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Sample records for abwr advanced boiling

  1. ABWR (advanced boiling water reactor) Design Verification Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, J.N.

    1990-10-01

    The ABWR Design Verification Program is aimed at restoring confidence in the US licensing process by demonstrating its workability by obtaining USNRC preapproval of GE's ABWR Standard Plant. The purpose of this work is to achieve full NRC approval of the ABWR through the award of an NRC Staff final design approval (FDA) and design certification. The approach is to (1) establish a licensing basis with the NRC Staff for the ABWR, (2) prepare and submit, for NRC Staff review, an SSAR to obtain an FDA, and (3) participate in a rulemaking process to obtain certification of the ABWR design. This program was initiated August 27, 1986. This report, the fourth annual progress report, summarizes progress on this program from October 1, 1989 through September 30, 1990. 9 refs., 5 tabs.

  2. Study of plutonium disposition using the GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR)

    SciTech Connect

    1994-04-30

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the U.S. to disposition 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in parallel with a similar program in Russia. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} identified light water reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a U.S. disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a 1350 MWe GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. The ABWR represents the integration of over 30 years of experience gained worldwide in the design, construction and operation of BWRs. It incorporates advanced features to enhance reliability and safety, minimize waste and reduce worker exposure. For example, the core is never uncovered nor is any operator action required for 72 hours after any design basis accident. Phase 1 of this study was documented in a GE report dated May 13, 1993. DOE`s Phase 1 evaluations cited the ABWR as a proven technical approach for the disposition of plutonium. This Phase 2 study addresses specific areas which the DOE authorized as appropriate for more in-depth evaluations. A separate report addresses the findings relative to the use of existing BWRs to achieve the same goal.

  3. 75 FR 10840 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR will hold a meeting on March 18... 3, 2010. Antonio F. Dias, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch B, Advisory Committee on Reactor...

  4. 75 FR 7632 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) The ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR will hold a meeting on March 2, 2010, at 11545...: February 12, 2010. Antonio F. Dias, Chief Reactor Safety Branch B, Advisory Committee on Reactor...

  5. 75 FR 32229 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) will hold a meeting on June 23-24, 2010, Room...

  6. 75 FR 57536 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) will hold a meeting on October 20, 2010, Room...

  7. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-13

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

  8. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 52 - Design Certification Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Water Reactor A Appendix A to Part 52 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES... Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor I. Introduction Appendix A constitutes the standard design certification for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) design, in accordance with 10 CFR...

  9. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 52 - Design Certification Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Water Reactor A Appendix A to Part 52 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSES... Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor I. Introduction Appendix A constitutes the standard design certification for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) design, in accordance with 10 CFR...

  10. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor design. Supplement 1

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This report supplements the final safety evaluation report (FSER) for the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design. The FSER was issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff as NUREG-1503 in July 1994 to document the NRC staff`s review of the US ABWR design. The US ABWR design was submitted by GE Nuclear Energy (GE) in accordance with the procedures of Subpart B to Part 52 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations. This supplement documents the NRC staff`s review of the changes to the US ABWR design documentation since the issuance of the FSER. GE made these changes primarily as a result of first-of-a-kind-engineering (FOAKE) and as a result of the design certification rulemaking for the ABWR design. On the basis of its evaluations, the NRC staff concludes that the confirmatory issues in NUREG-1503 are resolved, that the changes to the ABWR design documentation are acceptable, and that GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B to 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR design.

  11. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 1: Main report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  12. Final safety evaluation report related to the certification of the advanced boiling water reactor design. Volume 2: Appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) documents the technical review of the US Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard design by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff. The application for the ABWR design was initially submitted by the General Electric Company, now GE Nuclear Energy (GE), in accordance with the procedures of Appendix O of Part 50 of Title 10 of the code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR Part 50). Later GE requested that its application be considered as an application for design approval and subsequent design certification pursuant to 10 CFR {section} 52.45. The ABWR is a single-cycle, forced-circulation, boiling water reactor (BWR) with a rated power of 3,926 megawatts thermal (MWt) and a design power of 4,005 MWt. To the extent feasible and appropriate, the staff relied on earlier reviews for those ABWR design features that are substantially the same as those previously considered. Unique features of the ABWR design include internal recirculation pumps, fine-motion control rod drives, microprocessor-based digital logic and control systems, and digital safety systems. On the basis of its evaluation and independent analyses, the NRC staff concludes that, subject to satisfactory resolution of the confirmatory items identified in Section 1.8 of this SER, GE`s application for design certification meets the requirements of Subpart B of 10 CFR Part 52 that are applicable and technically relevant to the US ABWR standard design.

  13. IGL: Internal Gap Lattice for ABWR-II Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kouji Hiraiwa; Yamato Hayashi; Yasushi Yamamoto; Miyuki Akiba; Takafumi Anegawa; Hiroyuki Okada

    2002-07-01

    An internal gap lattice (IGL) bundle is currently being developed under the joint study of TEPCO and Toshiba corporation for advanced boiling water reactor II (ABWR-II). IGL bundle has four sub-bundles and has a cruciform steam flow area in a center of the bundle. The IGL bundle shows favorable thermal hydraulic characteristics and reactivity performance. The reactivity performances and equilibrium core performance was evaluated based on the representative large bundle design established in ABWR-II project. By adopting the IGL design,both the reactivity in hot operation and cold shut down margin increased. In addition, absolute value of void coefficient decreased. (authors)

  14. Development of Advanced Concept for Shortening Construction Period of ABWR Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroshi Ijichi; Toshio Yamashita; Masahiro Tsutagawa; Hiroya Mori; Nobuaki Ooshima; Jun Miura; Minoru Kanechika; Nobuaki Miura

    2002-07-01

    Construction of a nuclear power plant (NPP) requires a very long period because of large amount of construction materials and many issues for negotiation among multiple sections. Shortening the construction period advances the date of return on an investment, and can also result in reduced construction cost. Therefore, the study of this subject has a very high priority for utilities. We achieved a construction period of 37 months from the first concrete work to fuel loading (F/L) (51.5 months from the inspection of the foundation (I/F) to the start of commercial operation (C/O)) at the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPPs No. 6 and 7 (KK-6/7), which are the first ABWR plants in the world. At TEPCO's next plant, we think that a construction period of less than 36 months (45 months from I/F to C/O) can be realized based on conventional methods such as early start of equipment installation and blocking of equipment to be brought in advance. Furthermore, we are studying the feasibility of a 21.5-month construction period (30 months from I/F to C/O) with advanced ideas and methods. The important concepts for a 21.5-month construction period are adoption of a new building structure that is the steel plate reinforced concrete (SC) structure and promotion of extensive modularization of equipment and building structure. With introducing these new concepts, we are planning the master schedule (M/S) and finding solutions to conflicts in the schedule of area release from building construction work to equipment installation work (schedule-conflicts.) In this report, we present the shortest construction period and an effective method to put it into practice for the conventional general arrangement (GA) of ABWR. In the future, we will continue the study on the improvement of building configuration and arrangements, and make clear of the concept for large composite modules of building structures and equipment. (authors)

  15. 77 FR 76089 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR... Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  16. 76 FR 18585 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water...

  17. A Compilation of Boiling Water Reactor Operational Experience for the United Kingdom's Office for Nuclear Regulation's Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Generic Design Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Timothy A.; Liao, Huafei

    2014-12-01

    United States nuclear power plant Licensee Event Reports (LERs), submitted to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under law as required by 10 CFR 50.72 and 50.73 were evaluated for reliance to the United Kingdom’s Health and Safety Executive – Office for Nuclear Regulation’s (ONR) general design assessment of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) design. An NRC compendium of LERs, compiled by Idaho National Laboratory over the time period January 1, 2000 through March 31, 2014, were sorted by BWR safety system and sorted into two categories: those events leading to a SCRAM, and those events which constituted a safety system failure. The LERs were then evaluated as to the relevance of the operational experience to the ABWR design.

  18. 75 FR 80854 - Toshiba Corporation; Acceptance for Docketing of an Application for Renewal of the U.S. Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... Boiling Water Reactor Design Certification On November 2, 2010, Toshiba Corporation (Toshiba) submitted an....S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) in accordance with the requirements contained in 10...

  19. 75 FR 66803 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on ABWR will hold a meeting...

  20. Application of the DG-1199 methodology to the ESBWR and ABWR.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Walton, Fotini

    2010-09-01

    Appendix A-5 of Draft Regulatory Guide DG-1199 'Alternative Radiological Source Term for Evaluating Design Basis Accidents at Nuclear Power Reactors' provides guidance - applicable to RADTRAD MSIV leakage models - for scaling containment aerosol concentration to the expected steam dome concentration in order to preserve the simplified use of the Accident Source Term (AST) in assessing containment performance under assumed design basis accident (DBA) conditions. In this study Economic and Safe Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) RADTRAD models are developed using the DG-1199, Appendix A-5 guidance. The models were run using RADTRAD v3.03. Low Population Zone (LPZ), control room (CR), and worst-case 2-hr Exclusion Area Boundary (EAB) doses were calculated and compared to the relevant accident dose criteria in 10 CFR 50.67. For the ESBWR, the dose results were all lower than the MSIV leakage doses calculated by General Electric/Hitachi (GEH) in their licensing technical report. There are no comparable ABWR MSIV leakage doses, however, it should be noted that the ABWR doses are lower than the ESBWR doses. In addition, sensitivity cases were evaluated to ascertain the influence/importance of key input parameters/features of the models.

  1. 76 FR 34276 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) will hold a meeting on June 21, 2011, Room T-2B1,...

  2. 78 FR 37595 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR.... Kathy Weaver, Acting Chief, Technical Support Branch, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards....

  3. 76 FR 5218 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR); Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor... inconvenience. Dated: January 24, 2011. Antonio Dias, Chief, Reactor Safety Branch B, Advisory Committee...

  4. 77 FR 59678 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS), Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR... Branch, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  5. 78 FR 20959 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS); Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) will hold a meeting.... Antonio Dias, Technical Advisor, Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards. BILLING CODE 7590-01-P...

  6. Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs.

  7. Advances in shell side boiling of refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Ralph L.

    The design of shell and tube evaporators used in air conditioning and refrigeration applications is discussed. The heat exchanger geometry of interest involves evaporation or condensation on the shell side of a horizontal tube bundle. Enhanced heat transfer geometries are typically used for shell side evaporation and for forced convection to water on the tube side. Refrigerant boiling data and forced convection refrigerant boiling correlations are described. The refrigerants of interest include R-11, 12, 22, 123, and 134a. Thermal design methods for sizing of the evaporator and condenser are outlined. A computer model for prediction of the evaporator performance is described.

  8. Boils

    MedlinePlus

    ... the boil is very bad or comes back. Antibacterial soaps and creams cannot help much once a boil ... following may help prevent the spread of infection: Antibacterial soaps Antiseptic (germ-killing) washes Keeping clean (such as ...

  9. Boils

    MedlinePlus

    ... or recurrent boils, which are usually due to Staph infections. The bacteria are picked up somewhere and then ... version of boils is folliculitis . This is an infection of hair follicles, usually with Staph bacteria. These often itch more than hurt. The ...

  10. 76 FR 61118 - Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor...

  11. Boiling and quenching heat transfer advancement by nanoscale surface modification.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hong; Xu, Cheng; Zhao, Yang; Ziegler, Kirk J; Chung, J N

    2017-07-21

    All power production, refrigeration, and advanced electronic systems depend on efficient heat transfer mechanisms for achieving high power density and best system efficiency. Breakthrough advancement in boiling and quenching phase-change heat transfer processes by nanoscale surface texturing can lead to higher energy transfer efficiencies, substantial energy savings, and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. This paper reports breakthrough advancements on both fronts of boiling and quenching. The critical heat flux (CHF) in boiling and the Leidenfrost point temperature (LPT) in quenching are the bottlenecks to the heat transfer advancements. As compared to a conventional aluminum surface, the current research reports a substantial enhancement of the CHF by 112% and an increase of the LPT by 40 K using an aluminum surface with anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) nanoporous texture finish. These heat transfer enhancements imply that the power density would increase by more than 100% and the quenching efficiency would be raised by 33%. A theory that links the nucleation potential of the surface to heat transfer rates has been developed and it successfully explains the current finding by revealing that the heat transfer modification and enhancement are mainly attributed to the superhydrophilic surface property and excessive nanoscale nucleation sites created by the nanoporous surface.

  12. The Advanced BWR Nuclear Plant: Safe, economic nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    Redding, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    The safety and economics of Advanced BWR Nuclear Power Plants are outlined. The topics discussed include: ABWR Programs: status in US and Japan; ABWR competitiveness: safety and economics; SBWR status; combining ABWR and SBWR: the passive ABWR; and Korean/GE partnership.

  13. 77 FR 3009 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... COMMISSION Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors..., ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors.'' DATES... developed using this Catalog along with the Operator Licensing Examination Standards for Power Reactors...

  14. ATWS Analysis with an Advanced Boiling Curve Approach within COBRA 3-CP

    SciTech Connect

    Gensler, A.; Knoll, A.; Kuehnel, K.

    2007-07-01

    In 2005 the German Reactor Safety Commission issued specific requirements on core coolability demonstration for PWR ATWS (anticipated transients without scram). Thereupon AREVA NP performed detailed analyses for all German PWRs. For a German KONVOI plant the results of an ATWS licensing analysis are presented. The plant dynamic behavior is calculated with NLOOP, while the hot channel analysis is performed with the thermal hydraulic computer code COBRA 3-CP. The application of the fuel rod model included in COBRA 3-CP is essential for this type of analysis. Since DNB (departure from nucleate boiling) occurs, the advanced post DNB model (advanced boiling curve approach) of COBRA 3-CP is used. The results are compared with those gained with the standard BEEST model. The analyzed ATWS case is the emergency power case 'loss of main heat sink with station service power supply unavailable'. Due to the decreasing coolant flow rate during the transient the core attains film boiling conditions. The results of the hot channel analysis strongly depend on the performance of the boiling curve model. The BEEST model is based on pool boiling conditions whereas typical PWR conditions - even in most transients - are characterized by forced flow for which the advanced boiling curve approach is particularly suitable. Compared with the BEEST model the advanced boiling curve approach in COBRA 3-CP yields earlier rewetting, i.e. a shorter period in film boiling. Consequently, the fuel rod cladding temperatures, that increase significantly due to film boiling, drop back earlier and the high temperature oxidation is significantly diminished. The Baker-Just-Correlation was used to calculate the value of equivalent cladding reacted (ECR), i.e. the reduction of cladding thickness due to corrosion throughout the transient. Based on the BEEST model the ECR value amounts to 0.4% whereas the advanced boiling curve only leads to an ECR value of 0.2%. Both values provide large margins to the 17

  15. Cork boiling wastewater treatment and reuse through combination of advanced oxidation technologies.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Robles, L; Miralles-Cuevas, S; Oller, I; Agüera, A; Trinidad-Lozano, M J; Yuste, F J; Malato, S

    2016-08-12

    Industrial preparation of cork consists of its immersion for approximately 1 hour in boiling water. The use of herbicides and pesticides in oak tree forests leads to absorption of these compounds by cork; thus, after boiling process, they are present in wastewater. Cork boiling wastewater shows low biodegradability and high acute toxicity involving partial inhibition of their biodegradation when conventional biological treatment is applied. In this work, a treatment line strategy based on the combination of advanced physicochemical technologies is proposed. The final objective is the reuse of wastewater in the cork boiling process; thus, reducing consumption of fresh water in the industrial process itself. Coagulation pre-treatment with 0.5 g/L of FeCl3 attained the highest turbidity elimination (86 %) and 29 % of DOC elimination. Similar DOC removal was attained when using 1 g/L of ECOTAN BIO (selected for ozonation tests), accompanied of 64 % of turbidity removal. Ozonation treatments showed less efficiency in the complete oxidation of cork boiling wastewater, compared to solar photo-Fenton process, under the studied conditions. Nanofiltration system was successfully employed as a final purification step with the aim of obtaining a high-quality reusable permeate stream. Monitoring of unknown compounds by LC-QTOF-MS allowed the qualitative evaluation of the whole process. Acute and chronic toxicity as well as biodegradability assays were performed throughout the whole proposed treatment line.

  16. Piping benchmark problems for the General Electric Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J.; Wang, Y.K.

    1993-08-01

    To satisfy the need for verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for an advanced boiling water reactor standard design, three benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the advanced reactor standard design. It will be required that the combined license holders demonstrate that their solutions to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set.

  17. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 52 - Design Certification Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 50.2 or 52.1, or Section 11 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, as applicable. III. Scope... controls. E. Design activities for structures, systems, and components that are wholly outside the scope of... determined that the structures, systems, components, and design features of the U.S. ABWR design comply with...

  18. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 52 - Design Certification Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 50.2 or 52.1, or Section 11 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, as applicable. III. Scope... structures, systems, and components that are wholly outside the scope of this appendix may be performed using... structures, systems, components, and design features of the U.S. ABWR design, as contained in the GE DCD...

  19. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 52 - Design Certification Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 50.2 or 52.1, or Section 11 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, as applicable. III. Scope... structures, systems, and components that are wholly outside the scope of this appendix may be performed using... structures, systems, components, and design features of the U.S. ABWR design, as contained in the GE DCD...

  20. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    SciTech Connect

    1993-09-15

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval.

  1. Numerical Evaluation of Fluid Mixing Phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor Using Advanced Interface Tracking Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki

    Thermal-hydraulic design of the current boiling water reactor (BWR) is performed with the subchannel analysis codes which incorporated the correlations based on empirical results including actual-size tests. Then, for the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) core, an actual size test of an embodiment of its design is required to confirm or modify such correlations. In this situation, development of a method that enables the thermal-hydraulic design of nuclear reactors without these actual size tests is desired, because these tests take a long time and entail great cost. For this reason, we developed an advanced thermal-hydraulic design method for FLWRs using innovative two-phase flow simulation technology. In this study, a detailed Two-Phase Flow simulation code using advanced Interface Tracking method: TPFIT is developed to calculate the detailed information of the two-phase flow. In this paper, firstly, we tried to verify the TPFIT code by comparing it with the existing 2-channel air-water mixing experimental results. Secondary, the TPFIT code was applied to simulation of steam-water two-phase flow in a model of two subchannels of a current BWRs and FLWRs rod bundle. The fluid mixing was observed at a gap between the subchannels. The existing two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing is evaluated using detailed numerical simulation data. This data indicates that pressure difference between fluid channels is responsible for the fluid mixing, and thus the effects of the time average pressure difference and fluctuations must be incorporated in the two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing. When inlet quality ratio of subchannels is relatively large, it is understood that evaluation precision of the existing two-phase flow correlations for fluid mixing are relatively low.

  2. Microgravity experiments on boiling and applications: research activity of advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koichi; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    Research and development on advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices has been carried out as the Project of Fundamental Technology Development for Energy Conservation, promoted by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO). Based on the microgravity experiments on boiling heat transfer, the following useful results have obtained for the cooling of electronic devices. In subcooled flow boiling in a small channel, heat flux increases considerably more than the ordinary critical heat flux with microbubble emission in transition boiling, and dry out of the heating surface is disturbed. Successful enhancement of heat transfer is achieved by a capillary effect from grooved surface dual subchannels on the liquid supply. The critical heat flux increases 30-40 percent more than for ordinary subchannels. A self-wetting mechanism has been proposed, following investigation of bubble behavior in pool boiling of binary mixtures under microgravity. Ideas and a new concept have been proposed for the design of future cooling system in power electronics.

  3. Sliding mode control application in ABWR plant pressure regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhengyu; Edwards, Robert M.

    2002-07-01

    A sliding mode controller is designed for an ABWR nuclear power plant turbine throttle pressure regulation. To avoid chattering problem, which is common to conventional sliding mode controllers, and estimation of uncertainties and disturbances, the recursive-form sliding mode control algorithm is developed. To apply the sliding mode control technique, the original plant's 11.-order dynamics model is first transformed to a canonical form differential equation of a relative order of 2 for turbine throttle pressure's dynamics. Simulation results show that the design objectives are achieved and the resulting controller is superior to the existing PI controller in many aspects, including settling time, overshoot/undershoot in response to setpoint step input and fluctuation amplitude in the presence of external disturbances. (authors)

  4. Results of an Advanced Development Zero Boil-Off Cryogenic Propellant Storage Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David

    2004-01-01

    A zero boil-off (ZBO) cryogenic propellant storage concept was recently tested in a thermally relevant low-earth orbit environment, an important development in the effort to apply this concept to flight projects. Previous efforts documented the benefits of ZBO for launch vehicle upper stages in a low-earth orbit (LEO). Central to that analysis is a ZBO Cryogenic Analysis Tool that estimates the performance of each component and the ZBO system. This test is essential to the validation of that tool, and was the first flight representative configuration tested in a thermally representative environment. The test article was comprised of a spherical 1.4 m diameter insulated propellant tank, with a submerged mixer, a cryogenic heat pipe, flight design cryocooler, and a radiator. All were enclosed in a thermal shroud and inserted into and tested in a vacuum chamber that simulated an LEO thermal environment. Thermal and pressure control tests were performed at sub-critical LN2 temperatures and approximately 2 atmospheres pressure. The cold side of the ZBO system performed well. In particular, the heat pipe performed better than expected, which suggests that the cryocooler could be located further from the tank than anticipated, i.e. on a spacecraft bus, while maintaining the desired efficiency. Also, the mixer added less heat than expected. The tank heating rate through the insulation was higher than expected; also the temperatures on the cryocooler hot side were higher than planned. This precluded the cryocooler from eliminating the boil-off. The results show the cryocooler was successful at removing 6.8 W of heat at approximately 75 K and 150 W of input power, with a heat rejection temperature of 311 K. The data generated on the ZBO components is essential for the upgrade of the ZBO Cryogenic Analysis Tool to more accurately apply the concept to future missions.

  5. Advanced fuel assembly characterization capabilities based on gamma tomography at the Halden boiling water reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Holcombe, S.; Eitrheim, K.; Svaerd, S. J.; Hallstadius, L.; Willman, C.

    2012-07-01

    Characterization of individual fuel rods using gamma spectroscopy is a standard part of the Post Irradiation Examinations performed on experimental fuel at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor. However, due to handling and radiological safety concerns, these measurements are presently carried out only at the end of life of the fuel, and not earlier than several days or weeks after its removal from the reactor core. In order to enhance the fuel characterization capabilities at the Halden facilities, a gamma tomography measurement system is now being constructed, capable of characterizing fuel assemblies on a rod-by-rod basis in a more timely and efficient manner. Gamma tomography for measuring nuclear fuel is based on gamma spectroscopy measurements and tomographic reconstruction techniques. The technique, previously demonstrated on irradiated commercial fuel assemblies, is capable of determining rod-by-rod information without the need to dismantle the fuel. The new gamma tomography system will be stationed close to the Halden reactor in order to limit the need for fuel transport, and it will significantly reduce the time required to perform fuel characterization measurements. Furthermore, it will allow rod-by-rod fuel characterization to occur between irradiation cycles, thus allowing for measurement of experimental fuel repeatedly during its irradiation lifetime. The development of the gamma tomography measurement system is a joint project between the Inst. for Energy Technology - OECD Halden Reactor Project, Westinghouse (Sweden), and Uppsala Univ.. (authors)

  6. Pool boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Lallemand, M.

    1993-10-01

    Heat transfer between a wall and a stagnant boiling liquid is reviewed in this paper. The effect of different parameters on the boiling curve is pointed out on the basis of experimental data from the literature. Augmentation of heat transfer by enhanced surfaces is described briefly. The available correlations for prediction of heat transfer coefficients are given for the entire boiling curve, i.e., nucleate, transitional, and film boiling, and critical points. These correlations are useful for the design and operation of various heat-exchange systems.

  7. Identification and characterization of passive safety system and inherent safety feature building blocks for advanced light-water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating passive and inherent safety options for Advanced Light-Water Reactors (ALWRs). A major activity in 1989 includes identification and characterization of passive safety system and inherent safety feature building blocks, both existing and proposed, for ALWRs. Preliminary results of this work are reported herein. This activity is part of a larger effort by the US Department of Energy, reactor vendors, utilities, and others in the United States to develop improved LWRs. The Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) program and the Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR) program have as goals improved, commercially available LWRs in the early 1990s. The Advanced Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ASBWR) program and the AP-600 program are developing more advanced reactors with increased use of passive safety systems. It is planned that these reactors will become commercially available in the mid 1990s. The ORNL program is an exploratory research program for LWRs beyond the year 2000. Desired long-term goals for such reactors include: (1) use of only passive and inherent safety, (2) foolproof against operator errors, (3) malevolence resistance against internal sabotage and external assault and (4) walkaway safety. The acronym ''PRIME'' (Passive safety, Resilient operation, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended (walkaway) safety) is used to summarize these desired characteristics. Existing passive and inherent safety options are discussed in this document.

  8. Evaluation of Stability and Transient Characteristics of ABWR-II Large Bundle Core and SSR Influence for Transient phenomena by TRACG Code

    SciTech Connect

    Masao, Chaki; Hideo, Soneda; Shinya, Mizokami; Hideya, Kitamura; Kouji, Hiraiwa; Takanori, Fukahori; Andersen, Jens G.

    2004-07-01

    The next generation ABWR, the ABWR-II, has been under development for more than a decade in Japan. Among various features newly adopted for the ABWR-II, a 1.5 times lager fuel bundle is notable. This bundle design makes it possible to increase the total number of fuel rods in the core while minimizing the reactor pressure vessel size increase. As a result, the void coefficient is more negative due to the harder neutron spectrum since a smaller hydrogen-to uranium (H/U) ratio with fuel inventory increase makes the neutron spectrum harder. This more negative void coefficient affects the stability and transient characteristics of the ABWR-II plant. We have evaluated the stability and transient characteristics by using analysis codes and proven that these characteristics do not affect the realization of the ABWR-II large bundle core concept. Furthermore, we have evaluated the influences for the stability and transient phenomena by using spectral shift rods (SSRs) for the ABWR-II core. The analytical results show that the use of SSRs increases the design margin for the core stability. Regarding transient phenomena, the analyses by the TRACG code show that the influence of using SSRs is very small and do not affect the realization of the ABWR-II plant. In addition, the sensitivity analyses with the TRACG code show that design parameters of SSRs, inlet hole diameter of ascending path etc, are not very sensitive for the transient phenomena. (authors)

  9. BOILING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Untermyer, S.

    1962-04-10

    A boiling reactor having a reactivity which is reduced by an increase in the volume of vaporized coolant therein is described. In this system unvaporized liquid coolant is extracted from the reactor, heat is extracted therefrom, and it is returned to the reactor as sub-cooled liquid coolant. This reduces a portion of the coolant which includes vaporized coolant within the core assembly thereby enhancing the power output of the assembly and rendering the reactor substantially self-regulating. (AEC)

  10. Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas M. Gerstner

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 “flux traps” (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loop’s temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation.

  11. Experimental and Thermalhydraulic Code Assessment of the Transient Behavior of the Passive Condenser System in an Advanced Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S.T. Revankar; W. Zhou; Gavin Henderson

    2008-07-08

    The main goal of the project was to study analytically and experimentally the condensation heat transfer for the passive condenser system such as GE Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The effect of noncondensable gas in condenser tube and the reduction of secondary pool water level to the condensation heat transfer coefficient was the main focus in this research. The objectives of this research were to : 1) obtain experimental data on the local and tube averaged condensation heat transfer rates for the PCCS with non-condensable and with change in the secondary pool water, 2) assess the RELAP5 and TRACE computer code against the experimental data, and 3) develop mathematical model and ehat transfer correlation for the condensation phenomena for system code application. The project involves experimentation, theoretical model development and verification, and thermal- hydraulic codes assessment.

  12. Highly diverse, massive organic data as explored by a composite QSPR strategy: an advanced study of boiling point.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, A A; Ivanov, A A; Oliferenko, A A; Palyulin, V A; Zefirov, N S

    2005-06-01

    An improved strategy of quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) studies of diverse and inhomogeneous organic datasets has been proposed. A molecular connectivity term was successively corrected for different structural features encoded in fragmental descriptors. The so-called solvation index 1chis (a weighted Randic index) was used as a "leading" variable and standardized molecular fragments were employed as "corrective" class-specific variables. Performance of the new approach was illustrated by modelling a dataset of experimental normal boiling points of 833 organic compounds belonging to 20 structural classes. Firstly, separate QSPR models were derived for each class and for eight groups of structurally similar classes. Finally, a general model formed by combining all the classes together was derived (r2=0.957, s=12.9degreesC). The strategy outlined can find application in QSPR analyses of massive, highly diverse databases of organic compounds.

  13. Study of Pu consumption in light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants, compilation of Phase 1C task reports

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-15

    This report summarizes the evaluations conducted during Phase 1C of the Pu Disposition Study have provided further results which reinforce the conclusions reached during Phase 1A & 1B: These conclusions clearly establish the benefits of the fission option and the use of the ABWR as a reliable, proven, well-defined and cost-effective means available to disposition the weapons Pu. This project could be implemented in the near-term at a cost and on a schedule being validated by reactor plants currently under construction in Japan and by cost and schedule history and validated plans for MOX plants in Europe. Evaluations conducted during this phase have established that (1) the MOX fuel is licensable based on existing criteria for new fuel with limited lead fuel rod testing, (2) that the applicable requirements for transport, handling and repository storage can be met, and (3) that all the applicable safeguards criteria can be met.

  14. Application of PSA to review and define technical specifications for advanced nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.; Reinhart, F.M.; Wohl, M.L.

    1995-11-01

    As part of the design certification process, probabilistic safety assessments (PSAS) are performed at the design stage for each advanced nuclear power plant. Among other usages, these PSAs are important inputs in defining the Technical Specifications (TSs) for these plants. Knowledge gained from their use in improving the TSs for operating nuclear power plants is providing methods and insights for using PSAs at this early stage. Evaluating the safety or the risk significance of the TSs to be defined for an advanced plant encompasses diverse aspects: (a) determining the basic limiting condition for operation (LCO); (b) structuring conditions associated with the LCO; (c) defining completion times (equivalent to allowed outage times in the TS for conventional plants); and, (d) prescribing required actions to be taken within the specified completion times. In this paper, we consider the use of PSA in defining the TSs for an advanced nuclear plant, namely General Electric`s Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). Similar approaches are being taken for ABB-CE`s System 80+ and Westinghouse`s AP-600. We discuss the general features of an advanced reactor`s TS, how PSA is being used in reviewing the TSs, and we give an example where the TS submittal was reviewed using a PSA-based analysis to arrive at the requirements for the plant.

  15. Secondary pool boiling effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Tsubaki, A.; Zuhlke, C.; Anderson, T.; Alexander, D.; Gogos, G.; Ndao, S.

    2016-02-01

    A pool boiling phenomenon referred to as secondary boiling effects is discussed. Based on the experimental trends, a mechanism is proposed that identifies the parameters that lead to this phenomenon. Secondary boiling effects refer to a distinct decrease in the wall superheat temperature near the critical heat flux due to a significant increase in the heat transfer coefficient. Recent pool boiling heat transfer experiments using femtosecond laser processed Inconel, stainless steel, and copper multiscale surfaces consistently displayed secondary boiling effects, which were found to be a result of both temperature drop along the microstructures and nucleation characteristic length scales. The temperature drop is a function of microstructure height and thermal conductivity. An increased microstructure height and a decreased thermal conductivity result in a significant temperature drop along the microstructures. This temperature drop becomes more pronounced at higher heat fluxes and along with the right nucleation characteristic length scales results in a change of the boiling dynamics. Nucleation spreads from the bottom of the microstructure valleys to the top of the microstructures, resulting in a decreased surface superheat with an increasing heat flux. This decrease in the wall superheat at higher heat fluxes is reflected by a "hook back" of the traditional boiling curve and is thus referred to as secondary boiling effects. In addition, a boiling hysteresis during increasing and decreasing heat flux develops due to the secondary boiling effects. This hysteresis further validates the existence of secondary boiling effects.

  16. 75 FR 55365 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Joint Subcommittee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the ACRS Joint Subcommittee The ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulics Phenomena; Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR); and Materials,...

  17. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  18. Evaporation, Boiling and Bubbles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Evaporation and boiling are both terms applied to the change of a liquid to the vapour/gaseous state. This article argues that it is the formation of bubbles of vapour within the liquid that most clearly differentiates boiling from evaporation although only a minority of chemistry textbooks seems to mention bubble formation in this context. The…

  19. Computations of Boiling in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, Gretar; Jacqmin, David

    1999-01-01

    The absence (or reduction) of gravity, can lead to major changes in boiling heat transfer. On Earth, convection has a major effect on the heat distribution ahead of an evaporation front, and buoyancy determines the motion of the growing bubbles. In microgravity, convection and buoyancy are absent or greatly reduced and the dynamics of the growing vapor bubbles can change in a fundamental way. In particular, the lack of redistribution of heat can lead to a large superheat and explosive growth of bubbles once they form. While considerable efforts have been devoted to examining boiling experimentally, including the effect of microgravity, theoretical and computational work is limited to very simple models. In this project, the growth of boiling bubbles is studied by direct numerical simulations where the flow field is fully resolved and the effects of inertia, viscosity, surface deformation, heat conduction and convection, as well as the phase change, are fully accounted for. The proposed work is based on previously funded NASA work that allowed us to develop a two-dimensional numerical method for boiling flows and to demonstrate the ability of the method to simulate film boiling. While numerical simulations of multi-fluid flows have been advanced in a major way during the last five years, or so, similar capability for flows with phase change are still in their infancy. Although the feasibility of the proposed approach has been demonstrated, it has yet to be extended and applied to fully three-dimensional simulations. Here, a fully three-dimensional, parallel, grid adaptive code will be developed. The numerical method will be used to study nucleate boiling in microgravity, with particular emphasis on two aspects of the problem: 1) Examination of the growth of bubbles at a wall nucleation site and the instabilities of rapidly growing bubbles. Particular emphasis will be put on accurately capturing the thin wall layer left behind as a bubble expands along a wall, on

  20. Aspects of subcooled boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Bankoff, S.G.

    1997-12-31

    Subcooled boiling boiling refers to boiling from a solid surface where the bulk liquid temperature is below the saturation temperature (subcooled). Two classes are considered: (1) nucleate boiling, where, for large subcoolings, individual bubbles grow and collapse while remaining attached to the solid wall, and (2) film boiling, where a continuous vapor film separates the solid from the bulk liquid. One mechanism by which subcooled nucleate boiling results in very large surface heat transfer coefficient is thought to be latent heat transport within the bubble, resulting from simultaneous evaporation from a thin residual liquid layer at the bubble base, and condensation at the polar bubble cap. Another is the increased liquid microconvection around the oscillating bubble. Two related problems have been attacked. One is the rupture of a thin liquid film subject to attractive and repulsive dispersion forces, leading to the formation of mesoscopic drops, which then coalesce and evaporate. Another is the liquid motion in the vicinity of an oscillating contact line, where the bubble wall is idealized as a wedge of constant angle sliding on the solid wall. The subcooled film boiling problem has been attacked by deriving a general long-range nonlinear evolution equation for the local thickness of the vapor layer. Linear and weakly-nonlinear stability results have been obtained. A number of other related problems have been attacked.

  1. A review on boiling heat transfer enhancement with nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    There has been increasing interest of late in nanofluid boiling and its use in heat transfer enhancement. This article covers recent advances in the last decade by researchers in both pool boiling and convective boiling applications, with nanofluids as the working fluid. The available data in the literature is reviewed in terms of enhancements, and degradations in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux. Conflicting data have been presented in the literature on the effect that nanofluids have on the boiling heat-transfer coefficient; however, almost all researchers have noted an enhancement in the critical heat flux during nanofluid boiling. Several researchers have observed nanoparticle deposition at the heater surface, which they have related back to the critical heat flux enhancement. PMID:21711794

  2. A review on boiling heat transfer enhancement with nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Barber, Jacqueline; Brutin, David; Tadrist, Lounes

    2011-04-04

    There has been increasing interest of late in nanofluid boiling and its use in heat transfer enhancement. This article covers recent advances in the last decade by researchers in both pool boiling and convective boiling applications, with nanofluids as the working fluid. The available data in the literature is reviewed in terms of enhancements, and degradations in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux. Conflicting data have been presented in the literature on the effect that nanofluids have on the boiling heat-transfer coefficient; however, almost all researchers have noted an enhancement in the critical heat flux during nanofluid boiling. Several researchers have observed nanoparticle deposition at the heater surface, which they have related back to the critical heat flux enhancement.

  3. Boiling from small cylinders.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakhru, N.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1972-01-01

    Heat transfer is observed as a function of temperature on small horizontal wires in water and four organic liquids. When the wire radius is sufficiently small, the hydrodynamic transitions in the boiling curve disappear and the curve becomes monotonic. Three modes of heat removal are identified for the monotonic curve and described analytically: a natural convection mode, a mixed film boiling and natural convection mode, and a pure film boiling mode. Nucleate boiling does not occur on the small wires. The study was motivated by an interest in predicting the behavior of large heaters at low gravity. The application of the present results to such circumstances is therefore discussed. It is proposed that the peak and minimum heat fluxes will vanish at low gravity as well as on small wires.

  4. Odd-Boiled Eggs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminsky, Kenneth; Scheman, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    At a Shabbat lunch in Madrid not long ago, the conversation turned to the question of boiling eggs. One of the guests mentioned that a Dutch rabbi he knew had heard that in order to make it more likely that boiled eggs be kosher, you should add an egg to the pot if the number you began with was even. According to the laws of Kashruth, Jews may not…

  5. Odd-Boiled Eggs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminsky, Kenneth; Scheman, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    At a Shabbat lunch in Madrid not long ago, the conversation turned to the question of boiling eggs. One of the guests mentioned that a Dutch rabbi he knew had heard that in order to make it more likely that boiled eggs be kosher, you should add an egg to the pot if the number you began with was even. According to the laws of Kashruth, Jews may not…

  6. Radiolysis of boiling water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shuang; Katsumura, Yosuke; Yamashita, Shinichi; Matsuura, Chihiro; Hiroishi, Daisuke; Lertnaisat, Phantira; Taguchi, Mitsumasa

    2016-06-01

    γ-radiolysis of boiling water has been investigated. The G-value of H2 evolution was found to be very sensitive to the purity of water. In high-purity water, both H2 and O2 gases were formed in the stoichiometric ratio of 2:1; a negligible amount of H2O2 remained in the liquid phase. The G-values of H2 and O2 gas evolution depend on the dose rate: lower dose rates produce larger yields. To clarify the importance of the interface between liquid and gas phase for gas evolution, the gas evolution under Ar gas bubbling was measured. A large amount of H2 was detected, similar to the radiolysis of boiling water. The evolution of gas was enhanced in a 0.5 M NaCl aqueous solution. Deterministic chemical kinetics simulation elucidated the mechanism of radiolysis in boiling water.

  7. Numerical Investigation of Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Michael; Tanguy, Sebastien; Colin, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    In this work, boiling is numerically investigated, using two phase flow direct numerical simulation based on a level set / Ghost Fluid method. Nucleate boiling implies both thermal issue and multiphase dynamics issues at different scales and at different stages of bubble growth. As a result, the different phenomena are investigated separately, considering their nature and the scale at which they occur. First, boiling of a static bubble immersed in an overheated liquid is analysed. Numerical simulations have been performed at different Jakob numbers in the case of strong density discontinuity through the interface. The results show a good agreement on bubble radius evolution between the theoretical evolution and numerical simulation. After the validation of the code for the Scriven test case, interaction of a bubble with a wall is studied. A numerical method taking into account contact angle is evaluated by comparing simulations of the spreading of a liquid droplet impacting on a plate, with experimental data. Then the heat transfer near the contact line is investigated, and simulations of nucleate boiling are performed considering different contact angles values. Finally, the relevance of including a model to take into account the evaporation of the micro layer is discussed.

  8. Microheater Array Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    By conducting pool boiling tests in microgravity, the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and the relative magnitude of other phenomena can be assessed. Data from KC-135 and sounding rocket experiments indicate little effect of gravity on boiling heat transfer at wall superheats below 25 C, despite vast differences in bubble behavior between gravity levels. In microgravity, a large primary bubble, surrounded by smaller satellite bubbles, moved over the surface, occasionally causing nucleation. Once formed, the primary bubble size remained constant for a given superheat, indicating evaporation at the bubble base is balanced with condensation on the bubble cap. The primary bubble's size increased with wall superheat. Most heaters under the primary bubble had low heat transfer rates, suggesting liquid dryout. Strong Marangoni convection developed in microgravity, forming a 'jet' into the bulk liquid that forced the bubble onto the heater. An experiment is being designed for the. Microgravity Science Glovebox. This experiment uses two 96 element microheater arrays, 2.7 and 7.0 mm in size. These heaters are individually controlled to operate at a constant temperature, measuring local heat fluxes as a function of time and space. Most boiling experiments operate at constant wall heat flux with larger heaters, allowing only time and space-averaged measurements. Each heater is about the bubble departure size in normal gravity, but significantly smaller than the bubble departure size in reduced gravity.

  9. Liquid metal boiling inception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabin, C. M.; Poppendiek, H. F.; Mouritzen, G.; Meckel, P. T.; Cloakey, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental study of the inception of boiling in potassium in forced convection is reported. The boiler consisted of a 0.19-inch inside diameter, niobium-1% zirconium boiler tube approximately six feet long. Heating was accomplished by direct electrical tube wall conduction. Experiments were performed with both all-liquid fill and two-phase fill startup sequences and with a range of flow rates, saturation temperatures, inert gas levels, and fill liquid temperatures. Superheat of the liquid above the equilibrium saturation temperature was observed in all the experiments. Incipient boiling liquid superheat ranged from a few degrees to several hundred. Comparisons of these data with other data and with several analytical treatments are presented.

  10. Geysering in boiling channels

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomi, Masanori; Takemoto, Takatoshi; Chiang, Jing-Hsien

    1995-09-01

    A concept of natural circulation BWRs such as the SBWR has been proposed and seems to be promising in that the primary cooling system can be simplified. The authors have been investigating thermo-hydraulic instabilities which may appear during the start-up in natural circulation BWRs. In our previous works, geysering was investigated in parallel boiling channels for both natural and forced circulations, and its driving mechanism and the effect of system pressure on geysering occurrence were made clear. In this paper, geysering is investigated in a vertical column and a U-shaped vertical column heated in the lower parts. It is clarified from the results that the occurrence mechanism of geysering and the dependence of system pressure on geysering occurrence coincide between parallel boiling channels in circulation systems and vertical columns in non-circulation systems.

  11. Oscillate boiling from microheaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fenfang; Gonzalez-Avila, S. Roberto; Nguyen, Dang Minh; Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    We report about an intriguing boiling regime occurring for small heaters embedded on the boundary in subcooled water. The microheater is realized by focusing a continuous wave laser beam to about 10 μ m in diameter onto a 165-nm-thick layer of gold, which is submerged in water. After an initial vaporous explosion a single bubble oscillates continuously and repeatedly at several 100 kHz albeit with constant laser power input. The microbubble's oscillations are accompanied with bubble pinch-off, leading to a stream of gaseous bubbles in the subcooled water. The self-driven bubble oscillation is explained with a thermally kicked oscillator caused by surface attachment and by the nonspherical collapses. Additionally, Marangoni stresses induce a recirculating streaming flow which transports cold liquid towards the microheater, reducing diffusion of heat along the substrate and therefore stabilizing the phenomenon to many million cycles. We speculate that this oscillate boiling regime may overcome the heat transfer thresholds observed during the nucleate boiling crisis and offers a new pathway for heat transfer under microgravity conditions.

  12. Boiling incipience and convective boiling of neon and nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papell, S. S.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Forced convection and subcooled boiling heat transfer data for liquid nitrogen and liquid neon were obtained in support of a design study for a 30 tesla cryomagnet cooled by forced convection of liquid neon. The cryogen data obtained over a range of system pressures, fluid flow rates, and applied heat fluxes were used to develop correlations for predicting boiling incipience and convective boiling heat transfer coefficients in uniformly heated flow channels. The accuracy of the correlating equations was then evaluated. A technique was also developed to calculate the position of boiling incipience in a uniformly heated flow channel. Comparisons made with the experimental data showed a prediction accuracy of + or - 15 percent.

  13. Transition boiling heat transfer and the film transition regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramilison, J. M.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    The Berenson (1960) flat-plate transition-boiling experiment has been recreated with a reduced thermal resistance in the heater, and an improved access to those portions of the transition boiling regime that have a steep negative slope. Tests have been made in Freon-113, acetone, benzene, and n-pentane boiling on horizontal flat copper heaters that have been mirror-polished, 'roughened', or teflon-coated. The resulting data reproduce and clarify certain features observed by Berenson: the modest surface finish dependence of boiling burnout, and the influence of surface chemistry on both the minimum heat flux and the mode of transition boiling, for example. A rational scheme of correlation yields a prediction of the heat flux in what Witte and Lienhard (1982) previously identified as the 'film-transition boiling' region. It is also shown how to calculate the heat flux at the boundary between the pure-film, and the film-transition, boiling regimes, as a function of the advancing contact angle.

  14. Transition boiling heat transfer and the film transition regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramilison, J. M.; Lienhard, J. H.

    1987-01-01

    The Berenson (1960) flat-plate transition-boiling experiment has been recreated with a reduced thermal resistance in the heater, and an improved access to those portions of the transition boiling regime that have a steep negative slope. Tests have been made in Freon-113, acetone, benzene, and n-pentane boiling on horizontal flat copper heaters that have been mirror-polished, 'roughened', or teflon-coated. The resulting data reproduce and clarify certain features observed by Berenson: the modest surface finish dependence of boiling burnout, and the influence of surface chemistry on both the minimum heat flux and the mode of transition boiling, for example. A rational scheme of correlation yields a prediction of the heat flux in what Witte and Lienhard (1982) previously identified as the 'film-transition boiling' region. It is also shown how to calculate the heat flux at the boundary between the pure-film, and the film-transition, boiling regimes, as a function of the advancing contact angle.

  15. How Does Water Boil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahn, Dirk

    2004-11-01

    Insight into the boiling of water is obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. The process is initiated by the spontaneous formation of small vacuum cavities in liquid water. By themselves, these defects are very short lived. If, however, several cavities occur at close distances, they are likely to merge into larger vacuum holes. At the liquid-vapor interfaces, single or small groups of water molecules tend to leave the liquid surface. Once the system is propagated beyond the transition state, these evaporation events outnumber the competing reintegration into the hydrogen-bonded network.

  16. Boiling Fluids Behave Quite Differently in Space

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The boiling process is really different in space, since the vapor phase of a boiling liquid does not rise via buoyancy. Spacecraft and Earth-based systems use boiling to efficiently remove large am...

  17. Boiling liquid cauldron status report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1980-12-28

    The progress made over the past year in assessing the feasibility of the high-temperature, boiling cauldron blanket concept for the tanden mirror reactor is reviewed. The status of the proposed experiments and recently revised estimates of the vapor void fraction in the boiling pool are discussed.

  18. HORIZONTAL BOILING REACTOR SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the boiling water type are described wherein water serves both as the moderator and coolant. The reactor system consists essentially of a horizontal pressure vessel divided into two compartments by a weir, a thermal neutronic reactor core having vertical coolant passages and designed to use water as a moderator-coolant posltioned in one compartment, means for removing live steam from the other compartment and means for conveying feed-water and water from the steam compartment to the reactor compartment. The system further includes auxiliary apparatus to utilize the steam for driving a turbine and returning the condensate to the feed-water inlet of the reactor. The entire system is designed so that the reactor is self-regulating and has self-limiting power and self-limiting pressure features.

  19. When water does not boil at the boiling point.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hasok

    2007-03-01

    Every schoolchild learns that, under standard pressure, pure water always boils at 100 degrees C. Except that it does not. By the late 18th century, pioneering scientists had already discovered great variations in the boiling temperature of water under fixed pressure. So, why have most of us been taught that the boiling point of water is constant? And, if it is not constant, how can it be used as a 'fixed point' for the calibration of thermometers? History of science has the answers.

  20. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C.; Maroo, Shalabh C.

    2016-01-01

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics. PMID:26837464

  1. Steady State Vapor Bubble in Pool Boiling.

    PubMed

    Zou, An; Chanana, Ashish; Agrawal, Amit; Wayner, Peter C; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-02-03

    Boiling, a dynamic and multiscale process, has been studied for several decades; however, a comprehensive understanding of the process is still lacking. The bubble ebullition cycle, which occurs over millisecond time-span, makes it extremely challenging to study near-surface interfacial characteristics of a single bubble. Here, we create a steady-state vapor bubble that can remain stable for hours in a pool of sub-cooled water using a femtosecond laser source. The stability of the bubble allows us to measure the contact-angle and perform in-situ imaging of the contact-line region and the microlayer, on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces and in both degassed and regular (with dissolved air) water. The early growth stage of vapor bubble in degassed water shows a completely wetted bubble base with the microlayer, and the bubble does not depart from the surface due to reduced liquid pressure in the microlayer. Using experimental data and numerical simulations, we obtain permissible range of maximum heat transfer coefficient possible in nucleate boiling and the width of the evaporating layer in the contact-line region. This technique of creating and measuring fundamental characteristics of a stable vapor bubble will facilitate rational design of nanostructures for boiling enhancement and advance thermal management in electronics.

  2. Film boiling of mercury droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Vaporization times of mercury droplets in Leidenfrost film boiling on a flat horizontal plate are measured in an air atmosphere. Extreme care was used to prevent large amplitude droplet vibrations and surface wetting; therefore, these data can be compared to film boiling theory. For these data, diffusion from the upper surface of the drop is a dominant mode of mass transfer from the drop. A closed-form analytical film boiling theory is developed to account for the diffusive evaporation. Reasonable agreement between data and theory is seen.

  3. Film boiling of mercury droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Vaporization times of mercury droplets in Leidenfrost film boiling on a flat horizontal plate are measured in an air atmosphere. Extreme care was used to prevent large amplitude droplet vibrations and surface wetting; therefore, these data can be compared to film boiling theory. Diffusion from the upper surface of the drop appears as a dominant mode of mass transfer from the drop. A closed-form analytical film boiling theory is developed to account for the diffusive evaporation. Reasonable agreement between data and theory is seen.

  4. Film boiling of mercury droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Schoessow, G. J.; Chmielewski, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Vaporization times of mercury droplets in Leidenfrost film boiling on a flat horizontal plate are measured in an air atmosphere. Extreme care was used to prevent large amplitude droplet vibrations and surface wetting; therefore, these data can be compared to film boiling theory. For these data, diffusion from the upper surface of the drop is a dominant mode of mass transfer from the drop. A closed-form analytical film boiling theory is developed to account for the diffusive evaporation. Reasonable agreement between data and theory is seen.

