regarding the fracture resistance levels. The maximum Von Mises equivalent stress concentrated on zirconium copings in both of the groups. Implant-abutment-ZrO2 coping combination has the potential to withstand physiological occlusal forces in the anterior region. Three-dimensional finite elements analysis results of the implant-abutment-ZrO2 coping combination is compatible with the results of fracture resistance.

  2. Screw thread parameter measurement system based on image processing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Zhimin; Huang, Kanggao; Mao, Jiandong; Zhang, Yaya; Zhang, Fan

    2013-08-01

    In the industrial production, as an important transmission part, the screw thread is applied extensively in many automation equipments. The traditional measurement methods of screw thread parameter, including integrated test methods of multiparameters and the single parameter measurement method, belong to contact measurement method. In practical the contact measurement exists some disadvantages, such as relatively high time cost, introducing easily human error and causing thread damage. In this paper, as a new kind of real-time and non-contact measurement method, a screw thread parameter measurement system based on image processing method is developed to accurately measure the outside diameter, inside diameter, pitch diameter, pitch, thread height and other parameters of screw thread. In the system the industrial camera is employed to acquire the image of screw thread, some image processing methods are used to obtain the image profile of screw thread and a mathematics model is established to compute the parameters. The C++Builder 6.0 is employed as the software development platform to realize the image process and computation of screw thread parameters. For verifying the feasibility of the measurement system, some experiments were carried out and the measurement errors were analyzed. The experiment results show the image measurement system satisfies the measurement requirements and suitable for real-time detection of screw thread parameters mentioned above. Comparing with the traditional methods the system based on image processing method has some advantages, such as, non-contact, easy operation, high measuring accuracy, no work piece damage, fast error analysis and so on. In the industrial production, this measurement system can provide an important reference value for development of similar parameter measurement system.

  3. Far cortical locking screws in distal femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Adams, John D; Tanner, Stephanie L; Jeray, Kyle J

    2015-03-01

    Distal femur fractures routinely heal by secondary bone healing, which relies on interfragmentary motion. Periarticular locking plates are commonly used for fixation in distal femur fractures but are associated with a high nonunion rate, likely due to the stiffness of the constructs. Far cortical locking (FCL) screws are designed to allow micromotion at the near cortex while maintaining purchase in only the far cortex. Although clinical data are limited, these screws have been shown in biomechanical studies to provide excellent interfragmentary motion, and animal models have shown increased callus formation compared with traditional locking screws. The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical effects that FCL screws have on healing in distal femur fractures treated with locked constructs. In this retrospective case series, 15 patients with a distal femur fracture treated with MotionLoc screws (Zimmer, Warsaw, Indiana) were analyzed. Serial radiographs were evaluated for callus presence and time to union. All fractures were either 33-A3 or 33-C2 according to the AO classification system, and 5 (33%) were open. Bone loss was recorded in 2 patients. There were no nonunions, and average time to union was 24 weeks. There were no implant failures, and all 5 open fractures, including the 2 with bone loss, healed without intervention. There was 1 reoperation due to painful hardware. Although this is a small case series, these results are promising. Far cortical locking screws may provide the answer to the high nonunion rate associated with distal femur fractures treated with traditional locked constructs.

  4. Backflow in twin-screw-type multiphase pump

    SciTech Connect

    Egashira, Kazuyuki; Shoda, Shinji; Tochikawa, Tetsuro; Furukawa, Akinori

    1998-02-01

    The performance of a twin-screw-type multiphase pump was investigated from the viewpoints of backflow in a gap along the twin-screw shafts and of scaleup parameters. Although both the backflow and the scaleup parameters have been recognized as important factors in developing multiphase pumps, they have not yet been clarified. The twin-screw pump was equipped with pressure sensors, set in the multiphase-test facility, and experimented with under various conditions to clarify the relationship between backflow rates and factors such as differential pressure, gas-void fractions (GVF`s), and the rotation speed of the shaft. A physical model was proposed with the empirical relationship of pressure distribution along the screw, and was successfully associated with scaleup parameters, such as the geometrical data of the twin-screw pump. Then it was used successfully to simulate the backflow in twin-screw pumps on relatively broad experimental conditions, judging from the comparison between the model and the experimental data.

  5. Isthmus-guided cortical bone trajectory for pedicle screw insertion.

    PubMed

    Iwatsuki, Koichi; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Ninomiya, Kosi; Ohkawa, Toshika

    2014-08-01

    Herein is described cortical bone trajectory (CBT), a new path for pedicle screw insertion for lumbar vertebral fusion. Because the points of insertion are under the end of the inferior articular process, and because the screws are inserted toward the lateral side, there is less soft tissue development than with the conventional technique; the CBT technique therefore enables less invasive surgery than the conventional technique. However, it has some drawbacks. For example, in the original CBT approach, the points of insertion are in the vicinity of the end of the inferior articular process. Because this joint has been destroyed in many patients who have indications for intervertebral fusion surgery, it is sometimes difficult to use it as a reference point for screw insertion location. With severe lateral slippage, the screw insertion site can become significantly dislocated sideways, with possible resultant damaging to the spinal canal and/or nerve root. The CBT technique here involved inserting the screws while keeping clear of the intervertebral foramen with the assistance of side view X-ray fluoroscopy and using the end of the inferior articular process and the isthmus as points of reference for screw location.

  6. Measurement of Tip Apex Distance and Migration of Lag Screws and Novel Blade Screw Used for the Fixation of Intertrochanteric Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Cheng-Kung

    2017-01-01

    Fixation with a dynamic hip screw (DHS) is one of the most common methods for stabilizing intertrochanteric fractures, except for unstable and reverse oblique fracture types. However, failure is often observed in osteoporotic patients whereby the lag screw effectively ‘cuts out’ through the weak bone. Novel anti-migration blades have been developed to be used in combination with a lag screw (‘Blade Screw’) to improve the fixation strength in osteoporotic intertrochanteric fractures. An in-vitro biomechanical study and a retrospective clinical study were performed to evaluate lag screw migration when using the novel Blade Screw and a traditional threaded DHS. The biomechanical study showed both the Blade Screw and DHS displayed excessive migration (≥10 mm) before reaching 20,000 loading cycles in mild osteoporotic bone, but overall migration of the Blade Screw was significantly less (p ≤ 0.03). Among the patients implanted with a Blade Screw in the clinical study, there was no significant variation in screw migration at 3-months follow-up (P = 0.12). However, the patient’s implanted with a DHS did display significantly greater migration (P<0.001) than those implanted with the Blade Screw. In conclusion, the Blade Screw stabilizes the bone fragments during dynamic loading so as to provide significantly greater resistance to screw migration in patients with mild osteoporosis. PMID:28085930

  7. Prediction of Deformity Correction by Pedicle Screw Instrumentation in Thoracolumbar Scoliosis Surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiriyama, Yoshimori; Yamazaki, Nobutoshi; Nagura, Takeo; Matsumoto, Morio; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    In segmental pedicle screw instrumentation, the relationship between the combinations of pedicle screw placements and the degree of deformity correction was investigated with a three-dimensional rigid body and spring model. The virtual thoracolumbar scoliosis (Cobb’s angle of 47 deg.) was corrected using six different combinations of pedicle-screw placements. As a result, better correction in the axial rotation was obtained with the pedicle screws placed at or close to the apical vertebra than with the screws placed close to the end vertebrae, while the correction in the frontal plane was better with the screws close to the end vertebrae than with those close to the apical vertebra. Additionally, two screws placed in the convex side above and below the apical vertebra provided better correction than two screws placed in the concave side. Effective deformity corrections of scoliosis were obtained with the proper combinations of pedicle screw placements.

  8. Development and Testing of X-Ray Imaging-Enhanced Poly-L-Lactide Bone Screws

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Jy-Jiunn; Wu, Ting-Lin; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Nanosized iron oxide particles exhibit osteogenic and radiopaque properties. Thus, iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were incorporated into a biodegradable polymer (poly-L-lactic acid, PLLA) to fabricate a composite bone screw. This multifunctional, 3D printable bone screw was detectable on X-ray examination. In this study, mechanical tests including three-point bending and ultimate tensile strength were conducted to evaluate the optimal ratio of iron oxide nanoparticles in the PLLA composite. Both injection molding and 3D printing techniques were used to fabricate the PLLA bone screws with and without the iron oxide nanoparticles. The fabricated screws were implanted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. Bone blocks containing the PLLA screws were resected 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. Histologic examination of the surrounding bone and the radiopacity of the iron-oxide-containing PLLA screws were evaluated. Our results indicated that addition of iron oxide nanoparticles at 30% significantly decreased the ultimate tensile stress properties of the PLLA screws. The screws with 20% iron oxide exhibited strong radiopacity compared to the screws fabricated without the iron oxide nanoparticles. Four weeks after surgery, the average bone volume of the iron oxide PLLA composite screws was significantly greater than that of PLLA screws without iron oxide. These findings suggested that biodegradable and X-ray detectable PLLA bone screws can be produced by incorporation of 20% iron oxide nanoparticles. Furthermore, these screws had significantly greater osteogenic capability than the PLLA screws without iron oxide. PMID:26466309

  9. Development and Testing of X-Ray Imaging-Enhanced Poly-L-Lactide Bone Screws.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wei-Jen; Pan, Yu-Hwa; Tzeng, Jy-Jiunn; Wu, Ting-Lin; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Feng, Sheng-Wei; Huang, Haw-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Nanosized iron oxide particles exhibit osteogenic and radiopaque properties. Thus, iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles were incorporated into a biodegradable polymer (poly-L-lactic acid, PLLA) to fabricate a composite bone screw. This multifunctional, 3D printable bone screw was detectable on X-ray examination. In this study, mechanical tests including three-point bending and ultimate tensile strength were conducted to evaluate the optimal ratio of iron oxide nanoparticles in the PLLA composite. Both injection molding and 3D printing techniques were used to fabricate the PLLA bone screws with and without the iron oxide nanoparticles. The fabricated screws were implanted into the femoral condyles of New Zealand White rabbits. Bone blocks containing the PLLA screws were resected 2 and 4 weeks after surgery. Histologic examination of the surrounding bone and the radiopacity of the iron-oxide-containing PLLA screws were evaluated. Our results indicated that addition of iron oxide nanoparticles at 30% significantly decreased the ultimate tensile stress properties of the PLLA screws. The screws with 20% iron oxide exhibited strong radiopacity compared to the screws fabricated without the iron oxide nanoparticles. Four weeks after surgery, the average bone volume of the iron oxide PLLA composite screws was significantly greater than that of PLLA screws without iron oxide. These findings suggested that biodegradable and X-ray detectable PLLA bone screws can be produced by incorporation of 20% iron oxide nanoparticles. Furthermore, these screws had significantly greater osteogenic capability than the PLLA screws without iron oxide.

  10. Usefulness of absorbable screws in the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for rheumatoid wrist reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Oda, H; Tanaka, S; Kuga, Y; Yamamoto, M; Nishikawa, T; Juji, T; Shimizu, M

    2002-06-01

    Abstract  In the Sauvé-Kapandji (S-K) procedure for rheumatoid wrist reconstruction, the distal end of the ulna is fixed to the radius with screws. Recently, absorbable screws have increasingly been used instead of metal ones. However, the clinical usefulness of absorbable screws in S-K procedures for rheumatoid patients is still unknown. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the effect of absorbable screws in this procedure by comparing their clinical results with those of metal screws. Poly-l-lactic acid (PLLA) absorbable screws were used in 23 wrists, and metal screws were used in 20 wrists. We evaluated the presence of general or local reactions to PLLA, the stability of the ulnar head, the time to bone union, changes in the shape of the distal ulna, and the presence of bone resorption around the screws. There were no complications with the use of PLLA screws, and their fixation stability was adequate to form sufficient bone union. In five cases in the metal screw group, bone resorption around the screws occurred between 1 and 2 years after surgery. Bone resorption around the PLLA screws was not observed. We conclude that absorbable screws may be more useful than metal screws in the S-K procedure for rheumatoid wrist reconstruction.

  11. The influence of screw configuration on the pretreatment performance of a continuous twin screw-driven reactor (CTSR).

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Ho; Um, Byung-Hwan; Oh, Kyeong Keun

    2013-03-01

    A combination of a continuous twin screw-driven reactor (CTSR) and a dilute acid pretreatment was used for the pretreatment of biomass with a high cellulose content and high monomeric xylose hydrolyzate. With the newly modified CTSR screw configuration (Config. 3), the influences of the screw rotational speed (30-60 rpm), of the pretreatment conditions such as acid concentration (1-5%) and reaction temperature (160-175 °C) at the operating condition of biomass feeding rate (1.0 g/min) and acid feeding rate (13.4 mL/min) on the pretreatment performance were investigated. The cellulose content in the pretreated rape straw was 67.1% at the following optimal conditions: barrel temperature of 165 °C, acid concentration of 3.0% (w/v), and screw rotational speed of 30 rpm. According to the three screw configurations, the glucose yields from enzymatic hydrolysis were 70.1%, 72.9%, and 78.7% for screw Configs. 1, 2, and 3, respectively.

  12. Investigation of an 11mm diameter twin screw granulator: Screw element performance and in-line monitoring via image analysis.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Ridade; Martinez-Marcos, Laura; Osorio, Juan G; Cruise, Paul; Jones, Ian; Halbert, Gavin W; Lamprou, Dimitrios A; Litster, James D

    2015-12-30

    As twin screw granulation (TSG) provides one with many screw element options, characterization of each screw element is crucial in optimizing the screw configuration in order to obtain desired granule attributes. In this study, the performance of two different screw elements - distributive feed screws and kneading elements - was studied in an 11 mm TSG at different liquid-to-solid (L/S) ratios. The kneading element configuration was found to break large granules more efficiently, leading to narrower granule size distributions. While pharmaceutical industry shifts toward continuous manufacturing, inline monitoring and process control are gaining importance. Granules from an 11 mm TSG were analysed using the Eyecon™, a real-time high speed direct imaging system, which has been used to capture accurate particle size distribution and particle count. The size parameters and particle count were then assessed in terms of their ability to be a suitable control measure using the Shewhart control charts. d10 and particle count were found to be good indicators of the change in L/S ratio. However, d50 and d90 did not reflect the change, due to their inherent variability even when the process is at steady state.

  13. Posterior arch C-1 screw technique: a cadaveric comparison study.

    PubMed

    Moisi, Marc; Fisahn, Christian; Tkachenko, Lara; Jeyamohan, Shiveindra; Reintjes, Stephen; Grunert, Peter; Norvell, Daniel C; Tubbs, R Shane; Page, Jeni; Newell, David W; Nora, Peter; Oskouian, Rod J; Chapman, Jens

    2017-03-17

    OBJECTIVE Posterior atlantoaxial stabilization and fusion using C-1 lateral mass screw fixation has become commonly used in the treatment of instability and for reconstructive indications since its introduction by Goel and Laheri in 1994 and modification by Harms in 2001. Placement of such lateral mass screws can be challenging because of the proximity to the spinal cord, vertebral artery, an extensive venous plexus, and the C-2 nerve root, which overlies the designated starting point on the posterior center of the lateral mass. An alternative posterior access point starting on the posterior arch of C-1 could provide a C-2 nerve root-sparing starting point for screw placement, with the potential benefit of greater directional control and simpler trajectory. The authors present a cadaveric study comparing an alternative strategy (i.e., a C-1 screw with a posterior arch starting point) to the conventional strategy (i.e., using the lower lateral mass entry site), specifically assessing the safety of screw placement to preserve the C-2 nerve root. METHODS Five US-trained spine fellows instrumented 17 fresh human cadaveric heads using the Goel/Harms C-1 lateral mass (GHLM) technique on the left and the posterior arch lateral mass (PALM) technique on the right, under fluoroscopic guidance. After screw placement, a CT scan was obtained on each specimen to assess for radiographic screw placement accuracy. Four faculty spine surgeons, blinded to the surgeon who instrumented the cadaver, independently graded the quality of screw placement using a modified Upendra classification. RESULTS Of the 17 specimens, the C-2 nerve root was anatomically impinged in 13 (76.5%) of the specimens. The GHLM technique was graded Type 1 or 2, which is considered "acceptable," in 12 specimens (70.6%), and graded Type 3 or 4 ("unacceptable") in 5 specimens (29.4%). In contrast, the PALM technique had 17 (100%) of 17 graded Type 1 or 2 (p = 0.015). There were no vertebral artery injuries found

  14. Pullout performance comparison of novel expandable pedicle screw with expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shells and cement-augmented pedicle screws.

    PubMed

    Aycan, Mehmet Fatih; Tolunay, Tolga; Demir, Teyfik; Yaman, Mesut Emre; Usta, Yusuf

    2017-02-01

    Aim of this study is to assess the pullout performance of various pedicle screws in different test materials. Polyurethane foams (Grade 10 and Grade 40) produced in laboratory and bovine vertebrae were instrumented with normal, cannulated (cemented), novel expandable and normal (cemented) pedicle screws. Test samples were prepared according to the ASTM F543 standard testing protocols and surgical guidelines. To examine the screw placement and cement distribution, anteriosuperior and oblique radiographs were taken from each sample after insertion process was completed. Pullout tests were performed in an Instron 3369 testing device. Load versus displacement graphs were recorded and the ultimate pullout force was defined as the maximum load (pullout strength) sustained before failure of screw. Student's t-test was performed on each group whether the differences between pullout strength of pedicle screws were significant or not. While normal pedicle screws have the lowest pullout strength in all test materials, normal pedicle screws cemented with polymethylmethacrylate exhibit significantly higher pullout performance than others. For all test materials, there is a significant improvement in pullout strength of normal screws by augmentation. While novel expandable pedicle screws with expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shells exhibited lower pullout performance than normal screws cemented with polymethylmethacrylate, their pullout performances in all groups were higher than the ones of normal and cannulated pedicle screws. For all test materials, although cannulated pedicle screws exhibit higher pullout strength than normal pedicle screws, there are no significant differences between the two groups. The novel expandable pedicle screws with expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shells may be used instead of normal and cannulated pedicle screws cemented with polymethylmethacrylate due to their good performances.

  15. Accuracy of pedicle screw placement using intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Korres, Demetrios S; Papadopoulos, Konstantinos; Sakas, Damianos E; Pneumaticos, Spiros

    2009-01-01

    Fifty consecutive patients with posterior thoracolumbar spine fusion were included in a prospective study to determine the accuracy of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) for safe pedicle screw placement using postoperative computed tomography (CT). The patients were allocated into two equal groups. Pedicle screw placement was evaluated intraoperatively by using the image intensifier. In group A, the integrity of the pedicle wall was evaluated intraoperatively with monopolar stimulation of each screw head with a hand-held single-tip stimulator; the compound muscle action potentials were recorded. A constant current threshold of 7 mA was considered indicative of pedicle breach; < 7 mA was considered as direct contact with neural elements, and > 7mA was considered normal. In group B, pedicle screw placement was performed without IONM. Overall, 306 pedicle screws were inserted in both groups. Postoperatively, all patients underwent CT scans of the spine to evaluate pedicle screw placement. Intraoperatively, five screws in respective group A patients had to be repositioned after IONM (threshold of < 7 mA); in these patients, postoperative CT scans showed proper screw placement. Postoperative CT scans showed eight misdirected screws; two screws (1.26%) in group A patients and six screws (4%) in group B patients. Two screws were misdirected through the medial pedicle wall and six screws were misdirected through the lateral pedicle wall. Both medially misdirected screws were observed in group B patients (1.35%); these patients developed neurologic symptoms postoperatively and underwent revision surgery, with redirection of the misdirected screws and subsequent resolution of the neurologic symptoms. Two of the six laterally misdirected screws were observed in group A patients (1.26%); the remaining four laterally misdirected screws were observed in group B patients (2.7%). None of these patients had neurologic sequelae; no revision surgery was required. The

  16. Helical Screw Expander Evaluation Project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A functional 1-MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested in Utah in 1978 to 1979 with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer-equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000-kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Additional testing was performed in Mexico in 1980 under a cooperative test program using the same test array, and machine efficiency was measured at 62% maximum with the rotors partially coated with scale, compared with approximately 54% maximum in Utah with uncoated rotors, confirming the importance of scale deposits within the machine on performance. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  17. Grinding efficiency of abutment tooth with both dentin and core composite resin on axial plane.