  5. Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment is another investigation that examines the flow of a mixture of liquids and the vapors they produce when in contact with hot space system equipment. Coo...

  6. Noise analysis of nucleate boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcknight, R. D.; Ram, K. S.

    1971-01-01

    The techniques of noise analysis have been utilized to investigate nucleate pool boiling. A simple experimental setup has been developed for obtaining the power spectrum of a nucleate boiling system. These techniques were first used to study single bubbles, and a method of relating the two-dimensional projected size and the local velocity of the bubbles to the auto-correlation functions is presented. This method is much less time consuming than conventional methods of measurement and has no probes to disturb the system. These techniques can be used to determine the contribution of evaporation to total heat flux in nucleate boiling. Also, these techniques can be used to investigate the effect of various parameters upon the frequency response of nucleate boiling. The predominant frequencies of the power spectrum correspond to the frequencies of bubble generation. The effects of heat input, degree of subcooling, and liquid surface tension upon the power spectra of a boiling system are presented. It was found that the degree of subcooling has a more pronounced effect upon bubble size than does heat flux. Also the effect of lowering surface tension can be sufficient to reduce the effect of the degree of subcooling upon the size of the bubbles.

  7. Characteristics of Transient Boiling Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei; Monde, Masanori; Mitsutake, Y.

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, one dimensional inverse heat conduction solution is used for a measurement of pool boiling curve. The experiments are performed under atmospheric pressure for copper, brass, carbon steel and gold. Boiling curves, including unsteady transition boiling region, are found can be traced fairly well from a simple experiment system by solving inverse heat conduction solution. Boiling curves for steady heating and transient heating, for heating process and cooling process are compared. Surface behavior around CHF point, transition boiling and film-boiling regions are observed by using a high-speed camera. The results show the practicability of the inverse heat conduction solution in tracing boiling curve and thereby supply us a new way in boiling heat transfer research. (authors)

  8. Subcooled forced convection boiling of trichlorotrifluoroethane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougall, R. S.; Panian, D. J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental heat-transfer data were obtained for the forced-convection boiling of trichlorotrifluoroethane (R-113 or Freon-113) in a vertical annular test annular test section. The 97 data points obtained covered heat transfer by forced convection, local boiling, and fully-developed boiling. Correlating methods were obtained which accurately predicted the heat flux as a function of wall superheat (boiling curve) over the range of parameters studied.

  9. SWR 1000: The Innovative Boiling Water Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Brettschuh, Werner; Hudson, Greg

    2004-07-01

    Framatome ANP has developed the boiling water reactor SWR 1000 in close cooperation with German nuclear utilities and with support from various European partners. This advanced reactor design marks a new era in the successful tradition of boiling water reactor technology and, with a gross electric output of between 1290 and 1330 MW, is aimed at assuring competitive power generating costs compared to gas- and coal-fired stations. At the same time, the SWR 1000 meets the highest safety standards, including control of a core melt accident these objectives are met by supplementing active safety systems with passive safety equipment of diverse design for accident detection and control and by simplifying systems needed for normal plant operation on the basis of past operating experience. The plant is also protected against airplane crash loads. A short construction period, flexible fuel cycle lengths of between 12 and 24 months and a high fuel discharge burn-up all contribute towards meeting economic goals. The SWR 1000 fulfills international nuclear regulatory requirements and has been offered to TVO for the fifth nuclear unit in Finland. (authors)

  10. Boiling heat transfer and droplet spreading of nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Murshed, S M Sohel; de Castro, C A Nieto

    2013-11-01

    Nanofluids- a new class of heat transfer fluids have recently been a very attractive area of research due to their fascinating thermophysical properties and numerous potential benefits and applications in many important fields. However, there are many controversies and inconsistencies in reported arguments and experimental results on various thermal characteristics such as effective thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient and boiling heat transfer rate of nanofluids. As of today, researchers have mostly focused on anomalous thermal conductivity of nanofluids. Although investigations on boiling and droplet spreading are very important for practical application of nanofluids as advanced coolants, considerably fewer efforts have been made on these thermal features of nanofluids. In this paper, recent research and development in boiling heat transfer and droplet spreading of nanofluids are reviewed together with summarizing most related patents on nanofluids published in literature. Review reveals that despite some inconsistent results nanofluids exhibit significantly higher boiling heat transfer performance compared to their base fluids and show great promises to be used as advanced heat transfer fluids in numerous applications. However, there is a clear lack of in-depth understanding of heat transport mechanisms during phase change of nanofluids. It is also found that the nanofluids related patents are limited and among them most of the patents are based on thermal conductivity enhancement and synthesising processes of specific type of nanofluids.

  11. High heat flux transport by microbubble emission boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Koichi

    2007-10-01

    In highly subcooled flow boiling, coalescing bubbles on the heating surface collapse to many microbubbles in the beginning of transition boiling and the heat flux increases higher than the ordinary critical heat flux. This phenomenon is called Microbubble Emission Boiling, MEB. It is generated in subcooled flow boiling and the maximum heat flux reaches about 1 kW/cm2(10 MW/m2) at liquid subcooling of 40 K and liquid velocity of 0.5 m/s for a small heating surface of 10 mm×10 mm which is placed at the bottom surface of horizontal rectangular channel. The high pressure in the channel is observed at collapse of the coalescing bubbles and it is closely related the size of coalescing bubbles. Periodic pressure waves are observed in MEB and the heat flux increases linearly in proportion to the pressure frequency. The frequency is considered the frequency of liquid-solid exchange on the heating surface. For the large sized heating surface of 50 mm length×20 mm width, the maximum heat flux obtained is 500 W/cm2 (5 MW/m2) at liquid subcooling of 40 K and liquid velocity of 0.5 m/s. This is considerably higher heat flux than the conventional cooling limit in power electronics. It is difficult to remove the high heat flux by MEB for a longer heating surface than 50 mm by single channel type. A model of advanced cooling device is introduced for power electronics by subcooled flow boiling with impinging jets. Themaxumum cooling heat flux is 500 W/cm2 (5 MW/m2). Microbubble emission boiling is useful for a high heat flux transport technology in future power electronics used in a fuel-cell power plant and a space facility.

  12. The myth of the boiling point.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hasok

    2008-01-01

    Around 1800, many reputable scientists reported significant variations in the temperature of pure water boiling under normal atmospheric pressure. The reported variations included a difference of over 1 degree C between boiling in metallic and glass vessels (Gay-Lussac), and "superheating" up to 112 degrees C on extracting dissolved air out of water (De Luc). I have confirmed most of these observations in my own experiments, many of which are described in this paper. Water boils at the "boiling point" only under very particular circumstances. Our common-sense intuition about the fixedness of the boiling point is only sustained by our limited experience.

  13. EHD enhancement of nucleate boiling. [Electrohydrodynamic

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, P. )

    1990-05-01

    This paper describes: (a) an experimental investigation into the effect of an electric field applied to pool boiling of Freon (R114) on a finned tube and (b) a theoretical model of electrically enhanced nucleate boiling applicable to simple surfaces only. Experimental results have shown electrohydrodynamic (EHD) enhancement of heat transfer to be manifest in two ways: (1) elimination of boiling hysteresis, (2) augmentation of nulceate boiling heat transfer coefficients by up to an order of magnitude. These effects were also observed in electrically enhanced boiling of Freon/oil mixtures. A new analytical model is described whereby EHD nucleate boiling data from previous studies (employing simple apparatus comprising heated wires with concentric cylinder electrodes) have been correlated for the first time using the concept of an electrical influence number. This dimensionless parameter is based upon the relationship between applied electric field intensity and changes in bubble departure diameter at a heat transfer surface.

  14. 77 FR 64563 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the purposes of Sections 29 and 182b of the Atomic Energy Act (42 U.S.C. 2039, 2232b), the Advisory Committee on Reactor... the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) Design for South Texas Project Units 3 and 4 (STP 3 and...

  15. 78 FR 18375 - Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the purposes of Sections 29 and 182b of the Atomic Energy Act (42 U.S.C. 2039, 2232b), the Advisory Committee on Reactor... the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) Core Design. Note: A portion of this session may be...

  16. Boiling significantly promotes photodegradation of perfluorooctane sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Xian-Jin; Li, Wen-Wei; Lam, Paul K S; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-11-01

    The application of photochemical processes for perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) degradation has been limited by a low treatment efficiency. This study reports a significant acceleration of PFOS photodegradation under boiling condition compared with the non-boiling control. The PFOS decomposition rate increased with the increasing boiling intensity, but declined at a higher hydronium level or under oxygenation. These results suggest that the boiling state of solution resulted in higher effective concentrations of reactants at the gas-liquid interface and enhanced the interfacial mass transfer, thereby accelerating the PFOS decomposition. This study broadens our knowledge of PFOS photodegradation process and may have implications for development of efficient photodegradation technologies.

  17. CHIMNEY FOR BOILING WATER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Petrick, M.

    1961-08-01

    A boiling-water reactor is described which has vertical fuel-containing channels for forming steam from water. Risers above the channels increase the head of water radially outward, whereby water is moved upward through the channels with greater force. The risers are concentric and the radial width of the space between them is somewhat small. There is a relatively low rate of flow of water up through the radially outer fuel-containing channels, with which the space between the risers is in communication. (AE C)

  18. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of boiling heat transfer: The boiling curve and the effects of wettability

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Q.; Kang, Q. J.; Francois, M. M.; ...

    2015-03-03

    A hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is presented to simulate thermal multiphase flows with phase change based on an improved pseudopotential LB approach (Li et al., 2013). The present model does not suffer from the spurious term caused by the forcing-term effect, which was encountered in some previous thermal LB models for liquid–vapor phase change. Using the model, the liquid–vapor boiling process is simulated. The boiling curve together with the three boiling stages (nucleate boiling, transition boiling, and film boiling) is numerically reproduced in the LB community for the first time. The numerical results show that the basic featuresmore » and the fundamental characteristics of boiling heat transfer are well captured, such as the severe fluctuation of transient heat flux in the transition boiling and the feature that the maximum heat transfer coefficient lies at a lower wall superheat than that of the maximum heat flux. Moreover, the effects of the heating surface wettability on boiling heat transfer are investigated. It is found that an increase in contact angle promotes the onset of boiling but reduces the critical heat flux, and makes the boiling process enter into the film boiling regime at a lower wall superheat, which is consistent with the findings from experimental studies.« less

  19. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of boiling heat transfer: The boiling curve and the effects of wettability

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Q.; Kang, Q. J.; Francois, M. M.; He, Y. L.; Luo, K. H.

    2015-03-03

    A hybrid thermal lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is presented to simulate thermal multiphase flows with phase change based on an improved pseudopotential LB approach (Li et al., 2013). The present model does not suffer from the spurious term caused by the forcing-term effect, which was encountered in some previous thermal LB models for liquid–vapor phase change. Using the model, the liquid–vapor boiling process is simulated. The boiling curve together with the three boiling stages (nucleate boiling, transition boiling, and film boiling) is numerically reproduced in the LB community for the first time. The numerical results show that the basic features and the fundamental characteristics of boiling heat transfer are well captured, such as the severe fluctuation of transient heat flux in the transition boiling and the feature that the maximum heat transfer coefficient lies at a lower wall superheat than that of the maximum heat flux. Moreover, the effects of the heating surface wettability on boiling heat transfer are investigated. It is found that an increase in contact angle promotes the onset of boiling but reduces the critical heat flux, and makes the boiling process enter into the film boiling regime at a lower wall superheat, which is consistent with the findings from experimental studies.

  20. Zero Boil Off Cryogen Storage for Future Launchers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valentian, D.; Plachta, D.; Kittel, P.; Hastings, L. J.; Salerno, Louis J.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Zero boil off (ZBO) cryogen storage using both cryocoolers and passive insulation technologies will enable long-term exploration missions by allowing designers to optimize tankage without the need for excess cryogen storage to account for boil off. Studies of ZBO (zero boil off) have been on-going in the USA for several years. More recently, a review of the needs of advanced space propulsion took place in Europe. This showed the interest of the European community in cryogenic propulsion for planetary missions as well as the use of liquid hydrogen for large power electric propulsion (manned Mars missions). Although natural boiling could be acceptable for single leg missions, passive insulation techniques yield roughly a I% per month cryogen loss and this would not be cost effective for robotic planetary missions involving storage times greater than one year. To make economic sense, long-term exploration missions require lower tank capacity and longer storage times. Recent advances in cryocooler technology, resulting in vast improvements in both cooler efficiency and reliability, make ZBO is a clear choice for planetary exploration missions. Other, more near term applications of ZBO include boil-off reduction or elimination applied to first and upper stages of future earth-to-orbit (ETO) launchers. This would extend launch windows and reduce infrastructure costs. Successors to vehicles like Ariane 5 could greatly benefit by implementing ZBO. Zero Boil Off will only be successful in ETO launcher applications if it makes economic sense to implement. The energy cost is only a fraction of the total cost of buying liquid cryogen, the rest being transportation and other overhead. Because of this, higher boiling point cryogens will benefit more from on-board liquefaction, thus reducing the infrastructure costs. Since hydrogen requires a liquefier with at least a 17% efficiency just to break even from a cost standpoint, one approach for implementing ZBO in upper stages would

  1. Pool boiling inversion through bubble induced macroconvection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaikumar, A.; Kandlikar, S. G.

    2017-02-01

    While numerous surface geometries have been explored to achieve enhancements in pool boiling critical heat flux and heat transfer coefficient (HTC), their mechanistic contributions towards the characteristics of the pool boiling curve are not clear. Recently reported pool boiling curves in literature have shown a trend where an increase in heat flux leads to a decrease in wall superheat. Consequently, a negative slope in the pool boiling curve accompanied by a sharp increase in HTC, termed here as boiling inversion, is observed. We demonstrate that this inversion is due to vapor stream induced reinforcement of an impinging liquid jet over the non-boiling regions. This behavior is characteristic of surfaces developed using separate liquid-vapor pathways and macroconvection enhancement mechanism resulting in a highly efficient self-sustained boiling configuration. The increased jet impingement velocities lead to higher HTCs with lower wall superheats. The analytical models available in literature are employed to quantitatively explain this trend. Furthermore, a self-adjusting boiling mechanism is seen at play wherein a reduction in nucleation activity due to lowering of wall superheat counters the increase in HTC induced by the macroconvective currents.

  2. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many Earthbound applications, such as steam-generation power plants, petroleum, and other chemical plants. Also, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  3. Pool Boiling Experiment Has Five Successful Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiaramonte, Fran

    1997-01-01

    The Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE) is designed to improve understanding of the fundamental mechanisms that constitute nucleate pool boiling. Nucleate pool boiling is a process wherein a stagnant pool of liquid is in contact with a surface that can supply heat to the liquid. If the liquid absorbs enough heat, a vapor bubble can be formed. This process occurs when a pot of water boils. On Earth, gravity tends to remove the vapor bubble from the heating surface because it is dominated by buoyant convection. In the orbiting space shuttle, however, buoyant convection has much less of an effect because the forces of gravity are very small. The Pool Boiling Experiment was initiated to provide insight into this nucleate boiling process, which has many earthbound applications in steamgeneration power plants, petroleum plants, and other chemical plants. In addition, by using the test fluid R-113, the Pool Boiling Experiment can provide some basic understanding of the boiling behavior of cryogenic fluids without the large cost of an experiment using an actual cryogen.

  4. Boiling of the interface between two immiscible liquids below the bulk boiling temperatures of both components.

    PubMed

    Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Goldobin, Denis S

    2014-11-01

    We consider the problem of boiling of the direct contact of two immiscible liquids. An intense vapour formation at such a direct contact is possible below the bulk boiling points of both components, meaning an effective decrease of the boiling temperature of the system. Although the phenomenon is known in science and widely employed in technology, the direct contact boiling process was thoroughly studied (both experimentally and theoretically) only for the case where one of liquids is becoming heated above its bulk boiling point. On the contrary, we address the case where both liquids remain below their bulk boiling points. In this paper we construct the theoretical description of the boiling process and discuss the actualisation of the case we consider for real systems.

  5. Computations of Boiling in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tryggvason, G.; Jacqmin, Dave

    2000-01-01

    The absence (or reduction) of gravity, can lead to major changes in boiling heat transfer. On Earth, convection has a major effect on the heat distribution ahead of an evaporation front, and buoyancy determines the motion of the growing bubbles. In microgravity, convection and buoyancy are absent or greatly reduced and the dynamics of the growing vapor bubbles can change in a fundamental way. In particular, the lack of redistribution of heat can lead to a large superheat and explosive growth of bubbles once they form. While considerable efforts have been devoted to examining boiling experimentally, including the effect of microgravity, theoretical and computational work have been limited. Here, the growth of boiling bubbles is studied by direct numerical simulations where the flow field is fully resolved and the effects of inertia, viscosity, surface deformation, heat conduction and convection, as well as the phase change, are fully accounted for. Boiling involves both fluid flow and heat transfer and thus requires the solution of the Navier-Stokes and the energy equations. The numerical method is based on writing one set of governing transport equations which is valid in both the liquid and vapor phases. This local, single-field formulation incorporates the effect of the interface in the governing equations as source terms acting only at the interface. These sources account for surface tension and latent heat in the equations for conservation of momentum and energy as well as mass transfer across the interface due to phase change. The single-field formulation naturally incorporates the correct mass, momentum and energy balances across the interface. Integration of the conservation equations across the interface directly yields the jump conditions derived in the local instant formulation for two-phase systems. In the numerical implementation, the conservation equations for the whole computational domain (both vapor and liquid) are solved using a stationary grid and

  6. Development of a mechanistic model for forced convection subcooled boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaver, Dillon R.

    The focus of this work is on the formulation, implementation, and testing of a mechanistic model of subcooled boiling. Subcooled boiling is the process of vapor generation on a heated wall when the bulk liquid temperature is still below saturation. This is part of a larger effort by the US DoE's CASL project to apply advanced computational tools to the simulation of light water reactors. To support this effort, the formulation of the dispersed field model is described and a complete model of interfacial forces is formulated. The model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code with a K-epsilon model of turbulence. The interfacial force models are built on extensive work by other authors, and include novel formulations of the turbulent dispersion and lift forces. The complete model of interfacial forces is compared to experiments for adiabatic bubbly flows, including both steady-state and unsteady conditions. The same model is then applied to a transient gas/liquid flow in a complex geometry of fuel channels in a sodium fast reactor. Building on the foundation of the interfacial force model, a mechanistic model of forced-convection subcooled boiling is proposed. This model uses the heat flux partitioning concept and accounts for condensation of bubbles attached to the wall. This allows the model to capture the enhanced heat transfer associated with boiling before the point of net generation of vapor, a phenomenon consistent with existing experimental observations. The model is compared to four different experiments encompassing flows of light water, heavy water, and R12 at different pressures, in cylindrical channels, an internally heated annulus, and a rectangular channel. The experimental data includes axial and radial profiles of both liquid temperature and vapor volume fraction, and the agreement can be considered quite good. The complete model is then applied to simulations of subcooled boiling in nuclear reactor subchannels consistent with the

  7. Boiling Heat Transfer to Halogenated Hydrocarbon Refrigerants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Suguru; Fujita, Yasunobu

    The current state of knowledge on heat transfer to boiling refrigerants (halogenated hydrocarbons) in a pool and flowing inside a horizontal tube is reviewed with an emphasis on information relevant to the design of refrigerant evaporators, and some recommendations are made for future research. The review covers two-phase flow pattern, heat transfer characteristics, correlation of heat transfer coefficient, influence of oil, heat transfer augmentation, boiling from tube-bundle, influence of return bend, burnout heat flux, film boiling, dryout and post-dryout heat transfer.

  8. The effects of geometric, flow, and boiling parameters on bubble growth and behavior in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaroo, Randy

    Air bubble injection and subcooled flow boiling experiments have been performed to investigate the liquid flow field and bubble nucleation, growth, and departure, in part to contribute to the DOE Nuclear HUB project, Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). The main objective was to obtain quantitative data and compartmentalize the many different interconnected aspects of the boiling process -- from the channel geometry, to liquid and gas interactions, to underlying heat transfer mechanisms. The air bubble injection experiments were performed in annular and rectangular geometries and yielded data on bubble formation and departure from a small hole on the inner tube surface, subsequent motion and deformation of the detached bubbles, and interactions with laminar or turbulent water flow. Instantaneous and ensemble- average liquid velocity profiles have been obtained using a Particle Image Velocimetry technique and a high speed video camera. Reynolds numbers for these works ranged from 1,300 to 7,700. Boiling experiments have been performed with subcooled water at atmospheric pres- sure in the same annular channel geometry as the air injection experiments. A second flow loop with a slightly larger annular channel was constructed to perform further boiling experiments at elevated pressures up to 10 bar. High speed video and PIV measurements of turbulent velocity profiles in the presence of small vapor bubbles on the heated rod are presented. The liquid Reynolds number for this set of experiments ranged from 5,460 to 86,000. It was observed that as the vapor bubbles are very small compared to the injected air bubbles, further experiments were performed using a microscopic objective to obtain higher spatial resolution for velocity fields near the heated wall. Multiple correlations for the bubble liftoff diameter, liftoff time and bub- ble history number were evaluated against a number of experimental datasets from previous works, resulting in a

  9. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling...

  10. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling...

  11. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling...

  12. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an AC-powered device that consists of a container for boiling...

  13. Analysis of boiling flat-plate collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Price, H.W.; Klein, S.A.; Beckman, W.A.

    1986-05-01

    A detailed model for use with TRNSYS, capable of modelling a wide range of boiling collector types, was used to analyze boiling flat-plate collector systems. This model can account for a subcooled liquid entering the collector, heat losses in the vapor and the liquid return line, pressure drops due to friction in the collector and piping, and pressure drops due to the hydrostatic head of the fluid. The model has been used to determine the yearly performance of boiling flat-plate solar collector systems. A simplified approach was also developed which can be used with the f-Chart method to predict yearly performance of boiling flat-plate collector systems.

  14. Conceptual design for spacelab pool boiling experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, J. H.; Peck, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    A pool boiling heat transfer experiment to be incorporated with a larger two-phase flow experiment on Spacelab was designed to confirm (or alter) the results of earth-normal gravity experiments which indicate that the hydrodynamic peak and minimum pool boiling heat fluxes vanish at very low gravity. Twelve small sealed test cells containing water, methanol or Freon 113 and cylindrical heaters of various sizes are to be built. Each cell will be subjected to one or more 45 sec tests in which the surface heat flux on the heaters is increased linearly until the surface temperature reaches a limiting value of 500 C. The entire boiling process will be photographed in slow-motion. Boiling curves will be constructed from thermocouple and electric input data, for comparison with the motion picture records. The conduct of the experiment will require no more than a few hours of operator time.

  15. Microlayer during boiling in narrow slot channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diev, Mikhail D.; Leontiev, Alexander I.

    1997-01-01

    An international space station Alpha will have a two-phase thermal control system. Boiling of a liquid ammonia will be a process of heat collection in evaporative heat exchangers. Unfortunately, only little data is available for boiling heat transfer in microgravity. Geometries of boiling channels working good in normal gravity are not appropriate in microgravity, and special means should be worked out to avoid some undesired events. From this point of view, the narrow slot channels may be assumed as a promising geometry for microgravity operation. During boiling in narrow slots, the vapor bubbles are flattened between the channel walls. The vapor phase and the channel wall are separated by a thin liquid film which is known as a microlayer. The paper presents the experimental results compared to the theoretical analysis, the paper also shows the narrow slot channels as a perspective configuration for microgravity applications.

  16. Why Is NASA Boiling Fluids in Space?

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Convection and buoyancy work differently in space than on Earth. Learn how NASA uses this information and applies it to everyday life. Boiling fluids in space is easier than it is on Earth. Learn m...

  17. Cross Flow Boiling in Tube Bundles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    subsequent corrosion induced failure of the heating tube , an understanding of the fluid motion and heat transfer behavior in confined spaces will be...1-1982A U Cross Flowing Boiling in Tube Bundles Annual Technical Report October 1982 LOD S.C. Yao Associate Professor Department of Mechanical...Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Annual Technical Report CROSS FLOW BOILING IN TUBE BUNDLES Aug. 1, 1981 to Aug. 1, 1982 - 6. PERFORMING ORG

  18. SUPERHEATING IN A BOILING WATER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1960-05-31

    A boiling-water reactor is described in which the steam developed in the reactor is superheated in the reactor. This is accomplished by providing means for separating the steam from the water and passing the steam over a surface of the fissionable material which is not in contact with the water. Specifically water is boiled on the outside of tubular fuel elements and the steam is superheated on the inside of the fuel elements.

  19. Fundamental Boiling and RP-1 Freezing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Brian

    2002-01-01

    The prestart thermal conditioning of the hardware in LOX (liquid oxygen) systems involve heat transfer between LOX and metal where boiling plays a large role. Information is easily found on nucleate boiling, maximum heat flux, minimum heat flux and film boiling for common fluids like water. After looking at these standard correlations it was felt more data was needed for the cool down side transition boiling for the LN2 and LOX. In particular interest is the film boiling values, the temperature at which transition begins and the slope as peak heat flux is approached. The ultimate goal is an array of boiling heat transfer coefficient as a function of surface temperature which can be used in the chilldown model of the feed system, engine and bleed system for X-34. The first experiment consisted of an actual MC-1 LOX Impeller which had been machined backwards, that was instrumented with 17 surface thermocouples and submerged in liquid nitrogen. The thermocouples were installed on metal thicknesses varying from the thin inducer to the thick hub.

  20. High flux film and transition boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, L.C.

    1993-02-01

    An investigation was conducted on the potential for altering the boiling curve through effects of high velocity and high subcooling. Experiments using water and Freon-113 flowing over cylindrical electrical heaters in crossflow were made to see how velocity and subcooling affect the boiling curve, especially the film and transition boiling regions. We sought subcooling levels down to near the freezing points of these two liquids to prove the concept that the critical heat flux and the minimum heat flux could be brought together, thereby averting the transition region altogether. Another emphasis was to gain insight into how the various boiling regions could be represented mathematically on various parts of heating surface. Motivation for the research grew out of a realization that the effects of very high subcooling and velocity might be to avert the transition boiling altogether so that the unstable part of the boiling curve would not limit the application of high flux devices to temperatures less than the burnout temperatures. Summaries of results from the study are described. It shows that the potential for averting, the transition region is good, and points the way to further research that is needed to demonstrate the potential.

  1. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, David W.; Guzik, Monica C.

    2014-03-01

    A computational model of the cryogenic boil-off reduction system being developed by NASA as part of the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer technology maturation project has been applied to a range of propellant storage tanks sizes for high-performing in-space cryogenic propulsion applications. This effort focuses on the scaling of multi-layer insulation (MLI), cryocoolers, broad area cooling shields, radiators, solar arrays, and tanks for liquid hydrogen propellant storage tanks ranging from 2 to 10 m in diameter. Component scaling equations were incorporated into the Cryogenic Analysis Tool, a spreadsheet-based tool used to perform system-level parametric studies. The primary addition to the evolution of this updated tool is the integration of a scaling method for reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocoolers, as well as the development and inclusion of Self-Supporting Multi-Layer Insulation. Mass, power, and sizing relationships are traded parametrically to establish the appropriate loiter period beyond which this boil-off reduction system application reduces mass. The projected benefit compares passive thermal control to active thermal control, where active thermal control is evaluated for reduced boil-off with a 90 K shield, zero boil-off with a single heat interception stage at the tank wall, and zero boil-off with a second interception stage at a 90 K shield. Parametric studies show a benefit over passive storage at loiter durations under one month, in addition to showing a benefit for two-stage zero boil-off in terms of reducing power and mass as compared to single stage zero boil-off. Furthermore, active cooling reduces the effect of varied multi-layer insulation performance, which, historically, has been shown to be significant.

  2. A review of film boiling at cryogenic temperatures.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Y. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Film boiling occurs in the quenching of metals, the chilling of biological species, the regenerative cooling of rockets, and the cooling down of a cryogenic fuel tank. Occasionally film boiling is also found in a nuclear reactor or in a cryomagnet. Aspects of film boiling involving an unconstrained liquid mass are considered, giving attention to the evaporation time, the Leidenfrost temperature, solid-liquid contacts, the thermal properties of the solid, effects of coating or scale, wettability, the metastable condition, and the velocity effect on drops. Developments discussed with regard to pool boiling are related to vertical surfaces, film boiling from horizontal surfaces, film boiling from a horizontal cylinder, film boiling from a sphere, and film boiling of helium. Processes of film boiling in a channel are also analyzed.

  3. Enhancements of Nucleate Boiling Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, W. J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents two means for enhancing nucleate boiling and critical heat flux under microgravity conditions: using micro-configured metal-graphite composites as the boiling surface and dilute aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols as the working fluid. In the former, thermocapillary force induced by temperature difference between the graphite-fiber tips and the metal matrix plays an important role in bubble detachment. Thus boiling-heat transfer performance does not deteriorate in a reduced-gravity environment. In the latter cases, the surface tension-temperature gradient of the long-chain alcohol solutions turns positive as the temperature exceeds a certain value. Consequently, the Marangoni effect does not impede, but rather aids in bubble departure from the heating surface. This feature is most favorable in microgravity. As a result, the bubble size of departure is substantially reduced at higher frequencies. Based on the existing experimental data, and a two-tier theoretical model, correlation formulas are derived for nucleate boiling on the copper-graphite and aluminum-graphite composite surfaces, in both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes. In addition, performance equations for nucleate boiling and critical heat flux in dilute aqueous solutions of long-chain alcohols are obtained.

  4. Structural changes of malt proteins during boiling.

    PubMed

    Jin, Bei; Li, Lin; Liu, Guo-Qin; Li, Bing; Zhu, Yu-Kui; Liao, Liao-Ning

    2009-03-09

    Changes in the physicochemical properties and structure of proteins derived from two malt varieties (Baudin and Guangmai) during wort boiling were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, SDS-PAGE, two-dimensional electrophoresis, gel filtration chromatography and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results showed that both protein content and amino acid composition changed only slightly during boiling, and that boiling might cause a gradual unfolding of protein structures, as indicated by the decrease in surface hydrophobicity and free sulfhydryl content and enthalpy value, as well as reduced alpha-helix contents and markedly increased random coil contents. It was also found that major component of both worts was a boiling-resistant protein with a molecular mass of 40 kDa, and that according to the two-dimensional electrophoresis and SE-HPLC analyses, a small amount of soluble aggregates might be formed via hydrophobic interactions. It was thus concluded that changes of protein structure caused by boiling that might influence beer quality are largely independent of malt variety.

  5. Flow boiling with enhancement devices for cold plate coolant channel design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Ronald D.

    1991-01-01

    Future space exploration and commercialization will require more efficient heat rejection systems. For the required heat transfer rates, such systems must use advanced heat transfer techniques. Forced two phase flow boiling heat transfer with enhancements falls in this category. However, moderate to high quality two phase systems tend to require higher pressure losses. This report is divided into two major parts: (1) Multidimensional wall temperature measurement and heat transfer enhancement for top heated horizontal channels with flow boiling; and (2) Improved analytical heat transfer data reduction for a single side heated coolant channel. Part 1 summarizes over forty experiments which involve both single phase convection and flow boiling in a horizontal channel heated externally from the top side. Part 2 contains parametric dimensionless curves with parameters such as the coolant channel radius ratio, the Biot number, and the circumferential coordinate.

  6. Flow-Boiling Critical Heat Flux Experiments Performed in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Mudawar, Issam

    2005-01-01

    Poor understanding of flow boiling in microgravity has recently emerged as a key obstacle to the development of many types of power generation and advanced life support systems intended for space exploration. The critical heat flux (CHF) is perhaps the most important thermal design parameter for boiling systems involving both heatflux-controlled devices and intense heat removal. Exceeding the CHF limit can lead to permanent damage, including physical burnout of the heat-dissipating device. The importance of the CHF limit creates an urgent need to develop predictive design tools to ensure both the safe and reliable operation of a two-phase thermal management system under the reduced-gravity (like that on the Moon and Mars) and microgravity environments of space. At present, very limited information is available on flow-boiling heat transfer and the CHF under these conditions.

  7. How does surface wettability influence nucleate boiling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Hai Trieu; Caney, Nadia; Marty, Philippe; Colasson, Stéphane; Gavillet, Jérôme

    2009-05-01

    Although the boiling process has been a major subject of research for several decades, its physics still remain unclear and require further investigation. This study aims at highlighting the effects of surface wettability on pool boiling heat transfer. Nanocoating techniques were used to vary the water contact angle from 20° to 110° by modifying nanoscale surface topography and chemistry. The experimental results obtained disagree with the predictions of the classical models. A new approach of nucleation mechanism is established to clarify the nexus between the surface wettability and the nucleate boiling heat transfer. In this approach, we introduce the concept of macro- and micro-contact angles to explain the observed phenomenon. To cite this article: H.T. Phan et al., C. R. Mecanique 337 (2009).

  8. NUCLEAR SUPERHEATER FOR BOILING WATER REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Holl, R.J.; Klecker, R.W.; Graham, C.B.

    1962-05-15

    A description is given of a boiling water reactor having a superheating region integral with the core. The core consists essentially of an annular boiling region surrounding an inner superheating region. Both regions contain fuel elements and are separated by a cylindrical wall, perforations being provided in the lower portion of the cylindrical wall to permit circulation of a common water moderator between the two regions. The superheater region comprises a plurality of tubular fuel assemblies through which the steam emanating from the boiling region passes to the steam outlet. Each superheater fuel assembly has an outer double-walled cylinder, the double walls being concentrically spaced and connected together at their upper ends but open at the bottom to provide for differential thermal expansion of the inner and outer walls. Gas is entrapped in the annulus between the walls which acts as an insulating space between the fissionable material inside and the moderator outside. (AEC)

  9. Boiling on Microconfigured Composite Surfaces Enhanced

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer is one of the key technologies for the two-phase active thermal-control system used on space platforms, as well as for the dynamic power systems aboard the International Space Station. Because it is an effective heat transfer mode, boiling is integral to many space applications, such as heat exchangers and other cooling devices. Nucleate boiling near the critical heat flux (CHF) can transport very large thermal loads with a much smaller device and much lower pumping power than for single-phase heat exchangers. However, boiling performance sharply deteriorates in a reduced-gravity environment, and operation in the CHF regime is somewhat perilous because of the risk of burnout to the device surface. New materials called microconfigured metal-graphite composites can enhance boiling. The photomicrograph shows the microconfiguration (x3000) of the copper-graphite (Cu-Gr) surface as viewed by scanning electronic microscope. The graphite fiber tips appear as plateaus with rugged surfaces embedded in the copper matrix. It has been experimentally demonstrated that this type of material manifests excellent boiling heat transfer performance characteristics and an increased CHF. Nonisothermal surfaces were less sensitive to variations of wall superheat in the CHF regime. Because of the great difference in conductivity between the copper base and the graphite fiber, the composite surfaces have a nonisothermal surface characteristic and, therefore, will have a much larger "safe" operating region in the CHF regime. In addition, the thermocapillary forces induced by the temperature differences between the fiber tips and the metal matrix play an important role in bubble detachment, and may not be adversely affected in a reduced-gravity environment. All these factors indicate that microconfigured composites may improve the reliability and economy (dominant factors in all space applications) of various thermal components found on spacecraft during future

  10. Boiling as household water treatment in Cambodia: a longitudinal study of boiling practice and microbiological effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Brown, Joseph; Sobsey, Mark D

    2012-09-01

    This paper focuses on the consistency of use and microbiological effectiveness of boiling as it is practiced in one study site in peri-urban Cambodia. We followed 60 randomly selected households in Kandal Province over 6 months to collect longitudinal data on water boiling practices and effectiveness in reducing Escherichia coli in household drinking water. Despite > 90% of households reporting that they used boiling as a means of drinking water treatment, an average of only 31% of households had boiled water on hand at follow-up visits, suggesting that actual use may be lower than self-reported use. We collected 369 matched untreated and boiled water samples. Mean reduction of E. coli was 98.5%; 162 samples (44%) of boiled samples were free of E. coli (< 1 colony-forming unit [cfu]/100 mL), and 270 samples (73%) had < 10 cfu/100 mL. Storing boiled water in a covered container was associated with safer product water than storage in an uncovered container.

  11. Boiling as Household Water Treatment in Cambodia: A Longitudinal Study of Boiling Practice and Microbiological Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Joseph; Sobsey, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the consistency of use and microbiological effectiveness of boiling as it is practiced in one study site in peri-urban Cambodia. We followed 60 randomly selected households in Kandal Province over 6 months to collect longitudinal data on water boiling practices and effectiveness in reducing Escherichia coli in household drinking water. Despite > 90% of households reporting that they used boiling as a means of drinking water treatment, an average of only 31% of households had boiled water on hand at follow-up visits, suggesting that actual use may be lower than self-reported use. We collected 369 matched untreated and boiled water samples. Mean reduction of E. coli was 98.5%; 162 samples (44%) of boiled samples were free of E. coli (< 1 colony-forming unit [cfu]/100 mL), and 270 samples (73%) had < 10 cfu/100 mL. Storing boiled water in a covered container was associated with safer product water than storage in an uncovered container. PMID:22826487

  12. CONTINUOUS ANALYZER UTILIZING BOILING POINT DETERMINATION

    DOEpatents

    Pappas, W.S.

    1963-03-19

    A device is designed for continuously determining the boiling point of a mixture of liquids. The device comprises a distillation chamber for boiling a liquid; outlet conduit means for maintaining the liquid contents of said chamber at a constant level; a reflux condenser mounted above said distillation chamber; means for continuously introducing an incoming liquid sample into said reflux condenser and into intimate contact with vapors refluxing within said condenser; and means for measuring the temperature of the liquid flowing through said distillation chamber. (AEC)

  13. The boiling point of stratospheric aerosols.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    A photoelectric particle counter was used for the measurement of aerosol boiling points. The operational principle involves raising the temperature of the aerosol by vigorously heating a portion of the intake tube. At or above the boiling point, the particles disintegrate rather quickly, and a noticeable effect on the size distribution and concentration is observed. Stratospheric aerosols appear to have the same volatility as a solution of 75% sulfuric acid. Chemical analysis of the aerosols indicates that there are other substances present, but that the sulfate radical is apparently the major constituent.

  14. Nucleate pool boiling of hydrocarbon mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Sardesai, R.G.; Palen, J.W.; Thome, J.

    1986-01-01

    The Schlunder method can be correctly used to predict boiling heat transfer coefficient of multicomponent hydrocarbon mixtures. The method was tested against experimental mixtures containing up to five components. The Stephan-Abdelsalam correlation can be used to calculate a ''pseudo-single component'' boiling heat transfer coefficient for a mixture using weighted properties. The effective temperature driving force term and the high mass flux correction term in the Schlunder formulation are empirically adjusted to improve the accuracy of prediction. Predictions of the Schlunder method are sensitive to the VLE calculations. The UNIFAC method is used in this study for reasons discussed in the paper.

  15. BOILING SLURRY REACTOR AND METHOD FO CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Petrick, M.; Marchaterre, J.F.

    1963-05-01

    The control of a boiling slurry nuclear reactor is described. The reactor consists of a vertical tube having an enlarged portion, a steam drum at the top of the vertical tube, and at least one downcomer connecting the steam drum and the bottom of the vertical tube, the reactor being filled with a slurry of fissionabie material in water of such concentration that the enlarged portion of the vertical tube contains a critical mass. The slurry boils in the vertical tube and circulates upwardly therein and downwardly in the downcomer. To control the reactor by controlling the circulation of the slurry, a gas is introduced into the downcomer. (AEC)

  16. An Investigation of Graduate Scientists' Understandings of Evaporation and Boiling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan; Orlik, Yuri

    2000-01-01

    Uses a video presentation of six situations relating to the evaporation and boiling of liquids and the escape of dissolved gases from solution and investigates graduate scientists' understanding of the concepts of boiling and evaporation. (Author/YDS)

  17. An Investigation of Graduate Scientists' Understandings of Evaporation and Boiling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Alan; Orlik, Yuri

    2000-01-01

    Uses a video presentation of six situations relating to the evaporation and boiling of liquids and the escape of dissolved gases from solution and investigates graduate scientists' understanding of the concepts of boiling and evaporation. (Author/YDS)

  18. Cryogenic Propellant Boil-Off Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, D. W.; Christie, R. J.; Carlberg, E.; Feller, J. R.

    2008-03-01

    Lunar missions under consideration would benefit from incorporation of high specific impulse propellants such as LH2 and LO2, even with their accompanying boil-off losses necessary to maintain a steady tank pressure. This paper addresses a cryogenic propellant boil-off reduction system to minimize or eliminate boil-off. Concepts to do so were considered under the In-Space Cryogenic Propellant Depot Project. Specific to that was an investigation of cryocooler integration concepts for relatively large depot sized propellant tanks. One concept proved promising—it served to efficiently move heat to the cryocooler even over long distances via a compressed helium loop. The analyses and designs for this were incorporated into NASA Glenn Research Center's Cryogenic Analysis Tool. That design approach is explained and shown herein. Analysis shows that, when compared to passive only cryogenic storage, the boil-off reduction system begins to reduce system mass if durations are as low as 40 days for LH2, and 14 days for LO2. In addition, a method of cooling LH2 tanks is presented that precludes development issues associated with LH2 temperature cryocoolers.

  19. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffery

    2014-01-01

    The Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System was tested with LH2 and LOX in a vacuum chamber to simulate space vacuum and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. Testing was successful and results validated the scaling study model that predicts active cooling reduces upper stage cryogenic propulsion mass for loiter periods greater than 2 weeks.

  20. Electrically Driven Liquid Film Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Didion, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation presents the science background and ground based results that form the basis of the Electrically Driven Liquid Film Boiling Experiment. This is an ISS experiment that is manifested for 2021. Objective: Characterize the effects of gravity on the interaction of electric and flow fields in the presence of phase change specifically pertaining to: a) The effects of microgravity on the electrically generated two-phase flow. b) The effects of microgravity on electrically driven liquid film boiling (includes extreme heat fluxes). Electro-wetting of the boiling section will repel the bubbles away from the heated surface in microgravity environment. Relevance/Impact: Provides phenomenological foundation for the development of electric field based two-phase thermal management systems leveraging EHD, permitting optimization of heat transfer surface area to volume ratios as well as achievement of high heat transfer coefficients thus resulting in system mass and volume savings. EHD replaces buoyancy or flow driven bubble removal from heated surface. Development Approach: Conduct preliminary experiments in low gravity and ground-based facilities to refine technique and obtain preliminary data for model development. ISS environment required to characterize electro-wetting effect on nucleate boiling and CHF in the absence of gravity. Will operate in the FIR - designed for autonomous operation.

  1. Boiling heat transfer characteristics of liquid xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, T.

    2002-05-01

    Liquid xenon is one of the excellent media for high-energy particle calorimeter. In order to detect a scintillation light effectively, a large number of photo-multipliers (PMTs) will be immersed in liquid xenon. Many chip-resistors equipped with the PMTs dissipate heat into liquid and possibly generate thermal turbulence, such as bubbles, convection flow under a certain operating condition. There is, however, no heat transfer curve (q-ΔT curve) in the literature. Boiling heat transfer characteristics of liquid xenon were measured at a saturated pressure of 0.1 MPa for the first time by using a small pulse tube refrigerator. The heat transfer surface is a thin platinum wire of 0.1 mm diameter and 25 mm long. The measured results were in good agreement with the calculated values both in natural convection and nucleate boiling condition. The film boiling state was difficult to obtain due to its poor reproducibility, and only one data was obtained. The relationship between the heat flux q and temperature difference ΔT was in good agreement with the Morgan's empirical equation in the natural convection region, and with the Kutateladze's equation in the nucleate boiling region.

  2. Big Bubbles in Boiling Liquids: Students' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costu, Bayram

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elicit students' conceptions about big bubbles in boiling liquids (water, ethanol and aqueous CuSO[subscript 4] solution). The study is based on twenty-four students at different ages and grades. The clinical interviews technique was conducted to solicit students' conceptions and the interviews were analyzed to…

  3. The Plausibility of Boiling Geysers on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duxbury, N. S.; Brown, R. H.

    1995-01-01

    A mechanism is suggested and modeled whereby there may be boiling geysers on Triton. The geysers would be of nitrogen considering that Voyager detected cryovolcanic activity, that solid nitrogen conducts heat much less than water ice, and that there is internal heat on Triton.

  4. Big Bubbles in Boiling Liquids: Students' Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costu, Bayram

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to elicit students' conceptions about big bubbles in boiling liquids (water, ethanol and aqueous CuSO[subscript 4] solution). The study is based on twenty-four students at different ages and grades. The clinical interviews technique was conducted to solicit students' conceptions and the interviews were analyzed to…

  5. Electrohydrodynamic Pool Boiling in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, Benjamin D.; Stahl, S. L.

    1996-01-01

    This research is concerned with studying the effects of applied electric fields on pool boiling in a reduced-gravity environment. Experiments are conducted at the NASA Lewis 2.2 sec Drop tower using a drop rig constructed at UC Davis. In the experiments, a platinum wire is heated while immersed in saturated liquid refrigerants (FC-72 and FC-87), or water, causing vapor formation at the wire surface. Electric fields are applied between the wire surface and an outer screen electrode that surrounds the wire. Preliminary normal-gravity experiments with water have demonstrated that applied electric fields generated by the rig electronics can influence boiling characteristics. Reduced-gravity experiments will be performed in the summer of 1996. The experiments will provide fundamental data on electric field strengths required to disrupt film boiling (for various wire heat generation input rates) in reduced gravity for a cylindrical geometry. The experiments should also shed light on the roles of characteristic bubble generation times and charge relaxation times in determining the effects of electric fields on pool boiling. Normal-gravity comparison experiments will also be performed.

  6. A new regime of nucleate boiling in microsphere mesostructures: Jumping pool boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. S.; Makarov, P. G.; El Bouz, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    We have studied a new regime of nucleate boiling in distilled water on substrates representing mesostructures of monodisperse and/or polydisperse microspheres made of various materials. It is experimentally established that, under some conditions of nucleate boiling, there appear "jumping pool boiling" regimes in which bubbles do not reach the surface of underheated liquid. In addition, bubbles may capture a certain number of microspheres, lift them up to some height, and then sink together down to the vessel bottom. Alternatively, microspheres may trap a certain number of bubbles, float up toward the evaporating surface, and then (without reaching the surface) sink back to the bottom layer where the nucleate bubbling takes place. Subregimes of this boiling mechanism involving microspheres of various densities and dimensions have also been observed.

  7. 21 CFR 872.6710 - Boiling water sterilizer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Boiling water sterilizer. 872.6710 Section 872.6710 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6710 Boiling water sterilizer. (a) Identification. A boiling water sterilizer is an...

  8. Cryogenic Boil-Off Reduction System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration due to the high specific impulse that can be achieved using engines suitable for moving 10's to 100's of metric tons of payload mass to destinations outside of low earth orbit. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for missions with durations greater than several days. The losses can be greatly reduced by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and by the integration of self-supporting multi-layer insulation. The active thermal control technology under development is the integration of the reverse turbo- Brayton cycle cryocooler to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling network of tubes coupled to a shield in the tank insulation and to the tank wall itself. Also, the self-supporting insulation technology was utilized under the shield to obtain needed tank applied LH2 performance. These elements were recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center in a series of three tests, two that reduced LH2 boil-off and one to eliminate LO2 boil-off. This test series was conducted in a vacuum chamber that replicated the vacuum of space and the temperatures of low Earth orbit. The test results show that LH2 boil-off was reduced 60% by the cryocooler system operating at 90K and that robust LO2 zero boil-off storage, including full tank pressure control was achieved.

  9. Thermohydrodynamics of boiling in a van der Waals fluid.

    PubMed

    Laurila, T; Carlson, A; Do-Quang, M; Ala-Nissila, T; Amberg, G

    2012-02-01

    We present a modeling approach that enables numerical simulations of a boiling Van der Waals fluid based on the diffuse interface description. A boundary condition is implemented that allows in and out flux of mass at constant external pressure. In addition, a boundary condition for controlled wetting properties of the boiling surface is also proposed. We present isothermal verification cases for each element of our modeling approach. By using these two boundary conditions we are able to numerically access a system that contains the essential physics of the boiling process at microscopic scales. Evolution of bubbles under film boiling and nucleate boiling conditions are observed by varying boiling surface wettability. We observe flow patters around the three-phase contact line where the phase change is greatest. For a hydrophilic boiling surface, a complex flow pattern consistent with vapor recoil theory is observed.

  10. A study of flow boiling phenomena using real time neutron radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novog, David Raymond

    The operation and safety of both fossil-fuel and nuclear power stations depend on adequate cooling of the thermal source involved. This is usually accomplished using liquid coolants that are forced through the high temperature regions by a pumping system; this fluid then transports the thermal energy to another section of the power station. However, fluids that undergo boiling during this process create vapor that can be detrimental, and influence safe operation of other system components. The behavior of this vapor, or void, as it is generated and transported through the system is critical in predicting the operational and safety performance. This study uses two advanced penetrating radiation techniques, Real Time Neutron Radiography (RTNR), and High Speed X-Ray Tomography (HS-XCT), to examine void generation and transport behavior in a flow boiling system. The geometries studied were tube side flow boiling in a cylindrical configuration, and a similar flow channel with an internal twisted tape swirl flow generator. The heat transfer performance and pressure drop characteristics were monitored in addition to void distribution measurements, so that the impact of void distribution could be determined. The RTNR and heat transfer pipe flow studies were conducted using boiling Refrigerant 134a at pressures from 500 to 700 kPa, inlet subcooling from 3 to 12°C and mass fluxes from 55 to 170kg/m 2-s with heat fluxes up to 40 kW/m2. RTNR and HS-XCT were used to measure the distribution and size of the vapor phases in the channel for cylindrical tube-side flow boiling and swirl-flow boiling geometries. The results clearly show that the averaged void is similar for both geometries, but that there is a significant difference in the void distribution, velocity and transport behavior from one configuration to the next. Specifically, the void distribution during flow boiling in a cylindrical-tube test section showed that the void fraction was largest near the tube center and

  11. Enhanced Droplet Control by Transition Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Grounds, Alex; Still, Richard; Takashina, Kei

    2012-01-01

    A droplet of water on a heated surface can levitate over a film of gas produced by its own evaporation in the Leidenfrost effect. When the surface is prepared with ratchet-like saw-teeth topography, these droplets can self-propel and can even climb uphill. However, the extent to which the droplets can be controlled is limited by the physics of the Leidenfrost effect. Here, we show that transition boiling can be induced even at very high surface temperatures and provide additional control over the droplets. Ratchets with acute protrusions enable droplets to climb steeper inclines while ratchets with sub-structures enable their direction of motion to be controlled by varying the temperature of the surface. The droplets' departure from the Leidenfrost regime is assessed by analysing the sound produced by their boiling. We anticipate these techniques will enable the development of more sophisticated methods for controlling small droplets and heat transfer. PMID:23056912

  12. Enhanced droplet control by transition boiling.

    PubMed

    Grounds, Alex; Still, Richard; Takashina, Kei

    2012-01-01

    A droplet of water on a heated surface can levitate over a film of gas produced by its own evaporation in the Leidenfrost effect. When the surface is prepared with ratchet-like saw-teeth topography, these droplets can self-propel and can even climb uphill. However, the extent to which the droplets can be controlled is limited by the physics of the Leidenfrost effect. Here, we show that transition boiling can be induced even at very high surface temperatures and provide additional control over the droplets. Ratchets with acute protrusions enable droplets to climb steeper inclines while ratchets with sub-structures enable their direction of motion to be controlled by varying the temperature of the surface. The droplets' departure from the Leidenfrost regime is assessed by analysing the sound produced by their boiling. We anticipate these techniques will enable the development of more sophisticated methods for controlling small droplets and heat transfer.

  13. Enhanced Droplet Control by Transition Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grounds, Alex; Still, Richard; Takashina, Kei

    2012-10-01

    A droplet of water on a heated surface can levitate over a film of gas produced by its own evaporation in the Leidenfrost effect. When the surface is prepared with ratchet-like saw-teeth topography, these droplets can self-propel and can even climb uphill. However, the extent to which the droplets can be controlled is limited by the physics of the Leidenfrost effect. Here, we show that transition boiling can be induced even at very high surface temperatures and provide additional control over the droplets. Ratchets with acute protrusions enable droplets to climb steeper inclines while ratchets with sub-structures enable their direction of motion to be controlled by varying the temperature of the surface. The droplets' departure from the Leidenfrost regime is assessed by analysing the sound produced by their boiling. We anticipate these techniques will enable the development of more sophisticated methods for controlling small droplets and heat transfer.

  14. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70 °C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling.

  15. Pool Boiling Heat Transfer on structured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addy, J.; Olbricht, M.; Müller, B.; Luke, A.

    2016-09-01

    The development in the process and energy sector shows the importance of efficient utilization of available resources to improve thermal devices. To achieve this goal, all thermal components have to be optimized continuously. Various applications of multi-phase heat and mass transfer have to be improved. Therefore, the heat transfer and the influence of surface roughness in nucleate boiling with the working fluid propane is experimentally investigated on structured mild steel tubes, because only few data are available in the literature. The mild steel tube is sandblasted to obtain different surface roughness. The measurements are carried out over wide ranges of heat flux and pressure. The experimental results are compared with correlations from literature and the effect of surface roughness on the heat transfer is discussed. It is shown that the heat transfer coefficient increases with increasing surface roughness, heat flux and reduced pressure at nucleate pool boiling.

  16. Unorthodox bubbles when boiling in cold water.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott; Granick, Steve

    2014-01-01

    High-speed movies are taken when bubbles grow at gold surfaces heated spotwise with a near-infrared laser beam heating water below the boiling point (60-70 °C) with heating powers spanning the range from very low to so high that water fails to rewet the surface after bubbles detach. Roughly half the bubbles are conventional: They grow symmetrically through evaporation until buoyancy lifts them away. Others have unorthodox shapes and appear to contribute disproportionately to heat transfer efficiency: mushroom cloud shapes, violently explosive bubbles, and cavitation events, probably stimulated by a combination of superheating, convection, turbulence, and surface dewetting during the initial bubble growth. Moreover, bubbles often follow one another in complex sequences, often beginning with an unorthodox bubble that stirs the water, followed by several conventional bubbles. This large dataset is analyzed and discussed with emphasis on how explosive phenomena such as cavitation induce discrepancies from classical expectations about boiling.

  17. Flow boiling in vertical down-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Fighetti, C.; Reddy, G.; Yang, B.; Jafri, T.; McAssey, E.; Qureshi, Z.

    1989-12-31

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate the onset of Ledinegg instability in vertical down-flow. For three size uniformly heated test sections with L/D ratios from 100 to 150, the pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions has been obtained for a wide range of operating parameters. The results are presented in non-dimensional forms which correlate the important variables and provide techniques for predicting the onset of flow instability. 3 refs.

  18. Flow boiling in vertical down-flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, T.; Fighetti, C.; Reddy, G.; Yang, B.; Jafri, T. ); McAssey, E. ); Qureshi, Z. )

    1989-01-01

    An experimental program has been conducted to investigate the onset of Ledinegg instability in vertical down-flow. For three size uniformly heated test sections with L/D ratios from 100 to 150, the pressure drop under subcooled boiling conditions has been obtained for a wide range of operating parameters. The results are presented in non-dimensional forms which correlate the important variables and provide techniques for predicting the onset of flow instability. 3 refs.

  19. Reduced Boil-Off System Sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, Monica C.; Plachta, David W.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is currently developing cryogenic propellant storage and transfer systems for future space exploration and scientific discovery missions by addressing the need to raise the technology readiness level of cryogenic fluid management technologies. Cryogenic propellants are baselined in many propulsion systems due to their inherently high specific impulse; however, their low boiling points can cause substantial boil-off losses over time. Recent efforts such as the Reduced Boil-off Testing and the Active Thermal Control Scaling Study provide important information on the benefit of an active cooling system applied to LH2 propellant storage. Findings show that zero-boil off technologies can reduce overall mass in LH2 storage systems when low Earth orbit loiter periods extend beyond two months. A significant part of this mass reduction is realized by integrating two stages of cooling: a 20 K stage to intercept heat at the tank surface, and a 90 K stage to reduce the heat entering the less efficient 20 K stage. A missing element in previous studies, which is addressed in this paper, is the development of a direct method for sizing the 90 K cooling stage. Such a method requires calculation of the heat entering both the 90 K and 20 K stages as compared to the overall system masses, and is reliant upon the temperature distribution, performance, and unique design characteristics of the system in question. By utilizing the known conductance of a system without active thermal control, the heat being intercepted by a 90 K stage can be calculated to find the resultant lift and mass of each active thermal control stage. Integral to this is the thermal conductance of the cooling straps and the broad area cooling shield, key parts of the 90 K stage. Additionally, a trade study is performed to show the ability of the 90 K cooling stage to reduce the lift on the 20 K cryocooler stage, which is considerably less developed and efficient than 90 K cryocoolers.

  20. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.H.

    1995-08-01

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C{sub 4}F{sub 10} weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd.

  1. Fundamental Boiling and RP-1 Freezing Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goode, Brian; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes results from experiments performed to help understand certain aspects of the MC-1 engine prestart thermal conditioning procedure. The procedure was constrained by the fact that the engine must chill long enough to get quality LOX at the LOX pump inlet but must be short enough to prevent freezing of RP-1 in the fuel pump. A chill test of an MC-1 LOX impeller was performed in LN2 to obtain data on film boiling, transition boiling and impeller temperature histories. The transition boiling data was important to the chill time so a subsequent experiment was performed chilling simple steel plates in LOX to obtain similar data for LOX. To address the fuel freezing concern, two experiments were performed. First, fuel was frozen in a tray and its physical characteristics were observed and temperatures of the fuel were measured. The result was physical characteristics as a function of temperature. Second was an attempt to measure the frozen thickness of RP-1 on a cold wall submerged in warm RP-1 and to develop a method for calculating that thickness for other conditions.

  2. Boiling incipience in a reboiler tube

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, H.; Alam, S.S. )

    1991-03-01

    This heating surface and liquid temperature distributions were experimentally obtained to identify the boiling incipience conditions in a single vertical tube thermosiphon reboiler with water, acetone, ethanol, and ethylene glycol as test liquids. The test section was an electrically heated stainless steel tube of 25.56-mm i.d. and 1900 mm long. The uniform heat flux values were used in the range of 3800--40 000 W/m{sup 2}, while inlet liquid subcooling were varied from 0.2 to 45.5{degrees} C. The liquid submergence was maintained around 100, 75, 50 and 30%. All the data were generated at 1-atm pressure. The maximum superheats attained around boiling incipience were taken from the wall temperature distributions and correlated with heat flux and physical properties of liquids using the expression of Yin and Abdelmessih. The heated sections required for onset of fully developed boiling with net vapor generation were determined assuming a thermal equilibrium model. In this paper a dimensionless correlation relating these values with heat flux, liquid subcooling, and submergence is proposed.

  3. BOILING AUGMENTATION WITH MICRO/NANOSTRUCTURED SURFACES: CURRENT STATUS AND RESEARCH OUTLOOK

    SciTech Connect

    Bhavnani, S; Narayanan, V; Qu, WL; Jensen, M; Kandlikar, S; Kim, J; Thome, J

    2014-07-23

    Advances in the development of micro- and nanostructured surfaces have enabled tremendous progress in delineation of mechanisms in boiling heat transfer and have propelled the rapid enhancement of heat transfer rates. This area of research is poised to make great strides toward tailoring surface features to produce dramatically improved thermal performance. A workshop was held in April 2013 to provide a review of the current state-of-the-art and to develop near-term and long-term goals for the boiling augmentation community. A brief historical perspective and primary findings are presented in this article. Though impressive gains have been made in enhancement of boiling heat transport, there still remain several unknowns such as the mechanisms that affect critical heat flux and optimization of surfaces for boiling heat transport. The promise of improved spatial resolution of optical techniques should improve knowledge of near-surface mechanisms. Standardization of experimental test sections and procedures has emerged as a critical issue that needs to be addressed immediately.

  4. Boiling radial flow in fractures of varying wall porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, Robb Allan

    2000-06-01

    The focus of this report is the coupling of conductive heat transfer and boiling convective heat transfer, with boiling flow in a rock fracture. A series of experiments observed differences in boiling regimes and behavior, and attempted to quantify a boiling convection coefficient. The experimental study involved boiling radial flow in a simulated fracture, bounded by a variety of materials. Nonporous and impermeable aluminum, highly porous and permeable Berea sandstone, and minimally porous and permeable graywacke from The Geysers geothermal field. On nonporous surfaces, the heat flux was not strongly coupled to injection rate into the fracture. However, for porous surfaces, heat flux, and associated values of excess temperature and a boiling convection coefficient exhibited variation with injection rate. Nucleation was shown to occur not upon the visible surface of porous materials, but a distance below the surface, within the matrix. The depth of boiling was a function of injection rate, thermal power supplied to the fracture, and the porosity and permeability of the rock. Although matrix boiling beyond fracture wall may apply only to a finite radius around the point of injection, higher values of heat flux and a boiling convection coefficient may be realized with boiling in a porous, rather than nonporous surface bounded fracture.

  5. The Driving Force of Frost Boils and Hummocks Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shur, Y.; Ping, C.

    2003-12-01

    Formation of frost boils has several aspects to be explained, including the bowl shape of boils, the formation of an organic layer at the periphery of the frost boils, the elevated center of the boils, and resistance of the soil surface to vegetation colonization. Genesis of frost boils and hummocks have been widely attributed to cryoturbation-a complex of seasonally interchanging processes of frost heave and thaw settlement. Existing hypotheses, however, do not consider changes in the upper permafrost as factors of frost boil and hummock formation. Most of features listed above cannot be explained by reversible seasonal changes in the active layer. Frost boils and inter-boil areas form a well-organized and long-term functioning system closely linked to upper permafrost dynamics. Formation of this system starts with the occurrence of vegetation in inter-boil areas in shallow thermal cracks limited by the thickness of the active layer. Vegetation and its decomposition change the thermal properties of the active layer that steadily decreases with formation of aggradational ice and perennial frost heave beneath vegetated inter-boils. Due to the three-dimensional nature of the freezing front, frost heave in inter-boil areas is not perpendicular to the soil surface but is inclined in the direction of the boils, thus forming the bowl shape of boils. The organic matter formed in inter-boil areas intrudes under boils due to formation of frost cracks and thawing of ice lenses and layers at the bottom of the active layer. Penetration of organics along the active layer - permafrost boundary from an inter-boil area leads to formation of additional aggradational ice in the intermediate layer at the top of the permafrost accompanying the intruding organics. This aggradational process reinforces the bowl shape of frost-boils. Accumulation of organic matter at the lower part of the active layer leads to a decrease in active-layer thickness under the boils, which in turn leads to

  6. Heat Transfer For Subcooled Flow Boiling In Hypervapotron Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Chena, Peipei; Wua, Wen; Jonesa, Barclay G.; Newell, Ty A

    2006-07-01

    This work reports on experimental studies that examine subcooled boiling on the enhanced heat transfer surface of hypervapotron structures. The use of simulant fluid (refrigerant R134a) instead of prototypic water allows examination of a full range of subcooled boiling, including up to critical heat flux (CHF). The experimental results are compared to Bjorge's model and Kandlikar's heat transfer correlation in the subcooled boiling region. It is found that the fully developed boiling curve has a slope of about 2.96 (q{sup {approx}} {delta}{sub sat} {sup 2}.{sup 96}), which shows good agreement with Bjorge's recognition for flat surface channels. In addition, Kandlikar's correlation is also able to predict the heat transfer coefficient for the range from net vapor generation (NVG) to the fully developed boiling region with acceptable accuracy. However, the heat transfer curve shows a significant deviation when subcooled boiling approaches CHF. (authors)

  7. Water boiling inside carbon nanotubes: toward efficient drug release.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2011-07-26

    We show using molecular dynamics simulation that spatial confinement of water inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially increases its boiling temperature and that a small temperature growth above the boiling point dramatically raises the inside pressure. Capillary theory successfully predicts the boiling point elevation down to 2 nm, below which large deviations between the theory and atomistic simulation take place. Water behaves qualitatively different inside narrow CNTs, exhibiting transition into an unusual phase, where pressure is gas-like and grows linearly with temperature, while the diffusion constant is temperature-independent. Precise control over boiling by CNT diameter, together with the rapid growth of inside pressure above the boiling point, suggests a novel drug delivery protocol. Polar drug molecules are packaged inside CNTs; the latter are delivered into living tissues and heated by laser. Solvent boiling facilitates drug release.

  8. Heat transfer from aluminum surfaces to pool boiling He I

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.; Van Sciver, S.W.

    1996-12-31

    Heat transfer measurements between different aluminum surfaces and pool boiling He I at 4.21 K are reported. The samples are contained in a channel configuration similar to what might be found in a large bath cooled superconducting magnet. Results include heat transfer coefficients in the nucleate and film boiling regimes as well as values for the peak nucleate and minimum film boiling heat flux. The effects of sample orientation and surface condition are also studied.

  9. Heat exchange units boiling process numerical modeling at subatmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodina, E. N.; Mikhailov, A. G.

    2017-08-01

    The paper deals with the boiling process mechanism, the results of the boiling intensification methods analysis at subatmospheric pressure are presented. The calculation methodology for the boiling process on the surface performed in the form of capillary slotted channels is represented. Heat transfer coefficients variations calculation dependences defined by analytical and numerical methods applying are described. The heat exchange surface geometrical characteristics impact on the heat exchange capacity in vacuum conditions was investigated.

  10. Zero Boil-Off System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, David W.; Johnson, Wesley L.; Feller, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration due to their high specific impulse for rocket motors of upper stages suitable for transporting 10s to 100s of metric tons of payload mass to destinations outside of low earth orbit and for their return. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for missions with durations greater than several months. These losses can be eliminated by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and modulating the cryocooler to control tank pressure. The active thermal control technology being developed by NASA is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler and its integration to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling tubing network coupled to the tank wall. This configuration was recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center, in a vacuum chamber and cryoshroud that simulated the essential thermal aspects of low Earth orbit, its vacuum and temperature. Testing consisted of three passive tests with the active cryocooler system off, and 7 active tests, with the cryocooler powered up. The test matrix included zero boil-off tests performed at 90 full and 25 full, and several demonstrations at excess cooling capacity and reduced cooling capacity. From this, the tank pressure response with varied cryocooler power inputs was determined. This test series established that the active cooling system integrated with the propellant tank eliminated boil-off and robustly controlled tank pressure.

  11. Boiling Experiment Facility for Heat Transfer Studies in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; McQuillen, John; Chao, David

    2008-01-01

    Pool boiling in microgravity is an area of both scientific and practical interest. By conducting tests in microgravity, it is possible to assess the effect of buoyancy on the overall boiling process and assess the relative magnitude of effects with regards to other "forces" and phenomena such as Marangoni forces, liquid momentum forces, and microlayer evaporation. The Boiling eXperiment Facility is now being built for the Microgravity Science Glovebox that will use normal perfluorohexane as a test fluid to extend the range of test conditions to include longer test durations and less liquid subcooling. Two experiments, the Microheater Array Boiling Experiment and the Nucleate Pool Boiling eXperiment will use the Boiling eXperiment Facility. The objectives of these studies are to determine the differences in local boiling heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity and normal gravity from nucleate boiling, through critical heat flux and into the transition boiling regime and to examine the bubble nucleation, growth, departure and coalescence processes. Custom-designed heaters will be utilized to achieve these objectives.

  12. Optimizing the Combination of Smoking and Boiling on Quality of Korean Traditional Boiled Loin (M. longissimus dorsi)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    The combined effects of smoking and boiling on the proximate composition, technological quality traits, shear force, and sensory characteristics of the Korean traditional boiled loin were studied. Cooking loss, processing loss, and shear force were lower in the smoked/boiled samples than those in the control (without smoking treatment) (p<0.05). The results showed that the boiled loin samples between the control and treatment did not differ significantly in protein, fat, or ash contents, or pH values (p>0.05). The treated samples had higher score for overall acceptability than the control (p<0.05). Thus, these results show that the Korean traditional boiled loin treated with smoking for 60 min before boiling had improved physicochemical properties and sensory characteristics. PMID:26761822

  13. Optimizing the Combination of Smoking and Boiling on Quality of Korean Traditional Boiled Loin (M. longissimus dorsi).

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Kim, Hyun-Wook; Hwang, Ko-Eun; Song, Dong-Heon; Kim, Yong-Jae; Jung, Tae-Jun; Kim, Young-Boong; Kim, Cheon-Jei

    2015-01-01

    The combined effects of smoking and boiling on the proximate composition, technological quality traits, shear force, and sensory characteristics of the Korean traditional boiled loin were studied. Cooking loss, processing loss, and shear force were lower in the smoked/boiled samples than those in the control (without smoking treatment) (p<0.05). The results showed that the boiled loin samples between the control and treatment did not differ significantly in protein, fat, or ash contents, or pH values (p>0.05). The treated samples had higher score for overall acceptability than the control (p<0.05). Thus, these results show that the Korean traditional boiled loin treated with smoking for 60 min before boiling had improved physicochemical properties and sensory characteristics.

  14. Triops (Entomostraca) eggs killed only by boiling.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, D B

    1968-07-19

    Temporary rainpools near Khartoum, Sudan, are inhabited by the notostracan crustacean Triops which completes its life cycle within 4 weeks. The annual rains fall in late summer, and throughout the winter and early summer the eggs of Triops remain in the dried mud or dust where they may be exposed to temperatures up to 80 degrees C. Laboratory experiments show that they can withstand temperatures up to within 1 degrees C of boiling, but are killed in partial vacuum by 70 degrees C, at atmospheric pressure by 100 degrees C, or under pressure by 105 degrees C. Exposure to high temperature seems to be necessary to break the egg diapause.

  15. Static-flow-instability in subcooled flow boiling in wide rectangular parallel channels

    SciTech Connect

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; McDuffee, J.L.; Yoder, G.L. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a state-of-the-art research reactor facility that will be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and is designed to become the world`s most advanced thermal neutron flux source for scientific experiments. Therefore, the core of the ANS reactor (ANSR) must be designed to accommodate very high power densities using very high coolant mass fluxes and subcooling levels, The nominal average and peak heat fluxes in the ANSR are approximately 6 and 12 MW/M{sup 2}, respectively, with a nominal total thermal power of 303 MW. Highly subcooled heavy-water coolant (1.7 MPa and 85{degrees}C at the core exit) flows vertically upward at a very high mass flux of almost 27 Mg/M{sup 2}-s. The cooling channels in each fuel assembly are all parallel and share common inlet and outlet plenums, effectively imposing a common pressure drop across all the channels. This core configuration is subject to flow excursion (FE) and/or flow instability that may occur once boiling is initiated in any one of the channels. The FE phenomenon constitutes a different thermal limit than a true critical heat flux (CHF) or departure from nucleate boiling (DNB). In such a system, initiation of boiling in one of the channels (i.e., the hot channel) can result in flow redistribution to the other cooler channels. This report details testing to document this phenomenon.

  16. Zero Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcquillen, John

    2016-01-01

    The Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) experiment has been developed as a small scale ISS experiment aimed at delineating important fluid flow, heat and mass transport, and phase change phenomena that affect cryogenic storage tank pressurization and pressure control in microgravity. The experiments use a simulant transparent low boiling point fluid (PnP) in a sealed transparent Dewar to study and quantify: (a) fluid flow and thermal stratification during pressurization; (b) mixing, thermal destratification, depressurization, and jet-ullage penetration during pressure control by jet mixing. The experiment will provide valuable microgravity empirical two-phase data associated with the above-mentioned physical phenomena through highly accurate local wall and fluid temperature and pressure measurements, full-field phase-distribution and flow visualization. Moreover, the experiments are performed under tightly controlled and definable heat transfer boundary conditions to provide reliable high-fidelity data and precise input as required for validation verification of state-of-the-art two-phase CFD models developed as part of this research and by other groups in the international scientific and cryogenic fluid management communities.

  17. Unsteady heat transfer during subcooled film boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagov, V. V.; Zabirov, A. R.; Lexin, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cooling of high-temperature bodies in subcooled liquid is of importance for quenching technologies and also for understanding the processes initiating vapor explosion. An analysis of the available experimental information shows that the mechanisms governing heat transfer in these processes are interpreted ambiguously; a more clear-cut definition of the Leidenfrost temperature notion is required. The results of experimental observations (Hewitt, Kenning, and previous investigations performed by the authors of this article) allow us to draw a conclusion that there exists a special mode of intense heat transfer during film boil- ing of highly subcooled liquid. For revealing regularities and mechanisms governing intense transfer of energy in this process, specialists of Moscow Power Engineering Institute's (MPEI) Department of Engineering Thermal Physics conduct systematic works aimed at investigating the cooling of high-temperature balls made of different metals in water with a temperature ranging from 20 to 100°C. It has been determined that the field of temperatures that takes place in balls with a diameter of more than 30 mm in intense cooling modes loses its spherical symmetry. An approximate procedure for solving the inverse thermal conductivity problem for calculating the heat flux density on the ball surface is developed. During film boiling, in which the ball surface temperature is well above the critical level for water, and in which liquid cannot come in direct contact with the wall, the calculated heat fluxes reach 3-7 MW/m2.

  18. Droplet Impingement Boiling on Heated Superhydrophobic Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crockett, Julie; Clavijo, Cristian; Maynes, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    When a droplet impinges on a solid surface at a temperature well above the saturation temperature, vaporization of the liquid begins immediately after contact. Different boiling regimes may result depending on the surface temperature and volatility of the liquid. The nucleate boiling regime is characterized by explosive atomization, which occurs when vapor bubbles burst causing an extravagant shower of small micro droplets as well as the well-known ``sizzling'' sound. In this work, we show that the vapor is surprisingly re-directed during impingement on a superhydrophobic surface such that atomization is completely suppressed. We hypothesize that this occurs because vapor escapes through the superhydrophobic interface such that the top of the droplet remains free of bursting vapor bubbles. We explore a wide range of surface patterning with feature spacing of 8 to 32 microns and solid area fractions of 10 to 50 percent; surface temperatures from 100 C to 400 C; and Weber numbers of 1 to 100. Atomization is found to decrease with increasing feature spacing and decreasing solid fraction, and vanishes completely for large spacing. It may be that large feature spacing promotes early transition to the Leidenfrost regime.

  19. (Boiling water reactor (BWR) CORA experiments)

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1990-10-16

    To participate in the 1990 CORA Workshop at Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) GmbH, Karlsruhe, FRG, on October 1--4, and to participate in detailed discussions on October 5 with the KfK CORA Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) experiments. The traveler attended the 1990 CORA Workshop at KfK, FRG. Participation included the presentation of a paper on work performed by the Boiling Water Reactor Core Melt Progression Phenomena Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on posttest analyses of CORA BWR experiments. The Statement of Work (November 1989) for the BWR Core Melt Progression Phenomena Program provides for pretest and posttest analyses of the BWR CORA experiments performed at KfK. Additionally, it is intended that ORNL personnel participate in the planning process for future CORA BWR experiments. For these purposes, meetings were held with KfK staff to discuss such topics as (1) experimental test schedule, (2) BWR test conduct, (3) perceived BWR experimental needs, and (4) KfK operational staff needs with respect to ORNL support. 19 refs.

  20. Gravity Effects in Microgap Flow Boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Franklin; Bar-Cohen, Avram

    2017-01-01

    Increasing integration density of electronic components has exacerbated the thermal management challenges facing electronic system developers. The high power, heat flux, and volumetric heat generation of emerging devices are driving the transition from remote cooling, which relies on conduction and spreading, to embedded cooling, which facilitates direct contact between the heat-generating device and coolant flow. Microgap coolers employ the forced flow of dielectric fluids undergoing phase change in a heated channel between devices. While two phase microcoolers are used routinely in ground-based systems, the lack of acceptable models and correlations for microgravity operation has limited their use for spacecraft thermal management. Previous research has revealed that gravitational acceleration plays a diminishing role as the channel diameter shrinks, but there is considerable variation among the proposed gravity-insensitive channel dimensions and minimal research on rectangular ducts. Reliable criteria for achieving gravity-insensitive flow boiling performance would enable spaceflight systems to exploit this powerful thermal management technique and reduce development time and costs through reliance on ground-based testing. In the present effort, the authors have studied the effect of evaporator orientation on flow boiling performance of HFE7100 in a 218 m tall by 13.0 mm wide microgap cooler. Similar heat transfer coefficients and critical heat flux were achieved across five evaporator orientations, indicating that the effect of gravity was negligible.

  1. Zero Boil-Off System Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plachta, D. W.; Johnson, W. L.; Feller, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration plans due to their high specific impulse for rocket motors of upper stages. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for long duration missions. These losses can be eliminated by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and modulating the cryocooler temperature to control tank pressure. The technology being developed by NASA is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler and its integration to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling tubing network coupled to the tank wall. This configuration was recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center in a vacuum chamber and cryoshroud that simulated the essential thermal aspects of low Earth orbit, its vacuum and temperature. This test series established that the active cooling system integrated with the propellant tank eliminated boil-off and robustly controlled tank pressure.

  2. Thermohydrodynamics of boiling in binary compressible fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jiewei; Do-Quang, Minh; Amberg, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    We numerically study the thermohydrodynamics of boiling for a CO2 + ethanol mixture on lyophilic and lyophobic surfaces in both closed and open systems, based on a diffuse interface model for a two-component system. The corresponding wetting boundary conditions for an isothermal system are proposed and verified in this paper. New phenomena due to the addition of another component, mainly the preferential evaporation of the more volatile component, are observed. In the open system and the closed system, the physical process shows very different characteristics. In the open system, except for the movement of the contact line, the qualitative features are rather similar for lyophobic and lyophilic surfaces. In the closed system, the vortices that are observed on a lyophobic surface are not seen on a lyophilic surface. More sophisticated wetting boundary conditions for nonisothermal, two-component systems might need to be further developed, taking into account the variations of density, temperature, and surface tension near the wall, while numerical results show that the boundary conditions proposed here also work well even in boiling, where the temperature is nonuniform.

  3. Zero boil-off system testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachta, D. W.; Johnson, W. L.; Feller, J. R.

    2016-03-01

    Cryogenic propellants such as liquid hydrogen (LH2) and liquid oxygen (LO2) are a part of NASA's future space exploration plans due to their high specific impulse for rocket motors of upper stages. However, the low storage temperatures of LH2 and LO2 cause substantial boil-off losses for long duration missions. These losses can be eliminated by incorporating high performance cryocooler technology to intercept heat load to the propellant tanks and modulating the cryocooler temperature to control tank pressure. The technology being developed by NASA is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler and its integration to the propellant tank through a distributed cooling tubing network coupled to the tank wall. This configuration was recently tested at NASA Glenn Research Center in a vacuum chamber and cryoshroud that simulated the essential thermal aspects of low Earth orbit, its vacuum and temperature. This test series established that the active cooling system integrated with the propellant tank eliminated boil-off and robustly controlled tank pressure.

  4. 18. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. View: Detail of floor with molasses pits below floor level. The remaining floor boards indicate the structure of the floor covering the entire inside of the boiling house. In the left background the base of the centrifugals are in view. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  5. 17. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Boiling House, 1878. View: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Boiling House, 1878. View: Southwest corner of boiling house. The amimal-powered cane mill is located in the undergrowth in the right foreground, - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  6. Explosive Boiling at Very Low Heat Fluxes: A Microgravity Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, M. M.; Lin, C. S.; Knoll, R. H.; Bentz, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents experimental observations of explosive boiling from a large (relative to bubble sizes) flat heating surface at very low heat fluxes in microgravity. The explosive boiling is characterized as either a rapid growth of vapor mass over the entire heating surface due to the flashing of superheated liquid or a violent boiling spread following the appearance of single bubbles on the heating surface. Pool boiling data with saturated Freon 113 was obtained in the microgravity environment of the space shuttle. The unique features of the experimental results are the sustainability of high liquid superheat for long periods and the occurrence of explosive boiling at low heat fluxes (0.2 to 1.2 kW/sq m). For a heat flux of 1.0 kW/sq m a wall superheat of 17.9 degrees C was attained in ten minutes of heating. This was followed by an explosive boiling accompanied with a pressure spike and a violent bulk liquid motion. However, at this heat flux the vapor blanketing the heating surface could not be sustained. Stable nucleate boiling continued following the explosive boiling.

  7. Reversed boiling curve phenomenon on surfaces with interlaced wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, C. C.; Chiu, W. C.; Kuo, L. S.; Chen, P. H.

    2014-10-01

    We experimentally investigated the effects of contact angle difference of heterogeneous wettability surfaces on pool boiling. For surfaces exhibiting heterogeneous wettability, this study determined that the pool boiling curve experiences a superheat decrease in some regions before the system achieves the critical heat flux. In addition, oscillation of the vapor column and bubble transverse motions on the heterogeneous wettability coated surface were observed.

  8. Boiling treatment of ABS and PS plastics for flotation separation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chong-qing; Wang, Hui; Wu, Bao-xin; Liu, Qun

    2014-07-01

    A new physical method, namely boiling treatment, was developed to aid flotation separation of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) and polystyrene (PS) plastics. Boiling treatment was shown to be effective in producing a hydrophilic surface on ABS plastic. Fourier Transform Infrared analysis was conducted to investigate the mechanism of boiling treatment of ABS. Surface rearrangement of polymer may be responsible for surface change of boiling treated ABS, and the selective influence of boiling treatment on the floatability of boiling treated plastics may be attributed to the difference in the molecular mobility of polymer chains. The effects of flotation time, frother concentration and particle size on flotation behavior of simple plastic were investigated. Based on flotation behavior of simple plastic, flotation separation of boiling treatment ABS and PS with different particle sizes was achieved efficiently. The purity of ABS and PS was up to 99.78% and 95.80%, respectively; the recovery of ABS and PS was up to 95.81% and 99.82%, respectively. Boiling treatment promotes the industrial application of plastics flotation and facilitates plastic recycling.

  9. Thermal-hydraulic performance of convective boiling jet array impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, R.; De Brún, C.; Kempers, R.; Lupoi, R.; Robinson, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    Jet impingement boiling is investigated with regard to heat transfer and pressure drop performance using a novel laser sintered 3D printed jet impingement manifold design. Water was the working fluid at atmospheric pressure with inlet subcooling of 7oC. The convective boiling performance of the impinging jet system was investigated for a flat copper target surface for 2700≤Re≤5400. The results indicate that the heat transfer performance of the impinging jet is independent of Reynolds number for fully developed boiling. Also, the investigation of nozzle to plate spacing shows that low spacing delays the onset of nucleate boiling causing a superheat overshoot that is not observed with larger gaps. However, no sensitivity to the gap spacing was measured once boiling was fully developed. The assessment of the pressure drop performance showed that the design effectively transfers heat with low pumping power requirements. In particular, owing to the insensitivity of the heat transfer to flow rate during fully developed boiling, the coefficient of performance of jet impingement boiling in the fully developed boiling regime deteriorates with increased flow rate due to the increase in pumping power flux.

  10. Influence of Pressure on Stable Film Boiling of Subcooled Liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabirov, A. R.; Yagov, V. V.; Kaban'kov, O. N.; Leksin, M. A.; Kanin, P. K.

    2016-11-01

    Film boiling of subcooled liquids is an integral part of the hardening process. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying film boiling is important for modeling processes in atomic power engineering and cryogenic technology. Stationary processes of film boiling of subcooled liquids under conditions of their free motion near cylindrical heaters, just as subcooled liquid turbulent flow past high-temperature surfaces, represent quite a different type of process. In cooling metal spheres heated to a high temperature by a subcooled water, a special regime of film boiling is observed (microbubble boiling) distinguished by high intensity of heat transfer. Such a regime has not been revealed up to now for nonaqueous liquids. The paper presents new experimental data on heat transfer regimes in cooling nickel spheres in subcooled isopropanol and perfluorohexane at pressures of up to 1 MPa. It has been established that stable film boiling is the main regime of heat transfer that accounts for the larger part of the total time of cooling. The regimes of highly intensive film boiling heat transfer were not observed in the entire range of operational parameters even in the case of extreme subcoolings of liquid below their saturation temperature (to 170 K). The intensity of heat transfer in stable film boiling increases noticeably with subcooling of a chilling liquid.

  11. Nucleate boiling of water in twisted-tape swirled flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kudryavtsev, I.S.; Lekakh, B.M.; Paskar, B.L.; Fedorovich, Y.D. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper analyzes nucleate boiling in twisted-tape swirled water flow. The transverse flow velocity in the wall region, generated by the density gradient and acceleration, is estimated. It is concluded that the turbulence has a significant effect on the growth of vapor bubbles, decreasing the rate of nucleate boiling without simultaneously increasing the convective component to compensate for this effect.

  12. Effects of water in film boiling over liquid metal melts

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.A.; Finfrock, C.; Burson, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    Liquid-liquid boiling experiments have been performed with H/sub 2/O and liquid metal melts in the 100-series test matrix (Runs 121, 126, 127) and the VE test matrix. Some of the pre-explosion unstable film boiling data as well as observations from the explosive series have been previously reported.

  13. Prospective Primary School Teachers' Perceptions on Boiling and Freezing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senocak, Erdal

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the perceptions of prospective primary school teachers on the physical state of water during the processes of boiling and freezing. There were three stages in the investigation: First, open-ended questions concerning the boiling and freezing of water were given to two groups of prospective primary school…

  14. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, H. Jeremy; Mizerak, Jordan P.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2015-10-01

    Boiling--a process that has powered industries since the steam age--is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase performance. However, without active in situ control of bubbles, temperature or steam generation cannot be adjusted for a given heat input. Here we report the ability to turn bubbles `on and off' independent of heat input during boiling both temporally and spatially via molecular manipulation of the boiling surface. As a result, we can rapidly and reversibly alter heat transfer performance up to an order of magnitude. Our experiments show that this active control is achieved by electrostatically adsorbing and desorbing charged surfactants to alter the wettability of the surface, thereby affecting nucleation. This approach can improve performance and flexibility in existing boiling technologies as well as enable emerging or unprecedented energy applications.

  15. Conversion of direct process high-boiling residue to monosilanes

    DOEpatents

    Brinson, Jonathan Ashley; Crum, Bruce Robert; Jarvis, Jr., Robert Frank

    2000-01-01

    A process for the production of monosilanes from the high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride with silicon metalloid in a process typically referred to as the "direct process." The process comprises contacting a high-boiling residue resulting from the reaction of hydrogen chloride and silicon metalloid, with hydrogen gas in the presence of a catalytic amount of aluminum trichloride effective in promoting conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. The present process results in conversion of the high-boiling residue to monosilanes. At least a portion of the aluminum trichloride catalyst required for conduct of the process may be formed in situ during conduct of the direct process and isolation of the high-boiling residue.

  16. Stability of electric heaters in the boiling heat transfer process

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, R.I.

    1991-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer from electrically heated wires and composite heaters was studied in the three boiling regimes; nucleate, transition, and film. The electrical input to the heaters was controlled by the heater temperature through the use of feedback control techniques. Particular attention was paid to the transition region of the boiling curve where the slope is negative and operation is unstable without proper control. Boiling curves produced by an x-ray plotter are presented for gold-plated tungsten wires and also for platinum wires. Stability conditions and transfer functions were developed for a complete composite heater system. Steady-state operation in the transition region of the boiling curve clearly demonstrates that there are two separate transition curves depending on whether the temperature is increasing or decreasing.

  17. Microbiological effectiveness of disinfecting water by boiling in rural Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Ghislaine; Miller, Laura; Clasen, Thomas

    2010-03-01

    Boiling is the most common means of treating water in the home and the benchmark against which alternative point-of-use water treatment options must be compared. In a 5-week study in rural Guatemala among 45 households who claimed they always or almost always boiled their drinking water, boiling was associated with a 86.2% reduction in geometric mean thermotolerant coliforms (TTC) (N = 206, P < 0.0001). Despite consistent levels of fecal contamination in source water, 71.2% of stored water samples from self-reported boilers met the World Health Organization guidelines for safe drinking water (0 TTC/100 mL), and 10.7% fell within the commonly accepted low-risk category of (1-10 TTC/100 mL). As actually practiced in the study community, boiling significantly improved the microbiological quality of drinking water, though boiled and stored drinking water is not always free of fecal contaminations.

  18. Microbiological Effectiveness of Disinfecting Water by Boiling in Rural Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Ghislaine; Miller, Laura; Clasen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Boiling is the most common means of treating water in the home and the benchmark against which alternative point-of-use water treatment options must be compared. In a 5-week study in rural Guatemala among 45 households who claimed they always or almost always boiled their drinking water, boiling was associated with a 86.2% reduction in geometric mean thermotolerant coliforms (TTC) (N = 206, P < 0.0001). Despite consistent levels of fecal contamination in source water, 71.2% of stored water samples from self-reported boilers met the World Health Organization guidelines for safe drinking water (0 TTC/100 mL), and 10.7% fell within the commonly accepted low-risk category of (1–10 TTC/100 mL). As actually practiced in the study community, boiling significantly improved the microbiological quality of drinking water, though boiled and stored drinking water is not always free of fecal contaminations. PMID:20207876

  19. Little low-power boiling never hurt anybody. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F.E.

    1985-01-01

    Failures in the shutdown heat removal system of an LMFBR might lead to flow stagnation and coolant boiling in the reactor core. At normal operating power, the onset of sodium boiling will lead to film dryout and melting of the cladding and fuel within a few seconds. On the other hand, both calculations and currently available experimental data indicate that at heat fluxes corresponding to decay heat power levels, boiling leads to improved heat removal; and it limits the temperature rise in the fuel pins. Therefore, when setting safety criteria for decay heat removal systems, there is no reason to preclude sodium boiling per se because of heat removal considerations. As an example that illustrates the beneficial impact of coolant boiling, a case involving temporary loss of feedwater and staggered pump failures in a hypothetical, 1000-MWe loop-type reactor was run in the SASSYS-1 code.

  20. Influence of the wettability on the boiling onset.

    PubMed

    Bourdon, B; Rioboo, R; Marengo, M; Gosselin, E; De Coninck, J

    2012-01-17

    Experimental investigation of pool boiling is conducted in stationary conditions over very smooth bronze surfaces covered by a very thin layer of gold presenting various surface treatments to isolate the role of wettability. We show that even with surfaces presenting mean roughness amplitudes below 10 nm the role of surface topography is of importance. The study shows also that wettability alone can trigger the boiling and that the boiling position on the surface can be controlled by chemical grafting using for instance alkanethiol. Moreover, boiling curves, that is, heat flux versus the surface superheat (which is the difference between the solid surface temperature and the liquid saturation temperature), are recorded and enabled to quantify, for this case, the significant reduction of the superheat at the onset of incipient boiling due to wettability.

  1. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants.

    PubMed

    Cho, H Jeremy; Mizerak, Jordan P; Wang, Evelyn N

    2015-10-21

    Boiling--a process that has powered industries since the steam age--is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase performance. However, without active in situ control of bubbles, temperature or steam generation cannot be adjusted for a given heat input. Here we report the ability to turn bubbles 'on and off' independent of heat input during boiling both temporally and spatially via molecular manipulation of the boiling surface. As a result, we can rapidly and reversibly alter heat transfer performance up to an order of magnitude. Our experiments show that this active control is achieved by electrostatically adsorbing and desorbing charged surfactants to alter the wettability of the surface, thereby affecting nucleation. This approach can improve performance and flexibility in existing boiling technologies as well as enable emerging or unprecedented energy applications.

  2. Bubble transport in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owoeye, Eyitayo James

    Understanding the behavior of bubbles in subcooled flow boiling is important for optimum design and safety in several industrial applications. Bubble dynamics involve a complex combination of multiphase flow, heat transfer, and turbulence. When a vapor bubble is nucleated on a vertical heated wall, it typically slides and grows along the wall until it detaches into the bulk liquid. The bubble transfers heat from the wall into the subcooled liquid during this process. Effective control of this transport phenomenon is important for nuclear reactor cooling and requires the study of interfacial heat and mass transfer in a turbulent flow. Three approaches are commonly used in computational analysis of two-phase flow: Eulerian-Lagrangian, Eulerian-Eulerian, and interface tracking methods. The Eulerian- Lagrangian model assumes a spherical non-deformable bubble in a homogeneous domain. The Eulerian-Eulerian model solves separate conservation equations for each phase using averaging and closure laws. The interface tracking method solves a single set of conservation equations with the interfacial properties computed from the properties of both phases. It is less computationally expensive and does not require empirical relations at the fluid interface. Among the most established interface tracking techniques is the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method. VOF is accurate, conserves mass, captures topology changes, and permits sharp interfaces. This work involves the behavior of vapor bubbles in upward subcooled flow boiling. Both laminar and turbulent flow conditions are considered with corresponding pipe Reynolds number of 0 -- 410,000 using a large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence model and VOF interface tracking method. The study was performed at operating conditions that cover those of boiling water reactors (BWR) and pressurized water reactors (PWR). The analysis focused on the life cycle of vapor bubble after departing from its nucleation site, i.e. growth, slide, lift-off, rise

  3. Size-exclusion chromatography for the determination of the boiling point distribution of high-boiling petroleum fractions.

    PubMed

    Boczkaj, Grzegorz; Przyjazny, Andrzej; Kamiński, Marian

    2015-03-01

    The paper describes a new procedure for the determination of boiling point distribution of high-boiling petroleum fractions using size-exclusion chromatography with refractive index detection. Thus far, the determination of boiling range distribution by chromatography has been accomplished using simulated distillation with gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. This study revealed that in spite of substantial differences in the separation mechanism and the detection mode, the size-exclusion chromatography technique yields similar results for the determination of boiling point distribution compared with simulated distillation and novel empty column gas chromatography. The developed procedure using size-exclusion chromatography has a substantial applicability, especially for the determination of exact final boiling point values for high-boiling mixtures, for which a standard high-temperature simulated distillation would have to be used. In this case, the precision of final boiling point determination is low due to the high final temperatures of the gas chromatograph oven and an insufficient thermal stability of both the gas chromatography stationary phase and the sample. Additionally, the use of high-performance liquid chromatography detectors more sensitive than refractive index detection allows a lower detection limit for high-molar-mass aromatic compounds, and thus increases the sensitivity of final boiling point determination.

  4. The initiation of boiling during pressure transients. [water boiling on metal surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisman, J.; Bussell, G.; Jashnani, I. L.; Hsieh, T.

    1973-01-01

    The initiation of boiling of water on metal surfaces during pressure transients has been investigated. The data were obtained by a new technique in which light beam fluctuations and a pressure signal were simultaneously recorded on a dual beam oscilloscope. The results obtained agreed with those obtained using high speed photography. It was found that, for water temperatures between 90-150 C, the wall superheat required to initiate boiling during a rapid pressure transient was significantly higher than required when the pressure was slowly reduced. This result is explained by assuming that a finite time is necessary for vapor to fill the cavity at which the bubble originates. Experimental measurements of this time are in reasonably good agreement with calculations based on the proposed theory. The theory includes a new procedure for estimating the coefficient of vaporization.

  5. Boiling water reactor licensing basis transient

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H. S.; Lu, M. S.; Shier, W. G.; Diamond, D. J.; Levine, M. M.; Odar, F.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the licensing basis transient for a boiling water reactor where a turbine trip occurs without steam bypass. The analysis was performed by means of the two-dimensional (R,Z) core dynamics code BNL-TWIGL in conjunction with the system transient code RELAP-3B. Two plant models were used and produced similar results for the analysis of the Peach Bottom turbine trip tests. The models differed in the representation of the steam separator. The analysis of the licensing basis transient produced somewhat different results. The results of sensitivity studies to help explain the differences are presented as well as an analysis of the licensing basis transient with recirculation pump trip. 2 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The Physics of Boiling at Burnout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theofanous, T. G.; Tu, J. P.; Dinh, T. N.; Salmassi, T.; Dinh, A. T.; Gasljevic, K.

    2000-01-01

    The basic elements of a new experimental approach for the investigation of burnout in pool boiling are presented. The approach consists of the combined use of ultrathin (nano-scale) heaters and high speed infrared imaging of the heater temperature pattern as a whole, in conjunction with highly detailed control and characterization of heater morphology at the nano and micron scales. It is shown that the burnout phenomenon can be resolved in both space and time. Ultrathin heaters capable of dissipating power levels, at steady-state, of over 1 MW/square m are demonstrated. A separation of scales is identified and it is used to transfer the focus of attention from the complexity of the two-phase mixing layer in the vicinity of the heater to a micron-scaled microlayer and nucleation and associated film-disruption processes within it.

  7. Pool boiling enhancement through contact line augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghupathi, P. A.; Kandlikar, S. G.

    2017-05-01

    In addition to transient conduction, microconvection, and microlayer evaporation, contact line region heat transfer has been identified as an important mode of heat transfer during boiling. In this work, we demonstrate that generating additional contact line regions within the base of a nucleating bubble leads to critical heat flux (CHF) enhancement. The creation of a liquid meniscus adjacent to 10-20 μm deep microgrooves in the bubble base area was responsible for the generation of the additional contact line regions. The depth of the microgrooves was determined such that a sufficient reservoir of liquid is present in the meniscus to sustain evaporation in the contact line region throughout the bubble cycle. The effective contact line length at the base of the bubble was seen to be a good indicator of the CHF (wetted area) over the surface. The microgroove geometry played a significant role in influencing the bubble dynamics and bubble departure diameter during boiling. It was seen that the bubbles were able to bridge and grow over the shallow microgrooves of 10-20 μm depth and generate additional contact line regions but were pinned and constrained within the grooves in the case of the microgrooves deeper than 100 μm. For shallow grooves, narrow grooves resulted in smaller bubbles, which in turn reduced the contact line length. The findings of this work could be used to design heat transfer surfaces that significantly enhance the contact line region contribution and CHF by placing shallow enhancement features on the surface of the heater.

  8. Enceladus Plumes: A Boiling Liquid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Miki; Ingersoll, A. P.

    2012-10-01

    Following the discovery of H2O vapor and particle plumes from the tiger stripes at the south pole of Enceladus (Porco et al., 2006), observational and theoretical studies have been conducted to understand the plume mechanism (e.g., Schmidt et al., 2008; Kieffer et al., 2009; Ingersoll and Pankine, 2010). Although the “Ice Chamber Model”, which assumes that ice sublimation under the stripes causes the plumes, has successfully explained the plume mass flux (e.g., Nimmo et al., 2007; Ingersoll and Pankine, 2010), it cannot explain the high salinity in the plume (Postberg et al., 2009). Ice particles condensing from a vapor are relatively salt free, but ice particles derived from a salty liquid can have high salinity. Therefore we have investigated the “Boiling Liquid Model”, which assumes that liquid H2O under the stripes causes the plumes. With conservation of mass, momentum and energy, we built a simple atmospheric model that includes controlled boiling and gas-ice wall interaction. We first assumed that the heat radiated to space comes entirely from the heat generated by condensation of the gas onto the ice wall. We varied the width (0.1-1 m) and the height (5-4000 m) of the crack as parameters. We find that the escaping vapor flux can be relatively close to the observed value (250±100 kg/s, Hansen et al., 2006, 2008) but the radiated heat flux is only 1 GW, which is much less than the observed value (15.8 GW, Howett et al., 2011). Other models (Nimmo et al., 2007; Abramov and Spencer, 2009) also have the same difficulty accounting for the observed value. We then investigated the additional heat radiated by the particles after they come out of the crack. We built a simple model to estimate the size distributions of these condensed ice particles and their radiative properties.

  9. Boiling-Water Reactor internals aging degradation study. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Luk, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of an aging assessment study for boiling water reactor (BWR) internals. Major stressors for BWR internals are related to unsteady hydrodynamic forces generated by the primary coolant flow in the reactor vessel. Welding and cold-working, dissolved oxygen and impurities in the coolant, applied loads and exposures to fast neutron fluxes are other important stressors. Based on results of a component failure information survey, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fatigue are identified as the two major aging-related degradation mechanisms for BWR internals. Significant reported failures include SCC in jet-pump holddown beams, in-core neutron flux monitor dry tubes and core spray spargers. Fatigue failures were detected in feedwater spargers. The implementation of a plant Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) program is considered as a promising method for controlling SCC problems in BWR. More operating data are needed to evaluate its effectiveness for internal components. Long-term fast neutron irradiation effects and high-cycle fatigue in a corrosive environment are uncertainty factors in the aging assessment process. BWR internals are examined by visual inspections and the method is access limited. The presence of a large water gap and an absence of ex-core neutron flux monitors may handicap the use of advanced inspection methods, such as neutron noise vibration measurements, for BWR.