    PubMed

    Miho, Otoaki; Sato, Toru; Matsukubo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate grinding efficiency in abutment teeth comprising both dentin and core composite resin in the axial plane. Grinding was performed over 5 runs at two loads (0.5 or 0.25 N) and two feed rates (1 or 2 mm/sec). The grinding surface was observed with a 3-D laser microscope. Tomographic images of the grinding surfaces captured perpendicular to the feed direction were also analyzed. Using a non-ground surface as a reference, areas comprising only dentin, both dentin and core composite resin, or only core composite resin were analyzed to determine the angle of the grinding surface. Composite resins were subjected to the Vickers hardness test and scanning electron microscopy. Data were statistically analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance and multiple comparison tests. Multiple regression analysis was performed for load, feed rate, and Vickers hardness of the build-up material depending on number of runs. When grinding was performed at a constant load and feed rate, a greater grinding angle was observed in areas comprising both dentin and composite resin or only composite resin than in areas consisting of dentin alone. A correlation was found between machinability and load or feed rate in areas comprising both dentin and composite resin or composite resin alone, with a particularly high correlation being observed between machinability and load. These results suggest that great caution should be exercised in a clinical setting when the boundary between the dentin and composite resin is to be ground, as the angle of the grinding surface changes when the rotating diamond point begins grinding the composite resin.

  18. A biomechanical study of two different pedicle screw methods for fixation in osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Kosaku; Kim, Jin Hwan; Horton, William C; Hutton, William C

    2012-01-01

    In reconstruction of the osteoporotic spine, patients often show poor outcome because of pedicle screw failure. This study used osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic vertebrae to determine the difference in fixation strength between pedicle screws inserted straight forward and pedicle screws inserted in an upward trajectory toward the superior end plate (i.e., end-plate screws). There is some evidence to suggest that end-plate screws have a strength advantage. The particular focus was on osteoporotic vertebrae. Thirty-three vertebrae (T10-L2) were harvested. The bone mineral density (BMD) was measured: 15 vertebrae were greater than 0.8 g/cm(2) and designated as nonosteoporotic (average BMD 1.146 ± 0.186 g/cm(2)) and 18 vertebrae were designated as osteoporotic (average BMD 0.643 ± 0.088 g/cm(2)). On one pedicle the screw was inserted straight forward and on the other pedicle the screw was inserted as an end-plate screw. The torque of insertion was measured (Proto 6106 torque screwdriver). Using an MTS Mini Bionix, two types of mechanical testing were carried out on each pedicle: (a) cephalocaudad toggling was first carried out to simulate some physiological type loading: 500 cycles at 0.3 Hz, at ±50 N; and (b) then each pedicle screw was pulled out at a displacement rate of 12.5 cm/min.There was no difference in pullout force between the pedicle screws inserted straight forward and the pedicle screws inserted as end-plate screws. This result applies whether the vertebrae were osteoporotic or nonosteoporotic. For both the straight-forward screws and the end-plate screws, a statistically significant correlation was observed between torque of insertion and pullout force. The results of this experiment indicate that pedicle screws inserted as end-plate screws do not provide a strength advantage over pedicle screws inserted straight forward, whether the vertebrae are osteoporotic or not.

  19. The best location for proximal locking screw for femur interlocking nailing: A biomechanical study

    PubMed Central

    Karaarslan, Ahmet A; Karakaşli, Ahmet; Aycan, Hakan; Çeçen, Berivan; Yildiz, Didem Venüs; Sesli, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Proximal locking screw deformation and screw fracture is a frequently seen problem for femur interlocking nailing that affects fracture healing. We realized that there is lack of literature for the right level for the proximal locking screw. We investigated the difference of locking screw bending resistance between the application of screws on different proximal femoral levels. Materials and Methods: We used a total of 80 proximal locking screws for eight groups, 10 screws for each group. Three-point bending tests were performed on four types of screws in two different trochanteric levels (the lesser trochanter and 20 mm proximal). We determined the yield points at three-point bending tests that a permanent deformation started in the locking screws using an axial compression testing machine. Results: The mean yield point value of 5 mm threaded locking screws applied 20 mm proximal of lesser trochanter was 1022 ± 49 (range 986–1057) (mean ± standard deviation, 95% confidence interval). On the other hand, the mean yield point value of the same type of locking screws applied on the lesser trochanteric level was 2089 ± 249 (range 1911–2268). Which means 103% increase of screw resistance between two levels (P = 0.000). In all screw groups, on the lesser trochanter line we determined 98–174% higher than the yield point values of the same type of locking screws in comparison with 20 mm proximal to the lesser trochanter (P = 0.000). Conclusion: According to our findings, there is twice as much difference in locking screw bending resistance between these two application levels. To avoid proximal locking screw deformation, locking screws should be placed in the level of the lesser trochanter in nailing of 1/3 middle and distal femur fractures. PMID:26955183

  20. Interfragmentary compression forces of scaphoid screws in a sawbone cylinder model.

    PubMed

    Hausmann, J T; Mayr, W; Unger, E; Benesch, T; Vécsei, V; Gäbler, C

    2007-07-01

    Various screws have been developed to stabilise fractures of the scaphoid. Commonly used are the Herbert, the HBS, the 3-mm AO and the Acutrak screws. Not long ago a new screw, the Twin Fix, was introduced. This is cannulated and similar in shape and appearance to the classical Herbert screw. In our test series we compared the maximum achievable compression forces of the Twin Fix screw with that of three other screws (AO, HBS and Acutrak screws). To avoid the variations of density, stiffness and rigidity in natural bone, a polyurethane sawbone-based test setup was used. The test series included 10 screws of each type. The compression force was measured using a special strain gauge. The mean compression force was significantly higher for the Twin Fix screw (8+/-1N) and the Acutrak screw (7.6+/-0.4/0.6N) in relation to the AO screw (6.8+/-1.0/1.4N) and HBS screw (2+/-1N). We found the Twin Fix and Acutrak screws to be promising in the treatment of scaphoid fractures.

  1. Numerical and experimental study of an Archimedean Screw Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dellinger, G.; Garambois, P.-A.; Dufresne, M.; Terfous, A.; Vazquez, J.; Ghenaim, A.

    2016-11-01

    Finding new, safe and renewable energy is becoming more and more of a priority with global warming. One solution that is gaining popularity is the Archimedean Screw Generator (ASG). This kind of hydroelectric plant allows transforming potential energy of a fluid into mechanical energy and is convenient for low-head hydraulic sites. As it is a new and growing technology, there are few references dealing with their design and performance optimization. The present contribution proposes to investigate experimentally and numerically the ASG performances. The experimental study is performed for various flow conditions and a laboratory scale screw device installed at the fluid mechanics laboratory of the INSA of Strasbourg. The first results show that the screw efficiencies are higher than 80% for various hydraulic conditions. In order to study the structure of 3D turbulent flows and energy losses in a screw, the 3D Navier Stokes equations are solved with the k-w SST turbulence model. The exact geometry of the laboratory-scale screw was used in these simulations. Interestingly, the modeled values of efficiency are in fairly good agreement with experimental results while any friction coefficient is involved.

  2. Numerical simulation of a twin screw expander for performance prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papes, Iva; Degroote, Joris; Vierendeels, Jan

    2015-08-01

    With the increasing use of twin screw expanders in waste heat recovery applications, the performance prediction of these machines plays an important role. This paper presents a mathematical model for calculating the performance of a twin screw expander. From the mass and energy conservation laws, differential equations are derived which are then solved together with the appropriate Equation of State in the instantaneous control volumes. Different flow processes that occur inside the screw expander such as filling (accompanied by a substantial pressure loss) and leakage flows through the clearances are accounted for in the model. The mathematical model employs all geometrical parameters such as chamber volume, suction and leakage areas. With R245fa as working fluid, the Aungier Redlich-Kwong Equation of State has been used in order to include real gas effects. To calculate the mass flow rates through the leakage paths formed inside the screw expander, flow coefficients are considered as constant and they are derived from 3D Computational Fluid Dynamic calculations at given working conditions and applied to all other working conditions. The outcome of the mathematical model is the P-V indicator diagram which is compared to CFD results of the same twin screw expander. Since CFD calculations require significant computational time, developed mathematical model can be used for the faster performance prediction.

  3. The effect of resin cements and primer on retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung-Mi; Yoon, Ji-Young; Lee, Myung-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of resin cements and primer on the retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia blocks (Lava, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were obtained and forty sets of zirconia abutments and copings were fabricated using CAD/CAM technology. They were grouped into 4 categories as follows, depending on the types of resin cements used, and whether the primer is applied or not:Panavia F2.0 (P), Panavia F2.0 using Primer (PRIME Plus, Bisco Inc, Schaumburg, IL, USA) (PZ), Superbond C&B (S), and Superbond C&B using Primer (SZ). For each of the groups, the cementation was conducted. The specimens were kept in sterilized water (37℃) for 24 hours. Retentive forces were tested and measured, and a statistical analysis was carried out. The nature of failure was recorded. RESULTS The means and standard deviations of retentive force in Newton for each group were 265.15 ± 35.04 N (P), 318.21 ± 22.24 N (PZ), 445.13 ± 78.54 N (S) and 508.21 ± 79.48 N (SZ). Superbond C&B groups (S & SZ) showed significantly higher retentive force than Panavia F2.0 groups (P & PZ). In Panavia F2.0 groups, the use of primer was found to contribute to the increase of retentive force. On the other hand, in Superbond C&B groups, the use of primer did not influence the retention forces. Adhesive failure was observed in all groups. CONCLUSION This study suggests that cementation of the zirconia abutments and zirconia copings with Superbond C&B have a higher retentive force than Panavia F2.0. When using Panavia F2.0, the use of primer increases the retentive force. PMID:23755347

  4. The use of pedicle-screw internal fixation for the operative treatment of spinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Gaines, R W

    2000-10-01

    Pedicle screws have dramatically improved the outcomes of spinal reconstruction requiring spinal fusion. Short-segment surgical treatments based on the use of pedicle screws for the treatment of neoplastic, developmental, congenital, traumatic, and degenerative conditions have been proved to be practical, safe, and effective. The Funnel Technique provides a straightforward, direct, and inexpensive way to very safely apply pedicle screws in the cervical, thoracic, or lumbar spine. Carefully applied pedicle-screw fixation does not produce severe or frequent complications. Pedicle-screw fixation can be effectively and safely used wherever a vertebral pedicle can accommodate a pedicle screw--that is, in the cervical, thoracic, or lumbar spine. Training in pedicle-screw application should be standard in orthopaedic training programs since pedicle-screw fixation represents the so-called gold standard of spinal internal fixation.

  5. Effects of lag screw design and lubrication on sliding in trochanteric nails.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Frederick J

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the sliding characteristics of three lag screw designs used with trochanteric nails and determined the effects of lubrication on sliding. They were tested by an established method to measure initiation and ease of lag screw sliding. These tests were then repeated with calf serum lubrication. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) between the loads required to initiate lag screw sliding that appeared to be related to design. Screw sliding was similar for all three designs; however, the presence of lag screw locking slots affected sliding in that region. Lubrication did not affect either parameter. Lag screw design aspects, such as diameter and, particularly, surface finish, affect sliding. Due to the small contact area between the lag screw and nail creating high interface stresses, lubrication had no effect on lag screw sliding.

  6. Mechanical design, analysis, and laboratory testing of a dental implant with axial flexibility similar to natural tooth with periodontal ligament.

    PubMed

    Pektaş, Ömer; Tönük, Ergin

    2014-11-01

    At the interface between the jawbone and the roots of natural teeth, a thin, elastic, shock-absorbing tissue, called the periodontal ligament, forms a cushion which provides certain flexibility under mechanical loading. The dental restorations supported by implants, however, involve comparatively rigid connections to the jawbone. This causes overloading of the implant while bearing functional loading together with neighboring natural teeth, which leads to high stresses within the implant system and in the jawbone. A dental implant, with resilient components in the upper structure (abutment) in order to mimic the mechanical behavior of the periodontal ligament in the axial direction, was designed, analyzed in silico, and produced for mechanical testing. The aims of the design were avoiding high levels of stress, loosening of the abutment connection screw, and soft tissue irritations. The finite element analysis of the designed implant revealed that the elastic abutment yielded a similar axial mobility with the natural tooth while keeping stress in the implant at safe levels. The in vitro mechanical testing of the prototype resulted in similar axial mobility predicted by the analysis and as that of a typical natural tooth. The abutment screw did not loosen under repeated loading and there was no static or fatigue failure.

  7. A New Concept in Maintaining the Emergence Profile in Immediate Posterior Implant Placement: The Anatomic Harmony Abutment.

    PubMed

    Akin, Richard

    2016-12-01

    As the knowledge base in the demanding realm of esthetic management of anterior implant sites continues to expand, there exists a void in the literature on solutions to accelerate posterior implant protocols. This article proposes a new protocol using the anatomic harmony abutment for immediate molar implant placement. This technique preserves the anatomic emergence form with sutureless implant site sealing and improves the predictability of final restoration fabrication and delivery. The purpose of this report is to describe this concept and its numerous benefits to patients, surgeons, laboratories, and restorative dentists.

  8. Immediate provisionalization with a CAD/CAM interim abutment and crown: a guided soft tissue healing technique.

    PubMed

    Proussaefs, Periklis

    2015-02-01

    A technique is described in which a single interim abutment and crown were fabricated in advance and placed the day of dental implant surgery. The contours of the interim crown were identical to the contours of a tentatively designed definitive prosthesis and allowed the tissue to heal and obtain contours that accommodated the contours of the definitive prosthesis. After osseointegration was established, a definitive impression was made with a custom computer-assisted design and computer-assisted manufacturing impression coping. The definitive prosthesis then was fabricated.

  9. Clinical results of treatment using a modified K-wire tension band versus a cannulated screw tension band in transverse patella fractures

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Honglue; Dai, Pengyi; Yuan, Yanhao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It was a retrospective case–control study. The aim of this study was to explore the clinical efficacy and complication of treatment using a modified Kirschner wire tension band (MKTB) or a cannulated screw tension band (CSTB) in transverse patellar fractures. In total, 55 patients with transverse patellar fractures were retrospectively reviewed and divided into 2 groups according to the surgical technique: 29 patients were in the MKTB group and 26 patients in the CSTB group. Bǒstman's clinical grading scale, including range of movement (ROM), pain, ability to work, atrophy of quadriceps femoris, assistance in walking, effusion, giving way, and stair-climbing, was used to evaluate the clinical results. Complications including painful hardware, implant loosening or breakage, and bone nonunion were also assessed. Both groups were evaluated at the final follow-up before removing implant in the MKTB group. The Bǒstman's score of ROM, pain, atrophy of quadriceps femoris, and effusion were all higher in the CSTB group than in the MKTB group (P < 0.05). Twelve patients in the MKTB group underwent implant removal, and the score of ROM, pain, and effusion were higher than before removing implant (P < 0.05), but there was no difference compared to the CSTB group (P > 0.05). Seventeen patients achieved excellent results, 9 had good results, and 3 reported fair results in the MKTB group; the CSTB group had excellent results in 22 patients and good results in 4 patients, showing a significant difference in the excellent rate between the 2 groups (P = 0.021). Total Bǒstman scores in the MKTB and CSTB groups (26.96 ± 4.47 and 29.42 ± 1.47, respectively) were significantly different (P = 0.01). Total scores in the MKTB group after removing implant were higher than those before removing implant (P = 0.001), and similar to those in the CSTB group (P = 0.224). Eleven patients in the MKTB group reported painful hardware, including 4

  10. Optically driven Archimedes micro-screws for micropump application.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Lang; Vitrant, Guy; Bouriau, Michel; Casalegno, Roger; Baldeck, Patrice L

    2011-04-25

    Archimedes micro-screws have been fabricated by three-dimensional two-photon polymerization using a Nd:YAG Q-switched microchip laser at 532nm. Due to their small sizes they can be easily manipulated, and made to rotate using low power optical tweezers. Rotation rates up to 40 Hz are obtained with a laser power of 200 mW, i.e. 0.2 Hz/mW. A photo-driven micropump action in a microfluidic channel is demonstrated with a non-optimized flow rate of 6 pL/min. The optofluidic properties of such type of Archimedes micro-screws are quantitatively described by the conservation of momentum that occurs when the laser photons are reflected on the helical micro-screw surface.

  11. Study on the performance prediction of screw vacuum pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohbayashi, T.; Sawada, T.; Hamaguchi, M.; Miyamura, H.

    2001-01-01

    Pumping characteristics of the screw vacuum pump were investigated. The aim of this study was to establish a method of the performance prediction and a way to design the pump that satisfies specific requirements. The performance was analysed by the balance among geometrical pumping speed, net throughput and leaks. The leaks flow through clearances between a screw rotor and a stator, and clearances between two meshing rotors. These leaks were estimated with the results based on the linearised BGK model and the flows through ideal labyrinthes. Experiments were carried out by rotors of 120 mm diameter, and pumping speed and ultimate pressure were measured. The comparison between the measurements and the predicted values shows that the present method predicts the performance of the screw pump with a sufficient accuracy for practical applications.

  12. Mechanical Properties of Nanotextured Titanium Orthopedic Screws for Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Stephane; Awitor, Komla O; Raspal, Vincent; Johnson, Matthew B; Bokalawela, Roshan S P; Larson, Preston R; Doiron, Curtis F

    2013-06-01

    In this work, we modified the topography of commercial titanium orthopedic screws using electrochemical anodization in a 0.4 wt% hydrofluoric acid solution to produce titanium dioxide nanotube layers. The morphology of the nanotube layers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties of the nanotube layers were investigated by screwing and unscrewing an anodized screw into several different types of human bone while the torsional force applied to the screwdriver was measured using a torque screwdriver. The range of torsional force applied to the screwdriver was between 5 and [Formula: see text]. Independent assessment of the mechanical properties of the same surfaces was performed on simple anodized titanium foils using a triboindenter. Results showed that the fabricated nanotube layers can resist mechanical stresses close to those found in clinical situations.

  13. Efficiency study of oil cooling of a screw compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Tree, D.R.; McKellar, M.G.

    1989-04-01

    One of the major goals of all compressor manufacturers is to build as efficient a compressor as possible. Over the last several years improvements to the design of screw compressors has made them efficiently competitive with other types of compressors, especially at large loads. The primary purpose of this research is to investigate four different methods of cooling a 250 horsepower compressor and determine their effects on the efficiency of the compressor. Two conventional methods, liquid injection and thermosyphon cooling, and two new methods, V-PLUS and Fresco oil injection, are investigated. The screw compressor used in the tests was a VRS-500 screw compressor made by the Vilter Manufacturing Corporation. 6 figs.

  14. Mild coal gasification screw pyrolyzer development and design

    SciTech Connect

    Camp, D.W.

    1990-08-01

    Our objective is to produce information and design recommendations needed for the development of an efficient continuous process for the mild gasification of caking bituminous coals. We have focused on the development of an externally heated pyrolyzer in which the sticky, reacting coal is conveyed by one or more screws. We have taken a multifaceted approach to forwarding the development of the externally-heated screw pyrolyzer. Small scale process experiments on a 38-mm single screw pyrolyzer have been a major part of our effort. Engineering analyses aimed at producing design and scaleup equations have also been important. Process design recommendations follow from these. We critically review our experimental data and experience, and information from the literature and equipment manufactures for the purpose of making qualitative recommendations for improving practical pyrolyzer design and operation. Benchscale experiments are used to supply needed data and test some preliminary concepts. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Carpal Tunnel Cross-Sectional Area Affected by Soft Tissues Abutting the Carpal Bones.