  10. Micro-bubble emission boiling with the cavitation bubble blow pit

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Shigeaki; Shinagawa, Kazuaki; Illias, Suhaimi Bin; Sumiya, Hiroyuki; Jalaludin, Helmisyah A.

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization boiling (micro-bubble emission boiling [MEB]) phenomenon, with a high heat removal capacity that contributes considerably to the cooling of the divertor of the nuclear fusion reactor, was discovered in the early 1980s. Extensive research on MEB has been performed since its discovery. However, the progress of the application has been delayed because the generation mechanism of MEB remains unclear. Reasons for this lack of clarity include the complexity of the phenomenon itself and the high-speed phase change phenomenon in which boiling and condensation are rapidly generated. In addition, a more advanced thermal technique is required to realize the MEB phenomenon at the laboratory scale. To the authors’ knowledge, few studies have discussed the rush mechanism of subcooled liquid to the heating surface, which is critical to elucidating the mechanism behind MEB. This study used photographic images to verify that the cavitation phenomenon spreads to the inside of the superheated liquid on the heating surface and thus clarify the mechanism of MEB. PMID:27628271

  11. Micro-bubble emission boiling with the cavitation bubble blow pit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inada, Shigeaki; Shinagawa, Kazuaki; Illias, Suhaimi Bin; Sumiya, Hiroyuki; Jalaludin, Helmisyah A.

    2016-09-01

    The miniaturization boiling (micro-bubble emission boiling [MEB]) phenomenon, with a high heat removal capacity that contributes considerably to the cooling of the divertor of the nuclear fusion reactor, was discovered in the early 1980s. Extensive research on MEB has been performed since its discovery. However, the progress of the application has been delayed because the generation mechanism of MEB remains unclear. Reasons for this lack of clarity include the complexity of the phenomenon itself and the high-speed phase change phenomenon in which boiling and condensation are rapidly generated. In addition, a more advanced thermal technique is required to realize the MEB phenomenon at the laboratory scale. To the authors’ knowledge, few studies have discussed the rush mechanism of subcooled liquid to the heating surface, which is critical to elucidating the mechanism behind MEB. This study used photographic images to verify that the cavitation phenomenon spreads to the inside of the superheated liquid on the heating surface and thus clarify the mechanism of MEB.

  12. Benchmark evaluation of the RELAP code to calculate boiling in narrow channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kunze, J.F.; Loyalka, S.K. ); McKibben, J.C.; Hultsch, R.; Oladiran, O.

    1990-06-01

    The RELAP code has been tested with benchmark experiments (such as the loss-of-fluid test experiments at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) at high pressures and temperatures characteristic of those encountered in loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) in commercial light water power reactors. Application of RELAP to the LOCA analysis of a low pressure (< 7 atm) and low temperature (< 100{degree}C), plate-type research reactor, such as the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), the high-flux breeder reactor, high-flux isotope reactor, and Advanced Test Reactor, requires resolution of questions involving overextrapolation to very low pressures and low temperatures, and calculations of the pulsed boiling/reflood conditions in the narrow rectangular cross-section channels (typically 2 mm thick) of the plate fuel elements. The practical concern of this problem is that plate fuel temperatures predicted by RELAP5 (MOD2, version 3) during the pulsed boiling period can reach high enough temperatures to cause plate (clad) weakening, though not melting. Since an experimental benchmark of RELAP under such LOCA conditions is not available and since such conditions present substantial challenges to the code, it is important to verify the code predictions. The comparison of the pulsed boiling experiments with the RELAP calculations involves both visual observations of void fraction versus time and measurements of temperatures near the fuel plate surface.

  13. Micro-bubble emission boiling with the cavitation bubble blow pit.

    PubMed

    Inada, Shigeaki; Shinagawa, Kazuaki; Illias, Suhaimi Bin; Sumiya, Hiroyuki; Jalaludin, Helmisyah A

    2016-09-15

    The miniaturization boiling (micro-bubble emission boiling [MEB]) phenomenon, with a high heat removal capacity that contributes considerably to the cooling of the divertor of the nuclear fusion reactor, was discovered in the early 1980s. Extensive research on MEB has been performed since its discovery. However, the progress of the application has been delayed because the generation mechanism of MEB remains unclear. Reasons for this lack of clarity include the complexity of the phenomenon itself and the high-speed phase change phenomenon in which boiling and condensation are rapidly generated. In addition, a more advanced thermal technique is required to realize the MEB phenomenon at the laboratory scale. To the authors' knowledge, few studies have discussed the rush mechanism of subcooled liquid to the heating surface, which is critical to elucidating the mechanism behind MEB. This study used photographic images to verify that the cavitation phenomenon spreads to the inside of the superheated liquid on the heating surface and thus clarify the mechanism of MEB.

  14. Effects of structural parameters on flow boiling performance of reentrant porous microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Daxiang; Tang, Yong; Shao, Haoran; Zeng, Jian; Zhou, Wei; Liang, Dejie

    2014-06-01

    Flow boiling within advanced microchannel heat sinks provides an efficient and attractive method for the cooling of microelectronics chips. In this study, a series of porous microchannels with Ω-shaped reentrant configurations were developed for application in heat sink cooling. The reentrant porous microchannels were fabricated by using a solid-state sintering method under the replication of specially designed sintering modules. Micro wire electrical discharge machining was utilized to process the graphite-based sintering modules. Two types of commonly used copper powder in heat transfer devices, i.e., spherical and irregular powder, with three fractions of particle sizes respectively, were utilized to construct the porous microchannel heat sinks. The effects of powder type and size on the flow boiling performance of reentrant porous microchannels, i.e., two-phase heat transfer, pressure drop and flow instabilities, were examined under boiling deionized water conditions. The test results show that enhanced two-phase heat transfer was achieved with the increase of particle size for the reentrant porous microchannels with spherical powder, while the reversed trend existed for the counterparts with irregular powder. The reentrant porous microchannels with irregular powder of the smallest particle size presented the best heat transfer performance and lowest pressure drop.

  15. Nucleate boiling in drag-reducing polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jeun, G.

    1986-01-01

    Two types of experiment have been done to study the effects of polymer additives in nucleate boiling for plates and wires. Here, boiling on a flat surface is simulated by placing a flat unheated surface immediately underneath an electrically heated platinum wire. Saturated nucleate pool boiling curves were measured for water and solutions of six different polymers at various concentrations. For a bare wire and a simulated flat surface, the nucleate boiling curves are qualitatively similar. For equal heat fluxes, the temperature difference increases as the relative viscosity increases, although the temperature difference for the simulated flat surface is less than that for the bare wire. The observed changes in the nucleate boiling curves for polymer solutions are in qualitative agreement with those predicted using the Rohsenow correlation to account for change in the solution viscosity. These results show that for both wires and simulated flat surfaces, drag-reducing additives will reduce the heat transfer rate in nucleate boiling. Bubble dynamics on the heated wire and simulated flat surface were also measured using a high speed movie camera for water and Separan AP-30 at a relative viscosity of 1.16. The data were used to determine the relative contribution to the boiling heat flux of latent heat transport by bubbles, natural convection heat transfer, and enhanced convection heat transfer.

  16. A fundamental study of nucleate pool boiling under microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, Jamie S.; Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = +/- 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = +/- experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, and the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels is described. For the heater surface with a/g = -1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  17. A Fundamental Study of Nucleate Pool Boiling Under Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ervin, Jamie S.; Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental study of incipient boiling in short-term microgravity and with a/g = +/- 1 for pool boiling was performed. Calibrated thin gold films sputtered on a smoothly polished quartz surface were used simultaneously for thermal-resistance measurements and heating of the boiling surface. The gold films were used for both transient and quasi-steady heating surface temperature measurements. Two test vessels were constructed for precise measurement and control of fluid temperature and pressure: a laboratory pool boiling vessel for the a/g = +/- 1 experiments and a pool boiling vessel designed for the 131 m free-fall in the NASA Lewis Research Center Microgravity Research Facility for the microgravity tests. Measurements included the heater surface temperature, the pressure near the heating surface, the bulk liquid temperatures. High speed photography (up to 1,000 frames per second) was used in the experiments. With high quality microgravity and the measured initial temperature of the quiescent test fluid, R113, the temperature distribution in the liquid at the moment of boiling inception resulting from an imposed step in heat flux is known with a certainty not possible previously. The types of boiling propagation across the large flat heating surface, some observed here for the first time, are categorized; the conditions necessary for their occurrence are described. Explosive boiling propagation with a striking pattern of small scale protuberances over the entire vapor mass periphery not observed previously at low heat flux levels (on the order of 5 W/cm(exp 2)) is described. For the heater surface with a/g = -1, a step in the heater surface temperature of short duration was imposed. The resulting liquid temperature distribution at the moment of boiling inception was different from that obtained with a step in heat flux.

  18. Sequential hypoallergenic boiled peanut and roasted peanut oral immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Billy; Morris, Scott; Grzeskowiak, Luke; Smith, William; Forsyth, Kevin; Chataway, Tim

    2017-09-05

    Oral immunotherapy (OIT) using roasted peanut flour can effectively desensitize peanut-allergic children [1] but is considered not to be ready for clinical practice [2] due to high rates (≥45%) of adverse events (AEs) [3] [4]. This necessitates medically supervised up-dosing in hospital and limits the number of patients that can be treated. In 2001 Beyer et. al proposed that the prevalence of peanut allergy in China was lower than that of the Western world because peanuts consumed in China were boiled, not roasted [5]. They demonstrated that boiling peanuts for 20 minutes reduced IgE binding in vitro when compared to roasted peanut. We have subsequently shown that extended boiling progressively reduced peanut IgE binding to 12.5% at 2 hours and to 5.3% at 12 hours compared to raw peanut while still retaining T cell reactivity [6]. Further, Inhibition ELISAs demonstrated that boiled peanuts have restricted ability (2-h ~70%, 12-h ~50%) to block the binding of patient IgE to raw peanut [6] suggesting boiled peanuts possess an incomplete repertoire of epitopes. This indicates that boiled peanuts alone are unlikely to expose a patient to the full spectrum of peanut epitopes and will therefore require a roasted peanut phase following the initial boiled peanut therapy. We hypothesize that AEs can be reduced by commencing OIT with hypoallergenic boiled peanut. Here we describe a pilot study that aims to characterize the incidence of AEs and successful desensitization in mild/moderate peanut allergic children using hypoallergenic 2-hour boiled peanut prior to roasted peanut OIT. Due to the home-based up-dosing procedure, a cautious approach was adopted which excluded severely allergic children. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Multi-scale Control and Enhancement of Reactor Boiling Heat Flux by Reagents and Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Manglik, R M; Athavale, A; Kalaikadal, D S; Deodhar, A; Verma, U

    2011-09-02

    The phenomenological characterization of the use of non-invasive and passive techniques to enhance the boiling heat transfer in water has been carried out in this extended study. It provides fundamental enhanced heat transfer data for nucleate boiling and discusses the associated physics with the aim of addressing future and next-generation reactor thermal-hydraulic management. It essentially addresses the hypothesis that in phase-change processes during boiling, the primary mechanisms can be related to the liquid-vapor interfacial tension and surface wetting at the solidliquid interface. These interfacial characteristics can be significantly altered and decoupled by introducing small quantities of additives in water, such as surface-active polymers, surfactants, and nanoparticles. The changes are fundamentally caused at a molecular-scale by the relative bulk molecular dynamics and adsorption-desorption of the additive at the liquid-vapor interface, and its physisorption and electrokinetics at the liquid-solid interface. At the micro-scale, the transient transport mechanisms at the solid-liquid-vapor interface during nucleation and bubblegrowth can be attributed to thin-film spreading, surface-micro-cavity activation, and micro-layer evaporation. Furthermore at the macro-scale, the heat transport is in turn governed by the bubble growth and distribution, macro-layer heat transfer, bubble dynamics (bubble coalescence, collapse, break-up, and translation), and liquid rheology. Some of these behaviors and processes are measured and characterized in this study, the outcomes of which advance the concomitant fundamental physics, as well as provide insights for developing control strategies for the molecular-scale manipulation of interfacial tension and surface wetting in boiling by means of polymeric reagents, surfactants, and other soluble surface-active additives.

  20. Stabilization of freon 113 subcooled boiling in forced convection

    SciTech Connect

    Gentile, D.; Benejean, R.; Llory, M.

    1985-09-01

    A simple electronic feedback system allowing to perform tests in subcooled boiling of Freon 113 in the transition region, where systems directly heated by Joule effect are unstable, is presented. A short, electrically heated tube is used where the current is controlled by the measure of the wall temperature. First experiments highlight a hysteresis phenomenon depending on whether the temperature difference between the wall and the boiling liquid is increased or decreased, and the influence of surface conditions on the shape of the boiling curve.

  1. Pool and flow boiling in variable and microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1994-01-01

    As is well known, boiling is an effective mode of heat transfer in that high heat flux levels are possible with relatively small temperature differences. Its optimal application requires that the process be adequately understood. A measure of the understanding of any physical event lies in the ability to predict its behavior in terms of the relevant parameters. Despite many years of research the predictability of boiling is currently possible only for quite specialized circumstances, e.g., the critical heat flux and film boiling for the pool boiling case, and then only with special geometries. Variable gravity down to microgravity provides the opportunity to test this understanding, but possibly more important, by changing the dimensional and time scales involved permits more detailed observations of elements involved in the boiling process, and perhaps discloses phenomena heretofore unknown. The focus here is on nucleate boiling although, as will be demonstrated below, under but certain circumstances in microgravity it can take place concurrently with the dryout process. In the presence of earth gravity or forced convection effects, the latter process is usually referred to as film boiling. However, no vapor film as such forms with pool boiling in microgravity, only dryout. Initial results are presented here for pool boiling in microgravity, and were made possible at such an early date by the availability of the Get-Away-Specials (GAS). Also presented here are some results of ground testing of a flow loop for the study of low velocity boiling, eventually to take place also in microgravity. In the interim, variable buoyancy normal to the heater surface is achieved by rotation of the entire loop relative to earth gravity. Of course, this is at the expense of varying the buoyancy parallel to the heater surface. Two questions which must be resolved early in the study of flow boiling in microgravity are (1) the lower limits of liquid flow velocity where buoyancy

  2. Evaluation of engine coolants under flow boiling conditions

    SciTech Connect

    McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Stinson, C.; Gollin, M.

    1995-12-31

    An experimental program has been conducted to evaluate the heat transfer performance of two engine coolant mixtures, propylene-glycol/water and ethylene-glycol/water. In each mixture, the concentration was 50-50 by volume. Performance in this situation is defined as the ability to maintain a lower surface temperature for a given flux. The heat transfer regimes considered covered the range from single phase forced convection through saturated flow boiling. Results show that both coolants perform satisfactorily. However, in single phase convection, ethylene-glycol/water is slightly more effective. Conversely, for sub-cooled nucleate boiling and saturated boiling, propylene-glycol/water results in slightly lower metal temperatures.

  3. New equations predict boiling point from viscosity, gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, J.V.

    1996-10-07

    A simple numerical routine computes the normal boiling point of light and heavy petroleum fractions as a function of kinematic viscosities at 100 F abd 219 F and specific gravity at 60 F. The algorithm makes use of a single nonlinear equation with one unknown variable (boiling point), which requires numerical solution. A convenient correlation generates starting values for mean average boiling point (MeABP) that are accurate enough to allow convergence in three or fewer iterations. The paper discusses the need for new equations, the new approach, and the calculations.

  4. On the prediction of explosive boiling characteristics in superheated liquid during non-equilibrium heating: Continuum modeling vs. atomistic-continuum modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Mohammad Nasim; Hasan, Ashik; Mitsutake, Yuichi; Monde, Masanori

    2017-06-01

    With the recent advancement in the field of micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS), where actuation is used, researchers are in pursuit of using the energy released by explosive boiling phenomenon. Though many experimental works have been conducted on this phenomenon in the past, there have been very few theoretical works based on equilibrium nucleation theory that are unable to predict the time at which explosive boiling will occur when liquid is subjected to non-uniform transient heating. Recently two theoretical models based on two different approaches have been reported for transient non-equilibrium heating of liquid. One of the models is based on continuum assumption in which macroscopic properties of liquid together with heating condition govern the explosive boiling characteristics. The other model considers long range inter molecular forces between liquid and solid heater surface in addition to the continuum assumptions and therefore might be considered as atomistic-continuum model. In the present study, both of these models are applied to predict the time of explosive boiling for water and ethanol for two different boundary heating conditions: namely i) linearly increasing boundary temperature condition ii) constant boundary heat flux condition. Continuum characteristics and conditions for explosive boiling for both models have been verified. It is found that, the explosive boiling times of water and ethanol obtained in both models for different boundary conditions conform to each other reasonably.

  5. Critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David Douglas

    The critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon was investigated for water flow in tubes with particular emphasis on the development of methods for predicting CHF in the subcooled flow boiling regime. The Purdue University Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory (PU-BTPFL) CHF database for water flow in a uniformly heated tube was compiled from the world literature dating back to 1949 and represents the largest CHF database ever assembled with 32,544 data points from over 100 sources. The superiority of this database was proven via a detailed examination of previous databases. The PU-BTPFL CHF database is an invaluable tool for the development of CHF correlations and mechanistic models that are superior to existing ones developed with smaller, less comprehensive CHF databases. In response to the many inaccurate and inordinately complex correlations, two nondimensional, subcooled CHF correlations were formulated, containing only five adjustable constants and whose unique functional forms were determined without using a statistical analysis but rather using the parametric trends observed in less than 10% of the subcooled CHF data. The correlation based on inlet conditions (diameter, heated length, mass velocity, pressure, inlet quality) was by far the most accurate of all known subcooled CHF correlations, having mean absolute and root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 10.3% and 14.3%, respectively. The outlet (local) conditions correlation was the most accurate correlation based on local CHF conditions (diameter, mass velocity, pressure, outlet quality) and may be used with a nonuniform axial heat flux. Both correlations proved more accurate than a recent CHF look-up table commonly employed in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic computer codes. An interfacial lift-off, subcooled CHF model was developed from a consideration of the instability of the vapor-liquid interface and the fraction of heat required for liquid-vapor conversion as opposed to that for bulk liquid heating. Severe

  6. An investigation of transition boiling mechanisms of subcooled water under forced convective conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kwang-Won, Lee; Sang-Yong, Lee

    1995-09-01

    A mechanistic model for forced convective transition boiling has been developed to investigate transition boiling mechanisms and to predict transition boiling heat flux realistically. This model is based on a postulated multi-stage boiling process occurring during the passage time of the elongated vapor blanket specified at a critical heat flux (CHF) condition. Between the departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) and the departure from film boiling (DFB) points, the boiling heat transfer is established through three boiling stages, namely, the macrolayer evaporation and dryout governed by nucleate boiling in a thin liquid film and the unstable film boiling characterized by the frequent touches of the interface and the heated wall. The total heat transfer rates after the DNB is weighted by the time fractions of each stage, which are defined as the ratio of each stage duration to the vapor blanket passage time. The model predictions are compared with some available experimental transition boiling data. The parametric effects of pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling on the transition boiling heat transfer are also investigated. From these comparisons, it can be seen that this model can identify the crucial mechanisms of forced convective transition boiling, and that the transition boiling heat fluxes including the maximum heat flux and the minimum film boiling heat flux are well predicted at low qualities/high pressures near 10 bar. In future, this model will be improved in the unstable film boiling stage and generalized for high quality and low pressure situations.

  7. An Analytical Approach for Relating Boiling Points of Monofunctional Organic Compounds to Intermolecular Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struyf, Jef

    2011-01-01

    The boiling point of a monofunctional organic compound is expressed as the sum of two parts: a contribution to the boiling point due to the R group and a contribution due to the functional group. The boiling point in absolute temperature of the corresponding RH hydrocarbon is chosen for the contribution to the boiling point of the R group and is a…

  8. An Analytical Approach for Relating Boiling Points of Monofunctional Organic Compounds to Intermolecular Forces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struyf, Jef

    2011-01-01

    The boiling point of a monofunctional organic compound is expressed as the sum of two parts: a contribution to the boiling point due to the R group and a contribution due to the functional group. The boiling point in absolute temperature of the corresponding RH hydrocarbon is chosen for the contribution to the boiling point of the R group and is a…

  9. 40 CFR 180.1056 - Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Boiled linseed oil; exemption from... From Tolerances § 180.1056 Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance. Boiled linseed... “boiled linseed oil.” This exemption is limited to use on rice before edible parts form....

  10. 40 CFR 180.1056 - Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Boiled linseed oil; exemption from... From Tolerances § 180.1056 Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance. Boiled linseed... “boiled linseed oil.” This exemption is limited to use on rice before edible parts form....

  11. 40 CFR 180.1056 - Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Boiled linseed oil; exemption from... From Tolerances § 180.1056 Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance. Boiled linseed... “boiled linseed oil.” This exemption is limited to use on rice before edible parts form....

  12. 40 CFR 180.1056 - Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Boiled linseed oil; exemption from... From Tolerances § 180.1056 Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance. Boiled linseed... “boiled linseed oil.” This exemption is limited to use on rice before edible parts form....

  13. 40 CFR 180.1056 - Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Boiled linseed oil; exemption from... From Tolerances § 180.1056 Boiled linseed oil; exemption from requirement of tolerance. Boiled linseed... “boiled linseed oil.” This exemption is limited to use on rice before edible parts form....

  14. Turning bubbles on and off during boiling using charged surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Cho, H. Jeremy; Mizerak, Jordan P.; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2015-01-01

    Boiling—a process that has powered industries since the steam age—is governed by bubble formation. State-of-the-art boiling surfaces often increase bubble nucleation via roughness and/or wettability modification to increase performance. However, without active in situ control of bubbles, temperature or steam generation cannot be adjusted for a given heat input. Here we report the ability to turn bubbles ‘on and off' independent of heat input during boiling both temporally and spatially via molecular manipulation of the boiling surface. As a result, we can rapidly and reversibly alter heat transfer performance up to an order of magnitude. Our experiments show that this active control is achieved by electrostatically adsorbing and desorbing charged surfactants to alter the wettability of the surface, thereby affecting nucleation. This approach can improve performance and flexibility in existing boiling technologies as well as enable emerging or unprecedented energy applications. PMID:26486275

  15. BOILING HOUSE, INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, SYRUP TANKS IN RIGHT FOREGROUND, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOILING HOUSE, INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, SYRUP TANKS IN RIGHT FOREGROUND, HIGH GRADE VACUUM PANS BEYOND THE SYRUP TANKS. VIEW FROM THE SOUTH - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  16. 20. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. View: Remains of south wall. The molasses storage pits are below the floor in the foreground. The remaining piece of floor indicates the form of the entire floor. The sorghum pan and boiling range flue slope from left to right (east to west) and permitted batches of cane juice to flow through the boiling pan by gravity. The beams, joists, truss work are built of northwest pine. The sides and floor boards are built of redwood. The boiling range flue is built of fire-brick, masonry, and portland cement. The corrugated roof appears to be a later addition, not contemporary with mill operation. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  17. Boiling local heat transfer enhancement in minichannels using nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chehade, Ali Ahmad; Gualous, Hasna Louahlia; Le Masson, Stephane; Fardoun, Farouk; Besq, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports an experimental study on nanofluid convective boiling heat transfer in parallel rectangular minichannels of 800 μm hydraulic diameter. Experiments are conducted with pure water and silver nanoparticles suspended in water base fluid. Two small volume fractions of silver nanoparticles suspended in water are tested: 0.000237% and 0.000475%. The experimental results show that the local heat transfer coefficient, local heat flux, and local wall temperature are affected by silver nanoparticle concentration in water base fluid. In addition, different correlations established for boiling flow heat transfer in minichannels or macrochannels are evaluated. It is found that the correlation of Kandlikar and Balasubramanian is the closest to the water boiling heat transfer results. The boiling local heat transfer enhancement by adding silver nanoparticles in base fluid is not uniform along the channel flow. Better performances and highest effect of nanoparticle concentration on the heat transfer are obtained at the minichannels entrance.

  18. Boiling local heat transfer enhancement in minichannels using nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an experimental study on nanofluid convective boiling heat transfer in parallel rectangular minichannels of 800 μm hydraulic diameter. Experiments are conducted with pure water and silver nanoparticles suspended in water base fluid. Two small volume fractions of silver nanoparticles suspended in water are tested: 0.000237% and 0.000475%. The experimental results show that the local heat transfer coefficient, local heat flux, and local wall temperature are affected by silver nanoparticle concentration in water base fluid. In addition, different correlations established for boiling flow heat transfer in minichannels or macrochannels are evaluated. It is found that the correlation of Kandlikar and Balasubramanian is the closest to the water boiling heat transfer results. The boiling local heat transfer enhancement by adding silver nanoparticles in base fluid is not uniform along the channel flow. Better performances and highest effect of nanoparticle concentration on the heat transfer are obtained at the minichannels entrance. PMID:23506445

  19. A bubble-breaking effect in a sodium boiling test

    SciTech Connect

    Galati, A.; Migliori, S.

    1985-06-01

    An improvement of a single-bubble model in sodium boiling is discussed. A bubble-breaking effect is inductively inferred from an analysis of experimental data and is related to the local geometric enlargement of the flow channel.

  20. Effect of boiling surface vibration on heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alangar, Sathyabhama

    2017-01-01

    Experimental investigation of effect of forced vertical surface vibration on nucleate pool boiling heat transfer of saturated water at atmospheric pressure is presented in this paper. Vertical vibration was induced externally to the circular copper test surface on which boiling took place, using a vibration exciter. Frequency was varied in the range 0-25 Hz and amplitude of vibration was varied in the range 0-5 mm. Boiling takes place at much lower superheats for the same heat flux, slope of boiling curve decreases remarkably, when the surface is given external excitation. High frequency and high amplitude oscillations lead to more intensive heat transfer. There are some combinations of frequency and vibration amplitude, which cause up to two times increase in heat transfer coefficients.

  1. BOILING HOUSE, GROUND FLOOR. WAREHOUSE TO LEFT REAR, MASSECUITTE HEATERS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOILING HOUSE, GROUND FLOOR. WAREHOUSE TO LEFT REAR, MASSECUITTE HEATERS ABOVE RIGHT, LOW GRADE CENTRIFUGALS BELOW. CRYSTALLIZER HOT WATER TANK TO REAR. VIEW FROM NORTHEAST - Lihue Plantation Company, Sugar Mill Building, Haleko Road, Lihue, Kauai County, HI

  2. Film Boiling on Downward Quenching Hemisphere of Varying Sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Chan S. Kim; Kune Y. Suh; Joy L. Rempe; Fan-Bill Cheung; Sang B. Kim

    2004-04-01

    Film boiling heat transfer coefficients for a downward-facing hemispherical surface are measured from the quenching tests in DELTA (Downward-boiling Experimental Laminar Transition Apparatus). Two test sections are made of copper to maintain low Biot numbers. The outer diameters of the hemispheres are 120 mm and 294 mm, respectively. The thickness of all the test sections is 30 mm. The effect of diameter on film boiling heat transfer is quantified utilizing results obtained from the test sections. The measured data are compared with the numerical predictions from laminar film boiling analysis. The measured heat transfer coefficients are found to be greater than those predicted by the conventional laminar flow theory on account of the interfacial wavy motion incurred by the Helmholtz instability. Incorporation of the wavy motion model considerably improves the agreement between the experimental and numerical results in terms of heat transfer coefficient. In addition, the interfacial wavy motion and the quenching process are visualized through a digital camera.

  3. BOILING HOUSE, GROUND FLOOR, ABANDONED SUGAR BIN IN CENTER. IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOILING HOUSE, GROUND FLOOR, ABANDONED SUGAR BIN IN CENTER. IN BACKGROUND, THE ELEVATOR AND STAIRS GOING UP. VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST - Lihue Plantation Company, Sugar Mill Building, Haleko Road, Lihue, Kauai County, HI

  4. BOILING HOUSE, SECOND FLOOR, FROM TOP OF GARVER CLARIFIER, MUD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOILING HOUSE, SECOND FLOOR, FROM TOP OF GARVER CLARIFIER, MUD FILTERS AND CAUSTIC SODA TANKS TO THE LEFT. VIEW FROM THE EAST - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  5. BOILING HOUSE, INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, CLARIFIERS, SIEP TO THE LEFT, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOILING HOUSE, INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, CLARIFIERS, SIEP TO THE LEFT, WITH CLARIFIER FLASH TANK ABOVE, SAMPLING STATION TO THE LEFT. VIEW FROM THE SOUTHEAST - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  6. BOILING HOUSE, INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, GARVER CLARIFIER IN FOREGROUND, TOPS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOILING HOUSE, INTERIOR, SECOND FLOOR, GARVER CLARIFIER IN FOREGROUND, TOPS OF LONG TUBE EVAPORATORS IN BACKGROUND. VIEW FROM NORTHWEST - Kekaha Sugar Company, Sugar Mill Building, 8315 Kekaha Road, Kekaha, Kauai County, HI

  7. Boiling local heat transfer enhancement in minichannels using nanofluids.

    PubMed

    Chehade, Ali Ahmad; Gualous, Hasna Louahlia; Le Masson, Stephane; Fardoun, Farouk; Besq, Anthony

    2013-03-18

    This paper reports an experimental study on nanofluid convective boiling heat transfer in parallel rectangular minichannels of 800 μm hydraulic diameter. Experiments are conducted with pure water and silver nanoparticles suspended in water base fluid. Two small volume fractions of silver nanoparticles suspended in water are tested: 0.000237% and 0.000475%. The experimental results show that the local heat transfer coefficient, local heat flux, and local wall temperature are affected by silver nanoparticle concentration in water base fluid. In addition, different correlations established for boiling flow heat transfer in minichannels or macrochannels are evaluated. It is found that the correlation of Kandlikar and Balasubramanian is the closest to the water boiling heat transfer results. The boiling local heat transfer enhancement by adding silver nanoparticles in base fluid is not uniform along the channel flow. Better performances and highest effect of nanoparticle concentration on the heat transfer are obtained at the minichannels entrance.

  8. EAST ELEVATION OF THE ELECTRIC SHOP. BOILING HOUSE AND POWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION OF THE ELECTRIC SHOP. BOILING HOUSE AND POWER HOUSE WING IN THE BACKGROUND. VIEW FROM THE SOUTHEAST - Lihue Plantation Company, Sugar Mill Building, Haleko Road, Lihue, Kauai County, HI

  9. Ground Water Rule - Boil Water Advisory - Public Notification Template

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Ground Water Rule - Boil Water Advisory - Public Notification Template can be use to issue a Tier 1 Public Notification when it has been determined that source ground water is contaminated with E. Coli bacteria.

  10. A microgravity boiling and convective condensation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kachnik, Leo; Lee, Doojeong; Best, Frederick; Faget, Nanette

    1987-01-01

    A boiling and condensing test article consisting of two straight tube boilers, one quartz and one stainless steel, and two 1.5 m long glass-in-glass heat exchangers, on 6 mm ID and one 10 mm ID, was flown on the NASA KC-135 0-G aircraft. Using water as the working fluid, the 5 kw boiler produces two phase mixtures of varying quality for mass flow rates between 0.005 and 0.1 kg/sec. The test section is instrumented at eight locations with absolute and differential pressure transducers and thermocouples. A gamma densitometer is used to measure void fraction, and high speed photography records the flow regimes. A three axis accelerometer provides aircraft acceleration data (+ or - 0.01G). Data are collected via an analog-to-digital conversion and data acquisition system. Bubbly, annular, and slug flow regimes were observed in the test section under microgravity conditions. Flow oscillations were observed for some operating conditions and the effect of the 2-G pullout prior to the 0-G period was observed by continuously recording data throughout the parabolas. A total fo 300 parabolas was flown.

  11. A microgravity boiling and convective condensation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachnik, Leo; Lee, Doojeong; Best, Frederick; Faget, Nanette

    1987-12-01

    A boiling and condensing test article consisting of two straight tube boilers, one quartz and one stainless steel, and two 1.5 m long glass-in-glass heat exchangers, on 6 mm ID and one 10 mm ID, was flown on the NASA KC-135 0-G aircraft. Using water as the working fluid, the 5 kw boiler produces two phase mixtures of varying quality for mass flow rates between 0.005 and 0.1 kg/sec. The test section is instrumented at eight locations with absolute and differential pressure transducers and thermocouples. A gamma densitometer is used to measure void fraction, and high speed photography records the flow regimes. A three axis accelerometer provides aircraft acceleration data (+ or - 0.01G). Data are collected via an analog-to-digital conversion and data acquisition system. Bubbly, annular, and slug flow regimes were observed in the test section under microgravity conditions. Flow oscillations were observed for some operating conditions and the effect of the 2-G pullout prior to the 0-G period was observed by continuously recording data throughout the parabolas. A total fo 300 parabolas was flown.

  12. An experimental research on microbubble emission boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiguo; Zhu, Guangyu; Sun, Licheng; Cao, Xiaxin

    2013-07-01

    In the near future, heat transfer technology with higher performance surely has more application in the field of thermal engineering, such as electrical chip cooling, power regulating system, etc. Microbubble emission boiling (MEB) is getting more attentions by many researchers due to its extremely high heat dissipation capacity and potential application in the areas mentioned above. Despite that much work has been done to MEB, heat transfer characteristics and occurrence condition as well as formation mechanism involved MEB are not illustrated clearly by far. An experimental setup is built up to study MEB visually. The heating element is a cone copper block with its upper part of a 10mm diameter cylinder which is insulated from the water by a ceramic thimble. The different liquid subcooling is obtained by a water cooler combined with an electric heater. A high-speed video camera (Photron: Fastcam SA5) is employed for recording the scenario of MEB. Our experimental results are very similar to that from other researchers, and the maximum heat flux is about 9 MW/m2 at 60K subcooling. The presence of noncondensable gas in the vapor film and the liquid subcooling has obviously impact on MEB. Moreover, numerical simulation results show that marangoni convection is perhaps one of the reasons inducing the occurrence of MEB.

  13. Optimal boiling temperature for ORC installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Jarosław; Mikielewicz, Dariusz

    2012-09-01

    In the paper a research on cost-effective optimum design boiling temperature for Organic Rankine Cycle utilizing low-temperature heat sources is presented. The ratio of the heat exchanger area of the boiler to the power output is used as the objective function. Analytical relations for heat transfer area as well power of the cycle are formulated. Evaporation temperature and inlet temperature of the heat source medium as well its mass flow rate are varied in the optimization method. The optimization is carried out for three working fluids, i.e. R 134a, water and ethanol. The objective function (economics profitability, thermodynamic efficiency) leads to different optimal working conditions in terms of evaporating temperature. Maximum power generation in the near-critical conditions of subcritical ORC is the highest. The choice of the working fluid can greatly affect the objective function which is a measure of power plant cost. Ethanol exhibits a minimum objective function but not necessarily the maximum cycle efficiency.

  14. Explosive boiling incipience on a thin wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardin, Jean--Charles; Poulain, Cédric; Duplat, Jérôme

    2010-11-01

    When a metastable liquid is superheated above its saturation temperature, a phase transition occurs via a nucleation process leading to the creation of at least one vapor bubble that grows rapidly. If the surrounding liquid is subcooled, the bubble will eventually undergo a violent collapse. A further characterization of the thermodynamic properties of this explosive phase change, (temperature at the onset of nucleation as well as pressure inside the first nuclei), together with the following bubble dynamics, is necessary for a better comprehension of boiling phenomena. Thanks to dedicated experiments in which a platinum micrometer--size wire is heated in a liquid at ambient pressure and temperature, we will report that the onset temperature is close to the spinodal temperature but slightly depends on the heating rate. Using high--speed video imaging of the bubble dynamics together with the Rayleigh--Plesset equation, we will show how the heating rate, as well as the heater size governs the nucleation process (bubble lifetime, maximum radius reached, expansion velocity and cooling of the wire at the onset).

  15. Some parameter boundaries governing microgravity pool boiling modes.

    PubMed

    Merte, Herman

    2006-09-01

    Pool boiling experiments were conducted in microgravity on five space shuttle flights, using a flat plate heater consisting of a semitransparent thin gold film deposited on a quartz substrate that also acted as a resistance thermometer. The test fluid was R-113, and the vapor bubble behavior at the heater surface was photographed from beneath as well as from the side. Each flight consisted of a matrix of three levels of imposed heat flux and three levels of initial bulk liquid subcooling. In many of the total of 45 experiments, steady nucleate boiling was observed from 16-mm movie films, where a large vapor bubble formed and remained slightly removed from the heater surface, with small vapor bubbles growing on the heater surface, and on contact coalescing with the large bubble. Computations of the forces associated with the momentum transfer in this process, which counters the Marangoni convection effects tending to impel the large bubble toward the heater surface, have been completed for all cases where applicable. The modes of pool boiling observed with successive increases in levels of heat flux in microgravity are categorized as: (i) minimum or incipient nucleate boiling; (ii) nucleate boiling with vigorous motion of the bubbles adjacent and parallel to the heater surface, impelled by Marangoni convection effects; (iii) nucleate boiling followed by coalescence with a neighboring large vapor bubble; (iv) partial dryout of the heater surface, in parallel with nucleate boiling; (v) complete dryout. The boundaries between these modes are delineated graphically as a function of the imposed heat flux and initial bulk liquid subcooling, together with the levels of the forces holding the large bubbles, acting as vapor reservoirs, away from the heater surface for the steady nucleate boiling mode.

  16. 16. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. View: Looking from west to east through boiling house. The sorghum pan is on the right. The beams; joists, and trusses are of northwest pine; side boards are of redwood. A foundation line of a loading dock and smokestack are in the foreground. Both end walls have deteriorated completely. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  17. Nucleate Boiling Heat Transfer Studied Under Reduced-Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, David F.; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2000-01-01

    Boiling is known to be a very efficient mode of heat transfer, and as such, it is employed in component cooling and in various energy-conversion systems. In space, boiling heat transfer may be used in thermal management, fluid handling and control, power systems, and on-orbit storage and supply systems for cryogenic propellants and life-support fluids. Recent interest in the exploration of Mars and other planets and in the concept of in situ resource utilization on the Martian and Lunar surfaces highlights the need to understand how gravity levels varying from the Earth's gravity to microgravity (1g = or > g/g(sub e) = or > 10(exp -6)g) affect boiling heat transfer. Because of the complex nature of the boiling process, no generalized prediction or procedure has been developed to describe the boiling heat transfer coefficient, particularly at reduced gravity levels. Recently, Professor Vijay K. Dhir of the University of California at Los Angeles proposed a novel building-block approach to investigate the boiling phenomena in low-gravity to microgravity environments. This approach experimentally investigates the complete process of bubble inception, growth, and departure for single bubbles formed at a well-defined and controllable nucleation site. Principal investigator Professor Vijay K. Dhir, with support from researchers from the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field, is performing a series of pool boiling experiments in the low-gravity environments of the KC 135 microgravity aircraft s parabolic flight to investigate the inception, growth, departure, and merger of bubbles from single- and multiple-nucleation sites as a function of the wall superheat and the liquid subcooling. Silicon wafers with single and multiple cavities of known characteristics are being used as test surfaces. Water and PF5060 (an inert liquid) were chosen as test liquids so that the role of surface wettability and the magnitude of the effect of interfacial tension on boiling in reduced

  18. Laser-induced boiling of biological liquids in medical technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovskii, V. M.; Yusupov, V. I.; Dydykin, A. V.; Nevozhai, V. I.; Kisilev, A. Yu.; Zhukov, S. A.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2017-05-01

    Using optical and acoustic methods we study thermal and transport processes related to the boiling of biological liquids under the action of continuous-wave laser radiation having moderate power (1 - 10 W) in the near-IR range (0.97 - 1.94 μm). These processes are investigated in the course of a few particular clinical procedures aimed at the modification and removal of pathological tissues (veins, mammary gland cyst, Baker’s cyst) and tissue regeneration (intervertebral discs). In the proposed approach, the modification and destruction of biotissues are due to the fast delivery of heat by two-phase jet flows, formed in the course of liquid boiling, rather than the direct laser heating. This provides the high rate of heat delivery to the pathological biotissue, avoiding its overheating (the temperature higher than 100 °C) and undesired heating of adjacent tissues. Two main regimes of laser-induced boiling near the optical fibre tip were revealed, namely, the heterogeneous jet boiling (arising when the fibre with a blackened tip is used) and the homogeneous boiling (with the radiation absorbed in the liquid volume). Both studied regimes allow one to obtain high specific heat flows, and the domination of one of the boiling regimes is determined by the presence of absorbing coating on the fibre tip, the tissue type, as well as by its shape (e.g., the presence of channels or cavities in the tissue). It is established that the heterogeneous jet boiling at the fibre tip corresponds to the regime of superintensive bubble boiling.

  19. Chemical Characterization of Simulated Boiling Water Reactor Coolant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    industry to reduce personnel radiation exposure and down-time associated with the operation, mainte- nance and refueling of Light Water Reactor (LWR...AD-A226 654 t t-FILL UIY C CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SIMULATED , .BOILING WATER REACTOR COOLANt by Li . . , . , - VERRDON HOLBROOK MASON f ; B.S...CHARACTERIZATION OF SIMULATED BOILING WATER REACTOR COOLANT by VERRDON HOLBROOK MASON Submitted to the Department of Nuclear Engineering on May 9, 1988 in

  20. RELAP5/MOD3 subcooled boiling model assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Devkin, A.S.; Podosenov, A.S.

    1998-05-01

    This report presents the assessment of the RELAP5/Mod3 (5m5 version) code subcooled boiling process model which is based on a variety of experiments. The accuracy of the model is confirmed for a wide range of regime parameters for the case of uniform heating along the channel. The condensation rate is rather underpredicted, which may lead to considerable errors in void fraction behavior prediction in subcooled boiling regimes for nonuniformly or unheated channels.

  1. Pervaporation of ethanol and acetone above normal boiling temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Windmoeller, D.; Galembeck, F. )

    1992-08-01

    Pervaporation experiments were performed at higher than normal feed liquid boiling temperatures by applying pressure to the feed compartment. Ethanol, acetone, and aqueous ethanol solutions were pervaporated through silicone rubber dense membranes. Large increases were observed in the permeate flow as the temperature rose above the liquid boiling temperature. Separation factors in aqueous ethanol pervaporation are not affected by these increases in permeate output, and they are in the same range as those obtained in conventional pervaporation.

  2. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). In addition to macroscopic parameters like the average heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux [CHF] value, more fundamental parameters such as the bubble departure diameter and frequency, growth and wait times, and nucleation site density [NSD] were directly measured for a thin, resistively heated, indium-tin-oxide surface deposited onto a sapphire substrate. Consistent with other nanofluid studies, the nanoparticles caused deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer (by as much as 50%) and an increase in the CHF (by as much as 100%). The bubble departure frequency and NSD were found to be lower in nanofluids compared with water for the same wall superheat. Furthermore, it was found that a porous layer of nanoparticles built up on the heater surface during nucleate boiling, which improved surface wettability compared with the water-boiled surfaces. Using the prevalent nucleate boiling models, it was possible to correlate this improved surface wettability to the experimentally observed reductions in the bubble departure frequency, NSD, and ultimately to the deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the CHF enhancement. PMID:21711754

  3. The mismatch between laboratory boiling heat transfer data and industrialrequirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beduz, C.; Scurlock, R. G.

    There is a large mis-match between published boiling heat transferdata and the operation of industrial cryogenic plant. Published data are generally obtained on small laboratory test-rigs at uniform heat flux with vertical channel heights of the order of 50mm. Operation of industrial plant demands a constant wall temperature and vertical channel heights of up to 2000mm (2m). Using a 2.7m long cryostat with forced circulation of liquid nitrogen to promote an isothermal bath temperature, results show that boiling heat transfer at constant wall temperature Tw (as in a reboiler-condenser) is strongly affected by local sub-cooling of the liquid. Indeed, no boiling takes place until Tw exceeds the local boiling temperature determined by the pressure head of the liquid. For high thermodynamic efficiency, boiling heat transfer with smalltemperature difference T w-T 0 (where T 0 is the surface saturation temperature) there is a depth of liquid below which there is no boiling.

  4. Sub-Cooled Pool Boiling Enhancement with Nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Elliott Charles

    Phase-change heat transfer is an important process used in many engineering thermal designs. Boiling is an important phase change phenomena as it is a common heat transfer process in many thermal systems. Phase change processes are critical to thermodynamic cycles as most closed loop systems have an evaporator, in which the phase change process occurs. There are many applications/processes in which engineers employ the advantages of boiling heat transfer, as they seek to improve heat transfer performance. Recent research efforts have experimentally shown that nanofluids can have significantly better heat transfer properties than those of the pure base fluids, such as water. The objective of this study is to improve the boiling curve of de-ionized water by adding aluminum oxide nanoparticles in 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3% and 0.4% wt concentrations in a sub-cooled pool boiling apparatus. Enhancement to the boiling curve can be quantified in two ways: (i) the similar heat fluxes of de-ionized water at smaller excess temperature, indicating similar quantity of heat removal at lower temperatures and (ii) greater heat fluxes than de-ionized water at similar excess temperatures indicating better heat transfer at similar excess temperatures. In the same fashion, the secondary objective is to increase the convective heat transfer coefficient due to boiling by adding different concentrations of aluminum oxide nanoparticles.

  5. Electrohydrodynamics of boiling on microstructured surfaces for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccone, Giacomo; Moran, Jeffrey L.; Bucci, Matteo; Buongiorno, Jacopo; di Marco, Paolo; Mit-Nuclear Science; Engineering Team; University Of Pisa-Destec Dept. Team

    2016-11-01

    Surface wettability is a major parameter in boiling heat transfer. It affects the departure of bubbles from the boiling surface and consequently determines the maximum heat flux transferrable in safe conditions, known as critical heat flux (CHF). Surface wettability can be enhanced through passive techniques, including micro-engineered surfaces and coatings, or through active techniques, e.g. by applying a tunable electric field (electrowetting) that modifies the bubble shape in such a way as to drive bubble detachment. The latter technique is particularly interesting for space applications, where the electric field is used to create a body force that compensates for the absence of gravity. The present work is focused on boiling heat transfer on surfaces whose wettability has been modified by passive and active techniques. We have built a pool boiling apparatus composed of a micro-structured heater acting as boiling surface and an axisymmetric electrode High-speed optical and infrared imaging have been used to investigate the dynamics of boiling phenomena. The aims of this project are twofold: to achieve a superior understanding of wetting phenomena, and to improve the efficiency of cooling devices for space applications.

  6. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Craig; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hu, Lin-Wen; McKrell, Thomas

    2011-03-16

    Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). In addition to macroscopic parameters like the average heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux [CHF] value, more fundamental parameters such as the bubble departure diameter and frequency, growth and wait times, and nucleation site density [NSD] were directly measured for a thin, resistively heated, indium-tin-oxide surface deposited onto a sapphire substrate. Consistent with other nanofluid studies, the nanoparticles caused deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer (by as much as 50%) and an increase in the CHF (by as much as 100%). The bubble departure frequency and NSD were found to be lower in nanofluids compared with water for the same wall superheat. Furthermore, it was found that a porous layer of nanoparticles built up on the heater surface during nucleate boiling, which improved surface wettability compared with the water-boiled surfaces. Using the prevalent nucleate boiling models, it was possible to correlate this improved surface wettability to the experimentally observed reductions in the bubble departure frequency, NSD, and ultimately to the deterioration in the nucleate boiling heat transfer and the CHF enhancement.

  7. Numerical simulation of bubble departure in subcooled pool boiling based on non-empirical boiling and condensation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ose, Y.; Kunugi, T.

    2013-07-01

    In this study, in order to clarify the heat transfer characteristics of the subcooled boiling phenomena and to discuss on their mechanism, a non-empirical boiling and condensation model for numerical simulation has been adopted. This model consists of an improved phase-change model and a consideration of a relaxation time based on the quasithermal equilibrium hypothesis. The transient three-dimensional numerical simulations based on the MARS (Multiinterface Advection and Reconstruction Solver) with the non-empirical boiling and condensation model have been conducted for an isolated boiling bubble behavior in a subcooled pool. The subcooled bubble behaviors, such as the growth process of the nucleate bubble on the heating surface, the condensation process and the extinction behaviors after departing from the heating surface were investigated, respectively. In this paper, the bubble departing behavior from the heating surface was discussed in detail. The overall numerical results showed in very good agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Heat transfer mechanisms in microgravity flow boiling.

    PubMed

    Ohta, Haruhiko

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to clarify the mechanisms of heat transfer and dryout phenomena in flow boiling under microgravity conditions. Liquid-vapor behavior in annular flow, encountered in the moderate quality region, has extreme significance for practical application in space. To clarify the gravity effect on the heat transfer observed for an upward flow in a tube, the research described here started from the measurement of pressure drop for binary gas-liquid mixture under various gravity conditions. The shear stress acting on the surface of the annular liquid film was correlated by an empirical method. Gravity effects on the heat transfer due to two-phase forced convection were investigated by the analysis of velocity and temperature profiles in the film. The results reproduce well the trends of heat transfer coefficients varying with the gravity level, quality, and mass velocity. Dryout phenomena in the moderate quality region were observed in detail by the introduction of a transparent heated tube. At heat fluxes just lower and higher than CHF value, a transition of the heat transfer coefficient was calculated from oscillating wall temperature, where a series of opposing heat transfer trends--the enhancement due to the quenching of dried areas or evaporation from thin liquid films and the deterioration due to the extension of dry patches--were observed between the passage of disturbance waves. The CHF condition that resulted from the insufficient decrease of wall temperature in the period of enhanced heat transfer was overcome by a temperature increase in the deterioration period. No clear effect of gravity on the mechanisms of dryout was observed within the range of experiments.

  9. Gravity and Heater Size Effects on Pool Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; Raj, Rishi

    2014-01-01

    The current work is based on observations of boiling heat transfer over a continuous range of gravity levels between 0g to 1.8g and varying heater sizes with a fluorinert as the test liquid (FC-72/n-perfluorohexane). Variable gravity pool boiling heat transfer measurements over a wide range of gravity levels were made during parabolic flight campaigns as well as onboard the International Space Station. For large heaters and-or higher gravity conditions, buoyancy dominated boiling and heat transfer results were heater size independent. The power law coefficient for gravity in the heat transfer equation was found to be a function of wall temperature under these conditions. Under low gravity conditions and-or for smaller heaters, surface tension forces dominated and heat transfer results were heater size dependent. A pool boiling regime map differentiating buoyancy and surface tension dominated regimes was developed along with a unified framework that allowed for scaling of pool boiling over a wide range of gravity levels and heater sizes. The scaling laws developed in this study are expected to allow performance quantification of phase change based technologies under variable gravity environments eventually leading to their implementation in space based applications.