    PubMed

    Gabra, Joseph N; Li, Zong-Ming

    2013-02-01

    The carpal tunnel accommodates free movement of its contents, and the tunnel's cross-sectional area is a useful morphological parameter for the evaluation of the space available for the carpal tunnel contents and of potential nerve compression in the tunnel. The osseous boundary of the carpal bones as the dorsal border of the carpal tunnel is commonly used to determine the tunnel area, but this boundary contains soft tissues such as numerous intercarpal ligaments and the flexor carpi radialis tendon. The aims of this study were to quantify the thickness of the soft tissues abutting the carpal bones and to investigate how this soft tissue influences the calculation of the carpal tunnel area. Magnetic resonance images were analyzed for eight cadaveric specimens. A medical balloon with a physiological pressure was inserted into an evacuated tunnel to identify the carpal tunnel boundary. The balloon-based (i.e. true carpal tunnel) and osseous-based carpal tunnel boundaries were extracted and divided into regions corresponding to the hamate, capitate, trapezoid, trapezium, and transverse carpal ligament (TCL). From the two boundaries, the overall and regional soft tissue thicknesses and areas were calculated. The soft tissue thickness was significantly greater for the trapezoid (3.1±1.2mm) and trapezium (3.4±1.0mm) regions than for the hamate (0.7±0.3mm) and capitate (1.2±0.5mm) regions. The carpal tunnel area using the osseous boundary (243.0±40.4mm(2)) was significantly larger than the balloon-based area (183.9±29.7mm(2)) with a ratio of 1.32. In other words, the carpal tunnel area can be estimated as 76% (= 1/1.32) of the osseous-based area. The abundance of soft tissue in the trapezoid and trapezium regions can be attributed mainly to the capitate-trapezium ligament and the flexor carpi radialis tendon. Inclusion of such soft tissue leads to overestimations of the carpal tunnel area. Correct quantification of the carpal tunnel area aids in examining carpal

  16. Quantitative comparison between the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique for pedicle screw placement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knez, Dejan; Mohar, Janez; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2016-03-01

    Spinal deformity correction with vertebral fixation is nowadays the preferred surgical treatment, where pedicle screws are inserted through pedicles into corresponding vertebral bodies and afterwards connected with rods. In clinical practice, the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique are currently being used for pedicle screw placement surgery. However, it is difficult to quantitatively compare both techniques and determine which technique is more adequate for each planned pedicle screw before surgery (i.e. preoperatively). In this paper, we therefore describe a framework for quantitative comparison between the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique for pedicle screw placement surgery by evaluating the screw fastening strength. Quantitative comparisons were performed on computed tomography images of 11 patients with 74 manually planned pedicle screws, who underwent the vertebral fixation procedure. The first quantitative comparison was performed between the straight-forward and anatomical pedicle screw insertion technique, which resulted in a relatively high agreement with mean absolute difference of 0.0mm in screw diameter, 2.9mm in screw length, 1.2mm in pedicle crossing point and 6.5° in screw inclinations. The second quantitative comparison was performed between the best resulting pedicle screw insertion technique and manually obtained pedicle screw plans, which again resulted in a relatively high agreement with mean absolute difference of 0.5mm in screw diameter, 4.7mm in screw length, 2.4mm in pedicle crossing point and 6.0° in screw inclinations. Both the straight-forward and anatomical insertion technique proved approximately equal in terms of the screw fastening strength.

  17. Screw-in forces during instrumentation by various file systems

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to compare the maximum screw-in forces generated during the movement of various Nickel-Titanium (NiTi) file systems. Materials and Methods Forty simulated canals in resin blocks were randomly divided into 4 groups for the following instruments: Mtwo size 25/0.07 (MTW, VDW GmbH), Reciproc R25 (RPR, VDW GmbH), ProTaper Universal F2 (PTU, Dentsply Maillefer), and ProTaper Next X2 (PTN, Dentsply Maillefer, n = 10). All the artificial canals were prepared to obtain a standardized lumen by using ProTaper Universal F1. Screw-in forces were measured using a custom-made experimental device (AEndoS-k, DMJ system) during instrumentation with each NiTi file system using the designated movement. The rotation speed was set at 350 rpm with an automatic 4 mm pecking motion at a speed of 1 mm/sec. The pecking depth was increased by 1 mm for each pecking motion until the file reach the working length. Forces were recorded during file movement, and the maximum force was extracted from the data. Maximum screw-in forces were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc comparison at a significance level of 95%. Results Reciproc and ProTaper Universal files generated the highest maximum screw-in forces among all the instruments while M-two and ProTaper Next showed the lowest (p < 0.05). Conclusions Geometrical differences rather than shaping motion and alloys may affect the screw-in force during canal instrumentation. To reduce screw-in forces, the use of NiTi files with smaller cross-sectional area for higher flexibility is recommended. PMID:27847752

  18. Implant-abutment leaking of replace conical connection nobel biocare® implant system. An in vitro study of the microbiological penetration from external environment to implant-abutment space

    PubMed Central

    EL HADDAD, E.; GIANNÌ, A.B.; MANCINI, G.E.; CURA, F.; CARINCI, F.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose The aim of our study is to value the microbial contamination in the implant-abutment connections (IAC) of a Nobel Replace Conical Connection implant system [Nobel Biocare®, Vimercate (MB), Italy]. Materials and methods To identify the capability of the implant to protect the internal space from the external environment, the passage of genetically modified bacteria across IAC was evaluated. Four Nobel Replace Conical Connection implants (Nobel Biocare®, Vimercate (MB), Italy) were immerged in a bacterial culture for twenty-four hours and then bacteria amount was measured inside and outside IAC with Real-time PCR. Bacterial quantification was performed by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction using the absolute quantification with the standard curve method. Results In all tested implants, bacteria were found in the inner side, with a median percentage of 10.9%. The analysis revealed that in both cases (internally and externally), bacteria grew for the first 48 hours but subsequently they started to dye, probably as a consequence of nutrient consumption. Moreover, the difference between outer and inner bacteria concentration was statistically significant at each time point. Conclusions Implant’s internal contamination shows that IAC is not sealing. The reported results are similar to those of previous studies carried out on different implant systems. Until now, no IAC has been proven to seal the gap between implant and abutment. PMID:28042434

  19. Comparison of effectiveness between cork-screw and peg-screw electrodes for transcranial motor evoked potential monitoring using the finite element method

    PubMed Central

    Tomio, Ryosuke; Akiyama, Takenori; Ohira, Takayuki; Yoshida, Kazunari

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intraoperative monitoring of motor evoked potentials by transcranial electric stimulation is popular in neurosurgery for monitoring motor function preservation. Some authors have reported that the peg-screw electrodes screwed into the skull can more effectively conduct current to the brain compared to subdermal cork-screw electrodes screwed into the skin. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of electrode design on transcranial motor evoked potential monitoring. We estimated differences in effectiveness between the cork-screw electrode, peg-screw electrode, and cortical electrode to produce electric fields in the brain. Methods: We used the finite element method to visualize electric fields in the brain generated by transcranial electric stimulation using realistic three-dimensional head models developed from T1-weighted images. Surfaces from five layers of the head were separated as accurately as possible. We created the “cork-screws model,” “1 peg-screw model,” “peg-screws model,” and “cortical electrode model”. Results: Electric fields in the brain radially diffused from the brain surface at a maximum just below the electrodes in coronal sections. The coronal sections and surface views of the brain showed higher electric field distributions under the peg-screw compared to the cork-screw. An extremely high electric field was observed under cortical electrodes. Conclusion: Our main finding was that the intensity of electric fields in the brain are higher in the peg-screw model than the cork-screw model. PMID:27920938

  20. Virtual estimates of fastening strength for pedicle screw implantation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linte, Cristian A.; Camp, Jon J.; Augustine, Kurt E.; Huddleston, Paul M.; Robb, Richard A.; Holmes, David R.

    2014-03-01

    Traditional 2D images provide limited use for accurate planning of spine interventions, mainly due to the complex 3D anatomy of the spine and close proximity of nerve bundles and vascular structures that must be avoided during the procedure. Our previously developed clinician-friendly platform for spine surgery planning takes advantage of 3D pre-operative images, to enable oblique reformatting and 3D rendering of individual or multiple vertebrae, interactive templating, and placement of virtual pedicle implants. Here we extend the capabilities of the planning platform and demonstrate how the virtual templating approach not only assists with the selection of the optimal implant size and trajectory, but can also be augmented to provide surrogate estimates of the fastening strength of the implanted pedicle screws based on implant dimension and bone mineral density of the displaced bone substrate. According to the failure theories, each screw withstands a maximum holding power that is directly proportional to the screw diameter (D), the length of the in-bone segm,ent of the screw (L), and the density (i.e., bone mineral density) of the pedicle body. In this application, voxel intensity is used as a surrogate measure of the bone mineral density (BMD) of the pedicle body segment displaced by the screw. We conducted an initial assessment of the developed platform using retrospective pre- and post-operative clinical 3D CT data from four patients who underwent spine surgery, consisting of a total of 26 pedicle screws implanted in the lumbar spine. The Fastening Strength of the planned implants was directly assessed by estimating the intensity - area product across the pedicle volume displaced by the virtually implanted screw. For post-operative assessment, each vertebra was registered to its homologous counterpart in the pre-operative image using an intensity-based rigid registration followed by manual adjustment. Following registration, the Fastening Strength was computed

  1. 46 CFR 154.524 - Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. 154.524... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.524 Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. Pipe... warmer. (d) Screwed couplings are allowed for instrumentation and control piping that meets §...

  2. 46 CFR 154.524 - Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. 154.524... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.524 Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. Pipe... warmer. (d) Screwed couplings are allowed for instrumentation and control piping that meets §...

  3. 46 CFR 154.524 - Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. 154.524... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.524 Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. Pipe... warmer. (d) Screwed couplings are allowed for instrumentation and control piping that meets §...

  4. 46 CFR 154.524 - Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. 154.524... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.524 Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. Pipe... warmer. (d) Screwed couplings are allowed for instrumentation and control piping that meets §...

  5. 46 CFR 154.524 - Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. 154.524... Equipment Cargo and Process Piping Systems § 154.524 Piping joints: Welded and screwed couplings. Pipe... warmer. (d) Screwed couplings are allowed for instrumentation and control piping that meets §...

  6. Real-Time Estimation of Ball-Screw Thermal Elongation Based upon Temperature Distribution of Ball-Screw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodera, Takehiko; Yokoyama, Kazuhiro; Miyaguchi, Kazuo; Nagai, Yutaka; Suzuki, Takamasa; Masuda, Masami; Yazawa, Takanori

    The optical telemeter system has been developed, which converts the temperature of rotating spindle to the digital data and carries the digital data from LED on the rotating side toward PD on the stationary side by the optical data transmission. Based upon the temperature distribution of hollow ball-screw obtained by the telemeter system, the thermal elongation of the ball-screw is estimated as the one-dimensional thermal elongation. Estimation accuracy, which is the difference between the estimated thermal elongation and the measured thermal elongation, is -3.1∼+3.2µ m for the thermal elongation of 50-60µ m over the length of 935.5mm of the ball-screw.

  7. Leakage of Microbial Endotoxin through the Implant-Abutment Interface in Oral Implants: An In Vitro Study.

    PubMed

    Garrana, Rhoodie; Mohangi, Govindrau; Malo, Paulo; Nobre, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endotoxin initiates osteoclastic activity resulting in bone loss. Endotoxin leakage through implant abutment connections negatively influences peri-implant bone levels. Objectives. (i) To determine if endotoxin can traverse different implant-abutment connection (IAC) designs; (ii) to quantify the amount of endotoxins traversing the IAC; (iii) to compare the in vitro comportments of different IACs. Materials and Methods. Twenty-seven IACs were inoculated with E. coli endotoxin. Six of the twenty-seven IACs were external connections from one system (Southern Implants) and the remaining twenty-one IACs were made up of seven internal IAC types from four different implant companies (Straumann, Ankylos, and Neodent, Southern Implants). Results. Of the 27 IACs tested, all 6 external IACs leaked measurable amounts of endotoxin. Of the remaining 21 internal IACs, 9 IACs did not show measurable leakage whilst the remaining 12 IACs leaked varying amounts. The mean log endotoxin level was significantly higher for the external compared to internal types (p = 0.015). Conclusion. Within the parameters of this study, we can conclude that endotoxin leakage is dependent on the design of the IAC. Straumann Synocta, Straumann Cross-fit, and Ankylos displayed the best performances of all IACs tested with undetectable leakage after 7 days. Each of these IACs incorporated a morse-like component in their design. Speculation still exists over the impact of IAC endotoxin leakage on peri-implant tissues in vivo; hence, further investigations are required to further explore this.

  8. Leakage of Microbial Endotoxin through the Implant-Abutment Interface in Oral Implants: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Mohangi, Govindrau; Malo, Paulo; Nobre, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endotoxin initiates osteoclastic activity resulting in bone loss. Endotoxin leakage through implant abutment connections negatively influences peri-implant bone levels. Objectives. (i) To determine if endotoxin can traverse different implant-abutment connection (IAC) designs; (ii) to quantify the amount of endotoxins traversing the IAC; (iii) to compare the in vitro comportments of different IACs. Materials and Methods. Twenty-seven IACs were inoculated with E. coli endotoxin. Six of the twenty-seven IACs were external connections from one system (Southern Implants) and the remaining twenty-one IACs were made up of seven internal IAC types from four different implant companies (Straumann, Ankylos, and Neodent, Southern Implants). Results. Of the 27 IACs tested, all 6 external IACs leaked measurable amounts of endotoxin. Of the remaining 21 internal IACs, 9 IACs did not show measurable leakage whilst the remaining 12 IACs leaked varying amounts. The mean log endotoxin level was significantly higher for the external compared to internal types (p = 0.015). Conclusion. Within the parameters of this study, we can conclude that endotoxin leakage is dependent on the design of the IAC. Straumann Synocta, Straumann Cross-fit, and Ankylos displayed the best performances of all IACs tested with undetectable leakage after 7 days. Each of these IACs incorporated a morse-like component in their design. Speculation still exists over the impact of IAC endotoxin leakage on peri-implant tissues in vivo; hence, further investigations are required to further explore this. PMID:28127552

  9. Marginal bone response of implants with platform switching and non-platform switching abutments in posterior healed sites: a 1-year prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yun-Chi; Kan, Joseph Y K; Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Roe, Phillip; Lozada, Jaime L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This 1-year prospective study evaluated the implant success rate and marginal bone response of non-submerged implants with platform and non-platform switching abutments in posterior healed sites. Material and methods Nineteen patients (9 male, 10 female) with posterior partially edentulous spaces, between the ages of 23 and 76 (mean = 55.4 years), were included in this study. A total of 30 implants (15 implants restored with platform switching [PS] abutments [control] and 15 implants restored with non-platform switching [NPS] abutments [test]) were assigned between two groups using a randomization procedure. The definitive abutments with conical connections were placed at the time of surgery, and the definitive restorations were placed at 3 months. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically using standardized radiographs at time of implant placement (0), 3, 6 and 12 months after implant placement. Data were analyzed using Friedman test with post hoc pairwise comparisons, Mann–Whitney U-test, and Pearson's chi-square test at the significance level of α = 0.05. Results At 12 months, all 30 implants remained osseointegrated corresponding to a 100% success rate. The overall mean marginal bone level change at 12 months was −0.04 ± 0.08 mm for PS group and −0.19 ± 0.16 mm for NPS group. Statistically significant difference in the marginal bone level change was observed between groups at 0 to 12 months and 3 to 12 months (P < 0.05). Conclusions This 1-year randomized control study suggests that when a conical implant–abutment connection is present, similar peri-implant tissue responses can be achieved with platform switching and non-platform switching abutments. PMID:24383912

  10. Rotational Stability of Scaphoid Osteosyntheses: An In Vitro Comparison of Small Fragment Cannulated Screws to Novel Bone Screw Sets

    PubMed Central

    Erhart, Jochen; Unger, Ewald; Schefzig, Philip; Varga, Peter; Trulson, Inga; Gormasz, Anna; Trulson, Alexander; Reschl, Martin; Hagmann, Michael; Vecsei, Vilmos; Mayr, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background The current standard of care for operative repair of scaphoid fractures involves reduction and internal fixation with a single headless compression screw. However, a compression screw in isolation does not necessarily control rotational stability at a fracture or nonunion site. The single screw provides rotational control through friction and bone interdigitation from compression at the fracture site. We hypothesize that osteosyntheses with novel bone screw sets (BSS) equipped with anti-rotational elements provide improved rotational stability. Methods Stability of osteosynthesis under increasing cyclic torsional loading was investigated on osteotomized cadaveric scaphoids. Two novel prototype BSS, oblique type (BSS-obl.) and longitudinal type (BSS-long.) were compared to three conventional screws: Acutrak2®mini, HCS®3.0 and Twinfix®. Biomechanical tests were performed on scaphoids from single donors in paired comparison and analyzed by balanced incomplete random block design. Loading was increased by 50 mNm increments with 1,000 cycles per torque level and repeated until a rotational clearance of 10°. Primary outcome measure was the number of cycles to 10° clearance, secondary outcome measure was the maximum rotational clearance for each torque level. Findings BSS-obl. performed significantly better than Acutrak2®mini and HCS® (p = 0.015, p<0.0001). BSS-long. performed significantly better than HCS® (p = 0.010). No significant difference in performance between BSS-obl. and BSS-long. (p = 0.361), between BSS obl. and Twinfix® (p = 0.50) and BSS long. and Twinfix® (p = 0.667) was detected. Within the torque range up to 200 mNm, four of 21 (19%) BSS-long. and four of 21 (19%) BSS-obl. preparations showed early failure. The same loading led to early failure in four (29%) Twinfix®, seven (50%) Acutrak2®mini and 10 (71%) HCS® of 14 screw samples, respectively. Conclusions For both BSS and to a lesser extent for Twinfix® (as dual-component screw

  11. Benchtop comparison of a novel dynamic compression screw to a standard cortical screw: compression integrity and gap size over time during simulated resorption.

    PubMed

    Kinmon, Kyle; Garzon, Desiree; Tacktill, Jordan; Vassello, Wayne

    2013-06-01

    Literature reports the incidence of failed isolated foot and ankle fusions as up to 23%. A contributing factor is the natural bone resorption, which occurs resulting in loss of compression and gapping at the fusion site when standard static compression plates and screws are used. However, an innovative dynamic compression screw may provide lasting compression despite resorption. This benchtop study shows that the FxDEVICES spring-loaded dynamic POGO screw maintains more compression and more consistent compression rate during simulated resorption, as compared with a standard compression screw. The novel screw maintained much greater compression strength within the first millimeter of simulated resorption (13.57 vs 4.38 lb) and maintained greater compression strength at the test completion (1.14 vs 0 lb). The novel screw revealed a more consistent resorption rate over the duration of the simulation. Clinically, this may result in more stability and improved fusion rates.

  12. A new portable vibrator for plaster pouring: effect on the marginal fit at cylinder-abutment

    PubMed Central

    de ANDRADE, Pâmela Cândida Aires Ribas; LUTHI, Leonardo Flores; STANLEY, Kyle; CARDOSO, Antônio Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to test a new portable vibrator for plaster pouring (developed for this purpose), comparing the effect of its use on the accuracy of working cast of implant-supported restorations to the conventional vibrator. Material and methods From a master cast with 2 implants, 30 transfer moldings were made randomly and divided into three groups: Group I (GI): pouring performed in an outsourced dental laboratory with conventional plaster vibrator (10 casts), Group II (GII): pouring performed in the laboratory of the Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC) with conventional plaster vibrator (10 casts) and Group III (GIII): pouring performed with the portable vibrator fabricated for this study (10 casts). The position of the analogue and marginal adaptation of the infrastructure were verified by testing the single screw on the master model and on the working model. The measurement of misfit was blindly performed with a precision microscope and analyzing unit, Quadra-Check 200. The data were statistically analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Holm-Sidak test (α=0.05). Results Means±standard deviations were as follows: GI: 19.19±4.73 µm; GII: 21.72±5.41 µm; GIII: 13.5±2.39 µm (P<0.05), with GIII significantly lower as compared to the other groups. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that a greater accuracy of working cast was achieved when a portable vibrator was used for casting molds. PMID:23138736

  13. Role of rod diameter in comparison between only screws versus hooks and screws in posterior instrumentation of thoracic curve in idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Lamartina, Claudio; Petruzzi, Maria; Macchia, Marcello; Stradiotti, Paola; Zerbi, Alberto

    2011-05-01

    Since the introduction of Cotrel-Dubousset instrumentation in 1984, the correction techniques in scoliosis surgery have changed from Harrington principles of concave distraction to segmental realignment to a variety of possibilities including the rod rotation manoeuvres, and to segmental approximation via cantilever methods. Additionally, pedicle screw utilization in lumbar curves enhanced correction and stabilization of various deformities, and various studies have strongly supported the clinical advantages of lumbar pedicle screws versus conventional hook instrumentation. Pedicle screw constructs have become increasingly popular in the treatment of patients with spinal deformity. When applied to adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients, pedicle screw fixation has demonstrated increased corrective ability compared with traditional hook/hybrid instrumentation. In our study, we do a retrospective review of idiopathic scoliosis patients (King 2-Lenke 1 B/C) treated with a selective thoracic posterior fusion using an all-screw construct versus a hybrid (pedicle screws and hooks) construct and, compare the percentage of correction of the scoliotic curves obtained with screws alone and screws and hooks. Special attention was given to the rod diameter and correction technique. Our results show that the percentage of correction of idiopathic thoracic scoliosis is similar when treating the scoliosis with rods and screws alone or with rods, screws and hooks; therefore, we and the majority of authors in the literature do not consider the rod section. This can be an important parameter in the evaluation of the superiority of treatment with screws only or screws and hooks. In our study, even if not of statistical significance, the better thoracic curve correction obtained with the hybrid group should be ascribed to the fact that in this group mostly 6 mm rods were used.

  14. A Case of Implant Failure in Partial Wrist Fusion Applying Magnesium-Based Headless Bone Screws

    PubMed Central

    Emmerich, Judith

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a case of implant failure resulting in mechanical instability of a scaphotrapezotrapezoideal arthrodesis using magnesium-based headless bone screws. During revision surgery osteolysis surrounding the screws was observed as well as degraded screw threads already in existence at 6 weeks after implantation. The supposed osseous integration attributed to magnesium-based screws could not be reproduced in this particular case. Thus, it can be reasoned that the use of magnesium-based screws for partial wrist arthrodesis cannot be encouraged, at least not in dual use. PMID:27800201

  15. Covering the Screw-Access Holes of Implant Restorations in the Esthetic Zone: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Saboury, Abolfazl; Gooya, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Screw-retained implant restorations have an advantage of predictable retention as well as retrievability, and obviate the risk of excessive sub-gingival cement commonly associated with cement retained implant restorations. Screw-retained restorations generally have screw access holes, which can compromise esthetics and weaken the porcelain around the holes. The purpose of this study is to describe the use of a separate overcasting crown design to cover the screw access hole of implant screw-retained prosthesis for improved esthetics. PMID:25628703

  16. Use of computational fluid dynamics simulations for design of a pretreatment screw conveyor reactor.

    PubMed

    Berson, R Eric; Hanley, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics simulations were employed to compare performance of various designs of a pretreatment screw conveyor reactor. The reactor consisted of a vertical screw used to create cross flow between the upward conveying solids and the downward flow of acid. Simulations were performed with the original screw design and a modified design in which the upper flights of the screw were removed. Results of the simulations show visually that the modified design provided favorable plug flow behavior within the reactor. Pressure drop across the length of the reactor without the upper screws in place was predicted by the simulations to be 5 vs 40 kPa for the original design.

  17. Cellulose and the twofold screw axis: Modeling and experimental arguments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crystallography indicates that molecules in crystalline cellulose either have 2-fold screw-axis (21) symmetry or closely approximate it, leading to short distances between H4 and H1' across the glycosidic linkage. Therefore, modeling studies of cellobiose often show elevated energies for 21 structur...

  18. Stability of two-fold screw axis structures for cellulose

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diffraction crystallography indicates that most forms of crystalline cellulose have two-fold screw axis symmetry. Even if exact symmetry is absent, the degree of pseudo symmetry is very high. On the other hand, this symmetry leads to short contacts between H4 and H1' across the glycosidic linkage....

  19. Reprint of: Dynamics of discrete screw dislocations on glide directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicandro, R.; De Luca, L.; Garroni, A.; Ponsiglione, M.

    2016-12-01

    We consider a simple discrete model for screw dislocations in crystals. Using a variational discrete scheme we study the motion of a configuration of dislocations toward low energy configurations. We deduce an effective fully overdamped dynamics that follows the maximal dissipation criterion introduced in Cermelli and Gurtin (1999) and predicts motion along the glide directions of the crystal.

  20. Transalveolar screw: a new concept for orthodontic anchorage.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Alfaro, Federico; Egio, Elisabeth; Ruiz, Vanessa

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the use of a new trans-alveolar screw (TAS) as a temporary orthodontic anchorage device for the posterior maxilla, to intrude overerupted maxillary molars. To date, five consecutive patients have been treated with these newly designed screws. Intrusions achieved ranged from 2.1 and 6mm (mean 4.7 mm). The TAS is cheap, easy to place and remove by the orthodontist, has bicortical anchorage, and is loaded on both sides. The main advantage of TAS is that when placed in the maxilla to intrude upper molars, it allows application of intrusive force from both buccal and palatal aspects simultaneously, so that the line of force in relation to the center of resistance of the posterior segment, permits an in-mass intrusion, avoiding buccal tipping or rotations. Moreover the surgical procedure for inserting and removing the bicortical screw is simple and does not require any surgical flap, so complications are minimal and screws can be loaded immediately, without requiring any waiting healing period of time.

  1. Some refinements of the theory of the viscous screw pump.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Recently performed analysis for herringbone thrust bearings has been incorporated into the theory of the viscous screw pump for Newtonian fluids. In addition, certain earlier corrections for sidewall and channel curvature effects have been simplified. The result is a single, refined formula for the prediction of the pressure-flow relation for these pumps.

  2. [The effect of polylactide screws on fracture healing].

    PubMed

    Duan, H; Song, Y; Peng, Z; Liu, L; Xiong, C; Zhang, X; Luo, F; Zhu, X; Lin, D

    2000-12-01

    This experiment aimed at investigating the effect of a kind of home-bred poly-DL-lactide screws on fracture healing. An operation was performed so as to make bilateral lateral condylar fractures of the femur in 8 dogs. The left sides were fixed with 2 home-bred PDLLA(Mv = 43 x 10(4)) screws, and the contralateral sides were fixed with 2 metalic screws to be used as controls. The animals were sacrificed at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. Optic microscopy and SEM photography were done. The results of optic microscopy showed that fibrous callus formed already in both groups by 2 weeks after surgery, and bilateral fractures united uneventfully by 12 weeks. Although the course of fracture healing in experimental group was slower than that in control group, the osteogenesis in experimental group appeared to be normal. The SEM examination demonstrated that collagenous fibers arranged regularly and calcified normally in both groups at 12 weeks. And many square and rhomboid granules produced from the degradation of PDLLA material were found in experimental group at 12 weeks. Therefore, it is suggested that this kind of home-bred PDLLA screws should be applicable to fractures where the tissues are rich in blood supply.

  3. Dynamics of discrete screw dislocations on glide directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicandro, R.; De Luca, L.; Garroni, A.; Ponsiglione, M.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a simple discrete model for screw dislocations in crystals. Using a variational discrete scheme we study the motion of a configuration of dislocations toward low energy configurations. We deduce an effective fully overdamped dynamics that follows the maximal dissipation criterion introduced in Cermelli and Gurtin (1999) and predicts motion along the glide directions of the crystal.

  4. INTERIOR VIEW OF JAMES HARRIS CUTTING SCREW THREADS INTO THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF JAMES HARRIS CUTTING SCREW THREADS INTO THE INTERIOR OF FITTINGS ON ONE IN A BANK OF TAPPING MACHINES, EACH OPERATED BY THE SAME WORKER SIMULTANEOUSLY BUT TIMED TO REQUIRE WORKER ACTION AT INTERVALS THAT DO NOT INTERFERE WITH THE OTHER MACHINES. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Tapping Room, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  5. Granulation of increasingly hydrophobic formulations using a twin screw granulator.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shen; Reynolds, Gavin K; Huang, Zhenyu; de Matas, Marcel; Salman, Agba D

    2014-11-20

    The application of twin screw granulation in the pharmaceutical industry has generated increasing interest due to its suitability for continuous processing. However, an understanding of the impact of formulation properties such as hydrophobicity on intermediate and finished product quality has not yet been established. Hence, the current work investigated the granulation behaviour of three formulations containing increasing amounts of hydrophobic components using a Consigma™-1 twin screw granulator. Process conditions including powder feed rate, liquid to solid ratio, granulation liquid composition and screw configuration were also evaluated. The size of the wet granules was measured in order to enable exploration of granulation behaviour in isolation without confounding effects from downstream processes such as drying. The experimental observations indicated that the granulation process was not sensitive to the powder feed rate. The hydrophobicity led to heterogeneous liquid distribution and hence a relatively large proportion of un-wetted particles. Increasing numbers of kneading elements led to high shear and prolonged residence time, which acted to enhance the distribution of liquid and feeding materials. The bimodal size distributions considered to be characteristic of twin screw granulation were primarily ascribed to the breakage of relatively large granules by the kneading elements.

  6. The general theory of blade screws including propellers, fans, helicopter screws, helicoidal pumps, turbo-motors, and different kinds of helicoidal blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Bothezat, George

    1920-01-01

    Report presents a theory which gives a complete picture and an exact quantitative analysis of the whole phenomenon of the working of blade screws, but also unites in a continuous whole the entire scale of states of work conceivable for a blade screw. Chapter 1 is devoted to the establishment of the system of fundamental equations relating to the blade screw. Chapter 2 contains the general discussion of the 16 states of work which may establish themselves for a blade screw. The existence of the vortex ring state and the whirling phenomenon are established. All the fundamental functions which enter the blade-screw theory are submitted to a general analytical discussion. The general outline of the curve of the specific function is examined. Two limited cases of the work of the screw, the screw with a zero constructive pitch and the screw with an infinite constructive pitch, are pointed out. Chapter 3 is devoted to the study of the propulsive screw or propeller. (author)

  7. All-ceramic single-tooth implant reconstructions using modified zirconia abutments: a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial of the effect of pink veneering ceramic on the esthetic outcomes.

    PubMed

    Büchi, Dominik L E; Sailer, Irena; Fehmer, Vincent; Hämmerle, Christoph H F; Thoma, Daniel S

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether veneering of the submucosal part of zirconia abutments using pink veneering ceramic positively influences the color of the peri-implant mucosa. Single-tooth implants were restored with either white zirconia abutments (control group) or pink-veneered zirconia abutments and all-ceramic crowns. Esthetic outcome measurements included a spectrophotometric evaluation of the peri-implant mucosal color. Test and control groups induced a visible discoloration of the peri-implant mucosa after the insertion of the abutments and following cementation of the crowns compared to natural teeth. The calculated color differences were above the clinically visible threshold value and were more favorable for the control group, although not statistically significant. It is concluded that veneering of zirconia abutments with pink veneering ceramic failed to positively influence the esthetic outcome, mostly due to a decrease of the brightness compared with the control group.

  8. Evaluation of different screw fixation techniques and screw diameters in sagittal split ramus osteotomy: finite element analysis method.

    PubMed

    Sindel, A; Demiralp, S; Colok, G

    2014-09-01

    Sagittal split ramus osteotomy (SSRO) is used for correction of numerous congenital or acquired deformities in facial region. Several techniques have been developed and used to maintain fixation and stabilisation following SSRO application. In this study, the effects of the insertion formations of the bicortical different sized screws to the stresses generated by forces were studied. Three-dimensional finite elements analysis (FEA) and static linear analysis methods were used to investigate difference which would occur in terms of forces effecting onto the screws and transmitted to bone between different application areas. No significant difference was found between 1·5- and 2-mm screws used in SSRO fixation. Besides, it was found that 'inverted L' application was more successful compared to the others and that was followed by 'L' and 'linear' formations which showed close rates to each other. Few studies have investigated the effect of thickness and application areas of bicortical screws. This study was performed on both advanced and regressed jaws positions.

  9. Accuracy of robot-assisted pedicle screw placement for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Macke, Jeremy J; Woo, Raymund; Varich, Laura

    2016-06-01

    This is a retrospective review of pedicle screw placement in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) patients under 18 years of age who underwent robot-assisted corrective surgery. Our primary objective was to characterize the accuracy of pedicle screw placement with evaluation by computed tomography (CT) after robot-assisted surgery in AIS patients. Screw malposition is the most frequent complication of pedicle screw placement and is more frequent in AIS. Given the potential for serious complications, the need for improved accuracy of screw placement has spurred multiple innovations including robot-assisted guidance devices. No studies to date have evaluated this robot-assisted technique using CT exclusively within the AIS population. Fifty patients were included in the study. All operative procedures were performed at a single institution by a single pediatric orthopedic surgeon. We evaluated the grade of screw breach, the direction of screw breach, and the positioning of the patient for preoperative scan (supine versus prone). Of 662 screws evaluated, 48 screws (7.2 %) demonstrated a breach of greater than 2 mm. With preoperative prone position CT scanning, only 2.4 % of screws were found to have this degree of breach. Medial malposition was found in 3 % of screws, a rate which decreased to 0 % with preoperative prone position scanning. Based on our results, we conclude that the proper use of image-guided robot-assisted surgery can improve the accuracy and safety of thoracic pedicle screw placement in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. This is the first study to evaluate the accuracy of pedicle screw placement using CT assessment in robot-assisted surgical correction of patients with AIS. In our study, the robot-assisted screw misplacement rate was lower than similarly constructed studies evaluating conventional (non-robot-assisted) procedures. If patients are preoperatively scanned in the prone position, the misplacement rate is further

  10. Biomechanical analysis of forces sustained by iliac screws in spinal instrumentation for deformity treatment: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Frederique D; Aubin, Carl-Eric; Wang, Xiaoyu; Schwend, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    Iliac screws used in long instrumentation for deformity treatment are subject to large forces, which may sometimes lead to fixation failures (intra- and postoperatively). The objective of this study was to analyze the biomechanics of iliac screw fixations. The study was based on a patient-specific simulation of a neuromuscular scoliosis case with a long instrumentation to the pelvis. A multi body flexible model was created using a preoperative 3D reconstructed spine and pelvis. The side bending radiographs were used to personalize the mechanical properties. The instrumentation construct was modeled as rigid bodies and flexible beams connected by kinematic joints. Three instrumentation parameters were studied: the connector length, the inter rod connectors and the use of sacral screws. The simulations showed that the forces and torques at the iliac screws were lowered by 9% and 25% respectively by reducing the lateral connector length (from 20 to 10 mm). An inter rod connector did not significantly reduce the iliac screw loads. Sacral screws reduced the functional loads on the iliac screws, but hardware related problems may be shifted onto the sacral screws. Sacral screws in conjunction with inter rod connectors reduced the loads at iliac screws without overloading the sacral screws. The preliminary results showed that the forces at the iliac screws could be lowered through different instrumentation parameters. In the next step of the study, the model validation will be further completed and used to evaluate other instrumentation factors by means of an experimental design framework. The knowledge of loading biomechanics at the iliac screw fixation is important for finding solutions to reduce the risk of failure, such as improving preoperative planning, instrumentation techniques and iliac screw construct design.

  11. Subaxial cervical pedicle screw insertion with newly defined entry point and trajectory: accuracy evaluation in cadavers.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiujun; Chaudhari, Rahul; Wu, Chunhui; Mehbod, Amir A; Transfeldt, Ensor E

    2010-01-01

    Successful placement of cervical pedicle screws requires accurate identification of both entry point and trajectory. However, literature has not provided consistent recommendations regarding the direction of pedicle screw insertion and entry point location. The objective of this study was to define a guideline regarding the optimal entry point and trajectory in placing subaxial cervical pedicle screws and to evaluate the screw accuracy in cadaver cervical spines. The guideline for entry point and trajectory for each vertebra was established based on the recently published morphometric data. Six fresh frozen cervical spines (C3-C7) were used. There were two men and four women. After posterior exposure, the entry point was determined and the cortical bone of the entry point was removed using a 2-mm burr. Pilot holes were created with a cervical probe based on the guideline using fluoroscopy. After tapping, 3.5-mm screws with appropriate length were inserted. After screw insertion, every vertebra was dissected and inspected for pedicle breach. The pedicle width, height, pedicle transverse angulation and actual screw insertion angle were measured. A total of 60 pedicle screws were inserted. No statistical difference in pedicle width and height was found between the left and right sides for each level. The overall accuracy of pedicle screws was 83.3%. The remaining 13.3% screws had noncritical breach, and 3.3% had critical breach. The critical breach was not caused by the guideline. There was no statistical difference between the pedicle transverse angulation and the actual screw trajectory created using the guideline. There was statistical difference in pedicle width between the breach and non-breach screws. In conclusion, high success rate of subaxial cervical pedicle screw placement can be achieved using the recently proposed operative guideline and oblique views of fluoroscopy. However, careful preoperative planning and good surgical skills are still required to

  12. Pullout strength of anterior spinal instrumentation: a product comparison of seven screws in calf vertebral bodies

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Dieter; Wild, Alexander; Krauspe, Rüdiger; Schneider, Erich; Linke, Berend

    2007-01-01

    A lot of new implant devices for spine surgery are coming onto the market, in which vertebral screws play a fundamental role. The new screws developed for surgery of spine deformities have to be compared to established systems. A biomechanical in vitro study was designed to assess the bone–screw interface fixation strength of seven different screws used for correction of scoliosis in spine surgery. The objectives of the current study were twofold: (1) to evaluate the initial strength at the bone–screw interface of newly developed vertebral screws (Universal Spine System II) compared to established systems (product comparison) and (2) to evaluate the influence of screw design, screw diameter, screw length and bone mineral density on pullout strength. Fifty-six calf vertebral bodies were instrumented with seven different screws (USS II anterior 8.0 mm, USS II posterior 6.2 mm, KASS 6.25 mm, USS II anterior 6.2 mm, USS II posterior 5.2 mm, USS 6.0 mm, USS 5.0 mm). Bone mineral density (BMD) was determined by quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Failure in axial pullout was tested using a displacement-controlled universal test machine. USS II anterior 8.0 mm showed higher pullout strength than all other screws. The difference constituted a tendency (P = 0.108) when compared to USS II posterior 6.2 mm (+19%) and was significant in comparison to the other screws (+30 to +55%, P < 0.002). USS II posterior 6.2 mm showed significantly higher pullout strength than USS 5.0 mm (+30%, P = 0.014). The other screws did not differ significantly in pullout strength. Pullout strength correlated significantly with BMD (P = 0.0015) and vertebral body width/screw length (P < 0.001). The newly developed screws for spine surgery (USS II) show higher pullout strength when compared to established systems. Screw design had no significant influence on pullout force in vertebral body screws, but outer diameter of the screw, screw length and BMD are good predictors

  13. Investigation on the Influence of Abutment Pressure on the Stability of Rock Bolt Reinforced Roof Strata Through Physical and Numerical Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Hongpu; Li, Jianzhong; Yang, Jinghe; Gao, Fuqiang

    2017-02-01

    In underground coal mining, high abutment loads caused by the extraction of coal can be a major contributor to many rock mechanic issues. In this paper, a large-scale physical modeling of a 2.6 × 2.0 × 1.0 m entry roof has been conducted to investigate the fundamentals of the fracture mechanics of entry roof strata subjected to high abutment loads. Two different types of roof, massive roof and laminated roof, are considered. Rock bolt system has been taken into consideration. A distinct element analyses based on the physical modeling conditions have been performed, and the results are compared with the physical results. The physical and numerical models suggest that under the condition of high abutment loads, the massive roof and the laminated roof fail in a similar pattern which is characterized as vertical tensile fracturing in the middle of the roof and inclined shear fracturing initiated at the roof and rib intersections and propagated deeper into the roof. Both the massive roof and the laminated roof collapse in a shear sliding mode shortly after shear fractures are observed from the roof surface. It is found that shear sliding is a combination of tensile cracking of intact rock and sliding on bedding planes and cross joints. Shear sliding occurs when the abutment load is much less than the compressive strength of roof.