  10. Enhanced boiling heat transfer in horizontal test bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Trewin, R.R.; Jensen, M.K.; Bergles, A.E.

    1994-08-01

    Two-phase flow boiling from bundles of horizontal tubes with smooth and enhanced surfaces has been investigated. Experiments were conducted in pure refrigerant R-113, pure R-11, and mixtures of R-11 and R-113 of approximately 25, 50, and 75% of R-113 by mass. Tests were conducted in two staggered tube bundles consisting of fifteen rows and five columns laid out in equilateral triangular arrays with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.5. The enhanced surfaces tested included a knurled surface (Wolverine`s Turbo-B) and a porous surface (Linde`s High Flux). Pool boiling tests were conducted for each surface so that reference values of the heat transfer coefficient could be obtained. Boiling heat transfer experiments in the tube bundles were conducted at pressures of 2 and 6 bar, heat flux values from 5 to 80 kW/m{sup 2}s, and qualities from 0% to 80%, Values of the heat transfer coefficients for the enhanced surfaces were significantly larger than for the smooth tubes and were comparable to the values obtained in pool boiling. It was found that the performance of the enhanced tubes could be predicted using the pool boiling results. The degradation in the smooth tube heat transfer coefficients obtained in fluid mixtures was found to depend on the difference between the molar concentration in the liquid and vapor.

  11. A correlation for nucleate flow boiling in small channels

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, T.N. |; Wambsganss, M.W.; Chyu, M.C.; France, D.M.

    1997-08-01

    Compact heat exchangers are becoming more attractive for applications in which energy conservation, space saving, and cost are important considerations. Applications exist in the process industries where phase-change heat transfer realizes more compact designs and improved performance compared to single-phase heat transfer. However, there have been only a few studies in the literature reporting on phase-change heat transfer and two-phase flow in compact heat exchangers, and validated design correlations are lacking. Recent data from experiments on flow boiling of refrigerants in small channels have led researchers to conclude that nucleation is the dominant heat transfer mechanism over a broad range of heat flux and wall superheats. Local heat transfer coefficients and overall two-phase pressure drops were measured for three different refrigerants with circular and non-circular channels in a range of pressures. This data base supports the nucleate boiling mechanism, and it was used to develop a new correlation for heat transfer in nucleate flow boiling. The correlation is based on the Rohsenow boiling model, introducing a confinement number defined by Kew and Cornwell. The new correlation predicts the experimental data for nucleate flow boiling of three refrigerants within {+-}15%.

  12. Droplet impingement dynamics: effect of surface temperature during boiling and non-boiling conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian; Liburdy, James A.; Pence, Deborah V.; Narayanan, Vinod

    2009-11-01

    This study investigates the hydrodynamic characteristics of droplet impingement on heated surfaces and compares the effect of surface temperature when using water and a nanofluid on a polished and nanostructured surface. Results are obtained for an impact Reynolds number and Weber number of approximately 1700 and 25, respectively. Three discs are used: polished silicon, nanostructured porous silicon and gold-coated polished silicon. Seven surface temperatures, including single-phase (non-boiling) and two-phase (boiling) conditions, are included. Droplet impact velocity, transient spreading diameter and dynamic contact angle are measured. Results of water and a water-based single-wall carbon-nanotube nanofluid impinging on a polished silicon surface are compared to determine the effects of nanoparticles on impinging dynamics. The nanofluid results in larger spreading velocities, larger spreading diameters and an increase in early-stage dynamic contact angle. Results of water impinging on both polished silicon and nanostructured silicon show that the nanostructured surface enhances the heat transfer for evaporative cooling at lower surface temperatures, which is indicated by a shorter evaporation time. Using a nanofluid or a nanostructured surface can reduce the total evaporation time up to 20% and 37%, respectively. Experimental data are compared with models that predict dynamic contact angle and non-dimensional maximum spreading diameter. Results show that the molecular-kinetic theory's dynamic contact angle model agrees well with current experimental data for later times, but over-predicts at early times. Predictions of maximum spreading diameter based on surface energy analyses indicate that these models over-predict unless empirical coefficients are adjusted to fit the test conditions. This is a consequence of underestimates of the dissipative energy for the conditions studied.

  13. R and D program for French sodium fast reactor: On the description and detection of sodium boiling phenomena during sub-assembly blockages

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderhaegen, M.; Paumel, K.; Seiler, J. M.; Tourin, A.; Jeannot, J. P.; Rodriguez, G.

    2011-07-01

    In support of the French ASTRID (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration) reactor program, which aims to demonstrate the industrial applicability of sodium fast reactors with an increased level of safety demonstration and availability compared to the past French sodium fast reactors, emphasis is placed on reactor instrumentation. It is in this framework that CEA studies continuous core monitoring to detect as early as possible the onset of sodium boiling. Such a detection system is of particular interest due to the rapid progress and the consequences of a Total Instantaneous Blockage (TIB) at a subassembly inlet, where sodium boiling intervenes in an early phase. In this paper, the authors describe all the particularities which intervene during the different boiling stages and explore possibilities for their detection. (authors)

  14. VLA Shows "Boiling" in Atmosphere of Betelgeuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-04-01

    progressively outwards. Although its existence was not previously suspected, this lower-temperature gas turns out to be the most abundant constituent of Betelgeuse's atmosphere. "This alters our basic understanding of red-supergiant star atmospheres," explains Lim. "Instead of the star's atmosphere expanding uniformly because of gas heated to very high temperatures near its surface, it now appears that several giant convection cells propel gas from the star's surface into its atmosphere. This creates the complex structure we observe for Betelgeuse's atmosphere." Betelgeuse can be likened to an enormous "boiling" ball of gas heated by the release of energy from nuclear fusion in its core. The circulating boiling pattern -- convection -- appears as large regions of hot upwelling gas on the star's surface. "The idea that red-supergiant stars have enormous convection cells is not new," noted Marson. "This was suggested by Martin Schwarzschild more than 20 years ago, and was seen in optical images of Betelgeuse's surface in 1990." The new picture of Betelgeuse's atmosphere also helps resolve the mystery of how massive amounts of dust and gas are expelled from red supergiant stars, an important source of enrichment for the interstellar medium. If their atmospheres were entirely very hot at lower levels, dust grains would not be able to condense there. Dust grains could possibly condense at higher levels, but there they would not get enough "push" from the star's radiation to explain their outward movement. In the new picture, the relatively cool environment at lower levels allows dust grains to condense effectively; here they can be strongly propelled by the more-intense starlight, carrying gas with them. Indeed, dust has previously been inferred to form sporadically near Betelgeuse's surface, but its presence there was difficult to reconcile with the old picture. "This method for propelling the mass outflows of red giant and supergiant stars was proposed by Sun Kwok in the same year

  15. Numerical simulation of pool boiling of a Lennard-Jones liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaoka, Hajime; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2013-09-01

    We performed a numerical simulation of pool boiling by a molecular dynamics model. In the simulation, a liquid composed of Lennard-Jones particles in a uniform gravitational field is heated by a heat source at the bottom of the system. The model successfully reproduces the change in regimes of boiling from nucleate boiling to film boiling with the increase of the heat source temperature. We present the pool boiling curve by the model, whose general behavior is consistent with those observed in experiments of pool boiling.

  16. Bubble behaviour and mean diameter in subcooled flow boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Zeitoun, O.; Shoukri, M.

    1995-09-01

    Bubble behaviour and mean bubble diameter in subcooled upward flow boiling in a vertical annular channel were investigated under low pressure and mass flux conditions. A high speed video system was used to visualize the subcooled flow boiling phenomenon. The high speed photographic results indicated that, contrary to the common understanding, bubbles tend to detach from the heating surface upstream of the net vapour generation point. Digital image processing technique was used to measure the mean bubble diameter along the subcooled flow boiling region. Data on the axial area-averaged void fraction distributions were also obtained using a single beam gamma densitometer. Effects of the liquid subcooling, applied heat flux and mass flux on the mean bubble size were investigated. A correlation for the mean bubble diameter as a function of the local subcooling, heat flux and mass flux was obtained.

  17. Influence of the Wall on the Boiling Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to investigation of wall roughness and its thickness. It is not enough to know the heat flux and the physical properties of the liquid for determining the boiling mode. The wall roughness and its thickness also plays an important role. Changes in the surface roughness from 5 to 7th grade did not affect the behavior of the curves. The width of the transition region for the boiling crisis is much less for the polished surface (roughness grade is 9) compared to the rough wall. The boiling crisis for mirror wall comes at a lower overheating of the wall. The total time of evaporation on the mirror wall is almost 3 times higher than for a rough wall.

  18. Boiling process modelling peculiarities analysis of the vacuum boiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodina, E. N.; Mikhailov, A. G.

    2017-06-01

    The analysis of the low and medium powered boiler equipment development was carried out, boiler units possible development directions with the purpose of energy efficiency improvement were identified. Engineering studies for the vacuum boilers applying are represented. Vacuum boiler heat-exchange processes where boiling water is the working body are considered. Heat-exchange intensification method under boiling at the maximum heat- transfer coefficient is examined. As a result of the conducted calculation studies, heat-transfer coefficients variation curves depending on the pressure, calculated through the analytical and numerical methodologies were obtained. The conclusion about the possibility of numerical computing method application through RPI ANSYS CFX for the boiling process description in boiler vacuum volume was given.

  19. Boiling heat transfer enhancement in subsurface horizontal and vertical tunnels

    SciTech Connect

    Pastuszko, Robert

    2008-09-15

    Complex experimental investigations of boiling heat transfer on structured surfaces covered with perforated foil were taken up. Experimental data were discussed for two kinds of enhanced surfaces formed by joined horizontal and vertical tunnels: tunnel structures (TS) and narrow tunnel structures (NTS). The experiments were carried out with water, ethanol and R-123 at atmospheric pressure. The TS and NTS surfaces were manufactured out of perforated copper foil of 0.05 mm thickness (hole diameters: 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 mm) sintered with the mini-fins, formed on the vertical side of the 5 mm high rectangular fins and horizontal inter-fin surface. The effects of hole (pore) diameters, tunnel pitch for TS and tunnel width for NTS on nucleate pool boiling were examined. Substantial enhancement of heat transfer coefficient was observed. The investigated surfaces showed boiling heat transfer coefficients similar to those of existing structures with subsurface tunnels, but at higher heat fluxes range. (author)

  20. Boiling heat transfer on fins - experimental and numerical procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzechowski, T.; Tyburczyk, A.

    2014-03-01

    The paper presents the research methodology, the test facility and the results of investigations into non-isothermal surfaces in water boiling at atmospheric pressure, together with a discussion of errors. The investigations were conducted for two aluminium samples with technically smooth surfaces and thickness of 4 mm and 10 mm, respectively. For the sample of lower thickness, on the basis of the surface temperature distribution measured with an infrared camera, the local heat flux and the heat transfer coefficient were determined and shown in the form of a boiling curve. For the thicker sample, for which 1-D model cannot be used, numerical calculations were conducted. They resulted in obtaining the values of the local heat flux on the surface the invisible to the infrared, camera i.e. on the side on which the boiling of the medium proceeds.

  1. On mechanism of explosive boiling in nanosecond regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelen, Serap

    2016-06-01

    Today laser-based machining is used to manufacture vital parts for biomedical, aviation and aerospace industries. The aim of the paper is to report theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations of explosive boiling under nanosecond pulsed ytterbium fiber laser irradiation. Experiments were performed in an effective peak power density range between 1397 and 1450 MW/cm2 on pure titanium specimens. The threshold laser fluence for phase explosion, the pressure and temperature at the target surface and the velocity of the expulsed material were reported. A narrow transition zone was realized between the normal vaporization and phase explosion fields. The proof of heterogeneous boiling was given with detailed micrographs. A novel thermal model was proposed for laser-induced splashing at high fluences. Packaging factor and scattering arc radius terms were proposed to state the level of the melt ejection process. Results of the present investigation explain the explosive boiling during high-power laser interaction with metal.

  2. Atomic dynamics of explosive boiling of liquid-argon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, X.; Urbassek, H. M.

    2005-09-01

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we study the explosive boiling of thin liquid-argon films adsorbed on a metal surface. This process might be induced by heating the metal substrate by an ultra-fast laser. Upon sudden heating of the metal to temperatures well beyond the critical temperature of Ar, the film starts boiling. While thin films, with thickness below seven monolayers, fragment completely, in larger films only the near-surface Ar layers vaporize. The resulting vapor pressure drives the expansion of the remaining liquid overlayers. By monitoring the space and time dependence of the hydrodynamic variables density, pressure, and temperature, as well as the local thermodynamic state in the Ar sample, we obtain a detailed microscopic picture of the explosive boiling process. Finally, as a result of the fragmentation process, the abundance distribution of the clusters formed in the expansion follows a power-law distribution for cluster sizes m ≲ 10.

  3. Pool boiling on a large horizontal flat resistance heater

    SciTech Connect

    Reguillot, F.; Witte, L.; Lienhard, J.; Poniewski, M. Kielce University of Technology, )

    1992-08-01

    Results are presented of experiments on n-pentane/Freon-113 system, carried out to investigate the film-transition boiling region where liquid-solid contacts contribute significantly to the local heat flux, using a large flat horizontal resistance heater mounted on a ceramic insulating substrate. After steady film boiling was reached, the heat flux was decreased and recorded simultaneously with the temperature measured by thermocouples attached to the lower side of the heater surface. It is shown that the observed data on the quasi-linear film boiling regime are better represented by Berenson's (1960) correlation than by Klimenko's (1981) correlation. Burnout values measured for Freon-113 compared reasonably well to available correlations for the flat plate geometry. 10 refs.

  4. 3. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Sorghum pan and boiling ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Sorghum pan and boiling range flue. Manufactured by John Nott & Co., Honolulu, Hawaii, 1878. View: South side of sorghum pan and boiling range flue. In the sorghum pan heat was applied to the cane juice to clarify it, evaporate its water content, and concentrate the sugar crystals. Hot gasses moved through the flue underneath the entire copper bottom of the sorghum pan from the furnace (east) end to the smokestack (west) end of the boiling range. The sorghum pan sides are of redwood. The flue is built of fire-brick, masonry, and portland cement. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  5. A high-fidelity approach towards simulation of pool boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdani, Miad; Radcliff, Thomas; Soteriou, Marios; Alahyari, Abbas A.

    2016-01-15

    A novel numerical approach is developed to simulate the multiscale problem of pool-boiling phase change. The particular focus is to develop a simulation technique that is capable of predicting the heat transfer and hydrodynamic characteristics of nucleate boiling and the transition to critical heat flux on surfaces of arbitrary shape and roughness distribution addressing a critical need to design enhanced boiling heat transfer surfaces. The macro-scale of the phase change and bubble dynamics is addressed through employing off-the-shelf Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods for interface tracking and interphase mass and energy transfer. The micro-scale of the microlayer, which forms at early stage of bubble nucleation near the wall, is resolved through asymptotic approximation of the thin-film theory which provides a closed-form solution for the distribution of the micro-layer and its influence on the evaporation process. In addition, the sub-grid surface roughness is represented stochastically through probabilistic density functions and its role in bubble nucleation and growth is then represented based on the thermodynamics of nucleation process. This combination of deterministic CFD, local approximation, and stochastic representation allows the simulation of pool boiling on any surface with known roughness and enhancement characteristics. The numerical model is validated for dynamics and hydrothermal characteristics of a single nucleated bubble on a flat surface against available literature data. In addition, the prediction of pool-boiling heat transfer coefficient is verified against experimental measurements as well as reputable correlations for various roughness distributions and different surface orientations. Finally, the model is employed to demonstrate pool-boiling phenomenon on enhanced structures with reentrance cavities and to explore the effect of enhancement feature design on thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of these surfaces.

  6. Marangoni Effects in the Boiling of Binary Fluid Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Sayeed; Carey, Van P.; Motil, Brian

    1996-01-01

    Results of very recent experimental studies indicate that during nucleate boiling in some binary mixture, Marangoni effects augment the gravity driven flow of liquid towards the heated surface. With gravity present, it is impossible to separate the two effects. The reduced gravity environment gives an unique opportunity to explore th role of Marangoni effects on the boiling mechanisms free of gravitational body forces that obscure the role of such effects. However, recent experimental results suggest that under reduced gravity conditions, Marangoni effects is the dominant mechanism of vapor-liquid exchange at the surface for some binary mixture. To further explore such effects, experiments have been conducted with water/2-propanol mixtures at three different concentrations under normal gravity with different orientations of the heater surface and under reduce gravity aboard the DC-9 aircraft at NASA Lewis Research Center. The system pressure was sub atmospheric (approx. 8 kP at 1g(n)) and the bulk liquid temperature varied from low subcooling to near saturation. The molar concentrations of 2-propanol tested were 0.015, 0.025, and 0.1. Boiling curves were obtained both for high gravity (approx. 2g(n)) and reduce gravity (approx. 0.01g(n)). For each concentration of 2-propanol, the critical heat flux has been determined in the flight experiments only for reduced gravity conditions. Comparison of boiling curves and CHF obtained under l-g(n) an reduced gravity indicates that boiling mechanism in this mixtures is nearly independent of gravity. The results also indicate that the Marangoni mechanism is strong enough in these mixtures to sustain the boiling under reduced gravity conditions.

  7. Defluoridation of drinking water by boiling with brushite and calcite.

    PubMed

    Larsen, M J; Pearce, E I F

    2002-01-01

    Existing methods for defluoridating drinking water involve expensive high technology or are slow, inefficient and/or unhygienic. A new method is now suggested, encompassing brushite and calcite suspension followed by boiling. Our aim was to examine the efficiency of the method and the chemical reactions involved. Brushite, 0.3-0.5 g, and an equal weight of calcite were suspended in 1 litre water containing 5-20 ppm fluoride. The suspensions were boiled in an electric kettle, left to cool and the calcium salts to sediment. Solution ion concentrations were determined and sediments were examined by X-ray diffraction. In distilled water initially containing 5, 10 and 20 ppm fluoride the concentration was reduced to 0.06, 0.4 and 5.9 ppm, respectively. Using Aarhus tap water which contained 2.6 mmol/l calcium the final concentrations were 1.2, 2.5 and 7.7 ppm, respectively, and runs without calcite gave results similar to those with calcite. Without boiling the fluoride concentration remained unaltered, as did the brushite and calcite salts, despite occasional agitation by hand. All solutions were supersaturated with respect to fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite and close to saturation with respect to brushite. Boiling produced well-crystallised apatite and traces of calcite, while boiling of brushite alone left a poorly crystallised apatite. We conclude that boiling a brushite/calcite suspension rapidly converts the two salts to apatite which incorporates fluoride if present in solution, and that this process may be exploited to defluoridate drinking water.

  8. Effect of surface properties on nucleate pool boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Haze, Ikuya; Tomemori, Hideki; Motoya, Daiju; Osakabe, Masahiro

    1999-07-01

    A series of experiments on nucleate pool boiling was performed by use of an oxygen-free copper rod and platinum wires of different surface properties under both normal gravity condition and microgravity condition. As a result of the experiments, under normal gravity condition, the bubbling on thick cracked silicone-coated surfaces and that on scale surfaces were more vigorous than that on mirror-finished (copper) surfaces, that on bare (Pt) surfaces, that on thin silicone-coated surfaces and that on thick silicone-coated surfaces. The boiling curves on the mirror-finished surface, the bare surface, the thin silicone-coated surface and the thick cracked silicone-coated surface were equal to those predicted by the Rohsenow's correlation. The superheats on the thick silicone-coated surface and the scale surface were larger than those predicted by the Rohsenow's correlation. The boiling curves on the non-cracked silicone-coated surface and the scale surface corrected by those heat resistance were equal to those predicted by the Rohsenow's correlation. The superheat on the thick silicone-coated surface corrected by its heat resistance was smaller than that predicted by the Rohsenow's correlation. The thick cracked silicone-coated surface enhanced the nucleate boiling heat transfer. On the other hand, under microgravity condition, the bubbles stayed around heated surfaces except scale surfaces. The boiling curve on the bare surface under microgravity condition was equal to that under normal gravity condition. The effect of surface properties on the nucleate boiling heat transfer under microgravity condition was equal to that under normal gravity condition.

  9. A high-fidelity approach towards simulation of pool boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Miad; Radcliff, Thomas; Soteriou, Marios; Alahyari, Abbas A.

    2016-01-01

    A novel numerical approach is developed to simulate the multiscale problem of pool-boiling phase change. The particular focus is to develop a simulation technique that is capable of predicting the heat transfer and hydrodynamic characteristics of nucleate boiling and the transition to critical heat flux on surfaces of arbitrary shape and roughness distribution addressing a critical need to design enhanced boiling heat transfer surfaces. The macro-scale of the phase change and bubble dynamics is addressed through employing off-the-shelf Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods for interface tracking and interphase mass and energy transfer. The micro-scale of the microlayer, which forms at early stage of bubble nucleation near the wall, is resolved through asymptotic approximation of the thin-film theory which provides a closed-form solution for the distribution of the micro-layer and its influence on the evaporation process. In addition, the sub-grid surface roughness is represented stochastically through probabilistic density functions and its role in bubble nucleation and growth is then represented based on the thermodynamics of nucleation process. This combination of deterministic CFD, local approximation, and stochastic representation allows the simulation of pool boiling on any surface with known roughness and enhancement characteristics. The numerical model is validated for dynamics and hydrothermal characteristics of a single nucleated bubble on a flat surface against available literature data. In addition, the prediction of pool-boiling heat transfer coefficient is verified against experimental measurements as well as reputable correlations for various roughness distributions and different surface orientations. Finally, the model is employed to demonstrate pool-boiling phenomenon on enhanced structures with reentrance cavities and to explore the effect of enhancement feature design on thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics of these surfaces.

  10. The sudden coalescene model of the boiling crisis

    SciTech Connect

    Carrica, P.M.; Clausse, A.

    1995-09-01

    A local two-phase flow integral model of nucleate boiling and crisis is presented. The model is based on average balances on a control volume, yielding to a set of three nonlinear differential equations for the local void fraction, bubble number density and velocity. Boiling crisis as critical heat flux is interpreted as a dynamic transition caused by the coalescence of bubbles near the heater. The theoretical dynamic model is compared with experimental results obtained for linear power ramps in a horizontal plate heater in R-113, showing an excellent qualitative agreement.

  11. 23. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Boiling House Interior, 1878. View: North Wall of boiling house. In the original structure the three windows on the right admitted light and air from the outside. A shed occupied the left side of the wall outside (hence no windows). in 1881 the construction of the cooling shed closed in the right three windows. The sorghum is in the foreground. The centrifugals are in the left rear. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  12. Hysteresis of boiling for different tunnel-pore surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastuszko, Robert; Piasecka, Magdalena

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of boiling hysteresis on structured surfaces covered with perforated foil is proposed. Hysteresis is an adverse phenomenon, preventing high heat flux systems from thermal stabilization, characterized by a boiling curve variation at an increase and decrease of heat flux density. Experimental data were discussed for three kinds of enhanced surfaces: tunnel structures (TS), narrow tunnel structures (NTS) and mini-fins covered with the copper wire net (NTS-L). The experiments were carried out with water, R-123 and FC-72 at atmospheric pressure. A detailed analysis of the measurement results identified several cases of type I, II and III for TS, NTS and NTS-L surfaces.

  13. Ethyl alcohol boiling heat transfer on multilayer meshed surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dåbek, Lidia; Kapjor, Andrej; Orman, Łukasz J.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents the problem of heat transfer enhancement with the application of multilayer metal mesh structures during boiling of ethyl alcohol at ambient pressure. The preparation of samples involved sintering fine copper meshes with the copper base in the reduction atmosphere in order to prevent oxidation of the samples. The experiments included testing up to 4 layers of copper meshes. Significant augmentation of boiling heat transfer is possible, however, considerable number of meshes actually hinders heat transfer conditions and leads to the reduction in the heat flux transferred from the heater surface.

  14. Mechanistic modeling of CHF in forced-convection subcooled boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Podowski, M.Z.; Alajbegovic, A.; Kurul, N.; Drew, D.A.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    Because of the complexity of phenomena governing boiling heat transfer, the approach to solve practical problems has traditionally been based on experimental correlations rather than mechanistic models. The recent progress in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), combined with improved experimental techniques in two-phase flow and heat transfer, makes the use of rigorous physically-based models a realistic alternative to the current simplistic phenomenological approach. The objective of this paper is to present a new CFD model for critical heat flux (CHF) in low quality (in particular, in subcooled boiling) forced-convection flows in heated channels.

  15. Heat Transfer in Boiling Dilute Emulsion with Strong Buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeburg, Eric Thomas

    Little attention has been given to the boiling of emulsions compared to that of boiling in pure liquids. The advantages of using emulsions as a heat transfer agent were first discovered in the 1970s and several interesting features have since been studied by few researchers. Early research focuses primarily on pool and flow boiling and looks to determine a mechanism by which the boiling process occurs. This thesis looks at the boiling of dilute emulsions in fluids with strong buoyant forces. The boiling of dilute emulsions presents many favorable characteristics that make it an ideal agent for heat transfer. High heat flux electronics, such as those seen in avionics equipment, produce high heat fluxes of 100 W/cm2 or more, but must be maintained at low temperatures. So far, research on single phase convection and flow boiling in small diameter channels have yet to provide an adequate solution. Emulsions allow the engineer to tailor the solution to the specific problem. The fluid can be customized to retain the high thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity of the continuous phase while enhancing the heat transfer coefficient through boiling of the dispersed phase component. Heat transfer experiments were carried out with FC-72 in water emulsions. FC-72 has a saturation temperature of 56 °C, far below that of water. The parameters were varied as follows: 0% ≤ epsilon ≤ 1% and 1.82 x 1012 ≤ RaH ≤ 4.42 x 1012. Surface temperatures along the heated surface reached temperature that were 20 °C in excess of the dispersed phase saturation temperature. An increase of ˜20% was seen in the average Nusselt numbers at the highest Rayleigh numbers. Holography was used to obtain images of individual and multiple FC-72 droplets in the boundary layer next to the heated surface. The droplet diameters ranged from 0.5 mm to 1.3 mm. The Magnus effect was observed when larger individual droplets were injected into the boundary layer, causing the droplets to be pushed

  16. Length Scale and Gravity Effects on Microgravity Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Boiling is a complex phenomenon where hydrodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and interfacial phenomena are tightly interwoven. An understanding of boiling and critical heat flux in microgravity environments is of importance to space based hardware and processes such as heat exchange, cryogenic fuel storage and transportation, electronic cooling, and material processing due to the large amounts of heat that can be removed with relatively little increase in temperature. Although research in this area has been performed in the past four decades, the mechanisms by which heat is removed from surfaces in microgravity are still unclear. In earth gravity, buoyancy is an important parameter that affects boiling heat transfer through the rate at which bubbles are removed from the surface. A simple model describing the bubble departure size based on a quasistatic force balance between buoyancy and surface tension is given by the Fritz [I] relation: Bo(exp 1/2) = 0.0208 theta where Bo is the ratio between buoyancy and surface tension forces. For small, rapidly growing bubbles, inertia associated with the induced liquid motion can also cause bubble departure. In microgravity, the magnitude of effects related to natural convection and buoyancy are small and physical mechanisms normally masked by natural convection in earth gravity such as Marangoni convection can substantially influence the boiling and vapor bubble dynamics. CHF (critical heat transfer) is also substantially affected by microgravity. In 1 g environments, Bo has been used as a correlating parameter for CHF. Zuber's CHF model for an infinite horizontal surface assumes that vapor columns formed by the merger of bubbles become unstable due to a Helmholtz instability blocking the supply of liquid to the surface. The jets are spaced lambda(sub D) apart, where lambda(sub D) = 2pi square root of 3[(sigma)/(g(rho(sub l) - rho(sub v)](exp 1/2) = 2pi square root of 3 L Bo(exp -1/2) = square root of 3 lambda(sub c

  17. Length Scale and Gravity Effects on Microgravity Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Boiling is a complex phenomenon where hydrodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and interfacial phenomena are tightly interwoven. An understanding of boiling and critical heat flux in microgravity environments is of importance to space based hardware and processes such as heat exchange, cryogenic fuel storage and transportation, electronic cooling, and material processing due to the large amounts of heat that can be removed with relatively little increase in temperature. Although research in this area has been performed in the past four decades, the mechanisms by which heat is removed from surfaces in microgravity are still unclear. In earth gravity, buoyancy is an important parameter that affects boiling heat transfer through the rate at which bubbles are removed from the surface. A simple model describing the bubble departure size based on a quasistatic force balance between buoyancy and surface tension is given by the Fritz [I] relation: Bo(exp 1/2) = 0.0208 theta where Bo is the ratio between buoyancy and surface tension forces. For small, rapidly growing bubbles, inertia associated with the induced liquid motion can also cause bubble departure. In microgravity, the magnitude of effects related to natural convection and buoyancy are small and physical mechanisms normally masked by natural convection in earth gravity such as Marangoni convection can substantially influence the boiling and vapor bubble dynamics. CHF (critical heat transfer) is also substantially affected by microgravity. In 1 g environments, Bo has been used as a correlating parameter for CHF. Zuber's CHF model for an infinite horizontal surface assumes that vapor columns formed by the merger of bubbles become unstable due to a Helmholtz instability blocking the supply of liquid to the surface. The jets are spaced lambda(sub D) apart, where lambda(sub D) = 2pi square root of 3[(sigma)/(g(rho(sub l) - rho(sub v)](exp 1/2) = 2pi square root of 3 L Bo(exp -1/2) = square root of 3 lambda(sub c

  18. Length Scale and Gravity Effects on Microgravity Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungho; McQuillen, John; Balombin, Joe

    2002-11-01

    Boiling is a complex phenomenon where hydrodynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and interfacial phenomena are tightly interwoven. An understanding of boiling and critical heat flux in microgravity environments is of importance to space based hardware and processes such as heat exchange, cryogenic fuel storage and transportation, electronic cooling, and material processing due to the large amounts of heat that can be removed with relatively little increase in temperature. Although research in this area has been performed in the past four decades, the mechanisms by which heat is removed from surfaces in microgravity are still unclear. In earth gravity, buoyancy is an important parameter that affects boiling heat transfer through the rate at which bubbles are removed from the surface. A simple model describing the bubble departure size based on a quasistatic force balance between buoyancy and surface tension is given by the Fritz I relation: Bo1/2 = 0.0208 theta where Bo is the ratio between buoyancy and surface tension forces. For small, rapidly growing bubbles, inertia associated with the induced liquid motion can also cause bubble departure. In microgravity, the magnitude of effects related to natural convection and buoyancy are small and physical mechanisms normally masked by natural convection in earth gravity such as Marangoni convection can substantially influence the boiling and vapor bubble dynamics. CHF (critical heat transfer) is also substantially affected by microgravity. In 1 g environments, Bo has been used as a correlating parameter for CHF. Zuber's CHF model for an infinite horizontal surface assumes that vapor columns formed by the merger of bubbles become unstable due to a Helmholtz instability blocking the supply of liquid to the surface. The jets are spaced lambdaD apart, where lambdaD = 2pi square root of 3[(sigma)/(g(rhol - rhov]1/2 = 2pi square root of 3 L Bo-1/2 = square root of 3 lambdac and is the wavelength that amplifies most rapidly

  19. 76 FR 14437 - Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor Standard Design: GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; Issuance of... GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy (GEH) for the economic simplified boiling water reactor (ESBWR)...

  20. 46 CFR 154.705 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.705 Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. (a) Each cargo boil-off...

  1. Science 101: Why Does It Take Longer to Boil Potatoes at High Altitudes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Why Does It Take Longer to Boil Potatoes at High Altitudes? This column provides background science information for elementary teachers. This month's issue looks at why water boils at different temperatures at different altitudes.

  2. 46 CFR 154.705 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.705 Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. (a) Each cargo boil-off fuel...

  3. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    DOEpatents

    White, Terry L.

    1991-01-01

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuoulsly vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  4. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes an acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuously vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level.

  5. Acoustic emission feedback control for control of boiling in a microwave oven

    SciTech Connect

    White, T.L.

    1990-05-02

    An acoustic emission based feedback system for controlling the boiling level of a liquid medium in a microwave oven is provided. The acoustic emissions from the medium correlated with surface boiling is used to generate a feedback control signal proportional to the level of boiling of the medium. This signal is applied to a power controller to automatically and continuously vary the power applied to the oven to control the boiling at a selected level. 2 figs.

  6. Characteristic boiling curve of carbon nanotube nanofluid as determined by the transient calorimeter technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, H. S.; Fan, J. R.; Hong, R. H.; Hu, Y. C.

    2007-04-01

    Nickel-plated copper sphere is employed as the transient calorimeter to explore the boiling heat transfer characteristics of carbon nanotube (CNT) nanofluid. As compared to water, aqueous gum arabic (GA) solution has an enhanced critical heat flux (CHF), transition boiling, and minimum heat flux in film boiling (Leidenfrost point). CNT nanofluid has higher CHF than GA solution. Better wettability and deposits on the heating surface distort the characteristic boiling curve.

  7. 46 CFR 154.705 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. 154.705 Section 154.705... Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.705 Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. (a) Each cargo boil-off fuel system under § 154.703(c) must meet §§ 154.706 through 154.709. (b) The piping in the cargo boil-off...

  8. 46 CFR 154.705 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. 154.705 Section 154.705... Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.705 Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. (a) Each cargo boil-off fuel system under § 154.703(c) must meet §§ 154.706 through 154.709. (b) The piping in the cargo boil-off...

  9. 46 CFR 154.705 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. 154.705 Section 154.705... Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.705 Cargo boil-off as fuel: General. (a) Each cargo boil-off fuel system under § 154.703(c) must meet §§ 154.706 through 154.709. (b) The piping in the cargo boil-off...

  10. Experimental demonstration of contaminant removal from fractured rock by boiling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei; Liu, Xiaoling; Falta, Ronald W; Murdoch, Lawrence C

    2010-08-15

    This study was conducted to experimentally demonstrate removal of a chlorinated volatile organic compound from fractured rock by boiling. A Berea sandstone core was contaminated by injecting water containing dissolved 1,2-DCA (253 mg/L) and sodium bromide (144 mg/L). During heating, the core was sealed except for one end, which was open to the atmosphere to simulate an open fracture. A temperature gradient toward the outlet was observed when boiling occurred in the core. This indicates that steam was generated and a pressure gradient developed toward the outlet, pushing steam vapor and liquid water toward the outlet. As boiling occurred, the concentration of 1,2-DCA in the condensed effluent peaked up to 6.1 times higher than the injected concentration. When 38% of the pore volume of condensate was produced, essentially 100% of the 1,2-DCA was recovered. Nonvolatile bromide concentration in the condensate was used as an indicator of the produced steam quality (vapor mass fraction) because it can only be removed as a solute, and not as a vapor. A higher produced steam quality corresponds to more concentrated 1,2-DCA removal from the core, demonstrating that the chlorinated volatile compound is primarily removed by partitioning into vapor phase flow. This study has experimentally demonstrated that boiling is an effective mechanism for CVOC removal from the rock matrix.

  11. Mechanisms of steady-state nucleate pool boiling in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Sung

    2002-10-01

    Research on nucleate pool boiling in microgravity using R-113 as a working fluid was conducted using a five-second drop tower and five space flights at a/g approximately 10(-4). A 19 x 38-mm flat gold film heater was used that allowed cine camera viewing both from the side and the bottom of the heater. It was concluded that for both subcooled and saturated liquids long-term steady-state pool boiling can take place in reduced gravity, but the effectiveness of the boiling heat transfer appears to depend on the heater geometry and on the size and the properties of fluids. Heat transfer is enhanced at lower heat flux levels and the CHF increases as the subcooling increases. It was found that several mechanisms are responsible for the steady-state nucleate pool boiling in the absence of buoyancy. The mechanisms considered here are defined and summarized as bubble removal, bubble coalescence, thermocapillary flow, bubble migration, and latent heat transport.

  12. Microscale Heaters Detailed Boiling Behavior in Normal Gravity and Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.

    2002-01-01

    Pool boiling in microgravity is an area of both scientific and practical interest. Conducting tests in microgravity, as well as lunar and Martian gravity, makes it possible to assess the effect of the density difference between the vapor and liquid phases on the overall boiling process and to assess the relative magnitude of these effects in comparison to other "forces" and phenomena, such as surface tension forces, liquid momentum forces, and microlayer evaporation. The microscale heater developed under a NASA Glenn Research Center grant serves as a unique tool to probe the fundamental mechanisms associated with pool boiling. An experimental package was designed and built by the University of Maryland and tested on the NASA Johnson Space Center KC-135 experimental aircraft and a NASA WFF Terrier Orion Sounding Rocket under NASA Grants NAG3-2228 and NCC3-783. A square array of 96 microscale heaters was constructed and installed into a special boiling chamber. A fluorinert, FC-72, was used as the test fluid. A variety of tests were conducted at different pressures, heater wall temperatures, bulk fluid temperatures, and gravity levels.

  13. Research on radiation detectors, boiling transients, and organic lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The accomplishments of a space projects research facility are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) a study of radiation resistant semiconductor devices, (2) synthesis of high temperature organic lubricants, (3) departure from phase equilibrium during boiling transients, (4) effects of neutron irradiation on defect state in tungsten, and (5) determination of photon response function of NE-213 liquid scintillation detectors.

  14. Flow Boiling Critical Heat Flux in Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mudawar, Issam; Zhang, Hui; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    2004-01-01

    This study provides systematic method for reducing power consumption in reduced gravity systems by adopting minimum velocity required to provide adequate CHF and preclude detrimental effects of reduced gravity . This study proves it is possible to use existing 1 ge flow boiling and CHF correlations and models to design reduced gravity systems provided minimum velocity criteria are met

  15. Electrochemical study of aluminum corrosion in boiling high purity water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draley, J. E.; Legault, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Electrochemical study of aluminum corrosion in boiling high-purity water includes an equation relating current and electrochemical potential derived on the basis of a physical model of the corrosion process. The work involved an examination of the cathodic polarization behavior of 1100 aluminum during aqueous oxidation.

  16. EPA Statement on Flint Water Main Break, Boil Water Order

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    FLINT, MICH. -- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is working closely with the City of Flint and Michigan Department of Environmental Quality on the recent water main break and boil order. After the water transmission line broke on Feb. 9, EPA coordi

  17. Heat transfer research on enhanced heating surfaces in pool boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalawa, Wojciech; Wójcik, Tadeusz M.; Piasecka, Magdalena

    The paper focuses on the analysis of the enhanced surfaces in such applications as boiling heat transfer. The testing measurement module with enhanced heating surfaces was used for pool boiling research. Pool boiling experiments were conducted with distilled water at atmospheric pressure in the vessel using an enhanced sample as the bottom heating surface. The samples are soldered to a copper heating block of the round cross-section .They were placed: in the fluid (saturation temperature measurement), under the sample for temperature determination. A vessel made of four flat glass panes was used for visualization. The heated surfaces in contact with the fluid differed in roughness were smooth or enhanced. This paper analyzes the effects of the microstructured heated surface on the heat transfer coefficient. The results are presented as relationships between the heat transfer coefficient and the heat flux and as boiling curves. The experimental data obtained for the two types of enhanced heated surfaces was compared with the results recorded for the smooth heated surface. The highest local values of the heat transfer coefficient were reported for the enhanced surfaces.

  18. Developing a numerical model of frost boils dynamics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolsky, D. J.; Tipenko, G. S.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2003-12-01

    The research was initiated as a part of biocomplexity project, which investigates cryoturbation in continuous permafrost regions in the Arctic. The project explores influence of climate (mean annual and summer temperatures, and snow cover depth and density), vegetation layer composition and physical properties, soil textures and moisture content on evolution of frost boils. The work deals with analysis of temperature regimes and moisture distribution and dynamics during seasonal cycles of freezing and thawing. The research focuses on the development of a computational approach to the study of frost boils as a self-organized system. The model is calibrated using temperature and moisture content data collected from a field experiment at two study sites. A thermo-mechanical model of the frost boil phenomena based on principles of macroscopic thermodynamics and continuum mechanics will be presented. The model includes the energy and mass conservation equations, continuity equation, the Clausius-Claiperon equation, and an empirical formula which relates unfrozen water content to temperature. The complete system is reduced to a computationally convenient set of coupled equations for temperature, pore water pressure and porosity in a two-dimensional domain. A finite element method and an implicit scheme in time were utilized to construct a non-linear system of equations, which was solved iteratively. The model describes dynamics of frost boils and helps to explain geometric form and size of distinctly visible patterned ground north of the Alaska's Brook Range.

  19. Boiling on fins with wire screen of variable effective conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzechowski, Tadeusz

    The high scale of integration of modern equipment used for medical, military and other purposes puts heavy demands as regards the removal of great heat fluxes. This can be achieved only in exchangers that apply the phase change phenomena. Among many methods to improve boiling heat transfer, the wire mesh covering demonstrates some advantages due to the possibilities of designing the desired microstructure parameters, availability on the market, and low cost. The wire mesh microstucture with specified geometrical parameters produces anisotropy in conductivity. The different arrangement of the mesh layers relative to the direction of the heat flux is a cause of the change of temperature distribution within the layer. The consequence is a respective change in the discharge conditions of the gas phase and liquid feed. The experiments were conducted on fins covered with a single layer of copper mesh with lumen of 38 % and boiling FC-72 at ambient pressure. Compared with the smooth surface, the wire mesh structures yield an increase in the heat transfer rate at boiling. It is also shown that nucleate boiling is initiated at lower wall superheat. Formulas for longitudinal and perpendicular thermal conductivity are given for different mesh structure arrangements.

  20. Boiling on fins with wire screen of variable effective conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orzechowski, Tadeusz

    2016-11-01

    The high scale of integration of modern equipment used for medical, military and other purposes puts heavy demands as regards the removal of great heat fluxes. This can be achieved only in exchangers that apply the phase change phenomena. Among many methods to improve boiling heat transfer, the wire mesh covering demonstrates some advantages due to the possibilities of designing the desired microstructure parameters, availability on the market, and low cost. The wire mesh microstucture with specified geometrical parameters produces anisotropy in conductivity. The different arrangement of the mesh layers relative to the direction of the heat flux is a cause of the change of temperature distribution within the layer. The consequence is a respective change in the discharge conditions of the gas phase and liquid feed. The experiments were conducted on fins covered with a single layer of copper mesh with lumen of 38 % and boiling FC-72 at ambient pressure. Compared with the smooth surface, the wire mesh structures yield an increase in the heat transfer rate at boiling. It is also shown that nucleate boiling is initiated at lower wall superheat. Formulas for longitudinal and perpendicular thermal conductivity are given for different mesh structure arrangements.

  1. A study of forced convection boiling under reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the results of activities conducted over the period 1/2/85-12/31/90, in which the study of forced convection boiling under reduced gravity was initiated. The study seeks to improve the understanding of the basic processes that constitute forced convection boiling by removing the buoyancy effects which may mask other phenomena. Specific objectives may also be expressed in terms of the following questions: (1) what effects, if any, will the removal of body forces to the lowest possible levels have on the forced convection boiling heat transfer processes in well-defined and meaningful circumstances? (this includes those effects and processes associated with the nucleation or onset of boiling during the transient increase in heater surface temperature, as well as the heat transfer and vapor bubble behaviors with established or steady-state conditions); and (2) if such effects are present, what are the boundaries of the relevant parameters such as heat flux, heater surface superheat, fluid velocity, bulk subcooling, and geometric/orientation relationships within which such effects will be produced?

  2. Teachers College Students' Conceptions about Evaporation, Condensation, and Boiling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Jin-Yi

    1999-01-01

    An open-ended, written test was administered to 364 students divided into four groups according to their scientific learning background at a teachers college. Results indicate that although the science-major students performed better than nonscience majors, their understanding of condensation and boiling concepts still needed to be enhanced.…

  3. Facilitating Conceptual Change in Students' Understanding of Boiling Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costu, Bayram; Ayas, Alipasa; Niaz, Mansoor; Unal, Suat; Calik, Muammer

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to construct a teaching strategy for facilitating students' conceptual understanding of the boiling concept. The study is based on 52 freshman students in the primary science education department. Students' ideas were elicited by a test consisting of nine questions. Conceptual change strategy was designed based on…

  4. Nucleate Pool Boiling Experiments (NPBX) on the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhir, Vijay Kumar; Warrier, Gopinath R.; Aktinol, Eduardo; Chao, David; Eggers, Jeffery; Sheredy, William; Booth, Wendell

    2012-11-01

    During the period of March-May 2011, a series of boiling experiments was carried out in the Boiling Experimental Facility (BXF) located in the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) of the International Space Station (ISS). The BXF Facility was carried to ISS on Space Shuttle Mission STS-133 on February 24, 2011. Nucleate Pool Boiling Experiment (NPBX) was one of the two experiments housed in the BXF. Results of experiments on single bubble dynamics (e.g., inception and growth), multiple bubble dynamics (lateral merger and departure, if any), nucleate pool boiling heat transfer, and critical heat flux are described. In the experiments Perfluoro-n-hexane was used as the test liquid. The system pressure was varied from 51 to 243 kPa, pool temperature was varied from 30° to 59°C, and test surface temperature was varied from 40° to 80°C. The test surface was a polished aluminum disc (1 mm thick, 89.5 mm in diameter) heated from below with strain gage heaters. Five cylindrical cavities were formed on the surface with four cavities located at the corners of a square and one in the middle. During experiments the magnitude of mean gravity level normal to the heater surface varied from 1.2 × 10 - 7g e to 6 × 10 - 7g e . The results of the experiments show that a single bubble continues to grow to occupy the size of the chamber without departing from the heater surface. During lateral merger of bubbles, at high superheats a large bubble may lift off from the surface but continues to hover near the surface. Neighboring bubbles are continuously pulled into the large bubble. At low superheats bubbles at neighboring sites simply merge to yield a larger bubble. The larger bubble mostly locates in the middle of the heated surface and serves as a vapor sink. The latter mode continues to persist when boiling is occurring all over the heater surface. Heat fluxes for steady state nucleate boiling and critical heat fluxes are found to be much lower than those obtained under earth

  5. Nucleate pool boiling heat transfer in aqueous surfactant solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasekar, Vivek Mahadeorao

    Saturated, nucleate pool boiling in aqueous surfactant solutions is investigated experimentally. Also, the role of Marangoni convection, driven both by temperature and surfactant concentration gradients at the vapor-liquid interface of a nucleating bubble is computationally explored. Experimental measurements of dynamic and equilibrium sigma using the maximum bubble pressure method indicate dynamic sigma to be higher than the corresponding equilibrium value, both at room and elevated temperatures. Also, nonionic surfactants (Triton X-100, Triton X-305) show larger sigma depression than anionic surfactants (SDS, SLES), and a normalized representation of their dynamic adsorption isotherms is shown to be helpful in generalizing the surfactant effectiveness to reduce surface tension. The dynamic sigma has a primary role in the modification of bubble dynamics and associated heat transfer, and is dictated by the adsorption kinetics of the surfactant molecules at boiling temperatures. In general, an enhancement in heat transfer is observed, which is characterized by an early incipience and an optimum boiling performance at or around the critical micelle concentration of the surfactant. The optimum performances, typically in the fully developed boiling regime ( q''w > 100 kW/m2), show a reverse trend with respect to surfactant molecular weights M, i.e., higher molecular weight additives promote lower enhancement. Normalized boiling performance using the respective solution's dynamic sigma correlates heat transfer coefficient by M-0.5 for anionics and M 0 for nonionics. This has been shown to be brought about by the surfactant concentration and its interfacial activity in a concentration sublayer around the growing vapor bubble, which governs the bubble growth behavior through the mechanism of dynamic sigma. The ionic nature of the surfactant influences the thickness and molecular makeup of the enveloping sublayer, thereby affecting the bubble dynamics and boiling heat

  6. Boiling and the Leidenfrost effect in a gravity-free zone: a speculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, D. C.; Menon, V. J.

    1994-01-01

    If gravity and hence bouyancy are absent, the heat transfer in the boiling of water is by conduction. This leads to the absence of the usual nucleate boiling and to the occurrence of film boiling and the Leidenfrost effect at a relatively early stage.

  7. A Review of Boiling Heat Transfer Processes at High Heat Flux

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-01

    the limit of nucleate boiling (point C) and point 0 which is known as the Leidenfrost point. The path between the points is dependent on numerous...heat flux controlled system. 4 Point Elies on a portion of the boiling curve known as film boiling. Beginning at the Leidenfrost point (point D) heat

  8. In situ technique for measuring heat transfer from a power transistor to a boiling liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Struble, C. L.; Witte, L. C.

    1994-05-01

    A technique for in situ measurement of temperature and heat flux in boiling heat transfer from electronic chips is described. The method was used to obtain accurate partial boiling curves for jet impingement and pool boiling in R-113. While the characteristics of the heat transfer behavior agree with previous data, the data in general lie below data obtained with specialized test chips.

  9. Film boiling heat transfer from a sphere in natural and forced convection of freon-113

    SciTech Connect

    Dix, D.; Orozco, J. )

    1990-01-01

    Boiling heat transfer fluxes were measured on a 3.84-cm hollow copper sphere, in both forced convection and pool boiling, as a function of angular position in Freon 113. This paper reports on forced-convection tests run at speeds of 0.5 to 1.9 m/s. These tests were conducted in the stable film boiling region of the boiling curve. Significant heat transfer rates were measured in the vapor wake region of the sphere for flow film boiling. Video observations of the boiling process revealed that the flow film boiling vapor removal mechanism consisted of periodic formation and detachment of a vapor wake in the rear of the sphere. For pool boiling it was found that the heated surface had a uniform rate of energy dissipation in the stable film boiling regime, whereas in forced convection the film boiling rate was dependent on angular position. Pool film boiling tests also showed multiple humps (more than one maximum heat flux) in the boiling curve when the liquid was subcooled.

  10. Survey of Thermal-Fluids Evaluation and Confirmatory Experimental Validation Requirements of Accident Tolerant Cladding Concepts with Focus on Boiling Heat Transfer Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Nicholas R.; Wysocki, Aaron J.; Terrani, Kurt A.; Ali, Amir; Liu, Maolong; Blandford, Edward

    2016-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is working closely with the nuclear industry to develop fuel and cladding candidates with potentially enhanced accident tolerance, also known as accident tolerant fuel (ATF). Thermal-fluids characteristics are a vital element of a holistic engineering evaluation of ATF concepts. One vital characteristic related to boiling heat transfer is the critical heat flux (CHF). CHF plays a vital role in determining safety margins during normal operation and also in the progression of potential transient or accident scenarios. This deliverable is a scoping survey of thermal-fluids evaluation and confirmatory experimental validation requirements of accident tolerant cladding concepts with a focus on boiling heat transfer characteristics. The key takeaway messages of this report are: 1. CHF prediction accuracy is important and the correlations may have significant uncertainty. 2. Surface conditions are important factors for CHF, primarily the wettability that is characterized by contact angle. Smaller contact angle indicates greater wettability, which increases the CHF. Surface roughness also impacts wettability. Results in the literature for pool boiling experiments indicate changes in CHF by up to 60% for several ATF cladding candidates. 3. The measured wettability of FeCrAl (i.e., contact angle and roughness) indicates that CHF should be investigated further through pool boiling and flow boiling experiments. 4. Initial measurements of static advancing contact angle and surface roughness indicate that FeCrAl is expected to have a higher CHF than Zircaloy. The measured contact angle of different FeCrAl alloy samples depends on oxide layer thickness and composition. The static advancing contact angle tends to decrease as the oxide layer thickness increases.

  11. Phase relations and adiabats in boiling seafloor geothermal systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, J.L.; Pitzer, Kenneth S.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of large salinity variations and vent temperatures in the range of 380-400??C suggest that boiling or two-phase separation may be occurring in some seafloor geothermal systems. Consideration of flow rates and the relatively small differences in density between vapors and liquids at the supercritical pressures at depth in these systems suggests that boiling is occurring under closed-system conditions. Salinity and temperature of boiling vents can be used to estimate the pressure-temperature point in the subsurface at which liquid seawater first reached the two-phase boundary. Data are reviewed to construct phase diagrams of coexisting brines and vapors in the two-phase region at pressures corresponding to those of the seafloor geothermal systems. A method is developed for calculating the enthalpy and entropy of the coexisting mixtures, and results are used to construct adiabats from the seafloor to the P-T two-phase boundary. Results for seafloor vents discharging at 2300 m below sea level indicate that a 385??C vent is composed of a brine (7% NaCl equivalent) in equilibrium with a vapor (0.1% NaCl). Brine constitutes 45% by weight of the mixture, and the fluid first boiled at approximately 1 km below the seafloor at 415??C, 330 bar. A 400??C vent is primarily vapor (88 wt.%, 0.044% NaCl) with a small amount of brine (26% NaCl) and first boiled at 2.9 km below the seafloor at 500??C, 520 bar. These results show that adiabatic decompression in the two-phase region results in dramatic cooling of the fluid mixture when there is a large fraction of vapor. ?? 1985.

  12. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

    2009-11-16

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent

  13. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Results Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150°C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. Conclusion The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation

  14. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

    2009-11-16

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 degrees C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not

  15. Evaluation of commercial enhanced tubes in pool boiling: Topical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, C.; Bergles, A.E.

    1989-03-01

    In support of a study of shellside boiling with enhanced tubes, a pool boiling apparatus was developed and used to test single tubes with various structured boiling surfaces in R-113. The basic design of the tube-bundle test section was carried out and certain critical design features were tested experimentally. Copper tubes, 3/4 in. o.d. and 4 in. long, were selected with 1/4 in. diameter cartridge heaters. Four thermocouples were inserted in 3/32 in. diameter, 2 in. long holes. The pool boiling characteristics of a plain tube agree well with previous tests. Wolverine Turbo-B tubes with small, medium, and large features performed identically for a heat flux greater than 20 kW/m/sup 2/. For lower heat flux, however, the Turbo-B S was slightly superior. In general, the Wolverine Turbo-B tubes had more favorable boiling characteristics than the single Wieland Gewa-T tube that was tested. The test procedure is deemed entirely adequate for screening enhanced tubes to see which ones should be used in the tube-bundle test section. Three different ways of mounting the tubes were tested in R-113 at 65/degree/C and 5 bar gage pressure. As all three constructions sealed well, the simplest design is recommended in which a snap ring fixes the tube to the wall and an O-ring seals against the pressure. The general design features of the tube bundle test chamber are also presented. 14 refs.

  16. Numerical Investigation of Microgravity Tank Pressure Rise Due to Boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, Sonya; Ibrahim, Mounir; Kartuzova, Olga; Kassemi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The ability to control self-pressurization in cryogenic storage tanks is essential for NASAs long-term space exploration missions. Predictions of the tank pressure rise in Space are needed in order to inform the microgravity design and optimization process. Due to the fact that natural convection is very weak in microgravity, heat leaks into the tank can create superheated regions in the liquid. The superheated regions can instigate microgravity boiling, giving rise to pressure spikes during self-pressurization. In this work, a CFD model is developed to predict the magnitude and duration of the microgravity pressure spikes. The model uses the Schrage equation to calculate the mass transfer, with a different accommodation coefficient for evaporation at the interface, condensation at the interface, and boiling in the bulk liquid. The implicit VOF model was used to account for the moving interface, with bounded second order time discretization. Validation of the models predictions was carried out using microgravity data from the Tank Pressure Control Experiment, which flew aboard the Space Shuttle Mission STS-52. Although this experiment was meant to study pressurization and pressure control, it underwent boiling during several tests. The pressure rise predicted by the CFD model compared well with the experimental data. The ZBOT microgravity experiment is scheduled to fly on February 2016 aboard the ISS. The CFD model was also used to perform simulations for setting parametric limits for the Zero-Boil-Off Tank (ZBOT) Experiments Test Matrix in an attempt to avoid boiling in the majority of the test runs that are aimed to study pressure increase rates during self-pressurization. *Supported in part by NASA ISS Physical Sciences Research Program, NASA HQ, USA

  17. A Study of Nucleate Boiling with Forced Convection in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The ultimate objective of basic studies of flow boiling in microgravity is to improve the understanding of the processes involved, as manifested by the ability to predict its behavior. This is not yet the case for boiling heat transfer even in earth gravity, despite the considerable research activity over the past 30 years. The elements that constitute the nucleate boiling process - nucleation, growth, motion, and collapse of the vapor bubbles (if the bulk liquid is subcooled) - are common to both pool and flow boiling. It is well known that the imposition of bulk liquid motion affects the vapor bubble behavior relative to pool boiling, but does not appear to significantly influence the heat transfer. Indeed, it has been recommended in the past that empirical correlations or experimental data of pool boiling be used for design purposes with forced convection nucleate boiling. It is anticipated that such will most certainly not be possible for boiling in microgravity, based on observations made with pool boiling in microgravity. In earth gravity buoyancy will act to remove the vapor bubbles from the vicinity of the heater surface regardless of how much the imposed bulk velocity is reduced, depending, of course, on the geometry of the system. Vapor bubbles have been observed to dramatically increase in size in pool boiling in microgravity, and the heat flux at which dryout took place was reduced considerably below what is generally termed the critical heat flux (CHF) in earth gravity, depending on the bulk liquid subcooling. However, at heat flux levels below dryout, the nucleate pool boiling process was enhanced considerably over that in earth gravity, in spite of the large vapor bubbles formed in microgravity and perhaps as a consequence. These large vapor bubbles tended to remain in the vicinity of the heater surface, and the enhanced heat transfer appeared to be associated with the presence of what variously has been referred to as a liquid microlayer between the

  18. A New Theory of Nucleate Pool Boiling in Arbitrary Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Y. A.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    Heat transfer rates specific to nucleate pool boiling under various conditions are determined by the dynamics of vapour bubbles that are originated and grow at nucleation sites of a superheated surface. A new dynamic theory of these bubbles has been recently developed on the basis of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. In contrast to other existing models based on empirically postulated equations for bubble growth and motion, this theory does not contain unwarrantable assumptions, and both the equations are rigorously derived within the framework of a unified approach. The conclusions of the theory are drastically different from those of the conventional models. The bubbles are shown to detach themselves under combined action of buoyancy and a surface tension force that is proven to add to buoyancy in bubble detachment, but not the other way round as is commonly presumed. The theory ensures a sound understanding of a number of so far unexplained phenomena, such as effect caused by gravity level and surface tension on the bubble growth rate and dependence of the bubble characteristics at detachment on the liquid thermophysical parameters and relevant temperature differences. The theoretical predictions are shown to be in a satisfactory qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations. When being applied to heat transfer at nucleate pool boiling, this bubble dynamic theory offers an opportunity to considerably improve the main formulae that are generally used to correlate experimental findings and to design boiling heat removal in various industrial applications. Moreover, the theory makes possible to pose and study a great deal of new problems of essential impact in practice. Two such problems are considered in detail. One problem concerns the development of a principally novel physical model for the first crisis of boiling. This model allows for evaluating critical boiling heat fluxes under various conditions, and in particular at different

  19. Investigations of Mechanisms Associated with Nucleate Boiling Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, Vijay K.; Hasan, M.; Chao, David (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In this work a building block type of approach is used so that a basic understanding of the processes that contribute to nucleate boiling heat fluxes under microgravity conditions can be developed. This understanding will lead to development of a mechanistic model for nucleate boiling heat transfer which could eventually be used as a design tool in space applications. Task Description Task 1: Fabrication of the Experimental Setup. Under this task, the test section and liquid holding and viewing chambers will be fabricated. Artificial cylinder cavities will be formed on silicon wafers. A single cavity and two or four cavities, with a prescribed spacing and size, will be formed. The desired nucleation wall superheat will be used to determine the size of the mouth of the cavities. Task 2: Experiments. The basic experiments for flow and temperature field around single and multiple (2 or 4 separated or merged bubbles growing on downward facing or inclined surfaces) will be carried out under normal gravity conditions. The experiments will be conducted at one atmosphere pressure, but liquid subcooling will be varied from 0 to 30C. Water and PF-5050 will be used as test liquids. Task 3: Analytical/Numerical Models. In this task, transient temperature and flow field in vapor and liquid will be determined during growth of a single bubble. Analysis will include the evolution of the vapor-liquid interface and development of microlayer underneath the bubbles. For merged bubbles, detailed calculations of flow and temperature field will be carried out for transient shapes of vapor stems supporting a large bubble and the corresponding evaporation rate. Flow and temperature field for a bubble sliding along a heated wall will also be determined. Microgravity conditions will be simulated and a framework of a numerical tool for prediction of nucleate boiling heat fluxes under microgravity conditions will be developed. Task 4: Experiments in a KC-135. To understand bubble growth and

  20. A New Theory of Nucleate Pool Boiling in Arbitrary Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Y. A.; Webbon, Bruce W.

    1995-01-01

    Heat transfer rates specific to nucleate pool boiling under various conditions are determined by the dynamics of vapour bubbles that are originated and grow at nucleation sites of a superheated surface. A new dynamic theory of these bubbles has been recently developed on the basis of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. In contrast to other existing models based on empirically postulated equations for bubble growth and motion, this theory does not contain unwarrantable assumptions, and both the equations are rigorously derived within the framework of a unified approach. The conclusions of the theory are drastically different from those of the conventional models. The bubbles are shown to detach themselves under combined action of buoyancy and a surface tension force that is proven to add to buoyancy in bubble detachment, but not the other way round as is commonly presumed. The theory ensures a sound understanding of a number of so far unexplained phenomena, such as effect caused by gravity level and surface tension on the bubble growth rate and dependence of the bubble characteristics at detachment on the liquid thermophysical parameters and relevant temperature differences. The theoretical predictions are shown to be in a satisfactory qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations. When being applied to heat transfer at nucleate pool boiling, this bubble dynamic theory offers an opportunity to considerably improve the main formulae that are generally used to correlate experimental findings and to design boiling heat removal in various industrial applications. Moreover, the theory makes possible to pose and study a great deal of new problems of essential impact in practice. Two such problems are considered in detail. One problem concerns the development of a principally novel physical model for the first crisis of boiling. This model allows for evaluating critical boiling heat fluxes under various conditions, and in particular at different

  1. Characteristics of Pool Boiling on Graphite-Copper Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    2002-01-01

    Nucleate pool boiling performance of different liquids on graphite-copper composite (Gr-Cu) surfaces has been experimentally studied and modeled. Both highly wetting fluids, such as freon-113 and pentane, and a moderately wetting fluid (water) were tested on the Gr-Cu surfaces with different graphite-fiber volume fractions to reveal the enhancement effects of the composite surfaces on the nucleate pool boiling. Results of the experiments show that the graphite-fiber volume fraction has an optimum value. The Gr-Cu composite surface with 25 percent graphite-fiber volume (f=0.25) has a maximum enhancement effect on the nucleate boiling heat transfer comparing to the pure copper surface. For the highly wetting fluid, the nucleate boiling heat transfer is generally enhanced on the Gr- Cu composite surfaces by 3 to 6 times shown. In the low heat flux region, the enhancement is over 6 times, but in the high heat flux region, the enhancement is reduced to about 40%. For the moderately wetting fluid (water), stronger enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer is achieved on the composite surface. It shown the experimental results in which one observes the nucleate boiling heat transfer enhancement of 5 to 10 times in the low heat flux region and an enhancement of 3 to 5 times in the high heat flux region. Photographs of bubble departure during the initial stage of nucleate boiling indicate that the bubbles detached from the composite surface are much smaller in diameter than those detached from the pure copper surface. Typical photographs are presented.It shows that the bubbles departed from the composite surface have diameters of only O(0.1) mm, while those departed from the pure copper surface have diameters of O(1) mm. It is also found that the bubbles depart from the composite surface at a much higher frequency, thus forming vapor columns. These two phenomena combined with high thermal conductivity of the graphite fiber are considered the mechanisms for such a

  2. Pool boiling from rotating and stationary spheres in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuan, Winston M.; Schwartz, Sidney H.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for a preliminary experiment involving saturated pool boiling at 1 atm from rotating 2 and 3 in. diameter spheres which were immersed in liquid nitrogen (LN2). Additional results are presented for a stationary, 2 inch diameter sphere, quenched in LN2, which were obtained utilizing a more versatile and complete experimental apparatus that will eventually be used for additional rotating sphere experiments. The speed for the rotational tests was varied from 0 to 10,000 rpm. The stationary experiments parametrically varied pressure and subcooling levels from 0 to 600 psig and from 0 to 50 F, respectively. During the rotational tests, a high speed photographic analysis was undertaken to measure the thickness of the vapor film surrounding the sphere. The average Nusselt number over the cooling period was plotted against the rotational Reynolds number. Stationary sphere results included local boiling heat transfer coefficients at different latitudinal locations, for various pressure and subcooling levels.

  3. Considerations in predicting burnout of cylinders in flow boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Sadasivan, P.; Lienhard, J.H. )

    1992-02-01

    Previous investigations of the critical heat flux in flow boiling have resulted in widely different hydrodynamic mechanisms for the occurrence of burnout. Results of the present study indicate that existing models are not completely realistic representations of the process. The present study sorts out the influences of the far-wake bubble breakoff and vapor sheet characteristics, gravity, surface wettability, and heater surface temperature distribution on the peak heat flux in flow boiling on cylindrical heaters. The results indicate that burnout is dictated by near-surface effects. The controlling factor appears to be the vapor escape pattern close to the heater surface. It is also shown that a deficiency of liquid at the downstream end of the heater surface is not the cause of burnout.

  4. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2015-09-01

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well understood. Prior studies on boiling crisis indicate that CHF monotonically increases with increasing texture density. Here we report on the existence of maxima in CHF enhancement at intermediate texture density using measurements on parametrically designed plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces. Using high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we study the dynamics of dry spot heating and rewetting phenomena and reveal that the dry spot heating timescale is of the same order as that of the gravity and liquid imbibition-induced dry spot rewetting timescale. Based on these insights, we develop a coupled thermal-hydraulic model that relates CHF enhancement to rewetting of a hot dry spot on the boiling surface, thereby revealing the mechanism governing the hitherto unknown CHF enhancement maxima.

  5. Forced-convective boiling in small diameter tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazaki, Yoshiro; Kuriyma, Yoshio; Furukawa, Masao

    1988-03-01

    A straight bare tube type evaporator was tested in order to evaluate its feasibility on space applications. Two categories of flow regimes were observed during the test. One flow regime indicated a high pressure loss and a slight temperature decrease along the flow direction, and the test results showed a fairly good agreement with the analytical results obtained using a nucleat boiling model. Whereas, the other flow regime showed a contrasting feature of low pressure loss and abrupt temperature rise along the flow direction. In this case also the results obtained on the basis of the analytical model of film boiling showed a fairly good agreement with the experimental results of heat transfer characteristics.

  6. Radon depletion in xenon boil-off gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruenner, S.; Cichon, D.; Lindemann, S.; Undagoitia, T. Marrodán; Simgen, H.

    2017-03-01

    An important background in detectors using liquid xenon for rare event searches arises from the decays of radon and its daughters. We report for the first time a reduction of ^{222}Rn in the gas phase above a liquid xenon reservoir. We show a reduction factor of ≳ 4 for the ^{222}Rn concentration in boil-off xenon gas compared to the radon enriched liquid phase. A semiconductor-based α -detector and miniaturized proportional counters are used to detect the radon. As the radon depletion in the boil-off gas is understood as a single-stage distillation process, this result establishes the suitability of cryogenic distillation to separate radon from xenon down to the 10^{-15} mol/mol level.

  7. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2015-09-08

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well understood. Prior studies on boiling crisis indicate that CHF monotonically increases with increasing texture density. Here we report on the existence of maxima in CHF enhancement at intermediate texture density using measurements on parametrically designed plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces. Using high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we study the dynamics of dry spot heating and rewetting phenomena and reveal that the dry spot heating timescale is of the same order as that of the gravity and liquid imbibition-induced dry spot rewetting timescale. Based on these insights, we develop a coupled thermal-hydraulic model that relates CHF enhancement to rewetting of a hot dry spot on the boiling surface, thereby revealing the mechanism governing the hitherto unknown CHF enhancement maxima.

  8. Critical heat flux maxima during boiling crisis on textured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Dhillon, Navdeep Singh; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the critical heat flux (CHF) of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, but fundamentally this phenomenon is not well understood. Prior studies on boiling crisis indicate that CHF monotonically increases with increasing texture density. Here we report on the existence of maxima in CHF enhancement at intermediate texture density using measurements on parametrically designed plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces. Using high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we study the dynamics of dry spot heating and rewetting phenomena and reveal that the dry spot heating timescale is of the same order as that of the gravity and liquid imbibition-induced dry spot rewetting timescale. Based on these insights, we develop a coupled thermal-hydraulic model that relates CHF enhancement to rewetting of a hot dry spot on the boiling surface, thereby revealing the mechanism governing the hitherto unknown CHF enhancement maxima. PMID:26346098

  9. (Severe accident technology of BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) reactors)

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, L.J.

    1989-10-23

    The traveler attended the 1989 CORA Workshop at KfK, FRG. Participation included the presentation included the presentation of three papers on work performed by the Boiling Water Reactor Severe Accident Technology (BWRSAT) program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) severe accident analyses. The Statement of Work (June 1989) for the BWRSAT Program provides for code analyses of the BWR CORA experiments performed at KfK. Additionally, it is intended that BWRSAT personnel participate in the planning process for future CORA BWR experiments. For these purposes, meetings were held with KfK staff to arrange for acquisition of detailed CORA facility drawings, experimental data, and related engineering. 17 refs.

  10. Peculiarities of evolution of shock waves generated by boiling coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, M. V.; Vozhakov, I. S.; Lezhnin, S. I.; Pribaturin, N. A.

    2016-11-01

    Simulation of compression wave generation and evolution at the disk target was performed for the case of explosive-type boiling of coolant; the boiling is initiated by endwall rupture of a high-pressure pipeline. The calculations were performed for shock wave amplitude at different times and modes of pipe rupture. The simulated pressure of a target-reflected shock wave is different from the theoretical value for ideal gas; this discrepancy between simulation and theory becomes lower at higher distances of flow from the nozzle exit. Comparative simulation study was performed for flow of two-phase coolant with account for slip flow effect and for different sizes of droplets. Simulation gave the limiting droplet size when the single-velocity homogeneous flow model is valid, i.e., the slip flow effect is insignificant.

  11. Control of the boiling crisis: analysis of a model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pumir, A.; Barelko, V. V.; Buryak, E. V.

    2007-11-01

    Controlling the transition between the low (nucleate) and high temperature (film) regimes of boiling is a serious challenge for a number of technological applications. Based on the theoretical analysis of a simplified reaction-diffusion model, it has recently been shown [A. Pumir, V.V. Barelko, Chaos 12, 610 (2002)] that the transition towards the dangerous situation where the high temperature phase tends to invade the whole system requires a higher power in a periodically spatially modulated system than in an homogeneous system. We show here that the transition mechanisms between the various boiling regimes depend on the ratio between the periodicity length along the wire and the characteristic thermal diffusion length. We analyse theoretically a simple experimental setup aimed at testing these ideas. The heater consists of a thin wire, with an applied electric current, with alternatively low resistance and high resistance sections. We determine the gain in stability for a set of realistic values of the parameters.

  12. Characteristics of Pool Boiling on Graphite-Copper Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    2002-01-01

    Nucleate pool boiling performance of different liquids on graphite-copper composite (Gr-Cu) surfaces has been experimentally studied and modeled. Both highly wetting fluids, such as freon-113 and pentane, and a moderately wetting fluid (water) were tested on the Gr-Cu surfaces with different graphite-fiber volume fractions to reveal the enhancement effects of the composite surfaces on the nucleate pool boiling. Results of the experiments show that the graphite-fiber volume fraction has an optimum value. The Gr-Cu composite surface with 25 percent graphite-fiber volume (f=0.25) has a maximum enhancement effect on the nucleate boiling heat transfer comparing to the pure copper surface. For the highly wetting fluid, the nucleate boiling heat transfer is generally enhanced on the Gr- Cu composite surfaces by 3 to 6 times shown. In the low heat flux region, the enhancement is over 6 times, but in the high heat flux region, the enhancement is reduced to about 40%. For the moderately wetting fluid (water), stronger enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer is achieved on the composite surface. It shown the experimental results in which one observes the nucleate boiling heat transfer enhancement of 5 to 10 times in the low heat flux region and an enhancement of 3 to 5 times in the high heat flux region. Photographs of bubble departure during the initial stage of nucleate boiling indicate that the bubbles detached from the composite surface are much smaller in diameter than those detached from the pure copper surface. Typical photographs are presented.It shows that the bubbles departed from the composite surface have diameters of only O(0.1) mm, while those departed from the pure copper surface have diameters of O(1) mm. It is also found that the bubbles depart from the composite surface at a much higher frequency, thus forming vapor columns. These two phenomena combined with high thermal conductivity of the graphite fiber are considered the mechanisms for such a

  13. 15. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 18761889. Sorghum pan and boiling ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. RW Meyer Sugar Mill: 1876-1889. Sorghum pan and boiling range flue. Manufactured by John Nott & Co., Honolulu, Hawaii, 1878. View: North side of sorghum pan and boiling range flue, with furnace-end in background. In the sorghum pan heat was applied to the cane juice to clarify it, evaporate its water content, and concentrate the sugar crystals. Hot gasses moved through the flue underneath the entire copper bottom of the sorghum pan from the furnace end (in background) to the smokestack end (in foreground). After the hot cane juice moved through the separate compartments until it reached the final compartment (now missing two sides) where it was drawn out from the copper lip in the corner. - R. W. Meyer Sugar Mill, State Route 47, Kualapuu, Maui County, HI

  14. Microlayer formation characteristics in pool isolated bubble boiling of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuki, Tomohide; Nakabeppu, Osamu

    2016-10-01

    Investigation of microlayer formation characteristics is important for developing a reliable nucleate boiling heat transfer model based on accurate physical mechanisms. Although formation mechanisms of the thin liquid film in two-phase flow of confined spaces, such as micro-tubes and closely positioned parallel plates, have been thoroughly studied, microlayer formation mechanisms of pool boiling have been sparsely studied. In a previous study (Yabuki and Nakabeppu in Int J Heat Mass Transf 76:286-297, 2014; Int J Heat Mass Transf 100:851-860, 2016), the spatial distribution of initial microlayer thickness under pool boiling bubbles was calculated by transient heat conduction analysis using the local wall temperature measured with a MEMS sensor. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of microlayer formation in pool boiling were investigated using the relationship between derived initial microlayer thickness and microlayer formation velocity determined by transient local heat flux data. The trend of microlayer thickness was found to change depending on the thickness of the velocity boundary layer outside the bubble foot. When the boundary layer thickness was thin, the initial microlayer thickness was determined by the boundary layer thickness, and the initial microlayer thickness proportionally increased with increasing boundary layer thickness. On the other hand, when the boundary layer was thick, the initial microlayer thickness decreased with increasing boundary layer thickness. In this thick boundary layer region, the momentum balance in the dynamic meniscus region became important, in addition to the boundary layer thickness, and the microlayer thickness, made dimensionless using boundary layer thickness, correlated with the Bond number.

  15. Boiling on horizontal surfaces coated with porous metal wicks

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Zyan, H.Z.; Plumb, O.A.

    1997-07-01

    Boiling experiments intended to simulate heat pipe operating conditions were conducted on a copper surface covered with copper foametal and nickel fiber wicks 3.175 and 4.760 mm thick. The experiments were conducted on a horizontal surface open to the atmosphere with water as the working fluid. The experimental surface was operated like a heat pipe with distilled water supplied upstream of the heated section and transported by capillary action across a section which was adiabatic to the heated section where boiling took place. At low excess temperature, less than 10 to 20 C, the heat flux from the porous coated surfaces is comparable to or greater than that predicted for a smooth surface using the Rohsenow correlation. At higher excess temperatures corresponding to heat fluxes between 10{sup 5} and 10{sup 6} W/m{sup 2} the increase in heat flux with excess temperature is much less than that predicted by the Rohsenow correlation. When the wicks were vented by cutting slots covering 10 to 20% of the total surface area the heat flux increased, in some cases by a factor of three, for a given excess temperature. The heat flux at which the slope of the boiling curve decreased also increased for the vented surfaces. This is attributed to the provision of a low resistance path for the steam to escape providing a surface that is more highly wetted. A mathematical model for the transport with boiling in the porous wick is developed in an attempt to gain further understanding of the processes involved. The model predicts dryout conditions that are in reasonable agreement with experimental observations. However, the model predicts decreasing vapor pressure, and hence temperature, adjacent to the heated surface with increasing heat flux as a result of the decrease in relative permeability of the partially saturated wick.

  16. Liquid jet impingement heat transfer with or without boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. F.; Gan, Y. P.; Tian, Y. C.; Lei, D. H.; Gomi, T.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the important studies in the area of impingement heat transfer with or without phase change, with emphasis on the research conducted at Beijing Polytechnic University mainly with circular jets. Heat transfer characteristics of single phase jets are discussed in detail. Comment is presented on boiling heat transfer of impinging jets for steady and transient states. Some special cooling configurations of two-phase jets are also introduced.

  17. Effect of Running Parameters on Flow Boiling Instabilities in Microchannels.

    PubMed

    Zong, Lu-Xiang; Xu, Jin-Liang; Liu, Guo-Hua

    2015-04-01

    Flow boiling instability (FBI) in microchannels is undesirable because they can induce the mechanical vibrations and disturb the heat transfer characteristics. In this study, the synchronous optical visualization experimental system was set up. The pure acetone liquid was used as the working fluid, and the parallel triangle silicon microchannel heat sink was designed as the experimental section. With the heat flux ranging from 0-450 kW/m2 the microchannel demand average pressure drop-heater length (Δp(ave)L) curve for constant low mass flux, and the demand pressure drop-mass flux (Δp(ave)G) curve for constant length on main heater surface were obtained and studied. The effect of heat flux (q = 188.28, 256.00, and 299.87 kW/m2), length of main heater surface (L = 4.5, 6.25, and 8.00 mm), and mass flux (G = 188.97, 283.45, and 377.94 kg/m2s) on pressure drops (Ap) and temperatures at the central point of the main heater surface (Twc) were experimentally studied. The results showed that, heat flux, length of the main heater surface, and mass flux were identified as the important parameters to the boiling instability process. The boiling incipience (TBI) and critical heat flux (CHF) were early induced for the lower mass flux or the main heater surface with longer length. With heat flux increasing, the pressure drops were linearly and slightly decreased in the single liquid region but increased sharply in the two phase flow region, in which the flow boiling instabilities with apparent amplitude and long period were more easily triggered at high heat flux. Moreover, the system pressure was increased with the increase of the heat flux.

  18. Microlayer formation characteristics in pool isolated bubble boiling of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabuki, Tomohide; Nakabeppu, Osamu

    2017-05-01

    Investigation of microlayer formation characteristics is important for developing a reliable nucleate boiling heat transfer model based on accurate physical mechanisms. Although formation mechanisms of the thin liquid film in two-phase flow of confined spaces, such as micro-tubes and closely positioned parallel plates, have been thoroughly studied, microlayer formation mechanisms of pool boiling have been sparsely studied. In a previous study (Yabuki and Nakabeppu in Int J Heat Mass Transf 76:286-297, 2014; Int J Heat Mass Transf 100:851-860, 2016), the spatial distribution of initial microlayer thickness under pool boiling bubbles was calculated by transient heat conduction analysis using the local wall temperature measured with a MEMS sensor. In this study, the hydrodynamic characteristics of microlayer formation in pool boiling were investigated using the relationship between derived initial microlayer thickness and microlayer formation velocity determined by transient local heat flux data. The trend of microlayer thickness was found to change depending on the thickness of the velocity boundary layer outside the bubble foot. When the boundary layer thickness was thin, the initial microlayer thickness was determined by the boundary layer thickness, and the initial microlayer thickness proportionally increased with increasing boundary layer thickness. On the other hand, when the boundary layer was thick, the initial microlayer thickness decreased with increasing boundary layer thickness. In this thick boundary layer region, the momentum balance in the dynamic meniscus region became important, in addition to the boundary layer thickness, and the microlayer thickness, made dimensionless using boundary layer thickness, correlated with the Bond number.

  19. The Isolated Bubble Regime in Pool Nucleate Boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buyevich, Y. A.; Webbon, Bruce W.; Callaway, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    We consider an isolated bubble boiling regime in which vapour bubbles are intermittently produced at a prearranged set of nucleation site on an upward facing overheated wall plane. In this boiling regime, the bubbles depart from the wall and move as separate entities. Except in the matter of rise velocity, the bubbles do not interfere and are independent of one another. However, the rise velocity is dependent on bubble volume concentration in the bulk. Heat transfer properties specific to this regime cannot be described without bubble detachment size, and we apply our previously developed dynamic theory of vapour bubble growth and detachment to determine this size. Bubble growth is presumed to be thermally controlled. Two limiting cases of bubble evolution are considered: the one in which buoyancy prevails in promoting bubble detachment and the one in which surface tension prevails. We prove termination of the isolated regime of pool nucleate boiling to result from one of the four possible causes, depending on relevant parameters values. The first cause consists in the fact that the upward flow of rising bubbles hampers the downward liquid flow, and under certain conditions, prevents the liquid from coming to the wall in an amount that would be sufficient to compensate for vapour removal from the wall. The second cause is due to the lateral coalescence of growing bubbles that are attached to their corresponding nucleation sites, with ensuing generation of larger bubbles and extended vapour patches near the wall. The other two causes involve longitudinal coalescence either 1) immediately in the wall vicinity, accompanied by the establishment of the multiple bubble boiling regime, or 2) in the bulk, with the formation of vapour columns. The longitudinal coalescence in the bulk is shown to be the most important cause. The critical wall temperature and the heat flux density associated with isolated bubble regime termination are found to be functions of the physical and

  20. SELF-REGULATING BOILING-WATER NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Ransohoff, J.A.; Plawchan, J.D.

    1960-08-16

    A boiling-water reactor was designed which comprises a pressure vessel containing a mass of water, a reactor core submerged within the water, a reflector tank disposed within the reactor, the reflector tank being open at the top to the interior of the pressure vessel, and a surge tank connected to the reflector tank. In operation the reflector level changes as a function of the pressure witoin the reactor so that the reactivity of the reactor is automatically controlled.

  1. Local heat transfer for subcooled flow boiling with water

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, R.D.; Meng, X. )

    1992-12-01

    In this paper, local heat transfer coefficients are predicted for turbulent water subcooled flow boiling through uniformly heated circular tubes. Correlations by Petukhov and by Shah are modified slightly. however, the correlation suggested by Kandlikar is improved significantly by requiring that it approach more accurate limits near the onset of fully developed boiling and the onset of nucleate boiling for subcooled flow. Excellent agreement is obtained with data corresponding to conditions of high inlet subcooling (183[degrees]C), high mass velocity (4.4 to 31.5 Mg/m[sup 2][center dot]s), and a large ratio of the axial coordinate to the diameter (95.5). The exit subcooling varies from 53.0 to 81.5[degrees]C. For smaller ratios ([lt]50.0), the accuracy decreases. In all cases, the local film temperature is the characteristic temperature. When the associated critical heat flux (CHF) data are examined in a Stanton number-Peclet number space, St [lt] 0.0065 and Pe [gt] 10[sup 5] in all cases. Comparisons with the Saha-Zuber criterion for bubble detachment show that moderately subcooled and high-velocity flows re characterized by a multiboundary layer phenomenon that includes an attached bubble layer. These results show that the bubble layer's existence can now be documented for a wide variety of fluids and conditions without flow visualizations.

  2. Electrical control and enhancement of boiling heat transfer during quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahriari, Arjang; Hermes, Mark; Bahadur, Vaibhav

    2016-02-01

    Heat transfer associated with boiling degrades at elevated temperatures due to the formation of an insulating vapor layer at the solid-liquid interface (Leidenfrost effect). Interfacial electrowetting (EW) fields can disrupt this vapor layer to promote liquid-surface wetting. We experimentally analyze EW-induced disruption of the vapor layer and measure the resulting enhanced cooling during the process of quenching. Imaging is employed to visualize the fluid-surface interactions and understand boiling patterns in the presence of an electrical voltage. It is seen that EW fields fundamentally change the boiling pattern, wherein a stable vapor layer is replaced by intermittent wetting of the surface. Heat conduction across the vapor gap is thus replaced with transient convection. This fundamental switch in the heat transfer mode significantly accelerates cooling during quenching. An order of magnitude increase in the cooling rate is observed, with the heat transfer seen approaching saturation at higher voltages. An analytical model is developed to extract voltage dependent heat transfer rates from the measured cooling curve. The results show that electric fields can alter and tune the traditional cooling curve. Overall, this study presents an ultralow power consumption concept to control the mechanical properties and metallurgy, by electrically tuning the cooling rate during quenching.

  3. Early-Evaporation of Microlayer for Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Zou, An; Singh, Dhirendra P; Maroo, Shalabh C

    2016-10-06

    For over five decades, enhancement in pool boiling heat transfer has been achieved by altering the surface wetting, wickability, roughness, nucleation site density and providing separate liquid/vapor pathways. In this work, a new enhancement mechanism based on the early-evaporation of the microlayer is discovered and validated. The microlayer is a thin liquid film present at the base of a vapor bubble. Presence of micro-ridges on the silicon-dioxide surface partitions the microlayer and disconnects it from bulk liquid causing it to evaporate sooner, thus leading to increase in bubble growth rate, heat transfer, departure frequency and critical heat flux (CHF). Compared to a plain surface, ~120% enhancement in CHF is obtained with only ~18% increase in surface area. A CHF enhancement map is developed based on ridge height and spacing, resulting in three regions of full, partial and no enhancement. The new mechanism is validated by comparing the growth rate of a laser created vapor bubble on ridge-structured surface and plain surface, and the corresponding prediction of CHF enhancement is found to be in good agreement with experimental boiling data. This discovery opens up a new field of CHF enhancement and can be coupled with existing techniques to further push the limits of boiling heat transfer.

  4. A Study of Nucleate Boiling with Forced Convection in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merte, Herman, Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Boiling is a rather imprecise term applied to the process of evaporation in which the rate of liquid-vapor phase change is large. In seeking to determine the role and significance of body forces on the process, of which buoyancy or gravity is just one agent, it becomes necessary to define the term more precisely. It is generally characterized by the formation and growth of individual vapor bubbles arising from heat transfer to the liquid, either at a solid/liquid or liquid/liquid interface, or volumetrically. The terms 'bubble' boiling and 'nucleate' boiling are frequently used, in recognition of the interactions of surface tension and other forces in producing discrete bubbles at distinctive locations (although not always). Primary considerations are that evaporation can occur only at existing liquid-vapor interfaces, so that attention must be given to the formation of an interface (the nucleation process), and that the latent heat for this evaporation can come only from the superheated liquid, so that attention must also be given to the temperature distributions in the liquid.

  5. An investigation of vapor concentration during boiling of liquid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Utaka, Yoshio; Takahashi, Katsuaki; Tsuboi, Takao

    1999-07-01

    The objective of the study is to clarify experimentally the variation of the vapor concentration of binary mixture generated during nucleate boiling in a saturated pool under various boiling conditions. The generated vapor concentrations in the bulk vapor layer were measured for the binary mixtures of water-ethanol and ethanol-acetone under various liquid concentrations, the heat fluxes and the liquid layer heights from the heated thin wires at the atmospheric pressure. The main experimental apparatus for measuring concentration of bulk vapor in the boiling and condensation system is shown. Two methods of measuring concentration, i.e., the dew point method and the laser absorption method were adopted. The dew point measurement was carried out by utilizing the copper heat transfer block installed in the central part of the vapor layer in the vessel. The commencement of the condensation was observed directly for determining the dew point by controlling its temperature. The laser light having wavelength of 3.39 micron meters was used for the laser light absorption method utilizing its absorptive property against ethanol vapor. The measured results by using both methods coincided well with each other. The measured concentrations of the bulk vapor for various superheatings of heated wires, the depth of liquid mixture layer and liquid concentrations were almost independent of those parameters and were almost in equilibrium with bulk liquid conditions even under the higher surface superheating and the lower liquid heights.

  6. Boiling of an emulsion in a yield stress fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéna, Geoffroy; Wang, Ji; D'Espinose, Jean-Baptiste; Lequeux, François; Talini, Laurence

    2010-11-01

    We report the boiling behavior of pentane emulsified in a yield stress fluid, a colloidal clay (Laponite) suspension. We have observed that a superheated state is easily reached: the emulsion, heated more than 50°C above the alkane boiling point, does not boil. Superheating is made possible by the suppression of heterogeneous nucleation in pentane, resulting from the emulsification process, a phenomenon evidenced decades ago in studies of the superheating of two phase fluids. We have furthermore studied the growth of isolated bubbles nucleated in the emulsion. The rate of increase of the bubble radius with time depends on both the temperature and emulsion volume fraction but, rather unexpectedly, does not depend on the fluid rheology. We show that the bubbles grow by diffusion of the alkane through the aqueous phase between liquid droplets and bubbles, analogously to an Ostwald ripening process. The peculiarity of the process reported here is that a layer depleted in oil droplets forms around the bubble, layer to which the alkane concentration gradient is confined. We successfully describe our experimental results with a simple transfer model.

  7. Increasing Boiling Heat Transfer using Low Conductivity Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mahamudur Rahman, Md; Pollack, Jordan; McCarthy, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We report the counterintuitive mechanism of increasing boiling heat transfer by incorporating low-conductivity materials at the interface between the surface and fluid. By embedding an array of non-conductive lines into a high-conductivity substrate, in-plane variations in the local surface temperature are created. During boiling the surface temperature varies spatially across the substrate, alternating between high and low values, and promotes the organization of distinct liquid and vapor flows. By systematically tuning the peak-to-peak wavelength of this spatial temperature variation, a resonance-like effect is seen at a value equal to the capillary length of the fluid. Replacing ~18% of the surface with a non-conductive epoxy results in a greater than 5x increase in heat transfer rate at a given superheat temperature. This drastic and counterintuitive increase is shown to be due to optimized bubble dynamics, where ordered pathways allow for efficient removal of vapor and the return of replenishing liquid. The use of engineered thermal gradients represents a potentially disruptive approach to create high-efficiency and high-heat-flux boiling surfaces which are naturally insensitive to fouling and degradation as compared to other approaches. PMID:26281890

  8. Pool Boiling Enhancement on Textured Surfaces using Acoustic Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boziuk, Thomas; Smith, Marc; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    Boiling heat transfer on submerged textured heated surfaces is enhanced using ultrasound actuation. The heated surface is textured using an array of open microchannels that advantageously separate the nucleation sites on the surface and inhibit the transition to film boiling, which significantly increases the critical heat flux compared to a smooth surface of the same planform dimensions. The present investigation shows that the formation and evolution of vapor bubbles on the heated surface can be substantially altered by a highly directional ultrasound (1.7 MHz) beam, and leads to significant enhancement in heat transfer, including reduced surface superheat and increased critical heat flux (exceeding 55%). The effects of the beam incidence and azimuthal angle on vapor formation, advection, and resulting effect on surface superheat are investigated experimentally in a liquid test cell. Heat transfer enhancement characterized by changes in the boiling curve (i.e., superheat and CHF) varies with surface texturing and is also dependent on acoustic beam orientation relative to the surface texture pattern.

  9. Transient boiling in two-phase helium natural circulation loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furci, H.; Baudouy, B.; Four, A.; Meuris, C.

    2014-01-01

    Two-phase helium natural circulation loops are used for cooling large superconducting magnets, as CMS for LHC. During normal operation or in the case of incidents, transients are exerted on the cooling system. Here a cooling system of this type is studied experimentally. Sudden power changes are operated on a vertical-heated-section natural convection loop, simulating a fast increase of heat deposition on magnet cooling pipes. Mass flow rate, heated section wall temperature and pressure drop variations are measured as a function of time, to assess the time behavior concerning the boiling regime according to the values of power injected on the heated section. The boiling curves and critical heat flux (CHF) values have been obtained in steady state. Temperature evolution has been observed in order to explore the operating ranges where heat transfer is deteriorated. Premature film boiling has been observed during transients on the heated section in some power ranges, even at appreciably lower values than the CHF. A way of attenuating these undesired temperature excursions has been identified through the application of high enough initial heating power.

  10. Boiling of an emulsion in a yield stress fluid.

    PubMed

    Guéna, Geoffroy; Wang, Ji; d'Espinose, Jean-Baptiste; Lequeux, François; Talini, Laurence

    2010-11-01

    We report the boiling behavior of pentane emulsified in a yield stress fluid, a colloidal clay (Laponite) suspension. We have observed that a superheated state is easily reached: the emulsion, heated more than 50 °C above the alkane boiling point, does not boil. Superheating is made possible by the suppression of heterogeneous nucleation in pentane, resulting from the emulsification process, a phenomenon evidenced decades ago in studies of the superheating of two phase fluids. We have furthermore studied the growth of isolated bubbles nucleated in the emulsion. The rate of increase of the bubble radius with time depends on both the temperature and emulsion volume fraction but, rather unexpectedly, does not depend on the fluid rheology. We show that the bubbles grow by diffusion of the alkane through the aqueous phase between liquid droplets and bubbles, analogously to an Ostwald ripening process. The peculiarity of the process reported here is that a layer depleted in oil droplets forms around the bubble, layer to which the alkane concentration gradient is confined. We successfully describe our experimental results with a simple transfer model.

  11. Prediction of boiling points of organic compounds by QSPR tools.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yi-min; Zhu, Zhi-ping; Cao, Zhong; Zhang, Yue-fei; Zeng, Ju-lan; Li, Xun

    2013-07-01

    The novel electro-negativity topological descriptors of YC, WC were derived from molecular structure by equilibrium electro-negativity of atom and relative bond length of molecule. The quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR) between descriptors of YC, WC as well as path number parameter P3 and the normal boiling points of 80 alkanes, 65 unsaturated hydrocarbons and 70 alcohols were obtained separately. The high-quality prediction models were evidenced by coefficient of determination (R(2)), the standard error (S), average absolute errors (AAE) and predictive parameters (Qext(2),RCV(2),Rm(2)). According to the regression equations, the influences of the length of carbon backbone, the size, the degree of branching of a molecule and the role of functional groups on the normal boiling point were analyzed. Comparison results with reference models demonstrated that novel topological descriptors based on the equilibrium electro-negativity of atom and the relative bond length were useful molecular descriptors for predicting the normal boiling points of organic compounds.

  12. Microlayer Topology And Bubble Growth In Nucleate Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawurek, H. H.; Macgregor, H. G.; Bodenheimer, J. S.

    1987-09-01

    During nucleate boiling thin liquid films (nicrolayers) form beneath the base of bubbles and evaporate into the bubble interiors. A technique is presented which permits the simultaneous determination of microlayer topology and the contribution of microlayer evaporation to bubble growth. Isolated-bubble boiling takes place on an electrically heated, transparent tin-oxide coating deposited on a glass plate, the latter forming the floor of a vessel. With coherent Claser) illumination from beneath, the microlayers reflect fringe patterns similar to Newton's rings. Owing to the rapid evaporation of the layers (the process is completed within milliseconds) the fringes are in rapid motion and are recorded by eine photography at some 4 000 frames per second and exposure times of 50 μs. The resulting interferograms provide details of microlayer shape and thickness versus time, and thus evaporation rate. Simultaneously, and on the same film, bubble profiles (and thus volumes) are obtained under white light illumination. The two bubble images are manipulated by mirrors and lenses so as to appear side by side on the same frame of film, the fringes magnified and the profiles reduced. Sample results for methanol boiling at a pressure of 58.5 kPa and with the liquid bulk at saturation temperature, are presented. Under such conditions microlayer evaporation accounts for 37 per cent of the total bubble volume at detachment.

  13. Increasing Boiling Heat Transfer using Low Conductivity Materials.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mahamudur; Pollack, Jordan; McCarthy, Matthew

    2015-08-18

    We report the counterintuitive mechanism of increasing boiling heat transfer by incorporating low-conductivity materials at the interface between the surface and fluid. By embedding an array of non-conductive lines into a high-conductivity substrate, in-plane variations in the local surface temperature are created. During boiling the surface temperature varies spatially across the substrate, alternating between high and low values, and promotes the organization of distinct liquid and vapor flows. By systematically tuning the peak-to-peak wavelength of this spatial temperature variation, a resonance-like effect is seen at a value equal to the capillary length of the fluid. Replacing ~18% of the surface with a non-conductive epoxy results in a greater than 5x increase in heat transfer rate at a given superheat temperature. This drastic and counterintuitive increase is shown to be due to optimized bubble dynamics, where ordered pathways allow for efficient removal of vapor and the return of replenishing liquid. The use of engineered thermal gradients represents a potentially disruptive approach to create high-efficiency and high-heat-flux boiling surfaces which are naturally insensitive to fouling and degradation as compared to other approaches.

  14. Rheological properties and structural changes in different sections of boiled abalone meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Gao; Zhixu, Tang; Zhaohui, Zhang; Hiroo, Ogawa

    2003-04-01

    Changes in tissue structures, rheological properties of cross- and vertical section boiled abalone meat were studied in relation to boiling time. The adductor muscle of abalone Haliotis discus which was removed from the shell, was boiled for 1, 2, and 3 h, respectively. Then it was cut up and separated into cross- and vertical section meat. When observed by a light microscope and a scanning electron microscope, structural changes in the myofibrils were greatest in the cross section meat compared with the vertical section meat. When boiling time was increased from 1 h to 3 h, the instantaneous modulus E 0 and rupture strength of both section meat decreased gradually with increased boiling time, and no significant differences were observed between these two section meat for the same boiling time. When boiled for 1 h, the relaxation time of cross section meat was much longer than that of vertical section meat. There were no significant changes in the relaxation time of vertical section for different boiling time, but the relaxation time of cross section meat was reduced gradually with increasing boiling time. These results confirmed that the difference in rheological properties between the cross- and vertical section meat was mainly due to the denaturation level of myofibrils when heated for 1 h, as well as due to the changes in the amount of denatured proteins, and the manner in which the inner denatured protein components were exchanged after boiling time was increased from 1 h to 3 h.

  15. Boiling and Evaporation on Micro/nanoengineered Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Xianming

    Two-phase transport is widely used in energy conversion and storage, energy efficiency and thermal management. Surface roughness and interfacial wettability are two major impact factors for two-phase transport. Micro/nanostructures play important roles in varying the surface roughness and improving interfacial wettability. In this doctoral study, five types of micro/nanoengineered surfaces were developed to systematically study the impacts of interfacial wettability and flow structures on nucleate boiling and capillary evaporation. These surfaces include: 1) superhydrophilic atomic layer deposition (ALD) coatings; 2) partially hydrophobic and partially hydrophilic composite interfaces; 3) micromembrane-enhanced hybrid wicks; 4) superhydrophilic micromembrane-enhnaced hybrid wicks, and 5) functionalized carbon nanotube coated micromembrane-enhnaced hybrid wicks. Type 1 and 2 surfaces were developed to investigate the impacts of intrinsic superhydrophilicity and hydrophobic-hydrophilic composite wettability on nucleate boiling. Superhydrophilicity was achieved by depositing nano-thick ALD TiO 2 coatings, which were used to enable intrinsically superhydrophilic boiling surfaces on the microscale copper woven meshes. Critical heat flux (CHF) was substantially increased because of the superwetting property and delayed local dryout. Carbon nanotube (CNT) enabled partially hydrophobic and partially hydrophilic interfaces were developed to form ideal cavities for nucleate boiling. The hydrophobic-hydrophilic composite interfaces were synthesized from functionalized multiwall carbon nanotubes (FMWCNTs) by introducing hydrophilic functional groups on the surfaces of pristine MWCNTs. The nanoscale FMWCNTs with heterogeneous wettabilities were coated on the micromeshes to form hierarchical surfaces, which effectively increase the heat transfer coefficient (HTC) and CHF of pool boiling. To enhance capillary evaporation, micromembrane-enhanced capillary evaporating surfaces, i

  16. Development of Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment on the International Space Station- Normal and Low Gravity Flow Boiling Experiment Development and Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry K.; Hall, Nancy R.; Hasan, Mohammad M.; Wagner, James D.; May, Rochelle L.; Mackey, Jeffrey R.; Kolacz, John S.; Butcher, Robert L.; Frankenfield, Bruce J.; Mudawar, Issam; hide

    2013-01-01

    Flow boiling and condensation have been identified as two key mechanisms for heat transport that are vital for achieving weight and volume reduction as well as performance enhancement in future space systems. Since inertia driven flows are demanding on power usage, lower flows are desirable. However, in microgravity, lower flows are dominated by forces other than inertia (like the capillary force). It is of paramount interest to investigate limits of low flows beyond which the flow is inertial enough to be gravity independent. One of the objectives of the Flow Boiling and Condensation Flight Experiment sets to investigate these limits for flow boiling and condensation. A two-phase flow loop consisting of a Flow Boiling Module and two Condensation Modules has been developed to experimentally study flow boiling condensation heat transfer in the reduced gravity environment provided by the reduced gravity platform. This effort supports the development of a flow boiling and condensation facility for the International Space Station (ISS). The closed loop test facility is designed to deliver the test fluid, FC-72 to the inlet of any one of the test modules at specified thermodynamic and flow conditions. The zero-g-aircraft tests will provide subcooled and saturated flow boiling critical heat flux and flow condensation heat transfer data over wide range of flow velocities. Additionally, these tests will verify the performance of all gravity sensitive components, such as evaporator, condenser and accumulator associated with the two-phase flow loop. We will present in this paper the breadboard development and testing results which consist of detailed performance evaluation of the heater and condenser combination in reduced and normal gravity. We will also present the design of the reduced gravity aircraft rack and the results of the ground flow boiling heat transfer testing performed with the Flow Boiling Module that is designed to investigate flow boiling heat transfer and

  17. Compliance with advice to boil drinking water during an outbreak of cryptosporidiosis. Outbreak Investigation Team.

    PubMed

    Willocks, L J; Sufi, F; Wall, R; Seng, C; Swan, A V

    2000-06-01

    All 2000 employees of a hospital in an area of the North Thames region where 300,000 households were advised to boil tap water before consumption during a large outbreak of cryptosporidiosis were surveyed about compliance with and adverse events linked to the boil water notice. Eighty-five per cent (408/479) of respondents who lived in the boil water area said that they used boiled water while the notice was in place, 72% (347) used bottled water, and 12% (59) did not continue to boil water for the whole 16 days. Although 88% believed that they were following the advice, 20% washed food that would be eaten raw in unboiled tap water and 57% used it to clean their teeth. If a boil water notice is applied for more than a few days it may be helpful to issue a detailed follow up letter.