  14. Lateral mass screw stimulation thresholds in posterior cervical instrumentation surgery: a predictor of medial deviation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bayard; Curtis, Erik; Hirshman, Brian; Oygar, Ahmet; Chen, Karen; Gabel, Brandon C; Vaida, Florin; Allison, David W; Ciacci, Joseph D

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Normative data exists for stimulus-evoked pedicle screw electromyography (EMG) current thresholds in the lumbar spine, and is routinely referenced during spine surgeries to detect a screw breach, prevent injury of neural elements, and ensure the most biomechanically sound instrumentation construct. To date, similar normative data for cervical lateral mass screws is limited, thus the utility of lateral mass screw testing remains unclear. To address this disparity, in this study the authors describe cumulative lateral mass screw stimulation threshold data in patients undergoing posterior cervical instrumentation with lateral mass screws. These data are correlated with screw placement on postoperative imaging, and a novel correlation is discovered with direct clinical implications. METHODS Using a ball-tip probe, 154 lateral mass screws in 21 patients were electrically tested intraoperatively. In each case, for each screw, the lowest (or threshold) current at which the first polyphasic stimulus-evoked EMG response was reproducibly observed by a neurophysiologist was recorded. All patients underwent postoperative CT. Screw position within the lateral mass was first measured in the axial and sagittal planes for each lateral mass screw using the CT images. Screw placement was also evaluated by 2 independent physicians, blinded to current threshold data, on a binary scale of acceptability. The predictive capacity of screw EMG threshold data was evaluated via multivariable regression analyses and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses. Predictive capacity was examined with respect to screw position within the lateral mass, as well as screw acceptability. RESULTS Lateral mass screw EMG thresholds did not appear to differ significantly for screws considered "acceptable" versus "unacceptable" according to the radiographic criteria. Accordingly, ROC analysis confirmed that EMG current threshold data were of minimal utility in predicting screw radiographic

  15. Clinical Outcome of Inter-Proximal Papilla between a Tooth and a Single Implant Treated with CAD/CAM Abutments: a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Tiago; Carvalho, Ágata; Carvalho, Vasco

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the clinical outcomes achieved with Computer-Assisted Design/Computer-Assisted Manufacturing implant abutments in the anterior maxilla. Material and Methods Nineteen patients with a mean age of 41 (range form 26 to 63) years, treated with 21 single tooth implants and 21 Computer-Assisted Design/Computer-Assisted Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) abutments in the anterior maxillary region were included in this study. The patients followed 4 criteria of inclusion: (1) had a single-tooth implant in the anterior maxilla, (2) had a CAD/CAM abutment, (3) had a contralateral natural tooth, (4) the implant was restored and in function for at least 6 months up to 2 years. Cases without contact point were excluded. Presence/absence of the interproximal papilla, inter tooth-implant distance (ITD) and distance from the base of the contact point to dental crest bone of adjacent tooth (CPB) were accessed. Results Forty interproximal spaces were evaluated, with an average mesial CPB of 5.65 (SD 1.65) mm and distal CPB of 4.65 (SD 1.98) mm. An average mesial ITD of 2.49 (SD 0.69) mm and an average distal ITD of 1.89 (SD 0.63) mm were achieved. Papilla was present in all the interproximal spaces accessed. Conclusions The restoration of dental implants using CAD/CAM abutments is a predictable treatment with improved aesthetic results. These type of abutments seem to help maintaining a regular papillary filling although the variations of the implant positioning or the restoration teeth relation. PMID:24422016

  16. Cytotoxicity of a new antimicrobial coating for surgical screws: an in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Güzel, Yunus; Elmadag, Mehmet; Uzer, Gokcer; Yıldız, Fatih; Bilsel, Kerem; Tuncay, İbrahim

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The risk of surgery-related infection is a persistent problem in orthopaedics and infections involving implants are particularly difficult to treat. This study explored the responses of bone and soft tissue to antimicrobial-coated screws. We investigated whether such screws, which have never been used to fix bony tissues, would result in a cytotoxic effect. We hypothesised that the coated screws would not be toxic to the bone and that the likelihood of infection would be reduced since bacteria are not able to grow on these screws. METHODS Titanium screws were inserted into the left supracondylar femoral regions of 16 rabbits. The screws were either uncoated (control group, n = 8) or coated with a polyvinylpyrrolidone-polyurethane interpolymer with tertiary amine functional groups (experimental group, n = 8). At Week 6, histological samples were obtained and examined. The presence of necrosis, fibrosis and inflammation in the bony tissue and the tissue surrounding the screws was recorded. RESULTS Live, cellular bone marrow was present in all the rabbits from the experimental group, but was replaced with connective tissue in four rabbits from the control group. Eight rabbits from the control group and two rabbits from the experimental group had necrosis in fatty bone marrow. Inflammation was observed in one rabbit from the experimental group and five rabbits from the control group. CONCLUSION Titanium surgical screws coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone-polyurethane interpolymer were associated with less necrosis than standard uncoated screws. The coated screws were also not associated with any cytotoxic side effect. PMID:26805670

  17. SU-E-T-609: Perturbation Effects of Pedicle Screws On Radiotherapy Dose Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bar-Deroma, R; Borzov, E; Nevelsky, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation therapy in conjunction with surgical implant fixation is a common combined treatment in case of bone metastases. However, metal implants generally used in orthopedic implants perturb radiation dose distributions. Carbon-Fiber Reinforced (CFR) PEEK material has been recently introduced for production of intramedullary screws and plates. Gold powder can be added to the CFR-PEEK material in order to enhance visibility of the screws during intraoperative imaging procedures. In this work, we investigated the perturbation effects of the pedicle screws made of CFR-PEEK, CFR-PEEK with added gold powder (CFR-PEEK-AU) and Titanium (Ti) on radiotherapy dose distributions. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using the EGSnrc code package for 6MV beams with 10×10 fields at SSD=100cm. By means of MC simulations, dose distributions around titanium, CFR- PEEK and CFR-PEEK-AU screws (manufactured by Carbo-Fix Orthopedics LTD, Israel) placed in a water phantom were calculated. The screw axis was either parallel or perpendicular to the beam axis. Dose perturbation (relative to dose in homogeneous water phantom) was assessed. Results: Maximum overdose due to backscatter was 10% for the Ti screws, 5% for the CFR-PEEK-AU screws and effectively zero for the CFR-PEEK screws. Maximum underdose due to attenuation was 25% for the Ti screws, 15% for the CFR-PEEK-AU screws and 5% for the CFR-PEEK screws. Conclusion: Titanium screws introduce the largest distortion on the radiation dose distribution. The gold powder added to the CFR-PEEK material improves visibility at the cost of increased dose perturbation. CFR-PEEK screws caused minimal alteration on the dose distribution. This can decrease possible over and underdose of adjacent tissue and thus favorably influence treatment efficiency. The use of such implants has potential clinical advantage in the treatment of neoplastic bone disease.

  18. Range of motion, sacral screw and rod strain in long posterior spinal constructs: a biomechanical comparison between S2 alar iliac screws with traditional fixation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Field, Antony; Ferrara, Lisa A.; Freeman, Andrew L.; Phan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background S1 screw failure and L5/S1 non-union are issues with long fusions to S1. Improved construct stiffness and S1 screw offloading can help avoid this. S2AI screws have shown to provide similar stiffness to iliac screws when added to L3–S1 constructs. We sought to examine and compare the biomechanical effects on an L2–S1 pedicle screw construct of adding S2AI screws, AxiaLIF, L5–S1 interbody support via transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF), and to examine the effect of the addition of cross connectors to each of these constructs. Methods Two S1 screws and one rod with strain gauges (at L5/S1) were used in L2–S1 screw-rod constructs in 7 L1-pelvis specimens (two with low BMD). ROM, S1 screw and rod strain were assessed using a pure-moment flexibility testing protocol. Specimens were tested intact, and then in five instrumentation states consisting of: (I) Pedicle screws (PS) L2–S1; (II) PS + S2AI screws; (III) PS + TLIF L5/S1; (IV) PS + AxiaLIF L5/S1; (V) PS + S2AI + AxiaLIF L5/S1. The five instrumentation conditions were also tested with crosslinks at L2/3 and S1/2. Tests were conducted in flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial torsion with no compressive preload. Results S2A1 produces reduced S1 screw strain for flexion-extension, lateral bending and axial torsion, as well as reduced rod strain in lateral bending and axial torsion in comparison to AxiaLIF and interbody instrumentation, at the expense of increased rod flexion-extension strain. Cross-connectors may have a role in further reduction of S1 screw and rod strain. Conclusions From a biomechanical standpoint, the use of the S2AI technique is at least equivalent to traditional iliac screws, but offers lower prominence and ease of assembly compared to conventional sacroiliac stabilization. PMID:28097243

  19. The stability following advancement genioplasty with biodegradable screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gyu-Tae; Jung, Hwi-Dong; Kim, Sang Yoon; Park, Hyung-Sik; Jung, Young-Soo

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare postoperative stability using biodegradable screws with that of metal plates for fixation of advancement genioplasty. We studied patients who had advancement genioplasty alone or at the same time as other orthognathic surgery including mandibular setback. We assessed the lateral cephalographs at different time points (preoperatively, and 7 days, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months postoperatively). A total of 54 patients were enrolled and 27 patients were assigned to each group. The position of pogonion was stable 12 months postoperatively, and the amount of skeletal advancement was reflected in soft tissue close to 100%. There were no clinical differences between biodegradable screws and conventional metal plates used for fixation. Biodegradable fixation for advancement genioplasty is a good option for patients who would require a second operation for removal of the plates.

  20. Screw pumps provide high efficiency in transport of Orinoco bitumen

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.R.

    1995-03-01

    One of the world`s largest known deposits of extra natural bitumen is located in the Orinoco River basin of eastern Venezuela. Production and transportation of an emulsion of bitumen and water is one of the major projects being directed by Petroleos de Venezuela S.A. This paper reviews the pump selection options considered in transporting this bitumen to a viable processing facility. The three pump types evaluated were centrifugal, reciprocating, or rotary screw. Performance and cost parameters are evaluated and the screw pump was determined to be the most economical, high performance choice. The paper goes on to describe the installation of the main transport lines and efficiency of these new pumps.

  1. Minimally invasive dynamic hip screw for fixation of hip fractures

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Michael; Garau, Giorgio; Walley, Gayle; Oliva, Francesco; Panni, Alfredo Schiavone; Longo, Umile Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    We compared a minimally invasive surgical technique to the conventional (open approach) surgical technique used in fixation of hip fractures with the dynamic hip screw (DHS) device. Using a case-control design (44 cases and 44 controls), we tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference between the two techniques in the following outcome measures: duration of surgery, time to mobilisation and weight bearing postoperatively, length of hospital stay, mean difference of pre- and postoperative haemoglobin levels, position of the lag screw of the DHS device in the femoral head, and the tip–apex distance. The minimally invasive DHS technique had significantly shorter duration of surgery and length of hospital stay. There was also less blood loss in the minimally invasive DHS technique. The minimally invasive DHS technique produces better outcome measures in the operating time, length of hospital stay, and blood loss compared to the conventional approach while maintaining equal fixation stability. PMID:18478227

  2. Efficiency study of oil cooling of a screw compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Tree, D.R.; McKellar, M.G. . Ray W. Herrick Labs.); Fresco, A. )

    1990-01-01

    One of the major goals of all compressor manufacturers is to design and build as efficient a compressor as possible. In a screw compressor it appears that the way the compressor is cooled can have an effect on the compressor's efficiency. This paper presents experimental data on three different screw compressor cooling methods: Liquid Refrigerant Injection Cooling System; Thermosyphon Cooling System; and Oil Injection System. All tests were conducted on a hot gas bypass system using refrigerant R-22. The data taken shows that the Oil Injection System is slightly better than the other two. These tests should be repeated with a higher oil flow rate and ammonia as the working fluid. 10 figs.

  3. Thermally-Active Screw Dislocations in Si Nanowires and Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrica, Traian; Xiong, Shiyun; Ma, Jihong; Volz, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    New properties appear when nanomaterials contain dislocations. Understanding whether these features, which arise naturally during growth, are beneficial or problematic becomes essential for developing applications. Here we investigate 110 Si nanowire and nanotube structures containing an axial screw dislocation, as described by objective molecular dynamics coupled with the classical Tersoff potential. By means of direct nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, we uncover significant reductions in thermal conductivity when nanostructures contain axial screw dislocations with closed and open cores. Analysis based on the atomistic Green function method reveals that in nanowires, the effect originates largely in the phonon-phonon scattering due to the enhanced anharmonicity introduced by highly distorted core region of the dislocation. In nanotubes, the inner surface compensates effectively for the missing core region. The uncovered effect can act in combination with other already known thermal conductivity limiting mechanisms, and thus can enable the further optimization of the figure of merit for a new family of complex thermoelectric nanomaterials.

  4. Subaxial subluxation after atlantoaxial transarticular screw fixation in rheumatoid patients.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiromu; Neo, Masashi; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Takashi

    2009-06-01

    The most common cervical abnormality associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is atlantoaxial subluxation, and atlantoaxial transarticular screw fixation has proved to be one of the most reliable, stable fixation techniques for treating atlantoaxial subluxation. Following C1-C2 fixation, however, subaxial subluxation reportedly can bring about neurological deterioration and require secondary operative interventions. Rheumatoid patients appear to have a higher risk, but there has been no systematic comparison between rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid patients. Contributing radiological factors to the subluxation have also not been evaluated. The objective of this study was to evaluate subaxial subluxation after atlantoaxial transarticular screw fixation in patients with and without RA and to find contributing factors. Forty-three patients who submitted to atlantoaxial transarticular screw fixation without any concomitant operation were followed up for more than 1 year. Subaxial subluxation and related radiological factors were evaluated by functional X-ray measurements. Statistical analyses showed that aggravations of subluxation of 2.5 mm or greater were more likely to occur in RA patients than in non-RA patients over an average of 4.2 years of follow-up, and postoperative subluxation occurred in the anterior direction in the upper cervical spine. X-ray evaluations revealed that such patients had a significantly smaller postoperative C2-C7 angle, and that the postoperative AA angle correlated negatively with this. Furthermore, anterior subluxation aggravation was significantly correlated with the perioperative atlantoaxial and C2-C7 angle changes, and these two changes were strongly correlated to each other. In conclusion, after atlantoaxial transarticular screw fixation, rheumatoid patients have a greater risk of developing subaxial subluxations. The increase of the atlantoaxial angel at the operation can lead to a decrease in the C2-C7 angle, followed by anterior

  5. Screw pumps move heavy California offshore crude effectively

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, J.R. )

    1994-09-19

    Multiple-screw pumps are ideally suited for transporting and processing heavy crude and emulsions. The pumps have high-pressure capability and excellent operating efficiencies. Minimal space for treating equipment on a platform makes pumping heavy crude from offshore fields difficult. Water is difficult to separate from heavy crude and heavy crude also has a tendency to retain sediments/solids. The paper describes the original development of these pumps, their field expansion, and the supporting onshore facility.

  6. Continuous twin screw extrusion for the wet granulation of lactose.

    PubMed

    Keleb, E I; Vermeire, A; Vervaet, C; Remon, J P

    2002-06-04

    The suitability of continuous twin screw extrusion for the wet granulation of alpha-lactose monohydrate was studied and compared with conventional high shear granulation. The influence of process parameters (screw speed and total input rate) and formulation variables (water and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) concentration) on the properties of granules (yield, particle size distribution, friability and compressibility) and tablets (tablet tensile strength, friability and disintegration time) was investigated. Variation of the formulation and process parameters had a major effect on the process feasibility. Optimization of these parameters is required to allow continuous processing and to ensure a high yield. Total input rate, screw speed and water concentration had a minor influence on the granule and the tablet properties. The addition of PVP had no major influence on the granule properties, but significantly affected the tablet characteristics. For granules formulated with and without PVP a yield above 50%, a friability below 30% and a compressibility below 15% was obtained. Tablets without PVP showed a tensile strength below 0.6 MPa, a friability above 1% and a disintegration time below 3 min, whereas tablets with PVP showed a tensile strength above 0.6 MPa, a friability below 1% and a disintegration time ranging from 8 to 15 min. High shear granulation was only possible when PVP was added and it required a higher amount of water. It was concluded that wet granulation of alpha-lactose monohydrate using continuous twin screw extrusion is a robust process and might offer a suitable alternative for high shear granulation in the pharmaceutical industry.

  7. Biomechanical comparison of anatomic trajectory pedicle screw versus injectable calcium sulfate graft-augmented pedicle screw for salvage in cadaveric thoracic bone.

    PubMed

    Derincek, Alihan; Wu, Chunhui; Mehbod, Amir; Transfeldt, Ensor E

    2006-06-01

    Many salvage options for failed thoracic pedicle screws exist including the use of a different trajectory or the augmentation of the screw with polymethylmethacrylate cement. Although polymethylmethacrylate immediately increases the construct stiffness and the pull-out strength, it may cause bone necrosis, toxin relaxation, and/or neural injury. On the other hand, calcium sulfate bone grafts have a high potential for biologic incorporation and no thermal damage effect. In the current study, polyaxial pedicle screws were first inserted with a straightforward approach on both sides in 17 fresh human cadaveric thoracic vertebrae. The maximal insertion torque for each screw was measured and then the pull-out strengths were recorded. Afterward, these pedicle screws were randomly assigned to be replaced either by graft augmentation or by anatomic trajectory technique for salvage. The graft-augmented screws were placed using the previous holes. The maximum insertional torque for each anatomic trajectory screw was measured. Finally, the pull-out strengths of the revision screws were recorded. The mean maximum insertional torque decreased with the anatomic trajectory salvage technique when compared with the straightforward approach, 0.23 versus 0.38 Nm, respectively (P=0.003). The anatomic trajectory revision resulted in decreased pull-out strength when compared with the pull-out strength of the straightforward technique, 297 versus 469 N, respectively (P=0.003). The calcium sulfate graft augmentation increased the pull-out strength when compared with the pull-out strength of the straightforward technique, 680 versus 477 N, respectively (P=0.017). The mean pull-out strength ratio of revised screw to original was 0.71 for anatomic trajectory and 1.8 for graft-augmented screws, a statistically significant difference (P=0.002).

  8. Backflow in twin-screw-type multiphase pump

    SciTech Connect

    Egashira, Kazuyuki; Shoda, Shinji; Tochikawa, Tetsuro

    1996-12-31

    We experimentally investigated a twin-screw-type multi-phase pump focusing on the backflow in a gap along the twin-screw shafts and scale-up parameters. Although both the backflow and the scale-up parameters have been recognized as important factors in developing multiphase pumps, they have not been clarified yet. We designed and constructed a large-scale test facility suitable for acquiring data on the relationship between back-flow rates and important factors such as differential pressures, gas void fractions, and rotation speed of the shaft. As a result, the backflow rate was estimated as the difference between the volumetric flow rates of pressurized air and water, and those of unpressurized air and water. A physically based model was proposed to describe the backflow by taking into account the differential pressure, gas void fractions, and the rotation speed of the shaft. Evidently from the comparison between the model and the experimental data, the model was certified to simulate successfully the backflow in twin-screw pumps.

  9. Evaluation of pedicle screw insertion monitored by intraoperative evoked electromyography.

    PubMed

    Darden, B V; Wood, K E; Hatley, M K; Owen, J H; Kostuik, J

    1996-02-01

    The insertion of pedicle screws monitored by evoked electromyography (EMG) was prospectively evaluated in the 132 consecutive patients. The technique involved constant-voltage stimulation and was statistically evaluated at both the arbitrary 20- and 40-V settings. The patients were postoperatively evaluated clinically and radiographically. Computed tomography (CT) scanning was performed for new neurologic deficits. Results were divided into three groups: type 1, a negative EMG response; type 2, a positive EMG response, but no corrective action taken; and type 3, a positive EMG response and corrective action undertaken. Nonparametric statistics were used to evaluate the results at both the 20- and 40-V settings. In the type 3 group, in which corrective action was undertaken, there were no neurologic injuries or screw removals, a statistically significant result. Looking at the two intensity levels, at 20- and 40-V settings, there were no statistically significant differences in the three classifications at either intensity level. We concluded the evoked EMG for monitoring pedicle screw insertion is an efficacious adjunct. A positive response at < 20 V with the constant-voltage technique warrants corrective action.

  10. Laminar screw fixation in the subaxial cervical spine: A report on three cases

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Hironori; Aota, Yoichi; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Although laminar screw fixation is often used at the C2 and C7 levels, only few previous case reports have presented the use of laminar screws at the C3-C6 levels. Here, we report a novel fixation method involving the use of practical laminar screws in the subaxial spine. We used laminar screws in the subaxial cervical spine in two cases to prevent vertebral artery injury and in one case to minimize exposure of the lamina. This laminar screw technique was successful in all three cases with adequate spinal rigidity, which was achieved without complications. The use of laminar screws in the subaxial cervical spine is a useful option for posterior fusion of the cervical spine. PMID:27795952

  11. Anatomic Study of Anterior Transdiscal Axial Screw Fixation for Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Zheng, Minghui; Qu, Dongbin; Zou, Lin; Chen, Yongquan; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan

    2016-08-01

    Anterior transdiscal axial screw (ATAS) fixation is an alternative or supplement to the plate and screw constructs for the upper cervical spine injury. However, no existing literatures clarified the anatomic feasibility of this technique for subaxial cervical spine. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical feasibility and to establish guidelines for the use of the ATAS fixation for the subaxial cervical spine injury.Fifty normal cervical spines had radiographs to determine the proposed screw trajectory (the screw length and insertion angle) and the interbody graft-related parameters (the disc height and depth, and the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw) for all levels of the subaxial cervical spine. Following screw insertion in 8 preserved human cadaver specimens, surgical simulation and dissection verified the feasibility and safety of the ATAS fixation.Radiographic measurements showed the mean axial screw length and cephalic incline angle of all levels were 41.2 mm and 25.2°, respectively. The suitable depth of the interbody graft was >11.7 mm (the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw), but <17.1 mm (disc depth). Except the axial screw length, increase in all the measurements was seen with level up to C5-C6 segment. Simulated procedure in the preserved specimens demonstrated that ATAS fixation could be successfully performed at C2-C3, C3-C4, C4-C5, and C5-C6 levels, but impossible at C6-C7 due to the obstacle of the sternum. All screws were placed accurately. None of the screws penetrated into the spinal canal and caused fractures determined by dissecting the specimens.The anterior transdiscal axial screw fixation, as an alternative or supplementary instrumentation for subaxial cervical spine injuries, is feasible and safe with meticulous surgical planning.

  12. Analysis for the stick-slip motion of differential power screw actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun-bo; Yao, Ping; Zhang, Xue-jun; Tang, Jin-long; Zhang, Yu-dong

    2011-08-01

    The model for differential power screw transmission is established, and the mathematical expression of the stick-slip motion is derived based on the friction, in addition, influences of parameters of differential power screw transmission on the stick-slip motion are analyzed qualitatively. Based on dynamical equations of the analysis, the precision and stability of the designed differential power screw actuator is obtained, and the result is compared to it with software SIMULINK to verify.

  13. Stainless steel screws coated with bisphosphonates gave stronger fixation and more surrounding bone. Histomorphometry in rats.

    PubMed

    Wermelin, K; Suska, F; Tengvall, P; Thomsen, P; Aspenberg, P

    2008-02-01

    Coating of stainless steel screws with bisphosphonate in a fibrinogen matrix leads to an enhancement of the pullout strength 2 weeks after insertion in rat tibiae. This effect then increases over time until at least 8 weeks. The pullout force reflects the mechanical properties of the bone within the threads, which acts as a screw nut. The aim of the present study was to find descriptive and morphometric histological correlates to the increased pullout strength. Because the bisphosphonates are applied via the implant surface, we also measured bone to implant contact and how far away from the surface any effects could be seen. Stainless steel screws underwent one of three treatments: uncoated control, controls coated with a layer of cross-linked fibrinogen, or screws further modified with bisphosphonates covalently linked and physically adsorbed to the fibrinogen layer. At 1 (n=33) and 8 (n=27) weeks, bone to implant contact and bone area density in the threads were measured, as well as bone area density at 250 and 500 microm from the outer edge of the threads. Additionally, removal torque for each screw treatment was measured at 2 weeks (n=28). At 8 weeks, the part of the bisphosphonate screw that was located in the marrow cavity had become surrounded with bone, whereas there was almost no bone surrounding the controls. The bone area density in the threads along the entire bisphosphonate screw was increased by 40% compared with uncoated controls, and at 250 microm distance it was more than doubled. At 1 week, coated screws had less implant-bone contact, but at 8 weeks there was no difference between uncoated and bisphosphonate-coated screws. The bisphosphonate screws had 50% increased removal torque at 2 weeks compared to uncoated screws. Howship's lacunae and osteoclasts were found near the screws with bisphosphonates at 8 weeks, suggesting that some bone remodeling took place near the implant, in spite of the presence of bisphosphonates.

  14. Twin screw wet granulation: the study of a continuous twin screw granulator using Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) technique.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kai T; Ingram, Andy; Rowson, Neil A

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, Positron Emission Particle Tracking (PEPT) techniques are utilised to track the trajectory of single particles through the mixing and conveying zones of a Twin Screw Granulator (TSG). A TSG consisting of conveying zones and mixing zones is used in this study. The mixing zones are arranged with kneading discs at an angle of 30°, 60° or 90°. Experiments were carried out using different mixing configurations with various screw speed and total mass flow rate. The PEPT data obtained were then utilised to obtain the residence time distribution (RTD) and the Peclet number in an attempt to gain some insight into the mixing of the process. The fill level of the granulator was also estimated to study the mechanism of granulation. As might be expected, it was shown that the residence time of the granulation process increases with decreasing screw speed. It also increases with increasing angle of the arrangement of kneading blocks in the mixing zones, but will decreases when powder feed rate is increased. The fill level of the mixing zone in particular increases when the screw speed decreases or when powder feed rate increases. Furthermore, the fill level of the granulator will increase when the mixing zone configuration changes from 30° to 90°. It is shown that the granulator is never fully filled, even using 90° mixer elements implying limited compaction which may explain why the granules produced are porous compared with those from a high shear mixer. Interestingly, the RTD analysis reveals that the extent of axial mixing in the mixing zone of the granulator does not change significantly for different configurations and process conditions. There is evidence of a tail in the RTD which implies some material hold up and channelling.

  15. [Time-torque diagrams of self-cutting osteosynthesis screws of various lengths in fracture tests in aluminum].

    PubMed

    Neumayer, B

    1994-05-01

    Tapping screws of the Medicon system were checked for their mechanical strength by a time-torque curve and a new measurement system. To simulate a real situation three types of screws were applied. The predrill was 80% of the kernel diameter. The percentage of demolition was significantly higher with longer screws because there was a typical tilting of screws in aluminium. All tested screws had double the minimum fracture moment of 43 Ncm. Fracture of the screws occurred at about triple the torque of the maximal moment in the bones.

  16. Two inhomogeneities of irregular shape with internal uniform stress fields interacting with a screw dislocation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Schiavone, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Using complex variable methods and conformal mapping techniques, we demonstrate rigorously that two inhomogeneities of irregular shape interacting with a screw dislocation can indeed maintain uniform internal stress distributions. Our analysis indicates that while the internal uniform stresses are independent of the existence of the screw dislocation, the shapes of the two inhomogeneities required to achieve this uniformity depend on the Burgers vector, the location of the screw dislocation, and the size of the inhomogeneities. In addition, we find that this uniformity of the internal stress field is achievable also when the two inhomogeneities interact with an arbitrary number of discrete screw dislocations in the matrix.

  17. Innovative approach in the development of computer assisted algorithm for spine pedicle screw placement.

    PubMed

    Solitro, Giovanni F; Amirouche, Farid

    2016-04-01

    Pedicle screws are typically used for fusion, percutaneous fixation, and means of gripping a spinal segment. The screws act as a rigid and stable anchor points to bridge and connect with a rod as part of a construct. The foundation of the fusion is directly related to the placement of these screws. Malposition of pedicle screws causes intraoperative complications such as pedicle fractures and dural lesions and is a contributing factor to fusion failure. Computer assisted spine surgery (CASS) and patient-specific drill templates were developed to reduce this failure rate, but the trajectory of the screws remains a decision driven by anatomical landmarks often not easily defined. Current data shows the need of a robust and reliable technique that prevents screw misplacement. Furthermore, there is a need to enhance screw insertion guides to overcome the distortion of anatomical landmarks, which is viewed as a limiting factor by current techniques. The objective of this study is to develop a method and mathematical lemmas that are fundamental to the development of computer algorithms for pedicle screw placement. Using the proposed methodology, we show how we can generate automated optimal safe screw insertion trajectories based on the identification of a set of intrinsic parameters. The results, obtained from the validation of the proposed method on two full thoracic segments, are similar to previous morphological studies. The simplicity of the method, being pedicle arch based, is applicable to vertebrae where landmarks are either not well defined, altered or distorted.

  18. Nuts and bolts: dimensions of commonly utilized screws in upper extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Douglass, Nathan; Yao, Jeffrey

    2015-02-01

    A plethora of screw designs and sizes are available from multiple companies for use in upper extremity surgery. Knowing the dimensions of screws is critical in the treatment of bone of varying dimensions for fractures, osteotomies, or arthrodeses. Although many screws are named by their major thread diameter, this is not always true. Because of this confusing nomenclature and vast number of options, we sought to review the most commonly used screws and codify their dimensions into a readily available article and reference chart. This article highlights the basic dimensions of commonly used headless screws, stand-alone lag screws, non-locking and locking screws for plating, and biocomposite screws. Commonly described treatments using these screws include fixation of elbow, wrist, carpal, metacarpal, and phalangeal fractures and osteotomies, as well as arthrodeses of upper extremity joints. This article and its tables are by no means exhaustive of all commercially available implants. The focus is on the most commonly used implants in the United States as of 2014.

  19. C2 laminar screw and C1-2 transarticular screw combined with C1 laminar hooks for atlantoaxial instability with unilateral vertebral artery injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qunfeng; Liu, Jun; Ni, Bin; Lu, Xuhua; Zhou, Fengjin

    2011-09-01

    Transarticular screw fixation (TASF) is technically demanding, with high risk of vertebral artery (VA) injury. How to manage intraoperative VA injury and choose optimal alternative fixation becomes a concern of spinal surgeons. In this study, the management strategy for a patient with suspected intraoperative VA injury was analyzed. A 53-year-old woman developed type II odontoid fracture and brain stem injury due to a motor vehicle accident 3 months earlier. After conservative treatments, the brain stem injury improved, but with residual ocular motility defect in the right eye. The odontoid fracture did not achieve fusion with displacement and absorption of fracture fragments. After admission, atlantoaxial fixation using bilateral C1-2 transarticular screws (TASs) combined with C1 laminar hooks was planed. The first TAS was inserted successfully. Unfortunately, suspected VA injury developed during tapping the tract for the second TAS. Considering the previous brain stem injury and that directly inserting the screw to tamponade the hemorrhage might cause VA stenosis or occlusion, we blocked the screw trajectory with bone wax. C2 laminar screw was implanted instead of intended TAS on the injured side. The management strategy for suspected VA injury should depend on intraoperative circumstances and be tailored to patients. Blocking screw trajectory with bone wax is a useful method to stop bleeding. Atlantoaxial fixation using C2 laminar screw and C1-2 TAS combined with C1 laminar hooks is an ideal alternative procedure.

  20. Accuracy of Free Hand Pedicle Screw Installation in the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine by a Young Surgeon: An Analysis of the First Consecutive 306 Screws Using Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kim, Yongjung J; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective cross-sectional study. Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and safety of free-hand pedicle screw insertion performed by a young surgeon. Overview of Literature Few articles exist regarding the safety of the free-hand technique without inspection by an experienced spine surgeon. Methods The index surgeon has performed spinal surgery for 2 years by himself. He performed fluoroscopy-assisted pedicle screw installation for his first year. Since then, he has used the free-hand technique. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all consecutive patients undergoing pedicle screw installation using the free-hand technique without fluoroscopy in the thoracic or lumbar spine by the index surgeon. Incidence and extent of cortical breach by misplaced pedicle screw was determined by a review of postoperative computed tomography (CT) images. Results A total of 36 patients received 306 free-hand placed pedicle screws in the thoracic or lumbar spine. A total of 12 screws (3.9%) were identified as breaching the pedicle in 9 patients. Upper thoracic spine was the most frequent location of screw breach (10.8%). Lateral breach (2.3%) was more frequent than any other direction. Screw breach on the right side (9 patients) was more common than that on the left side (3 patients) (p<0.01). Conclusions An analysis by CT scan shows that young spine surgeons who have trained under the supervision of an experienced surgeon can safely place free-hand pedicle screws with an acceptable breach rate through repetitive confirmatory steps. PMID:24967036

  1. Reliability of the Planned Pedicle Screw Trajectory versus the Actual Pedicle Screw Trajectory using Intra-operative 3D CT and Image Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Ledonio, Charles G.; Hunt, Matthew A.; Siddiq, Farhan; Polly, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Technological advances, including navigation, have been made to improve safety and accuracy of pedicle screw fixation. We evaluated the accuracy of the virtual screw placement (Stealth projection) compared to actual screw placement (intra-operative O-Arm) and examined for differences based on the distance from the reference frame. Methods A retrospective evaluation of prospectively collected data was conducted from January 2013 to September 2013. We evaluated thoracic and lumbosacral pedicle screws placed using intraoperative O-arm and Stealth navigation by obtaining virtual screw projections and intraoperative O-arm images after screw placement. The screw trajectory angle to the midsagittal line and superior endplate was compared in the axial and sagittal views, respectively. Percent error and paired t-test statistics were then performed. Results Thirty-one patients with 240 pedicle screws were analyzed. The mean angular difference between the virtual and actual image in all screws was 2.17° ± 2.20° on axial images and 2.16° ± 2.24° on sagittal images. There was excellent agreement between actual and virtual pedicle screw trajectories in the axial and sagittal plane with ICC = 0.99 (95%CI: 0.992-0.995) (p<0.001) and ICC= 0.81 (95%CI: 0.759-0.855) (p<0.001) respectively. When comparing thoracic and lumbar screws, there was a significant difference in the sagittal angulation between the two distributions. No statistical differences were found distance from the reference frame. Conclusion The virtual projection view is clinically accurate compared to the actual placement on intra-operative CT in both the axial and sagittal views. There is slight imprecision (~2°) in the axial and sagittal planes and a minor difference in the sagittal thoracic and lumbar angulation, although these did not affect clinical outcomes. In general, we find that pedicle screw placement using intraoperative cone beam CT and navigation to be accurate and reliable, and as such

  2. Ibandronate and cementless total hip arthroplasty: densitometric measurement of periprosthetic bone mass and new therapeutic approach to the prevention of aseptic loosening

    PubMed Central

    Muratore, Maurizio; Quarta, Eugenio; Quarta, Laura; Calcagnile, Fabio; Grimaldi, Antonella; Orgiani, M. Antonio; Marsilio, Antonio; Rollo, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Summary Studies of the mechanisms of periprosthetic bone loss have led to the development of pharmacologic strategies intended to enhance bone mass recovery after surgery and consequently prevent aseptic loosening and prolong the implant survival. Bisphosphonates, potent anti-resorptive drugs widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis and other disorders of bone metabolism, were shown to be particularly effective in reducing periprosthetic bone resorption in the first year after hip and knee arthroplasty, both cemented and cementless. Based on these results, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ibandronate on periprosthetic bone loss in a 2-year study of postmenopausal women that underwent cementless total hip arthroplasty. In the first 6 months both groups (A, treated with ibandronate 3 mg i.v. within five days after surgery and then with oral ibandronate 150 mg/month, plus calcium and vitamin D supplementation; and B, treated with calcium and vitamin D supplementation only) experienced bone loss, though to a lesser extent in group A. After 12 months, group A showed a remarkable BMD recovery, that was statistically significant versus baseline values (about +1, 74% of global BMD) and most evident in region R1 (+3, 81%) and R2 (+4, 12%); in group B, on the contrary, BMD values were unchanged compared with those at 6 months post-surgery. Quality of life scores also showed a greater improvement in group A, both at 6 and 12 months after surgery, likely because of the pain-reducing effects of ibandronate treatment. PMID:22783337

  3. Pull-out strength of cemented solid versus fenestrated pedicle screws in osteoporotic vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Leichtle, C. I.; Rothstock, S.; Happel, J.; Walter, F.; Shiozawa, T.; Leichtle, U. G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cement augmentation of pedicle screws could be used to improve screw stability, especially in osteoporotic vertebrae. However, little is known concerning the influence of different screw types and amount of cement applied. Therefore, the aim of this biomechanical in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of cement augmentation on the screw pull-out force in osteoporotic vertebrae, comparing different pedicle screws (solid and fenestrated) and cement volumes (0 mL, 1 mL or 3 mL). Materials and Methods A total of 54 osteoporotic human cadaver thoracic and lumbar vertebrae were instrumented with pedicle screws (uncemented, solid cemented or fenestrated cemented) and augmented with high-viscosity PMMA cement (0 mL, 1 mL or 3 mL). The insertion torque and bone mineral density were determined. Radiographs and CT scans were undertaken to evaluate cement distribution and cement leakage. Pull-out testing was performed with a material testing machine to measure failure load and stiffness. The paired t-test was used to compare the two screws within each vertebra. Results Mean failure load was significantly greater for fenestrated cemented screws (+622 N; p ⩽ 0.001) and solid cemented screws (+460 N; p ⩽ 0.001) than for uncemented screws. There was no significant difference between the solid and fenestrated cemented screws (p = 0.5). In the lower thoracic vertebrae, 1 mL cement was enough to significantly increase failure load, while 3 mL led to further significant improvement in the upper thoracic, lower thoracic and lumbar regions. Conclusion Conventional, solid pedicle screws augmented with high-viscosity cement provided comparable screw stability in pull-out testing to that of sophisticated and more expensive fenestrated screws. In terms of cement volume, we recommend the use of at least 1 mL in the thoracic and 3 mL in the lumbar spine. Cite this article: C. I. Leichtle, A. Lorenz, S. Rothstock, J. Happel, F. Walter, T. Shiozawa, U. G. Leichtle. Pull

  4. Surgical safety of cervical pedicle screw placement with computer navigation system.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Nobuyuki; Takami, Toshihiro

    2017-04-01

    Cervical pedicle screw (CPS) may be the biomechanically best system for posterior cervical segmental fixation, but may carry a surgery-related risk. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of CPS placement using computer navigation system for posterior cervical instrumented fixation and discuss its complication avoidance and management. Posterior cervical instrumented fixation using CPS was performed in a total of 128 patients during the period between 2007 and 2015. Intraoperative image guidance was achieved using a preoperative 3D CT-based or an intraoperative 3D CT-based navigation system. A total of 762 CPSs were placed in the spine level of C2 to Th3. The radiological accuracy of CPS placement was evaluated using postoperative CT. Accuracy of CPS placement using a preoperative 3D CT-based navigation system was 93.6 % (423 of 452 screws) in grade 0; the screw was completely contained in the pedicle, and accuracy of CPS placement using an intraoperative 3D CT-based navigation system was a little bit improved to 97.1 % (301 of 310 screws) in grade 0. CPS misplacement (more than half of screw) was 3.3 % (15 of 452 screws) using a preoperative 3D CT-based navigation system, and CPS misplacement (more than half of screw) was 0.6 % (2 of 310 screws) using an intraoperative 3D CT-based navigation system. In total, 38 screws (5.0 %) were found to perforate the cortex of pedicle, although any neural or vascular complications closely associated with CPS placement were not encountered. Twenty nine of 38 screws (76.3 %) were found to perforate laterally, and seven screws (18.4 %) were found to perforate medially. Image-guided CPS placement has been an important advancement to secure the safe surgery, although the use of CPS placement needs to be carefully determined based on the individual pathology.

  5. Assessment of Intra-articular Screw Penetration During Radial Head and Olecranon Locking Plate Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Dizdarevic, Ismar; Eden, Claire M.; Bengard, Matthew; Barron, O. Alton; Catalano, Louis W.; Glickel, Steven Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the role of radiographic and clinical exams in predicting screw penetration into the proximal radioulnar joint and ulnohumeral joint during open reduction and internal fixation of the radial head and proximal ulna. Methods: Olecranon and radial head plates were applied to 15 cadaveric elbows. Screws were assessed for intra-articular joint penetration using both clinical exam and radiographic evaluation. Clinical exam consisted of evaluation for crepitus. Radiographs demonstrating screws positioned near the joint surface were evaluated for penetration by 3 fellowship trained hand surgeons. Elbows were disarticulated and screw prominence was determined and recorded using standardized calipers. The ability of clinical and radiographic exams to correctly predict a breach in the articular surface was determined by calculating sensitivity, specificity, and predictive values. Consideration was given to screw position. Results: The sensitivity of crepitus was 81.1% for screws in the radial head plate and 72.6% for screws in the olecranon plate. The sensitivity of radiographs was 72.4% for the screws in the radial head plate and 55.0% for screws in the olecranon plate. Correct radiographic assessment of penetration varied but position o-2 on the olecranon plate consistently resulted in the lowest sensitivity of 30.3%. Conclusions: The study evaluates sensitivity and specificity of clinical and radiographic means when assessing for articular penetration of screws during olecranon and radial head locking plate fixation. Certain screw locations are more difficult to evaluate than others and may go undetected by standard means of assessment used in a surgical setting. PMID:27418892

  6. Vascularized bone grafting fixed by biodegradable magnesium screw for treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dewei; Huang, Shibo; Lu, Faqiang; Wang, Benjie; Yang, Lei; Qin, Ling; Yang, Ke; Li, Yangde; Li, Weirong; Wang, Wei; Tian, Simiao; Zhang, Xiuzhi; Gao, Wenbin; Wang, Zongpu; Zhang, Yu; Xie, Xinhui; Wang, Jiali; Li, Junlei

    2016-03-01

    Hip-preserving surgery with vascularized bone graft implantation has been widely practiced in treating osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). However, the current approach presents a drawback, in which the implanted bone graft without screw fixation may slip or exhibit a certain degree of displacement postoperatively. This study was designed to investigate the application potential of biodegradable magnesium (Mg) screws for the fixation of vascularized bone graft in ONFH patients. Forty-eight patients were randomly divided into two groups: the Mg screw group (vascularized bone grafting fixed by Mg screws) and the control group (vascularized bone grafting without fixation). During 12 month follow-up period after surgery, treatment outcomes in patients were assessed by multiple imaging techniques including x-ray and computed tomography (CT) scanning as well as functional recovery Harris hip score (HHS). The temporal changes in serum levels of Mg, Ca, and P as well as in vivo degradation rate of Mg screws were determined. The absence of potential adverse effects induced by degradation products from Mg screws on surrounding bone tissue was validated via CT imaging analysis. HHS was significantly improved in the Mg screw group when compared to the control group. X-ray imaging analysis showed that the screw shape did not show significant alteration due to the diameter of Mg screws measured with approximate 25% reduction within 12 months post-surgically. The postoperative serum levels of Ca, Mg, and P, which are relevant for liver and kidney function, were all within normal physiological range in all patients of both groups. The use of biodegradable Mg screws may provide a promising bone graft-screw fixation route in treating ONFH and present considerable potential for orthopedic applications.