  18. A Novel Role of Three Dimensional Graphene Foam to Prevent Heater Failure during Boiling

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Ho Seon; Kim, Ji Min; Park, Chibeom; Jang, Ji-Wook; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Hyungdae; Kaviany, Massoud; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel boiling heat transfer (NBHT) in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) suspended in water (RGO colloid) near critical heat flux (CHF), which is traditionally the dangerous limitation of nucleate boiling heat transfer because of heater failure. When the heat flux reaches the maximum value (CHF) in RGO colloid pool boiling, the wall temperature increases gradually and slowly with an almost constant heat flux, contrary to the rapid wall temperature increase found during water pool boiling. The gained time by NBHT would provide the safer margin of the heat transfer and the amazing impact on the thermal system as the first report of graphene application. In addition, the CHF and boiling heat transfer performance also increase. This novel boiling phenomenon can effectively prevent heater failure because of the role played by the self-assembled three-dimensional foam-like graphene network (SFG). PMID:23743619

  19. A novel role of three dimensional graphene foam to prevent heater failure during boiling.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Ho Seon; Kim, Ji Min; Park, Chibeom; Jang, Ji-Wook; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Hyungdae; Kaviany, Massoud; Kim, Moo Hwan

    2013-01-01

    We report a novel boiling heat transfer (NBHT) in reduced graphene oxide (RGO) suspended in water (RGO colloid) near critical heat flux (CHF), which is traditionally the dangerous limitation of nucleate boiling heat transfer because of heater failure. When the heat flux reaches the maximum value (CHF) in RGO colloid pool boiling, the wall temperature increases gradually and slowly with an almost constant heat flux, contrary to the rapid wall temperature increase found during water pool boiling. The gained time by NBHT would provide the safer margin of the heat transfer and the amazing impact on the thermal system as the first report of graphene application. In addition, the CHF and boiling heat transfer performance also increase. This novel boiling phenomenon can effectively prevent heater failure because of the role played by the self-assembled three-dimensional foam-like graphene network (SFG).

  20. Measurement of Key Pool BOiling Parameters in nanofluids for Nuclerar Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, In C; Buongiorno, Jdacopo; Hu, Lin-wen; Wang, Hsin

    2007-01-01

    Nanofluids, colloidal dispersions of nanoparticles in a base fluid such as water, can afford very significant Critical Heat Flux (CHF) enhancement. Such engineered fluids potentially could be employed in reactors as advanced coolants in safety systems with significant safety and economic advantages. However, a satisfactory explanation of the CHF enhancement mechanism in nanofluids is lacking. To close this gap, we have identified the important boiling parameters to be measured. These are the properties (e.g., density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat, vaporization enthalpy, surface tension), hydrodynamic parameters (i.e., bubble size, bubble velocity, departure frequency, hot/dry spot dynamics) and surface conditions (i.e., contact angle, nucleation site density). We have also deployed a pool boiling facility in which many such parameters can be measured. The facility is equipped with a thin indium-tin-oxide heater deposited over a sapphire substrate. An infra-red high-speed camera and an optical probe are used to measure the temperature distribution on the heater and the hydrodynamics above the heater, respectively. The first data generated with this facility already provide some clue on the CHF enhancement mechanism in nanofluids. Specifically, the progression to burnout in a pure fluid (ethanol in this case) is characterized by a smoothly-shaped and steadily-expanding hot spot. By contrast, in the ethanol-based nanofluid the hot spot pulsates and the progression to burnout lasts longer, although the nanofluid CHF is higher than the pure fluid CHF. The presence of a nanoparticle deposition layer on the heater surface seems to enhance wettability and aid hot spot dissipation, thus delaying burnout.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube - Final CRADA Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wenhua; Singh, Dileep; France, David M.

    2016-11-01

    Coolant subcooled boiling in the cylinder head regions of heavy-duty vehicle engines is unavoidable at high thermal loads due to high metal temperatures. However, theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies of coolant subcooled flow boiling under these specific application conditions are generally lacking in the engineering literature. The objective of this project was to provide such much-needed information, including the coolant subcooled flow boiling characteristics and the corresponding heat transfer coefficients, through experimental investigations.

  2. EFFECTS OF LOCALIZED AQUIFER BOILING ON FLUID PRODUCTION AT CERRO PRIETO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Truesdell, Alfred H.; D'Amore, Franco; Nieva, David

    1984-01-01

    Localized aquifer boiling in the shallow two-phase reservoir of Cerro Prieto has produced excess steam and increased electrical output. Unfortunately it has also caused near-well mineral deposition that has decreased permeability and fluid flow. Inflow of cold water has limited the extent of aquifer boiling and permeability loss. The deeper reservoir at Cerro Prieto may need injection of cold water to decrease boiling and prevent loss of production. Refs.

  3. Surface boiling - an "obvious" explanation for the observed limiting temperature of finite nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tõke, J.

    2012-07-01

    Limits of stability of nuclear systems are explored within the framework of a finite-range interacting Fermi gas model and microcanonical thermodynamics in Thomas-Fermi approximation. It is found that with increasing excitation energy, infinite systems become unstable against volume boiling, while finite systems become subject to surface boiling, providing a natural explanation for the observed saturationlike patterns, or limiting temperature, in caloric curves. Boiling patterns of iso-asymmetric matter are discussed.

  4. Film Boiling Heat Transfer Properties of Liquid Hydrogen in Natural Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horie, Y.; Shirai, Y.; Shiotsu, M.; Matsuzawa, T.; Yoneda, K.; Shigeta, H.; Tatsumoto, H.; Hata, K.; Naruo, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Inatani, Y.

    Film boiling heat transfer properties of LH2 for various pressures and subcooling conditions were measured by applying electric current to give an exponential heat input to a PtCo wire with a diameter of 1.2 mm submerged in LH2. The heated wire was set to be horizontal to the ground. The heat transfer coefficient in the film boiling region was higher for higher pressure and higher subcooling. The experimental results are compared with the equation of pool film boiling heat transfer. It is confirmed that the pool film boiling heat transfer coefficients in LH2 can be expressed by this equation.

  5. Extended hydrodynamic theory of the peak and minimum pool boiling heat fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linehard, J. H.; Dhir, V. K.

    1973-01-01

    The hydrodynamic theory of the extreme pool boiling heat fluxes is expanded to embrace a variety of problems that have not previously been analyzed. These problems include the prediction of the peak heat flux on a variety of finite heaters, the influence of viscosity on the Taylor and Helmoltz instability mechanisms with application to film boiling and to the peak heat flux in viscous liquids, the formalization of the analogy between high-current-density electrolysis and boiling, and the description of boiling in the low-gravity limit. The predictions are verified with a large number of new data.

  6. Experimental evidence of the vapor recoil mechanism in the boiling crisis.

    PubMed

    Nikolayev, V S; Chatain, D; Garrabos, Y; Beysens, D

    2006-11-03

    Boiling crisis experiments are carried out in the vicinity of the liquid-gas critical point of H2. A magnetic gravity compensation setup is used to enable nucleate boiling at near critical pressure. The measurements of the critical heat flux that defines the threshold for the boiling crisis are carried out as a function of the distance from the critical point. The obtained power law behavior and the boiling crisis dynamics agree with the predictions of the vapor recoil mechanism and disagree with the classical vapor column mechanism.

  7. Hydrogen Water Chemistry Technology in Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chien C

    2000-04-15

    Modification of coolant chemistry by feedwater hydrogen addition in boiling water reactors (BWRs), generally called hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), is a viable option to mitigate the intergranular stress corrosion cracking problems for operating BWRs. Some fundamentals in HWC technologies as known today are reviewed. Several full-scale HWC test results are analyzed, and the roles that hydrogen plays in HWC technology are identified and quantitatively evaluated. Some deficiencies in water radiolysis modeling for BWR applications under HWC conditions and the impact of {sup 16}N radiation field increase in the main steam line are also discussed.

  8. Generic safety insights for inspection of boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, J.C.; Taylor, J.H.; Fresco, A.N.; Hillman, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    As the number of operating nuclear power plants (NPPs) increases, safety inspection has increased in importance. Over the last 2 yr, probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) techniques have been developed to aid in the inspection process. Broad interest in generic PRA-based methods has arisen in the past year, since only approx. 25% of the US nuclear power plants have completed PRAs, and also, inspectors want PRA-based tools for these plants. This paper describes the Brookhaven National Lab. program to develop generic boiling water reactor (BWR) PRA-based inspection insights or inspection guidance designed to be applied to plants without PRAs.

  9. Contaminant Recovery during In-Situ Boiling in Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Liu, X.; Falta, R. W.; Murdoch, L. C.

    2009-12-01

    In-situ boiling may be an effective mechanism for removing contaminants from tight rock matrix where they would otherwise be all but inaccessible. Heating the matrix above the boiling temperature and then depressurizing will induce boiling that leads to large gas-phase pressure gradients and a steam stripping effect that can remove the contaminants from the matrix. Despite the promise of this process, it has not yet been demonstrated in the field or laboratory, and the controlling parameters and limits of the process are poorly understood. The objective of this project is to characterize mass transfer during boiling in saturated rock. We built an experimental apparatus to heat cores (5cmx30cm) of contaminated rock in a pressurized vessel. The core was sealed in Teflon tube with metal end caps and wrapped with a strip heater. Additional heaters were located in the end caps. Sensors were placed on the surface and embedded within the core to monitor the temperature. An insulation layer covered the strip heater to minimize the heat loss. A recent test was conducted using Berea sandstone (18 millidarcy) initially saturated with de-aired water and contaminated by injecting 200ml (about 2 pore volumes) containing 200mg/L of 1,2-dichloroethane (1,2-DCA), 10 mg/L of chlorobenzene (CB), and 195 mg/L sodium bromide (NaBr). The solution was circulated and both inlet and outlet concentrations were monitored. After the contaminant injection, both the inlet and outlet valves were closed and the core was heated at a constant power of 31.3 watts. Pressure and temperature increased for 3 hours until temperatures exceeded 100 C. A valve on the outlet tube was opened and steam flow started immediately and was routed through a condenser. Concentrations of chlorinated solvents in the outflow increased abruptly to between 6 and 10 times the input concentration. The concentrations decreased after a few 10s of ml were recovered, and at least 80 to 90 percent of the contaminant masses were

  10. A geometric view of adaptive optics control: boiling atmosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiberg, Donald M.; Max, Claire E.; Gavel, Donald T.

    2004-10-01

    The separation principle of optimal adaptive optics control is derived, and definitions of controllability and observability are introduced. An exact finite dimensional state space representation of the control system dynamics is obtained without the need for truncation in modes such as Zernikes. The uncertainty of sensing uncontrollable modes confuses present adaptive optics controllers. This uncertainty can be modeled by a Kalman filter. Reducing this uncertainty permits increased gain, increasing the Strehl, which is done by an optimal control law derived here. A general model of the atmosphere is considered, including boiling.

  11. Union job fight boiling at DOE cleanup sites

    SciTech Connect

    Setzer, S.W.

    1993-11-15

    The US DOE is facing a growing jurisdictional dispute over which unions will perform the majority of clean-up work at its facilities. Unions affiliated with the AFL-CIO Metal Trades Council representing operations employees at the sites believe they have a fundamental right to work. Unions in the AFL-CIO's Building and Construction Trades Dept. insist that they have a clear mandate under federal labor law and the Davis-Bacon Act. The issue has heated up in recent weeks at the policy level and is boiling in a contentious dispute at DOE's Fernald site in Ohio.

  12. DIRECT-CYCLE, BOILING-WATER NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Harrer, J.M.; Fromm, L.W. Jr.; Kolba, V.M.

    1962-08-14

    A direct-cycle boiling-water nuclear reactor is described that employs a closed vessel and a plurality of fuel assemblies, each comprising an outer tube closed at its lower end, an inner tube, fuel rods in the space between the tubes and within the inner tube. A body of water lying within the pressure vessel and outside the fuel assemblies is converted to saturated steam, which enters each fuel assembly at the top and is converted to superheated steam in the fuel assembly while it is passing therethrough first downward through the space between the inner and outer tubes of the fuel assembly and then upward through the inner tube. (AEC)

  13. Low Temperature Regenerators for Zero Boil-Off Liquid Hydrogen Pulse Tube Cryocoolers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, Louis J.; Kashani, Ali; Helvensteijn, Ben; Kittel, Peter; Arnoldm James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recently, a great deal of attention has been focused on zero boil-off (ZBO) propellant storage as a means of minimizing the launch mass required for long-term exploration missions. A key component of ZBO systems is the cooler. Pulse tube coolers offer the advantage of zero moving mass at the cold head, and recent advances in lightweight, high efficiency cooler technology have paved the way for reliable liquid oxygen (LOx) temperature coolers to be developed which are suitable for flight ZBO systems. Liquid hydrogen (LH2) systems, however, are another matter. For ZBO liquid hydrogen systems, cooling powers of 1-5 watts are required at 20 K. The final development from tier for these coolers is to achieve high efficiency and reliability at lower operating temperatures. Most of the life-limiting issues of flight Stirling and pulse tube coolers are associated with contamination, drive mechanisms, and drive electronics. These problems are well in hand in the present generation coolers. The remaining efficiency and reliability issues reside with the low temperature regenerators. This paper will discuss advances to be made in regenerators for pulse tube LH2 ZBO coolers, present some historical background, and discuss recent progress in regenerator technology development using alloys of erbium.

  14. Taking a fresh look at boiling heat transfer on the road to improved nuclear economics and efficiency

    DOE PAGES

    Pointer, William David; Baglietto, Emilio

    2016-05-01

    Here, in the effort to reinvigorate innovation in the way we design, build, and operate the nuclear power generating stations of today and tomorrow, nothing can be taken for granted. Not even the seemingly familiar physics of boiling water. The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, or CASL, is focused on the deployment of advanced modeling and simulation capabilities to enable the nuclear industry to reduce uncertainties in the prediction of multi-physics phenomena and continue to improve the performance of today’s Light Water Reactors and their fuel. An important part of the CASL mission is the developmentmore » of a next generation thermal hydraulics simulation capability, integrating the history of engineering models based on experimental experience with the computing technology of the future.« less

  15. Taking a fresh look at boiling heat transfer on the road to improved nuclear economics and efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Pointer, William David; Baglietto, Emilio

    2016-05-01

    Here, in the effort to reinvigorate innovation in the way we design, build, and operate the nuclear power generating stations of today and tomorrow, nothing can be taken for granted. Not even the seemingly familiar physics of boiling water. The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, or CASL, is focused on the deployment of advanced modeling and simulation capabilities to enable the nuclear industry to reduce uncertainties in the prediction of multi-physics phenomena and continue to improve the performance of today’s Light Water Reactors and their fuel. An important part of the CASL mission is the development of a next generation thermal hydraulics simulation capability, integrating the history of engineering models based on experimental experience with the computing technology of the future.

  16. Taking a fresh look at boiling heat transfer on the road to improved nuclear economics and efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Pointer, William David; Baglietto, Emilio

    2016-05-01

    Here, in the effort to reinvigorate innovation in the way we design, build, and operate the nuclear power generating stations of today and tomorrow, nothing can be taken for granted. Not even the seemingly familiar physics of boiling water. The Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, or CASL, is focused on the deployment of advanced modeling and simulation capabilities to enable the nuclear industry to reduce uncertainties in the prediction of multi-physics phenomena and continue to improve the performance of today’s Light Water Reactors and their fuel. An important part of the CASL mission is the development of a next generation thermal hydraulics simulation capability, integrating the history of engineering models based on experimental experience with the computing technology of the future.

  17. Complete Numerical Simulation of Subcooled Flow Boiling in the Presence of Thermal and Chemical Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    V.K. Dhir

    2003-04-28

    At present, guidelines for fuel cycle designs to prevent axial offset anomalies (AOA) in pressurized water reactor (PWR) cores are based on empirical data from several operating reactors. Although the guidelines provide an ad-hoc solution to the problem, a unified approach based on simultaneous modeling of thermal-hydraulics, chemical, and nuclear interactions with vapor generation at the fuel cladding surface does not exist. As a result, the fuel designs are overly constrained with a resulting economic penalty. The objective of present project is to develop a numerical simulation model supported by laboratory experiments that can be used for fuel cycle design with respect to thermal duty of the fuel to avoid economic penalty, as well as, AOA. At first, two-dimensional numerical simulation of the growth and departure of a bubble in pool boiling with chemical interaction is considered. A finite difference scheme is used to solve the equations governing conservation of mass, momentum, energy, and species concentration. The Level Set method is used to capture the evolving liquid-vapor interface. A dilute aqueous boron solution is considered in the simulation. From numerical simulations, the dynamic change in concentration distribution of boron during the bubble growth shows that the precipitation of boron can occur near the advancing and receding liquid-vapor interface when the ambient boron concentration level is 3,000 ppm by weight. Secondly, a complete three-dimensional numerical simulation of inception, growth and departure of a single bubble subjected to forced flow parallel to the heater surface was developed. Experiments on a flat plate heater with water and with boron dissolved in the water were carried out. The heater was made out of well-polished silicon wafer. Numbers of nucleation sites and their locations were well controlled. Bubble dynamics in great details on an isolated nucleation site were obtained while varying the wall superheat, liquid subcooling

  18. Evaluation of CFD Methods for Simulation of Two-Phase Boiling Flow Phenomena in a Helical Coil Steam Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Pointer, William David; Shaver, Dillon; Liu, Yang; Vegendla, Prasad; Tentner, Adrian

    2016-09-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy charges participants in the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program with the development of advanced modeling and simulation capabilities that can be used to address design, performance and safety challenges in the development and deployment of advanced reactor technology. The NEAMS has established a high impact problem (HIP) team to demonstrate the applicability of these tools to identification and mitigation of sources of steam generator flow induced vibration (SGFIV). The SGFIV HIP team is working to evaluate vibration sources in an advanced helical coil steam generator using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of the turbulent primary coolant flow over the outside of the tubes and CFD simulations of the turbulent multiphase boiling secondary coolant flow inside the tubes integrated with high resolution finite element method assessments of the tubes and their associated structural supports. This report summarizes the demonstration of a methodology for the multiphase boiling flow analysis inside the helical coil steam generator tube. A helical coil steam generator configuration has been defined based on the experiments completed by Polytecnico di Milano in the SIET helical coil steam generator tube facility. Simulations of the defined problem have been completed using the Eulerian-Eulerian multi-fluid modeling capabilities of the commercial CFD code STAR-CCM+. Simulations suggest that the two phases will quickly stratify in the slightly inclined pipe of the helical coil steam generator. These results have been successfully benchmarked against both empirical correlations for pressure drop and simulations using an alternate CFD methodology, the dispersed phase mixture modeling capabilities of the open source CFD code Nek5000.

  19. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. Nineteen test series and a total of 178 tests were performed. Testing addressed the effects of: Heat flux; pressure; helium gas; power tilt; ribs; asymmetric heat flux. This document consists solely of the plato file index from 11/87 to 11/90.

  20. A depletable micro-layer model for nucleate pool boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yohei; Niceno, Bojan

    2015-11-01

    A depletable micro-layer model has been developed for the simulation of nucleate pool boiling within the framework of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling using an interface-tracking method. A micro-layer model is required for the CFD simulation to take into account vaporization from the thin liquid film - called the micro-layer - existing beneath a growing vapor bubble on a hot surface. In our model, the thickness of the micro-layer is a variable defined at each discretized fluid cell adjacent to the heat-transfer surface; the layer decreases due to vaporization, and can finally disappear. Compared to existing micro-region models, most of them based on the concept of contact-line evaporation, as originally proposed by Stephan and Busse, and by Lay and Dhir, our model incorporates simplified modeling ideas, but can nonetheless predict the temperature field beneath the growing bubble accurately. The model proposed in this paper has been validated against measurements of pool boiling in water at atmospheric pressure. Specifically, the bubble principal dimensions and the temperature distribution over the heat-transfer surface are in good agreement with experimental data.

  1. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1985-02-19

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (nonborated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two water volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  2. Boiling water neutronic reactor incorporating a process inherent safety design

    DOEpatents

    Forsberg, Charles W.

    1987-01-01

    A boiling-water reactor core is positioned within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel of a size which will hold a supply of coolant water sufficient to submerge and cool the reactor core by boiling for a period of at least one week after shutdown. Separate volumes of hot, clean (non-borated) water for cooling during normal operation and cool highly borated water for emergency cooling and reactor shutdown are separated by an insulated wall during normal reactor operation with contact between the two water volumes being maintained at interfaces near the top and bottom ends of the reactor vessel. Means are provided for balancing the pressure of the two volumes at the lower interface zone during normal operation to prevent entry of the cool borated water into the reactor core region, for detecting the onset of excessive power to coolant flow conditions in the reactor core and for detecting low water levels of reactor coolant. Cool borated water is permitted to flow into the reactor core when low reactor coolant levels or excessive power to coolant flow conditions are encountered.

  3. Momentum effects in steady nucleate pool boiling during microgravity.

    PubMed

    Merte, Herman

    2004-11-01

    Pool boiling experiments were conducted in microgravity on five space shuttle flights, using a flat plate heater consisting of a semitransparent thin gold film deposited on a quartz substrate that also acted as a resistance thermometer. The test fluid was R-113, and the vapor bubble behavior at the heater surface was photographed from beneath as well as from the side. Each flight consisted of a matrix of three levels of heat flux and three levels of subcooling. In 26 of the total of 45 experiments conditions of steady-state pool boiling were achieved under certain combinations of heat flux and liquid subcooling. In many of the 26 cases, it was observed from the 16-mm movie films that a large vapor bubble formed, remaining slightly removed from the heater surface, and that subsequent vapor bubbles nucleate and grow on the heater surface. Coalescence occurs upon making contact with the large bubble, which thus acts as a vapor reservoir. Recently, measurements of the frequencies and sizes of the small vapor bubbles as they coalesced with the large bubble permitted computation of the associated momentum transfer. The transient forces obtained are presented here. Where these arise from the conversion of the surface energy in the small vapor bubble to kinetic energy acting away from the solid heater surface, they counter the Marangoni convection due to the temperature gradients normal to the heater surface. This Marangoni convection would otherwise impel the large vapor bubble toward the heater surface and result in dryout and unsteady heat transfer.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Saturated Boiling in a Heated Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, Alok; LeClair, Andre; Hartwig, Jason

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a mathematical formulation and numerical solution of boiling in a heated tube. The mathematical formulation involves a discretization of the tube into a flow network consisting of fluid nodes and branches and a thermal network consisting of solid nodes and conductors. In the fluid network, the mass, momentum and energy conservation equations are solved and in the thermal network, the energy conservation equation of solids is solved. A pressure-based, finite-volume formulation has been used to solve the equations in the fluid network. The system of equations is solved by a hybrid numerical scheme which solves the mass and momentum conservation equations by a simultaneous Newton-Raphson method and the energy conservation equation by a successive substitution method. The fluid network and thermal network are coupled through heat transfer between the solid and fluid nodes which is computed by Chen's correlation of saturated boiling heat transfer. The computer model is developed using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program and the numerical predictions are compared with test data.

  5. Parametric study of boiling heat transfer in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, B.; Jones, B.G.; Pan, C.

    1996-04-01

    Detailed numerical modeling and parametric variation studies were conducted on boiling heat transfer processes in porous deposits with emphasis on applications associated with light water nuclear power reactor systems. The processes of boiling heat transfer in the porous corrosion deposits typically involve phase changes in finite volumetric regions in the porous media. The study examined such processes in two porous media configurations, without chimneys (homogeneous porous structures) and with chimneys (heterogeneous porous structures). A 1-D model and a 2-D model were developed to simulate two-phase flows with phase changes, without dry-out, inside the porous media for both structural configurations. For closure of the governing equations, an empirical correlation of the evaporation rate for phase changes inside the porous media was introduced. In addition, numerical algorithms were developed to solve the coupled nonlinear equations of mass, momentum, energy, capillary pressure, and evaporation rate. The distributions of temperature, thermodynamic saturation, liquid pressure, vapor pressure, liquid velocity, and vapor velocity were predicted. Furthermore, the effects of heat flux, system pressure, porosity, particle diameter, chimney population density, chimney radius, and crud thickness on the all superheat, critical heat flux, and minimum saturation were examined. The predictions were found to be in good agreement with the available experimental results.

  6. A heat transfer model for slug flow boiling within microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magnini, Mirco; Thome, John

    2016-11-01

    We propose a novel physics-based model for the fluid mechanics and heat transfer associated with slug flow boiling in horizontal circular microchannels, to update the widely used three-zone model for the design of multi-microchannel evaporators. The flow is modelled as the cyclic passage of a liquid slug, an elongated bubble which traps a thin liquid film against the channel wall, and a dry vapor plug. The capillary flow theory, extended to incorporate evaporation effects, is applied to estimate the bubble velocity along the channel. A liquid film thickness prediction method considering bubble proximity effects, which may limit the radial extension of the film, is included. Theoretical heat transfer models accounting for the thermal inertia of the liquid film and for the recirculating flow within the liquid slug are utilized. The heat transfer model is compared to experimental data taken from three independent studies: 833 slug flow boiling data points covering R134a, R245fa and R236fa and channel diameters from 0.4 mm to 1 mm. The new model predicts more than 80% of the database to within +/- 30 % and it represents an important step toward a complete physics-based modelling of bubble dynamics and heat transfer within microchannels under evaporating flow conditions.

  7. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, Douglas M.

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  8. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOEpatents

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-03-12

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  9. Development and Capabilities of ISS Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahra, Henry; Hasan, Mohammad; Balasubramaniam, R.; Patania, Michelle; Hall, Nancy; Wagner, James; Mackey, Jeffrey; Frankenfield, Bruce; Hauser, Daniel; Harpster, George; Nawrocki, David; Clapper, Randy; Kolacz, John; Butcher, Robert; May, Rochelle; Chao, David; Mudawar, Issam; Kharangate, Chirag R.; O'Neill, Lucas E.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental facility to perform flow boiling and condensation experiments in long duration microgravity environment is being designed for operation on the International Space Station (ISS). This work describes the design of the subsystems of the FBCE including the Fluid subsystem modules, data acquisition, controls, and diagnostics. Subsystems and components are designed within the constraints of the ISS Fluid Integrated Rack in terms of power availability, cooling capability, mass and volume, and most importantly the safety requirements. In this work we present the results of ground-based performance testing of the FBCE subsystem modules and test module which consist of the two condensation modules and the flow boiling module. During this testing, we evaluated the pressure drop profile across different components of the fluid subsystem, heater performance, on-orbit degassing subsystem, heat loss from different modules and components, and performance of the test modules. These results will be used in the refinement of the flight system design and build-up of the FBCE which is manifested for flight in late 2017-early 2018.

  10. Thermal interaction effect on nucleation site distribution in subcooled boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Zou; Barclay Joned

    2012-05-01

    An experimental work on subcooled boiling of refrigerant, R134a, to examine nucleation site distributions on both copper and stainless steel heating surfaces was performed. In order to obtain high fidelity active nucleation site density and distribution data, a high-speed digital camera was utilized to record bubble emission images from a view normal to heating surfaces. Statistical analyses on nucleation site data were done and their statistical distributions were obtained. Those experimentally observed nucleation site distributions were compared to the random spatial Poisson distribution. The comparisons showed that, rather than purely random, active nucleation site distributions on boiling surfaces are relatively more uniform. Experimental results also showed that on the copper heating surface, nucleation site distributions are slightly more uniform than on the stainless steel surface. This was concluded as the results of thermal interactions between nucleation sites with different solid thermal conductivities. A two dimensional thermal interaction model was then developed to quantitatively examine the thermal interactions between nucleation sites. The results give a reasonable explanation to the experimental observation on nucleation site distributions.

  11. Does boiling affect the bioaccessibility of selenium from cabbage?

    PubMed

    Funes-Collado, Virginia; Rubio, Roser; López-Sánchez, J Fermín

    2015-08-15

    The bioaccessible selenium species from cabbage were studied using an in vitro physiologically-based extraction test (PBET) which establishes conditions that simulate the gastric and gastrointestinal phases of human digestion. Samples of cabbage (Brassica oleracea) grown in peat fortified with different concentrations of Se(IV) and Se(VI) were analysed, and several enzymes (pepsin, pancreatin and amylase) were used in the PBET. The effect of boiling before extraction was also assayed. Selenium speciation in the PBET extracts was determined using anionic exchange and LC-ICP/MS. The selenocompounds in the extracts were Se(IV), SeMet and, mostly, Se(VI) species. The results show that the activity of the enzymes increased the concentration of the selenocompounds slightly, although the use of amylase had no effect on the results. The PBET showed the concentration of inorganic selenium in the extracts from boiled cabbage decreased as much as 4-fold while the release of SeMet and its concentration increased (up to 6-fold), with respect to raw cabbage.

  12. An analysis of a flat-plate solar collector with internal boiling

    SciTech Connect

    Abramzon, B.; Borde, I.; Yaron, I.

    1983-11-01

    The extended mathematical model of a flat-plate solar collector-evaporator permits prediction of the effects of boiling of the working fluid in the collector tubes on the efficiency of the collector. The efficiency increases sharply and approaches the ideal on transition from single phase flow to the subcooled and saturated boiling regimes, regardless of the nature of the working fluid.

  13. The Boiling eXperiment Facility (BXF) for the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John; Chao, David; Vergilii, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Boiling is an effective means of cooling by removing heat from surfaces through vaporization of a working fluid. It is also affected by both the magnitude and direction of gravity. By conducting pool boiling tests in microgravity, the effect of buoyancy n the overall boiling process and the relative magnitude of other phenomena can be assessed. The Boiling eXperiment Facility (BXF) is being built for the Microgravity Science Glovebox. This facility will conduct two pool boiling studies. The first study the Microheater Array Boiling Experiment (MABE) uses two 96 element microheater arrays, 2.7 mm and 7.0 mm in size, to measure localized hear fluxes while operating at a constant temperature. The other experiment, the Nucleate Pool Boiling eXperiment (NPBX) uses a 85 mm diameter heater wafer that has been "seeded" with five individually-controlled nucleation sites to study bubble nucleation, growth, coalescence and departure. The BXF uses normal-perfluorohexane as the test fluid and will operate between pressures of 60 to 244 Pa. and temperatures of 35 to 60 C. Both sets of experimental heaters are highly instrumented. Pressure and bulk fluid temperature measurements will be made with standard rate video. A high speed video system will be used to visualize the boiling process through the bottom of the MABE heater arrays. The BXF is currently scheduled to fly on Utilization Flight-13A.1 to the ISS with facility integration into the MSG and operation during Increment 15

  14. 46 CFR 154.707 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Ventilation. 154.707 Section 154... SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.707 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Ventilation. (a)...

  15. 46 CFR 154.707 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Ventilation. 154.707 Section 154... SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.707 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Ventilation. (a)...

  16. The effects of freezing, boiling and degreasing on the microstructure of bone.

    PubMed

    Lander, S L; Brits, D; Hosie, M

    2014-04-01

    The histology of bone has been a useful tool in research. It is commonly used to estimate the age of an individual at death, to assess if the bone is of human or non-human origin and in trauma analysis. Factors that affect the histology of bone include age, sex, population affinity and burning to name but a few. Other factors expected to affect bone histology are freezing, boiling and degreasing but very little information is available for freezing and the effect thereof, and it is unknown if boiling and degreasing affects bone histology. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of freezing, freezing and boiling, and freezing, boiling and degreasing on the histological structure of compact bone. Five cadaver tibiae were frozen at -20°C for 21 days followed by segments being boiled in water for three days and degreased in trichloroethylene at 82°C for three days. Anterior midshaft sections were prepared as ground sections and for Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Quantitatively, there were no significant differences between freezing, boiling and degreasing; however, qualitative differences were observed using SEM. After being frozen the bone displayed cracks and after boiling the bones displayed erosion pits on the surface. It is suggested that further research, using different durations and temperatures for boiling and freezing be undertaken on bone samples representing different ages and various skeletal elements.

  17. The Gibbs Energy Basis and Construction of Boiling Point Diagrams in Binary Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Norman O.

    2004-01-01

    An illustration of how excess Gibbs energies of the components in binary systems can be used to construct boiling point diagrams is given. The underlying causes of the various types of behavior of the systems in terms of intermolecular forces and the method of calculating the coexisting liquid and vapor compositions in boiling point diagrams with…

  18. Teaching Structure-Property Relationships: Investigating Molecular Structure and Boiling Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    A concise, well-organized table of the boiling points of 392 organic compounds has facilitated inquiry-based instruction in multiple scientific principles. Many individual or group learning activities can be derived from the tabulated data of molecular structure and boiling point based on the instructor's education objectives and the students'…

  19. Self-sustained hydrodynamic oscillations in a natural-circulation two-phase-flow boiling loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, K. C.

    1969-01-01

    Results of an experimental and theoretical study of factors affecting self-sustaining hydrodynamic oscillations in boiling-water loops are reported. Data on flow variables, and the effects of geometry, subcooling and pressure on the development of oscillatory behavior in a natural-circulation two-phase-flow boiling loop are included.

  20. The Gibbs Energy Basis and Construction of Boiling Point Diagrams in Binary Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Norman O.

    2004-01-01

    An illustration of how excess Gibbs energies of the components in binary systems can be used to construct boiling point diagrams is given. The underlying causes of the various types of behavior of the systems in terms of intermolecular forces and the method of calculating the coexisting liquid and vapor compositions in boiling point diagrams with…

  1. Teaching Structure-Property Relationships: Investigating Molecular Structure and Boiling Point

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    A concise, well-organized table of the boiling points of 392 organic compounds has facilitated inquiry-based instruction in multiple scientific principles. Many individual or group learning activities can be derived from the tabulated data of molecular structure and boiling point based on the instructor's education objectives and the students'…

  2. Experimental analysis of nanofluid pool boiling heat transfer in copper bead packed porous layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Wang, Ji

    2017-03-01

    Coupling the nanofluid as working fluid and the copper beads packed porous structure on heating surface were employed to enhance the pool boiling heat transfer by changing the fluid properties with the adjunction of nanoparticles in liquid and altering the heating surface with a bead porous layer. Due to the higher thermal conductivity, the copper beads served as an extended heating surface and the boiling nucleation sites rose, but the flow resistance increased. The CuO-water and SiO2-water nanofluids as well as the pure water were respectively employed as working fluids in the pool boiling experiments. Comparing with the base fluid of water, the higher thermal conductivity and lower surface tension occur in the nanofluids and those favor the boiling heat transfer, but the higher viscosity and density of nanofluids serve as deteriorative factors. So, the concentration region of the nanofluids should be chosen properly. The maximum relative error between the collected experimental data of the pure water on a flat surface and the theoretical prediction of pool boiling using the Rohsenow correlation was less than 12 %. The comparisons of the pool boiling heat transfer characteristics were also conducted between the pure water and the nanofluids respectively on the horizontal flat surface and on the heating surface packed with a copper bead porous layer. Besides, the boiling bubble generation, integration and departure have a great affect on the pool boiling and were recorded with a camera in the bead stacked porous structures at different heat flux.

  3. 46 CFR 154.709 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment. 154.709 Section 154.709 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.709 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection...

  4. 46 CFR 154.708 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves. 154.708 Section 154.708 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.708 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves. (a) Gas fuel lines to the...

  5. The effects of boiling on the allergenic properties of tropomyosin of shrimp (litopenaeus vannamei).

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Shrimp play an important role in human nutrition, and is responsible for severe hypersensitivity reactions. The thermal stability of raw and boiled shrimp tropomyosins (TM) has never been reported. The aims of the study were to compare the stability of raw and boiled shrimp TM of Litopenaeus vanname...

  6. 46 CFR 154.709 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment. 154.709 Section 154.709 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.709 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection...

  7. 46 CFR 154.709 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection equipment. 154.709 Section 154.709 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.709 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Gas detection...

  8. 46 CFR 154.708 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves. 154.708 Section 154.708 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.708 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves. (a) Gas fuel lines to the...

  9. 46 CFR 154.707 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo boil-off as fuel: Ventilation. 154.707 Section 154.707 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.707 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Ventilation. (a)...

  10. Full evaporation headspace gas chromatography for sensitive determination of high boiling point volatile organic compounds in low boiling matrices.

    PubMed

    Mana Kialengila, Didi; Wolfs, Kris; Bugalama, John; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2013-11-08

    Determination of volatile organic components (VOC's) is often done by static headspace gas chromatography as this technique is very robust and combines easy sample preparation with good selectivity and low detection limits. This technique is used nowadays in different applications which have in common that they have a dirty matrix which would be problematic in direct injection approaches. Headspace by nature favors the most volatile compounds, avoiding the less volatile to reach the injector and column. As a consequence, determination of a high boiling solvent in a lower boiling matrix becomes challenging. Determination of VOCs like: xylenes, cumene, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI), benzyl alcohol (BA) and anisole in water or water soluble products are an interesting example of the arising problems. In this work, a headspace variant called full evaporation technique is worked out and validated for the mentioned solvents. Detection limits below 0.1 μg/vial are reached with RSD values below 10%. Mean recovery values ranged from 92.5 to 110%. The optimized method was applied to determine residual DMSO in a water based cell culture and DMSO and DMA in tetracycline hydrochloride (a water soluble sample).

  11. Theoretical modeling of CHF for near-saturated pool boiling and flow boiling from short heaters using the interfacial lift-off criterion

    SciTech Connect

    Mudawar, I.; Galloway, J.E.; Gersey, C.O.

    1995-12-31

    Pool boiling and flow boiling were examined for near-saturated bulk conditions in order to determine the critical heat flux (CHF) trigger mechanism for each. Photographic studies of the wall region revealed features common to both situations. At fluxes below CHF, the vapor coalesces into a wavy layer which permits wetting only in wetting fronts, the portions of the liquid-vapor interface which contact the wall as a result of the interfacial waviness. Close examination of the interfacial features revealed the waves are generated from the lower edge of the heater in pool boiling and the heater`s upstream region in flow boiling. Wavelengths follow predictions based upon the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability criterion. Critical heat flux in both cases occurs when the pressure force exerted upon the interface due to interfacial curvature, which tends to preserve interfacial contact with the wall prior to CHF, is overcome by the momentum of vapor at the site of the first wetting front, causing the interface to lift away from the wall. It is shown this interfacial lift-off criterion facilitates accurate theoretical modeling of CHF in pool boiling and in flow boiling in both straight and curved channels.

  12. Heat Transfer Performances of Pool Boiling on Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    2000-01-01

    Nucleate boiling, especially near the critical heat flux (CHF), can provide excellent economy along with high efficiency of heat transfer. However, the performance of nucleate boiling may deteriorate in a reduced gravity environment and the nucleate boiling usually has a potentially dangerous characteristic in CHF regime. That is, any slight overload can result in burnout of the boiling surface because the heat transfer will suddenly move into the film-boiling regime. Therefore, enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer becomes more important in reduced gravity environments. Enhancing nucleate boiling and critical heat flux can be reached using micro-configured metal-graphite composites as the boiling surface. Thermocapillary force induced by temperature difference between the graphite-fiber tips and the metal matrix, which is independent of gravity, will play an important role in bubble detachment. Thus boiling heat transfer performance does not deteriorate in a reduced-gravity environment. Based on the existing experimental data, and a two-tier theoretical model, correlation formulas are derived for nucleate boiling on the copper-graphite and aluminum-graphite composite surfaces, in both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes. Experimental studies were performed on nucleate pool boiling of pentane on cooper-graphite (Cu-Gr) and aluminum-graphite (Al-Gr) composite surfaces with various fiber volume concentrations for heat fluxes up to 35 W per square centimeter. It is revealed that a significant enhancement in boiling heat transfer performance on the composite surfaces is achieved, due to the presence of micro-graphite fibers embedded in the matrix. The onset of nucleate boiling (the isolated bubble regime) occurs at wall superheat of about 10 C for the Cu-Gr surface and 15 C for the Al-Gr surface, much lower than their respective pure metal surfaces. Transition from an isolated bubble regime to a coalesced bubble regime in boiling occurs at a superheat of

  13. Heat Transfer Performances of Pool Boiling on Metal-Graphite Composite Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    2000-01-01

    Nucleate boiling, especially near the critical heat flux (CHF), can provide excellent economy along with high efficiency of heat transfer. However, the performance of nucleate boiling may deteriorate in a reduced gravity environment and the nucleate boiling usually has a potentially dangerous characteristic in CHF regime. That is, any slight overload can result in burnout of the boiling surface because the heat transfer will suddenly move into the film-boiling regime. Therefore, enhancement of nucleate boiling heat transfer becomes more important in reduced gravity environments. Enhancing nucleate boiling and critical heat flux can be reached using micro-configured metal-graphite composites as the boiling surface. Thermocapillary force induced by temperature difference between the graphite-fiber tips and the metal matrix, which is independent of gravity, will play an important role in bubble detachment. Thus boiling heat transfer performance does not deteriorate in a reduced-gravity environment. Based on the existing experimental data, and a two-tier theoretical model, correlation formulas are derived for nucleate boiling on the copper-graphite and aluminum-graphite composite surfaces, in both the isolated and coalesced bubble regimes. Experimental studies were performed on nucleate pool boiling of pentane on cooper-graphite (Cu-Gr) and aluminum-graphite (Al-Gr) composite surfaces with various fiber volume concentrations for heat fluxes up to 35 W per square centimeter. It is revealed that a significant enhancement in boiling heat transfer performance on the composite surfaces is achieved, due to the presence of micro-graphite fibers embedded in the matrix. The onset of nucleate boiling (the isolated bubble regime) occurs at wall superheat of about 10 C for the Cu-Gr surface and 15 C for the Al-Gr surface, much lower than their respective pure metal surfaces. Transition from an isolated bubble regime to a coalesced bubble regime in boiling occurs at a superheat of

  14. Heat and Mass Transfer in Nucleate Boiling Regime of HE I in a Natural Circulation Loop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkheira, L.; Souhar, M.; Baudouy, B.

    2006-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the experimental study of He I natural circulation loop under nucleate boiling conditions, which simulates the cooling system of the 4 Tesla superconducting solenoid CMS under construction at CERN for the LHC. The test section consists of an electrically heated copper tube of 0.010 m ID and 0.95 m long. Uniform heat fluxes in the range of 0-2000 W/m2 were employed. All data were generated near atmospheric pressure. Reported are results of the boiling curves and the effect of heat flux on the heat transfer coefficient under boiling. An attempt is carried out to predict the boiling incipience and to correlate the heat transfer coefficient based on the combining effect of forced convection and nucleate boiling by a power-type asymptotic model.

  15. Bubble dynamics, two-phase flow, and boiling heat transfer in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Jacob N.

    1994-01-01

    The two-phase bubbly flow and boiling heat transfer in microgravity represents a substantial challenge to scientists and engineers and yet there is an urgent need to seek fundamental understanding in this area for future spacecraft design and space missions. At Washington State University, we have successfully designed, built and tested a 2.1 second drop tower with an innovation airbag deceleration system. Microgravity boiling experiments performed in our 0.6 second Drop Tower produced data flow visualizations that agree with published results and also provide some new understanding concerning flow boiling and microgravity bubble behavior. On the analytical and numerical work, the edge effects of finite divergent electrode plates on the forces experienced by bubbles were investigated. Boiling in a concentric cylinder microgravity and an electric field was numerically predicted. We also completed a feasibility study for microgravity boiling in an acoustic field.

  16. The Gibbs Energy Basis and Construction of Boiling Point Diagrams in Binary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Norman O.

    2004-03-01

    Following an earlier paper ( J. Chem. Educ. 1997, 74, 1080-1084 ) on binary melting point diagrams, a method of constructing boiling point diagrams for each of the kinds of behavior of binary miscible liquid pairs (those without an azeotrope, those with a maximum boiling azeotrope, and those with a minimum boiling azeotrope) is described and illustrated. Necessary data are the boiling points and enthalpies of vaporization of the components, and parameters relating the activity coefficients of the liquid components to their concentrations. The procedure requires the solution of pairs of simultaneous equations by the method of successive approximation. It is shown how the resulting diagram reflects the nature of the intermolecular forces and the proximity of the boiling points of the components to each other.

  17. Evaluation of Correlations of Flow Boiling Heat Transfer of R22 in Horizontal Channels

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiande; Li, Dingkun

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels is required in a variety of applications, such as chemical process cooling systems, refrigeration, and air conditioning. A number of correlations for flow boiling heat transfer in channels have been proposed. This work evaluates the existing correlations for flow boiling heat transfer coefficient with 1669 experimental data points of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 collected from 18 published papers. The top two correlations for R22 are those of Liu and Winterton (1991) and Fang (2013), with the mean absolute deviation of 32.7% and 32.8%, respectively. More studies should be carried out to develop better ones. Effects of channel dimension and vapor quality on heat transfer are analyzed, and the results provide valuable information for further research in the correlation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels. PMID:23956695

  18. Experimental investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms for cylinders in water and FC-72

    SciTech Connect

    Ammerman, C.N.; You, S.M.; Hong, Y.S.

    1995-12-31

    A recently developed photographic method is used to quantify vapor volumetric flow rate above a boiling wire. The volumetric flow rate is combined with additional analyses to determine the overall contributions to the total heat flux from four nucleate boiling heat transfer mechanisms (latent heat, natural convection, Marangoni flow, and micro-convection). This technique is used to quantify the boiling heat transfer mechanisms versus heat flux for a 510-{micro}m wire immersed in saturated water and in water with a small amount of liquid soap added. These data are compared with similar data taken for a 75-{micro}m wire boiling in saturated FC-72. For all cases, latent heat is the dominant heat transfer mechanism in the fully developed nucleate boiling regime. In addition, the latent heat component is significantly increased by the addition of small amounts of soap (surfactant).

  19. Evaluation of correlations of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in horizontal channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanru; Fang, Xiande; Li, Dingkun

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels is required in a variety of applications, such as chemical process cooling systems, refrigeration, and air conditioning. A number of correlations for flow boiling heat transfer in channels have been proposed. This work evaluates the existing correlations for flow boiling heat transfer coefficient with 1669 experimental data points of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 collected from 18 published papers. The top two correlations for R22 are those of Liu and Winterton (1991) and Fang (2013), with the mean absolute deviation of 32.7% and 32.8%, respectively. More studies should be carried out to develop better ones. Effects of channel dimension and vapor quality on heat transfer are analyzed, and the results provide valuable information for further research in the correlation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels.

  20. Two-dimensional modeling of sodium boiling in a simulated LMFBR loss-of-flow test

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, S.D.

    1984-01-01

    Loss-of-flow (LOF) accidents are of major importance in LMFBR safety. Tests have been performed to simulate the simultaneous failure of all primary pumps and reactor shutdown systems in a 37-pin electrically heated test bundle installed in the KNS sodium boiling loop at the Institute of Reactor Development, Karlsruhe. The tests simulated LOF conditions of the German prototype LMFBR, the SNR 300. The main objectives of these tests were to characterize the transient boiling development to cladding dryout and to provide data for validation of sodium boiling codes. One particular LOF test, designated L22, at full power was selected as a benchmark exercise for comparison of several codes at the Eleventh Meeting of the Liquid Metal Boiling Working Group (LMBWG) held in Grenoble, France, in October 1984. In this paper, the results of the calculations performed at ORNL with the two-dimensional (2-D) boiling code THORAX are presented.

  1. Impact of boiling on phytochemicals and antioxidant activity of green vegetables consumed in the Mediterranean diet.

    PubMed

    Vinha, Ana F; Alves, Rita C; Barreira, Sérgio V P; Costa, Anabela S G; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P

    2015-04-01

    The effect of boiling (10 minutes) on eleven green vegetables frequently consumed in the Mediterranean diet was evaluated. For that, some physicochemical parameters and the contents of vitamin C, phenolics and carotenoids, as well as the antioxidant activity, were determined in raw and boiled samples. The raw vegetables analysed in this study were good sources of vitamin C, carotenoids and phenolic compounds, with contents ranging from 10.6 to 255.1 mg/100 g, 0.03 to 3.29 mg/100 g and 202.9 to 1010.7 mg/100 g, respectively. Boiling promoted losses in different extensions considering both the different bioactive compounds and the distinct vegetables analysed. Contrary to phenolics (more resistant), vitamin C was the most affected compound. Boiling also originated significant losses in the antioxidant activity of the vegetables. Considering all the parameters analysed, the vegetables most affected by boiling were broccoli and lettuce. The least affected ones were collard and tronchuda cabbage.