  7. A new alternative to expandable pedicle screws: Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell.

    PubMed

    Demir, Teyfik

    2015-05-01

    Screw pullout is a very common problem in the fixation of sacrum with pedicle screws. The principal cause of this problem is that the cyclic micro motions in the fixation of sacrum are higher than the other regions of the vertebrae that limit the osteo-integration between bone and screw. In addition to that, the bone quality is very poor at sacrum region. This study investigated a possible solution to the pullout problem without the expandable screws' handicaps. Newly designed poly-ether-ether-ketone expandable shell and classical pedicle screws were biomechanically compared. Torsion test, pullout tests, fatigue tests, flexion/extension moment test, axial gripping capacity tests and torsional gripping capacity tests were conducted in accordance with ASTM F543, F1798 and F1717. Standard polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were used as embedding medium for pullout tests. Classical pedicle screw pullout load on polyurethane foam was 564.8 N compared to the failure load for calf vertebrae's 1264 N. Under the same test conditions, expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell system's pullout loads from polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae were 1196.3 and 1890 N, respectively. The pullout values for expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell were 33% and 53% higher than classical pedicle screw on polyurethane foam and calf vertebrae, respectively. The expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited endurance on its 90% of yield load. Contrary to poly-ether-ether-ketone shell, classical pedicle screw exhibited endurance on 70% of its yield load. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell exhibited much higher pullout performance than classical pedicle screw. Fatigue performance of expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is also higher than classical pedicle screw due to damping the micro motion capacity of the poly-ether-ether-ketone. Expandable poly-ether-ether-ketone shell is a safe alternative to all other expandable pedicle screw systems on mechanical perspective.

  8. Acrylic resin polymerization in direct contact to the abutment and the temperature at bone-implant interface: a pilot in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Mahmood; Jalali, Hamid; Eghtedari, Mehrdad; Sadrimanesh, Roozbeh; Sadr-Eshkevari, Pooyan; Maurer, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Three autopolymerizing acrylic resins were applied to a titanium alloy abutment connected to 2 different diameters of an implant. The implants were embedded in fresh iliac bone of sheep in a 37°C water bath. Temperature changes were recorded via embedded thermocouples at the cervical (T1) and apical (T2) regions of the implant surface. Polymerization temperature of acrylic resins did not seem to exceed the critical threshold of 47°C.

  9. Impact of implant–abutment connection and positioning of the machined collar/microgap on crestal bone level changes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Frank; Hegewald, Andrea; Becker, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To address the following focused question: What is the impact of implant–abutment configuration and the positioning of the machined collar/microgap on crestal bone level changes? Material and methods Electronic databases of the PubMed and the Web of Knowledge were searched for animal and human studies reporting on histological/radiological crestal bone level changes (CBL) at nonsubmerged one-/two-piece implants (placed in healed ridges) exhibiting different abutment configurations, positioning of the machined collar/microgap (between 1992 and November 2012: n = 318 titles). Quality assessment of selected full-text articles was performed according to the ARRIVE and CONSORT statement guidelines. Results A total of 13 publications (risk of bias: high) were eligible for the review. The weighted mean difference (WMD) (95% CI) between machined collars placed either above or below the bone crest amounted to 0.835 mm favoring an epicrestal positioning of the rough/smooth border (P <  0.001) (P-value for heterogeneity: 0.885, I2: 0.000% = no heterogeneity). WMD (95% CI) between microgaps placed either at or below the bone crest amounted to −0.479 mm favoring a subcrestal position of the implant neck (P <  0.001) (P-value for heterogeneity: 0.333, I2: 12.404% = low heterogeneity). Only two studies compared different implant–abutment configurations. Due to a high heterogeneity, a meta-analysis was not feasible. Conclusions While the positioning of the machined neck and microgap may limit crestal bone level changes at nonsubmerged implants, the impact of the implant–abutment connection lacks documentation. PMID:23782338

  10. In vitro evaluation of leakage at implant-abutment connection of three implant systems having the same prosthetic interface using rhodamine B.

    PubMed

    Berberi, Antoine; Tehini, Georges; Rifai, Khaldoun; Bou Nasser Eddine, Farah; El Zein, Nabil; Badran, Bassam; Akl, Haidar

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Hollow space between implant and abutment may act as reservoir for commensal and/or pathogenic bacteria representing a potential source of tissue inflammation. Microbial colonization of the interfacial gap may ultimately lead to infection and bone resorption. Using Rhodamine B, a sensitive fluorescent tracer dye, we aim in this study to investigate leakage at implant-abutment connection of three implant systems having the same prosthetic interface. Materials and Methods. Twenty-one implants (seven Astra Tech, seven Euroteknika, and seven Dentium) with the same prosthetic interface were connected to their original abutments, according to the manufacturers' recommendation. After determination of the inner volume of each implant systems, the kinetic quantification of leakage was evaluated for each group using Rhodamine B (10(-2) M). For each group, spectrophotometric analysis was performed to detect leakage with a fluorescence spectrophotometer at 1 h (T0) and 48 h (T1) of incubation time at room temperature. Results. Astra Tech had the highest inner volume (6.8  μ L), compared to Dentium (4  μ L) and Euroteknika (2.9  μ L). At T0 and T1, respectively, the leakage volume and percentage of each system were as follows: Astra Tech 0.043  μ L or 1.48% (SD 0.0022), 0.08  μ L or 5.56% (SD 0.0074), Euroteknika 0.09  μ L or 6.93% (SD 0.0913), 0.21  μ L or 20.55% (SD 0.0035), and Dentium 0.07  μ L or 4.6% (SD 0.0029), 0.12  μ L or 10.47% (SD 0.0072). Conclusion. The tested internal conical implant-abutment connections appear to be unable to prevent leakage. In average, Astra Tech implants showed the highest inner volume and the least leakage.

  11. Impact of Dynamic Loading on the Implant-abutment Interface Using a Gas-enhanced Permeation Test In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Al-Jadaa, Anas; Attin, Thomas; Peltomäki, Timo; Heumann, Christian; Schmidlin, Patrick Roger

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : To assess implant leakage under static conditions as well as during and after dynamic loading. Materials and methods : Implants (Astra Tech (A), Biomet 3i (B) and Nobel Biocare (C)) were evaluated for leakage (n=8/group). Testing to assess the gas pressure change over time (hPa/min) and infiltrated fluid volume, was performed in a Gas Enhanced Permeation Test (GEPT) to qualify embedding. Implant apexes were then drilled, abutments were mounted and resin build-ups were fabricated. GEPT was reassessed. Samples were afterward mounted in a computer-controlled masticator while tested to bacterial leakage, they were daily observed for turbidity. Samples were then reassessed using GEPT. Dunnett's and Fisher's exact tests were utilized to compare implant and to analyze bacterial leakage. Results : Significant differences in GEPT values were shown after loading (p=0.034). Leakage resistance was best for B when compared to C (p=0.023). Samples with higher GEPT values demonstrated earlier bacterial leakage, occurring after 1 or 2 days (A=4, B=0, C=6) and showing favorability for implant system B (p=0.009). Conclusion : Implants leaking under static conditions had increased potential for bacterial leakage under dynamic conditions. As strongly correlating to sophisticated analytical methods, GEPT is a promising technique for assessing the overall implant system leakage resistance. PMID:25870719

  12. Late prevertebral abscess following anterior cervical plating: the missing screw.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lage, J F; Felipe-Murcia, M; Martínez-Lage Azorín, L

    2007-04-01

    A 51-year-old man underwent a C5-C7 anterior decompression and fusion. Six years later the patient complained of dysphagia caused by displacement of the cervical plate. One week after the scheduled removal of the implanted material, the patient developed a painful cervical swelling and fever. His cervical radiographs showed that a screw was missing compared to previous studies. Computerized tomography showed a large prevertebral abscess anterior to C4-C7. He underwent emergency surgical drainage of the abscess that was followed by total recovery. This report is aimed at describing this unusual complication of cervical instrumentation and to briefly review its pathogenesis and management options.

  13. Biomechanical effects of pedicle screw fixation on adjacent segments.

    PubMed

    Kyaw, Thein Aung; Wang, Zhuo; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Yoshikawa, Takamasa; Inaba, Tadashi; Kasai, Yuichi

    2014-07-01

    Various biomechanical investigations have attempted to clarify the aetiology of adjacent segment disease (ASD). However, no biomechanical study has examined in detail the deformation behaviour of the adjacent segments when both pure torque and an angular displacement load are applied to the vertebrae along multiple segments. The purpose of this study is to investigate the biomechanical effects of pedicle screw fixation on adjacent segments. Ten cadaveric lumbar spines (L2-L5) of boars were used. Control and fusion models were prepared by disc damage and pedicle screw fixation of each specimen, and then, bending and rotation tests were performed using a six-axis material tester. In the biomechanical tests regulated by an angular displacement load, the range of motion (ROM) of the cranial and caudal adjacent segments in antero-posterior flexion and lateral bending was increased by about 20 % (p < 0.05), and the maximal torque in the fusion model was about threefold (p < 0.05) that in the control model. And in axial rotation, the ROM of cranial and caudal adjacent segments was increased by about 100 % (p < 0.001), and the maximal torque was about sixfold (p < 0.01) that in the control model. The ROM of adjacent segments was significantly increased after pedicle screw fixation as assessed by biomechanical tests regulated by an angular displacement load, but not in those regulated by torque. We present the results of biomechanical tests regulated by torque and angular displacement and show that the maximum torque of the fusion model was larger than that of the control model in the biomechanical test regulated by an angular displacement load, suggesting that mechanical stress on the segments adjacent to the fused segment is large. We think that ASD arises after spinal fusion surgery as a mechanism to compensate for the ROM lost due to excessive fusion by pedicle screw fixation, so that a large torque may be applied to adjacent segments within a physiologically

  14. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1) The... secured at once. (ii) Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing temperatures shall be supplied with an...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1) The... secured at once. (ii) Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing temperatures shall be supplied with an...

  16. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1) The... secured at once. (ii) Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing temperatures shall be supplied with an...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1) The... secured at once. (ii) Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing temperatures shall be supplied with an...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.305 - Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jacks-lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. 1926.305... Power § 1926.305 Jacks—lever and ratchet, screw, and hydraulic. (a) General requirements. (1) The... secured at once. (ii) Hydraulic jacks exposed to freezing temperatures shall be supplied with an...

  19. Foreign body reaction after PLC reconstruction caused by a broken PLLA screw.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Kwon; Jeong, Tae-Wan; Lee, Dae-Hee

    2014-12-01

    Foreign body reactions may occur in patients who receive bioabsorbable implants during orthopedic surgery for fractures and ligament repair. The authors describe a 34-year-old man who presented with a palpable tender mass on the lateral aspect of the left knee of 1 month's duration. He underwent posterior cruciate ligament and posterolateral corner reconstruction 3 years earlier. Physical examination showed a 1×1-cm soft, nontender mass without localized warmth on the lateral epicondyle of the distal femur. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a broken screw fragment surrounded by a cyst-like mass. Under general anesthesia, the surgeon excised the screw fragment and the fibrotic mass, enclosing it in the subcutaneous tissue at the lateral epicondyle, the site at which a poly-L-lactic acid bioabsorbable screw had been inserted to fix the graft for posterolateral corner reconstruction. Histologic evaluation showed a foreign body reaction to the degraded screw particles. To the authors' knowledge, this report is the first description of a patient presenting with a delayed foreign body reaction to a broken poly-L-lactic acid bioabsorbable screw at the lateral femoral epicondyle after posterolateral corner reconstruction. Because delayed foreign body reactions can occur at any site of poly-L-lactic acid bioabsorbable screw insertion, care should be taken to avoid screw protrusion during ligament reconstruction because it can lead to screw breakage and delayed foreign body reaction.

  20. A comparative animal experimental study of differently dimensioned osteosynthesis screws used in the mid-face.

    PubMed

    Bähr, W; Lessing, R

    1993-12-01

    The soft tissue covering most of the midfacial skeleton is relatively thin. On account of this plates and screws of the 2 mm systems used in the osteosynthesis of this region can bulge and/or be palpable through the thin integument. This shortcoming has prompted the need to develop smaller systems. The present study was designed to investigate whether these more delicate systems are capable of withstanding the midfacial forces that come to bear during functional mastication. For the study a Le Fort I osteotomy was carried out in 10 sheep. The mobile maxilla was fixed with osteosynthesis plates and screws. This paper reports on 40 plates and 170 screws of two AO titanium systems. It compares the strength of 1.5 mm and 2.0 mm AO screws. The anchorage of the screws was assessed by evaluating the nature of contact between the screw and interfacial bone. The loaded screws showed no discernible differences in postoperative bone remodelling that could be correlated to the osteosynthesis systems. Although the experimental situation may not be directly comparable to the trauma or osteotomy case, this study lends credibility to the assumption that the 1.5 mm screw system could be used instead of the 2.0 mm system, even in mid-face areas associated with high masticatory loads.

  1. Thoracic Pedicle Screw Placement Guide Plate Produced by Three-Dimensional (3-D) Laser Printing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hongliang; Guo, Kaijing; Yang, Huilin; Wu, Dongying; Yuan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of an individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate produced by 3-D laser printing. Material/Methods Thoracic pedicle samples of 3 adult cadavers were randomly assigned for 3-D CT scans. The 3-D thoracic models were established by using medical Mimics software, and a screw path was designed with scanned data. Then the individualized thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate models, matched to the backside of thoracic vertebral plates, were produced with a 3-D laser printer. Screws were placed with assistance of a guide plate. Then, the placement was assessed. Results With the data provided by CT scans, 27 individualized guide plates were produced by 3-D printing. There was no significant difference in sex and relevant parameters of left and right sides among individuals (P>0.05). Screws were placed with assistance of guide plates, and all screws were in the correct positions without penetration of pedicles, under direct observation and anatomic evaluation post-operatively. Conclusions A thoracic pedicle screw placement guide plate can be produced by 3-D printing. With a high accuracy in placement and convenient operation, it provides a new method for accurate placement of thoracic pedicle screws. PMID:27194139

  2. A biomechanical study on fixation stability with twin hook or lag screw in artificial cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Olsson, O; Tanner, K E; Ceder, L; Ryd, L

    2002-01-01

    The twin hook has been developed as an alternative to the conventional lag screw to be combined with a barrelled side-plate in the treatment of trochanteric hip fractures. With two oppositely directed apical hooks introduced into the subchondral bone of the femoral head, the twin hook provides different stabilising properties to the lag screw. The femoral head purchase of the twin hook and the lag screw were compared in a biomechanical study using artificial cancellous bone, and responses to axial and torsional loading was determined. A distinct yield point in load and torque was noted for the lag screw, representing failure of the laminas supporting the threads. For the twin hook, gradual increase of load and torque occurred during impaction of the bone supporting the hooks. The peak loads and torques were higher for the lag screw, but were similar for both devices after 8 mm deformation. The stiffness was higher for the lag screw, but in counter-clockwise rotation the stiffness for the lag screw was negligible. The twin hook appeared to provide fixation stability comparable to that offered by the lag screw, but with conceivable advantages in terms of a deformation response involving bone impaction and gradually increasing stability.

  3. Determining the residence time distribution of various screw elements in a co-rotating twin-screw extruder by means of fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepschi, Alexander; Gerstorfer, Gregor; Miethlinger, Jürgen

    2015-05-01

    The Residence Time Distribution (RTD) is key to optimizing the mixing ability of an extruder. For both sensitive and reactive materials, it is important to know how long particles remain in the barrel and how long the polymer remains, for instance, in a kneading element. To assess the influence of different screw configurations on the RTD, a low-concentration tracer particle was injected into the feeding section and measured inline by fluorescence spectroscopy1 both inside the barrel and at the extruder exit. The measurements were conducted using polypropylene with different amounts of organic peroxide. Measuring the residence time at various positions along the screw allows the RTD to be determined for just one screw element. Furthermore, we show the influence of different screw configurations on the polydispersity of polypropylene.

  4. Are two retrograde 3.5 mm screws superior to one 7.3 mm screw for anterior pelvic ring fixation in bones with low bone mineral density?

    PubMed Central

    Zderic, I.; Grechenig, S.; Richards, R. G.; Schmitz, P.; Gueorguiev, B.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Osteosynthesis of anterior pubic ramus fractures using one large-diameter screw can be challenging in terms of both surgical procedure and fixation stability. Small-fragment screws have the advantage of following the pelvic cortex and being more flexible. The aim of the present study was to biomechanically compare retrograde intramedullary fixation of the superior pubic ramus using either one large- or two small-diameter screws. Materials and Methods A total of 12 human cadaveric hemipelvises were analysed in a matched pair study design. Bone mineral density of the specimens was 68 mgHA/cm3 (standard deviation (sd) 52). The anterior pelvic ring fracture was fixed with either one 7.3 mm cannulated screw (Group 1) or two 3.5 mm pelvic cortex screws (Group 2). Progressively increasing cyclic axial loading was applied through the acetabulum. Relative movements in terms of interfragmentary displacement and gap angle at the fracture site were evaluated by means of optical movement tracking. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was applied to identify significant differences between the groups Results Initial axial construct stiffness was not significantly different between the groups (p = 0.463). Interfragmentary displacement and gap angle at the fracture site were also not statistically significantly different between the groups throughout the evaluated cycles (p ⩾ 0.249). Similarly, cycles to failure were not statistically different between Group 1 (8438, sd 6968) and Group 2 (10 213, sd 10 334), p = 0.379. Failure mode in both groups was characterised by screw cutting through the cancellous bone. Conclusion From a biomechanical point of view, pubic ramus stabilisation with either one large or two small fragment screw osteosynthesis is comparable in osteoporotic bone. However, the two-screw fixation technique is less demanding as the smaller screws deflect at the cortical margins. Cite this article: Y. P. Acklin, I. Zderic, S. Grechenig, R. G. Richards, P

  5. Loosening Up the Uptight Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landsman, Julie

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on releasing students' creative impulses, their imaginations, and their memories. Discusses a set of reading and writing activities that have been used with all kinds of students in a wide variety of settings. (RS)

  6. Standing placement of transphyseal screw in the distal radius in 8 Thoroughbred yearlings

    PubMed Central

    Modesto, Rolf B.; Rodgerson, Dwayne H.; Masciarelli, Amanda E.; Spirito, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study describes placement of distal radial transphyseal screws in Thoroughbred yearlings with carpal varus deformities while standing, and identifes short- and long-term complications following the procedure. Data gathered from 2009 to 2013 identified 8 yearlings that met the inclusion criteria. Horses were sedated intravenously and a single 4.5-mm cortical screw was placed in the distal lateral radial physis following application of local anesthetic and surgical preparation of a pre-placed hole. All horses were evaluated weekly after surgery and screw removal was performed standing and under sedation when correction of the angular limb deformity was achieved. The mean time for screw removal was 46 days. No short- or long-term complications were identified. Findings indicate that placing a single transphyseal screw in the lateral aspect of the distal radial physis with the horse standing is a viable option to treat varus angular limb deformity of the carpus in horses. PMID:26028683

  7. Use of the channel fill level in defining a design space for twin screw wet granulation.

    PubMed

    Gorringe, L J; Kee, G S; Saleh, M F; Fa, N H; Elkes, R G

    2017-03-15

    Twin screw wet granulation is a key process in the continuous manufacture of oral solid dosage forms. Previous research has qualitatively suggested that the channel fill level influences the granules produced. In this paper a quantitative measure of the total volumetric fraction of the conveying element channels of the screw filled with powder (φ) was used. Experimental results are shown which demonstrate that very similar particle size distributions can be obtained at the same φ with the same material and screw configuration but radically different solids feed rates and screw speeds. Morphology of the granules also correlates with φ. This is consistent with previous observations in the literature correlating granule attributes with powder feed rate and screw speed but also considers the two parameters in combination. A process design space approach based on φ is proposed. This can be determined empirically, and potentially has value in setting process control strategies, assuring process robustness and allowing process flexibility during the product lifecycle.

  8. Evaluation of contributions of orthodontic mini-screw design factors based on FE analysis and the Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Li; Yu, Jian-Hong; Liu, Heng-Liang; Lin, Chih-Hao; Lin, Yang-Sung

    2010-08-10

    This study determines the relative effects of changes in bone/mini-screw osseointegration and mini-screw design factors (length, diameter, thread shape, thread depth, material, head diameter and head exposure length) on the biomechanical response of a single mini-screw insertion. Eighteen CAD and finite element (FE) models corresponding to a Taguchi L(18) array were constructed to perform numerical simulations to simulate mechanical responses of a mini-screw placed in a cylindrical bone. The Taguchi method was employed to determine the significance of each design factor in controlling strain. Simulation results indicated that mini-screw material, screw exposure length and screw diameter were the major factors affecting bone strain, with percentage contributions of 63%, 24% and 7%, respectively. Bone strain decreased obviously when screw material had the high elastic modulus of stainless/titanium alloys, a small exposure length and a large diameter. Other factors had no significant on bone strain. The FE analysis combined with the Taguchi method efficiently identified the relative contributions of several mini-screw design factors, indicating that using a strong stainless/titanium alloys as screw material is advantageous, and increase in mechanical stability can be achieved by reducing the screw exposure length. Simulation results also revealed that mini-screw and bone surface contact can provide sufficient mechanical retention to perform immediately load in clinical treatment.

  9. Evaluation of a new approach for modelling the screw-bone interface in a locking plate fixation: a corroboration study.

    PubMed

    Moazen, Mehran; Mak, Jonathan H; Jones, Alison C; Jin, Zhongmin; Wilcox, Ruth K; Tsiridis, Eleftherios

    2013-07-01

    Computational modelling of the screw-bone interface in fracture fixation constructs is challenging. While incorporating screw threads would be a more realistic representation of the physics, this approach can be computationally expensive. Several studies have instead suppressed the threads and modelled the screw shaft with fixed conditions assumed at the screw-bone interface. This study assessed the sensitivity of the computational results to modelling approaches at the screw-bone interface. A new approach for modelling this interface was proposed, and it was tested on two locking screw designs in a diaphyseal bridge plating configuration. Computational models of locked plating and far cortical locking constructs were generated and compared to in vitro models described in prior literature to corroborate the outcomes. The new approach led to closer agreement between the computational and the experimental stiffness data, while the fixed approach led to overestimation of the stiffness predictions. Using the new approach, the pattern of load distribution and the magnitude of the axial forces, experienced by each screw, were compared between the locked plating and far cortical locking constructs. The computational models suggested that under more severe loading conditions, far cortical locking screws might be under higher risk of screw pull-out than the locking screws. The proposed approach for modelling the screw-bone interface can be applied to any fixation involved application of screws.

  10. COMPLICATIONS OF THE SCREW/WASHER TIBIAL FIXATION TECHNIQUE FOR KNEE LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Alexandre; Roveda, Gilberto; Valin, Márcio Rangel; Almeida, Nayvaldo Couto de; Sartor, Vanderlei; Alves, Soraya Melina

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the presence of pain at the site of the surgical incision and the need to remove the tibial fixation screw in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction, in relation to sex and body mass index (BMI). Methods: A group of 265 patients who underwent ACL reconstruction with ipsilateral flexor tendon grafts from the thigh in which the tibial fixation technique consisted of using a cortical screw and metal washer, between July 2000 and November 2007, were evaluated. Results: 176 patients were evaluated for an average of 33.3 ± 19.5 months; median of 29.5 months; IIQ: 17-45 months; minimum of 8 and maximum of 87 months. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.272) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.633) between sexes. There was no statistical difference regarding complaints of pain at the site of the screw (p = 0.08) and the need to remove the tibial screw (p = 0.379) according to BMI. Conclusion: The pain complaint rate at the screw site from the screw and metal washer method used for tibial fixation in ACL reconstruction was of the order of 25%, and the screw had to be removed in 10.8% of the cases. There was no predominance of pain complaints at the surgical wound between the sexes. There was a greater tendency to complain about pain among patients with BMI < 25. There was no predominance of screw and washer removal between the sexes or between individuals with different BMIs. PMID:27022587

  11. Prevention of arthrofibrosis after arthroscopic screw fixation of tibial spine fracture in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Shital N; Myer, David; Eismann, Emily A

    2014-01-01

    Arthrofibrosis is a major complication of tibial spine fracture treatment in children, potentially resulting in knee pain, quadriceps weakness, altered gait, decreased function, inability to return to sports, and long-term osteoarthritis. Thus, prevention rather than treatment of arthrofibrosis is desirable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate an aggressive postoperative rehabilitation and early intervention approach to prevent permanent arthrofibrosis after tibial spine fracture treatment and to compare epiphyseal and transphyseal screws for fixation. A consecutive series of 24 patients younger than age 18 with displaced type II and III tibial spine fractures who underwent arthroscopic reduction and screw fixation between 2006 and 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Final range of motion was compared between patients with epiphyseal (n=12) and transphyseal (n=9) screws. One-third (4 of 12) of patients with epiphyseal screws underwent arthroscopic debridement and screw removal approximately 3 months postoperatively; 3 patients lacked 5° to 15° of extension, 1 experienced pain with extension, and 1 had radiographic evidence of screw pullout, loss of reduction, and resultant malunion. In the transphyseal screw group, 3 patients had 10° loss of extension, and all corrected after arthroscopic debridement and screw removal. The two groups did not significantly differ in time to hardware removal or return to sports or final range of motion. No growth disturbances were identified in patients after transphyseal screw removal. An aggressive approach of postoperative rehabilitation and early intervention after arthroscopic reduction and screw fixation of tibial spine fractures in children was successful in preventing permanent arthrofibrosis.

  12. Prosopis pubescens (screw bean mesquite) seedlings are hyperaccumulators of copper.

    PubMed

    Zappala, Marian N; Ellzey, Joanne T; Bader, Julia; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge

    2013-08-01

    Due to health reasons, toxic metals must be removed from soils contaminated by mine tailings and smelter activities. The phytoremediation potential of Prosopis pubescens (screw bean mesquite) was examined by use of inductively-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe ultrastructural changes of parenchymal cells of leaves in the presence of copper. Elemental analysis was used to localize copper within leaves. A 600-ppm copper sulfate exposure to seedlings for 24 days resulted in 31,000 ppm copper in roots, 17,000 ppm in stems, 11,000 in cotyledons and 20 ppm in the true leaves. For a plant to be considered a hyperaccumulator, the plant must accumulate a leaf-to-root ratio <1. Screw bean mesquite exposed to copper had a leaf-to-root ratio of 0.355 when cotyledons were included. We showed that P. pubescens grown in soil is a hyperaccumulator of copper. We recommend that this plant should be field tested.

  13. Accuracy and complications of transpedicular C2 screw placement without the use of spinal navigation.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Christian-Andreas; Roesseler, Lukas; Podlogar, Martin; Kovacs, Attlila; Kristof, Rudolf Andreas

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the study was to describe the technique, accuracy of placement and complications of transpedicular C2 screw fixation without spinal navigation. Patients treated by C2 pedicle screw fixations were identified from the surgical log book of the department. Clinical data were extracted retrospectively from the patients' charts. Pedicle screw placement accuracy was assessed on postoperative CT scans according to Gertzbein and Robbins (GRGr). A total of 27 patients were included in the study. The mean age of the patients was 56 +/- 22.0 years; 51.9% of them were female. As much as 17 patients suffered from trauma, 5 of degenerative disease, 3 of inflammations and 2 of metastatic disease. A total of 47 C2 transpedicular screw fixations were performed. The canulated screws were inserted under visual control following the preparation of the superior surface of the isthmus and of the medial surface of the pedicles of the C2. Intraoperative fluoroscopy was additionally used. The postoperative CT findings showed in 55.3% GRGr 1, in 27.7% GRGr 2, in 10.6% GRGr 3, and in 6.3% GRGr 4 pedicle screw insertion accuracy. Screw insertions GRGr 5 were not observed. Screw malpositioning (i.e., GRGr 3 and 4) was significantly associated with thin (<5 mm) pedicle diameters and with surgery for C2 fractures. In the three patients with screw insertions GRGr 4, postoperative angiographies were performed to exclude vertebral artery affections. In one of these three cases, the screw caused a clinically asymptomatic vertebral artery compression. Hardware failures did not occur. In one patient, postoperative pneumonia resulted in the death of the patient. Careful patient selection and surgical technique is necessary to avoid vertebral artery injury in C2 pedicle screw fixation without spinal navigation. A slight opening of the vertebral artery canal (Gertzbein and Robbins grade < or =3) does not seem to put the artery at risk. However, the high rate of misplaced screws when

  14. Individualized 3D printing navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in upper cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Fei; Dai, Jianhao; Zhang, Junxiang; Ma, Yichuan; Zhu, Guanghui; Shen, Junjie; Niu, Guoqi

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine is a difficult and high-risk procedure. The screw is difficult to place rapidly and accurately, and can lead to serious injury of spinal cord or vertebral artery. The aim of this study was to design an individualized 3D printing navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine. Methods Using CT thin slices data, we employed computer software to design the navigation template for pedicle screw fixation in the upper cervical spine (atlas and axis). The upper cervical spine models and navigation templates were produced by 3D printer with equal proportion, two sets for each case. In one set (Test group), pedicle screws fixation were guided by the navigation template; in the second set (Control group), the screws were fixed under fluoroscopy. According to the degree of pedicle cortex perforation and whether the screw needed to be refitted, the fixation effects were divided into 3 types: Type I, screw is fully located within the vertebral pedicle; Type II, degree of pedicle cortex perforation is <1 mm, but with good internal fixation stability and no need to renovate; Type III, degree of pedicle cortex perforation is >1 mm or with the poor internal fixation stability and in need of renovation. Type I and Type II were acceptable placements; Type III placements were unacceptable. Results A total of 19 upper cervical spine and 19 navigation templates were printed, and 37 pedicle screws were fixed in each group. Type I screw-placements in the test group totaled 32; Type II totaled 3; and Type III totaled 2; with an acceptable rate of 94.60%. Type I screw placements in the control group totaled 23; Type II totaled 3; and Type III totaled 11, with an acceptable rate of 70.27%. The acceptability rate in test group was higher than the rate in control group. The operation time and fluoroscopic frequency for each screw were decreased, compared with control group. Conclusion The individualized 3D

  15. Modeling flow, melting, solid conveying and global behavior in intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extruders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Qibo

    Intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extruders are widely applied in polymer processing industry, especially in compounding and PVC profile processing. However, the design of this type of machines is generally based on experiences and error-and-try. In addition, most of the investigations on intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extruders were made on the melt conveying region. There is a lack of adequate study on a complete extrusion process to this type of machines. In this study, models were developed to simulate the extrusion processes, including solid conveying, melting and metering, evaluate the performance of intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extruders, and optimize the design of machines and operating conditions. Experiments were carried out on a laboratory modular intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extruder to observe solid conveying, the melting process and the global behavior of this type of machine. The solid bed is formed in the solid conveying region. The inter-screw region plays a dominant role in the melting process. Based on our observations, models were developed to describe both the solid conveying and the melting process. Based on hydrodynamic lubrication theory, a melt conveying model was developed to characterize the pumping capacity of screw elements in intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extruders. The effect of screw channel aspect ratio (screw channel depth/width) was incorporated into the melt conveying model to improve the prediction of screw pumping capacity. Calculations were made to investigate the effect of geometrical parameter on screw pumping capacity. Models of solid conveying, the melting process and melt conveying were integrated together and a global composite model was developed to characterize the whole intermeshing counter-rotating twin screw extrusion process. The global model is intended for both flood fed and metered starved fed conditions. This is the first composite model designed for this type

  16. Efficacy of Osteoconductive Ceramics in Bioresorbable Screws for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Johannes; Akritopoulos, Panagiotis; Graveleau, Nicolas; Barthelemy, Renaud; Toanen, Cécile; Saffarini, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteoconductive additives are used in resorbable interference screws for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction to improve graft incorporation and mitigate adverse effects. There are no published studies that compare biological performances of bioresorbable and biocomposite screws without artifacts due to different follow-up times and intrinsic patient characteristics. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of osteoconductive agents in bioresorbable screws for ACL reconstruction at minimum follow-up of 2 years by intrapatient comparison. The hypothesis was that osteoconductive ceramics would result in slower resorption, improved ossification, and less tunnel widening. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 28 ACL reconstructions at 2 centers were randomly assigned into 2 comparable groups: (1) the graft was fixed in the tibia using standard bioresorbable screws and in the femur using biocomposite screws with osteoconductive agents (biphasic calcium phosphate), and (2) the graft was fixed in the femur using a standard bioresorbable screw and in the tibia using a biocomposite screw with osteoconductive agents. Results: Twenty-seven patients completed evaluations at 29.9 ± 4.0 months. Resorption was complete for more bioresorbable (81%) than biocomposite (37%) screws (P = .0029), whereas satisfactory ossification was observed in more biocomposite (52%) than bioresorbable (15%) screws (P = .0216). The tunnel shape was normal in more biocomposite (81%) than bioresorbable (48%) screws (P = .0126), and marked cortical formation was twice more frequent for biocomposite (78%) than bioresorbable (37%) screws (P = .0012). Bioresorbable screws exhibited faster resorption in the femur (P = .0202) but not in the tibia (not significant). Conversely, biocomposite screws demonstrated better ossification, less tunnel widening, and more cortical formation in the tibia (P < .0001, P = .0227, and P

  17. Unilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation with Bone Graft vs. Bilateral Pedicle Screw Fixation with Bone Graft or Cage: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Si-Dong; Chen, Qian; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Qiang; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Shen, Yong; Yang, Da-Long

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to explore the clinical efficacy of unilateral pedicle screw fixation with bone graft (UPSFB) in treating single-segment lumbar degenerative diseases (LDD), as compared to bilateral pedicle screw fixation with bone graft (BPSFB) or with cage (BPSFC). Material/Methods Medical records were retrospectively collected between 01/2010 and 02/2015 in Longyao County Hospital. According to surgical methods used, all patients were divided into 3 groups: UPSFB group, BPSFB group, and BPSFC group. Clinical outcomes were evaluated by blood loss, blood transfusion, duration of operation, hospital stay, postoperative complications, interbody fusion rate, reoperation rate, medical expenses, patient satisfaction survey, and JOA score. Results Ninety-five patients were included and underwent 2.5-year follow-up, with 7 patients lost to regular follow-up. As compared to the BPSFB group and BPSFC group, the UPSFB group had less blood loss and less blood transfusion, as well as shorter hospital stay (p<0.05). Medical expenses were far lower in the UPSFB group (p<0.001). There were no significant differences among the 3 groups in postoperative complications, interbody fusion rate, reoperation rate, JOA score, and patient satisfaction (all p>0.05). Conclusions As compared to BPSFB and BPSFC, UPSFB has the same reliability and effectiveness in treating single-segment LDD with unilateral radicular symptoms in a single lower extremity, with the additional advantage being less expensive. PMID:26988532

  18. The biomechanical effect of artificial and human bone density on stopping and stripping torque during screw insertion.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Matthew; Crookshank, Meghan; Olsen, Michael; Schemitsch, Emil H; Zdero, Rad

    2013-06-01

    Orthopedic surgeons apply torque to metal screws manually by "subjective feel" to obtain adequate fracture fixation, i.e. stopping torque, and attempt to avoid accidental over-tightening that leads to screw-bone interface failure, i.e. stripping torque. Few studies have quantified stripping torque in human bone, and only one older study from 1980 reported stopping/ stripping torque ratio. The present aim was to measure stopping and stripping torque of cortical and cancellous screws in artificial and human bone over a wide range of densities. Sawbone blocks were obtained having densities from 0.08 to 0.80g/cm(3). Sixteen fresh-frozen human femurs of known standardized bone mineral density (sBMD) were also used. Using a torque screwdriver, 3.5-mm diameter cortical screws and 6.5-mm diameter cancellous screws were inserted for adequate tightening as determined subjectively by an orthopedic surgeon, i.e. stopping torque, and then further tightened until failure of the screw-bone interface, i.e. stripping torque. There were weak (R=0.25) to strong (R=0.99) linear correlations of absolute and normalized torque vs. density or sBMD. Maximum stopping torques normalized by screw thread area engaged by the host material were 15.2N/mm (cortical screws) and 13.4N/mm (cancellous screws) in sawbone blocks and 20.9N/mm (cortical screws) and 6.1N/mm (cancellous screws) in human femurs. Maximum stripping torques normalized by screw thread area engaged by the host material were 23.4N/mm (cortical screws) and 16.8N/mm (cancellous screws) in sawbone blocks and 29.3N/mm (cortical screws) and 8.3N/mm (cancellous screws) in human femurs. Combined average stopping/ stripping torque ratios were 80.8% (cortical screws) and 76.8% (cancellous screws) in sawbone blocks, as well as 66.6% (cortical screws) and 84.5% (cancellous screws) in human femurs. Surgeons should be aware of stripping torque limits for human femurs and monitor stopping torque during surgery. This is the first study of the

  19. Spinal pedicle screw planning using deformable atlas registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerres, J.; Uneri, A.; De Silva, T.; Ketcha, M.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Jacobson, M.; Vogt, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Osgood, G.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2017-04-01

    Spinal screw placement is a challenging task due to small bone corridors and high risk of neurological or vascular complications, benefiting from precision guidance/navigation and quality assurance (QA). Implicit to both guidance and QA is the definition of a surgical plan—i.e. the desired trajectories and device selection for target vertebrae—conventionally requiring time-consuming manual annotations by a skilled surgeon. We propose automation of such planning by deriving the pedicle trajectory and device selection from a patient’s preoperative CT or MRI. An atlas of vertebrae surfaces was created to provide the underlying basis for automatic planning—in this work, comprising 40 exemplary vertebrae at three levels of the spine (T7, T8, and L3). The atlas was enriched with ideal trajectory annotations for 60 pedicles in total. To define trajectories for a given patient, sparse deformation fields from the atlas surfaces to the input (CT or MR image) are applied on the annotated trajectories. Mean value coordinates are used to interpolate dense deformation fields. The pose of a straight trajectory is optimized by image-based registration to an accumulated volume of the deformed annotations. For evaluation, input deformation fields were created using coherent point drift (CPD) to perform a leave-one-out analysis over the atlas surfaces. CPD registration demonstrated surface error of 0.89  ±  0.10 mm (median  ±  interquartile range) for T7/T8 and 1.29  ±  0.15 mm for L3. At the pedicle center, registered trajectories deviated from the expert reference by 0.56  ±  0.63 mm (T7/T8) and 1.12  ±  0.67 mm (L3). The predicted maximum screw diameter differed by 0.45  ±  0.62 mm (T7/T8), and 1.26  ±  1.19 mm (L3). The automated planning method avoided screw collisions in all cases and demonstrated close agreement overall with expert reference plans, offering a potentially valuable tool in support

  20. Effect of cortical thickness and cancellous bone density on the holding strength of internal fixator screws.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, J; Goldhahn, J; Städele, H; Messmer, P; Morlock, M M; Schneider, E

    2004-11-01

    Internal fixators are a new class of implants designed to preserve the periosteal blood supply of the bone. In contrast to conventional plate fixation in which the screws have spherical heads and are loaded mainly by axial pullout forces, screws in internal fixators are "locked" within the plate and therefore subjected to axial as well as bending loads. In this study the ultimate loads of screws of a commercially available internal fixator system were tested in a pullout (n = 72) and cantilever bending mode (n = 72) in metaphyseal and diaphyseal regions of four pairs of human tibiae with different bone qualities. Cortical thickness and cancellous bone density were determined at the screw insertion sites. Stepwise multiple linear regression revealed that cortical thickness and cancellous density can explain 93% and 98% of the variance of the ultimate load of the screws in an axial pullout and cantilever bending mode. Screws in internal fixators are better suited to transmit shear forces and thereby make better use of the strength potential of bone than screws used in conventional plate fixation: this is especially advantageous when bone strength is reduced, e.g. due to osteoporosis.