  2. Boiling effect in liquid nitrogen directly cooled Yb³⁺:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Toshimitsu; Chosrowjan, Haik; Furuse, Hiroaki; Taniguchi, Seiji; Kitamura, Toshiyuki; Fujita, Masayuki; Ishii, Shinya; Izawa, Yasukazu

    2016-02-20

    Liquid nitrogen (LN2) behavior on the surface of excited Yb(3+):YAG is investigated using fluorometry. From the time-resolved temperature variations and integrated fluorescence spectra intensity on this directly cooled Yb(3+):YAG surface, we observe a phase transition of LN2 from nucleate boiling to film boiling. As a result of this pool boiling, good beam quality should occur when the temperature and heat flux at an excited surface of Yb(3+):YAG are below 95 K and 15.8  W/cm2, respectively. That is, the LN2 should remain in a steady state of nucleate boiling to produce good beam quality using pool boiling.

  3. Children's Understanding of Changes of State Involving the Gas State, Part 1: Boiling Water and the Particle Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Philip

    1998-01-01

    Explores the development of children's conception of a substance and reports the findings in relation to children's understanding of boiling water and particle ideas. Argues that boiling water should have a broad significance in the curriculum. Contains 23 references. (DDR)

  4. Feasibility study on the thorium fueled boiling water breeder reactor

    SciTech Connect

    PetrusTakaki, N.

    2012-07-01

    The feasibility of (Th,U)O 2 fueled, boiling water breeder reactor based on conventional BWR technology has been studied. In order to determine the potential use of water cooled thorium reactor as a competitive breeder, this study evaluated criticality, breeding and void reactivity coefficient in response to changes made in MFR and fissile enrichments. The result of the study shows that while using light water as moderator, low moderator to fuel volume ratio (MFR=0.5), it was possible to breed fissile fuel in negative void reactivity condition. However the burnup value was lower than the value of the current LWR. On the other hand, heavy water cooled reactor shows relatively wider feasible breeding region, which lead into possibility of designing a core having better neutronic and economic performance than light water with negative void reactivity coefficient. (authors)

  5. High-boiling arenes of Paleozoic petroleum of West Siberia

    SciTech Connect

    Golovko, A.K.; Kam'yanov, V.F.; Korobitsina, L.L.; Kurakolova, E.A.; Rusinova, G.V.; Petrov, Al. A.

    1984-01-01

    A number of petroleum deposits have been found recently in the southern regions of West Siberia, in carbonate reservoirs of the Paleozoic age; certain aspects of increasing petroleum output in the field are related to these deposits. The general characteristics of Paleozoic petroleums of West Siberia are fairly varied, these petroleums usually have lower sulfur and resin contents but contain more was than petroleums from the Mesozoic deposits in the upper strata. No detailed study has so far, apparently, been carried out of the hydrocarbon composition of higher fractions of Paleozoic petroleums of the regio using physico-chemical methods. Accordingly, the composition of aromatic components of medium and high-boiling petroleum distillates of the Maloich deposit are examined since these are one of the first Paleozoic deposits put to industrial use.

  6. Electrical design of payload G-534: The Pool Boiling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francisco, David R.

    1992-01-01

    Payload G-534, the Pool Boiling Experiment (PBE), is a Get Away Special that is scheduled to fly on the shuttle in 1992. This paper will give a brief overall description of the experiment with the main discussion being the electrical design with a detailed description of the power system and interface to the GAS electronics. The batteries used and their interface to the experiment Power Control Unit (PCU) and GAS electronics will be examined. The design philosophy for the PCU will be discussed in detail. The criteria for selection of fuses, relays, power semiconductors and other electrical components along with grounding and shielding policy for the entire experiment will be presented. The intent of this paper is to discuss the use of military tested parts and basic design guidelines to build a quality experiment for minimal additional cost.

  7. Nucleate pool boiling in microgravity: Recent progress and future prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colin, Catherine; Kannengieser, Olivier; Bergez, Wladimir; Lebon, Michel; Sebilleau, Julien; Sagan, Michaël; Tanguy, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Pool boiling on flat plates in microgravity has been studied for more than 50 years. The results of recent experiments performed in sounding rocket are presented and compared to previous results. At low heat flux, the vertical oscillatory motion of the primary bubble is responsible for the increase in the heat transfer coefficient in microgravity compared to ground experiments. The effect of a non-condensable gas on the stabilisation of the large primary bubble on the heater is pointed out. Experiments on isolated bubbles are also performed on ground and in parabolic flight. The effect of a shear flow on the bubble detachment is highlighted. A force balance model allows determining an expression of the capillary force and of the drag force acting on the bubble.

  8. Chemical Gradients in Crud on Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Elements

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Porter; D. E. Janney

    2007-04-01

    Crud (radioactive corrosion products formed inside nuclear reactors is a major problem in commercial power-producing nuclear reactors. Although there are numerous studies of simulated (non-radioactive) crud, characteristics of crud from actual reactors are rarely studied. This study reports scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies of fragments of crud from a commercially operating boiling water reactor. Chemical analyses in the SEM indicated that the crud closest to the outer surfaces of the fuel pins in some areas had Fe:Zn ratios close to 2:1, which decreased away from the fuel pin in some of the fragments. In combination with transmission electron microsope analyses (published elsewhere), these results suggest that the innermost layer of crud in some areas may consist of franklinite (ZnFe2O4, also called zinc spinel), while outer layers in these areas may be predominantly iron oxides.

  9. A FIB induced boiling mechanism for rapid nanopore formation

    PubMed Central

    Das, K; Freund, J B; Johnson, H T

    2015-01-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) technology is widely used to fabricate nanopores in solid-state membranes. These nanopores have desirable thermomechanical properties for applications such as high-throughput DNA sequencing. Using large scale molecular dynamics simulations of the FIB nanopore formation process, we show that there is a threshold ion delivery rate above which the mechanism underlying nanopore formation changes. At low rates nanopore formation is slow, with the rate proportional to the ion flux and therefore limited by the sputter rate of the target material. However, at higher fluxes nanopores form via a thermally dominated process, consistent with an explosive boiling mechanism. In this case, mass is rapidly rearranged via bubble growth and coalescence, much more quickly than would occur during sputtering. This mechanism has the potential to greatly speed up nanopore formation. PMID:24356374

  10. Pool boiling of nanoparticle-modified surface with interlaced wettability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the pool boiling heat transfer under heating surfaces with various interlaced wettability. Nano-silica particles were used as the coating element to vary the interlaced wettability of the surface. The experimental results revealed that when the wettability of a surface is uniform, the critical heat flux increases with the more wettable surface; however, when the wettability of a surface is modified interlacedly, regardless of whether the modified region becomes more hydrophilic or hydrophobic, the critical heat flux is consistently higher than that of the isotropic surface. In addition, this study observed that critical heat flux was higher when the contact angle difference between the plain surface and the modified region was smaller. PMID:22607462

  11. Stability monitor experience in German BWRs (boiling water reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, L. ); Fuge, R. ); Seepolt, R. ); Frank, M. )

    1989-11-01

    A digital stability monitor developed by NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft MBH, operable on a personal computer, is in use at three boiling water reactor (BWR) plants in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). The device has received the approval of an FRG licensing authority. It has been in operation for 5 yr. The stability monitor is a measurement device used to accurately determine and confirm the boundaries of the exclusion region on the operating power-flow map, and to permit controlled operation through such regions. This is achieved via neutron noise measurements converted to direct readout of decay ratios. It has satisfied regulatory requirements by defining potential unstable operating regions at Kernkraftwerk Isar in the FRG and the high power density Gundremmingen (KRB Units B and C) BWRs.

  12. Boiling and condensation of saline geothermal fluids above magmatic intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Samuel; Driesner, Thomas; Weis, Philipp

    2017-02-01

    Numerical simulation of subaerial, magma-driven, saline hydrothermal systems reveals that fluid phase separation near the intrusion is a first-order control on the dynamics and efficiency of heat and mass transfer. Above shallow intrusions emplaced at <2.5 km depth, phase separation through boiling of saline liquid leads to accumulation of low-mobility hypersaline brines and halite precipitation, thereby reducing the efficiency of heat and mass transfer. Above deeper intrusions (>4 km), where fluid pressure is >30 MPa, phase separation occurs by condensation of hypersaline brine from a saline intermediate-density fluid. The fraction of brine remains small, and advective, vapor-dominated mass and heat fluxes are maximized. We thus hypothesize that, in contrast to pure water systems, for which shallow intrusions make better targets for supercritical resource exploitation, the optimal targets in saline systems are located above deeper intrusions.

  13. Investigation of vapor film motion regularities at boiling liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaltsov, A.; Zeigarnik, Y. U.

    2013-04-01

    The experimental investigation of the saturated Freon-113 and distilled water film boiling on spheres with different diameters at atmospheric pressure under conditions of free convection is executed. With high-speed video average thickness and cumulative distribution function of vapor film as a function of the angle was measured. It was found that with increasing the angle the average thickness of vapor film can change by different laws depending on diameter of the sphere and the temperature difference. It was found also that the increase in the average vapor film thickness with increasing angle is more connected with the increase of large components of cumulative distribution function. It also noted the presence of quasi-periodic pulsations of the vapor film thickness in the lower part, which eventually largely determine the behavior of the interface at large angles.

  14. Analysis of scrams and forced outages at boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Earle, R. T.; Sullivan, W. P.; Miller, K. R.; Schwegman, W. J.

    1980-07-01

    This report documents the results of a study of scrams and forced outages at General Electric Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) operating in the United States. This study was conducted for Sandia Laboratories under a Light Water Reactor Safety Program which it manages for the United States Department of Energy. Operating plant data were used to identify the causes of scrams and forced outages. Causes of scrams and forced outages have been summarized as a function of operating plant and plant age and also ranked according to the number of events per year, outage time per year, and outage time per event. From this ranking, identified potential improvement opportunities were evaluated to determine the associated benefits and impact on plant availability.

  15. Boiling inception in trichlorotrifluoroethane during forced convection at high pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dougall, R. S.; Lippert, T. E.

    1972-01-01

    The inception of bubbles during forced convection was studied experimentally by using trichlorotrifluoroethane (R-113 or Freon-113). The experiments were performed in a rectangular channel, 12.7 x 9.5 mm in cross section. Heating was from a 3.2 mm wide strip embedded in the longer side of the channel. The pressures studied ranged from 3.6 to 20.7 bar, mass velocities from 700 to 600 kg/sq m/sec, and inlet subcoolings from 26 to 97 C. Photographs of the flow were used to determine when bubbles first appeared on the heated surface. These data were compared with wall temperature measurements and inception theories. A reasonable method for calculating the complete boiling curve was found to agree with these results.

  16. BOILING WATER REACTOR WITH FEED WATER INJECTION NOZZLES

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1963-04-30

    This patent covers the use of injection nozzles for pumping water into the lower ends of reactor fuel tubes in which water is converted directly to steam. Pumping water through fuel tubes of this type of boiling water reactor increases its power. The injection nozzles decrease the size of pump needed, because the pump handles only the water going through the nozzles, additional water being sucked into the tubes by the nozzles independently of the pump from the exterior body of water in which the fuel tubes are immersed. The resulting movement of exterior water along the tubes holds down steam formation, and thus maintains the moderator effectiveness, of the exterior body of water. (AEC)

  17. Variation of superheat with subcooling in nucleate pool boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, R. L.; Merte, H., Jr.; Ulucakli, M. E.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis is presented that explains the variation of superheat with subcooling that has been observed by a number of researchers investigating nucleate boiling heat transfer at constant heat flux. It is shown that superheat initially increases with increasing subcooling near saturated conditions because of the way in which changes in active site density and average bubble frequency with increasing subcooling affect the rate of heat removal from the heater surface by enthalpy transport and microlayer evaporation. As subcooling increases further, natural convection begins to play an increasingly important role in the heat transfer process. Ultimately, natural convection is able to accommodate the entire imposed heat flux, after which superheat decreases as subcooling increases. The success of the analysis in explaining the variation of superheat with subcooling suggests that the rate of the heat removal from the heater surface is completely determined by the mechanisms of enthalpy transport, natural convection, and microlayer evaporation.

  18. Radial nodalization effects on BWR (boiling water reactor) stability calculations

    SciTech Connect

    March-Leuba, J.

    1990-01-01

    Computer simulations have shown that stability calculations in boiling water reactors (BWRs) are very sensitive to a number of input parameters and modeling assumptions. In particular, the number of thermohydraulic regions (i.e., channels) used in the calculation can affect the results of decay ratio calculations by as much as 30%. This paper presents the background theory behind the observed effects of radial nodalization in BWR stability calculations. The theory of how a radial power distribution can be simulated in time or frequency domain codes by using representative'' regions is developed. The approximations involved in this method of solution are reviewed, and some examples of the effect of radial nodalization are presented based on LAPUR code solutions. 2 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 4

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of data plots and summary files of temperature measurements.

  20. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 8

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of tables of temperature measurements.

  1. Terrestrial Applications of Zero Boil-Off Cryogen Storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salerno, L. J.; Gaby, J.; Hastings, L.; Johnson, R.; Kittel, P.; Marquardt, E.; Plachta, D.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Storing cryogenic propellants with zero boil off (ZBO) using a combination of active (cryocoolers) and passive technologies has recently received a great deal of attention for applications such as future long-term space missions. This paper will examine a variety of potential near-term terrestrial applications for ZBO and, where appropriate, provide a rough order of magnitude cost benefit of implementing ZBO technology. NASA's Space Shuttle power system uses supercritical propellant tanks, which are filled several days before launch. If the launch does not occur within 48-96 hours, the tanks must be drained and refilled, further delaying the launch. By implementing ZBO, boil off could be eliminated and pad hold time extended. At the launch site, vented liquid hydrogen (LH2) storage dewars lose 1200-1600 gal/day through boiloff. Implementing ZBO would eliminate this, saving $300,000-$400,000 per year. Similarly, overland trucking of LH2 from the supplier to the launch site via roadable dewars results in a cryogen loss of ten percent per tanker (1500 gal/tanker). Providing a cryocooler on board the rig would prevent this loss. Previous work investigating variable density insulation found that a 50% reduction in evaporation from a 6000 gallon dewar would save $5000 per year. For a 20 year dewar lifetime, the payback period would be less than two years. Similar benefits could be realized at other storage facilities across the nation. Within the superconductivity community, there is skepticism about using coolers, based upon reliability concerns. By providing a cooler on the dewar, lifetime could be extended while retaining fail-safe capability. If the cooler failed, it would merely lower the storage life of the dewar.

  2. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 3

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. This document consists of data plots and summary files of temperature measurements.

  3. Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 2

    SciTech Connect

    Block, J.A.; Crowley, C.; Dolan, F.X.; Sam, R.G.; Stoedefalke, B.H.

    1992-11-01

    The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The annulus has a full-scale geometry, and in fat uses SRL dummy hardware for the inner annulus wall in the ribbed geometry. The materials aluminum. The annulus is uniformly heated in the axial direction, but the circumferential heat flux can be varied to provide ``power tilt`` or asymmetric heating of the inner and outer annulus walls. The test facility uses H{sub 2}O rather than D{sub 2}O, but it includes the effects of dissolved helium gas present in the reactor. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. Nineteen test series and a total of 178 tests were performed. Testing addressed the effects of: Heat flux; pressure; helium gas; power tilt; ribs; asymmetric heat flux.

  4. Mathematical and experimental modeling of nucleate boiling heat transfer in liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco, Ciro

    The investigation of nucleate boiling heat transfer, because of its complexity, is usually carried out experimentally and by using phenomenological approximations. The purpose of this work is to capture the essential features of nucleate boiling heat transfer in liquid nitrogen and to formulate a theoretical description useful for the prediction of the temperature fluctuations and beat flux. Experimental analysis was coupled with mathematical modeling to elucidate nucleate boiling heat transfer. The experimental setting consists of a platinum wire immersed in liquid nitrogen. A current is passed through the wire while the resistance is measured. The orientation of the wire can be changed from horizontal to vertical. The fluctuations of the wire temperature are measured. Using high-speed analysis, we characterized nucleate boiling heat transfer from the wire as occurring in two distinct phases or regimes: discrete nucleate boiling and transition boiling. We defined discrete nucleate boiling as the phase during which the active nucleation sites are clearly distinguishable from one another with no bubble coalescence occurring between adjacent sites. The high-speed analysis helped also to compute the frequencies, diameters, and nucleation density of departing bubbles as well as the energy loss by a single bubble during the discrete nucleate boiling regime. These parameters were subsequently used to formulate a mathematical model to simulate by discrete time steps the discrete nucleate boiling heat transfer from the platinum wire. The average temperature of the wire can be adequately modeled with only one variable, the power input. In addition to predicting the average temperature of the wire in the discrete nucleate boiling regime the model predicts well the average temperature of the wire in the conduction and convection regime and the transition regime. The model also reproduces the fluctuation of temperature in the discrete nucleate boiling regime. The mathematical

  5. Boiling induced nanoparticle coating and its effect on pool boiling heat transfer on a vertical cylindrical surface using CuO nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegde, Ramakrishna N.; Rao, Shrikantha S.; Reddy, R. P.

    2012-09-01

    Experiments were performed to study boiling induced nanoparticle coating and its influence on pool boiling heat transfer using low concentrations of CuO- nanofluid in distilled water at atmospheric pressure. To investigate the effect of the nanoparticle coated surface on pool boiling performance, two different concentrations of CuO nanofluids (0.1 and 0.5 g/l) were chosen and tests were conducted on a clean heater surface in nanofluid and nanoparticle coated surface in pure water. For the bare heater tested in CuO nanofluid, CHF was enhanced by 35.83 and 41.68 % respectively at 0.1 and 0.5 g/l concentration of nanofluid. For the nanoparticle coated heater surface obtained by boiling induced coating using 0.1 and 0.5 g/l concentration of nanofluid and tested in pure water, CHF was enhanced by 29.38 and 37.53 % respectively. Based on the experimental investigations it can be concluded that nanoparticle coating can also be a potential substitute for enhancing the heat transfer in pure water. Transient behaviour of nanofluid was studied by keeping heat flux constant at 1,000 and 1,500 kW/m2 for 90 min in 0.5 g/l concentration. The boiling curve shifted to the right indicating degradation in boiling heat transfer due to prolonged exposure of heater surface to nanofluid. Experimental outcome indicated that pool boiling performance of nanofluid could be a strong function of time and applied heat flux. The longer the duration of exposure of the heater surface, the higher will be the degradation in heat transfer.

  6. Development of a MELCOR self-initialization algorithm for boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, C.S.; Wang, S.J.; Cheng, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    The MELCOR code, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, is suitable for calculating source terms and simulating severe accident phenomena of nuclear power plants. Prior to simulating a severe accident transient with MELCOR, the initial steady-state conditions must be generated in advance. The current MELCOR users` manuals do not provide a self-initialization procedure; this is the reason users have to adjust the initial conditions by themselves through a trial-and-error approach. A MELCOR self-initialization algorithm for boiling water reactor plants has been developed, which eliminates the tedious trial-and-error procedures and improves the simulation accuracy. This algorithm adjusts the important plant variable such as the dome pressure, downcomer level, and core flow rate to the desired conditions automatically. It is implemented through input with control functions provided in MELCOR. The reactor power and feedwater temperature are fed as input data. The initialization work of full-power conditions of the Kuosheng nuclear power station is cited as an example. These initial conditions are generated successfully with the developed algorithm. The generated initial conditions can be stored in a restart file and used for transient analysis. The methodology in this study improves the accuracy and consistency of transient calculations. Meanwhile, the algorithm provides all MELCOR users an easy and correct method for establishing the initial conditions.

  7. Potent odorants characterize the aroma quality of leaves and stalks in raw and boiled celery.

    PubMed

    Kurobayashi, Yoshiko; Kouno, Emi; Fujita, Akira; Morimitsu, Yasujiro; Kubota, Kikue

    2006-04-01

    The raw and boiled odors of celery leaves and stalks were investigated. Among 12 compounds identified as potent odorants, 3-n-butylphthalide 1, sedanenolide 2, and trans- and cis-sedanolides 3, 4 were assessed to be most contributive to the overall odor of celery. These three phthalides, (3E,5Z)-1,3,5-undecatriene, myrcene, and (E)-2-nonenal were common to both raw and boiled materials. Two compounds, ((Z)-3-hexenal and (Z)-3-hexenol), were dominant in raw materials and four compounds, (2-methylbutanoic acid, sotolon, beta-damascenone, and beta-ionone), were dominant in boiled materials. Sensory evaluations were performed on natural celery odor and a series of reconstructed model aromas by assigning each intensity ratings for a set of seven odor qualities which aptly describe the odors of raw and boiled celery. According to the evaluation results, six common components contributed to the moderate odor of raw celery, two components dominant in raw materials enhanced the raw celery character, and four components dominant in boiled materials reduced the raw celery character and enhanced the boiled celery character. It was clarified that boiling-induced changes in celery odor were not affected by the amounts of phthalides, but by thermally generated compounds such as sotolon, beta-damascenone, and beta-ionone, which reduce the "green spicy" note.

  8. Transient boiling heat transfer in saturated liquid nitrogen and F113 at standard and zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oker, E.; Merte, H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Transient and steady state nucleate boiling in saturated LN2 and F113 at standard and near zero gravity conditions were investigated for the horizontal up, vertical and horizontal down orientations of the heating surface. Two distinct regimes of heat transfer mechanisms were observed during the interval from the step increase of power input to the onset of nucleate boiling: the conduction and convection dominated regimes. The time duration in each regime was considerably shorter with LN2 than with F113, and decreased as heat flux increased, as gravity was reduced, and as the orientation was changed from horizontal up to horizontal down. In transient boiling, boiling initiates at a single point following the step increase in power, and then spreads over the surface. The delay time for the inception of boiling at the first site, and the velocity of spread of boiling varies depending upon the heat flux, orientation, body force, surface roughness and liquid properties, and are a consequence of changes in boundary layer temperature levels associated with changes in natural convection. Following the step increase in power input, surface temperature overshoot and undershoot occur before the steady state boiling temperature level is established.

  9. Cooling of hot bubbles by surface texture during the boiling crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhillon, Navdeep; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Varanasi, Kripa

    2015-11-01

    We report the existence of maxima in critical heat flux (CHF) enhancement for pool boiling on textured hydrophilic surfaces and reveal the interaction mechanism between bubbles and surface texture that governs the boiling crisis phenomenon. Boiling is a process of fundamental importance in many engineering and industrial applications but the maximum heat flux that can be absorbed by the boiling liquid (or CHF) is limited by the boiling crisis. Enhancing the CHF of industrial boilers by surface texturing can lead to substantial energy savings and reduction in greenhouse gas emissions on a global scale. However, the fundamental mechanisms behind this enhancement are not well understood, with some previous studies indicating that CHF should increase monotonically with increasing texture density. However, using pool boiling experiments on a parametrically designed set of plain and nano-textured micropillar surfaces, we show that there is an optimum intermediate texture density that maximizes CHF and further that the length scale of this texture is of fundamental significance. Using imbibition experiments and high-speed optical and infrared imaging, we reveal the fundamental mechanisms governing the CHF enhancement maxima in boiling crisis. We acknowledge funding from the Chevron corporation.

  10. Microbiologic effectiveness of boiling and safe water storage in South Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sodha, Samir V; Menon, M; Trivedi, K; Ati, A; Figueroa, M E; Ainslie, R; Wannemuehler, K; Quick, R

    2011-09-01

    In Indonesia, where diarrhea remains a major cause of mortality among children <5 years, the government promotes boiling of drinking water. We assessed the impact of boiling on water quality in South Sulawesi. We surveyed randomly selected households with at least one child <5 years old in two rural districts and tested source and stored water samples for Escherichia coli contamination. Among 242 households, 96% of source and 51% of stored water samples yielded E. coli. Unboiled water samples, obtained from 15% of households, were more likely to yield E. coli than boiled samples [prevalence ratios (PR) = 2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-2.5]. Water stored in wide-mouthed (PR = 1.4, 95% CI = 1.1-1.8) or uncovered (PR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.3-2.4) containers, or observed to be touched by the respondent's hands (PR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.3-2.1) was more likely to yield E. coli. A multivariable model showed that households that did not boil water were more likely to have contaminated stored water than households that did boil water (PR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.5-2.3). Although this study demonstrated the effectiveness of boiling in reducing contamination, overall impact on water quality was suboptimal. Future studies are needed to identify factors behind the success of boiling water in Indonesia to inform efforts to scale up other effective water treatment practices.

  11. High fidelity simulation of nucleate boiling and transition to critical heat flux on enhanced structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Miad; Alahyari, Abbas; Radcliff, Thomas; Soteriou, Marios

    2015-11-01

    Surface enhancement is often is the primary approach for improved heat transfer performance of two-phase thermal systems particularly when they operate in nucleate boiling regime. This paper exploits the modeling capability developed by Yazdani et al. for simulation of nucleate boiling and transition to critical heat flux to study the nucleation phenomenon on various enhanced structures. The multi-scale of two-phase flow associated with boiling phenomena is addressed through combination of deterministic CFD for the macro-scale transport, asymptotic based representation of micro-layer, and stochastic representation of surface roughness so as to allow a high-fidelity simulation of boiling on an arbitrary surface. In addition, given the excessive complexity of surface structures often used for enhancement of boiling heat transfer, a phase-field-based method is developed to generate the structures where the numerical parameters in the phase-field model determine the topology of a given structure. The ``generated'' structure is then embedded into the two-phase flow model through virtual boundary method for the boiling simulation. The model is validated against experimental data for the boiling curve and the critical heat flux as well as nucleation and bubble dynamics characteristics.

  12. Criticality in the slowed-down boiling crisis at zero gravity.

    PubMed

    Charignon, T; Lloveras, P; Chatain, D; Truskinovsky, L; Vives, E; Beysens, D; Nikolayev, V S

    2015-05-01

    Boiling crisis is a transition between nucleate and film boiling. It occurs at a threshold value of the heat flux from the heater called CHF (critical heat flux). Usually, boiling crisis studies are hindered by the high CHF and short transition duration (below 1 ms). Here we report on experiments in hydrogen near its liquid-vapor critical point, in which the CHF is low and the dynamics slow enough to be resolved. As under such conditions the surface tension is very small, the experiments are carried out in the reduced gravity to preserve the conventional bubble geometry. Weightlessness is created artificially in two-phase hydrogen by compensating gravity with magnetic forces. We were able to reveal the fractal structure of the contour of the percolating cluster of the dry areas at the heater that precedes the boiling crisis. We provide a direct statistical analysis of dry spot areas that confirms the boiling crisis at zero gravity as a scale-free phenomenon. It was observed that, in agreement with theoretical predictions, saturated boiling CHF tends to zero (within the precision of our thermal control system) in zero gravity, which suggests that the boiling crisis may be observed at any heat flux provided the experiment lasts long enough.

  13. Hypergravity to Explore the Role of Buoyancy in Boiling in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lioumbas, John S.; Krause, Jutta; Karapantsios, Thodoris D.

    2013-02-01

    Boiling in porous media is an active topic of research since it is associated with various applications, e.g. microelectronics cooling, wetted porous media as thermal barriers, food frying. Theoretical expressions customary scale boiling heat and mass transfer rates with the value of gravitational acceleration. Information obtained at low gravity conditions show a deviation from the above scaling law but refers exclusively to non-porous substrates. In addition, the role of buoyancy in boiling at varying gravitational levels (i.e. from microgravity—important to satellites and future Lunar and Martial missions, to high-g body forces—associated with fast aerial maneuvers) is still unknown since most experiments were conducted over a limited range of g-value. The present work aims at providing evidence regarding boiling in porous media over a broad range of hypergravity values. For this, a special device has been constructed for studying boiling inside porous media in the Large Diameter Centrifuge (LDC at ESA/ESTEC). LDC offers the unique opportunity to cancel the shear stresses and study only the effect of increased normal forces on boiling in porous media. The device permits measurement of the temperature field beneath the surface of the porous material and video recordings of bubble activity over the free surface of the porous material. The preliminary results presented from experiments conducted at terrestrial and hypergravity conditions, reveal for the first time the influence of increased levels of gravity on boiling in porous media.

  14. An assessment of boiling as a method of household water treatment in South India.

    PubMed

    Juran, Luke; MacDonald, Morgan C

    2014-12-01

    This article scrutinizes the boiling of water in Tamil Nadu and Puducherry, India. Boiling, as it is commonly practiced, improves water quality, but its full potential is not being realized. Thus, the objective is to refine the method in practice, promote acceptability, and foster the scalability of boiling and household water treatment (HWT) writ large. The study is based on bacteriological samples from 300 households and 80 public standposts, 14 focus group discussions (FGDs), and 74 household interviews. Collectively, the data fashion both an empirical and ethnographic understanding of boiling. The rate and efficacy of boiling, barriers to and caveats of its adoption, and recommendations for augmenting its practice are detailed. While boiling is scientifically proven to eliminate bacteria, data demonstrate that pragmatics inhibit their total destruction. Furthermore, data and the literature indicate that a range of cultural, economic, and ancillary health factors challenge the uptake of boiling. Fieldwork and resultant knowledge arrive at strategies for overcoming these impediments. The article concludes with recommendations for selecting, introducing, and scaling up HWT mechanisms. A place-based approach that can be sustained over the long-term is espoused, and prolonged exposure by the interveners coupled with meaningful participation of the target population is essential.

  15. Nucleate pool boiling in the long duration low gravity environment of the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, M. M.; Lin, C. S.; Knoll, R. H.; Bentz, M. D.; Meserole, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    The results are presented of an experimental study of nucleate pool boiling performed in the low gravity environment of the space shuttle. Photographic observations of pool boiling in Freon 113 were obtained during the 'Tank Pressure Control Experiment', flown on the Space Transportation System STS-43 in August 1991. Nucleate boiling data from large (relative to bubble size) flat heating surfaces (0.1046 by 0.0742 m) was obtained at very low heat fluxes (0.22 to 1.19 kw/so m). The system pressure and the bulk liquid subcooling varied in the range of 40 to 60 kPa and 3 to 5 C respectively. Thirty-eight boiling tests, each of 10 min duration for a given heat flux, were conducted. Measurements included the heater power, heater surface temperature, the liquid temperature and the system pressure as functions of heating time. Video data of the first 2 min of heating was recorded for each test. In some tests the video clearly shows the inception of boiling and the growth and departure of bubbles from the surface during the first 2 min of heating. In the absence of video data, the heater temperature variation during heating shows the inception of boiling and stable nucleate boiling. During the stable nucleate boiling, the wall superheat varied between 2.8 to 3.8 C for heat fluxes in the range of 0.95 to 1.19 kw/so m. The wall superheat at the inception of boiling varied between 2 to 13 C.

  16. Nucleate pool boiling in the long duration low gravity environment of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, M. M.; Lin, C. S.; Knoll, R. H.; Bentz, M. D.; Meserole, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    The results are presented of an experimental study of nucleate pool boiling performed in the low gravity environment of the space shuttle. Photographic observations of pool boiling in Freon 113 were obtained during the 'Tank Pressure Control Experiment,' flown on the Space Transportation System, STS-43 in August 1991. Nucleate boiling data from large (relative to bubble size) flat heating surfaces (0.1046 by 0.0742 m) was obtained at very low heat fluxes (0.22 to 1.19 kW/sq m). The system pressure and the bulk liquid subcooling varied in the range of 40 to 60 kPa and 3 to 5 C respectively. Thirty-eight boiling tests, each of 10-min duration for a given heat flux, were conducted. Measurements included the heater power, heater surface temperature, the liquid temperature and the system pressure as functions of heating time. Video data of the first 2 min of heating was recorded for each test. In some tests the video clearly shows the inception of boiling and the growth and departure of bubbles from the surface during the first 2 min of heating. In the absence of video data, the heater temperature variation during heating shows the inception of boiling and stable nucleate boiling. During the stable nucleate boiling, the wall superheat varied between 2.8 to 3.8 C for heat fluxes in the range of 0.95 to 1.19 kW/sq m. The wall superheat at the inception of boiling varied between 2 to 13 C.

  17. Local Heat Transfer and CHF for Subcooled Flow Boiling - Annual Report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald D. Boyd

    2000-07-01

    The physical phenomenon of forced convective boiling is probably one of the most interesting and complex transport phenomena. It has been under study for more than two centuries. Simply stated, forced convective subcooled boiling involves a locally boiling fluid: (1) whose mean temperature is below its saturation temperature, and (2) that flows over a surface exposed uniformly or non-uniformly to a high heat flux (HHF). The objective of this work is to assess and/or improve the present ability to predict local axial heat transfer distributions in the subcooled flow boiling regime for the case of uniformly heated coolant channels. This requires an accurate and complete representation of the boiling curve up to the CHF. The present. results will be useful for both heat transfer research and industrial design applications. Future refinements may result in the application of the results to non-uniformly heated channels or other geometries, and other fluids. Several existing heat transfer models for uniformly heated channels were examined for: (1) accurate representation of the boiling curve, and (2) characterizing the local heat transfer coefficient under high heat flux (HHF) conditions. Comparisons with HHF data showed that major correlation modifications were needed in the subcooled partial nucleate boiling (SPNB) region. Since the slope of boiling curve in this region is important to assure continuity of the HHF trends into the fully developed boiling region and up to the critical heat flux, accurate characterization in the SPNB region is essential. Approximations for the asymptotic limits for the SPNB region have been obtained and have been used to develop an improved composite correlation. The developed correlation has been compared with 363 water data points. For the local heat transfer coefficient and wall temperature, the over-all percent standard deviations with respect to the data were 19% and 3%, respectively, for the high velocity water data.

  18. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this work’s calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the “CIPS Validation Data Plan” at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable

  19. Pervaporation investigation of recovery of volatile compounds from brown crab boiling juice.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Rodrigo; Sanz, M Teresa; Beltrán, Sagrario

    2014-10-01

    Pervaporation has been used to obtain aroma concentrates from brown crab boiling juice. The boiling juice and the obtained permeate have been analysed by Headspace Solid Phase Dynamic Extraction Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. The effect of feed temperature on the pervaporation performance of the membrane has been analysed. The permeate aroma profile, at 25 ℃ and 40 ℃, was different from that of the boiling juice. Enrichment factors for some of the volatile compounds were much lower than those obtained in model aqueous dilute solutions. Pervaporation performance can be significantly improved by modifying the permeant circuit to include two condensation stages.

  20. Critical heat flux for free convection boiling in thin rectangular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1991-01-01

    A review of the experimental data on free convection boiling critical heat flux (CHF) in vertical rectangular channels reveals three mechanisms of burnout. They are the pool boiling limit, the circulation limit, and the flooding limit associated with a transition in flow regime from churn to annular flow. The dominance of a particular mechanism depends on the dimensions of the channel. Analytical models were developed for each free convection boiling limit. Limited agreement with data is observed. A CHF correlation, which is valid for a wide range of gap sizes, was constructed from the CHFs calculated according to the three mechanisms of burnout. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Can multiple flow boiling regimes be reduced into a single one in microchannels?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fanghao; Dai, Xianming; Peles, Yoav; Cheng, Ping; Li, Chen

    2013-07-01

    We report that multiple and transitional flow boiling regimes in microchannels can be reduced into a single annular flow from the onset of nucleate boiling to the critical heat flux condition. Hydrophilic silicon nanowires directly grown on inner walls of microchannels were tailored to create boiling surfaces with optimal submicron pores surrounded by nanogaps through controlling the height and density of silicon nanowires using the nanocarpet effect. A single two-phase regime can be realized by controlling the flow structure in two aspects: reducing bubble size and transforming the dominant surface tension force from the cross-sectional plane to the inner-wall plane.

  2. New flow boiling heat transfer model for hydrocarbons evaporating inside horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, G. F.; Gong, M. Q.; Wu, J. F.; Zou, X.; Wang, S.

    2014-01-29

    Hydrocarbons have high thermodynamic performances, belong to the group of natural refrigerants, and they are the main components in mixture Joule-Thomson low temperature refrigerators (MJTR). New evaluations of nucleate boiling contribution and nucleate boiling suppression factor in flow boiling heat transfer have been proposed for hydrocarbons. A forced convection heat transfer enhancement factor correlation incorporating liquid velocity has also been proposed. In addition, the comparisons of the new model and other classic models were made to evaluate its accuracy in heat transfer prediction.

  3. Heat transfer with nucleate boiling of liquids under weak mass force field conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirichenko, Y. A.

    1974-01-01

    The motion is examined of a vapor bubble growing and rising from a flat horizontal heater in the ideal fluid approximation and taking drag into account. Estimates are given of bubble lifetime, bubble radius at detachment, bubble detachment frequency, and time for the bubble to attain a constant rate of rise. The relations obtained for the microcharacteristics of the boiling process are used to determine the coefficients of heat transfer in developed nucleate boiling. A new form of the equations for describing heat transfer in nucleate boiling in dimensionless parameters is proposed.

  4. The influence of three-dimensional capillary-porous coatings on heat transfer at liquid boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surtaev, A. S.; Pavlenko, A. N.; Kalita, V. I.; Kuznetsov, D. V.; Komlev, D. I.; Radyuk, A. A.; Ivannikov, A. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    The process of heat transfer at pool boiling of liquid (Freon R21) on tubes with three-dimensional plasma-deposited capillary-porous coatings of various thicknesses has been experimentally studied. Comparative analysis of experimental data showed that the heat transfer coefficient for a heater tube with a 500-μm-thick porous coating is more than twice as large as that in liquid boiling on an otherwise similar uncoated tube. At the same time, no intensification of heat exchange in the regime of bubble boiling is observed on a tube with a 100-μm-thick porous coating.

  5. An experimental investigation of transition boiling in subcooled Freon-113 forced flow

    SciTech Connect

    Passos, J.C. ); Gentile, D. )

    1991-05-01

    An experimental study of subcooled boiling in a Freon-113 forced flow is presented. The test section is a short tube (length 50 mm, inner diameter 8 mm, and wall thickness 0.3 mm) heated by the Joule effect. Wall temperature profiles along the tube are presented for different operating points and discussed in terms of the upstream propagation of a temperature front separating regions of nucleate and film boiling. This study emphasizes the effect of axial heat conduction on the boiling processes.

  6. QSPR using MOLGEN-QSPR: the challenge of fluoroalkane boiling points.

    PubMed

    Rücker, Christoph; Meringer, Markus; Kerber, Adalbert

    2005-01-01

    By means of the new software MOLGEN-QSPR, a multilinear regression model for the boiling points of lower fluoroalkanes is established. The model is based exclusively on simple descriptors derived directly from molecular structure and nevertheless describes a broader set of data more precisely than previous attempts that used either more demanding (quantum chemical) descriptors or more demanding (nonlinear) statistical methods such as neural networks. The model's internal consistency was confirmed by leave-one-out cross-validation. The model was used to predict all unknown boiling points of fluorobutanes, and the quality of predictions was estimated by means of comparison with boiling point predictions for fluoropentanes.

  7. Honey dressing versus boiled potato peel in the treatment of burns: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Subrahmanyam, M

    1996-09-01

    Honey dressing was compared with boiled potato peel dressings as a cover for fresh partial-thickness burns in two groups of 50 randomly allocated patients. In the 50 patients treated with honey, 90 per cent of wounds were rendered sterile within 7 days. In the 50 patients treated with boiled potato peel dressings, persistent infection was noted within 7 days. Of the wounds treated with honey, 100 per cent healed within 15 days as against 50 per cent in the wounds treated with boiled potato peel dressings (mean 10.4 vs. 16.2 days).

  8. Issue a Boil-Water Advisory or Wait for Definitive Information? A Decision Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Michael M.; Wallstrom, Garrick L.; Onisko, Agnieszka

    2005-01-01

    Objective Study the decision to issue a boil-water advisory in response to a spike in sales of diarrhea remedies or wait 72 hours for the results of definitive testing of water and people. Methods Decision analysis. Results In the base-case analysis, the optimal decision is test-and-wait. If the cost of issuing a boil-water advisory is less than 13.92 cents per person per day, the optimal decision is to issue the boil-water advisory immediately. Conclusions Decisions based on surveillance data that are suggestive but not conclusive about the existence of a disease outbreak can be modeled. PMID:16779145

  9. Diffusive and radiative effects on vaporization times of drops in film boiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.; Choessow, G. J.

    1972-01-01

    Diffusive and radiative effects are incorporated into an analysis for the vaporization time of drops in film boiling. The momentum, energy, and continuity equations are solved with some appropriate simplifications so as to obtain a simple closed form solution for the overall film boiling heat transfer coefficient. Next, a theoretical expression for the droplet vaporization time is developed and compared to the measured vaporization times of water droplets vaporizing into air, argon, nitrogen, and helium. The agreement between experiment and theory is good. Under the helium blanket, the diffusive evaporative component is significant in comparison to the film boiling component.

  10. A Mechanistic Study of Nucleate Boiling Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, V. K.; Warrier, G. R.; Hasan, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall objective of this work is to study nucleate boiling heat transfer under microgravity conditions in such a way that while providing basic knowledge of the phenomena, it also leads to development of simulation models and correlations that can be used as design tools for a wide range of gravity levels. In the study a building block type of approach is used and both pool and low velocity flow boiling are investigated. Starting with experiments using a single bubble, the complexity of the experiments is increased to two or three inline bubbles, to five bubbles placed on a two-dimensional grid. Finally, experiments are conducted where a large number of prescribed cavities nucleate on the heater and when a commercial surface is used. So far experiments have been conducted at earth normal gravity and in the reduced gravity environment of the KC-135 aircraft whereas experiments on the space station are planned. Modeling/complete numerical simulation of the boiling process is an integral part of the total effort. Experiments conducted with single bubbles formed on a nucleation site microfabricated on a polished silicon wafer show that for gravity levels (g) varying from 1.5g(sub e) to 0.01g(sub e), the bubble diameter at departure varies approximately as (g(sub e)/g)(exp 1/2) and the growth period as (g(sub e)/g). When bubbles merge either inline or in a plane, the bubble diameter at departure is found to be smaller than that obtained for a single bubble and shows a weaker dependence on the level of gravity. The possible reason is that as the bubbles merge they create fluid circulation around the bubbles, which in turn induces a lift force that is responsible for the earlier departure of the bubbles. The verification of this proposition is being sought through numerical simulations. There is a merger of two inline, three inline, and several bubbles in a plane in the low gravity environment of the KC-135 aircraft. After merger and before departure, a mushroom type

  11. A Mechanistic Study of Nucleate Boiling Under Microgravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dhir, V. K.; Warrier, G. R.; Hasan, M. M.

    2002-01-01

    The overall objective of this work is to study nucleate boiling heat transfer under microgravity conditions in such a way that while providing basic knowledge of the phenomena, it also leads to development of simulation models and correlations that can be used as design tools for a wide range of gravity levels. In the study a building block type of approach is used and both pool and low velocity flow boiling are investigated. Starting with experiments using a single bubble, the complexity of the experiments is increased to two or three inline bubbles, to five bubbles placed on a two-dimensional grid. Finally, experiments are conducted where a large number of prescribed cavities nucleate on the heater and when a commercial surface is used. So far experiments have been conducted at earth normal gravity and in the reduced gravity environment of the KC-135 aircraft whereas experiments on the space station are planned. Modeling/complete numerical simulation of the boiling process is an integral part of the total effort. Experiments conducted with single bubbles formed on a nucleation site microfabricated on a polished silicon wafer show that for gravity levels (g) varying from 1.5g(sub e) to 0.01g(sub e), the bubble diameter at departure varies approximately as (g(sub e)/g)(exp 1/2) and the growth period as (g(sub e)/g). When bubbles merge either inline or in a plane, the bubble diameter at departure is found to be smaller than that obtained for a single bubble and shows a weaker dependence on the level of gravity. The possible reason is that as the bubbles merge they create fluid circulation around the bubbles, which in turn induces a lift force that is responsible for the earlier departure of the bubbles. The verification of this proposition is being sought through numerical simulations. There is a merger of two inline, three inline, and several bubbles in a plane in the low gravity environment of the KC-135 aircraft. After merger and before departure, a mushroom type

  12. Models and Stability Analysis of Boiling Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    John Dorning

    2002-04-15

    We have studied the nuclear-coupled thermal-hydraulic stability of boiling water reactors (BWRs) using a model that includes: space-time modal neutron kinetics based on spatial w-modes; single- and two-phase flow in parallel boiling channels; fuel rod heat conduction dynamics; and a simple model of the recirculation loop. The BR model is represented by a set of time-dependent nonlinear ordinary differential equations, and is studied as a dynamical system using the modern bifurcation theory and nonlinear dynamical systems analysis. We first determine the stability boundary (SB) - or Hopf bifurcation set- in the most relevant parameter plane, the inlet-subcooling-number/external-pressure-drop plane, for a fixed control rod induced external reactivity equal to the 100% rod line value; then we transform the SB to the practical power-flow map used by BWR operating engineers and regulatory agencies. Using this SB, we show that the normal operating point at 100% power is very stable, that stability of points on the 100% rod line decreases as the flow rate is reduced, and that operating points in the low-flow/high-power region are least stable. We also determine the SB that results when the modal kinetics is replaced by simple point reactor kinetics, and we thereby show that the first harmonic mode does not have a significant effect on the SB. However, we later show that it nevertheless has a significant effect on stability because it affects the basin of attraction of stable operating points. Using numerical simulations we show that, in the important low-flow/high-power region, the Hopf bifurcation that occurs as the SB is crossed is subcritical; hence, growing oscillations can result following small finite perturbations of stable steady-states on the 100% rod line at points in the low-flow/high-power region. Numerical simulations are also performed to calculate the decay ratios (DRs) and frequencies of oscillations for various points on the 100% rod line. It is

  13. Microgravity Boiling Enhancement Using Vibration-Based Fluidic Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari; Heffington, Samuel N.

    2002-11-01

    Thermal management is an important subsystem in many devices and technologies used in a microgravity environment. The increased power requirements of new Space technologies and missions mean that the capacity and efficiency of thermal management systems must be improved. The current work addresses this need through the investigation and development of a direct liquid immersion heat transfer cell for microgravity applications. The device is based on boiling heat transfer enhanced by two fluidic technologies developed at Georgia Tech. The first of these fluidic technologies, called vibration-induced bubble ejection, is shown in Fig. 1. Here, an air bubble in water is held against a vibrating diaphragm by buoyancy. The vibrations at 440 Hz induce violent oscillations of the air/water interface that can result in small bubbles being ejected from the larger air bubble (Fig. 1a) and, simultaneously, the collapse of the air/water interface against the solid surface (Fig. 1b). Both effects would be useful during a heat transfer process. Bubble ejection would force vapor bubbles back into the cooler liquid so that they can condense. Interfacial collapse would tend to keep the hot surface wet thereby increasing liquid evaporation and heat transfer to the bulk liquid. Figure 2 shows the effect of vibrating the solid surface at 7.6 kHz. Here, small-scale capillary waves appear on the surface of the bubble near the attachment point on the solid surface (the grainy region). The vibration produces a net force on the bubble that pushes it away from the solid surface. As a result, the bubble detaches from the solid and is propelled into the bulk liquid. This force works against buoyancy and so it would be even more effective in a microgravity environment. The benefit of the force in a boiling process would be to push vapor bubbles off the solid surface, thus helping to keep the solid surface wet and increasing the heat transfer. The second fluidic technology to be employed in this

  14. 76 FR 3540 - U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design Certification Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ...: Rulemakings and Adjudications Staff. E-mail comments to: Rulemaking.Comments@nrc.gov . If you do not receive a... accessing the documents located in ADAMS, contact the NRC's PDR reference staff at 1-800-397-4209, or 301... that the applicant has complied with 10 CFR 50.150. Specifically, the staff confirmed that...

  15. 76 FR 78096 - U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design Certification Amendment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ..., the ``departure'' concept itself may be regarded as movement away from standardization. The GEH did...'' approach embodies the standardization concept more closely than the commenter's proposed use of departures... undermines the protection afforded by the design certification rulemaking concept. The comment included...

  16. Pool Boiling of Ethanol-Water mixture on Nano-Textured Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarin, Alexander; Sahu, Rakesh; Sinha-Ray, Sumit; Sinha-Ray, Suman

    2015-03-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of pool boiling of ethanol-water mixtures on nano-textured surfaces was studied. A comparison of pool boiling on bare copper surface with pool boiling on surfaces covered by copper-plated supersonically-blown nanofibers revealed a significant increase in the heat flux in the latter case. Namely, the heat flux on the nano-textured surfaces was about 3-8 times higher than that on the bare copper surfaces, while the surface temperature due to the nano-texture would be lower by about 10 °C at the same heat flux. The significant positive effect of the nano-texture is due to the fact that it facilitates bubble nucleation. Some preliminary results of numerical modeling of boiling process in the framework of the Cahn-Hilliard approach are discussed and several examples of the predictions are given. Supported by NASA, Grant No. NNX13AQ77G.

  17. 46 CFR 154.707 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Ventilation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.707 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Ventilation. (a)...

  18. 46 CFR 154.708 - Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.708 Cargo boil-off as fuel: Valves. (a) Gas fuel lines to the...

  19. A molecular dynamics study of phobic/philic nano-patterning on pool boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Ricardo; Guo, Zhixiong

    2017-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the pool boiling heat transfer of a liquid argon thin film on a flat, horizontal copper wall structured with vertical nanoscale pillars. The efficacy of phobic/philic nano-patterning for enhancing boiling heat transfer was scrutinized. Both nucleate and explosive boiling modes were considered. An error analysis demonstrated that the typical 2.5σ cutoff in MD simulations could under-predict heat flux by about 8.7 %, and 6σ cutoff was chosen here in order to maintain high accuracy. A new coordination number criterion was also introduced to better quantify evaporation characteristics. Results indicate that the argon-phobic/philic patterning tends to either have no effect, or decrease overall boiling heat flux, while the argon-philic nano-pillar/argon-philic wall shows the best heat transfer performance.

  20. An Experimental Study of Boiling in Reduced and Zero Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usiskin, C. M.; Siegel, R.

    1961-01-01

    A pool boiling apparatus was mounted on a counterweighted platform which could be dropped a distance of nine feet. By varying the size of the counterweight, the effective gravity field on the equipment was adjusted between zero and unity. A study of boiling burnout in water indicated that a variation in the critical heat flux according to the one quarter power of gravity was reasonable. A consideration of the transient burnout process was necessary in order to properly interpret the data. A photographic study of nucleate boiling showed how the velocity of freely rising vapor bubbles decreased as gravity was reduced. The bubble diameters at the time of breakoff from the heated surface were found to vary inversely as gravity to the 1/3.5 power. Motion pictures were taken to illustrate both nucleate and film boiling in the low gravity range.